WorldWideScience

Sample records for charged particle reactions

  1. Radiation Reaction for a Charged Brownian Particle

    CERN Document Server

    Vlasov, A A

    2002-01-01

    As it is known a model of a charged particle with finite size is a good tool to consider the effects of self- action and backreaction, caused by electromagnetic radiation. In this work the "size" of a charged particle is induced by its stochastic Brownian vibration. Appropriate equation of particle's motion with radiation force is derived. It is shown that the solutions of this equation correctly describe the effects of radiation reaction.

  2. Radiation reaction for a massless charged particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazinski, P. O.; Sharapov, A. A.

    2003-07-01

    We derive effective equations of motion for a massless charged particle coupled to the dynamical electromagnetic field with regard to the radiation back reaction. It is shown that unlike the massive case, not all the divergences resulting from the self-action of the particle are Lagrangian, i.e., can be cancelled out by adding appropriate counterterms to the original action. Besides, the order of renormalized differential equations governing the effective dynamics turns out to be greater than the order of the corresponding Lorentz-Dirac equation for a massive particle. For the case of a homogeneous external field, the first radiative correction to the Lorentz equation is explicitly derived via the reduction of order procedure.

  3. Radiation reaction for a massless charged particle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazinski, P O; Sharapov, A A [Physics Faculty, Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2003-07-07

    We derive effective equations of motion for a massless charged particle coupled to the dynamical electromagnetic field with regard to the radiation back reaction. It is shown that unlike the massive case, not all the divergences resulting from the self-action of the particle are Lagrangian, i.e., can be cancelled out by adding appropriate counterterms to the original action. Besides, the order of renormalized differential equations governing the effective dynamics turns out to be greater than the order of the corresponding Lorentz-Dirac equation for a massive particle. For the case of a homogeneous external field, the first radiative correction to the Lorentz equation is explicitly derived via the reduction of order procedure.

  4. Radiation reaction for a massless charged particle

    CERN Document Server

    Kazinski, P O

    2003-01-01

    We derive effective equations of motion for a massless charged particle coupled to the dynamical electromagnetic field having regard to the radiation back reaction. It is shown that unlike the massive case not all the divergences resulting from the self-action of the particle are Lagrangian, i.e. can be canceled out by adding appropriate counterterms to the original action. Besides, the order of renormalized differential equations governing the effective dynamics turns out to be greater than the order of the corresponding Lorentz-Dirac equation for a massive particle. For the case of homogeneous external field the first radiative correction to the Lorentz equation is explicitly derived via the reduction of order procedure.

  5. A compilation of charged-particle induced thermonuclear reaction rates

    CERN Document Server

    Angulo, C; Rayet, M; Descouvemont, P; Baye, D; Leclercq-Willain, C; Coc, A; Barhoumi, S; Aguer, P; Rolfs, C; Kunz, R; Hammer, J W; Mayer, A; Paradelis, T; Kossionides, S; Chronidou, C; Spyrou, K; Degl'Innocenti, S; Fiorentini, G; Ricci, B; Zavatarelli, S; Providência, C; Wolters, H; Soares, J; Grama, C; Rahighi, J; Shotter, A; Rachti, M L

    1999-01-01

    Low-energy cross section data for 86 charged-particle induced reactions involving light (1 <= Z <= 14), mostly stable, nuclei are compiled. The corresponding Maxwellian-averaged thermonuclear reaction rates of relevance in astrophysical plasmas at temperatures in the range from 10 sup 6 K to 10 sup 1 sup 0 K are calculated. These evaluations assume either that the target nuclei are in their ground state, or that the target states are thermally populated following a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, except in some cases involving isomeric states. Adopted values complemented with lower and upper limits of the rates are presented in tabular form. Analytical approximations to the adopted rates, as well as to the inverse/direct rate ratios, are provided.

  6. A compilation of charged-particle induced thermonuclear reaction rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angulo, C.; Arnould, M.; Rayet, M.; Descouvemont, P.; Baye, D.; Leclercq-Willain, C.; Coc, A.; Barhoumi, S.; Aguer, P.; Rolfs, C.; Kunz, R.; Hammer, J.W.; Mayer, A.; Paradellis, T.; Kossionides, S.; Chronidou, C.; Spyrou, K.; Degl' Innocenti, S.; Fiorentini, G.; Ricci, B.; Zavatarelli, S.; Providencia, C.; Wolters, H.; Soares, J.; Grama, C.; Rahighi, J.; Shotter, A.; Rachti, M. Lamehi

    1999-08-23

    Low-energy cross section data for 86 charged-particle induced reactions involving light (1 {<=} Z {<=} 14), mostly stable, nuclei are compiled. The corresponding Maxwellian-averaged thermonuclear reaction rates of relevance in astrophysical plasmas at temperatures in the range from 10{sup 6} K to 10{sup 10} K are calculated. These evaluations assume either that the target nuclei are in their ground state, or that the target states are thermally populated following a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, except in some cases involving isomeric states. Adopted values complemented with lower and upper limits of the rates are presented in tabular form. Analytical approximations to the adopted rates, as well as to the inverse/direct rate ratios, are provided.

  7. Extension of a Kinetic-Theory Approach for Computing Chemical-Reaction Rates to Reactions with Charged Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liechty, Derek S.; Lewis, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Recently introduced molecular-level chemistry models that predict equilibrium and nonequilibrium reaction rates using only kinetic theory and fundamental molecular properties (i.e., no macroscopic reaction rate information) are extended to include reactions involving charged particles and electronic energy levels. The proposed extensions include ionization reactions, exothermic associative ionization reactions, endothermic and exothermic charge exchange reactions, and other exchange reactions involving ionized species. The extensions are shown to agree favorably with the measured Arrhenius rates for near-equilibrium conditions.

  8. Light charged particle emission in heavy-ion reactions – What have we learnt?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Kailas

    2001-07-01

    Light charged particles emitted in heavy-ion induced reactions, their spectra and angular distributions measured over a range of energies, carry the signature of the underlying reaction mechanisms. Analysis of data of light charged particles, both inclusive and exclusive measured in coincidence with gamma rays, fission products, evaporation residues have yielded interesting results which bring out the influence of nuclear structure, nuclear mean field and dynamics on the emission of these particles.

  9. The motion of charged particles in strong plane waves including radiation reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinemann, R.; Herold, H.; Ruder, H.; Kegel, W. H.

    The Lorentz-Dirac equation in the Landau approximation is used to study the motion of charged particles in strong plane vacuum waves. It is shown that integration for circularly polarized waves can be used to determine analytically the curves of the particle trajectories. The solution is used to investigate the particle trajectories and energy evolution for various strong waves. The initial conditions for the motion are chosen so that the particles start from a radiation-free path and the growing effect of the radiation reaction on the particle trajectory is highlighted.

  10. Charged-Particle Thermonuclear Reaction Rates: II. Tables and Graphs of Reaction Rates and Probability Density Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Iliadis, Christian; Champagne, Art; Coc, Alain; Fitzgerald, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    Numerical values of charged-particle thermonuclear reaction rates for nuclei in the A=14 to 40 region are tabulated. The results are obtained using a method, based on Monte Carlo techniques, that has been described in the preceding paper of this series (Paper I). We present a low rate, median rate and high rate which correspond to the 0.16, 0.50 and 0.84 quantiles, respectively, of the cumulative reaction rate distribution. The meaning of these quantities is in general different from the commonly reported, but statistically meaningless expressions, "lower limit", "nominal value" and "upper limit" of the total reaction rate. In addition, we approximate the Monte Carlo probability density function of the total reaction rate by a lognormal distribution and tabulate the lognormal parameters {\\mu} and {\\sigma} at each temperature. We also provide a quantitative measure (Anderson-Darling test statistic) for the reliability of the lognormal approximation. The user can implement the approximate lognormal reaction rat...

  11. Radiation reaction on charged particles in three-dimensional motion in classical and quantum electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Atsushi; Martin, Giles D. R.

    2006-01-01

    We extend our previous work [A. Higuchi and G. D. R. Martin, Found. Phys. 35, 1149 (2005)FNDPA40015-901810.1007/s10701-005-6405-0], which compared the predictions of quantum electrodynamics concerning radiation reaction with those of the Abraham-Lorentz-Dirac theory for a charged particle in linear motion. Specifically, we calculate the predictions for the change in position of a charged-scalar particle, moving in three-dimensional space, due to the effect of radiation reaction in the one-photon-emission process in quantum electrodynamics. The scalar particle is assumed to be accelerated for a finite period of time by a three-dimensional electromagnetic potential dependent only on one of the spacetime coordinates. We perform this calculation in the ℏ→0 limit and show that the change in position agrees with that obtained in classical electrodynamics with the Lorentz-Dirac force treated as a perturbation. We also show for a time-dependent but space-independent electromagnetic potential that the forward-scattering amplitude at order e2 does not contribute to the position change in the ℏ→0 limit after the mass renormalization is taken into account.

  12. Charged particle decay of hot and rotating 88Mo nuclei in fusion-evaporation reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdré, S.; Piantelli, S.; Casini, G.; Barlini, S.; Carboni, S.; Ciemała, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Mazurek, K.; Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Morelli, L.; Marchi, T.; Baiocco, G.; Bardelli, L.; Bednarczyk, P.; Benzoni, G.; Bini, M.; Blasi, N.; Bracco, A.; Brambilla, S.; Bruno, M.; Camera, F.; Chbihi, A.; Corsi, A.; Crespi, F. C. L.; D'Agostino, M.; Degerlier, M.; Fabris, D.; Fornal, B.; Giaz, A.; Krzysiek, M.; Leoni, S.; Matejska-Minda, M.; Mazumdar, I.; MÈ©czyński, W.; Million, B.; Montanari, D.; Myalski, S.; Nicolini, R.; Olmi, A.; Pasquali, G.; Prete, G.; Roberts, O. J.; Styczeń, J.; Szpak, B.; Wasilewska, B.; Wieland, O.; Wieleczko, J. P.; ZiÈ©bliński, M.

    2016-03-01

    A study of fusion-evaporation and (partly) fusion-fission channels for the 88Mo compound nucleus, produced at different excitation energies in the reaction 48Ti+40Ca at 300, 450, and 600 MeV beam energies, is presented. Fusion-evaporation and fusion-fission cross sections have been extracted and compared with the existing systematics. Experimental data concerning light charged particles have been compared with the prediction of the statistical model in its implementation in the gemini++ code, well suited even for high spin systems, in order to tune the main model parameters in a mass region not abundantly covered by exclusive experimental data. Multiplicities for light charged particles emitted in fusion evaporation events are also presented. Some discrepancies with respect to the prediction of the statistical model have been found for forward emitted α particles; they may be due both to pre-equilibrium emission and to reaction channels (such as deep inelastic collisions or quasifission/quasifusion) different from the compound nucleus formation.

  13. Charged particle decay of hot and rotating $^{88}$Mo nuclei in fusion-evaporation reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Valdré, S; Casini, G; Barlini, S; Carboni, S; Ciemała, M; Kmiecik, M; Maj, A; Mazurek, K; Cinausero, M; Gramegna, F; Kravchuk, V L; Morelli, L; Marchi, T; Baiocco, G; Bardelli, L; Bednarczyk, P; Benzoni, G; Bini, M; Blasi, N; Bracco, A; Brambilla, S; Bruno, M; Camera, F; Chbihi, A; Corsi, A; Crespi, F C L; D'Agostino, M; Degerlier, M; Fabris, D; Fornal, B; Giaz, A; Krzysiek, M; Leoni, S; Matejska-Minda, M; Mazumdar, I; Mȩczyński, W; Million, B; Montanari, D; Myalski, S; Nicolini, R; Olmi, A; Pasquali, G; Prete, G; Roberts, O J; Styczeń, J; Szpak, B; Wasilewska, B; Wieland, O; Wieleczko, J P; Ziȩbliński, M

    2015-01-01

    A study of fusion-evaporation and (partly) fusion-fission channels for the $^{88}$Mo compound nucleus, produced at different excitation energies in the reaction $^{48}$Ti + $^{40}$Ca at 300, 450 and 600 MeV beam energies, is presented. Fusion-evaporation and fusion-fission cross sections have been extracted and compared with the existing systematics. Experimental data concerning light charged particles have been compared with the prediction of the statistical model in its implementation in the Gemini++ code, well suited even for high spin systems, in order to tune the main model parameters in a mass region not abundantly covered by exclusive experimental data. Multiplicities for light charged particles emitted in fusion evaporation events are also presented. Some discrepancies with respect to the prediction of the statistical model have been found for forward emitted $\\alpha$-particles; they may be due both to pre-equilibrium emission and to reaction channels (such as Deep Inelastic Collisions, QuasiFission/Q...

  14. Further evidence of nuclear reactions in the Pd/D lattice: emission of charged particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szpak, Stanislaw; Mosier-Boss, Pamela A; Gordon, Frank E

    2007-06-01

    Almost two decades ago, Fleischmann and Pons reported excess enthalpy generation in the negatively polarized Pd/D-D2O system, which they attributed to nuclear reactions. In the months and years that followed, other manifestations of nuclear activities in this system were observed, viz. tritium and helium production and transmutation of elements. In this report, we present additional evidence, namely, the emission of highly energetic charged particles emitted from the Pd/D electrode when this system is placed in either an external electrostatic or magnetostatic field. The density of tracks registered by a CR-39 detector was found to be of a magnitude that provides undisputable evidence of their nuclear origin. The experiments were reproducible. A model based upon electron capture is proposed to explain the reaction products observed in the Pd/D-D2O system.

  15. Charged particle-induced nuclear fission reactions – Progress and prospects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Kailas; K Mahata

    2014-12-01

    The nuclear fission phenomenon continues to be an enigma, even after nearly 75 years of its discovery. Considerable progress has been made towards understanding the fission process. Both light projectiles and heavy ions have been employed to investigate nuclear fission. An extensive database of the properties of fissionable nuclei has been generated. The theoretical developments to describe the fission phenomenon have kept pace with the progress in the corresponding experimental measurements. As the fission process initiated by the neutrons has been well documented, the present article will be restricted to charged particle-induced fission reactions. The progress made in recent years and the prospects in the area of nuclear fission research will be the focus of this review.

  16. Radiation reaction on a classical charged particle: a modified form of the equation of motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaine, Guillermo García; Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J

    2013-09-01

    We present and numerically solve a modified form of the equation of motion for a charged particle under the influence of an external force, taking into account the radiation reaction. This covariant equation is integro-differential, as Dirac-Röhrlich's, but has several technical improvements. First, the equation has the form of Newton's second law, with acceleration isolated on the left hand side and the force depending only on positions and velocities: Thus, the equation is linear in the highest derivative. Second, the total four-force is by construction perpendicular to the four-velocity. Third, if the external force vanishes for all future times, the total force and the acceleration automatically vanish at the present time. We show the advantages of this equation by solving it numerically for several examples of external force.

  17. Charged particle assisted nuclear reactions in solid state environment: renaissance of low energy nuclear physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kálmán, Péter

    2015-01-01

    The features of electron assisted neutron exchange processes in crystalline solids are survayed. It is stated that, contrary to expectations, the cross section of these processes may reach an observable magnitude even in the very low energy case because of the extremely huge increment caused by the Coulomb factor of the electron assisted processes and by the effect of the crystal-lattice. The features of electron assisted heavy charged particle exchange processes, electron assisted nuclear capure processes and heavy charged particle assisted nuclear processes are also overviewed. Experimental observations, which may be related to our theoretical findings, are dealt with. The anomalous screening phenomenon is related to electron assisted neutron and proton exchange processes in crystalline solids. A possible explanation of observations by Fleischmann and Pons is presented. The possibility of the phenomenon of nuclear transmutation is qualitatively explained with the aid of usual and charged particle assisted r...

  18. Large Acceptance Measurement of Photons and Charged Particles in Heavy Ion Reactions

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % WA98 \\\\ \\\\ The aim of the experiment is the high statistics study of photons and neutral hadrons, as well as of charged particles, and their correlations in Pb~-~Pb collisions. The photons are measured by: \\begin{enumerate}[-] \\item a 10~000 module LEADGLASS SPECTROMETER yielding high precision data on $ \\pi ^0 $ and $ \\eta $ at midrapidity (with transverse momenta 0.3 GeV/c $>$ p$ _{T} $ $>$ 4.5 GeV/c for $\\pi ^0 $ and 1.5~GeV/c~$>$~p$ _{T}~$ $>$~4.0~GeV/c for $ \\eta $ covering the $^{\\prime\\prime}$thermal$^{\\prime\\prime}$ as well as the $^{\\prime\\prime}$hard scattering$^{\\prime\\prime}$ regime beyond 3~GeV/c) and determination of the thermal and direct photon to $ \\pi ^0 $ ratio. \\item a pad preshower PHOTON MULTIPLICITY DETECTOR which, by comparing with the charged particle multiplicity measurement allows to determine the photon enrichment in an event or event class. \\end{enumerate}\\\\ \\\\The charged particle setup contains:\\\\ \\\\\\begin{enumerate}[-] \\item a 4000 element SILICON PAD DETECTOR and a 4-inch SIL...

  19. The exact radiation-reaction equation for a classical charged particle

    CERN Document Server

    Tessarotto, M; Cremaschini, C; Nicolini, P; Beklemishev, A

    2008-01-01

    An unsolved problem of classical mechanics and classical electrodynamics is the search of the exact relativistic equations of motion for a classical charged point-particle subject to the force produced by the action of its EM self-field. The problem is related to the conjecture that for a classical charged point-particle there should exist a relativistic equation of motion (RR equation) which results both non-perturbative, in the sense that it does not rely on a perturbative expansion on the electromagnetic field generated by the charged particle and non-asymptotic, i.e., it does not depend on any infinitesimal parameter. In this paper we intend to propose a novel solution to this well known problem, and in particular to point out that the RR equation is necessarily variational. The approach is based on two key elements: 1) the adoption of the relativistic hybrid synchronous Hamilton variational principle recently pointed out (Tessarotto et al, 2006). Its basic feature is that it can be expressed in principle...

  20. New potentialities of the Li\\`ege intranuclear cascade (INCL) model for reactions induced by nucleons and light charged particles

    CERN Document Server

    Boudard, Alain; David, Jean-Christophe; Leray, Sylvie; Mancusi, Davide

    2012-01-01

    The new version (INCL4.6) of the Li`ege intranuclear cascade (INC) model for the description of spallation reactions is presented in detail. Compared to the standard version (INCL4.2), it incorporates several new features, the most important of which are: (i) the inclusion of cluster production through a dynamical phase space coalescence model, (ii) the Coulomb deflection for entering and outgoing charged particles, (iii) the improvement of the treatment of Pauli blocking and of soft collisions, (iv) the introduction of experimental threshold values for the emission of particles, (v) the improvement of pion dynamics, (vi) a detailed procedure for the treatment of light-cluster induced reactions taking care of the effects of binding energy of the nucleons inside the incident cluster and of the possible fusion reaction at low energy. Performances of the new model concerning nucleon-induced reactions are illustrated. Whenever necessary, the INCL4.6 model is coupled to the ABLA07 deexcitation model and the respec...

  1. Light charged particles from low-energy {sup 58}Ni+{sup 112}Sn fusion-evaporation reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fineman, B.J.; Brinkmann, K.; Caraley, A.L.; Gan, N.; Kernan, W.J.; McGrath, R.L.; Savas, T.A. [Physics Department, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Proton and {alpha}-particle energy spectra were measured in coincidence with evaporation residues from 252 and 295 MeV {sup 58}Ni+{sup 112}Sn fusion reactions. Residues were separated from the beam using an electrostatic deflector and detected with surface barrier detectors. Light charged particles were detected with arrays of NaI detectors. Statistical model calculations based on standard parameter choices reproduce the spectra from the cold, low spin {sup 170}Pt{sup *} system. The effects of employing different methods of calculating transmission coefficients were explored. The optical model, ingoing wave boundary condition model, and a simple one-dimensional barrier penetration model from a fusion systematics analysis produce comparable satisfactory predictions. The Hill-Wheeler approximation for transmission coefficients gives unrealistic results for protons.

  2. Charged particle beams

    CERN Document Server

    Humphries, Stanley

    2013-01-01

    Detailed enough for a text and sufficiently comprehensive for a reference, this volume addresses topics vital to understanding high-power accelerators and high-brightness-charged particle beams. Subjects include stochastic cooling, high-brightness injectors, and the free electron laser. Humphries provides students with the critical skills necessary for the problem-solving insights unique to collective physics problems. 1990 edition.

  3. Average charged-particle multiplicities in. pi. /sup -/p inclusive reactions at 147 GeV/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brick, D.; Fong, D.; Heller, M.; Shapiro, A.M.; Widgoff, M.; Bruyant, F.; Bogert, D.; Johnson, M.; Burnstein, R.; Fu, C.; Petersen, D.; Robertson, M.; Rubin, H.; Sard, R.D.; Snyder, A.; Tortora, J.; Alyea, E.D. Jr.; Chien, C.; Lucas, P.; Pevsner, A.; Zdanis, R.; Barreiro, F.; Benary, O.; Brau, J.E.; DeTar, C.E.; Grunhaus, J.; Hafen, E.S.; Hulsizer, R.I.; Karshon, U.; Kistiakowsky, V.; Levy, A.; Napier, A.; Pless, I.A.; Silverman, J.P.; Stoughton, T.; Trepagnier, P.C.; Wolfson, J.; Yamamoto, R.K.; Cohn, H.O.; Jacques, P.F.; Ou, T.C.; Plano, R.J.; Watts, T.L.; Brucker, E.B.; Koller, E.; Stamer, P.; Taylor, S.; Bugg, W.M.; Condo, G.; Handler, T.; Hart, E.; Kraybill, H.; Ljung, D.; Ludlam, T.; Taft, H.D.

    1979-02-01

    The experimentally determined average charged-particle multiplicities, , of the systems, X, produced in the following reactions for 147 GeV/c incident pion momentum are presented as functions of the square of the invariant mass of X, M/sub x//sup 2/, and of *t*: ..pi../sup -/p ..-->.. ..pi../sup -//sub fast/X, ..pi../sup -/p ..-->.. pX, ..pi../sup -/p ..-->.. ..delta../sup + +/X, ..pi../sup -/p ..-->.. (..pi../sup -/..pi../sup +/)/sub rho//sup 0/X, and ..pi../sup -/p ..-->.. ..lambda../sup 0/X. Details of the analysis are discussed. These data can be fit by the expression = A + BlnM/sub X//sup 2/ + C*t* and the coefficients obtained for B are equal within their uncertainties. C is significantly different from zero only for ..pi../sup -/p ..-->.. ..pi../sup -//sub fast/X.

  4. Front-end electronics for CsI based charged particle array for the study of reaction dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jhingan, Akhil, E-mail: akhil@iuac.res.in [Inter University Accelerator Centre, P.O. Box 10502, New Delhi 110067 (India); Sugathan, P. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, P.O. Box 10502, New Delhi 110067 (India); Kaur, Gurpreet; Kapoor, K. [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Saneesh, N.; Banerjee, T. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, P.O. Box 10502, New Delhi 110067 (India); Singh, Hardev [Department of Physics, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra 136119 (India); Kumar, A.; Behera, B.R. [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Nayak, B.K. [Nuclear Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2015-06-21

    The characteristics and performance of a new detector system based on CsI(TI) scintillators, and its front-end electronics are presented. The detector system has been developed for the detection of light charged particles to investigate fusion–fission dynamics, and will also serve as ancillary detector for an array of neutron detectors. CsI scintillators are read by photo-diodes. The main feature of the array is its compact and simple high density front-end electronics which includes custom developed low noise charge sensitive preamplifiers (with very low power consumption for operation inside vacuum), NIM differential drivers, and commercially available Mesytec amplifiers with two different time constants for particle identification using a ballistic deficit technique.

  5. NACRE II: an update of the NACRE compilation of charged-particle-induced thermonuclear reaction rates for nuclei with mass number A<16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y.; Takahashi, K.; Goriely, S.; Arnould, M.; Ohta, M.; Utsunomiya, H.

    2013-11-01

    An update of the NACRE compilation [3] is presented. This new compilation, referred to as NACRE II, reports thermonuclear reaction rates for 34 charged-particle induced, two-body exoergic reactions on nuclides with mass number A<16, of which fifteen are particle-transfer reactions and the rest radiative capture reactions. When compared with NACRE, NACRE II features in particular (1) the addition to the experimental data collected in NACRE of those reported later, preferentially in the major journals of the field by early 2013, and (2) the adoption of potential models as the primary tool for extrapolation to very low energies of astrophysical S-factors, with a systematic evaluation of uncertainties.

  6. Thermophoresis of charged colloidal particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayolle, Sébastien; Bickel, Thomas; Würger, Alois

    2008-04-01

    Thermally induced particle flow in a charged colloidal suspension is studied in a fluid-mechanical approach. The force density acting on the charged boundary layer is derived in detail. From Stokes' equation with no-slip boundary conditions at the particle surface, we obtain the particle drift velocity and the thermophoretic transport coefficients. The results are discussed in view of previous work and available experimental data.

  7. Thermophoresis of charged colloidal particles

    OpenAIRE

    Fayolle, Sébastien; Bickel, Thomas; Würger, Alois

    2008-01-01

    International audience; Thermally induced particle flow in a charged colloidal suspension is studied in a fluid-mechanical approach. The force density acting on the charged boundary layer is derived in detail. From Stokes' equation with no-slip boundary conditions at the particle surface, we obtain the particle drift velocity and the thermophoretic transport coefficients. The results are discussed in view of previous work and available experimental data.

  8. Electrostatic wire stabilizing a charged particle beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prono, D.S.; Caporaso, G.J.; Briggs, R.J.

    1983-03-21

    In combination with a charged particle beam generator and accelerator, apparatus and method are provided for stabilizing a beam of electrically charged particles. A guiding means, disposed within the particle beam, has an electric charge induced upon it by the charged particle beam. Because the sign of the electric charge on the guiding means and the sign of the particle beam are opposite, the particles are attracted toward and cluster around the guiding means to thereby stabilize the particle beam as it travels.

  9. Electrooptical Detection of Charged Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Semertzidis, Y K; Kowalski, L A; Kraus, D E; Larsen, R; Lazarus, D M; Magurno, B; Nikas, D; Ozben, C; Srinivasan-Rao, T; Tsang, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    We have made the first observation of a charged particle beam by means of its electro-optical effect on the polarization of laser light in a LiNbO3 crystal. The modulation of the laser light during the passage of a pulsed electron beam was observed using a fast photodiode and a digital oscilloscope. The fastest rise time measured, 120 ps, was obtained in the single shot mode and was limited by the bandwidth of the oscilloscope and the associated electronics. This technology holds promise for detectors of greatly improved spatial and temporal resolution for single relativistic charged particles as well as particle beams.

  10. Coaxial charged particle energy analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Michael A. (Inventor); Bryson, III, Charles E. (Inventor); Wu, Warren (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A non-dispersive electrostatic energy analyzer for electrons and other charged particles having a generally coaxial structure of a sequentially arranged sections of an electrostatic lens to focus the beam through an iris and preferably including an ellipsoidally shaped input grid for collimating a wide acceptance beam from a charged-particle source, an electrostatic high-pass filter including a planar exit grid, and an electrostatic low-pass filter. The low-pass filter is configured to reflect low-energy particles back towards a charged particle detector located within the low-pass filter. Each section comprises multiple tubular or conical electrodes arranged about the central axis. The voltages on the lens are scanned to place a selected energy band of the accepted beam at a selected energy at the iris. Voltages on the high-pass and low-pass filters remain substantially fixed during the scan.

  11. Preaccelerations of charged particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ares de Parga, G.; Domínguez, S.

    2004-12-01

    A region of applicability of classical electrodynamics with radiation reaction force is described. Due to quantum effects, the non-existence of preacceleration solutions is proved and as a consequence of this, a discussion about the validity of Lorentz-Dirac equation is exposed.

  12. NACRE II: an update of the NACRE compilation of charged-particle-induced thermonuclear reaction rates for nuclei with mass number A<16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Y. [Institut d' Astronomie et d' Astrophysique, Université Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium); Takahashi, K. [Institut d' Astronomie et d' Astrophysique, Université Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium); GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Goriely, S. [Institut d' Astronomie et d' Astrophysique, Université Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium); Arnould, M., E-mail: marnould@ulb.ac.be [Institut d' Astronomie et d' Astrophysique, Université Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium); Ohta, M. [Hirao School of Management, Konan University, Kobe (Japan); Department of Physics, Konan University, Kobe (Japan); Utsunomiya, H. [Department of Physics, Konan University, Kobe (Japan)

    2013-11-20

    An update of the NACRE compilation [3] is presented. This new compilation, referred to as NACRE II, reports thermonuclear reaction rates for 34 charged-particle induced, two-body exoergic reactions on nuclides with mass number A<16, of which fifteen are particle-transfer reactions and the rest radiative capture reactions. When compared with NACRE, NACRE II features in particular (1) the addition to the experimental data collected in NACRE of those reported later, preferentially in the major journals of the field by early 2013, and (2) the adoption of potential models as the primary tool for extrapolation to very low energies of astrophysical S-factors, with a systematic evaluation of uncertainties. As in NACRE, the rates are presented in tabular form for temperatures in the 10{sup 6}≲T⩽10{sup 10} K range. Along with the ‘adopted’ rates, their low and high limits are provided. The new rates are available in electronic form as part of the Brussels Library (BRUSLIB) of nuclear data. The NACRE II rates also supersede the previous NACRE rates in the Nuclear Network Generator (NETGEN) for astrophysics. [ (http://www.astro.ulb.ac.be/databases.html)].

  13. NACRE II: an update of the NACRE compilation of charged-particle-induced thermonuclear reaction rates for nuclei with mass number $A < 16$

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Yi; Goriely, Stephane; Arnould, Marcel; Ohta, Masahisa; Utsunomiya, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    An update of the NACRE compilation [Angulo et al., Nucl. Phys. A 656 (1999) 3] is presented. This new compilation, referred to as NACRE II, reports thermonuclear reaction rates for 34 charged-particle induced, two-body exoergic reactions on nuclides with mass number $A<16$, of which fifteen are particle-transfer reactions and the rest radiative capture reactions. When compared with NACRE, NACRE II features in particular (1) the addition to the experimental data collected in NACRE of those reported later, preferentially in the major journals of the field by early 2013, and (2) the adoption of potential models as the primary tool for extrapolation to very low energies of astrophysical $S$-factors, with a systematic evaluation of uncertainties. As in NACRE, the rates are presented in tabular form for temperatures in the $10^{6}$ $\\simeq\\leq$ T $\\leq$ $10^{10}$ K range. Along with the 'adopted' rates, their low and high limits are provided. The new rates are available in electronic form as part of the Brussels...

  14. Light Charged Particles Emission and the Giant Dipole Resonance in Highly Excited Ce Nucleus Formed in Reactions with Different Mass Asymmetries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlini, S.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Wieland, O.; Bracco, A.; Gramegna, F.; Airoldi, A.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Brambilla, S.; Brekiesz, M.; Bruno, M.; Camera, F.; Casini, G.; Chiari, M.; D'Agostino, M.; De Sanctis, J.; Geraci, E.; Kmiecik, M.; Lanchais, A.; Leoni, S.; Maj, A.; Mastinu, P. F.; Million, B.; Moroni, A.; Nannini, A.; Ordine, A.; Sacchi, R.; Vannini, G.

    2006-08-01

    Recent measurements have been performed at the National Laboratoty of Legnaro using mass-symmetric (400, 500 MeV 64Ni + 68Zn) and mass-asymmetric (250 MeV 16O + 116Sn) entrance channel reactions to form 132Ce compound nucleus at different excitation energies (E*=150, 200 and 200 MeV, respectively). The decay of the composite system has been followed studying the γ-rays and Light Charged Particles (LCP) spectra emitted in coincidence with the Evaporation Residues (ER). In this way the emission mechanism of the LCP, depending on the mass-asymmetry at the entrance channel and on the projectile energy, and the results of the Full Width Half-Maximum (FWHM) of the Giant Dipole Resonance as a function of the nuclear temperature have been studied.

  15. Magnetic guidance of charged particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Dubbers

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Many experiments and devices in physics use static magnetic fields to guide charged particles from a source onto a detector, and we ask the innocent question: What is the distribution of particle intensity over the detector surface? One should think that the solution to this seemingly simple problem is well known. We show that, even for uniform guide fields, this is not the case, and we present analytical point spread functions (PSF for magnetic transport that deviate strongly from previous results. The “magnetic” PSF shows unexpected singularities, which were recently also observed experimentally, and which make detector response very sensitive to minute changes of position, field amplitude, or particle energy. In the field of low-energy particle physics, these singularities may become a source of error in modern high precision experiments, or may be used for instrument tests.

  16. Geometrical charged-particle optics

    CERN Document Server

    Rose, Harald H

    2009-01-01

    This reference monograph covers all theoretical aspects of modern geometrical charged-particle optics. It is intended as a guide for researchers, who are involved in the design of electron optical instruments and beam-guiding systems for charged particles, and as a tutorial for graduate students seeking a comprehensive treatment. Procedures for calculating the properties of systems with arbitrarily curved axes are outlined in detail and methods are discussed for designing and optimizing special components such as aberration correctors, spectrometers, energy filters, monochromators, ion traps, electron mirrors and cathode lenses. Also addressed is the design of novel electron optical components enabling sub-Angstroem spatial resolution and sub-0.1eV energy resolution. Relativistic motion and spin precession of the electron is treated in a concise way by employing a covariant five-dimensional procedure.

  17. Geometrical charged-particle optics

    CERN Document Server

    Rose, Harald

    2012-01-01

    This second edition is an extended version of the first edition of Geometrical Charged-Particle Optics. The updated reference monograph is intended as a guide for researchers and graduate students who are seeking a comprehensive treatment of the design of instruments and beam-guiding systems of charged particles and their propagation in electromagnetic fields. Wave aspects are included in this edition for explaining electron holography, the Aharanov-Bohm effect and the resolution of electron microscopes limited by diffraction. Several methods for calculating the electromagnetic field are presented and procedures are outlined for calculating the properties of systems with arbitrarily curved axis. Detailed methods are presented for designing and optimizing special components such as aberration correctors, spectrometers, energy filters monochromators, ion traps, electron mirrors and cathode lenses. In particular, the optics of rotationally symmetric lenses, quadrupoles, and systems composed of these elements are...

  18. Nacre II:. AN Update and Extension of the Nacre Compilation of Charged-Particle Thermonuclear Reaction Rates for Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y.; Takahashi, K.; Goriely, S.; Arnould, M.

    2013-03-01

    The status of a new evaluation of astrophysical nuclear reaction rates, referred as NACRE- II, is reported. It includes 19 radiative capture and 15 transfer reactions on targets with mass numbers A < 16. This work is meant to supersede the NACRE compilation. Post-NACRE experimental data are taken into account. Extrapolations of the astrophysical S-factor to largely sub-Coulomb energies are based on the use of the potential model and of the distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA) for capture and transfer reactions, respectively. Adopted rates and their lower and upper limits are provided. Here, we illustrate with some results the general procedure followed in the construction of NACRE-II.

  19. Charged particles in Titan's ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Sachchida

    2010-05-01

    Charged particles in Titan's ionosphere Marykutty Michael1, Sachchida Nand Tripathi1,2,3, Pratima Arya1 1Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur 2Oak Ridge Associated Universities 3NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Observations by two instruments onboard the Cassini spacecraft, Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) and CAssini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS), revealed the existence of heavy hydrocarbon and nitrile species with masses of several thousand atomic mass units at altitudes of 950 - 1400 km in the atmosphere of Titan (Waite et al., 2007; Crary et al., 2009). Though these particles were believed to be molecules, they are most likely aerosols formed by the clumping of smaller molecules (Waite et al., 2009). These particles were estimated to have a density of 10-3 kg m-3 and a size of up to 256 nm. The existence of very heavy ions has also been observed by the CAPS components with a mass by charge ratio of up to 10000 (Coates et al., 2007, 2009; Sittler et al., 2009). The goal of this paper is to find out whether the so called heavy ions (or charged particles) are generated by the charge transfer of ions and electrons to the particles. The charging of these particles has been studied by using the charge balance equations that include positive ions, negative ions, electrons, neutral and charged particles. Information on the most abundant ion clusters are obtained from Vuitton et al., (2009) and Wilson and Atreya, (2004). Mass by charge ratio thus calculated will be compared with those observed by Coates et al. (2007). References: Coates AJ, et al., Discovery of heavy negative ions in Titan's ionosphere, Geophys. Res. Lett., 34:L22103, 2007. Coates AJ, et al., Heavy negative ions in titan's ionosphere: altitude and latitude dependence. Planet. Space Sci., doi:10.1016/j.pss.2009.05.009, 2009. Crary F.J., et al., Heavy ions, temperatures and winds in titan's ionosphere: Combined cassini caps and inms observations. Planet. Space Sci., doi:10.1016/j.pss.2009.09.006, 2009

  20. NACRE II: An Update of the NACRE Compilation of Atarget<16 Charged-Particle Thermonuclear Reaction Rates for Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y.; Takahashi, K.; Goriely, S.; Arnould, M.

    2011-10-01

    We report on the status of a new evaluation of the rates in astrophysical conditions of 19 capture and 15 transfer reactions on stable targets with mass numbers A<16, referred as NACRE-II. This work is meant to supersede the NACRE compilation. Post-NACRE experimental data are taken into account. Extrapolations of the astrophysical S-factor to largely sub-Coulomb energies are based on the use of the potential model and of the distorted wave Born approximation for capture and transfer reactions, respectively. Adopted rates and their lower and upper limits are provided. Here, we illustrate the general procedure followed in the NACRE-II construction with two examples.

  1. Microanalysis of Fluorine Contamination and its Depth Distribution in Zircaloy by the Use of a Charged Particle Nuclear Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, E.; Starfelt, N.

    1966-07-15

    Fluorine contamination on and below the surface of zircaloy has been studied by means of proton irradiation using a Van de Graaff accelerator and the detection of prompt gamma radiation from the {sup 19}F (p, {alpha}{gamma}) {sup 16}O reaction. Formulae for deriving depth distributions of impurities from the measured counting rates have been derived. The influence of energy straggling on the depth resolution has been studied. Both the total amount and the depth distribution have been measured in samples, which have undergone different treatments. Because of the high yield from the reaction used, a quantity of fluorine less than 0. 01 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} can be detected by this method.

  2. Motion of charged particles in pulsar magnetospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariades, Haris Andrea

    The motion of charges in the magnetosphere of pulsars is studied from two complementary points of view: (1) for the case of aligned magnetic and rotational axes we solve a fluid version of the Lorentz-Dirac equation, in the Landau approximation, for a two-component plasma. We start from an approximately force-free initial condition and numerically integrate the equations of motion for a time equal to 1.6 percent of one stellar rotation period. We find that the system tends to a charge-separated state in which a negative charge region above the poles is separated by a vacuum gap from a positive charge region near the equator. We see the formation of force-free regions and a tendency of the vacuum gap to spread as the integrations proceed. The energies attained by the charges are only mildly relativistic and radiation reaction does not play an important role during the integrations. The negative charge above the polar region is electrostatically bound and there is a force-free region towards which negative charge tends to flow. Some positive charge is magnetically confined near the stellar equator and other positive charge crosses magnetic field lines moving outward to the region beyond the light cylinder. The outward motion of positive charge is due to the relative magnitudes of the electric and magnetic fields. (2) For the case of non-aligned axes we study the single particle dynamics for electrons moving in the region beyond the light cylinder, again using the Landau approximation to the Lorentz-Dirac equation. The effect of the inner magnetosphere is taken into account by adding a central attractive charge. We find that there exists a class of solutions corresponding to bounded orbits beyond the light cylinder. In an independent particle picture, particles started with different initial conditions within the basin of attraction of this class of orbits eventually form corotating patterns beyond the light cylinder. For a frequently occurring particle configuration

  3. Charge of dust particles in a particle chain

    CERN Document Server

    Yousefi, Razieh; Matthews, Lorin Swint; Hyde, Truell W

    2016-01-01

    Charged dust particles form structures which are extended in the vertical direction in the electrode sheath of a rf discharge when confined within a glass box. The charge on each particle as a function of height varies due to the changing plasma conditions and the wakefield of upstream particles. Here an analysis of the equilibrium state of chains of varying number of particles is analyzed to determine the charge on each particle within a vertically extended chain as well as the magnitude of the positive wakefield charge.

  4. Particle production in antiproton induced nuclear reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2014-01-01

    The quantum molecular dynamics model has been improved to investigate the reaction dynamics induced by antiprotons. The reaction channels of elastic scattering, annihilation, charge exchange and inelastic collisions have been included in the model. Dynamics on particle production, in particular pions, kaons, antikaons and hyperons, is investigated in collisions of $\\overline{p}$ on $^{12}$C, $^{20}$Ne, $^{40}$Ca, $^{112}$Sn, $^{181}$Ta, $^{197}$Au and $^{238}$U from a low to high incident momentum. The rapidity and momentum distributions of $\\pi^{+}$ and protons from the LEAR measurements can be well reproduced. The impacts of system size and incident momentum on particle emissions are investigated from the inclusive spectra, transverse momentum and rapidity distributions. It is found that the annihilations of $\\overline{p}$ on nucleons are of importance on the particle production. Hyperons are mainly produced via meson induced reactions on nucleons and strangeness exchange collisions when the incident moment...

  5. Scintillation Detectors for Charged Particles and Photons

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, P

    2011-01-01

    Scintillation Detectors for Charged Particles and Photons in 'Charged Particle Detectors - Particle Detectors and Detector Systems', part of 'Landolt-Börnstein - Group I Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms: Numerical Data and Functional Relationships in Science and Technology, Volume 21B1: Detectors for Particles and Radiation. Part 1: Principles and Methods'. This document is part of Part 1 'Principles and Methods' of Subvolume B 'Detectors for Particles and Radiation' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the Subsection '3.1.1 Scintillation Detectors for Charged Particles and Photons' of Section '3.1 Charged Particle Detectors' of Chapter '3 Particle Detectors and Detector Systems' with the content: 3.1.1 Scintillation Detectors for Charged Particles and Photons 3.1.1.1 Basic detector principles and scintillator requirements 3.1.1.1.1 Interaction of ionizing radiation with scintillator material 3.1.1.1.2 Important scint...

  6. Dynamics of neutral and charged aerosol particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppae, J.

    2012-07-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles have various climate effects and adverse health effects, which both depend on the size and number concentration of the particles. Freshly-formed particles are not large enough to impact neither health nor climate and they are most susceptible to removal by collisions with larger pre-existing particles. Consequently, the knowledge of both the formation and the growth rate of particles are crucially important when assessing the health and climate effects of atmospheric new particle formation. The purpose of this thesis is to increase our knowledge of the dynamics of neutral and charged aerosol particles with a specific interest towards the particle growth rate and processes affecting the aerosol charging state. A new model, Ion-UHMA, which simulates the dynamics of neutral and charged particles, was developed for this purpose. Simple analytical formulae that can be used to estimate the growth rate due to various processes were derived and used to study the effects of charged particles on the growth rate. It was found that the growth rate of a freshly-formed particle population due to condensation and coagulation could be significantly increased when a considerable fraction of the particles are charged. Finally, recent data-analysis methods that have been applied to the aerosol charging states obtained from the measurements were modified for a charge asymmetric framework. The methods were then tested on data obtained from aerosol dynamics simulations. The methods were found to be able to provide reasonable estimates on the growth rate and proportion of particles formed via ion-induced nucleation, provided that the growth rate is high enough and that the charged particles do not grow much more rapidly than the neutral ones. A simple procedure for estimating whether the methods are suitable for analysing data obtained in specific conditions was provided. In this thesis, the dynamics of neutral and charged aerosol particles were studied in

  7. Reduction of surface charges during coalescence of elastomer particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauer, Cornelius; Wu, Hua; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2010-07-15

    Reaction-limited aggregation of soft elastomer particles has been studied with specific attention to the fate of surface charges during coalescence. The employed system is an aqueous dispersion of fluoroelastomer particles, which are known to coalesce completely at 70 degrees C. In contrast to diffusion-limited conditions, under reaction-limited conditions the stability of the system is expected to change during aggregation because of surface reduction and charge accumulation resulting from coalescence. This allows investigating the mechanism of charge relocation during cluster coalescence. For particles stabilized by ionic surfactants, it has been found that the charges are mobile (i.e., they redistribute between aqueous solution and particle surface according to their adsorption equilibrium) (Gauer, C.; Jia, Z.; Wu, H.; Morbidelli, M. Langmuir 2009, 25, 9703). In this work, we consider the case of fixed charges, as those given by charged polymer end groups covalently bound to the particle surface. We demonstrate that a loss of fixed surface charges occurs during the coalescence and strongly affects the time evolution and the shape of the resulting cluster mass distribution.

  8. Quantum and classical dissipation of charged particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibarra-Sierra, V.G. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana at Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 México D.F. (Mexico); Anzaldo-Meneses, A.; Cardoso, J.L.; Hernández-Saldaña, H. [Área de Física Teórica y Materia Condensada, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana at Azcapotzalco, Av. San Pablo 180, Col. Reynosa-Tamaulipas, Azcapotzalco, 02200 México D.F. (Mexico); Kunold, A., E-mail: akb@correo.azc.uam.mx [Área de Física Teórica y Materia Condensada, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana at Azcapotzalco, Av. San Pablo 180, Col. Reynosa-Tamaulipas, Azcapotzalco, 02200 México D.F. (Mexico); Roa-Neri, J.A.E. [Área de Física Teórica y Materia Condensada, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana at Azcapotzalco, Av. San Pablo 180, Col. Reynosa-Tamaulipas, Azcapotzalco, 02200 México D.F. (Mexico)

    2013-08-15

    A Hamiltonian approach is presented to study the two dimensional motion of damped electric charges in time dependent electromagnetic fields. The classical and the corresponding quantum mechanical problems are solved for particular cases using canonical transformations applied to Hamiltonians for a particle with variable mass. Green’s function is constructed and, from it, the motion of a Gaussian wave packet is studied in detail. -- Highlights: •Hamiltonian of a damped charged particle in time dependent electromagnetic fields. •Exact Green’s function of a charged particle in time dependent electromagnetic fields. •Time evolution of a Gaussian wave packet of a damped charged particle. •Classical and quantum dynamics of a damped electric charge.

  9. Charged particles constrained to a curved surface

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We study the motion of charged particles constrained to arbitrary two-dimensional curved surfaces but interacting in three-dimensional space via the Coulomb potential. To speed-up the interaction calculations, we use the parallel compute capability of the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) of todays graphics boards. The particles and the curved surfaces are shown using the Open Graphics Library (OpenGL). The paper is intended to give graduate students, who have basic experiences with electrostatics and differential geometry, a deeper understanding in charged particle interactions and a short introduction how to handle a many particle system using parallel computing on a single home computer

  10. Further Problems with Integral Spin Charged Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Comay E.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The structure of the Lagrangian density of quantum theories of electrically charged particles is analyzed. It is pointed out that a well known and self-consistent expression exists for the electromagnetic interactions of a spin-1/2 Dirac particle. On the other hand, using the Noether theorem, it is shown that no such expression exists for the spin-0 Klein-Gordon charged particle as well as for the W spin-1 particle. It is also explained why effective expressions used in practical analysis of collider data cannot be a part of a self-consistent theory. The results cast doubt on the validity of the electroweak theory.

  11. Charged particle therapy: the physics of interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomax, Antony J

    2009-01-01

    Particle therapy has a long and distinguished history with more than 50,000 patients having been treated, mainly with high-energy proton therapy. Particularly, for proton therapy, there is an increasing interest in exploiting the physical characteristics of charged particles for further improving the potential of radiation therapy. In this article, we review the most important interactions of charged particles with matter and describe the basic physical principles that underlie why particle beams behave the way they do and why such a behavior could bring many benefits in radiation therapy.

  12. Light charged particle and neutron velocity spectra in coincidence with projectile fragments in the reaction sup 4 sup 0 Ar(44 A MeV)+ sup 2 sup 7 Al

    CERN Document Server

    Lanzanò, G; Geraci, M; Pagano, A; Aiello, S; Cunsolo, A; Fonte, R; Foti, A; Sperduto, M L; Volant, C; Charvet, J L; Dayras, R; Legrain, R

    2001-01-01

    We present a three source analysis of velocity spectra of light charged particles (LCP) and neutrons emitted in the reaction sup 4 sup 0 Ar+ sup 2 sup 7 Al at 44 A MeV. The light particle (LP) velocity spectra are studied as a function of the detection angle (1.5 deg. charge of the forward detected projectile-like fragment (PLF). The temperature parameter, the velocity and the intensity of each source are extracted as a function of the PLF charge. While the temperature parameters for PLF and target-like fragments (TLF) are very similar and show a dependence on the PLF charge, the temperature parameter for the intermediate source is approximately 15 MeV, independent of the PLF charge. Comparison with temperature values extracted from double isotopic ratios, shows an agreement only between the temperature values extracted from formula involving sup 3 He, sup 4 He, d, t ratios and the PLF proton temperature parameter. The characteristics of the PLF sources are derived. Present ...

  13. New Charged Particles from Higgs Couplings

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, Andrew G

    2012-01-01

    The recently reported observation of a new particle with mass about 125 GeV and couplings generally resembling those of the Standard Model Higgs boson provides a potential probe of the physics of electroweak symmetry breaking. Although the current data only provides hints, we suggest a particular combination of Higgs couplings as an assay for new charged particles connected with electroweak symmetry breaking, and construct a simple model with charge 5/3 quarks as a demonstration of its use.

  14. Infinite Blueshift of Charged Null Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Mann, R. B.; Sajko, W. N.

    1994-01-01

    We demonstrate that charged null particles can be infinitely blue\\-shifted in a Kerr-Newman spacetime. The surface of infinite blueshift can be outside of the ergosphere in a Kerr-Newman spacetime, and outside of the outer event horizon for a Reissner-Nordstrom spacetime. Implications for extensions of the standard model which incorporate charged neutrinos are discussed.

  15. Charged particle sub-barrier transfer reactions for {sup 16}O + {sup A}Sm and their influence on the fusion cross section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, P.R.S.; Maciel, A.M.M.; Cabezas, R. [and others

    1995-10-01

    Transfer cross section angular distribution data for the stripping of two protons and one alpha particle are studied for the {sup 16}O + {sup A}Sm systems (A = 144, 148, 150, 152 and 154), at energies slightly lower than the Coulomb barriers and angles up to 0 = 170{degrees}. From a semiclassical formalism, transfer and elastic scattering data, the transfer form factors is derived. For only one of the ten channels studied there are signatures for the interpretation that the transfer reaction mechanism at backward angles, corresponding to small distances, may behave as a multi-step process leading to fusion. Coupled channel calculations including transfer channels are performed for the study of the sub-barrier fusion of these systems. The influence of short distance transfer reactions on the fusion is discussed. For these and other systems, the conclusions from this approach are found t to long range fusion absorptive potentials.

  16. Diffusiophoretic mobility of charge-regulating porous particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei C; Keh, Huan J

    2016-08-01

    The diffusiophoresis of a charge-regulating porous sphere, such as polyelectrolyte coil, with an arbitrary thickness of the electric double layer in an electrolyte solution prescribed with a concentration gradient is analytically studied for the first time. The ionogenic functional groups and hydrodynamic frictional segments distribute uniformly within the permeable particle, and a charge regulation model for the association and dissociation reactions of the functional groups relates the fixed charge density to the local electric potential. The electrokinetic equations governing the electric potential, ionic electrochemical potential, and fluid velocity distributions are solved as power-series expansions in the basic fixed charge density. An explicit formula for the diffusiophoretic mobility of the particle, which vanishes at the isoelectric point, is derived from a force balance. The effects of charge regulation on the diffusiophoretic mobility, which depend on various particle and electrolyte characteristics such as the reaction equilibrium constants of the ionogenic functional groups, are significant and interesting. The variation in the bulk concentration of the charge-determining ions can produce more than one reversal in the direction of the diffusiophoretic velocity. The obtained results differ conspicuously from those of impermeable particles and provide valuable information for the interpretation of experimental data.

  17. Equations of motion for charged particles in strong laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    Ruhl, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Starting from the Dirac equation coupled to a classical radiation field a set of equations of motion for charged quasi-particles in the classical limit for slowly varying radiation and matter fields is derived. The radiation reaction term derived in the paper is the Abraham-Lorentz-Dirac term.

