WorldWideScience

Sample records for charging fusion reactor

  1. Compact fusion reactors

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Fusion research is currently to a large extent focused on tokamak (ITER) and inertial confinement (NIF) research. In addition to these large international or national efforts there are private companies performing fusion research using much smaller devices than ITER or NIF. The attempt to achieve fusion energy production through relatively small and compact devices compared to tokamaks decreases the costs and building time of the reactors and this has allowed some private companies to enter the field, like EMC2, General Fusion, Helion Energy, Lawrenceville Plasma Physics and Lockheed Martin. Some of these companies are trying to demonstrate net energy production within the next few years. If they are successful their next step is to attempt to commercialize their technology. In this presentation an overview of compact fusion reactor concepts is given.

  2. Fusion reactor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1989-01-01

    This paper discuses the following topics on fusion reactor materials: irradiation, facilities, test matrices, and experimental methods; dosimetry, damage parameters, and activation calculations; materials engineering and design requirements; fundamental mechanical behavior; radiation effects; development of structural alloys; solid breeding materials; and ceramics.

  3. Hydrogen Production in Fusion Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Sudo, S.; Tomita, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Iiyoshi, A.; Momota, H; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M; Uenosono, C.

    1993-01-01

    As one of methods of innovative energy production in fusion reactors without having a conventional turbine-type generator, an efficient use of radiation produced in a fusion reactor with utilizing semiconductor and supplying clean fuel in a form of hydrogen gas are studied. Taking the candidates of reactors such as a toroidal system and an open system for application of the new concepts, the expected efficiency and a concept of plant system are investigated.

  4. Design of a Fast Neutral He Beam System for Feasibility Study of Charge-Exchange Alpha-Particle Diagnostics in a Thermonuclear Fusion Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Shinto, Katsuhiro; Kitajima, Sumio; Kiyama, Satoru; Nishiura, Masaki; Sasao, Mamiko; Sugawara, Hiroshi; Takenaga, Mahoko; Takeuchi, Shu; Wada, Motoi

    2005-01-01

    For alpha-particle diagnostics in a thermonuclear fusion reactor, neutralization using a fast (~2 MeV) neutral He beam produced by the spontaneous electron detachment of a He- is considered most promising. However, the beam transport of produced fast neutral He has not been studied, because of difficulty for producing high-brightness He- beam. Double-charge-exchange He- sources and simple beam transport systems were developed and their results were reported in the PAC99* and other papers.** To accelerate an intense He- beam and verify the production of the fast neutral He beam, a new test stand has been designed. It consists of a multi-cusp He+

  5. Magnetic fusion reactor economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    An almost primordial trend in the conversion and use of energy is an increased complexity and cost of conversion systems designed to utilize cheaper and more-abundant fuels; this trend is exemplified by the progression fossil fission {yields} fusion. The present projections of the latter indicate that capital costs of the fusion ``burner`` far exceed any commensurate savings associated with the cheapest and most-abundant of fuels. These projections suggest competitive fusion power only if internal costs associate with the use of fossil or fission fuels emerge to make them either uneconomic, unacceptable, or both with respect to expensive fusion systems. This ``implementation-by-default`` plan for fusion is re-examined by identifying in general terms fusion power-plant embodiments that might compete favorably under conditions where internal costs (both economic and environmental) of fossil and/or fission are not as great as is needed to justify the contemporary vision for fusion power. Competitive fusion power in this context will require a significant broadening of an overly focused program to explore the physics and simbiotic technologies leading to more compact, simplified, and efficient plasma-confinement configurations that reside at the heart of an attractive fusion power plant.

  6. Tritium management in fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galloway, T.R.

    1978-05-01

    This is a review paper covering the key environmental and safety issues and how they have been handled in the various magnetic and inertial confinement concepts and reference designs. The issues treated include: tritium accident analyses, tritium process control, occupational safety, HTO formation rate from the gas-phase, disposal of tritium contaminated wastes, and environmental impact--each covering the Joint European Tokamak (J.E.T. experiment), Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), Russian T-20, The Next Step (TNS) designs by Westinghouse/ORNL and General Atomic/ANL, the ANL and ORNL EPR's, the G.A. Doublet Demonstration Reactor, the Italian Fintor-D and the ORNL Demo Studies. There are also the following full scale plant reference designs: UWMAK-III, LASL's Theta Pinch Reactor Design (RTPR), Mirror Fusion Reactor (MFR), Tandem Mirror Reactor (TMR), and the Mirror Hybrid Reactor (MHR). There are four laser device breakeven experiments, SHIVA-NOVA, LLL reference designs, ORNL Laser Fusion power plant, the German ''Saturn,'' and LLL's Laser Fusion EPR I and II.

  7. Alternative approaches to fusion. [reactor design and reactor physics for Tokamak fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    The limitations of the Tokamak fusion reactor concept are discussed and various other fusion reactor concepts are considered that employ the containment of thermonuclear plasmas by magnetic fields (i.e., stellarators). Progress made in the containment of plasmas in toroidal devices is reported. Reactor design concepts are illustrated. The possibility of using fusion reactors as a power source in interplanetary space travel and electric power plants is briefly examined.

  8. Researches on a reactor core in heavy ion inertial fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Kondo, S; Iinuma, T; Kubo, K; Kato, H; Kawata, S; Ogoyski, A I

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a study on a fusion reactor core is presented in heavy ion inertial fusion (HIF), including the heavy ion beam (HIB) transport in a fusion reactor, a HIB interaction with a background gas, reactor cavity gas dynamics, the reactor gas backflow to the beam lines, and a HIB fusion reactor design. The HIB has remarkable preferable features to release the fusion energy in inertial fusion: in particle accelerators HIBs are generated with a high driver efficiency of ~30-40%, and the HIB ions deposit their energy inside of materials. Therefore, a requirement for the fusion target energy gain is relatively low, that would be ~50 to operate a HIF fusion reactor with a standard energy output of 1GW of electricity. In a fusion reactor the HIB charge neutralization is needed for a ballistic HIB transport. Multiple mechanical shutters would be installed at each HIB port at the reactor wall to stop the blast waves and the chamber gas backflow, so that the accelerator final elements would be protected from the ...

  9. (Meeting on fusion reactor materials)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, R.H. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Klueh, R.L.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Wiffen, F.W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Loomis, B.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

    1990-11-01

    During his visit to the KfK, Karlsruhe, F. W. Wiffen attended the IEA 12th Working Group Meeting on Fusion Reactor Materials. Plans were made for a low-activation materials workshop at Culham, UK, for April 1991, a data base workshop in Europe for June 1991, and a molecular dynamics workshop in the United States in 1991. At the 11th IEA Executive Committee on Fusion Materials, discussions centered on the recent FPAC and Colombo panel review in the United States and EC, respectively. The Committee also reviewed recent progress toward a neutron source in the United States (CWDD) and in Japan (ESNIT). A meeting with D. R. Harries (consultant to J. Darvas) yielded a useful overview of the EC technology program for fusion. Of particular interest to the US program is a strong effort on a conventional ferritic/martensitic steel for fist wall/blanket operation beyond NET/ITER.

  10. Design and operation of the pellet charge exchange diagnostic for measurement of energetic confined α particles and tritons on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medley, S. S.; Mansfield, D. K.; Roquemore, A. L.; Fisher, R. K.; Duong, H. H.; McChesney, J. M.; Parks, P. B.; Petrov, M. P.; Khudoleev, A. V.; Gorelenkov, N. N.

    1996-09-01

    Radially resolved energy and density distributions of the confined α particles in D-T experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) are being measured with the pellet charge exchange (PCX) diagnostic. Other energetic ion species can be detected as well, such as tritons produced in D-D plasmas and H, He3, or tritium rf-driven minority ion tails. The ablation cloud formed by injected low-Z impurity pellets provides the neutralization target for this active charge exchange technique. Because the cloud neutralization efficiency is uncertain, the PCX diagnostic is not absolutely calibrated so only relative density profiles are obtained. A mass and energy resolving E∥B neutral particle analyzer (NPA) is used which has eight energy channels covering the energy range of 0.3-3.7 MeV for α particles with energy resolution ranging from 5.8% to 11.3% and a spatial resolution of ˜5 cm. The PCX diagnostic views deeply trapped ions in a narrow pitch angle range around a mean value of v∥/v=-0.048±10-3. For D-T operation, the NPA was shielded by a polyethylene-lead enclosure providing 100× attenuation of ambient γ radiation and 14 MeV neutrons. The PCX diagnostic technique and its application on TFTR are described in detail.

  11. Construction and operation of parallel electric and magnetic field spectrometers for mass/energy resolved multi-ion charge exchange diagnostics on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medley, S. S.; Roquemore, A. L.

    1998-07-01

    A novel charge exchange spectrometer using a dee-shaped region of parallel electric and magnetic fields was developed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory for neutral particle diagnostics on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The E∥B spectrometer has an energy range of 0.5⩽A (amu)E (keV)⩽600 and provides mass-resolved energy spectra of H+, D+, and T+ (or 3He+) ion species simultaneously during a single discharge. The detector plane exhibits parallel rows of analyzed ions, each row containing the energy dispersed ions of a given mass-to-charge ratio. The detector consists of a large area microchannel plate (MCP) which is provided with three rectangular, semicontinuous active area strips, one coinciding with each of the mass rows for detection of H+, D+, and T+ (or 3He+) and each mass row has 75 energy channels. To suppress spurious signals attending operation of the plate in the magnetic fringe field of the spectrometer, the MCP was housed in a double-walled iron shield with a wire mesh ion entrance window. Using an accelerator neutron generator, the MCP neutron detection efficiency was measured to be 1.7×10-3 and 6.4×10-3 counts/neutron/cm2 for 2.5 MeV-DD and 14 MeV-DT neutrons, respectively. The design and calibration of the spectrometer are described in detail, including the effect of MCP exposure to tritium, and results obtained during high performance D-D operation on TFTR are presented to illustrate the performance of the E∥B spectrometer. The spectrometers were not used during D-T plasma operation due to the cost of providing the required radiation shielding.

  12. Materials issues in fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suri, A. K.; Krishnamurthy, N.; Batra, I. S.

    2010-02-01

    The world scientific community is presently engaged in one of the toughest technological tasks of the current century, namely, exploitation of nuclear fusion in a controlled manner for the benefit of mankind. Scientific feasibility of controlled fusion of the light elements in plasma under magnetic confinement has already been proven. International efforts in a coordinated and co-operative manner are presently being made to build ITER - the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor - to test, in this first step, the concept of 'Tokamak' for net fusion energy production. To exploit this new developing option of making energy available through the route of fusion, India too embarked on a robust fusion programme under which we now have a working tokamak - the Aditya and a steady state tokamak (SST-1), which is on the verge of functioning. The programme envisages further development in terms of making SST-2 followed by a DEMO and finally the fusion power reactor. Further, with the participation of India in the ITER program in 2005, and recent allocation of half - a - port in ITER for placing our Lead - Lithium Ceramic Breeder (LLCB) based Test Blanket Module (TBM), meant basically for breeding tritium and extracting high grade heat, the need to understand and address issues related to materials for these complex systems has become all the more necessary. Also, it is obvious that with increasing power from the SST stages to DEMO and further to PROTOTYPE, the increasing demands on performance of materials would necessitate discovery and development of new materials. Because of the 14.1 MeV neutrons that are generated in the D+T reaction exploited in a tokamak, the materials, especially those employed for the construction of the first wall, the diverter and the blanket segments, suffer crippling damage due to the high He/dpa ratios that result due to the high energy of the neutrons. To meet this challenge, the materials that need to be developed for the tokamaks

  13. Compound cryopump for fusion reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Kovari, M; Shephard, T

    2013-01-01

    We reconsider an old idea: a three-stage compound cryopump for use in fusion reactors such as DEMO. The helium "ash" is adsorbed on a 4.5 K charcoal-coated surface, while deuterium and tritium are adsorbed at 15-22 K on a second charcoal-coated surface. The helium is released by raising the first surface to ~30 K. In a separate regeneration step, deuterium and tritium are released at ~110 K. In this way, the helium can be pre-separated from other species. In the simplest design, all three stages are in the same vessel, with a single valve to close the pump off from the tokamak during regeneration. In an alternative design, the three stages are in separate vessels, connected by valves, allowing the stages to regenerate without interfering with each other. The inclusion of the intermediate stage would not affect the overall pumping speed significantly. The downstream exhaust processing system could be scaled down, as much of the deuterium and tritium could be returned directly to the reactor. This could reduce ...

  14. Fast Neutron Detector for Fusion Reactor KSTAR Using Stilbene Scintillator

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Seung Kyu; Kim, Gi-Dong; Kim, Yong-Kyun

    2011-01-01

    Various neutron diagnostic tools are used in fusion reactors to evaluate different aspects of plasma performance, such as fusion power, power density, ion temperature, fast ion energy, and their spatial distributions. The stilbene scintillator has been proposed for use as a neutron diagnostic system to measure the characteristics of neutrons from the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) fusion reactor. Specially designed electronics are necessary to measure fast neutron spectra with high radiation from a gamma-ray background. The signals from neutrons and gamma-rays are discriminated by the digital charge pulse shape discrimination (PSD) method, which uses total to partial charge ratio analysis. The signals are digitized by a flash analog-to-digital convertor (FADC). To evaluate the performance of the fabricated stilbene neutron diagnostic system, the efficiency of 10 mm soft-iron magnetic shielding and the detection efficiency of fast neutrons were tested experimentally using a 252Cf neutr...

  15. Radiochemical problems of fusion reactors. 1. Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crespi, M.B.A.

    1984-02-01

    A list of fusion reactor candidate materials is given, for use in connection with blanket structure, breeding, moderation, neutron multiplication, cooling, magnetic field generation, electrical insulation and radiation shielding. The phenomena being studied for each group of materials are indicated. Suitable irradiation test facilities are discussed under the headings (1) accelerator-based neutron sources, (2) fission reactors, and (3) ion accelerators.

  16. Status and problems of fusion reactor development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, U

    2001-03-01

    Thermonuclear fusion of deuterium and tritium constitutes an enormous potential for a safe, environmentally compatible and sustainable energy supply. The fuel source is practically inexhaustible. Further, the safety prospects of a fusion reactor are quite favourable due to the inherently self-limiting fusion process, the limited radiologic toxicity and the passive cooling property. Among a small number of approaches, the concept of toroidal magnetic confinement of fusion plasmas has achieved most impressive scientific and technical progress towards energy release by thermonuclear burn of deuterium-tritium fuels. The status of thermonuclear fusion research activity world-wide is reviewed and present solutions to the complicated physical and technological problems are presented. These problems comprise plasma heating, confinement and exhaust of energy and particles, plasma stability, alpha particle heating, fusion reactor materials, reactor safety and environmental compatibility. The results and the high scientific level of this international research activity provide a sound basis for the realisation of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), whose goal is to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of a fusion energy source for peaceful purposes.

  17. Cold nuclear fusion reactor and nuclear fusion rocket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Zhenqiang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available "Nuclear restraint inertial guidance directly hit the cold nuclear fusion reactor and ion speed dc transformer" [1], referred to as "cold fusion reactor" invention patents, Chinese Patent Application No. CN: 200910129632.7 [2]. The invention is characterized in that: at room temperature under vacuum conditions, specific combinations of the installation space of the electromagnetic field, based on light nuclei intrinsic magnetic moment and the electric field, the first two strings of the nuclei to be bound fusion on the same line (track of. Re-use nuclear spin angular momentum vector inherent nearly the speed of light to form a super strong spin rotation gyro inertial guidance features, to overcome the Coulomb repulsion strong bias barrier to achieve fusion directly hit. Similar constraints apply nuclear inertial guidance mode for different speeds and energy ion beam mixing speed, the design of ion speed dc transformer is cold fusion reactors, nuclear fusion engines and such nuclear power plants and power delivery systems start important supporting equipment, so apply for a patent merger

  18. Packed fluidized bed blanket for fusion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, John W. H.

    1984-01-01

    A packed fluidized bed blanket for a fusion reactor providing for efficient radiation absorption for energy recovery, efficient neutron absorption for nuclear transformations, ease of blanket removal, processing and replacement, and on-line fueling/refueling. The blanket of the reactor contains a bed of stationary particles during reactor operation, cooled by a radial flow of coolant. During fueling/refueling, an axial flow is introduced into the bed in stages at various axial locations to fluidize the bed. When desired, the fluidization flow can be used to remove particles from the blanket.

  19. The first fusion reactor: ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, D. J.

    2016-11-01

    Established by the signature of the ITER Agreement in November 2006 and currently under construction at St Paul-lez-Durance in southern France, the ITER project [1,2] involves the European Union (including Switzerland), China, India, Japan, the Russian Federation, South Korea and the United States. ITER (`the way' in Latin) is a critical step in the development of fusion energy. Its role is to provide an integrated demonstration of the physics and technology required for a fusion power plant based on magnetic confinement.

  20. Fusion reactors for hydrogen production via electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillo, J. A.; Powell, J. R.; Steinberg, M.

    The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and supplement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of 50 to 70% are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets.

  1. Reactor potential for magnetized target fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlin, J.E

    2001-06-01

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) is a possible pathway to thermonuclear fusion different from both magnetic fusion and inertial confinement fusion. An imploding cylindrical metal liner compresses a preheated and magnetized plasma configuration until thermonuclear conditions are achieved. In this report the Magnetized Target Fusion concept is evaluated and a zero-dimensional computer model of the plasma, liner and circuit as a connected system is designed. The results of running this code are that thermonuclear conditions are achieved indeed, but only during a very short time. At peak compression the pressure from the compressed plasma and magnetic field is so large reversing the liner implosion into an explosion. The time period of liner motion reversal is termed the dwell time and is crucial to the performance of the fusion system. Parameters as liner thickness and plasma density are certainly of significant importance to the dwell time, but it seems like a reactor based on the MTF principle hardly can become economic if not innovative solutions are introduced. In the report two such solutions are presented as well.

  2. Materials needs for compact fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    The economic prospects for magnetic fusion energy can be dramatically improved if for the same total power output the fusion neutron first-wall (FW) loading and the system power density can be increased by factors of 3 to 5 and 10 to 30, respectively. A number of compact fusion reactor embodiments have been proposed, all of which would operate with increased FW loadings, would use thin (0.5 to 0.6 m) blankets, and would confine quasi-steady-state plasma with resistive, water-cooled copper or aluminum coils. Increased system power density (5 to 15 MWt/m/sup 3/ versus 0.3 to 0.5 MW/m/sup 3/), considerably reduced physical size of the fusion power core (FPC), and appreciably reduced economic leverage exerted by the FPC and associated physics result. The unique materials requirements anticipated for these compact reactors are outlined against the well documented backdrop provided by similar needs for the mainline approaches. Surprisingly, no single materials need that is unique to the compact systems is identified; crucial uncertainties for the compact approaches must also be addressed by the mainline approaches, particularly for in-vacuum components (FWs, limiters, divertors, etc.).

  3. Carbon-14 production in fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheele, R.D.; Burger, L.L.

    1976-09-01

    Calculations based on existing composition data were performed to estimate the order of magnitude and the final location of /sup 14/C in fusion reactors. These calculations indicate that approximately 8 Ci/day, formed principally by /sup 14/N activation, will be produced in the UWMAK-II reference reactor (5,000 MWth). If Nb-1 percent Zr is used as the structural material instead of stainless steel 316 this quantity will be more than doubled. No information is available on the form of the /sup 14/C produced, but reduced forms such as carbides, hydrocarbons and perhaps CO may be produced. Most of the /sup 14/C may remain fixed in structural and other reactor materials until the material is reclaimed. Activation of air in the plasma chamber would be an immediate concern.

  4. Fusion reactors-high temperature electrolysis (HTE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillo, J.A. (ed.)

    1978-01-01

    Results of a study to identify and develop a reference design for synfuel production based on fusion reactors are given. The most promising option for hydrogen production was high-temperature electrolysis (HTE). The main findings of this study are: 1. HTE has the highest potential efficiency for production of synfuels from fusion; a fusion to hydrogen energy efficiency of about 70% appears possible with 1800/sup 0/C HTE units and 60% power cycle efficiency; an efficiency of about 50% possible with 1400/sup 0/C HTE units and 40% power cycle efficiency. 2. Relative to thermochemical or direct decomposition methods HTE technology is in a more advanced state of development, 3. Thermochemical or direct decomposition methods must have lower unit process or capital costs if they are to be more attractive than HTE. 4. While design efforts are required, HTE units offer the potential to be quickly run in reverse as fuel cells to produce electricity for restart of Tokamaks and/or provide spinning reserve for a grid system. 5. Because of the short timescale of the study, no detailed economic evaluation could be carried out.A comparison of costs could be made by employing certain assumptions. For example, if the fusion reactor-electrolyzer capital installation is $400/(KW(T) ($1000/KW(E) equivalent), the H/sub 2/ energy production cost for a high efficiency (about 70 %) fusion-HTE system is on the same order of magnitude as a coal based SNG plant based on 1976 dollars. 6. The present reference design indicates that a 2000 MW(th) fusion reactor could produce as much at 364 x 10/sup 6/ scf/day of hydrogen which is equivalent in heating value to 20,000 barrels/day of gasoline. This would fuel about 500,000 autos based on average driving patterns. 7. A factor of three reduction in coal feed (tons/day) could be achieved for syngas production if hydrogen from a fusion-HTE system were used to gasify coal, as compared to a conventional syngas plant using coal-derived hydrogen.

  5. Investigation of materials for fusion power reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhaddane, A.; Slugeň, V.; Sojak, S.; Veterníková, J.; Petriska, M.; Bartošová, I.

    2014-06-01

    The possibility of application of nuclear-physical methods to observe radiation damage to structural materials of nuclear facilities is nowadays a very actual topic. The radiation damage to materials of advanced nuclear facilities, caused by extreme radiation stress, is a process, which significantly limits their operational life as well as their safety. In the centre of our interest is the study of the radiation degradation and activation of the metals and alloys for the new nuclear facilities (Generation IV fission reactors, fusion reactors ITER and DEMO). The observation of the microstructure changes in the reactor steels is based on experimental investigation using the method of positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS). The experimental part of the work contains measurements focused on model reactor alloys and ODS steels. There were 12 model reactor steels and 3 ODS steels. We were investigating the influence of chemical composition on the production of defects in crystal lattice. With application of the LT 9 program, the spectra of specimen have been evaluated and the most convenient samples have been determined.

  6. The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This paper on titan plasma engineering contains papers on the following topics: reversed-field pinch as a fusion reactor; parametric systems studies; magnetics; burning-plasma simulations; plasma transient operations; current drive; and physics issues for compact RFP reactors.

  7. The need and prospects for improved fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakowski, R. A.; Miller, R. L.; Hagenson, R. L.

    1986-09-01

    Conceptual fusion reactor studies over the past 10-15 yr have projected systems that may be too large, complex, and costly to be of commercial interest. One main direction for improved fusion reactors points toward smaller, higher-power-density approaches. First-order economic issues (i.e., unit direct cost and cost of electricity) are used to support the need for more compact fusion reactors. The results of a number of recent conceptual designs of reversed-field pinch, spheromak, and tokamak fusion reactors are summarized as examples of more compact approaches. While a focus has been placed on increasing the fusion-power-core mass power density beyond the minimum economic threshold of 100-200 kWe/tonne, other means by which the overall attractiveness of fusion as a long-term energy source are also addressed.

  8. Introduction to Nuclear Fusion Power and the Design of Fusion Reactors. An Issue-Oriented Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillo, J. A.

    This three-part module focuses on the principles of nuclear fusion and on the likely nature and components of a controlled-fusion power reactor. The physical conditions for a net energy release from fusion and two approaches (magnetic and inertial confinement) which are being developed to achieve this goal are described. Safety issues associated…

  9. Fission-suppressed hybrid reactor: the fusion breeder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moir, R.W.; Lee, J.D.; Coops, M.S.

    1982-12-01

    Results of a conceptual design study of a /sup 233/U-producing fusion breeder are presented. The majority of the study was devoted to conceptual design and evaluation of a fission-suppressed blanket and to fuel cycle issues such as fuel reprocessing, fuel handling, and fuel management. Studies in the areas of fusion engineering, reactor safety, and economics were also performed.

  10. Homopolar Gun for Pulsed Spheromak Fusion Reactors II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, T

    2004-06-14

    A homopolar gun is discussed that could produce the high currents required for pulsed spheromak fusion reactors even with unit current amplification and open field lines during injection, possible because close coupling between the gun and flux conserver reduces gun losses to acceptable levels. Example parameters are given for a gun compatible with low cost pulsed reactors and for experiments to develop the concept.

  11. SABR fusion-fission hybrid transmutation reactor design concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Weston

    2009-11-01

    A conceptual design has been developed for a sub-critical advanced burner reactor (SABR) consisting of i) a sodium cooled fast reactor fueled with the transuranics (TRU) from spent nuclear fuel, and ii) a D-T tokamak fusion neutron source based on ITER physics and technology. Subcritical operation enables more efficient transmutation fuel cycles in TRU fueled reactors (without compromising safety), which may be essential for significant reduction in high-level waste repository requirements. ITER will serve as the prototype for the fusion neutron source, which means SABRs could be implemented to help close the nuclear fuel cycle during the 2^nd quarter of the century.

  12. Experimental devices in the osiris reactor to study effects of radiations on fusion reactor materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefevre, F.; Thevenot, G.

    1986-11-01

    Within the framework of the Technology Research Program on controlled fusion initiated by the European Communities, the Services des Piles de Saclay (SPS) of Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique (CEA) have been requested to perform some necessary experiments to study the irradiation behaviour of materials which are possible candidates for controlled fusion reactors. This paper describes the devices, generally adapted from a standard model "The COLIBRI", which allow one to carry out, in the OSIRIS reactor, irradiations on the three great families of fusion reactor materials: - lithium containing materials of breeding blanket for in-situ tritium production, - protection materials, and - structural materials.

  13. Experimental devices in the OSIRIS reactor to study effects of radiations on fusion reactor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefevre, F.; Thevenot, G.

    Within the framework of the Technology Research Program on controlled fusion initiated by the European Communities, the Services des Piles de Saclay (SPS) of Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) have been requested to perform some necessary experiments to study the irradiation behaviour of materials which are possible candidates for controlled fusion reactors. This paper describes the devices, generally adapted from a standard model The COLIBRI, which allow one to carry out, in the OSIRIS reactor, irradiations on the three great families of fusion reactor materials: Lithium containing materials of breeding blanket for in-situ tritium production, protection materials, and structural materials.

  14. 8th International School of Fusion Reactor Technology "Ettore Majorana"

    CERN Document Server

    Leotta, G G; Muon-catalyzed fusion and fusion with polarized nuclei

    1988-01-01

    The International School of Fusion Reactor Technology started its courses 15 years ago and since then has mantained a biennial pace. Generally, each course has developed the subject which was announced in advance at the closing of the previous course. The subject to which the present proceedings refer was chosen in violation of that rule so as to satisfy the recent and diffuse interest in cold fusion among the main European laboratories involved in controlled thermonuclear research (CTR). In the second half of 1986 we started to prepare a workshop aimed at assessing the state of the art and possibly of the perspectives of muon- catalyzed fusion. Research in this field has recently produced exciting experimental results open to important practical applications. We thought it worthwhile to consider also the beneficial effects and problems of the polarization ofthe nuclei in both cold and thermonuclear fusion. In preparing the 8th Course on Fusion Reactor Technology, it was necessary to abandon the tradi...

  15. Radioactive waste management and disposal scenario for fusion power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabara, Takashi; Yamano, Naoki [Sumitomo Atomic Energy Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Seki, Yasushi; Aoki, Isao

    1997-10-01

    The environmental and economic impact of radioactive waste (radwaste) generated from fusion power reactors using five types of structural materials and a light water reactor (LWR) have been evaluated and compared. At first, the amount and the radioactive level of the radwaste generated in five fusion reactors ware evaluated by an activation calculation code. Next, a possible radwaste disposal scenario applicable to fusion radwaste in Japan is considered and the disposal cost evaluated under certain assumptions. The exposure doses are evaluated for the skyshine of gamma-rays during the disposal operation, groundwater migration scenario during the institutional control period of 300 years and future site use scenario after the institutional period. The radwaste generated from a typical LWR was estimated based on a literature survey and the disposal cost was evaluated using the same assumptions as for the fusion reactors. It is found that the relative cost of disposal is strongly dependent on the cost for interim storage of medium level waste of fusion reactors and the cost of high level waste for the LWR. (author)

  16. Cold fusion reactors and new modern physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Zhenqiang Huang Yuxiang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The author of the "modern physics classical particle quantization orbital motion model general solution", referred to as the “new modern physics” a book. “The nuclear force constraint inertial guidance cold nuclear fusion collides” patent of invention referred to as the “cold nuclear fusion reactor” detailed technical data. Now provide to you, hope you help spread and the mainstream of modern physics of academic and fusion engineering academic communication. We work together to promote the cause of science and technology progress of mankind to contribute

  17. Overview of the Lockheed Martin Compact Fusion Reactor (CFR) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    The Lockheed Martin Compact Fusion Reactor (CFR) Program endeavors to quickly develop a compact fusion power plant with favorable commercial economics and military utility. An overview of the concept and its diamagnetic, high beta magnetically encapsulated linear ring cusp confinement scheme will be given. The analytical model of the major loss mechanisms and predicted performance will be discussed, along with the major physics challenges. Key features of an operational CFR reactor will be highlighted. The proposed developmental path following the current experimental efforts will be presented. ©2015 Lockheed Martin Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Effects of a liquid lithium curtain as the first wall in a fusion reactor plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Cheng-Yue; J.P. Allain; Deng Bai-Quan

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores the effect of a liquid lithium curtain on fusion reactor plasma, such curtain is utilized as the first wall for the engineering outline design of the Fusion Experimental Breeder (FEB-E). The relationships between the surface temperature of a liquid lithium curtain and the effective plasma charge, fuel dilution and fusion power production have been derived. Results indicate that under normal operation, the evaporation of liquid lithium does not seriously affect the effective plasma charge, but effects on fuel dilution and fusion power are more sensitive. As an example, it has investigated the relationships between the liquid lithium curtain flow velocity and the rise of surface temperature based on operation scenario Ⅱ of the FEB-E design with reversed shear configuration and high power density. Results show that even if the liquid lithium curtain flow velocity is as low as 0.5 m/s, the effects of evaporation from the liquid lithium curtain on plasma are negligible. In the present design, the sputtering of liquid lithium curtain and the particle removal effects of the divertor are not yet considered in detail. Further studies are in progress, and in this work implication of lithium erosion and divertor physics on fusion reactor operation are discussed.

  19. A comparison of radioactive waste from first generation fusion reactors and fast fission reactors with actinide recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, M.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1991-04-01

    Limitations of the fission fuel resources will presumably mandate the replacement of thermal fission reactors by fast fission reactors that operate on a self-sufficient closed fuel cycle. This replacement might take place within the next one hundred years, so the direct competitors of fusion reactors will be fission reactors of the latter rather than the former type. Also, fast fission reactors, in contrast to thermal fission reactors, have the potential for transmuting long-lived actinides into short-lived fission products. The associated reduction of the long-term activation of radioactive waste due to actinides makes the comparison of radioactive waste from fast fission reactors to that from fusion reactors more rewarding than the comparison of radioactive waste from thermal fission reactors to that from fusion reactors. Radioactive waste from an experimental and a commercial fast fission reactor and an experimental and a commercial fusion reactor has been characterized. The fast fission reactors chosen for this study were the Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 and the Integral Fast Reactor. The fusion reactors chosen for this study were the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and a Reduced Activation Ferrite Helium Tokamak. The comparison of radioactive waste parameters shows that radioactive waste from the experimental fast fission reactor may be less hazardous than that from the experimental fusion reactor. Inclusion of the actinides would reverse this conclusion only in the long-term. Radioactive waste from the commercial fusion reactor may always be less hazardous than that from the commercial fast fission reactor, irrespective of the inclusion or exclusion of the actinides. The fusion waste would even be far less hazardous, if advanced structural materials, like silicon carbide or vanadium alloy, were employed.

  20. An evaluation of fusion gain in the compact helical fusion reactor FFHR-c1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, J.; Goto, T.; Sakamoto, R.; Sagara, A.; the FFHR Design Group

    2014-01-01

    A new procedure to predict achievable fusion gain in a sub-ignition fusion reactor is proposed. This procedure uses the direct profile extrapolation (DPE) method based on the gyro-Bohm model. The DPE method has been developed to predict the radial profiles in a fusion reactor sustained without auxiliary heating (i.e., in the self-ignition state) from the experimental data. To evaluate the fusion gain in a fusion reactor sustained with auxiliary heating (i.e., in the sub-ignition state), the DPE method is modified to include the influence of the auxiliary heating. The beta scale factor from experiment to reactor is assumed to be 1. Under this assumption, it becomes reasonable to apply the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium (which is calculated to reproduce the experimental data) to the reactor. At the same time, the MHD stability of the reactor plasma is also guaranteed to a certain extent since that beta was already proven in the experiment. The fusion gain in the helical type nuclear test machine FFHR-c1 has been evaluated using this modified DPE method. FFHR-c1 is basically a large duplication of the Large Helical Device (LHD) with a scale factor of 10/3, which corresponds to the major radius of the helical coils of 13.0 m and the plasma volume of ∼1000 m3. Two options with different magnetic field strengths are considered. The fusion gain in FFHR-c1 extrapolated from a set of radial profile data obtained in LHD ranges from 1 to 7, depending on the profiles used together with the assumptions of the magnetic field strength and the alpha heating efficiency.

  1. Modular stellarator reactor: a fusion power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.L.; Bathke, C.G.; Krakowski, R.A.; Heck, F.M.; Green, L.; Karbowski, J.S.; Murphy, J.H.; Tupper, R.B.; DeLuca, R.A.; Moazed, A.

    1983-07-01

    A comparative analysis of the modular stellarator and the torsatron concepts is made based upon a steady-state ignited, DT-fueled, reactor embodiment of each concept for use as a central electric-power station. Parametric tradeoff calculations lead to the selection of four design points for an approx. 4-GWt plant based upon Alcator transport scaling in l = 2 systems of moderate aspect ratio. The four design points represent high-aspect ratio. The four design points represent high-(0.08) and low-(0.04) beta versions of the modular stellarator and torsatron concepts. The physics basis of each design point is described together with supporting engineering and economic analyses. The primary intent of this study is the elucidation of key physics and engineering tradeoffs, constraints, and uncertainties with respect to the ultimate power reactor embodiment.

  2. 1st International School of Fusion Reactor Technology "Ettore Majorana"

    CERN Document Server

    Knoepfel, Heinz; Safety, Environmental Impact and Economic Prospects of Nuclear Fusion

    1990-01-01

    This book contains the lectures and the concluding discussion of the "Seminar on Safety, Environmental Impact, and Economic Prospects of Nuclear Fusion", which was held at Erice, August 6-12, 1989. In selecting the contributions to this 9th meeting held by the International School of Fusion Reactor Technology at the E. Majorana Center for Scientific Cul­ ture in Erice, we tried to provide a comprehensive coverage of the many interre­ lated and interdisciplinary aspects of what ultimately turns out to be the global acceptance criteria of our society with respect to controlled nuclear fusion. Consequently, this edited collection of the papers presented should provide an overview of these issues. We thus hope that this book, with its extensive subject index, will also be of interest and help to nonfusion specialists and, in general, to those who from curiosity or by assignment are required to be informed on these as­ pects of fusion energy.

  3. Magnetic charge lattices, moduli spaces and fusion rules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampmeijer, L.; Slingerland, J.K.; Schroers, B.J.; Bais, F.A.

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the labelling and fusion properties of magnetic charge sectors consisting of smooth BPS monopoles in Yang-Mills-Higgs theory with arbitrary gauge group G spontaneously broken to a subgroup H. The magnetic charges are restricted by a generalized Dirac quantization condition and by an inequ

  4. Conceptual design study of a scyllac fusion test reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomassen, K.I. (comp.)

    1975-07-01

    The report describes a conceptual design study of a fusion test reactor based on the Scyllac toroidal theta-pinch approach to fusion. It is not the first attempt to describe the physics and technology required for demonstrating scientific feasibility of the approach, but it is the most complete design in the sense that the physics necessary to achieve the device goals is extrapolated from experimentally tested MHD theories of toroidal systems,and it uses technological systems whose engineering performance has been carefully calculated to ensure that they meet the machine requirements.

  5. Fusion reactor blanket/shield design study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.L.; Clemmer, R.G.; Harkness, S.D.

    1979-07-01

    A joint study of tokamak reactor first-wall/blanket/shield technology was conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company (MDAC). The objectives of this program were the identification of key technological limitations for various tritium-breeding-blanket design concepts, establishment of a basis for assessment and comparison of the design features of each concept, and development of optimized blanket designs. The approach used involved a review of previously proposed blanket designs, analysis of critical technological problems and design features associated with each of the blanket concepts, and a detailed evaluation of the most tractable design concepts. Tritium-breeding-blanket concepts were evaluated according to the proposed coolant. The ANL effort concentrated on evaluation of lithium- and water-cooled blanket designs while the MDAC effort focused on helium- and molten salt-cooled designs. A joint effort was undertaken to provide a consistent set of materials property data used for analysis of all blanket concepts. Generalized nuclear analysis of the tritium breeding performance, an analysis of tritium breeding requirements, and a first-wall stress analysis were conducted as part of the study. The impact of coolant selection on the mechanical design of a tokamak reactor was evaluated. Reference blanket designs utilizing the four candidate coolants are presented.

  6. Towards the detection of magnetohydrodynamics instabilities in a fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sozzi, Carlo, E-mail: sozzi@ifp.cnr.it; Alessi, E., E-mail: sozzi@ifp.cnr.it; Figini, L., E-mail: sozzi@ifp.cnr.it; Galperti, G., E-mail: sozzi@ifp.cnr.it; Lazzaro, E., E-mail: sozzi@ifp.cnr.it; Marchetto, C., E-mail: sozzi@ifp.cnr.it; Nowak, S. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, CNR, EURATOM-ENEA Association, Milano (Italy); Mosconi, M. [Dipartimento di Energia, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy)

    2014-08-21

    Various active control strategies of the Neoclassical tearing modes are being studied in present tokamaks using established detection techniques which exploit the measurements of the fluctuations of the magnetic field and of the electron temperature. The extrapolation of such techniques to the fusion reactor scale is made problematic by the neutron fluence and by the physics conditions related to the high plasma temperature and density which degrade the spatial resolution of such measurements.

  7. Shielding efficiency of metal hydrides and borohydrides in fusion reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Vishvanath P.; Badiger, Nagappa M.; Gerward, Leif

    2016-01-01

    Mass attenuation coefficients, mean free paths and exposure buildup factors have been used to characterize the shielding efficiency of metal hydrides and borohydrides, with high density of hydrogen. Gamma ray exposure buildup factors were computed using five-parameter geometric progression fittin...... combination of low-and high-Z elements. The present work should be useful for the selection and design of blankets and shielding, and for dose evaluation for components in fusion reactors....

  8. Hydrogen isotopes transport parameters in fusion reactor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra, E. [Politecnico di Torino (Italy). Dipartimento di Energetica; Benamati, G. [ENEA Fusion Division, CR Brasimone, 40032 Camungnano, Bologna (Italy); Ogorodnikova, O.V. [Moscow State Engineering Physics Institute, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation)

    1998-06-01

    This work presents a review of hydrogen isotopes-materials interactions in various materials of interest for fusion reactors. The relevant parameters cover mainly diffusivity, solubility, trap concentration and energy difference between trap and solution sites. The list of materials includes the martensitic steels (MANET, Batman and F82H-mod.), beryllium, aluminium, beryllium oxide, aluminium oxide, copper, tungsten and molybdenum. Some experimental work on the parameters that describe the surface effects is also mentioned. (orig.) 62 refs.

  9. Effect of Fuelling Depth on the Fusion Performance and Particle Confinement of a Fusion Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shijia; Wang, Shaojie

    2016-12-01

    The fusion performance and particle confinement of an international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER)-like fusion device have been modeled by numerically solving the energy transport equation and the particle transport equation. The effect of fuelling depth has been investigated. The plasma is primarily heated by the fusion produced alpha particles and the loss process of particles and energy in the scrape-off layer has been taken into account. To study the effect of fuelling depth on fusion performance, the ITERH-98P(y,2) scaling law has been used to evaluate the transport coefficients. It is shown that the particle confinement and fusion performance are significantly dependent on the fuelling depth. Deviation of 10% of the minor radius on fuelling depth can make the particle confinement change by ∼ 61% and the fusion performance change by ∼ 108%. The enhancement of fusion performance is due to the better particle confinement induced by deeper particle fuelling. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11175178 and 11375196) and the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (No. 2014GB113000)

  10. Individual dose due to radioactivity accidental release from fusion reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Baojie; Ni, Muyi; Wei, Shiping

    2017-04-05

    As an important index shaping the design of fusion safety system, evaluation of public radiation consequences have risen as a hot topic on the way to develop fusion energy. In this work, the comprehensive public early dose was evaluated due to unit gram tritium (HT/HTO), activated dust, activated corrosion products (ACPs) and activated gases accidental release from ITER like fusion reactor. Meanwhile, considering that we cannot completely eliminate the occurrence likelihood of multi-failure of vacuum vessel and tokamak building, we conservatively evaluated the public radiation consequences and environment restoration after the worst hypothetical accident preliminarily. The comparison results show early dose of different unit radioactivity release under different conditions. After further performing the radiation consequences, we find it possible that the hypothetical accident for ITER like fusion reactor would result in a level 6 accident according to INES, not appear level 7 like Chernobyl or Fukushima accidents. And from the point of environment restoration, we need at least 69 years for case 1 (1kg HTO and 1000kg dust release) and 34-52years for case 2 (1kg HTO and 10kg-100kg dust release) to wait the contaminated zone drop below the general public safety limit (1mSv per year) before it is suitable for human habitation.

  11. Burning high-level TRU waste in fusion fission reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yaosong

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the concept of actinide burning instead of a once-through fuel cycle for disposing spent nuclear fuel seems to get much more attention. A new method of burning high-level transuranic (TRU) waste combined with Thorium-Uranium (Th-U) fuel in the subcritical reactors driven by external fusion neutron sources is proposed in this paper. The thorium-based TRU fuel burns all of the long-lived actinides via a hard neutron spectrum while outputting power. A one-dimensional model of the reactor concept was built by means of the ONESN_BURN code with new data libraries. The numerical results included actinide radioactivity, biological hazard potential, and much higher burnup rate of high-level transuranic waste. The comparison of the fusion-fission reactor with the thermal reactor shows that the harder neutron spectrum is more efficient than the soft. The Th-U cycle produces less TRU, less radiotoxicity and fewer long-lived actinides. The Th-U cycle provides breeding of 233U with a long operation time (>20 years), hence significantly reducing the reactivity swing while improving safety and burnup.

  12. Material options for a commercial fusion reactor first wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabiri, A.E.

    1986-05-01

    A study has been conducted to evaluate the potential of various materials for use as first walls in high-power-density commercial fusion reactors. Operating limits for each material were obtained based on a number of criteria, including maximum allowable structural temperatures, critical heat flux, ultimate tensile strength, and design-allowable stress. The results with water as a coolant indicate that a modified alloy similar to HT-9 may be a suitable candidate for low- and medium-power-density reactor first walls with neutron loads of up to 6 MW/m/sup 2/. A vanadium or copper alloy must be used for high-power-density reactors. The neutron wall load limit for vanadium alloys is about 14 MW/sup 2/, provided a suitable coating material is chosen. The extremely limited data base for radiation effects hinders any quantitative assessment of the limits for copper alloys.

  13. Reactor applications of the compact fusion advanced Rankine (CFAR) cycle for a D-T tokamak fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, H.A.; Logan, B.G.; Campbell, R.B.

    1988-03-01

    We have made a preliminary design of a D-T fusion reactor blanket and MHD power conversion system based on the CFAR concept, and found that the performance and costs for the reference cycle are very attractive. While much remains to be done, the potential advantage of liquid metal Rankine cycles for fusion applications are much clearer now. These include low pressures and mass flow rates, a nearly isothermal module shell which minimizes problems of thermal distortion and stresses, and an insensitivity to pressure losses in the blanket so that the two-phase MHD pressure drops in the boilling part of the blanket and the ordinary vapor pressure drops in the pebble-bed superheating zones are acceptable (the direct result of pumping a liquid rather than having to compress a gas). There are no moving parts in the high-temperature MHD power generators, no steam bottoming plant is required, only small vapor precoolers and condensers are needed because of the high heat rejection trmperatures, and only a relatively small natural-draft heat exhanger is required to reject the heat to the atmosphere. The net result is a very compact fusion reactor and power conversion system which fit entirely inside an 18 meter radius reactor vault. Although we have not yet performed a detailed cost analysis, preliminary cost estimates indicate low capital costs and a very attractive cost of electricity. 11 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. High Temperature Fusion Reactor Cooling Using Brayton Cycle Based Partial Energy Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, Albert J.; Sawicki, Jerzy T.

    2003-01-01

    For some future space power systems using high temperature nuclear heat sources most of the output energy will be used in other than electrical form, and only a fraction of the total thermal energy generated will need to be converted to electrical work. The paper describes the conceptual design of such a partial energy conversion system, consisting of a high temperature fusion reactor operating in series with a high temperature radiator and in parallel with dual closed cycle gas turbine (CCGT) power systems, also referred to as closed Brayton cycle (CBC) systems, which are supplied with a fraction of the reactor thermal energy for conversion to electric power. Most of the fusion reactor's output is in the form of charged plasma which is expanded through a magnetic nozzle of the interplanetary propulsion system. Reactor heat energy is ducted to the high temperature series radiator utilizing the electric power generated to drive a helium gas circulation fan. In addition to discussing the thermodynamic aspects of the system design the authors include a brief overview of the gas turbine and fan rotor-dynamics and proposed bearing support technology along with performance characteristics of the three phase AC electric power generator and fan drive motor.

  15. Magnetic charge lattices, moduli spaces and fusion rules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kampmeijer, L. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65, 1018 XE Amsterdam (Netherlands)], E-mail: leo.kampmeijer@uva.nl; Slingerland, J.K. [Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, School for Theoretical Physics, 10 Burlington Rd, Dublin (Ireland)], E-mail: slingerland@stp.dias.ie; Schroers, B.J. [Department of Mathematics, Heriot-Watt University, Riccarton, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)], E-mail: bernd@ma.hw.ac.uk; Bais, F.A. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65, 1018 XE Amsterdam (Netherlands)], E-mail: bais@science.uva.nl

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the labelling and fusion properties of magnetic charge sectors consisting of smooth BPS monopoles in Yang-Mills-Higgs theory with arbitrary gauge group G spontaneously broken to a subgroup H. The magnetic charges are restricted by a generalized Dirac quantization condition and by an inequality due to Murray. Geometrically, the set of allowed charges is a solid cone in the coroot lattice of G, which we call the Murray cone. We argue that magnetic charge sectors correspond to points in this cone divided by the Weyl group of H so that magnetic charge sectors are labelled by dominant integral weights of the dual group H*. We define generators of the Murray cone modulo Weyl group, and interpret the monopoles in the associated magnetic charge sectors as basic; monopoles in sectors with decomposable charges are interpreted as composite configurations. This interpretation is supported by the dimensionality of the moduli spaces associated to the magnetic charges and by classical fusion properties for smooth monopoles in particular cases. Throughout the paper we compare our findings with corresponding results for singular monopoles recently obtained by Kapustin and Witten.

  16. Neutronic predesign tool for fusion power reactors system assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaboulay, J.-C., E-mail: jean-charles.jaboulay@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, Saclay, DM2S, SERMA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Li Puma, A. [CEA, DEN, Saclay, DM2S, SERMA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Martínez Arroyo, J. [ETSEIB, Internship in CEA (Spain)

    2013-10-15

    SYCOMORE, a fusion reactor system code based on a modular approach, is under development at CEA. In this framework, this paper describes a methodology developed to build the neutronic module of SYCOMORE. This neutronic module aims to evaluate main neutronic parameters characterising a fusion reactor (tokamak): tritium breeding ratio, multiplication factor, nuclear heating as a function of the reactor main geometrical parameters (major radius, elongation, etc.), of the radial build, Li enrichment, blanket and shield thickness, etc. It is based on calculations carried out with APOLLO2 and TRIPOLI-4 CEA transport code on simplified 1D and 2D neutronic models. These models are validated versus a more detailed 3D Monte-Carlo model (using TRIPOLI-4). To ease the integration of this neutronic module in SYCOMORE and provide results instantly, a surrogate model that replicates the 1D and 2D neutronic model results was used. Among the different surrogate models types (polynomial interpolation, responses functions, interpolating by Kriging, artificial neural network, etc.) the neural networks were selected for their efficiency and flexibility. The methodology described in this paper to build SYCOMORE neutronic module is devoted to HCLL blanket, but it could be applied to any breeder blanket concept provided that appropriate validation could be carried out.

  17. Synfuels from fusion: producing hydrogen with the Tandem Mirror Reactor and thermochemical cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, R.W.; Ribe, F.L.

    1981-01-21

    This volume contains the following sections: (1) the Tandem Mirror fusion driver, (2) the Cauldron blanket module, (3) the flowing microsphere, (4) coupling the reactor to the process, (5) the thermochemical cycles, and (6) chemical reactors and process units. (MOW)

  18. Materials degradation in fission reactors: Lessons learned of relevance to fusion reactor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Was, Gary S.

    2007-08-01

    The management of materials in power reactor systems has become a critically important activity in assuring the safe, reliable and economical operation of these facilities. Over the years, the commercial nuclear power reactor industry has faced numerous 'surprises' and unexpected occurrences in materials. Mitigation strategies have sometimes solved one problem at the expense of creating another. Other problems have been solved successfully and have motivated the development of techniques to foresee problems before they occur. This paper focuses on three aspects of fission reactor experience that may benefit future fusion systems. The first is identification of parameters and processes that have had a large impact on the behavior of materials in fission systems such as temperature, dose rate, surface condition, gradients, metallurgical variability and effects of the environment. The second is the development of materials performance and failure models to provide a basis for assuring component integrity. Last is the development of proactive materials management programs that identify and pre-empt degradation processes before they can become problems. These aspects of LWR experience along with the growing experience with materials in the more demanding advanced fission reactor systems form the basis for a set of 'lessons learned' to aid in the successful management of materials in fusion reactor systems.

  19. Charge density asymmetry of heavy-ion fusion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poenaru, N.D.; Ivascu, M.; Mazilu, D.; Sandulescu, A. (Institutul de Fizica si Inginerie Nucleara, Bucharest (Romania))

    1980-01-01

    The generalized liquid-drop model replacing surface energy by double folded Yukawa-plus-exponential function is extended for fusion of heavy ions with different charge densities. Calculated interaction barriers for some 58 pairs of nuclei are in good agreement with experimental ones, within -10% and +7%. For even-even beta-stable nuclei with Z =4-104 the general trend of variation of interaction barriers and fusion Q-values show the regions where the charge density asymmetry cannot be neglected. PES for the entrance channel of the reactions /sup 109/Ag + /sup 40/Ar, /sup 138/Ce + /sup 57/Fe, /sup 144/Nd + /sup 84/Kr and the corresponding charge-equilibrated system have been computed.

  20. Systems study of tokamak fusion--fission reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenney, F.H.; Bathke, C.G.; Price, W.G. Jr.; Bohlke, W.H.; Mills, R.G.; Johnson, E.F.; Todd, A.M.M.; Buchanan, C.H.; Gralnick, S.L.

    1978-11-01

    This publication reports the results of a two to three year effort at a systematic analysis of a wide variety of tokamak-driven fissioning blanket reactors, i.e., fusion--fission hybrids. It addresses the quantitative problems of determining the economically most desirable mix of the two products: electric power and fissionable fuel and shows how the price of electric power can be minimized when subject to a variety of constraints. An attempt has been made to avoid restricting assumptions, and the result is an optimizing algorithm that operates in a six-dimensional parameter space. Comparisons are made on sets of as many as 100,000 distinct machine models, and the principal results of the study have been derived from the examination of several hundred thousand possible reactor configurations.

  1. High conductivity Be-Cu alloys for fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilley, E.A. [NGK Metals Corp., Reading, PA (United States); Adachi, Takao; Ishibashi, Yoshiki [NGK Insulators, Ltd., Aichi-ken (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    The optimum material has not yet been identified. This will result in heat from plasma to the first wall and divertor. That is, because of cracks and melting by thermal power and shock. Today, it is considered to be some kinds of copper, alloys, however, for using, it must have high conductivity. And it is also needed another property, for example, high strength and so on. We have developed some new beryllium copper alloys with high conductivity, high strength, and high endurance. Therefore, we are introducing these new alloys as suitable materials for the heat sink in fusion reactors.

  2. Alpha Particle Physics Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budny, R.V.; Darrow, D.S.; Medley, S.S.; Nazikian, R.; Zweben, S.J.; et al.

    1998-12-14

    Alpha particle physics experiments were done on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) during its deuterium-tritium (DT) run from 1993-1997. These experiments utilized several new alpha particle diagnostics and hundreds of DT discharges to characterize the alpha particle confinement and wave-particle interactions. In general, the results from the alpha particle diagnostics agreed with the classical single-particle confinement model in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) quiescent discharges. Also, the observed alpha particle interactions with sawteeth, toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE), and ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) waves were roughly consistent with theoretical modeling. This paper reviews what was learned and identifies what remains to be understood.

  3. Final optics for laser-driven inertial fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth, J. G.; Chase, L. L.; Guinan, M. W.; Krupke, W. F.; Sooy, W. R.

    1991-10-01

    If Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) power plus utilizing laser drivers are to be considered for electrical power generation, a method for delivering the driver energy into the reactor must be developed. This driver-reactor interface will necessarily employ 'final optics,' which must survive in the face of fast neutrons, x rays, hot vapors and condensates, and high speed droplets. The most difficult to protect against is fast neutron damage since no optically transmissive shielding material for 14 MeV neutrons is available. Multilayer dielectric mirrors are judged to be unsuitable because radiation induced chemical change, diffusion, and thickness changes will destroy their reflectivity within a few months of plant operation. Recently, grazing incidence metal mirrors were proposed, but optical damage issues are unresolved for this approach. In this study, we considered the use of refractive optics. A baseline design consists of two wedges of fused silica, which put a dogleg into the beam and thus remove optics further upstream from direct sight of the reactor. If the closest optic were located 40 m from the center of a 3 GW sub t reactor it would be subject to an average 14 MeV neutron flux of approx. 5 x 10(exp 12) n/sq cm with a peak flux of approx. 6 x 10(exp 18) n/sq cm. A major question to be answered is: 'what duration of reactor operation can this optic withstand'. To answer this question we have reviewed the literature bearing on radiation induced optical damage in fused silica and assessed its implications for reactor operation with the baseline final optics scheme. It appears possible to continuously anneal the neutron damage in the silica by keeping the wedge at a modestly elevated temperature.

  4. On the observation of charged particles in cold fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundqvist, Bo U. R.; Håkansson, Per; Hedin, Allan; Bucur, Romulus V.; Johansson, Börje; Wäppling, Roger

    1989-09-01

    With the aim to confirm or reject the recent claim of observation of cold d-d fusion, an experimental effort has been made to try to observe MeV protons which should be emitted as a result of d-d fusion. Pd foils, thin enough to allow all protons produced to escape the foil, were electrolytically charged with deuterium. A Si(SB) detector was placed close to the Pd foil during charging in order to detect any protons emitted. The deuterium content was measured to be the expected 0.7 D per Pd. Monte Carlo simulations were made to estimate the detection efficiency of 3.02 MeV protons produced in the Pd foil. The background in the experiment was so low that fusion rates considerably lower than those reported on by Jones et al. could be detected. A number of experiments have been performed where the charging conditions were varied. In spite of that and the good sensitivity of the experiment no evidence for cold fusion has been found.

  5. On the observation of charged particles in cold fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundqvist, B.U.R.; Haakansson, P.; Hedin, A. (Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Div. of Ion Physics); Bucur, R.V. (Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Chemistry); Johansson, B.; Waeppling, R. (Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Physics)

    1989-09-01

    With the aim to confirm or reject the recent claim of observation of cold d-d fusion, an experimental effort has been made to try to observe MeV protons which should be emitted as a result of d-d fusion. Pd foils, thin enough to allow all protons produced to escape the foil, were electrolytically charged with deuterium. A Si(SB) detector was placed close to the Pd foil during charging in order to detect any protons emitted. The deuterium content was measured to be the expected 0.7 D per Pd. Monte Carlo simulations were made to estimate the detection efficiency of 3.02 MeV protons produced in the Pd foil. The background in the experiment was so low that fusion rates considerably lower than those reported on by Jones et al. could be detected. A number of experiments have been performed where the charging conditions were varied. In spite of that and the good sensitivity of the experiment no evidence for cold fusion has been found. (orig.).

  6. Concept of a charged fusion product diagnostic for NSTX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeglin, W. U.; Valenzuela Perez, R. [Department of Physics, Florida International University, 11200 SW 8th Street, Miami, Florida 33199 (United States); Darrow, D. S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, James Forrestal Campus, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    The concept of a new diagnostic for NSTX to determine the time dependent charged fusion product emission profile using an array of semiconductor detectors is presented. The expected time resolution of 1-2 ms should make it possible to study the effect of magnetohydrodynamics and other plasma activities (toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAE), neoclassical tearing modes (NTM), edge localized modes (ELM), etc.) on the radial transport of neutral beam ions. First simulation results of deuterium-deuterium (DD) fusion proton yields for different detector arrangements and methods for inverting the simulated data to obtain the emission profile are discussed.

  7. Fusion reactor handling operations with cable-driven parallel robots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izard, Jean-Baptiste, E-mail: jeanbaptiste.izard@tecnalia.com; Michelin, Micael; Baradat, Cédric

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • CDPR allow 6DOF positioning of loads using cable as links without payload swag. • Conceptual design of a CDPR for carrying and positioning tokamak sectors is given. • A CDPR for threading stellarator coils (6D trajectory following) is provided. • Both designs are capable of fullfilling the required precision without tooling. - Abstract: Cable-driven parallel robots (CDPR) are in their concept cranes with inclined cables which allow control of all the degrees of freedom of its payload, and therefore stability of all the degrees of freedom, including rotations. The workspace of a CDPR is only limited by the length of the cables, and the payload capacity related to the mass of the whole robot is very important. Besides, the control being based on kinematic models, the behavior of a CDPR is really that of a robot capable of automated trajectories or remote handling. The present paper gives a presentation of two use case studies based on some of the assembly phases and remote handling actions as designed for the recent fusion machines. Based on the use cases already in place in fusion reactor baselines, the opportunity of using CDPR for assembly of structural elements and coils is discussed. Finally, prospects for remote handling equipment from the reactor in hot cells are envisioned based on current CDPR research.

  8. The properties and weldability of materials for fusion reactor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, B.A.; Kee, C.K.; Wilcox, R.C. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1991-11-15

    Low-activation austenitic stainless steels have been suggested for applications within fusion reactors. The use of these nickel-free steels will help to reduce the radioactive waste management problem after service. one requirement for such steels is the ability to obtain sound welds for fabrication purposes. Thus, two austenitic Fe-Cr-Mn alloys were studied to characterize the welded microstructure and mechanical properties. The two steels investigated were a Russian steel (Fe-11.6Cr19.3Mn-0.181C) and an US steel (Fe-12.lCr-19.4Mn-0.24C). Welding was performed using a gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. Microscopic examinations of the structure of both steels were conducted. The as-received Russian steel was found to be in the annealed state. Only the fusion zone and the base metal were observed in the welded Russian steel. No visible heat affected zone was observed. Examination revealed that the as-received US steel was in the cold rolled condition. After welding, a fusion zone and a heat affected zone along with the base metal region were found.

  9. Application of Kelvin Probe to Studies of Fusion Reactor Materials under Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Guangnan; K. Yamaguchi; T. Terai; M. Yamawaki

    2005-01-01

    Recently, the work function (WF) changes in metallic and ceramic materials to be potentially used in future fusion reactors have been examined by means of Kelvin probe (KP),under He ion irradiation in high energy (MeV) and / or low energy (500 eV) ranges. The results of polycrystalline Ni samples indicate that the 1 MeV beam only induces decrease in the WF within the experimental fluence range; whereas the irradiation of 500 eV beam results in decrease in the WF firstly, then increase till saturation. A dual layer surface model is employed to explain the observed phenomena, together with computer simulation results by SRIM code. Charges buildup on the surface of lithium ceramics has been found to greatly influence the probe output, which can be explained qualitatively using a model concerning an induction electric field due to external field and free charges on the ceramic surface.