  18. Electrostatic wire for stabilizing a charged particle beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prono, Daniel S.; Caporaso, George J.; Briggs, Richard J.

    1985-01-01

    In combination with a charged particle beam generator and accelerator, apparatus and method are provided for stabilizing a beam of electrically charged particles. A guiding means, disposed within the particle beam, has an electric charge induced upon it by the charged particle beam. Because the sign of the electric charge on the guiding means and the sign of the particle beam are opposite, the particles are attracted toward and cluster around the guiding means to thereby stabilize the particle beam as it travels.

  19. Black hole horizons and quantum charged particles

    CERN Document Server

    Jaramillo, José Luis

    2014-01-01

    We point out a structural similarity between the characterization of black hole apparent horizons as stable marginally outer trapped surfaces (MOTS) and the quantum description of a non-relativistic charged particle moving in given magnetic and electric fields on a closed surface. Specifically, the spectral problem of the MOTS-stability operator corresponds to a stationary quantum particle with a formal fine-structure constant $\\alpha$ of negative sign. We discuss how such analogy enriches both problems, illustrating this with the insights into the MOTS-spectral problem gained from the analysis of the spectrum of the quantum charged particle Hamiltonian.

  20. First Electrooptical Detection of Charged Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Lazarus, D M; Kowalski, L A; Kraus, D E; Larsen, R; Magurno, B; Nikas, D; Ozben, C; Semertzidis, Y K; Srinivasan-Rao, T; Tsang, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    We have made the first observation of a charged particle beam by means of its electro-optical effect on the polarization of laser light in a birefringent crystal. The modulation of the laser light during the passage of a pulsed electron beam was observed using a fast photodiode and a digital oscilloscope. The fastest rise time measured in a single shot, 120 ps, was limited by the bandwidth of the oscilloscope and the associated electronics. This technology holds promise for detectors of greatly improved spatial and temporal resolution for single relativistic charged particles as well as particle beams.

  1. Electro-optical detection of charged particles

    CERN Document Server

    Semertzidis, Y K; Kowalski, L A; Kraus, D E; Larsen, R; Lazarus, D M; Magurno, B; Nikas, D; Ozben, C; Srinivasan-Rao, T; Tsang, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    We have made the first observation of a charged particle beam by means of its electro-optical effect on the polarization of laser light in a LiNbO sub 3 crystal. The modulation of the laser light during the passage of a pulsed electron beam was observed using a fast photodiode and a digital oscilloscope. The fastest rise time measured, 120 ps, was obtained in the single shot mode and was limited by the bandwidth of the oscilloscope and the associated electronics. This technology holds good for detectors of greatly improved spatial and temporal resolution for single relativistic charged particles as well as particle beams.

  2. METHODOLOGICAL NOTES: Radiation damping forces and radiation from charged particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepikov, N. P.

    1985-06-01

    A review of the literature on the radiation reaction force on a charged particle shows that the expression given for this force obtained by Lorentz, Abraham, and Dirac is in physically reasonable agreement with the radiation of energy, momentum, and angular momentum, and is successfully used in investigating the motion of particles in a field. A selection of physical solutions by the methods presented herein guarantees that the conservation laws are satisfied. In the first approximation, which is the only one utilized in the majority of physical situations, radiation damping does not depend on assumptions concerning the structure of the charge of the particle. A theory is presented of the losses of energy, momentum and angular momentum by a system of charged particles in the course of their moving together taking into account the external field, the radiation damping forces, and the retarded Lienard-Wiechert forces. Formulas are given for the spectral and angular distribution of the radiation from a system of particles. The concept of a center of a system of events with relativistic particles is utilized in constructing a system of equations for finding the angular momenta of the electromagnetic waves radiated by particles of the system. The angular distribution and the total intensity of the radiation from a system of particles at an arbitrary instant of time is obtained. Using the example of the joint synchrotron radiation from two particles the consistency of all three approaches to the radiation from a system of particles is demonstrated.

  3. Search milli-charged particles at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langeveld, W.G.J. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Particles with electric charge q {triple_bond} Qe {le} 10{sup -3} e and masses in the range 1-1000 MeV/c{sup 2} are not excluded by present experiments or by astrophysical or cosmological arguments. A beam dump experiment uniquely suited to the detection of such {open_quotes}milli-charged{close_quotes} particles has been carried out at SLAC, utilizing the short-duration pulses of the SLC electron beam to establish a tight coincidence window for the signal. The detector, a large scintillation counter sensitive to very small energy depositions, provided much greater sensitivity than previous searches. Analysis of the data leads to the exclusion of a substantial portion of the charge-mass plane. In this report, a preliminary mass-dependent upper limit is presented for the charge of milli-charged particles, ranging from Q = 1.7 x 10{sup -5} at milli-charged particle mass 0.1 MeV/c{sup 2} to Q = 9.5 x 10{sup -4} at 100 MeV/c{sup 2}.

  4. Radiation damping forces and radiation from charged particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepikov, N. P.

    1985-06-01

    In the present evaluation of reported results on the radiation reaction force to which a charged particle is subject, the expression obtained for this force by Lorentz (1909), Abraham (1904), and Dirac (1938) is noted to be in physically reasonable agreement with the radiation of energy, momentum and angular momentum; it has, moreover, been successfully used in investigations of the motion of particles in a field. A theory is presented for the losses of energy, momentum, and angular momentum by a system of charged particles as they move together, taking the external field, the radiation damping forces, and the retarded Lienard-Wiechert forces into account. Formulas are given for the spectral and angular distribution of the radiation from a system of particles, and a system of equations is constructed for finding the angular momenta of EM waves radiated by particles of the system.

  5. Charged particle detection in organic semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Beckerle, P

    2000-01-01

    Polyacetylene is an organic semiconductor in which charges can be set free by a traversing charged particle, transported by an electric field to read-out electrodes and, subsequently, amplified and recorded in a way similar to what happens in a silicon-drift detector. In an experimental investigation of the features of this charge transport in thin foils we find drift velocities of the order of 40 cm/s. Stretching of the foils by a factor of three to four increases the drift velocity by a factor of ten and introduces a strong directionality of the charge transport. The detection efficiency of 5 MeV alpha particles in a few micron thin stretched foil is around 70%.

  6. Radiation from moving charged particles with spin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luccio, A.

    1992-10-05

    The theory of radiation emitted by a charged particle with spin in relativistic motion in an external magnetic field is reviewed. Approximate expressions suitable numerical computation, in far and near field, are derived. In particular, the case of the passage of a particle accelerator beam through an undulator is considered. It is shown that observation of the spectrum of the emitted radiation, in its two states of polarization, can be used not only for beam diagnostics, but also to measure the spin state of the accelerated particles. Undulator radiation is compared with Compton scattering of laser light by the particle beam. Examples for high energy electron and proton colliders are presented.

  7. Computational Approach to Electron Charge Transfer Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jónsson, Elvar Örn

    -molecular mechanics scheme, and tools to analyse statistical data and generate relative free energies and free energy surfaces. The methodology is applied to several charge transfer species and reactions in chemical environments - chemical in the sense that solvent, counter ions and substrate surfaces are taken...... in to account - which directly influence the reactants and resulting reaction through both physical and chemical interactions. All methods are though general and can be applied to different types of chemistry. First, the basis of the various theoretical tools is presented and applied to several test systems...... and asymmetric charge transfer reactions between several first-row transition metals in water. The results are compared to experiments and rationalised with classical analytic expressions. Shortcomings of the methods are accounted for with clear steps towards improved accuracy. Later the analysis is extended...

  8. The charged particle accelerators subsystems modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averyanov, G. P.; Kobylyatskiy, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    Presented web-based resource for information support the engineering, science and education in Electrophysics, containing web-based tools for simulation subsystems charged particle accelerators. Formulated the development motivation of Web-Environment for Virtual Electrophysical Laboratories. Analyzes the trends of designs the dynamic web-environments for supporting of scientific research and E-learning, within the framework of Open Education concept.

  9. Studying Charged Particle Optics: An Undergraduate Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovalle, V.; Otomar, D. R.; Pereira, J. M.; Ferreira, N.; Pinho, R. R.; Santos A. C. F.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes some computer-based activities to bring the study of charged particle optics to undergraduate students, to be performed as a part of a one-semester accelerator-based experimental course. The computational simulations were carried out using the commercially available SIMION program. The performance parameters, such as the focal…

  10. Free charged particle behavior in intense laser fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fradkin, D. M.

    1984-03-01

    Theoretical studies were performed examining the effect of intense laser fields, together with auxiliary electromagnetic field configuration, on the behavior of otherwise free charged particles. The Lorentz-Dirac classical equation was employed to determine the effect of radiation reaction on the transfer of asymptotic energy momentum to a particle by a single intense plane wave pulse. The added effect due to a uniform magnetic field along the pulse propagation direction was determined. Single particle Dirac theory was employed to analyze particle polarization direction changes in a quantum-mechanical model. The general nature of the Lorentz transformation as a active transformation connecting initial and final states was determined, in which a single state characterization parameter was left unspecified. Analytic and computer studies were made of the effect of two simultaneous laser pulses, propagating in opposite directions on particle dynamics.

  11. Formation of Charged Particle Tracks in Solids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mukhtar A. Rana

    2006-01-01

    A criterion for formation of etchabJe tracks in solids is suggested using the well-known concepts of ionization and thermal spikes, diffusion process with useful and justified assumptions, and present or published experimental and theoretical investigations on the same subject. The suggested criterion is useful for a wide spectrum of researchers including development and applications of track recording materials, ions implantation, sputtering and other areas, which include interactions of charged particles with solids.

  12. Studying charged particle optics: an undergraduate course

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovalle, V [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Gal. Milton Tavares de Souza s/n0. Gragoata, Niteroi, 24210-346 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Otomar, D R [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Gal. Milton Tavares de Souza s/n0. Gragoata, Niteroi, 24210-346 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Pereira, J M [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68528, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Ferreira, N [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Gal. Milton Tavares de Souza s/n0. Gragoata, Niteroi, 24210-346 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Pinho, R R [Departamento de Fisica-ICE, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Campus Universitario, 36036-900, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Santos, A C F [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68528, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2008-03-12

    This paper describes some computer-based activities to bring the study of charged particle optics to undergraduate students, to be performed as a part of a one-semester accelerator-based experimental course. The computational simulations were carried out using the commercially available SIMION program. The performance parameters, such as the focal length and P-Q curves are obtained. The three-electrode einzel lens is exemplified here as a study case.

  13. Metastable states of plasma particles close to a charged surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shavlov, A. V., E-mail: shavlov@ikz.ru [The Institute of the Earth Cryosphere, RAS Siberian branch, 625000, P.O. 1230, Tyumen (Russian Federation); Tyumen State Oil and Gas University, 38, Volodarskogo St., 625000, Tyumen (Russian Federation); Dzhumandzhi, V. A. [The Institute of the Earth Cryosphere, RAS Siberian branch, 625000, P.O. 1230, Tyumen (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    The free energy of the plasma particles and the charged surface that form an electroneutral system is calculated on the basis of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. It is shown that, owing to correlation of light plasma particles near the charged surface and close to heavy particles of high charge, there can be metastable states in plasma. The corresponding phase charts of metastable states of the separate components of plasma, and plasma as a whole, are constructed. These charts depend on temperature, the charge magnitude, the size of the particles, and the share of the charge of the light carriers out of the total charge of the plasma particles.

  14. A chemical analyzer for charged ultrafine particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Gonser

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available New particle formation is a frequent phenomenon in the atmosphere and of major significance for the earth's climate and human health. To date the mechanisms leading to the nucleation of particles as well as to aerosol growth are not completely understood. A lack of appropriate measurement equipment for online analysis of the chemical composition of freshly nucleated particles is one major limitation. We have developed a Chemical Analyzer for Charged Ultrafine Particles (CAChUP capable of analyzing particles with diameters below 30 nm. A bulk of size separated particles is collected electrostatically on a metal filament, resistively desorbed and consequently analyzed for its molecular composition in a time of flight mass spectrometer. We report of technical details as well as characterization experiments performed with the CAChUP. Our instrument was tested in the laboratory for its detection performance as well as for its collection and desorption capabilities. The manual application of known masses of camphene (C10H16 to the desorption filament resulted in a detection limit between 0.5 and 5 ng, and showed a linear response of the mass spectrometer. Flow tube experiments of 25 nm diameter secondary organic aerosol from ozonolysis of alpha-pinene also showed a linear relation between collection time and the mass spectrometer's signal intensity. The resulting mass spectra from the collection experiments are in good agreement with published work on particles generated by the ozonolysis of alpha-pinene. A sensitivity study shows that the current setup of CAChUP is ready for laboratory measurements and for the observation of new particle formation events in the field.

  15. A chemical analyzer for charged ultrafine particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Gonser

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available New particle formation is a frequent phenomenon in the atmosphere and of major significance for the Earth's climate and human health. To date the mechanisms leading to the nucleation of particles as well as to aerosol growth are not completely understood. A lack of appropriate measurement equipment for online analysis of the chemical composition of freshly nucleated particles is one major limitation. We have developed a Chemical Analyzer for Charged Ultrafine Particles (CAChUP capable of analyzing particles with diameters below 30 nm. A bulk of size-separated particles is collected electrostatically on a metal filament, resistively desorbed and subsequently analyzed for its molecular composition in a time of flight mass spectrometer. We report on technical details as well as characterization experiments performed with the CAChUP. Our instrument was tested in the laboratory for its detection performance as well as for its collection and desorption capabilities. The manual application of defined masses of camphene (C10H16 to the desorption filament resulted in a detection limit between 0.5 and 5 ng, and showed a linear response of the mass spectrometer. Flow tube experiments of 25 nm diameter secondary organic aerosol from ozonolysis of alpha-pinene also showed a linear relation between collection time and the mass spectrometer's signal intensity. The resulting mass spectra from the collection experiments are in good agreement with published work on particles generated by the ozonolysis of alpha-pinene. A sensitivity study shows that the current setup of CAChUP is ready for laboratory measurements and for the observation of new particle formation events in the field.

  16. Alpha particles diffusion due to charge changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clauser, C. F., E-mail: cesar.clauser@ib.edu.ar; Farengo, R. [Centro Atómico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica and Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina)

    2015-12-15

    Alpha particles diffusion due to charge changes in a magnetized plasma is studied. Analytical calculations and numerical simulations are employed to show that this process can be very important in the pedestal-edge-SOL regions. This is the first study that presents clear evidence of the importance of atomic processes on the diffusion of alpha particles. A simple 1D model that includes inelastic collisions with plasma species, “cold” neutrals, and partially ionized species was employed. The code, which follows the exact particle orbits and includes the effect of inelastic collisions via a Monte Carlo type random process, runs on a graphic processor unit (GPU). The analytical and numerical results show excellent agreement when a uniform background (plasma and cold species) is assumed. The simulations also show that the gradients in the density of the plasma and cold species, which are large and opposite in the edge region, produce an inward flux of alpha particles. Calculations of the alpha particles flux reaching the walls or divertor plates should include these processes.

  17. Particle Catcher Using Induced-Charge Electroosmosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugioka, Hideyuki

    2017-01-01

    Finding an innovative separation mechanism is a central task in future microfluidic systems. We propose a size-controllable microfluidic catching device that has a face-to-face structure consisting of elastic beams that change the acceptable particle size dynamically by hydrodynamic force due to induced charge electroosmosis (ICEO) in water and numerically examine the novel separation mechanism consisting of catching and releasing motions with size selectivity. By an implicit strongly coupled simulation technique between a fluid and an elastic structure based on the boundary element method, along with the thin double-layer approximation, we find that the catching device works effectively at low applied voltages in a realistic microfluidic channel and shows a wide range dynamic size selectivity. Furthermore, by modeling the ICEO phenomena with elastic motion, we successfully explain the acceptable particle size of the catching device. We believe that our proposed device will contribute to realizing innovative microfluidic systems in the future.

  18. CVD diamond sensors for charged particle detection

    CERN Document Server

    Krammer, Manfred; Berdermann, E; Bergonzo, P; Bertuccio, G; Bogani, F; Borchi, E; Brambilla, A; Bruzzi, Mara; Colledani, C; Conway, J; D'Angelo, P; Dabrowski, W; Delpierre, P A; Dencuville, A; Dulinski, W; van Eijk, B; Fallou, A; Fizzotti, F; Foulon, F; Friedl, M; Gan, K K; Gheeraert, E; Hallewell, G D; Han, S; Hartjes, F G; Hrubec, Josef; Husson, D; Kagan, H; Kania, D R; Kaplon, J; Kass, R; Koeth, T W; Lo Giudice, A; Lü, R; MacLynne, L; Manfredotti, C; Meier, D; Mishina, M; Moroni, L; Oh, A; Pan, L S; Pernicka, Manfred; Peitz, A; Perera, L P; Pirollo, S; Procario, M; Riester, J L; Roe, S; Rousseau, L; Rudge, A; Russ, J; Sala, S; Sampietro, M; Schnetzer, S; Sciortino, S; Stelzer, H; Stone, R; Suter, B; Tapper, R J; Tesarek, R; Trischuk, W; Tromson, D; Vittone, E; Walsh, A M; Wedenig, R; Weilhammer, Peter; Wetstein, M; White, C; Zeuner, W; Zöller, M

    2001-01-01

    CVD diamond material was used to build position-sensitive detectors for single-charged particles to be employed in high-intensity physics experiments. To obtain position information, metal contacts shaped as strips or pixels are applied to the detector surface for one- or two- dimensional coordinate measurement. Strip detectors 2*4 cm/sup 2/ in size with a strip distance of 50 mu m were tested. Pixel detectors of various pixel sizes were bump bonded to electronics chips and investigated. A key issue for the use of these sensors in high intensity experiments is the radiation hardness. Several irradiation experiments were carried out with pions, protons and neutrons exceeding a fluence of 10/sup 15/ particles/cm/sup 2/. The paper presents an overview of the results obtained with strip and pixel detectors in high-energy test beams and summarises the irradiation studies. (8 refs).

  19. Resonance strengths in the {sup 17,18}O(p, α){sup 14,15}N reactions and background suppression underground. Commissioning of a new setup for charged-particle detection at LUNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruno, C.G.; Scott, D.A.; Aliotta, M.; Davinson, T.; Griffin, C.J. [University of Edinburgh, SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Formicola, A.; Best, A.; Junker, M. [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, INFN, Assergi (Italy); Anders, M.; Bemmerer, D.; Szuecs, T. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Dresden (Germany); Broggini, C.; Menegazzo, R. [INFN, Padova (Italy); Caciolli, A.; Depalo, R. [INFN, Padova (Italy); Universita di Padova, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Padova (Italy); Cavanna, F.; Corvisiero, P.; Prati, P. [INFN, Genova (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Genova, Genova (Italy); Di Leva, A.; Imbriani, G. [Universita di Napoli ' ' Federico II' ' , Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Napoli (Italy); Elekes, Z.; Fueloep, Zs.; Gyuerky, Gy.; Somorjai, E. [MTA Atomki, Institute of Nuclear Research, Debrecen (Hungary); Gervino, G. [Universita degli Studi di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica Sperimentale, Torino (Italy); Guglielmetti, A.; Trezzi, D. [Universita degli Studi di Milano (Italy); INFN, Milano (Italy); Gustavino, C. [INFN, Roma (Italy); Napolitani, E. [Universita di Padova, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Padova (Italy); Straniero, O. [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, INFN, Assergi (Italy); Osservatorio Astronomico di Collurania, Teramo (Italy); Strieder, F. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD (United States); Collaboration: LUNA Collaboration

    2015-08-15

    We report on measurements of resonance strengths and energies for the E{sub p} = 151 and 193 keV resonances in the {sup 18}O(p, α){sup 15}N and {sup 17}O(p, α){sup 14}N reactions, respectively, obtained during commissioning of a new setup for alpha-particle detection studies at the LUNA underground laboratory. Our values, ωγ(151) = 164.2 ± 0.9{sub stat-11.7}{sup +12.1}{sub syst} meV and ωγ (193) = 1.68 ± 0.03{sub stat} ± 0.12{sub syst} meV, are in excellent agreement with those reported in the literature. New values of resonance energies are E{sub p} = 151.2 ± 0.3 keV and E{sub p} = 194.8 ± 0.3 keV, respectively, this latter with the highest precision to date. Comparative background measurements in silicon detectors overground and underground were also carried out, yielding up to a factor of 15 in background suppression at LUNA at energies around 200 keV. This clearly demonstrates the usefulness of underground measurements in charged-particles experiments, especially at low detection energies. (orig.)

  20. Charged Particle Tracking with the Timepix ASIC

    CERN Document Server

    Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Collins, P; Crossley, M; Dumps, R; Gersabeck, M; Gligorov, Vladimir V; Llopart, X; Nicol, M; Poikela, T; Cabruja, Enric; Fleta, C; Lozano, M; Pellegrini, G; Bates, R; Eklund, L; Hynds, D; Ferre Llin, L; Maneuski, D; Parkes, C; Plackett, R; Rodrigues, E; Stewart, G; Akiba, K; van Beuzekom, M; Heijne, V; Heijne, E H M; Gordon, H; John, M; Gandelman, M; Esperante, D; Gallas, A; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Bayer, F; Michel, T; Needham, M; Artuso, M; Badman, R; Borgia, A; Garofoli, J; Wang, J; Xing, Z; Buytaert, Jan; Leflat, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    A prototype particle tracking telescope has been constructed using Timepix and Medipix ASIC hybrid pixel assemblies as the six sensing planes. Each telescope plane consisted of one 1.4 cm2 assembly, providing a 256x256 array of 55 micron square pixels. The telescope achieved a pointing resolution of 2.3 micron at the position of the device under test. During a beam test in 2009 the telescope was used to evaluate in detail the performance of two Timepix hybrid pixel assemblies; a standard planar 300 micron thick sensor, and 285 micron thick double sided 3D sensor. This paper describes a detailed charge calibration study of the pixel devices, which allows the true charge to be extracted, and reports on measurements of the charge collection characteristics and Landau distributions. The planar sensor achieved a best resolution of 4.0 micron for angled tracks, and resolutions of between 4.4 and 11 micron for perpendicular tracks, depending on the applied bias voltage. The double sided 3D sensor, which has signific...

  1. A search for free fractional electric charge elementary particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halyo, Valerie

    2001-07-01

    A direct search was carried out in bulk matter for free fractional electric charge elementary particles using the largest mass single sample ever studied-about 17.4 mg of silicone oil. The search used an improved and highly automated Millikan oil drop technique. No evidence for fractional charge particles was found. The concentration of particles with fractional charge more than 0.16 e (e being the magnitude of the electron charge) from the nearest integer charge is less than 4.71 × 10-22 particles per nucleon with 95% confidence.

  2. Search for free fractional electric charge elementary particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halyo, V.

    1999-10-29

    The authors have carried out a direct search in bulk matter for free fractional electric charge elementary particles using the largest mass single sample ever studied--about 17.4 mg of silicone oil. The search used an improved and highly automated Millikan oil drop technique. No evidence for fractional charge particles was found. The concentration of particles with fractional charge more than 0.16 e (e being the magnitude of the electron charge) from the nearest integer charge is less than 4.71 x 10{sup {minus}22} particles per nucleon with 95% confidence.

  3. A Search for Free Fractional Electric Charge Elementary Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halyo, Valerie

    2000-12-04

    A direct search was carried out in bulk matter for free fractional electric charge elementary particles using the largest mass single sample ever studied| about 17.4 mg of silicone oil. The search used an improved and highly automated Millikan oil drop technique. No evidence for fractional charge particles was found. The concentration of particles with fractional charge more than 0.16 e (e being the magnitude of the electron charge) from the nearest integer charge is less than 4.71 x 10{sup -22} particles per nucleon with 95% confidence.

  4. Search for Free Fractional Electric Charge Elementary Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Halyo, V; Lee, E R; Lee, I T; Loomba, D; Perl, Martin Lewis

    2000-01-01

    We have carried out a direct search in bulk matter for free fractional electric charge elementary particles using the largest mass single sample ever studied - about 17.4 mg of silicone oil. The search used an improved and highly automated Millikan oil drop technique. No evidence for fractional charge particles was found. The concentration of particles with fractional charge more than 0.16e (e being the magnitude of the electron charge) from the nearest integer charge is less than $4.71\\times10^{-22}$ particles per nucleon with 95% confidence.

  5. A Search for Free Fractional Electric Charge Elementary Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halyo, Valerie

    2000-12-04

    A direct search was carried out in bulk matter for free fractional electric charge elementary particles using the largest mass single sample ever studied--about 17.4 mg of silicone oil. The search used an improved and highly automated Millikan oil drop technique. No evidence for fractional charge particles was found. The concentration of particles with fractional charge more than 0.16 e (e being the magnitude of the electron charge) from the nearest integer charge is less than 4.71 x 10{sup -22} particles per nucleon with 95% confidence.

  6. Microsparks Generated by Charged Particles in Dielectric Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Robert

    2012-10-01

    The electrodynamics of charged particles in dielectric liquids have been described by several authors [1,2]. As a charged particle approaches an electrode of opposite charge the local electric field eventually exceeds the dielectric strength of the liquid and a microspark is generated. These plasmas can be very small, about Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 47, 8020.

  7. Electrophysical Systems Based On Charged Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Vorogushin, M F

    2004-01-01

    The advancement of the charged particle accelerator engineering affects appreciably the modern tendencies of the scientific and technological progress in the world. In a number of advanced countries, this trend is one of the most dynamically progressing in the field of applied science and high-technology production. Such internationally known firms as VARIAN, SIEMENS, PHILIPS, ELECTA, IBA, HITACHI, etc., with an annual budget of milliards of dollars and growth rate of tens of percent may serve as an example. Although nowadays the projects of new large-scale accelerators for physical research are not implemented so quickly and frequently as desired, accelerating facilities are finding ever-widening application in various fields of human activities. The contribution made by Russian scientists into high-energy beams physics is generally known. High scientific and technical potential in this field, qualified personnel with a high creative potential, modern production and test facilities and state-of-the-art techn...

  8. The Timepix telescope for charged particle tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynds, Daniel

    2013-12-01

    The Timepix telescope has been developed as a general purpose tool for studying the performance of position sensitive charged particle detectors. Initiated as part of the infrastructure for the development of a new vertex detector for the LHCb experiment, the system was extended under the FP7 project AIDA to allow its use as an external facility by several groups within both the high energy and medical physics communities. Based at the CERN SPS, high track rates (up to 18 kHz), precise spatial resolution at the device under test (down to 1.6 μm), and a flexible integration method have all been demonstrated. The telescope is constructed using the Timepix ASIC, a hybrid pixel chip with an active area of 14×14 mm2.

  9. Computation of charged current neutrino-Te reactions cross sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsakstara, V.; Kosmas, T. S.; Sinatkas, J.

    2016-08-01

    Neutrino-nucleus reactions, involving both neutral current (NC) and charged current (CC) interactions are important probes in modern neutrino physics searches. In the present work, we study the concrete CC reactions 130 Te(vℓ,ℓ-)130 I and 130 Te(ṽℓ,ℓ+)130Sb which are of current experimental interest for the CUORE and COBRA experiments operating at Gran Sasso underground laboratory in Italy. The nuclear wave functions for the required initial and final nuclear states are derived by employing the proton-neutron (p-n) quasi-particle random phase approximation (QRPA) which has been previously tested in our neutral-current v-nucleus studies for Te isotopes.

  10. Bibliography of integral charged particle nuclear data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrows, T.W.; Burt, J.S.

    1977-03-01

    This bibliography is divided into three main sections covering experimental, theoretical, and review references. The review section also includes compilation and evaluation references. Each section contains two subsections. The main subsection contains all references satisfying the criteria noted above and the second subsection is devoted to isotope production. The main subsections are ordered by increasing Z and A of the incident particle, then by increasing Z and A of the target nucleus. Within this order, the entries are ordered by residual nucleus and quantity (e.g., sigma(E)). Finally, the entries are ordered by outgoing particles or processes. All entries which have the same target, reaction, and quantity are grouped under a common heading with the most recent reference first. As noted above the second subsection is devoted to isotope production and is limited in the information it carries. Only those references which contain data on a definite residual nucleus or group of nuclei (e.g., fission fragments) are included in these subsections. Entries within these second subsections are ordered by increasing Z and A of the isotope produced and then by quantity. All references containing data on the same isotope production and quantity are grouped together. All lines within a group are ordered by increasing Z and A of the target and then of the incident particle. The final ordering is by increasing minimum energy.

  11. Searches for Fractionally Charged Particles: What Should Be Done Next?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perl, Martin L.; /SLAC

    2009-01-15

    Since the initial measurements of the electron charge a century ago, experimenters have faced the persistent question as to whether elementary particles exist that have charges that are fractional multiples of the electron charge. I concisely review the results of the last 50 years of searching for fractional charge particles with no confirmed positive results. I discuss the question of whether more searching is worthwhile?

  12. Controlling chemical reactions of a single particle

    CERN Document Server

    Ratschbacher, Lothar; Sias, Carlo; Köhl, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The control of chemical reactions is a recurring theme in physics and chemistry. Traditionally, chemical reactions have been investigated by tuning thermodynamic parameters, such as temperature or pressure. More recently, physical methods such as laser or magnetic field control have emerged to provide completely new experimental possibilities, in particular in the realm of cold collisions. The control of reaction pathways is also a critical component to implement molecular quantum information processing. For these undertakings, single particles provide a clean and well-controlled experimental system. Here, we report on the experimental tuning of the exchange reaction rates of a single trapped ion with ultracold neutral atoms by exerting control over both their quantum states. We observe the influence of the hyperfine interaction on chemical reaction rates and branching ratios, and monitor the kinematics of the reaction products. These investigations advance chemistry with single trapped particles towards achi...

  13. Search for Free Fractional Electric Charge Elementary Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Halyo, V.; Kim, P.; Lee, E. R.; Lee, I T; Loomba, D.; Perl, M. L.

    1999-01-01

    We have carried out a direct search in bulk matter for free fractional electric charge elementary particles using the largest mass single sample ever studied - about 17.4 mg of silicone oil. The search used an improved and highly automated Millikan oil drop technique. No evidence for fractional charge particles was found. The concentration of particles with fractional charge more than 0.16e (e being the magnitude of the electron charge) from the nearest integer charge is less than $4.71\\times...

  14. Effects of charged particles on human tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn D Held

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of charged particle therapy in cancer treatment is growing rapidly, in large part because the exquisite dose localization of charged particles allows for higher radiation doses to be given to tumor tissue while normal tissues are exposed to lower doses and decreased volumes of normal tissues are irradiated. In addition, charged particles heavier than protons have substantial potential clinical advantages because of their additional biological effects including greater cell killing effectiveness, decreased radiation resistance of hypoxic cells in tumors and reduced cell cycle dependence of radiation response. These biological advantages depend on many factors such as endpoint, cell or tissue type, dose, dose rate or fractionation, charged particle type and energy, and oxygen concentration. This review summarizes the unique biological advantages of charged particle therapy and highlights recent research and areas of particular research needs, such as quantification of Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE for various tumor types and radiation qualities, role of genetic background of tumor cells in determining response to charged particles, sensitivity of cancer stem-like cells to charged particles, role of charged particles in tumors with hypoxic fractions and importance of fractionation, including use of hypofractionation, with charged particles.

  15. Large bulk matter search for fractional charge particles

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, I

    2002-01-01

    We have carried out the largest search for stable particles with fractional electric charge, based on an oil drop method that incorporates a horizontal electric field and upward air flow. No evidence for such particles was found, giving a 95% C.L. upper limit of $1.15\\times 10^{-22}$ particles per nucleon on the abundance of fractional charge particles in silicone oil for $0.18 e \\le |Q_{residual}| \\le 0.82 e$.

  16. Charged particle production at the CERN ISR as a function of transverse momentum

    CERN Document Server

    Bertin, A; Capiluppi, P; D'Agostino-Bruno, M; Ellis, R J; Giacomelli, G; Poe, R T; Rossi, A M; Vannini, G

    1972-01-01

    Experimental results are presented on the production of charged particles in inclusive reactions at ISR energies. The data have been taken as function of transverse momentum p/sub t/ at the fixed x- values of 0.08, 0.16 and 0.32. The behaviour of the p/sub t/- distributions for the different particles is discussed. (9 refs).

  17. Charge Exchange and Chemical Reactions with Trapped Th$^{3+}$

    CERN Document Server

    Churchill, L R; Chapman, M S

    2010-01-01

    We have measured the reaction rates of trapped, buffer gas cooled Th$^{3+}$ and various gases and have analyzed the reaction products using trapped ion mass spectrometry techniques. Ion trap lifetimes are usually limited by reactions with background molecules, and the high electron affinity of multiply charged ions such as Th$^{3+}$ make them more prone to loss. Our results show that reactions of Th$^{3+}$ with carbon dioxide, methane, and oxygen all occur near the classical Langevin rate, while reaction rates with argon, hydrogen, and nitrogen are orders of magnitude lower. Reactions of Th$^{3+}$ with oxygen and methane proceed primarily via charge exchange, while simultaneous charge exchange and chemical reaction occurs between Th$^{3+}$ and carbon dioxide. Loss rates of Th$^{3+}$ in helium are consistent with reaction with impurities in the gas. Reaction rates of Th$^{3+}$ with nitrogen and argon depend on the internal electronic configuration of the Th$^{3+}$.

  18. Beyond Millikan: The Dynamics of Charging Events on Individual Colloidal Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beunis, Filip; Strubbe, Filip; Neyts, Kristiaan; Petrov, Dmitri

    2012-01-01

    By measuring the stable charge on oil drops in air, Millikan demonstrated the discrete nature of electric charge. We extend his approach to the charge on solid-liquid interfaces, and focus on the dynamics of the discrete fluctuations. Our measurements are accurate and fast enough to observe changes of one elementary charge. Experiments over thousands of seconds yield information about the fast dynamics of electrochemical reactions, relevant for physicochemical and biological systems. As an example, we study (dis)charging processes on colloidal particles in a nonpolar liquid.

  19. Interaction of free charged particles with a chirped electromagnetic pulse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khachatryan, A.G.; Goor, van F.A.; Boller, K.-J.

    2004-01-01

    We study the effect of chirp on electromagnetic (EM) pulse interaction with a charged particle. Both the one-dimensional (1D) and 3D cases are considered. It is found that, in contrast to the case of a nonchirped pulse, the charged particle energy can be changed after the interaction with a 1D EM ch

  20. Abnormal Kinetic Energy of Charged Dust Particles in Plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norman, G.; Stegailov, V.; Timofeev, A.

    2010-01-01

    A mechanism of the increase of the average kinetic energy of charged dust particles in gas discharge plasmas is suggested. Particle charge fluctuation is the reason for the appearance of forced resonance, which heals vertical oscillations. The energy transfer from vertical oscillations to the horizo

  1. Peculiarities of propagation of charged particles in solar corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, E. I.; Pisarenko, N. F.; Mikryukova, N. A.; Klimenko, V. V.; Timofeev, V. E.; Shafer, Y. G.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of boundaries of the large scale unipolar magnetic regions (UMR) on the Sun upon the charged particle propagation in the solar corona and interplanetary space is investigated. Increases of the charged particle fluxes from solar flares on November 4 and 20, 1978 detected by Venera-11 and Prognoz-1 and on December 7, 1982 by Venera-13 and "GMS-2" were analyzed.

  2. Boron concentration measurement in biological tissues by charged particle spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolussi, S; Altieri, S

    2013-11-01

    Measurement of boron concentration in biological tissues is a fundamental aspect of boron neutron capture therapy, because the outcome of the therapy depends on the distribution of boron at a cellular level, besides on its overall concentration. This work describes a measurement technique based on the spectroscopy of the charged particles emitted in the reaction (10)B(n,α)(7)Li induced by thermal neutrons, allowing for a quantitative determination of the boron concentration in the different components that may be simultaneously present in a tissue sample, such as healthy cells, tumor cells and necrotic cells. Thin sections of tissue containing (10)B are cut at low temperatures and irradiated under vacuum in a thermal neutron field. The charged particles arising from the sample during the irradiation are collected by a thin silicon detector, and their spectrum is used to determine boron concentration through relatively easy calculations. The advantages and disadvantages of this technique are here described, and validation of the method using tissue standards with known boron concentrations is presented.

  3. Dust particle charge distribution in a stratified glow discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukhinin, Gennady I [Institute of Thermophysics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Lavrentyev Ave., 1, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Fedoseev, Alexander V [Institute of Thermophysics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Lavrentyev Ave., 1, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Ramazanov, Tlekkabul S [Institute of Experimental and Theoretical Physics, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Tole Bi, 96a, Almaty 050012 (Kazakhstan); Dzhumagulova, Karlygash N [Institute of Experimental and Theoretical Physics, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Tole Bi, 96a, Almaty 050012 (Kazakhstan); Amangaliyeva, Rauan Zh [Institute of Experimental and Theoretical Physics, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Tole Bi, 96a, Almaty 050012 (Kazakhstan)

    2007-12-21

    The influence of a highly pronounced non-equilibrium characteristic of the electron energy distribution function in a stratified dc glow discharge on the process of dust particle charging in a complex plasma is taken into account for the first time. The calculated particle charge spatial distribution is essentially non-homogeneous and it can explain the vortex motion of particles at the periphery of a dusty cloud obtained in experiments.

  4. Hawking radiation of charged Dirac particles in Vaidya-Bonner space-time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱建阳; 张建华; 赵峥

    1995-01-01

    The dynamical properties of charged Dirac spinor particles in the Vaidya-Bonner space-time are investigated. The asymptotic solution to the radial part of the charged Dirac equation near the event horizon of the black hole is obtained. The Hawking temperature and the event horizon of the charged evaporating black hole, as well as the spectrum of the Hawking radiation of the Dirac particles, are exactly shown. Thereby, a new approach to the back-reaction of radiation from the non-stationary black holes is established.

  5. Search for charged-particle emission from deuterated palladium foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schilling, K.D.; Gippner, P.; Seidel, W.; Stary, F.; Wohlfarth, D. (Zentralinstitut fuer Kernforschung, Rossendorf bei Dresden (German Democratic Republic))

    1990-05-01

    Results are presented from the search for energetic charged particles possibly emitted from a deuterium loaded palladium electrode in an electrolysis cell. Within the sensitivity of our experimental set-up, we could not find events originating from 'cold nuclear fusion' processes. Based on this outcome, an upper limit for the non-observation of CNF of 2.0x10{sup -2}s{sup -1} emitted charged particles per cm{sup 3} (Pd) resp. 1.6x10{sup -24}s{sup -1} emitted charged particles per D pair has been deduced. (orig.).

  6. Study of Deformation Effects in the Charged Particle Emission from 46Ti

    CERN Document Server

    Brekiesz, M; Maj, A; Kmiecik, M; Beck, C; Bednarczyk, P; Grebosz, J; Haas, F; Meczynski, W; Rauch, V; Rousseau, M; Zafra, A S; Styczen, J; Thummerer, S; Zieblinski, M; Zuber, K

    2004-01-01

    The 46Ti compound nucleus, as populated by the fusion-evaporation reaction 27Al + 19F at the bombarding energy of 144 MeV, has been investigated by charged particle spectroscopy using the multidetector array ICARE at the VIVITRON tandem facility of the IReS (Strasbourg). The light charged particles have been measured in coincidence with evaporation residues. The CACARIZO code, a Monte Carlo implementation of the statistical-model code CASCADE, has been used to calculate the spectral shapes of evaporated alpha-particles which are compared with the experimental spectra. This comparison indicates the possible signature of large deformations of the compound nucleus.

  7. Search for Fractional-Charge Particles in Meteoritic Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Peter C.; Lee, Eric R.; Lee, Irwin T.; Perl, Martin L.; Halyo, Valerie; Loomba, Dinesh

    2007-10-01

    We have used an automated Millikan oil drop method to search for free fractional-charge particles in a sample containing in total 3.9 mg of pulverized Allende meteorite suspended in 259 mg of mineral oil. The average diameter of the drops was 26.5μm with the charge on about 42 500 000 drops being measured. This search was motivated by the speculation that isolatable, fractional-charge particles produced in the early Universe and present in our Solar System are more likely to be accumulated in asteroids than on Earth‘s surface. No evidence for fractional-charge particles was found. With 95% confidence, the concentration of particles with fractional-charge more than 0.25 e (e being the magnitude of the electron charge) from the nearest integer charge is less than 1.3×10-21 particles per nucleon in the meteoritic material and less than 1.9×10-23 particles per nucleon in the mineral oil.

  8. Energy Spectra of Light Charged Particles and Evaporation Residues in Heavy Ion Induced Reactions at Low Energy%低能重离子诱导反应中轻带电粒子和蒸发剩余物的能谱

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕绮雯; 卫华荣; Rahim Magda A; Fakhraddin S; 刘福虎

    2012-01-01

    Using a unified description on multiplicity distributions of final-state particles,the energy spectra of light charged particles and evaporation residues in heavy ion induced reactions at low energy are studied in the framework of a multisource ideal gas model.Each source in an excited composite contributes energy spectra of light charged particles and evaporation residues to be an exponential law.The calculated results are compared and found to be in agreement with the expe-rimental data of inclusive and exclusive energy distributions for light charged particles and evaporation residues measured in the 20Ne(158,170,180,and 200 MeV) + 12C reactions.%在多源理想气体模型的框架内,用一个关于末态粒子多重数分布的统一描述,研究了低能重离子诱导反应中轻带电粒子和蒸发剩余物的能谱。在同一个激发的复合核中,每个源对带电粒子和蒸发剩余物均贡献一个指数分布的能谱。计算结果与158,170,180和200MeV20Ne+12C反应中,轻带电粒子和蒸发剩余物能谱的实验结果符合。

  9. The influence of filler particles on space charge measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hole, Stephane [Laboratoire des Instruments et Systemes d' Ile de France, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie - 10, rue Vauquelin, 75005 Paris, France (France); Sylvestre, Alain [Laboratoire d' lectrostatique et des Materiaux Dielectriques, CNRS UMR5517 - 25, avenue des Martyrs, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Rowe, Stephen [Direction des Recherches Materiaux, Schneider Electric SA - 20, rue Henri Tarze, 38050 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2004-07-07

    The effects of filler particles on the signal measured using the pressure-wave-propagation method to determine the space charge distribution are analysed. A special test sample geometry is used to classify the influence of particles, and in particular, the role of piezoelectricity is discussed. Applications with Epoxy resin samples loaded either by silica or alumina particles are presented. Silica particles are shown to exhibit piezoelectricity which strongly modifies the measured signals.

  10. Charged particle propagation through nanostructures and associated radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N.K.ZHEVAGO; V.I.GLEBOV

    2004-01-01

    In this report, using computer simulations, we investigate the channeling of high-energy charged particles in nanotube ropes and fullerites and estimate the capability of bent nanocrystals to deflect a particle beam. We also discuss electromagnetic radiation arising both from the non-uniform motion of the particles in the electrostatic potential of aligned atoms and from the transient polarization of the medium caused by the particles.

  11. Radiation Reaction Force on a Particle

    OpenAIRE

    Fearn, H.; Bengtsson, J.

    2012-01-01

    The Abrahamn Lorentz radiation reaction force term, with da/dt, derived in text books is shown to be incomplete. We show that, with the addition of a term, the classical radiation reaction force can be generalized to the relativistic force expression. This addition is the Poynting Robertson term, seen mostly in astrophysics and usually missing from texts in electromagnetism. With this term added, it takes into account the rate of change of mass dm/dt of the particle and makes the generalizati...

  12. Charged particle interaction with a chirped electromagnetic pulse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khachatryan, A.G.; Boller, K.-J.; Goor, van F.A.

    2003-01-01

    It is found that a charged particle can get a net energy gain from the interaction with an electromagnetic chirped pulse. Theoretically, the energy gain increases with the pulse amplitude and with the relative frequency variation in the pulse.

  13. Charged particle beam scanning using deformed high gradient insulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu -Jiuan

    2015-10-06

    Devices and methods are provided to allow rapid deflection of a charged particle beam. The disclosed devices can, for example, be used as part of a hadron therapy system to allow scanning of a target area within a patient's body. The disclosed charged particle beam deflectors include a dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) with a hollow center and a dielectric wall that is substantially parallel to a z-axis that runs through the hollow center. The dielectric wall includes one or more deformed high gradient insulators (HGIs) that are configured to produce an electric field with an component in a direction perpendicular to the z-axis. A control component is also provided to establish the electric field component in the direction perpendicular to the z-axis and to control deflection of a charged particle beam in the direction perpendicular to the z-axis as the charged particle beam travels through the hollow center of the DWA.

  14. Radiobiology with heavy charged particles: a historical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skarsgard, L.D. [Dept. of Medical Biophysics, B.C. Cancer Research Centre and TRIUMF, Vancouver (Canada)

    1997-09-01

    The presentation will attempt to briefly review some of radiobiological data on the effects of heavy charged particles and to discuss the influence of those studies on the clinical application which followed. (orig./MG)

  15. Role of Solution Conductivity in Reaction Induced Charge Auto-Electrophoresis

    CERN Document Server

    Moran, Jeffrey L

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic bimetallic Janus particles swim by a bipolar electrochemical propulsion mechanism that results from electroosmotic fluid slip around the particle surface. The flow is driven by electrical body forces which are generated from a coupling of a reaction-induced electric field and net charge in the diffuse layer surrounding the particle. This paper presents simulations, scaling, and physical descriptions of the experimentally observed trend that the swimming speed decays rapidly with increasing solution conductivity. The simulations solve the full Poisson-Nernst-Planck-Stokes equations with multiple ionic species, a cylindrical particle in an infinite fluid, and nonlinear Butler-Volmer boundary conditions to represent the electrochemical surface reactions. The speed of bimetallic particles is reduced in high-conductivity solutions because of reductions in the induced electric field in the diffuse layer near the rod, the total reaction rate, and the magnitude of the rod zeta potential. The results in this...

  16. Proposal to Search for Magnetically Charged Particles with Magnetic Charge 1e

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, Michael K. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Fryberger, David [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-11-02

    A model for composite elementary Standard Model (SM) particles based upon magnetically bound vorton pairs, we briefly introduce here, predicts the existence of a complete family of magnetically charged particles, as well as their neutral isotopic partners (all counterparts to the SM elementary particles), in which the lowest mass (charged) particle would be an electrically neutral stable lepton, but which carries a magnetic charge equivalent to 1e. This new particle, which we call a magneticon (a counterpart to the electron) would be pair produced at all e+e- colliders at an Ecm above twice its mass. In addition, PP and PPbar colliders should also be able to produce these new particles through the Drell-Yan process. To our knowledge, no monopole search experiment has been sensitive to such a low-charged magnetic monopole above a particle mass of about 5 GeV/c2. Hence, we propose that a search for such a stable particle of magnetic charge 1e should be undertaken. We have taken the ATLAS detector at the LHC as an example in which this search might be done. To this end, we modeled the magnetic fields and muon trigger chambers of this detector. We show results from a simple Monte Carlo simulation program to indicate how these particles might look in the detector and describe how one might search for these new particles in the ATLAS data stream.

  17. Noncommutative magnetic moment of charged particles

    CERN Document Server

    Adorno, T C; Shabad, A E; Vassilevich, D V

    2011-01-01

    It has been argued, that in noncommutative field theories sizes of physical objects cannot be taken smaller than an elementary length related to noncommutativity parameters. By gauge-covariantly extending field equations of noncommutative U(1)_*-theory to the presence of external sources, we find electric and magnetic fields produces by an extended charge. We find that such a charge, apart from being an ordinary electric monopole, is also a magnetic dipole. By writing off the existing experimental clearance in the value of the lepton magnetic moments for the present effect, we get the bound on noncommutativity at the level of 10^4 TeV.

  18. An improved search for elementary particles with fractional electric charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, E.R.

    1996-08-01

    The SLAC Quark Search Group has demonstrated successful operation of a low cost, high mass throughput Millikan apparatus designed to search for fractionally charged particles. About six million silicone oil drops were measured with no evidence of fractional charges. A second experiment is under construction with 100 times greater throughput which will utilize optimized search fluids.

  19. Colloidal gelation of oppositely charged particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russel, E.; Sprakel, J.H.B.; Kodger, T.E.; Weitz, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Colloidal gelation has been extensively studied for the case of purely attractive systems, but little is understood about how colloidal gelation is affected by the presence of repulsive interactions. Here we demonstrate the gelation of a binary system of oppositely charged colloids, in which repulsi

  20. Light Charged Particle Emission and the Giant Dipole Resonance in Ce Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramegna, F.; Barlini, S.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Lanchais, A. L.; Wieland, O.; Bracco, A.; Moroni, A.; Casini, G.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Brambilla, S.; Brekiesz, M.; Bruno, M.; Camera, F.; Chiari, M.; Crespi, F.; Geraci, E.; Guiot, B.; Kmiecik, M.; Leoni, S.; Maj, A.; Mastinu, P. F.; Million, B.; Nannini, A.; Ordine, A.; Vannini, G.

    2005-04-01

    The 132Ce compound nucleus was formed in fusion reactions 64Ni + 68Zn and 16O + 116Sn at different excitation energies. High energy γ -rays have been measured in coincidence with Evaporation Residues (ER) in these reactions. At the same time Light Charged Particles (LCP) were measured with the same gate on ER for all the reactions in order to verify and compare the amount of pre-equilibrium emission using mass-symmetric and mass-asymmetric entrance channels. Results on α -particle spectra will be presented together with a moving source fit analysis.

  1. Charged and Neutral Current Neutrino Induced Nucleon Emission Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Nieves, J; Vacas, M J V

    2006-01-01

    By means of a Monte Carlo cascade method, to account for the rescattering of the outgoing nucleon, we study the charged and neutral current inclusive one nucleon knockout reactions off nuclei induced by neutrinos. The nucleon emission process studied here is a clear signal for neutral--current neutrino driven reactions, and can be used in the analysis of future neutrino experiments.

  2. A twin ionization chamber setup as detector for light charged particles with energies around 1 MeV applied to the sup 1 sup 0 B(n, alpha) sup 7 Li reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Göpfert, A; Bax, H

    2000-01-01

    The setup and operating conditions of a gridded twin ionization chamber with sample change facility to study light charged particle properties in the 1 MeV region is described. Detailed studies of different grid geometries in connection with the choice of an eligible counting gas mixture and the applied high voltage have been performed. Due to the high overall amplification of the small electrical chamber signals obtained from such low-energy particles, special filters have been developed in order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. Timing properties of the chamber signals are discussed in detail. Information available from chamber signals and encoding methods are elucidated by spectra of alpha particles created by sup 2 sup 3 sup 4 sup , sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U spontaneous alpha decay. The detector permits the independent and simultaneous measurement of energy and angular distribution of particles in both sides of the chamber. Finally, preliminary results and related analysis methods will be presented for the...

  3. Description of light charged particle multiplicities in the framework of dinuclear system model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonenko N.V.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of dinuclear system (DNS model we calculate the light charged particle (LCP multiplicities produced in fusion and quasifission reactions and their kinetic energy spectra. Calculations indicate that with increasing bombarding energy the ratio of LCP multiplicity from fragments MFF to corresponding LCP multiplicity from compound nucleus (CN MCN strongly increases.

  4. Measurement of double differential cross sections for light charged particles production in neutron induced reaction at 62.7 MeV on lead target; Mesures des sections efficaces doublement differentielles de production de particules chargees legeres lors de reactions induites par neutrons de 62.7 MeV sur cible de plomb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerveno, M

    2000-09-27

    In order to develop new options for nuclear waste management, studies are carrying out on the perfecting of hybrid systems (sub-critical reactor driven by accelerator). This thesis work takes place more precisely in the framework of nuclear data linked to hybrid systems development. Increasing the upper limit energy value (from 20 to 150 MeV) of data bases supposes that theoretical codes could have sufficient predictive power in this energy range. Thus it's necessary to measure new cross sections to constrain these codes. The experiment, performed at Louvain-la-Neuve Cyclotron, aims to determine the double differential cross sections for light charged particles production in neutron induced reactions at 62.7 MeV on natural lead target. The detection device consists of 6 NE102-CsI telescopes. Time of flight measurements are used to reconstruct the neutron energy spectra. The general framework (hybrid systems and associated nuclear data problematic) in which this work takes place is presented in a first part. The experimental set up used for our measurements is described in a second part. The three following parts are dedicated to the data analysis and double differential cross sections extraction. The particle discrimination, the energy calibration of detectors as the different corrections applied to the experimental spectra are related in details. And finally a comparative study between our experimental results and some theoretical predictions is presented. (author)

  5. Charge Balance in the Mesosphere with Meteoric Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, S. H.; Asmus, H.; Dickson, S.; Friedrich, M.; Megner, L. S.

    2013-12-01

    An aerosol particle charging model developed initially for noctilucent cloud particles has been extended in several steps in order to better explain data for charged meteoric smoke particles (MSPs) returned by the nighttime and daytime CHAMPS rockets launched from the Andøya rocket Range, Norway, in October 2011. Addition of photodetachment to the model shows that this process reduces the number density of positively charged MSPs as well as the number density of negatively charged MSPs as a consequence of the photodetached electrons neutralizing the positively charged MSPs. In addition, the model shows that the ionization rate can be deduced from the electron number density and the electron-ion recombination rate only at the highest altitudes as a consequence of recombination of electrons on the MSPs at lower altitudes. The differences between the daytime and nighttime data place constraints on the photodetachment rate. A further extension of the model to include the formation of negative ions and their destruction by atomic oxygen helps explain the ledge seen in the number density of the lightest negatively charged particles. MSP particle densities from the CARMA/CHEM2D model are in better agreement with rocket data for assumed values of the meteor input flux that are at the low end of the generally accepted range.

  6. Sources for charged particles; Les sources de particules chargees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arianer, J.

    1997-09-01

    This document is a basic course on charged particle sources for post-graduate students and thematic schools on large facilities and accelerator physics. A simple but precise description of the creation and the emission of charged particles is presented. This course relies on every year upgraded reference documents. Following relevant topics are considered: electronic emission processes, technological and practical considerations on electron guns, positron sources, production of neutral atoms, ionization, plasma and discharge, different types of positive and negative ion sources, polarized particle sources, materials for the construction of ion sources, low energy beam production and transport. (N.T.).

  7. Charged-particle orbits near a magnetic null point

    OpenAIRE

    Jaroensutasinee, K.; Rowlands, G.

    2000-01-01

    An approximate analytical expression is obtained for the orbits of a charged particle moving in a cusp magnetic field. The particle orbits pass close to or through a region of zero magnetic field before being reflected in regions where the magnetic field is strong. Comparison with numerically evaluated orbits shows that the analytical formula is surprisingly good and captures all the main features of the particle motion. A map describing the long-time behaviour of such orbits is obtained.

  8. Late time CMB anisotropies constrain mini-charged particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrage, C.; Redondo, J.; Ringwald, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Jaeckel, J. [Univ. of Durham, Inst. for Particle Physics Phenomenology (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-15

    Observations of the temperature anisotropies induced as light from the CMB passes through large scale structures in the late universe are a sensitive probe of the interactions of photons in such environments. In extensions of the Standard Model which give rise to mini-charged particles, photons propagating through transverse magnetic fields can be lost to pair production of such particles. Such a decrement in the photon flux would occur as photons from the CMB traverse the magnetic fields of galaxy clusters. Therefore late time CMB anisotropies can be used to constrain the properties of mini- charged particles. We outline how this test is constructed, and present new constraints on mini-charged particles from observations of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in the Coma cluster. (orig.)

  9. Charging of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) colloids in cyclohexyl bromide: locking, size dependence, and particle mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linden, Marjolein N; Stiefelhagen, Johan C P; Heessels-Gürboğa, Gülşen; van der Hoeven, Jessi E S; Elbers, Nina A; Dijkstra, Marjolein; van Blaaderen, Alfons

    2015-01-13

    We studied suspensions of sterically stabilized poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) particles in the solvent cyclohexyl bromide (CHB; εr = 7.92). We performed microelectrophoresis measurements on suspensions containing a single particle species and on binary mixtures, using confocal microscopy to measure the velocity profiles of the particles. We measured the charge of so-called locked PMMA particles, for which the steric stabilizer, a comb-graft stabilizer of poly(12-hydroxystearic acid) (PHSA) grafted on a backbone of PMMA, was covalently bonded to the particle, and for unlocked particles, for which the stabilizer was adsorbed to the surface of the particle. We observed that locked particles had a significantly higher charge than unlocked particles. We found that the charge increase upon locking was due to chemical coupling of 2-(dimethylamino)ethanol to the PMMA particles, which was used as a catalyst for the locking reaction. For particles of different size we obtained the surface potential and charge from the electrophoretic mobility of the particles. For locked particles we found that the relatively high surface potential (∼ +5.1 kBT/e or +130 mV) was roughly constant for all particle diameters we investigated (1.2 μm particle charge was proportional to the square of the diameter.

  10. Planetary Magnetosphere Probed by Charged Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternovsky, Z.; Horanyi, M.; Gruen, E.; Srama, R.; Auer, S.; Kempf, S.; Krueger, H.

    2010-12-01

    In-situ and remote sensing observations combined with theoretical and numerical modeling greatly advanced our understanding planetary magnetospheres. Dust is an integral component of the Saturnian and Jovian magnetospheres where it can act as a source/sink of plasma particles (dust particles are an effective source for plasma species like O2, OH, etc. through sputtering of ice particles, for example); its distribution is shaped by electrodynamic forces coupled radiation pressure, plasma, and neutral drag, for example. The complex interaction can lead to unusual dust dynamics, including the transport, capture, and ejection of dust grains. The study of the temporal and spatial evolution of fine dust within or outside the magnetosphere thus provides a unique way to combine data from a large number of observations: plasma, plasma wave, dust, and magnetic field measurements. The dust detectors on board the Galileo and Cassini spacecrafts lead to major discoveries, including the jovian dust stream originating from Io or the in-situ sampling and analysis of the plumes of Enceladus. Recent advancement in dust detector technology enables accurate measurement of the dust trajectory and elemental composition that can greatly enhance the understanding of dust magnetorspheric interaction and indentify the source of the dust with high precision. The capabilities of a modern dust detector thus can provide support for the upcoming Europa Jupiter System Mission.

  11. Trapped charged particles a graduate textbook with problems and solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Madsen, Niels; Thompson, Richard C

    2016-01-01

    At Les Houches in January 2015, experts in the field of particle trapping came together to discuss the fundamental physics of traps and the different types of applications. This textbook collates the lectures delivered there; the Second Winter School on Physics with Trapped Charged Particles. Taken as a whole, the book gives an overview of why traps for charged particles are important, how they work, their special features and limitations, and their application in areas such as precision measurements, mass spectrometry, optical clocks, plasma physics, antihydrogen creation, quantum simulation and quantum information processing. Chapters from various world experts include those on the basic properties of Penning traps, RF traps and particle accelerators, as well as those covering important practical aspects such as vacuum systems, detection techniques, and different types of particle cooling including laser cooling. Finally, individual chapters deal with the different areas of application listed above. Each ...

  12. Measuring massive metastable charged particles with ATLAS RPC timing information.

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, Jonathan Richard; Oye, Ola Kristoffer

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the measurement of massive metastable charged particles in ATLAS, using timing information from the resistive plate chambers (RPCs). As representative particle candidates we use staus, the partners of $ au$ leptons in supersymmetric models with gravitino dark matter (GDM), which may well be stable on the scale of the detector. The generic signatures of massive metastable charged particles are a long Time-of-Flight (ToF) and high energy-loss ($dE/dx$). The RPC timing information allows us to measure the ToF of a particle which, taken in conjunction with the measurement of the particle's momentum from its track, allows one to determine its mass. We pioneer the study of the RPCs' potential for this measurement. We also consider triggering effects on the event selection, and discuss quantitatively the ATLAS potential for measuring the stau mass in three specific GDM benchmark scenarios.

  13. Particle tracking in kaon electroproduction with cathode-charge sampling in multi-wire proportional chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Achenbach, P; Bernauer, J C; Böhm, R; Bosnar, D; Bösz, M; Debenjak, L; Distler, M O; Esser, A; Friščić, I; de la Paz, M Gómez Rodríguez; Makek, M; Merkel, H; Müller, U; Nungesser, L; Pochodzalla, J; Potokar, M; Majos, S Sánchez; Schlimme, B S; Širca, S; Weinriefer, M; 10.1016/j.nima.2011.03.039

    2011-01-01

    Wire chambers are routinely operated as tracking detectors in magnetic spectrometers at high-intensity continuous electron beams. Especially in experiments studying reactions with small cross-sections the reaction yield is limited by the background rate in the chambers. One way to determine the track of a charged particle through a multi-wire proportional chamber (MWPC) is the measurement of the charge distribution induced on its cathodes. In practical applications of this read-out method, the algorithm to relate the measured charge distribution to the avalanche position is an important factor for the achievable position resolution and for the track reconstruction efficiency. An algorithm was developed for operating two large-sized MWPCs in a strong background environment with multiple-particle tracks. Resulting efficiencies were determined as a function of the electron beam current and on the signal amplitudes. Because of the different energy-losses of pions, kaons, and protons in the momentum range of the s...

  14. Electric birefringence anomaly of solutions of ionically charged anisometric particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, H; Gräbner, Dieter

    2015-02-01

    The term "electric birefringence anomaly" is known as the electric birefringence (EB) signal that occurs in solutions of ionically charged anisometric particles in a narrow concentration region. The signal is of opposite sign to the normal birefringence that occurs below and above this narrow concentration region. The normal electric birefringence signals in the dilute and more concentrated regions are due to the orientation of the particles in the direction of the applied electric field. The origin for the anomalous signal was not completely understood until now. The article summarises previous results in which the anomalous results had been observed but not well understood. It shows that the birefringence anomaly occurs in systems as diverse as micellar solutions, polyelectrolytes, solutions of clays, viruses and fibres. In all these systems the anomaly signals are present at the concentration when the length of the colloidal particles including the thickness of the electric double layer are about the same as the mean distance between the colloidal particles. Under these conditions the electric double layers of the particles overlap along the main axis of the particles but not in the direction across the particles. As a consequence of this situation a dipole is built up across the particles by the migration of the counter-ions of the particles in the electric field and this dipole leads to an orientation of the particles perpendicular to the electric field. The anomalous signal can usually be observed simultaneously with the normal signal. The amplitude of the anomalous signal can be larger than the amplitude of the normal signal. As a consequence the total birefringence changes its sign in the anomalous concentration region. The anomaly signal of the clays can also be explained by a fluctuating dipole around the particles, which is due to the fact that the centre of the ionic charges of the particles does not fall on the centre of the ionic charge of the counter

  15. Relativistic mixtures of charged and uncharged particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kremer, Gilberto M. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Curitiba (Brazil)

    2014-01-14

    Mixtures of relativistic gases within the framework of Boltzmann equation are analyzed. Three systems are considered. The first one refers to a mixture of uncharged particles by using Grad’s moment method, where the relativistic mixture is characterized by the moments of the distribution functions: particle four-flows, energy-momentum tensors, and third-order moment tensors. In the second Fick’s law for a mixture of relativistic gases of non-disparate rest masses in a Schwarzschild metric are derived from an extension of Marle and McCormack model equations applied to a relativistic truncated Grad’s distribution function, where it is shown the dependence of the diffusion coefficient on the gravitational potential. The third one consists in the derivation of the relativistic laws of Ohm and Fourier for a binary mixtures of electrons with protons and electrons with photons subjected to external electromagnetic fields and in presence of gravitational fields by using the Anderson and Witting model of the Boltzmann equation.

  16. Laser controlled charge-transfer reaction at low temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Petrov, Alexander; Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2016-01-01

    We study the low-temperature charge transfer reaction between a neutral atom and an ion under the influence of near-resonant laser light. By setting up a multi-channel model with field-dressed states we demonstrate that the reaction rate coefficient can be enhanced by several orders of magnitude with laser intensities of $10^6$ W/cm$^2$ or larger. In addition, depending on laser frequency one can induce a significant enhancement or suppression of the charge-exchange rate coefficient. For our intensities multi-photon processes are not important.

  17. Charged Particle Motion in Temporal Chaotic and Spatiotemporal Chaotic Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张海云; 贺凯芬

    2002-01-01

    We investigate charged particle motion in temporal chaotic and spatiotemporal chaotic fields. In its steady wave frame a few key modes of the solution of the driven/damped nonlinear wave equation are used as the field. It is found that in the spatiotemporal chaotic field the particle drifts relative to the steady wave, in contrast to that in the temporal chaotic field where the particle motion is localized in a trough of the wave field. The result is of significance for understanding stochastic acceleration of particles.

  18. Electromagnetic radiation of charged particles in stochastic motion

    CERN Document Server

    Harko, Tiberiu

    2016-01-01

    The study of the Brownian motion of a charged particle in electric and magnetic fields fields has many important applications in plasma and heavy ions physics, as well as in astrophysics. In the present paper we consider the electromagnetic radiation properties of a charged non-relativistic particle in the presence of electric and magnetic fields, of an exterior non-electromagnetic potential, and of a friction and stochastic force, respectively. We describe the motion of the charged particle by a Langevin and generalized Langevin type stochastic differential equation. We investigate in detail the cases of the Brownian motion with or without memory in a constant electric field, in the presence of an external harmonic potential, and of a constant magnetic field. In all cases the corresponding Langevin equations are solved numerically, and a full description of the spectrum of the emitted radiation and of the physical properties of the motion is obtained. The Power Spectral Density (PSD) of the emitted power is ...

  19. Preparation of Panel and Charged Particles for Electrophoretic Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyung Suk; Park, Jin Woo; Park, Lee Soon; Lee, Jung Kyung; Han, Yoon Soo; Kwon, Younghwan

    Studies on the formulation of photosensitive paste for transparent soft mold press (TSMP) method have been performed. With the optimum formulation of the photosensitive paste the box-type barrier rib with good flexibility and high solvent resistance was fabricated, suitable for the panel material of the electrophoretic display. Cationically-charged white particles were prepared by using TiO2 nanoparticles, silane coupling agent with amino groups, dispersant and acetic acid. The cationically charged TiO2 particles exhibited 74.09 mV of zeta potential and 3.11 × 10-5 cm2/Vs of mobility. Electrophoretic display fabricated with the charged TiO2 particles exhibited 10 V of low driving voltage and maximum contrast ratio (5.3/1) at 30 V.

  20. Medical radiation dosimetry theory of charged particle collision energy loss

    CERN Document Server

    McParland, Brian J

    2014-01-01

    Accurate radiation dosimetry is a requirement of radiation oncology, diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine. It is necessary so as to satisfy the needs of patient safety, therapeutic and diagnostic optimisation, and retrospective epidemiological studies of the biological effects resulting from low absorbed doses of ionising radiation. The radiation absorbed dose received by the patient is the ultimate consequence of the transfer of kinetic energy through collisions between energetic charged particles and atoms of the tissue being traversed. Thus, the ability of the medical physicist to both measure and calculate accurately patient dosimetry demands a deep understanding of the physics of charged particle interactions with matter. Interestingly, the physics of charged particle energy loss has an almost exclusively theoretical basis, thus necessitating an advanced theoretical understanding of the subject in order to apply it appropriately to the clinical regime. ​ Each year, about one-third of the worl...

  1. A New Mechanism of Higgs Bosons in Producing Charge Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Javadi, Hossein; Forouzbakhsh, Farshid

    2006-01-01

    A new production method of elementary particles by Higgs Bosons will be shown. But before that the structure of photon will be considered deeply, while a new definition of Higgs Boson about color-charges and color-magnet will be given for the first time.......A new production method of elementary particles by Higgs Bosons will be shown. But before that the structure of photon will be considered deeply, while a new definition of Higgs Boson about color-charges and color-magnet will be given for the first time....

  2. Thermodiffusion of charged colloids: single-particle diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhont, Jan K G; Wiegand, S; Duhr, S; Braun, D

    2007-02-13

    An expression for the single-particle thermal diffusion coefficient of a charged colloidal sphere is derived on the basis of force balance on the Brownian time scale in combination with thermodynamics. It is shown that the single-particle thermal diffusion coefficient is related to the temperature dependence of the reversible work necessary to build the colloidal particle, including the core, the solvation layer, and the electrical double layer. From this general expression, an explicit expression for the contribution of the electrical double layer to the single-particle thermal diffusion coefficient is derived in terms of the surface charge density of the colloidal sphere, the electrostatic screening length, and its core radius, to within the Debye-Hückel approximation. This result is shown to explain experimental data, for both thin and thick double layers. In addition, a comparison with other theories is made.

  3. Surface modification for polystyrene colloidal particles with controlled charge densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jongman; Kwon, Oh-Sun; Shin, Kwanwoo; Song, Ju-Myung; Kim, Joon-Seop; Seo, Young-Soo; Tael, Giyoong; Jon, Sangyong

    2007-11-01

    A significant amount of polystyrene sulfonated acid (PSSA) and poly(styrene-ran-acrylic acid) (PSAA) random copolymer can be adsorbed by dispersion of PS particles via a swelling-quenching process. A THF-water mixed solvent was used in the swelling process and a large amount of pure water was used, to give a low concentration of THF% in quenching process. Our results showed that functional PSSA groups were randomly and tightly adsorbed to the PS particles. When the mol.% of charged segments was increased, the progressive adsorption of PSSA chains to the PS particles leads to an increase in the electrophoretic mobility and zeta-potential of aqueous dispersions. Thus, we were able to obtain well-distributed surface charge density on the PS particles.

  4. Charged Particle Monitor on the AstroSat mission

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, A R; Bhargava, Yash; Khanna, Rakesh; Hingar, M K; Kutty, A P K; Malkar, J P; Basak, Rupal; Sreekumar, S; Samuel, Essy; Priya, P; Vinod, P; Bhattacharya, D; Bhalerao, V; Vadawale, S V; Mithun, N P S; Pandiyan, R; Subbarao, K; Seetha, S; Sarma, K Suryanarayana

    2016-01-01

    Charged Particle Monitor (CPM) on-board the AstroSat satellite is an instrument designed to detect the flux of charged particles at the satellite location. A Cesium Iodide Thallium (CsI(Tl)) crystal is used with a Kapton window to detect protons with energies greater than 1 MeV. The ground calibration of CPM was done using gamma-rays from radioactive sources and protons from particle accelerators. Based on the ground calibration results, energy deposition above 1 MeV are accepted and particle counts are recorded. It is found that CPM counts are steady and the signal for the onset and exit of South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) region are generated in a very reliable and stable manner.

  5. Asymptotic conditions of motion for radiating charged particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James L.

    1997-10-01

    Approximate asymptotic conditions on the motion of compact, electrically charged particles are derived within the framework of general relativity using the Einstein-Infeld-Hoffmann (EIH) surface integral method. While superficially similar to the Abraham-Lorentz and Lorentz-Dirac equations, these conditions differ from them in several fundamental ways. They are not equations of motion in the usual sense but rather a set of conditions which these motions must obey asymptotically in the future of an initial starting time. And furthermore, they do not admit the runaway solutions of these other equations. As in the original EIH work, they are integrability conditions gotten from integrating the empty-space (i.e., sourceless) Einstein-Maxwell equations of general relativity over closed two-surfaces surrounding the sources of the fields appearing in these equations. No additional ad hoc assumptions, such as the form of a force law or the introduction of inertial reaction terms, are required for this purpose, nor is there a need for any infinite mass renormalizations such as are required in other derivations since all integrals are over surfaces and thus finite. In addition to being asymptotic, the conditions of motion derived here are also approximate and apply, as do the original EIH equations, only to slowly moving systems. A ``slowness'' parameter ɛ is identified as the ratio of the light travel time across the system divided by a characteristic time, e.g., a period. Use is made of both the method of matched asymptotic expansions and the method of multiple time scales to obtain an asymptotic expansion in ɛ and the expansion is carried to sufficiently high order ɛ7 to obtain the lowest-order radiation reaction terms. The resulting conditions of motion are shown to not allow runaway motions.

  6. Generation of narrow peaks in spectroscopy of charged particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubbers, Dirk; Schmidt, Ulrich

    2016-11-01

    In spectroscopy of charged particles, narrow peaks may appear in continuous spectra if magnetic transport of the particles is involved. These artefacts, which so far have escaped the attention of investigators, can develop whenever geometric detection efficiency is less than 100%. As such peaks may be misinterpreted as new physics, their generation is investigated, both analytically and experimentally, for various detector configurations, including those used in searches for the spontaneous decay of the vacuum in heavy-ion collisions.

  7. Self-affine roughness influence on redox reaction charge admittance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G

    2005-01-01

    In this work we investigate the influence of self-affine electrode roughness on the admittance of redox reactions during facile charge transfer kinetics. The self-affine roughness is characterized by the rms roughness amplitude w, the correlation length xi and the roughness exponent H (0

  8. Photoinduced charge separation and enzyme reactions in reversed micelles.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaert, R.M.D.

    1989-01-01

    In this thesis the performance and coupling of two types of reaction, photoinduced charge separation and enzymatic conversion were studied in reversed micelles. Reversed micelles are 1 to 10 nm sized water droplets dispersed in an organic solution. The dispersant is a detergent (cationogenic, nonion

  9. Properties of an ultrarelativistic charged particle radiation in a constant homogeneous crossed electromagnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Bogdanov, O V; Lazarenko, G Yu

    2016-01-01

    The properties of radiation created by a classical ultrarelativistic scalar charged particle in a constant homogeneous crossed electromagnetic field are described both analytically and numerically with radiation reaction taken into account in the form of the Landau-Lifshitz equation. The total radiation naturally falls into two parts: the radiation formed at the entrance point of a particle into the crossed field (the synchrotron entrance radiation), and the radiation coming from the late-time asymptotics of a particle motion (the de-excited radiation). The synchrotron entrance radiation resembles, although does not coincide with, the ultrarelativistic limit of the synchrotron radiation: its distribution over energies and angles possesses almost the same properties. The de-excited radiation is soft, not concentrated in the plane of motion of a charged particle, and almost completely circularly polarized. The photon energy delivering the maximum to its spectral angular distribution decreases with increasing th...

  10. Functionally charged nanosize particles differentially activate BV2 microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of particle surface charge on the biological activation of immortalized mouse microglia (BV2) was examined. Nanosize (860-950 nm) spherical polystyrene microparticles (SPM) were coated with carboxyl (COOH-) or dimethyl amino (CH3)2-N- groups to give a net negative or p...

  11. Measurements of charged-particle distributions with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Cairo, Valentina Maria Martina

    2016-01-01

    Inclusive charged-particle measurements probe the low-energy region of the non-perturbative quantum chromodynamics. The ATLAS collaboration has recently measured the charged-particle multiplicity and its dependence on transverse momentum and pseudorapidity in special data sets with low LHC beam currents, recorded at centre-of-mass energies of 8 TeV and 13 TeV. The measurements at 8 TeV cover a wide spectrum using charged-particle selections with minimum transverse momentum of both 100 MeV and 500 MeV and in various phase space regions of low and high charged-particle multiplicities, some of which are studied for the first time by ATLAS. The measurements at 13 TeV also present detailed studies with a minimum transverse momentum of both 100 MeV and 500 MeV. The measurements are compared with predictions of various tuned Monte Carlo generators and are found to provide strong constraints on these. None of the Monte Carlo generators with their respective tunes are able to reproduce all the features of the data.

  12. Thermodynamic model for bouncing charged particles inside a capacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaeizadeh, Amin; Mameghani, Pooya

    2013-08-01

    We introduce an equation of state for a conducting particle inside a charged parallel-plate capacitor and show that it is similar to the equation of state for an ideal gas undergoing an adiabatic process. We describe a simple experiment that shows reasonable agreement with the theoretical model.

  13. The Mathematics of Charged Particles interacting with Electromagnetic Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kim

    In this thesis, we study the mathematics used to describe systems of charged quantum mechanical particles coupled with their classical self-generated electromagnetic field. We prove the existence of a unique local in time solution to the many-body Maxwell-Schrödinger initial value problem expressed...

  14. Charged particle production ratios at the CERN ISR for a transverse momentum of 0.4 GeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Bertin, A; Capiluppi, P; D'Agostino-Bruno, M; Ellis, R J; Giacomelli, G; Poe, R T; Rossi, A M; Vannini, G

    1972-01-01

    Experimental results are presented on the production ratios of charged particles in inclusive reactions at ISR energies. The data have been taken at a fixed transverse momentum of 0.4 GeV/c. At ISR energies and for 0.1charged particles seems to be energy independent, suggesting that limiting distributions have been reached. (7 refs).

  15. Search for new charged massive stable particles at CDF

    Science.gov (United States)

    CDF Collaboration

    1996-05-01

    We report on a general search at CDF for new particles which are electrically charged and sufficiently long-lived to allow detection (γ c τ >= 1m). Examples of such particles include free quarks, 4th generation leptons which are lighter than their neutrino, and sextet quarks. Their signature would be particles with high momentum but relatively low velocity, β Fisica Nucleare; the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture of Japan; the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada; the National Science Council of the Republic of China; and the A. P. Sloan Foundation. Supported by U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-76CH03000.

  16. Charge fluctuations for particles on a surface exposed to plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Sheridan, T E

    2011-01-01

    We develop a stochastic model for the charge fluctuations on a microscopic dust particle resting on a surface exposed to plasma. We find in steady state that the fluctuations are normally distributed with a standard deviation that is proportional to $CT_{e})^{1/2}$, where $C$ is the particle-surface capacitance and $T_{e}$ is the plasma electron temperature. The time for an initially uncharged ensemble of particles to reach the steady state distribution is directly proportional to $CT_{e}$.

  17. Charging of heated colloidal particles using the electrolyte Seebeck effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majee, Arghya; Würger, Alois

    2012-03-16

    We propose a novel actuation mechanism for colloids, which is based on the Seebeck effect of the electrolyte solution: Laser heating of a nonionic particle accumulates in its vicinity a net charge Q, which is proportional to the excess temperature at the particle surface. The corresponding long-range thermoelectric field E is proportional to 1/r(2) provides a tool for controlled interactions with nearby beads or with additional molecular solutes. An external field E(ext) drags the thermocharged particle at a velocity that depends on its size and absorption properties; the latter point could be particularly relevant for separating carbon nanotubes according to their electronic band structure.

  18. ULF Waves and Diffusive Radial Transport of Charged Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ashar Fawad

    The Van Allen radiation belts contain highly energetic particles which interact with a variety of plasma and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. Waves in the ultra low-frequency (ULF) range play an important role in the loss and acceleration of energetic particles. Considering the geometry of the geomagnetic field, charged particles trapped in the inner magnetosphere undergo three distinct types of periodic motions; an adiabatic invariant is associated with each type of motion. The evolution of the phase space density of charged particles in the magnetosphere in the coordinate space of the three adiabatic invariants is modeled by the Fokker-Planck equation. If we assume that the first two adiabatic invariants are conserved while the third invariant is violated, then the general Fokker-Planck equation reduces to a radial diffusion equation with the radial diffusion coefficient quantifying the rate of the radial diffusion of charged particles, including contributions from perturbations in both the magnetic and the electric fields. This thesis investigates two unanswered questions about ULF wave-driven radial transport of charged particles. First, how important are the ULF fluctuations in the magnetic field compared with the ULF fluctuations in the electric field in driving the radial diffusion of charged particles in the Earth's inner magnetosphere? It has generally been accepted that magnetic field perturbations dominate over electric field perturbations, but several recently published studies suggest otherwise. Second, what is the distribution of ULF wave power in azimuth, and how does ULF wave power depend upon radial distance and the level of geomagnetic activity? Analytic treatments of the diffusion coefficients generally assume uniform distribution of power in azimuth, but in situ measurements suggest that this may not be the case. We used the magnetic field data from the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) and the electric and the magnetic

  19. Monitoring of Hadrontherapy Treatments by Means of Charged Particle Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraro, Silvia; Battistoni, Giuseppe; Collamati, Francesco; De Lucia, Erika; Faccini, Riccardo; Ferroni, Fernando; Fiore, Salvatore; Frallicciardi, Paola; Marafini, Michela; Mattei, Ilaria; Morganti, Silvio; Paramatti, Riccardo; Piersanti, Luca; Pinci, Davide; Rucinski, Antoni; Russomando, Andrea; Sarti, Alessio; Sciubba, Adalberto; Solfaroli-Camillocci, Elena; Toppi, Marco; Traini, Giacomo; Voena, Cecilia; Patera, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of the incoming beam radiation with the patient body in hadrontherapy treatments produces secondary charged and neutral particles, whose detection can be used for monitoring purposes and to perform an on-line check of beam particle range. In the context of ion-therapy with active scanning, charged particles are potentially attractive since they can be easily tracked with a high efficiency, in presence of a relatively low background contamination. In order to verify the possibility of exploiting this approach for in-beam monitoring in ion-therapy, and to guide the design of specific detectors, both simulations and experimental tests are being performed with ion beams impinging on simple homogeneous tissue-like targets (PMMA). From these studies, a resolution of the order of few millimeters on the single track has been proven to be sufficient to exploit charged particle tracking for monitoring purposes, preserving the precision achievable on longitudinal shape. The results obtained so far show that the measurement of charged particles can be successfully implemented in a technology capable of monitoring both the dose profile and the position of the Bragg peak inside the target and finally lead to the design of a novel profile detector. Crucial aspects to be considered are the detector positioning, to be optimized in order to maximize the available statistics, and the capability of accounting for the multiple scattering interactions undergone by the charged fragments along their exit path from the patient body. The experimental results collected up to now are also valuable for the validation of Monte Carlo simulation software tools and their implementation in Treatment Planning Software packages.

  20. Monitoring of hadrontherapy treatments by means of charged particle detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Battistoni

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of the incoming beam radiation with the patient body in hadrontherapy treatments produces secondary charged and neutral particles, whose detection can be used for monitoring purposes and to perform an on-line check of beam particle range. Charged particles are potentially attractive since they can be easily tracked with a high efficiency, in presence of a relatively low background contamination. In order to verify the possibility of exploiting this approach for in-beam monitoring in hadrontherapy, and to guide the design of specific detectors, both simulations and experimental tests are being performed with ion beams impinging on simple homogeneous tissue-like targets (PMMA. An important outcome of these studies is that the experimental single track resolution needed for charged particle based monitoring applications can be safely of the order of few millimeters, without spoiling the precision achievable on longitudinal shape. The results obtained so far show that the measurement of charged particles can be successfully implemented in a technology capable of monitoring the dose profile and the position of the Bragg peak inside the target and finally lead to the design of a novel profile detector. Crucial aspects to be considered are the detector positioning, to be optimized in order to maximize the available statistics, and the capability of accounting for the multiple scattering interactions undergone by the charged fragments along their exit path from the patient body. The experimental results collected up to now are also valuable for the validation of Monte Carlo simulation software tools and their implementation in Treatment Planning Software packages.

  1. Monitoring of Hadrontherapy Treatments by Means of Charged Particle Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraro, Silvia; Battistoni, Giuseppe; Collamati, Francesco; De Lucia, Erika; Faccini, Riccardo; Ferroni, Fernando; Fiore, Salvatore; Frallicciardi, Paola; Marafini, Michela; Mattei, Ilaria; Morganti, Silvio; Paramatti, Riccardo; Piersanti, Luca; Pinci, Davide; Rucinski, Antoni; Russomando, Andrea; Sarti, Alessio; Sciubba, Adalberto; Solfaroli-Camillocci, Elena; Toppi, Marco; Traini, Giacomo; Voena, Cecilia; Patera, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of the incoming beam radiation with the patient body in hadrontherapy treatments produces secondary charged and neutral particles, whose detection can be used for monitoring purposes and to perform an on-line check of beam particle range. In the context of ion-therapy with active scanning, charged particles are potentially attractive since they can be easily tracked with a high efficiency, in presence of a relatively low background contamination. In order to verify the possibility of exploiting this approach for in-beam monitoring in ion-therapy, and to guide the design of specific detectors, both simulations and experimental tests are being performed with ion beams impinging on simple homogeneous tissue-like targets (PMMA). From these studies, a resolution of the order of few millimeters on the single track has been proven to be sufficient to exploit charged particle tracking for monitoring purposes, preserving the precision achievable on longitudinal shape. The results obtained so far show that the measurement of charged particles can be successfully implemented in a technology capable of monitoring both the dose profile and the position of the Bragg peak inside the target and finally lead to the design of a novel profile detector. Crucial aspects to be considered are the detector positioning, to be optimized in order to maximize the available statistics, and the capability of accounting for the multiple scattering interactions undergone by the charged fragments along their exit path from the patient body. The experimental results collected up to now are also valuable for the validation of Monte Carlo simulation software tools and their implementation in Treatment Planning Software packages. PMID:27536555

  2. Charged Q-balls and boson stars and dynamics of charged test particles

    CERN Document Server

    Brihaye, Yves; Hartmann, Betti

    2014-01-01

    We construct electrically charged Q-balls and boson stars in a model with a scalar self-interaction potential resulting from gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking. We discuss the properties of these solutions in detail and emphasize the differences to the uncharged case. We observe that $Q$-balls can only be constructed up to a maximal value of the charge of the scalar field, while for boson stars the interplay between the attractive gravitational force and the repulsive electromagnetic force determines their behaviour. We also study the motion of charged, massive test particles in the space-time of boson stars. We find that in contrast to charged black holes the motion of charged test particles in charged boson star space-times is planar, but that the presence of the scalar field plays a crucial r\\^ole for the qualitative features of the trajectories. Applications of this test particle motion can be made in the study of extreme-mass ratio inspirals (EMRIs) as well as astrophysical plasmas relevant e.g. in th...

  3. Space charge distribution measurement methods and particle loaded insulating materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hole, S [Laboratoire des Instruments et Systemes d' Ile de France, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris6, 10 rue Vauquelin, 75005 Paris (France); Sylvestre, A [Laboratoire d' Electrostatique et des Materiaux Dielectriques, CNRS UMR5517, 25 avenue des Martyrs, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Lavallee, O Gallot [Laboratoire d' Etude Aerodynamiques, CNRS UMR6609, boulevard Marie et Pierre Curie, Teleport 2, BP 30179, 86962 Futuroscope, Chasseneuil (France); Guillermin, C [Schneider Electric Industries SAS, 22 rue Henry Tarze, 38000 Grenoble (France); Rain, P [Laboratoire d' Electrostatique et des Materiaux Dielectriques, CNRS UMR5517, 25 avenue des Martyrs, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Rowe, S [Schneider Electric Industries SAS, 22 rue Henry Tarze, 38000 Grenoble (France)

    2006-03-07

    In this paper the authors discuss the effects of particles (fillers) mixed in a composite polymer on the space charge measurement techniques. The origin of particle-induced spurious signals is determined and silica filled epoxy resin is analysed using the laser-induced-pressure-pulse (LIPP) method, the pulsed-electro-acoustic (PEA) method and the laser-induced-thermal-pulse (LITP) method. A spurious signal identified as the consequence of a piezoelectric effect of some silica particles is visible for all the method. Moreover, space charges are clearly detected at the epoxy/silica interface after a 10 kV mm{sup -1} poling at room temperature for 2 h.

  4. Brownian Dynamics of charged particles in a constant magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Hou, L J; Piel, A; Shukla, P K

    2009-01-01

    Numerical algorithms are proposed for simulating the Brownian dynamics of charged particles in an external magnetic field, taking into account the Brownian motion of charged particles, damping effect and the effect of magnetic field self-consistently. Performance of these algorithms is tested in terms of their accuracy and long-time stability by using a three-dimensional Brownian oscillator model with constant magnetic field. Step-by-step recipes for implementing these algorithms are given in detail. It is expected that these algorithms can be directly used to study particle dynamics in various dispersed systems in the presence of a magnetic field, including polymer solutions, colloidal suspensions and, particularly complex (dusty) plasmas. The proposed algorithms can also be used as thermostat in the usual molecular dynamics simulation in the presence of magnetic field.

  5. Effects of dispersive wave modes on charged particles transport

    CERN Document Server

    Schreiner, Cedric

    2015-01-01

    The transport of charged particles in the heliosphere and the interstellar medium is governed by the interaction of particles and magnetic irregularities. For the transport of protons a rather simple model using a linear Alfv\\'en wave spectrum which follows the Kolmogorov distribution usually yields good results. Even magnetostatic spectra may be used. For the case of electron transport, particles will resonate with the high-k end of the spectrum. Here the magnetic fluctuations do not follow the linear dispersion relation, but the kinetic regime kicks in. We will discuss the interaction of fluctuations of dispersive waves in the kinetic regime using a particle-in-cell code. Especially the scattering of particles following the idea of Lange et al. (2013) and its application to PiC codes will be discussed. The effect of the dispersive regime on the electron transport will be discussed in detail.

  6. Nucleon charge-exchange reactions at intermediate energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alford, W.P. [Western Ontario Univ., London, ON (Canada). Dept. of Physics]|[TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Spicer, B.M. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1997-12-31

    An historical review of the development of ideas pertaining to Gamow-Teller giant resonances is given, and a description of the emergence of techniques for the study of charge exchange reactions - particularly the technical advances which yielded the recent volume of new date. The present status of charge exchange reactions is reviewed and assessed. Evidence is presented from the {sup 14}C(p,n) reaction for the dominance of the spin-isospin component of the nucleon-nucleon interaction in intermediate energy reactions. In (p,n) reactions the Gamow-Teller giant resonance dominates the spectra, with higher multipoles contributing. By contrast, in (n,p) reactions in the heavier nuclei, the Gamow-Teller transitions are substantially Pauli-blocked and the spin dipole resonance dominates, with contributions from higher multipoles. Discussions of the multipole decomposition process, used to obtain from the data the contributions of the different multipoles, and the contributions of the multipoles, are given. 226 refs., 19 figs.

  7. Charge neutrality of fine particle (dusty) plasmas and fine particle cloud under gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totsuji, Hiroo

    2017-03-01

    The enhancement of the charge neutrality due to the existence of fine particles is shown to occur generally under microgravity and in one-dimensional structures under gravity. As an application of the latter, the size and position of fine particle clouds relative to surrounding plasmas are determined under gravity.

  8. Development of a Charged Particle Microbeam for Targeted and Single Particle Subcellular Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.

    2004-03-12

    The development of a charged particle microbeam for single particle, subcellular irradiations at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications (MIT LABA) was initiated under this NEER aeard. The Microbeam apparatus makes use of a pre-existing electrostatic accelerator with a horizontal beam tube.

  9. An unphysical result for the Landau-Lifshitz equation of motion for a charged particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Parga, G. A.; Mares, R.; Dominguez, S.

    2006-04-01

    An unphysical result for the Landau-Lifshitz equation of motion for a charged particle is presented. The similarity with the Lorentz-Dirac equation is discussed. Indeed the reaction force obtained for the uniform electric field vanishes when the motion is parallel to it in both cases. A discussion of this unphysical result is given and the need for of an expression for the radiation rate of energy for the Landau-Lifshitz theory is emphasized.

  10. Charge density asymmetry of heavy-ion fusion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poenaru, N.D.; Ivascu, M.; Mazilu, D.; Sandulescu, A. (Institutul de Fizica si Inginerie Nucleara, Bucharest (Romania))

    1980-01-01

    The generalized liquid-drop model replacing surface energy by double folded Yukawa-plus-exponential function is extended for fusion of heavy ions with different charge densities. Calculated interaction barriers for some 58 pairs of nuclei are in good agreement with experimental ones, within -10% and +7%. For even-even beta-stable nuclei with Z =4-104 the general trend of variation of interaction barriers and fusion Q-values show the regions where the charge density asymmetry cannot be neglected. PES for the entrance channel of the reactions /sup 109/Ag + /sup 40/Ar, /sup 138/Ce + /sup 57/Fe, /sup 144/Nd + /sup 84/Kr and the corresponding charge-equilibrated system have been computed.

  11. Volatility Measurements Of Reaction Chamber-Generated Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulsen, D. [PSI and ETH Zuerich (Switzerland); Duplissy, J.; Weingartner, E.; Alfarra, R. [University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Baltensperger, U.

    2005-03-01

    A volatility-tandem differential mobility analyzer (VTDMA) was designed to monitor the non-volatile fraction of reaction chamber-generated organic particles. Using a coiled-tube heater for particle volatilization, particle volume fraction remaining measurements were made for wall temperatures of 100, 150, and 200 C. Oligomerization of organic particles generated from irradiations of {alpha}-pinene/NO{sub x} in the reaction chamber shows a strong linear relationship with time. (author)

  12. Modelling die filling with charged particles using DEM/CFD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emmanuel Nkem Nwose; Chunlei Pei; Chuan-Yu Wu

    2012-01-01

    The effects of electrostatic charge on powder flow behaviour during die filling in a vacuum and in air were analysed using a coupled discrete element method and computational fluid dynamics (DEM/CFD) code,in which long range electrostatic interactions were implemented.The present 2D simulations revealed that both electrostatic charge and the presence of air can affect the powder flow behaviour during die filling.It was found that the electrostatic charge inhibited the flow of powders into the die and induced a loose packing structure.At the same filling speed,increasing the electrostatic charge led to a decrease in the fill ratio which quantifies the volumetric occupancy of powder in the die.In addition,increasing the shoe speed caused a further decrease in the fill ratio,which was characterised using the concept of critical filling speed.When the electrostatic charge was low,the air/particle interaction was strong so that a lower critical filling speed was obtained for die filling in air than in a vacuum.With high electrostatic charge,the electrostatic interactions became dominant.Consequently,similar fill ratio and critical filling speed were obtained for die filling in air and in a vacuum.

  13. Low energy charged particles interacting with amorphous solid water layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horowitz, Yonatan; Asscher, Micha [Institute of Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Edmund J. Safra Campus, Givat-Ram, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2012-04-07

    The interaction of charged particles with condensed water films has been studied extensively in recent years due to its importance in biological systems, ecology as well as interstellar processes. We have studied low energy electrons (3-25 eV) and positive argon ions (55 eV) charging effects on amorphous solid water (ASW) and ice films, 120-1080 ML thick, deposited on ruthenium single crystal under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Charging the ASW films by both electrons and positive argon ions has been measured using a Kelvin probe for contact potential difference (CPD) detection and found to obey plate capacitor physics. The incoming electrons kinetic energy has defined the maximum measurable CPD values by retarding further impinging electrons. L-defects (shallow traps) are suggested to be populated by the penetrating electrons and stabilize them. Low energy electron transmission measurements (currents of 0.4-1.5 {mu}A) have shown that the maximal and stable CPD values were obtained only after a relatively slow change has been completed within the ASW structure. Once the film has been stabilized, the spontaneous discharge was measured over a period of several hours at 103 {+-} 2 K. Finally, UV laser photo-emission study of the charged films has suggested that the negative charges tend to reside primarily at the ASW-vacuum interface, in good agreement with the known behavior of charged water clusters.

  14. Low energy charged particles interacting with amorphous solid water layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Yonatan; Asscher, Micha

    2012-04-01

    The interaction of charged particles with condensed water films has been studied extensively in recent years due to its importance in biological systems, ecology as well as interstellar processes. We have studied low energy electrons (3-25 eV) and positive argon ions (55 eV) charging effects on amorphous solid water (ASW) and ice films, 120-1080 ML thick, deposited on ruthenium single crystal under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Charging the ASW films by both electrons and positive argon ions has been measured using a Kelvin probe for contact potential difference (CPD) detection and found to obey plate capacitor physics. The incoming electrons kinetic energy has defined the maximum measurable CPD values by retarding further impinging electrons. L-defects (shallow traps) are suggested to be populated by the penetrating electrons and stabilize them. Low energy electron transmission measurements (currents of 0.4-1.5 μA) have shown that the maximal and stable CPD values were obtained only after a relatively slow change has been completed within the ASW structure. Once the film has been stabilized, the spontaneous discharge was measured over a period of several hours at 103 ± 2 K. Finally, UV laser photo-emission study of the charged films has suggested that the negative charges tend to reside primarily at the ASW-vacuum interface, in good agreement with the known behavior of charged water clusters.

  15. Emission of ions and charged soot particles by aircraft engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sorokin

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a model which examines the formation and evolution of chemiions in an aircraft engine is proposed. This model which includes chemiionisation, electron thermo-emission, electron attachment to soot particles and to neutral molecules, electron-ion and ion-ion recombination, ion-soot interaction, allows the determination of the ion concentration at the exit of the combustor and at the nozzle exit of the engine. It also allows the determination of the charge of the soot particles. For the engine considered, the upper limit for the ion emission index EIi is of the order of (2-5 x1016 ions/kg-fuel if ion-soot interactions are ignored and the introduction of ion-soot interactions lead about to a 50% reduction. The results also show that most of the soot particles are either positively or negatively charged, the remaining neutral particles representing approximately 20% of the total particles. A comparison of the model results with the available ground-based experimental data obtained on the ATTAS research aircraft engines during the SULFUR experiments (Schumann, 2002 shows an excellent agreement.

  16. Gas-silicon detector telescope for charged particle spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honkanen, A.; Oinonen, M.; Aeystoe, J. [Jyvaeskylae Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physics; Eskola, K. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Phys.; Jokinen, A. [PPE Division, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); ISOLDE Collaboration

    1997-08-11

    A gas-silicon detector telescope for charged particle spectroscopy has been constructed and tested. The lower detection limits were determined to be 155 keV for protons, 180 keV for deuterons and 350 keV for alpha particles. Typical energy resolution of the telescope measured for beta-delayed protons is 20 keV. Time resolution for the signals of the telescope was measured to be less than 10 ns. Examples of using the detector telescope in detection of beta-delayed proton activities are presented. (orig.).

  17. 3D Simulations of Space Charge Effects in Particle Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelmann, A

    2002-10-01

    For the first time, it is possible to calculate the complicated three-dimensional proton accelerator structures at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). Under consideration are external and self effects, arising from guiding and space-charge forces. This thesis has as its theme the design, implementation and validation of a tracking program for charged particles in accelerator structures. This work form part of the discipline of Computational Science and Engineering (CSE), more specifically in computational accelerator modelling. The physical model is based on the collisionless Vlasov-Maxwell theory, justified by the low density ({approx} 10{sup 9} protons/cm{sup 3}) of the beam and of the residual gas. The probability of large angle scattering between the protons and the residual gas is then sufficiently low, as can be estimated by considering the mean free path and the total distance a particle travels in the accelerator structure. (author)

  18. Visual Basic VPython Interface: Charged Particle in a Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prayaga, Chandra

    2006-12-01

    A simple Visual Basic (VB) to VPython interface is described and illustrated with the example of a charged particle in a magnetic field. This interface allows data to be passed to Python through a text file read by Python. The first component of the interface is a user-friendly data entry screen designed in VB, in which the user can input values of the charge, mass, initial position and initial velocity of the particle, and the magnetic field. Next, a command button is coded to write these values to a text file. Another command button starts the VPython program, which reads the data from the text file, numerically solves the equation of motion, and provides the 3d graphics animation. Students can use the interface to run the program several times with different data and observe changes in the motion.

  19. Electro-Optical Detection of Charged Particle Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Semertzidis, Y K; Kowalski, L A; Kraus, D E; Larsen, R C; Lazarus, D M; Magurno, B; Srinivasan-Rao, T; Tsang, Thomas; Usack, V

    1999-01-01

    We have made the first observation of a charged particle beam by means of its electro-optical effect on the propagation of laser light in a birefringent crystal at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility. Polarized infrared light was coupled to a LiNbO3 crystal through a polarization maintaining fiber of 4 micron diameter. An electron beam in 10ps bunches of 1mm diameter was scanned across the crystal. The modulation of the laser light during passage of the electron beam was observed using a photodiode with 45GHz bandwidth. The fastest rise time measured, 120ps, was made in the single shot mode and was limited by the bandwidth of the oscilloscope and the associated electronics. Both polarization dependent and polarization independent effects were observed. This technology holds promise of greatly improved spatial and temporal resolution of charged particle beams.

  20. Interdefect charge exchange in silicon particle detectors at cryogenic temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    MacEvoy, B; Hall, G; Moscatelli, F; Passeri, D; Santocchia, A

    2002-01-01

    Silicon particle detectors in the next generation of experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider will be exposed to a very challenging radiation environment. The principal obstacle to long-term operation arises from changes in detector doping concentration (N/sub eff/), which lead to an increase in the bias required to deplete the detector and hence achieve efficient charge collection. We have previously presented a model of interdefect charge exchange between closely spaced centers in the dense terminal clusters formed by hadron irradiation. This manifestly non-Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) mechanism leads to a marked increase in carrier generation rate and negative space charge over the SRH prediction. There is currently much interest in the subject of cryogenic detector operation as a means of improving radiation hardness. Our motivation, however, is primarily to investigate our model further by testing its predictions over a range of temperatures. We present measurements of spectra from /sup 241/Am alpha par...

  1. Uniformly Accelerating Charged Particles A Threat to the Equivalence Principle

    CERN Document Server

    Lyle, Stephen N

    2008-01-01

    There has been a long debate about whether uniformly accelerated charges should radiate electromagnetic energy and how one should describe their worldline through a flat spacetime, i.e., whether the Lorentz-Dirac equation is right. There are related questions in curved spacetimes, e.g., do different varieties of equivalence principle apply to charged particles, and can a static charge in a static spacetime radiate electromagnetic energy? The problems with the LD equation in flat spacetime are spelt out in some detail here, and its extension to curved spacetime is discussed. Different equivalence principles are compared and some vindicated. The key papers are discussed in detail and many of their conclusions are significantly revised by the present solution.

  2. Stopping power of charged particles due to ion wave excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, H.; Muroki, C.; Nambu, M.

    2002-08-01

    Stopping power due to ion wave excitations is derived for a charged particle moving in a two-component plasma. Unlike previous theories based on ion-acoustic-wave approximation (IAWA), the excitation of short-wavelength ion waves is taken into account. The obtained stopping power has a magnitude larger than that of IAWA. Stopping power at subsonic velocities, where stopping power in IAWA disappears, is even larger than that of supersonic velocities.

  3. Stopping power of charged particles due to ion wave excitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, H; Muroki, C; Nambu, M

    2002-08-01

    Stopping power due to ion wave excitations is derived for a charged particle moving in a two-component plasma. Unlike previous theories based on ion-acoustic-wave approximation (IAWA), the excitation of short-wavelength ion waves is taken into account. The obtained stopping power has a magnitude larger than that of IAWA. Stopping power at subsonic velocities, where stopping power in IAWA disappears, is even larger than that of supersonic velocities.

  4. Electromagnetic radiation of charged particles in stochastic motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harko, Tiberiu [Babes-Bolyai University, Department of Physics, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); University College London, Department of Mathematics, London (United Kingdom); Mocanu, Gabriela [Astronomical Institute of the Romanian Academy, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2016-03-15

    The study of the Brownian motion of a charged particle in electric and magnetic fields has many important applications in plasma and heavy ions physics, as well as in astrophysics. In the present paper we consider the electromagnetic radiation properties of a charged non-relativistic particle in the presence of electric and magnetic fields, of an exterior non-electromagnetic potential, and of a friction and stochastic force, respectively. We describe the motion of the charged particle by a Langevin and generalized Langevin type stochastic differential equation. We investigate in detail the cases of the Brownian motion with or without memory in a constant electric field, in the presence of an external harmonic potential, and of a constant magnetic field. In all cases the corresponding Langevin equations are solved numerically, and a full description of the spectrum of the emitted radiation and of the physical properties of the motion is obtained. The power spectral density of the emitted power is also obtained for each case, and, for all considered oscillating systems, it shows the presence of peaks, corresponding to certain intervals of the frequency. (orig.)

  5. Charge dependence of nano-particle growth in silane plasmas under UV irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seon, C. R.; Choe, W.; Chai, K. B.; Park, H. Y.; Park, S.

    2009-01-01

    The controlled generation of nano-particles has been an important issue for the nano-structure formation in processing plasmas. We observed that the particle growth under UV irradiation was enhanced due to electric charge reduction of the particles, suggesting that the variation of particle charges could be a control parameter for the particle growth. The particle growth variation by UV irradiation is well described by the particle coagulation model with time-dependent particle charges in consideration, where predator particles grow by adsorbing a few nanometer-sized proto-particles.