  10. Decay heat measurement on fusion reactor materials and validation of calculation code system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekawa, Fujio; Ikeda, Yujiro; Wada, Masayuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    Decay heat rates for 32 fusion reactor relevant materials irradiated with 14-MeV neutrons were measured for the cooling time period between 1 minute and 400 days. With using the experimental data base, validity of decay heat calculation systems for fusion reactors were investigated. (author)

  11. Material Science Activities for Fusion Reactors in Kazakhstan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tazhibayeva, I.; Kenzhin, E.; Kulsartov, T. [Institute of Atomic Energy NNC RK, Kurchatov (Kazakhstan); Shestakov, V. [Kazakhstan State University, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Chikhray, Y. [Kazakh National University, Kourmangazy 15, app.lO, 480100 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Azizov, E. [TRINITI, Troitsk (Russian Federation); Filatov, O. [Effremov Institute, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Chernov, V.M. [Bochvar Institute of Inorganic Materials, P.O. Box 369, 123060 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Paper contains results of fusion material testing national program and results of activities on creation of material testing spherical tokamak. Hydrogen isotope behavior (diffusion, permeation, and accumulation) in the components of the first wall and divertor was studied taking into account temperature, pressure, and reactor irradiation. There were carried out out-of-pile and in-pile (reactors IVG-IM, WWRK, RA) studies of beryllium of various grades (TV-56, TShG-56, DV-56, TGP-56, TIP-56), graphites (RG-T, MPG-8, FP 479, R 4340), molybdenum, tungsten, steels (Cr18Ni10Ti, Cr16Ni15, MANET, F82H), alloys V-(4-6)Cr-( 4-5)Ti, Cu+1%Cr+0.1%Zr, and double Be/Cu and triple Be/Cu/steel structures. Tritium permeability from eutectic Pb+17%Li through steels Cr18Ni10Ti, Cr16Ni15, MANET, and F82H were studied taking into account protective coating effects. The tritium production rate was experimentally assessed during in-pile and post-reactor experiments. There were carried out radiation tests of ceramic Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} (96% enrichment by Li-6) with in-situ registration of released tritium and following post-irradiation material tests of irradiated samples. Verification of computer codes for simulation of accidents related to LOCA in ITER reactor was carried out. Codes' verification was carried out for a mockup of first wall in a form of three-layer cylinder of beryllium, bronze (Cu-Cr-Zr) and stainless steel. At present Kazakhstan Tokamak for Material testing (tokamak KTM) is created in National Nuclear Center of Republic of Kazakhstan in cooperation with Russian Federation organizations (start-up is scheduled on 2008). Tokamak KTM allows for expansion and specification of the studies and tests of materials, protection options of first wall, receiving divertor tiles and divertor components, methods for load reduction at divertor, and various options of heat/power removal, fast evacuation of divertor volume and development of the

  12. Design of a fusion reactor for eutectic alloys Pb- Li; Diseno de un reactor de fusion para aleaciones autecticas Pb-Li

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinones, J.; Barrena Perez, M. I.; Gomez de Salazar, J. M.; Serrano, L.; Duran, S.; Conde, E.; Barrado, A. I.; Fernandez, M.; Sedano, L.; Soria Munoz, A.

    2010-07-01

    Given the interest that have the Pb-Li eutectic alloys in the field of production of tritium, designed to optimize energy through nuclear fusion processes, in this paper, we present the design, construction and commissioning of a fusion reactor of Pb-Li alloys eutectic and the optimal process conditions, for these alloys.

  13. Development of dynamic simulation code for fuel cycle fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Isao; Seki, Yasushi [Department of Fusion Engineering Research, Naka Fusion Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan); Sasaki, Makoto; Shintani, Kiyonori; Kim, Yeong-Chan

    1999-02-01

    A dynamic simulation code for fuel cycle of a fusion experimental reactor has been developed. The code follows the fuel inventory change with time in the plasma chamber and the fuel cycle system during 2 days pulse operation cycles. The time dependence of the fuel inventory distribution is evaluated considering the fuel burn and exhaust in the plasma chamber, purification and supply functions. For each subsystem of the plasma chamber and the fuel cycle system, the fuel inventory equation is written based on the equation of state considering the fuel burn and the function of exhaust, purification, and supply. The processing constants of subsystem for steady states were taken from the values in the ITER Conceptual Design Activity (CDA) report. Using this code, the time dependence of the fuel supply and inventory depending on the burn state and subsystem processing functions are shown. (author)

  14. High temperature indentation tests on fusion reactor candidate materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montanari, R. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Universita di Roma-Tor Vergata, Via del Politecnico 1, I-00133 Rome (Italy)]. E-mail: roberto.montanari@uniroma2.it; Filacchioni, G. [ENEA CR Casaccia, Via Anguillarese 301, I-00060 S.M. di Galeria, Rome (Italy); Iacovone, B. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Universita di Roma-Tor Vergata, Via del Politecnico 1, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Plini, P. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Universita di Roma-Tor Vergata, Via del Politecnico 1, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Riccardi, B. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, P.O. Box 65, I-00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy)

    2007-08-01

    Flat-top cylinder indenter for mechanical characterization (FIMEC) is an indentation technique employing cylindrical punches with diameters ranging from 0.5 to 2 mm. The test gives pressure-penetration curves from which the yield stress can be determined. The FIMEC apparatus was developed to test materials in the temperature range from -180 to +200 {sup o}C. Recently, the heating system of FIMEC apparatus has been modified to operate up to 500 {sup o}C. So, in addition to providing yield stress over a more extended temperature range, it is possible to perform stress-relaxation tests at temperatures of great interest for several nuclear fusion reactor (NFR) alloys. Data on MANET-II, F82H mod., Eurofer-97, EM-10, AISI 316 L, Ti6Al4V and CuCrZr are presented and compared with those obtained by mechanical tests with standard methods.

  15. Radioactivity effects of Pb-17Li in fusion power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casini, G.; Rocco, P. (Commission of the European Communities, Joint Research Centre, Ispra (Italy)); Zucchetti, M. (Dipt. di Energetica, Politecnico Turin (Italy))

    1991-12-01

    Research on the eutectic Pb-17Li is part of the blanket studies carried out in Europe for fusion power reactors. The use of this breeder makes easier some safety problems as compared to the case of lithium as a consequence of the lower chemical reactivity of Pb-17Li. On the other hand, it increases the radioactivity problems due to the neutron activation of lead and impurities. This paper presents both short-term (accidents) and long-term (waste disposal and recycling) aspects of the Pb-17Li activation products. They include the production, mobilization, release and environmental impact. Concerning accidents, a particular attention is given to Po-210 and Hg-203. Questions related to waste management are also revised. The most attractive solution seems that of recycling the spent Pb-17Li. This will be possible about 20 y after removal from service. As an alternative to recycling, the breeder disposal as radioactive waste is discussed. (orig.).

  16. Radiation Hydrodynamic Parameter Study of Inertial Fusion Energy Reactor Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacks, Ryan; Moses, Gregory

    2014-10-01

    Inertial fusion energy reactors present great promise for the future as they are capable of providing baseline power with no carbon footprint. Simulation work regarding the chamber response and first wall insult is performed with the 1-D radiation hydrodynamics code BUCKY. Simulation with differing chamber parameters are implemented to study the effect of gas fill, gas mixtures and chamber radii. Xenon and argon gases are of particular interest as shielding for the first wall due to their high opacity values and ready availability. Mixing of the two gases is an attempt to engineer a gas cocktail to provide the maximum amount of shielding with the least amount of cost. A parameter study of different chamber radii shows a consistent relationship with that of first wall temperature (~1/r2) and overpressure (~1/r3). This work is performed under collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  17. Shielding efficiency of metal hydrides and borohydrides in fusion reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Vishvanath P.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mass attenuation coefficients, mean free paths and exposure buildup factors have been used to characterize the shielding efficiency of metal hydrides and borohydrides, with high density of hydrogen. Gamma ray exposure buildup factors were computed using five-parameter geometric progression fitting at energies 0.015 MeV to15 MeV, and for penetration depths up to 40 mean free paths. Fast-neutron shielding efficiency has been characterized by the effective neutron removal cross-section. It is shown that ZrH2 and VH2 are very good shielding materials for gamma rays and fast neutrons due to their suitable combination of low- and high-Z elements. The present work should be useful for the selection and design of blankets and shielding, and for dose evaluation for components in fusion reactors.

  18. Flibe Use in Fusion Reactors - An Initial Safety Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwallader, Lee Charles; Longhurst, Glen Reed

    1999-04-01

    This report is an initial effort to identify and evaluate safety issues associated with the use of Flibe (LiF-BeF2) as a molten salt coolant for nuclear fusion power plant applications. Flibe experience in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment is briefly reviewed. Safety issues identified include chemical toxicity, radiological issues resulting from neutron activation, and the operational concerns of handling a high temperature coolant. Beryllium compounds and fluorine pose be toxicological concerns. Some controls to protect workers are discussed. Since Flibe has been handled safely in other applications, its hazards appear to be manageable. Some safety issues that require further study are pointed out. Flibe salt interaction with strong magnetic fields should be investigated. Evolution of Flibe constituents and activation products at high temperature (i.e., will Fluorine release as a gas or remain in the molten salt) is an issue. Aerosol and tritium release from a Flibe spill requires study, as does neutronics analysis to characterize radiological doses. Tritium migration from Flibe into the cooling system is also a safety concern. Investigation of these issues will help determine the extent to which Flibe shows promise as a fusion power plant coolant or plasma-facing material.

  19. Flibe use in fusion reactors -- An initial safety assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwallader, L.C.; Longhurst, G.R.

    1999-03-01

    This report is an initial effort to identify and evaluate safety issues associated with the use of Flibe (LiF-BeF{sub 2}) as a molten salt coolant for nuclear fusion power plant applications. Flibe experience in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment is briefly reviewed. Safety issues identified include chemical toxicity, radiological issues resulting from neutron activation, and the operational concerns of handling a high temperature coolant. Beryllium compounds and fluorine pose be toxicological concerns. Some controls to protect workers are discussed. Since Flibe has been handled safely in other applications, its hazards appear to be manageable. Some safety issues that require further study are pointed out. Flibe salt interaction with strong magnetic fields should be investigated. Evolution of Flibe constituents and activation products at high temperature (i.e., will Fluorine release as a gas or remain in the molten salt) is an issue. Aerosol and tritium release from a Flibe spill requires study, as does neutronics analysis to characterize radiological doses. Tritium migration from Flibe into the cooling system is also a safety concern. Investigation of these issues will help determine the extent to which Flibe shows promise as a fusion power plant coolant or plasma-facing material.

  20. Metabolic and environmental aspects of fusion reactor activation products: niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Easterly, C.E.; Shank, K.E.

    1977-11-01

    A summary of the metabolic and environmental aspects of niobium is presented. The toxicological symptoms from exposure to niobium are given, along with lethal concentration values for acute and chronic exposures. Existing human data are presented; animal uptake and retention data are analyzed for various routes of administration. Recommended metabolic values are also presented along with comments concerning their use and appropriateness. The natural distribution of niobium is given for freshwater, seawater, and the biosphere. Concentration factors and retention of /sup 95/Nb in the environment are discussed with reference to: plant retention via leaf absorption; plant retention via root uptake; uptake in terrestrial animals from plants; uptake in freshwater organisms; uptake in marine organisms; and movement in soil. Conclusions are drawn regarding needs for future work in these areas. This review was undertaken because niobium is expected to be a key metal in the development of commercial fusion reactors. It is recognized that niobium will likely not be used in the first generation reactors as a structural material but will appear as an alloy in such materials as superconducting wire.

  1. Power conversion systems based on Brayton cycles for fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linares, J.I., E-mail: linares@upcomillas.es [Rafael Marino Chair on New Energy Technologies. Comillas Pontifical University, Alberto Aguilera, 25-28015 Madrid (Spain); Herranz, L.E. [Unit of Nuclear Safety Research. CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Moratilla, B.Y.; Serrano, I.P. [Rafael Marino Chair on New Energy Technologies. Comillas Pontifical University, Alberto Aguilera, 25-28015 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    This paper investigates Brayton power cycles for fusion reactors. Two working fluids have been explored: helium in classical configurations and CO{sub 2} in recompression layouts (Feher cycle). Typical recuperator arrangements in both cycles have been strongly constrained by low temperature of some of the energy thermal sources from the reactor. This limitation has been overcome in two ways: with a combined architecture and with dual cycles. Combined architecture couples the Brayton cycle with a Rankine one capable of taking advantage of the thermal energy content of the working fluid after exiting the turbine stage (iso-butane and steam fitted best the conditions of the He and CO{sub 2} cycles, respectively). Dual cycles set a specific Rankine cycle to exploit the lowest quality thermal energy source, allowing usual recuperator arrangements in the Brayton cycle. The results of the analyses indicate that dual cycles could reach thermal efficiencies around 42.8% when using helium, whereas thermal performance might be even better (46.7%), if a combined CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O cycle was set.

  2. Elevator mode convection in liquid metal blankets for fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zikanov, Oleg; Liu, Li

    2015-11-01

    The work is motivated by the design of liquid-metal blankets for nuclear fusion reactors. Mixed convection in a downward flow in a vertical duct with strong contant-rate heating of one wall (the Grashof number up to 1012) and strong transverse magnetic field (the Hartmann number up to 104) is considered. It is found that in an infinitely long duct the flow is dominated by exponentially growing elevator modes having the form of a combination of ascending and descending jets. An analytical solution approximating the growth rate of the modes is derived. Analogous flows in finite-length pipes and ducts are analyzed using the high-resolution numerical simulations. The results of the recent experiments are reproduced and explained. It is found that the flow evolves in cycles consisting of periods of exponential growth and breakdowns of the jets. The resulting high-amplitude fluctuations of temperature is a feature potentially dangerous for operation of a reactor blanket. Financial support was provided by the US NSF (Grant CBET 1232851).

  3. Overview of Indian activities on fusion reactor materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Srikumar

    2014-12-01

    This paper on overview of Indian activities on fusion reactor materials describes in brief the efforts India has made to develop materials for the first wall of a tokamak, its blanket and superconducting magnet coils. Through a systematic and scientific approach, India has developed and commercially produced reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel that is comparable to Eurofer 97. Powder of low activation ferritic/martensitic oxide dispersion strengthened steel with characteristics desired for its application in the first wall of a tokamak has been produced on the laboratory scale. V-4Cr-4Ti alloy was also prepared in the laboratory, and kinetics of hydrogen absorption in this was investigated. Cu-1 wt%Cr-0.1 wt%Zr - an alloy meant for use as heat transfer elements for hypervapotrons and heat sink for the first wall - was developed and characterized in detail for its aging behavior. The role of addition of a small quantity of Zr in its improved fatigue performance was delineated, and its diffusion bonding with both W and stainless steel was achieved using Ni as an interlayer. The alloy was produced in large quantities and used for manufacturing both the heat transfer elements and components for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). India has proposed to install and test a lead-lithium cooled ceramic breeder test blanket module (LLCB-TBM) at ITER. To meet this objective, efforts have been made to produce and characterize Li2TiO3 pebbles, and also improve the thermal conductivity of packed beds of these pebbles. Liquid metal loops have been set up and corrosion behavior of RAFM steel in flowing Pb-Li eutectic has been studied in the presence as well as absence of magnetic fields. To prevent permeation of tritium and reduce the magneto-hydro-dynamic drag, processes have been developed for coating alumina on RAFM steel. Apart from these activities, different approaches being attempted to make the U-shaped first wall of the TBM box

  4. Code development incorporating environmental, safety, and economic aspects of fusion reactors (FY 89--91)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, S.K.; Fowler, T.K.; Holdren, J.P. (eds.)

    1991-11-01

    This report discusses the following aspects of Fusion reactors.: Activation Analysis; Tritium Inventory; Environmental and Safety Indices and Their Graphical Representation; Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) and Decision Analysis; Plasma Burn Control -- Application to ITER; and Other Applications.

  5. Dynamical Safety Analysis of the SABR Fusion-Fission Hybrid Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, Tyler; Stacey, Weston; Ghiaassian, Seyed

    2009-11-01

    A hybrid fusion-fission reactor for the transmutation of spent nuclear fuel is being developed at Georgia Tech. The Subcritical Advanced Burner Reactor (SABR) is a 3000 MWth sodium-cooled, metal TRU-Zr fueled fast reactor driven by a tokamak fusion neutron source based on ITER physics and technology. We are investigating the accident dynamics of SABR's coupled fission, fusion and heat removal systems to explore the safety characteristics of a hybrid reactor. Possible accident scenarios such as loss of coolant mass flow (LOFA), of power (LOPA) and of heat sink (LOHSA), as well as inadvertent reactivity insertions and fusion source excursion are being analyzed using the RELAP5-3D code, the ATHENA version of which includes liquid metal coolants.

  6. Prospects of steady state magnetic diagnostic of fusion reactors based on metallic Hall sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ďuran, I.; Sentkerestiová, J.; Kovařík, K.; Viererbl, L.

    2012-06-01

    Employment of sensors based on Hall effect (Hall sensors) is one of the candidate approaches to detection of almost steady state magnetic fields in future fusion reactors based on magnetic confinement (tokamaks, stellarators etc.), and also in possible fusion-fission hybrid systems having these fusion reactors as a neutron source and driver. This contribution reviews the initial considerations concerning application of metallic Hall sensors in fusion reactor harsh environment that include high neutron loads (>1018 cm-2) and elevated temperatures (>200°C). In particular, the candidate sensing materials, candidate technologies for sensors production, initial analysis of activation and transmutation of sensors under reactor relevant neutron loads and the tests of the the first samples of copper Hall sensors are presented.

  7. Radiation damage of graphite in fission and fusion reactor systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engle, G.B. (GA Technologies, Inc., San Diego, CA (USA)); Kelly, B.T. (Springfields Nuclear Power Development Labs. (UK))

    1984-05-01

    Increasing the crystalline perfection of artificial graphites is suggested as one method of reducing the crystallite damage. The life expectance for the isotropic conventional graphites will in each case depend on the reactor component for which it will be used and on its design considerations. Based on neutron damage and related dimensional changes it is estimated graphite will be tenable to about 3x10/sup 22/ n/cm/sup 2/ (EDN) at 400/sup 0/C, 0.6x10/sup 22/ n/cm/sup 2/ (EDN) at 1000/sup 0/C and 1.4x10/sup 22/ n/cm/sup 2/ (EDN) at 1400/sup 0/C. There are no data above 1400/sup 0/C on which to speculate. A dose of 2x10/sup 22/ n/cm/sup 2/ may be accumulated in times ranging from as short as a few months in the first wall region of high power density designs to the fusion plant lifetime (30 years) in the neutron reflector region behind the blanket.

  8. Plasma engineering studies for Tennessee Tokamak (TENTOK) fusion power reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, K.E.; Lacatski, J.T.; Miller, J.B.; Bryan, W.E.; King, P.W.; Santoro, R.T.; Uckan, N.A.; Shannon, T.E.

    1984-02-01

    This paper summarizes the results of the plasma engineering and systems analysis studies for the Tennessee Tokamak (TENTOK) fusion power reactor. TENTOK is a 3000-MW(t) central station power plant that uses deuterium-tritium fuel in a D-shaped tokamak plasma configuration with a double-null poloidal divertor. The major parameters are R/sub 0/ = 6.4 m, a = 1.6 m, sigma (elongation) = 1.65, (n) = 1.5 x 10/sup 20/ m/sup -3/, (T) = 15 keV, (..beta..) = 6%, B/sub T/ (on-axis) = 5.6 T, I/sub p/ = 8.5 MA, and wall loading = 3 MW/m/sup 2/. Detailed analyses are performed in the areas of (1) transport simulation using the one-and-one-half-dimensional (1-1/2-D) WHIST transport code, (2) equilibrium/poloidal field coil systems, (3) neutral beam and radiofrequency (rf) heating, and (4) pellet fueling. In addition, impurity control systems, diagnostics and controls, and possible microwave plasma preheating and steady-state current drive options are also considered. Some of the major features of TENTOK include rf heating in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies, superconducting equilibrium field coils outside the superconducting toroidal field coils, a double-null poloidal divertor for impurity control and alpha ash removal, and rf-assisted plasma preheating and current startup.

  9. ANALISA PENGARUH PERIODIK CHARGING DAN DISCHARGING PADA WAKTU CHARGING DAN DISCHARGING DARI METAL HYDRIDE REACTOR (MHR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taurista Perdana Syawitri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Perpindahan panas merupakan faktor penting yang mempengaruhi kinerja tangki penyimpanan hydrogen dalam bentuk metal hydride. Penelitian sebelumnya menyimpulkan bahwa penambahan sejumlah kecil metal foam pada interior metal hydride reactor (MHR merupakan cara yang efektif untuk meningkatkan perpindahan panas pada reaktor, sehingga mengurangi waktu charging. Namun, proses charging dan discharging MHR dilakukan secara terpisah dalam studi ini. Oleh karena itu, penelitian ini menyimulasikan model 2-D axisymmetric menggunakan software COMSOL untuk menginvestigasi pengaruh dari periodik charging dan discharging dari MHR yang mengandung metal foam dengan fraksi volume tertentu. Hasil simulasi menunjukkan bahwa model saat ini mempunyai hasil yang sesuai dengan hasil yang ditunjukkan di dalam literatur. Selain itu, ditemukan bahwa terdapat nilai optimum dari fraksi volume metal foam di setiap proses charging dan proses discharging yang memberikan waktu charging dan discharging lebih pendek.

  10. Innovative fusion reactor design analysis: Annual performance report, May 15, 1988--January 31, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, A.C.

    1989-01-31

    This report discusses the following topics on fusion reactor component design: FLiBe intermediate heat exchanger design analysis; FLiBe properties; design methodology; FLiBe system steam generator freezeup; FLiBe reactor systems studies; tritium breeding ratio control; analysis of original objectives; and budget analysis. 15 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs. (LSP)

  11. Core Plasma Characteristics of a Spherical Tokamak D-3He Fusion Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Bingren

    2005-01-01

    The magnetic fusion reactor using the advanced D-3He fuels has the advantage of much less-neutron productions so that the consequent damages to the first wall are less serious. If the establishment of this kind of reactor becomes realistic, the exploration of 3He on the moon will be largely motivated. Based on recent progresses in the spherical torus (ST) research, we have physically designed a D-3He fusion reactor using the extrapolated results from the ST experiments and also the present-day tokamak scaling. It is found that the reactor size significantly depends on the wall reflection coefficient of the synchrotron radiation and of the impurity contaminations.The secondary reaction between D-D that promptly leads to the D-T reaction producing 14 MeV neutrons is also estimated. Comparison of this D-3He ST reactor with the D-T reactor is made.

  12. Beyond ITER: Neutral beams for a demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO) (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAdams, R., E-mail: roy.mcadams@ccfe.ac.uk [EURATOM/CCFE Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-15

    In the development of magnetically confined fusion as an economically sustainable power source, International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER) is currently under construction. Beyond ITER is the demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO) programme in which the physics and engineering aspects of a future fusion power plant will be demonstrated. DEMO will produce net electrical power. The DEMO programme will be outlined and the role of neutral beams for heating and current drive will be described. In particular, the importance of the efficiency of neutral beam systems in terms of injected neutral beam power compared to wallplug power will be discussed. Options for improving this efficiency including advanced neutralisers and energy recovery are discussed.

  13. Beyond ITER: neutral beams for a demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO) (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdams, R

    2014-02-01

    In the development of magnetically confined fusion as an economically sustainable power source, International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER) is currently under construction. Beyond ITER is the demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO) programme in which the physics and engineering aspects of a future fusion power plant will be demonstrated. DEMO will produce net electrical power. The DEMO programme will be outlined and the role of neutral beams for heating and current drive will be described. In particular, the importance of the efficiency of neutral beam systems in terms of injected neutral beam power compared to wallplug power will be discussed. Options for improving this efficiency including advanced neutralisers and energy recovery are discussed.

  14. Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    This is the fourteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Depart of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. Separate abstracts were prepared for each individual section.

  15. Hydrogen Spectral Line Shape Formation in the SOL of Fusion Reactor Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valery S. Lisitsa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The problems related to the spectral line-shape formation in the scrape of layer (SOL in fusion reactor plasma for typical observation chords are considered. The SOL plasma is characterized by the relatively low electron density (1012–1013 cm−3 and high temperature (from 10 eV up to 1 keV. The main effects responsible for the line-shape formation in the SOL are Doppler and Zeeman effects. The main problem is a correct modeling of the neutral atom velocity distribution function (VDF. The VDF is determined by a number of atomic processes, namely: molecular dissociation, ionization and charge exchange of neutral atoms on plasma ions, electron excitation accompanied by the charge exchange from atomic excited states, and atom reflection from the wall. All the processes take place step by step during atom motion from the wall to the plasma core. In practice, the largest contribution to the neutral atom radiation emission comes from a thin layer near the wall with typical size 10–20 cm, which is small as compared with the minor radius of modern devices including international test experimental reactor ITER (radius 2 m. The important problem is a strongly non-uniform distribution of plasma parameters (electron and ion densities and temperatures. The distributions vary for different observation chords and ITER operation regimes. In the present report, most attention is paid to the problem of the VDF calculations. The most correct method for solving the problem is an application of the Monte Carlo method for atom motion near the wall. However, the method is sometimes too complicated to be combined with other numerical codes for plasma modeling for various regimes of fusion reactor operation. Thus, it is important to develop simpler methods for neutral atom VDF in space coordinates and velocities. The efficiency of such methods has to be tested via a comparison with the Monte Carlo codes for particular plasma conditions. Here a new simplified method

  16. Operation of Fusion Reactors in One Atmosphere of Air Instead of Vacuum Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J. Reece

    2009-07-01

    Engineering design studies of both magnetic and inertial fusion power plants have assumed that the plasma will undergo fusion reactions in a vacuum environment. Operation under vacuum requires an expensive additional major system for the reactor-a vacuum vessel with vacuum pumping, and raises the possibility of sudden unplanned outages if the vacuum containment is breached. It would be desirable in many respects if fusion reactors could be made to operate at one atmosphere with air surrounding the plasma, thus eliminating the requirement of a pressure vessel and vacuum pumping. This would have obvious economic, reliability, and engineering advantages for currently envisaged power plant reactors; it would make possible forms of reactor control not possible under vacuum conditions (i.e. adiabatic compression of the fusion plasma by increasing the pressure of surrounding gas); it would allow reactors used as aircraft engines to operate as turbojets or ramjets in the atmosphere, and it would allow reactors used as fusion rockets to take off from the surface of the earth instead of low earth orbit.

  17. Joining and fabrication techniques for high temperature structures including the first wall in fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Jin; Lee, B. S.; Kim, K. B

    2003-09-01

    The materials for PFC's (Plasma Facing Components) in a fusion reactor are severely irradiated with fusion products in facing the high temperature plasma during the operation. The refractory materials can be maintained their excellent properties in severe operating condition by lowering surface temperature by bonding them to the high thermal conducting materials of heat sink. Hence, the joining and bonding techniques between dissimilar materials is considered to be important in case of the fusion reactor or nuclear reactor which is operated at high temperature. The first wall in the fusion reactor is heated to approximately 1000 .deg. C and irradiated severely by the plasma. In ITER, beryllium is expected as the primary armour candidate for the PFC's; other candidates including W, Mo, SiC, B4C, C/C and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. Since the heat affected zones in the PFC's processed by conventional welding are reported to have embrittlement and degradation in the sever operation condition, both brazing and diffusion bonding are being considered as prime candidates for the joining technique. In this report, both the materials including ceramics and the fabrication techniques including joining technique between dissimilar materials for PFC's are described. The described joining technique between the refractory materials and the dissimilar materials may be applicable for the fusion reactor and Generation-4 future nuclear reactor which are operated at high temperature and high irradiation.

  18. Fusion reactor materials. Semiannual progress report for period ending September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowcliffe, A.F.; Burn, G.L.; Knee`, S.S.; Dowker, C.L. [comps.

    1994-02-01

    This is the fifteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; Special purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

  19. Proceedings of the Office of Fusion Energy/DOE workshop on ceramic matrix composites for structural applications in fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, R.H. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Lucas, G.E. (California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (USA))

    1990-11-01

    A workshop to assess the potential application of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) for structural applications in fusion reactors was held on May 21--22, 1990, at University of California, Santa Barbara. Participants included individuals familiar with materials and design requirements in fusion reactors, ceramic composite processing and properties and radiation effects. The primary focus was to list the feasibility issues that might limit the application of these materials in fusion reactors. Clear advantages for the use of CMCs are high-temperature operation, which would allow a high-efficiency Rankine cycle, and low activation. Limitations to their use are material costs, fabrication complexity and costs, lack of familiarity with these materials in design, and the lack of data on radiation stability at relevant temperatures and fluences. Fusion-relevant feasibility issues identified at this workshop include: hermetic and vacuum properties related to effects of matrix porosity and matrix microcracking; chemical compatibility with coolant, tritium, and breeder and multiplier materials, radiation effects on compatibility; radiation stability and integrity; and ability to join CMCs in the shop and at the reactor site, radiation stability and integrity of joints. A summary of ongoing CMC radiation programs is also given. It was suggested that a true feasibility assessment of CMCs for fusion structural applications could not be completed without evaluation of a material tailored'' to fusion conditions or at least to radiation stability. It was suggested that a follow-up workshop be held to design a tailored composite after the results of CMC radiation studies are available and the critical feasibility issues are addressed.

  20. An Ion Switch Regulates Fusion of Charged Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siepi, Evgenios; Lutz, Silke; Meyer, Sylke; Panzner, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    Here we identify the recruitment of solvent ions to lipid membranes as the dominant regulator of lipid phase behavior. Our data demonstrate that binding of counterions to charged lipids promotes the formation of lamellar membranes, whereas their absence can induce fusion. The mechanism applies to anionic and cationic liposomes, as well as the recently introduced amphoteric liposomes. In the latter, an additional pH-dependent lipid salt formation between anionic and cationic lipids must occur, as indicated by the depletion of membrane-bound ions in a zone around pH 5. Amphoteric liposomes fuse under these conditions but form lamellar structures at both lower and higher pH values. The integration of these observations into the classic lipid shape theory yielded a quantitative link between lipid and solvent composition and the physical state of the lipid assembly. The key parameter of the new model, κ(pH), describes the membrane phase behavior of charged membranes in response to their ion loading in a quantitative way. PMID:21575575

  1. Evaluating and planning the radioactive waste options for dismantling the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rule, K.; Scott, J.; Larson, S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is a one-of-a kind tritium fusion research reactor, and is planned to be decommissioned within the next several years. This is the largest fusion reactor in the world and as a result of deuterium-tritum reactions is tritium contaminated and activated from 14 Mev neutrons. This presents many unusual challenges when dismantling, packaging and disposing its components and ancillary systems. Special containers are being designed to accommodate the vacuum vessel, neutral beams, and tritium delivery and processing systems. A team of experienced professionals performed a detailed field study to evaluate the requirements and appropriate methods for packaging the radioactive materials. This team focused on several current and innovative methods for waste minimization that provides the oppurtunmost cost effective manner to package and dispose of the waste. This study also produces a functional time-phased schedule which conjoins the waste volume, weight, costs and container requirements with the detailed project activity schedule for the entire project scope. This study and project will be the first demonstration of the decommissioning of a tritium fusion test reactor. The radioactive waste disposal aspects of this project are instrumental in demonstrating the viability of a fusion power reactor with regard to its environmental impact and ultimate success.

  2. The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research on the titan-1 fusion power core. The major topics covered are: titan-1 fusion-power-core engineering; titan-1 divertor engineering; titan-1 tritium systems; titan-1 safety design and radioactive-waste disposal; and titan-1 maintenance procedures.

  3. Effect of design parameters on enhancement of hydrogen charging in metal hydride reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, Y. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Nigde University, 51100 Nigde (Turkey)

    2009-03-15

    The effects of heat transfer mechanisms on the charging process in metal hydride reactors are studied under various charging pressures. Three different cylindrical reactors with the same base dimensions are designed and manufactured. The first one is a closed cylinder cooled with natural convection, the fins are manufactured around the second reactor and the third reactor is cooled with water circulating around the reactor. The temperatures of the reactor at several locations are measured during charging with a range of pressure of 1-10 bar. The third reactor shows the lowest temperature increase with the fastest charging time under all charging pressures investigated. The effective heat transfer coefficients of the reactors are also calculated according to the experimental results and they are found to be 5.5 {+-} 1 W m{sup -2} K{sup -1}, 35 {+-} 2 W m{sup -2} K{sup -1} and 113 {+-} 1 W m{sup -2} K{sup -1}, respectively. The experimental results showed that the charging of hydride reactors is mainly heat transfer dependent and the reactor with better cooling exhibits the fastest charging characteristics. (author)

  4. Hybrid fusion reactor for production of nuclear fuel with minimum radioactive contamination of the fuel cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velikhov, E. P.; Kovalchuk, M. V.; Azizov, E. A.; Ignatiev, V. V.; Subbotin, S. A.; Tsibulskiy, V. F.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the results of the system research on the coordinated development of nuclear and fusion power engineering in the current century. Considering the increasing problems of resource procurement, including limited natural uranium resources, it seems reasonable to use fusion reactors as high-power neutron sources for production of nuclear fuel in a blanket. It is shown that the share of fusion sources in this structural configuration of the energy system can be relatively small. A fundamentally important aspect of this solution to the problem of closure of the fuel cycle is that recycling of highly active spent fuel can be abandoned. Radioactivity released during the recycling of the spent fuel from the hybrid reactor blanket is at least two orders of magnitude lower than during the production of the same number of fissile isotopes after the recycling of the spent fuel from a fast reactor.

  5. Reference mirror hybrid fusion-fission reactor design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, D.J.; Lee, J.D.; Neef, W.S.

    1977-06-08

    The status of the reference mirror hybrid reactor design being performed by LLL and General Atomic is summarized. The reactor parameters have been chosen to minimize the cost of producing fissile fuel for consumption in fission power reactors. The design draws on the experience developed at LLL in previous hybrid reactor conceptual designs and on GA expertise in gas-cooling technology and fission reactor mechanical design. As in the past, we have emphasized the use of existing technology where possible and a minimum extrapolation of technology otherwise. We consider our projections for the plasma physics parameters to be conservative, in that they are well-founded on the experiments in 2XIIB and the interpretation of these experiments.

  6. Proposal for a novel type of small scale aneutronic fusion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruenwald, J.

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this work is to propose a novel scheme for a small scale aneutronic fusion reactor. This new reactor type makes use of the advantages of combining laser driven plasma acceleration and electrostatic confinement fusion. An intense laser beam is used to create a lithium-proton plasma with high density, which is then collimated and focused into the centre of the fusion reaction chamber. The basic concept presented here is based on the 7Li-proton fusion reaction. However, the physical and technological fundamentals may generally as well be applied to 11B-proton fusion. The former fusion reaction path offers higher energy yields while the latter has larger fusion cross sections. Within this paper a technological realisation of such a fusion device, which allows a steady state operation with highly energetic, well collimated ion beam, is presented. It will be demonstrated that the energetic break even can be reached with this device by using a combination of already existing technologies.

  7. Models and analyses for inertial-confinement fusion-reactor studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohachevsky, I.O.

    1981-05-01

    This report describes models and analyses devised at Los Alamos National Laboratory to determine the technical characteristics of different inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor elements required for component integration into a functional unit. We emphasize the generic properties of the different elements rather than specific designs. The topics discussed are general ICF reactor design considerations; reactor cavity phenomena, including the restoration of interpulse ambient conditions; first-wall temperature increases and material losses; reactor neutronics and hydrodynamic blanket response to neutron energy deposition; and analyses of loads and stresses in the reactor vessel walls, including remarks about the generation and propagation of very short wavelength stress waves. A discussion of analytic approaches useful in integrations and optimizations of ICF reactor systems concludes the report.

  8. Fusion-power-core design of a Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor (CRFPR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copenhaver, C.; Schnurr, N. M.; Krakowski, R. A.; Hagenson, R. L.; Mynard, R. C.; Cappiello, C.; Lujan, R. E.; Davidson, J. W.; Chaffee, A. D.; Battat, M. E.

    A conceptual design of a fusion power core (FPC, i.e., plasma chamber, first wall, blanket, shield, coils) based on a Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) has been completed. After a brief statement of rationale and description of the reactor configuraton, the FPC integration is described in terms of power balance, thermal-hydraulics, and mechanical design. The engineering versatility, promise, and problems of this high-power-density approach to fusion are addressed.

  9. Fusion reactor materials: Semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1987-09-01

    This is the second in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities in the following areas: (1) Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance; (2) Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; and (3) Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials program being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. Separate analytics were prepared for the reports in this volume.

  10. The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: overview of titan-2 design; titan-2 fusion-power-core engineering; titan-2 divertor engineering; titan-2 tritium systems; titan-2 safety design and radioactive-waste disposal; and titan-2 maintenance procedures.

  11. Recent contributions to fusion reactor design and technology development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-11-01

    The report contains a collection of 16 recent fusion technology papers on the STARFIRE Project, the study of alternate fusion fuel cycles, a maintainability study, magnet safety, neutral beam power supplies and pulsed superconducting magnets and energy transfer. This collection of papers contains contributions for Argonne National Laboratory, McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company, General Atomic Company, The Ralph M. Parsons Company, the University of Illinois, and the University of Wisconsin. Separate abstracts are presented for each paper. (MOW)

  12. Advanced Fusion Reactors for Space Propulsion and Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, John J.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years the methodology proposed for conversion of light elements into energy via fusion has made steady progress. Scientific studies and engineering efforts in advanced fusion systems designs have introduced some new concepts with unique aspects including consideration of Aneutronic fuels. The plant parameters for harnessing aneutronic fusion appear more exigent than those required for the conventional fusion fuel cycle. However aneutronic fusion propulsion plants for Space deployment will ultimately offer the possibility of enhanced performance from nuclear gain as compared to existing ionic engines as well as providing a clean solution to Planetary Protection considerations and requirements. Proton triggered 11Boron fuel (p- 11B) will produce abundant ion kinetic energy for In-Space vectored thrust. Thus energetic alpha particles "exhaust" momentum can be used directly to produce high ISP thrust and also offer possibility of power conversion into electricity. p- 11B is an advanced fusion plant fuel with well understood reaction kinematics but will require some new conceptual thinking as to the most effective implementation.

  13. Measurements of charged fusion product diffusion in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boivin, R.L.

    1991-12-01

    The single particle confinement of charged fusion products, namely the 1 MeV triton and the 3 MeV proton, has been studied using a detector located near the outer midplane of TFTR. The detector, which measure the flux of escaping particles, is composed of a scintillator (ZnS(Ag)) and a system of collimating apertures, which permit pitch angle, energy and time resolution. It is mounted on a movable probe which can be inserted 25 cm into the vacuum vessel. Measurements indicate a level of losses higher than expected from a first-orbit loss mechanism alone. The primary candidate for explaining the observed anomalous losses is the toroidal field (TF) stochastic ripple diffusion, theoretically discovered by Goldston, White and Boozer. This loss mechanism is expected to be localized near the outer midplane where, at least at high current ({approx gt} 1.0 MA) it would locally dominate over first-orbit losses. Calculations made with a mapping particle orbit code (MAPLOS) show a semi-quantitative agreement with the measurements. The predominant uncertainties in the numerical simulations were found to originate from the modeling of the first wall geometry and also from the assumed plasma current and source profiles. Direct measurements of the diffusion rate were performed by shadowing the detector with a second movable probe used as an obstacle. The diffusion rate was also measured by moving the detector behind the radius of the RF limiters, located on the outer wall. Comparisons of these experimental results with numerical simulations, which include diffusive mechanisms, indicate a quantitative agreement with the TF stochastic ripple diffusion model.

  14. Measurements of charged fusion product diffusion in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boivin, R.L.

    1991-12-01

    The single particle confinement of charged fusion products, namely the 1 MeV triton and the 3 MeV proton, has been studied using a detector located near the outer midplane of TFTR. The detector, which measure the flux of escaping particles, is composed of a scintillator [ZnS(Ag)] and a system of collimating apertures, which permit pitch angle, energy and time resolution. It is mounted on a movable probe which can be inserted 25 cm into the vacuum vessel. Measurements indicate a level of losses higher than expected from a first-orbit loss mechanism alone. The primary candidate for explaining the observed anomalous losses is the toroidal field (TF) stochastic ripple diffusion, theoretically discovered by Goldston, White and Boozer. This loss mechanism is expected to be localized near the outer midplane where, at least at high current ({approx_gt} 1.0 MA) it would locally dominate over first-orbit losses. Calculations made with a mapping particle orbit code (MAPLOS) show a semi-quantitative agreement with the measurements. The predominant uncertainties in the numerical simulations were found to originate from the modeling of the first wall geometry and also from the assumed plasma current and source profiles. Direct measurements of the diffusion rate were performed by shadowing the detector with a second movable probe used as an obstacle. The diffusion rate was also measured by moving the detector behind the radius of the RF limiters, located on the outer wall. Comparisons of these experimental results with numerical simulations, which include diffusive mechanisms, indicate a quantitative agreement with the TF stochastic ripple diffusion model.

  15. The Feasibility of Pellet Re-Fuelling of a Fusion Reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Tinghong; Jørgensen, L. W.; Nielsen, P.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of re-fuelling a fusion reactor by injecting pellets of frozen hydrogen isotopes is reviewed. First a general look is taken of the dominant energy fluxes received by the pellet, the re-fuelling rate required and the relation between pellet size, injection speed and frequency....... Current available theories of pellet ablation are then discussed. For a given penetration depth inside the reactor, the necessary pellet injection speed is examined in terms of the ablation theory adopted and the temperature and density profiles of the reactor plasma. The interaction between the injected...

  16. Plasma Heating and Current Drive for Fusion Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtkamp, Norbert

    2010-02-01

    ITER (in Latin ``the way'') is designed to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy. Fusion is the process by which two light atomic nuclei combine to form a heavier one and thus release energy. In the fusion process two isotopes of hydrogen - deuterium and tritium - fuse together to form a helium atom and a neutron. Thus fusion could provide large scale energy production without greenhouse effects; essentially limitless fuel would be available all over the world. The principal goals of ITER are to generate 500 megawatts of fusion power for periods of 300 to 500 seconds with a fusion power multiplication factor, Q, of at least 10. Q >= 10 (input power 50 MW / output power 500 MW). In a Tokamak the definition of the functionalities and requirements for the Plasma Heating and Current Drive are relevant in the determination of the overall plant efficiency, the operation cost of the plant and the plant availability. This paper summarise these functionalities and requirements in perspective of the systems under construction in ITER. It discusses the further steps necessary to meet those requirements. Approximately one half of the total heating will be provided by two Neutral Beam injection systems at with energy of 1 MeV and a beam power of 16 MW into the plasma. For ITER specific test facility is being build in order to develop and test the Neutral Beam injectors. Remote handling maintenance scheme for the NB systems, critical during the nuclear phase of the project, will be developed. In addition the paper will give an overview over the general status of ITER. )

  17. Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. Final conceptual design report. [Overall cost and scheduling program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-02-01

    The TFTR is the first U.S. magnetic confinement device planned to demonstrate the fusion of D-T at reactor power levels. This report addresses the physics objectives and the engineering goals of the TFTR project. Technical, cost, and schedule aspects of the project are included. (MOW)

  18. Fusion reactor materials: Semiannual progress report for period ending September 30, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1988-03-01

    This is the third in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following technical progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performances; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials program being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

  19. Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for the period ending September 30, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1989-04-01

    This paper discusses the following topics on fusion reactor materials: irradiation, facilities, test matrices, and experimental methods; dosimetry, damage parameters, and activation calculations; materials engineering and design requirements; fundamental mechanical behavior; radiation effects; development of structural alloys; solid breeding materials; and ceramics.

  20. Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for the period ending September 30, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1989-01-01

    This is the seventh in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following technical progress reports: alloy development for irradiation performance, damage analysis and fundamental studies, and special purpose materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials program being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

  1. Fusion Reactor Materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-07-01

    This is the twelfth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; and Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

  2. Review of heat transfer problems associated with magnetically-confined fusion reactor concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, M.A.; Werner, R.W.; Carlson, G.A.; Cornish, D.N.

    1976-04-01

    Conceptual design studies of possible fusion reactor configurations have revealed a host of interesting and sometimes extremely difficult heat transfer problems. The general requirements imposed on the coolant system for heat removal of the thermonuclear power from the reactor are discussed. In particular, the constraints imposed by the fusion plasma, neutronics, structure and magnetic field environment are described with emphasis on those aspects which are unusual or unique to fusion reactors. Then the particular heat transfer characteristics of various possible coolants including lithium, flibe, boiling alkali metals, and helium are discussed in the context of these general fusion reactor requirements. Some specific areas where further experimental and/or theoretical work is necessary are listed for each coolant along with references to the pertinent research already accomplished. Specialized heat transfer problems of the plasma injection and removal systems are also described. Finally, the challenging heat transfer problems associated with the superconducting magnets are reviewed, and once again some of the key unsolved heat transfer problems are enumerated.

  3. Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-04-01

    This is the ninth in series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following technical progress reports: Alloy Development of Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; and Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials program being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

  4. Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1991-07-01

    This is the tenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: alloy development for irradiation performance; damage analysis and fundamental studies; special purpose materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials program being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the test of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

  5. A revaluation of helium/dpa ratios for fast reactor and thermal reactor data in fission-fusion correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garner, F.A.; Greenwood, L.R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Oliver, B.M.

    1996-10-01

    For many years it has been accepted that significant differences exist in the helium/dpa ratios produced in fast reactors and various proposed fusion energy devices. In general, the differences arise from the much larger rate of (n,{alpha}) threshold reactions occurring in fusion devices, reactions which occur for energies {ge} 6 MeV. It now appears, however, that for nickel-containing alloys in fast reactors the difference may not have been as large as was originally anticipated. In stainless steels that have a very long incubation period for swelling, for instance, the average helium concentration over the duration of the transient regime have been demonstrated in an earlier paper to be much larger in the FFTF out-of-core regions than first calculated. The helium/dpa ratios in some experiments conducted near the core edge or just outside of the FFTF core actually increase strongly throughout the irradiation, as {sup 59}Ni slowly forms by transmutation of {sup 58}Ni. This highly exothermic {sup 59}Ni(n,{alpha}) reaction occurs in all fast reactors, but is stronger in the softer spectra of oxide-fueled cores such as FFTF and weaker in the harder spectra of metal-fueled cores such as EBR-II. The formation of {sup 59}Ni also increases strongly in out-of-core unfueled regions where the reactor spectra softens with distance from the core.

  6. Fusion Ash Separation in the Princeton Field-Reversed Configuration Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbate, Joseph; Yeh, Meagan; McGreivy, Nick; Cohen, Samuel

    2016-10-01

    The Princeton Field-Reversed Configuration (PFRC) concept relies on low-neutron production by D-3He fusion to enable small, safe nuclear-fusion reactors to be built, an approach requiring rapid and efficient extraction of fusion ash and energy produced by D-3He fusion reactions. The ash exhaust stream would contain energetic (0.1-1 MeV) protons, T, 3He, and 4He ions and nearly 1e5 cooler (ca. 100 eV) D ions. The T extracted from the reactor would be a valuable fusion product in that it decays into 3He, which could be used as fuel. If the T were not extracted it would be troublesome because of neutron production by the D-T reaction. This paper discusses methods to separate the various species in a PFRC reactor's exhaust stream. First, we discuss the use of curved magnetic fields to separate the energetic from the cool components. Then we discuss exploiting material properties, specifically reflection, sputtering threshold, and permeability, to allow separation of the hydrogen from the helium isotopes. DOE Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  7. Measurement of tritium production rate distribution for a fusion-fission hybrid conceptual reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xin-Hua; GUO Hai-Ping; MOU Yun-Feng; ZHENG Pu; LIU Rong; YANG Xiao-Fei; YANG Jian

    2013-01-01

    A fusion-fission hybrid conceptual reactor is established.It consists of a DT neutron source and a spherical shell of depleted uranium and hydrogen lithium.The tritium production rate (TPR) distribution in the conceptual reactor was measured by DT neutrons using two sets of lithium glass detectors with different thicknesses in the hole in the vertical direction with respect to the D+ beam of the Cockcroft-Walton neutron generator in direct current mode.The measured TPR distribution is compared with the calculated results obtained by the threedimensional Monte Carlo code MCNP5 and the ENDF/B-Ⅵ data file.The discrepancy between the measured and calculated values can be attributed to the neutron data library of the hydrogen lithium lack S(α,β) thermal scattering model,so we show that a special database of low-energy and thermal neutrons should be established in the physics design of fusion-fission hybrid reactors.

  8. Charge exchange reaction by Reggeon exchange and W$^{+}$W$^{-}$-fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Schicker, R

    2014-01-01

    Charge exchange reactions at high energies are examined. The existing cross section data on the Reggeon induced reaction pp $\\rightarrow$ n + $\\Delta^{++}$ taken at the ZGS and ISR accelerators are extrapolated to the energies of the RHIC and LHC colliders. The interest in the charge exchange reaction induced by $W^{\\pm}$-fusion is presented, and the corresponding QCD-background is examined.

  9. Comparative evaluation of remote maintenance schemes for fusion DEMO reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utoh, Hiroyasu, E-mail: uto.hiroyasu@jaea.go.jp; Tobita, Kenji; Someya, Youji; Asakura, Nobuyuki; Sakamoto, Yoshiteru; Hoshino, Kazuo; Nakamura, Makoto

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Various remote maintenance schemes for DEMO were comparatively assessed based on requirements for DEMO remote maintenance. • The banana shape segment transport using all vertical maintenance ports would be more probable DEMO reactor maintenance scheme. • The key engineering issues are in-vessel transferring mechanism of segment, pipe connection and conducting shell design for plasma vertical stability. - Abstract: Maintenance schemes are one of the critical issues in DEMO design, significantly affecting the configuration of in-vessel components, the size of toroidal field (TF) coil, the arrangement of poloidal field (PF) coils, reactor building, hot cell and so forth. Therefore, the maintenance schemes should satisfy many design requirements and criteria to assure reliable and safe plant operation and to attain reasonable plant availability. The plant availability depends on reliability of remote maintenance scheme, inspection of pipe connection and plasma operation. In this paper, various remote maintenance schemes for DEMO were comparatively assessed based on requirements for DEMO remote maintenance. From the view points of the reliability of inspection on hot cell, TF coil size, stored energy of PF coil and portability of segment, the banana shape segment transport using all vertical maintenance ports would be more probable DEMO reactor maintenance scheme, and it has key engineering issues such as in-vessel transferring mechanism of segment, pipe connection and conducting shell design for plasma vertical stability.

  10. Tritium issues to be solved for establishment of a fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanabe, Tetsuo, E-mail: tanabe@nucl.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Science, Kyushu University (Japan)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overview of Japanese tritium researches. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Introduction of necessary works for establishment of tritium safety. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tritium researches for burning plasma. - Abstract: In order to establish a D-T fusion reactor as an energy source, economical conversion of fusion energy to electricity and/or heat, attaining enough margins in tritium breeding, and insuring tritium safety must be simultaneously achieved. Scientists and researchers working on Tritium in Japan are now tackling with T related problems. Their research subjects can be categorized into two, i.e. researches on 'Science and technology' to establish safe and economic Tritium fuel cycle for fusion reactors and 'Tritium safety'. Many researchers from various universities, and institutes such as NIFS, JAEA and IEA (Inst. Environmental Science) in Japan are involved in various research programs. In this report, after brief introduction on Tritium related researches in Japan, important T issues to be solved for establishment of a fusion reactor will be summarized considering the handling of large amount of tritium, i.e. fuelling, D-T burning, T inventory, exhausting, refinement, confinement, permeation, leakage, contamination, regulation and tritium accountancy.

  11. Building on knowledge base of sodium cooled fast spectrum reactors to develop materials technology for fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Baldev; Rao, K. Bhanu Sankara

    2009-04-01

    The alloys 316L(N) and Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel are the major structural materials for fabrication of structural components in sodium cooled fast reactors (SFRs). Various factors influencing the mechanical behaviour of these alloys and different modes of deformation and failure in SFR systems, their analysis and the simulated tests performed on components for assessment of structural integrity and the applicability of RCC-MR code for the design and validation of components are highlighted. The procedures followed for optimal design of die and punch for the near net shape forming of petals of main vessel of 500 MWe prototype fast breeder reactor (PFBR); the safe temperature and strain rate domains established using dynamic materials model for forming of 316L(N) and 9Cr-1Mo steels components by various industrial processes are illustrated. Weldability problems associated with 316L(N) and Mo. 9Cr-1Mo are briefly discussed. The utilization of artificial neural network models for prediction of creep rupture life and delta-ferrite in austenitic stainless steel welds is described. The usage of non-destructive examination techniques in characterization of deformation, fracture and various microstructural features in SFR materials is briefly discussed. Most of the experience gained on SFR systems could be utilized in developing science and technology for fusion reactors. Summary of the current status of knowledge on various aspects of fission and fusion systems with emphasis on cross fertilization of research is presented.

  12. A Spherical Torus Nuclear Fusion Reactor Space Propulsion Vehicle Concept for Fast Interplanetary Travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Craig H.; Borowski, Stanley K.; Dudzinski, Leonard A.; Juhasz, Albert J.

    1998-01-01

    A conceptual vehicle design enabling fast outer solar system travel was produced predicated on a small aspect ratio spherical torus nuclear fusion reactor. Initial requirements were for a human mission to Saturn with a greater than 5% payload mass fraction and a one way trip time of less than one year. Analysis revealed that the vehicle could deliver a 108 mt crew habitat payload to Saturn rendezvous in 235 days, with an initial mass in low Earth orbit of 2,941 mt. Engineering conceptual design, analysis, and assessment was performed on all ma or systems including payload, central truss, nuclear reactor (including divertor and fuel injector), power conversion (including turbine, compressor, alternator, radiator, recuperator, and conditioning), magnetic nozzle, neutral beam injector, tankage, start/re-start reactor and battery, refrigeration, communications, reaction control, and in-space operations. Detailed assessment was done on reactor operations, including plasma characteristics, power balance, power utilization, and component design.

  13. A spherical torus nuclear fusion reactor space propulsion vehicle concept for fast interplanetary travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Craig H.; Borowski, Stanley K.; Dudzinski, Leonard A.; Juhasz, Albert J.

    1999-01-01

    A conceptual vehicle design enabling fast outer solar system travel was produced predicated on a small aspect ratio spherical torus nuclear fusion reactor. Initial requirements were for a human mission to Saturn with a>5% payload mass fraction and a one way trip time of less than one year. Analysis revealed that the vehicle could deliver a 108 mt crew habitat payload to Saturn rendezvous in 235 days, with an initial mass in low Earth orbit of 2,941 mt. Engineering conceptual design, analysis, and assessment was performed on all major systems including payload, central truss, nuclear reactor (including diverter and fuel injector), power conversion (including turbine, compressor, alternator, radiator, recuperator, and conditioning), magnetic nozzle, neutral beam injector, tankage, start/re-start reactor and battery, refrigeration, communications, reaction control, and in-space operations. Detailed assessment was done on reactor operations, including plasma characteristics, power balance, and component design.

  14. Overview of the Lockheed Martin Compact Fusion Reactor (CFR) T4B Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    The Lockheed Martin Compact Fusion Reactor (CFR) Program endeavors to quickly develop a compact fusion power plant with favorable commercial economics and military utility. The CFR uses a diamagnetic, high beta, magnetically encapsulated, linear ring cusp plasma confinement scheme. The goal of the T4B experiment is to demonstrate a suitable plasma target for heating experiments and to characterize the behavior of plasma sources in the CFR configuration. The design of the T4B experiment will be presented, including discussion of predicted behavior, plasma sources, heating mechanisms, diagnostics suite and relevant numerical modeling. ©2016 Lockheed Martin Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Attachment system for helium-cooled blanket of RF DEMO fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leshukov, A. E-mail: leshu@entek.ru; Blinov, Y.; Kovalenko, V.; Shatalov, G.; Strebkov, Y.; Strizhov, A

    2002-11-01

    The development of DEMO thermonuclear reactor is a part of Russian national program on the fusion process mastering. The DEMO-S (stationary thermonuclear reactor) should be the logic continuation of the ITER-type projects (pulse thermonuclear reactors) and the prototype for commercial power plants. DEMO reactor layout suggests to use the segmented blanket with mounting/dismounting procedure through the vacuum vessel vertical ports. Taking into account this layout the blanket attachment system has been developed and the present paper is devoted to this subject. The considered attachment system includes the lower and upper toroidal support assemblies which connect all the blanket segments in the enclosed ring. In it's turn the lower support assemblies attached to the vacuum vessel through the system of hinged support pillars. The heights of support pillars for inboard and outboard blankets are selected so that to indemnify the blanket massif thermal expansions in vertical and radial directions. The support pillars have been calculated on strength taking into account the electromagnetic loads from the plasma disruptions and blanket mass. The selection of high-strength chromium steel as a structural material for the support pillars could be considered as the results of strength analysis. The conclusions on the possibility to apply this attachment system for fusion reactor blanket and the critical issues are contained in this paper too.

  16. Fusion reactor theory and conceptual design. (Latest citations from the INSPEC: Information Services for the Physics and Engineering Communities database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning theoretical and conceptual aspects of fusion reactor physics and designs. A variety of fusion reactors is discussed, including Tokamak, experimental, commercial, tandem mirror, and superconducting magnetic. Topics also include fusion reactor materials, Tokamak devices, blanket design, divertors, fusion plasma production, superconducting magnets, and cryogenic systems. (Contains a minimum of 159 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  17. Status of the irradiation test vehicle for testing fusion materials in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, H.; Gomes, I.C.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Palmer, A.J.; Ingram, F.W. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wiffen, F.W. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States). Office of Fusion Energy

    1998-09-01

    The design of the irradiation test vehicle (ITV) for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has been completed. The main application for the ITV is irradiation testing of candidate fusion structural materials, including vanadium-base alloys, silicon carbide composites, and low-activation steels. Construction of the vehicle is underway at the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technology Company (LMITCO). Dummy test trains are being built for system checkout and fine-tuning. Reactor insertion of the ITV with the dummy test trains is scheduled for fall 1998. Barring unexpected difficulties, the ITV will be available for experiments in early 1999.

  18. Membrane pumping technology for helium and hydrogen isotope separation in the fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pistunovich, V.I. [Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation). NFI RRC; Pigarov, A.Yu. [Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation). NFI RRC; Busnyuk, A.O. [Bonch-Bruyevich University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Livshits, A.I. [Bonch-Bruyevich University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Notkin, M.E. [Bonch-Bruyevich University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Samartsev, A.A. [Bonch-Bruyevich University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Borisenko, K.L. [Efremov Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Darmogray, V.V. [Efremov Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Ershov, B.D. [Efremov Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Filippova, L.V. [Efremov Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Mudugin, B.G. [Efremov Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Odintsov, V.N. [Efremov Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Saksagansky, G.L. [Efremov Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Serebrennikov, D.V. [Efremov Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1995-03-01

    A gas pumping system for ITER, improved by implementation of superpermeable membranes for selective hydrogen isotope exhaust, is considered. A study of the pumping capability of a niobium membrane for a hydrogen-helium mixture has been performed.Monte Carlo simulations of gas behaviour for the experimental facility and fusion reactor have been done.The scheme of the ITER pumping system with the membranes and membrane pumping technology was considered. The conceptual study the membrane pump for the ITER was done. This work gives good prospects for the membrane pumping use in ITER to reduce the total inventory of tritium necessary for reactor operation. (orig.).

  19. Disassembly of the fusion-1 capsule after irradiation in the BOR-60 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Kazakov, V.A.; Chakin, V.P. [and others

    1997-04-01

    A U.S./Russia (RF) collaborative irradiation experiment, Fusion-1, was completed in June 1996 after reaching a peak exposure of {approx}17 dpa in the BOR-60 fast reactor at the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (RIAR) in Russia. The specimens were vanadium alloys, mainly of recent heats from both countries. In this reporting period, the capsule was disassembled at the RIAR hot cells and all test specimens were successfully retrieved. For the disassembly, an innovative method of using a heated diffusion oil to melt and separate the lithium bond from the test specimens was adopted. This method proved highly successful.

  20. Mechanical design aspects of a tandem mirror fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neef, W.S. Jr.

    1977-04-25

    Two ''plugs'' of dense plasma at either end of a central solenoid cell form the basis of a new mirror fusion power plant concept. A central cell blanket design is presented. Modules on crawler tracks serviced by remote welding and handling machines of very simple design are important features resulting from linear axisymmetric geometry. Three blanket designs are considered and the best one presented in some detail. It has lithium as the breeder material, helium cooled. ''Plug'' magnet field strengths must be high. A novel magnet is presented to satisfy the physics of the end plugs. Beam sources at 1,200 KV present special problems. Methods of voltage standoff, arc damage control, and neutralization are discussed. New secondary containment ideas are presented to allow removable roof sections of balanced design.

  1. Ion cyclotron and lower hybrid arrays applicable to current drive in fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosia, G.; Helou, W.; Goniche, M.; Hillaret, J.; Ragona, R.

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents concepts for Ion Cyclotron and Lower Hybrid Current Drive arrays applicable to fusion reactors and based on periodically loaded line power division. It is shown that, in large arrays, such as the ones proposed for fusion reactor applications, these schemes can offer, in principle, a number of practical advantages, compared with currently adopted ones, such as in-blanket operation at significantly reduced power density, lay out suitable for water cooling, single ended or balanced power feed, simple and load independent impedance matching In addition, a remote and accurate real time measurement of the complex impedance of all array elements as well as detection, location, and measurement of the complex admittance of a single arc occurring anywhere in the structure is possible.