  6. Improved search for elementary particles with fractional electric charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mar, N.M.; Lee, E.R.; Fleming, G.R.; Casey, B.C.; Perl, M.L.; Garwin, E.L. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford, California 94309 (United States); Hendricks, C.D. [W. J. Schafer Associates, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Lackner, K.S. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Shaw, G.L. [Department of Physics, University of California, Irvine, California 92717 (United States)

    1996-06-01

    We have devised and demonstrated the successful operation of a low-cost, high-mass throughput technique capable of performing bulk matter searches for fractionally charged particles based on an improved Millikan liquid drop method. The method uses a stroboscopic lamp and a charge coupled device video camera to image the trajectories of silicone oil drops falling through air in the presence of a vertical, alternating electric field. The images of the trajectories are computer processed in real time, the electric charge on a drop being measured with an rms error of 0.025 of an electron charge. This error is dominated by Brownian motion. In the first use of this method, we have looked at 5974941 drops and found no evidence for fractional charges in 1.07 mg of oil. With 95{percent} confidence, the concentration of isolated quarks with {plus_minus}1/3{ital e} or {plus_minus}2/3{ital e} in silicone oil is less than one per 2.14{times}10{sup 20} nucleons. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  7. Improved search for elementary particles with fractional electric charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mar, Nancy M.; Lee, Eric R.; Fleming, George R.; Casey, Brendan C. K.; Perl, Martin L.; Garwin, Edward L.; Hendricks, Charles D.; Lackner, Klaus S.; Shaw, Gordon L.

    1996-06-01

    We have devised and demonstrated the successful operation of a low-cost, high-mass throughput technique capable of performing bulk matter searches for fractionally charged particles based on an improved Millikan liquid drop method. The method uses a stroboscopic lamp and a charge coupled device video camera to image the trajectories of silicone oil drops falling through air in the presence of a vertical, alternating electric field. The images of the trajectories are computer processed in real time, the electric charge on a drop being measured with an rms error of 0.025 of an electron charge. This error is dominated by Brownian motion. In the first use of this method, we have looked at 5 974 941 drops and found no evidence for fractional charges in 1.07 mg of oil. With 95% confidence, the concentration of isolated quarks with +/-1/3e or +/-2/3e in silicone oil is less than one per 2.14×1020 nucleons.

  8. Human fibrinogen adsorption on positively charged latex particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeliszewska, Paulina; Bratek-Skicki, Anna; Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Cieśla, Michał

    2014-09-23

    Fibrinogen (Fb) adsorption on positively charged latex particles (average diameter of 800 nm) was studied using the microelectrophoretic and the concentration depletion methods based on AFM imaging. Monolayers on latex were adsorbed from diluted bulk solutions at pH 7.4 and an ionic strength in the range of 10(-3) to 0.15 M where fibrinogen molecules exhibited an average negative charge. The electrophoretic mobility of the latex after controlled fibrinogen adsorption was systematically measured. A monotonic decrease in the electrophoretic mobility of fibrinogen-covered latex was observed for all ionic strengths. The results of these experiments were interpreted according to the three-dimensional electrokinetic model. It was also determined using the concentration depletion method that fibrinogen adsorption was irreversible and the maximum coverage was equal to 0.6 mg m(-2) for ionic strength 10(-3) M and 1.3 mg m(-2) for ionic strength 0.15 M. The increase of the maximum coverage was confirmed by theoretical modeling based on the random sequential adsorption approach. Paradoxically, the maximum coverage of fibrinogen on positively charged latex particles was more than two times lower than the maximum coverage obtained for negative latex particles (3.2 mg m(-2)) at pH 7.4 and ionic strength of 0.15 M. This was interpreted as a result of the side-on adsorption of fibrinogen molecules with their negatively charged core attached to the positively charged latex surface. The stability and acid base properties of fibrinogen monolayers on latex were also determined in pH cycling experiments where it was observed that there were no irreversible conformational changes in the fibrinogen monolayers. Additionally, the zeta potential of monolayers was more positive than the zeta potential of fibrinogen in the bulk, which proves a heterogeneous charge distribution. These experimental data reveal a new, side-on adsorption mechanism of fibrinogen on positively charged surfaces and

  9. Electromagnetic fields and potentials generated by massless charged particles

    CERN Document Server

    Azzurli, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    We provide for the first time the exact solution of Maxwell's equations for a massless charged particle moving on a generic trajectory at the speed of light. In particular we furnish explicit expressions for the vector potential and the electromagnetic field, which were both previously unknown, finding that they entail different physical features for bounded and unbounded trajectories. With respect to the standard Lienard-Wiechert field the electromagnetic field acquires singular delta-like contributions whose support and dimensionality depend crucially on whether the motion is a) linear, b) accelerated unbounded, c) accelerated bounded. In the first two cases the particle generates a planar shock-wave-like electromagnetic field traveling along a straight line. In the second and third cases the field acquires, in addition, a delta-like contribution supported on a physical singularity-string attached to the particle. For generic accelerated motions a genuine radiation field is also present, represented by a re...

  10. Coherent Light induced in Optical Fiber by a Charged Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artru, Xavier; Ray, Cédric

    2016-07-01

    Coherent light production in an optical fiber by a charged particle (named PIGL, for particle-induced guided, light) is reviewed. From the microscopic point of view, light is emitted by transient electric dipoles induced in the fiber medium by the Coulomb field of the particle. The phenomenon can also considered as the capture of virtual photons of the particle field by the fiber. Two types of captures are distinguished. Type-I takes place in a uniform part of the fiber; then the photon keeps its longitudinal momentum pz . Type-II takes place near an end or in a non-uniform part of the fiber; then pz is not conserved. Type-I PIGL is not affected by background lights external to the fiber. At grazing incidence it becomes nearly monochromatic. Its circular polarization depends on the angular momentum of the particle about the fiber and on the relative velocity between the particle and the guided wave. A general formula for the yield of Type-II radiation, based on the reciprocity theorem, is proposed. This radiation can be assisted by metallic objects stuck to the fiber, via plasmon excitation. A periodic structure leads to a guided Smith-Purcell radiation. Applications of PIGL in beam diagnostics are considered.

  11. Theory of intense beams of charged particles optics of charged particle analyzers

    CERN Document Server

    Hawkes, Peter W

    2011-01-01

    Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics merges two long-running serials--Advances in Electronics and Electron Physics and Advances in Optical and Electron Microscopy. This series features extended articles on the physics of electron devices (especially semiconductor devices), particle optics at high and low energies, microlithography, image science and digital image processing, electromagnetic wave propagation, electron microscopy, and the computing methods used in all these domains. * Contributions from leading international scholars and industry experts * Discusses hot topic areas and pr

  12. Conformational regulation of charge recombination reactions in a photosynthetic bacterial reaction center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katona, Gergely; Snijder, Arjan; Gourdon, Pontus Emanuel;

    2005-01-01

    In bright light the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides stabilizes the P(+)(870).Q(-)(A) charge-separated state and thereby minimizes the potentially harmful effects of light saturation. Using X-ray diffraction we report a conformational change that occurs within the cy...

  13. Dosimetry of charged and neutral particles onboard a stratospheric balloon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dönsdorf, Esther Miriam; Burmeister, Soenke; Heber, Bernd; Benton, Eric; Berger, Thomas

    The interaction of the primary galactic cosmic rays with constituents of the atmosphere leads to a complex secondary radiation field at high altitudes. Of special interest for aviation and thereby also for radiation protection is the height up to 30 km where the radiation field consists of charged and neutral particles. For the determination of the dose rates up to this altitude in the Earth's atmosphere a stratopheric balloon flight will be performed in central Oklahoma which has a cutoff rigidity of about 4 GV. Onboard there will be two different active radiation detector systems to measure the dose of charged and neutral particles in the stratosphere. The first one is a silicon telescope which consists of two 2 cm2 silicon PIN-photodiodes used as semiconductor detectors. This instrument will mainly be used to measure the charged component of the radiation field due to the fact that the silicon detectors have a rather low efficiency for the detection of neutrons and gammas with energies higher than 60 keV. The second instrument is a so called phoswich detector. It is composed of two dissimilar scintillators optically coupled to each other and to a common photomultiplier tube. For this experimental setup a combination of a fast plastic scintillator BC412 and a slow inorganic scintillator CsI(Na) is used. The pulses from the two scintillators will be separated by applying pulse shape analysis. These two different scintillator materials have been chosen because BC412 is hydrogen rich and thus the cross section for fast neutrons is relatively high and CsI(Na) has a high cross section for gamma radiation. The objective of the phoswich detector is to distinguish between gammas and neutrons but it is also possible to measure charged particles with this setup. The aim of the balloon flight is to determine the dose measured with these two different instruments and in particular to differentiate between the dose induced by charged particles and by the different neutral

  14. Charge cluster distribution in nanosites traversed by a single ionizing particle An experimental approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pszona, S.; Bantsar, A.; Kula, J.

    2008-11-01

    A method for modeling charge cluster formation by a single ionizing particle in nanoelectronic structures of few nanometres size is presented. The method is based on experimental modeling of charge formation in the equivalent gaseous nanosites irradiated by single charged particles and the subsequent scaling procedure to a needed medium. Propane irradiated by alpha particles is presented as an example.

  15. A New Approach to Charged Particle Slowing Down and Dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, David E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-24

    The process by which super-thermal ions slow down against background Coulomb potentials arises in many fields of study. In particular, this is one of the main mechanisms by which the mass and energy from the reaction products of fusion reactions is deposited back into the background. Many of these fields are characterized by length and time scales that are the same magnitude as the range and duration of the trajectory of these particles, before they thermalize into the background. This requires numerical simulation of this slowing down process through numerically integrating the velocities and energies of these particles. This paper first presents a simple introduction to the required plasma physics, followed by the description of the numerical integration used to integrate a beam of particles. This algorithm is unique in that it combines in an integrated manner both a second-order integration of the slowing down with the particle beam dispersion. These two processes are typically computed in isolation from each other. A simple test problem of a beam of alpha particles slowing down against an inert background of deuterium and tritium with varying properties of both the beam and the background illustrate the utility of the algorithm. This is followed by conclusions and appendices. The appendices define the notation, units, and several useful identities.

  16. A novel method for beam misalignment correction of an accelerated charged-particle beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahighi, J. [Van de Graaff Laboratory, Nuclear Science Research School, NSTRI, P.O. Box 14395-836, Tehran, Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: jrahighi@aeoi.org.ir; Lamehi-Rachti, M. [Van de Graaff Laboratory, Nuclear Science Research School, NSTRI, P.O. Box 14395-836, Tehran, Iran (Iran); Kakuee, O.R. [Van de Graaff Laboratory, Nuclear Science Research School, NSTRI, P.O. Box 14395-836, Tehran, Iran (Iran)

    2007-07-21

    A novel method is presented for misalignment correction of an accelerated charged-particle beam in a typical charged-particle scattering experiment employing large-solid-angle detectors. The correction method is based on Rutherford scattering and is quite straightforward to apply when a large solid angle and axially symmetric detection system is used in the experimental measurements. A Monte Carlo computer program and its formalism based on Rutherford scattering cross-section have been described. The program is used to calculate beam misalignment offline after data collection is completed. The method has been successfully applied to correct for misalignment calculated to be typically of the order of a few mm in a {sup 6}He radioactive beam of 27 MeV total energy emerging from a cyclotron and produced via {sup 7}Li(p,2p){sup 6}He reaction.

  17. Measurement of light charged particles in the decay channels of medium-mass excited compound nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Valdre', S; Casini, G; Pasquali, G; Piantelli, S; Carboni, S; Cinausero, M; Gramegna, F; Marchi, T; Baiocco, G; Bardelli, L; Benzoni, G; Bini, M; Blasi, N; Bracco, A; Brambilla, S; Bruno, M; Camera, F; Corsi, A; Crespi, F; Agostino, M D; Degerlier, M; Kravchuk, V L; Leoni, S; Million, B; Montanari, D; Morelli, L; Nannini, A; Nicolini, R; Poggi, G; Vannini, G; Wieland, O; Bednarczyk, P; Ciemała, M; Dudek, J; Fornal, B; Kmiecik, M; Maj, A; Matejska-Minda, M; Mazurek, K; Meczynski, W; Myalski, S; Styczen, J; Zieblinski, M

    2013-01-01

    The 48Ti on 40Ca reactions have been studied at 300 and 600 MeV focusing on the fusion-evaporation (FE) and fusion-fission (FF) exit channels. Energy spectra and multiplicities of the emitted light charged particles have been compared to Monte Carlo simulations based on the statistical model. Indeed, in this mass region (A about 100) models predict that shape transitions can occur at high spin values and relatively scarce data exist in the literature about coincidence measurements between evaporation residues and light charged particles. Signals of shape transitions can be found in the variations of the lineshape of high energy gamma rays emitted from the de-excitation of GDR states gated on different region of angular momenta. For this purpose it is important to keep under control the FE and FF processes, to regulate the statistical model parameters and to control the onset of possible preequilibrium emissions from 300 to 600 MeV bombarding energy.

  18. Electromagnetic fields and potentials generated by massless charged particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azzurli, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.azzurli@gmail.com [Scuola Galileiana di Studi Superiori, Università degli Studi di Padova (Italy); Lechner, Kurt, E-mail: lechner@pd.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Padova (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Padova, Via F. Marzolo, 8, 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2014-10-15

    We provide for the first time the exact solution of Maxwell’s equations for a massless charged particle moving on a generic trajectory at the speed of light. In particular we furnish explicit expressions for the vector potential and the electromagnetic field, which were both previously unknown, finding that they entail different physical features for bounded and unbounded trajectories. With respect to the standard Liénard–Wiechert field the electromagnetic field acquires singular δ-like contributions whose support and dimensionality depend crucially on whether the motion is (a) linear, (b) accelerated unbounded, (c) accelerated bounded. In the first two cases the particle generates a planar shock-wave-like electromagnetic field traveling along a straight line. In the second and third cases the field acquires, in addition, a δ-like contribution supported on a physical singularity-string attached to the particle. For generic accelerated motions a genuine radiation field is also present, represented by a regular principal-part type distribution diverging on the same singularity-string. - Highlights: • First exact solution of Maxwell’s equations for massless charges in arbitrary motion. • Explicit expressions of electromagnetic fields and potentials. • Derivations are rigorous and based on distribution theory. • The form of the field depends heavily on whether the motion is bounded or unbounded. • The electromagnetic field contains unexpected Dirac-delta-function contributions.

  19. The Stability of the Vacuum Polarization Surrounding a Charged Particle

    CERN Document Server

    Himpsel, F J

    2015-01-01

    The internal stability of the electron has been debated for a century at both the classical and the quantum level. Recently, a local force density balance was established for the 1s electron in the H atom, based on the energy-momentum tensor of the classical Dirac field. This methodology is now extended to quantum fields by considering the force densities acting on the vacuum polarization induced by a point charge. Such a model is applicable to any charged particle at large distances, since the only vestige of its internal structure is the electric Coulomb field together with the vacuum polarization induced by it. While the polarization charge density is attracted to the point charge, it is kept from collapsing by repulsive forces due to confinement and degeneracy. It is shown analytically that the corresponding force densities are balanced for every filled shell of mj states at a given angular momentum j. The force densities are then summed over all single-electron states in the Dirac sea and renormalized by...

  20. Moving Charged Particles in Lattice Boltzmann-Based Electrokinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Kuron, Michael; Schornbaum, Florian; Bauer, Martin; Godenschwager, Christian; Holm, Christian; de Graaf, Joost

    2016-01-01

    The motion of ionic solutes and charged particles under the influence of an electric field and the ensuing hydrodynamic flow of the underlying solvent is ubiquitous in aqueous colloidal suspensions. The physics of such systems is described by a coupled set of differential equations, along with boundary conditions, collectively referred to as the electrokinetic equations. Capuani et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 121, 973 (2004)] introduced a lattice-based method for solving this system of equations, which builds upon the lattice Boltzmann (LB) algorithm for the simulation of hydrodynamic flow and exploits computational locality. However, thus far, a description of how to incorporate moving boundary conditions, which are needed to simulate moving colloids, into the Capuani scheme has been lacking. In this paper, we detail how to introduce such moving boundaries, based on an analogue to the moving boundary method for the pure LB solver. The key ingredients in our method are mass and charge conservation for the solute spec...

  1. Charged Particle Multiplicity Analysis in MicroBooNE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafique, Aleena; MicroBooNE Experiment Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    MicroBooNE is a short baseline neutrino experiment that utilizes 89 ton active volume liquid argon Time Projection Chamber (TPC) situated on the Booster Neutrino Beamline at Fermilab. It is the first of three liquid argon TPC detectors planned for the Fermilab Short Baseline Neutrino program and will directly probe the source of the anomalous excess of electron-like events in MiniBooNE, while also measuring low-energy neutrino cross sections and providing important R&D for future detectors. In this talk, a study of charged particle multiplicity using neutrino charged-current inclusive events is presented. This analysis can be used to test models of neutrino-argon scattering, and it may be particularly sensitive to nuclear final state interaction effects. Kansas State University.

  2. Radiation reaction in a system of relativistic gravitating particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galtsov, D. V.

    A Lorentz-covariant approach is developed to the description of electromagnetic and gravitational radiation in general relativity. A model of a relativistic system of gravitating point particles is constructed in which energy losses can be interpreted in terms of radiation-reaction forces. These forces are applied not only to the point particles but also to fields generated by these particles in the near zone. It is concluded that radiation friction in a system of relativistic gravitating particles is collective in character.

  3. A Generalized Boltzmann Fokker-Planck Method for Coupled Charged Particle Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prinja, Anil K

    2012-01-09

    The goal of this project was to develop and investigate the performance of reduced-physics formulations of high energy charged particle (electrons, protons and heavier ions) transport that are computationally more efficient than not only analog Monte Carlo methods but also the established condensed history Monte Carlo technique. Charged particles interact with matter by Coulomb collisions with target nuclei and electrons, by bremsstrahlung radiation loss and by nuclear reactions such as spallation and fission. Of these, inelastic electronic collisions and elastic nuclear collisions are the dominant cause of energy-loss straggling and angular deflection or range straggling of a primary particle. These collisions are characterized by extremely short mean free paths (sub-microns) and highly peaked, near-singular differential cross sections about forward directions and zero energy loss, with the situation for protons and heavier ions more extreme than for electrons. For this reason, analog or truephysics single-event Monte Carlo simulation, while possible in principle, is computationally prohibitive for routine calculation of charged particle interaction phenomena.

  4. Charged Particle Multiplicities in Deep Inelastic Scattering at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aïd, S; Andreev, V; Andrieu, B; Appuhn, R D; Babaev, A; Ban, Y; Baranov, P S; Barrelet, E; Barschke, R; Bartel, Wulfrin; Barth, Monique; Bassler, U; Beck, H P; Behrend, H J; Belousov, A; Berger, C; Bernardi, G; Bertrand-Coremans, G H; Besançon, M; Beyer, R; Biddulph, P; Bispham, P; Bizot, J C; Blobel, Volker; Borras, K; Botterweck, F; Boudry, V; Braemer, A; Braunschweig, W; Brisson, V; Bruel, P; Bruncko, Dusan; Brune, C R; Buchholz, R; Buniatian, A Yu; Burke, S; Burton, M; Bähr, J; Büngener, L; Bürger, J; Büsser, F W; Calvet, D; Campbell, A J; Carli, T; Charlet, M; Chechelnitskii, S; Chernyshov, V; Clarke, D; Clegg, A B; Clerbaux, B; Cocks, S P; Contreras, J G; Cormack, C; Coughlan, J A; Courau, A; Cousinou, M C; Cozzika, G; Criegee, L; Cussans, D G; Cvach, J; Dagoret, S; Dainton, J B; Dau, W D; Daum, K; David, M; Davis, C L; De Wolf, E A; Delcourt, B; Di Nezza, P; Dirkmann, M; Dixon, P; Dlugosz, W; Dollfus, C; Dowell, John D; Dreis, H B; Droutskoi, A; Duhm, H; Dünger, O; Ebert, J; Ebert, T R; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eichler, R; Eisele, Franz; Eisenhandler, Eric F; Ellison, R J; Elsen, E E; Erdmann, M; Erdmann, W; Evrard, E; Fahr, A B; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Feeken, D; Felst, R; Feltesse, Joel; Ferencei, J; Ferrarotto, F; Flamm, K; Fleischer, M; Flieser, M; Flügge, G; Fomenko, A; Fominykh, B A; Formánek, J; Foster, J M; Franke, G; Fretwurst, E; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gabathuler, K; Gaede, F; Garvey, J; Gayler, J; Gebauer, M; Genzel, H; Gerhards, R; Glazov, A; Goerlach, U; Gogitidze, N; Goldberg, M; Goldner, D; Golec-Biernat, Krzysztof J; González-Pineiro, B; Gorelov, I V; Grab, C; Greenshaw, T J; Griffiths, R K; Grindhammer, G; Gruber, A; Gruber, C; Grässler, Herbert; Grässler, R; Görlich, L; Haack, J; Hadig, T; Haidt, Dieter; Hajduk, L; Hampel, M; Haynes, W J; Heinzelmann, G; Henderson, R C W; Henschel, H; Herynek, I; Hess, M F; Hewitt, K; Hildesheim, W; Hiller, K H; Hilton, C D; Hladky, J; Hoeger, K C; Hoffmann, D; Holtom, T; Hoppner, M; Horisberger, R P; Hudgson, V L; Hufnagel, H; Hütte, M; Ibbotson, M; Itterbeck, H; Jacholkowska, A; Jacobsson, C; Jaffré, M; Janoth, J; Jansen, T; Johnson, D P; Jung, H; Jönsson, L B; Kalmus, Peter I P; Kander, M; Kant, D; Kaschowitz, R; Kathage, U; Katzy, J M; Kaufmann, H H; Kaufmann, O; Kazarian, S; Kenyon, Ian Richard; Kermiche, S; Keuker, C; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Knies, G; Kolanski, H; Kole, F; Kolya, S D; Korbel, V; Korn, M; Kostka, P; Kotelnikov, S K; Krasny, M W; Krehbiel, H; Krämerkämper, T; Krücker, D; Kuhlen, M; Kurca, T; Kurzhofer, J; Köhler, T; Köhne, J H; Küster, H; Lacour, D; Laforge, B; Lander, R; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Langenegger, U; Laporte, J F; Lebedev, A; Lehner, F; Levonian, S; Lindström, G; Lindstrøm, M; Link, J; Linsel, F; Lipinski, J; List, B; Lobo, G; Loch, P; Lomas, J W; Lubimov, V; Lüke, D; López, G C; Magnussen, N; Malinovskii, E I; Mani, S; Maracek, R; Marage, P; Marks, J; Marshall, R; Martens, J; Martin, G; Martin, R D; Martyn, H U; Martyniak, J; Mavroidis, A; Maxfield, S J; McMahon, S J; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Meyer, A; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Meyer, P O; Migliori, A; Mikocki, S; Milstead, D; Moeck, J; Moreau, F; Morris, J V; Mroczko, E; Murín, P; Müller, G; Müller, K; Nagovitsin, V; Nahnhauer, R; Naroska, Beate; Naumann, T; Negri, I; Newman, P R; Newton, D; Neyret, D; Nguyen, H K; Nicholls, T C; Niebergall, F; Niebuhr, C B; Niedzballa, C; Niggli, H; Nisius, R; Nowak, G; Noyes, G W; Nyberg-Werther, M; Oakden, M N; Oberlack, H; Olsson, J E; Ozerov, D; Palmen, P; Panaro, E; Panitch, A; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Pawletta, H; Peppel, E; Phillips, J P; Pieuchot, A; Pitzl, D; Pope, G; Prell, S; Pérez, E; Rabbertz, K; Reimer, P; Reinshagen, S; Rick, Hartmut; Riech, V; Riedlberger, J; Riepenhausen, F; Riess, S; Rizvi, E; Robertson, S M; Robmann, P; Roloff, H E; Roosen, R; Rosenbauer, K; Rostovtsev, A A; Rouse, F; Royon, C; Rusakov, S V; Rybicki, K; Rädel, G; Rüter, K; Sankey, D P C; Schacht, P; Schiek, S; Schleif, S; Schleper, P; Schmidt, D; Schmidt, G; Schröder, V; Schuhmann, E; Schwab, B; Schöning, A; Sefkow, F; Seidel, M; Sell, R; Semenov, A A; Shekelian, V I; Shevyakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Siegmon, G; Siewert, U; Sirois, Y; Skillicorn, Ian O; Smirnov, P; Smith, J R; Solochenko, V; Soloviev, Yu V; Specka, A E; Spiekermann, J; Spielman, S; Spitzer, H; Squinabol, F; Starosta, R; Steenbock, M; Steffen, P; Steinberg, R; Steiner, H; Steinhart, J; Stella, B; Stellberger, A; Stier, J; Stiewe, J; Stolze, K; Straumann, U; Struczinski, W; Stösslein, U; Sutton, J P; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tasevsky, M; Theissen, J; Thiebaux, C; Thompson, G; Truöl, P; Tsipolitis, G; Turnau, J; Tutas, J; Uelkes, P; Usik, A; Valkár, S; Valkárová, A; Vallée, C; Van Esch, P; Van Mechelen, P; Van den Plas, D; Vazdik, Ya A; Verrecchia, P; Villet, G; Wacker, K; Wagener, A; Wagener, M; Walther, A; Waugh, B; Weber, G; Weber, M; Wegener, D; Wegner, A; Wengler, T; Werner, M; West, L R; Wiesand, S; Wilksen, T; Willard, S; Winde, M; Winter, G G; Wittek, C; Wobisch, M; Wünsch, E; Zarbock, D; Zhang, Z; Zhokin, A S; Zini, P; Zomer, F; Zsembery, J; Zuber, K; Zur Nedden, M; Zácek, J; de Roeck, A; von Schlippe, W

    1996-01-01

    Using the H1 detector at HERA, charged particle multiplicity distributions in deep inelastic ep scattering have been measured over a large kinematical region. The evolution with $W$ and $Q^2$ of the multiplicity distribution and of the multiplicity moments in pseudorapidity domains of varying size is studied in the current fragmentation region of the hadronic centre-of-mass frame. The results are compared with data from fixed target lepton-nucleon interactions, $e^+e^-$ annihilations and hadron-hadron collisions as well as with expectations from QCD based parton models. Fits to the Negative Binomial and Lognormal distributions are presented.

  5. Motion of charged particles in a knotted electromagnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrayas, M; Trueba, J L, E-mail: joseluis.trueba@urjc.e [Area de Electromagnetismo, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Camino del Molino s/n, 28943 Fuenlabrada, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-06-11

    In this paper we consider the classical relativistic motion of charged particles in a knotted electromagnetic field. After reviewing how to construct electromagnetic knots from maps between the three-sphere and the two-sphere, we introduce a mean quadratic radius of the energy density distribution in order to study some properties of this field. We study the classical relativistic motion of electrons in the electromagnetic field of the Hopf map, and compute their trajectories. It is observed that these electrons initially at rest are strongly accelerated by the electromagnetic force, becoming ultrarelativistic in a period of time that depends on the knot energy and size.

  6. A technique to improve crystal channeling efficiency of charged particles

    CERN Document Server

    Tikhomirov, V V

    2007-01-01

    It is shown that a narrow plane cut near the crystal surface considerably increases the probability of capture into the stable channeling motion of positively charged particles entering a crystal at angles smaller than a quarter of the critical channeling angle with respect to the crystal planes. At smallest incidence angles the capture probability reaches 99 percent. A pair of crystals bent in orthogonal planes and provided with the cuts allows to reach a 99.9 percent efficiency of single-pass deflection of a proton beam with an ultra small divergence. Conditions necessary for efficient single-pass deflection of protons from the LHC beam halo are also discussed.

  7. KAERI charged particle cross section library for radioisotope production

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, J H; Kim, D H; Lee, Y O; Zhuang, Y X

    2001-01-01

    This report summarized information and figures describing the 'KAERI Charged Particle Cross Section Library for Radioisotope production' The library contains proton-, deutron-, He-3-, and alpha-induced monitor cross sections, and gamma- and positron-emitter production cross sections. Experimental data and evaluation methods are described, and the evaluated cross sections are compared with those of the IAEA, MENDL, and LA150. The library has cross sections and emission spectra suitable for the transport analysis in the design of radioisotope production system, and are available at http://atom.kaeri.re.kr/ in ENDF-6 format.

  8. Explicit K-symplectic algorithms for charged particle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yang; Zhou, Zhaoqi; Sun, Yajuan; Liu, Jian; Qin, Hong

    2017-02-01

    We study the Lorentz force equation of charged particle dynamics by considering its K-symplectic structure. As the Hamiltonian of the system can be decomposed as four parts, we are able to construct the numerical methods that preserve the K-symplectic structure based on Hamiltonian splitting technique. The newly derived numerical methods are explicit, and are shown in numerical experiments to be stable over long-term simulation. The error convergency as well as the long term energy conservation of the numerical solutions is also analyzed by means of the Darboux transformation.

  9. Inclusive photoproduction of single charged particles at high p T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apsimon, R. J.; Atkinson, M.; Baake, M.; Bagdasarian, L. S.; Barberis, D.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brook, N.; Charity, T.; Clegg, A. B.; Coyle, P.; Danaher, S.; Danagulian, S.; Davenport, M.; Dickinson, B.; Diekmann, B.; Donnachie, A.; Doyle, A. T.; Eades, J.; Ellison, R. J.; Flower, P. S.; Foster, J. M.; Galbraith, W.; Galumian, P. I.; Gapp, C.; Gebert, F.; Hallewell, G.; Heinloth, K.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hickman, M. T.; Hoeger, C.; Holzkamp, S.; Hughes-Jones, R. E.; Ibbotson, M.; Jakob, H. P.; Joseph, D.; Keemer, N. R.; Kingler, J.; Koersgen, G.; Kolya, S. D.; Lafferty, G. D.; McCann, H.; McClatchey, R.; McManus, C.; Mercer, D.; Morris, J. A. G.; Morris, J. V.; Newton, D.; O'Connor, A.; Oedingen, R.; Oganesian, A. G.; Ottewell, P. J.; Paterson, C. N.; Paul, E.; Reid, D.; Rotscheidt, H.; Sharp, P. H.; Soeldner-Rembold, S.; Thacker, N. A.; Thompson, L.; Thompson, R. J.; Voigtlaender-Tetzner, A.; Waterhouse, J.; Weigend, A. S.; Wilson, G. W.

    1989-03-01

    Single charged-particle inclusive cross sections for photon, pion and kaon beams on hydrogen at the CERN-SPS are presented as functions of p T and x F . Data cover the range 0.01.6 GeV/c for the photon-induced data. Using the hadron-induced data to estimate the hadronic behaviour of the photon, the difference distributions and ratios of cross sections are a measure of the contribution of the point-like photon interactions. The data are compared with QCD calculations and show broadly similar features.

  10. Classical Radiation Reaction in Particle-In-Cell Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Vranic, Marija; Fonseca, Ricardo A; Silva, Luis O

    2015-01-01

    Under the presence of ultra high intensity lasers or other intense electromagnetic fields the motion of particles in the ultrarelativistic regime can be severely affected by radiation reaction. The standard particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithms do not include radiation reaction effects. Even though this is a well known mechanism, there is not yet a definite algorithm nor a standard technique to include radiation reaction in PIC codes. We have compared several models for the calculation of the radiation reaction force, with the goal of implementing an algorithm for classical radiation reaction in the Osiris framework, a state-of-the-art PIC code. The results of the different models are compared with standard analytical results, and the relevance/advantages of each model are discussed. Numerical issues relevant to PIC codes such as resolution requirements, application of radiation reaction to macro particles and computational cost are also addressed. The Landau and Lifshitz reduced model is chosen for implementatio...

  11. ABCD-Type Law for Charged-Particle Beam Transport in Paraxial Approximation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈宝信; 孙别和

    2003-01-01

    Based on the similarity between charged-particle beam transversal transport and transmission of ellipse Gaussian light beam in paraxial approximation, it is shown that charged-particle beam transversal transport in real space is governed by the ABCD-type law for a complex curvature radius of the charged-particle beam in which the beam transverse emittance plays the role of wavelength; from this, a novel technique for characterizing charged-particle beam is proposed. Finally, this analogy provides an insight observation that it is hopeful to attain possible coherent charged-particle beam in favourable accelerator environment.

  12. Measuring Charged Particle Multiplicity with Early ATLAS Public Data

    CERN Document Server

    Üstün, Gözde; Bektaş, Erhan; Özcan, V Erkcan

    2016-01-01

    We study 100 images of early LHC collisions that were recorded by the ATLAS experiment and made public for outreach purposes, and extract the charged particle multiplicity as a function of momentum for proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV. As the collisions we study have already been pre-processed by the ATLAS Collaboration, the tracks are visible, but are available to the public only in the form of low-resolution bitmaps. We employ two separate image processing methods, one based on the industry-standard OpenCV library and C++, another based on self-developed algorithms in Python. We present the transverse momentum and azimuthal angle distributions of the particles obtained through both methods, in agreement with the literature.

  13. A Search for Charged Massive Stable Particles at D0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eads, Michael Terry [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States)

    2005-08-01

    A search for charged massive stable particles has been performed with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The signature is two particles reconstructed as muons, but with speed and invariant mass inconsistent with beam-produced muons. No excess of events is observed and limits are set on the production cross-section for pair-produced stable stau sleptons based on 390 pb-1 of data. Limits vary from 0.06 pb to 0.62 pb, depending on the stau mass, and are the strictest Tevatron limits to date. Mass limits are also set for stable charginos. The limits are 140 GeV/c2 for a higgsino-like chargino and 174 GeV/c2 for a gaugino-like chargino. These are currently the best limits to date for stable charginos.

  14. Emission of ions and charged soot particles by aircraft engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sorokin

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a model which examines the formation and evolution of chemiions in an aircraft engine is proposed. This model which includes chemiionisation, electron thermo-emission, electron attachment to soot particles and to neutral molecules, electron-ion and ion-ion recombination, ion-soot interaction, allows the determination of the ion concentration at the exit of the combustor and at the nozzle exit of the engine. It also allows the determination of the charge of the soot particles. A comparison of the model results with the available ground-based experimental data obtained on the ATTAS research aircraft engines during the SULFUR experiments (Schumann, 2002 shows an excellent agreement.

  15. Search for Charged Massive Long-Lived Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alimena J.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Alves G. A.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M. -C.; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; De K.; de Jong S. J.; De la Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph.; Grivaz J. -F.; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De La Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Kvita J.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; et al.

    2012-03-21

    We report on a search for charged massive long-lived particles (CMLLPs), based on 5.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collider. We search for events in which one or more particles are reconstructed as muons but have speed and ionization energy loss (dE/dx) inconsistent with muons produced in beam collisions. CMLLPs are predicted in several theories of physics beyond the standard model. We exclude pair-produced long-lived gaugino-like charginos below 267 GeV and Higgsino-like charginos below 217 GeV at 95% C.L., as well as long-lived scalar top quarks with mass below 285 GeV.

  16. Charging and coagulation of radioactive and nonradioactive particles in the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-H. Kim

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Charging and coagulation influence one another and impact the particle charge and size distributions in the atmosphere. However, few investigations to date have focused on the coagulation kinetics of atmospheric particles accumulating charge. This study presents three approaches to include mutual effects of charging and coagulation on the microphysical evolution of atmospheric particles such as radioactive particles. The first approach employs ion balance, charge balance, and a bivariate population balance model (PBM to comprehensively calculate both charge accumulation and coagulation rates of particles. The second approach involves a much simpler description of charging, and uses a monovariate PBM and subsequent effects of charge on particle coagulation. The third approach is further simplified assuming that particles instantaneously reach their steady-state charge distributions. It is found that compared to the other two approaches, the first approach can accurately predict time-dependent changes in the size and charge distributions of particles over a wide size range covering from the free molecule to continuum regimes. The other two approaches can reliably predict both charge accumulation and coagulation rates for particles larger than about 40 nm and atmospherically relevant conditions. These approaches are applied to investigate coagulation kinetics of particles accumulating charge in a radioactive neutralizer, the urban atmosphere, and a radioactive plume. Limitations of the approaches are discussed.

  17. Charge-transfer reactions between C{sub 60} and hydrophilic solutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimitrijevic, N.M.; Nedeljkovic, J.M.; Saponjic, Z.V. [Institute for Nuclear Sciences ``Vinca``, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1998-10-01

    Two different procedures for dissolving fullerene molecule C{sub 60} into aqueous solutions have been developed. Embedding C{sub 60} clusters into a water-soluble host molecule of {gamma}-cyclodextrin resulted in relatively low concentration of C{sub 60} (5-10 {mu}M). Prepare of a stable ionic surfactant/water/oil microemulsion provided a method for dissolving C{sub 60} in relatively high concentrations (1 mM). In both cases charge-transfer reactions between hydrophobic molecule of C{sub 60} and hydrophilic solutes were examined. Anion radical C{sub 60}{sup -} was detected in reaction with radiolytically produced radicals (e{sub aq}{sup -}, (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}COH or MV{sup +}), and in reaction with excess electrons stored onto nanometer-sized metal (Ag) or quantized semiconductor (TiO{sub 2}) particles. (orig.) 33 refs.

  18. Charged particle motion near a linear magnetic null

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.; Cary, J.R.

    1983-08-01

    Charged particle motion near the null of a two-dimensional magnetic field is studied. Specifically, the magnetic field is given by the vector potential A = zpsi/sub 0/((y/a)/sup 2/+(epsilonx/a)/sup 2/), in which psi/sub 0/,a, and epsilon are constants with epsilon parameterizing the ellipticity of the flux surfaces. Conservation of canonical z momentum p/sub z/ reduces the number of nontrivial degrees of freedom to two. Scaling reduces the number of parameters in the system to two, epsilon and sigma (the sign of p/sub z/ ). Analytical and numerical methods are used to study the nature of orbits. The results are expressed conveniently in terms of epsilon and Qequivalent(2mE)/sup 1/2//p/sub z/. When epsilon is unity, the additional symmetry implies integrability. When epsilon is less than unity (the case epsilon>1 is trivially related) three regimes are found: (1) For Vertical BarQVertical Bar>>1 particle orbits are regular, (2) for epsilon/sup 3/2/< or approx. =Vertical BarQVertical Bar< or approx. =1 most particle orbits are stochastic, and (3) for Vertical BarQVertical Bar<particle orbits are regular, with the third invariant being the magnetic moment.

  19. Energy losses of positive and negative charged particles in electron gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diachenko, M. M.; Kholodov, R. I.

    2017-02-01

    A heavy charged particle propagation through electron gas has been studied using combination of non-relativistic quantum mechanics and the Green’s functions method. The energy loss of a charged particle has been found in the case of large transferred momentum taking into account the interference term in the expression for the rate. The dependence of the energy loss of a charged particles in electron gas with nonzero temperature on the sign of the charge has been obtained.

  20. Modeling of mesoscopic electrokinetic phenomena using charged dissipative particle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Mingge; Li, Zhen; Karniadakis, George

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we propose a charged dissipative particle dynamics (cDPD) model for investigation of mesoscopic electrokinetic phenomena. In particular, this particle-based method was designed to simulate micro- or nano- flows which governing by Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) equation coupled with Navier-Stokes (NS) equation. For cDPD simulations of wall-bounded fluid systems, a methodology for imposing correct Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions for both PNP and NS equations is developed. To validate the present cDPD model and the corresponding boundary method, we perform cDPD simulations of electrostatic double layer (EDL) in the vicinity of a charged wall, and the results show good agreement with the mean-field theoretical solutions. The capacity density of a parallel plate capacitor in salt solution is also investigated with different salt concentration. Moreover, we utilize the proposed methodology to study the electroosmotic and electroosmotic/pressure-driven flow in a micro-channel. In the last, we simulate the dilute polyelectrolyte solution both in bulk and micro-channel, which show the flexibility and capability of this method in studying complex fluids. This work was sponsored by the Collaboratory on Mathematics for Mesoscopic Modeling of Materials (CM4) supported by DOE.

  1. Spin dipole nuclear matrix elements for double beta decay nuclei by charge-exchange reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Ejiri, H

    2016-01-01

    Spin dipole (SD) strengths for double beta-decay (DBD) nuclei were studied experimentally for the first time by using measured cross sections of (3He,t) charge exchange reactions (CERs). Then SD nuclear matrix elements (NMEs) for low-lying 2- states were derived from the experimental SD strengths by referring to the experimental GT (Gamow-Teller) and F (Fermi) strengths. They are consistent with the empirical SD NMEs based on the quasi-particle model with the empirical effective SD coupling constant. The CERs are used to evaluate the SD NME, which is associated with one of the major components of the neutrino-less DBD NME.

  2. Atmospheric new particle formation: real and apparent growth of neutral and charged particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Leppä

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we have provided simple analytical formulae to estimate the growth rate of a nucleation mode due to self-coagulation and the apparent growth rate due to coagulation scavenging by larger particles. These formulae were used on a set of simulations covering a wide range of atmospheric conditions. The modal growth rates were determined from the simulation results by summing the contribution of each process, by calculating the increase rate in the count mean diameter of the mode and by following the peak concentration of the mode. The results of these three methods were compared with each other and the means used to estimate the growth rate due to self-coagulation and coagulation scavenging were found to work quite well. We also investigated the role of charged particles and electric interactions in the growth of a nucleation mode. Charged particles were found to increase the growth rate due to both self-coagulation and coagulation scavenging by a factor of ~1.5 to 2. In case of increased condensation onto charged particles, the total condensational growth rate of a nucleation mode may increase significantly in the very early steps of the growth. The analytical formulae provided by this paper were designed to provide the growth rates due to different processes from aerosol dynamic simulations, but the same principles can be used to determine the growth rates from measurement data.

  3. Atmospheric new particle formation: real and apparent growth of neutral and charged particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Leppä

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study we have provided simple analytical formulae to estimate the growth rate of a nucleation mode due to self-coagulation and the apparent growth rate due to coagulation scavenging by larger particles. These formulae were used on a set of simulations covering a wide range of atmospheric conditions. The modal growth rates were determined from the simulation results by summing the contribution of each process, by calculating the increase rate in the count mean diameter of the mode and by following the peak concentration of the mode. The results of these three methods were compared with each other and the means used to estimate the growth rate due to self-coagulation and coagulation scavenging were found to give accurate values. We also investigated the role of charged particles and electric interactions in the growth of a nucleation mode. Charged particles were found to increase the growth rate due to both self-coagulation and coagulation scavenging by a factor of ~1.5 to 2. In case of increased condensation onto charged particles, the total condensational growth rate of a nucleation mode may increase significantly in the very early steps of the growth. The analytical formulae provided by this paper were designed to provide the growth rates due to different processes from aerosol dynamic simulations, but the same principles can be used to determine the growth rates from measurement data.

  4. Measurements of charge distributions of the fragments in the low energy fission reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Taofeng; Han, Hongyin; Meng, Qinghua; Wang, Liming; Zhu, Liping; Xia, Haihong

    2013-01-01

    The measurement for charge distributions of fragments in spontaneous fission 252Cf has been performed by using a unique style of detector setup consisting of a typical grid ionization chamber and a ΔΕ-Ε particle telescope, in which a thin grid ionization chamber served as the ΔΕ-section and the E-section was an Au-Si surface barrier detector. The typical physical quantities of fragments, such as mass number and kinetic energies as well as the deposition in the gas ΔΕ detector and E detector were derived from the coincident measurement data. The charge distributions of the light fragments for the fixed mass number A2* and total kinetic energy (TKE) were obtained by the least-squares fits for the response functions of the ΔΕ detector with multi-Gaussian functions representing the different elements. The results of the charge distributions for some typical fragments are shown in this article which indicates that this detection setup has the charge distribution capability of Ζ:ΔΖ>40:1. The experimental method developed in this work for determining the charge distributions of fragments is expected to be employed in the neutron induced fissions of 232Th and 238U or other low energy fission reactions.

  5. Response of Charged Particles in a Storage Ring to Gravitational Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Dong; HUANG Chao-Guang

    2003-01-01

    The influence of gravitational waves on the charged particles in a storage ring is studied. It shows thatthe gravitational waves might be directly detected by monitoring the motion of charged particles in a storage ring. Theangular velocity of the charged particles is continually adjustable by changing the initial energy of particles and thestrength of the magnetic field. This feature is very useful for finding the gravitational waves with different frequencies.

  6. Response of Charged Particles in a Storage Ring to Gravitational Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONGDong; HUANGChao-Guang

    2003-01-01

    The influence of gravitational waves on the charged particles in a storage ring is studied. It shows that the gravitational waves might be directly detected by monitoring the motion of charged particles in a storage ring. The angular velocity of the charged particles is continually adjustable by changing the initial energy of particles and the strength of the magnetic field. This feature is very useful for finding the gravitational waves with different frequencies.

  7. Fractional dynamics of charged particles in magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronel-Escamilla, A.; Gómez-Aguilar, J. F.; Alvarado-Méndez, E.; Guerrero-Ramírez, G. V.; Escobar-Jiménez, R. F.

    2016-02-01

    In many physical applications the electrons play a relevant role. For example, when a beam of electrons accelerated to relativistic velocities is used as an active medium to generate Free Electron Lasers (FEL), the electrons are bound to atoms, but move freely in a magnetic field. The relaxation time, longitudinal effects and transverse variations of the optical field are parameters that play an important role in the efficiency of this laser. The electron dynamics in a magnetic field is a means of radiation source for coupling to the electric field. The transverse motion of the electrons leads to either gain or loss energy from or to the field, depending on the position of the particle regarding the phase of the external radiation field. Due to the importance to know with great certainty the displacement of charged particles in a magnetic field, in this work we study the fractional dynamics of charged particles in magnetic fields. Newton’s second law is considered and the order of the fractional differential equation is (0;1]. Based on the Grünwald-Letnikov (GL) definition, the discretization of fractional differential equations is reported to get numerical simulations. Comparison between the numerical solutions obtained on Euler’s numerical method for the classical case and the GL definition in the fractional approach proves the good performance of the numerical scheme applied. Three application examples are shown: constant magnetic field, ramp magnetic field and harmonic magnetic field. In the first example the results obtained show bistability. Dissipative effects are observed in the system and the standard dynamic is recovered when the order of the fractional derivative is 1.

  8. Charged and Neutral Particles Channeling Phenomena Channeling 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabagov, Sultan B.; Palumbo, Luigi

    2010-04-01

    On the discovery of coherent Bremsstrahlung in a single crystal at the Frascati National Laboratories / C. Barbiellini, G. P. Murtas and S. B. Dabagov -- Advances in coherent Bremsstrahlung and LPM-effect studies (to the lOOth anniversary from the birth of L. D. Landau) / N. F. Shul'ga -- Spectra of radiation and created particles at intermediate energy in oriented crystal taking into account energy loss / V. N. Baier and V. M. Katkov -- The coherent Bremsstrahlung beam at MAX-lab facility / K. Fissum ... [et al.] -- Radiation from thin, structured targets (CERN NA63) / A. Dizdar -- Hard incoherent radiation in thick crystals / N. F. Shul'ga, V. V. Syshchenko and A. I. Tarnovsky -- Coherent Bremsstrahlung in periodically deformed crystals with a complex base / A. R. Mkrtchyan, A. A. Saharian and V. V. Parazian -- Induction of coherent x-ray Bremsstrahlung in crystals under the influence of acoustic waves / A. R. Mkrtchyan and V. V. Parazian -- Coherent processes in bent single crystals / V. A. Maisheev -- Experimental and theoretical investigation of complete transfer phenomenon for media with various heat exchange coefficients / A. R. Mkrtchyan, A. E. Movsisyan and V. R. Kocharyan -- Coherent pair production in crystals / A. R. Mkrtchyan, A. A. Saharian and V. V. Parazian -- Negative particle planar and axial channeling and channeling collimation / R. A. Carrigan, Jr. -- CERN crystal-based collimation in modern hadron colliders / W. Scandale -- Studies and application of bent crystals for beam steering at 70 GeV IHEP accelerator / A. G. Afonin ... [et al.] -- Crystal collimation studies at the Tevatron (T-980) / N. V. Mokhov ... [et al.] -- Fabrication of crystals for channeling of particles in accellerators / A. Mazzolari ... [et al.] -- New possibilities to facilitate collimation of both positively and negatively charged particle beams by crystals / V. Guidi, A. Mazzolari and V. V. Tikhomirov -- Increase of probability of particle capture into the channeling

  9. Preliminary study for the detection of neutrons in heavy-ion collisions with charged particle detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auditore L.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available At Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS the CHIMERA 4π multidetector has been designed and setup to detect charged particles emitted in heavy ion collisions at intermediate energies. Properties and performances of CHIMERA have been widely demonstrated by published results obtained in the performed experiments. Moreover, in recent years, a new charged particle detector (ChPD for correlation studies (FARCOS has been designed, and recently a first prototype has been coupled to CHIMERA, in order to test performances in view of correlation measurements in coincidence with 4π detectors. Simultaneous neutrons and charged particles detection in heavy ion collisions represents an important experimental progress for future experiments to be performed with both stable and exotic nuclei. In order to investigate about this possibility, simple Monte Carlo simulations have been performed. Preliminary simulations have been carried out by means of MCNPX transport code to evaluate the perturbation effects, including cross-talk and time response, induced in CHIMERA and/or FARCOS Si-CsI(Tl telescopes on (typical 20MeV neutron signals coming froma typical reaction in heavy ion collisions at the Fermi energy. Moreover, first data analysis results of the INKIISSY experiment indicates sizable probability to detect neutrons by properly shadowing CHIMERA Si-CsI(Tl telescopes. Analysis is still in progress.

  10. Composite charged particle detectors with logarithmic energy response for large dynamic range energy measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, M.M.; Begemann-Blaich, M.L.; Blaich, T.; Boissevain, J.A.; Gavron, A.; Jacak, B.V.; Lysaght, P.S.; Wilhelmy, J.B. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Sangster, T.C.; Britt, H.C.; Fields, D.J.; Lanier, R.G.; Massoletti, D.J.; Namboodiri, M.N. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Chan, Y.D.; Harmon, A.; Pouliot, J.; Stokstad, R.G. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Dacal, A. (Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City. Inst. de Fisica); Fraenkel, Z.; Mamane, G. (Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovoth (Israel)); Webb, M.L. (Dynamics Technology, Inc., Torrance, CA (USA))

    1989-09-15

    We have developed an array of detectors to identify charged particles produced in heavy ion reactions. The array, which consists of eight individual detector modules and a forward hodoscope, subtends a solid angle of 0.58{pi} and covers 62% of the reaction plane in laboratory coordinates. Each of the eight identical modules has an active area which extends 13{sup 0} above and below the array plane with additional limited coverage between 13{sup 0} and 26{sup 0}. Each module measures the position, energy and velocity of charged particles over a dynamic range which extends from minium ionizing protons with energies up to 200 MeV to highly ionizing fission fragments with Coulomb-like energies. Position and time-of-flight are measured with low pressure multiwire proprotional counters (MWPC). Total energies for heavier ions are obtained from large ion chambers. Energy and position measurements for more energetic lighter ions which pass through the ion chambers are made with segmented phoswich arrays. The forward angle hodoscope is a 34-element array of phoswich detectors mounted symmetrically around the beam axis. These detectors are sensitive to beam velocity particles (E/A > 10-40 MeV/A) and capable of elemental resolution from protons to Z = 23. (orig.).

  11. Measuring Landau damping in Particle-in-Cell simulations using particles of different charge-weights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, C.; Sarkar, A.; Cao, Y.-X.; Huang, M. C.; Li, J.

    2016-10-01

    We study whether putting more particles in ``region of interest (ROI)'' in phase space can efficiently increase Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulation accuracy. We use Landau damping of a plasma wave as a figure of merit and set the ROI near the phase velocity of the wave. Improvement in Landau damping rate measurement is observed in 1D PIC simulations when employing more particles in the ROI but the effect is not monotonic. This is partly due to energy transfer from particles of large charge weights to those of smaller weights through the electric fields. Possible strategies to mitigate the energy transfer will also be discussed. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1314734 and by the Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-SC0012316.

  12. Inclusive Charged--Current Neutrino--Nucleus Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Nieves, J; Vacas, M J Vicente

    2011-01-01

    We present a model for weak CC induced nuclear reactions at energies of interest for current and future neutrino oscillation experiments. This model is a natural extension of the work of Refs.[1,2], where the QE contribution to the inclusive electron and neutrino scattering on nuclei was analyzed. The model is based on a systematic many body expansion of the gauge boson absorption modes that includes one, two and even three body mechanisms, as well as the excitation of Delta isobars. The whole scheme has no free parameters, besides those previously adjusted to the weak pion production off the nucleon cross sections in the deuteron, since all nuclear effects were set up in previous studies of photon, electron and pion interactions with nuclei. We have discussed at length the recent charged current quasi-elastic MiniBooNE cross section data, and showed that two nucleon knockout mechanisms are essential to describe these measurements.

  13. A Model for the Coalescence of Abraded Nucleons in Heavy Charged Particle Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wet, Wouter; Townsend, Lawrence; Werneth, Charles; Ford, William

    2016-09-01

    Accurate nuclear reaction models are required by the radiation transport codes used to predict the radiation field behind shielding in the space radiation environment. The resulting particle spectra and their corresponding biological response functions are used to estimate radiation risk to astronauts. Radiation transport codes use nuclear fragmentation models to describe the breakup of heavy charged particles in collisions with constituent nuclei of spacecraft and astronauts. The Relativistic Abrasion-Ablation and De-Excitation Fragmentation code, or RAADFRG, uses an abrasion-ablation reaction mechanism to calculate total and isotopic production cross sections of fragment species from a projectile nucleus. In this reaction mechanism, a fraction of nucleons, which sheared from the projectile nucleus during the abrasion step, coalesce to form various light ions. As with its predecessors, the Nuclear Fragmentation (NUCFRG) series, RAADFRG is being developed for implementation in NASA's deterministic High Charge (Z) and Energy radiation TRaNsport code, HZETRN. In this work, we derive the formalism used in RAADFRG to handle this process. Also, characterization of the model and its sensitivity to the coalescence radius parameterization are investigated. Work supported by NASA Grant NNX10AD18A.

  14. Accelerators for heavy-charged-particle radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutrakon, George B

    2007-08-01

    This paper focuses on current and future designs of medical hadron accelerators for treating cancers and other diseases. Presently, five vendors and several national laboratories have produced heavy-particle medical accelerators for accelerating nuclei from hydrogen (protons) up through carbon and oxygen. Particle energies are varied to control the beam penetration depth in the patient. As of the end of 2006, four hospitals and one clinic in the United States offer proton treatments; there are five more such facilities in Japan. In most cases, these facilities use accelerators designed explicitly for cancer treatments. The accelerator types are a combination of synchrotrons, cyclotrons, and linear accelerators; some carry advanced features such as respiration gating, intensity modulation, and rapid energy changes, which contribute to better dose conformity on the tumor when using heavy charged particles. Recent interest in carbon nuclei for cancer treatment has led some vendors to offer carbon-ion and proton capability in their accelerator systems, so that either ion can be used. These features are now being incorporated for medical accelerators in new facilities.

  15. Classical scattering of charged particles confined on an inhomogeneous helix

    CERN Document Server

    Zampetaki, A V; Krönke, S; Schmelcher, P

    2013-01-01

    We explore the effects arising due to the coupling of the center of mass and relative motion of two charged particles confined on an inhomogeneous helix with a locally modified radius. It is first proven that a separation of the center of mass and the relative motion is provided if and only if the confining manifold represents a homogeneous helix. In this case bound states of repulsively Coulomb interacting particles occur. For an inhomogeneous helix, the coupling of the center of mass and relative motion induces an energy transfer between the collective and relative motion, leading to dissociation of initially bound states in a scattering process. Due to the time reversal symmetry, a binding of the particles out of the scattering continuum is thus equally possible. We identify the regimes of dissociation for different initial conditions and provide an analysis of the underlying phase space via Poincar\\'e surfaces of section. Bound states inside the inhomogeneity as well as resonant states are identified.

  16. Charged Particle Motion in a Highly Ionized Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, L S; Singleton, R; Brown, Lowell S; Preston, Dean L; Singleton, Robert L

    2005-01-01

    A recently introduced method utilizing dimensional continuation is employed to compute the energy loss rate for a non-relativistic particle moving through a highly ionized plasma. No restriction is made on the charge, mass, or speed of this particle. It is, however, assumed that the plasma is not strongly coupled in the sense that the dimensionless plasma coupling parameter g=e^2\\kappa_D/ 4\\pi T is small, where \\kappa_D is the Debye wave number of the plasma. To leading and next-to-leading order in this coupling, dE/dx is of the generic form g^2 \\ln[C g^2]. The precise numerical coefficient out in front of the logarithm is well known. We compute the constant C under the logarithm exactly for arbitrary particle speeds. Our exact results differ from approximations given in the literature. The differences are in the range of 20% for cases relevant to inertial confinement fusion experiments. The same method is also employed to compute the rate of momentum loss for a projectile moving in a plasma, and the rate at ...

  17. Chaotic phenomena of charged particles in crystal lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desalvo, Agostino; Giannerini, Simone; Rosa, Rodolfo

    2006-06-01

    In this article, we have applied the methods of chaos theory to channeling phenomena of positive charged particles in crystal lattices. In particular, we studied the transition between two ordered types of motion; i.e., motion parallel to a crystal axis (axial channeling) and to a crystal plane (planar channeling), respectively. The transition between these two regimes turns out to occur through an angular range in which the particle motion is highly disordered and the region of phase space spanned by the particle is much larger than the one swept in the two ordered motions. We have evaluated the maximum Lyapunov exponent with the method put forward by Rosenstein et al. [Physica D 65, 117 (1993)] and by Kantz [Phys. Lett. A 185, 77 (1994)]. Moreover, we estimated the correlation dimension by using the Grassberger-Procaccia method. We found that at the transition the system exhibits a very complex behavior showing an exponential divergence of the trajectories corresponding to a positive Lyapunov exponent and a noninteger value of the correlation dimension. These results turn out to be linked to a physical interpretation. The Lyapunov exponents are in agreement with the model by Akhiezer et al. [Phys. Rep. 203, 289 (1991)], based on the equivalence between the ion motion along the crystal plane described as a "string of strings" and the "kicked" rotator. The nonintegral value of the correlation dimension can be explained by the nonconservation of transverse energy at the transition.

  18. Search for Free Fractional Electric Charge Elementary Particles Using an Automated Millikan Oil Drop Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halyo, V.; Kim, P.; Lee, E. R.; Lee, I. T.; Loomba, D.; Perl, M. L.

    2000-03-20

    We have carried out a direct search in bulk matter for free fractional electric charge elementary particles using the largest mass single sample ever studied--about 17.4 mg of silicone oil. The search used an improved and highly automated Millikan oil drop technique. No evidence for fractional charge particles was found. The concentration of particles with fractional charge more than 0.16e (e being the magnitude of the electron charge) from the nearest integer charge is less than 4.71x10{sup -22} particles per nucleon with 95% confidence. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  19. Search for Free Fractional Electric Charge Elementary Particles Using an Automated Millikan Oil Drop Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halyo, V.; Kim, P.; Lee, E. R.; Lee, I. T.; Loomba, D.; Perl, M. L.

    2000-03-01

    We have carried out a direct search in bulk matter for free fractional electric charge elementary particles using the largest mass single sample ever studied-about 17.4 mg of silicone oil. The search used an improved and highly automated Millikan oil drop technique. No evidence for fractional charge particles was found. The concentration of particles with fractional charge more than 0.16e ( e being the magnitude of the electron charge) from the nearest integer charge is less than 4.71×10-22 particles per nucleon with 95% confidence.

  20. The search for free particles with fractional charge;Experimental survey and new results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halyo, Valerie; Kim, Peter; Lee, Eric R.; Lee, Irwin T.; Loomba, Dinesh; Perl, Martin L.

    2000-04-01

    We have carried out a direct search in bulk matter for free fractional electric charge elementary particles using the largest mass single sample ever studied--- about 17.4 mg of silicone oil. The search used an improved and highly automated Millikan oil drop technique. No evidence for fractional charge particles was found. The concentration of particles with fractional charge more than 0.16 e (e being the magnitude of the electron charge) from the nearest integer charge is less than 4.71×10-22 particles per nucleon with 95% confidence.

  1. Charge collection efficiency of GaAs detectors studied with low-energy heavy charged particles

    CERN Document Server

    Bates, R; Linhart, V; O'Shea, V; Pospísil, S; Raine, C; Smith, K; Sinor, M; Wilhelm, I

    1999-01-01

    Epitaxially grown GaAs layers have recently been produced with sufficient thickness and low enough free carrier concentration to permit their use as radiation detectors. Initial tests have shown that the epi-material behaves as a classical semiconductor as the depletion behaviour follows the square root dependency on the applied bias. This article presents the results of measurements of the growth of the active depletion depth with increasing bias using low-energy protons and alpha particles as probes for various depths and their comparison to values extrapolated from capacitance measurements. From the proton and alpha particle spectroscopic measurements, an active depth of detector material that collects 100% of the charge generated inside it was determined. The consistency of these results with independent capacitance measurements supports the idea that the GaAs epi-material behaves as a classical semiconductor. (author)

  2. Search for multiply charged Heavy Stable Charged Particles in data collected with the CMS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2013-10-30

    Several models of new physics yield particles that are massive, long-lived, and have an electric charge, Q, greater than that of the electron, e. A search for evidence of such particles was performed using 5.0 fb-1 and 18.8 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data collected at √s = 7 TeV and √s = 8 TeV, respectively, with the Compact Muon Solenoid detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The distinctive detector signatures of these particles are that they are slow-moving and highly ionizing. Ionization energy loss and time-of- flight measurements were made using the inner tracker and the muon system, respectively. The search is sensitive to 1e ≤ |Q| ≤ 8e. Data were found to be consistent with standard model expectations and upper limits on the production cross section of these particles were computed using a Drell-Yan-like production model. Masses below 517, 687, 752, 791, 798, 778, 753, and 724 GeV are excluded for |Q| = 1e, 2e, 3e, 4e, 5e, 6e, 7e, and 8e, respectively.

  3. How to model the interaction of charged Janus particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieronimus, Reint; Raschke, Simon; Heuer, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    We analyze the interaction of charged Janus particles including screening effects. The explicit interaction is mapped via a least square method on a variable number n of systematically generated tensors that reflect the angular dependence of the potential. For n = 2 we show that the interaction is equivalent to a model previously described by Erdmann, Kröger, and Hess (EKH). Interestingly, this mapping is for n = 2 not able to capture the subtleties of the interaction for small screening lengths. Rather, a larger number of tensors has to be used. We find that the characteristics of the Janus type interaction plays an important role for the aggregation behavior. We obtained cluster structures up to the size of 13 particles for n = 2 and 36 and screening lengths κ-1 = 0.1 and 1.0 via Monte Carlo simulations. The influence of the screening length is analyzed and the structures are compared to results for an electrostatic-type potential and for the multipole-expanded Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. We find that a dipole-like potential (EKH or dipole DLVO approximation) is not able to sufficiently reproduce the anisotropy effects of the potential. Instead, a higher order expansion has to be used to obtain cluster structures that are compatible with experimental observations. The resulting minimum-energy clusters are compared to those of sticky hard sphere systems. Janus particles with a short-range screened interaction resemble sticky hard sphere clusters for all considered particle numbers, whereas for long-range screening even very small clusters are structurally different.

  4. Weakly nonlinear electrophoresis of a highly charged colloidal particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzer, Ory; Zeyde, Roman; Yavneh, Irad; Yariv, Ehud

    2013-05-01

    At large zeta potentials, surface conduction becomes appreciable in thin-double-layer electrokinetic transport. In the linear weak-field regime, where this effect is quantified by the Dukhin number, it is manifested in non-Smoluchowski electrophoretic mobilities. In this paper we go beyond linear response, employing the recently derived macroscale model of Schnitzer and Yariv ["Macroscale description of electrokinetic flows at large zeta potentials: Nonlinear surface conduction," Phys. Rev. E 86, 021503 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevE.86.021503] as the infrastructure for a weakly nonlinear analysis of spherical-particle electrophoresis. A straightforward perturbation in the field strength is frustrated by the failure to satisfy the far-field conditions, representing a non-uniformity of the weak-field approximation at large distances away from the particle, where salt advection becomes comparable to diffusion. This is remedied using inner-outer asymptotic expansions in the spirit of Acrivos and Taylor ["Heat and mass transfer from single spheres in Stokes flow," Phys. Fluids 5, 387 (1962), 10.1063/1.1706630], with the inner region representing the particle neighborhood and the outer region corresponding to distances scaling inversely with the field magnitude. This singular scheme furnishes an asymptotic correction to the electrophoretic velocity, proportional to the applied field cubed, which embodies a host of nonlinear mechanisms unfamiliar from linear electrokinetic theories. These include the effect of induced zeta-potential inhomogeneity, animated by concentration polarization, on electro-osmosis and diffuso-osmosis; bulk advection of salt; nonuniform bulk conductivity; Coulomb body forces acting on bulk volumetric charge; and the nonzero electrostatic force exerted upon the otherwise screened particle-layer system. A numerical solution of the macroscale model validates our weakly nonlinear analysis.

  5. Particle-gamma and particle-particle correlations in nuclear reactions using Monte Carlo Hauser-Feshback model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawano, Toshihiko [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Talou, Patrick [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Watanabe, Takehito [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chadwick, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations for particle and {gamma}-ray emissions from an excited nucleus based on the Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory are performed to obtain correlated information between emitted particles and {gamma}-rays. We calculate neutron induced reactions on {sup 51}V to demonstrate unique advantages of the Monte Carlo method. which are the correlated {gamma}-rays in the neutron radiative capture reaction, the neutron and {gamma}-ray correlation, and the particle-particle correlations at higher energies. It is shown that properties in nuclear reactions that are difficult to study with a deterministic method can be obtained with the Monte Carlo simulations.

  6. The ST environment: Expected charged particle radiation levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stassinopoulos, E. G.

    1978-01-01

    The external (surface incident) charged particle radiation, predicted for the ST satellite at the three different mission altitudes, was determined in two ways: (1) by orbital flux-integration and (2) by geographical instantaneous flux-mapping. The latest standard models of the environment were used in this effort. Magnetic field definitions for three nominal circular trajectories and for the geographic mapping positions were obtained from a current field model. Spatial and temporal variations or conditions affecting the static environment models were considered and accounted for, wherever possible. Limited shielding and dose evaluations were performed for a simple geometry. Results, given in tabular and graphical form, are analyzed, explained, and discussed. Conclusions are included.

  7. Charged particle spectra in p+Pb collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Shulga, Evgeny; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Per-event charged particle spectra and nuclear modification factors are measured with the ATLAS detector at the LHC in p+Pbinteractions at sqrt(s_NN)=5.02 TeV. Results are presented as a function of transverse momentum, rapidity, and in different intervals of collision centrality, which is characterised in p+Pb collisions by the total transverse energy measured over the pseudorapidity interval -3.2

  8. Iron free permanent magnet systems for charged particle beam optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, S.M.; Halbach, K.

    1995-09-03

    The strength and astounding simplicity of certain permanent magnet materials allow a wide variety of simple, compact configurations of high field strength and quality multipole magnets. Here we analyze the important class of iron-free permanent magnet systems for charged particle beam optics. The theory of conventional segmented multipole magnets formed from uniformly magnetized block magnets placed in regular arrays about a circular magnet aperture is reviewed. Practical multipole configurations resulting are presented that are capable of high and intermediate aperture field strengths. A new class of elliptical aperture magnets is presented within a model with continuously varying magnetization angle. Segmented versions of these magnets promise practical high field dipole and quadrupole magnets with an increased range of applicability.

  9. Lorentz Covariant Canonical Symplectic Algorithms for Dynamics of Charged Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yulei; Qin, Hong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the Lorentz covariance of algorithms is introduced. Under Lorentz transformation, both the form and performance of a Lorentz covariant algorithm are invariant. To acquire the advantages of symplectic algorithms and Lorentz covariance, a general procedure for constructing Lorentz covariant canonical symplectic algorithms (LCCSA) is provided, based on which an explicit LCCSA for dynamics of relativistic charged particles is built. LCCSA possesses Lorentz invariance as well as long-term numerical accuracy and stability, due to the preservation of discrete symplectic structure and Lorentz symmetry of the system. For situations with time-dependent electromagnetic fields, which is difficult to handle in traditional construction procedures of symplectic algorithms, LCCSA provides a perfect explicit canonical symplectic solution by implementing the discretization in 4-spacetime. We also show that LCCSA has built-in energy-based adaptive time steps, which can optimize the computation performance when th...

  10. Charge exchange reaction by Reggeon exchange and W$^{+}$W$^{-}$-fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Schicker, R

    2014-01-01

    Charge exchange reactions at high energies are examined. The existing cross section data on the Reggeon induced reaction pp $\\rightarrow$ n + $\\Delta^{++}$ taken at the ZGS and ISR accelerators are extrapolated to the energies of the RHIC and LHC colliders. The interest in the charge exchange reaction induced by $W^{\\pm}$-fusion is presented, and the corresponding QCD-background is examined.

  11. Charged-current neutrino-nucleus reactions within the SuSAv2-MEC approach

    CERN Document Server

    Megias, G D; Barbaro, M B; Caballero, J A; Donnelly, T W; Simo, I Ruiz

    2016-01-01

    We present a detailed study of charged-current (CC) neutrino-nucleus reactions in a fully relativis- tic framework and comparisons with recent experiments spanning an energy range from hundreds of MeV up to 100 GeV within the SuperScaling Approach, which is based on the analysis of electron- nucleus scattering data and has been recently improved with the inclusion of Relativistic Mean Field theory effects. We also evaluate and discuss the impact of two-particle two-hole meson-exchange currents (2p-2h MEC) on neutrino-nucleus interactions through the analysis of two-particle two-hole axial and vector contributions to weak response functions in a fully relativistic Fermi gas. The results show a fairly good agreement with experimental data over the whole range of neutrino energies.

  12. Radiation reaction in a system of relativistic gravitating particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galtsov, D.V.

    1983-01-01

    A Lorentz-covariant approach is developed to the description of electromagnetic and gravitational radiation in general relativity. A model of a relativistic system of gravitating point particles is constructed in which energy losses can be interpreted in terms of radiation-reaction forces. These forces are applied not only to the point particles but also to fields generated by these particles in the near zone. It is concluded that radiation friction in a system of relativistic gravitating particles is collective in character. 16 references.

  13. Harmonic Ratcheting for Ferrite Tuned RF Acceleration of Charged Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Nathan; Brennan, Mike

    2013-04-01

    One of the most persistent difficulties in the design of RF cavities for acceleration of charged particles is the rapid and efficient acceleration of particles over a large range of frequencies. From medical synchrotrons to accelerator driven systems, there is a strong need for fast acceleration of protons and light ions over hundreds of MeV. Conventionally, this is a costly undertaking, requiring specially designed ferrite loaded cavities to be tuned over a large range of frequencies. Ferromagnetic materials allow for the precise adjustment of cavity resonant frequency, but rapid changes in the frequency as well as operation outside material specific frequency ranges result in significant Q-loss to the cavity. This leads to a considerable increase in power required and is thus undesirable for regular operation. We introduce an acceleration scheme known as harmonic ratcheting which can be used to reduce the cavity frequency range needed for accelerating an ion beam in a synchrotron. In particular, this scheme addresses the need for high rep. rate machines for applications such as radiation therapy in which low beam intensity is needed. We demonstrate with simulations the type of ramps achievable using this technique and consider its advantages over h=1 acceleration schemes.

  14. Charged-particle beam diagnostics for the advanced photon source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumpkin, A. H.; Decker, G.; Kahana, E.; Patterson, D.; Sellyey, W.; Wang, X.; Chung, Y.

    1993-07-01

    Plans, prototypes, and initial test results for the charged-particle beam (e -, e +) diagnostic systems on the injector rings, their transport lines, and the storage ring for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) are presented. The APS will be a synchrotron radiation user facility with one of the world's brightest X-ray sources in the 10-keV regime. Its 200-MeV electron linac, 450-MeV positron linac, positron accumulator ring, 7-GeV injector synchrotron (IS), 7-GeV storage ring (SR), and undulator test lines will also demand the development and demonstration of key particle-beam characterization techniques over a wide range of parameter space. Some of these parameter values overlap or approach those projected for fourth generation light sources (linac-driven FELs and high brightness storage rings) as described at a recent workshop. Initial results from the diagnostics prototypes on the linac test stand operating at 45-MeV include current monitor data, beam loss monitor data, and video digitization using VME architecture.

  15. Charged Particle ID with DIRCs in PANDA at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schepers, Georg [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Collaboration: PANDA Cherenkov Group of the PANDA-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The PANDA detector at FAIR, the new international accelerator facility for antiprotons and ions in Darmstadt, will address open questions of hadronic physics. Experiments concerning charmonium spectroscopy are performed with antiproton beams colliding with hydrogen or nuclear targets. The beam momentum range between 1.5 GeV/c and 15 GeV/c allows tests of the predictions by perturbation theory, but will also reveal deviations originating from strong QCD. Excellent charged particle identification over a large momentum range is necessary for all these experiments. In the target spectrometer this will be accomplished by two Cherenkov counters using the DIRC principle, reducing the size of the solenoid and calorimeter. Both counters have to work in a strong magnetic field and withstand high event rates. The concept of the Barrel DIRC, covering the polar angles between 22 and 140 degrees, is based on the successful BaBar DIRC. It uses focusing optics with lenses and fast photon timing. The Endcap Disc DIRC works with a novel radiator geometry and covers the angular range from 5 to 22 degrees. In addition to a fast electronic readout it employs a compact photon detection system. Prototypes were tested with particle beams at GSI, CERN, DESY, and MAMI to validate the design choices. The results achieved and the status of the PANDA DIRC detectors are presented.

  16. Chaotic motion of charged particles in toroidal magnetic configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambon, Benjamin; Leoncini, Xavier; Vittot, Michel; Dumont, Rémi; Garbet, Xavier

    2014-09-01

    We study the motion of a charged particle in a tokamak magnetic field and discuss its chaotic nature. Contrary to most of recent studies, we do not make any assumption on any constant of the motion and solve numerically the cyclotron gyration using Hamiltonian formalism. We take advantage of a symplectic integrator allowing us to make long-time simulations. First considering an idealized magnetic configuration, we add a nongeneric perturbation corresponding to a magnetic ripple, breaking one of the invariant of the motion. Chaotic motion is then observed and opens questions about the link between chaos of magnetic field lines and chaos of particle trajectories. Second, we return to an axisymmetric configuration and tune the safety factor (magnetic configuration) in order to recover chaotic motion. In this last setting with two constants of the motion, the presence of chaos implies that no third global constant exists, we highlight this fact by looking at variations of the first order of the magnetic moment in this chaotic setting. We are facing a mixed phase space with both regular and chaotic regions and point out the difficulties in performing a global reduction such as gyrokinetics.

  17. The "Puck" energetic charged particle detector: Design, heritage, and advancements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, G.; Cohen, I.; Westlake, J. H.; Andrews, G. B.; Brandt, P.; Gold, R. E.; Gkioulidou, M. A.; Hacala, R.; Haggerty, D.; Hill, M. E.; Ho, G. C.; Jaskulek, S. E.; Kollmann, P.; Mauk, B. H.; McNutt, R. L.; Mitchell, D. G.; Nelson, K. S.; Paranicas, C.; Paschalidis, N.; Schlemm, C. E.

    2016-08-01

    Energetic charged particle detectors characterize a portion of the plasma distribution function that plays critical roles in some physical processes, from carrying the currents in planetary ring currents to weathering the surfaces of planetary objects. For several low-resource missions in the past, the need was recognized for a low-resource but highly capable, mass-species-discriminating energetic particle sensor that could also obtain angular distributions without motors or mechanical articulation. This need led to the development of a compact Energetic Particle Detector (EPD), known as the "Puck" EPD (short for hockey puck), that is capable of determining the flux, angular distribution, and composition of incident ions between an energy range of ~10 keV to several MeV. This sensor makes simultaneous angular measurements of electron fluxes from the tens of keV to about 1 MeV. The same measurements can be extended down to approximately 1 keV/nucleon, with some composition ambiguity. These sensors have a proven flight heritage record that includes missions such as MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging and New Horizons, with multiple sensors on each of Juno, Van Allen Probes, and Magnetospheric Multiscale. In this review paper we discuss the Puck EPD design, its heritage, unexpected results from these past missions and future advancements. We also discuss high-voltage anomalies that are thought to be associated with the use of curved foils, which is a new foil manufacturing processes utilized on recent Puck EPD designs. Finally, we discuss the important role Puck EPDs can potentially play in upcoming missions.

  18. Motion of charged particle in Reissner - Nordstr\\"om spacetime: A Jacobi metric approach

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Praloy; Ghosh, Subir

    2016-01-01

    The present work discusses motion of neutral and charged particles in Reissner - Nordstr\\"{o}m spacetime. The constant energy paths are derived in a variational principle framework using the Jacobi metric which is parameterized by conserved particle energy. Of particular interest is the case of particle charge and Reissner-Nordstr\\"{o}m black hole charge being of same sign since this leads to a clash of opposing forces - gravitational (attractive) and Coulomb (repulsive).

  19. Measurement of the electrostatic charge in airborne particles: I - development of the equipment and preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marra Jr. W.D.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The design and construction of a equipment capable of measuring the electrostatic charges in aerosols, named the electrostatic charge classifier, were carried out. They were based on the concept of particle electromobility and the charge classifier was intended to classify the nature and the distribution of electrostatic charges as a function of particle size. The resulting piece of equipment is easy to dismount, which facilitates its cleaning and transport, and easy to operate. Early results indicate that the values of electrostatic charge measured on test particles are inside the range reported in the literature, indicating the adequacy of the technique utilized.

  20. Radiation reaction from electromagnetic fields in the neighborhood of a point charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singal, Ashok K.

    2017-03-01

    From the expression for the electromagnetic field in the neighborhood of a point charge, we determine the rate of electromagnetic momentum flow, calculated using the Maxwell stress tensor, across a surface surrounding the charge. From that we derive for a "point" charge the radiation reaction formula, which turns out to be proportional to the first time-derivative of the acceleration of the charge, identical to the expression for the self-force, hitherto obtained in the literature from the detailed mutual interaction between constituents of a small charged sphere. We then use relativistic transformations to arrive at a generalized formula for radiation reaction for a point charge undergoing relativistic motion.

  1. Radiation reaction and renormalization in classical electrodynamics of a point particle in any dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazinski, P. O.; Lyakhovich, S. L.; Sharapov, A. A.

    2002-07-01

    The effective equations of motion for a point charged particle taking into account the radiation reaction are considered in various space-time dimensions. The divergences stemming from the pointness of the particle are studied and an effective renormalization procedure is proposed encompassing uniformly the cases of all even dimensions. It is shown that in any dimension the classical electrodynamics is a renormalizable theory if not multiplicatively beyond d=4. For the cases of three and six dimensions the covariant analogues of the Lorentz-Dirac equation are explicitly derived.

  2. Radiation reaction and renormalization in classical electrodynamics of point particle in any dimension

    CERN Document Server

    Kazinski, P O; Sharapov, A A

    2002-01-01

    The effective equations of motion for a point charged particle taking account of radiation reaction are considered in various space-time dimensions. The divergencies steaming from the pointness of the particle are studied and the effective renormalization procedure is proposed encompassing uniformly the cases of all even dimensions. It is shown that in any dimension the classical electrodynamics is a renormalizable theory if not multiplicatively beyond d=4. For the cases of three and six dimensions the covariant analogs of the Lorentz-Dirac equation are explicitly derived.

  3. Charged particles interacting with a mixed supported lipid bilayer as a biomimetic pulmonary surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munteanu, B; Harb, F; Rieu, J P; Berthier, Y; Tinland, B; Trunfio-Sfarghiu, A-M

    2014-08-01

    This study shows the interactions of charged particles with mixed supported lipid bilayers (SLB) as biomimetic pulmonary surfactants. We tested two types of charged particles: positively charged and negatively charged particles. Two parameters were measured: adsorption density of particles on the SLB and the diffusion coefficient of lipids by FRAPP techniques as a measure of interaction strength between particles and lipids. We found that positively charged particles do not adsorb on the bilayer, probably due to the electrostatic repulsion between positively charged parts of the lipid head and the positive groups on the particle surface, therefore no variation in diffusion coefficient of lipid molecules was observed. On the contrary, the negatively charged particles, driven by electrostatic interactions are adsorbed onto the supported bilayer. The adsorption of negatively charged particles increases with the zeta-potential of the particle. Consecutively, the diffusion coefficient of lipids is reduced probably due to binding onto the lipid heads which slows down their Brownian motion. The results are directly relevant for understanding the interactions of particulate matter with pulmonary structures which could lead to pulmonary surfactant inhibition or deficiency causing severe respiratory distress or pathologies.

  4. The steady state of a particle in a vibrating box and possible application in short pulse generation of charged particles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nandan Jha; Sudhir R Jain

    2013-09-01

    In this paper the classical evolution of a particle is studied which bounces back and forth in a 1D vibrating cavity such that the reflection from the wall does not change the speed of the particle. A peculiar behaviour of the particle motion can be seen where the time evolution of the motion shows superposition of linear and oscillatory behaviour. In particular, the parameter range is found in which the particle oscillates between the walls in steady state as if the wall was static and it is showed that for these parameter ranges the particle settles to this steady state for all initial conditions. It is proposed that this phenomenon can be used to bunch charged particles in short pulses where the synchronization proposed in our model should work against the space charge effect in the charged particle bunch.

  5. KRATTA, a versatile triple telescope array for charged reaction products

    CERN Document Server

    Łukasik, J; Budzanowski, A; Czech, B; Skwirczyńska, I; Brzychczyk, J; Adamczyk, M; Kupny, S; Lasko, P; Sosin, Z; Wieloch, A; Kiš, M; Leifels, Y; Trautmann, W

    2013-01-01

    A new detection system KRATTA, Krak\\'ow Triple Telescope Array, is presented. This versatile, low threshold, broad energy range system has been built to measure the energy, emission angle, and isotopic composition of light charged reaction products. It consists of 38 independent modules which can be arranged in an arbitrary configuration. A single module, covering actively about 4.5 msr of the solid angle at the optimal distance of 40 cm from the target, consists of three identical, 0.500 mm thick, large area photodiodes, used also for direct detection, and of two CsI(1500 ppm Tl) crystals of 2.5 and 12.5 cm length, respectively. All the signals are digitally processed. The lower identification threshold, due to the thickness of the first photodiode, has been reduced to about 2.5 MeV for protons (~0.065 mm of Si equivalent) by applying a pulse shape analysis. The pulse shape analysis allowed also to decompose the complex signals from the middle photodiode into their ionization and scintillation components and...

  6. Theory of using magnetic deflections to combine charged particle beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steckbeck, Mackenzie K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Doyle, Barney Lee [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Several radiation effects projects in the Ion Beam Lab (IBL) have recently required two disparate charged particle beams to simultaneously strike a single sample through a single port of the target chamber. Because these beams have vastly different mass–energy products (MEP), the low-MEP beam requires a large angle of deflection toward the sample by a bending electromagnet. A second electromagnet located further upstream provides a means to compensate for the small angle deflection experienced by the high-MEP beam during its path through the bending magnet. This paper derives the equations used to select the magnetic fields required by these two magnets to achieve uniting both beams at the target sample. A simple result was obtained when the separation of the two magnets was equivalent to the distance from the bending magnet to the sample, and the equation is given by: Bs= 1/2(rc/rs) Bc, where Bs and Bc are the magnetic fields in the steering and bending magnet and rc/rs is the ratio of the radii of the bending magnet to that of the steering magnet. This result is not dependent upon the parameters of the high MEP beam, i.e. energy, mass, charge state. Therefore, once the field of the bending magnet is set for the low-MEP beam, and the field in the steering magnet is set as indicted in the equation, the trajectory path of any high-MEP beam will be directed into the sample.

  7. Intermediate regime of charged particle scattering in the field-reversal configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shustov, P. I., E-mail: p.shustov@gmail.com; Yushkov, E. V. [Space Research Institute, RAS, Profsouznaya st., 84/32, GSP-7, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Department of Physics, Moscow State University, 119992 Moscow (Russian Federation); Artemyev, A. V., E-mail: artemyev@iki.rssi.ru [Space Research Institute, RAS, Profsouznaya st., 84/32, GSP-7, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    In this paper, we investigate the charged particle scattering in the magnetic field configuration with stretched magnetic field lines. This scattering results from the violation of the adiabaticity of charged particle motion in the region with the strong gradient of the magnetic field. We consider the intermediate regime of charged particle dynamics, when the violation of the adiabaticity is significant enough, but particle motion is not chaotic. We demonstrate and describe the significant scattering of particles with large adiabatic invariants (magnetic moment). We discuss a possible application of obtained results for description of the peculiarities of pitch-angle diffusion of relativistic electrons in the Earth radiation belts.

  8. Nuclear reactions induced by high-energy alpha particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, B. S. P.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of nuclear reactions induced by high energy protons and heavier ions are included. Fundamental data needed in the shielding, dosimetry, and radiobiology of high energy particles produced by accelerators were generated, along with data on cosmic ray interaction with matter. The mechanism of high energy nucleon-nucleus reactions is also examined, especially for light target nuclei of mass number comparable to that of biological tissue.

  9. Path Sampling Methods for Enzymatic Quantum Particle Transfer Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzierlenga, M W; Varga, M J; Schwartz, S D

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms of enzymatic reactions are studied via a host of computational techniques. While previous methods have been used successfully, many fail to incorporate the full dynamical properties of enzymatic systems. This can lead to misleading results in cases where enzyme motion plays a significant role in the reaction coordinate, which is especially relevant in particle transfer reactions where nuclear tunneling may occur. In this chapter, we outline previous methods, as well as discuss newly developed dynamical methods to interrogate mechanisms of enzymatic particle transfer reactions. These new methods allow for the calculation of free energy barriers and kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) with the incorporation of quantum effects through centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) and the full complement of enzyme dynamics through transition path sampling (TPS). Recent work, summarized in this chapter, applied the method for calculation of free energy barriers to reaction in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH). We found that tunneling plays an insignificant role in YADH but plays a more significant role in LDH, though not dominant over classical transfer. Additionally, we summarize the application of a TPS algorithm for the calculation of reaction rates in tandem with CMD to calculate the primary H/D KIE of YADH from first principles. We found that the computationally obtained KIE is within the margin of error of experimentally determined KIEs and corresponds to the KIE of particle transfer in the enzyme. These methods provide new ways to investigate enzyme mechanism with the inclusion of protein and quantum dynamics.

  10. Classical radiation reaction in particle-in-cell simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranic, M.; Martins, J. L.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2016-07-01

    Under the presence of ultra high intensity lasers or other intense electromagnetic fields the motion of particles in the ultrarelativistic regime can be severely affected by radiation reaction. The standard particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithms do not include radiation reaction effects. Even though this is a well known mechanism, there is not yet a definite algorithm nor a standard technique to include radiation reaction in PIC codes. We have compared several models for the calculation of the radiation reaction force, with the goal of implementing an algorithm for classical radiation reaction in the Osiris framework, a state-of-the-art PIC code. The results of the different models are compared with standard analytical results, and the relevance/advantages of each model are discussed. Numerical issues relevant to PIC codes such as resolution requirements, application of radiation reaction to macro particles and computational cost are also addressed. For parameters of interest where the classical description of the electron motion is applicable, all the models considered are shown to give comparable results. The Landau and Lifshitz reduced model is chosen for implementation as one of the candidates with the minimal overhead and no additional memory requirements.

  11. Charged-particle cross section database for medical radioisotope production: chapter 3. theoretical evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mustafa, M

    1999-06-24

    Creation of a Reference Charged Particle Cross Section Database for Medical Radioisotope Production requires the evaluation of both experimental and modeled cross sections for beam monitor reactions and for radionuclide (positron and gamma emitters) production reactions. It was recognized at the first meeting of this CRP in Vienna in 1995 that modeling will play an important role in predicting cross sections where measurements are either not available or have large discrepancies. Because of the volume of work involving about forty-five reactions in the CRP, it was decided to use modeling as a guide rather than for full evaluation. (Although in some cases the CRP used the modeled cross sections as the recommended values). Thus the modeling was done using global input parameters. In this chapter we describe the modeling by four different groups: Livermore, Obninsk, Beijing and Islamabad. First we give a general overview of nuclear reaction models that may be used in modeling cross sections below 100 MeV. This will be followed by a short description of the codes and calculations actually used by the four groups. (We note that the codes have similar basic reaction physics, but they differ in details and in actual applications.) In the final section we give a discussion of the modeling with its successes and failures in reproducing experimental data using global input parameters.

  12. Discrimination of charged particles in a neutral beam line by using a solid scintillation detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Jong-Kwan; Ko, Jewou; Liu, Dong

    2017-01-01

    In the past several decades, many studies have been conducted to search for non-baryonic dark matter, such as weakly interactive massive particles (WIMPs). In the search for WIMPs, charged particles incident on the detector are background particles because WIMPs are neutral. Charged particles originate from various sources, such as cosmic rays and laboratory materials surrounding the main detector. Therefore, a veto that discriminates charged particles can improve the particle-detection efficiency of the entire experiment for detecting WIMPs. Here, we investigate in the thickness range of 1 mm to 5 mm, the optimal thickness of a polystyrene scintillator as a chargedparticle veto detector. We found that 3-mm-thick polystyrene provides the best performance to veto charged particles and the charged-particle background in the search for the WIMP signal. Furthermore, we fabricated 3-mm-thick and 5-mm-thick polystyrene charged particle veto detectors that will be used in an underground laboratory in the search for WIMP dark matter. After exposing those detectors are the actual beam line, we compared the rate of charged particles measured using those detectors and the rate simulated through a Monte Carlo simulation.

  13. Charged particle production under EMCal trigger condition with ALICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huhn, Patrick [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The ALICE experiment at the LHC is designed to study the properties of the Quark-Gluon-Plasma (QGP). The measured transverse momentum (p{sub T}) distribution in heavy ion collisions can be compared to that measured in pp collisions in terms of the nuclear modification factor (R{sub AA}). The minimum bias pp reference at √(s) = 2.76 TeV and therefore R{sub AA} in Pb-Pb collisions are currently limited in their p{sub T} range to p{sub T} = 50 GeV/c. To extend the p{sub T} distribution to higher p{sub T} (p{sub T} > 50 GeV/c), triggers can be used. We present an analysis of the cross section of inclusive charged particles in pp collisions as a function of p{sub T} with a selection on deposited energy in the electromagnetic calorimeter (EMCal). Results based on a Toy Monte Carlo simulation including realistic EMCal geometry and acceptance to evaluate trigger biases are presented.

  14. Fission modes in charged-particle induced fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthies, A.; Kotte, R.; Seidel, W.; Stary, F.; Wohlfarth, D. (Zentralinstitut fuer Kernforschung, Rossendorf bei Dresden (German Democratic Republic))

    1990-12-01

    The population of the three fission modes predicted by Brosa's multi-channel fission model for the uranium region was studied in different fissioning systems. They were produced bombarding {sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U targets by light charged particles with energies slightly above the Coulomb barrier. Though the maximum excitation energy of the compound nucleus amounted to about 22 MeV, the influences of various spherical and deformed nuclear shells on the mass and total kinetic energy distributions of fission fragments are still pronounced. The larger variances of the total kinetic energy distributions compared to those of thermal neutron induced fission were explained by temperature dependent fluctuations of the amount and velocity of alteration of the scission point elongation of the fissioning system. From the ratio of these variances the portion of the potential energy dissipated among intrinsic degrees of freedom before scission was deduced for the different fission channels. It was found that the excitation remaining after pre-scission neutron emission is mainly transferred into intrinsic heat and less into pre-scission kinetic energy. (orig.).

  15. Charged particle therapy with mini-segmented beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Avraham eDilmanian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the fundamental attributes of proton therapy and carbon ion therapy is the ability of these charged particles to spare tissue distal to the targeted tumor. This significantly reduces normal tissue toxicity and has the potential to translate to a wider therapeutic index. Although, in general, particle therapy also reduces dose to the proximal tissues, particularly in the vicinity of the target, dose to the skin and to other very superficial tissues tends to be higher than that of megavoltage x-rays. The methods presented here, namely Interleaved carbon minibeams and Radiosurgery with arrays of proton and light ion minibeams, both utilize beams segmented into arrays of parallel minibeams of about 0.3 mm incident beam size. These minibeam arrays spare tissues, as demonstrated by synchrotron x-ray experiments. An additional feature of particle minibeams is their gradual broadening due to multiple Coulomb scattering as they penetrate tissues. In the case of interleaved carbon minibeams, which do not broaden much, two arrays of planar carbon minibeams that remain parallel at target depth, are aimed at the target from 90º angles and made to interleave at the target to produce a solid radiation field within the target. As a result the surrounding tissues are exposed only to individual carbon minibeam arrays and are therefore spared. The method was used in four-directional geometry at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory to ablate a 6.5-mm target in a rabbit brain at a single exposure with 40 Gy physical absorbed dose. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and histology six month later showed very focal target necrosis with nearly no damage to the surrounding brain. As for minibeams of protons and light ions, for which the minibeam broadening is substantial, measurements at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas, and Monte Carlo simulations showed that the broadening minibeams will merge with their neighbors at a certain tissue depth

  16. Influence of Ionization Degrees on the Evolutions of Charged Particles in Atmospheric Plasma at Low Altitude

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANG Xuexia; DENG Zechao; JIA Pengying; LIANG Weihua; LI Xia

    2012-01-01

    A zero-dimensional model which includes 56 species of reactants and 427 reactions is used to study the behavior of charged particles in atmospheric plasmas with different ionization degrees at low altitude (near 0 km). The constant coefficient nonlinear equations are solved by using the Quasi-steady-state approximation method. The electron lifetimes are obtained for afterglow plasma with different initial values, and the temporal evolutions of the main charged species are presented, which are dominant in reaction processes. The results show that the electron number density decays quickly. The lifetimes of electrons are shortened by about two orders with increasing ionization degree. Electrons then attach to neutral particles and produce negative ions. When the initial electron densities are in the range of 10l~ ~ 1014 cm-3, the negative ions have sufficiently high densities and long lifetimes for air purification, disinfection and sterilization. Electrons, O(2,-), O(4,-) CO(4,-) and CO(3,-) are the dominant negative species when the initial electron density neo ≤ 1013 cm^(-3), and only electrons and CO3 are left when neo 〉 1015 cm^(-3). N(+,2), N+ and O(+,2) are dominant in the positive charges for any ionization degree. Other positive species, such as 0(+,4), N(+,3), NO(+,2), NO(+,2), Ar(+,2) and H3O+. H2O, are dominant only for a certain ionization degree and in a certain period.

  17. Screening of heterogeneous surfaces: charge renormalization of Janus particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, N; Carvajal Gallardo, E; Zheng, S; Eggen, E; Dijkstra, M; van Roij, R

    2010-03-17

    Nonlinear ionic screening theory for heterogeneously charged spheres is developed in terms of a mode decomposition of the surface charge. A far-field analysis of the resulting electrostatic potential leads to a natural generalization of charge renormalization from purely monopolar to dipolar, quadrupolar, etc, including 'mode couplings'. Our novel scheme is generally applicable to large classes of surface heterogeneities, and is explicitly applied here to Janus spheres with differently charged upper and lower hemispheres, revealing strong renormalization effects for all multipoles.

  18. Radiation reaction and the pitch angle changes for a charge undergoing synchrotron losses

    CERN Document Server

    Singal, Ashok K

    2015-01-01

    In synchrotron radiation formulas it is always assumed that the pitch angle of a charged particle remains constant during the radiation process. The argument employed is that as the radiation is beamed along the instantaneous direction of motion of the charge, the momentum loss will also be along the direction of motion. Accordingly radiation reaction should not cause any change in the direction of the velocity vector, and the pitch angle of the charge would therefore remain constant during the radiation process. However, it turns out that this picture is not relativistically covariant and that in the case of synchrotron losses, the pitch angle in general varies. While the component of the velocity vector perpendicular to the magnetic field does reduce in magnitude due to radiative losses, the parallel component does not undergo any change during radiation. Therefore there is a change in the ratio of the two components, implying a change in the pitch angle. This apparent paradox gets resolved and one gets a c...

  19. Screening of heterogeneous surfaces: Charge renormalization of Janus particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boon, N.; Carvajal Gallardo, E.; Zheng, S.; Eggen, E.; Dijkstra, M.; Van Roij, R.

    2010-01-01

    Nonlinear ionic screening theory for heterogeneously charged spheres is developed in terms of a mode decomposition of the surface charge. A far-field analysis of the resulting electrostatic potential leads to a natural generalization of charge renormalization from purely monopolar to dipolar, quadru

  20. Dispersion Polymerization of Polystyrene Particles Using Alcohol as Reaction Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young-Sang; Shin, Cheol Hwan; Han, Sujin

    2016-02-01

    In this study, monodisperse polystyrene nanospheres were prepared by dispersion polymerization using alcohol as reaction medium to prepare colloidal clusters of the latex beads. Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyltrimethylammonium chloride (MTC) were used as dispersion stabilizer and comonomer, respectively. The particle size could be controlled by adjusting the reactant compositions such as the amount of stabilizer, comonomer, and water in the reactant mixture. The size and monodispersity of the polymeric particles could be also controlled by changing the reaction medium with different alcohols other than ethanol or adjusting the polymerization temperature. The synthesized particles could be self-organized inside water-in-oil emulsion droplets by evaporation-driven self-assembly to produce colloidal clusters of the polymeric nanospheres.

  1. Search for fractionally charged particles in pp collisions at s=7TeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Aguilo, E.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Staykova, Z.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Mohammadi, A.; Reis, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Marcken, G.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Soares Jorge, L.; Sznajder, A.; Anjos, T. S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Tomei, T. R. Fernandez Perez; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Khalil, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Karjalainen, A.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Shreyber, I.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Juillot, P.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Anagnostou, G.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.

    2013-05-01

    A search is presented for free heavy long-lived fractionally charged particles produced in pp collisions at s=7TeV. The data sample was recorded by the CMS detector at the LHC and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.0fb-1. Candidate fractionally charged particles are identified by selecting tracks with associated low charge measurements in the silicon tracking detector. Observations are found to be consistent with expectations for background processes. The results of the search are used to set upper limits on the cross section for pair production of fractionally charged, massive spin-1/2 particles that are neutral under SU(3)C and SU(2)L. We exclude at 95% confidence level such particles with electric charge ±2e/3 with masses below 310 GeV, and those with charge ±e/3 with masses below 140 GeV.

  2. Search for fractionally charged particles in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aguilo, Ernest; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hammer, Josef; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Pernicka, Manfred; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Christine; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Walzel, Gerhard; Widl, Edmund; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Bansal, Monika; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Luyckx, Sten; Mucibello, Luca; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Selvaggi, Michele; Staykova, Zlatka; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dero, Vincent; Gay, Arnaud; Hreus, Tomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Reis, Thomas; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Marcken, Gil; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Garcia, Guillaume; Grunewald, Martin; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jérémie; Marinov, Andrey; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Verwilligen, Piet; Walsh, Sinead; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Ceard, Ludivine; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Schul, Nicolas; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Alves, Gilvan; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Martins, Thiago; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Custódio, Analu; Da Costa, Eliza Melo; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Oguri, Vitor; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Soares Jorge, Luana; Sznajder, Andre; Souza Dos Anjos, Tiago; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Lagana, Caio; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Tcholakov, Vanio; Trayanov, Rumen; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Meng, Xiangwei; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Jian; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Xiao, Hong; Xu, Ming; Zang, Jingjing; Zhang, Zhen; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Yifei; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Teng, Haiyun; Wang, Dayong; Zhang, Linlin; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Osorio Oliveros, Andres Felipe; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Plestina, Roko; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Duric, Senka; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Morovic, Srecko; Attikis, Alexandros; Galanti, Mario; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Khalil, Shaaban; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Müntel, Mait; Raidal, Martti; Rebane, Liis; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Heikkinen, Mika Aatos; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Ungaro, Donatella; Wendland, Lauri; Banzuzi, Kukka; Karjalainen, Ahti; Korpela, Arja; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc

    2013-01-01

    A search is presented for free heavy long-lived fractionally charged particles produced in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV. The data sample was recorded by the CMS detector at the LHC and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.0 inverse femtobarns. Candidate fractionally charged particles are identified by selecting tracks with associated low charge measurements in the silicon tracking detector. Observations are found to be consistent with expectations for background processes. The results of the search are used to set upper limits on the cross section for pair production of fractionally charged, massive spin-1/2 particles that are neutral under SU(3)$_C$ and SU(2)$_L$. We exclude at 95% confidence level such particles with electric charge ±2e/3 with masses below 310 GeV, and those with charge ±e/3 with masses below 140 GeV.

  3. The charged-particle multiplicity inside jets at 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Nachman, Benjamin Philip; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The number of charged particles inside jets is a widely used discriminant for identifying the quark or gluon nature of the initiating parton and is sensitive to both the perturbative and non-perturbative components of fragmentation. This paper presents a measurement of the average number of charged particles with pT>500 MeV inside high-momentum jets in dijet events using 20.3 1/fb of data recorded with the ATLAS detector in pp collisions at s = sqrt(8) TeV collisions at the LHC. The jets considered have transverse momenta from 50 GeV up to and beyond 1.5 TeV. The reconstructed charged-particle track multiplicity distribution is unfolded to remove distortions from detector effects and the resulting charged-particle multiplicity is compared to several models. Furthermore, quark and gluon jet fractions are used to extract the average charged-particle multiplicity for quark and gluon jets separately.

  4. Effect of airborne particle on SO 2-calcite reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böke, Hasan; Göktürk, E. Hale; Caner-Saltık, Emine N.; Demirci, Şahinde

    1999-02-01

    In modern urban atmosphere, sulphur dioxide (SO 2) attacks calcite (CaCO 3) in calcareous stone-producing gypsum (CaSO 4·2H 2O) which forms crust at rain sheltered surfaces and accelerates erosion at areas exposed to rain. The airborne particles collected on stone surfaces have always been considered to enhance the gypsum crust formation and thus it is believed that they should be removed from the surface to decrease the effects of SO 2. In this study, our aim was to investigate this event by carrying out a series of experiments in laboratory using pure calcium carbonate powder to represent calcareous stone. Sodium montmorillonite, activated carbon, ferric oxide, vanadium pentoxide and cupric chloride were mixed in the pure calcium carbonate powder as substitutes of the airborne particles in the polluted atmosphere. The samples have been exposed at nearly 10 ppmv SO 2 concentrations at 90% relative humidity conditions in a reaction chamber for several days. The mineralogical composition of the exposed samples were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and infrared spectrometer (IR). Sulphation reaction products, calcium sulphite hemihydrate, gypsum and unreacted calcite, were determined quantitatively using IR. Exposed samples have also been investigated morphologically using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Experimental results reveal that calcium sulphite hemihydrate is the main reaction product of the SO 2-calcite reaction. It turns out that airborne particles play an important catalytic role in the oxidation of calcium sulphite hemihydrate into gypsum, although their presence does not very significantly affect the extent of sulphation reaction. This behaviour of airborne particles is explained by the presence of liquid film on the calcium carbonate surface where a series of reactions in the gas-liquid-solid interfaces takes place.

  5. Rotating Charged Hairy Black Hole in (2+1) Dimensions and Particle Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, J.; Pourhassan, B.; Farahani, H.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we construct rotating charged hairy black hole in (2+1) dimensions for infinitesimal black hole charge and rotation parameters. Then we consider this black hole as particle accelerator and calculate the center-of-mass energy of two colliding test particles near the rotating charged hairy black hole in (2+1) dimensions. As we expected, the center-of-mass energy has infinite value.

  6. Rotating charged hairy black hole in (2+1) dimensions and particle acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Sadeghi, J; Farahani, H

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we construct rotating charged hairy black hole in (2+1) dimensions for infinitesimal black hole charge and rotation parameters. Then we consider this black hole as particle accelerator and calculate the center-of-mass energy of two colliding test particles near the rotating charged hairy black hole in (2+1) dimensions. As we expected, the center-of-mass energy has infinite value.

  7. Structure of Multi-Species Charged-Particles with Competing Interactions in a Quadratic Trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yan-Hong; CHEN Bao-xin; WANG Long

    2006-01-01

    Multi-species charged-particles interacting with each other by a competing short-range attraction and long-rangerepulsion potential confined in a quadratic trap are studied with molecular dynamics simulations.It is foundthat particles with similar mass-to-charge ratio tend to populate a common shell,whose location depends on theparticle mass-to-charge ratio,and that the greater the latter is,the closer the particles to the centre of the trapare.This rule for the ground.state config'uration is independent of the total particle and species numbers in thesystem.

  8. Hawking Radiation of the Charged Particle via Tunneling from the Kaluza-Klein Black Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Jin; Han, Yan

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, by applying the Lagrangian analysis on the action, we first redefine the geodesic equation of the charged massive particle. Then, basing on the new definition of the geodesic equation, we revisit the Hawking radiation of the charged massive particle via tunneling from the event horizon of the Kaluza-Klein black hole. In our treatment, the geodesic equation of the charged massive particle is defined uniformly with that of the massless particle, which overcomes the shortcomings of its previous definition, and is more suitable for the tunneling mechanism. The highlight of our work is a new and important development for the Parikh-Wilczek's tunneling method.