  2. New Revelation of Lightning Ball Observation and Proposal for a Nuclear Reactor Fusion Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Tar, Domokos

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the author brings further details regarding his Lightning Ball observation that were not mentioned in the first one (Ref.1-2). Additionally, he goes more into detail as the three forces that are necessary to allow the residual crescent form the hydrodynamic vortex ring to shrink into a sphere.Further topics are the similarities and analogies between the Lightning Ball formation's theory and the presently undertaken Tokamak-Stellarator-Spheromak fusion reactor experiments. A new theory and its experimental realisation are proposed as to make the shrinking of the hot plasma of reactors into a ball possible by means of the so called long range electromagnetic forces. In this way,the fusion ignition temperature could possibly atteined.

  3. Status of R&D Activities on Materials for Fusion Power Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baluc, N.; Abe, K.; Boutard, J. L.; Chernov, V. M.; Diegele, E.; Jitsukawa, S.; Kimura, Akihiko; Klueh, R. L.; Kohyama, Akira; Kurtz, Richard J.; Lasser, R.; Matsui, H.; Moslang, A.; Muroga, T.; Odette, George R.; Tran, M. Q.; van der Schaaf, B.; Wu, Y.; Yu, J.; Zinkle, Steven J.

    2007-09-19

    Current R&D activities on materials for fusion power reactors are mainly focused on plasma facing, structural and tritium breeding materials for plasma facing (first wall, divertor) and breeding blanket components. Most of these activities are being performed in Europe, Japan, P.R. China, Russia and the USA. They relate to development of new high temperature, radiation resistant materials, development of coatings that shall act as erosion, corrosion, permeation or electrical/MHD barriers, characterization of the whole candidate materials in terms of mechanical and physical properties, assessment of irradiation effects, compatibility experiments, development of reliable joints, and development and/or validation of design rules. Priorities defined worldwide in the field of materials for fusion power reactors are summarized, as well as the main achievements obtained during the last few years and the near-term perspectives in the different investigation areas.

  4. Code development incorporating environmental, safety, and economic aspects of fusion reactors (FY 89--91). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, S.K.; Fowler, T.K.; Holdren, J.P. [eds.

    1991-11-01

    This report discusses the following aspects of Fusion reactors.: Activation Analysis; Tritium Inventory; Environmental and Safety Indices and Their Graphical Representation; Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) and Decision Analysis; Plasma Burn Control -- Application to ITER; and Other Applications.

  5. COMPARISON OF COOLING SCHEMES FOR HIGH HEAT FLUX COMPONENTS COOLING IN FUSION REACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phani Kumar Domalapally

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Some components of the fusion reactor receives high heat fluxes either during the startup and shutdown or during the operation of the machine. This paper analyzes different ways of enhancing heat transfer using helium and water for cooling of these high heat flux components and then conclusions are drawn to decide the best choice of coolant, for usage in near and long term applications.

  6. High energy resolution characteristics on 14MeV neutron spectrometer for fusion experimental reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iguchi, Tetsuo [Tokyo Univ., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab.; Takada, Eiji; Nakazawa, Masaharu

    1996-10-01

    A 14MeV neutron spectrometer suitable for an ITER-like fusion experimental reactor is now under development on the basis of a recoil proton counter telescope principle in oblique scattering geometry. To verify its high energy resolution characteristics, preliminary experiments are made for a prototypical detector system. The comparison results show reasonably good agreement and demonstrate the possibility of energy resolution of 2.5% in full width at half maximum for 14MeV neutron spectrometry. (author)

  7. Development of whole energy absorption spectrometer for decay heat measurement on fusion reactor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekawa, Fujio; Ikeda, Yujiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    To measure decay heat on fusion reactor materials irradiated by D-T neutrons, a Whole Energy Absorption Spectrometer (WEAS) consisting of a pair of large BGO (bismuth-germanate) scintillators was developed. Feasibility of decay heat measurement with WEAS for various materials and for a wide range of half-lives (seconds - years) was demonstrated by experiments at FNS. Features of WEAS, such as high sensitivity, radioactivity identification, and reasonably low experimental uncertainty of {approx} 10 %, were found. (author)

  8. Resistive sensor and electromagnetic actuator for feedback stabilization of liquid metal walls in fusion reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Mirhoseini, S H M

    2016-01-01

    Liquid metal walls in fusion reactors will be subject to instabilities, turbulence, induced currents, error fields and temperature gradients that will make them locally bulge, thus entering in contact with the plasma, or deplete, hence exposing the underlying solid substrate. To prevent this, research has begun to actively stabilize static or flowing liquid metal layers by locally applying forces in feedback with thickness measurements. Here we present resistive sensors of liquid metal thickness and demonstrate jxB actuators, to locally control it.

  9. Direct extrapolation of radial profile data to a self-ignited fusion reactor based on the gyro-Bohm model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazawa, J., E-mail: miyazawa@LHD.nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Goto, T.; Morisaki, T.; Goto, M.; Sakamoto, R.; Motojima, G.; Peterson, B.J.; Suzuki, C.; Ida, K.; Yamada, H.; Sagara, A. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The DPE method predicts temperature and density profiles in a fusion reactor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This method is based on the gyro-Bohm type parameter dependence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The size of fusion reactor is determined to fulfill the power balance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The reactor size is proportional to a factor and -4/3 power of the magnetic field. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This factor can be a measure of plasma performance like the fusion triple product. - Abstract: A new method named direct profile extrapolation (DPE) has been developed to estimate the radial profiles of temperature and density in a fusion reactor. This method directly extrapolates the radial profiles observed in present experiments to the fusion reactor condition assuming gyro-Bohm type parameter dependence. The magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium that fits the experimental profile data is used to determine the plasma volume. Four enhancement factors for the magnetic field strength, the density, the plasma beta, and the energy confinement are assumed. Then, the plasma size is determined so as to fulfill the power balance in the reactor plasma. The plasma performance can be measured by an index, C{sub exp}, introduced in the DPE method. The minimum magnetic stored energy of the fusion reactor to achieve self-ignition is shown to be proportional to the cube of C{sub exp} and inversely proportional to the square of magnetic field strength. Using this method, the design window of a self-ignited fusion reactor that can be extrapolated from recent experimental results in the Large Helical Device (LHD) is considered. Also discussed is how large an enhancement is needed for the LHD experiment to ensure the helical reactor design of FFHR2m2.

  10. Avalanche boron fusion by laser picosecond block ignition with magnetic trapping for clean and economic reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Hora, H; Eliezer, S; Lalousis, N Nissim P; Giuffrida, L; Margarone, D; Picciotto, A; Miley, G H; Moustaizis, S; Martinez-Val, J -M; Barty, C P J; Kirchhoff, G J

    2016-01-01

    After the very long consideration of the ideal energy source by fusion of the protons of light hydrogen with the boron isotope 11 (boron fusion HB11) the very first two independent measurements of very high reaction gains by lasers basically opens a fundamental breakthrough. The non-thermal plasma block ignition with extremely high power laser pulses above petawatt of picosecond duration in combination with up to ten kilotesla magnetic fields for trapping has to be combined to use the measured high gains as proof of an avalanche reaction for an environmentally clean, low cost and lasting energy source as potential option against global warming. The unique HB11 avalanche reaction is are now based on elastic collisions of helium nuclei (alpha particles) limited only to a reactor for controlled fusion energy during a very short time within a very small volume.

  11. Model for collisional fast ion diffusion into Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor loss cone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C.S. [New York Univ., NY (United States). Courant Inst. of Mathematical Sciences]|[Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Zweben, S.J.; Schivell, J.; Budny, R.; Scott, S. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.

    1994-08-01

    An analytic model is developed to estimate the classical pitch angle scattering loss of energetic fusion product ions into prompt loss orbits in a tokamak geometry. The result is applied to alpha particles produced by deutrium-tritium fusion reactions in a plasma condition relevant to Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). A poloidal angular distribution of collisional fast ion loss at the first wall is obtained and the numerical result from the TRANSP code is discussed. The present model includes the effect that the prompt loss boundary moves away from the slowing-down path due to reduction in banana thickness, which enables us to understand, for the first time. the dependence of the collisional loss rate on Z{sub eff}.

  12. The measurement of neutron and neutron induced photon spectra in fusion reactor related assemblies

    CERN Document Server

    Unholzer, S; Klein, H; Seidel, K

    2002-01-01

    The spectral neutron and photon fluence (or flux) measured outside and inside of assemblies related to fusion reactor constructions are basic quantities of fusion neutronics. The comparison of measured spectra with the results of MCNP neutron and photon transport calculations allows a crucial test of evaluated nuclear data as generally used in fusion applications to be carried out. The experiments concern mixed neutron/photon fields with about the same intensity of the two components. An NE-213 scintillation spectrometer, well described by response matrices for both neutrons and photons, is used as proton-recoil and Compton spectrometer. The experiments described here in more detail address the background problematic of two applications, an iron benchmark experiment with an ns-pulsed neutron source and a deep penetration mock-up experiment for the investigation of the ITER in-board shield system. The measured spectral neutron and photon fluences are compared with spectra calculated with the MCNP code on the b...

  13. Physical and mechanical characteristics and chemical compatibility of aluminum nitride insulator coatings for fusion reactor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Rink, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.

    1996-04-01

    The blanket system is one of the most important components in a fusion reactor because it has a major impact on both the economics and safety of fusion energy. The primary functions of the blanket in a deuterium/tritium-fueled fusion reactor are to convert the fusion energy into sensible heat and to breed tritium for the fuel cycle. The Blanket Comparison and Selection Study, conducted earlier, described the overall comparative performance of various concepts, including liquid metal, molten salt, water, and helium. Based on the requirements for an electrically insulating coating on the first-wall structural material to minimize the MHD pressure drop during the flow of liquid metal in a magnetic field, AlN was selected as a candidate coating material for the Li self-cooled blanket concept. This report discusses the results from an ongoing study of physical and mechanical characteristics and chemical compatibility of AlN electrical insulator coatings in a liquid Li environment. Details are presented on the AlN coating fabrication methods, and experimental data are reported for microstructures, chemistry of coatings, pretreatment of substrate, heat treatment of coatings, hardness data for coatings, coating/lithium interactions, and electrical resistance before and after exposure to lithium. Thermodynamic calculations are presented to establish regions of stability for AlN coatings in an Li environment as a function of O concentration and temperature, which can aid in-situ development of AlN coatings in Li.

  14. Calculation of Radioactivity and Dose Rate of Activated Corrosion Products in Water-Cooled Fusion Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyu Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In water-cooled reactor, the dominant radioactive source term under normal operation is activated corrosion products (ACPs, which have an important impact on reactor inspection and maintenance. A three-node transport model of ACPs was introduced into the new version of ACPs source term code CATE in this paper, which makes CATE capable of theoretically simulating the variation and the distribution of ACPs in a water-cooled reactor and suitable for more operating conditions. For code testing, MIT PWR coolant chemistry loop was simulated, and the calculation results from CATE are close to the experimental results from MIT, which means CATE is available and credible on ACPs analysis of water-cooled reactor. Then ACPs in the blanket cooling loop of water-cooled fusion reactor ITER under construction were analyzed using CATE and the results showed that the major contributors are the short-life nuclides, especially Mn-56. At last a point kernel integration code ARShield was coupled with CATE, and the dose rate around ITER blanket cooling loop was calculated. Results showed that after shutting down the reactor only for 8 days, the dose rate decreased nearly one order of magnitude, which was caused by the rapid decay of the short-life ACPs.

  15. Compatibility of structural materials with fusion reactor coolant and breeder fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeVan, J.H.

    1979-01-01

    Fusion reactors are characterized by a lithium-containing blanket, a heat transfer medium that is integral with the blanket and first wall, and a heat engine that couples to the heat transfer medium. A variety of lithium-containing substances have been identified as potential blanket materials, including molten lithium metal, molten LiF--BeF/sub 2/, Pb--Li alloys, and solid ceramic compounds such as Li/sub 2/O. Potential heat transfer media include liquid lithium, liquid sodium, molten nitrates, water, and helium. Each of these coolants and blankets requires a particular set of chemical and mechanical properties with respect to the associated reactor and heat engine structural materials. This paper discusses the materials factors that underlie the selection of workable combinations of blankets and coolants. It also addresses the materials compatibility problems generic to those blanket-coolant combinations currently being considered in reactor design studies.

  16. What we miss in order to be able to design and build a commercially viable fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreani, R. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, RM (Italy). Dipt. Energia

    1999-07-01

    The paper considers in a critical way the different areas in which work is required to provide sufficient information in view of designing a reliable and attractive fusion reactor. [Italian] Il rapporto considera in modo critico le differenti aree nelle quali si richiede ulteriore lavoro per fornire informazioni al fine di progettare un reattore a fusione affidabile ed economicamente competitivo.

  17. Russian design studies of the DEMO-S demonstration fusion power reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolbasov, B.; Belyakov, V.; Borisov, A.; Kirillov, I.; Shatalov, G.; Sokolov, Yu.; Strebkov, Yu.; Vasiliev, N. [Kurchatov Institut (Russian Federation)

    2007-07-01

    Different concepts for a fusion power plant have been studied in Russia since 1975. Researchers have considered power facilities using tokamaks, stellarators and inertial fusion devices. Tokamak reactors appear the most promising at this stage of science development. Application of fusion reactors for generation of electricity, production of domestic and industrial heat, hydrogen production, transmutation of non-fissionable isotopes into fissionable ones, water desalination, and burning out of minor actinides was considered. Conceptual design studies of a tokamak-based demonstration fusion reactor have been carried out since 1991. The preferred concept was selected, which was a steady-state operating tokamak with superconducting magnets, one-null divertor configuration and a high contribution of bootstrap current into plasma current drive. The general reactor layout was determined. Plasma characteristics were optimized. Two most attractive blanket concepts were analyzed: (1) a He-cooled ceramic (Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}) design for tritium breeding, using ferritic steel as structural material, and (2) a blanket using liquid Li as tritium breeding material and coolant and a V-Cr-Ti alloy as structural material. The studies were supported by neutronic, heat-hydraulic and mechanical calculations. A conventional type of water or Li cooled divertor targets with maximum heat load of {proportional_to}10 MW/m{sup 2} was chosen. Blankets of both types require Be as a neutron multiplier and have to be replaced after the integral fusion neutron load on the first wall reaches 10 MW/m{sup 2}. Heat to electricity conversion schemes enable operation with net efficiency of 34% for the He-coolant design and 40% for the liquid Li one. Aspects of radioactive waste management and scarce materials refabrication are considered. In particular, a radiochemical extraction technology for separation of V alloy components and their purification from activation products after reactor

  18. Study of thorium-uranium based molten salt blanket in a fusion-fission hybrid reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Jing, E-mail: zhao_jing@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [INET, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Yang Yongwei; Zhou Zhiwei [INET, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A molten salt blanket has been designed for the fusion-fission hybrid reactor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The use of Thorium in the molten salt fuels has been studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The molten salt was consisted of F-Li-Be and with the thickness of 40 cm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The concentration of {sup 6}Li was chosen to be the natural enrichment ratio. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The result shows that TBR is greater than 1, M is about 15-16. - Abstract: Not only solid fuels, but also liquid fuels can be used for the fusion-fission symbiotic reactor blanket. The operational record of the molten salt reactor with F-Li-Be was very successful, so the F-Li-Be blanket was chosen for research. The molten salt has several features which are suited for the fusion-fission applications. The fuel material uranium and thorium were dissolved in the F-Li-Be molten salt. A combined program, COUPLE, was used for neutronics analysis of the molten salt blanket. Several cases have been calculated and compared. Not only the influence of the different fuels have been studied, but also the thickness of the molten salt, and the concentration of the {sup 6}Li in the molten salt. Preliminary studies indicate that when thorium-uranium-plutonium fuels were added into a F-Li-Be molten salt blanket and with a component of 71% LiF-2% BeF{sub 2}-13.5% ThF{sub 4}-8.5% UF{sub 4}-5% PuF{sub 3}, and also with the molten salt thickness of 40 cm and natural concentration of {sup 6}Li, the appropriate blanket energy multiplication factor and TBR can be obtained. The result shows that thorium-uranium molten salt can be used in the blanket of a fusion-fission symbiotic reactor. The research on the molten salt blanket must be valuable for the design of fusion-fission symbiotic reactor.

  19. The TITAN Reversed-Field Pinch fusion reactor study: Scoping phase report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    The TITAN research program is a multi-institutional effort to determine the potential of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) magnetic fusion concept as a compact, high-power-density, and ''attractive'' fusion energy system from economic (cost of electricity, COE), environmental, and operational viewpoints. In particular, a high neutron wall loading design (18 MW/m/sup 2/) has been chosen as the reference case in order to quantify the issue of engineering practicality, to determine the physics requirements and plasma operating mode, to assess significant benefits of compact systems, and to illuminate the main drawbacks. The program has been divided into two phases, each roughly one year in length: the Scoping Phase and the Design Phase. During the scoping phase, the TITAN design team has defined the parameter space for a high mass power density (MPD) RFP reactor, and explored a variety of approaches to the design of major subsystems. Two major design approaches consistent with high MPD and low COE, the lithium-vanadium blanket design and aqueous loop-in-pool design, have been selected for more detailed engineering evaluation in the design phase. The program has retained a balance in its approach to investigating high MPD systems. On the one hand, parametric investigations of both subsystems and overall system performance are carried out. On the other hand, more detailed analysis and engineering design and integration are performed, appropriate to determining the technical feasibility of the high MPD approach to RFP fusion reactors. This report describes the work of the scoping phase activities of the TITAN program. A synopsis of the principal technical findings and a brief description of the TITAN multiple-design approach is given. The individual chapters on Plasma Physics and Engineering, Parameter Systems Studies, Divertor, Reactor Engineering, and Fusion Power Core Engineering have been cataloged separately.

  20. A Fusion Reactor Design with a Liquid First Wall and Divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nygren, R E; Rognlien, T D; Rensink, M E; Smolentsev, S S; Youssef, M E; Sawan, M Z; Merrill, B J; Eberle, C; Fogarty, P J; Nelson, B E; Sze, D K; Majeski, R

    2003-11-13

    Within the magnetic fusion energy program in the US, a program called APEX is investigating the use of free flowing liquid surfaces to form the inner surface of the chamber around the plasma. As part of this work, the APEX Team has investigated several possible design implementations and developed a specific engineering concept for a fusion reactor with liquid walls. Our approach has been to utilize an already established design for a future fusion reactor, the ARIES-RS, for the basic chamber geometry and magnetic configuration and to replace the chamber technology in this design with liquid wall technology for a first wall and divertor and a blanket with adequate tritium breeding. This paper gives an overview of one design with a molten salt (a mixture of lithium, beryllium and sodium fluorides) forming the liquid surfaces and a ferritic steel for the structural material of the blanket. The design point is a reactor with 3840MW of fusion power of which 767MW is in the form of energetic particles (alpha power) and 3073MW is in the form of neutrons. The alpha plus auxiliary power total 909MW of which 430MW is radiated from the core mostly onto the first wall and the balance flows into the edge plasma and is distributed between the first wall and the divertor. In pursuing the application of liquid surfaces in APEX, the team has developed analytical tools that are significant achievements themselves and also pursued experiments on flowing liquids. This work is covered elsewhere, but the paper will also note several such areas to indicate the supporting science behind the design presented. Significant new work in modeling the plasma edge to understand the interaction of the plasma with the liquid walls is one example. Another is the incorporation of magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) effects in fluid modeling and heat transfer.

  1. Plasma-material Interactions in Current Tokamaks and their Implications for Next-step Fusion Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Federici, G.; Skinner, C.H.; Brooks, J.N.; Coad, J.P.; Grisolia, C. [and others

    2001-01-10

    The major increase in discharge duration and plasma energy in a next-step DT [deuterium-tritium] fusion reactor will give rise to important plasma-material effects that will critically influence its operation, safety, and performance. Erosion will increase to a scale of several centimeters from being barely measurable at a micron scale in today's tokamaks. Tritium co-deposited with carbon will strongly affect the operation of machines with carbon plasma-facing components. Controlling plasma wall interactions is critical to achieving high performance in present-day tokamaks and this is likely to continue to be the case in the approach to practical fusion reactors. Recognition of the important consequences of these phenomena has stimulated an internationally coordinated effort in the field of plasma-surface interactions supporting the Engineering Design Activities of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project and significant progress has been made in better under standing these issues. This paper reviews the underlying physical processes and the existing experimental database of plasma-material interactions both in tokamaks and laboratory simulation facilities for conditions of direct relevance to next-step fusion reactors. Two main topical groups of interactions are considered: (i) erosion/redeposition from plasma sputtering and disruptions, including dust and flake generation, (ii) tritium retention and removal. The use of modeling tools to interpret the experimental results and make projections for conditions expected in future devices is explained. Outstanding technical issues and specific recommendations on potential R and D [Research and Development] avenues for their resolution are presented.

  2. A preliminary study of a D-T tokamak fusion reactor with advanced blanket using compact fusion advanced Brayton (CFAB) cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, K.; Ohnishi, M.; Yamamoto, Y. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    Key issues on a D-T Tokamak fusion reactor with advanced blanket concept using CFAB (Compact Fusion Advanced Brayton) cycle are presented. Although the previously proposed and studied compact fusion advanced Rankine cycle using mercury liquid metal has shown, in general, excellent performance characteristics in extracting energy and electricity with high efficiency by the {open_quotes}in-situ{close_quotes} nonequilibrium MHD disk generator, and in enhancing safety potential, there was a fear about uses of hazardous mercury as primary coolant as well as its limited natural resources. To overcome these disadvantages while retaining the advantage features of a ultra-high temperature coolant inherent in the synchrotron energy-enhanced D-T tokamak reactor, a compact fusion advanced Brayton cycle using helium was reexamined which was once considered relatively not superior in the CFAR study, at the expense of high, but acceptable circulation power, lower heat transfer characteristics, and probably of a little bit reduced safety.

  3. Elastic, excitation, ionization and charge transfer cross sections of current interest in fusion energy research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, D.R.; Krstic, P.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. TN (United States). Physics Div.

    1997-01-01

    Due to the present interest in modeling and diagnosing the edge and divertor plasma regions in magnetically confined fusion devices, we have sought to provide new calculations regarding the elastic, excitation, ionization, and charge transfer cross sections in collisions among relevant ions, neutrals, and isotopes in the low-to intermediate-energy regime. We summarize here some of our recent work. (author)

  4. Application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes as design tools for inertial confinement fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abanades, A; MartInez-Val, J M [Instituto de Fusion Nuclear, c/Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, 28006 - Madrid (Spain); Sordo, F; Lafuente, A [Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales-UPM, c/Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, 28006 - Madrid (Spain); Munoz, J [Fundacion para el Fomento de la Innovacion Industrial, c/Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, 28006 - Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: abanades@etsii.upm.es

    2008-05-15

    The engineering design of the new innovative fusion reactors constitutes a clear challenge for the need to overcome several new technological edges in every engineering aspect. The great amount of thermal energy delivered into any inertial fusion chamber and the large temperatures and thermal gradients that are envisaged, joined to the even more demanding aspects related to neutron activation, Tritium breeding and the characteristics that are imposed to the coolant that could be used for that purpose, converged into material selection in which liquid metal seems to be one of the most interesting options. The safety assessment of such Fusion reactors should be clearly provided to fulfill the requirements asked by the Regulatory Bodies in a near-term future, when licensing will be a must. Therefore the availability of well proven and validated engineering design tools is a must. In this context, CFD is one of the tools that are potentially needed for thermal-hydraulic design of such complex machines. The state-of-the-art of CFD technologies will be shown, in particular in relation with liquid metals.

  5. Application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes as design tools for inertial confinement fusion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abánades, A.; Sordo, F.; Lafuente, A.; Muñoz, J.; Martínez-Val, J. M.

    2008-05-01

    The engineering design of the new innovative fusion reactors constitutes a clear challenge for the need to overcome several new technological edges in every engineering aspect. The great amount of thermal energy delivered into any inertial fusion chamber and the large temperatures and thermal gradients that are envisaged, joined to the even more demanding aspects related to neutron activation, Tritium breeding and the characteristics that are imposed to the coolant that could be used for that purpose, converged into material selection in which liquid metal seems to be one of the most interesting options. The safety assessment of such Fusion reactors should be clearly provided to fulfill the requirements asked by the Regulatory Bodies in a near-term future, when licensing will be a must. Therefore the availability of well proven and validated engineering design tools is a must. In this context, CFD is one of the tools that are potentially needed for thermal-hydraulic design of such complex machines. The state-of-the-art of CFD technologies will be shown, in particular in relation with liquid metals.

  6. X-rays from Proton Bremsstrahlung: Evidence from Fusion Reactors and Its Implication in Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Nie

    2009-01-01

    In a fusion reactor, a proton and a neutron generated in previous reactions may again fuse with each other. Or they can in turn fuse with or be captured by an un-reacted deuteron. The average center-of-mass (COM) energy for such reaction is around 10 keV in a typical fusion reactor, but could be as low as 1 keV. At this low COM energy, the reacting nucleons are in an s-wave state in terms of their relative angular momentum. The single-gamma radiation process is thus strongly suppressed due to conservation laws. Instead the gamma ray released is likely to be accompanied by x-ray photons from a nuclear bremsstrahlung process. The x-ray thus generated has a continuous spectrum and peaks around a few hundred eV to a few keV. The average photon energy and spectrum properties of such a process are calculated with a semiclassical approach. The results give a peak near 1.1 keV for the proton-deuteron fusion and a power-to-the-minus-second law in the spectrum's high-energy limit. An analysis of some prior tokamak disc...

  7. Cryogenic hydrogen fuel for controlled inertial confinement fusion (formation of reactor-scale cryogenic targets)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrova, I. V.; Koresheva, E. R.; Krokhin, O. N.; Osipov, I. E.

    2016-12-01

    In inertial fusion energy research, considerable attention has recently been focused on low-cost fabrication of a large number of targets by developing a specialized layering module of repeatable operation. The targets must be free-standing, or unmounted. Therefore, the development of a target factory for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is based on methods that can ensure a cost-effective target production with high repeatability. Minimization of the amount of tritium (i.e., minimization of time and space at all production stages) is a necessary condition as well. Additionally, the cryogenic hydrogen fuel inside the targets must have a structure (ultrafine layers—the grain size should be scaled back to the nanometer range) that supports the fuel layer survivability under target injection and transport through the reactor chamber. To meet the above requirements, significant progress has been made at the Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI) in the technology developed on the basis of rapid fuel layering inside moving free-standing targets (FST), also referred to as the FST layering method. Owing to the research carried out at LPI, unique experience has been gained in the development of the FST-layering module for target fabrication with an ultrafine fuel layer, including a reactor- scale target design. This experience can be used for the development of the next-generation FST-layering module for construction of a prototype of a target factory for power laser facilities and inertial fusion power plants.

  8. Mitigation of the hydrogen risk in fusion reactors; Mitigation du risque hydrogene dans les reacteurs de fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruejouls, C.; Robin, J.C. [CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. d' Etudes des Reacteurs; Arnould, F.; Bachellerie, E. [Technicatome DI SEPS, 13 - Aix en Provence (France); Latge, C. [CEA Cadarache, Dept. d' Etudes des Dechets DED, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Laurent, A. [Institut National Polytechnique de Lorraine, Lab. des Sciences du Genie Chimique, 54 - Nancy (France)

    2001-07-01

    The rupture of the first wall and the intrusion of water vapor inside the torus, is one of the major accident that can occur in a thermonuclear fusion reactor. In this situation, water oxidizes the beryllium of the wall and the reaction produces hydrogen with a strong risk of explosion inside the reactor. In order to mitigate this risk, a process based on the reduction of metal oxides (MnO{sub 2}, Ag{sub 2}O) has been developed. The aim of this study is the determination of the kinetics of this reduction reaction. A mixture of both oxides has been deposited on the surface of porous balls for an experiment on fixed beds. The modeling of the phenomenon is based on the equations used in heterogenous catalysis and the experimental determination of the kinetics of the reaction is performed with the CIGNE test-facility. The velocity of the reduction reaction is deduced from the remaining amount of hydrogen in the test-gas (N{sub 2} with 1 to 2% of H{sub 2}) after it has been flowed on the oxides coated balls of the fixed bed. (J.S.)

  9. ORNL fusion power demonstration study: arguments for a vacuum building in which to enclose a fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, R.W.

    1976-12-01

    Fusion reactors as presently contemplated are excessively complicated, are virtually inaccessible for some repairs, and are subject to frequent loss of function. This dilemma arises in large part because the closed surface that separates the ''hard'' vacuum of the plasma zone from atmospheric pressure is located at the first wall or between blanket and shield. This closed surface is one containing hundreds to thousands of linear meters of welds or mechanical seals which are subject to radiation damage and cyclic fatigue. In situ repair is extremely difficult. This paper examines the arguments favoring the enclosing of the entire reactor in a vacuum building and thus changing the character of this closed surface from one requiring absolute vacuum integrity to one of high pumping impedance. Two differentially pumped vacuum zones are imagined, one clean zone for the plasma and one for the balance of the volume. Both would be at substantially the same pressure. Other advantages for the vacuum enclosure are also cited and discussed.

  10. Charged particle decay of hot and rotating 88Mo nuclei in fusion-evaporation reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdré, S.; Piantelli, S.; Casini, G.; Barlini, S.; Carboni, S.; Ciemała, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Mazurek, K.; Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Morelli, L.; Marchi, T.; Baiocco, G.; Bardelli, L.; Bednarczyk, P.; Benzoni, G.; Bini, M.; Blasi, N.; Bracco, A.; Brambilla, S.; Bruno, M.; Camera, F.; Chbihi, A.; Corsi, A.; Crespi, F. C. L.; D'Agostino, M.; Degerlier, M.; Fabris, D.; Fornal, B.; Giaz, A.; Krzysiek, M.; Leoni, S.; Matejska-Minda, M.; Mazumdar, I.; MÈ©czyński, W.; Million, B.; Montanari, D.; Myalski, S.; Nicolini, R.; Olmi, A.; Pasquali, G.; Prete, G.; Roberts, O. J.; Styczeń, J.; Szpak, B.; Wasilewska, B.; Wieland, O.; Wieleczko, J. P.; ZiÈ©bliński, M.

    2016-03-01

    A study of fusion-evaporation and (partly) fusion-fission channels for the 88Mo compound nucleus, produced at different excitation energies in the reaction 48Ti+40Ca at 300, 450, and 600 MeV beam energies, is presented. Fusion-evaporation and fusion-fission cross sections have been extracted and compared with the existing systematics. Experimental data concerning light charged particles have been compared with the prediction of the statistical model in its implementation in the gemini++ code, well suited even for high spin systems, in order to tune the main model parameters in a mass region not abundantly covered by exclusive experimental data. Multiplicities for light charged particles emitted in fusion evaporation events are also presented. Some discrepancies with respect to the prediction of the statistical model have been found for forward emitted α particles; they may be due both to pre-equilibrium emission and to reaction channels (such as deep inelastic collisions or quasifission/quasifusion) different from the compound nucleus formation.

  11. Charged particle decay of hot and rotating $^{88}$Mo nuclei in fusion-evaporation reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Valdré, S; Casini, G; Barlini, S; Carboni, S; Ciemała, M; Kmiecik, M; Maj, A; Mazurek, K; Cinausero, M; Gramegna, F; Kravchuk, V L; Morelli, L; Marchi, T; Baiocco, G; Bardelli, L; Bednarczyk, P; Benzoni, G; Bini, M; Blasi, N; Bracco, A; Brambilla, S; Bruno, M; Camera, F; Chbihi, A; Corsi, A; Crespi, F C L; D'Agostino, M; Degerlier, M; Fabris, D; Fornal, B; Giaz, A; Krzysiek, M; Leoni, S; Matejska-Minda, M; Mazumdar, I; Mȩczyński, W; Million, B; Montanari, D; Myalski, S; Nicolini, R; Olmi, A; Pasquali, G; Prete, G; Roberts, O J; Styczeń, J; Szpak, B; Wasilewska, B; Wieland, O; Wieleczko, J P; Ziȩbliński, M

    2015-01-01

    A study of fusion-evaporation and (partly) fusion-fission channels for the $^{88}$Mo compound nucleus, produced at different excitation energies in the reaction $^{48}$Ti + $^{40}$Ca at 300, 450 and 600 MeV beam energies, is presented. Fusion-evaporation and fusion-fission cross sections have been extracted and compared with the existing systematics. Experimental data concerning light charged particles have been compared with the prediction of the statistical model in its implementation in the Gemini++ code, well suited even for high spin systems, in order to tune the main model parameters in a mass region not abundantly covered by exclusive experimental data. Multiplicities for light charged particles emitted in fusion evaporation events are also presented. Some discrepancies with respect to the prediction of the statistical model have been found for forward emitted $\\alpha$-particles; they may be due both to pre-equilibrium emission and to reaction channels (such as Deep Inelastic Collisions, QuasiFission/Q...

  12. Optimisation of confinement in a fusion reactor using a nonlinear turbulence model

    CERN Document Server

    Highcock, E G; Barnes, M; Dorland, W

    2016-01-01

    The confinement of heat in the core of a magnetic fusion reactor is optimised using a multidimensional optimisation algorithm. For the first time in such a study, the loss of heat due to turbulence is modelled at every stage using first-principles nonlinear simulations which accurately capture the turbulent cascade and large-scale zonal flows. The simulations utilise a novel approach, with gyrofluid treatment of the small-scale drift waves and gyrokinetic treatment of the large-scale zonal flows. A simple near-circular equilibrium with standard parameters is chosen as the initial condition. The figure of merit, fusion power per unit volume, is calculated, and then two control parameters, the elongation and triangularity of the outer flux surface, are varied, with the algorithm seeking to optimise the chosen figure of merit. An optimal configuration is discovered at an elongation of 1.5 and a triangularity of 0.03.

  13. Selected transport studies of a tokamak-based DEMO fusion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fable, E.; Wenninger, R.; Kemp, R.

    2017-02-01

    As a next-step in the tokamak-based fusion programme, the DEMO fusion reactor is foreseen to produce relevant output electricity, in the order of  ∼500 MW delivered to the network. The scenarios that are being presently investigated consist of a pulsed device, called DEMO1, and a steady-state device, called DEMO2. In this work, which is focused on the pulsed device DEMO1, scenarios are studied from the point of view of core transport, to assess plasma performance and limitations due to core microinstabilities. The role of radiated power, aspect ratio, and height of temperature pedestal are assessed as they impact both core energy and particle transport. Open issues in this framework are also discussed.

  14. High-power-density approaches to magnetic fusion energy: Problems and promise of compact reversed-field pinch reactors (CRFPR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagenson, Randy L.; Krakowski, Robert A.; Dreicer, Harry

    1983-03-01

    If the costing assumptions upon which the positive assessment of conventional large superconducting fusion reactors are based proves overly optimistic, approaches that promise considerably increased system power density and reduced mass utilization will be required. These more compact reactor embodiments generally must operate with reduced shield thickness and resistive magnets. Because of the unique magnetic topology associated with the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP), the compact reactor embodiment for this approach is particularly attractive from the viewpoint of low-field resistive coils operating with ohmic losses that can be made small relative to the fusion power. The RFP, therefore, is used as one example of a high-power-density (HPD) approach to magnetic fusion energy. A comprehensive system model is described and applied to select a unique, cost-optimized design point that will be used for a subsequent conceptual engineering design of the compact RFP Reactor (CRFPR). This cost-optimized CRFPR design serves as an example of a HPD fusion reactor that would operate with system power densities and mass utilizations that are comparable to fission power plants, these measures of system performance being an order of magnitude more favorable than the conventional approaches to magnetic fusion energy (MFE).

  15. Thermal-hydraulic characteristics in a tokamak vacuum vessel of fusion reactor after transient events occurred

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takase, Kazuyuki; Kunugi, Tomoaki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Seki, Yasushi

    1997-12-31

    The thermal-hydraulic characteristics in a vacuum vessel (VV) of fusion reactor under the ingress-of-coolant-event (ICE) or loss-of-vacuum-event (LOVA) condition were carried out to investigate experimentally the thermofluid safety in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) under transient events. In the ICE experiments, the pressure rise and wall temperatures in the VV were measured and the performance of a suppression tank was confirmed. In the LOVA experiments, the exchange time inside the VV from the vacuum to be the atmospheric pressure was measured for various breach size and the exchange flow rates through the breaches of the VV under the atmospheric pressure conditions were clarified. (author)

  16. Potential for use of high-temperature superconductors in fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, John R.

    1992-09-01

    The present rate of development of high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) is sufficiently rapid that there may be opportunities for their use in contemporary fusion devices such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The most likely application is for delivering power to the superconducting magnets, especially in substituting for the current leads between the temperatures of 4 and 77 K. A second possible application of HTSs is in a liquid-nitrogen-cooled power bus connecting the power supplies to the magnets, thus reducing ohmic heating losses in these relatively long cables. A third potential application of HTSs is in inner high-field windings of the toroidal field coils that would operate at ~ 20 K. While the use of higher temperature magnets offers significant advantages to the reactor system, it is unlikely that tested HTSs for this application will be available within the ITER time frame.

  17. Industrial Hygiene Concerns during the Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Lumia, M E

    2002-01-01

    A significant industrial hygiene concern during the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) was the oxidation of the lead bricks' surface, which were utilized for radiation shielding. This presented both airborne exposure and surface contamination issues for the workers in the field removing this material. This paper will detail the various protection and control methods tested and implemented to protect the workers, including those technologies deployed to decontaminate the work surfaces. In addition, those techniques employed to recycle the lead for additional use at the site will be discussed.

  18. Thermionic plasma injection for the Lockheed Martin T4 Compact Fusion Reactor experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Jonathon

    2015-11-01

    Lockheed Martin's Compact Fusion Reactor (CFR) concept relies on diamagnetic confinement in a magnetically encapsulated linear ring cusp geometry. Plasma injection into cusp field configurations requires careful deliberation. Previous work has shown that axial injection via a plasma gun is capable of achieving high-beta conditions in cusp configurations. We present a pulsed, high power thermionic plasma source and the associated magnetic field topology for plasma injection into the caulked-cusp magnetic field. The resulting plasma fueling and cross-field diffusion is discussed.

  19. Demountable Toroidal Field Magnets for Use in a Compact Modular Fusion Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiarotti, F. J.; Goh, J.; Takayasu, M.; Bromberg, L.; Minervini, J. V.; Whyte, D.

    2014-05-01

    A concept of demountable toroidal field magnets for a compact fusion reactor is discussed. The magnets generate a magnetic field of 9.2 T on axis, in a 3.3 m major radius tokamak. Subcooled YBCO conductors have a critical current density adequate to provide this large magnetic field, while operating at 20 K reduces thermodynamic cooling cost of the resistive electrical joints. Demountable magnets allow for vertical replacement and maintenance of internal components, potentially reducing cost and time of maintenance when compared to traditional sector maintenance. Preliminary measurements of contact resistance of a demountable YBCO electrical joint between are presented.

  20. Fusion reactor materials: Semiannual progress report for period ending September 30, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1987-09-01

    These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials program being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The major areas of concern covered in this report are irradiation facilities, test matrices, and experimental methods; dosimetry, damage parameters and activation calculations; materials engineering and design requirements; radiation effects; development of structural alloys; solid breeding materials; ceramics and superconducting magnet materials. There are 61 reports cataloged separately. (LSP)

  1. Note: Readout of a micromechanical magnetometer for the ITER fusion reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimminen, H; Kyynäräinen, J

    2013-05-01

    We present readout instrumentation for a MEMS magnetometer, placed 30 m away from the MEMS element. This is particularly useful when sensing is performed in high-radiation environment, where the semiconductors in the readout cannot survive. High bandwidth transimpedance amplifiers are used to cancel the cable capacitances of several nanofarads. A frequency doubling readout scheme is used for crosstalk elimination. Signal-to-noise ratio in the range of 60 dB was achieved and with sub-percent nonlinearity. The presented instrument is intended for the steady-state magnetic field measurements in the ITER fusion reactor.

  2. Neutronics optimization study for D-D fusion reactor blanket/shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiba, T.; Kanda, Y.; Nakashima, H.

    1985-12-01

    Position-dependent optimization calculations have been carried out on a D-D fusion reactor blanket/shield to maximize the energy gain in the blanket and to minimize the atomic displacement rate of the copper stabilizer in the superconducting magnet. The results obtained by using the optimization code SWAN indicate the advantage of D/sub 2/O coolant over H/sub 2/O coolant with respect to increasing the energy gain, and the difference in the optimal shield distributions between D-T and D-D neutron sources. The possibility of improving both the energy gain and radiation shielding characteristics is also discussed.

  3. Polarized SANS study of microstructural evolution in a martensitic steel for fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppola, R. [ENEA-Casaccia, FIS, CP 2400, 00100 Roma (Italy); Glaettli, H. [CEA-SACLAY, SPEC and Laboratoire Leon Brillouin (CEA-CNRS), 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Valli, M. [ENEA-Bologna, FIS, V. Don Fiammelli 2, 40128 Bologna (Italy)

    2002-07-01

    The results of a polarized SANS study of a martensitic steel (MANET) developed for fusion-reactor technology are presented. The measurements were carried out to investigate Cr-redistribution phenomena in the martensitic matrix, which can play a crucial role in ductile-to-brittle transition changes under irradiation. The nuclear-magnetic interference term and the ratio of nuclear plus magnetic to nuclear SANS cross sections show that such inhomogeneities, which are present immediately after quenching and give rise to Fe-rich precipitates, dissolve even for short tempering times. (orig.)

  4. Modifications made to the MELCOR Code for Analyzing Lithium Fires in Fusion Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. J. Merrill

    2000-04-01

    This report documents initial modifications made to the MELCOR code that allows MELCOR to predict the consequences of lithium spill accidents for evolving fusion reactor designs. These modifications include thermodynamic and transport properties for lithium, and physical models for predicting the rate of reaction of and energy production from the lithium-air reaction. A benchmarking study was performed with this new MELCOR capability. Two lithium-air reaction tests conducted at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) were selected for this benchmark study. Excellent agreement was achieved between MELCOR predictions and measured data. Recommendations for modeling lithium fires with MELCOR and for future work in this area are included in this report.

  5. Modifications Made to the MELCOR Code for Analyzing Lithium Fires in Fusion Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, Brad Johnson

    2000-04-01

    This report documents initial modifications made to the MELCOR code that allows MELCOR to predict the consequences of lithium spill accidents for evolving fusion reactor designs. These modifications include thermodynamic and transport properties for lithium, and physical models for predicting the rate of reaction of and energy production from the lithium-air reaction. A benchmarking study was performed with this new MELCOR capability. Two lithium-air reaction tests conducted at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) were selected for this benchmark study. Excellent agreement was achieved between MELCOR predictions and measured data. Recommendations for modeling lithium fires with MELCOR and for future work in this area are included in this report.

  6. Scientific report. Plasma-wall interaction studies related to fusion reactor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temmerman, G. De

    2006-07-01

    This scientific report summarises research done on erosion and deposition mechanisms affecting the optical reflectivity of potential materials for use in the mirrors used in fusion reactors. Work done in Juelich, Germany, at the Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne, Switzerland, the JET laboratory in England and in Basle is discussed. Various tests made with the mirrors are described. Results obtained are presented in graphical and tabular form and commented on. The influence of various material choices on erosion and deposition mechanisms is discussed.

  7. Fusion core start-up, ignition and burn simulations of reversed-field pinch (RFP) reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Yuh-Yi

    1988-01-01

    A transient reactor simulation model is developed to investigate and simulate the start-up, ignition and burn of a reversed-field pinch reactor. The simulation is based upon a spatially averaged plasma balance model with field profiles obtained from MHD quasi-equilibrium analysis. Alpha particle heating is estimated from Fokker-Planck calculations. The instantaneous plasma current is derived from a self-consistent circuit analysis for plasma/coil/eddy current interactions. The simulation code is applied to the TITAN RFP reactor design which features a compact, high-power-density reversed-field pinch fusion system. A contour analysis is performed using the steady-state global plasma balance. The results are presented with contours of constant plasma current. A saddle point is identified in the contour plot which determines the minimum value of plasma current required to achieve ignition. An optimized start-up to ignition and burn path can be obtained by passing through the saddle point. The simulation code is used to study and optimize the start-up scenario. In the simulations of the TITAN RFP reactor, the OH-driven superconducting EF coils are found to deviate from the required equilibrium values as the induced plasma current increases. This results in the modification of superconducting EF coils and the addition of a set of EF trim coils. The design of the EF coil system is performed with the simulation code subject to the optimization of trim-coil power and current. In addition, the trim-coil design is subject to the constraints of vertical-field stability index and maintenance access. A power crowbar is also needed to prevent the superconducting EF coils from generating excessive vertical field. A set of basic results from the simulation of TITAN RFP reactor yield a picture of RFP plasma operation in a reactor. Investigations of eddy current are also presented. 145 refs., 37 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. On the implementation of new technology modules for fusion reactor systems codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franza, F., E-mail: fabrizio.franza@kit.edu [Institute of Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, 76344 (Germany); Boccaccini, L.V.; Fisher, U. [Institute of Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, 76344 (Germany); Gade, P.V.; Heller, R. [Institute for Technical Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, 76344 (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • At KIT a new technology modules for systems code are under development. • A new algorithm for the definition of the main reactor's components is defined. • A new blanket model based on 1D neutronics analysis is described. • A new TF coil stress model based on 3D electromagnetic analysis is described. • The models were successfully benchmarked against more detailed models. - Abstract: In the frame of the pre-conceptual design of the next generation fusion power plant (DEMO), systems codes are being used from nearly 20 years. In such computational tools the main reactor components (e.g. plasma, blanket, magnets, etc.) are integrated in a unique computational algorithm and simulated by means of rather simplified mathematical models (e.g. steady state and zero dimensional models). The systems code tries to identify the main design parameters (e.g. major radius, net electrical power, toroidal field) and to make the reactor's requirements and constraints to be simultaneously accomplished. In fusion applications, requirements and constraints can be either of physics or technology kind. Concerning the latest category, at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology a new modelling activity has been recently launched aiming to develop improved models focusing on the main technology areas, such as neutronics, thermal-hydraulics, electromagnetics, structural mechanics, fuel cycle and vacuum systems. These activities started by developing: (1) a geometry model for the definition of poloidal profiles for the main reactors components, (2) a blanket model based on neutronics analyses and (3) a toroidal field coil model based on electromagnetic analysis, firstly focusing on the stresses calculations. The objective of this paper is therefore to give a short outline of these models.

  9. Possibility of fusion power reactor to transmute minor actinides of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serikov, A. E-mail: serikov@nfi.kiae.ru; Shatalov, G.; Sheludjakov, S.; Shpansky, Yu.; Vasiliev, N

    2002-12-01

    A possibility to use fusion power reactor (FPR) is considered for burning long-life elements of spent nuclear fuel in parallel with energy production. In this study a principal design of FPR blanket was examined for transmutation of long-life minor actinides (Np, Am, Cm). A production of minor actinide isotopes is equal to 20-30 kg/1 GW{sub (e)} year for now operating fission reactors, and their amounts will rise with the expected growth of fission reactor power. These isotopes have long-life time and can be dangerous in big amounts in future. Plutonium isotopes are not included in an assumption that they will be used in fission reactors. The major goals of the study were to determine FPR blanket composition corresponding to fast transmutation rate of actinides and tritium self-supply simultaneously. Tritium breeding ratio (TBR) was obtained at level 1.11 for water cooling and reached up 1.56 in variant with helium-cooled assemblies with Np nitride. It was concluded that rows with actinides from processed waste fuel should be arranged near the plasma first wall. Advantages of helium above water cooling are observed in the twice-increased loading of waste fissionable materials and essential increase of achievable TBR. Burnout of Np, Am, Cm would remain at a level {approx}40-50% after 4 full power years.

  10. Process Model of A Fusion Fuel Recovery System for a Direct Drive IFE Power Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natta, Saswathi; Aristova, Maria; Gentile, Charles

    2008-11-01

    A task has been initiated to develop a detailed representative model for the fuel recovery system (FRS) in the prospective direct drive inertial fusion energy (IFE) reactor. As part of the conceptual design phase of the project, a chemical process model is developed in order to observe the interaction of system components. This process model is developed using FEMLAB Multiphysics software with the corresponding chemical engineering module (CEM). Initially, the reactants, system structure, and processes are defined using known chemical species of the target chamber exhaust. Each step within the Fuel recovery system is modeled compartmentally and then merged to form the closed loop fuel recovery system. The output, which includes physical properties and chemical content of the products, is analyzed after each step of the system to determine the most efficient and productive system parameters. This will serve to attenuate possible bottlenecks in the system. This modeling evaluation is instrumental in optimizing and closing the fusion fuel cycle in a direct drive IFE power reactor. The results of the modeling are presented in this paper.

  11. Neutronics shielding analysis for the end plug of a tandem mirror fusion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragheb, Magdi M. H.; Maynard, Charles W.

    1981-10-01

    A neutronics analysis using the Monte Carlo method is carried out for the end-plug penetration and magnet system of a tandem mirror fusion reactor. Detailed penetration and the magnets' three-dimensional configurations are modeled. A method of position dependent angular source biasing is developed to adequately sample the DT fusion source in the central cell region and obtain flux contributions at the penetration components. To assure cryogenic stability, the barrier cylindrical solenoid is identified as needing substantial shielding of about 1 m of a steel-lead-boron-carbide-water mixture. Heating rates there would require a thermal-hydraulic design similar to that in the central cell blanket region. The transition coils, however, need a minimal 0.2 m thickness shield. The leakage neutron flux at the direct converters is estimated at 1.3×1015 n/(m2·s), two orders of magnitude lower than that reported at the neutral beam injectors for tokamaks around 1017 n/(m2·s) for a 1 MW/m2 14 MeV neutron wall loading. This result is obtained through a coupling between the nuclear and plasma physics designs in which hydrogen ions rather than deuterium atoms are used for energy injection at the end plug, to avoid creating a neutron source there. This lower and controllable radiation leakage problem is perceived as a potential major advantage of tandem mirrors compared to tokamaks and laser reactor systems.

  12. Magnetic stochasticity in magnetically confined fusion plasmas chaos of field lines and charged particle dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Abdullaev, Sadrilla

    2014-01-01

    This is the first book to systematically consider the modern aspects of chaotic dynamics of magnetic field lines and charged particles in magnetically confined fusion plasmas.  The analytical models describing the generic features of equilibrium magnetic fields and  magnetic perturbations in modern fusion devices are presented. It describes mathematical and physical aspects of onset of chaos, generic properties of the structure of stochastic magnetic fields, transport of charged particles in tokamaks induced by magnetic perturbations, new aspects of particle turbulent transport, etc. The presentation is based on the classical and new unique mathematical tools of Hamiltonian dynamics, like the action--angle formalism, classical perturbation theory, canonical transformations of variables, symplectic mappings, the Poincaré-Melnikov integrals. They are extensively used for analytical studies as well as for numerical simulations of magnetic field lines, particle dynamics, their spatial structures and  statisti...

  13. Analysis of Induced Gamma Activation by D-T Neutrons in Selected Fusion Reactor Relevant Materials with EAF-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klix, Axel; Fischer, Ulrich; Gehre, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Samples of lanthanum, erbium and titanium which are constituents of structural materials, insulating coatings and tritium breeder for blankets of fusion reactor designs have been irradiated in a fusion peak neutron field. The induced gamma activities were measured and the results were used to check calculations with the European activation system EASY-2010. Good agreement for the prediction of major contributors to the contact dose rate of the materials was found, but for minor contributors the calculation deviated up to 50%.

  14. Anomalous fast ion losses at high β on the tokamak fusion test reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredrickson, E. D.; Bell, M. G.; Budny, R. V.; Darrow, D. S.; White, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    This paper describes experiments carried out on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [R. J. Hawryluk et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 33, 1509 (1991)] to investigate the dependence of β-limiting disruption characteristics on toroidal field strength. The hard disruptions found at the β-limit in high field plasmas were not found at low field, even for β's 50% higher than the empirical β-limit of β{sub n} ≈ 2 at high field. Comparisons of experimentally measured β's to TRANSP simulations suggest anomalous loss of up to half of the beam fast ions in the highest β, low field shots. The anomalous transport responsible for the fast ion losses may at the same time broaden the pressure profile. Toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes, fishbone instabilities, and Geodesic Acoustic Modes are investigated as possible causes of the enhanced losses. Here, we present the first observations of high frequency fishbones [F. Zonca et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 085009 (2009)] on TFTR. The interpretation of Axi-symmetric Beam-driven Modes as Geodesic Acoustic Modes and their possible correlation with transport barrier formation are also presented.

  15. Comparative study of survived displacement damage defects in iron irradiated in IFMIF and fusion power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simakov, S.P. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institute for Reactor Safety, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)], E-mail: simakov@irs.fzk.de; Konobeyev, A.Yu.; Fischer, U.; Heinzel, V. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institute for Reactor Safety, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2009-04-30

    The assessment of the primary survived defects rates in iron such as vacancies-interstitials pairs and simplest clusters have been performed for the IFMIF, fusion power plant and research reactor. This was achieved by a modified version of the NJOY code, when processing evaluated nuclear cross section file. The modifications accounted for the reduction of the available damage energy predicted by the standard NRT model by the surviving defects fractions. These fractions were picked-up from the molecular dynamics and binary collisions simulation results available in the literature. The number of primary survived and clustered defects in the {alpha}-iron irradiated in the high flux test module of IFMIF was estimated as 10 and 6 dpa/fpy or several times less than standard NRT estimates at the level of 30 dpa/fpy. The comparison with damages in iron calculated for irradiation in the first wall of fusion power plant gave however the same reduction factors, that supports the qualification of IFMIF as a fusion material irradiation facility.

  16. Burn control of an ITER-like fusion reactor using fuzzy logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Amador, A. Sair; Martinell, Julio J.

    2016-10-01

    The fuel burn in a fusion reactor has to be kept at a nearly constant rate in order to have a steady power exhaust. Here, we develop a control system based on a fuzzy logic controller in order that adjusts external parameters to keep the plasma temperature and density at the design values of a reactor of the characteristics of ITER. The control parameters chosen are the D-T refueling rate, the auxiliary heating power and a neutral helium beam. We use a fuzzy controller of the Mamdani type that uses a number of membership functions appropriate to produce a response to parameter deviations that minimizes the response time. The inference rules are determined in a way to provide stabilization to all perturbations of the temperature, density and alpha particle fraction. The dynamical response of the reactor is simulated with a 0D model that uses confinement times provided by the ITER scaling. We show that the system is feedback stabilized for a large range of parameters around the nominal values. The recovery time after a departure from the steady values is of the order of one second. We compare the results with another control system based on neural networks that was developed previously. Funded by projects PAPIIT IN109115 and Conacyt 152905.

  17. Design of a fusion reactor for Pb-Li eutectic alloy; Diseno de un reactor de fusion para aleaciones eutecticas Pb-Li

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinones, J.; Barrena, M. I.; Gomez de Salazar, J. M.; Serrano, L.; Durana, S.; Conde, E.; Barrado, A. I.; Fernandez, M.; Sedano, L.; Soria, A.

    2011-07-01

    Nowadays, Pb-Li eutectic alloy shows an increase interest due to its new industrial applications in the field of production of tritium. This isotope is critical in the nuclear fusion reactor. In this paper, it is presented the design, construction and commissioning of a melting furnace of Pb-Li eutectic alloy and the optimization procedure necessary in order to produce the alloy. In the study presented, different parameters have been taken into account, such as: environmental conditions (shielding gas), melting temperature (375-800 degree centigrade); the possibility of using slag with different chemical composition (i.e.; LiCl-Kcl eutectic molten salt). The alloys obtained were characterized both from an analytical point of view as microstructural. These characterization results allow to determine, for example: the range of %w Li in the ingots, presence of different phases, possible micro segregations effect, etc. The characterization techniques used were X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and chemical analysis by ICP-MS. From these studies and the results presented in this paper it is possible to point out that the furnace designed for obtaining ingots of Pb-Li eutectic composition allows to produces very homogeneous ingots. (Author)

  18. Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    International Electrotechnical Commission. Geneva

    1988-01-01

    This standard applies to the following types of reactors: shunt reactors, current-limiting reactors including neutral-earthing reactors, damping reactors, tuning (filter) reactors, earthing transformers (neutral couplers), arc-suppression reactors, smoothing reactors, with the exception of the following reactors: small reactors with a rating generally less than 2 kvar single-phase and 10 kvar three-phase, reactors for special purposes such as high-frequency line traps or reactors mounted on rolling stock.

  19. Evaluation of Nb-base alloys for the divertor structure in fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purdy, I.M. [Argonne National Laboratory, Upton, IL (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Niobium-base alloys are candidate materials for the divertor structure in fusion reactors. For this application, an alloy should resist aqueous corrosion, hydrogen embrittlement, and radiation damage and should have high thermal conductivity and low thermal expansion. Results of corrosion and embrittlement screening tests of several binary and ternary Nb alloys in high-temperature water indicated the Mb-1Zr, Nb-5MO-1Zr, and Nb-5V-1Z4 (wt %) showed sufficient promise for further investigation. These alloys, together with pure Nb and Zircaloy-4 have been exposed to high purity water containing a low concentration of dissolved oxygen (<12 ppb) at 170, 230, and 300{degrees}C for up to {approx}3200 h. Weight-change data, microstructural observations, and qualitative mechanical-property evaluation reveal that Nb-5V-1Zr is the most promising alloy at higher temperatures. Below {approx}200{degrees}C, the alloys exhibit similiar corrosion behavior.

  20. The role of risk management in the design of diagnostics for fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingesson, L. C. [Fusion for Energy, Josep Pla 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Collaboration: F4E Diagnostic Project Team

    2014-08-21

    A project-oriented approach is beneficial for the selection and design of viable diagnostics for fusion reactors because of the associated complex physical and organizational environment. The project-oriented approach includes rigorous risk management. The nature and impact of risks related to technical, organizational and commercial aspects in relation to the development of ITER diagnostics under EU responsibility are analyzed. The majority of risks are related to organizational aspects and technical feasibility issues. The experience with ITER is extrapolated to DEMO and beyond. It should not be taken for granted that technical solutions will be found, while a risk analysis of various diagnostic techniques with quantitative assessments undertaken early in the design of DEMO would be beneficial.

  1. Tritium permeation characterization of materials for fusion and generation IV very high temperature reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, S.; Pilatzke, K.; McCrimmon, K.; Castillo, I.; Suppiah, S. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2015-03-15

    The objective of this work is to establish the tritium-permeation properties of structural alloys considered for Fusion systems and very high temperature reactors (VHTR). A description of the work performed to set up an apparatus to measure permeation rates of hydrogen and tritium in 304L stainless steel is presented. Following successful commissioning with hydrogen, the test apparatus was commissioned with tritium. Commissioning tests with tritium suggest the need for a reduction step that is capable of removing the oxide layer from the test sample surfaces before accurate tritium-permeation data can be obtained. Work is also on-going to clearly establish the temperature profile of the sample to correctly estimate the tritium-permeability data.

  2. Magnet design with 100-kA HTS STARS conductors for the helical fusion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagi, N.; Terazaki, Y.; Ito, S.; Tamura, H.; Hamaguchi, S.; Mito, T.; Hashizume, H.; Sagara, A.

    2016-12-01

    The high-temperature superconducting (HTS) option is employed for the conceptual design of the LHD-type helical fusion reactor FFHR-d1. The 100-kA-class STARS (Stacked Tapes Assembled in Rigid Structure) conductor is used for the magnet system including the continuously wound helical coils. Protection of the magnet system in case of a quench is a crucial issue and the hot-spot temperature during an emergency discharge is estimated based on the zero-dimensional and one-dimensional analyses. The number of division of the coil winding package is examined to limit the voltage generation. For cooling the HTS magnet, helium gas flow is considered and its feasibility is examined by simple analysis as a first step.

  3. An integrated approach to assessing the fracture safe margins of fusion reactor structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odette, G.R. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Design and operation of fusion reactor structures will require an appropriate data base closely coupled to a reliable failure analysis method to safely manage irradiation embrittlement. However, ongoing irradiation programs will not provide the information on embrittlement necessary to accomplish these objectives. A new engineering approach is proposed based on the concept of a master toughness-temperature curve indexed on an absolute temperature scale using shifts to account for variables such as size scales, crack geometry and loading rates as well as embrittlement. While providing a simple practical engineering expedient, the proposed method can also be greatly enhanced by fundamental mechanism based models of fracture and embrittlement. Indeed, such understanding is required for the effective use of small specimen test methods, which is a integral element in developing the necessary data base.

  4. Fusion Reactor and Break-Even Experiment Based on Stabilized Liner Compression of Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchi, Peter; Frese, Sherry; Frese, Michael

    2016-10-01

    An optimum regime, known as magnetized-target or magneto-inertial fusion (MTF/MIF), requires magnetic fields at megagauss levels, which are attainable by use of dynamic conductors called liners. The stabilized liner compressor (SLC) provides the basis for controlled implosion and re-capture of the liner for reversible energy exchange between liner kinetic energy and the internal energy of a magnetized-plasma target. This exchange requires rotational stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor modes on the inner surface of the liner and pneumatically driven free-pistons that eliminate such modes at the outer surface. We discuss the implications of the SLC approach for the power reactor, a breakeven experiment, and intermediate experiments to develop the plasma target. Features include the importance of pneumatic drive and the liner-blanket for economic feasibility of MTF/MIF. Supported by ARPA-E ALPHA Program.