  9. Hawking Radiation of the Charged Particle via Tunneling from the Kaluza-Klein Black Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Jin; Han, Yan

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, by applying the Lagrangian analysis on the action, we first redefine the geodesic equation of the charged massive particle. Then, basing on the new definition of the geodesic equation, we revisit the Hawking radiation of the charged massive particle via tunneling from the event horizon of the Kaluza-Klein black hole. In our treatment, the geodesic equation of the charged massive particle is defined uniformly with that of the massless particle, which overcomes the shortcomings of its previous definition, and is more suitable for the tunneling mechanism. The highlight of our work is a new and important development for the Parikh-Wilczek's tunneling method.

  10. First direct limits on Lightly Ionizing Particles with electric charge less than $e/6$

    CERN Document Server

    Agnese, R; Balakishiyeva, D; Thakur, R Basu; Bauer, D A; Billard, J; Borgland, A; Bowles, M A; Brandt, D; Brink, P L; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Cerdeno, D G; Chagani, H; Chen, Y; Cooley, J; Cornell, B; Crewdson, C H; Cushman, P; Daal, M; Di Stefano, P C F; Doughty, T; Esteban, L; Fallows, S; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Godfrey, G L; Golwala, S R; Hall, J; Harris, H R; Hertel, S A; Hofer, T; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Jastram, A; Kamaev, O; Kara, B; Kelsey, M H; Kennedy, A; Kiveni, M; Koch, K; Leder, A; Loer, B; Asamar, E Lopez; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; Martinez, C; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Moffatt, R A; Moore, D C; Nelson, H; Nelson, R H; Ogburn, R W; Page, K; Page, W A; Partridge, R; Pepin, M; Phipps, A; Prasad, K; Pyle, M; Qiu, H; Rau, W; Redl, P; Reisetter, A; Ricci, Y; Rogers, H E; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schneck, K; Schnee, R W; Scorza, S; Serfass, B; Shank, B; Speller, D; Upadhyayula, S; Villano, A N; Welliver, B; Wright, D H; Yellin, S; Yen, J J; Young, B A; Zhang, J

    2014-01-01

    While the Standard Model of particle physics does not include free particles with fractional charge, experimental searches have not ruled out their existence. We report results from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS II) experiment that give the first direct-detection limits for cosmogenically-produced relativistic particles with electric charge lower than $e$/6. A search for tracks in the six stacked detectors of each of two of the CDMS II towers found no candidates, thereby excluding new parameter space for particles with electric charges between $e$/6 and $e$/200.

  11. Deformation Effects in Hot Rotating $^{46}Ti$ Probed by the Charged Particle Emission and GDR $\\gamma-Decay$

    CERN Document Server

    Brekiesz, M; Kmiecik, M; Mazurek, K; Meczynski, W; Styczen, J; Zuber, K; Papka, P; Beck, C; Haas, F; Rauch, V; Rousseau, M; Zafra, A S; Dudek, J; Schunck, N

    2007-01-01

    The 46Ti* compound nucleus, as populated by the fusion-evaporation reaction 27Al+19F at the bombarding energy of E_lab=144 MeV, has been investigated by charged particle spectroscopy using the multidetector array ICARE at the VIVITRON tandem facility of the IReS (Strasbourg). The light charged particles and high-energy gamma-rays from the GDR decay have been measured in coincidence with selected evaporation residues. The CACARIZO code, a Monte Carlo implementation of the statistical-model code CASCADE, has been used to calculate the spectral shapes of evaporated alpha-particles which are compared with the experimental coincident spectra. This comparison indicates the signature of large deformations (possibly superdeformed and hyperdeformed shapes) present in the compound nucleus decay. The occurrence of the Jacobi shape transition is also discussed in the framework of a newly developed rotating liquid drop model.

  12. Deformation Effects in Hot Rotating {sup 46}Ti Probed by the Charged Particle Emission and GDR {gamma}-Decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brekiesz, M. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, PAN, 31-342 Cracow (Poland); Maj, A. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, PAN, 31-342 Cracow (Poland); Kmiecik, M. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, PAN, 31-342 Cracow (Poland); Mazurek, K. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, PAN, 31-342 Cracow (Poland); Meczynski, W. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, PAN, 31-342 Cracow (Poland); Styczen, J. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, PAN, 31-342 Cracow (Poland); Zuber, K. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, PAN, 31-342 Cracow (Poland); Papka, P. [IPHC and ULP (Strasbourg I), B.P. 28 F-67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); iThemba LABS, 7129 Somerset West (South Africa); Beck, C. [IPHC and ULP (Strasbourg I), B.P. 28 F-67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Haas, F. [IPHC and ULP (Strasbourg I), B.P. 28 F-67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Rauch, V. [IPHC and ULP (Strasbourg I), B.P. 28 F-67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Rousseau, M. [IPHC and ULP (Strasbourg I), B.P. 28 F-67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Sanchez i Zafra, A. [IPHC and ULP (Strasbourg I), B.P. 28 F-67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Dudek, J. [IPHC and ULP (Strasbourg I), B.P. 28 F-67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Schunck, N. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, PAN, 31-342 Cracow (Poland); Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain)

    2007-05-15

    The {sup 46}Ti * compound nucleus, as populated by the fusion-evaporation reaction {sup 27}Al + {sup 19}F at the bombarding energy of E {sub lab} = 144 MeV, has been investigated by charged particle spectroscopy using the multidetector array ICARE at the VIVITRON tandem facility of the IReS (Strasbourg). The light charged particles and high-energy {gamma}-rays from the GDR decay have been measured in coincidence with selected evaporation residues. The CACARIZO code, a Monte Carlo implementation of the statistical-model code CASCADE, has been used to calculate the spectral shapes of evaporated {alpha}-particles which are compared with the experimental coincident spectra. This comparison indicates the signature of large deformations (possibly superdeformed and hyperdeformed shapes) present in the compound nucleus decay. The occurrence of the Jacobi shape transition is also discussed in the framework of a newly developed rotating liquid drop model.

  13. Spin dipole nuclear matrix elements for double beta decay nuclei by charge-exchange reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejiri, H.; Frekers, D.

    2016-11-01

    Spin dipole (SD) strengths for double beta-decay (DBD) nuclei were studied experimentally for the first time by using measured cross sections of (3He, t) charge-exchange reactions (CERs). Then SD nuclear matrix elements (NMEs) {M}α ({{SD}}) for low-lying 2- states were derived from the experimental SD strengths by referring to the experimental α = GT (Gamow-Teller) and α = F (Fermi) strengths. They are consistent with the empirical NMEs M({{SD}}) based on the quasi-particle model with the empirical effective SD coupling constant. The CERs are used to evaluate the SD NME, which is associated with one of the major components of the neutrino-less DBD NME.

  14. Pion induced double charge exchange reactions in the Delta resonance region

    CERN Document Server

    Buss, O; Larionov, A B; Mosel, U

    2006-01-01

    We have applied the Giessen BUU (GiBUU) transport model to the description of the double charge exchange (DCX) reaction of pions with different nuclear targets at incident kinetic energies of 120-180 MeV . The DCX process is highly sensitive to details of the interactions of pions with the nuclear medium and, therefore, represents a major benchmark for any model of pion scattering off nuclei at low and intermediate energies. The impact of surface effects, such as the neutron skins of heavy nuclei, is investigated. The dependence of the total cross section on the nuclear mass number is also discussed. We achieve a good quantitative agreement with the extensive data set obtained at LAMPF. Furthermore, we compare the solutions of the transport equations obtained in the test-particle ansatz using two different schemes - the full and the parallel ensemble method.

  15. Hamiltonian and Lagrangian dynamics of charged particles including the effects of radiation damping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hong; Burby, Joshua; Davidson, Ronald; Fisch, Nathaniel; Chung, Moses

    2015-11-01

    The effects of radiation damping (radiation reaction) on accelerating charged particles in modern high-intensity accelerators and high-intensity laser beams have becoming increasingly important. Especially for electron accelerators and storage rings, radiation damping is an effective mechanism and technique to achieve high beam luminosity. We develop Hamiltonian and Lagrangian descriptions of the classical dynamics of a charged particle including the effects of radiation damping in the general electromagnetic focusing channels encountered in accelerators. The direct connection between the classical Hamiltonian and Lagrangian theories and the more fundamental QED description of the synchrotron radiation process is also addressed. In addition to their theoretical importance, the classical Hamiltonian and Lagrangian theories of the radiation damping also enable us to numerically integrate the dynamics using advanced structure-preserving geometric algorithms. These theoretical developments can also be applied to runaway electrons and positrons generated during the disruption or startup of tokamak discharges. This research was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-AC02-09CH11466).

  16. Correlations between the fragmentation modes and light charged particles emission in heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yingxun; Chen, Jixian; Wang, Ning; Zhao, Kai; Li, Zhuxia

    2015-01-01

    The correlations between the shape of rapidity distribution of the yield of light charged particles and the fragmentation modes in semi-peripheral collisions for $^{70}$Zn+$^{70}$Zn, $^{64}$Zn+$^{64}$Zn and $^{64}$Ni+$^{64}$Ni at the beam energy of 35MeV/nucleon are investigated based on ImQMD05 code. Our studies show there is an interplay between the binary, ternary and multi-fragmentation break-up modes. The binary and ternary break-up modes more prefer to emit light charged particles at middle rapidity and give larger values of $R_{yield}^{mid}$ compared with the multi-fragmentation break-up mode does. The reduced rapidity distribution for the normalized yields of p, d, t, $^3$He, $^4$He and $^6$He and the corresponding values of $R_{yield}^{mid}$ can be used to estimate the probability of multi-fragmentation break-up modes. By comparing to experimental data, our results illustrate that $\\ge$40\\% of the collisions events belong to the multi-fragmentation break-up mode for the reactions we studied.

  17. Correlation between the fragmentation modes and light charged particles emission in heavy ion collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG YingXun[1; ZHOU ChengShuang[1,2; CHEN JiXian[1,2; WANG Ning[2; ZHAO Kai[1; LI ZhuXia[1

    2015-01-01

    The correlation between the shape of rapidity distribution of the yield of light charged particles and the fragmentation modes in semi-peripheral collisions for 70Zn+70Zn, 64Zn+64Zn and 64Ni+64Ni at the beam energy of 35 MeV/nucleon is investigated based on ImQMD05 code. Our studies show there is an interplay between the binary, ternary and multi-fragmentation break-up modes. The binary and ternary break-up modes more prefer to emit light charged particles at middle rapidity and give larger values of Rmid compared with the multi-fragmentation break-up mode does. The reduced rapidity distribution for the normalized yields of yield p, d, t, 3He, 4He and 6He and the corresponding values ~ Rmid oI yield can be used to estimate the probability of multi-fragmentation break-up modes. By comparing to experimental data, our results illustrate that ~40% of the collisions events belong to the multi- fragmentation break-up mode for the reactions we studied.

  18. Measurement of light charged particles in the decay channels of medium-mass excited compound nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdré, S.; Barlini, S.; Casini, G.; Pasquali, G.; Piantelli, S.; Carboni, S.; Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; Marchi, T.; Baiocco, G.; Bardelli, L.; Benzoni, G.; Bini, M.; Blasi, N.; Bracco, A.; Brambilla, S.; Bruno, M.; Camera, F.; Corsi, A.; Crespi, F.; D'Agostino, M.; Degerlier, M.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Leoni, S.; Million, B.; Montanari, D.; Morelli, L.; Nannini, A.; Nicolini, R.; Poggi, G.; Vannini, G.; Wieland, O.; Bednarczyk, P.; Ciemała, M.; Dudek, J.; Fornal, B.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Matejska-Minda, M.; Mazurek, K.; Męczyński, W. M.; Myalski, S.; Styczeń, J.; Ziębliński, M.

    2014-03-01

    The 48Ti on 40Ca reactions have been studied at 300 and 600 MeV focusing on the fusion-evaporation (FE) and fusion-fission (FF) exit channels. Energy spectra and multiplicities of the emitted light charged particles have been compared to Monte Carlo simulations based on the statistical model. Indeed, in this mass region (A ~ 100) models predict that shape transitions can occur at high spin values and relatively scarce data exist in the literature about coincidence measurements between evaporation residues and light charged particles. Signals of shape transitions can be found in the variations of the lineshape of high energy gamma rays emitted from the de-excitation of GDR states gated on different region of angular momenta. For this purpose it is important to keep under control the FE and FF processes, to regulate the statistical model parameters and to control the onset of possible pre-equilibrium emissions from 300 to 600 MeV bombarding energy.

  19. Time-dependent quantum wave packet dynamics to study charge transfer in heavy particle collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Song Bin; Wu, Yong; Wang, Jian Guo

    2016-12-01

    The method of time-dependent quantum wave packet dynamics has been successfully extended to study the charge transfer/exchange process in low energy two-body heavy particle collisions. The collision process is described by coupled-channel equations with diabatic potentials and (radial and rotational) couplings. The time-dependent coupled equations are propagated with the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree method and the modulo squares of S-matrix is extracted from the wave packet by the flux operator with complex absorbing potential (FCAP) method. The calculations of the charge transfer process 12Σ+ H-(1s2) +Li(1 s22 s ) →22Σ+ /32 Σ+ /12 Π H(1 s ) +Li-(1s 22 s 2 l ) (l =s ,p ) at the incident energy of about [0.3, 1.3] eV are illustrated as an example. It shows that the calculated reaction probabilities by the present FCAP reproduce that of quantum-mechanical molecular-orbital close-coupling very well, including the peak structures contributed by the resonances. Since time-dependent external interactions can be directly included in the present FCAP calculations, the successful implementation of FCAP provides us a powerful potential tool to study the quantum control of heavy particle collisions by lasers in the near future.

  20. A new detector array for charged particle spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Cowin, R L; Chappell, S P G; Clarke, N M; Freer, M; Fulton, B R; Cunningham, R A; Curtis, N; Dillon, G; Lilley, J; Jones, C D; Lee, P; Rae, W D M

    1999-01-01

    A compact and highly segmented detector array consisting of 44 gas-silicon-caesium iodide, position sensitive, particle identification detector telescopes and up to 10 position-sensitive, silicon strip detectors has been constructed for the study of light-ion-heavy-ion reactions including cluster break-up in the energy range 5-15 MeV/nucleon. The detectors are housed in a purpose built vacuum chamber. The telescopes are placed in fixed positions, covering the forward hemisphere from 3 to 30 deg. in the laboratory with the target placed at 535 mm from the front of the telescopes or 6-52 deg. with the target placed at 215 mm. The strip detectors are placed in any of 30 fixed positions in the forward hemisphere. For 85 MeV sup 1 sup 2 C ions the telescope energy resolution (gas plus silicon) is 345 keV with an angular resolution of 0.03 deg. . Using the gas-silicon section ions with Z up to 21 can be identified. For ions that pass through the silicon isotopic identification is achieved using the silicon-CsI comb...

  1. Development of Charged.Particle Detector and Its Application in Shenzhou-5 Manned Spacecraft

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TanJilian; LuZiwei; ZhangJinxia; LiCunfan; WangZhusheng; BaoZhiqing; WangShijin; ZhuGuangwu; LiangJinbao; GaoPing

    2003-01-01

    The measuring and monitoring of the radiation environment of earth's space have very important significance for developing space science and application techniques. The measurement of space charged particle radiation includes mainly two aspects: (1) measurement of energy spectra and flux of protons and electrons; (2) identification of particle species lighter than Fe and measurement of energy spectra. Charged particle spectroscope consisting of semiconductor detectors was usually used for the measurements mentioned above.

  2. Phase Separation of Binary Charged Particle Systems with Small Size Disparities using a Dusty Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killer, Carsten; Bockwoldt, Tim; Schütt, Stefan; Himpel, Michael; Melzer, André; Piel, Alexander

    2016-03-18

    The phase separation in binary mixtures of charged particles has been investigated in a dusty plasma under microgravity on parabolic flights. A method based on the use of fluorescent dust particles was developed that allows us to distinguish between particles of slightly different size. A clear trend towards phase separation even for smallest size (charge) disparities is observed. The diffusion flux is directly measured from the experiment and uphill diffusion coefficients have been determined.

  3. Preequilibrium particle emission in 250 MeV {sup 16}O + {sup 116}Sn reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barlini, S.; Kravchuk, V.L.; Gramegna, F. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro Padova (Italy)] (and others)

    2005-07-01

    A certain progress in understanding the phenomenon of the Preequilibrium (fast) light charged particle and neutron Emission (PE) was achieved in the last two decades. However, there is a strong need to study systematically the dependence of the PE emission on the reaction mass asymmetry and the projectile energy. In the present work we present the results on the PE proton and alpha-particle multiplicities and the total energy loss of the composite system formed in fusion reaction E{sub b}eam=250 MeV (15.6 MeV/u) {sup 16}O + {sup 116}Sn. The experiment was performed at the Legnaro National Laboratory using a 1 ns (FWHM) pulsed beam provided by the TANDEM-ALPI acceleration system.

  4. Excitation of the dynamical dipole in the charge asymmetric reaction {sup 16}O + {sup 116}Sn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corsi, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Milano, Milano (Italy); INFN Sezione di Milano, Milano (Italy); Wieland, O. [INFN Sezione di Milano, Milano (Italy); Kravchuk, V.L. [Laboratori Nazionali INFN di Legnaro, Legnaro (Italy); Bracco, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Milano, Milano (Italy); INFN Sezione di Milano, Milano (Italy); Camera, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Milano, Milano (Italy); INFN Sezione di Milano, Milano (Italy)], E-mail: franco.camera@mi.infn.it; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Brambilla, S. [INFN Sezione di Milano, Milano (Italy); Crespi, F.C.L.; Giussani, A.; Leoni, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Milano, Milano (Italy); INFN Sezione di Milano, Milano (Italy); Million, B. [INFN Sezione di Milano, Milano (Italy); Montanari, D.; Moroni, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Milano, Milano (Italy); INFN Sezione di Milano, Milano (Italy); Gramegna, F.; Lanchais, A.; Mastinu, P. [Laboratori Nazionali INFN di Legnaro, Legnaro (Italy); Brekiesz, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A. [Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow (Poland)] (and others)

    2009-08-24

    The {gamma}-ray emission from the dynamical dipole formed in heavy-ion collisions during the process leading to fusion was measured for the N/Z asymmetric reaction {sup 16}O + {sup 116}Sn at beam energies of 8.1 and 15.6 MeV/nucleon. High-energy {gamma}-rays and charged particles were measured in coincidence with the heavy recoiling residual nuclei. The data are compared with those from the N/Z symmetric reaction {sup 64}Ni + {sup 68}Zn at bombarding energies of 4.7 and 7.8 MeV/nucleon, leading to the same CN with the same excitation energies as calculated from kinematics. The measured yield of the high-energy {gamma}-rays from the {sup 16}O-induced reaction is found to exceed that of the thermalized CN and the excess yield increases with bombarding energy. The data are in rather good agreement with the predictions for the dynamical dipole emission based on the Boltzmann-Nordheim-Vlasov model. In addition, a comparison with existing data in the same mass region is performed to extract information on the dipole moment dependence.

  5. Excitation of the dynamical dipole in the charge asymmetric reaction 16O + 116Sn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsi, A.; Wieland, O.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Bracco, A.; Camera, F.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Brambilla, S.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Giussani, A.; Leoni, S.; Million, B.; Montanari, D.; Moroni, A.; Gramegna, F.; Lanchais, A.; Mastinu, P.; Brekiesz, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Bruno, M.; D'Agostino, M.; Geraci, E.; Vannini, G.; Barlini, S.; Casini, G.; Chiari, M.; Nannini, A.; Ordine, A.; Di Toro, M.; Rizzo, C.; Colonna, M.; Baran, V.

    2009-08-01

    The γ-ray emission from the dynamical dipole formed in heavy-ion collisions during the process leading to fusion was measured for the N/Z asymmetric reaction 16O + 116Sn at beam energies of 8.1 and 15.6 MeV/nucleon. High-energy γ-rays and charged particles were measured in coincidence with the heavy recoiling residual nuclei. The data are compared with those from the N/Z symmetric reaction 64Ni + 68Zn at bombarding energies of 4.7 and 7.8 MeV/nucleon, leading to the same CN with the same excitation energies as calculated from kinematics. The measured yield of the high-energy γ-rays from the 16O-induced reaction is found to exceed that of the thermalized CN and the excess yield increases with bombarding energy. The data are in rather good agreement with the predictions for the dynamical dipole emission based on the Boltzmann-Nordheim-Vlasov model. In addition, a comparison with existing data in the same mass region is performed to extract information on the dipole moment dependence.

  6. Particles inside electrolytes with ion-specific interactions, their effective charge distributions, and effective interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Mingnan; Liang, Yihao; Xing, Xiangjun

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we explore the statistical physics of colloidal particles that interact with electrolytes via ion-specific interactions. Firstly we study particles interacting weakly with electrolyte using linear response theory. We find that the mean potential around a particle is linearly determined by the effective charge distribution of the particle, which depends both on the bare charge distribution and on ion-specific interactions. We also discuss the effective interaction between two such particles and show that, in the far field regime, it is bilinear in the effective charge distributions of two particles. We subsequently generalize the above results to the more complicated case where particles interact strongly with the electrolyte. Our results indicate that in order to understand the statistical physics of non-dilute electrolytes, both ion-specific interactions and ionic correlations have to be addressed in a single unified and consistent framework. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11174196 and 91130012).

  7. Radiation reaction from electromagnetic fields in the neighborhood of a point charge

    CERN Document Server

    Singal, Ashok K

    2015-01-01

    From the electromagnetic field in the neighborhood of a "point charge" in arbitrary motion, it is shown that the Poynting flux across a spherical surface of vanishingly small radius, surrounding the charge in its instantaneous rest-frame, is nil. The absence of the Poynting flux in the neighborhood of such a charge explicitly shows that there are no radiative losses from an instantly stationary point charge. While this might appear to contradict Larmor's formula for radiation, nevertheless, it is in complete conformity with energy conservation. After all a charge stationary, even if for an instant, possesses no kinetic energy at the moment that could be lost into radiation. Further, from the rate of electromagnetic momentum flow, calculated using the Maxwell stress tensor, across a surface surrounding the charge, the radiation reaction is determined which turns out to be proportional to the first time derivative of the acceleration of the charge. The power loss due to radiation reaction, hitherto derived in t...

  8. The low-frequency dielectric response of charged oblate spheroidal particles immersed in an electrolyte

    CERN Document Server

    Hou, Chang-Yu; Sen, Pabitra N

    2016-01-01

    We study the low-frequency polarization response of a surface-charged oblate spheroidal particle immersed in an electrolyte solution. Because the charged spheroid attracts counter-ions which form the electric double layer around the particle, using usual boundary conditions at the interface between the particle and electrolyte can be quite complicated and challenging. Hence, we generalize Fixman's boundary conditions, originally derived for spherical particles, to the case of the charged oblate spheroid. Given two different counter-ion distributions in the thin electric double layer limit, we obtain analytic expressions for the polarization coefficients to the first non-trivial order in frequency. We find that the polarization response normal to the symmetry axis depends on the total amount of charge carried by the oblate spheroid while that parallel to the symmetry axis is suppressed when there is less charge on the edge of the spheroid. We further study the overall dielectric response for a dilute suspensio...

  9. Charging Guidance of Electric Taxis Based on Adaptive Particle Swarm Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyong Niu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Electric taxis are playing an important role in the application of electric vehicles. The actual operational data of electric taxis in Shenzhen, China, is analyzed, and, in allusion to the unbalanced time availability of the charging station equipment, the electric taxis charging guidance system is proposed basing on the charging station information and vehicle information. An electric taxis charging guidance model is established and guides the charging based on the positions of taxis and charging stations with adaptive mutation particle swarm optimization. The simulation is based on the actual data of Shenzhen charging stations, and the results show that electric taxis can be evenly distributed to the appropriate charging stations according to the charging pile numbers in charging stations after the charging guidance. The even distribution among the charging stations in the area will be achieved and the utilization of charging equipment will be improved, so the proposed charging guidance method is verified to be feasible. The improved utilization of charging equipment can save public charging infrastructure resources greatly.

  10. Charging Guidance of Electric Taxis Based on Adaptive Particle Swarm Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Liyong; Zhang, Di

    2015-01-01

    Electric taxis are playing an important role in the application of electric vehicles. The actual operational data of electric taxis in Shenzhen, China, is analyzed, and, in allusion to the unbalanced time availability of the charging station equipment, the electric taxis charging guidance system is proposed basing on the charging station information and vehicle information. An electric taxis charging guidance model is established and guides the charging based on the positions of taxis and charging stations with adaptive mutation particle swarm optimization. The simulation is based on the actual data of Shenzhen charging stations, and the results show that electric taxis can be evenly distributed to the appropriate charging stations according to the charging pile numbers in charging stations after the charging guidance. The even distribution among the charging stations in the area will be achieved and the utilization of charging equipment will be improved, so the proposed charging guidance method is verified to be feasible. The improved utilization of charging equipment can save public charging infrastructure resources greatly.

  11. Ultracold Fermi and Bose gases and Spinless Bose Charged Sound Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minasyan V.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel approach for investigation of the motion of Bose or Fermi liquid (or gas which consists of decoupled electrons and ions in the uppermost hyperfine state. Hence, we use such a concept as the fluctuation motion of “charged fluid particles” or “charged fluid points” representing a charged longitudinal elastic wave. In turn, this elastic wave is quantized by spinless longitudinal Bose charged sound particles with the rest mass m and charge e 0 . The existence of spinless Bose charged sound particles allows us to present a new model for description of Bose or Fermi liquid via a non-ideal Bose gas of charged sound particles . In this respect, we introduce a new postulation for the superfluid component of Bose or Fermi liquid determined by means of charged sound particles in the condensate, which may explain the results of experiments connected with ultra-cold Fermi gases of spin-polarized hydrogen, 6 Li and 40 K, and such a Bose gas as 87 Rb in the uppermost hyperfine state, where the Bose- Einstein condensation of charged sound particles is realized by tuning the magnetic field.

  12. R-Matrix Codes for Charged-particle Induced Reactionsin the Resolved Resonance Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leeb, Helmut [Technical Univ. of Wien, Vienna (Austria); Dimitriou, Paraskevi [Intl Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna (Austria); Thompson, Ian J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-01-01

    A Consultant’s Meeting was held at the IAEA Headquarters, from 5 to 7 December 2016, to discuss the status of R-matrix codes currently used in calculations of charged-particle induced reaction cross sections at low energies. The meeting was a follow-up to the R-matrix Codes meeting held in December 2015, and served the purpose of monitoring progress in: the development of a translation code to enable exchange of input/output parameters between the various codes in different formats, fitting procedures and treatment of uncertainties, the evaluation methodology, and finally dissemination. The details of the presentations and technical discussions, as well as additional actions that were proposed to achieve all the goals of the meeting are summarized in this report.

  13. A search for relativistic particles with fractional electric charge at the Cern collider

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banner, M.; Kofoed-Hansen, O.

    1983-01-01

    A search for relativistic particles with fractional electric charge has been performed at the CERN collider using a telescope of scintillation counters to detect particles with abnormally low ionisation. The thickness of the detector (40 gr cm−2) limits this search to particles without strong...

  14. Trajectory of Charged Particle in Combined Electric and Magnetic Fields Using Interactive Spreadsheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambade, Popat S.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this article is to graphically illustrate to the students the physical phenomenon of motion of charged particle under the action of simultaneous electric and magnetic fields by simulating particle motion on a computer. Differential equations of motions are solved analytically and path of particle in three-dimensional space are…

  15. High-energy charged particle bursts in the near-Earth space as earthquake precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yu. Aleksandrin

    Full Text Available The experimental data on high-energy charged particle fluxes, obtained in various near-Earth space experiments (MIR orbital station, METEOR-3, GAMMA and SAMPEX satellites were processed and analyzed with the goal to search for particle bursts. Particle bursts have been selected in every experiment considered. It was shown that the significant part of high-energy charged particle bursts correlates with seismic activity. Moreover, the particle bursts are observed several hours before strong earthquakes; L-shells of particle bursts and corresponding earthquakes are practically the same. Some features of a seismo-magnetosphere connection model, based on the interaction of electromagnetic emission of seismic origin and radiation belt particles, were considered.

    Key words. Ionospheric physics (energetic particles, trapped; energetic particles, precipitating; magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions

  16. Dipole Moment of a Charged Particle Trapped at the Air-Water Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossa, Guilherme Volpe; Bohinc, Klemen; Brown, Matthew A; May, Sylvio

    2016-07-07

    The interaction between two charged particles (such as nanoparticles or colloids) trapped at the air-water interface becomes dipolar at large separations. The corresponding dipole moment can be modeled by considering a single point charge located exactly at the interface, but this model fails to correctly predict the dipole moment's dependence on the salt concentration in the aqueous medium. We extend the single point charge model to two point charges that are separated by a fixed distance and are located at the air-water interface, with one charge being immersed in air and the other in the solvent. The two point charges represent the surface charges at the air-exposed and water-exposed regions of an interface-trapped particle. The two point charges also account for the spatial extension of the particle. On the basis of the Debye-Hückel model, we derive mathematical expressions for the interaction between two pairs of charges and discuss the salt concentration dependence of the dipolar moment at large separations. Our results reveal a residual dipole moment in the limit of large salt content that originates from the charge attached to the air-exposed region of the particle. We discuss nonlinear screening effects and compare the predicted dipolar moments with recent experimental results.

  17. Heavy charged particle radiobiology: using enhanced biological effectiveness and improved beam focusing to advance cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Christopher; Borak, Thomas B; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Nickoloff, Jac A

    2011-06-03

    Ionizing radiation causes many types of DNA damage, including base damage and single- and double-strand breaks. Photons, including X-rays and γ-rays, are the most widely used type of ionizing radiation in radiobiology experiments, and in radiation cancer therapy. Charged particles, including protons and carbon ions, are seeing increased use as an alternative therapeutic modality. Although the facilities needed to produce high energy charged particle beams are more costly than photon facilities, particle therapy has shown improved cancer survival rates, reflecting more highly focused dose distributions and more severe DNA damage to tumor cells. Despite early successes of charged particle radiotherapy, there is room for further improvement, and much remains to be learned about normal and cancer cell responses to charged particle radiation.

  18. Toner Display Based on Movement of Tribo-electrically Charged Particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takashi Kitamura

    2004-01-01

    The mechanism of toner display based on an electrical movement of black and white charged particles has been investigated. Two kinds of particles of black and white charged in the different electric polarity are enclosed in two ITO transparent electrodes using an insulating spacer. The particle movement is controlled by the external electric field applied between two transparent electrodes. The black toner is adhered on the electrode by an electrostatic force across the CTL to display a black image. The toners can be put back to the counter electrode by applying a reverse electric field, and a white image is formed. The black and white solid images are displayed by the switch of polarity of applied voltage in toner display cell. The polarity of charge and the value of charge to mass ratio of two particles were measured by observation of the particle separation on the surface-type electrodes and using q/m meter, respectively.

  19. Mass analysis of charged aerosol particles in NLC and PMSE during the ECOMA/MASS campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Robertson

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available MASS (Mesospheric Aerosol Sampling Spectrometer is a multichannel mass spectrometer for charged aerosol particles, which was flown from the Andøya Rocket Range, Norway, through NLC and PMSE on 3 August 2007 and through PMSE on 6 August 2007. The eight-channel analyzers provided for the first time simultaneous measurements of the charge density residing on aerosol particles in four mass ranges, corresponding to ice particles with radii <0.5 nm (including ions, 0.5–1 nm, 1–2 nm, and >3 nm (approximately. Positive and negative particles were recorded on separate channels. Faraday rotation measurements provided electron density and a means of checking charge density measurements made by the spectrometer. Additional complementary measurements were made by rocket-borne dust impact detectors, electric field booms, a photometer and ground-based radar and lidar. The MASS data from the first flight showed negative charge number densities of 1500–3000 cm−3 for particles with radii >3 nm from 83–88 km approximately coincident with PMSE observed by the ALWIN radar and NLC observed by the ALOMAR lidar. For particles in the 1–2 nm range, number densities of positive and negative charge were similar in magnitude (~2000 cm−3 and for smaller particles, 0.5–1 nm in radius, positive charge was dominant. The occurrence of positive charge on the aerosol particles of the smallest size and predominately negative charge on the particles of largest size suggests that nucleation occurs on positive condensation nuclei and is followed by collection of negative charge during subsequent growth to larger size. Faraday rotation measurements show a bite-out in electron density that increases the time for positive aerosol particles to be neutralized and charged negatively. The larger particles (>3 nm are observed throughout the NLC region, 83–88 km, and the smaller particles are observed primarily at the high end of the range, 86–88 km

  20. Charged particle-like branes in ABJM: A summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, N.; Lozano, Y. [Department of Physics, University of Oviedo, Avda. Calvo Sotelo 18, 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Rodriguez-Gomez, D. [Department of Physics, Technion, Haifa, 3200 (Israel); Department of Mathematics and Physics University of Haifa at Oranim, Tivon, 36006 (Israel)

    2011-07-01

    We study the effect of adding lower dimensional brane charges to the 't Hooft monopole, di-baryon and baryon vertex configurations in AdS{sub 4} x P{sup 3}. We show that these configurations capture the background fluxes in a way that depends on the induced charges, requiring additional fundamental strings to cancel the worldvolume tadpoles. The dynamics reveal that the charges must lie inside some interval, a situation familiar from the baryon vertex in AdS{sub 5} x S{sup 5} with charges. For the baryon vertex and the di-baryon the number of fundamental strings must also lie inside an allowed interval. Some ideas about the existence of these bounds in relation to the stringy exclusion principle are given. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Numerical computation of discrete differential scattering cross sections for Monte Carlo charged particle transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Jonathan A., E-mail: walshjon@mit.edu [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, 24-107, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Palmer, Todd S. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics, Oregon State University, 116 Radiation Center, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Urbatsch, Todd J. [XTD-IDA: Theoretical Design, Integrated Design and Assessment, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Generation of discrete differential scattering angle and energy loss cross sections. • Gauss–Radau quadrature utilizing numerically computed cross section moments. • Development of a charged particle transport capability in the Milagro IMC code. • Integration of cross section generation and charged particle transport capabilities. - Abstract: We investigate a method for numerically generating discrete scattering cross sections for use in charged particle transport simulations. We describe the cross section generation procedure and compare it to existing methods used to obtain discrete cross sections. The numerical approach presented here is generalized to allow greater flexibility in choosing a cross section model from which to derive discrete values. Cross section data computed with this method compare favorably with discrete data generated with an existing method. Additionally, a charged particle transport capability is demonstrated in the time-dependent Implicit Monte Carlo radiative transfer code, Milagro. We verify the implementation of charged particle transport in Milagro with analytic test problems and we compare calculated electron depth–dose profiles with another particle transport code that has a validated electron transport capability. Finally, we investigate the integration of the new discrete cross section generation method with the charged particle transport capability in Milagro.

  2. Measurement of charmed particle production in hadronic reactions

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the experiment is to measure the production cross-section for charmed particles in hadronic reactions, study their production mechanism, and search for excited charmed hadrons.\\\\ \\\\ Charmed Mesons and Baryons will be measured in $\\pi$ and $p$ interactions on Beryllium between 100 and 200 GeV/c. The trigger will be on an electron from the leptonic decay of one charmed particle by signals from the Cerenkov counter (Ce), the electron trigger calorimeter (eCal), scintillation counters, and proportional wire chambers. The accompanying charmed particle will be measured via its hadronic decay in a two-stage magnetic spectrometer with drift chambers (arms 2, 3a, 3b, 3c), two large-area multicell Cerenkov counters (C2, C3) and a large-area shower counter ($\\gamma$-CAL). The particles which can be measured and identified include $\\gamma, e, \\pi^{\\pm}, \\pi^{0}, K^{\\pm}, p, \\bar{p}$ so that a large number of hadronic decay modes of charmed particles can be studied. \\\\ \\\\ A silicon counter telescope with 5 $\\m...

  3. Light Particle Emission Mechanisms in Heavy-Ion Reactions at 5-20 MeV/u

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fotina O.V.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Light Charged Particle emission mechanisms were studied for different mass entrance channel nuclear reactions. The 300, 400, 500 MeV 64Ni + 68Zn and 130, 250 MeV 16O + 116Sn reactions were measured at the Legnaro National Laboratory using the beams from the TANDEM-ALPI acceleration system. Light Charged Particles were measured in coincidence with Evaporation Residues and their spectra were analyzed using the global moving source fit technique. The characterization of different emission sources (evaporative, pre-equilibrium, break-up is discussed. The behavior of pre-equilibrium emission as a function of projectile energy, excitation energy and mass-asymmetry in the entrance channel was studied, evaluating the energy, mass and charge lost by the composite systems and using Griffin exciton model for the pre-equilibrium neutron emission. The present results are compared with the systematics of the asymmetric mass entrance channel reactions. The present work shows that also at the onset the pre-equilibrium emission depends not only on the projectile velocity but also on the reaction entrance channel mass-asymmetry. The first attempt of the particle spectra analysis using the Griffin exciton model is demonstrated for the case of proton emission in the 130 MeV 16O + 116Sn reaction.

  4. Stimulated Brillouin scattering of an electromagnetic wave in weakly magnetized plasma with variably charged dust particles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sourabh Bal; M Bose

    2009-10-01

    We have investigated analytically the stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) of an electromagnetic wave in non-dissipative weakly magnetized plasma in the presence of dust particles with variable charge.

  5. Nonlinear dynamics for charges particle beams with a curved axis in the matrix - recursive model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dymnikov, A.D. [University of St Petersburg, (Russian Federation). Institute of Computational Mathematics and Control Process

    1993-12-31

    In this paper a new matrix and recursive approach has been outlined for treating nonlinear optics of charged particle beams. This approach is a new analytical and computational tool for designers of optimal beam control systems. 9 refs.

  6. Scaling theory of relative diffusion of charged particles in a weakly magneto-turbulent plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haida Wang (University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui. Dept. of Modern Physics); Xiaoming Qui (Southwest Inst. of Physics, Leshan, SC (China))

    1989-02-01

    Stochastic motion of charged particles in a magneto-turbulent plasma is studied for the whole time region. A set of nonlinear differential equations for describing relative spatial diffusion of charged particles is derived and some explicit results are obtained in the case of a weak magnetic field. It is found that, for the diffusion in the present system there are some new and interesting properties which do not exist in an unmagnetized plasma. The clump effect is also discussed. (author).

  7. CHANTI: a Fast and Efficient Charged Particle Veto Detector for the NA62 Experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosino, F; Di Filippo, D; Massarotti, P; Mirra, M; Napolitano, M; Palladino, V; Saracino, G; Roscilli, L; Vanzanella, A; Corradi, G; Tagnani, D; Paglia, U

    2016-01-01

    The design, construction and test of a charged particle detector made of scintillation counters read by Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) is described. The detector, which operates in vacuum and is used as a veto counter in the NA62 experiment at CERN, has a single channel time resolution of 1.14 ns, a spatial resolution of ~2.5 mm and an efficiency very close to 1 for penetrating charged particles.

  8. Measurements of charged-particle inclusive distributions in hadronic decays of the Z boson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrams, G.S.; Adolphsen, C.E.; Averill, D.; Ballam, J.; Barish, B.C.; Barklow, T.; Barnett, B.A.; Bartelt, J.; Bethke, S.; Blockus, D.; Bonvicini, G.; Boyarski, A.; Brabson, B.; Breakstone, A.; Bulos, F.; Burchat, P.R.; Burke, D.L.; Cence, R.J.; Chapman, J.; Chmeissani, M.; Cords, D.; Coupal, D.P.; Dauncey, P.; DeStaebler, H.C.; Dorfan, D.E.; Dorfan, J.M.; Drewer, D.C.; Elia, R.; Feldman, G.J.; Fernandes, D.; Field, R.C.; Ford, W.T.; Fordham, C.; Frey, R.; Fujino, D.; Gan, K.K.; Gero, E.; Gidal, G.; Glanzman, T.; Goldhaber, G.; Gomez Cadenas, J.J.; Gratta, G.; Grindhammer, G.; Grosse-Wiesmann, P.; Hanson, G.; Harr, R.; Harral, B.; Harris, F.A.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hayes, K.; Hearty, C.; Heusch, C.A.; Hildreth, M.D.; Himel, T.; Hinshaw, D.A.; Hong, S.J.; Hutchinson, D.; Hylen, J.; Innes, W.R.; Jacobsen, R.G.; Jaros, J.A.; Jung, C.K.; Kadyk, J.A.; Kent, J.; King, M.; Klein, S.R.; Koetke, D.S.; Komamiya, S.; Koska, W.; Kowalski, L.A.; Kozanecki, W.; Kral, J.F.; Kuhlen, M.; Labarga, L.; Lankford

    1990-03-19

    We have measured inclusive distributions for charged particles in hadronic decays of the {ital Z} boson. The variables chosen for study were charged-particle multiplicity, scaled momentum, and momenta transverse to the sphericity axes. The distributions have been corrected for detector effects and are compared with data from {ital e}{sup +}{ital e}{sup {minus}} annihilation at lower energies and with the predictions of several QCD-based models. The data are in reasonable agreement with expectations.

  9. Influence of the fringe field on moving of the charged particles in flat and cylindrical capacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doskeyev, G.A.; Edenova, O.A. [Aktobe State University named after K. Zhubanov, Br. Zhubanov Street 263, 030000 Aktobe (Kazakhstan); Spivak-Lavrov, I.F., E-mail: spivakif@rambler.ru [Aktobe State University named after K. Zhubanov, Br. Zhubanov Street 263, 030000 Aktobe (Kazakhstan)

    2011-07-21

    This paper describes different analytic approaches to describe the fringe fields of flat and cylindrical capacitor structures. A method for the calculation of deflection of charged particles from the optical axis is developed. The behavior of a charged particle beam in a flat capacitor is approximated by using a sharp cut-off boundary for the field, which has the provision of taking fringe fields into account.

  10. A parametrisation of the energy loss distributions of charged particles and its applications for silicon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Sikler, Ferenc

    2012-01-01

    The energy loss distribution of charged particles in silicon is approximated by a simple analytical parametrization. Its use is demonstrated through several examples. With the help of energy deposits in sensing elements of the detector, the position of track segments and the corresponding deposited energy are estimated with improved accuracy and less bias. The parametrization is successfully used to estimate the energy loss rate of charged particles, and it is applied to detector gain calibration tasks.

  11. Heterogeneous reaction of NO2 with sea salt particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    To understand how NO2 reacts with sea salt particles in the atmosphere of Mega-cities in coastal zones,the heterogeneous reaction of NO2 on the surface of wet sea salt was investigated with diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and ion chromatography (IC).Kinetic measurements indicated that nitrate formation on sea salt was second order in NO 2 concentration and reactive uptake coefficients were (5.51 ± 0.19) × 10-7 and 1.26 × 10-6 respectively under 0% and 20% relative humidity (RH) at NO 2 molecular concentration of 1.96 × 1015 mol/cm3.The results showed that liquid water was formed at the site of MgCl2·6H2O,CaCl2·2H2O on the surface of sea salt and made the reaction more sustainable by releasing hydrated water and absorbing water from air even under a low RH (30%).Therefore,pure NaCl particles should not be used to represent sea salt in studies of the heterogeneous reaction with NO2.

  12. Canonical formalism of action-at-a-distance electrodynamics and many-particle potential among charged particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Tadayuki; Kimura, Toshiei

    1993-10-01

    The second post-Coulombian Lagrangian of Wheeler-Feynman electrodynamics for a many-particle system is treated according to a canonical formalism of a singular Lagrangian with higher derivatives. The canonical equations are given in terms of a reduced Hamiltonian with Dirac brackets, but they are transformed to be expressed in terms of ordinary Poisson brackets by redefinition of canonical variables. The reduced Hamiltonian includes a characteristic form of three-particle and four-particle potentials. Finally a direct pathway to the reduced Hamiltonian is presented via first-order formalism of the Maxwell theory with charged particles.

  13. Charge transfer reactions at interfaces between neutral gas and plasma: Dynamical effects and X-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provornikova, E.; Izmodenov, V. V.; Lallement, R.

    2012-04-01

    Charge-transfer is the main process linking neutrals and charged particles in the interaction regions of neutral (or partly ionized) gas with a plasma. In this paper we illustrate the importance of charge-transfer with respect to the dynamics and the structure of neutral gas-plasma interfaces. We consider the following phenomena: (1) the heliospheric interface - region where the solar wind plasma interacts with the partly-ionized local interstellar medium (LISM) and (2) neutral interstellar clouds embedded in a hot, tenuous plasma such as the million degree gas that fills the so-called ``Local Bubble". In (1), we discuss several effects in the outer heliosphere caused by charge exchange of interstellar neutral atoms and plasma protons. In (2) we describe the role of charge exchange in the formation of a transition region between the cloud and the surrounding plasma based on a two-component model of the cloud-plasma interaction. In the model the cloud consists of relatively cold and dense atomic hydrogen gas, surrounded by hot, low density, fully ionized plasma. We discuss the structure of the cloud-plasma interface and the effect of charge exchange on the lifetime of interstellar clouds. Charge transfer between neutral atoms and minor ions in the plasma produces X-ray emission. Assuming standard abundances of minor ions in the hot gas surrounding the cold interstellar cloud, we estimate the X-ray emissivity consecutive to the charge transfer reactions. Our model shows that the charge-transfer X-ray emission from the neutral cloud-plasma interface may be comparable to the diffuse thermal X-ray emission from the million degree gas cavity itself.

  14. The role of space charge in GaAs-based particle detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Mares, J J; Hubik, P; Pospísil, S

    1999-01-01

    The direct measurement of the captured charge using the Faraday cup method together with the analysis of current-voltage curves was used for the experimental proof of the existence of the space charge in biased GaAs detector structures. The role of this space charge was discussed using the generalized Ramo-Gunn's theorem which enabled the explanation of the data observed and, moreover, provides a useful criterion for the optimization of GaAs-based particle detectors. (author)

  15. Optical signatures of the Charge of a Dielectric Particle in a Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Heinisch, R L; Fehske, H

    2013-01-01

    With an eye on dust particles immersed into an ionized gas, we study the effect of a negative charge on the scattering of light by a dielectric particle with a strong transverse optical phonon resonance in the dielectric constant. Surplus electrons alter the scattering behavior of the particle by their phonon limited conductivity in the surface layer (negative electron affinity) or in the bulk of the particle (positive electron affinity). We identify a charge-dependent increase of the extinction efficiency for low frequencies, a shift of the extinction resonance above the transverse optical phonon frequency, and a rapid variation of the polarization angles over this resonance. These effects could be used for non-invasive optical measurements of the charge of the particle.

  16. Alterations of CNS structure & function by charged particle radiation & resultant oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Gregory; Chang, Polly; Favre, Cecile; Fike, John; Komarova, Natalia; Limoli, Charles; Mao, Xiao-Wen; Obenaus, Andre; Raber, Jacob; Spigelman, Igor; Soltesz, Ivan; Song, Sheng-Kwei; Stampanoni, Marco; Vlkolinsky, Roman; Wodarz, Dominik

    The NSCOR program project is transitioning from establishing the existence of CNS responses to low doses of charged particles, to an investigation of mechanisms underlying these changes and extending the irradiation paradigm to more space-like exposures. In earlier experiments we examined radiation responses of the mouse brain (hippocampus) following exposure to 250 MeV protons and 600 MeV/n iron ions. Our key findings on structural changes were: 1) Significant dose and time dependent loss of en-dothelial cells and microvessel network remodeling occurs suggesting that vascular insufficiency is produced. 2) Significant dose dependent losses of neural precursor cells were observed in a lineage specific pattern which may be associated with cognitive impairment. 3) Evaluation of DNA damage showed dose and time dependent accumulation of mutations with region-specific mutation structures and gene expression profiling demonstrated activation of neurotrophic and adhesion factors as well as chemokine receptors associated with inflammation. Our key find-ings on functional changes were: 1) Time and dose dependent modifications to neural output expressed as enhanced excitability but reduced synaptic efficacy and plasticity (including long term potentiation). 2) Intrinsic membrane properties of neurons were not significantly modi-fied by radiation exposure but pharmacological treatments demonstrated changes in inhibitory synapses. 3) MRI imaging visualized brain structural changes based on altered water diffu-sion properties and patterns were consistent with demyelination or gliosis. Our key findings on neurodegeneration and fidelity of homeostasis were: 1) APP23 transgenic mice exhibited accelerated APP-type electrophysiological pathology over several months. 2) Microvessel net-work changes following irradiation were suggestive of poor tissue oxygenation. 3) The ability of the brain to respond a controlled septic shock was altered by irradiation; the septic shock reactions

  17. Chemisorption and Reactions of Small Molecules on Small Gold Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey C. Bond

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The activity of supported gold particles for a number of oxidations and hydrogenations starts to increase dramatically as the size falls below ~3 nm. This is accompanied by an increased propensity to chemisorption, especially of oxygen and hydrogen. The explanation for these phenomena has to be sought in kinetic analysis that connects catalytic activity with the strength and extent of chemisorption of the reactants, the latter depending on the electronic structure of the gold atoms constituting the active centre. Examination of the changes to the utilisation of electrons as particle size is decreased points to loss of metallic character at about 3 nm, as energy bands are replaced by levels, and a band gap appears. Detailed consideration of the Arrhenius parameters (E and ln A for CO oxidation points clearly to a step-change in activity at the point where metallic character is lost, as opposed to there being a monotonic dependence of rate on a physical property such as the fraction of atoms at corners or edges of particles. The deplorable scarcity of kinetic information on other reactions makes extension of this analysis difficult, but non-metallic behaviour is an unavoidable property of very small gold particles, and therefore cannot be ignored when seeking to explain their exceptional activity.

  18. Pre-Equilibrium Effects in the Secondary Particle Spectra in the Reactions with Heavy Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotina, O. V.; Eremenko, D. O.; Parfenova, Yu. L.; Platonov, S. Yu.; Yuminov, O. A.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Gramegna, F.; Barlini, S.; Casini, G.; Bruno, M.; D'Agostino, M.; Wieland, O.; Bracco, A.; Camera, F.

    Theoretical description of the experimentally obtained spectra for protons and α-particles and model calculations for the neutron spectra in the reactions with heavy ions has been presented. The hybrid model of non-equilibrium processes was used. Equilibrium evaporation process was analyzed in the framework of the statistical theory of nuclear reactions with Monte-Carlo simulation including certain dynamical and kinematical characteristics. This approach was included in PACE code, which permits to simulate Monte-Carlo de-excitation nuclear process. The Fermi-gas model and level-density phenomenological model for the variation of the nuclear level density parameters was used. In this approach data on 16O+116Sn reaction with Ebeam = 130, 250 MeV were analyzed. Double-differential light charged particle spectra for this reaction were measured using the GARFIELD apparatus in coincidence with evaporation residues. The experimental data were collected in four angular ranges from 29 to 41, 41 to 53, 53 to 67 and 67 to 82 degrees in the laboratory system. The results of the calculations are shown and discussed for these four angular ranges. The contributions from the evaporative and pre-equilibrium processes were analyzed in connection with different nucleus equilibration mechanisms.

  19. Reaction to fire of ETICS applied on wood particle board

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonati Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As well known the ETICS are diffusely used both for energy saving and thermal insulation reasons. They have been applied recently in wood buildings and in regions of southern Europe too due to green building and sustainability reasons. ITC-CNR has tested a lot of building materials and developed good knowledge about reaction to fire since the 1980 and currently, ETICS fixed directly to particle wood panels have been investigated with several SBI tests. In the case study are presented the main factors that can influence the fire reaction results when applied on wood structure are highlighted: the thickness of the insulating material, the presence of accidental damage, the flame attack from the inside. From the results obtained by tests on samples prepared with simulated accidental damages and fire from inside, some considerations are made about the hazard due to this specific construction technology and others on limits of the type of actually used standards product classification.