  5. Development of dynamic simulation code for fuel cycle of fusion reactor. 1. Single pulse operation simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Isao; Seki, Yasushi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; Sasaki, Makoto; Shintani, Kiyonori; Kim, Yeong-Chan

    1997-11-01

    A dynamic simulation code for the fuel cycle of a fusion experimental reactor has been developed. The code follows the fuel inventory change with time in the plasma chamber and the fuel cycle system during a single pulse operation. The time dependence of the fuel inventory distribution is evaluated considering the fuel burn and exhaust in the plasma chamber, purification and supply functions. For each subsystem of the plasma chamber and the fuel cycle system, the fuel inventory equation is written based on the equation of state considering the function of fuel burn, exhaust, purification, and supply. The processing constants of subsystem for the steady states were taken from the values in the ITER Conceptual Design Activity (CDA) report. Using the code, the time dependence of the fuel supply and inventory depending on the burn state and subsystem processing functions are shown. (author)

  6. Polarised SANS study of microstructural evolution under neutron irradiation in a martensitic steel for fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppola, R.; Dewhurst, C.D.; Lindau, R.; May, R.P.; Moeslang, A.; Valli, M

    2004-03-01

    This work presents the results of polarised small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements of modified martensitic steel DIN1.4914, originally developed for application in future fusion reactors (MANET steel). SANS measurements were made using the D22 instrument at the ILL Grenoble using an ad hoc polarised beam set-up. The investigated MANET samples were neutron irradiated and subsequently post-irradiation tempered to reproduce as much as possible the expected service conditions. The results, based on the analysis of the nuclear-magnetic interference, are discussed taking into account both the occurrence of Cr redistribution phenomena with correlated changes in the composition of the precipitate phases, and the growth of non-magnetic defects (He-bubbles or microvoids)

  7. Experimental determination of creep properties of Beryllium irradiated to relevant fusion power reactor doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scibetta, M.; Pellettieri, A.; Sannen, L.

    2007-08-01

    A dead weight machine has been developed to measure creep in irradiated beryllium relevant to fusion power reactors. Due to the external compressive load, the material will creep and the specimen will shrink. However, the specimen also swells due to the combined effect of internal pressure in helium bubbles and creep. One of the major challenges is to unmask swelling and derive intrinsic creep properties. This has been achieved through appropriate pre-annealing experiments. Creep has been measured on irradiated and unirradiated specimens. The temperature and stress dependence is characterized and modeled using the product of an Arrhenius' law for the temperature dependence and a power law for the stress dependence. Irradiation increases the sensitivity to creep but the irradiation effects can be rationalized by taking into account the irradiation-induced porosity. Experimental evidence supports dislocation climb by vacancy absorption to be the most plausible intrinsic creep mechanism.

  8. Thick SS316 materials TIG welding development activities towards advanced fusion reactor vacuum vessel applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, B. Ramesh; Gangradey, R.

    2012-11-01

    Advanced fusion reactors like ITER and up coming Indian DEMO devices are having challenges in terms of their materials design and fabrication procedures. The operation of these devices is having various loads like structural, thermo-mechanical and neutron irradiation effects on major systems like vacuum vessel, divertor, magnets and blanket modules. The concept of double wall vacuum vessel (VV) is proposed in view of protecting of major reactor subsystems like super conducting magnets, diagnostic systems and other critical components from high energy 14 MeV neutrons generated from fusion plasma produced by D-T reactions. The double walled vacuum vessel is used in combination with pressurized water circulation and some special grade borated steel blocks to shield these high energy neutrons effectively. The fabrication of sub components in VV are mainly used with high thickness SS materials in range of 20 mm- 60 mm of various grades based on the required protocols. The structural components of double wall vacuum vessel uses various parts like shields, ribs, shells and diagnostic vacuum ports. These components are to be developed with various welding techniques like TIG welding, Narrow gap TIG welding, Laser welding, Hybrid TIG laser welding, Electron beam welding based on requirement. In the present paper the samples of 20 mm and 40 mm thick SS 316 materials are developed with TIG welding process and their mechanical properties characterization with Tensile, Bend tests and Impact tests are carried out. In addition Vickers hardness tests and microstructural properties of Base metal, Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) and Weld Zone are done. TIG welding application with high thick SS materials in connection with vacuum vessel requirements and involved criticalities towards welding process are highlighted.

  9. Mitigation of hydrogen hazard in a fusion reactor by reduction of metallic oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnould, F.; Chaudron, V. [Technicatome, Dir. de l' Ingenierie, SEPS, 13 - Aix-en-Provence (France); Latge, C. [CEA/Cadarache, Dept. d' Etudes des Reacteurs (DER), 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Laurent, A. [Institut National Polytechnique de Lorraine, Lab. des Sciences du Genie Chimique, 54 - Nancy (France)

    1998-07-01

    Significant quantities of hydrogen could be generated inside a fusion reactor during a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) by chemical reaction between steam released into the torus and plasma-facing components at high temperature. On the basis of functional specifications stemming from ITER accident sequence analyses, it appears that the implementation of an anaerobic hydrogen elimination system inside the torus or its expansion volume is the most advisable mitigation means because it allows removal of the hydrogen at its source of production before it comes into contact with oxygen. After a review of literature data and an experimental evaluation of various types of metallic oxides at laboratory scale, manganese oxide catalyzed by silver compounds was found to be the most efficient hydrogen getter. In order to test this hydrogen mitigation technique in representative fusion plant accident conditions, Technicatome and the CEA designed and built a pilot installation named MIRHABEL (MItigation of the Risk linked to Hydrogen by ABsorption and ELimination). After a short description of MIRHABEL, this paper presents and discusses the test results with respect to ITER accident conditions. (authors)

  10. Materials recycle and waste management in fusion power reactors. Progress report for 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogler, S.; Jung, J.; Steindler, M.J.; Maya, I.; Levine, H.E.; Peterman, D.D.; Strausburg, S.; Schultz, K.R.

    1983-01-01

    Several components of a STARFIRE fusion reactor have been studied. The breeding ratios were calculated as a function of lithium enrichment and neutron multiplier for systems containing either Li/sub 2/O or LiAlO/sub 2/. The lithium requirements for a fusion economy were also estimated for those cases and the current US resources were found to be adequate. However, competition with other lithium demands in the future emphasizes the need for recovering and reusing lithium. The radioactivities induced in the breeder and the impurities responsible for their formation were determined. The residual radioactivities of several low-activation structural materials were compared with the radioactivity from the prime candidate alloy (PCA) a titanium modified Type 316 stainless steel used in STARFIRE. The impurities responsible for the radioactivity levels were identified. From these radioactive impurity levels it was determined that V15Cr5Ti could meet the requirements for shallow land burial as specified by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (10CFR61), whereas PCA would require a more restrictive disposal mode, i.e. in a geologic medium. The costs for each of these disposal modes were then estimated.

  11. Russian concept for a DEMO-S demonstration fusion power reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolbasov, B.N. [Russian Research Centre ' Kurchatov Institute' , Pl. Kurchatova 1, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); D.V. Efremov Institute, Scientific Technical Centre ' Sintez' , 196641 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)], E-mail: kolbasov@nfi.kiae.ru; Belyakov, V.A.; Bondarchuk, E.N. [D.V. Efremov Institute, Scientific Technical Centre ' Sintez' , 196641 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Borisov, A.A. [Russian Research Centre ' Kurchatov Institute' , Pl. Kurchatova 1, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kirillov, I.R. [D.V. Efremov Institute, Scientific Technical Centre ' Sintez' , 196641 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Leonov, V.M.; Shatalov, G.E. [Russian Research Centre ' Kurchatov Institute' , Pl. Kurchatova 1, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Sokolov, Yu.A. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramerstrasse 5, P.O. Box 100, 1400 Vienna (Austria); Strebkov, Yu.S. [N.A. Dollezhal Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering (RDIPE), P.O. Box 788, 101000 Moscow (Russian Federation); Vasiliev, N.N. [Russian Research Centre ' Kurchatov Institute' , Pl. Kurchatova 1, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2008-12-15

    Conceptual design studies for a tokamak-based demonstration fusion reactor have been carried out in Russia since 1991. The preferred concept was a steady-state operating tokamak with superconducting magnets, a single-null divertor configuration and a high contribution of bootstrap current into a plasma current drive. Two blanket concepts were analyzed: (1) a helium-cooled ceramic (Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}) design for tritium breeding, using ferritic steel as the structural material, and (2) a blanket using liquid lithium for the tritium breeding material and coolant and a vanadium-chromium-titanium alloy as the structural material. Conventional-type water/lithium-cooled divertor targets with a maximum heat load of {approx}10 MW/m{sup 2} were chosen. Blankets of both designs require beryllium as a neutron multiplier and have to be replaced after the integral fusion neutron load on the first wall reaches 10 MW a/m{sup 2}. The results of the analyses show the necessity of additional studies prior to choosing the most promising blanket concept for further development. Aspects of radioactive waste management and scarce material recycling were also considered.

  12. Deuterium--tritium plasmas in novel regimes in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, M.G.; Batha, S.; Beer, M.; Bell, R.E.; Belov, A.; Berk, H.; Bernabei, S.; Bitter, M.; Breizman, B.; Bretz, N.L.; Budny, R.; Bush, C.E.; Callen, J.; Cauffman, S.; Chang, C.S.; Chang, Z.; Cheng, C.Z.; Darrow, D.S.; Dendy, R.O.; Dorland, W.; Duong, H.; Efthimion, P.C.; Ernst, D.; Evenson, H.; Fisch, N.J.; Fisher, R.; Fonck, R.J.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Fu, G.Y.; Furth, H.P.; Gorelenkov, N.N.; Goloborodko, V.Y.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L.R.; Hammett, G.W.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Heidbrink, W.; Herrmann, H.W.; Herrmann, M.C.; Hill, K.W.; Hogan, J.; Hooper, B.; Hosea, J.C.; Houlberg, W.A.; Hughes, M.; Jassby, D.L.; Jobes, F.C.; Johnson, D.W.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Kesner, J.; Kim, J.S.; Kissick, M.; Krasilnikov, A.V.; Kugel, H.; Kumar, A.; Lam, N.T.; Lamarche, P.; LeBlanc, B.; Levinton, F.M.; Ludescher, C.; Machuzak, J.; Majeski, R.P.; Manickam, J.; Mansfield, D.K.; Mauel, M.; Mazzucato, E.; McChesney, J.; McCune, D.C.; McKee, G.; McGuire, K.M.; Meade, D.M.; Medley, S.S.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Mirnov, S.V.; Mueller, D.; Nagayama, Y.; Navratil, G.A.; Nazikian, R.; Okabayashi, M.; Osakabe, M.; Owens, D.K.; Park, H.K.; Park, W.; Paul, S.F.; Petrov, M.P.; Phillips, C.K.; Phillips, M.; Phillips, P.; Ramsey, A.T.; Rice, B.; Redi, M.H.; Rewoldt, G.; Reznik, S.; Roquemore, A.L.; Rogers, J.; Ruskov, E.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Sasao, M.; Schilling, G.; Schmidt, G.L.; Scott, S.D.; Semenov, I.; Senko, T.; Skinner, C.H.; Stevenson, T.; Strait, E.J.; Stratton, B.C.; Strachan, J.D.; Stodiek, W.; Synakowski, E.; Takahashi, H.; Tang, W.; Taylor, G.; Thompson, M.E.; von Goeler, S.; Von Halle, A.; Walters, R.T.; Wang, S.; White, R.; Wieland, R.M.; Williams, M.; Wilson, J.R.; Wong, K.L.; Wurden, G.A.; Yamada, M.; Yavorski, V.; Young, K.M.; Zakharov, L.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; Zweben, S.J. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    1997-05-01

    Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Phys. Plasmas {bold 2}, 2176 (1995)] have explored several novel regimes of improved tokamak confinement in deuterium{endash}tritium (D--T) plasmas, including plasmas with reduced or reversed magnetic shear in the core and high-current plasmas with increased shear in the outer region (high l{sub i}). New techniques have also been developed to enhance the confinement in these regimes by modifying the plasma-limiter interaction through {ital in situ} deposition of lithium. In reversed-shear plasmas, transitions to enhanced confinement have been observed at plasma currents up to 2.2 MA (q{sub a}{approx}4.3), accompanied by the formation of internal transport barriers, where large radial gradients develop in the temperature and density profiles. Experiments have been performed to elucidate the mechanism of the barrier formation and its relationship with the magnetic configuration and with the heating characteristics. The increased stability of high-current, high-l{sub i} plasmas produced by rapid expansion of the minor cross section, coupled with improvement in the confinement by lithium deposition has enabled the achievement of high fusion power, up to 8.7 MW, with D--T neutral beam heating. The physics of fusion alpha-particle confinement has been investigated in these regimes, including the interactions of the alphas with endogenous plasma instabilities and externally applied waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. In D--T plasmas with q{sub 0}{gt}1 and weak magnetic shear in the central region, a toroidal Alfvn eigenmode instability driven purely by the alpha particles has been observed for the first time. The interactions of energetic ions with ion Bernstein waves produced by mode conversion from fast waves in mixed-species plasmas have been studied as a possible mechanism for transferring the energy of the alphas to fuel ions. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Deuterium-tritium plasmas in novel regimes in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, M.G.; Beer, M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Princeton Plasma Physics Lab.; Batha, S. [Fusion Physics and Technology, Torrance, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have explored several novel regimes of improved tokamak confinement in deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas, including plasmas with reduced or reversed magnetic shear in the core and high-current plasmas with increased shear in the outer region (high-l{sub i}). New techniques have also been developed to enhance the confinement in these regimes by modifying the plasma-limiter interaction through in-situ deposition of lithium. In reversed-shear plasmas, transitions to enhanced confinement have been observed at plasma currents up to 2.2 MA (q{sub a} {approx} 4.3), accompanied by the formation of internal transport barriers, where large radial gradients develop in the temperature and density profiles. Experiments have been performed to elucidate the mechanism of the barrier formation and its relationship with the magnetic configuration and with the heating characteristics. The increased stability of high-current, high-l{sub i} plasmas produced by rapid expansion of the minor cross-section, coupled with improvement in the confinement by lithium deposition has enabled the achievement of high fusion power, up to 8.7 MW, with D-T neutral beam heating. The physics of fusion alpha-particle confinement has been investigated in these regimes, including the interactions of the alphas with endogenous plasma instabilities and externally applied waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. In D-T plasmas with q{sub 0} > 1 and weak magnetic shear in the central region, a toroidal Alfven eigenmode instability driven purely by the alpha particles has been observed for the first time. The interactions of energetic ions with ion Bernstein waves produced by mode-conversion from fast waves in mixed-species plasmas have been studied as a possible mechanism for transferring the energy of the alphas to fuel ions.

  14. Adapting computational optimization concepts from aeronautics to nuclear fusion reactor design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baelmans M.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Even on the most powerful supercomputers available today, computational nuclear fusion reactor divertor design is extremely CPU demanding, not least due to the large number of design variables and the hybrid micro-macro character of the flows. Therefore, automated design methods based on optimization can greatly assist current reactor design studies. Over the past decades, “adjoint methods” for shape optimization have proven their virtue in the field of aerodynamics. Applications include drag reduction for wing and wing-body configurations. Here we demonstrate that also for divertor design, these optimization methods have a large potential. Specifically, we apply the continuous adjoint method to the optimization of the divertor geometry in a 2D poloidal cross section of an axisymmetric tokamak device (as, e.g., JET and ITER, using a simplified model for the plasma edge. The design objective is to spread the target material heat load as much as possible by controlling the shape of the divertor, while maintaining the full helium ash removal capabilities of the vacuum pumping system.

  15. Activation analysis and materials choice in the laser fusion reactor KOYO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlado, J. M.; Mima, K.; Nakai, S.; Alonso, E.; Mun˜oz, E.; Sanz, J.

    1996-10-01

    The laser fusion conceptual reactor KOYO, developed by the ILE Osaka, is presented and analyzed from the activation perspective. The reactor is driven by a laser diode pumped solid state laser which dramatically increases the efficiency of the system, and uses liquid LiPb film protection flowing through ceramic SiC porous tubes in the blanket. Neutron fluxes have been computed using 2/3D models and compared with spherical approaches. Two blanket areas with different packing fractions are considered, and we show the availability of a large fraction of the SiC with impurities to be considered as shallow land burial (SLB). We propose a more complete solution for SLB through the use of porous woven graphite (C) fabric tubes. A graphite reflector is included with important effect in the activation of the chamber wall. Ferritic HT-9 is considered as the structural material for the chamber wall, allowing its SLB and different recycling options. Releases of 1 kg of target-emissions-facing SiC tubes and HT-9 materials have also been simulated with optimum performances.

  16. Liquid immersion blanket design for use in a compact modular fusion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorbom, Brandon; Ball, Justin; Barnard, Harold; Haakonsen, Christian; Hartwig, Zachary; Olynyk, Geoffrey; Sierchio, Jennifer; Whyte, Dennis

    2012-10-01

    Traditional tritium breeding blankets in fusion reactor designs include a large amount of structural material. This results in complex engineering requirements, complicated sector maintenance, and marginal tritium breeding ratios (TBR). We present a conceptual design of a fully liquid blanket. To maximize tritium breeding volume, the vacuum vessel is completely immersed in a continuously recycled FLiBe blanket, with the exception of small support posts. FLiBe has a wide liquid temperature window (459 C to 1430 C), low electrical conductivity to minimize MHD effects, similar thermal/fluid characteristics to water, and is chemically inert. While tritium breeding with FLiBe in traditional blankets is poor, we use MCNP neutronics analysis to show that the immersion blanket design coupled with a beryllium neutron multiplier results in TBR > 1. FLiBe is shown to be a sufficient radiation shield for the toroidal field magnets and can be used as a coolant for the vacuum vessel and divertor, allowing for a simplified single-phase, low-pressure, single-fluid cooling scheme. When coupled with a high-field compact reactor design, the immersion blanket eliminates the need for complex sector maintenance, allows the vacuum vessel to be a replaceable component, and reduces financial cost.

  17. Development of the breeding blanket and shield model for the fusion power reactors system SYCOMORE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li-Puma, Antonella, E-mail: antonella.lipuma@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, Saclay, DM2S, SERMA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Jaboulay, Jean-Charles, E-mail: Jean-Charles.jaboulay@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, Saclay, DM2S, SERMA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Martin, Brunella, E-mail: brunella.martin@gmail.com [Incka, 19-21 Rue du 8 mai 1945, F-94110 Arcueil (France)

    2014-10-15

    SYCOMORE, a fusion reactor system code based on a modular approach is under development at CEA. Within this framework, this paper describes the relevant sub-modules which have been implemented to model the main outputs of the breeding blanket and shield block of the system code: tritium breeding ratio, peak energy deposition in toroidal field coils, reactor layout and power deposition, blanket pressure drops and materials inventory. Blanket and shield requirements are calculated by several sub-modules: the blanket assembly and layout sub-module, the neutronic sub-module, the blanket design sub-module (thermal hydraulic and thermo-mechanic pre-design tool). A power flow module has also been developed which is directly linked to the blanket thermo-dynamic performances, which is not described in this paper. For the blanket assembly and layout and the blanket module design sub-modules, explicit analytic models have been developed and implemented; for the neutronic sub-module neural networks that replicate the results of appropriate simplified 1D and 2D neutronic simulations have been built. Presently, relevant model for the Helium Cooled Lithium Lead is available. Sub-modules have been built in a way that they can run separately or coupled into the breeding blanket and shield module in order to be integrated in SYCOMORE. In the paper, the objective and main input/output parameters of each sub-module are reported and relevant models discussed. The application to previous studied reactor models (PPCS model AB, DEMO-HCLL 2006–2007 studies) is also presented.

  18. Georgia Tech Studies of Sub-Critical Advanced Burner Reactors with a D-T Fusion Tokamak Neutron Source for the Transmutation of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, W. M.

    2009-09-01

    The possibility that a tokamak D-T fusion neutron source, based on ITER physics and technology, could be used to drive sub-critical, fast-spectrum nuclear reactors fueled with the transuranics (TRU) in spent nuclear fuel discharged from conventional nuclear reactors has been investigated at Georgia Tech in a series of studies which are summarized in this paper. It is found that sub-critical operation of such fast transmutation reactors is advantageous in allowing longer fuel residence time, hence greater TRU burnup between fuel reprocessing stages, and in allowing higher TRU loading without compromising safety, relative to what could be achieved in a similar critical transmutation reactor. The required plasma and fusion technology operating parameter range of the fusion neutron source is generally within the anticipated operational range of ITER. The implications of these results for fusion development policy, if they hold up under more extensive and detailed analysis, is that a D-T fusion tokamak neutron source for a sub-critical transmutation reactor, built on the basis of the ITER operating experience, could possibly be a logical next step after ITER on the path to fusion electrical power reactors. At the same time, such an application would allow fusion to contribute to meeting the nation's energy needs at an earlier stage by helping to close the fission reactor nuclear fuel cycle.

  19. Charged Higgs production via vector-boson fusion at NNLO in QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaro, Marco; Maltoni, Fabio [Univ. Catholique de Louvain (Belgium). CP3; Bolzoni, Paolo [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). II. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Moch, Sven-Olaf [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    We present the total cross sections at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in the strong coupling for single and double charged Higgs production via weak boson fusion. Results are obtained via the structure function approach, which builds upon the approximate, though very accurate, factorization of the QCD corrections between the two quark lines. The theoretical uncertainty on the total cross sections at the LHC from higher order corrections and the parton distribution uncertainties are estimated at the 2% level each for a wide range of Higgs boson masses. (orig.)

  20. Modeling of direct beam extraction for a high-charge-state fusion driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, O. A.; Grant Logan, B.

    A newly proposed type of multicharged ion source offers the possibility of an economically advantageous high-charge-state fusion driver. Multiphoton absorption in an intense uniform laser focus can give multiple charge states of high purity, simplifying or eliminating the need for charge-state separation downstream. Very large currents (hundreds of amperes) can be extracted from this type of source. Several arrangements are possible. For example, the laser plasma could be tailored for storage in a magnetic bucket, with beam extracted from the bucket. A different approach, described in this report, is direct beam extraction from the expanding laser plasma. We discuss extraction and focusing for the particular case of a 4.1 MV beam of Xe 16+ ions. The maximum duration of the beam pulse is limited by the total charge in the plasma, while the practical pulse length is determined by the range of plasma radii over which good beam optics can be achieved. The extraction electrode contains a solenoid for beam focusing. Our design studies were carried out first with an envelope code and then with a self-consistent particle code. Results from our initial model showed that hundreds of amperes could be extracted, but that most of this current missed the solenoid entrance or was intercepted by the wall and that only a few amperes were able to pass through. We conclude with an improved design which increases the surviving beam to more than 70 A.

  1. Enhanced charged Higgs production through W -Higgs fusion in W - b scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arhrib, Abdesslam; Cheung, Kingman; Lee, Jae Sik; Lu, Chih-Ting

    2016-05-01

    We study the associated production of a charged Higgs boson with a bottom quark and a light quark at the LHC via pp → H ± b j in the Two Higgs Doublet Models (2HDMs). Using the effective W approximation, we show that there is exact cancellation among various Feynman diagrams in high energy limit. This may imply that the production of charged Higgs can be significantly enhanced in the presence of large mass differences among the neutral Higgs bosons via W ±-Higgs fusion in the pp → H ± b j process. Particularly, we emphasize the potential enhancement due to a light pseudoscalar boson A, which is still allowed by the current data by which we explicitly calculate the allowed regions in ( M A , tan β) plane, and show that the production cross section can be as large as 0.1 pb for large tan β. We also show that the transverse momentum distribution of the b quark can potentially distinguish the W ± - A fusion diagram from the top diagram. Finally, we point out further enhancement when we go beyond the 2HDMs.

  2. Fusion reactor design-III. Report on the third IAEA technical committee meeting and workshop, Tokyo, Japan, 5-16 October 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iso, Y. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokyo); Stacey, W.M. Jr. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta (USA)); Kulcinski, G.L. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison (USA)); Krakowski, R.A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Carlson, G.A. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Yamanaka, C. (Osaka Univ., Suita, Japan); Casini, G. (Commission of the European Communities, Ispra (Italy). Joint Research Centre); Igata, N. (Tokyo Univ. (Japan))

    1982-05-01

    A brief summary is given of the plenary sessions of the Third IAEA Technical Committee Meeting and Workshop on Fusion Reactor Design and Technology. The large tokamak experiments now under construction have brought fusion research to the threshold of fusion reactor power. A number of major in-depth reactor design studies are reported such as the 650-MW INTOR near-term experimental fusion reactor based upon essentially current technology. Also reported are studies of commercial reactor designs. Results are given of the discussions of seven workshops that were based on the papers presented. These groups evaluated the current status and identified key problem areas for each in the following areas: near-term tokamaks, long-term tokamaks, toroidal systems (alternative concepts), open systems, inertial confinement systems (advanced fuels, hybrids, etc.), and fusion reactor materials. The importance of beginning now to prepare for the next major step in fusion reactor development was emphasized and the benefits of international co-operation were evident in the consensus reached in the INTOR results and the strong influence it has had on the direction of the leading national design efforts.

  3. Nonperturbative measurement of the local magnetic field using pulsed polarimetry for fusion reactor conditions (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Roger J

    2008-10-01

    A novel diagnostic technique for the remote and nonperturbative sensing of the local magnetic field in reactor relevant plasmas is presented. Pulsed polarimetry [Patent No. 12/150,169 (pending)] combines optical scattering with the Faraday effect. The polarimetric light detection and ranging (LIDAR)-like diagnostic has the potential to be a local B(pol) diagnostic on ITER and can achieve spatial resolutions of millimeters on high energy density (HED) plasmas using existing lasers. The pulsed polarimetry method is based on nonlocal measurements and subtle effects are introduced that are not present in either cw polarimetry or Thomson scattering LIDAR. Important features include the capability of simultaneously measuring local T(e), n(e), and B(parallel) along the line of sight, a resiliency to refractive effects, a short measurement duration providing near instantaneous data in time, and location for real-time feedback and control of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities and the realization of a widely applicable internal magnetic field diagnostic for the magnetic fusion energy program. The technique improves for higher n(e)B(parallel) product and higher n(e) and is well suited for diagnosing the transient plasmas in the HED program. Larger devices such as ITER and DEMO are also better suited to the technique, allowing longer pulse lengths and thereby relaxing key technology constraints making pulsed polarimetry a valuable asset for next step devices. The pulsed polarimetry technique is clarified by way of illustration on the ITER tokamak and plasmas within the magnetized target fusion program within present technological means.

  4. Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Mahaffey, James A

    2012-01-01

    As energy problems of the world grow, work toward fusion power continues at a greater pace than ever before. The topic of fusion is one that is often met with the most recognition and interest in the nuclear power arena. Written in clear and jargon-free prose, Fusion explores the big bang of creation to the blackout death of worn-out stars. A brief history of fusion research, beginning with the first tentative theories in the early 20th century, is also discussed, as well as the race for fusion power. This brand-new, full-color resource examines the various programs currently being funded or p

  5. Transmutation of Minor Actinides in a Spherical Torus Tokamak Fusion Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENGKaiming; ZHANGGuoshu

    2002-01-01

    Fusion energy will be a long-term energy source. Great efforts have been devoted to fusion research in the past 50 years, and there is still a long way to go. Transmutation of high-level waste (HLW) utilizing D-T fusion neutrons is a good choice for an early application of fusion.

  6. FORIG: a computer code for calculating radionuclide generation and depletion in fusion and fission reactors. User's manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blink, J.A.

    1985-03-01

    In this manual we describe the use of the FORIG computer code to solve isotope-generation and depletion problems in fusion and fission reactors. FORIG runs on a Cray-1 computer and accepts more extensive activation cross sections than ORIGEN2 from which it was adapted. This report is an updated and a combined version of the previous ORIGEN2 and FORIG manuals. 7 refs., 15 figs., 13 tabs.

  7. ITER: The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and the nuclear weapons proliferation implications of thermonuclear-fusion energy systems

    OpenAIRE

    Gsponer, Andre; Hurni, Jean-Pierre

    2004-01-01

    This report contains two parts: (1) A list of "points" highlighting the strategic-political and military-technical reasons and implications of the very probable siting of ITER (the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) in Japan, which should be confirmed sometimes in early 2004. (2) A technical analysis of the nuclear weapons proliferation implications of inertial- and magnetic-confinement fusion systems substantiating the technical points highlighted in the first part, and showin...

  8. Development of new generation reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steels for advanced fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, L.; Snead, L. L.; Katoh, Y.

    2016-09-01

    International development of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels has focused on 9 wt percentage Cr, which primarily contain M23C6 (M = Cr-rich) and small amounts of MX (M = Ta/V, X = C/N) precipitates, not adequate to maintain strength and creep resistance above ∼500 °C. To enable applications at higher temperatures for better thermal efficiency of fusion reactors, computational alloy thermodynamics coupled with strength modeling have been employed to explore a new generation RAFM steels. The new alloys are designed to significantly increase the amount of MX nanoprecipitates, which are manufacturable through standard and scalable industrial steelmaking methods. Preliminary experimental results of the developed new alloys demonstrated noticeably increased amount of MX, favoring significantly improved strength, creep resistance, and Charpy impact toughness as compared to current RAFM steels. The strength and creep resistance were comparable or approaching to the lower bound of, but impact toughness was noticeably superior to 9-20Cr oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic alloys.

  9. Ion source development for a photoneutralization based NBI system for fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonin, A.; de Esch, H. P. L.; Garibaldi, P.; Grand, C.; Bechu, S.; Bès, A.; Lacoste, A.

    2015-04-01

    The next step after ITER is to demonstrate the viability and generation of electricity by a future fusion reactor (DEMO). The specifications required to operate an NBI system on DEMO are very demanding. The system has to provide a very high level of power and energy, ~100MW of D° beam at 1MeV, including high wall-plug efficiency (η > 60%). For this purpose, a new injector concept, called Siphore, is under investigation between CEA and French universities. Siphore is based on the stripping of the accelerated negative ions by photo-detachment provided by several Fabry-Perot cavities (3.5MW of light power per cavity) implemented along the D- beam. The beamline is designed to be tall and narrow in order that the photon flux overlaps the entire negative ion beam. The paper will describe the present R&D at CEA which addresses the development of an ion source and pre-accelerator prototypes for Siphore, the main goal being to produce an intense negative ion beam sheet. The negative ion source Cybele is based on a magnetized plasma column where hot electrons are emitted from the source center. Parametric studies of the source are performed using Langmuir probes in order to characterize the plasma and to compare with numerical models being developed in French universities.

  10. Repetitive tabletop plasma focus to produce a tunable damage factor on materials for fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Leopoldo; Pavez, Cristian; Inestrosa-Izurieta, Maria Jose; Moreno, Jose; Davis, Sergio; Bora, Biswajit; Avaria, Gonzalo; Jain, Jalaj; Altamirano, Luis; Panizo, Miguel; Gonzalez, Raquel; Rivera, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    Future thermonuclear reactors, both magnetic and inertial confinement approaches, need materials capable of withstanding the extreme radiation and heat loads expected from high repetition rate plasma. A damage factor (F = qτ1/2) in the order of 104 (W/cm2) s1/2 is expected. The axial plasma dynamics after the pinch in a tabletop plasma focus of hundred joules, PF-400J, was characterized by means of pulsed optical refractive diagnostics. The energy, interaction time and power flux of the plasma burst interacting with targets was obtained. Results show a high dependence of the damage factor with the distance from the anode top where the sample is located. A tunable damage factor in the range 10- 105(W/cm2) s1/2 can be obtained. At present the PF-400J operating at 0.077 Hz is being used to study the effects of fusion-relevant pulses on material target, including nanostructured materials. A new tabletop device to be operated up to 1Hz including tunable damage factor has been designed and is being constructed, thus thousand cumulative shots on materials could be obtained in few minutes. The scaling of the damage factor for plasma foci operating at different energies is discussed. Supported by CONICYT: PIA ACT-1115, PAI 79130026.

  11. Conceptual design of the Fast-Liner Reactor (FLR) for fusion power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, R.W.; Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.

    1979-02-01

    The generation of fusion power from the Fast-Liner Reactor (FLR) concept envisages the implosion of a thin (3-mm) metallic cylinder (0.2-m radius by 0.2-m length) onto a preinjected plasma. This plasma would be heated to thermonuclear temperatures by adiabatic compression, pressure confinement would be provided by the liner inertia, and thermal insulation of the wall-confined plasma would be established by an embedded azimuthal magnetic field. A 2- to 3-mu s burn would follow the approx. 10/sup 4/ m/s radial implosion and would result in a thermonuclear yield equal to 10 to 15 times the energy initially invested into the liner kinetic energy. For implosions occurring once every 10 s a gross thermal power of 430 MWt would be generated. The results of a comprehensive systems study of both physics and technology (economics) optima are presented. Despite unresolved problems associated with both the physics and technology of the FLR, a conceptual power plant design is presented.

  12. Investigating the Neutral-Gas Manometers in the Wendelstein 7-X Experimental Fusion Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisano-Brown, Jeannette; Wenzel, Uwe; Sunn-Pederson, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The neutral-gas manometer is a powerful diagnostic tool used in the Wendelstein 7-X stellarator, a magnetized fusion experiment located in Germany. The Wendelstein, produced at a cost of 1.2 billion euros, and 20 years in the making, had its first experimental results in Winter 2016. Initial findings exceeded expectations but further study is still necessary. The particular instrument we examined was a hot-cathode ionization gauge, critical for attaining a quality in-vessel environment and a stable plasma. However, after the winter operation of Wendelstein, we found that some of the gauges had failed the six-second (maximum) plasma runs. Wendelstein is on track for 30-minute operations within three years, so it has become of utmost importance to scrutinize gauge design claims. We therefore subjected the devices to high magnetic field, input current, and temperature, as well as to long operational periods. Our results confirmed that the manometer cannot survive a 30-minute run. Though our findings did motivate promising recommendations for design improvement and for further experimentation so that the gauge can be ready for upcoming operations in Summer 2017 and eventual installment in ITER, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, currently under construction. This research was graciously supported by the Max Planck Institute and the MIT-Germany Initiative.

  13. Ion source development for a photoneutralization based NBI system for fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonin, A.; Esch, H. P. L. de; Garibaldi, P.; Grand, C.; Bechu, S.; Bès, A.; Lacoste, A. [CEA-Cadarache, IRFM, F-13108 St. Paul-lez-Durance (France); LPSC, Grenoble-Alpes University, F-38026 Grenoble France (France)

    2015-04-08

    The next step after ITER is to demonstrate the viability and generation of electricity by a future fusion reactor (DEMO). The specifications required to operate an NBI system on DEMO are very demanding. The system has to provide a very high level of power and energy, ~100MW of D° beam at 1MeV, including high wall-plug efficiency (η > 60%). For this purpose, a new injector concept, called Siphore, is under investigation between CEA and French universities. Siphore is based on the stripping of the accelerated negative ions by photo-detachment provided by several Fabry-Perot cavities (3.5MW of light power per cavity) implemented along the D{sup −} beam. The beamline is designed to be tall and narrow in order that the photon flux overlaps the entire negative ion beam. The paper will describe the present R and D at CEA which addresses the development of an ion source and pre-accelerator prototypes for Siphore, the main goal being to produce an intense negative ion beam sheet. The negative ion source Cybele is based on a magnetized plasma column where hot electrons are emitted from the source center. Parametric studies of the source are performed using Langmuir probes in order to characterize the plasma and to compare with numerical models being developed in French universities.

  14. A miniaturized test method for the mechanical characterization of structural materials for fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gondi, P. [Rome-2 Univ. (Italy). Mech. Eng. Dept.; Donato, A. [ENEA CRE, Fusion Sector, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Montanari, R. [Rome-2 Univ. (Italy). Mech. Eng. Dept.; Sili, A. [Rome-2 Univ. (Italy). Mech. Eng. Dept.

    1996-10-01

    This work deals with a non-destructive method for mechanical tests which is based on the indentation of materials at a constant rate by means of a cylinder with a small radius and penetrating flat surface. The load versus penetration depth curves obtained using this method have shown correspondences with those of tensile tests and have given indications about the mechanical properties on a reduced scale. In this work penetration tests have been carried out on various kinds of Cr martensitic steels (MANET-2, BATMAN and modified F82H) which are of interest for first wall and structural applications in future fusion reactors. The load versus penetration depth curves have been examined with reference to data obtained in tensile tests and to microhardness measurements. Penetration tests have been performed at various temperature (from -180 to 100 C). Conclusions, which can be drawn for the ductile to brittle transition, are discussed for MANET-2 steel. Preliminary results obtained on BATMAN and modified F82H steels are reported. The characteristics of the indenter imprints have been studied by scanning electron microscopy. (orig.).

  15. Feasibility of conducting a dynamic helium charging experiment for vanadium alloys in the advanced test reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, H.; Gomes, I.; Strain, R.V.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Matsui, H. [Tohoku Univ. (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    The feasibility of conducting a dynamic helium charging experiment (DHCE) for vanadium alloys in the water-cooled Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is being investigated as part of the U.S./Monbusho collaboration. Preliminary findings suggest that such an experiment is feasible, with certain constraints. Creating a suitable irradiation position in the ATR, designing an effective thermal neutron filter, incorporating thermocouples for limited specimen temperature monitoring, and handling of tritium during various phases of the assembly and reactor operation all appear to be feasible. An issue that would require special attention, however, is tritium permeation loss through the capsule wall at the higher design temperatures (>{approx}600{degrees}C). If permeation is excessive, the reduced amount of tritium entering the test specimens would limit the helium generation rates in them. At the lower design temperatures (<{approx}425{degrees}C), sodium, instead of lithium, may have to be used as the bond material to overcome the tritium solubility limitation.

  16. Report of the second joint Research Committee for Fusion Reactor and Materials. July 12, 2002, Tokyo, Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-05-01

    Joint research committees in purpose of the discussion on DEMO blanket in view point of the both of reactor technology and materials were held by the Research Committee for Fusion Reactor and Fusion Materials. The joint research committee was held in Tokyo on July 12, 2002. In the committee, the present status of development of solid and liquid breeding blanket, the present status of development of reduced activation structure materials, and IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) program were discussed based on the discussions of the development programs of the blanket and materials at the first joint research committee. As a result, it was confirmed that high electric efficiency with 41% would be obtained in the solid breeding blanket system, that neutron radiation data of reduced activation ferritic steel was obtained by HFIR collaboration, and that KEP (key element technology phase) of IFMIF would be finished at the end of 2002 and the data base for the next step, i.e. EVEDA (engineering validation/engineering design activity) was obtained. In addition, the present status of ITER CTA, which was a transient phase for the construction, and the outline of ITER Fast Track, which was an accelerated plan for the performance of the power plants, were reported. This report consists of the summary of the discussion and the viewgraphs which were used at the second joint research committee, and these are very useful for the researchers of the fusion area in Japan. (author)

  17. Analysis and evaluation of the hydrogen risk in a thermonuclear fusion reactor; Analyse et evaluation du risque hydrogene dans un reacteur de fusion thermonucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudron, V. [Societe Helion, 13 - Aix en Provence (France); Arnould, F. [Technicatome DI SEPS, 13 - Aix en Provence (France); Latge, C. [CEA Cadarache, Dept. d' Etudes des Dechets DED, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Laurent, A. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Industries Chimiques, ENSIC, Lab. des Sciences du Genie Chimique, CNRS INPL, 54 - Villers les Nancy (France)

    2001-07-01

    After a recall of the principle of controlled thermonuclear fusion, the ITER reactor project is briefly described. The integrity of the reactor must be preserved in the case of a potential explosion of the hydrogen generated inside the reactor, in order to avoid any dispersion radioactive, chemical or toxic materials in the environment. The fundamental principles of safety developed to fulfill these objectives, in particular the defense-in-depth concept, are presented. The main potential source of hydrogen production is the oxidation of beryllium, which is used as protection material in the first wall of the torus, and the accidental presence of water, as reported in several scenarios. The confinement strategy is then described with the qualification of the role of the different barriers. Finally, the hydrogen explosion risk is analyzed and evaluated with respect to the sources, to the reference envelope scenarios and to the location of hydrogen inside the ITER reactor. It appears, at the engineering stage, that the vacuum toric vessel, the discharge reservoir and the exchanger compartments are the most worrying parts. (J.S.)

  18. Reactor for boron fusion with picosecond ultrahigh power laser pulses and ultrahigh magnetic field trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Miley, G H; Kirchhoff, G

    2015-01-01

    Compared with the deuterium tritium (DT) fusion, the environmentally clean fusion of protons with 11B is extremely difficult. When instead of nanosecond laser pulses for thermal-ablating driven ignition, picosecond pulses are used, a drastic change by nonlinearity results in ultrahigh acceleration of plasma blocks. This radically changes to economic boron fusion by a measured new avalanche ignition.

  19. Thermal hydraulic characteristics during ingress of coolant and loss of vacuum events in fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takase, K.; Kunugi, T.; Seki, Y.; Akimoto, H.

    2000-03-01

    The thermal hydraulic characteristics in the vacuum vessel (VV) of a fusion reactor under an ingress of coolant event (ICE) and a loss of vacuum event (LOVA) were investigated quantitatively using preliminary experimental apparatuses. In the ICE experiments, pressure rise characteristics in the VV were clarified for experimental parameters of the wall temperature and water temperature and for cases with and without a blowdown tank. In addition, the functional performance of a blowdown tank with and without a water cooling system was examined and it was confirmed that the blowdown tank with a water cooling system is effective for suppressing the pressure rise during the ICE. In the LOVA experiments, the saturation time in the VV from vacuum to atmosphere was investigated for various breach sizes and it was found that the saturation time is in inverse proportion to the breach size. In addition, the characteristics of exchange flow through breaches were clarified for the different breach positions on the VV. It was proven from the experimental results that the exchange flow became a counter-current flow when the breach was positioned on the top of the VV and a stratified flow when it was formed on the side wall of the VV, and that the exchange flow under the stratified flow condition was smoother than that of counter-current flow. On the basis of these results, the severest breach condition in ITER was changed from the top-break case to the side-break case. To predict with high accuracy the thermal hydraulic characteristics during ICEs and LOVAs under ITER conditions, a large scale test facility will be necessary. The current conceptual design of the combined ICE-LOVA test facility with a scaling factor of 1/1000 in comparison with the ITER volume is presented.

  20. Negative ion source development for a photoneutralization based neutral beam system for future fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonin, A.; Agnello, R.; Bechu, S.; Bernard, J. M.; Blondel, C.; Boeuf, J. P.; Bresteau, D.; Cartry, G.; Chaibi, W.; Drag, C.; Duval, B. P.; de Esch, H. P. L.; Fubiani, G.; Furno, I.; Grand, C.; Guittienne, Ph; Howling, A.; Jacquier, R.; Marini, C.; Morgal, I.

    2016-12-01

    In parallel to the developments dedicated to the ITER neutral beam (NB) system, CEA-IRFM with laboratories in France and Switzerland are studying the feasibility of a new generation of NB system able to provide heating and current drive for the future DEMOnstration fusion reactor. For the steady-state scenario, the NB system will have to provide a high NB power level with a high wall-plug efficiency (η ˜ 60%). Neutralization of the energetic negative ions by photodetachment (so called photoneutralization), if feasible, appears to be the ideal solution to meet these performances, in the sense that it could offer a high beam neutralization rate (>80%) and a wall-plug efficiency higher than 60%. The main challenge of this new injector concept is the achievement of a very high power photon flux which could be provided by 3 MW Fabry-Perot optical cavities implanted along the 1 MeV D- beam in the neutralizer stage. The beamline topology is tall and narrow to provide laminar ion beam sheets, which will be entirely illuminated by the intra-cavity photon beams propagating along the vertical axis. The paper describes the present R&D (experiments and modelling) addressing the development of a new ion source concept (Cybele source) which is based on a magnetized plasma column. Parametric studies of the source are performed using Langmuir probes in order to characterize and compare the plasma parameters in the source column with different plasma generators, such as filamented cathodes, radio-frequency driver and a helicon antenna specifically developed at SPC-EPFL satisfying the requirements for the Cybele (axial magnetic field of 10 mT, source operating pressure: 0.3 Pa in hydrogen or deuterium). The paper compares the performances of the three plasma generators. It is shown that the helicon plasma generator is a very promising candidate to provide an intense and uniform negative ion beam sheet.

  1. Condensation of ablated first-wall materials in the cascade inertial confinement fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladd, A.J.C.

    1985-12-18

    This report concerns problems involved in recondensing first-wall materials vaporized by x rays and pellet debris in the Cascade inertial confinement fusion reactor. It examines three proposed first-wall materials, beryllium oxide (BeO), silicon carbide (SiO), and pyrolytic graphite (C), paying particular attention to the chemical equilibrium and kinetics of the vaporized gases. The major results of this study are as follows. Ceramic materials composed of diatomic molecules, such as BeO and SiC, exist as highly dissociated species after vaporization. The low gas density precludes significant recombination during times of interest (i.e., less than 0.1 s). The dissociated species (Be, O, Si, and C) are, except for carbon, quite volatile and are thermodynamically stable as a vapor under the high temperature and low density found in Cascade. These materials are thus unsuitable as first-wall materials. This difficulty is avoided with pyrolytic graphite. Since the condensation coefficient of monatomic carbon vapor (approx. 0.5) is greater than that of the polyatomic vapor (<0.1), recondensation is assisted by the expected high degree of dissociation. The proposed 10-layer granular carbon bed is sufficient to condense all the carbon vapor before it penetrates to the BeO layer below. The effective condensation coefficient of the porous bed is about 50% greater than that of a smooth wall. An estimate of the mass flux leaving the chamber results in a condensation time for a carbon first wall of about 30 to 50 ms. An experiment to investigate condensation in a Cascade-like chamber is proposed.

  2. Transmutation of minor actinides discharged from LMFBR spent fuel in a high power density fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uebeyli, Mustafa E-mail: mubeyli@gazi.edu.tr

    2004-12-01

    Significant amounts of nuclear wastes consisting of plutonium, minor actinides and long lived fission products are produced during the operation of commercial nuclear power plants. Therefore, the destruction of these wastes is very important with respect to public health, environment and also the future of nuclear energy. In this study, transmutation of minor actinides (MAs) discharged from LMFBR spent fuel in a high power density fusion reactor has been investigated under a neutron wall load of 10 MW/m{sup 2} for an operation period of 10 years. Also, the effect of MA percentage on the transmutation has been examined. The fuel zone, containing MAs as spheres cladded with W-5Re, has been located behind the first wall to utilize the high neutron flux for transmutation effectively. Helium at 40 atm has been used as an energy carrier. At the end of the operation period, the total burning and transmutation are greater than the total buildups in all investigated cases, and very high burnups (420-470 GWd/tHM) are reached, depending on the MA content. The total transmutation rate values are 906 and 979 kg/GW{sub th} year at startup and decrease to 140 and 178 kg/GW{sub th} year at the end of the operation for fuel with 10% and 20% MA, respectively. Over an operation period of 10 years, the effective half lives decrease from 2.38, 2.21 and 3.08 years to 1.95, 1.80 and 2.59 years for {sup 237}Np, {sup 241}Am and {sup 243}Am, respectively. Total atomic densities decrease exponentially during the operation period. The reductions in the total atomic densities with respect to the initial ones are 79%, 81%, 82%, 83%, 85% and 86% for 10%, 12%, 14%, 16%, 18% and 20% MAs, respectively.

  3. Neutronic design studies of a conceptual DCLL fusion reactor for a DEMO and a commercial power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, I.; Veredas, G.; Gómez-Ros, J. M.; Sanz, J.; Ibarra, A.

    2016-01-01

    Neutronic analyses or, more widely, nuclear analyses have been performed for the development of a dual-coolant He/LiPb (DCLL) conceptual design reactor. A detailed three-dimensional (3D) model has been examined and optimized. The design is based on the plasma parameters and functional materials of the power plant conceptual studies (PPCS) model C. The initial radial-build for the detailed model has been determined according to the dimensions established in a previous work on an equivalent simplified homogenized reactor model. For optimization purposes, the initial specifications established over the simplified model have been refined on the detailed 3D design, modifying material and dimension of breeding blanket, shield and vacuum vessel in order to fulfil the priority requirements of a fusion reactor in terms of the fundamental neutronic responses. Tritium breeding ratio, energy multiplication factor, radiation limits in the TF coils, helium production and displacements per atom (dpa) have been calculated in order to demonstrate the functionality and viability of the reactor design in guaranteeing tritium self-sufficiency, power efficiency, plasma confinement, and re-weldability and structural integrity of the components. The paper describes the neutronic design improvements of the DCLL reactor, obtaining results for both DEMO and power plant operational scenarios.

  4. Final Report: Safety of Plasma Components and Aerosol Transport During Hard Disruptions and Accidental Energy Release in Fusion Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourham, Mohamed A.; Gilligan, John G.

    1999-08-14

    Safety considerations in large future fusion reactors like ITER are important before licensing the reactor. Several scenarios are considered hazardous, which include safety of plasma-facing components during hard disruptions, high heat fluxes and thermal stresses during normal operation, accidental energy release, and aerosol formation and transport. Disruption events, in large tokamaks like ITER, are expected to produce local heat fluxes on plasma-facing components, which may exceed 100 GW/m{sup 2} over a period of about 0.1 ms. As a result, the surface temperature dramatically increases, which results in surface melting and vaporization, and produces thermal stresses and surface erosion. Plasma-facing components safety issues extends to cover a wide range of possible scenarios, including disruption severity and the impact of plasma-facing components on disruption parameters, accidental energy release and short/long term LOCA's, and formation of airborne particles by convective current transport during a LOVA (water/air ingress disruption) accident scenario. Study, and evaluation of, disruption-induced aerosol generation and mobilization is essential to characterize database on particulate formation and distribution for large future fusion tokamak reactor like ITER. In order to provide database relevant to ITER, the SIRENS electrothermal plasma facility at NCSU has been modified to closely simulate heat fluxes expected in ITER.

  5. Characterization of scintillator materials for fast-ion loss detectors in nuclear fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Ramos, M. C.; García López, J.; García-Muñoz, M.; Rodríguez-Ramos, M.; Carmona Gázquez, M.; Zurro, B.

    2014-08-01

    In fusion plasma reactors, fast ion generated by heating systems and fusion born particles must be well confined. The presence of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities can lead to a significant loss of these ions, which may reduce drastically the heating efficiency and may cause damage to plasma facing components in the vacuum vessel. In order to understand the physics underlying the fast ion loss mechanism, scintillator based detectors have been installed in several fusion devices. In this work we present the absolute photon yield and its degradation with ion fluence in terms of the number of photons emitted per incident ion of several scintillators thin coatings: SrGa2S4:Eu2+ (TG-Green), Y3Al5O12:Ce3+ (P46) and Y2O3:Eu3+ (P56) when irradiated with light ions of different masses (deuterium ions, protons and α-particles) at energies between approximately 575 keV and 3 MeV. The photon yield will be discussed in terms of the energy deposited by the particles into the scintillator. For that, the actual composition and thickness of the thin layers were determined by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). A collimator with 1 mm of diameter, which defines the beam size for the experiments, placed at the entrance of the chamber. An electrically isolated sample holder biased to +300 V to collect the secondary electrons, connected to a digital current integrator (model 439 by Ortec) to measure the incident beam current. A home made device has been used to store the real-time evolution of the beam current in a computer file allowing the correction of the IL yields due to the current fluctuations. The target holder is a rectangle of 150 × 112 mm2 and can be tilted. The X and Y movements are controlled through stepping motors, which permits a fine control of the beam spot positioning as well as the study of several samples without venting the chamber. A silica optical fiber of 1 mm diameter fixed to the vacuum chamber, which collects the light from the scintillators

  6. Automation of nonlinear calculations in the theory of fusion reactor; Automatisation des calculs non lineaires dans la theorie des reacteurs a fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braffort, P.; Chaigne, M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    1) Introduction: The difficulties of the formulation of the equations of phenomena occurring during the operation of a fusion reactor are underlined. 2) The possibilities presented by analog computation of the solution of nonlinear differential equations are enumerated. The accuracy and limitations of this method are discussed. 3) The analog solution in the stationary problem of the measurement of the discharge confinement is given and comparison with experimental results. 4) The analog solution of the dynamic problem of the evolution of the discharge current in a simple case is given and it is compared with experimental data. 5) The analog solution of the motion of an isolated ion in the electromagnetic field is given. A spatial field simulator used for this problem (bidimensional problem) is described. 6) The analog solution of the preceding problem for a tridimensional case for particular geometrical configurations using simultaneously 2 field simulators is given. 7) A method of computation derived from Monte Carlo method for the study of dynamic of plasma is described. 8) Conclusion: the essential differences between the analog computation of fission reactors and fusion reactors are analysed. In particular the theory of control of a fusion reactor as described by SCHULTZ is discussed and the results of linearized formulations are compared with those of nonlinear simulation. (author)Fren. [French] 1) Introduction. On souligne les difficultes que presente la mise en equation des phenomenes mis en jeu lors du fonctionnement d'un reacteur a fusion. On selectionne un certain nombre d'equations generalement utilisees et on montre les impossibilites analytiques auxquelles on se heurte alors. 2) On rappelle les possibilites du calcul analogique pour la resolution des systemes differentiels non lineaires et on indique la precision de la methode ainsi que ses limitations. 3) On decrit esolution analogique du probleme statique de la mesure du confinement de la

  7. Classical physics impossibility of magnetic fusion reactor with neutral beam injection at thermonuclear energies below 200 KeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglich, Bogdan; Hester, Timothy; Vaucher, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    Lawson criterion was specifically derived for inertial fusion and DT gas of stable lifetime without ions and magnetic fields. It was revised with realistic parametrers. To account for the losses of unstable ions against neutralization with lifetime τ, n (t) = nτ [ 1 - exp (- t / - tτ τ) ] -> nτ for τ CT resonance regime below critical energy To, τ 10-5 , and Lawson requirement ntL 1021 i.e. not realistic. Luminosity (reaction rate for σ = 1) is that of two unstable particles each with lifetime τ: L =n2(t)v12 =n2t2v12 . In subcritical regime, L =10-10n2 forn =1014cm-3 , v 109 cms-1 = L =1027 . Which is negligible and implies a negative power flow reactor. But above T0 , atTD = 725 KeV , τ = 20 s was observed implying L =1039 i.e. massive fusion energy production.

  8. Development of thermal-hydraulic analysis methodology for multiple modules of water-cooled breeder blanket in fusion DEMO reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Geon-Woo; Lee, Jeong-Hun [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyoung-Kyu, E-mail: chohk@snu.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Goon-Cherl [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Im, Kihak [National Fusion Research Institute, 169-148, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • A methodology to simulate the K-DEMO blanket system was proposed. • The results were compared with the CFD, to verify the prediction capability of MARS. • 46 Blankets in a single sector in K-DEMO were simulated using MARS-KS. • Supervisor program was devised to handle each blanket module individually. • The calculation results showed the flow rates, pressure drops, and temperatures. - Abstract: According to the conceptual design of the fusion DEMO reactor proposed by the National Fusion Research Institute of Korea, the water-cooled breeding blanket system incorporates a total of 736 blanket modules. The heat flux and neutron wall loading to each blanket module vary along their poloidal direction, and hence, thermal analysis for at least one blanket sector is required to confirm that the temperature limitations of the materials are satisfied in all the blanket modules. The present paper proposes a methodology of thermal analysis for multiple modules of the blanket system using a nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulic analysis code, MARS-KS. In order to overcome the limitations of the code, caused by the restriction on the number of computational nodes, a supervisor program was devised, which handles each blanket module separately at first, and then corrects the flow rate, considering pressure drops that occur in each module. For a feasibility test of the proposed methodology, 46 blankets in a single sector were simulated; the calculation results of the parameters, such as mass flow, pressure drops, and temperature distribution in the multiple blanket modules showed that the multi-module analysis method can be used for efficient thermal-hydraulic analysis of the fusion DEMO reactor.

  9. Accuracy and convergence of coupled finite-volume/Monte Carlo codes for plasma edge simulations of nuclear fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghoos, K., E-mail: kristel.ghoos@kuleuven.be [KU Leuven, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Celestijnenlaan 300A, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Dekeyser, W. [KU Leuven, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Celestijnenlaan 300A, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Samaey, G. [KU Leuven, Department of Computer Science, Celestijnenlaan 200A, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Börner, P. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research (IEK-4), FZ Jülich GmbH, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Baelmans, M. [KU Leuven, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Celestijnenlaan 300A, 3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2016-10-01

    The plasma and neutral transport in the plasma edge of a nuclear fusion reactor is usually simulated using coupled finite volume (FV)/Monte Carlo (MC) codes. However, under conditions of future reactors like ITER and DEMO, convergence issues become apparent. This paper examines the convergence behaviour and the numerical error contributions with a simplified FV/MC model for three coupling techniques: Correlated Sampling, Random Noise and Robbins Monro. Also, practical procedures to estimate the errors in complex codes are proposed. Moreover, first results with more complex models show that an order of magnitude speedup can be achieved without any loss in accuracy by making use of averaging in the Random Noise coupling technique.

  10. Neutron irradiation of V-Cr-Ti alloys in the BOR-60 fast reactor: Description of the fusion-1 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowcliffe, A.F. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States); Tsai, H.C.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    The FUSION-1 irradiation capsule was inserted in Row 5 of the BOR-60 fast reactor in June 1995. The capsule contains a collaborative RF/U.S. experiment to investigate the irradiation performance of V-Cr-Ti alloys in the temperature range 310 to 350{degrees}C. This report describes the capsule layout, specimen fabrication history, and the detailed test matrix for the U.S. specimens. A description of the operating history and neutronics will be presented in the next semiannual report.

  11. Prospects for a dominantly microwave-diagnosed magnetically confined fusion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, F. A.

    2017-01-01

    Compared to present experiments, tokamak and stellarator reactors will be subject to higher heat loads, sputtering, erosion and subsequent coating, tritium retention, higher neutron fluxes, and a number of radiation effects. Additionally, neutral beam penetration in tokamak reactors will only be limited to the plasma edge. As a result, several optical, beam-based and magnetic diagnostics of today's plasmas might not be applicable to tomorrow's reactors, but the present discussion suggests that reactors could largely rely on microwave diagnostics, including techniques based on mode conversions and Collective Thomson Scattering.

  12. What we miss in order to be able to design and build a commercially viable fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreani, R. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Energia

    1999-07-01

    The paper considers in a critical way the different areas in which work is required to provide sufficient information in view of designing a reliable and attractive fusion reactor. Four main areas of activity are considered: physics, technology, engineering, safety. In physics the trend is positive towards a better understanding of suitable plasma regimes to be confirmed through further experimentation on the operating machines. Engineering has already proven itself by the design and construction of a number of experimental machines. In addition a large data base obtained from design and operation of fission reactors is available. Safety is reaching very satisfactory results in the analysis of the impact of fusion on man and the environment. Where it is still a large unsolved problem is concerning materials capable of standing the harsh fusion environment for an adequate number of years. An intense neutron source is needed in order to allow the necessary developments. [Italian] Il rapporto considera in modo critico le differenti aree nelle quali si richiede ulteriore lavoro per fornire informazini sufficienti al fine di progettare un reattore a fusione affidabile ed economicamente competitivo. Vengono considerate quattro aree principali di attivita': fisica, tecnologia, ingegneria, sicurezza. Nella fisica, vi e' una positiva tendenza verso una migliore comprensione di regimi di plasma favorevoli da confermare attraverso ulteriore sperimentazione sulle macchine funzionanti. L' ingegneria ha gia' dato dimostrazione di se' col progetto e la costruzione di un notevole numero di macchine sperimentali. In aggiunta e' disponibile un gran numero di dati ottenuti dalla progettazione, realizzazione e funzionamento dei reattori a fissione. La sicurezza sta raggiungendo risultati molto soddisfacenti nell'analisi dell'impatto della fusione sull'uomo e sull'ambiente. Un grosso problema tuttora irresoluto e' quello dei

  13. Plasma-Facing Materials Research For Fusion Reactors At FOM Rijnhuizen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rapp, J.; De Temmerman, G.; van Rooij, G. J.; van Emmichoven, P. A. Zeijlma; Kleyn, A. W.

    2011-01-01

    In next generation magnetic fusion devices such as ITER, plasma-facing materials are exposed to unprecedented high ion, power and neutron fluxes. Those extreme conditions cannot be recreated in current fusion devices from the tokamak type. The plasma-surface interaction is still an area of great unc

  14. Plasma-facing materials research for fusion reactors at Fom Rijnhuizen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rapp, J.; De Temmerman, G.; van Rooij, G.J.; Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P.A.; Kleijn, A.W.

    2011-01-01

    In next generation magnetic fusion devices such as ITER, plasma-facing materials are exposed to unprecedented high ion, power and neutron fluxes. Those extreme conditions cannot be recreated in current fusion devices from the tokamak type. The plasma-surface interaction is still an area of great unc

  15. Hybrid fusion-fission reactor with a thorium blanket: Its potential in the fuel cycle of nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmelev, A. N.; Kulikov, G. G.; Kurnaev, V. A.; Salahutdinov, G. H.; Kulikov, E. G.; Apse, V. A.

    2015-12-01

    Discussions are currently going on as to whether it is suitable to employ thorium in the nuclear fuel cycle. This work demonstrates that the 231Pa-232U-233U-Th composition to be produced in the thorium blanket of a hybrid thermonuclear reactor (HTR) as a fuel for light-water reactors opens up the possibility of achieving high, up to 30% of heavy metals (HM), or even ultrahigh fuel burnup. This is because the above fuel composition is able to stabilize its neutron-multiplying properties in the process of high fuel burnup. In addition, it allows the nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) to be better protected against unauthorized proliferation of fissile materials owing to an unprecedentedly large fraction of 232U (several percent!) in the uranium bred from the Th blanket, which will substantially hamper the use of fissile materials in a closed NFC for purposes other than power production.

  16. Tritium permeation behavior through pyrolytic carbon in tritium production using high-temperature gas-cooled reactor for fusion reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ushida

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Under tritium production method using a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor loaded Li compound, Li compound has to be coated by ceramic materials in order to suppress the spreading of tritium to the whole reactor. Pyrolytic carbon (PyC is a candidate of the coating material because of its high resistance for gas permeation. In this study, hydrogen permeation experiments using a PyC-coated isotropic graphite tube were conducted and hydrogen diffusivity, solubility and permeability were evaluated. Tritium permeation behavior through PyC-coated Li compound particles was simulated by using obtained data. Hydrogen permeation flux through PyC in a steady state is proportional to the hydrogen pressure and is larger than that through Al2O3 which is also candidate coating material. However, total tritium leak within the supposed reactor operation period through the PyC-coated Li compound particles is lower than that through the Al2O3-coated ones because the hydrogen absorption capacity in PyC is considerably larger than that in Al2O3.

  17. Minimization of the external heating power by long fusion power rise-up time for self-ignition access in the helical reactor FFHR2m

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitarai, O.; Sagara, A.; Chikaraishi, H.; Imagawa, S.; Watanabe, K.; Shishkin, A. A.; Motojima, O.

    2007-11-01

    Minimization of the external heating power to access self-ignition is advantageous to increase the reactor design flexibility and to reduce the capital and operating costs of the plasma heating device in a helical reactor. In this work we have discovered that a larger density limit leads to a smaller value of the required confinement enhancement factor, a lower density limit margin reduces the external heating power and over 300 s of the fusion power rise-up time makes it possible to reach a minimized heating power. While the fusion power rise-up time in a tokamak is limited by the OH transformer flux or the current drive capability, any fusion power rise-up time can be employed in a helical reactor for reducing the thermal stresses of the blanket and shields, because the confinement field is generated by the external helical coils.

  18. Research on the HYLIFE liquid-first-wall concept for future laser-fusion reactors. Final report No. 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, M.A.

    1980-09-01

    It has been proposed to protect the structural walls of a future laser fusion reactor with a curtain or fluid-wall of liquid lithium jets. As part of the investigation of this concept, experiments have been performed on planar sheet water jets issuing vertically downward from slit nozzles. The nozzles were subjected to transverse forced harmonic excitation to simulate the vibrational environment of the laser fusion reactor, and experiments were run at both 1 atm and at lower ambient pressures. Linear temporal stability theory is shown to predict the onset of the unstable regime and the initial spatial growth rates quite well for the cases where the amplitudes of the nozzle vibration are not too large and the waveform is nearly sinusoidal. In addition, both the linear theory and a simplified trajectory theory are shown to predict the initial wave envelope amplitudes very well. For larger amplitude nozzle excitation, the waveform becomes highly nonlinear and non-sinusoidal and can resemble a sawtooth waveform in some cases; these latter experimental results can only be partially explained by existing theories at the present time.

  19. A Review of Dangerous Dust in Fusion Reactors: from Its Creation to Its Resuspension in Case of LOCA and LOVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Malizia

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The choice of materials for the future nuclear fusion reactors is a crucial issue. In the fusion reactors, the combination of very high temperatures, high radiation levels, intense production of transmuting elements and high thermomechanical loads requires very high-performance materials. Erosion of PFCs (Plasma Facing Components determines their lifetime and generates a source of impurities (i.e., in-vessel tritium and dust inventories, which cool down and dilute the plasma. The resuspension of dust could be a consequences of LOss of Coolant Accidents (LOCA and LOss of Vacuum Accidents (LOVA and it can be dangerous because of dust radioactivity, toxicity, and capable of causing an explosion. These characteristics can jeopardize the plant safety and pose a serious threat to the operators. The purpose of this work is to determine the experimental and numerical steeps to develop a numerical model to predict the dust resuspension consequences in case of accidents through a comparison between the experimental results taken from campaigns carried out with STARDUST-U and the numerical simulation developed with CFD codes. The authors in this work will analyze the candidate materials for the future nuclear plants and the consequences of the resuspension of its dust in case of accidents through the experience with STARDUST-U.

  20. Research and development of the tritium recovery system for the blanket of the fusion reactor in JAEA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Y.; Isobe, K.; Iwai, Y.; Kobayashi, K.; Nakamura, H.; Hayashi, T.; Yamanishi, T.

    2009-05-01

    A water-cooling solid breeder blanket is a prime candidate for the blanket of the fusion reactor in Japan. In this case, the blanket tritium recovery system will be composed of three processes: tritium recovery from helium sweep gas as hydrogen, that as water vapour and tritium recovery from coolant water. The authors have proposed a set of advanced systems. For tritium recovery as hydrogen, an electrochemical hydrogen pump with a ceramic proton conductor has been proposed. The correlation between the proton concentration in the ceramic and the hydrogen gas pressure has been investigated to describe the pumping performance specifically. A ceramic electrolysis cell has been proposed to process the tritiated water vapour. The authors have developed a new electrode containing cerium oxide, and it has shown fairly good electrolysis efficiency. For tritium recovery from coolant water, reduction in the processing water by tritium concentration is necessary. The authors have proposed to apply the fixed-bed adsorption process of synthetic zeolite, and have developed new zeolite. It showed unique characteristics for water adsorption and desorption. The authors have determined the potential of these systems for the blanket of the fusion DEMO reactor.

  1. Fusion plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Weston M

    2012-01-01

    This revised and enlarged second edition of the popular textbook and reference contains comprehensive treatments of both the established foundations of magnetic fusion plasma physics and of the newly developing areas of active research. It concludes with a look ahead to fusion power reactors of the future. The well-established topics of fusion plasma physics -- basic plasma phenomena, Coulomb scattering, drifts of charged particles in magnetic and electric fields, plasma confinement by magnetic fields, kinetic and fluid collective plasma theories, plasma equilibria and flux surface geometry, plasma waves and instabilities, classical and neoclassical transport, plasma-materials interactions, radiation, etc. -- are fully developed from first principles through to the computational models employed in modern plasma physics. The new and emerging topics of fusion plasma physics research -- fluctuation-driven plasma transport and gyrokinetic/gyrofluid computational methodology, the physics of the divertor, neutral ...

  2. Depth-charge static and time-dependence perturbation/sensitivity system for nuclear reactor core analysis. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, J.R.

    1981-09-01

    This report provides the background theory, user input, and sample problems required for the efficient application of the DEPTH-CHARGE system - a code block for both static and time-dependence perturbation theory and data sensitivity analyses. The DEPTH-CHARGE system is of modular construction and has been implemented within the VENTURE-BURNER computational system at Oak Ridge National Labortary. The DEPTH-CHARGE system provides, for the first time, a complete generalized first-order perturbation/sensitivity theory capability for both static and time-dependent analysis of realistic multidimensional reactor models.

  3. Preliminary structural design and thermo-mechanical analysis of helium cooled solid breeder blanket for Chinese Fusion Engineering Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Min; Chen, Hongli, E-mail: hlchen1@ustc.edu.cn; Zhou, Guangming; Liu, Qianwen; Wang, Shuai; Lv, Zhongliang; Ye, Minyou

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • A helium cooled solid breeder blanket module was designed for CFETR. • Multilayer U-shaped pebble beds were adopted in the blanket module. • Thermal and thermo-mechanical analyses were carried out under normal operating conditions. • The analysis results were found to be acceptable. - Abstract: With the aim to bridge the R&D gap between ITER and fusion power plant, the Chinese Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) was proposed to be built in China. The mission of CFETR is to address the essential R&D issues for achieving practical fusion energy. Its blanket is required to be tritium self-sufficient. In this paper, a helium cooled solid breeder blanket adopting multilayer U-shaped pebble beds was designed and analyzed. Thermo-mechanical analysis of the first wall and side wall combined with breeder unit was carried out for normal operating steady state conditions. The results showed that the maximum temperatures of the structural material, neutron multiplier and tritium breeder pebble beds are 523 °C, 558 °C and 787 °C, respectively, which are below the corresponding limits of 550 °C, 650 °C and 920 °C. The maximum equivalent stress of the structure is under the allowable value with a margin about 14.5%.

  4. Irradiation creep in austenitic and ferritic steels irradiated in a tailored neutron spectrum to induce fusion reactor levels of helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Gibson, L.T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States); Jitsukawa, S.

    1996-04-01

    Six austenitic stainless steels and two ferritic alloys were irradiated sequentially in two research reactors where the neutron spectrum was tailored to produce a He production rate typical of a fusion device. Irradiation began in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor where an atomic displacement level of 7.4 dpa was achieved and was then transferred to the High Flux Isotope Reactor for the remainder of the irradiation to a total displacement level of 19 dpa. Temperatures of 60 and 330{degree}C are reported on. At 330{degree}C irradiation creep was found to be linear in stress and fluence with rates in the range of 1.7 - 5.5 x 10{sup -4}% MPa{sup -1} dpa{sup -1}. Annealed and cold-worked materials exhibited similar creep rates. There is some indication that austenitic alloys with TiC or TiO precipitates had a slightly higher irradiation creep rate than those without. The ferritic alloys HT-9 and Fe-16Cr had irradiatoin creep rates about 0.5 x 10{sup -4}% MPa{sup -1} dpa{sup -1}. No meaningful data could be obtained from the tubes irradiated at 60{degree}C because of damage to the tubes.

  5. Synfuels from fusion: using the tandem mirror reactor and a thermochemical cycle to produce hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, R.W. (ed.)

    1982-11-01

    This study is concerned with the following area: (1) the tandem mirror reactor and its physics; (2) energy balance; (3) the lithium oxide canister blanket system; (4) high-temperature blanket; (5) energy transport system-reactor to process; (6) thermochemical hydrogen processes; (7) interfacing the GA cycle; (8) matching power and temperature demands; (9) preliminary cost estimates; (10) synfuels beyond hydrogen; and (11) thermodynamics of the H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/-H/sub 2/O system. (MOW)

  6. The pair production of Charged and Neutral Higgs bosons in W and Z gauge boson fusion process

    CERN Document Server

    Morozumi, Takuya

    2012-01-01

    We study the signatures of a two Higgs doublet model of Davidson and Logan. The model includes an extra Higgs doublet with the vacuum expectation value (VEV) much smaller than the one of the standard model like Higgs. The smaller VEV is related to the origin of the small neutrino mass in the two Higgs doublet model. In the model, a single non-standard model like Higgs production of weak gauge boson fusion is suppressed due to the smallness of the vacuum expectation value. In contrast to the single Higgs production, the cross section of the Higgs pair production due to gauge boson fusion is not suppressed. Using the model, we compute the charged Higgs and neutral Higgs pair production cross section in W Z annihilation channel. In the two Higgs doublet model, the charged Higgs H^+ decays into a pair of the charged anti-lepton and right-handed neutrino. The neutral Higgs boson decays into right-handed neutrino and left-handed anti-neutrino pair which is invisible. A single charged anti-lepton and three neutrinos...

  7. Heat transfer problems associated with laser fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, T.G.; Bohachevsky, I.O.; Booth, L.A.; Pendergrass, J.H.

    1976-01-01

    Briefly discussed are the laser-initiated fusion reaction, emissions that are produced, and methods that may be used to protect the walls of reactor cavities from these emissions. Thermal loadings encountered in laser fusion reactors will consist of energy deposition by discrete, short, intense pulses of x and gamma rays, fast alpha and other charged particles, and fusion neutrons. Presented are models of energy deposition in structural walls and blanket regions surrounding the reaction chamber and methods used to calculate resulting temperature increases and thermal stresses in these components. The results of such calculations indicate that the design conditions for the engineering of laser-initiated fusion reactors will be severe and a great amount of ingenuity and analysis will be required to meet them successfully.

  8. Plasma–wall interaction in laser inertial fusion reactors: novel proposals for radiation tests of first wall materials

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez Ruiz, Jesus; Rivera de Mena, Antonio; Mima, K.; Garoz, D.; Gonzalez Arrabal, Raquel; Gordillo Garcia, Nuria; Fuchs, J; Tanaka, K.; Fernández, I.; Briones, F.; Perlado Martin, Jose Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Dry-wall laser inertial fusion (LIF) chambers will have to withstand strong bursts of fast charged particles which will deposit tens of kJ m−2 and implant more than 1018 particles m−2 in a few microseconds at a repetition rate of some Hz. Large chamber dimensions and resistant plasma-facing materials must be combined to guarantee the chamber performance as long as possible under the expected threats: heating, fatigue, cracking, formation of defects, retention of light species, swelling and er...

  9. High-Yield Lithium-Injection Fusion-Energy (HYLIFE) reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blink, J.A.; Hogam, W.J.; Hovingh, J.; Meier, E.R.; Pitts, J.H. (comps.)

    1985-12-23

    The High-Yield Lithium-Injection Fusion Energy (HYLIFE) concept to convent inertial confinement fusion energy into electric power has undergone intensive research and refinement at LLNL since 1978. This paper reports on the final HYLIFE design, focusing on five major areas: the HYLIFE reaction chamber (which includes neutronics, liquid-metal jet-array hydrocynamics, and structural design), supporting systems, primary steam system and balance of plant, safety and environmental protection, and costs. An annotated bibliography of reports applicable to HYLIFE is also provided. We conclude that HYLIFE is a particularly viable concept for the safe, clean production of electrical energy. The liquid-metal jet array, HYLIFE's key design feature, protects the surrounding structural components from x-rays, fusion fuel-pellet debris, neutron damage and activation, and high temperatures and stresses, allowing the structure to last for the plant's entire 30-year lifetime without being replaced. 127 refs., 18 figs.

  10. Economics and Environmental Compatibility of Fusion Reactors —Its Analysis and Coming Issues— 4.Economic Effect of Fusion in Energy Market 4.2Various Externalities of Energy Systems and the Integrated Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Keishiro

    The primacy of a nuclear fusion reactor in a competitive energy market remarkably depends on to what extent the reactor contributes to reduce the externalities of energy. The reduction effects are classified into two effects, which have quite dissimilar characteristics. One is an effect of environmental dimensions. The other is related to energy security. In this study I took up the results of EC's Extern Eproject studies as are presentative example of the former effect. Concerning the latter effect, I clarified the fundamental characteristics of externalities related to energy security and the conceptual framework for the purpose of evaluation. In the socio-economical evaluation of research into and development investments in nuclear fusions reactors, the public will require the development of integrated evaluation systems to support the cost-effect analysis of how well the reduction effects of externalities have been integrated with the effects of technological innovation, learning, spillover, etc.

  11. Pacific Northwest Laboratory report on fusion reactor technology, April 1976 - June 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1976-07-01

    This quarterly report consists of progress summaries of research conducted by the staff of Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL). This reporting period includes progress made from April 1, 1976 through June 30, 1976. The summaries are presented in four major categories of: (1) fusion systems engineering, (2) material research and radiation environment simulation, (3) environmental effects of fusion concepts, and (4) manpower development. At the beginning of each section is a brief summary of the reports making up the section. The reports themselves have been kept relatively short and include preliminary results which ultimately are expected to be published elsewhere.

  12. ITER: The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and the nuclear weapons proliferation implications of thermonuclear-fusion energy

    CERN Document Server

    Gsponer, A; Gsponer, Andre; Hurni, Jean-Pierre

    2004-01-01

    This paper contains two parts: (I) A list of "points" highlighting the strategic-political and military-technical reasons and implications of the very probable siting of ITER (the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) in Japan, which should be confirmed sometimes in early 2004. (II) A technical analysis of the nuclear weapons proliferation implications of inertial- and magnetic-confinement fusion systems substantiating the technical points highlighted in the first part, and showing that while full access to the physics of thermonuclear weapons is the main implication of ICF, full access to large-scale tritium technology is the main proliferation impact of MCF. The conclusion of the paper is that siting ITER in a country such as Japan, which already has a large separated-plutonium stockpile, and an ambitious laser-driven ICF program (comparable in size and quality to those of the United States or France) will considerably increase its latent (or virtual) nuclear weapons proliferation status, and fo...

  13. Exchange Flow Characteristics in a Tokamak Vacuum Vessel of Fusion Reactor Under the Loss-of-Vacuum Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takase, Kazuyuki; Kunugi, Tomoaki; Seki, Yasushi

    1997-06-01

    When a Tokamak vacuum vessel of fusion reactor is broken, buoyancy-driven exchange flows will take place through breaches after the inside pressure of the vacuum vessel (VV) becomes equal to the outside pressure. The exchange flow may bring a mixture of activated dusts and tritium from the inside of the VV to the outside through the breaches. Moreover, the exchange flow may remove decay heat from the plasma-facing components. A preliminary LOVA (Loss Of VAcuum event) apparatus was constructed to investigate quantitative heat transfer characteristics of the exchange flows through the breaches under the LOVA conditions. The results of this study, the relationship between Froude numbers and breach locations in the VV was determined and empirical correlations for the average Froude numbers were derived.

  14. On the energy gain enhancement of DT+D3He fuel configuration in nuclear fusion reactor driven by heavy ion beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Khoshbinfar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available It is expected that advanced fuels be employed in the second generation of nuclear fusion reactors. Theoretical calculations show that in such a fuel, a high plasma temperature about 100 keV is a requisite for reaction rate improvement of nuclear fusion. However, creating such a temporal condition requires a more powerful driver than we have today. Here, introducing an optimal fuel configuration consisting of DT and D-3He layers, suitable for inertial fusion reactors and driven by heavy ion beams, the optimal energy gain conditions have been simulated and derived for 1.3 MJ system. It was found that, in this new fuel configuration, the ideal energy gain, is 22 percent more comparing with energy gain in corresponding single DT fuel layer. Moreover, the inner DT fuel layer contributed as an ignition trigger, while the outer D3He fuel acts as particle and radiation shielding as well as fuel layer.

  15. Light charged particles from low-energy {sup 58}Ni+{sup 112}Sn fusion-evaporation reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fineman, B.J.; Brinkmann, K.; Caraley, A.L.; Gan, N.; Kernan, W.J.; McGrath, R.L.; Savas, T.A. [Physics Department, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Proton and {alpha}-particle energy spectra were measured in coincidence with evaporation residues from 252 and 295 MeV {sup 58}Ni+{sup 112}Sn fusion reactions. Residues were separated from the beam using an electrostatic deflector and detected with surface barrier detectors. Light charged particles were detected with arrays of NaI detectors. Statistical model calculations based on standard parameter choices reproduce the spectra from the cold, low spin {sup 170}Pt{sup *} system. The effects of employing different methods of calculating transmission coefficients were explored. The optical model, ingoing wave boundary condition model, and a simple one-dimensional barrier penetration model from a fusion systematics analysis produce comparable satisfactory predictions. The Hill-Wheeler approximation for transmission coefficients gives unrealistic results for protons.

  16. Fusion Reactor Materials semiannual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1992-04-01

    This report contains papers on topic in the following areas of thermonuclear reactor materials: irradiation facilities, test matrices, and experimental methods; dosimetry, damage parameters and activation calculations; materials engineering and design requirements; fundamental mechanical behavior; radiation effects; development of structural alloys; solid breeding materials and beryllium; and ceramics. These paper have been index separately elsewhere. (LSP).

  17. Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-08-01

    This report mainly discusses topics on the physical effects of radiation on thermonuclear reactor materials. The areas discussed are: irradiation facilities, test matrices, and experimental methods; dosimetry, damage parameters, and activation calculations; fundamental mechanical behavior; radiation effects; mechanistic studies, theory and modeling; development of structural alloys; solid breeding materials; and ceramics. (FI)

  18. Fusion reactor materials: Semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1988-08-01

    This report contains papers on thermonuclear reactor materials. The general categories of these papers are: irradiation facilities, test matrices, and experimental methods; dosimetry, damage parameters and activation calculations; materials engineering and design requirements; fundamental mechanical behavior; development of structural alloys; solid breeding materials; ceramics; and radiation effects. Selected papers have been processed for inclusion in the energy database. (LSP)

  19. Inertial Fusion Energy reactor design studies: Prometheus-L, Prometheus-H. Volume 2, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waganer, L.M.; Driemeyer, D.E.; Lee, V.D.

    1992-03-01

    This report contains a review of design studies for Inertial Confinement reactor. This second of three volumes discussions is some detail the following: Objectives, requirements, and assumptions; rationale for design option selection; key technical issues and R&D requirements; and conceptual design selection and description.

  20. Local transport barrier formation and relaxation in reverse-shear plasmas on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synakowski, E. J.; Batha, S. H.; Beer, M. A.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R. E.; Budny, R. V.; Bush, C. E.; Efthimion, P. C.; Hahm, T. S.; Hammett, G. W.; LeBlanc, B.; Levinton, F.; Mazzucato, E.; Park, H.; Ramsey, A. T.; Schmidt, G.; Rewoldt, G.; Scott, S. D.; Taylor, G.; Zarnstorff, M. C.

    1997-05-01

    The roles of turbulence stabilization by sheared E×B flow and Shafranov shift gradients are examined for Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [D. J. Grove and D. M. Meade, Nucl. Fusion 25, 1167 (1985)] enhanced reverse-shear (ERS) plasmas. Both effects in combination provide the basis of a positive-feedback model that predicts reinforced turbulence suppression with increasing pressure gradient. Local fluctuation behavior at the onset of ERS confinement is consistent with this framework. The power required for transitions into the ERS regime are lower when high power neutral beams are applied earlier in the current profile evolution, consistent with the suggestion that both effects play a role. Separation of the roles of E×B and Shafranov shift effects was performed by varying the E×B shear through changes in the toroidal velocity with nearly steady-state pressure profiles. Transport and fluctuation levels increase only when E×B shearing rates are driven below a critical value that is comparable to the fastest linear growth rates of the dominant instabilities. While a turbulence suppression criterion that involves the ratio of shearing to linear growth rates is in accord with many of these results, the existence of hidden dependencies of the criterion is suggested in experiments where the toroidal field was varied. The forward transition into the ERS regime has also been examined in strongly rotating plasmas. The power threshold is higher with unidirectional injection than with balance injection.

  1. Simulation of plasma-surface interactions in a fusion reactor by means of QSPA plasma streams: recent results and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garkusha, I. E.; Aksenov, N. N.; Byrka, O. V.; Makhlaj, V. A.; Herashchenko, S. S.; Malykhin, S. V.; Petrov, Yu V.; Staltsov, V. V.; Surovitskiy, S. V.; Wirtz, M.; Linke, J.; Sadowski, M. J.; Skladnik-Sadowska, E.

    2016-09-01

    This paper is devoted to plasma-surface interaction issues at high heat-loads which are typical for fusion reactors. For the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), which is now under construction, the knowledge of erosion processes and the behaviour of various constructional materials under extreme conditions is a very critical issue, which will determine a successful realization of the project. The most important plasma-surface interaction (PSI) effects in 3D geometry have been studied using a QSPA Kh-50 powerful quasi-stationary plasma accelerator. Mechanisms of the droplet and dust generation have been investigated in detail. It was found that the droplets emission from castellated surfaces has a threshold character and a cyclic nature. It begins only after a certain number of the irradiating plasma pulses when molten and shifted material is accumulated at the edges of the castellated structure. This new erosion mechanism, connected with the edge effects, results in an increase in the size of the emitted droplets (as compared with those emitted from a flat surface). This mechanism can even induce the ejection of sub-mm particles. A concept of a new-generation QSPA facility, the current status of this device maintenance, and prospects for further experiments are also presented.

  2. The role of the boundary plasma in defining the viability of a magnetic fusion reactor: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, Dennis

    2012-10-01

    The boundary of magnetic confinement devices, from the pedestal through to the surrounding surfaces, encompasses an enormous range of plasma and material physics, and their integrated coupling. It is becoming clear that due to fundamental limits of plasma stability and material response the boundary will largely define the viability of an MFE reactor. However we face an enormous knowledge deficit in stepping from present devices and ITER towards a demonstration power plant. We review the boundary and plasma-material interaction (PMI) research required to address this deficit as well as related theoretical/scaling methods for extending present results to future devices. The research activities and gaps are reviewed and organized to three major axes of challenges: power density, plasma duration, and material temperature. The boundary can also be considered a multi-scale system of coupled plasma and material science regulated through the non-linear interface of the sheath. Measurement, theory and modeling across these scales are reviewed. Dimensionless parameters, often used to organized core plasma transport on similarity arguments, can be extended to the boundary plasma, plasma-surface interactions and material response. The scaling methodology suggests intriguing ways forward to prescribe and understand the boundary issues of an eventual reactor in intermediate size devices. Finally, proposed technology and science innovations towards solving the extreme PMI/boundary challenges of magnetic fusion energy will be reviewed.

  3. Fusion power production in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor baseline H-mode scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafiq, T.; Kritz, A. H. [Department of Physics, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States); Kessel, C. E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Pankin, A. Y. [Tech-X Corporation, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Self-consistent simulations of 15 MA ITER H-mode DT scenarios, from ramp-up through flat-top, are carried out. Electron and ion temperatures, toroidal angular frequency, and currents are evolved, in simulations carried out using the predictive TRANSPort and integrated modeling code starting with initial profiles and equilibria obtained from tokamak simulation code studies. Studies are carried out examining the dependence and sensitivity of fusion power production on electron density, argon impurity concentration, choice of radio frequency heating, pedestal temperature without and with E × B flow shear effects included, and the degree of plasma rotation. The goal of these whole-device ITER simulations is to identify dependencies that might impact ITER fusion performance.

  4. Conceptual study of ferromagnetic pebbles for heat exhaust in fusion reactors with short power decay length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Gierse

    2015-03-01

    The key results of this study are that very high heat fluxes are accessible in the operation space of ferromagnetic pebbles, that ferromagnetic pebbles are compatible with tokamak operation and current divertor designs, that the heat removal capability of ferromagnetic pebbles increases as λq decreases and, finally, that for fusion relevant values of q∥ pebble diameters below 100 μm are required.

  5. Study of safety features and accident scenarios in a fusion DEMO reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, M., E-mail: nakamura.makoto@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Tobita, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Gulden, W. [Fusion for Energy, c/o EFDA Garching and Max-Plank-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching D-85748 (Germany); Watanabe, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Toshiba Corporation, Yokohama, Kanagawa 235-8523 (Japan); Someya, Y. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Tanigawa, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Sakamoto, Y. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Araki, T.; Matsumiya, H.; Ishii, K. [Toshiba Corporation, Yokohama, Kanagawa 235-8523 (Japan); Utoh, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Takase, H. [IFERC Project Team, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Hayashi, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Satou, A.; Yonomoto, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Federici, G. [Fusion for Energy, c/o EFDA Garching and Max-Plank-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching D-85748 (Germany); Okano, K. [IFERC Project Team, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: This paper reports progress in the fusion DEMO safety research conducted under the Broader Approach DEMO Design Activities; Hazards of a reference DEMO concept have been assessed; Reference accident event sequences in the reference DEMO in this study have been analyzed based on the master logic diagram (MLD) and the functional failure mode and effect analysis (FFMEA) techniques; Accident events of particular concern in the DEMO have been selected based on the MLD and FFMEA analysis. Abstract: After the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear accident, a need for assuring safety of fusion energy has grown in the Japanese (JA) fusion research community. DEMO safety research has been launched as a part of Broader Approach DEMO Design Activities (BA-DDA). This paper reports progress in the fusion DEMO safety research conducted under BA-DDA. Safety requirements and evaluation guidelines have been, first of all, established based on those established in the Japanese ITER site invitation activities. The radioactive source terms and energies that can mobilize such source terms have been assessed for a reference DEMO concept. This concept employs in-vessel components that are cooled by pressurized water and built of a low activation ferritic steel (F82H), contains solid pebble beds made of lithium-titanate (Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}) and beryllium–titanium (Be{sub 12}Ti) for tritium breeding and neutron multiplication, respectively. It is shown that unlike the energies expected in ITER, the enthalpy in the first wall/blanket cooling loops is large compared to the other energies expected in the reference DEMO concept. Reference accident event sequences in the reference DEMO in this study have been analyzed based on the Master Logic Diagram and Functional Failure Mode and Effect Analysis techniques. Accident events of particular concern in the DEMO have been selected based on the event sequence analysis and the hazard assessment.

  6. A water cooled, lithium lead breeding blanket for a DEMO fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casini, G.; Rieger, M.; Biggio, M.; Farfaletti-Casali, F.; Tominetti, S.; Wu, J.; Zucchetti, M. (Commission of the European Communities, Ispra (Italy). Joint Research Centre); Labbe, P.; Baraer, L.; Gervaise, G.; Giancarli, L.; Roze, M.; Severi, Y.; Quintric-Bossy, J. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France))

    1991-04-01

    The main features of a tritium breeding blanket for a Demonstration Power Reactor involving the eutectic Pb-17Li as liquid breeder and water as coolant are presented. The configuration of the blanket segments and breeder modules as well as their arrangement inside the reactor vacuum vessel are outlined. The main design aspects and the corresponding design limits are reviewed, namely those related to thermomechanics, neutronics, magneto-hydrodynamics, tritium permeation and recovery. First results of safety analysis, in particular those connected with the rupture of a coolant tube in the breeder module are presented and discussed. As a conclusion, the feasibility of the concept look attractive. A problem which requires further investigation is that of the tritium self-sufficiency. It is shown that a net tritium production near to one can be obtained if berylium tiles are placed in front of the plasma, provided that they are cooled by heavy water. (orig.).

  7. Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS). Final report. Volume 2. Commercial fusion synfuels plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donohue, M.L.; Price, M.E. (eds.)

    1984-07-01

    Volume 2 contains the following chapters: (1) synfuels; (2) physics base and parameters for TMR; (3) high-temperature two-temperature-zone blanket system for synfuel application; (4) thermochemical hydrogen processes; (5) interfacing the sulfur-iodine cycle; (6) interfacing the reactor with the thermochemical process; (7) tritium control in the blanket system; (8) the sulfur trioxide fluidized-bed composer; (9) preliminary cost estimates; and (10) fuels beyond hydrogen. (MOW)

  8. Transient Behaviour of Superconducting Magnet Systems of Fusion Reactor ITER during Safety Discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Miri

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the transient behaviour of the toroidal and poloidal field coils magnet systems of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor during safety discharge, network models with lumped elements are established. Frequency-dependant values of the network elements, that is, inductances and resistances are calculated with the finite element method. That way, overvoltages can be determined. According to these overvoltages, the insulation coordination of coils has to be selected.

  9. Numerical simulations of in-situ neutron detector calibration experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ku, L.P.; Hendel, H.W.; Liew, S.L.; Strachan, J.D.

    1990-02-01

    Accurate determinations of fusion neutron yields on the TFTR require that the neutron detectors be absolutely calibrated in-situ, using neutron sources of known strengths. For such calibrations, numerical simulations of neutron transport can be powerful tools in the design of experiments and the study of measurement results. On the TFTR, numerical calibration experiments' have been frequently used to complement actual detector calibrations. We present calculational approaches and transport models used in these numerical simulations, and summarize the results from simulating the calibration of {sup 235}U fission detectors carried out in December 1988. 12 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. Helium desorption in EFDA iron materials for use in nuclear fusion reactors; Desorcion de helio en materiales de fierro EFDA para su aplicacion en los reactores de fusion nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar R, A. R.; Pinedo V, J. L. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Sanchez, F. J.; Ibarra, A.; Vila, R., E-mail: arsr2707@hotmail.com [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Av. Complutense No. 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-09-15

    In this paper the implantation with monoenergetic ions (He{sup +}) was realized with an energy of 5 KeV in iron samples (99.9999 %) EFDA (European Fusion Development Agreement) using a collimated beam, after this a Thermal Desorption Spectrometry of Helium (THeDS) was made using a leak meter that detects amounts of helium of up to 10{sup -}- {sup 12} mbar l/s. Doses with which the implantation was carried out were 2 x 10{sup 15} He{sup +} /cm{sup 2}, 1 x 10{sup 16} He{sup +} /cm{sup 2}, 2 x 10{sup 16} He{sup +} /cm{sup 2}, 1 x 10{sup 17} He{sup +} /cm{sup 2} during times of 90 s, 450 s, 900 s and 4500 s, respectively. Also, using the SRIM program was calculated the depth at which the helium ions penetrate the sample of pure ion, finding that the maximum distance is 0.025μm in the sample. For this study, 11 samples of Fe EFDA were prepared to find defects that are caused after implantation of helium in order to provide valuable information to the manufacture of materials for future fusion reactors. However understand the effects of helium in the micro structural evolution and mechanical properties of structural materials are some of the most difficult questions to answer in materials research for nuclear fusion. When analyzing the spectra of THeDS was found that five different groups of desorption peaks existed, which are attributed to defects of He caused in the material, these defects are He{sub n} V (2≤n≤6), He{sub n} V{sub m}, He V for the groups I, II and IV respectively. These results are due to the comparison of the peaks presented in the desorption spectrum of He, with those of other authors who have made theoretical calculations. Is important to note that the thermal desorption spectrum of helium was different depending on the dose with which the implantation of He{sup +} was performed. (Author)

  11. Laser-induced mobilization of dust produced during fusion reactors operation; Mise en suspension par laser de poussieres generees lors du fonctionnement des reacteurs de fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vatry, A.

    2010-11-16

    During tokamak operation, plasma-wall interactions lead to material erosion process and dusts production. These dusts are mainly composed by carbon and tungsten, with sizes ranging from 10 nm to 100 {mu}m. For safety reasons and to guarantee an optimum reactor functioning, the dusts have to be kept in reasonable quantity. The dusts mobilization is a first step to collect them, and the laser is a promising technique for this application. To optimize the cleaning, physical mechanisms responsible for dust ejection induced by laser have been identified. Some particles, such as aggregates, are directly ablated by the laser. The metal droplets are ejected intact by an electrostatic force, induced by the photoelectrons. We also characterized the particles ejection to choose an appropriate collection device. (author) [French] Lors du fonctionnement d'une machine de fusion, les interactions plasma-parois conduisent a des processus d'erosion des materiaux et a la production de particules. Ces poussieres sont principalement composees de carbone et de tungstene. Pour des raisons de surete et afin de garantir un fonctionnement optimum du reacteur, il est important de garder en quantite raisonnable les poussieres dont la taille varie entre 10 nm et 100 {mu}m. La mise en suspension de ces poussieres est une etape preliminaire a leur recuperation, et le laser est une technique prometteuse pour cette application. Afin d'optimiser le nettoyage, les mecanismes physiques a l'origine de l'ejection induite par laser de ces poussieres ont ete identifies. Les agregats sont directement ablates par le laser et les gouttelettes metalliques sont ejectees intactes par une force electrostatique induite par les photoelectrons. Nous avons egalement caracterise l'ejection des particules pour choisir un systeme de recuperation adapte

  12. Possibilities of synthesis of unknown isotopes of superheavy nuclei with charge numbers Z > 108 in asymmetric actinide-based complete fusion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Juhee [Institute for Basic Science, Rare Isotope Science Project, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Adamian, G.G. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Antonenko, N.V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Tomsk Polytechnic University, Mathematical Physics Department, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-10-15

    The possibilities of production of new isotopes of superheavy nuclei with charge numbers Z = 109-114 in various asymmetric hot fusion reactions are studied for the first time. The excitation functions of the formation of these isotopes in the xn evaporation channels are predicted and the optimal conditions for the synthesis are proposed. The products of the suggested reactions can fill a gap of unknown isotopes between the isotopes of the heaviest nuclei obtained in cold and hot complete fusion reactions. (orig.)

  13. Possibilities of synthesis of unknown isotopes of superheavy nuclei with charge numbers Z > 108 in asymmetric actinide-based complete fusion reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Juhee; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.

    2016-10-01

    The possibilities of production of new isotopes of superheavy nuclei with charge numbers Z = 109-114 in various asymmetric hot fusion reactions are studied for the first time. The excitation functions of the formation of these isotopes in the xn evaporation channels are predicted and the optimal conditions for the synthesis are proposed. The products of the suggested reactions can fill a gap of unknown isotopes between the isotopes of the heaviest nuclei obtained in cold and hot complete fusion reactions.

  14. Self-ignition of an advanced fuel field-reversed configuration reactor by fusion product heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, M.; Ohi, S.; Okamoto, M.; Momota, H.; Wakabayashi, J.

    1987-09-01

    A self-ignition of a deuterium-deuterium (D-D)-/sup 3/He fuel field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma by fusion product heating is studied by using the point plasma model, where an FRC plasma equilibrium is taken into account. It is numerically demonstrated that the D-D-/sup 3/He plasma can be evolved from a deuterium-tritium burning plasma in a controlled manner by means of a compression-decompression control as well as a fueling control. It is also indicated that the increase of a trapped flux is effective for suppressing the excessive elongation of a plasma during the transition. The proposed method may provide a solution to the problem on plasma heating to attain a D-D-/sup 3/He self-ignition.

  15. Application of railgun principle to high-velocity hydrogen pellet injection for magnetic fusion reactor refueling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K.

    1991-08-01

    This report contains three documents describing the progress made by the University of Illinois electromagnetic railgun program sponsored by the Office of Fusion Energy of the United States Department of Energy during the period from July 16, 1990 to August 16, 1991. The first document contains a brief summary of the tasks initiated, continued, or completed, the status of major tasks, and the research effort distribution, estimated and actual, during the period. The second document contains a description of the work performed on time resolved laser interferometric density measurement of the railgun plasma-arc armature. The third document is an account of research on the spectroscopic measurement of the electron density and temperature of the railgun plasma arc.

  16. Fusion reactor systems studies. Progress report, November 1, 1992--October 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-09

    Fusion Technology Institute personnel actively participated in the ARIES/PULSAR project during the present contract period. Numerous presentations were made at PULSAR project meetings, major contributions were written for the ARIES-II/IV Final Report presentations and papers were given at technical conferences contributions were written for the ARIES Lessons Learned report and a very large number of electronic-mail and regular-mail communications were sent. The remaining sections of this progress report win summarize the work accomplished and in progress for the PULSAR project during the contract period. The main areas of effort are: PULSAR Research; ARIES-II/IV Report Contributions; ARIES Lessons Learned Report Contributions; and Stellarator Study.

  17. Reinvestigation of the charge density distribution in arc discharge fusion system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Lin Horng; Yee, Lee Kim; Nan, Phua Yeong; Thung, Yong Yun; Khok, Yong Thian; Rahman, Faidz Abd [Centre of Photonics and Advance Material, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-04-24

    A continual arc discharge system has been setup and the light intensity of arc discharge has been profiled. The mathematical model of local energy density distribution in arc discharge fusion has been simulated which is in good qualitative agreement with light intensity profile of arc discharge in the experiments. Eventually, the local energy density distribution of arc discharge system is able to be precisely manipulated to act as heat source in the fabrication of fused fiber devices.

  18. Fabrication and integrity test preparation of HIP-joined W and ferritic-martensitic steel mockups for fusion reactor development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Won; Shin, Kyu In; Kim, Suk Kwon; Jin, Hyung Gon; Lee, Eo Hwak; Yoon, Jae Sung; Choi, Bo Guen; Moon, Se Youn; Hong, Bong Guen

    2014-10-01

    Tungsten (W) and ferritic-martensitic steel (FMS) as armor and structural materials, respectively, are the major candidates for plasma-facing components (PFCs) such as the blanket first wall (BFW) and the divertor, in a fusion reactor. In the present study, three W/FMS mockups were successfully fabricated using a hot isostatic pressing (HIP, 900 °C, 100 MPa, 1.5 hrs) with a following post-HIP heat treatment (PHHT, tempering, 750 °C, 70 MPa, 2 hrs), and the W/FMS joining method was developed based on the ITER BFW and the test blanket module (TBM) development project from 2004 to the present. Using a 10-MHz-frequency flat-type probe to ultrasonically test of the joint, we found no defects in the fabricated mockups. For confirmation of the joint integrity, a high heat flux test will be performed up to the thermal lifetime of the mockup under the proper test conditions. These conditions were determined through a preliminary analysis with conventional codes such as ANSYS-CFX for thermal-hydraulic conditions considering the test facility, the Korea heat load test facility with an electron beam (KoHLT-EB), and its water coolant system at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI).

  19. Temperature distributions in a Tokamak vacuum vessel of fusion reactor after the loss-of-vacuum-events occurred

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takase, K.; Kunugi, T.; Shibata, M.; Seki, Y. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1998-09-01

    If a loss-of-vacuum-event (LOVA) occurred in a fusion reactor, buoyancy-driven exchange flows would occur at breaches of a vacuum vessel (VV) due to the temperature difference between the inside and outside of the VV. The exchange flows may bring mixtures of activated materials and tritium in the VV to the outside through the breaches, and remove decay heat from the plasma-facing components of the VV. Therefore, the LOVA experiments were carried out under the condition that one or two breaches was opened and that the VV was heated to a maximum 200 C, using a small-scaled LOVA experimental apparatus. Air and helium gas were provided as working fluids. Fluid and wall temperature distributions in the VV were measured and the flow patterns in the VV were estimated by using these temperature distributions. It was found that: (1) the exchange mass in the VV depended on the breach positions; (2) the exchange flow at the single breach case became a counter-current flow when the breach was at the roof of the VV and a stratified flow when it was at the side wall; (3) and that at the double breach case, a one-way flow between two breaches was formed. (orig.) 6 refs.

  20. Design and Analysis of HIP joined W and Ferritic-Martensitic Steel Mockup for Fusion Reactor Divertor Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D. W.; Shin, K. I.; Kim, S. K.; Jin, H. G.; Lee, E. H.; Yoon, J. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Moon, S. Y.; Hong, B. G. [Chonbuk National Univ., Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Korea has developed a Helium Cooled Ceramic Reflector (HCCR) based Test Blanket System (TBS) for an ITER, which consists of the First Wall (FW), Breeding Zone (BZ), Side Wall (SW), and BZ box. Among them, the FW is an important component which faces the plasma directly and, therefore, it is subjected to high heat and neutron loads. The FW of the TBM is considered to be composed of a beryllium (Be) armor as a plasma-facing material and Ferritic-Martensitic (FM) steel as a structure material, or a tungsten (W) armor and FM steel, or bare FM steel. Since Be/FMS and bare FMS were developed and proved by high heat flux (HHF) test, W armor and FM steel joining, fabricated mock-ups, and preparation of the high heat flux (HHF) test for integrity investigation are introduced in the present study. For the application to fusion reactor, joining methods with W to FMS has been developed. The W mock-up was fabricated with HIP considering Ti interlayer and PHHT condition. And the HHF test was prepared by performing the preliminary analysis to determine the test conditions. From the analysis heating and cooling conditions were determined for 0.5 and 1.0 MW/m2 heat fluxes. In the near future, the thermal life-time will be evaluated to determine the test period of the mockups by the mechanical analysis with ANSYS.

  1. A review of nuclear data needs and their status for fusion reactor technology with some suggestions on a strategy to satisfy the requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Cheng, E.T. [TSI Research, Inc., Solana Beach, CA (United States)

    1991-09-01

    A review was performed on the needs and status of nuclear data for fusion-reactor technology. Generally, the status of nuclear data for fusion has been improved during the past two decades due to the dedicated effort of the nuclear data developers. However, there are still deficiencies in the nuclear data base, particularly in the areas of activation and neutron scattering cross sections. Activation cross sections were found to be unsatisfactory in 83 of the 153 reactions reviewed. The scattering cross sections for fluorine and boron will need to be improved at energies above 1 MeV. Suggestions concerning a strategy to address the specific fusion nuclear data needs for dosimetry and activation are also provided.

  2. Conceptual studies of toroidal field magnets for the tokamak (fusion) experimental power reactor. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-11-01

    This report presents the results of ''Conceptual Studies of Toroidal Field Magnets for the Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor'' performed for the Energy Research and Development Administration, Oak Ridge Operations. Two conceptual coil designs are developed. One design approach to produce a specified 8 Tesla maximum field uses a novel NbTi superconductor design cooled by pool-boiling liquid helium. For a highest practicable field design, a unique NbSn/sub 3/ conductor is used with forced-flow, single-phase liquid helium cooling to achieve a 12 Tesla peak field. Fabrication requirements are also developed for these approximately 7 meter horizontal bore by 11 meter vertical bore coils. Cryostat design approaches are analyzed and a hybrid cryostat approach selected. Structural analyses are performed for approaches to support in-plane and out-of-plane loads and a structural approach selected. In addition to the conceptual design studies, cost estimates and schedules are prepared for each of the design approaches, major uncertainties and recommendations for research and development identified, and test coil size for demonstration recommended.

  3. Microstructural evolution in an austenitic stainless steel fusion reactor first wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoller, R.E.; Odette, G.R.

    1986-01-01

    A detailed rate-theory-based model of microstructural evolution under fast neutron irradiation has been developed. The prominent new aspect of this model is a treatment of dislocation evolution in which Frank faulted loops nucleate, grow and unfault to provide a source for network dislocations while the dislocation network can be simultaneously annihilated by a climb/glide process. The predictions of this model compare very favorably with the observed dose and temperature dependence of these key microstructural features over a broad range. This new description of dislocation evolution has been coupled with a previously developed model of cavity evolution and good agreement has been obtained between the predictions of the composite model and fast reactor swelling data as well. The results from the composite model also reveal that the various components of the irradiation-induced microstructure evolve in a highly coupled manner. The predictions of the composite model are more sensitive to parametric variations than more simple models. Hence, its value as a tool in data analysis and extrapolation is enhanced.

  4. Engineering solutions for components facing the plasma in experimental fusion power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casini, G.; Farfaletti-Casali, F.

    1986-07-01

    An analysis is made of the engineering problems related to the structures facing the plasma in experimental tokamak-type reactors. Attention is focused on the so-called ''current first wall'', i.e. the wall side of the blanket segments facing the plasma, and on the collector plates of the impurity control system. The design of a first wall, developed at the JRC-Ispra for INTOR/NET and based on the idea of conceiving it as one of the sides, of a box which envelopes a blanket segment, is described. The progress in the structural analysis of the first wall box under operating and abnormal (plasma disruption) conditions is presented and discussed. The design of the collector plates of the single-null divertor of INTOR/NET, as developed at the JRC-Ispra, is described. This design is based on a W-Re protective layer and a water-cooled heat sink, including cooling channels iun Cu-alloys and a Cu-matrix for bonding. The results of the elastic and elasto-plastic evaluations are discussed, together with a layout of the experimental activity in progress. It is concluded that, even if the uncertainties related to the plasma-wall interaction are still relevant, the engineering solutions identified look manageable, although they require a large research and development effort.

  5. Ceramics for fusion reactors: The role of the lithium orthosilicate as breeder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carella, Elisabetta, E-mail: elisabetta.carella@ciemat.es [National Laboratory for Magnetic Fusion, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Hernandez, Teresa [National Laboratory for Magnetic Fusion, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)

    2012-11-15

    Lithium-based oxide ceramics are studied as breeder blanket materials for the controlled thermonuclear reactors (CTR). Lithium orthosilicate (Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}) is one of the most promising candidates because of its lithium concentration (0.54 g/cm{sup 3}), its high melting temperature (1523 K) and its excellent tritium release behavior. It is reported that the diffusion of tritium is closely related to that of lithium, so it is possible to find an indirect measure of the trend of tritium studying the diffusivity of Li{sup +}. In the present work, the synthesis of the Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} is carried out by Spray drying followed by pyrolysis. The study of the Li{sup +} ion diffusion on the sintered bodies, is investigated by means of electrical conductivity measurements. The effect of the {gamma}-ray irradiation is evaluated by the impedance spectroscopy method (EIS) from room temperature to 1173 K. The results indicate that the sintesis process employed can produce Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} in the form of pebbles, finally the best ion species for the electrical conduction is the Li{sup +} and is shown that the g-irradiation to a dose of 5MGy, facilitate its mobility through the creation of defects, without change in its conduction process.

  6. Charge-injection-device performance in the high-energy-neutron environment of laser-fusion experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, F J; DeHaas, T; Glebov, V Yu

    2010-10-01

    Charge-injection devices (CIDs) are being used to image x rays in laser-fusion experiments on the University of Rochester's OMEGA Laser System. The CID cameras are routinely used up to the maximum neutron yields generated (∼10(14) DT). The detectors are deployed in x-ray pinhole cameras and Kirkpatrick-Baez microscopes. The neutron fluences ranged from ∼10(7) to ∼10(9) neutrons/cm(2) and useful x-ray images were obtained even at the highest fluences. It is intended to use CID cameras at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) as a supporting means of recording x-ray images. The results of this work predict that x-ray images should be obtainable on the NIF at yields up to ∼10(15), depending on distance and shielding.

  7. Is Helium-3 hype, hyperbole or a hopeful fuel for the future. [Lunar He-3 extraction/production for earth fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackowski, M.J.

    1989-08-01

    Sixty kilowatts of thermal power have been reached with deuterium/He-3 reaction on the JET reactor, and full scale study of the environmental impact of a tokamak D/He-3 reactor is now underway for NASA. He-3 is obtained from the decaying process undergone by tritium, but in nature, the source of He-3 is the sun. It is found in abundance in the lunar regolith. He-3 combines with deuterium in a fusion reaction generating very high amounts of energy, He-4 and protons. He-3 is economical; it could be moon mined and sold at a price comparable to oil. The energy released is roughly 70 percent efficient, and can be directly converted to electricity with solid-state converters. Also, reactors can be built cheaper, placed closer to cities, and maintained and decomissioned more easily than any other type of fission or fusion reactor, thus allowing faster commercialization and lower energy costs. He-3 is not very radioactive; however, the physics of its nuclear structure presents barriers to getting it to fuse. Other advantages of producing He-3 on the moon include obtaining gases necessary in moon colonies, and fuel for hydrogen rockets. Water, nickel and carbon-oxygen compounds can also be obtained that way.

  8. Application of carbon-aluminum nanostructures in divertor coatings from fusion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciupina, V.; Lungu, C. P.; Vladoiu, R.; Epure, T. D.; Prodan, G.; Porosnicu, C.; Prodan, M.; Stanescu, I. M.; Contulov, M.; Mandes, A.; Dinca, V.; Zarovschi, V.

    2012-10-01

    Nanostructured carbon materials have increasingly attracted the interest of the scientific community, because of their fascinating physical properties and potential applications in high-tech devices. In the current ITER design, the tiles made of carbon fiber composites (CFCs) are foreseen for the strike point zone and tungsten (W) for other parts of the divertor region. This choice is a compromise based mainly on experience with individual materials in many different tokamaks. Also Carbon-Aluminum composites are the candidate material for the First Wall in ITER. In order to prepare nanostructured carbon-aluminum nanocomposite for the divertor part in fusion applications, the original method thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) was used in two electronic guns configuration. One of the main advantages of this technology is the bombardment of the growing thin film just by the ions of the depositing film. Moreover, the energy of ions can be controlled. Thermo-electrons emitted by an externally heated cathode and focused by a Wehnelt focusing cylinder are strongly accelerated towards the anode whose material is evaporated and bright plasma is ignited by a high voltage DC supply. The nanostructured C-Al films were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Tribological properties in dry sliding were evaluated using a CSM ball-on-disc tribometer. The carbon - aluminum films were identified as a nanocrystals complex (from 2nm to 50 nm diameters) surrounded by amorphous structures with a strong graphitization tendency, allowing the creating of adherent and wear resistant films. The friction coefficients (0.1 - 0.2, 0.5) of the C-Al coatings was decreased more than 2-5 times in comparison with the uncoated substrates proving excellent tribological properties. C-Al nanocomposites coatings were designed to have excellent tribological properties while the structure is composed by nanocrystals complex surrounded by amorphous structures

  9. Electron microscopy characterization of some carbon based nanostructures with application in divertors coatings from fusion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciupina, V.; Morjan, I.; Lungu, C. P.; Vladoiu, R.; Prodan, G.; Prodan, M.; Zarovschi, V.; Porosnicu, C.; Stanescu, I. M.; Contulov, M.; Mandes, A.; Dinca, V.; Sugiyama, K.

    2011-10-01

    Nanostructured carbon materials have increasingly attracted the interest of the scientific community, because of their fascinating physical properties and potential applications in high-tech devices. In the current ITER design, the tiles made of carbon fiber composites (CFCs) are foreseen for the strike point zone and tungsten (W) for other parts of the divertor region. This choice is a compromise based mainly on experience with individual materials in many different tokamaks. Also Beryllium is the candidate material for the First Wall in ITER. In order to prepare nanostructured carbon-tungsten nanocomposite for the divertor part in fusion applications, the original method thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) was used in two electronic guns configuration. One of the main advantages of this technology is the bombardment of the growing thin film just by the ions of the depositing film. The nanostructured C-W and C-Be films were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The C-W films were identified as a nanocrystals complex (5 nm average diameter) surrounded by amorphous structures with a strong graphitization tendency, allowing the creating of adherent and wear resistant films. The C-Be films are polycrystalline with mean grain size about 15 nm. The friction coefficients (0.15 - 0.35) of the C-W coatings was decreased more than 3-5 times in comparison with the uncoated substrates proving excellent tribological properties. C-W nanocomposites coatings were designed to have excellent tribological properties while the structure is composed by nanocrystals complex surrounded by amorphous structures with a strong graphitization tendency, allowing the creating of adherent and wear resistant films.&updat

  10. A passively-safe fusion reactor blanket with helium coolant and steel structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crosswait, K.M.

    1994-04-01

    Helium is attractive for use as a fusion blanket coolant for a number of reasons. It is neutronically and chemically inert, nonmagnetic, and will not change phase during any off-normal or accident condition. A significant disadvantage of helium, however, is its low density and volumetric heat capacity. This disadvantage manifests itself most clearly during undercooling accident conditions such as a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) or a loss of flow accident (LOFA). This thesis describes a new helium-cooled tritium breeding blanket concept which performs significantly better during such accidents than current designs. The proposed blanket uses reduced-activation ferritic steel as a structural material and is designed for neutron wall loads exceeding 4 MW/m{sup 2}. The proposed geometry is based on the nested-shell concept developed by Wong, but some novel features are used to reduce the severity of the first wall temperature excursion. These features include the following: (1) A ``beryllium-joint`` concept is introduced, which allows solid beryllium slabs to be used as a thermal conduction path from the first wall to the cooler portions of the blanket. The joint concept allows for significant swelling of the beryllium (10 percent or more) without developing large stresses in the blanket structure. (2) Natural circulation of the coolant in the water-cooled shield is used to maintain shield temperatures below 100 degrees C, thus maintaining a heat sink close to the blanket during the accident. This ensures the long-term passive safety of the blanket.

  11. A modular platform for one-step assembly of multi-component membrane systems by fusion of charged proteoliposomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishmukhametov, Robert R.; Russell, Aidan N.; Berry, Richard M.

    2016-10-01

    An important goal in synthetic biology is the assembly of biomimetic cell-like structures, which combine multiple biological components in synthetic lipid vesicles. A key limiting assembly step is the incorporation of membrane proteins into the lipid bilayer of the vesicles. Here we present a simple method for delivery of membrane proteins into a lipid bilayer within 5 min. Fusogenic proteoliposomes, containing charged lipids and membrane proteins, fuse with oppositely charged bilayers, with no requirement for detergent or fusion-promoting proteins, and deliver large, fragile membrane protein complexes into the target bilayers. We demonstrate the feasibility of our method by assembling a minimal electron transport chain capable of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis, combining Escherichia coli F1Fo ATP-synthase and the primary proton pump bo3-oxidase, into synthetic lipid vesicles with sizes ranging from 100 nm to ~10 μm. This provides a platform for the combination of multiple sets of membrane protein complexes into cell-like artificial structures.

  12. Image quality method as a possible way of in situ monitoring of in-vessel mirrors in a fusion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalov, V. G.; Voitsenya, V. S.; Makhov, M. N.; Ryzhkov, I. V.; Shapoval, A. N.; Solodovchenko, S. I.; Stan, A. F.; Bondarenko, V. N.; Donné, A. J. H.; Litnovsky, A.

    2016-09-01

    The plasma-facing (first) mirrors in ITER will be subject to sputtering and/or contamination with rates that will depend on the precise mirror locations. The resulting influence of both these factors can reduce the mirror reflectance (R) and worsen the transmitted image quality (IQ). This implies that monitoring the mirror quality in situ is an actual desire, and the present work is an attempt towards a solution. The method we propose is able to elucidate the reason for degradation of the mirror reflectance: sputtering by charge exchange atoms or deposition of contaminated layers. In case of deposition of contaminants, the mirror can be cleaned in situ, but a rough mirror (due to sputtering) cannot be used anymore and has to be replaced. To demonstrate the feasibility of the IQ method, it was applied to mirror specimens coated with carbon film in laboratory conditions and to mirrors coated with contaminants during exposure in fusion devices (TRIAM-1M and Tore Supra), as well as to mirrors of different materials exposed to sputtering by plasma ions in the DSM-2 plasma stand (in IPP NSC KIPT).

  13. Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Robert M.

    1976-10-05

    1. A neutronic reactor having a moderator, coolant tubes traversing the moderator from an inlet end to an outlet end, bodies of material fissionable by neutrons of thermal energy disposed within the coolant tubes, and means for circulating water through said coolant tubes characterized by the improved construction wherein the coolant tubes are constructed of aluminum having an outer diameter of 1.729 inches and a wall thickness of 0.059 inch, and the means for circulating a liquid coolant through the tubes includes a source of water at a pressure of approximately 350 pounds per square inch connected to the inlet end of the tubes, and said construction including a pressure reducing orifice disposed at the inlet ends of the tubes reducing the pressure of the water by approximately 150 pounds per square inch.

  14. Review of the safety concept for fusion reactor concepts and transferability of the nuclear fission regulation to potential fusion power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raeder, Juergen; Weller, Arthur; Wolf, Robert [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik (IPP), Garching (Germany); Jin, Xue Zhou; Boccaccini, Lorenzo V.; Stieglitz, Robert; Carloni, Dario [Karlsruher Institute fuer Technologie (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Pistner, Christoph [Oeko-Institut e.V., Darmstadt (Germany); Herb, Joachim [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Koeln (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    This paper summarizes the current state of the art in science and technology of the safety concept for future fusion power plants (FPPs) and examines the transferability of the current nuclear fission regulation to the concepts of future fusion power plants. At the moment there exist only conceptual designs of future fusion power plants. The most detailed concepts with regards to safety aspects were found in the European Power Plant Conceptual Study (PPCS). The plant concepts discussed in the PPCS are based on magnetic confinement of the plasma. The safety concept of fusion power plants, which has been developed during the last decades, is based on the safety concepts of installations with radioactive inventories, especially nuclear fission power plants. It applies the concept of defence in depth. However, there are specific differences between the implementations of the safety concepts due to the physical and technological characteristics of fusion and fission. It is analysed whether for fusion a safety concept is required comparable to the one of fission. For this the consequences of a purely hypothetical release of large amounts of the radioactive inventory of a fusion power plant and a fission power plant are compared. In such an event the evacuation criterion outside the plant is exceeded by several orders of magnitude for a fission power plant. For a fusion power plant the expected radiological consequences are of the order of the evacuation criterion. Therefore, a safety concept is also necessary for fusion to guarantee the confinement of the radioactive inventory. The comparison between the safety concepts for fusion and fission shows that the fundamental safety function ''confinement of the radioactive materials'' can be transferred directly in a methodical way. For a fusion power plant this fundamental safety function is based on both, physical barriers as well as on active retention functions. After the termination of the fusion

  15. Review of the safety concept for fusion reactor concepts and transferability of the nuclear fission regulation to potential fusion power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raeder, Juergen; Weller, Arthur; Wolf, Robert [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik (IPP), Garching (Germany); Jin, Xue Zhou; Boccaccini, Lorenzo V.; Stieglitz, Robert; Carloni, Dario [Karlsruher Institute fuer Technologie (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Pistner, Christoph [Oeko-Institut e.V., Darmstadt (Germany); Herb, Joachim [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Koeln (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    This paper summarizes the current state of the art in science and technology of the safety concept for future fusion power plants (FPPs) and examines the transferability of the current nuclear fission regulation to the concepts of future fusion power plants. At the moment there exist only conceptual designs of future fusion power plants. The most detailed concepts with regards to safety aspects were found in the European Power Plant Conceptual Study (PPCS). The plant concepts discussed in the PPCS are based on magnetic confinement of the plasma. The safety concept of fusion power plants, which has been developed during the last decades, is based on the safety concepts of installations with radioactive inventories, especially nuclear fission power plants. It applies the concept of defence in depth. However, there are specific differences between the implementations of the safety concepts due to the physical and technological characteristics of fusion and fission. It is analysed whether for fusion a safety concept is required comparable to the one of fission. For this the consequences of a purely hypothetical release of large amounts of the radioactive inventory of a fusion power plant and a fission power plant are compared. In such an event the evacuation criterion outside the plant is exceeded by several orders of magnitude for a fission power plant. For a fusion power plant the expected radiological consequences are of the order of the evacuation criterion. Therefore, a safety concept is also necessary for fusion to guarantee the confinement of the radioactive inventory. The comparison between the safety concepts for fusion and fission shows that the fundamental safety function ''confinement of the radioactive materials'' can be transferred directly in a methodical way. For a fusion power plant this fundamental safety function is based on both, physical barriers as well as on active retention functions. After the termination of the fusion

  16. Research on the wetted first wall concept for future laser fusion reactors. Final report No. 1, October 1, 1974--January 31, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, M.A.; Munir, Z.A.