  20. Production of leading charged particles and leading charged-particle jets at small transverse momenta in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Lauwers, Jasper; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Rougny, Romain; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dobur, Didar; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Léonard, Alexandre; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Randle-conde, Aidan; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Zenoni, Florian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Crucy, Shannon; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Poyraz, Deniz; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Dos Reis Martins, Thiago; Molina, Jorge; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Da Costa, Eliza Melo; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santaolalla, Javier; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Genchev, Vladimir; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Zheng; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Zhang, Linlin; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Mekterovic, Darko; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Chapon, Emilien; Charlot, Claude; Dahms, Torsten; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Filipovic, Nicolas; Florent, Alice; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Miné, Philippe; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Skovpen, Kirill; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Brochet, Sébastien; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Courbon, Benoit; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sabes, David; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Xiao, Hong; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Bontenackels, Michael; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heister, Arno; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Preuten, Marius; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Knutzen, Simon; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behr, Joerg; Behrens, Ulf; Bell, Alan James; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Choudhury, Somnath; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Flucke, Gero; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Gunnellini, Paolo; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Karacheban, Olena; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nayak, Aruna; Ntomari, Eleni; Perrey, Hanno; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Roland, Benoit; Ron, Elias; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Saxena, Pooja; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schröder, Matthias; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Vargas Trevino, Andrea Del Rocio; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Görner, Martin; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Junkes, Alexandra; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Ott, Jochen; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Pietsch, Niklas; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Pöhlsen, Thomas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Seidel, Markus; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Frensch, Felix; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Hartmann, Frank; Hauth, Thomas; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Müller, Thomas; Nürnberg, Andreas; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Röcker, Steffen; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weiler, Thomas; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Psallidas, Andreas; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Agapitos, Antonis; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Stiliaris, Efstathios; Tziaferi, Eirini; Aslanoglou, Xenofon; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Makovec, Alajos; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Gupta, Ruchi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Mittal, Monika; Nishu, Nishu; Singh, Jasbir; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Modak, Atanu; Mukherjee, Swagata; Roy, Debarati; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Sharma, Seema; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Goldouzian, Reza; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Sharma, Archana; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Ferretti, Roberta; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Gerosa, Raffaele; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bellato, Marco; Dall'Osso, Martino; Dorigo, Tommaso; Fantinel, Sergio; Gonella, Franco; Gozzelino, Andrea; Gulmini, Michele; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Montecassiano, Fabio; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pegoraro, Matteo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Sgaravatto, Massimo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Vanini, Sara; Ventura, Sandro; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Gabusi, Michele; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiezia, Aniello; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fedi, Giacomo; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Moon, Chang-Seong; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Vernieri, Caterina; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Soffi, Livia; Traczyk, Piotr; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Casasso, Stefano; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Dattola, Domenico; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Tamponi, Umberto; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Schizzi, Andrea; Umer, Tomo; Zanetti, Anna; Chang, Sunghyun; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Oh, Young Do; Park, Hyangkyu; Sakharov, Alexandre; Son, Dong-Chul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Ryu, Min Sang; Kim, Jae Yool; Moon, Dong Ho; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kyong Sei; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Reucroft, Steve; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Khein, Lev; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Lukina, Olga; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Ekmedzic, Marko; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Soares, Mara Senghi; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Brun, Hugues; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Graziano, Alberto; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benaglia, Andrea; Bendavid, Joshua; Benhabib, Lamia; Benitez, Jose F; Bianchi, Giovanni; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Bondu, Olivier; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Colafranceschi, Stefano; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; De Visscher, Simon; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dordevic, Milos; Dorney, Brian; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Eugster, Jürg; Franzoni, Giovanni; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Guida, Roberto; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Magini, Nicolo; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Marrouche, Jad; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Plagge, Michael; Racz, Attila; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Steggemann, Jan; Stieger, Benjamin; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Treille, Daniel; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Wollny, Heiner; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Chanon, Nicolas; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Dünser, Marc; Eller, Philipp; Grab, Christoph; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Kasieczka, Gregor; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Marionneau, Matthieu; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Masciovecchio, Mario; Meister, Daniel; Mohr, Niklas; Musella, Pasquale; Nägeli, Christoph; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrozzi, Luca; Peruzzi, Marco; Quittnat, Milena; Rebane, Liis; Rossini, Marco; Starodumov, Andrei; Takahashi, Maiko; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Amsler, Claude; Canelli, Maria Florencia; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Cosa, Annapaola; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Lange, Clemens; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Pinna, Deborah; Robmann, Peter; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Taroni, Silvia; Yang, Yong; Cardaci, Marco; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Ferro, Cristina; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Bartek, Rachel; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Petrakou, Eleni; Tsai, Jui-fa; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Asavapibhop, Burin; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Mehmet; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Gamsizkan, Halil; Isildak, Bora; Karapinar, Guler; Ocalan, Kadir; Sekmen, Sezen; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Yetkin, Taylan; Cankocak, Kerem; Vardarlı, Fuat Ilkehan; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Meng, Zhaoxia; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Vincent J; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Womersley, William John; Worm, Steven; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Burton, Darren; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Dunne, Patrick; Elwood, Adam; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; Jarvis, Martyn; Karapostoli, Georgia; Kenzie, Matthew; Lane, Rebecca; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Mathias, Bryn; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Raymond, David Mark; Rogerson, Samuel; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Tapper, Alexander; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Kasmi, Azeddine; Liu, Hongxuan; Pastika, Nathaniel; Scarborough, Tara; Wu, Zhenbin; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Lawson, Philip; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; St John, Jason; Sulak, Lawrence; Alimena, Juliette; Berry, Edmund; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Christopher, Grant; Cutts, David; Demiragli, Zeynep; Dhingra, Nitish; Ferapontov, Alexey; Garabedian, Alex; Heintz, Ulrich; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Sagir, Sinan; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Speer, Thomas; Swanson, Joshua; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Cousins, Robert; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Rakness, Gregory; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Ivova PANEVA, Mirena; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Malberti, Martina; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wimpenny, Stephen; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Klein, Daniel; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Welke, Charles; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Barge, Derek; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Danielson, Thomas; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Mccoll, Nickolas; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; To, Wing; West, Christopher; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Duarte, Javier; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Pierini, Maurizio; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wilkinson, Richard; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carlson, Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Krohn, Michael; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Nauenberg, Uriel; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Eggert, Nicholas; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Ryd, Anders; Salvati, Emmanuele; Skinnari, Louise; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Weng, Yao; Winstrom, Lucas; Wittich, Peter; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Kwan, Simon; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena Ingrid; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Prokofyev, Oleg; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vidal, Richard; Whitbeck, Andrew; Whitmore, Juliana; Yang, Fan; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; De Gruttola, Michele; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Hugon, Justin; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kypreos, Theodore; Low, Jia Fu; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Shchutska, Lesya; Snowball, Matthew; Sperka, David; Yelton, John; Zakaria, Mohammed; Hewamanage, Samantha; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Adams, Jordon Rowe; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Diamond, Brendan; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Kurt, Pelin; O'Brien, Christine; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Silkworth, Christopher; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sen, Sercan; Tan, Ping; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Anderson, Ian; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bolognesi, Sara; Fehling, David; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Martin, Christopher; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Bruner, Christopher; Gray, Julia; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Majumder, Devdatta; Malek, Magdalena; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Sanders, Stephen; Sekaric, Jadranka; Stringer, Robert; Wang, Quan; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Svintradze, Irakli; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Lu, Ying; Mignerey, Alice; Pedro, Kevin; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Bierwagen, Katharina; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Gulhan, Doga; Klute, Markus; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Stephans, George; Sumorok, Konstanty; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zanetti, Marco; Zhukova, Victoria; Dahmes, Bryan; Gude, Alexander; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Rusack, Roger; Singovsky, Alexander; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Keller, Jason; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Meier, Frank; Ratnikov, Fedor; Snow, Gregory R; Zvada, Marian; Dolen, James; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael; Stoynev, Stoyan; Sung, Kevin; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Chan, Kwok Ming; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Musienko, Yuri; Pearson, Tessa; Planer, Michael; Ruchti, Randy; Smith, Geoffrey; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Antonelli, Louis; Brinson, Jessica; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Luo, Wuming; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Winer, Brian L; Wolfe, Homer; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Koay, Sue Ann; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zuranski, Andrzej; Brownson, Eric; Malik, Sudhir; Mendez, Hector; Ramirez Vargas, Juan Eduardo; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bortoletto, Daniela; Gutay, Laszlo; Hu, Zhen; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Kurt; Kress, Matthew; Leonardo, Nuno; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Primavera, Federica; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shi, Xin; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Zablocki, Jakub; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Korjenevski, Sergey; Petrillo, Gianluca; Verzetti, Mauro; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Ciesielski, Robert; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Mesropian, Christina; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Kaplan, Steven; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; York, Andrew; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Montalvo, Roy; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Kunori, Shuichi; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Mao, Yaxian; Melo, Andrew; Sharma, Monika; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wolfe, Evan; Wood, John; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Friis, Evan; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Levine, Aaron; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ross, Ian; Sarangi, Tapas; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Vuosalo, Carl; Woods, Nathaniel

    2015-01-01

    The per-event yield of the highest transverse momentum charged particle and charged-particle jet, integrated above a given $p_{\\mathrm{T}}^{\\mathrm{min}}$ threshold starting at $p_{\\mathrm{T}}^{\\mathrm{min}} = $ 0.8 and 1 GeV, respectively, is studied in PbPb collisions at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 8 TeV. The particles and the jets are measured for absolute pseudorapidities lower than 2.4 and 1.9, respectively. The data are sensitive to the momentum scale at which parton densities saturate in the proton, to multiple partonic interactions, and other key aspects of the transition between the soft and hard QCD regimes in hadronic collisions.

  1. A Symplectic Multi-Particle Tracking Model for Self-Consistent Space-Charge Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Qiang, Ji

    2016-01-01

    Symplectic tracking is important in accelerator beam dynamics simulation. So far, to the best of our knowledge, there is no self-consistent symplectic space-charge tracking model available in the accelerator community. In this paper, we present a two-dimensional and a three-dimensional symplectic multi-particle spectral model for space-charge tracking simulation. This model includes both the effect from external fields and the effect of self-consistent space-charge fields using a split-operator method. Such a model preserves the phase space structure and shows much less numerical emittance growth than the particle-in-cell model in the illustrative examples.

  2. Comprehensive decay law for emission of charged particles and exotic cluster radioactivity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Basudeb Sahu

    2014-04-01

    A general decay formula for the emission of charged particles from metastable nuclei is developed based on the basic phenomenon of resonances occurring in quantum scattering process under Coulomb-nuclear potential. It relates the half-lives of radioactive decays with the values of the outgoing elements with masses and charges of the nuclei involved in the decay. The relation is found to be a generalization of the Geiger–Nuttall law in radioactivity and explains well all the known emissions of charged particles including clusters, alpha and proton.

  3. Inclusive transverse momentum distributions of charged particles in diffractive and non-diffractive photoproduction at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Derrick, Malcolm; Magill, S; Mikunas, D; Musgrave, B; Repond, J; Stanek, R; Talaga, R L; Zhang, H; Ayad, R; Bari, G; Basile, M; Bellagamba, L; Boscherini, D; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bruni, P; Cara Romeo, G; Castellini, G; Chiarini, M; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Contin, A; Corradi, M; Gialas, I; Giusti, P; Iacobucci, G; Laurenti, G; Levi, G; Margotti, A; Massam, Thomas; Nania, R; Nemoz, C; Palmonari, F; Polini, A; Sartorelli, G; Timellini, R; Zamora-Garcia, Yu E; Zichichi, Antonino; Bargende, A; Crittenden, James Arthur; Desch, Klaus; Diekmann, B; Doeker, T; Eckert, M; Feld, L; Frey, A; Geerts, M; Geitz, G; Grothe, M; Haas, T; Hartmann, H; Haun, D; Heinloth, K; Hilger, E; Jakob, H P; Katz, U F; Mari, S M; Mass, A; Mengel, S; Mollen, J; Paul, E; Rembser, C; Schattevoy, R; Schramm, D; Stamm, J; Wedemeyer, R; Campbell-Robson, S; Cassidy, A; Dyce, N; Foster, B; George, S; Gilmore, R; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Llewellyn, T J; Morgado, C J S; Norman, D J P; O'Mara, J A; Tapper, R J; Wilson, S S; Yoshida, R; Rau, R R; Arneodo, M; Iannotti, L; Schioppa, M; Susinno, G; Bernstein, A M; Caldwell, A; Cartiglia, N; Parsons, J A; Ritz, S; Sciulli, F; Straub, P B; Wai, L; Yang, S; Zhu, Q; Borzemski, P; Chwastowski, J; Eskreys, Andrzej; Piotrzkowski, K; Zachara, M; Zawiejski, L; Adamczyk, L; Bednarek, B; Jelen, K; Kisielewska, D; Kowalski, T; Rulikowska-Zarebska, E; Suszycki, L; Zajac, J; Kotanski, Andrzej; Przybycien, M B; Bauerdick, L A T; Behrens, U; Beier, H; Bienlein, J K; Coldewey, C; Deppe, O; Desler, K; Drews, G; Flasinski, M; Gilkinson, D J; Glasman, C; Göttlicher, P; Grosse-Knetter, J; Gutjahr, B; Hain, W; Hasell, D; Hessling, H; Iga, Y; Joos, P; Kasemann, M; Klanner, Robert; Koch, W; Köpke, L; Kötz, U; Kowalski, H; Labs, J; Ladage, A; Löhr, B; Loewe, M; Lüke, D; Manczak, O; Monteiro, T; Ng, J S T; Nickel, S; Notz, D; Ohrenberg, K; Roco, M T; Rohde, M; Roldán, J; Schneekloth, U; Schulz, W; Selonke, F; Stiliaris, E; Surrow, B; Voss, T; Westphal, D; Wolf, G; Youngman, C; Zhou, J F; Grabosch, H J; Kharchilava, A I; Leich, A; Mattingly, M C K; Meyer, A; Schlenstedt, S; Wulff, N; Barbagli, G; Pelfer, P G; Anzivino, Giuseppina; Maccarrone, G D; De Pasquale, S; Votano, L; Bamberger, Andreas; Eisenhardt, S; Freidhof, A; Söldner-Rembold, S; Schröder, J; Trefzger, T M; Brook, N H; Bussey, Peter J; Doyle, A T; Fleck, I; Saxon, D H; Utley, M L; Wilson, A S; Dannemann, A; Holm, U; Horstmann, D; Neumann, T; Sinkus, R; Wick, K; Badura, E; Burow, B D; Hagge, L; Lohrmann, E; Mainusch, J; Milewski, J; Nakahata, M; Pavel, N; Poelz, G; Schott, W; Zetsche, F; Bacon, Trevor C; Butterworth, Ian; Gallo, E; Harris, V L; Hung, B Y H; Long, K R; Miller, D B; Morawitz, P P O; Prinias, A; Sedgbeer, J K; Whitfield, A F; Mallik, U; McCliment, E; Wang, M Z; Wang, S M; Wu, J T; Zhang, Y; Cloth, P; Filges, D; An Shiz Hong; Hong, S M; Nam, S W; Park, S K; Suh, M H; Yon, S H; Imlay, R; Kartik, S; Kim, H J; McNeil, R R; Metcalf, W; Nadendla, V K; Barreiro, F; Cases, G; Graciani, R; Hernández, J M; Hervás, L; Labarga, L; Del Peso, J; Puga, J; Terrón, J; De Trocóniz, J F; Smith, G R; Corriveau, F; Hanna, D S; Hartmann, J; Hung, L W; Lim, J N; Matthews, C G; Patel, P M; Sinclair, L E; Stairs, D G; Saint-Laurent, M G; Ullmann, R T; Zacek, G; Bashkirov, V; Dolgoshein, B A; Stifutkin, A; Bashindzhagian, G L; Ermolov, P F; Gladilin, L K; Golubkov, Yu A; Kobrin, V D; Kuzmin, V A; Proskuryakov, A S; Savin, A A; Shcheglova, L M; Solomin, A N; Zotov, N P; Botje, M; Chlebana, F S; Dake, A P; Engelen, J; De Kamps, M; Kooijman, P M; Kruse, A; Tiecke, H G; Verkerke, W; Vreeswijk, M; Wiggers, L; De Wolf, E; Van Woudenberg, R; Acosta, D; Bylsma, B G; Durkin, L S; Honscheid, K; Li Chuan; Ling, T Y; McLean, K W; Murray, W N; Park, I H; Romanowsky, T A; Seidlein, R; Bailey, D S; Blair, G A; Byrne, A; Cashmore, Roger J; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Daniels, D C; Devenish, R C E; Harnew, N; Lancaster, M; Luffman, P; Lindemann, L; McFall, J D; Nath, C; Noyes, V A; Quadt, A; Uijterwaal, H; Walczak, R; Wilson, F F; Yip, T; Abbiendi, G; Bertolin, A; Brugnera, R; Carlin, R; Dal Corso, F; De Giorgi, M; Dosselli, U; Limentani, S; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Stanco, L; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Bulmahn, J; Butterworth, J M; Feild, R G; Whitmore, J; D'Agostini, Giulio; Marini, G; Nigro, A; Tassi, E; Hart, J C; McCubbin, N A; Prytz, K; Shah, T P; Short, T L; Barberis, E; Dubbs, T; Heusch, C A; Van Hook, M; Hubbard, B; Lockman, W; Rahn, J T; Sadrozinski, H F W; Seiden, A; Biltzinger, J; Seifert, R J; Walenta, Albert H; Zech, G; Abramowicz, H; Briskin, G M; Dagan, S; Levy, A; Hasegawa, T; Hazumi, M; Ishii, T; Kuze, M; Mine, S; Nagasawa, Y; Nakao, M; Susuki, I; Tokushuku, K; Yamada, S; Yamazaki, Y; Chiba, M; Hamatsu, R; Hirose, T; Homma, K; Kitamura, S; Nakamitsu, Y; Yamauchi, K; Cirio, R; Costa, M; Ferrero, M I; Lamberti, L; Maselli, S; Peroni, C; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Staiano, A; Dardo, M; Bailey, D C; Bandyopadhyay, D; Bénard, F; Brkic, M; Crombie, M B; Gingrich, D M; Hartner, G F; Joo, K K; Levman, G M; Martin, J F; Orr, R S; Sampson, C R; Teuscher, R; Catterall, C D; Jones, T W; Kaziewicz, P B; Lane, J B; Saunders, R L; Shulman, J; Blankenship, K; Lu, B; Mo, L W; Bogusz, W; Charchula, K; Ciborowski, J; Gajewski, J; Grzelak, G; Kasprzak, M; Krzyzanowski, M; Muchorowski, K; Nowak, R J; Pawlak, J M; Tymieniecka, T; Wróblewski, A K; Zakrzewski, J A; Zarnecki, A F; Adamus, M; Eisenberg, Y; Karshon, U; Revel, D; Zer-Zion, D; Ali, I; Badgett, W F; Behrens, B H; Dasu, S; Fordham, C; Foudas, C; Goussiou, A; Loveless, R J; Reeder, D D; Silverstein, S; Smith, W H; Vaiciulis, A W; Wodarczyk, M; Tsurugai, T; Bhadra, S; Cardy, M L; Fagerstroem, C P; Frisken, W R; Furutani, K M; Khakzad, M; Schmidke, W B

    1995-01-01

    Inclusive transverse momentum spectra of charged particles in photoproduction events in the laboratory pseudorapidity range -1.2<\\eta<1.4 have been measured up to p_{T}=8\\GeV using the ZEUS detector. Diffractive and non--diffractive reactions have been selected with an average \\gamma p centre of mass (c.m.) energy of \\langle W \\rangle = 180\\GeV. For diffractive reactions, the p_{T} spectra of the photon dissociation events have been measured in two intervals of the dissociated photon mass with mean values \\langle M_{X} \\rangle = 5 GeV and 10 GeV. The inclusive transverse momentum spectra fall exponentially in the low p_{T} region. The non--diffractive data show a pronounced high p_{T} tail departing from the exponential shape. The p_{T} distributions are compared to lower energy photoproduction data and to hadron--hadron collisions at a similar c.m. energy. The data are also compared to the results of a next--to--leading order QCD calculation.

  4. Elucidation of charge storage characteristics of conducting polymer film using redox reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Contractor, Asfiya Q

    2013-01-01

    A general technique to investigate charge storage characteristics of conducting polymer films has been developed. A redox reaction is conducted on a polymer film on a rotating disk electrode under potentiostatic condition so that the rate of charging of the film equals the rate of removal of the charge by the reaction. In an experiment on polyaniline film deposited on platinum substrate, using Fe2+/Fe3+ in HCl as the redox system, the voltammogram shows five distinct linear segments (bands) with discontinuity in the slope at specific transition potentials. These bands are the same as those indicated by ESR/Raman spectroscopy with comparable transition potentials. From the dependence of the slopes of the bands on concentration of ferrous and ferric ions, it was possible to estimate the energies of the charge carrier in different bands. It is shown that the charge storage in the film is capacitive.

  5. Suprathermal Charged Particle Acceleration by Small-scale Flux Ropes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zank, G. P.; le Roux, J. A.; Webb, G. M.

    2015-12-01

    We consider different limits of our recently developed kinetic transport theory to investigate the potential of super-Alvenic solar wind regions containing several small-scale flux ropes to explain the acceleration of suprathermal ions to power-law spectra as observations show. Particle acceleration is modeled in response to flux-rope activity involving contraction, merging (reconnection), and collisions in the limit where the particle gyoradius is smaller than the characteristic flux-rope scale length. The emphasis is mainly on the statistical variance in the electric fields induced by flux-rope dynamics rather than on the mean electric field induced by multiple flux ropes whose acceleration effects are discussed elsewhere. Our steady-state analytical solutions suggest that particle drift acceleration by flux ropes, irrespective of whether displaying incompressible or compressible behavior, can yield power laws asymptotically at higher energies whereas an exponential spectral rollover results asymptotically when field-aligned guiding center motion acceleration occur by reconnection electric fields from merging flux ropes. This implies that at sufficiently high particle energies, drift acceleration might dominate. We also expect compressive flux ropes to yield harder power-law spectra than incompressible flux ropes. Preliminary results will be discussed to illustrate how particle acceleration might be affected when both diffusive shock and small-scale flux acceleration occur simultaneously at interplanetary shocks.

  6. Directly resolving particles in an electric field: local charge, force, torque, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qianlong

    2011-11-01

    Prosperetti's seminal Physalis method for fluid flows with suspended particles is extended to electric fields to directly resolve finite-sized particles and to investigate accurately the mutual fluid-particle, particle-particle, and particle-boundary interactions. The method can be used for uncharged/charged dielectrics, uncharged/charged conductors, conductors with specified voltage, and general weak and strong discontinuous interface conditions. These interface conditions can be in terms of field variable, its gradients, and surface integration which has not been addesed by other numerical methods. In addition, for the first time, we rigorously derive the force and torque on the finite-sized particles resulting from the interactions between harmonics. The method, for the first time, directly resolves the particles with accurate local charge distribution, force, and torque on the particles, making many applications in engineering, mechanics, physics, chemistry, and biology possible, such as heterogeneous materials, microfluidics, electrophotography, electric double layer capacitors, and microstructures of nanodispersions. The efficiency of the method is demonstrated with up to one hundred thousand 3D particles, which suggests that the method can be used for many important engineering applications of broad interest. This research is supported by the Department of Energy under funding for an EFRC (the HeteroFoaM Center), grant no. DE-SC0001061.

  7. The Dependence of Average Multiplicity of Produced Charged Particles on Interacting Projectile Nucleons in Nuclear Collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ayaz Ahmad

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present articles an attempt has been made for the determination of multiplicity distributions of the secondary charged particles produced in the central region of relativistic heavy ion collisions. Due to sophisticated measurement in the nuclear emulsion experiment only some particles having special criteria could be selected as central collision events with consenting accuracy.

  8. Search for long-lived heavy charged particles using a ring imaging Cherenkov technique at LHCb

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Cartelle, P. Alvarez; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M. -O.; Van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Perez, D. Campora; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casanova Mohr, R.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Garcia, L. Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S. F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; CruzTorres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C. T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Deleage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suarez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; ElRifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Faerber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Torreira, A. Gallas; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garcia Pardinas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Tico, J. Garra; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Geraci, A.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Goebel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Gandara, M. Grabalosa; Diaz, R. Graciani; Cardoso, L. A. Granado; Grauges, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Gruenberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hess, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J. P.; Lefevre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Maerki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martinelli, M.; Santos, D. Martinez; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; Mcnab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M. N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Morda, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, K.; Mueller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Altarelli, M. Pepe; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Olloqui, E. Picatoste; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilar, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Perez, P. Rodriguez; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M. H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Coutinho, R. Silva; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skillicorn, I.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Sterpka, F.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tekampe, T.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Garcia, M. Ubeda; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Gomez, R. Vazquez; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vazquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voss, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.

    2015-01-01

    A search is performed for heavy long-lived charged particles using 3.0 fb(-1) of proton-proton collisions collected at root s = 7 and 8 TeV with the LHCb detector. The search is mainly based on the response of the ring imaging Cherenkov detectors to distinguish the heavy, slow-moving particles from

  9. Charged particle acceleration by induction electric field in Neptune magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasko, I. Y.; Malova, H. V.; Artemyev, A. V.; Zelenyi, L. M.

    2012-12-01

    The precession of the Neptune magnetic dipole leads to strong dynamics of the magnetosphere and results in continuous transformation from the “Earth-like” configuration to the “pole-on” one and vice versa. In the present work we use simple model of the Neptune magnetotail to investigate the influence of magnetotail topology transformation on particle acceleration and transport through the tail. Energy spectra are obtained for protons penetrating from the solar wind and heavier ions N+ from the Neptune ionosphere. We have found that protons and heavier ions are accelerated up to ∼330 keV and ∼150 keV, respectively. More particles are accelerated and leave the tail during transformations from the “pole-on” configuration to the “Earth-like” one than during inverse transformations. We have shown that the dusk-dawn convection field is responsible for particle leaving through the dawn flank. We briefly compare our results with Voyager-2 observations.

  10. Role of stochastic processes in particle charging due to photoeffect on the Moon

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenfeld, Eugene V

    2016-01-01

    Neglecting the effects associated with the solar wind plasma, the photoelectrons are the only elementary particles which create an electrical current through sunlit surface of the moon. They are knocked off of the surface soil, rise above the surface, and then fall back. Therefore, on average, on any unit of surface area there is a positive charge, equal in magnitude to the charge of photoelectrons flying over this area. However, the charge of any small dust particle can strongly fluctuate discretely: a photoelectron can be either knocked off of the or be reacquired by the particle. The result is a "random walk" in sign and magnitude of the charge of grains. In a few minutes after sunrise, almost every dust particle on the surface has at least one extra or missing electron, and the average modulus of the charge accumulated on a particle is proportional to the square root of the number of "steps" (knocking off /returns of photoelectrons). Therefore, the average value of the modulus of the charge of a fine dust...

  11. On the observation of charged particles in cold fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundqvist, Bo U. R.; Håkansson, Per; Hedin, Allan; Bucur, Romulus V.; Johansson, Börje; Wäppling, Roger

    1989-09-01

    With the aim to confirm or reject the recent claim of observation of cold d-d fusion, an experimental effort has been made to try to observe MeV protons which should be emitted as a result of d-d fusion. Pd foils, thin enough to allow all protons produced to escape the foil, were electrolytically charged with deuterium. A Si(SB) detector was placed close to the Pd foil during charging in order to detect any protons emitted. The deuterium content was measured to be the expected 0.7 D per Pd. Monte Carlo simulations were made to estimate the detection efficiency of 3.02 MeV protons produced in the Pd foil. The background in the experiment was so low that fusion rates considerably lower than those reported on by Jones et al. could be detected. A number of experiments have been performed where the charging conditions were varied. In spite of that and the good sensitivity of the experiment no evidence for cold fusion has been found.

  12. On the observation of charged particles in cold fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundqvist, B.U.R.; Haakansson, P.; Hedin, A. (Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Div. of Ion Physics); Bucur, R.V. (Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Chemistry); Johansson, B.; Waeppling, R. (Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Physics)

    1989-09-01

    With the aim to confirm or reject the recent claim of observation of cold d-d fusion, an experimental effort has been made to try to observe MeV protons which should be emitted as a result of d-d fusion. Pd foils, thin enough to allow all protons produced to escape the foil, were electrolytically charged with deuterium. A Si(SB) detector was placed close to the Pd foil during charging in order to detect any protons emitted. The deuterium content was measured to be the expected 0.7 D per Pd. Monte Carlo simulations were made to estimate the detection efficiency of 3.02 MeV protons produced in the Pd foil. The background in the experiment was so low that fusion rates considerably lower than those reported on by Jones et al. could be detected. A number of experiments have been performed where the charging conditions were varied. In spite of that and the good sensitivity of the experiment no evidence for cold fusion has been found. (orig.).

  13. Identified Charged Particles in Quark and Gluon Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P.; Adye, T.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, Z.; Alderweireld, T.; Alekseev, G.D.; Alemany, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P.P.; Almehed, S.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anassontzis, E.G.; Andersson, P.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.D.; Arnoud, Y.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J.E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barao, F.; Barbiellini, G.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.Yu.; Barker, G.J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Beilliere, P.; Belokopytov, Yu.; Belous, K.; Benekos, N.C.; Benvenuti, A.C.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Bigi, M.; Bilenky, Mikhail S.; Bizouard, M.A.; Bloch, D.; Blom, H.M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P.S.L.; Borgland, A.W.; Borisov, G.; Bosio, C.; Botner, O.; Boudinov, E.; Bouquet, B.; Bourdarios, C.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Boyko, I.; Bozovic, I.; Bozzo, M.; Bracko, M.; Branchini, P.; Brenner, R.A.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J.M.; Bugge, L.; Buran, T.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Cabrera, S.; Caccia, M.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Carroll, L.; Caso, C.; Castillo Gimenez, M.V.; Cattai, A.; Cavallo, F.R.; Chabaud, V.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, P.; Checchia, P.; Chelkov, G.A.; Chierici, R.; Shlyapnikov, P.; Chochula, P.; Chorowicz, V.; Chudoba, J.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cortina, E.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Crawley, H.B.; Crennell, D.; Crepe-Renaudin, Sabine; Crosetti, G.; Cuevas Maestro, J.; Czellar, S.; Davenport, M.; Da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; Delpierre, P.A.; Demaria, N.; De Angelis, A.; de Boer, W.; De Clercq, C.; De Lotto, B.; De Min, A.; De Paula, L.; Dijkstra, H.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Dolbeau, J.; Doroba, K.; Dracos, M.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Duperrin, A.; Durand, J.D.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ekspong, G.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Engel, J.P.; Espirito Santo, M.C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fayot, J.; Feindt, M.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; Ferro, F.; Fichet, S.; Firestone, A.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fontanelli, F.; Franek, B.; Frodesen, A.G.; Fruhwirth, R.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Galloni, A.; Gamba, D.; Gamblin, S.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gaspar, C.; Gaspar, M.; Gasparini, U.; Gavillet, P.; Gazis, Evangelos; Gele, D.; Geralis, T.; Ghodbane, N.; Gil Botella, Ines; Glege, F.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Gopal, G.; Gorn, L.; Guz, Yu.; Gracco, V.; Grahl, J.; Graziani, E.; Gris, P.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hahn, F.; Hahn, S.; Haider, S.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hansen, J.; Harris, F.J.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Heising, S.; Hernandez, J.J.; Herquet, P.; Herr, H.; Hessing, T.L.; Heuser, J.M.; Higon, E.; Holmgren, S.O.; Holt, P.J.; Hoorelbeke, S.; Houlden, M.; Hrubec, J.; Huber, M.; Huet, K.; Hughes, G.J.; Hultqvist, K.; Jackson, John Neil; Jacobsson, R.; Jalocha, P.; Janik, R.; Jarlskog, C.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jean-Marie, B.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, Erik Karl; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Juillot, P.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, Frederic; Karafasoulis, K.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.C.; Keranen, R.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B.P.; Khokhlov, Yu.A.; Khomenko, B.A.; Khovanskii, N.N.; Kiiskinen, A.; King, B.J.; Kinvig, A.; Kjaer, N.J.; Klapp, O.; Klein, Hansjorg; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kostyukhin, V.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kuznetsov, O.; Krammer, M.; Kriznic, E.; Krumshtein, Z.; Kubinec, P.; Kurowska, J.; Kurvinen, K.; Lamsa, J.W.; Lane, D.W.; Lapin, V.; Laugier, J.P.; Lauhakangas, R.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, Fabienne; Lefebure, V.; Leinonen, L.; Leisos, A.; Leitner, R.; Lenzen, G.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Libby, J.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lippi, I.; Loerstad, B.; Loken, J.G.; Lopes, J.H.; Lopez, J.M.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Mahon, J.R.; Maio, A.; Malek, A.; Malmgren, T.G.M.; Maltezos, S.; Malychev, V.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Marti i Garcia, S.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matthiae, G.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; McCubbin, M.; McKay, R.; McNulty, R.; McPherson, G.; Meroni, C.; Meyer, W.T.; Migliore, E.; Mirabito, L.; Mitaroff, W.A.; Mjornmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moller, Rasmus; Monig, Klaus; Monge, M.R.; Moraes, D.; Moreau, X.; Morettini, P.; Morton, G.; Muller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mulet-Marquis, C.; Muresan, R.; Murray, W.J.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Naraghi, F.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.L.; Navas, Sergio; Nawrocki, K.; Negri, P.; Neufeld, N.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nielsen, B.S.; Niezurawski, P.; Nikolenko, M.; Nomokonov, V.; Nygren, A.; Obraztsov, V.F.; Olshevskii, A.G.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Orazi, G.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Pain, R.; Paiva, R.; Palacios, J.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, T.D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Pavel, T.; Pegoraro, M.; Peralta, L.; Pernicka, M.; Perrotta, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolini, A.; Phillips, H.T.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Pol, M.E.; Polok, G.; Poropat, P.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Privitera, P.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Radojicic, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Rahmani, H.; Rames, J.; Ratoff, P.N.; Read, Alexander L.; Rebecchi, P.; Redaelli, Nicola Giuseppe; Regler, M.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.B.; Resvanis, L.K.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rinaudo, G.; Ripp-Baudot, Isabelle; Rohne, O.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Rosenberg, E.I.; Rosinsky, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Royon, C.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ruiz, A.; Saarikko, H.; Sacquin, Y.; Sadovskii, A.; Sajot, G.; Salt, J.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sannino, M.; Schwemling, P.; Schwering, B.; Schwickerath, U.; Scuri, Fabrizio; Seager, P.; Sedykh, Yu.; Seemann, F.; Segar, A.M.; Seibert, N.; Sekulin, R.; Shellard, R.C.; Siebel, M.; Simard, L.; Simonetto, F.; Sisakian, A.N.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, G.R.; Solovianov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassoff, Tz.; Spiriti, E.; Squarcia, S.; Stanescu, C.; Stanic, S.; Stanitzki, M.; Stevenson, K.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Strub, R.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Taffard, A.; Chikilev, O.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Terranova, F.; Thomas, J.; Timmermans, Jan; Tinti, N.; Tkatchev, L.G.; Tobin, M.; Todorova, S.; Tomaradze, A.G.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortora, L.; Tortosa, P.; Transtromer, G.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.L.; Tyapkin, I.A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Ullaland, O.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallazza, E.; Van Dam, Piet; Vanden Boeck, W.; Van Eldik, J.; Van Lysebetten, A.; van Remortel, N.; Van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Ventura, L.; Venus, W.; Verbeure, F.; Verdier, P.; Verlato, M.; Vertogradov, L.S.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vlasov, E.; Vodopianov, A.S.; Voulgaris, G.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Walck, C.; Washbrook, A.J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.H.; Wilkinson, G.R.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Wolf, G.; Yi, J.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zevgolatakos, E.; Zimine, N.I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zoller, P.; Zucchelli, G.C.; Zumerle, G.

    2000-01-01

    A sample of 2.2 million hadronic \\z decays, selected fythe {\\sc Delphi} detector at {\\sc Lep} during 1994-199nimprovedmeasurement of inclusive distributions of \\pie, \\kp anrantiparticles in gluon and quark jets. The production l identified particles were found to be softer in gluon kjets, with a higher multiplicity in gluon jets as obseecharged particles. A significant proton enhancement indindicating that baryon production proceeds directly fr.The maxima, $\\xi^*$, of the $\\xi$-distributions for kakjets are observed to be different. The study of isoscanshows no indication of an excess of $\\phi(1020)$ produ.

  14. Detection of charged particles with a methylammonium lead tribromide perovskite single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiang; Wei, Haotong; Wei, Wei; Chuirazzi, William; DeSantis, Dylan; Huang, Jinsong; Cao, Lei

    2017-03-01

    Methylammonium lead tribromide (MAPbBr3) perovskite crystals have attracted significant attention due to their attractive performance in various optoelectronic applications such as solar cells, light-emitting devices, photodetectors, and recently in X-ray detectors. In this study, we demonstrate a possible use of perovskite-based devices for detection of charged particles (which can be applied in basic scientific research, health physics, and environmental analysis) and investigate the mechanism of fundamental charge transport inside perovskite crystals. It was found that inexpensive MAPbBr3 single crystals could be used for measuring the energy spectrum of charged particles through direct collection of the produced charge. After fitting the plot of the centroid peak position versus voltage with the Hecht equation for single-polarity charge transport, the obtained hole mobility-lifetime product was in the range of (0.4-1.6)×10-3 cm2/V.

  15. A new charge conservation method in electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, T.; Omura, Y.; Tominaga, T.; Matsumoto, H.

    2003-12-01

    We developed a fast algorithm for solving the current density satisfying the continuity equation of charge in electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. In PIC simulations of the charge conservation, a particle trajectory over one time step is conventionally assumed to be a straight line. In the present new scheme we assume that a particle trajectory is a zigzag line. Compared with the Villasenor-Buneman method and Esirkepov's method, the present scheme has an advantage in computation speed without any substantial distortion of physics.

  16. The Hawking radiation of the charged particle via tunnelling from the axisymmetric Sen black hole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Qing-Quan; Yang Shu-Zheng; Chen De-You

    2006-01-01

    Extending Parikh's semi-classical quantum tunnelling model, this paper has studied the Hawking radiation of the charged particle via tunnelling from the horizon of the axisymmetric Sen black hole. Different from the uncharged massless particle, the geodesies of the charged massive particle tunnelling from the horizon is not light-like. The derived result supports Parikh's opinion and provides a correct modification to Hawking strictly thermal spectrum developed by the fixed background space-time and not considering the energy conservation and the self-gravitation interaction.

  17. Diagnostics of many-particle electronic states: non-stationary currents and residual charge dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslova, N. S.; Mantsevich, V. N.; Arseyev, P. I.

    2017-01-01

    We propose the method for identifying many particle electronic states in the system of coupled quantum dots (impurities) with Coulomb correlations. We demonstrate that different electronic states can be distinguished by the complex analysis of localized charge dynamics and non-stationary characteristics. We show that localized charge time evolution strongly depends on the properties of initial state and analyze different time scales in charge kinetics for initially prepared singlet and triplet states. We reveal the conditions for existence of charge trapping effects governed by the selection rules for electron transitions between the states with different occupation numbers.

  18. Tunnelling Radiation of Charged and Magnetized Massive Particles from BTZ Black Holes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Tang-Mei; ZHANG Jing-Yi

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the tunnelling radiation of charged and magnetized massive particles from a Ba(n)ados-TeitelboimZanelli (BTZ) black hole by extending the Parikh-Wilczek tunnelling framework. In order to calculate the emission rate,we reconstruct the electromagnetic field tensor and the Lagrangian of the field corresponding to the source with electric and magnetic charges,and treat the charges as an equivalent electric charge for simplicity in the later calculation.The result supports Parikh-Wilczek's conclusion,that is,the Hawking thermal radiation actually deviates from perfect thermality and agrees with an underlying unitary theory.

  19. A Search for Long-Lived, Charged, Supersymmetric Particles using Ionization with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00379148

    Several extensions of the Standard Model predict the existence of charged, very massive, and long-lived particles. Because of their high masses these particles would propagate non-relativistically through the ATLAS pixel detector and would therefore be identifiable through a measurement of large specific energy loss. Measuring heavy, long-lived particles through their track parameters in the pixel detector allows sensitivity to particles with lifetimes in the nanosecond range and above. This dissertation presents an inner detector driven method for identifying such particles in proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV with the 2015 LHC dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.5 pb−1.

  20. Scattering of light by charged colloidal particles in salt solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrij, A.; Overbeek, J.Th.G.

    1962-01-01

    In the interpretation of light scattering by colloidal electrolytes in salt solutions the interaction between the colloidal particles and the low molecular weight ions has to be taken into account. When fluctuation theory is applied for the derivation of a light-scattering equation, nonelectroneutra

  1. ELECTROSTATIC CHARGE ON NANO-PARTICLES ACTIVATES CNS MACROPHAGES (MICROGLIA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanometer size particles carry free radical activity on their surface and can produce oxidative stress (OS)-mediated damage upon impact to target cells. The initiating event of phage cell activation (i.e., the oxidative burst) is unknown, although many proximal events have been i...

  2. Reparametrization of the Relativistic Infinitely Extended Charged Particle Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadat, Hassan; Pourhassan, Behnam

    2016-09-01

    In this letter, relativistic infinitely extended particles formulated. Correct form of action with possibility of reparametrization obtained and effect of electric field considered. It may be one of the first step to re-introduce theory of every things given by Nakano and Hessaby many years ago.

  3. Accounting for changes in particle charge, dry mass and composition occurring during studies of single levitated particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddrell, Allen E; Davies, James F; Yabushita, Akihiro; Reid, Jonathan P

    2012-10-11

    The most used instrument in single particle hygroscopic analysis over the past thirty years has been the electrodynamic balance (EDB). Two general assumptions are made in hygroscopic studies involving the EDB. First, it is assumed that the net charge on the droplet is invariant over the time scale required to record a hygroscopic growth cycle. Second, it is assumed that the composition of the droplet is constant (aside from the addition and removal of water). In this study, we demonstrate that these assumptions cannot always be made and may indeed prove incorrect. The presence of net charge in the humidified vapor phase reduces the total net charge retained by the droplet over prolonged levitation periods. The gradual reduction in charge limits the reproducibility of hygroscopicity measurements made on repeated RH cycles with a single particle, or prolonged experiments in which the particle is held at a high relative humidity. Further, two contrasting examples of the influence of changes in chemical composition changes are reported. In the first, simple acid-base chemistry in the droplet leads to the irreversible removal of gaseous ammonia from a droplet containing an ammonium salt on a time scale that is shorter than the hygroscopicity measurement. In the second example, the net charge on the droplet (<100 fC) is high enough to drive redox chemistry within the droplet. This is demonstrated by the reduction of iodic acid in a droplet made solely of iodic acid and water to form iodine and an iodate salt.

  4. Effect of trapped ions and nonequilibrium electron-energy distribution function on dust-particle charging in gas discharges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhinin, G I; Fedoseev, A V; Antipov, S N; Petrov, O F; Fortov, V E

    2009-03-01

    Dust-particles charging in a low-pressure glow discharge was investigated theoretically. The dust-particle charge was found on the basis of a developed self-consistent model taking into account the nonequilibrium character of electron distribution function and the formation of an ionic coat composed of bound or trapped ions around the dust particle. The dust-particle charge, the radial distributions of electron density, free and trapped ions densities, and the distribution of electrostatic potential were found. It was shown that the non-Maxwellian electron distribution function and collisional flux of trapped ions both reduce the dust-particle charge in comparison with that received with the help of the conventional orbital motion limited (OML) model. However, in rare collisional regimes in plasma when the collisional flux is negligible, the formation of ionic coat around a particle leads to a shielding of the proper charge of a dust particle. In low-pressure experiments, it is only possible to detect the effective charge of a dust particle that is equal to the difference between the proper charge of the particle and the charge of trapped ions. The calculated effective dust particle charge is in fairly good agreement with the experimental measurements of dust-particle charge dependence on gas pressure.

  5. The Deflection of Charged Particles in an Electric Dodecapole Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seely, D. G.; Chalut, K.; Thompson, J. S.; Kvale, T. J.

    1997-10-10

    The properties of an ion-optical device consisting of twelve long parallel rods placed equidistantly on a circle are briefly reviewed. The use of this device in its dodecapole configuration to deflect ions in a plane perpendicular to the axis of the dodecapole is discussed. Results of trajectory computations made with the SIMION ion-optics computer program demonstrate that the device works remarkably well in separating the constituents of a multiply-charged ion beam. The use of this device to merge an ion beam with an optical beam is proposed.

  6. On the energisation of charged particles by fast magnetic reconnection

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Rohit; Oberoi, Divya

    2016-01-01

    We study the role of turbulence in magnetic reconnection, within the framework of magneto-hydrodynamics, using three-dimensional direct numerical simulations. For small turbulent intensity we find that the reconnection rate obeys Sweet-Parker scaling. For large enough turbulent intensity reconnection rate departs significantly from Sweet-Parker behaviour, becomes almost a constant as a function of the Lundquist number. We further study energisation of test-particles in the same setup. We find that the speed of the energised particles obeys a Maxwellian distribution, whose variance also obeys Sweet-Parker scaling for small turbulent intensity but depends weakly on the Lundquist number for large turbulent intensity. Furthermore, the variance is found to increase with the strength of the reconnecting magnetic field.

  7. Reflected Charged Particle Populations around Dipolar Lunar Magnetic Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deca, Jan; Divin, Andrey

    2016-10-01

    In this work we analyze and compare the reflected particle populations for both a horizontal and a vertical dipole model embedded in the lunar surface, representing the solar wind interaction with two different lunar magnetic anomaly (LMA) structures. Using the 3D full-kinetic electromagnetic code iPic3D, in combination with a test-particle approach to generate particle trajectories, we focus on the ion and electron dynamics. Whereas the vertical model electrostatically reflects ions upward under both near-parallel and near-perpendicular angles with respect to the lunar surface, the horizontal model only has a significant shallow component. Characterizing the electron dynamics, we find that the interplay of the mini-magnetosphere electric and magnetic fields is capable of temporarily trapping low-energy electrons and possibly ejecting them upstream. Our results are in agreement with recent high-resolution observations. Low- to medium-altitude ion and electron observations might be excellent indicators to complement orbital magnetic field measurements and better uncover the underlying magnetic field structure. The latter is of particular importance in defining the correlation between LMAs and lunar swirls, and further testing the solar wind shielding hypothesis for albedo markings due to space weathering. Observing more reflected ions does not necessarily point to the existence of a mini-magnetosphere.

  8. Production of medical isotopes from a thorium target irradiated by light charged particles up to 70 MeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchemin, C; Guertin, A; Haddad, F; Michel, N; Métivier, V

    2015-02-07

    The irradiation of a thorium target by light charged particles (protons and deuterons) leads to the production of several isotopes of medical interest. Direct nuclear reaction allows the production of Protactinium-230 which decays to Uranium-230 the mother nucleus of Thorium-226, a promising isotope for alpha radionuclide therapy. The fission of Thorium-232 produces fragments of interest like Molybdenum-99, Iodine-131 and Cadmium-115g. We focus our study on the production of these isotopes, performing new cross section measurements and calculating production yields. Our new sets of data are compared with the literature and the last version of the TALYS code.

  9. Charged Particle Energization and Transport in the Magnetotail during Substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Qingjiang

    This dissertation addresses the problem of energization of particles (both electrons and ions) to tens and hundreds of keV and the associated transport process in the magnetotail during substorms. Particles energized in the magnetotail are further accelerated to even higher energies (hundreds of keV to MeV) in the radiation belts, causing space weather hazards to human activities in space and on ground. We develop an analytical model to quantitatively estimate flux changes caused by betatron and Fermi acceleration when particles are transported along narrow high-speed flow channels from the magnetotail to the inner magnetosphere. The model shows that energetic particle flux can be significantly enhanced by a modest compression of the magnetic field and/or shrinking of the distance between the magnetic mirror points. We use coordinated spacecraft measurements, global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations driven by measured upstream solar wind conditions, and large-scale kinetic (LSK) simulations to quantify electron local acceleration in the near-Earth reconnection region and nonlocal acceleration during plasma earthward transport. Compared to the analytical model, application of the LSK simulations is much less restrictive because trajectories of millions of test particles are calculated in the realistically determined global MHD fields and the results are statistical. The simulation results validated by the observations show that electrons following a power law distribution at high energies are generated earthward of the reconnection site, and that the majority of the energetic electrons observed in the inner magnetosphere are caused by adiabatic acceleration in association with magnetic dipolarizations and fast flows during earthward transport. We extend the global MHD+LSK simulations to examine ion energization and compare it with electron energization. The simulations demonstrate that ions in the magnetotail are first nonadiabatically accelerated in the weak

  10. Acceleration of charged particles due to chaotic scattering in the combined black hole gravitational field and asymptotically uniform magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Stuchlík, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    To test the role of large-scale magnetic fields in accretion processes, we study dynamics of charged test particles in vicinity of a black hole immersed into an asymptotically uniform magnetic field. Using the Hamiltonian formalism of charged particle dynamics, we examine chaotic scattering in the effective potential related to the black hole gravitational field combined with the uniform magnetic field. Energy interchange between the translational and oscillatory modes od the charged particle dynamics provides mechanism for charged particle acceleration along the magnetic field lines. This energy transmutation is an attribute of the chaotic charged particle dynamics in the combined gravitational and magnetic fields only, the black hole rotation is not necessary for such charged particle acceleration. The chaotic scatter can cause transition to the motion along the magnetic field lines with small radius of the Larmor motion or vanishing Larmor radius, when the speed of the particle translational motion is larg...

  11. Sialic acid mediates the initial binding of positively charged inorganic particles to alveolar macrophage membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, J E; George, G; Brody, A R

    1987-06-01

    Pulmonary macrophages phagocytize inhaled particles and are postulated to play a role in the development of pulmonary interstitial fibrogenesis. The basic biologic mechanisms through which inhaled particles bind to macrophage membranes and subsequently are phagocytized remain unclear. We hypothesize that positively charged particles bind to negatively charged sialic acid (SA) residues on macrophage membranes. Alveolar Macrophages (AM) were collected by saline lavage from normal rat lungs. The cells adhered to plastic coverslips in serum-free phosphate buffered saline at 37 degrees C for 45 min and then were maintained at 4 degrees C for the binding experiments. Even distribution of SA groups on AM surfaces was demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy of wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) conjugated to 50 nm gold spheres. The WGA is a lectin that binds specifically to sialic acid, and pretreatment of AM with this lectin prevented the binding of positively charged carbonyl iron (C-Fe) spheres, aluminum (Al) spheres, and chrysotile asbestos fibers to AM surfaces. Limulus protein, another lectin with binding specificity for SA, similarly blocked the binding of positively charged spheres and chrysotile asbestos fibers but not negatively charged glass spheres or crocidolite asbestos fibers. Con A and ricin, lectins that bind to mannose and galactose residues, respectively, did not block particle binding. When both positively charged iron spheres and negatively charged glass spheres were prebound to AM membranes, subsequent treatment with WGA displaced only the positively charged spheres from macrophage surfaces. Con A and ricin had no effect on prebound positively charged C-Fe and Al spheres.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. A 2-D Implicit, Energy and Charge Conserving Particle In Cell Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McPherson, Allen L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Knoll, Dana A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cieren, Emmanuel B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Feltman, Nicolas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Leibs, Christopher A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; McCarthy, Colleen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Murthy, Karthik S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Yijie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-10

    Recently, a fully implicit electrostatic 1D charge- and energy-conserving particle-in-cell algorithm was proposed and implemented by Chen et al ([2],[3]). Central to the algorithm is an advanced particle pusher. Particles are moved using an energy conserving scheme and are forced to stop at cell faces to conserve charge. Moreover, a time estimator is used to control errors in momentum. Here we implement and extend this advanced particle pusher to include 2D and electromagnetic fields. Derivations of all modifications made are presented in full. Special consideration is taken to ensure easy coupling into the implicit moment based method proposed by Taitano et al [19]. Focus is then given to optimizing the presented particle pusher on emerging architectures. Two multicore implementations, and one GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) implementation are discussed and analyzed.

  13. Development of radiation hardened pixel sensors for charged particle detection

    CERN Document Server

    Koziel, Michal

    2014-01-01

    CMOS Pixel Sensors are being developed since a few years to equip vertex detectors for future high-energy physics experiments with the crucial advantages of a low material budget and low production costs. The features simultaneously required are a short readout time, high granularity and high tolerance to radiation. This thesis mainly focuses on the radiation tolerance studies. To achieve the targeted readout time (tens of microseconds), the sensor pixel readout was organized in parallel columns restricting in addition the readout to pixels that had collected the signal charge. The pixels became then more complex, and consequently more sensitive to radiation. Different in-pixel architectures were studied and it was concluded that the tolerance to ionizing radiation was limited to 300 krad with the 0.35- m fabrication process currently used, while the targeted value was several Mrad. Improving this situation calls for implementation of the sensors in processes with a smaller feature size which naturally imp...