    1976-01-01

    Research is in progress to determine the feasibility of the wetted first wall concept for a future laser fusion reactor. The basic idea involves the use of a thin coating of lithium on the inner wall of the laser fusion containment vessel to protect it from the micro-explosion blast debris. This report contains a review of the available information on contact angles and wettability of alkali metals on various metal substrates as well as a review of literature on thin falling liquid films. A proposed experiment to measure the contact angles of lithium on stainless steel and niobium is described. The requirements for a second experiment to measure certain key characteristics of thin falling films are also included.

  17. Optical transmittance investigation of 1-keV ion-irradiated sapphire crystals as potential VUV to NIR window materials of fusion reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Iwano

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the optical transmittances of ion-irradiated sapphire crystals as potential vacuum ultraviolet (VUV to near-infrared (NIR window materials of fusion reactors. Under potential conditions in fusion reactors, sapphire crystals are irradiated with hydrogen (H, deuterium (D, and helium (He ions with 1-keV energy and ∼ 1020-m-2 s-1 flux. Ion irradiation decreases the transmittances from 140 to 260 nm but hardly affects the transmittances from 300 to 1500 nm. H-ion and D-ion irradiation causes optical absorptions near 210 and 260 nm associated with an F-center and an F+-center, respectively. These F-type centers are classified as Schottky defects that can be removed through annealing above 1000 K. In contrast, He-ion irradiation does not cause optical absorptions above 200 nm because He-ions cannot be incorporated in the crystal lattice due to the large ionic radius of He-ions. Moreover, the significant decrease in transmittance of the ion-irradiated sapphire crystals from 140 to 180 nm is related to the light scattering on the crystal surface. Similar to diamond polishing, ion irradiation modifies the crystal surface thereby affecting the optical properties especially at shorter wavelengths. Although the transmittances in the VUV wavelengths decrease after ion irradiation, the transmittances can be improved through annealing above 1000 K. With an optical transmittance in the VUV region that can recover through simple annealing and with a high transparency from the ultraviolet (UV to the NIR region, sapphire crystals can therefore be used as good optical windows inside modern fusion power reactors in terms of light particle loadings of hydrogen isotopes and helium.

  18. Towards standardization of the dissemination measures and tritium solubility in materials of fusion reactors; Hacia la estandarizacion de las medidas de difusion y solubilidad de tritio en materiales de reactores de fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberto, G.; Penalva, I.; Aranburu, I.; Sarrionandia-Ibarra, A.; Legarda, F.; Martinez, P. M.; Sedano, L.; Moral, N.

    2011-07-01

    The standardization of the measurements of hydrogen isotope interaction with different materials is a challenge and goal of fusion technology programs worldwide. For decades the programs have promoted the need for a reference laboratory for measurements of hydrogen transport to the evolution of fusion technology, but that goal is still pending, in contrast to the situation in other goals I+D.

  19. Excitation of Alfven Cyclotron Instability by charged fusion products in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorelenkov, N.N.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1994-08-01

    The spectrum of ion cyclotron emission (ICE) observed in tokamak experiments shows narrow peaks at multiples of the edge cyclotron frequency of background ions. A possible mechanism of ICE based on the fast Alfven Cyclotron Instability (ACI) resonantly excited by high energy charged products ({alpha}-particles or protons) is studied here. The two-dimensional ACI eigenmode structure and eigenfrequency are obtained in the large tokamak aspect ratio limit. The ACI is excited via wave-particle resonances in phase space by tapping the fast ion velocity space free energy. The instability growth rates are computed perturbatively from the perturbed fast particle distribution function, which is obtained by integrating the high frequency gyrokinetic equation along the particle orbit. Numerical examples of ACI growth rates are presented for TFTR plasmas. The fast ion distribution function is assumed to be singular in pitch angle near the plasma edge. The results are employed to understand the ICE in Deuterium-Deuterium (DD) and Deuterium-tritium (DT) tokamak experiments.

  20. The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor decontamination and decommissioning project and the Tokamak Physics Experiment at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Environmental Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-05-27

    If the US is to meet the energy needs of the future, it is essential that new technologies emerge to compensate for dwindling supplies of fossil fuels and the eventual depletion of fissionable uranium used in present-day nuclear reactors. Fusion energy has the potential to become a major source of energy for the future. Power from fusion energy would provide a substantially reduced environmental impact as compared with other forms of energy generation. Since fusion utilizes no fossil fuels, there would be no release of chemical combustion products to the atmosphere. Additionally, there are no fission products formed to present handling and disposal problems, and runaway fuel reactions are impossible due to the small amounts of deuterium and tritium present. The purpose of the TPX Project is to support the development of the physics and technology to extend tokamak operation into the continuously operating (steady-state) regime, and to demonstrate advances in fundamental tokamak performance. The purpose of TFTR D&D is to ensure compliance with DOE Order 5820.2A ``Radioactive Waste Management`` and to remove environmental and health hazards posed by the TFTR in a non-operational mode. There are two proposed actions evaluated in this environmental assessment (EA). The actions are related because one must take place before the other can proceed. The proposed actions assessed in this EA are: the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR); to be followed by the construction and operation of the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). Both of these proposed actions would take place primarily within the TFTR Test Cell Complex at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The TFTR is located on ``D-site`` at the James Forrestal Campus of Princeton University in Plainsboro Township, Middlesex County, New Jersey, and is operated by PPPL under contract with the United States Department of Energy (DOE).

  1. Mechanical properties and microstructural investigations of TIG welded 40 mm and 60 mm thick SS 316L samples for fusion reactor vacuum vessel applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buddu, Ramesh Kumar, E-mail: brkumar75@gmail.com; Chauhan, N.; Raole, P.M.

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Austenitic stainless steels (316L) of 40 mm and 60 mm thickness plates were joined by Tungsten Inert Gas welding (TIG) process which are probable materials for advanced fusion reactor vacuum vessel requirements. • Mechanical properties and detailed microstructure studies have been carried out for welded samples. • Fractography analysis of impact test specimens indicated ductile fracture mode in BM, HAZ and WZ samples. • Presence of delta ferrite phase was observed in the welded zone and ferrite number data was measured for the base and weld metal and was found high in welds. - Abstract: The development of advanced fusion reactors like DEMO will have various challenges in materials and fabrication. The vacuum vessel is important part of the fusion reactor. The double walled design for vacuum vessel with thicker stainless steel material (40–60 mm) has been proposed in the advanced fusion reactors like ITER. Different welding techniques will have to be used for such vacuum vessel development. The required mechanical, structural and other properties of stainless steels have to be maintained in these joining processes of components of various shapes and sizes in the form of plates, ribs, shells, etc. The present paper reports characterization of welding joints of SS316L plates with higher thicknesses like 40 mm and 60 mm, prepared using multi-pass Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding process. The weld quality has been evaluated with non-destructive tests by X-ray radiography and ultrasonic methods. The mechanical properties like tensile, bend tests, Vickers hardness and impact fracture tests have been carried out for the weld samples. Tensile property test results indicate sound weld joints with efficiencies over 100%. Hardening was observed in the weld zone in non-uniform manner. Macro and microstructure studies have been carried out for Base Metal (BM), Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) and Weld Zone (WZ). Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis carried

  2. An Examination of the Feasibility of a Nuclear-Pumped Laser-Driven Inertial Confinement Fusion Reactor with Magnetically Protected Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-01

    23 N eutronics of Sim ple Reactor Blanket M odel...energy through a thermal cycle such as a gas turbine (1:14-15). In order to store the energy required to power the laser between pulses, huge banks of... thermal conversion process such as steam or a gas 1 turbine which has a potential efficiency of 30-45%. In contrast, the charged-particle yield of the

  3. Thermal-Fatigue Analysis of W-joined Ferritic-Martensitic Steel Mockup for Fusion Reactor Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Won; Jin, Hyung Gon; Lee, Eo Hwak; Yoon, Jae Sung; Kim, Suk Kwon; Park, Seong Dae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Kyu In [Gentec Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Se Yeon; Hong, Bong Guen [Chonbuk National University, Chonbuk (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Through the ITER blanket first wall (BFW) development project in Korea, the joining methods were developed with a beryllium (Be) layer as a plasma-facing material, a copper alloy (CuCrZr) layer as a heat sink, and type 316L austenitic stainless steel (SS316L) as a structural material. And joining methods were developed such as Be as an armor and FMS as a structural material, or W as an armor and FMS as a structural material were developed through the test blanket module (TBM) program. As a candidate of PFC for DEMO, W/FMS joining methods have been developed and a new Ti interlayer was applied differently from the previous work. In the present study, the W/FMS PFC development was introduced with the following procedure to apply to the PFCs for a fusion reactor: (1) Three W/FMS mockups were fabricated using the developed HIP followed by a post-HIP heat treatment (PHHT). (2) Because the High Heat Flux (HHF) test should be performed over the thermal lifetime of the mockup under the proper test conditions to confirm the joint's integrity, the test conditions were determined through a preliminary analysis. In this study, commercial ANSYS-CFX for thermalhydraulic analysis and ANSYS-mechanical for the thermo-mechanical analysis are used to evaluate the thermal-lifetime of the mockup to determine the test conditions. Also, the Korea Heat Load Test facility with an Electron Beam (KoHLT-EB) will be used and its water cooling system is considered to perform the thermal-hydraulic analysis especially for considering the two-phase analysis with a higher heat flux conditions. From the analysis, the heating and the cooling conditions were determined for 0.5- and 1.0-MW/m{sup 2} heat fluxes, respectively. Elastic-plastic analysis is performed to determine the lifetime and finally, the 1.0 MW/m{sup 2} heat flux conditions are determined up to 4,306 cycles. The test will be done in the near future and the measured temperatures will be compared with the present simulation results.

  4. Numerical investigation of the film uniformity during the surface coating of charged nanoparticles in a low pressure plasma reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourali, N.; Foroutan, G., E-mail: foroutan@sut.ac.ir

    2016-07-15

    The uniformity of film deposition on charged nanoparticles, trapped near the sheath of a capacitively coupled plasma reactor, is studied by numerical simulation of the multi-fluid plasma equations, surface deposition processes, and nanoparticle heating effects. It is found that the anisotropy in the ion flux onto the powered electrode may be hold responsible for the film nonuniformity. The nonuniformity increases with increasing of the particle radius, although small particles lose sphericity faster than the large particles. Because of the electron temperature dependence of the deposition rate and the incident ion flux, higher electron temperatures lead to more nonuniform film deposition. However, the uniformity is improved and the sphericity is restored by the increase in the background gas pressure and/or temperature. - Highlights: • The surface coating of charged nanoparticles in a low pressure plasma is investigated by numerical simulation of the multi-fluid plasma equations. • The deposition rate on the particle surface is not spatially uniform. • The nonuniformity in the film deposition is attributed to the anisotropy of the ion flux. • The nonuniformity increases with distance from the sheath edge.

  5. 球形托卡马克聚变嬗变堆中子学设计%NEUTRONICS DESIGN FOR A SPHERICAL TOKAMAK FUSION-TRANSMUTATION REACTOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯开明; 张国书; 郭增基

    2001-01-01

    Based on studies of spherical tokamak fusion reactors,a concept of fusion-transmutation reactor is put forward.A set of plasma parameters suitable for the transmutation blanket is selected.Using the transport and burn-up calculation code BISON3.0 and its associated database,transmutation rate of MA nuclear waste,energy multiplication,and tritium breeder rate in the transmutation blanket are calculated.%基于对球形托卡马克ST聚变堆的研究,提出了ST聚变嬗变堆的设计概念。对堆芯参数作了初步选择,确定了一组适合于嬗变包层的堆芯参数供中子学计算和结构设计参考,给出了旨在以嬗变次锕系元素(MA)核废物为目标的一维中子学计算结果。

  6. Manufacturing W fibre-reinforced Cu composite pipes for application as heat sink in divertor targets of future nuclear fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Alexander v.; You, Jeong-Ha [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Ewert, Dagmar [Institut fuer Textil- und Verfahrenstechnik Denkendorf, 73770 Denkendorf (Germany); Siefken, Udo [Louis Renner GmbH, 85221 Dachau (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    An important plasma-facing component (PFC) in future nuclear fusion reactors is the so-called divertor which allows power exhaust and removal of impurities from the main plasma. The most highly loaded parts of a divertor are the target plates which have to withstand intense particle bombardment. This intense particle bombardment leads to high heat fluxes onto the target plates which in turn lead to severe thermomechanical loads. With regard to future nuclear fusion reactors, an improvement of the performance of divertor targets is desirable in order to ensure reliable long term operation of such PFCs. The performance of a divertor target is most closely linked to the properties of the materials that are used for its design. W fibre-reinforced Cu (Wf/Cu) composites are regarded as promising heat sink materials in this respect. These materials do not only feature adequate thermophysical and mechanical properties, they do also offer metallurgical flexibility as their microstructure and hence their macroscopic properties can be tailored. The contribution will point out how Wf/Cu composites can be used to realise an advanced design of a divertor target and how these materials can be fabricated by means of liquid Cu infiltration.

  7. Burn Control of Magnetically Confined Fusion Plasma 2. Burn Control in Tokamak Fusion Reactors 2.3 Burn Control in ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Noboru

    The issue of burn control in FDR-ITER, the design of which was completed in 1998, is introduced, Controllability was studied based on the ID transport code, PRETOR, during the burn phase with self-ignition, as well as during start-up and shut-down. The results of the present study have helped us to identify the importance of controlling the fuel supply, impurity injection, and heating power to maintain fusion power and power to the divertor.

  8. Magnetic fusion; La fusion magnetique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This document is a detailed lecture on thermonuclear fusion. The basic physics principles are recalled and the technological choices that have led to tokamaks or stellarators are exposed. Different aspects concerning thermonuclear reactors such as safety, economy and feasibility are discussed. Tore-supra is described in details as well as the ITER project.

  9. Spectrographic Determination of Impurities in Ceramic Materials for Nuclear fusion Reactors. II. Analysis of Magnesium Aluminate; Determinacion Espectrografia de Impurezas en materiales Ceramicos para Fusion Nuclear. II. Analisis de Aluminato de Magnesio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rucandio, M. I.; Roca, M.; Melon, A.

    1990-07-01

    The determination of minor and trace elements in the magnesium aluminate, considered as possible material in thermonuclear fusion reactors, has been studied. The concentration ranges are 0.1 - 0.3 % for Ca, SI and Y, and at the ppm level for Co, Cr, Fe, Hf, K, Li, Mn, Na, Ni, Se, Ta, Ti, V and Zr. Atomic emission spectroscopy with direct current are excitation and photographic detection has been employed. For Hf, Ta and Zr the use of 40% of copper fluoride as a carrier and of Nb as internal standard provide suitable sensitivities and precessions, while for the rest of elements the best results are obtained with graphite powder in different proportions and Rb or Sn as internal standard. (Author)4 refs.

  10. Spectrographic Determination of Impurities in Ceramic Materials for Nuclear Fusion Reactors. I. Analysis of Alumina; Determinacion Espectrografica de impurezas en materiales ceramicos para fusion nuclear. I.- Analisis de alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rucandio, M. I.; Roca, M.; Melon, A.

    1990-07-01

    The determination of minor and trace elements in the aluminium oxide considered as possible ceramic material in thermonuclear fusion reactors has been studied. The concentration ranges are 0.1 - 0.3 * for Ca, Si and Y, and at the ppm level for Co, Cr, Fe, Hf, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Se, Ta, Ti, V and Zr. Atomic emission spectroscopy with direct current ore excitation and photographic detection has been employed. For Hf, Mg, Ta, Ti, V and Zr the use of 40% of copper fluoride as a carrier and of Nb as lnternal standard provide suitable sensitivities and precessions, while for the rest of elements the bent results are obtained with graphite powder in different proportions and Rb or Sn as internal standard. (Author) 7 refs.

  11. Direct conversion of fusion energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Markus

    2003-03-01

    Deuterium and tritium are expected to be used as fuel in the first fusion reactors. Energy is released as kinetic energy of ions and neutrons, when deuterium reacts with tritium. One way to convert the kinetic energy to electrical energy, is to let the ions and neutrons hit the reactor wall and convert the heat that is caused by the particle bombardment to electrical energy with ordinary thermal conversion. If the kinetic energy of the ions instead is converted directly to electrical energy, a higher efficiency of the energy conversion is possible. The majority of the fusion energy is released as kinetic energy of neutrons, when deuterium reacts with tritium. Fusion reactions such as the D-D reactions, the D-{sup 3}He reaction and the p-{sup 11}B reaction, where a larger part of the fusion energy becomes kinetic energy of charged particles, appears therefore more suitable for direct conversion. Since they have lower reactivity than the D-T reaction, they need a larger {beta}B{sup 2}{sub 0} to give sufficiently high fusion power density. Because of this, the fusion configurations spherical torus (ST) and field-reversed configuration (FRC), where high {beta} values are possible, appear interesting. Rosenbluth and Hinton come to the conclusion that efficient direct conversion isn't possible in closed field line systems and that open geometries, which facilitate direct conversion, provide inadequate confinement for D-{sup 3}He. It is confirmed in this study that it doesn't seem possible to achieve as high direct conversion efficiency in closed systems as in open systems. ST and FRC fusion power plants that utilize direct conversion seem however interesting. Calculations with the help of Maple indicate that the reactor parameters needed for a D-D ST and a D{sub 3} He ST hopefully are possible to achieve. The best energy conversion option for a D-D or D{sub 3} He ST appears to be direct electrodynamic conversion (DEC) together with ordinary thermal conversion

  12. Soft Fusion Energy Path: Isotope Production in Energy Subcritical/Economy Hypercritical D +D Colliding-Beam Mini Fusion Reactor `Exyder'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Tim; Maglich, Bogdan; Calsec Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Bethe1 and Sakharov2 argued for soft fusion energy path via isotope production, substantiated by Manheimer3. - Copious T and 3He production4 , 5 from D(d, p) T and D(d, n) 3He reactions in 725 KeV D +D colliding beams was measured in weak-focusing Self-Collider6 , 7 radius 0.15 m, in B = 3.12 T, non-linearly stabilized by electron cloud oscillations8 to confinement time = 24 s. Simulations6 predict that by switching to strong focusing9, 10 deuterons 0.75 MeV each, generate 1 3He +1T +1p + 1n at total input energy cost 10.72 MeV. Economic value of T and 3He is 65 and 120 MeV/atom, respectively. We obtain economic gain 205MeV/10.72 MeV ~ 2,000% i.e. 3He production funds cost of T. If first wall is made of Thorium n's will breed 233U releasing 200 MeV/fission, at neutron cost 5.36 MeV versus 160 MeV in beam on target, resulting in no cost 3He production, valued 75K/g. 1. Physics Today, May 1979, p.44; 2. Memoirs, Vintage Books, (1992); 3. Phys. Today, May 2012 p. 12; 4. Phys. Rev. Lett. 54, 796 (1985); 5. Bull. APS, 57, No. 3 (2012); 6. Part. Acc.1, (1970); 7. ANEUTRONIC FUSION NIM A 271 1-167 (1988); 8. Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 1818 (1993); 9. Part. Acc. 34, 13 (1990).

  13. Metallurgical aspects of possibility of 9?12% chromium steel application as a structural material for first wall and blanket of fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioltukhovsky, A. G.; Kondrat'ev, V. P.; Leont'eva-Smirnova, M. V.; Votinov, S. N.; Shamardin, V. K.; Povstyanko, A. V.; Bulanova, T. M.

    1996-10-01

    Steels containing 9-12% Cr are considered to be candidate structural materials for the first wall and blanket of a fusion reactor at the operation temperature up to 650°C. The optimal structure, phase composition and the specific chemical composition of the steels ensure their high heat resistance, yield strength and ductility as well as adequate thermophysical properties. The susceptibility of chromium steels for low temperature irradiation embrittlement can be influenced by changing their structural state via alloying, heat treatment and method of melting. Steels having a uniform martensite structure are less susceptible to irradiation conditions and have more stable tensile properties as compared to steels having δ-ferrite in their structures.

  14. Metallurgical aspects of possibility of 9-12% chromium steel application as a structural material for first wall and blanket of fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ioltukhovsky, A.G. [State Sci. Center of Russian Feder., Moscow (Russian Federation). A.A. Bochvar All-Rusia Res Inst. of Inorg. Mater.; Kondrat`ev, V.P. [State Sci. Center of Russian Feder., Moscow (Russian Federation). A.A. Bochvar All-Rusia Res Inst. of Inorg. Mater.; Leont`eva-Smirnova, M.V. [State Sci. Center of Russian Feder., Moscow (Russian Federation). A.A. Bochvar All-Rusia Res Inst. of Inorg. Mater.; Votinov, S.N. [State Sci. Center of Russian Feder., Moscow (Russian Federation). A.A. Bochvar All-Rusia Res Inst. of Inorg. Mater.; Shamardin, V.K. [Nauchno-Issledovatel`skij Inst. Atomnykh Reaktorov, Dimitrovgrad (Russian Federation); Povstyanko, A.V. [Nauchno-Issledovatel`skij Inst. Atomnykh Reaktorov, Dimitrovgrad (Russian Federation); Bulanova, T.M. [Nauchno-Issledovatel`skij Inst. Atomnykh Reaktorov, Dimitrovgrad (Russian Federation)

    1996-10-01

    Steels containing 9-12% Cr are considered to be candidate structural materials for the first wall and blanket of a fusion reactor at the operation temperature up to 650 C. The optimal structure, phase composition and the specific chemical composition of the steels ensure their high heat resistance, yield strength and ductility as well as adequate thermophysical properties. The susceptibility of chromium steels for low temperature irradiation embrittlement can be influenced by changing their structural state via alloying, heat treatment and method of melting. Steels having a uniform martensite structure are less susceptible to irradiation conditions and have more stable tensile properties as compared to steels having {delta}-ferrite in their structures. (orig.).

  15. Studies in fusion reactor technology. Progress report, June 1, 1975--June 30, 1976. [Hydrogen permeation through first wall, radiolytic fuel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axtmann, R C; Perkins, H K; Noda, T; Fish, J D

    1976-01-01

    Two investigations are described that are pertinent to hydrogen hold-up and re-emission in the first wall of fusion reactors. The first employs existing theory to calculate the range distributions for light ions normally incident on metallic targets at energies of one to 20 keV. Three different statistical atomic potentials were used to approximate the interaction between a swift atom and a target atom. A surface correction to the theory of ion penetration was developed to account for the presence of a free surface in the target. The second study employed the diffusion equation to calculate the time dependent fluxes and concentration profiles of a gas originating at a planar source within a finite slab. The purpose of this procedure was to model the transport of gas implanted beneath a metal surface by the impingement of energetic, gaseous ions. Some studies on radiolytic fuel production are briefly reviewed. (MOW)

  16. Progress in studies of Li/sub 17/Pb/sub 83/ as liquid breeder for fusion reactor blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casini, G.

    1983-09-01

    A review of the experimental and conceptual design work in progress at JRC-Ispra to investigate the feasibility of the eutectic Li/sub 17/Pb/sub 83/ as a liquid breeder for experimental power reactors is presented. Results of recent measurements to implement the data base of this material are given in the following areas: physical parameters, hydrogen solubility and recovery, chemical reactivity with air and water, compatibility with steel. The studies carried out on blanket concepts for the INTOR (International Tokamak Reactor)/NET (Next European Torus) projects are outlined and discussed.

  17. 新型反应堆可视化设计方法研究%A novel design method for nuclear fusion reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓平; 李琳; 王文韬; 檀结庆; 吴宜灿; 邱励俭

    2000-01-01

    以核聚变反应堆为研究对象,提出了一种参数化的零部件设计为先导、以可变异的零部件组装逻辑为手段的新型的可视设计方法,所有的设计对象采用实体造型技术,可对系统的设计结果进行三维渲染和动态仿真。设计的对象包括偏滤器、中心柱、包层、纵向场、极向场等,以偏滤器为例,部件组成又包括轨道、支体、外靶板、内靶板、能量沉积板、圆顶和翼。所介绍的设计系统为核聚变装置的灵活设计提供了一种有效的的手段,同时也将促进核聚变装置的设计研究走向深入。%In this paper, taking nuclear fusion reactor as a research object, one novel design method guided by parametric component design and variational assembly logic relation is presented. The parametric design relates to such components as center conductor post, PF coil, TF coil, divertor cassette, blanket, shielding and vacuum pumping. The solid modeling technology is used for all design objects, which will give the users a 3-D visualization. The design system introduced in the paper shows a new design means for agile design of nuclear fusion reactor and will promote the design to a desper stage.

  18. Experimental study on buoyancy-driven exchange flows through breaches of a tokamak vacuum vessel in a fusion reactor under the loss-of-vacuum-event conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takase, Kazuyuki; Tomoaki, Kunugi; Ogawa, Masurou; Seki, Yasushi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-02-01

    As one of thermofluid safety studies in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, buoyancy-driven exchange flow behavior through breaches of a vacuum vessel (VV) has been investigated quantitatively by using a preliminary loss-of-vacuum-event (LOVA) apparatus that simulated the tokamak VV of a fusion reactor with a small-scaled model. To carry out the present experiments under the atmospheric pressure condition, helium gas and air were provided as the working fluids. The inside of the VV was initially filled with helium gas and the outside was atmosphere. The breaches on the VV under the LOVA condition were simulated by opening six simulated breaches to which were set the different positions on the VV. When the buoyancy-driven exchange flow through the breach occurred, helium gas went out from the inside of the VV through the breach to the outside and air flowed into the inside of the VV through the breach from the outside. The exchange rate in the VV between helium gas and air was calculated from the measured weight change of the VV with time since the experiment has started. experimental parameters were breach position, breach number, breach length, breach size, and breach combination. The present study clarifies that the relation between the exchange rate and the breach position of the VV depended on the magnitude of the potential energy from the ground level to the breach position, and then, the exchange rate decreased as the breach length increased and as the breach size decreased.

  19. Simulations of fusion chamber dynamics and first wall response in a Z-pinch driven fusion–fission hybrid power reactor (Z-FFR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, J.M., E-mail: qjm06@sina.com [Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Energy (LANE), Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China); Center for Fusion Energy Science and Technology (CFEST), China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China); Wang, Z., E-mail: wangz_es@caep.cn [Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Energy (LANE), Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China); Center for Fusion Energy Science and Technology (CFEST), China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China); Chu, Y.Y., E-mail: chuyanyun@caep.cn [Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Energy (LANE), Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China); Center for Fusion Energy Science and Technology (CFEST), China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China); Li, Z.H., E-mail: lee_march@sina.com [Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Energy (LANE), Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China)

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • Z-FFR utilizes DT neutrons to drive a sub-critical fission blanket to produce energy. • A metal shell and Ar gas are employed in the fusion chamber for shock mitigation. • Massive materials can effectively mitigate the thermal heats on the chamber wall. • The W-coated Zr-alloy first wall exhibits good viability as a long-lived component. - Abstract: In a Z-pinch driven fusion–fission hybrid power reactor (Z-FFR), the fusion target will produce enormous energy of ∼1.5 GJ per pulse at a frequency of 0.1 Hz. Almost 20% of the fusion energy yield, approximately 300 MJ, is released in forms of pulsed X-rays. To prevent the first wall from fatal damages by the intense X-rays, a thin spherical metal shell and rare Ar buffer gas are introduced to mitigate the transient X-ray bursts. Radiation hydrodynamics in the fusion chamber were investigated by MULTI-1D simulations, and the corresponding thermal and mechanical loads on the first wall were also obtained. The simulations indicated that by optimizing the design parameters of the metal shell and Ar buffer gas, peak power flux of the thermal heats on the first wall could be mitigated to less than 10{sup 4} W/cm{sup 2} within a time scale of several milliseconds, while peak overpressures of the mechanical loads varying from 0.6 to 0.7 MPa. In addition, the thermomechanical response in a W–coated Zr-alloy first wall was performed by FWDR1D calculations using the derived thermal and mechanical loads as inputs. The temperature and stress fields were analyzed, and the corresponding elastic strains were conducted for primary lifetime estimations by using the Coffin–Manson relationships of both W and Zr-alloy. It was shown that the maximum temperature rises and stresses in the first wall were less than 50 K and 130 MPa respectively, and lifetime of the first wall would be in excess of 10{sup 9} cycles. The chamber exhibits good viability as a long-lived component to sustain the Z-FFR conceptual

  20. Storage-ring ionization and recombination experiments with multiply charged ions relevant to astrophysical and fusion plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Schippers, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Past and ongoing research activities at the Heidelberg heavy-ion storage-ring TSR are reviewed which aim at providing accurate absolute rate coefficients and cross sections of atomic collision processes for applications in astrophysics and magnetically confined fusion. In particular, dielectronic recombination and electron impact ionization of iron ions are discussed as well as dielectronic recombination of tungsten ions.

  1. Fusion reactor systems studies. Progress report for the period November 1, 1996--October 31, 1997, and final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Guebaly, L.A.; Blanchard, J.P.; Kulcinski, G.L.

    1997-08-01

    During FY97, the University of Wisconsin Fusion Technology Institute personnel have participated in the ARIES-RS and the ARIES-ST projects. The main areas of effort are: (1) neutronics analysis; (2) shielding of components and personnel; (3) neutron wall loading distribution; (4) radiation damage to in-vessel components; (5) components lifetimes; (6) embrittled materials designs issues; (7) stress and structural analysis; (8) activation, LOCA, and safety analysis; (9) support and fabrication of components; (10) vacuum system; and (11) maintenance. Progress made in these areas are summarized.

  2. A Study on the fusion reactor - Development of a flat-field XUV spectrograph for tokamak diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Chang Hee; Choi, Il Woo; Shin, Hyun Joon; Cha, Yong Ho; Yang, Ho Soon; Ra, Sun Ae [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chan Hong [Kyungwon University, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-09-01

    The research on the development of a flat-field XUV spectrograph for tokamak fusion diagnostics investigated the following items: Theoretical investigation of a flat-field XUV spectrograph to determine the position of toroidal mirror, incident slit, varied-line spacing concave grating, detector, etc, Design and fabrication of spectrograph components using Auto CAD, Design and fabrication of film cassette holder and translator, Design and fabrication of vacuum chamber for spectrograph, Computer simulation of aberration, Installation of spectrograph to tokamak, Design of components for soft x-ray CCD. 24 refs., 3 tabs., 23 figs. (author)

  3. Conceptual design study FY 1981: synfuels from fusion - using the tandem mirror reactor and a thermochemical cycle to produce hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krikorian, O.H. (ed.)

    1982-02-09

    This report represents the second year's effort of a scoping and conceptual design study being conducted for the express purpose of evaluating the engineering potential of producing hydrogen by thermochemical cycles using a tandem mirror fusion driver. The hydrogen thus produced may then be used as a feedstock to produce fuels such as methane, methanol, or gasoline. The main objective of this second year's study has been to obtain some approximate cost figures for hydrogen production through a conceptual design study.

  4. Materials research for fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaster, J.; Moeslang, A.; Muroga, T.

    2016-05-01

    Fusion materials research started in the early 1970s following the observation of the degradation of irradiated materials used in the first commercial fission reactors. The technological challenges of fusion energy are intimately linked with the availability of suitable materials capable of reliably withstanding the extremely severe operational conditions of fusion reactors. Although fission and fusion materials exhibit common features, fusion materials research is broader. The harder mono-energetic spectrum associated with the deuterium-tritium fusion neutrons (14.1 MeV compared to hydrogen and helium as transmutation products that might lead to a (at present undetermined) degradation of structural materials after a few years of operation. Overcoming the historical lack of a fusion-relevant neutron source for materials testing is an essential pending step in fusion roadmaps. Structural materials development, together with research on functional materials capable of sustaining unprecedented power densities during plasma operation in a fusion reactor, have been the subject of decades of worldwide research efforts underpinning the present maturity of the fusion materials research programme.

  5. 1: the atom. 2: radioactivity. 3: man and radiations. 4: the energy. 5: nuclear energy: fusion and fission. 6: the operation of a nuclear reactor. 7: the nuclear fuel cycle; 1: l'atome. 2: la radioactivite. 3: l'homme et les rayonnements. 4: l'energie. 5: l'energie nucleaire: fusion et fission. 6: le fonctionnement d'un reacteur nucleaire. 7: le cycle du combustible nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This series of 7 digest booklets present the bases of the nuclear physics and of the nuclear energy: 1 - the atom (structure of matter, chemical elements and isotopes, the four fundamental interactions, nuclear physics); 2 - radioactivity (definition, origins of radioelements, applications of radioactivity); 3 - man and radiations (radiations diversity, biological effects, radioprotection, examples of radiation applications); 4 - energy (energy states, different forms of energy, characteristics); 5 - nuclear energy: fusion and fission (nuclear energy release, thermonuclear fusion, nuclear fission and chain reaction); 6 - operation of a nuclear reactor (nuclear fission, reactor components, reactor types); 7 - nuclear fuel cycle (nuclear fuel preparation, fuel consumption, reprocessing, wastes management). (J.S.)

  6. The cluster charge identification in the GEM detector for fusion plasma imaging by soft X-ray diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarski, T.; Chernyshova, M.; Malinowski, K.; Pozniak, K. T.; Kasprowicz, G.; Kolasinski, P.; Krawczyk, R.; Wojenski, A.; Zabolotny, W.

    2016-11-01

    The measurement system based on gas electron multiplier detector is developed for soft X-ray diagnostics of tokamak plasmas. The multi-channel setup is designed for estimation of the energy and the position distribution of an X-ray source. The focal measuring issue is the charge cluster identification by its value and position estimation. The fast and accurate mode of the serial data acquisition is applied for the dynamic plasma diagnostics. The charge clusters are counted in the space determined by 2D position, charge value, and time intervals. Radiation source characteristics are presented by histograms for a selected range of position, time intervals, and cluster charge values corresponding to the energy spectra.

  7. Controlled thermonuclear fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Bobin, Jean Louis

    2014-01-01

    The book is a presentation of the basic principles and main achievements in the field of nuclear fusion. It encompasses both magnetic and inertial confinements plus a few exotic mechanisms for nuclear fusion. The state-of-the-art regarding thermonuclear reactions, hot plasmas, tokamaks, laser-driven compression and future reactors is given.

  8. Investigating the effect of acene-fusion and trifluoroacetyl substitution on the electronic and charge transport properties by density functional theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Irfan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We designed novel derivatives of 4,6-di(thiophen-2-ylpyrimidine (DTP. Two benchmark strategies including mesomerically deactivating group, as well as the extension of π-conjugation bridge (acene-fusion have been employed to enhance the electrical and charge transport properties. The density functional theory (DFT and time dependent DFT methods have been used to get optimized geometries in ground and first excited state, respectively. The structural properties (geometric parameters, electronic properties (frontier molecular orbitals; highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals, photophysical properties (absorption, fluorescence and phosphorescence, and important charge transport properties are discussed to establish a molecular level structure–property relationship among these derivatives. Our calculated electronic spectra i.e., absorption, fluorescence and phosphorescence have been found in good semi-quantitative agreement with available experimental data. All the newly designed derivatives displayed significantly improved electron injection ability than those of the parent molecule. The values of reorganization energy and transfer integral elucidate that DTP is a potential hole transport material. Based on our present investigation, it is expected that the naphtho and anthra derivatives of DTP are better hole transporters than those of some well-known charge transporter materials like naphthalene, anthracene, tetracene and pentacene.

  9. Fusion research principles

    CERN Document Server

    Dolan, Thomas James

    2013-01-01

    Fusion Research, Volume I: Principles provides a general description of the methods and problems of fusion research. The book contains three main parts: Principles, Experiments, and Technology. The Principles part describes the conditions necessary for a fusion reaction, as well as the fundamentals of plasma confinement, heating, and diagnostics. The Experiments part details about forty plasma confinement schemes and experiments. The last part explores various engineering problems associated with reactor design, vacuum and magnet systems, materials, plasma purity, fueling, blankets, neutronics

  10. Heat resistant reduced activation 12% Cr steel of 16Cr12W2VTaB type-advanced structural material for fusion and fast breeder power reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioltukhovskiy, A. G.; Leonteva-Smirnova, M. V.; Solonin, M. I.; Chernov, V. M.; Golovanov, V. N.; Shamardin, V. K.; Bulanova, T. M.; Povstyanko, A. V.; Fedoseev, A. E.

    2002-12-01

    Heat resistant 12% Cr steels of the 16Cr12W2VTaB type (12Cr-2W-V-Ta-B-0.16C) provide a reduced activation material that can be used as a structural material for fusion and fast breeder reactors. The composition under study meets scientific and engineering requirements and has an optimal base element composition to provide a δ-ferrite content of no more than 20%. It also has a minimum quantity of low melting impurity elements and non-metallic inclusions. Short-term tensile properties for the steel tested to 700 °C are provided after the standard heat treatment (normalization, temper). Rupture strength and creep properties for the steel depending on the initial heat treatment conditions are also given. The microstructural stability of the 16Cr12W2VTaB type steel at temperatures up to 650 °C is predicted to be good, and the properties of the steel after irradiation in BOR-60 are demonstrated.

  11. Heat resistant reduced activation 12% Cr steel of 16Cr12W2VTaB type-advanced structural material for fusion and fast breeder power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ioltukhovskiy, A.G. E-mail: iral@bochvar.ru; Leonteva-Smirnova, M.V.; Solonin, M.I.; Chernov, V.M.; Golovanov, V.N.; Shamardin, V.K.; Bulanova, T.M.; Povstyanko, A.V.; Fedoseev, A.E

    2002-12-01

    Heat resistant 12% Cr steels of the 16Cr12W2VTaB type (12Cr-2W-V-Ta-B-0.16C) provide a reduced activation material that can be used as a structural material for fusion and fast breeder reactors. The composition under study meets scientific and engineering requirements and has an optimal base element composition to provide a {delta}-ferrite content of no more than 20%. It also has a minimum quantity of low melting impurity elements and non-metallic inclusions. Short-term tensile properties for the steel tested to 700 deg. C are provided after the standard heat treatment (normalization, temper). Rupture strength and creep properties for the steel depending on the initial heat treatment conditions are also given. The microstructural stability of the 16Cr12W2VTaB type steel at temperatures up to 650 deg. C is predicted to be good, and the properties of the steel after irradiation in BOR-60 are demonstrated.

  12. ACCELERATING FUSION REACTOR NEUTRONICS MODELING BY AUTOMATIC COUPLING OF HYBRID MONTE CARLO/DETERMINISTIC TRANSPORT ON CAD GEOMETRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biondo, Elliott D [ORNL; Ibrahim, Ahmad M [ORNL; Mosher, Scott W [ORNL; Grove, Robert E [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Detailed radiation transport calculations are necessary for many aspects of the design of fusion energy systems (FES) such as ensuring occupational safety, assessing the activation of system components for waste disposal, and maintaining cryogenic temperatures within superconducting magnets. Hybrid Monte Carlo (MC)/deterministic techniques are necessary for this analysis because FES are large, heavily shielded, and contain streaming paths that can only be resolved with MC. The tremendous complexity of FES necessitates the use of CAD geometry for design and analysis. Previous ITER analysis has required the translation of CAD geometry to MCNP5 form in order to use the AutomateD VAriaNce reducTion Generator (ADVANTG) for hybrid MC/deterministic transport. In this work, ADVANTG was modified to support CAD geometry, allowing hybrid (MC)/deterministic transport to be done automatically and eliminating the need for this translation step. This was done by adding a new ray tracing routine to ADVANTG for CAD geometries using the Direct Accelerated Geometry Monte Carlo (DAGMC) software library. This new capability is demonstrated with a prompt dose rate calculation for an ITER computational benchmark problem using both the Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling (CADIS) method an the Forward Weighted (FW)-CADIS method. The variance reduction parameters produced by ADVANTG are shown to be the same using CAD geometry and standard MCNP5 geometry. Significant speedups were observed for both neutrons (as high as a factor of 7.1) and photons (as high as a factor of 59.6).

  13. MHD Stability Analysis and Flow Controls of Liquid Metal Free Surface Film Flows as Fusion Reactor PFCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiujie; Pan, Chuanjie; Xu, Zengyu

    2016-12-01

    Numerical and experimental investigation results on the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) film flows along flat and curved bottom surfaces are summarized in this study. A simplified modeling has been developed to study the liquid metal MHD film state, which has been validated by the existing experimental results. Numerical results on how the inlet velocity (V), the chute width (W) and the inlet film thickness (d0) affect the MHD film flow state are obtained. MHD stability analysis results are also provided in this study. The results show that strong magnetic fields make the stable V decrease several times compared to the case with no magnetic field, especially small radial magnetic fields (Bn) will have a significant impact on the MHD film flow state. Based on the above numerical and MHD stability analysis results flow control methods are proposed for flat and curved MHD film flows. For curved film flow we firstly proposed a new multi-layers MHD film flow system with a solid metal mesh to get the stable MHD film flows along the curved bottom surface. Experiments on flat and curved MHD film flows are also carried out and some firstly observed results are achieved. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2014GB125003 and 2013GB114002), National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11105044)

  14. Calculation of the absolute detection efficiency of a moderated /sup 235/U neutron detector on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ku, L.P.; Hendel, H.W.; Liew, S.L.

    1989-02-01

    Neutron transport simulations have been carried out to calculate the absolute detection efficiency of a moderated /sup 235/U neutron detector which is used on the TFTR as a part of the primary fission detector diagnostic system for measuring fusion power yields. Transport simulations provide a means by which the effects of variations in various shielding and geometrical parameters can be explored. These effects are difficult to study in calibration experiments. The calculational model, benchmarked against measurements, can be used to complement future detector calibrations, when the high level of radioactivity resulting from machine operation may severely restrict access to the tokamak. We present a coupled forward-adjoint algorithm, employing both the deterministic and Monte Carlo sampling methods, to model the neutron transport in the complex tokamak and detector geometries. Sensitivities of the detector response to the major and minor radii, and angular anisotropy of the neutron emission are discussed. A semi-empirical model based on matching the calculational results with a small set of experiments produces good agreement (+-15%) for a wide range of source energies and geometries. 20 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Progress in physics design of fusion-fission hybrid energy reactor%次临界能源堆物理设计进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李茂生; 贾建平; 程和平; 蒋洁琼; 栗再新; 杨永伟; 吴宏春; 师学明; 刘荣; 鹿心鑫; 朱通华; 王新华; 余泳; 严钧; 唐涛

    2014-01-01

    聚变-裂变混合能源堆包括聚变中子源和次临界能源堆,主要目标是生产电能。回顾了国内外混合堆的发展历史,给出混合能源堆设计的边界条件和约束条件,说明次临界能源堆以铀锆合金为燃料、水为冷却剂的设计思想。利用输运燃耗耦合程序 MCORGS 计算了混合能源的燃耗,给出了中子有效增殖因数、能量放大倍数和氚增殖比等物理量随时间的变化。通过分析能谱和重要核素随燃耗时间的变化,说明混合能源堆与核燃料增殖、核废料嬗变混合堆的不同特点。论述了混合堆的热工设计并进行了安全分析。对于燃耗数值模拟程序,通过多家对算,保证其计算结果的可信性。针对次临界能源堆的特点,利用贫铀球壳建立了贫铀聚乙烯装置和贫铀 LiH 装置,并且专门设计加工了天然铀装置,开展铀裂变率、造钚率、产氚率等中子学积分实验,验证了数值模拟的可靠性。%In this paper,we propose a preliminary design for a fusion-fission hybrid energy reactor (FFHER),based on cur-rent fusion science and technology and well-developed fission technology.Design rules are listed and a primary concept blanket with uranium alloy as fuel and water as coolant is put forward.The uranium fuel can be natural uranium,LWR spent fuel,or de-pleted uranium.The FFHER design can increase the utilization rate of uranium in a comparatively simple way to sustain the de-velopment of nuclear energy.The interaction between the fusion neutron and the uranium fuel with the aim of achieving greater energy multiplication and tritium sustainability is studied.Other concept hybrid reactor designs are also reviewed.Integral neu-tron experiments were carried out to verify the credibility of our proposed physical design.The combination of the physical design with the related thermal hydraulic design,alloy fuel manufacture,and nuclear fuel cycle programs provides the

  16. Compared FEM and neutron diffraction study of residual strains in Eurofer97 prototype laser welds for fusion reactor technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppol, R. [ENEA - Casaccia, FPN, CP Roma (Italy); Asserin, O. [CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Hughes, D.J. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin, 38 - Grenoble (France)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: A reliable characterization of residual strains and stresses is a crucial step in the development of high quality welds for Helium-Cooled-Lithium-Lead (HCLL) blanket modules for DEMO. This contribution will present the first results of a comparative study, carried out using Finite Element Model (FEM) calculations and neutron diffraction measurements to determine the strain and stress field in an Eurofer97 (9Cr, 0.01C, 1W, 0.2V Fe bal wt%) prototype laser weld. The neutron diffraction measurements were carried out at the SALSA diffractometer at the High Flux Reactor of the Institut Max von Laue-Paul Langevin, Grenoble, France. A diffracting volume of approximately 1 x 1 x 5 mm{sup 3} was defined, giving appropriate neutron counting times and allowing a significant comparison with the material volume sampled by FEM. The measurements were carried out at various distances from the weld and within the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ), where the analysis of the detected diffraction line-widths provides information on the metallurgic phases produced during the heat treatment. The neutron diffraction results are compared with the theoretical calculations in view of providing them with an experimental validation. (authors)

  17. Study of the Fe-Ti/W system for joining applications in high-temperature fusion reactor components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prado, J. de, E-mail: javier.deprado@urjc.es [Rey Juan Carlos University, Calle Tulipán s/n 28933 Móstoles, Madrid (Spain); Sánchez, M. [Rey Juan Carlos University, Calle Tulipán s/n 28933 Móstoles, Madrid (Spain); Alvaredo, P.; Gordo, E. [Carlos III de Madrid University, Avenida de la Universidad 30, 28911 Leganés, Madrid (Spain); Ureña, A. [Rey Juan Carlos University, Calle Tulipán s/n 28933 Móstoles, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Simulations show good correlation versus experimental results for Fe-Ti/W system. • The joint is predicted to be stable at the service conditions of the component. • The predictions could help to analyze different scenarios during its service life. - Abstract: The interaction of the Fe-Ti/W system in a brazed divertor component of the future fusion power plant has been studied. The reactivity between the substrates and the filler is an important factor to obtain a high quality joint. Thermodynamic and diffusion simulation software can be valuable tools for studying these effects, particularly in scenarios that are difficult to experimentally analyze. Two different strategies have been performed: 1) simulation processes using the Thermo-Calc and DICTRA software to calculate the phase diagram and simulate the diffusion process, respectively, and 2) experimental tests in a furnace to join W-W substrates using a filler with an 86Fe-Ti composition to analyze the operational brazeability and compare it with the simulation results. The simulation processes predicted two of the three phases that formed at the experimental joint (α-Fe and TiC). The interaction at the W-filler interface predicted by DICTRA correlates with the experimental results, where Fe, Ti and C diffused into the W substrate and moved the interface by 25 μm. Simulations also show the stability of the interface over the lifetime of the component. The combined use of Thermo-Calc and DICTRA software enabled the accurate prediction of different scenarios in the system of Fe-Ti-C/W.

  18. Peaceful Uses of Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teller, E.

    1958-07-03

    Applications of thermonuclear energy for peaceful and constructive purposes are surveyed. Developments and problems in the release and control of fusion energy are reviewed. It is pointed out that the future of thermonuclear power reactors will depend upon the construction of a machine that produces more electric energy than it consumes. The fuel for thermonuclear reactors is cheap and practically inexhaustible. Thermonuclear reactors produce less dangerous radioactive materials than fission reactors and, when once brought under control, are not as likely to be subject to dangerous excursions. The interaction of the hot plasma with magnetic fields opens the way for the direct production of electricity. It is possible that explosive fusion energy released underground may be harnessed for the production of electricity before the same feat is accomplished in controlled fusion processes. Applications of underground detonations of fission devices in mining and for the enhancement of oil flow in large low-specific-yield formations are also suggested.

  19. Alfven Eigenmode And Ion Bernstein Wave Studies For Controlling Fusion Alpha Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Heeter, R F

    1999-01-01

    In magnetic confinement fusion reactor plasmas, the charged fusion products (such as alpha particles in deuterium-tritium plasmas) will be the dominant power source, and by controlling these charged fusion products using wave-particle interactions the reactor performance could be optimized. This thesis studies two candidate waves: Mode-Converted Ion Bernstein Waves (MCIBWs) and Alfvén Eigenmodes (AEs). Rates of MCIBW-driven losses of alpha-like fast deuterons, previously observed in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), are reproduced by a new model so that the wave-particle diffusion coefficient can be deduced. The MCIBW power in TFTR is found to be ∼ 1/3 that needed for collisionless alpha particle control. A reasonable reactor power scaling is derived. To study AEs, existing magnetic fluctuation probes at the Joint European Torus (JET) have been absolutely calibrated from 30–500 kHz for the first time, allowing fluctuation measurements with &vbm0;dBpol&vbm0;/B0&am...

  20. R&D around a photoneutralizer-based NBI system (Siphore) in view of a DEMO Tokamak steady state fusion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonin, A.; Achard, Jocelyn; Achkasov, K.; Bechu, S.; Baudouin, C.; Baulaigue, O.; Blondel, C.; Boeuf, J. P.; Bresteau, D.; Cartry, G.; Chaibi, W.; Drag, C.; de Esch, H. P. L.; Fiorucci, D.; Fubiani, G.; Furno, I.; Futtersack, R.; Garibaldi, P.; Gicquel, A.; Grand, C.; Guittienne, Ph.; Hagelaar, G.; Howling, A.; Jacquier, R.; Kirkpatrick, M. J.; Lemoine, D.; Lepetit, B.; Minea, T.; Odic, E.; Revel, A.; Soliman, B. A.; Teste, P.

    2015-11-01

    Since the signature of the ITER treaty in 2006, a new research programme targeting the emergence of a new generation of neutral beam (NB) system for the future fusion reactor (DEMO Tokamak) has been underway between several laboratories in Europe. The specifications required to operate a NB system on DEMO are very demanding: the system has to provide plasma heating, current drive and plasma control at a very high level of power (up to 150 MW) and energy (1 or 2 MeV), including high performances in term of wall-plug efficiency (η  >  60%), high availability and reliability. To this aim, a novel NB concept based on the photodetachment of the energetic negative ion beam is under study. The keystone of this new concept is the achievement of a photoneutralizer where a high power photon flux (~3 MW) generated within a Fabry-Perot cavity will overlap, cross and partially photodetach the intense negative ion beam accelerated at high energy (1 or 2 MeV). The aspect ratio of the beam-line (source, accelerator, etc) is specifically designed to maximize the overlap of the photon beam with the ion beam. It is shown that such a photoneutralized based NB system would have the capability to provide several tens of MW of D0 per beam line with a wall-plug efficiency higher than 60%. A feasibility study of the concept has been launched between different laboratories to address the different physics aspects, i.e. negative ion source, plasma modelling, ion accelerator simulation, photoneutralization and high voltage holding under vacuum. The paper describes the present status of the project and the main achievements of the developments in laboratories.

  1. Study of a transaugmented two-stage small circular-bore railgun for injection of hypervelocity hydrogen pellets as a fusion reactor refueling mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tompkins, M.W.; Anderson, M.A.; Feng, Q.; Zhang, J.; Kim, K. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Injection of hypervelocity hydrogen pellets has become widely accepted as the most effective means of refueling magnetically confined fusion reactors. Pellet velocities on the order of 10 km/s are desired and hydrogen pellet erosion during acceleration must be minimized. It is important to maintain uniform bore surfaces during repetitive shots, implying that, if a railgun is to be used to accelerate the pellets, damage to the sidewalls and rails of the railgun due to local heating must be limited. In order to reduce the amount of power dissipated within the bore and increase the propulsive force generated by the plasma-arc armature while minimizing losses due to pellet, rail, and sidewall ablation, the authors have employed a magnetic field transaugmentation mechanism consisting of a two-turn pulsed electromagnet. The two-stage gun consists of a light-gas gun which accelerates a 4- to 5-mg pellet to a speed around 1.2 km/s and injects it into the plasma-arc armature railgun. Currently, they have achieved a final output velocity for a hydrogen pellet of 2.11 km/s with a time-averaged acceleration of 4,850 km/s{sup 2} using a 58-cm railgun pulsed with a peak rail current of 9.2 kA and 28.0 kA of transaugmentation current. This paper will present a description of the hydrogen-pellet-injector railgun system, a discussion of the data on hydrogen pellet acceleration, and projections for future systems.

  2. Capabilities of computer materials science and irradiation experiments for irradiation materials database and design methodology development (based on discussions at the {sup I}EA symposium on fusion reactor materials development)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jitsukawa, S.; Suzuki, K.; Kaburaki, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Wiffen, F.W.; Stoller, R. [ORNL - Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Materials Science and Technology Div., AK TN (United States); Sharafat, S. [UCLA, Los Angeles, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Dept., AK CA (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Irradiation by high-energy fusion neutrons of the first wall of a DEMO blanket introduces transmutation produced helium atoms and displacement damage in the structural material to levels of greater than 1000 appm and 100 displacement per atom during typical service lifetimes, respectively. To simulate high levels of helium atoms in materials, doping techniques using species with large helium producing cross sections are often used in fission reactor irradiation experiments. However, the capability of these techniques is rather limited due to the geometric accumulation of dopants and helium along grain boundaries. In recent years, significant progress in modeling and simulation studies on these irradiation effects using large-scale computational techniques has been achieved. However, further improvements in accuracy and reliability of modeling results are needed prior to application of these results to structural design analyses and licensing. Therefore, the community is anticipating the construction of an intense neutron source, such as the d-Li stripping reaction neutron source of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF). At the recent 'IEA Symposium on Fusion Reactor Materials Development' held Tokyo, Japan 2006, accomplishments of modeling and simulation studies, results of fission neutron and ion irradiation experiments, and a gap between the knowledge of these activities and design methodology of fusion reactor components were presented and discussed. One of the major conclusions of the meeting was that 'IFMIF is an essential facility in the pursuit of a low-risk path to the rapid development of commercially-viable fusion energy (DEMO). To facilitate highly productive IFMIF and supporting efforts (theory, modeling, and computer materials science), it is also important to enhance the activities of materials development, by continuing irradiation experiments in fission reactors and at other

  3. Reactor Materials Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Walle, E

    2001-04-01

    The activities of the Reactor Materials Research Department of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN in 2000 are summarised. The programmes within the department are focussed on studies concerning (1) fusion, in particular mechanical testing; (2) Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC); (3) nuclear fuel; and (4) Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel (RPVS)

  4. Fusion Studies in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Yuichi

    2016-05-01

    A new strategic energy plan decided by the Japanese Cabinet in 2014 strongly supports the steady promotion of nuclear fusion development activities, including the ITER project and the Broader Approach activities from the long-term viewpoint. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) in Japan formulated the Third Phase Basic Program so as to promote an experimental fusion reactor project. In 2005 AEC has reviewed this Program, and discussed on selection and concentration among many projects of fusion reactor development. In addition to the promotion of ITER project, advanced tokamak research by JT-60SA, helical plasma experiment by LHD, FIREX project in laser fusion research and fusion engineering by IFMIF were highly prioritized. Although the basic concept is quite different between tokamak, helical and laser fusion researches, there exist a lot of common features such as plasma physics on 3-D magnetic geometry, high power heat load on plasma facing component and so on. Therefore, a synergetic scenario on fusion reactor development among various plasma confinement concepts would be important.

  5. Evaluation of a Non-Destructive Method for the Removal of Dust, Debris, and Co-deposited Tritium from First Wall Surfaces and Plasma Surface Interfaces (PSI) in a Fusion Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGahan, Christina; Gentile, Charles

    2009-11-01

    Diagnostic mirrors and windows located within the vacuum vessel boundary of fusion reactors will be subjected to dust and debris collection, causing reflectivity and clarity respectively to degrade and thus undermining data accuracy and machine performance. Additionally, co-deposited tritium must be removed in an efficient manner so unexpended tritium can be re-introduced into the fusion fuel cycle. A technique for removing carbon, beryllium, and co-deposited tritium from first wall components using a rastering 325 watt continuous wave neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd: YAG) laser is under investigation. This technique has shown promise in ablating dust and debris without damaging reflective surfaces in addition to removing co-deposited layers of tritium from various diagnostic and PSI components in a non-destructive fashion. We will discuss the physical effects on surfaces and components pre and post laser interaction(s).

  6. 1D Burnup Calculation of Fusion-Fission Hybrid Energy Reactor%聚变-裂变混合能源堆一维计算模型燃耗分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李茂生; 师学明; 伊炜伟

    2012-01-01

    Fusion-fission hybrid energy reactor is driven by Tokamak fusion source for energy production. Its subcritical zone uses the natural uranium as fuel and water as coolant. The neutron multiplication constant keff, energy multiplication factor M and tritium breeding ratio TBR of the ID hybrid energy reactor model were calculated by transport burnup code MCORGS. The neutron spectrum and nuclear density changing as a function of time show the characteristics of the hybrid energy reactors, which differs from the hybrid reactor for breed nuclear fuel and for spent fuel transmutation. The definition and results may be a reference to the other conceptual analysis.%聚变-裂变混合能源堆包括聚变中子源和以天然铀为燃料、水为冷却剂的次临界包层,主要目标是生产电力.利用输运燃耗耦合程序系统MCORGS计算了混合能源堆一维模型的燃耗,给出了中子有效增殖因数keff、能量放大倍数M、氚增殖比TBR等物理量随时间的变化.通过分析能谱和重要核素随燃耗时间的变化,说明混合能源堆与核燃料增殖、核废料嬗变混合堆的不同特点.本文给出的结果可作为混合堆中子输运、燃耗分析程序校验的参考数据,为混合堆概念研究提供了基础数据.

  7. Fusion ignition research experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dale Meade

    2000-07-18

    Understanding the properties of high gain (alpha-dominated) fusion plasmas in an advanced toroidal configuration is the largest remaining open issue that must be addressed to provide the scientific foundation for an attractive magnetic fusion reactor. The critical parts of this science can be obtained in a compact high field tokamak which is also likely to provide the fastest and least expensive path to understanding alpha-dominated plasmas in advanced toroidal systems.

  8. (Fusion energy research)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, C.A. (ed.)

    1988-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY88); tokamak fusion test reactor; Princeton beta Experiment-Modification; S-1 Spheromak; current drive experiment; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical plasma; tokamak modeling; compact ignition tokamak; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; Engineering Department; Project Planning and Safety Office; quality assurance and reliability; and technology transfer.

  9. Preresidue'' light charged particles from [sup 28]Si+[sup 165]Ho, [sup 16]O+[sup 197]Au, and [sup 16]O+[sup 208]Pb fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fineman, B.J.; Brinkmann, K.; Caraley, A.L.; Gan, N.; McGrath, R.L.; Velkovska, J. (Physics Department, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States))

    1994-10-01

    Proton and [alpha]-particle spectral shapes and multiplicities have been measured in coincidence with evaporation residues from 145 to 220 MeV [sup 28]Si+[sup 165]Ho and 115 and 140 MeV [sup 16]O+[sup 197]Au,[sup 208]Pb fusion reactions. Evaporation residues were separated using an electrostatic deflector and detected with large area surface barrier detectors. Light charged particles were detected at forward and backward angles with 14 single NaI detectors. In the context of the statistical model, the charged particle spectra provide information about the shapes and level densities of the emitting systems. Deformed emitters are inferred, and to a varying degree, an energy-dependent level density parameter is compatible with the data in each of the three cases. Implications for current fusion and fission dynamics studies are discussed.

  10. Frontiers in fusion research

    CERN Document Server

    Kikuchi, Mitsuru

    2011-01-01

    Frontiers in Fusion Research provides a systematic overview of the latest physical principles of fusion and plasma confinement. It is primarily devoted to the principle of magnetic plasma confinement, that has been systematized through 50 years of fusion research. Frontiers in Fusion Research begins with an introduction to the study of plasma, discussing the astronomical birth of hydrogen energy and the beginnings of human attempts to harness the Sun's energy for use on Earth. It moves on to chapters that cover a variety of topics such as: * charged particle motion, * plasma kinetic theory, *

  11. Controlled fusion and plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Miyamoto, Kenro

    2006-01-01

    Resulting from ongoing, international research into fusion processes, the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER) is a major step in the quest for a new energy source.The first graduate-level text to cover the details of ITER, Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics introduces various aspects and issues of recent fusion research activities through the shortest access path. The distinguished author breaks down the topic by first dealing with fusion and then concentrating on the more complex subject of plasma physics. The book begins with the basics of controlled fusion research, foll

  12. 聚变-裂变混合能源堆球模型参数敏感性分析%Sensitivity Analysis on Parameters of Spherical Model of Fusion-Fission Hybrid Energy Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘国明; 程和平; 邵增

    2012-01-01

    在聚变-裂变混合能源堆球模型基础上,使用蒙特卡罗方法中子学程序对中子源、铀水体积比、产氚区等相关参数进行了中子学的敏感性计算.分析了各参数对混合能源堆能量放大倍数M和氚增殖比TBR的影响,并总结其基本规律,为开展进一步的混合能源堆概念设计提供了重要参考.%The sensitivity analysis on neutronics parameters related to neutron source, uranium-water ratio and tritium breeding layers for spherical blanket model of fusion-fission hybrid reactor were presented. By using a Monte-Carlo method based neutron transport code, the effects of the parameters on energy multiplication factor M and tritium breeding ratio TBR were analyzed, and the general various laws of M and TBR were summarized, which were significant for the further conceptual design of fusion-fission hybrid energy reactor.

  13. Electromagnetic analysis for blanket of fusion reactor under plasma disruption%等离子体破裂工况下的聚变堆包层组件电磁分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈明锋; 刘素梅; 孙朋飞; 雷明准; 王忠伟

    2015-01-01

    In a fusion reactor, the blanket is one of the core components inside the vacuum vessel, it is directly facing the plasma, and the working environment is very harsh. In this paper, the induced eddy current and suffered electromagnetic force in the blanket of China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) has been calculated by the vector electromagnetic method of ANSYS in the major plasma disruption or the vertical displacement event. The modeling, the current source loading, boundary conditions setting, solving and calculated results are presented. This will provides the necessary reference data and method for future detailed design and optimization of the blanket components.%在聚变堆中,包层是真空室内的核心部件之一,它直接面对等离子体,工作环境十分恶劣.利用ANSYS软件的矢量电磁法,计算了中国聚变工程实验堆(CFETR)包层在离子体破裂和垂直位移事件中感应的涡电流和电磁力.介绍了建模、电流源加载、边界条件的设置、求解和计算结果.这为今后包层组件结构的详细设计和优化提供了必要的参考数据和方法.

  14. Fusion research programme in India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shishir Deshpande; Predhiman Kaw

    2013-10-01

    The fusion energy research program of India is summarized in the context of energy needs and scenario of tokamak advancements on domestic and international fronts. In particular, the various technologies that will lead us to ultimately build a fusion power reactor are identified along with the steps being taken for their indigenous development.

  15. Muon Catalyzed Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Edward A.G.

    2007-01-01

    Muon catalyzed fusion is a process in which a negatively charged muon combines with two nuclei of isotopes of hydrogen, e.g, a proton and a deuteron or a deuteron and a triton, to form a muonic molecular ion in which the binding is so tight that nuclear fusion occurs. The muon is normally released after fusion has taken place and so can catalyze further fusions. As the muon has a mean lifetime of 2.2 microseconds, this is the maximum period over which a muon can participate in this process. This article gives an outline of the history of muon catalyzed fusion from 1947, when it was first realised that such a process might occur, to the present day. It includes a description of the contribution that Drachrnan has made to the theory of muon catalyzed fusion and the influence this has had on the author's research.

  16. Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogerton, John

    1964-01-01

    This pamphlet describes how reactors work; discusses reactor design; describes research, teaching, and materials testing reactors; production reactors; reactors for electric power generation; reactors for supply heat; reactors for propulsion; reactors for space; reactor safety; and reactors of tomorrow. The appendix discusses characteristics of U.S. civilian power reactor concepts and lists some of the U.S. reactor power projects, with location, type, capacity, owner, and startup date.

  17. Bouillabaisse sushi fusion power

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    "If avant-garde cuisine is any guide, Japanese-French fusion does not work all that well. And the interminable discussions over the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) suggest that what is true of cooking is true of physics" (1 page)

  18. On fusion driven systems (FDS) for transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aagren, O (Uppsala Univ., Aangstroem laboratory, div. of electricity, Uppsala (Sweden)); Moiseenko, V.E. (Inst. of Plasma Physics, National Science Center, Kharkov Inst. of Physics and Technology, Kharkov (Ukraine)); Noack, K. (Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany))

    2008-10-15

    This report gives a brief description of ongoing activities on fusion driven systems (FDS) for transmutation of the long-lived radioactive isotopes in the spent nuclear waste from fission reactors. Driven subcritical systems appears to be the only option for efficient minor actinide burning. Driven systems offer a possibility to increase reactor safety margins. A comparatively simple fusion device could be sufficient for a fusion-fission machine, and transmutation may become the first industrial application of fusion. Some alternative schemes to create strong fusion neutron fluxes are presented

  19. Radiation effects and tritium technology for fusion reactors. Volume I. Proceedings of the international conference, Gatlinburg, Tennessee, October 1--3, 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, J.S.; Wiffen, F.W.; Bishop, J.L.; Breeden, B.K. (eds.)

    1976-03-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 29 included papers in Vol. I. The topics covered in this volume include swelling and microstructures in thermonuclear reactor materials. Some papers on modeling and damage analysis are included. (MOW)

  20. Hybrid reactors. [Fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moir, R.W.

    1980-09-09

    The rationale for hybrid fusion-fission reactors is the production of fissile fuel for fission reactors. A new class of reactor, the fission-suppressed hybrid promises unusually good safety features as well as the ability to support 25 light-water reactors of the same nuclear power rating, or even more high-conversion-ratio reactors such as the heavy-water type. One 4000-MW nuclear hybrid can produce 7200 kg of /sup 233/U per year. To obtain good economics, injector efficiency times plasma gain (eta/sub i/Q) should be greater than 2, the wall load should be greater than 1 MW.m/sup -2/, and the hybrid should cost less than 6 times the cost of a light-water reactor. Introduction rates for the fission-suppressed hybrid are usually rapid.

  1. Preliminary Neutronics Design of Breed Blanket for Fusion-fission Hybrid Reactor%聚变-裂变增殖堆包层的初步中子学设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵奉超; 栗再新

    2012-01-01

    基于国际热核实验堆ITER的堆芯参数和套管结构,对聚变-裂变增殖堆包层进行了初步中子学设计.基于国际热核实验堆的堆芯参数提出了采用套管结构,以天然金属铀为燃料和硅酸锂为氚增殖剂的快裂变-增殖堆包层的初步中子学设计方案.使用FENDL 2.1核数据库及MCNP程序自带的核数据库,用MCNP程序对套管结构快裂变-增殖堆包层进行一维的方案筛选及三维中子学的计算分析.计算分析包层内的一维功率密度分布、产氚率、钚增殖率分布,通过优化设计分析给出合理的包层设计方案,并计算氚增殖率TBR、能量放大倍数M、有效增值系数(Keff)、裂变增殖比等参数.%A preliminary neutronics design of breed blanket for fusion-fission hybrid reactor has been carried out based on the plasma parameters of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and casing structure. In the design of fast-fission breed blanket, the natural Uranium pebble bed is used as fuel and neutron multiplication and the Lithium silicate pebble bed is used as tritium breed material. By using FENDL2.1 nuclear database cross section library with native cross section library of MCNP nuclear database, the calculation and analysis are carried out with MCNP program. Through one-dimension calculation and analysis on different design proposals, a proper design proposal has been screened and then the three-dimension calculation and analysis have been implemented with the parameters of ITER. The calculation shows that the TBR of fusion-fission hybrid reactor is 1.13, it indicates that the design of breed blanket is able to meet self-sustaining of tritium and the calculation also indicates that the energy enlargement of fusion-ission hybrid reactor is 6.5 and Polonium breeding rate is 1.35, it means that the reactor is able to also product large quantities energy and Polonium and they could be used by light water reactor. Meanwhile, fission

  2. Magnetic fusion 1985: what next

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, T.K.

    1985-03-01

    Recent budget reductions for magnetic fusion have led to a re-examination of program schedules and objectives. Faced with delays and postponement of major facilities as previously planned, some have called for a near-term focus on science, others have stressed technology. This talk will suggest a different focus as the keynote for this conference, namely, the applications of fusion. There is no doubt that plasma science is by now mature and fusion technology is at the forefront. This has and will continue to benefit many fields of endeavor, both in actual new discoveries and techniques and in attracting and training scientists and engineers who move on to make significant contributions in science, defense and industry. Nonetheless, however superb the science or how challenging the technology, these are means, not ends. To maintain its support, the magnetic fusion program must also offer the promise of power reactors that could be competitive in the future. At this conference, several new reactor designs will be described that claim to be smaller and economically competitive with fission reactors while retaining the environmental and safety characteristics that are the hallmark of fusion. The American Nuclear Society is an appropriate forum in which to examine these new designs critically, and to stimulate better ideas and improvements. As a preview, this talk will include brief discussions of new tokamak, tandem mirror and reversed field pinch reactor designs to be presented in later sessions. Finally, as a preview of the session on fusion breeders, the talk will explore once again the economic implications of a new nuclear age, beginning with improved fission reactors fueled by fusion breeders, then ultimately evolving to reactors based solely on fusion.

  3. Inertial fusion energy; L'energie de fusion inertielle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decroisette, M.; Andre, M.; Bayer, C.; Juraszek, D. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, Dir. des Systemes d' Information (CEA/DIF), 91 (France); Le Garrec, B. [CEA Centre d' Etudes Scientifiques et Techniques d' Aquitaine, 33 - Le Barp (France); Deutsch, C. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France); Migus, A. [Institut d' Optique Centre scientifique, 91 - Orsay (France)

    2005-07-01

    We first recall the scientific basis of inertial fusion and then describe a generic fusion reactor with the different components: the driver, the fusion chamber, the material treatment unit, the target factory and the turbines. We analyse the options proposed at the present time for the driver and for target irradiation scheme giving the state of art for each approach. We conclude by the presentation of LMJ (laser Megajoule) and NIF (national ignition facility) projects. These facilities aim to demonstrate the feasibility of laboratory DT ignition, first step toward Inertial Fusion Energy. (authors)

  4. Charged particle sub-barrier transfer reactions for {sup 16}O + {sup A}Sm and their influence on the fusion cross section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, P.R.S.; Maciel, A.M.M.; Cabezas, R. [and others

    1995-10-01

    Transfer cross section angular distribution data for the stripping of two protons and one alpha particle are studied for the {sup 16}O + {sup A}Sm systems (A = 144, 148, 150, 152 and 154), at energies slightly lower than the Coulomb barriers and angles up to 0 = 170{degrees}. From a semiclassical formalism, transfer and elastic scattering data, the transfer form factors is derived. For only one of the ten channels studied there are signatures for the interpretation that the transfer reaction mechanism at backward angles, corresponding to small distances, may behave as a multi-step process leading to fusion. Coupled channel calculations including transfer channels are performed for the study of the sub-barrier fusion of these systems. The influence of short distance transfer reactions on the fusion is discussed. For these and other systems, the conclusions from this approach are found t to long range fusion absorptive potentials.

  5. {open_quotes}Pre-residue{close_quotes} light charged particles from {sup 28}Si+{sup 165}Ho and {sup 16}O+{sup 197}Au, {sup 208}Pb fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fineman, B.J.; Brinkmann, K.T.; Caraley, A.L.; Gan, N.; McGrath, R.L.; Velkovska, J.

    1993-10-01

    Proton and alpha particle spectral shapes and multiplicities have been measured in coincidence with evaporation residues from {sup 28}Si+{sup 165}Ho and {sup 16}O + {sup 197}Au, {sup 208}Pb fusion reactions. Our experiments used 145 to 220 MeV {sup 28}Si and 115 and 140 MeV {sup 16}O beams produced with the Stony Brook LINAC. ER`s were separated using an electrostatic deflector and detected with large area surface barrier detectors. Light charged particles were detected at forward and backward angles with fourteen single NaI detectors. In the context of the statistical model, charged particle spectra yield information about emission barriers and compound nucleus equilibrium level densities. These are significant ingredients in calculations determining fission timescales from other observables such as pre-scission neutron multiplicities or fusion-evaporation excitation functions. Results will also be compared to analyses of pre-scission charged particles from similar systems which required barrier reductions to describe measured spectra.

  6. G8 decision on fusion would herald nuclear future

    CERN Multimedia

    Starck, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear fusion as a future abundant energy source would receive a boost if G8 leaders agree next month on the site for the world's first fusion test reactor, two nuclear scientists said on Wednesday (1 page)

  7. Simulation on advanced operation mode for the compact fusion-fission hybrid reactor%紧凑型聚变裂变混合堆先进运行模式的数值模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈美霞; 刘成岳; 吴斌

    2012-01-01

    Reversed shear (RS) operation mode is simulated with Jsolver and TSC codes on some important issues, such as RS Plasma configuration, bootstrap current fraction and RS operation mode discharge simulation etc.. To some degree, the modeling results show that the RS operation mode is advanced and feasible for the compact Fusion-fission hybrid reactor.%使用Jsolver程序及托卡马克模拟程序TSC对紧凑型聚变裂变混合堆系统的反剪切平衡位形、自举电流份额及放电模拟进行数值模拟研究,以此探讨该混合堆的可行性和先进性.

  8. 3D characterization of thermal fatigue damage in monofilament reinforced copper for heat sink applications in fusion reactor systems; 3D-Charakterisierung von thermischer Ermuedungsschaedigung in Monofilament verstaerktem Kupfer zur Anwendung als Waermeleiter in Kernfusionsreaktorsystemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoebel, Michael; Degischer, H. Peter [Vienna Univ. of Technology (Austria). Inst. of Materials Science and Technology; Brendel, Annegret [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Harrer, Bernhard [Upper Austria Univ. of Applied Sciences, Wels (Austria); Di Michiel, Marco [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    2012-07-01

    Monofilament reinforced metals (MFRM) are developed as high temperature heat sink materials for fusion reactor applications. These composites combine the high thermal conductivity (TC) of a Cu matrix with low thermal expansion (CTE) of SiC or W filaments. The CTE mismatch between matrix and reinforcement lead to high micro stresses under operation conditions. Stress induced thermal fatigue damage such as interface delamination and fiber/matrix damage degrades the thermal properties of these composites. Different interface designs are developed for SiC as well as W filaments to improve bonding strength and increase the long term stability. Conventional as well as synchrotron tomography was applied on different MFRMs to characterize thermal fatigue damage and its propagation before, during and after thermal cycling. (orig.)

  9. Fe-15Ni-13Cr austenitic stainless steels for fission and fusion reactor applications - Part 1: Effects of minor alloying elements on precipitate phases in melt products and implication in alloy fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, E. H.; Mansur, L. K.

    2000-01-01

    In an effort to develop alloys for fission and fusion reactor applications, 28Fe-15Ni-13Cr base alloys were fabricated by adding various combinations of the minor alloying elements, Mo, Ti, C, Si, P, Nb, and B. The results showed that a significant fraction of undesirable residual oxygen was removed as oxides when Ti, C, and Si were added. Accordingly, the concentrations of the latter three essential alloying elements were reduced also. Among these elements, Ti was the strongest oxide former, but the largest oxygen removal (over 80%) was observed when carbon was added alone without Ti, since gaseous CO boiled off during melting. This paper recommends an alloy melting procedure to mitigate solute losses while reducing the undesirable residual oxygen. In this work, 14 different types of precipitate phases were identified. Compositions of precipitate phases and their crystallographic data are documented. Finally, stability of precipitate phases was examined in view of Gibbs free energy of formation.

  10. Fusion Power Program biannual progress report, April-September 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-02-01

    This biannual report summarizes the Argonne National Laboratory work performed for the Office of Fusion Energy during the April-September 1979 quarter in the following research and development areas: materials; energy storage and transfer; tritium containment, recovery and control; advanced reactor design; atomic data; reactor safety; fusion-fission hybrid systems; alternate applications of fusion energy; and other work related to fusion power. Separate abstracts were prepared for three sections. (MOW)

  11. Fusion Power Program. Quarterly progress report, October--December 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-04-01

    This quarterly report summarizes the Argonne National Laboratory work performed for the Office of Fusion Energy during the October--December 1978 quarter in the following research and development areas: materials; energy storage and transfer; tritium containment, recovery and control; advanced reactor design; atomic data; reactor safety; fusion-fission hybrid systems; alternate applications of fusion energy; and other work related to fusion power. Three separate abstracts were prepared for the included sections. (MOW)

  12. Conceptual design of Z-pinch driven fusion-fission hybrid power reactor%Z箍缩驱动聚变-裂变混合堆总体概念研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李正宏; 周林; 黄洪文; 王真; 陈晓军; 祁建敏; 郭海兵; 马纪敏; 肖成建; 褚衍运

    2014-01-01

    Z箍缩驱动聚变-裂变混合能源堆(Z-FFR)在核安全、经济、持久和环境友好等方面具有优良的品质,有望成为有效应对未来能源危机和环境、气候问题的新能源。从 Z箍缩驱动聚变方案与聚变靶设计、重复频率驱动器、次临界包层及产氚包层设计、燃料循环等关键问题方面,对Z-FFR工程概念总体研究情况进行了介绍。%The Z-pinch driven fusion-fission hybrid power reactor(Z-FFR)has remarkable advantages in nuclear security,e-conomy,permanence and environment-friendliness,it can promisingly be millennial energy source dealing effectively with future energy crisis and climate problem.This article introduces the status quo of the conceptual research on Z-FFR from aspects of fu-sion-target physics,low-repetitive Z-pinch driver development,sub-critical fission reactor design and fuel cycle analysis.

  13. Chamber transport for heavy ion fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Craig L., E-mail: clolson66@msn.com

    2014-01-01

    A brief review is given of research on chamber transport for HIF (heavy ion fusion) dating from the first HIF Workshop in 1976 to the present. Chamber transport modes are categorized into ballistic transport modes and channel-like modes. Four major HIF reactor studies are summarized (HIBALL-II, HYLIFE-II, Prometheus-H, OSIRIS), with emphasis on the chamber transport environment. In general, many beams are used to provide the required symmetry and to permit focusing to the required small spots. Target parameters are then discussed, with a summary of the individual heavy ion beam parameters required for HIF. The beam parameters are then classified as to their line charge density and perveance, with special emphasis on the perveance limits for radial space charge spreading, for the space charge limiting current, and for the magnetic (Alfven) limiting current. The major experiments on ballistic transport (SFFE, Sabre beamlets, GAMBLE II, NTX, NDCX) are summarized, with specific reference to the axial electron trapping limit for charge neutralization. The major experiments on channel-like transport (GAMBLE II channel, GAMBLE II self-pinch, LBNL channels, GSI channels) are discussed. The status of current research on HIF chamber transport is summarized, and the value of future NDCX-II transport experiments for the future of HIF is noted.

  14. Fusion Propulsion Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-01

    of propellant can be millions of times greater than the fuel, only a tiny fraction can completely push out the fuel. If the plasma is moving at a... push -plate for various explosive yields. It appears that the maximum specific impulse for such a system is -4000 to 5000 sec and increasing the base...Energy Agency, 1977, p. 507. Bourque, R.F., "OHTE as a Fusion Reactor," Proc. 4th Topl. Mt,. Tecnology of Controlled NV?4clear Fusion, King of Prussia

  15. Draft program plan for TNS: The Next Step after the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. Part II. R and D needs assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, M.

    1977-12-01

    The information contained in this document represents the brief but intensive efforts of the Oak Ridge TNS Program Team to answer the following questions: (1) Is there an adequate basis of R and D support for the TNS program as a central, ambitious goal for the fusion program. (2) What are the principal gaps in the current and projected R and D program. (3) What must be done to permit operation of TNS in the mid 1980s. The findings of our preliminary study provide these answers to the questions: (1) The physics and technology base does exist from which to start the TNS design as a central fusion program goal. (2) We have specific recommendations for new emphasis in certain physics and technology areas to minimize R and D program gaps. (3) TNS conceptual design must be started now, and a close look at organizing the fusion program around a TNS project is an essential need to support operation in the mid 1980s.

  16. Power Flattening and Rejuvenation of PWR Spent Fuel Blanket for Hybrid Fusion-Fission Reactor%功率展平的压水堆乏燃料发电包层中子学初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马续波; 陈义学; 王继亮; 王悦; 韩静茹; 陆道纲

    2011-01-01

    The hybrid fusion-fission reactor has advantages of breeding of the nuclear fuel and transmutation of the long-life nuclear waste and having inherent safety. Meanwhile, the engineering and technological demand of hybrid reactor is significantly reduced comparing with that of pure fusion reactor. A generating electricity blanket concept using the PWR spent fuel directly was proposed, which was based on ITER parameter level achieved. Different volume fractions of the fuel in blanket enabled to realize a power flattening in the fissile zone. The results show that the peak-to-average power factor becomes less than no power flattening, and the output power of the fuel zone raises more than 21. 7%. At the end of the operation, the maximum fuel enrichment is 5. 23%. The blanket is feasible from the neutronics viewpoint.%聚变裂变混合堆在增殖核燃料、嬗变长寿命核废料及固有安全性等方面具有较大优势,同时,它比纯聚变堆在工程及技术方面要求低,因此较聚变堆更易实现.本工作基于目前国际聚变实验堆(ITER)所能达到的技术水平,提出一种直接利用乏燃料进行发电的聚变裂变混合堆包层概念,利用在不同位置放置不同乏燃料体积分数的方法对燃料增殖区实现了功率展平.计算结果表明:功率展平后的包层功率不均匀系数更小,且包层中燃料区的能量输出要比不展平情况下的能量输出高约21.7%.燃料富集度到运行末期最大可达5.23%.从中子学角度初步论证了该包层的可行性.

  17. Nuclear Fusion with Polarized Nucleons & PolFusion

    CERN Document Server

    Engels, Ralf; Büscher, Markus; Vasilyev, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This book offers a detailed examination of the latest work on the potential of polarized fuel to realize the vision of energy production by nuclear fusion. It brings together contributions from nuclear physicists and fusion physicists with the aims of fostering exchange of information between the two communities, describing the current status in the field, and examining new ideas and projects under development. It is evident that polarized fuel can offer huge improvements for the first generation of fusion reactors and open new technological possibilities for future generations, including neutron lean reactors, which could be the most popular and sustainable energy production option to avoid environmental problems. Nevertheless, many questions must be resolved before polarized fuel can be used for energy production in the different reactor types. Readers will find this book to be a stimulating source of information on the key issues. It is based on contributions from leading scientists delivered at the meetin...

  18. Search for a Charged Higgs Boson Produced in the Vector-boson Fusion Mode with Decay $H^\\pm \\to W^\\pm Z$ using $pp$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV with the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanco, Jacobo Ezequiel; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boehler, Michael; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozic, Ivan; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Lydia; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Kieran; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Britzger, Daniel; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Brown, Jonathan; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Lars; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burghgrave, Blake; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Buzykaev, Aleksey; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cairo, Valentina; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerny, Karel; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chang, Philip; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Liming; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cheremushkina, Evgenia; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Childers, John Taylor; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choi, Kyungeon; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christodoulou, Valentinos; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Chuinard, Annabelle Julia; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Cioara, Irina Antonela; Ciocio, Alessandra; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Brian Lee; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dandoy, Jeffrey Rogers; Dang, Nguyen Phuong; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Danninger, Matthias; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Peter; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delgove, David; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; DeMarco, David; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaconu, Cristinel; Diamond, Miriam; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Djuvsland, Julia Isabell; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Dobos, Daniel; Dobre, Monica; Doglioni, Caterina; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Drechsler, Eric; Dris, Manolis; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Duschinger, Dirk; Dyndal, Mateusz; Eckardt, Christoph; Ecker, Katharina Maria; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Edson, William; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Elliot, Alison; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Engelmann, Roderich; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Fernandez Martinez, Patricia; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Cora; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fitzgerald, Eric Andrew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Fraternali, Marco; Freeborn, David; French, Sky; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yanyan; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; Garberson, Ford; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudiello, Andrea; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Geisler, Manuel Patrice; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghazlane, Hamid; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Giannetti, Paola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giromini, Paolo; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Goujdami, Driss; Goussiou, Anna; Govender, Nicolin; Grabas, Herve Marie Xavier; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guenther, Jaroslav; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Shaun; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Haefner, Petra; Hageböck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Maike Christina; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harrington, Robert; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauser, Reiner; Hauswald, Lorenz; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Lukas; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Hengler, Christopher; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg-Schubert, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hinman, Rachel Reisner; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohlfeld, Marc; Hohn, David; Holmes, Tova Ray; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Qipeng; Hu, Xueye; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Iurii; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Inamaru, Yuki; Ince, Tayfun; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Ivarsson, Jenny; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karamaoun, Andrew; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Keyes, Robert; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver Maria; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kivernyk, Oleh; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Matthew Henry; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Aine; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Koletsou, Iro; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; König, Sebastian; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kurumida, Rie; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwan, Tony; Kyriazopoulos, Dimitrios; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rosa Navarro, Jose Luis; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Lambourne, Luke; Lammers, Sabine; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, J örn Christian; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeBlanc, Matthew Edgar; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lester, Christopher; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Adrian; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Shu; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Liblong, Aaron; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Linde, Frank; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan; Long, Robin Eamonn; Looper, Kristina Anne; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lösel, Philipp Jonathan; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macdonald, Calum Michael; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeland, Steffen; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maier, Thomas; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mancini, Giada; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mantoani, Matteo; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marjanovic, Marija; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Middleton, Robin; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milesi, Marco; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Mönig, Klaus; Monini, Caterina; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Morinaga, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Mortensen, Simon Stark; Morton, Alexander; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Mueller, Ralph Soeren Peter; Mueller, Thibaut; Muenstermann, Daniel; Mullen, Paul; Munwes, Yonathan; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nagy, Elemer; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Nef, Pascal Daniel; Negri, Andrea; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Jon Kerr; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nooney, Tamsin; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Oide, Hideyuki; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Owen, Rhys Edward; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Pandini, Carlo Enrico; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panitkin, Sergey; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parker, Kerry Ann; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pearson, Benjamin; Pedersen, Lars Egholm; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penwell, John; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickering, Mark Andrew; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pinto, Belmiro; Pires, Sylvestre; Pitt, Michael; Pizio, Caterina; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Pluth, Daniel; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Primavera, Margherita; Prince, Sebastien; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopapadaki, Eftychia-sofia; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Puddu, Daniele; Pueschel, Elisa; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Raddum, Silje; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Stefan; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reisin, Hernan; Relich, Matthew; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter, Stefan; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ricken, Oliver; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Riegel, Christian Johann; Rieger, Julia; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ristić, Branislav; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romano Saez, Silvestre Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Peyton; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Russell, Heather; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sabato, Gabriele; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Saddique, Asif; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Saimpert, Matthias; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sannino, Mario; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sato, Koji; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savage, Graham; Savard, Pierre; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaeffer, Jan; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R~Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Schiavi, Carlo; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schmitt, Stefan; Schneider, Basil; Schnellbach, Yan Jie; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schopf, Elisabeth; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schroeder, Christian; Schuh, Natascha; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwarz, Thomas Andrew; Schwegler, Philipp; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Schwoerer, Maud; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Scifo, Estelle; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seema, Pienpen; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekhon, Karishma; Sekula, Stephen; Selbach, Karoline Elfriede; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Serre, Thomas; Sessa, Marco; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shaw, Savanna Marie; Shcherbakova, Anna; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shoaleh Saadi, Diane; Shochet, Mel; Shojaii, Seyedruhollah; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Sicho, Petr; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simon, Dorian; Simoniello, Rosa; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinner, Malcolm Bruce; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Slawinska, Magdalena; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Matthew; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snidero, Giacomo; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Song, Hong Ye; Soni, Nitesh; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Bruno; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosa, David; Sosebee, Mark; Sotiropoulou, Calliope Louisa; Soualah, Rachik; Soueid, Paul; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spalla, Margherita; Spanò, Francesco; Spearman, William Robert; Spettel, Fabian; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; St Denis, Richard Dante; Staerz, Steffen; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Stavina, Pavel; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strubig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suhr, Chad; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Shota; Suzuki, Yu; Svatos, Michal; Swedish, Stephen; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Taccini, Cecilia; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tam, Jason; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Shuji; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Tepel, Fabian-Phillipp; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Ray; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thun, Rudolf; Tibbetts, Mark James; Ticse Torres, Royer Edson; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Tojo, Junji; 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    2015-01-01

    A search for a charged Higgs boson, $H^\\pm$, decaying to a $W^\\pm$ boson and a $Z$ boson is presented. The search is based on 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ of proton-proton collision data at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The $H^\\pm$ boson is assumed to be produced via vector-boson fusion and the decays $W^\\pm \\to q\\bar{q^\\prime}$ and $Z\\rightarrow e^+e^-/\\mu^+\\mu^-$ are considered. The search is performed in a range of charged Higgs boson masses from 200 to 1000 GeV. No evidence for the production of an $H^\\pm$ boson is observed. Upper limits of 31--1020 fb at 95\\% CL are placed on the cross section for vector-boson fusion production of an $H^\\pm$ boson times its branching fraction to $W^\\pm Z$. The limits are compared with predictions from the Georgi-Machacek Higgs Triplet Model.

  19. Search for a Charged Higgs Boson Produced in the Vector-Boson Fusion Mode with Decay H(±)→W(±)Z using pp Collisions at √s=8  TeV with the ATLAS Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

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Pozdnyakov, V; Pralavorio, P; Pranko, A; Prasad, S; Prell, S; Price, D; Price, L E; Primavera, M; Prince, S; Proissl, M; Prokofiev, K; Prokoshin, F; Protopapadaki, E; Protopopescu, S; Proudfoot, J; Przybycien, M; Ptacek, E; Puddu, D; Pueschel, E; Puldon, D; Purohit, M; Puzo, P; Qian, J; Qin, G; Qin, Y; Quadt, A; Quarrie, D R; Quayle, W B; Queitsch-Maitland, M; Quilty, D; Raddum, S; Radeka, V; Radescu, V; Radhakrishnan, S K; Radloff, P; Rados, P; Ragusa, F; Rahal, G; Rajagopalan, S; Rammensee, M; Rangel-Smith, C; Rauscher, F; Rave, S; Ravenscroft, T; Raymond, M; Read, A L; Readioff, N P; Rebuzzi, D M; Redelbach, A; Redlinger, G; Reece, R; Reeves, K; Rehnisch, L; Reisin, H; Relich, M; Rembser, C; Ren, H; Renaud, A; Rescigno, M; Resconi, S; Rezanova, O L; Reznicek, P; Rezvani, R; Richter, R; Richter, S; Richter-Was, E; Ricken, O; Ridel, M; Rieck, P; Riegel, C J; Rieger, J; Rijssenbeek, M; Rimoldi, A; Rinaldi, L; Ristić, B; Ritsch, E; Riu, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rizvi, E; Robertson, S H; Robichaud-Veronneau, A; Robinson, D; Robinson, J E M; Robson, A; Roda, C; Roe, S; Røhne, O; Rolli, S; Romaniouk, A; Romano, M; Romano Saez, S M; Romero Adam, E; Rompotis, N; Ronzani, M; Roos, L; Ros, E; Rosati, S; Rosbach, K; Rose, P; Rosendahl, P L; Rosenthal, O; Rossetti, V; Rossi, E; Rossi, L P; Rosten, R; Rotaru, M; Roth, I; Rothberg, J; Rousseau, D; Royon, C R; Rozanov, A; Rozen, Y; Ruan, X; Rubbo, F; Rubinskiy, I; Rud, V I; Rudolph, C; Rudolph, M S; Rühr, F; Ruiz-Martinez, A; Rurikova, Z; Rusakovich, N A; Ruschke, A; Russell, H L; Rutherfoord, J P; Ruthmann, N; Ryabov, Y F; Rybar, M; Rybkin, G; Ryder, N C; Saavedra, A F; Sabato, G; Sacerdoti, S; Saddique, A; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sadykov, R; Safai Tehrani, F; Saimpert, M; Sakamoto, H; Sakurai, Y; Salamanna, G; Salamon, A; Saleem, M; Salek, D; Sales De Bruin, P H; Salihagic, D; Salnikov, A; Salt, J; Salvatore, D; Salvatore, F; Salvucci, A; Salzburger, A; Sampsonidis, D; Sanchez, A; Sánchez, J; Sanchez Martinez, V; Sandaker, H; Sandbach, R L; Sander, H G; Sanders, M P; Sandhoff, M; Sandoval, C; Sandstroem, R; Sankey, D P C; Sannino, M; Sansoni, A; Santoni, C; Santonico, R; Santos, H; Santoyo Castillo, I; Sapp, K; Sapronov, A; Saraiva, J G; Sarrazin, B; Sasaki, O; Sasaki, Y; Sato, K; Sauvage, G; Sauvan, E; Savage, G; Savard, P; Sawyer, C; Sawyer, L; Saxon, J; Sbarra, C; Sbrizzi, A; Scanlon, T; Scannicchio, D A; Scarcella, M; Scarfone, V; Schaarschmidt, J; Schacht, P; Schaefer, D; Schaefer, R; Schaeffer, J; Schaepe, S; Schaetzel, S; Schäfer, U; Schaffer, A C; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scharf, V; Schegelsky, V A; Scheirich, D; Schernau, M; Schiavi, C; Schillo, C; Schioppa, M; Schlenker, S; Schmidt, E; Schmieden, K; Schmitt, C; Schmitt, S; Schmitt, S; Schneider, B; Schnellbach, Y J; Schnoor, U; Schoeffel, L; Schoening, A; Schoenrock, B D; Schopf, E; Schorlemmer, A L S; Schott, M; Schouten, D; Schovancova, J; Schramm, S; Schreyer, M; Schroeder, C; Schuh, N; Schultens, M J; Schultz-Coulon, H-C; Schulz, H; Schumacher, M; Schumm, B A; Schune, Ph; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwarz, T A; Schwegler, Ph; Schwemling, Ph; Schwienhorst, R; Schwindling, J; Schwindt, T; Schwoerer, M; Sciacca, F G; Scifo, E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Scutti, F; Searcy, J; Sedov, G; Sedykh, E; Seema, P; Seidel, S C; Seiden, A; Seifert, F; Seixas, J M; Sekhniaidze, G; Sekhon, K; Sekula, S J; Selbach, K E; Seliverstov, D M; Semprini-Cesari, N; Serfon, C; Serin, L; Serkin, L; Serre, T; Sessa, M; Seuster, R; Severini, H; Sfiligoj, T; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shan, L Y; Shang, R; Shank, J T; Shapiro, M; Shatalov, P B; Shaw, K; Shaw, S M; Shcherbakova, A; Shehu, C Y; Sherwood, P; Shi, L; Shimizu, S; Shimmin, C O; Shimojima, M; Shiyakova, M; Shmeleva, A; Shoaleh Saadi, D; Shochet, M J; Shojaii, S; Shrestha, S; Shulga, E; Shupe, M A; Shushkevich, S; Sicho, P; Sidiropoulou, O; Sidorov, D; Sidoti, A; Siegert, F; Sijacki, Dj; Silva, J; Silver, Y; Silverstein, S B; Simak, V; Simard, O; Simic, Lj; Simion, S; Simioni, E; Simmons, B; Simon, D; Simoniello, R; Sinervo, P; Sinev, N B; Siragusa, G; Sisakyan, A N; Sivoklokov, S Yu; Sjölin, J; Sjursen, T B; Skinner, M B; Skottowe, H P; Skubic, P; Slater, M; Slavicek, T; Slawinska, M; Sliwa, K; Smakhtin, V; Smart, B H; Smestad, L; Smirnov, S Yu; Smirnov, Y; Smirnova, L N; Smirnova, O; Smith, M N K; Smizanska, M; Smolek, K; Snesarev, A A; Snidero, G; Snyder, S; Sobie, R; Socher, F; Soffer, A; Soh, D A; Solans, C A; Solar, M; Solc, J; Soldatov, E Yu; Soldevila, U; Solodkov, A A; Soloshenko, A; Solovyanov, O V; Solovyev, V; Sommer, P; Song, H Y; Soni, N; Sood, A; Sopczak, A; Sopko, B; Sopko, V; Sorin, V; Sosa, D; Sosebee, M; Sotiropoulou, C L; Soualah, R; Soueid, P; Soukharev, A M; South, D; Spagnolo, S; Spalla, M; Spanò, F; Spearman, W R; Spettel, F; Spighi, R; Spigo, G; Spiller, L A; Spousta, M; Spreitzer, T; St Denis, R D; Staerz, S; Stahlman, J; Stamen, R; Stamm, S; Stanecka, E; Stanescu, C; Stanescu-Bellu, M; Stanitzki, M M; Stapnes, S; Starchenko, E A; Stark, J; Staroba, P; Starovoitov, P; Staszewski, R; Stavina, P; Steinberg, P; Stelzer, B; Stelzer, H J; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stenzel, H; Stern, S; Stewart, G A; Stillings, J A; Stockton, M C; Stoebe, M; Stoicea, G; Stolte, P; Stonjek, S; Stradling, A R; Straessner, A; Stramaglia, M E; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strandlie, A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Strizenec, P; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D M; Stroynowski, R; Strubig, A; Stucci, S A; Stugu, B; Styles, N A; Su, D; Su, J; Subramaniam, R; Succurro, A; Sugaya, Y; Suhr, C; Suk, M; Sulin, V V; Sultansoy, S; Sumida, T; Sun, S; Sun, X; Sundermann, J E; Suruliz, K; Susinno, G; Sutton, M R; Suzuki, S; Suzuki, Y; Svatos, M; Swedish, S; Swiatlowski, M; Sykora, I; Sykora, T; Ta, D; Taccini, C; Tackmann, K; Taenzer, J; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Taiblum, N; Takai, H; Takashima, R; Takeda, H; Takeshita, T; Takubo, Y; Talby, M; Talyshev, A A; Tam, J Y C; Tan, K G; Tanaka, J; Tanaka, R; Tanaka, S; Tannenwald, B B; Tannoury, N; Tapprogge, S; Tarem, S; Tarrade, F; Tartarelli, G F; Tas, P; Tasevsky, M; Tashiro, T; Tassi, E; Tavares Delgado, A; Tayalati, Y; Taylor, F E; Taylor, G N; Taylor, W; Teischinger, F A; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M; Teixeira-Dias, P; Temming, K K; Ten Kate, H; Teng, P K; Teoh, J J; Tepel, F; Terada, S; Terashi, K; Terron, J; Terzo, S; Testa, M; Teuscher, R J; Therhaag, J; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T; Thomas, J P; Thomas-Wilsker, J; Thompson, E N; Thompson, P D; Thompson, R J; Thompson, A S; Thomsen, L A; Thomson, E; Thomson, M; Thun, R P; Tibbetts, M J; Ticse Torres, R E; Tikhomirov, V O; Tikhonov, Yu A; Timoshenko, S; Tiouchichine, E; Tipton, P; Tisserant, S; Todorov, T; Todorova-Nova, S; Tojo, J; Tokár, S; Tokushuku, K; Tollefson, K; Tolley, E; Tomlinson, L; Tomoto, M; Tompkins, L; Toms, K; Torrence, E; Torres, H; Torró Pastor, E; Toth, J; Touchard, F; Tovey, D R; Trefzger, T; Tremblet, L; Tricoli, A; Trigger, I M; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tripiana, M F; Trischuk, W; Trocmé, B; Troncon, C; Trottier-McDonald, M; Trovatelli, M; True, P; Truong, L; Trzebinski, M; Trzupek, A; Tsarouchas, C; Tseng, J C-L; Tsiareshka, P V; Tsionou, D; Tsipolitis, G; Tsirintanis, N; Tsiskaridze, S; Tsiskaridze, V; Tskhadadze, E G; Tsukerman, I I; Tsulaia, V; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Tudorache, A; Tudorache, V; Tuna, A N; Tupputi, S A; Turchikhin, S; Turecek, D; Turra, R; Turvey, A J; Tuts, P M; Tykhonov, A; Tylmad, M; Tyndel, M; Ueda, I; Ueno, R; Ughetto, M; Ugland, M; Uhlenbrock, M; Ukegawa, F; Unal, G; Undrus, A; Unel, G; Ungaro, F C; Unno, Y; Unverdorben, C; Urban, J; Urquijo, P; Urrejola, P; Usai, G; Usanova, A; Vacavant, L; Vacek, V; Vachon, B; Valderanis, C; Valencic, N; Valentinetti, S; Valero, A; Valery, L; Valkar, S; Valladolid Gallego, E; Vallecorsa, S; Valls Ferrer, J A; Van Den Wollenberg, W; Van Der Deijl, P C; van der Geer, R; van der Graaf, H; Van Der Leeuw, R; van Eldik, N; van Gemmeren, P; Van Nieuwkoop, J; van Vulpen, I; van Woerden, M C; Vanadia, M; Vandelli, W; Vanguri, R; Vaniachine, A; Vannucci, F; Vardanyan, G; Vari, R; Varnes, E W; Varol, T; Varouchas, D; Vartapetian, A; Varvell, K E; Vazeille, F; Vazquez Schroeder, T; Veatch, J; Veloso, F; Velz, T; Veneziano, S; Ventura, A; Ventura, D; Venturi, M; Venturi, N; Venturini, A; Vercesi, V; Verducci, M; Verkerke, W; Vermeulen, J C; Vest, A; Vetterli, M C; Viazlo, O; Vichou, I; Vickey, T; Vickey Boeriu, O E; Viehhauser, G H A; Viel, S; Vigne, R; Villa, M; Villaplana Perez, M; Vilucchi, E; Vincter, M G; Vinogradov, V B; Vivarelli, I; Vives Vaque, F; Vlachos, S; Vladoiu, D; Vlasak, M; Vogel, M; Vokac, P; Volpi, G; Volpi, M; von der Schmitt, H; von Radziewski, H; von Toerne, E; Vorobel, V; Vorobev, K; Vos, M; Voss, R; Vossebeld, J H; Vranjes, N; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M; Vrba, V; Vreeswijk, M; Vuillermet, R; Vukotic, I; Vykydal, Z; Wagner, P; Wagner, W; Wahlberg, H; Wahrmund, S; Wakabayashi, J; Walder, J; Walker, R; Walkowiak, W; Wang, C; Wang, F; Wang, H; Wang, H; Wang, J; Wang, J; Wang, K; Wang, R; Wang, S M; Wang, T; Wang, X; Wanotayaroj, C; Warburton, A; Ward, C P; Wardrope, D R; Warsinsky, M; Washbrook, A; Wasicki, C; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, I J; Watson, M F; Watts, G; Watts, S; Waugh, B M; Webb, S; Weber, M S; Weber, S W; Webster, J S; Weidberg, A R; Weinert, B; Weingarten, J; Weiser, C; Weits, H; Wells, P S; Wenaus, T; Wengler, T; Wenig, S; Wermes, N; Werner, M; Werner, P; Wessels, M; Wetter, J; Whalen, K; Wharton, A M; White, A; White, M J; White, R; White, S; Whiteson, D; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wienemann, P; Wiglesworth, C; Wiik-Fuchs, L A M; Wildauer, A; Wilkens, H G; Williams, H H; Williams, S; Willis, C; Willocq, S; Wilson, A; Wilson, J A; Wingerter-Seez, I; Winklmeier, F; Winter, B T; Wittgen, M; Wittkowski, J; Wollstadt, S J; Wolter, M W; Wolters, H; Wosiek, B K; Wotschack, J; Woudstra, M J; Wozniak, K W; Wu, M; Wu, M; Wu, S L; Wu, X; Wu, Y; Wyatt, T R; Wynne, B M; Xella, S; Xu, D; Xu, L; Yabsley, B; Yacoob, S; Yakabe, R; Yamada, M; Yamaguchi, Y; Yamamoto, A; Yamamoto, S; Yamanaka, T; Yamauchi, K; Yamazaki, Y; Yan, Z; Yang, H; Yang, H; Yang, Y; Yao, L; Yao, W-M; Yasu, Y; Yatsenko, E; Yau Wong, K H; Ye, J; Ye, S; Yeletskikh, I; Yen, A L; Yildirim, E; Yorita, K; Yoshida, R; Yoshihara, K; Young, C; Young, C J S; Youssef, S; Yu, D R; Yu, J; Yu, J M; Yu, J; Yuan, L; Yurkewicz, A; Yusuff, I; Zabinski, B; Zaidan, R; Zaitsev, A M; Zalieckas, J; Zaman, A; Zambito, S; Zanello, L; Zanzi, D; Zeitnitz, C; Zeman, M; Zemla, A; Zengel, K; Zenin, O; Ženiš, T; Zerwas, D; Zhang, D; Zhang, F; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhang, R; Zhang, X; Zhang, Z; Zhao, X; Zhao, Y; Zhao, Z; Zhemchugov, A; Zhong, J; Zhou, B; Zhou, C; Zhou, L; Zhou, L; Zhou, N; Zhu, C G; Zhu, H; Zhu, J; Zhu, Y; Zhuang, X; Zhukov, K; Zibell, A; Zieminska, D; Zimine, N I; Zimmermann, C; Zimmermann, S; Zinonos, Z; Zinser, M; Ziolkowski, M; Živković, L; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; zur Nedden, M; Zurzolo, G; Zwalinski, L

    2015-06-12

    A search for a charged Higgs boson, H(±), decaying to a W(±) boson and a Z boson is presented. The search is based on 20.3  fb(-1) of proton-proton collision data at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The H(±) boson is assumed to be produced via vector-boson fusion and the decays W(±)→qq' and Z→e(+)e(-)/μ(+)μ(-) are considered. The search is performed in a range of charged Higgs boson masses from 200 to 1000 GeV. No evidence for the production of an H(±) boson is observed. Upper limits of 31-1020 fb at 95% C.L. are placed on the cross section for vector-boson fusion production of an H(±) boson times its branching fraction to W(±)Z. The limits are compared with predictions from the Georgi-Machacek Higgs triplet model.

  20. Clouds of short-circuited thermionic nanobatteries and promising prospects for development of nanobattery-based aerosol fusion reactors. The preliminary report

    CERN Document Server

    Meshcheryakov, Oleg

    2012-01-01

    The physical mechanisms of periodic separation and relaxation of electric charges within aerosol particles possessing the properties the short-circuited batteries can be extremely diverse. With use of appropriate materials and dispersing methods, the electrochemical, thermoelectric, thermionic, pyroelectric, photoelectric, photo electronic emission, or even radionuclide-based emission micro and nano-batteries can be synthesized and be dispersed in the air as clouds self-assembed of the short-circuited aerosol batteries due to the inter-particle electromagnetic dipole-dipole attraction. Intense thermionic emission from ionized hot spots migrating on the relatively cold surface of charged explosive particles, can convert these particles into short-circuited thermionic batteries, turning an aerosol cloud consisting of such unipolar charged, gradually decomposing explosive particles into ball lightning. The slow exothermic decomposition of the highly sensitive explosive aerosol particles, catalyzed by excess ions...

  1. Application of a fluidized bed reactor charged with aragonite for control of alkalinity, pH and carbon dioxide in marine recirculating aquaculture systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul S Wills, PhD; Pfeiffer, Timothy; Baptiste, Richard; Watten, Barnaby J.

    2016-01-01

    Control of alkalinity, dissolved carbon dioxide (dCO2), and pH are critical in marine recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) in order to maintain health and maximize growth. A small-scale prototype aragonite sand filled fluidized bed reactor was tested under varying conditions of alkalinity and dCO2 to develop and model the response of dCO2 across the reactor. A large-scale reactor was then incorporated into an operating marine recirculating aquaculture system to observe the reactor as the system moved toward equilibrium. The relationship between alkalinity dCO2, and pH across the reactor are described by multiple regression equations. The change in dCO2 across the small-scale reactor indicated a strong likelihood that an equilibrium alkalinity would be maintained by using a fluidized bed aragonite reactor. The large-scale reactor verified this observation and established equilibrium at an alkalinity of approximately 135 mg/L as CaCO3, dCO2 of 9 mg/L, and a pH of 7.0 within 4 days that was stable during a 14 day test period. The fluidized bed aragonite reactor has the potential to simplify alkalinity and pH control, and aid in dCO2 control in RAS design and operation. Aragonite sand, purchased in bulk, is less expensive than sodium bicarbonate and could reduce overall operating production costs.

  2. Fusion development and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, D.B.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the following: superconducting magnet technology; high field superconductors; advanced magnetic system and divertor development; poloidal field coils; gyrotron development; commercial reactor studies--aries; ITER physics: alpha physics and alcator R D for ITER; lower hybrid current drive and heating in the ITER device; ITER superconducting PF scenario and magnet analysis; ITER systems studies; and safety, environmental and economic factors in fusion development.

  3. Online stress corrosion crack and fatigue usages factor monitoring and prognostics in light water reactor components: Probabilistic modeling, system identification and data fusion based big data analytics approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Subhasish M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jagielo, Bryan J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Oakland Univ., Rochester, MI (United States); Iverson, William I. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL (United States); Bhan, Chi Bum [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Pusan National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of); Soppet, William S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Majumdar, Saurin M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Natesan, Ken N. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-12-10

    Nuclear reactors in the United States account for roughly 20% of the nation's total electric energy generation, and maintaining their safety in regards to key component structural integrity is critical not only for long term use of such plants but also for the safety of personnel and the public living around the plant. Early detection of damage signature such as of stress corrosion cracking, thermal-mechanical loading related material degradation in safety-critical components is a necessary requirement for long-term and safe operation of nuclear power plant systems.

  4. FINESSE: study of the issues, experiments and facilities for fusion nuclear technology research and development. Interim report. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdou, M.

    1984-10-01

    The Nuclear Fusion Issues chapter contains a comprehensive list of engineering issues for fusion reactor nuclear components. The list explicitly defines the uncertainties associated with the engineering option of a fusion reactor and addresses the potential consequences resulting from each issue. The next chapter identifies the fusion nuclear technology testing needs up to the engineering demonstration stage. (MOW)

  5. The research reactors their contribution to the reactors physics; Les reacteurs de recherche leur apport sur la physique des reacteurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barral, J.C. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France); Zaetta, A. [CEA/Cadarache, Direction des Reacteurs Nucleaires, DRN, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Johner, J. [CEA/Cadarache, Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee (DRFC), 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Mathoniere, G. [CEA/Saclay, DEN, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)] [and others

    2000-07-01

    The 19 october 2000, the french society of nuclear energy organized a day on the research reactors. This associated report of the technical session, reactors physics, is presented in two parts. The first part deals with the annual meeting and groups general papers on the pressurized water reactors, the fast neutrons reactors and the fusion reactors industry. The second part presents more technical papers about the research programs, critical models, irradiation reactors (OSIRIS and Jules Horowitz) and computing tools. (A.L.B.)

  6. Ion Rings for Magnetic Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenly, John, B.

    2005-07-31

    This Final Technical Report presents the results of the program, Ion Rings for Magnetic Fusion, which was carried out under Department of Energy funding during the period August, 1993 to January, 2005. The central objective of the program was to study the properties of field-reversed configurations formed by ion rings. In order to reach this objective, our experimental program, called the Field-reversed Ion Ring Experiment, FIREX, undertook to develop an efficient, economical technology for the production of field-reversed ion rings. A field-reversed configuration (FRC) in which the azimuthal (field-reversing) current is carried by ions with gyro-radius comparable to the magnetic separatrix radius is called a field-reversed ion ring. A background plasma is required for charge neutralization of the ring, and this plasma will be confined within the ring's closed magnetic flux. Ion rings have long been of interest as the basis of compact magnetic fusion reactors, as the basis for a high-power accelerator for an inertial fusion driver, and for other applications of high power ion beams or plasmas of high energy density. Specifically, the FIREX program was intended to address the longstanding question of the contribution of large-orbit ions to the observed stability of experimental FRCs to the MHD tilt mode. Typical experimental FRCs with s {approx} 2-4, where s is the ratio of separatrix radius to ion gyro-radius, have been stable to tilting, but desired values for a fusion reactor, s > 20, should be unstable. The FIREX ring would consist of a plasma with large s for the background ions, but with s {approx} 1 for the ring ions. By varying the proportions of these two populations, the minimum proportion of large-orbit ions necessary for stability could be determined. The incorporation of large-orbit ions, perhaps by neutral-beam injection, into an FRC has been advanced for the purpose of stabilizing, heating, controlling angular momentum, and aiding the formation

  7. 聚变堆氚系统设计中的一些重要问题研究(Ⅱ)%Innovative researches on some important problems in fusion reactor tritium system design (Ⅱ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓柏权

    2013-01-01

    In part one published in the last issue,the tritium retention and the total tritium inventory in PFC materials of FEB-E fusion reactor had been calculated.The tritium well depth,tritium well time during the FEB-E fusion reactor start-up and initial operation phase had been obtained.In this part,how to improve tritium recovery efficiency in the ITER TBM solid breeder blanket with using purge gas has been discussed.Some new innovative schemes for reducing tritium retention and improving tritium recovery efficiency are proposed.Such as,sponge mechanism based on deuterium saturated PFC materials; deuterium and beryllium co-deposition layer created on first wall surface; SPB scheme for enhancing tritium recovery efficiency of purge gas in ceramic breeder blanket based on the electrical polarization rotations catalyzing isotope exchange rate enhancement resulted from applied low frequency electric-field,of Li4SiO4 grain and purge gas molecular particles and so on,are explored.%在文献[1]中,计算了FEB-E聚变堆PFC材料内的氚滞留量、堆系统总的氚投料量、启动运行开始阶段的氚坑深度和氚坑时间大小.这里将讨论在ITER的TBM氚增殖包层内固体氚增殖剂中的氚如何高效率地被载氚气体带出并且以高效率地提取回收.本部分将进行创新的探索性研究并且提出某些减少氚滞留量和改善氚提取回收效率的新方案,例如:基于氘饱和的海绵效应;第一壁表面建立氘和铍的伴同沉积层;基于在低频外电场作用下载氚气分子和硅酸锂颗粒电极化旋转催化同位素交换速率的增强载氚气提取氚效率“SPB方法”.

  8. 扩散连接技术在核聚变反应堆包层模块制造中的应用%Application of Diffusion Bonding Technique in Fabrication of Blanket Module Components of Nuclear Fusion Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晨曦; 刘永长; 周晓胜; 马宗青; 王颖; 李会军; 杨建国

    2015-01-01

    国际受控热核聚变实验堆计划是全球规模最大、影响最深远的国际科研合作项目之一,有望彻底解决能源危机。核聚变反应堆关键部件———包层模块的结构复杂、体积庞大,且服役环境恶劣,焊接接头成为影响反应堆安全运行的薄弱环节。以扩散连接为代表的固相焊接技术对接头性能及组织影响较小,已逐渐取代熔化焊应用于包层模块复杂构件制造。在简要介绍扩散连接及其原理的基础上,对包层模块构件扩散连接的研究进展进行了阐述,包括低活化铁素体/马氏体钢及氧化物弥散强化钢构件的扩散连接,Be,W,SiC等其他先进高温材料的扩散连接等。%International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor is one of the world′s largest and the most far-reaching in-ternational scientific collaborative projects, which is expected to solve the energy crisis.As a key built-up part, blanket module has complex structure and large size, and serves under harsh service conditions.The welding joints of blanket mod-ule have become the weak links affecting the operation of the nuclear fusion reactor.Solid-phase welding technology, repre-sented by diffusion bonding, have relatively low effect on the mechanical properties and microstructure of the joints, and has gradually taken the place of the fusion welding technology used for fabrication of the blanket module complex compo-nents.Based on the brief presentation of diffusion bondingand its bonding mechanism, the research progress in diffusion bonding of blanket module components was discussed in this paper, including the diffusion bonding of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels and oxide dispersion strengthened steels, and the diffusion bonding of Be, W, SiC and/or other advanced high-temperature materials.

  9. Fusion - An energy source for synthetic fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillo, J. A.; Powell, J.; Steinberg, M.

    1980-05-01

    An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of 50 to 70% are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets. Fusion/coal symbiotic systems appear economically promising for the first generation of commercial fusion synfuels plants. In the long term, there could be a gradual transition to an inexhaustible energy system based solely on fusion.

  10. Characterization of the axial plasma shock in a table top plasma focus after the pinch and its possible application to testing materials for fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, Leopoldo, E-mail: lsoto@cchen.cl; Pavez, Cristian; Moreno, José [Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Centro de Investigación y Aplicaciones en Física de Plasmas y Potencia Pulsada, P" 4, Santiago-Talca (Chile); Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Andrés Bello, República 220, Santiago (Chile); Inestrosa-Izurieta, María José [Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Centro de Investigación y Aplicaciones en Física de Plasmas y Potencia Pulsada, P" 4, Santiago-Talca (Chile); Veloso, Felipe [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Gutiérrez, Gonzalo [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Vergara, Julio [Facultad de Ingeniería, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Clausse, Alejandro [CNEA-CONICET and Universidad Nacional del Centro, 7000 Tandil (Argentina); Bruzzone, Horacio [CONICET and Universidad de Mar del Plata, Mar del Plata (Argentina); Castillo, Fermín [Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); and others

    2014-12-15

    The characterization of plasma bursts produced after the pinch phase in a plasma focus of hundreds of joules, using pulsed optical refractive techniques, is presented. A pulsed Nd-YAG laser at 532 nm and 8 ns FWHM pulse duration was used to obtain Schlieren images at different times of the plasma dynamics. The energy, interaction time with a target, and power flux of the plasma burst were assessed, providing useful information for the application of plasma focus devices for studying the effects of fusion-relevant pulses on material targets. In particular, it was found that damage factors on targets of the order of 10{sup 4} (W/cm{sup 2})s{sup 1/2} can be obtained with a small plasma focus operating at hundred joules.

  11. Application of railgun principle to high-velocity hydrogen pellet injection for magnetic fusion reactor refueling. Technical progress report, [July 16, 1990--August 16, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K.

    1991-08-01

    This report contains three documents describing the progress made by the University of Illinois electromagnetic railgun program sponsored by the Office of Fusion Energy of the United States Department of Energy during the period from July 16, 1990 to August 16, 1991. The first document contains a brief summary of the tasks initiated, continued, or completed, the status of major tasks, and the research effort distribution, estimated and actual, during the period. The second document contains a description of the work performed on time resolved laser interferometric density measurement of the railgun plasma-arc armature. The third document is an account of research on the spectroscopic measurement of the electron density and temperature of the railgun plasma arc.

  12. Tensile properties of vanadium-base alloys irradiated in the Fusion-1 low-temperature experiment in the BOR-60 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, H.; Gazda, J.; Nowicki, L.J.; Billone, M.C.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1998-09-01

    The irradiation has been completed and the test specimens have been retrieved from the lithium-bonded capsule at the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (RIAR) in Russia. During this reporting period, the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) tensile specimens were received from RIAR and initial testing and examination of these specimens at ANL has been completed. The results, corroborating previous findings showed a significant loss of work hardening capability in the materials. There appears to be no significant difference in behavior among the various heats of vanadium-base alloys in the V-(4-5)Cr-(4-5)Ti composition range. The variations in the preirradiation annealing conditions also produced no notable differences.

  13. Contact method or automated immersion technique: possible application and limitations of ultrasonic testing in the fusion reactor; Kontakttechnik oder automatisierte Tauchtechnik. Einsatzmoeglichkeiten und Beschraenkungen der Ultraschallpruefung im Fusionsreaktor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Tatiana; Knaak, Stefan; Aktaa, Jarir [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst. fuer Angewandte Materialien Werkstoff- und Biomechanik (IAM-WBM); Rey, Joerg; Neuberger, Heiko [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik (INR); Krueger, Friedhelm [Krueger Erodiertechnik GmbH und Co.KG, Biedenkopf (Germany); Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2014-11-01

    The tritium breeding blanket is the most important component of a thermonuclear reactor combining the protective function against plasma impact and heat exchange. The breeding blanket concept is based on the use of helium as coolant and beryllium pebbles as neutron multiplier. As structural material the low-activation ferritic-martensitic steel EUROFER (9Cr-W-V-T) is used. For quality assurance the components of the breeding blankets are tested using different non-destructive testing methods. The contact methodology applies the testing equipment VEO in combination of the 10 MHz array-wheel sensor of the ultrasonic phased array series. Immersion testing is performed using the automated facility KC 200 from GE Inspection technologies.

  14. Modeling and sizing of the heat exchangers of a new supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton power cycle for energy conversion for fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, I.P.; Cantizano, A.; Linares, J.I., E-mail: linares@upcomillas.es; Moratilla, B.Y.

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: •We propose a procedure to model the heat exchangers of a S-CO2 Brayton power cycle. •Discretization in sub-heat exchangers is performed due to complex behavior of CO{sub 2}. •Different correlations have been tested, verifying them with CFD when necessary. •Obtained sizes are agree with usual values of printed circuit heat exchangers. -- Abstract: TECNO{sub F}US is a research program financed by the Spanish Government to develop technologies related to a dual-coolant (He/Pb–Li) breeding blanket design concept including the auxiliary systems for a future power reactor (DEMO). One of the main issues of this program is the optimization of heat recovery from the reactor and its conversion into electrical power. This paper is focused on the methodology employed for the design and sizing of all the heat exchangers of the supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton power cycle (S-CO2) proposed by the authors. Due to the large pressure difference between the fluids, and also to their compactness, Printed Circuit Heat Exchangers (PCHE) are suggested in literature for these type of cycles. Because of the complex behavior of CO{sub 2}, their design is performed by a numerical discretization into sub-heat exchangers, thus a higher precision is reached when the thermal properties of the fluids vary along the heat exchanger. Different empirical correlations for the pressure drop and the Nusselt number have been coupled and assessed. The design of the precooler (PC) and the low temperature recuperator (LTR) is also verified by simulations using CFD because of the near-critical behavior of CO{sub 2}. The size of all of the heat exchangers of the cycle have been assessed.

  15. Osteoclast Fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marie Julie Møller, Anaïs; Delaissé, Jean-Marie; Søe, Kent

    2017-01-01

    suggesting that fusion partners may specifically select each other and that heterogeneity between the partners seems to play a role. Therefore, we set out to directly test the hypothesis that fusion factors have a heterogenic involvement at different stages of nuclearity. Therefore, we have analyzed...... on the nuclearity of fusion partners. While CD47 promotes cell fusions involving mono-nucleated pre-osteoclasts, syncytin-1 promotes fusion of two multi-nucleated osteoclasts, but also reduces the number of fusions between mono-nucleated pre-osteoclasts. Furthermore, CD47 seems to mediate fusion mostly through......Investigations addressing the molecular keys of osteoclast fusion are primarily based on end-point analyses. No matter if investigations are performed in vivo or in vitro the impact of a given factor is predominantly analyzed by counting the number of multi-nucleated cells, the number of nuclei per...

  16. Study of heat and synchrotron radiation transport in fusion tokamak plasmas. Application to the modelling of steady state and fast burn termination scenarios for the international experimental fusion reactor ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villar Colome, J. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee]|[Universitat Polytechnica de Catalunya (Spain)

    1997-12-01

    of fast burn termination scenarios in ITER is made by combining thermalhydraulic and fusion plasma modelling codes that implement the results obtained in the preceding sections. (author) 52 refs.

  17. Membrane fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    At Stanford University, Boxer lab, I worked on membrane fusion of small unilamellar lipid vesicles to flat membranes tethered to glass surfaces. This geometry closely resembles biological systems in which liposomes fuse to plasma membranes. The fusion mechanism was studied using DNA zippering...... between complementary strands linked to the two apposing membranes closely mimicking the zippering mechanism of SNARE fusion complexes....

  18. Investigation on non-glass laser fusion targets: their fabrication, characterization, and transport. Charged Particle Research Laboratory report No. 2-81, progress report, June 1, 1980-January 31, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K.

    1981-01-01

    A summary is presented of the research progress made under LLNL Subcontract 8320003 for the period of June 1, 1980 through January 31, 1981. The main theme of the research has continued to be the development of techniques for fabricating, characterizing, and transporting laser fusion targets on a continuous basis. The target fabrication techniques are intended mainly for non-glass spherical shell targets, both cryogenic and non-cryogenic. Specifically, progress has been made in each of the following categories. (1) Investigation of liquid hydrogen behavior inside a spherical laser fusion target. (2) Development of automated target characterization scheme. (3) Study of cryogenic target fabrication scheme utilizing cold-gas-levitation and electric field positioning. (4) Development of a cryogenic target fabrication system based on target free-fall method. (5) Generation of hydrogen powder using electro-hydrodynamic spraying. (6) Study of target-charging techniques for application to contactless cryogenic target fabrication. (7) Development of hollow metal sphere production technique. A brief summary of the research progress made in each category is presented.

  19. 面向Z箍缩驱动聚变能源需求的超高功率重复频率驱动器技术%Super-power repetitive Z-pinch driver for fusion-fission reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓建军; 陈林; 夏明鹤; 计策; 袁建强; 宋盛义; 黄显宾; 彭先觉; 王勐; 谢卫平; 周良骥; 邹文康; 郭帆; 章乐; 李逢; 丰树平

    2014-01-01

    According to the demands of Z-pinch driven fusion-fission reactor(Z-FFR),several possible technical schemes are analyzed and evaluated.A novel technical scheme named mixed-mode LTD is proposed.A conceptual design of Z-FFR driver is presented based on mixed-mode LTD scheme.The main directions for key technologies development are pointed out.A road-map is proposed for the super-power Z-pinch driver development.%针对Z箍缩驱动聚变裂变混合能源系统对驱动器的总体要求,对可能的技术路线进行了分析评述,结合当前在单脉冲超高功率Z箍缩驱动器和重复频率脉冲功率技术方面的研究基础,提出了混合模式直线变压驱动器概念设计思想,分析了主要的技术难点,明确了相应的关键技术攻关方向,同时对 Z 箍缩驱动器的总体发展计划提出了建议。

  20. Atomic data for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, H.T.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; Alvarez, I.; Cisneros, C.; Phaneuf, R.A. (eds.); Barnett, C.F.

    1990-07-01

    This report provides a handbook of recommended cross-section and rate-coefficient data for inelastic collisions between hydrogen, helium and lithium atoms, molecules and ions, and encompasses more than 400 different reactions of primary interest in fusion research. Published experimental and theoretical data have been collected and evaluated, and the recommended data are presented in tabular, graphical and parametrized form. Processes include excitation and spectral line emission, charge exchange, ionization, stripping, dissociation and particle interchange reactions. The range of collision energies is appropriate to applications in fusion-energy research.

  1. Power deposition distribution in liquid lead cooled fission reactors and effects on the reactor thermal behaviour; Distribuzione di potenza nei reattori a fusione refrigerante ed effetti sul comportamento del reattore termale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cevolani, S.; Nava, E.; Burn, K.W. [ENEA, Divisione Sistemi Energetici Ecosostenibili, Centro Ricerche Ezio Clementel, Bologna (Italy)

    2001-07-01

    In the framework of an ADS study (Accelerator Driven System, a reactor cooled by a lead bismuth alloy) the distribution of the deposited energy between the fuel, coolant and structural materials was evaluated by means of Monte Carlo calculations. The energy deposition in the coolant turned out to be about four percent of the total deposited energy. In order to study this effect, further calculations were performed on water and sodium cooled reactors. Such an analysis showed, for both coolant materials, a much lower heat deposition, about one percent. Based on such results, a thermohydraulic analysis was performed in order to verify the effect of this phenomenon on the fuel assembly temperature distribution. The main effect of a significant fraction of energy deposition in the coolant is concerned with the decrease of the fuel pellet temperature. As a consequence, taking into account this effect allows to increase the possibilities of optimization at the disposal of the designer. [Italian] Nell'ambito dello studio di un ADS (Accelerator Driven System, un reattore refrigerato per mezzo di una lega di piombo-bismuto) per mezzo di calcoli Monte Carlo sono stati valutati i contributi di deposizione di potenza nei materiali fissile, strutturale e refrigerante, ottenendo che il contributo della potenza depositata nel refrigerante e' pari al quattro per cento circa del totale. Allo scopo di meglio approfondire questo effetto, sono stati effettuati ulteriori calcoli in relazione a reattori refrigeranti ad acqua e sodio; i risultati mostrano come, in questi casi, la deposizione di potenza nel refrigerante sia decisamente inferiore dell'ordine di un per cento circa. Sulla base di tali risultati, e' stata avviata un'analisi di caratterre termoidraulico avente lo scopo di verificare l'effetto di questo fenomeno sulla distribuzione di temperatura negli elementi di combustibile. L'effetto principale di una sensibile frazione di energia

  2. Inertial-confinement fusion-reactor dry-wall study. Final report, 13 August 1981-31 March 1983. Report WAESD-TR-83-0010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sucov, E.W.

    1983-04-01

    The Westinghouse ICF Dry Wall Study was undertaken (1) to explore the practical implications of using a Ta coating to protect the steel first wall of an ICF reactor against the power pulses from the explosions of a pellet containing Ta as the heavy element and (2) to determine if a feasible design for improved safety and lower cost in a blanket could be developed using solid lithium compound in place of liquid lithium as the tritium breeder. Three coating techniques were examined; plasma spray, chemical vapor deposition and explosive bonding. An evaporation code and a sputtering code which were developed at LANL, were used to calculate the loss rate of Ta due to these processes after each pellet explosion. A simulation experiment to verify the CHART D calculations was investigated. Sources of pulsed x-rays and ions to simulate the debris from each pellet explosion were identified. The CANDID code was developed to permit evaluation of candidate metals for coating the steel based on criteria such as surface and bulk temperature rise, thermal stress in the creating layer and evaporation rate. Material properties were stored in the memory and were called upon to calculate evaluation algorithms. Of twenty original candidates, six remain: Re, Ir, Mo, Cr, W, Ta and Nb. Further evaluation would include parameters such as cost, manufacturability, radioactive decay rate, etc.

  3. The production of {sup 238-242}Pu(n,γ){sup 239-243}Pu fissionable fluids in a fusion-fission hybrid reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenay, Mehtap [Inoenue Univ., Malatya (Turkey). Physics Dept.

    2014-03-15

    In this study, the effect of spent fuel grade plutonium content on {sup 239-243}Pu was investigated in a designed hybrid reactor system. In this system, the fluids were composed of a molten salt, heavy metal mixture with increased mole fractions 99-95 % Li{sub 20}Sn{sub 80}-1-5 % SFG-Pu, 99-95 % Li{sub 20}Sn{sub 80}-1-5 % SFG-PuF{sub 4}, 99-95 % Li{sub 20}Sn{sub 80}-1-5 % SFG-PuO{sub 2}. Beryllium (Be) is a neutron multiplier by (n,2n) reactions. Thence, a Be zone of 3 cm thickness was used in order to contribute to fissile fuel breeding between the liquid first wall and a 9Cr2WVTa ferritic steel blanket which is used as structural material. The production of {sup 238-242}Pu(n,γ){sup 239-243}Pu was calculated in liquid first wall, blanket and shielding zones. Three-dimensional nucleonic calculations were performed by using the most recent version MCNPX-2.7.0 Monte Carlo code and nuclear data library ENDF/B-VII.0. (orig.)

  4. Neutron-energy-dependent defect production cross sections for fission and fusion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odette, G.R.; Doiron, D.R.

    1976-06-01

    Neutron cross sections for displacements and post-short-term cascade annealing defects are derived from nuclear kinematics calculations of primary atomic recoil energy distributions and the number of secondary defects produced per primary as a function of recoil energy. For the first time, recoil kinematics of charged- and multiple-particle emission reactions are treated rigorously using a compound-nucleus evaporation spectrum nuclear model. Secondary-defect production functions, derived from computer simulation experiments, are taken from the literature. Spectral-averaged defect production cross sections for a fusion reactor first-wall-type environment are on the order of 1.5 to 2.5 times those for a fast fission reactor core-type spectrum. The indicated range of uncertainty is primarily due to secondary-defect production model sensitivity. Nuclear model and data errors are expected to become more significant at high neutron energies, greater than approximately 20 MeV. Fusion reactor environments are found to produce some very energetic recoils and high-energy release events due to charged-particle reactions such as (n,..cap alpha..).

  5. Fusion rings and fusion ideals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Troels Bak

    by the so-called fusion ideals. The fusion rings of Wess-Zumino-Witten models have been widely studied and are well understood in terms of precise combinatorial descriptions and explicit generating sets of the fusion ideals. They also appear in another, more general, setting via tilting modules for quantum...

  6. Development and trial manufacturing of 1/2-scale partial mock-up of blanket box structure for fusion experimental reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Toshiyuki; Takatsu, Hideyuki; Sato, Satoshi

    1994-07-01

    Conceptual design of breeding blanket has been discussed during the CDA (Conceptual Design Activities) of ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). Structural concept of breeding blanket is based on box structure integrated with first wall and shield, which consists of three coolant manifolds for first wall, breeding and shield regions. The first wall must have cooling channels to remove surface heat flux and nuclear heating. The box structure includes plates to form the manifolds and stiffening ribs to withstand enormous electromagnetic load, coolant pressure and blanket internal (purge gas) pressure. A 1/2-scale partial model of the blanket box structure for the outboard side module near midplane is manufactured to estimate the fabrication technology, i.e. diffusion bonding by HIP (Hot Isostatic Pressing) and EBW (Electron Beam Welding) procedure. Fabrication accuracy is a key issue to manufacture first wall panel because bending deformation during HIP may not be small for a large size structure. Data on bending deformation during HIP was obtained by preliminary manufacturing of HIP elements. For the shield structure, it is necessary to reduce the welding strain and residual stress of the weldment to establish the fabrication procedure. Optimal shape of the parts forming the manifolds, welding locations and welding sequence have been investigated. In addition, preliminary EBW tests have been performed in order to select the EBW conditions, and fundamental data on built-up shield have been obtained. Especially, welding deformation by joining the first wall panel to the shield has been measured, and total deformation to build-up shield by EBW has been found to be smaller than 2 mm. Consequently, the feasibility of fabrication technologies has been successfully demonstrated for a 1m-scaled box structure including the first wall with cooling channels by means of HIP, EBW and TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas arc)-welding.

  7. H Reactor

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The H Reactor was the first reactor to be built at Hanford after World War II.It became operational in October of 1949, and represented the fourth nuclear reactor on...

  8. The Role of the JET Project in Global Fusion Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Vagn Orla

    1983-01-01

    The aim of nuclear fusion research is to make fusion energy available as a new energy source. Fusion processes occur naturally in the sun, where hydrogen nuclei release energy by combining to form helium. A fusion reactor on earth will require even higher temperatures than in the interior...... of the sun, and it will be based on deuterium and tritium reactions. JET (Joint European Torus) is a major fusion experiment now under construction near Abingdon in the UK It is aimed at producing conditions approximating those necessary in a fusion reactor. The results expected from JET should permit...... a realistic evaluation of the prospects for fusion power and serve as a basis for the design of the next major fusion experiment....

  9. 聚变-裂变混合能源堆球模型中子学对算研究%Comparative Study on Spherical Model of Fusion-Fission Hybrid Energy Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵增; 程和平; 刘国明

    2012-01-01

    利用蒙特卡罗程序和自主开发的蒙特卡罗-燃耗耦合程序MOCouple-s,对北京应用物理与计算数学研究所提出的聚变-裂变混合能源堆球模型进行了对算研究.对初始时刻及各燃耗时刻下的有效增殖因数、能量倍增因子、氚增殖比、中子源强度等堆芯参数进行了比较,结果总体符合较好.对寿期末重要核素的成分进行了详细比较,除个别核素外,偏差很小,表明所采用的计算程序与核参数库一致性良好.对核参数库的选择、铀水体积比等对燃耗计算结果的影响进行敏感性分析,并对外中子源驱动的次临界堆芯的燃耗计算进行详细讨论,提出可行的燃耗计算基准.%The comparative study on fusion-fission hybrid spherical model proposed by the Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics was performed with Monte-Carlo code and MOCouple-s code. Comparisons of reactor parameters, such as neutron effective multiplication factor, energy multiplication factor, tritium breeding ratio and neutron source intensity, were made. The results agree well with the reference as a whole. The concentrations of important isotopes were also compared in detail. Most of the biases are very small except a tiny fraction of the iotopes. It proves that both codes and nuclear data library have very good consistency. In calculation of the model used, the burnup sensitivity of nuclear data and uranium-water ratio employed in the simulation model were analyzed. For such a fixed external source driven subcritical reactor core, detailed discussion was made about the burnup calculation method, and a feasible burnup calculation benchmark was proposed.

  10. 聚变堆第一壁连续W/Cu梯度材料的热工性能优化%Thermo-technical performance optimization on first wall in fusion reactor applied with continuous W/Cu functionally graded material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵永强; 黄生洪; 汪卫华

    2016-01-01

    针对不同体积分布指数p的W/Cu连续功能梯度材料的偏滤器第一壁结构,采用有限元软件计算了8MW.m−2稳态运行热加载以及等离子体破裂条件下1GW.m−2热流冲击下的力学响应。相同稳态加载条件下,W/Cu连续功能梯度材料的最优分布指数与分层梯度材料存在较大差异,其最优等效应力比分层梯度材料要小26%,表现出更优异的性能。在热冲击响应过程中,连续梯度W/Cu材料塑性损伤随p值不同也存在较大变化,其最优p值与其稳态运行时热应力最优p值存在一定差异,从第一壁应用条件考虑,应综合选取,最佳p值在1.2附近。综合来看,连续梯度W/Cu材料具有更连续变化的热物理属性及力学性能,在聚变堆第一壁结构设计中具有更大的应用潜力。%The thermo-technical performance optimization on first wall in fusion reactor made by such continuous W/Cu graded material with different composition distribution parameterp was descrided The thermal/mechanical responses of the first wall mockup under steady-state heat loads of 8MW.m−2and heat shock loads of 1GW.m−2during plasma disruptions are computed numerically with the finite element method. Under the same steady heat load conditions, the optimized composition distribution parameterp for composition continuous W/Cu graded material is very different with that of previous quasi-continuous W/Cu graded material. A 26%reducing in thermal stress is observed for first wall with composition continuous W/Cu graded material, demonstrating a more excellent performance. In the process of heat shock, the damage degree measured by volume fraction of plastic deformation is changing with different composition distribution parameterp, its optimized value is different with that obtained in steady state conditions. In consideration of environment conditions endured by first wall, the optimized value should be chosen to be close to 1.2. In general

  11. Transmutation of silicon carbide in fusion nuclear environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawan, M.E., E-mail: sawan@engr.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Dr., Madison, WI (United States); Katoh, Y.; Snead, L.L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2013-11-15

    The amount and type of metallic transmutants produced in SiC/SiC when used in magnetic (MFE) and inertial (IFE) confinement fusion systems are determined and compared to those obtained following irradiation in fission reactors. Up to ∼1.3% metallic transmutants are generated at the expected lifetime of the fusion blanket. Irradiation in fission reactors to the same fast neutron fluence produces about an order of magnitude lower metallic transmutation products than in fusion systems. While the dominant component in fusion systems is Mg, P is the main transmutation product in fission reactors. The impact on the SiC/SiC properties is not fully understood. The results of this work will help guide irradiation experiments in fission reactors to properly simulate the conditions in fusion systems by possible ion implantation. In addition, the results represent a necessary input for modeling activities aimed at understanding the expected effects on properties.

  12. Alternate laser fusion drivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pleasance, L.D.

    1979-11-01

    Over the past few years, several laser systems have been considered as possible laser fusion drivers. Recently, there has been an increasing effort to evaluate these systems in terms of a reactor driver application. The specifications for such a system have become firmer and generally more restrictive. Several of the promising candidates such as the group VI laser, the metal vapor excimers and some solid state lasers can be eliminated on the basis of inefficiency. New solid state systems may impact the long range development of a fusion driver. Of the short wavelength gas lasers, the KrF laser used in conjunction with Raman compression and pulse stacking techniques is the most promising approach. Efficiencies approaching 10% may be possible with this system. While technically feasible, these approaches are complex and costly and are unsatisfying in an aethetic sense. A search for new lasers with more compelling features is still needed.

  13. Generomak: Fusion physics, engineering and costing model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delene, J.G.; Krakowski, R.A.; Sheffield, J.; Dory, R.A.

    1988-06-01

    A generic fusion physics, engineering and economics model (Generomak) was developed as a means of performing consistent analysis of the economic viability of alternative magnetic fusion reactors. The original Generomak model developed at Oak Ridge by Sheffield was expanded for the analyses of the Senior Committee on Environmental Safety and Economics of Magnetic Fusion Energy (ESECOM). This report describes the Generomak code as used by ESECOM. The input data used for each of the ten ESECOM fusion plants and the Generomak code output for each case is given. 14 refs., 3 figs., 17 tabs.

  14. New trends in fusion research

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2004-01-01

    The efforts of the international fusion community aim at demonstrating the scientific feasibility of thermonuclear fusion energy power plants. Understanding the behavior of burning plasmas, i.e. plasmas with strong self-heating, represents a primary scientific challenge for fusion research and a new science frontier. Although integrated studies will only be possible, in new, dedicated experimental facilities, such as the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER), present devices can address specific issues in regimes relevant to burning plasmas. Among these are an improvement of plasma performance via a reduction of the energy and particle transport, an optimization of the path to ignition or to sustained burn using additional heating and a control of plasma-wall interaction and energy and particle exhaust. These lectures address recent advances in plasma science and technology that are relevant to the development of fusion energy. Mention will be made of the inertial confinement line of research, but...

  15. Advanced tokamak concepts and reactor designs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomens, A. A. M.

    2000-01-01

    From a discussion of fusion reactor designs based on today's well-established experience gained in the operation of large tokamaks, it is concluded that such reactors are economically not attractive. The physics involved in the various options for concept improvement is described, some examples

  16. Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System

    OpenAIRE

    Kramer, Kevin James

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the neutronics design aspects of a hybrid fusion-fission energy system called the Laser Fusion-Fission Hybrid (LFFH). A LFFH combines current Laser Inertial Confinement fusion technology with that of advanced fission reactor technology to produce a system that eliminates many of the negative aspects of pure fusion or pure fission systems. When examining the LFFH energy mission, a significant portion of the United States and world energy production could be supplied by ...

  17. Estimates of time-dependence fatigue behavior of type 316 stainless steel subject to irradiation damage in fast breeder and fusion power reactor systems. [Fluence 1--2. 63 x 10/sup 26/ n/m/sup 2/ (E > 0. 1 MeV/ at 593/sup 0/C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkman, C. R.; Liu, K. C.; Grossbeck, M. L.

    Cyclic lives obtained from strain controlled fatigue tests at 593/sup 0/C from specimens irradiated to a fluence of 1 to 2.63 x 10/sup 26/ n/m/sup 2/ (E greater than 0.1 MeV) were compared to predictions based on the method of strainrange partitioning. When appropriate tensile and creep-rupture ductilities were employed reasonably good estimates of the influence of hold periods and irradiation damage on the fully reversed fatigue life of type 316 stainless steel could be made. Ductility values for 20 percent cold-worked type 316 stainless steel specimens irradiated in a mixed spectrum fission reactor were used to estimate fusion reactor first wall lifetime. The ductility values were from irradiations that simulate the environment of the first wall of a fusion reactor. Neutron wall loadings ranging from 2 to 5 MW/m/sup 2/ were used. Results, although conjectural because of the many assumptions, tended to show that 20 percent cold-worked type 316 stainless steel could be used as a first wall material meeting a 7.5 to 8.5 MW-year/m/sup 2/ lifetime goal provided the neutron wall loading does not exceed more than about 2 MW/m/sup 2/. Results were obtained for an air environment, and it is expected that the actual vacuum environment will extend lifetime beyond 10 MW-year/m/sup 2/.

  18. Helias reactor studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beidler, C.D. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Grieger, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Harmeyer, E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Kisslinger, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Karulin, N. [Nuclear Fusion Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Maurer, W. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany); Nuehrenberg, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Rau, F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Sapper, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Wobig, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)

    1995-10-01

    The present status of Helias reactor studies is characterised by the identification and investigation of specific issues which result from the particular properties of this type of stellarator. On the technical side these are issues related to the coil system, while physics studies have concentrated on confinement, alpha-particle behaviour and ignition conditions. The usual assumptions have been made in those fields which are common to all toroidal fusion reactors: blanket and shield, refuelling and exhaust, safety and economic aspects. For blanket and shield sufficient space has been provided, a detailed concept will be developed in future. To date more emphasis has been placed on scoping and parameter studies as opposed to fixing a specific set of parameters and providing a detailed point study. One result of the Helias reactor studies is that physical dimensions are on the same order as those of tokamak reactors. However, it should be noticed that this comparison is difficult in view of the large spectrum of tokamak reactors ranging from a small reactor like Aries, to a large device such as SEAFP. The notion that the large aspect ratio of 10 or more in Helias configurations also leads to large reactors is misleading, since the large major radius of 22 m is compensated by the average plasma radius of 1.8 m and the average coil radius of 5 m. The plasma volume of 1400 m{sup 3} is about the same as the ITER reactor and the magnetic energy of the coil system is about the same or even slightly smaller than envisaged in ITER. (orig.)

  19. Historical evolution of nuclear energy systems development and related activities in JAERI. Fission, fusion, accelerator utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tone, Tatsuzo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    Overview of the historical evolution of nuclear energy systems development and related activities in JAERI is given in the report. This report reviews the research and development for light water reactor, fast breeder reactor, high temperature gas reactor, fusion reactor and utilization of accelerator-based neutron source. (author)

  20. Mirror Advanced Reactor Study interim design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-04-01

    The status of the design of a tenth-of-a-kind commercial tandem-mirror fusion reactor is described at the midpoint of a two-year study. When completed, the design is to serve as a strategic goal for the mirror fusion program. The main objectives of the Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) are: (1) to design an attractive tandem-mirror fusion reactor producing electricity and synfuels (in alternate versions), (2) to identify key development and technology needs, and (3) to exploit the potential of fusion for safety, low activation, and simple disposal of radioactive waste. In the first year we have emphasized physics and engineering of the central cell and physics of the end cell. Design optimization and trade studies are continuing, and we expect additional modifications in the end cells to further improve the performance of the final design.

  1. Fusion Energy for Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillo, J. A.; Powell, J. R.; Steinberg, M.; Salzano, F.; Benenati, R.; Dang, V.; Fogelson, S.; Isaacs, H.; Kouts, H.; Kushner, M.; Lazareth, O.; Majeski, S.; Makowitz, H.; Sheehan, T. V.

    1978-09-01

    The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and supplement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approximately 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of approximately 50 to 70% are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets.

  2. Fusion Policy Advisory Committee (FPAC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-01

    This document is the final report of the Fusion Policy Advisory Committee. The report conveys the Committee's views on the matters specified by the Secretary in his charge and subsequent letters to the Committee, and also satisfies the provisions of Section 7 of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Engineering Act of 1980, Public Law 96-386, which require a triennial review of the conduct of the national Magnetic Fusion Energy program. Three sub-Committee's were established to address the large number of topics associated with fusion research and development. One considered magnetic fusion energy, a second considered inertial fusion energy, and the third considered issues common to both. For many reasons, the promise of nuclear fusion as a safe, environmentally benign, and affordable source of energy is bright. At the present state of knowledge, however, it is uncertain that this promise will become reality. Only a vigorous, well planned and well executed program of research and development will yield the needed information. The Committee recommends that the US commit to a plan that will resolve this critically important issue. It also outlines the first steps in a development process that will lead to a fusion Demonstration Power Plant by 2025. The recommended program is aggressive, but we believe the goal is reasonable and attainable. International collaboration at a significant level is an important element in the plan.

  3. Reactor Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Abderrahim, A

    2001-04-01

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised.

  4. Lunar helium-3 and fusion power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-09-01

    The NASA Office of Exploration sponsored the NASA Lunar helium-3 and fusion power Workshop. The meeting was held to understand the potential of using He-3 from the moon for terrestrial fusion power production. It provided an overview, two parallel working sessions, a review of sessions, and discussions. The lunar mining session concluded that mining, beneficiation, separation, and return of He-3 from the moon would be possible but that a large scale operation and improved technology is required. The fusion power session concluded that: (1) that He-3 offers significant, possibly compelling, advantages over fusion of tritium, principally increased reactor life, reduced radioactive wastes, and high efficiency conversion, (2) that detailed assessment of the potential of the D/He-3 fuel cycle requires more information, and (3) D/He-3 fusion may be best for commercial purposes, although D/T fusion is more near term.

  5. Lunar Helium-3 and Fusion Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Office of Exploration sponsored the NASA Lunar Helium-3 and Fusion Power Workshop. The meeting was held to understand the potential of using He-3 from the moon for terrestrial fusion power production. It provided an overview, two parallel working sessions, a review of sessions, and discussions. The lunar mining session concluded that mining, beneficiation, separation, and return of He-3 from the moon would be possible but that a large scale operation and improved technology is required. The fusion power session concluded that: (1) that He-3 offers significant, possibly compelling, advantages over fusion of tritium, principally increased reactor life, reduced radioactive wastes, and high efficiency conversion, (2) that detailed assessment of the potential of the D/He-3 fuel cycle requires more information, and (3) D/He-3 fusion may be best for commercial purposes, although D/T fusion is more near term.

  6. Nuclear Fusion Fuel Cycle Research Perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Hongsuk; Koo, Daeseo; Park, Jongcheol; Kim, Yeanjin [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Sei-Hun [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    As a part of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Project, we at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and our National Fusion Research Institute (NFRI) colleagues are investigating nuclear fusion fuel cycle hardware including a nuclear fusion fuel Storage and Delivery System (SDS). To have a better knowledge of the nuclear fusion fuel cycle, we present our research efforts not only on SDS but also on the Fuel Supply System (FS), Tokamak Exhaust Processing System (TEP), Isotope Separation System (ISS), and Detritiation System (DS). To have better knowledge of the nuclear fusion fuel cycle, we presented our research efforts not only on SDS but also on the Fuel Supply System (FS), Tokamak Exhaust Processing System (TEP), Isotope Separation System (ISS), and Detritiation System (DS). Our efforts to enhance the tritium confinement will be continued for the development of cleaner nuclear fusion power plants.

  7. Mass Producing Targets for Nuclear Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T. G.; Elleman, D. D.; Kendall, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Metal-encapsulating technique advances prospects of controlling nuclear fusion. Prefilled fusion targets form at nozzle as molten metal such as tin flows through outer channel and pressurized deuterium/tritium gas flows through inner channel. Molten metal completely encloses gas charge as it drops off nozzle.

  8. Reactor safeguards

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Charles R

    1962-01-01

    Reactor Safeguards provides information for all who are interested in the subject of reactor safeguards. Much of the material is descriptive although some sections are written for the engineer or physicist directly concerned with hazards analysis or site selection problems. The book opens with an introductory chapter on radiation hazards, the construction of nuclear reactors, safety issues, and the operation of nuclear reactors. This is followed by separate chapters that discuss radioactive materials, reactor kinetics, control and safety systems, containment, safety features for water reactor

  9. Reactor operation

    CERN Document Server

    Shaw, J

    2013-01-01

    Reactor Operation covers the theoretical aspects and design information of nuclear reactors. This book is composed of nine chapters that also consider their control, calibration, and experimentation.The opening chapters present the general problems of reactor operation and the principles of reactor control and operation. The succeeding chapters deal with the instrumentation, start-up, pre-commissioning, and physical experiments of nuclear reactors. The remaining chapters are devoted to the control rod calibrations and temperature coefficient measurements in the reactor. These chapters also exp

  10. Clean steels for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1995-03-01

    Fusion energy production has an inherent advantage over fission: a fuel supply with reduced long term radioactivity. One of the leading candidate materials for structural applications in a fusion reactor is a tungsten stabilized 9% chromium Martensitic steel. This alloy class is being considered because it offers the opportunity to maintain that advantage in the reactor structure as well as provide good high temperature strength and radiation induced swelling and embrittlement resistance. However, calculations indicate that to obtain acceptable radioactivity levels within 500 years after service, clean steel will be required because the niobium impurity levels must be kept below about 2 appm and nickel, molybdenum, nitrogen, copper, and aluminum must be intentionally restricted. International efforts are addressing the problems of clean steel production. Recently, a 5,000 kg heat was vacuum induction melted in Japan using high purity commercial raw materials giving niobium levels less than 0.7 appm. This paper reviews the need for reduced long term radioactivity, defines the advantageous properties of the tungsten stabilized Martensitic steel class, and describes the international efforts to produce acceptable clean steels.

  11. Cold fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Suk Yong; Sung, Ki Woong; Kang, Joo Sang; Lee, Jong Jik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-02-01

    So called `cold fusion phenomena` are not confirmed yet. Excess heat generation is very delicate one. Neutron generation is most reliable results, however, the records are erratic and the same results could not be repeated. So there is no reason to exclude the malfunction of testing instruments. The same arguments arise in recording {sup 4}He, {sup 3}He, {sup 3}H, which are not rich in quantity basically. An experiment where plenty of {sup 4}He were recorded is attached in appendix. The problem is that we are trying to search cold fusion which is permitted by nature or not. The famous tunneling effect in quantum mechanics will answer it, however, the most fusion rate is known to be negligible. The focus of this project is on the theme that how to increase that negligible fusion rate. 6 figs, 4 tabs, 1512 refs. (Author).

  12. Spinal Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... results in predictable healing. Autograft is currently the “gold standard” source of bone for a fusion. The ... pump. With this technique, the patient presses a button that delivers a predetermined amount of narcotic pain ...

  13. Complex Spectra in Fusion Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellermann, M.G. von; Jaspers, R. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Bertschinger, G.; Biel, W.; Marchuk, O. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Plasmaphysik; Giroud, C.; Zastrow, K.D. [UKAEA Culham Laboratory Euratom Association, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Jupen, C. [Univ. of Lund (Sweden). Physics Dept.; O' Mullane, M.; Summers, H.P.; Whiteford, A. [Univ. of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom). Applied Physics Dept.

    2005-12-15

    The need for quantitative evaluation of complex line emission spectra as observed in hot fusion plasmas initiated a challenging development of sophisticated interpretation tools based on integrating advanced atomic modelling with detailed treatment of the plasma environment. The successful merging of the two worlds has led to routine diagnostic procedures which have contributed enormously to the understanding of underlying plasma processes and also to a wide acceptance of spectroscopy as a reliable diagnostic method. In this paper three characteristic types of spectra of current and continuing interest are presented. The first is that of medium/heavy species with many ionisation stages revealed in survey VUV and XUV spectra. Such species occur as control gases, as wall materials, as ablated heavy species and possible as layered wall dopants for monitoring erosion. The spectra are complex with line-like and quasi-continuum regions and are amenable to advanced ?pattern recognition' methods. The second type is of few electron, highly ionised systems observed as line-of-sight integrated passive emission spectra in the soft X-ray region. They are analysed successfully in terms of plasma parameters through matching of observation with predicted synthetic spectra. Examples used here include highly resolved helium-like emission spectra of argon, iron and titanium observed on the tokamaks TEXTOR and Tore Supra. The third type, and the emphasis of this work, comprises spectra linked to active beam spectroscopy, that is, charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) and beam emission spectroscopy (BES). In this case, a complex spectrum is again composed of a (usually) dominating active spectrum and an underlying passive emission spectrum. Its analysis requires modelling of both active and passive features. Examples used here are from the CXRS diagnostic at JET and TEXTOR. They display characteristic features of the main light impurity ions (C{sup +6}, He{sup +2}, N

  14. Study on heat transfer performance of flow channels in first-wall of fusion reactor blanket%聚变堆包层第一壁流道换热性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹浩然; 黄荣华; 孟宪超; 黎俊亨

    2015-01-01

    以聚变堆包层第一壁内流道作为研究对象,设计了以空气为介质的包层第一壁U型流道换热性能实验台架。通过测量第一壁流道沿流动方向的温度和压力分布,研究了在不同管径和雷诺数下,温度、流速和弯头形状等因素对第一壁流道换热性能的影响,并与数值模拟结果进行了对比分析。实验结果表明:30mm×30mm最大的U型方管可以在不增加流动阻力的情况下,提高流体与管壁之间换热强度23%,并且通过弯头处渐缩的优化改进可进一步提高换热强度15%,数值分析结果与之也较符合。本研究表明通过改变包层第一壁流道的形状和尺寸可以有效提高第一壁流道的换热性能。%A set of apparatus of the U‐shape flow channels with air as coolant was designed to study the flow channels in the first‐wall of fusion reactor blanket .The temperature distributions of the flow channels in the first‐wall were measured along the flowing direction ,and the impacts of flow channel diameter ,Reynolds number ,temperature ,inlet velocity and corner shape on heat transfer perform‐ance of the first wall were investigated by comparing the measured data with numerical simulation re‐sults .The experiment results show that the largest U‐shape flow channel with 30 mm × 30 mm square cross‐section could increase performance of heat transfer between coolant and flow channel wall by 23% without the increasing coolant flow resistance ,the modified flow channel design with the conver‐ging flow area could further enhance the heat transfer by almost 15% ,with which the numerical simu‐lation results agree well .Research results show that the heat transfer performance of flow channels could be efficiently increased by modifying the size and shape .

  15. 聚变堆实验包层模块第一壁传热结构优化分析%Heat Transfer Structure Optimization Analysis for the First-wall of Fusion Power Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周涛; 刘梦影; 廖航涛; 苏子威

    2012-01-01

    Controlled nuclear fusion has been considered as the optimal energy to human beings. Test blanket module is a critical component of the international thermal experimental reactor. There are two designs for the first-wall of Chinese helium-cooled solid breeder test blanket module (CH HCSB TBM). One has 3 coolant pipelines and the other has 5. On the basis of simplifying both designs, combined with convection heat transfer calculation, the temperature distribution of the first-wall was achieved and the design of four coolant pipelines was proposed. The allowable temperature of 5 coolant pipelines is 5"C lower than that of 3 coolant pipelines. The specific structure of 4 coolant pipelines has a 13 mm radical size and a 13.5 mm longitudinal size. Compared with the previous two schemes, this one has the lower temperature distribution as well as larger temperature safety allowance. Additionally, it is with more economy of more material than the three pipelines ones.%可控核聚变是解决人类能源问题的理想途径.实验包层模块是国际热核聚变实验堆的关键部件之一.中国氦冷固态增殖剂包层模块(CH HCSB TBM)第一壁的设计,有3根冷却剂管道和5根冷却剂管道的方案.通过对这2种方案的简化,结合对流传热计算,得到第一壁的温度分布,并且提出了4根冷却剂通道的设计方案.5根冷却剂管道比3根冷却剂管道的设计许用温度低4℃.4根冷却剂通道具体结构是,通道径向尺寸为13mm,极向尺寸为13.5 mm.这种设计在3种方案中拥有最低的温度分布,与前2种设计相比有较好的温度安全裕量,与3根管道的设计相比更能节省材料.

  16. Reactor Neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Soo-Bong Kim; Thierry Lasserre; Yifang Wang

    2013-01-01

    We review the status and the results of reactor neutrino experiments. Short-baseline experiments have provided the measurement of the reactor neutrino spectrum, and their interest has been recently revived by the discovery of the reactor antineutrino anomaly, a discrepancy between the reactor neutrino flux state of the art prediction and the measurements at baselines shorter than one kilometer. Middle and long-baseline oscillation experiments at Daya Bay, Double Chooz, and RENO provided very ...

  17. SABR Fusion-Fission Hybrid Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Chris

    2012-03-01

    The Subcritical Advanced Burner Reactor (SABR) concept is a fast reactor comprised of a tokamak fusion neutron source based on ITER surrounded by an annular fission core adapted from Integral Fast Reactor designs. Previous work has examined SABR used to help close the nuclear fuel cycle by fissioning the transuranics from spent nuclear fuel. One focus of the present work is a SABR Breeder Reactor to achieve tritium self-sufficieny and a Pu breeding ratio significantly above 1 in order to provide fuel for SABR as well as for MOX-fueled LWR's and other fast reactors. Another focus of this research is the dynamic safety simulation of lloss-of-flow loss-of-heat-sink, loss-of-power, and positive reactivity accidents in the TRU fuel SABR burner reactor. The reactivity effect of thermal-induced bowing of fuel pins has been modeled, which is expected to provide passive safety.

  18. Recent developments concerning the fusion; Developpements recents sur la fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquinot, J. [CEA/Cadarache, Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee, DRFC, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Andre, M. [CEA/DAM Ile de France, 91 - Bruyeres Le Chatel (France); Aymar, R. [ITER Joint Central Team Garching, Muenchen (Germany)] [and others

    2000-09-04

    Organized the 9 march 2000 by the SFEN, this meeting on the european program concerning the fusion, showed the utility of the exploitation and the enhancement of the actual technology (JET, Tore Supra, ASDEX) and the importance of the Europe engagement in the ITER program. The physical stakes for the magnetic fusion have been developed with a presentation of the progresses in the knowledge of the stability limits. A paper on the inertial fusion was based on the LMJ (Laser MegaJoule) project. The two blanket concepts chosen in the scope of the european program on the tritium blankets, have been discussed. These concepts will be validated by irradiation tests in the ITER-FEAT and adapted for a future reactor. (A.L.B.)

  19. Plasma physics for controlled fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Miyamoto, Kenro

    2016-01-01

    This new edition presents the essential theoretical and analytical methods needed to understand the recent fusion research of tokamak and alternate approaches. The author describes magnetohydrodynamic and kinetic theories of cold and hot plasmas in detail. The book covers new important topics for fusion studies such as plasma transport by drift turbulence, which depend on the magnetic configuration and zonal flows. These are universal phenomena of microturbulence. They can modify the onset criterion for turbulent transport, instabilities driven by energetic particles as well as alpha particle generation and typical plasma models for computer simulation. The fusion research of tokamaks with various new versions of H modes are explained. The design concept of ITER, the international tokamak experimental reactor, is described for inductively driven operations as well as steady-state operations using non-inductive drives. Alternative approaches of reversed-field pinch and its relaxation process, stellator includi...

  20. Trophoblast fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppertz, Berthold; Gauster, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The villous trophoblast of the human placenta is the epithelial cover of the fetal chorionic villi floating in maternal blood. This epithelial cover is organized in two distinct layers, the multinucleated syncytiotrophoblast directly facing maternal blood and a second layer of mononucleated cytotrophoblasts. During pregnancy single cytotrophoblasts continuously fuse with the overlying syncytiotrophoblast to preserve this end-differentiated layer until delivery. Syncytial fusion continuously supplies the syncytiotrophoblast with compounds of fusing cytotrophoblasts such as proteins, nucleic acids and lipids as well as organelles. At the same time the input of cytotrophoblastic components is counterbalanced by a continuous release of apoptotic material from the syncytiotrophoblast into maternal blood. Fusion is an essential step in maintaining the syncytiotrophoblast. Trophoblast fusion was shown to be dependant on and regulated by multiple factors such as fusion proteins, proteases and cytoskeletal proteins as well as cytokines, hormones and transcription factors. In this chapter we focus on factors that may be involved in the fusion process of trophoblast directly or that may prepare the cytotrophoblast to fuse.

  1. Ablation of a Deuterium Pellet in a Fusion Plasma Viewed as a Stopping Power Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, C. T.

    1983-01-01

    At present, the most exploited technology to refuel a future fusion reactor is the high speed injection of macroscopic size pellet of solid hydrogen isotopes. The basic idea is that the ablation of a pellet in a fusion reactor is mainly caused by thermal electrons (~ 10 keV) /1/. Due to the low s...

  2. Fusion the energy of the universe

    CERN Document Server

    McCracken, Garry

    2012-01-01

    Fusion: The Energy of the Universe, 2e is an essential reference providing basic principles of fusion energy from its history to the issues and realities progressing from the present day energy crisis. The book provides detailed developments and applications for researchers entering the field of fusion energy research. This second edition includes the latest results from the National Ignition Facility at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory at Livermore, CA, and the progress on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) tokamak programme at Caderache, France.

  3. Materials availability for fusion power plant construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartley, J.N.; Erickson, L.E.; Engel, R.L.; Foley, T.J.

    1976-09-01

    A preliminary assessment was made of the estimated total U.S. material usage with and without fusion power plants as well as the U.S. and foreign reserves and resources, and U.S. production capacity. The potential environmental impacts of fusion power plant material procurement were also reviewed including land alteration and resultant chemical releases. To provide a general measure for the impact of material procurement for fusion reactors, land requirements were estimated for mining and disposing of waste from mining.

  4. Household energy consumption: the future is in our hands. ITER, an experimental fusion reactor. Do CO{sub 2}-free energies exist? Liquefied natural gas, king of the gas market; Consommation d'energie domestique: prenons l'avenir entre nos mains. ITER, un reacteur experimental de fusion. Existe-t-il des energies sans CO{sub 2}? Le gaz naturel liquefie, force motrice du marche du gaz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2008-07-01

    This issue of Alternatives newsletter features 4 main articles dealing with: 1 - Household energy consumption - the future is in our hands: With energy resources growing scarcer and more expensive, everyone has a duty to conserve energy. Because combating global warming also means adopting simple habits and using the right equipment - with help from our governments to lead us to change. A practical look at what we can do. 2 - ITER, an experimental fusion reactor: The entire international community is trying to reproduce here on Earth the fusion of hydrogen atoms occurring naturally in the Sun, lured by the promise of a virtually inexhaustible source of energy. More on ITER from the project's Director General. 3 - Do CO{sub 2}-free energies exist?: As nations struggle to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, the question is moot. Environmental engineer Jean-Marc Jancovici gives us his point of view. 4 - Liquefied natural gas, king of the gas market: LNG's many advantages are enticing industry to develop supply routes and infrastructure to meet strong demand. But the race for LNG is not without its limits.

  5. Fusion Machinery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jakob Balslev; Milosevic, Ira

    2015-01-01

    the vesicular SNARE VAMP2/synaptobrevin-2 and the target (plasma membrane) SNAREs SNAP25 and syntaxin-1 results in fusion and release of neurotransmitter, synchronized to the electrical activity of the cell by calcium influx and binding to synaptotagmin. Formation of the SNARE complex is tightly regulated...... and appears to start with syntaxin-1 bound to an SM (Sec1/Munc18-like) protein. Proteins of the Munc13-family are responsible for opening up syntaxin and allowing sequential binding of SNAP-25 and VAMP2/synaptobrevin-2. N- to C-terminal “zippering” of the SNARE domains leads to membrane fusion...

  6. The perspectives of fusion energy: The roadmap towards energy production and fusion energy in a distributed energy system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naulin, Volker; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Korsholm, Søren Bang

    2014-01-01

    Controlled thermonuclear fusion has the potential of providing an environmentally friendly and inexhaustible energy source for mankind. Fusion energy, which powers our sun and the stars, is released when light elements, such as the hydrogen isotopes deuterium and tritium, fuse together. This occurs......-wide international collaboration and is in a crucial new phase with the construction of the international fusion experimental reactor, ITER, in Cadarache, France, which will be largest energy experiment in the world, and a milestone on the way to fusion energy. The recently adopted European Roadmap to fusion energy...

  7. Fusion analysis of MH-Ni batteries characteristics by neural network data fusion method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Presents the fusion analysis of the charging and dischargingcharacteristics of MH-Ni batteries in wide applications by neural network data fusion method to generate a specific vector and the use of this specific vector for selection of MH-Ni batteries, and the comparison of two results of selection.

  8. Closed loop control of the sawtooth instability in nuclear fusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witvoet, G.; Steinbuch, M.; Westerhof, E.; Doelman, N.J.; Baar, M.R. de

    2010-01-01

    In nuclear fusion the sawtooth instability is an important plasma phenomenon, having both positive and negative effects on the tokamak plasma. Control of its period is essential in future nuclear fusion reactors. This paper presents a control oriented model of the sawtooth instability, with current

  9. Preliminary three-dimensional neutronics design and analysis of helium-cooled blanket for a multi-functional experimental fusion-fission hybrid reactor%多功能聚变裂变混合实验堆FDS-MFX氦冷包层三维中子学初步设计与分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘金超; FDS团队; 金鸣; 王明煌; 蒋洁琼; 王国忠; 邱岳峰; 宋婧; 邹俊; 吴宜灿

    2011-01-01

    FDS-MFX(Multi-Functional eXperimental fusion-fission hybrid reactor)是一个基于现实可行技术的多功能聚变裂变混合实验堆概念,分3个阶段相继开展实验研究,分别采用纯氚增殖包层、铀燃料包层和乏燃料包层.本文重点对其中铀燃料包层后期阶段中高浓缩铀模块的摆放方式和尺寸进行优化,给出一个区平均最大功率密度约为100 MW/m3,235U装料量约为1 t,氚增殖率为1.05的三维初步中子学方案.%A multi-functional experimental fusion-fission hybrid reactor concept named FDS-MFX , which is based on viable fusion and fission technologies, has been proposed. Three-stage tests will be carried out successively, in which the tritium breeding blanket, uranium-fueled blanket and spent-fuel-fueled blanket will be utilized respectively. In this paper,the design optimization for the layout and the size of high enriched uranium modules inlater stage of uranium-fueled blanket has been performed.Finally,proposing a preliminarythree-dimension neutronies design with maximum average Power Density(Pdmax)100 MW/m3,loaded mass of the 235U 1 000 kg and TBR(Tritium Breeding Ratio)1.05.

  10. Reactor Antineutrino Signals at Morton and Boulby

    CERN Document Server

    Dye, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Increasing the distance from which an antineutrino detector is capable of monitoring the operation of a registered reactor, or discovering a clandestine reactor, strengthens the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons Treaty. This report presents calculations of reactor antineutrino interactions, from quasi-elastic neutrino-proton scattering and elastic neutrino-electron scattering, in a water-based detector operated >10 km from a commercial power reactor. It separately calculates signal from the proximal reactor and background from all other registered reactors. The main results are interaction rates and kinetic energy distributions of charged leptons scattered from quasi-elastic and elastic processes. Comparing signal and background distributions evaluates reactor monitoring capability. Scaling the results to detectors of different sizes, target media, and standoff distances is straightforward. Calculations are for two examples of a commercial reactor (P_th~3 GW) operating nearby (L~20 km) an underground facil...

  11. The Development of Low Activation Ferritic Steels for Fusion Application

    OpenAIRE

    Kohyama, A; Hishinuma, A.; Kohno, Y; Shiba, K; Sagara, A.

    1997-01-01

    The development of low-activation ferritic/martensitic steels is a key to the achievement of nuclear fusion as a safe, environmentally attractive and economically competitive energy source. The Japanese and the European Fusion Materials programs have put low-activation ferritic and martensitic steels R & D at the highest priority for a demonstration reactor (DEMO) and the beyond. An international collaborative test program on low-activation ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion is in progres...

  12. Subtask 12G2: Effects of dynamically charged helium on tensile properties of V-4Cr-4Ti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H.M.; Loomis, B.A.; Nowicki, L.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The objective of this work is to determine the effect of displacement damage and dynamically charged helium on tensile properties of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy irradiated to 18-31 dpa at 425-600{degrees}C in the Dynamic Helium Charging Experiment (DHCE). One property of vanadium-base alloys that is not well understood in terms of their potential use as fusion reactor structural materials is the effect of simultaneous generation of helium and neutron damage under conditions relevant to fusion reactor operation. In the present Dynamic Helium Charging Experiment (DHCE), helium was produced uniformly in the specimen at linear rates of {approx}0.4 to 4.2 appm helium/dpa by the decay of tritium during irradiation to 18-31 dpa at 425-600{degrees}C in the Li-filled DHCE capsules in the Fast Flux Test Facility. This report presents results of postirradiation tests of tensile properties of V-4Cr-4Ti, an alloy identified as the most promising vanadium-base alloy for fusion reactors on the basis of its superior baseline and irradiation properties. Effects of helium on tensile strength and ductility were insignificant after irradiation and testing at >420{degrees}C. Contrary to initial expectation, room-temperature ductilities of DHCE specimens were higher than those of non-DHCE specimens (in which there was negligible helium generation), whereas strengths were lower, indicating that different types of hardening centers are produced during DHCE and non-DHCE irradiation. In strong contrast to tritium-trick experiments in which dense coalescence of helium bubbles is produced on grain boundaries in the absence of displacement damage, no intergranular fracture was observed in any tensile specimens irradiated in the DHCE. 25 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. JENDL fusion file 99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiba, Satoshi; Fukahori, Tokio; Shibata, Keiichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Yu Baosheng [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China); Kosako, Kazuaki [Sumitomo Atomic Industries, Tokyo (Japan); Yamamuro, Nobuhiro [Data Engineering Co. Ltd., Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2002-02-01

    The double-differential cross sections (DDXs) of secondary neutrons have been evaluated for 79 isotopes and 13 natural elements ranging from H to Bi to improve the accuracy of predictions for the neutronics calculations in the D-T thermonuclear fusion applications. The data given in JENDL-3.1, which was the newest version of JENDL general purpose file when this project was initiated, was combined with new calculations based on the optical model, DWBA, pre-equilibrium and multi-step statistical models, and the DDX data were generated based on various kinds of systematics for medium-mass nuclei. Different methods were employed for light nuclei to which the above method could not be applied. In addition, the DDXs for emission of charged particles (p, d, t, {sup 3}He and {alpha}-particle) were given for {sup 2}H, {sup 9}Be and elements heavier or equal to F. The present results give an overall good description of the measured DDX data of both the neutron and charged particles emission channels. The data were compiled in ENDF-6 format, and released in 1999 as a special purpose file of JENDL family, namely, JENDL Fusion File 99. (author)

  14. Fusion Plasma Theory project summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    This Project Summary book is a published compilation consisting of short descriptions of each project supported by the Fusion Plasma Theory and Computing Group of the Advanced Physics and Technology Division of the Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy. The summaries contained in this volume were written by the individual contractors with minimal editing by the Office of Fusion Energy. Previous summaries were published in February of 1982 and December of 1987. The Plasma Theory program is responsible for the development of concepts and models that describe and predict the behavior of a magnetically confined plasma. Emphasis is given to the modelling and understanding of the processes controlling transport of energy and particles in a toroidal plasma and supporting the design of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). A tokamak transport initiative was begun in 1989 to improve understanding of how energy and particles are lost from the plasma by mechanisms that transport them across field lines. The Plasma Theory program has actively-participated in this initiative. Recently, increased attention has been given to issues of importance to the proposed Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). Particular attention has been paid to containment and thermalization of fast alpha particles produced in a burning fusion plasma as well as control of sawteeth, current drive, impurity control, and design of improved auxiliary heating. In addition, general models of plasma behavior are developed from physics features common to different confinement geometries. This work uses both analytical and numerical techniques. The Fusion Theory program supports research projects at US government laboratories, universities and industrial contractors. Its support of theoretical work at universities contributes to the office of Fusion Energy mission of training scientific manpower for the US Fusion Energy Program.

  15. Fission Fusion Hybrids: a nearer term application of Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotschenreuther, M.; Valanju, P.; Mahajan, S.; Covele, B.

    2011-10-01

    Fission-fusion hybrids enjoy unique advantages for addressing long standing societal acceptability issues of nuclear fission power at a much lower level of technical development than a competitive fusion power plant. For waste incineration, hybrids burn intransigent transuranic residues (with the long lived biohazard) from light water reactors (LWRs). The number of hybrids needed is 5-10 times less than the corresponding number of fast reactors (FRs). The highly sub-critical hybrids, with a thermal/epithermal spectrum, incinerate > 95% of the waste in decades rather than the centuries needed for FRs. For fuel production, hybrids can produce fuel for 3-4 times as many LWRs with no fuel reprocessing. Thorium fuel rods exposed to neutrons in the hybrid reach fissile concentrations that enable efficient burning in LWR without the proliferation risks of reprocessing. The proliferation risks of this method are far less than other fuel breeding approaches, including today's gas centrifuge. With this cycle, US Thorium reserves could supply the entire US electricity supply for centuries. The centerpiece of the fuel cycle is a high power density Compact Fusion Neutron Source (major+minor radius ~ 2.5-3.5 m), which is made feasible by the super-X divertor.

  16. Converting energy from fusion into useful forms

    CERN Document Server

    Kovari, M; Jenkins, I; Kiely, C

    2014-01-01

    If fusion power reactors are to be feasible, it will still be necessary to convert the energy of the nuclear reaction into usable form. The heat produced will be removed from the reactor core by a primary coolant, which might be water, helium, molten lithium-lead, molten lithium-containing salt, or CO2. The heat could then be transferred to a conventional Rankine cycle or Brayton (gas turbine) cycle. Alternatively it could be used for thermochemical processes such as producing hydrogen or other transport fuels. Fusion presents new problems because of the high energy neutrons released. These affect the selection of materials and the operating temperature, ultimately determining the choice of coolant and working cycle. The limited temperature ranges allowed by present day irradiated structural materials, combined with the large internal power demand of the plant, will limit the overall thermal efficiency. The operating conditions of the fusion power source, the materials, coolant, and energy conversion system w...

  17. Multifunctional reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerterp, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    Multifunctional reactors are single pieces of equipment in which, besides the reaction, other functions are carried out simultaneously. The other functions can be a heat, mass or momentum transfer operation and even another reaction. Multifunctional reactors are not new, but they have received much

  18. Tame Fusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.D. Scott

    2003-01-01

    The first section of this paper covers preliminaries. Essentially, the next four cover units. It is shown that a compatible nearring with DCCR is Nnilpotent if and only if every maximal right N-subgroup is a right ideal. The last five sections relate to fusion (I.e., N-groups minimal for being generated by Nsubgroups, where each is N-isomorphic to a given N-group). Right N-subgroups of a tame nearring N with DCCR, minimal for not annihilating a minimal ideal from the left, are self monogenic and N-isomorphic. That this holds for any collection of minimal ideals is significant. Here, the right N-subgroup involved is a 'fusion product' of the 'components'.

  19. Accelerators for Fusion Materials Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaster, Juan; Okumura, Yoshikazu

    Fusion materials research is a worldwide endeavor as old as the parallel one working toward the long term stable confinement of ignited plasma. In a fusion reactor, the preservation of the required minimum thermomechanical properties of the in-vessel components exposed to the severe irradiation and heat flux conditions is an indispensable factor for safe operation; it is also an essential goal for the economic viability of fusion. Energy from fusion power will be extracted from the 14 MeV neutron freed as a product of the deuterium-tritium fusion reactions; thus, this kinetic energy must be absorbed and efficiently evacuated and electricity eventually generated by the conventional methods of a thermal power plant. Worldwide technological efforts to understand the degradation of materials exposed to 14 MeV neutron fluxes >1018 m-2s-1, as expected in future fusion power plants, have been intense over the last four decades. Existing neutron sources can reach suitable dpa (“displacement-per-atom”, the figure of merit to assess materials degradation from being exposed to neutron irradiation), but the differences in the neutron spectrum of fission reactors and spallation sources do not allow one to unravel the physics and to anticipate the degradation of materials exposed to fusion neutrons. Fusion irradiation conditions can be achieved through Li (d, xn) nuclear reactions with suitable deuteron beam current and energy, and an adequate flowing lithium screen. This idea triggered in the late 1970s at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) a campaign working toward the feasibility of continuous wave (CW) high current linacs framed by the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) project. These efforts continued with the Low Energy Demonstrating Accelerator (LEDA) (a validating prototype of the canceled Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project), which was proposed in 2002 to the fusion community as a 6.7MeV, 100mA CW beam injector for a Li (d, xn) source to bridge

  20. Carpal Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Carpal fusion may be seen in hereditary and nonhereditary conditions such as acrocallosal syndrome,acromegaly, Apert syndrome, arthrogryposis, Carpenter syndrome, chromosomal abnormalities, ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft (EEC) syndrome, the F form of acropectorovertebral dysgenesis or the F syndrome, fetal alcohol syndrome, Holt-Oram syndrome, Leopard syndrome, multiple synostosis syndrome, oligosyndactyly syndrome, Pfeiffer-like syndrome, scleroderma, split hand and foot malformatio...

  1. Fusion Breeding for Sustainable, Mid Century, Carbon Free Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manheimer, Wallace

    2015-11-01

    If ITER achieves Q ~10, it is still very far from useful fusion. The fusion power, and the driver power will allow only a small amount of power to be delivered, NIF to achhieve ignition, at this point it has many more obstacles to overcome than magnetic fusion. One way out of this dilemma is to use an ITER size tokamak, or a NIF size laser, as a fuel breeder for searate nuclear reactors. Hence ITER and NIF become ends in themselves, instead of steps to who knows what DEMO decades later. Such a tokamak can easily live within the consrtaints of conservative design rules. This has led the author to propose ``The Energy Park'' a sustainable, carbon free, economical, and environmently viable power source without prolifertion risk. It is one fusion breeder fuels 5 conventional nuclear reactors, and one fast neutron reactor burns the actinide wastes.

  2. Fusion rules of equivariantizations of fusion categories

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We determine the fusion rules of the equivariantization of a fusion category $\\mathcal{C}$ under the action of a finite group $G$ in terms of the fusion rules of $\\mathcal{C}$ and group-theoretical data associated to the group action. As an application we obtain a formula for the fusion rules in an equivariantization of a pointed fusion category in terms of group-theoretical data. This entails a description of the fusion rules in any braided group-theoretical fusion category.

  3. Scientist to appeal misconduct charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2008-08-01

    Lawyers for the "bubble-fusion" researcher Rusi Taleyarkhan have told Physics World that he will appeal over the findings of a panel that last month found him guilty of two charges of scientific misconduct. Taleyarkhan, a nuclear engineer at Purdue University in the US, was charged by a sixmember internal committee, which concluded that he had cited a paper by researchers in his own lab as if it were an independent confirmation of his alleged discovery of bubble fusion in 2002. The committee also found him guilty of adding the name of a student who had not contributed to that paper as an author.

  4. The EU fusion programme and roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pero, H., E-mail: Herve.Pero@ec.europa.eu [European Commission, DG-RTD, CDMA 05/146, B-1049 Brussels (Belgium); Paidassi, S. [European Commission, DG-RTD, CDMA 05/146, B-1049 Brussels (Belgium)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► The EU fusion programme has to evolve from today's research to a strong goal-oriented programme driven by an ambitious roadmap. ► The programme shall focus on ITER and reactor-relevant technologies development. ► A new structure based on joint programming will be developed to implement the programme during Horizon 2020. -- Abstract: To meet ITER and fusion energy challenges, a gradual transition of the EU fusion programme priorities from today's fusion research to a strongly goal-oriented programme with clear milestones is required. This transition and the programme priorities should be driven by an ambitious, yet realistic roadmap to be agreed by EU fusion stakeholders. The programme must primarily focus on: ensuring the success of ITER; and research and development of reactor-relevant technologies. Industry must be involved early in the implementation and international collaboration should be conducted as part of a strategic approach. Joint programming should be a cornerstone of the EU fusion programme in Horizon 2020. Options for the new structure and current actions required to implement the roadmap during Horizon 2020 will be presented.

  5. Damaging impacts of energetic charge particles on materials in plasma energy explosive events

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Bai-Quan; Peng Li-Lin; Yan Jian-Cheng; Luo Zheng-Ming; Chen Zhi

    2006-01-01

    To provide some reference data for estimation of the erosion rates and lifetimes of some candidate plasma facing component (PF3 materials in the plasma stored energy explosive events (PSEEE), this paper calculates the sputtering yields of Mo, W and deuterium saturated Li surface bombarded by energetic charged particles by a new sputtering physics description method based on bipartition model of charge particle transport theory. The compar