  14. Some recent developments in nuclear charged particle detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stelzer, H.

    1980-08-01

    The latest developments of large-area, position sensitive gas-filled ionization chambers are described. Multi-wire-proportional chambers as position-sensing and parallel-plate-avalanche counters as time-sensing detectors at low pressure (5 torr) have proven to be useful and reliable instruments in heavy ion physics. Gas (proportional) scintillation counters, used mainly for x-ray spectroscopy, have recently been applied as particle detectors. Finally, a brief description of a large plastic scintillator spectrometer, the Plastic Ball, is given and some of the first test and calibration data are shown.

  15. Influence of radioactivity on surface charging and aggregation kinetics of particles in the atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Ha; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Lee, Ida; McFarlane, Joanna; Tsouris, Costas

    2014-01-01

    Radioactivity can influence surface interactions, but its effects on particle aggregation kinetics have not been included in transport modeling of radioactive particles. In this research, experimental and theoretical studies have been performed to investigate the influence of radioactivity on surface charging and aggregation kinetics of radioactive particles in the atmosphere. Radioactivity-induced charging mechanisms have been investigated at the microscopic level, and heterogeneous surface potential caused by radioactivity is reported. The radioactivity-induced surface charging is highly influenced by several parameters, such as rate and type of radioactive decay. A population balance model, including interparticle forces, has been employed to study the effects of radioactivity on particle aggregation kinetics in air. It has been found that radioactivity can hinder aggregation of particles because of similar surface charging caused by the decay process. Experimental and theoretical studies provide useful insights into the understanding of transport characteristics of radioactive particles emitted from severe nuclear events, such as the recent accident of Fukushima or deliberate explosions of radiological devices.

  16. Near resonant charge transfer in the reaction F(+) + CO - F + CO(+)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusunoki, I.; Ishikawa, T.

    1985-06-01

    Charge transfer reactions in the F(+) + CO system were investigated using a F(+) ion beam in the energy range 10-300 eVlab. The electronically excited product CO(+) A2Pi(i) was observed by the emission from the A-X transitions. At low collisional energy the dominant product is in the vibrational level v' = 5. The reaction cross section sigma(5) is about 1 A-sq at 12 eVc.m. and decreases with increasing collision energy. The large cross section at v' = 5 can be interpreted by near-resonant charge-transfer reactions. The rotational temperature of the product is about 300 K, which is the temperature of the reactant CO gas. For the resonant charge transfer, the translational energy is not effective, but the electronic and vibrational energy couple with each other strongly.

  17. Simulation of ASTROD I test mass charging due to solar energetic particles

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Lei; Ni, Wei-Tou; Shaul, D N A

    2007-01-01

    As ASTROD I travels through space, its test mass will accrue charge due to galactic cosmic-rays and solar energetic particles incident on the spacecraft. This test mass charge will result in Coulomb forces between the test mass and the surrounding electrodes. In earlier work using the GEANT4 toolkit, we predicted a net charging rate of nearly 9.0 +e/s from cosmic-ray protons between 0.1 and 1000 GeV at solar maximum, and rising to 26.5 +e/s at solar minimum. Here we use GEANT4 to simulate the charging process due to solar energetic particle events and to estimate the magnitude of acceleration noise due to this charging. The predicted charging rates range from 2840 to 64300 +e/s, at peak intensity, for the 4 largest SEP events in September and October 1989. For the 2 larger events, the acceleration disturbances due to charging exceeds the ASTROD I acceleration noise budget requirement. Continuous discharge should be considered for suppressing this charging noise. The acceleration noise during the 2 small event...

  18. Influence of an Additive-Free Particle Spreading Method on Interactions between Charged Colloidal Particles at an Oil/Water Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peng; Yi, Zonglin; Xing, Xiaochen; Ngai, To; Jin, Fan

    2016-05-17

    The assembly and manipulation of charged colloidal particles at oil/water interfaces represent active areas of fundamental and applied research. Previously, we have shown that colloidal particles can spontaneously generate unstable residual charges at the particle/oil interface when spreading solvent is used to disperse them at an oil/water interface. These residual charges in turn affect the long-ranged electrostatic repulsive forces and packing of particles at the interface. To further uncover the influence arising from the spreading solvents on interfacial particle interactions, in the present study we utilize pure buoyancy to drive the particles onto an oil/water interface and compare the differences between such a spontaneously adsorbed particle monolayer to the spread monolayer based on solvent spreading techniques. Our results show that the solvent-free method could also lead particles to spread well at the interface, but it does not result in violent sliding of particles along the interface. More importantly, this additive-free spreading method can avoid the formation of unstable residual charges at the particle/oil interface. These findings agree well with our previous hypothesis; namely, those unstable residual charges are triboelectric charges that arise from the violently rubbing of particles on oil at the interface. Therefore, if the spreading solvents could be avoided, then we would be able to get rid of the formation of residual charges at interfaces. This finding will provide insight for precisely controlling the interactions among colloidal particles trapped at fluid/fluid interfaces.

  19. Excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction in 4-(1-azetidinyl)benzonitrile: Solvent isotope effects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tuhin Pradhan; Piue Ghoshal; Ranjit Biswas

    2009-01-01

    Excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction of 4-(1-azetidinyl) benzonitrile (P4C) in deuterated and normal methanol, ethanol and acetonitrile has been studied in order to investigate the solvent isotope effects on reaction rates and yields. These quantities (reaction rates and yields) along with several other properties such as quantum yield and radiative rates have been found to be insensitive to the solvent isotope substitution in all these solvents. The origin of the solvent isotope insensitivity of the reaction is discussed and correlated with the observed slowing down of the solvation dynamics upon isotope substitution.

  20. Surface charge properties of red mud particles generated from Chinese diaspore bauxite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Kun-yu; HU Hui-ping; ZHANG Li-juan; CHEN Qi-yuan

    2008-01-01

    Acid/basic potentiometric titration can be used to quantify the red mud surface charge properties. The amount of surface active -OH groups and surface charge density on the red mud particles generated from Chinese diaspore bauxite were evaluated from the acid/basic potentiometric titration data in 0.1 mol/L or 0.5 molL NaCI solution. The results show that the adsorption of sodium polyacrylate(SPA) on the red mud surface causes the increase of the surface active -OH groups, which makes the point of zero charge(PZC) shift to a lower pH value. However, the adsorption of polyacrylamide(PAM) causes little change. As the concentration of NaCl solution increases, the surface charge becomes more positive in acidic solution and more negative in alkaline solution, which can be attributed to the presence of a porous surface gel coating on the red mud particles.

  1. Dynamics of test particles in the five-dimensional, charged, rotating EMCS spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Reimers, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    We derive the complete set of geodesic equations for massive and massless test particles of a five-dimensional, charged, rotating black hole solution of the Einstein-Maxwell-Chern-Simons field equations in five-dimensional minimal gauged supergravity and present their analytical solutions in terms of Weierstra{\\ss}' elliptic functions. We study the polar and radial motion, depending on the black hole and test particle parameters, and characterize the test particle motion qualitatively by the means of effective potentials. We use the analytical solutions in order to visualize the test particle motion by two- and three-dimensional plots.

  2. CPIC: A Parallel Particle-In-Cell Code for Studying Spacecraft Charging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meierbachtol, Collin; Delzanno, Gian Luca; Moulton, David; Vernon, Louis

    2015-11-01

    CPIC is a three-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell code designed for use with curvilinear meshes. One of its primary objectives is to aid in studying spacecraft charging in the magnetosphere. CPIC maintains near-optimal computational performance and scaling thanks to a mapped logical mesh field solver, and a hybrid physical-logical space particle mover (avoiding the need to track particles). CPIC is written for parallel execution, utilizing a combination of both OpenMP threading and MPI distributed memory. New capabilities are being actively developed and added to CPIC, including the ability to handle multi-block curvilinear mesh structures. Verification results comparing CPIC to analytic test problems will be provided. Particular emphasis will be placed on the charging and shielding of a sphere-in-plasma system. Simulated charging results of representative spacecraft geometries will also be presented. Finally, its performance capabilities will be demonstrated through parallel scaling data.

  3. Search for stable mutli-charged particles with the ATLAS experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zimmermann Simone

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A search for long-lived, multi-charged particles is performed using the ATLAS detector. We examine pp collision-data taken during the 2011 LHC running, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.4 fb−1. A search is made for charged particle tracks exhibiting anomalously high ionization consistent with stable massive particles with charges from |q| = 2e to |q| = 6e. For this search new variables of specific energy loss per path length (dE/dx are developed and used in the candidate selection. No excess is observed with respect to the prediction of Standard Model processes. The 95% CL cross-section limits are interpreted as lower mass limits of 420-490 GeV for a simplified Drell-Yan production model.

  4. Control Of Screening Of A Charged Particle In Electrolytic Aqueous Paul Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae Hyun; Krsti, Predrag S.

    2011-01-01

    Individual charged particles could be trapped and confined by the combined radio-frequency and DC quadrupole electric field of an aqueous Paul trap. Viscosity of water improves confinement and extends the range of the trap parameters which characterize the stability of the trap. Electrolyte, if present in aqueous solution, may screen the charged particle and thus partially or fully suppress electrophoretic interaction with the applied filed, possibly reducing it to a generally much weaker dielectrophoretic interaction with an induced dipole. Applying molecular dynamics simulation we show that the quadrupole field has a different effect at the electrolyte ions and at much heavier charged particle, effectively eliminating the screening by electrolyte ions and reinstating the electrophoretic confinement. PMID:24839332

  5. Isospin restrictions on charge distributions in charmed-particle decays. [Branching ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peshkin, M.; Rosner, J.L.

    1976-01-01

    The isospin properties of the semileptonic and nonleptonic charm-changing weak interactions lead to restrictions on the branching ratios of the different charge states that can occur in multi-particle decays of charmed particles. Upper and lower bounds imposed by isospin invariance on these ratios, and on the average number of charged decay products, are calculated for various charmed-particle decay modes. Simultaneous bounds on the branching ratios of two different charge distributions in the same decay mode, or in isospin-related decay modes, are presented. Branching ratios are also calculated under the statistical postulate that all the allowed invariant isospin channels contribute equally and incoherently in each decay mode.

  6. Explicit symplectic algorithms based on generating functions for charged particle dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Ruili; Tang, Yifa; Liu, Jian; He, Yang; Xiao, Jianyuan

    2016-01-01

    Dynamics of a charged particle in the canonical coordinates is a Hamiltonian system, and the well-known symplectic algorithm has been regarded as the de facto method for numerical integration of Hamiltonian systems due to its long-term accuracy and fidelity. For long-term simulations with high efficiency, explicit symplectic algorithms are desirable. However, it is widely accepted that explicit symplectic algorithms are only available for sum-separable Hamiltonians, and that this restriction severely limits the application of explicit symplectic algorithms to charged particle dynamics. To overcome this difficulty, we combine the familiar sum-split method and a generating function method to construct second and third order explicit symplectic algorithms for dynamics of charged particle. The generating function method is designed to generate explicit symplectic algorithms for product-separable Hamiltonian with form of $H(\\mathbf{p},\\mathbf{q})=\\mathbf{p}_{i}f(\\mathbf{q})$ or $H(\\mathbf{p},\\mathbf{q})=\\mathbf{q}...

  7. Layer-by-layer deposition of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes on the surface of condensed DNA particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubetskoy, V S; Loomis, A; Hagstrom, J E; Budker, V G; Wolff, J A

    1999-08-01

    DNA can be condensed with an excess of poly-cations in aqueous solutions forming stable particles of submicron size with positive surface charge. This charge surplus can be used to deposit alternating layers of polyanions and polycations on the surface surrounding the core of condensed DNA. Using poly-L-lysine (PLL) and succinylated PLL (SPLL) as polycation and polyanion, respectively, we demonstrated layer-by-layer architecture of the particles. Polyanions with a shorter carboxyl/backbone distance tend to disassemble binary DNA/PLL complexes by displacing DNA while polyanions with a longer carboxyl/backbone distance effectively formed a tertiary complex. The zeta potential of such complexes became negative, indicating effective surface recharging. The charge stoichiometry of the DNA/PLL/SPLL complex was found to be close to 1:1:1, resembling poly-electrolyte complexes layered on macrosurfaces. Recharged particles containing condensed plasmid DNA may find applications as non-viral gene delivery vectors.

  8. Quantum mechanical investigations on the role of neutral and negatively charged enamine intermediates in organocatalyzed reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubin, Pierre O., E-mail: pierre.hubin@unamur.be [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie Informatique (PCI), Unité de Chimie Physique Théorique et Structurale, University of Namur, 61 rue de Bruxelles, 5000 Namur (Belgium); Jacquemin, Denis [Laboratoire CEISAM – UMR CNRS 6230, Université de Nantes, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP92208, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Institut Universitaire de France 103, Boulevard St Michel, 75005 Paris Cedex 5 (France); Leherte, Laurence; Vercauteren, Daniel P. [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie Informatique (PCI), Unité de Chimie Physique Théorique et Structurale, University of Namur, 61 rue de Bruxelles, 5000 Namur (Belgium)

    2014-04-15

    Highlights: • M06-2X functional is suitable to model key steps of proline-catalyzed reactions. • Investigation of the proline-catalyzed aldol reaction mechanism. • Influence of water molecules on the C–C bond formation step. • Mechanism for the reaction of proline-derived enamines with benzhydrylium cations. - Abstract: The proline-catalyzed aldol reaction is the seminal example of asymmetric organocatalysis. Previous theoretical and experimental studies aimed at identifying its mechanism in order to rationalize the outcome of this reaction. Here, we focus on key steps with modern first principle methods, i.e. the M06-2X hybrid exchange–correlation functional combined to the solvation density model to account for environmental effects. In particular, different pathways leading to the formation of neutral and negatively charged enamine intermediates are investigated, and their reactivity towards two electrophiles, i.e. an aldehyde and a benzhydrylium cation, are compared. Regarding the self-aldol reaction, our calculations confirm that the neutral enamine intermediate is more reactive than the negatively charged one. For the reaction with benzhydrylium cations however, the negatively charged enamine intermediate is more reactive.

  9. Chromatically Corrected Imaging Systems for Charged-Particle Radiography

    CERN Document Server

    Blind, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    In proton radiography, imaging with systems consisting of quadrupole magnets is an established technique for viewing the material distribution and composition of objects, either statically or during fast events such as explosions. With the most favorable magnet configuration, the -I lens, chromatic aberrations generally dominate the image blur. Image resolution can be improved, and largely decoupled from the input-beam parameters, by using a second-order achromatic bend with some additional higher-order aberration correction. The aberration-correction approach is discussed. For a given resolution, such a bend allows use of much lower-energy imaging particles than a -I lens. Each bend design represents a set of equivalent systems; an 800-MeV proton design and its equivalent 40-MeV electron system are presented. The electron system is useful for imaging small objects. Magnet errors in the achromatic bends must be tightly controlled to preserve image quality, but not beyond feasibility of present technology. Sys...

  10. Molecular processes in plasmas collisions of charged particles with molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Itikawa, Yukikazu

    2007-01-01

    Molecular Processes in Plasmas describes elementary collision processes in plasmas, particularly those involving molecules or molecular ions. Those collision processes (called molecular processes) maintain plasmas, produce reactive species and emissions, and play a key role in energy balance in plasmas or more specifically in determining the energy distribution of plasma particles. Many books on plasma physics mention the elementary processes, but normally rather briefly. They only touch upon the general feature or fundamental concept of the collision processes. On the other hand, there are many books on atomic and molecular physics, but most of them are too general or too detailed to be useful to people in the application fields. The present book enumerates all the possible processes in the collisions of electrons, as well as ions, with molecules. For each process, a compact but informative description of its characteristics is given together with illustrative examples. Since the author has much experience a...

  11. Charge states of energetic solar particles. Die Ladungszustaende solarer energetischer Teilchen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luhn, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    The dissertation deals with the measurement and interpretation of the charge state of energetic solar particles. Measurements of the C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S and Fe ions were carried out with the ULEZEQ sensor on the ISEE-3 satellite. For the first time it was possible to determine the three parameters energy, atomic number and charge state of infalling ions separately and indepedent from each other.

  12. A CMOS Active Pixel Sensor for Charged Particle Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matis, Howard S.; Bieser, Fred; Kleinfelder, Stuart; Rai, Gulshan; Retiere, Fabrice; Ritter, Hans George; Singh, Kunal; Wurzel, Samuel E.; Wieman, Howard; Yamamoto, Eugene

    2002-12-02

    Active Pixel Sensor (APS) technology has shown promise for next-generation vertex detectors. This paper discusses the design and testing of two generations of APS chips. Both are arrays of 128 by 128 pixels, each 20 by 20 {micro}m. Each array is divided into sub-arrays in which different sensor structures (4 in the first version and 16 in the second) and/or readout circuits are employed. Measurements of several of these structures under Fe{sup 55} exposure are reported. The sensors have also been irradiated by 55 MeV protons to test for radiation damage. The radiation increased the noise and reduced the signal. The noise can be explained by shot noise from the increased leakage current and the reduction in signal is due to charge being trapped in the epi layer. Nevertheless, the radiation effect is small for the expected exposures at RHIC and RHIC II. Finally, we describe our concept for mechanically supporting a thin silicon wafer in an actual detector.

  13. Measurements of Branching Ratios for $\\eta$ Decays into Charged Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Adlarson, P; Bardan, W; Bashkanov, M; Bergmann, F S; Berłowski, M; Bhatt, H; Bondar, A; Büscher, M; Calén, H; Ciepał, I; Clement, H; Coderre, D; Czerwiński, E; Demmich, K; Engels, R; Erven, A; Erven, W; Eyrich, W; Fedorets, P; Föhl, K; Fransson, K; Goldenbaum, F; Goswami, A; Grigoryev, K; Gullström, C -O; Heijkenskjöld, L; Hejny, V; Hüsken, N; Jarczyk, L; Johansson, T; Kamys, B; Kemmerling, G; Khan, F A; Khatri, G; Khoukaz, A; Kirillov, D A; Kistryn, S; Kleines, H; Kłos, B; Krzemień, W; Kulessa, P; Kupść, A; Kuzmin, A; Lalwani, K; Lersch, D; Lorentz, B; Magiera, A; Maier, R; Marciniewski, P; Mariański, B; Mikirtychiants, M; Morsch, H -P; Moskal, P; Ohm, H; Ozerianska, I; del Rio, E Perez; Piskunov, N M; Prasuhn, D; Pszczel, D; Pysz, K; Pyszniak, A; Ritman, J; Roy, A; Rudy, Z; Rundel, O; Sawant, S; Schadmand, S; Sefzick, T; Serdyuk, V; Shwartz, B; Sitterberg, K; Siudak, R; Skorodko, T; Skurzok, M; Smyrski, J; Sopov, V; Stassen, R; Stepaniak, J; Stephan, E; Sterzenbach, G; Stockhorst, H; Ströher, H; Szczurek, A; Täschner, A; Trzciński, A; Varma, R; Wiedner, U; Wolke, M; Wrońska, A; Wüstner, P; Wurm, P; Yamamoto, A; Zabierowski, J; Zieliński, M J; Zink, A; Złomańczuk, J; Żuprański, P; Żurek, M

    2015-01-01

    The WASA-at-COSY experiment has collected $3\\times10^{7}$ events with $\\eta$-mesons produced via the reaction $pd\\rightarrow{^{3}\\textrm{He}}\\eta$ at $\\textrm{T} = 1.0 \\textrm{GeV}$. Using this data set, we evaluate the branching ratios of the decays $\\eta\\to\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}\\gamma$, $\\eta\\to e^{+}e^{-}\\gamma$, $\\eta\\to\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}e^{+}e^{-}$ and $\\eta\\to e^{+}e^{-}e^{+}e^{-}$. The branching ratios are normalized to the $\\eta\\rightarrow\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}\\pi^{0}$ decay. In addition an upper limit on a $CP$-violating asymmetry in $\\eta\\rightarrow \\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}e^{+}e^{-}$ is extracted.

  14. Physics with gamma-beams and charged particle detectors: I) Nuclear structure II) Nuclear astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gai, Moshe [LNS at Avery Point, University of Connecticut, Groton, CT 06340-6097, USA and Wright Lab, Dept. of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8124 and the Charged Particle Working Group (CPWG) of the Technical Design Report (TDR) (United States)

    2015-02-24

    The Charged Particle Working Group (CPWG) is proposing to construct large area Silicon Strip Detector (SSD), a gas Time Projection Chamber detector read by an electronic readout system (eTPC) and a Bubble Chamber (BC) containing superheated high purity water to be used in measurements utilizing intense gamma-ray beams from the newly constructed ELI-NP facility at Magurele, Bucharest in Romania. We intend to use the SSD and eTPC detectors to address essential problems in nuclear structure physics, such as clustering and the many alpha-decay of light nuclei such as {sup 12}C and {sup 16}O. All three detectors (SSD, eTPC and BC) will be used to address central problems in nuclear astrophysics such as the astrophysical cross section factor of the {sup 12}C(α,γ) reaction and other processes central to stellar evolution. The CPWG intends to submit to the ELI-NP facility a Technical Design Report (TDR) for the proposed detectors.

  15. Relative Nonlinear Electrodynamics Interaction of Charged Particles with Strong and Super Strong Laser Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Avetissian, Hamlet

    2006-01-01

    This book covers a large class of fundamental investigations into Relativistic Nonlinear Electrodynamics. It explores the interaction between charged particles and strong laser fields, mainly concentrating on contemporary problems of x-ray lasers, new type small set-up high-energy accelerators of charged particles, as well as electron-positron pair production from super powerful laser fields of relativistic intensities. It will also discuss nonlinear phenomena of threshold nature that eliminate the concurrent inverse processes in the problems of Laser Accelerator and Free Electron Laser, thus creating new opportunities for solving these problems.

  16. A perspective on Black Hole Horizons from the Quantum Charged Particle

    CERN Document Server

    Jaramillo, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    Black hole apparent horizons possess a natural notion of stability, whose spectral characterization can be related to the problem of the stationary quantum charged particle. Such mathematical relation leads to an "analyticity conjecture" on the dependence of the spectral properties on a complex "fine-structure-constant" parameter, that can reduce the study of the spectrum of the (non-selfadjoint) MOTS-stability operator to that of the (selfadjoint) Hamiltonian of the quantum charged particle. Moreover, this perspective might open an avenue to the spinorial treatment of apparent horizon (MOTS-)stability and to the introduction of semiclassical tools to explore some of the qualitative aspects of this black hole spectral problem.

  17. Tunneling of massive and charged particles from noncommutative Reissner-Nordstr\\"{o}m black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Nozari, Kourosh

    2012-01-01

    Massive charged and uncharged particles tunneling from commutative Reissner-Nordstrom black hole horizon has been studied with details in literature. Here, by adopting the coherent state picture of spacetime noncommutativity, we study tunneling of massive and charged particles from a noncommutative inspired Reissner-Nordstrom black hole horizon. We show that Hawking radiation in this case is not purely thermal and there are correlations between emitted modes. These correlations may provide a solution to the information loss problem. We also study thermodynamics of noncommutative horizon in this setup.

  18. Modeling and Characterization of Charged Particle Trajectories in an Oscillating Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Irawan, Dani; Khotimah, Siti Nurul; Latief, Fourier Dzar Eljabbar; Novitrian,

    2015-01-01

    A constant magnetic field has frequently been discussed and has been known that it can cause a charged particle to form interesting trajectories such as cycloid and helix in presence of electric field, but a changing magnetic field is rarely discussed. In this work, modeling and characterization of charged particle trajectories in oscillating magnetic field is reported. The modeling is performed using Euler method with speed corrector. The result shows that there are two types of trajectory patterns that will recur for every $180 n T_0$ ($n = 0, 1, 2, ..$) in increasing of magnetic field oscillation period, where $T_0$ is about $6.25\\times10^{-7}$ s.

  19. Charged particle multiplicities in inelastic pp interactions with ATLAS and the ATLAS Minimum Bias Tune 1

    CERN Document Server

    Brandt, G; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of the charged particle multiplicity produced in proton-proton collisions at the LHC at centre-of-mass energies $sqrt{s}=0.9$~TeV and $7$~TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector are presented. Distributions are measured for events with at least one charged particle $n_{ch}geq1$ in the kinematic range $|eta|<2.5$ and $p_T>500$~MeV. The measurement is also constrained to a diffraction-limited phasespace $n_{ch} geq 6$ and used for the production of the first py6 tune to LHC data, the ATLAS Minimum Bias Tune~1 (AMBT1).

  20. Direct search for pair production of heavy stable charged particles in Z decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soderstrom, E.; McKenna, J.A.; Abrams, G.S.; Adolphsen, C.E.; Averill, D.; Ballam, J.; Barish, B.C.; Barklow, T.; Barnett, B.A.; Bartelt, J.; Bethke, S.; Blockus, D.; Bonvicini, G.; Boyarski, A.; Brabson, B.; Breakstone, A.; Bulos, F.; Burchat, P.R.; Burke, D.L.; Cence, R.J.; Chapman, J.; Chmeissani, M.; Cords, D.; Coupal, D.P.; Dauncey, P.; DeStaebler, H.C.; Dorfan, D.E.; Dorfan, J.M.; Drewer, D.C.; Elia, R.; Feldman, G.J.; Fernandes, D.; Field, R.C.; Ford, W.T.; Fordham, C.; Frey, R.; Fujino, D.; Gan, K.K.; Gero, E.; Gidal, G.; Glanzman, T.; Goldhaber, G.; Gomez Cadenas, J.J.; Gratta, G.; Grindhammer, G.; Grosse-Wiesmann, P.; Hanson, G.; Harr, R.; Harral, B.; Harris, F.A.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hayes, K.; Hearty, C.; Heusch, C.A.; Hildreth, M.D.; Himel, T.; Hinshaw, D.A.; Hong, S.J.; Hutchinson, D.; Hylen, J.; Innes, W.R.; Jacobsen, R.G.; Jaros, J.A.; Jung, C.K.; Kadyk, J.A.; Kent, J.; King, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Komamiya, S.; Koska, W.; Kowalski, L.A.; Kozanecki, W.; Kral, J.F.; Kuhlen, M.; Lab

    1990-06-18

    A search for pair production of stable charged particles from {ital Z} decay has been performed with the Mark II detector at the SLAC Linear Collider. Particle masses are determined from momentum, ionization energy loss, and time-of-flight measurements. A limit excluding pair production of stable fourth-generation charged leptons and stable mirror fermions with masses between the muon mass and 36.3 GeV/{ital c}{sup 2} is set at the 95% confidence level. Pair production of stable supersymmetric scalar leptons with masses between the muon mass and 32.6 GeV/{ital c}{sup 2} is also excluded.

  1. Neutrino nuclear responses for double beta decays and astro neutrinos by charge exchange reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejiri, Hiroyasu

    2014-09-01

    Neutrino nuclear responses are crucial for neutrino studies in nuclei. Charge exchange reactions (CER) are shown to be used to study charged current neutrino nuclear responses associated with double beta decays(DBD)and astro neutrino interactions. CERs to be used are high energy-resolution (He3 ,t) reactions at RCNP, photonuclear reactions via IAR at NewSUBARU and muon capture reactions at MUSIC RCNP and MLF J-PARC. The Gamow Teller (GT) strengths studied by CERs reproduce the observed 2 neutrino DBD matrix elements. The GT and spin dipole (SD) matrix elements are found to be reduced much due to the nucleon spin isospin correlations and the non-nucleonic (delta isobar) nuclear medium effects. Impacts of the reductions on the DBD matrix elements and astro neutrino interactions are discussed.

  2. Double, Rydberg and charge transfer excitations from pairing matrix fluctuation and particle-particle random phase approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yang [Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Aggelen, Helen van [Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Ghent University, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Yang, Weitao, E-mail: weitao.yang@duke.edu [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2013-12-14

    Double, Rydberg, and charge transfer (CT) excitations have been great challenges for time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). Starting from an (N ± 2)-electron single-determinant reference, we investigate excitations for the N-electron system through the pairing matrix fluctuation, which contains information on two-electron addition/removal processes. We adopt the particle-particle random phase approximation (pp-RPA) and the particle-particle Tamm-Dancoff approximation (pp-TDA) to approximate the pairing matrix fluctuation and then determine excitation energies by the differences of two-electron addition/removal energies. This approach captures all types of interesting excitations: single and double excitations are described accurately, Rydberg excitations are in good agreement with experimental data and CT excitations display correct 1/R dependence. Furthermore, the pp-RPA and the pp-TDA have a computational cost similar to TDDFT and consequently are promising for practical calculations.

  3. Double, Rydberg and charge transfer excitations from pairing matrix fluctuation and particle-particle random phase approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; van Aggelen, Helen; Yang, Weitao

    2013-12-14

    Double, Rydberg, and charge transfer (CT) excitations have been great challenges for time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). Starting from an (N ± 2)-electron single-determinant reference, we investigate excitations for the N-electron system through the pairing matrix fluctuation, which contains information on two-electron addition/removal processes. We adopt the particle-particle random phase approximation (pp-RPA) and the particle-particle Tamm-Dancoff approximation (pp-TDA) to approximate the pairing matrix fluctuation and then determine excitation energies by the differences of two-electron addition/removal energies. This approach captures all types of interesting excitations: single and double excitations are described accurately, Rydberg excitations are in good agreement with experimental data and CT excitations display correct 1/R dependence. Furthermore, the pp-RPA and the pp-TDA have a computational cost similar to TDDFT and consequently are promising for practical calculations.

  4. Constraints on rapidity-dependent initial conditions from charged particle pseudorapidity densities and two-particle correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Ke, Weiyao; Bernhard, Jonah E; Bass, Steffen A

    2016-01-01

    We study the initial three-dimensional spatial configuration of the quark-gluon plasma produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions using centrality and rapidity-dependent measurements of charged particle pseudorapidity densities and two-particle correlations. A cumulant-generating function is used to parametrize the rapidity dependence of local entropy deposition and extend arbitrary boost-invariant initial conditions to nonzero beam rapidities. The model is compared to p+Pb and Pb+Pb single-particle distributions and systematically optimized using Bayesian parameter estimation to extract high-probability initial condition parameters. The optimized initial conditions are then compared to a number of experimental observables including two-particle rapidity correlations, the rapidity dependence of anisotropic flow, and event-plane decorrelations.

  5. Locomotion of Electrocatalytic Nanomotors due to Reaction Induced Charge Auto-Electrophoresis

    CERN Document Server

    Moran, J L; Posner, J D

    2010-01-01

    Bimetallic rod-shaped nanomotors swim autonomously in hydrogen peroxide solutions. Here we present a scaling analysis, computational simulations, and experimental data that show that the nanomotor locomotion is driven by fluid slip around the nanomotor surface due to electrical body forces. The body forces are generated by a coupling of charge density and electric fields induced by electrochemical reactions occurring on the nanomotor surface. We describe the dependence of nanomotor motion on the nanomotor surface potential and reaction-driven flux.

  6. Single-file diffusion of macroscopic charged particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coste, C; Delfau, J-B; Even, C; Saint Jean, M

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, we study a macroscopic system of electrically interacting metallic beads organized as a sequence along an annulus. A random mechanical shaking mimics the thermal excitation. We exhibit non-Fickian diffusion (single-file diffusion) at large time. We measure the mobility of the particles and compare it to theoretical expectations. We show that our system cannot be accurately described by theories assuming only hard-sphere interactions. Its behavior is qualitatively described by a theory extended to more realistic potentials [M. Kollmann, Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 180602 (2003)]. A correct quantitative agreement is shown and we interpret the discrepancies by the violation of the assumption of overdamped dynamics, which is a key point in the theory. We recast previous results on colloids with known interaction potentials and compare them quantitatively to the theory. Focusing on the transition between ordinary and single-file diffusions, we exhibit a dimensionless crossover time that is of order 1 both for colloids and our system, although the time and length scales differ by several orders of magnitude.

  7. Magnetic stochasticity in magnetically confined fusion plasmas chaos of field lines and charged particle dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Abdullaev, Sadrilla

    2014-01-01

    This is the first book to systematically consider the modern aspects of chaotic dynamics of magnetic field lines and charged particles in magnetically confined fusion plasmas.  The analytical models describing the generic features of equilibrium magnetic fields and  magnetic perturbations in modern fusion devices are presented. It describes mathematical and physical aspects of onset of chaos, generic properties of the structure of stochastic magnetic fields, transport of charged particles in tokamaks induced by magnetic perturbations, new aspects of particle turbulent transport, etc. The presentation is based on the classical and new unique mathematical tools of Hamiltonian dynamics, like the action--angle formalism, classical perturbation theory, canonical transformations of variables, symplectic mappings, the Poincaré-Melnikov integrals. They are extensively used for analytical studies as well as for numerical simulations of magnetic field lines, particle dynamics, their spatial structures and  statisti...

  8. Kinetics of contrail particles formation and heterogeneous reactions on such particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kogan, M.N.; Butkovsky, A.V.; Erofeev, A.I.; Freedlender, O.G.; Makashev, N.K. [Central Aerohydrodynamic Inst., Zhukovsky (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The research of impact of aircraft emissions upon the atmosphere is very complex and difficult problem. More than two decades of intensive investigations of the problem of ozone decay do not permit to make definite conclusions. Many important problems still remain unsolved in the aircraft/atmosphere interaction: engine, nozzle, jet, jet/vortex system interaction, vortex breakdown, contrail formation, meso-scale and global processes, their effects on climate. The particles formation and heterogeneous reactions play an important role in some of these processes. These problems are discussed. (author) 11 refs.

  9. Ballistic Diffusion of a Charged Particle in a Blackbody Radiation Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAO Jing-Dong; BAI Zhan-Wu

    2005-01-01

    @@ The generalized Langevin equation is used to describe the motion of a charged particle interacting with a blackbody radiation field via dipole coupling. The exact expressions for the mean-square displacement and velocity of such a particle are obtained, which show a ballistic diffusion and a modified Kubo fluctuation-dissipation relation. In particular, a velocity-dependent coupling or force can induce this novel phenomenon.

  10. Energy losses of charged particles in a finite layer of substance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chechin, V. A.

    1985-04-01

    The energy lost by a charged particle as it crosses a plane-parallel plate with dielectric permittivity in a vacuum is calculated theoretically, applying the intermediate transition to the Heaviside transformation and considering various combinations of particle Lorentz factor and plate thickness. The problems encountered in comparing the theoretical predictions with experimental data are examined, and the application of the model of energy loss in very thin layers of Ermilova et al. (1974) is found to explain the observed anomalies.

  11. Deflection and focusing of charged particles by cavities of general shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinderer, G.

    1991-04-01

    The integrated transverse momentum change of a charged particle in the rf field of a cavity can be related to the change of its voltage gain due to a virtual transverse displacement of its orbit. Formulas for the particle deflection are derived, which are a generalisation of the Panofsky-Wenzel theorem to an arbitrary cavity shape and to curved orbits through the cavity. In addition, some useful formulas for the transverse and longitudinal focusing are presented.

  12. An Energy- and Charge-conserving, Implicit, Electrostatic Particle-in-Cell Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Guangye; Barnes, Daniel C

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses a novel fully implicit formulation for a 1D electrostatic particle-in-cell (PIC) plasma simulation approach. Unlike earlier implicit electrostatic PIC approaches (which are based on a linearized Vlasov-Poisson formulation), ours is based on a nonlinearly converged Vlasov-Amp\\`ere (VA) model. By iterating particles and fields to a tight nonlinear convergence tolerance, the approach features superior stability and accuracy properties, avoiding most of the accuracy pitfalls in earlier implicit PIC implementations. In particular, the formulation is stable against temporal (CFL) and spatial (aliasing) instabilities. It is charge- and energy-conserving to numerical roundoff for arbitrary implicit time steps. While momentum is not exactly conserved, errors are kept small by an adaptive particle sub-stepping orbit integrator, which is instrumental to prevent particle tunneling. The VA model is orbit-averaged along particle orbits to enforce an energy conservation theorem with particle sub-steppin...

  13. Strange Resonance and Charmed Particle Production in Muon-Associated Neutrino Neon Charged-Current Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, Eric Roy

    The production of strange resonances and charmed particles in nu_{mu} Ne charged-current interactions was measured in the 15 ft Bubble Chamber. The chamber, filled with a heavy Ne-H_2 mixture, was exposed at Fermilab to a wide-band horn-focussed neutrino beam with peak energy ~20 GeV. In a 390,000 expansion exposure of the chamber, ~125,000 charge-current events occurred within the fiducial volume. Among these events were 4381 (3676) well-reconstructed K _sp{s}{0} ( Lambda^0) decays. The events containing these neutral strange particle decays are examined to measure strange resonance and charmed particle production. Inclusive production rates or rate limits per charged-current event are measured for the K*(890) and Sigma^ {*}(1380) resonances. The production of any particular resonance is measured to be typically {cal O}(1%), and resonance decays are shown to account for 10-25% of K^0 /|{rm K}^0 's and Lambda^0's. Production rates or rate limits are measured for charmed particles via hadronic decays which include a neutral strange particle --these rates are typically {cal O} (1%) and are consistent with the rate at which charmed particle semileptonic decays were observed during the same experiment. ftn*Research supported by the National Science Foundation. Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in the graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Columbia University.

  14. Fog camera to visualize ionizing charged particles; Camara de niebla para visualizar particulas cargadas ionizantes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trujillo A, L.; Rodriguez R, N. I.; Vega C, H. R., E-mail: ingtrujilloa@hotmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The human being can not perceive the different types of ionizing radiation, natural or artificial, present in the nature, for what appropriate detection systems have been developed according to the sensibility to certain radiation type and certain energy type. The objective of this work was to build a fog camera to visualize the traces, and to identify the trajectories, produced by charged particles with high energy, coming mainly of the cosmic rays. The origin of the cosmic rays comes from the solar radiation generated by solar eruptions where the protons compose most of this radiation. It also comes, of the galactic radiation which is composed mainly of charged particles and gamma rays that comes from outside of the solar system. These radiation types have energy time millions higher that those detected in the earth surface, being more important as the height on the sea level increases. These particles in their interaction produce secondary particles that are detectable by means of this cameras type. The camera operates by means of a saturated atmosphere of alcohol vapor. In the moment in that a charged particle crosses the cold area of the atmosphere, the medium is ionized and the particle acts like a condensation nucleus of the alcohol vapor, leaving a visible trace of its trajectory. The built camera was very stable, allowing the detection in continuous form and the observation of diverse events. (Author)

  15. Electrostatics in dissipative particle dynamics using Ewald sums with point charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrón-Mejía, Ketzasmin A.; López-Rendón, Roberto; Gama Goicochea, Armando

    2016-10-01

    A proper treatment of electrostatic interactions is crucial for the accurate calculation of forces in computer simulations. Electrostatic interactions are typically modeled using Ewald-based methods, which have become some of the cornerstones upon which many other methods for the numerical computation of electrostatic interactions are based. However, their use with charge distributions rather than point charges requires the inclusion of ansatz for the solutions of the Poisson equation, since there is no exact solution known for smeared out charges. The interest in incorporating electrostatic interactions at the scales of length and time that are relevant for the study the physics of soft condensed matter has increased considerably. Using mesoscale simulation techniques, such as dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), allows us to reach longer time scales in numerical simulations, without abandoning the particulate description of the problem. The main problem with incorporating electrostatics into DPD simulations is that DPD particles are soft and those particles with opposite charge can form artificial clusters of ions. Here we show that one can incorporate the electrostatic interactions through Ewald sums with point charges in DPD if larger values of coarse-graining degree are used, where DPD is truly mesoscopic. Using point charges with larger excluded volume interactions, the artificial formation of ionic pairs with point charges can be avoided and one obtains correct predictions. We establish ranges of parameters useful for detecting boundaries where artificial formation of ionic pairs occurs. Lastly, using point charges we predict the scaling properties of polyelectrolytes in solvents of varying quality, and obtain predictions that are in agreement with calculations that use other methods and with recent experimental results.

  16. Mechanism of the Primary Charge Transfer Reaction in the Cytochrome bc1 Complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barragan, Angela M; Schulten, Klaus; Solov'yov, Ilia A

    2016-01-01

    , the quinol-protein interaction, which initiates the Q-cycle, has not yet been completely described. Furthermore, the initial charge transfer reactions of the Q-cycle lack a physical description. The present investigation utilizes classical molecular dynamics simulations in tandem with quantum density...

  17. Near-resonant versus nonresonant chemiluminescent charge-transfer reactions of atomic ions with HCl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenewinkel-Meyer, Th.; Ottinger, Ch.

    1994-01-01

    Charge-transfer reactions of C+, O+, F+, Ar+ and some other atomic ions with hydrogen chloride were investigated at collision energies between eVc.m.. This may be due to formation of a long-lived collision complex (Ar-HCl)+.

  18. Single-particle detection of products from atomic and molecular reactions in a cryogenic ion storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, C.; Novotný, O.; Becker, A.; George, S.; Grieser, M.; Hahn, R. von; Meyer, C.; Schippers, S.; Spruck, K.; Vogel, S.; Wolf, A.

    2017-04-01

    We have used a single-particle detector system, based on secondary electron emission, for counting low-energetic (∼keV/u) massive products originating from atomic and molecular ion reactions in the electrostatic Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR). The detector is movable within the cryogenic vacuum chamber of CSR, and was used to measure production rates of a variety of charged and neutral daughter particles. In operation at a temperature of ∼ 6 K , the detector is characterised by a high dynamic range, combining a low dark event rate with good high-rate particle counting capability. On-line measurement of the pulse height distributions proved to be an important monitor of the detector response at low temperature. Statistical pulse-height analysis allows to infer the particle detection efficiency of the detector, which has been found to be close to unity also in cryogenic operation at 6 K.

  19. Spatiotemporal kinetics of γ-H2AX protein on charged particles induced DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, H., E-mail: hniu@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Chang, H.C. [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Cho, I.C. [Institute for Radiological Research, Chang Gung University and Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chen, C.H. [Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Liu, C.S. [Cancer Center of Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chou, W.T. [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Charged particles can induce more complex DNA damages, and these complex damages have higher ability to cause the cell death or cell carcinogenesis. • In this study, we used γ-H2AX protein to investigate the spatiotemporal kinetics of DNA double strand breaks in particle irradiated HeLa cells. • The HeLa cells were irradiated by 400 keV alpha-particles in four different dosages. • The result shows that a good linear relationship can be observed between foci number and radiation dose. • The data shows that the dissolution rate of γ-H2AX foci agree with the two components DNA repairing model, and it was decreasing as the radiation dose increased. • These results suggest that charged particles can induce more complex DNA damages and causing the retardation of DNA repair. - Abstract: In several researches, it has been demonstrated that charged particles can induce more complex DNA damages. These complex damages have higher ability to cause the cell death or cell carcinogenesis. For this reason, clarifying the DNA repair mechanism after charged particle irradiation plays an important role in the development of charged particle therapy and space exploration. Unfortunately, the detail spatiotemporal kinetic of DNA damage repair is still unclear. In this study, we used γ-H2AX protein to investigate the spatiotemporal kinetics of DNA double strand breaks in alpha-particle irradiated HeLa cells. The result shows that the intensity of γ-H2AX foci increased gradually, and reached to its maximum at 30 min after irradiation. A good linear relationship can be observed between foci intensity and radiation dose. After 30 min, the γ-H2AX foci intensity was decreased with time passed, but remained a large portion (∼50%) at 48 h passed. The data show that the dissolution rate of γ-H2AX foci agreed with two components DNA repairing model. These results suggest that charged particles can induce more complex DNA damages and causing the retardation of DNA

  20. Modification of Charge Trapping at Particle/Particle Interfaces by Electrochemical Hydrogen Doping of Nanocrystalline TiO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Juan M; Bourret, Gilles R; Berger, Thomas; McKenna, Keith P

    2016-12-14

    Particle/particle interfaces play a crucial role in the functionality and performance of nanocrystalline materials such as mesoporous metal oxide electrodes. Defects at these interfaces are known to impede charge separation via slow-down of transport and increase of charge recombination, but can be passivated via electrochemical doping (i.e., incorporation of electron/proton pairs), leading to transient but large enhancement of photoelectrode performance. Although this process is technologically very relevant, it is still poorly understood. Here we report on the electrochemical characterization and the theoretical modeling of electron traps in nanocrystalline rutile TiO2 films. Significant changes in the electrochemical response of porous films consisting of a random network of TiO2 particles are observed upon the electrochemical accumulation of electron/proton pairs. The reversible shift of a capacitive peak in the voltammetric profile of the electrode is assigned to an energetic modification of trap states at particle/particle interfaces. This hypothesis is supported by first-principles theoretical calculations on a TiO2 grain boundary, providing a simple model for particle/particle interfaces. In particular, it is shown how protons readily segregate to the grain boundary (being up to 0.6 eV more stable than in the TiO2 bulk), modifying its structure and electron-trapping properties. The presence of hydrogen at the grain boundary increases the average depth of traps while at the same time reducing their number compared to the undoped situation. This provides an explanation for the transient enhancement of the photoelectrocatalytic activity toward methanol photooxidation which is observed following electrochemical hydrogen doping of rutile TiO2 nanoparticle electrodes.

  1. Consecutive reversible ionization-recombination reactions and ionic charge state distribution of Au plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Zhiyan; ZHU Zhenghe; TANG Changhuan; TANG Yongjian; GAO Tao

    2005-01-01

    The present work proposes kinetics of ionization-recombination to study the charge state distribution of Au plasma. The first step is to calculate the average lifetime, energy level structure, degeneracy and partition function of Au48+―Au52+ by relativistic quantum mechanics, and next to compute the equilibrium constant and the second-order recombination rate constant by statistical thermodynamics. Based on these data, the differential equations of consecutive reversible ionization-recombination reactions are solved from which the charge state distribution and its average charge are derived. Finally, the influence of electron temperature and density on average charge is given in this paper. It is called the first-principle theory, for no experimental data are needed.

  2. A numerical study on charged-particle scattering and radiography of a steep density gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Guangchao; Wang, Xiaofang

    2016-09-01

    Electron and proton radiography of polystyrene planar targets with different density gradients is studied by Monte Carlo simulations in a regime that the incident charged-particle's kinetic energy is much higher than its energy loss in the targets. It is shown that by scattering of the electrons or protons, the density gradient causes modulations of the charged-particle beam transmitted from the target and the modulation contrast is sensitive only to a steep gradient, which suggests a novel diagnostic method wherein a steep density gradient could be distinguished from the scattering of a charged-particle beam in radiography. By using a 100-MeV charged-particle beam, it is found that the modulation is evident for a steep density gradient of width smaller than 1 μm for electron radiography and 0.6 μm for proton radiography, respectively, but almost negligible when the density gradient width is greater than 1 μm. The feasibility of diagnosing the steep density gradients in compressed matter is confirmed by the simulations of radiographing a laser-ablated planar foil. Simulations also show that it is possible to diagnose the density gradients inside a multilayered spherical capsule.

  3. Charged Particle Dynamics in the Magnetic Field of a Long Straight Current-Carrying Wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, A.; Fatuzzo, M.; Toepker, T.

    2015-01-01

    By describing the motion of a charged particle in the well-known nonuniform field of a current-carrying long straight wire, a variety of teaching/learning opportunities are described: 1) Brief review of a standard problem; 2) Vector analysis; 3) Dimensionless variables; 4) Coupled differential equations; 5) Numerical solutions.

  4. Charged particle density distributions in Au + Au collisions at relativistic heavy-ion collider energies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fauad Rami

    2003-05-01

    Charged particle pseudorapidity distributions have been measured in Au + Au collisions using the BRAHMS detector at RHIC. The results are presented as a function of the collision centrality and the center of mass energy. They are compared to the predictions of different parton scattering models and the important role of hard scattering processes at RHIC energies is discussed.

  5. Functionally Charged Polystyrene Particles Activate Immortalized Mouse Microglia (BV2): Cellular and Genomic Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of particle surface charge on the biological activation of immortalized mouse microglia (BV2) was examined. Same size (~850-950 nm) spherical polystyrene microparticles (SPM) with net negative (carboxyl, COOH-) or positive (dimethyl amino, CH3)2

  6. Azimuthal angular correlations of D mesons and charged particles with the ALICE detector at the LHC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bjelogrlic, S.

    2016-01-01

    The thesis presents the results of the analysis of azimuthal angular correlations of D mesons and charged particles with the ALICE detector, in pp and p-Pb collisions at center-of mass energies of 7 and 5.02 TeV respectively. The measurements have been performed differentially as function of the tra

  7. Motion of a Charged Particle in a Constant and Uniform Electromagnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladino, L. A.; Rondón, S. H.; Orduz, P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the use of software developed by the authors that allows the visualization of the motion of a charged particle under the influence of magnetic and electric fields in 3D, at a level suitable for introductory physics courses. The software offers the possibility of studying a great number of physical situations that can…

  8. Tailoring the charged particle fluxes across the target surface of Magnum-PSI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costin, C.; Anita, V.; Popa, G.; Scholten, J.; De Temmerman, G.

    2016-01-01

    Linear plasma generators are plasma devices designed to study fusion-relevant plasma-surface interactions. The first requirement for such devices is to operate with adjustable and well characterized plasma parameters. In the linear plasma device Magnum-PSI, the distribution of the charged particle f

  9. Search for long-lived charged massive particles with the D0 detector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abazov, V.M.; et al., [Unknown; Anastasoaie, M.; Ancu, L.S.; de Jong, S.J.; Filthaut, F.; Galea, C.F.; Hegeman, J.G.; Houben, P.; Meijer, M.M.; Naumann, N.A.; Svoisky, P.; van den Berg, P.J.; van Leeuwen, W.M.

    2009-01-01

    We search for long-lived charged massive particles using 1.1 fb(-1) of data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp Collider. Time-of-flight information is used to search for pair produced long-lived tau sleptons, gauginolike charginos, and Higgsino-like charginos. We find no eviden

  10. The topology dependence of charged particle multiplicities in three-jet events

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Comas, P; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Orteu, S; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, F; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Buchmüller, O L; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Giehl, I; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Konstantinidis, N P; Leroy, O; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Choi, Y; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1997-01-01

    A study of individual jet and whole-event charged particle multiplicities in three-jet events measured in e+e- annihilation at the Z reveals a significant topology dependence. Mean jet multiplicities are inadequately described by jet energies; interjet angles must also be specified. Quantitative tests suggest that it is necessary to use transverse-momentum-like scales to describe the data.

  11. Charged Particle, Photon Multiplicity, and Transverse Energy Production in High-Energy Heavy-Ion Collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghunath Sahoo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the charged particle and photon multiplicities and transverse energy production in heavy-ion collisions starting from few GeV to TeV energies. The experimental results of pseudorapidity distribution of charged particles and photons at different collision energies and centralities are discussed. We also discuss the hypothesis of limiting fragmentation and expansion dynamics using the Landau hydrodynamics and the underlying physics. Meanwhile, we present the estimation of initial energy density multiplied with formation time as a function of different collision energies and centralities. In the end, the transverse energy per charged particle in connection with the chemical freeze-out criteria is discussed. We invoke various models and phenomenological arguments to interpret and characterize the fireball created in heavy-ion collisions. This review overall provides a scope to understand the heavy-ion collision data and a possible formation of a deconfined phase of partons via the global observables like charged particles, photons, and the transverse energy measurement.

  12. Measurements of the Charged-Particle distributions with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Cairo, Valentina; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Inclusive charged-particle measurements probe the low-energy region of non-perturbative quantum chromodynamics. The ATLAS collaboration has recently measured the charged-particle multiplicity and its dependence on transverse momentum and pseudorapidity in special data sets with low LHC beam currents, recorded at centre-of-mass energies of 8 TeV and 13 TeV. The measurements at 8 TeV cover a wide spectrum using charged-particle selections with minimum transverse momentum of both 100 MeV and 500 MeV and in various phase space regions of low and high charged-particle multiplicities, some of which are studied for the first time by ATLAS. The measurements at 13 TeV also present detailed studies with a minimum transverse momentum of both 100 MeV and 500 MeV. The measurements are compared with predictions of various tuned Monte Carlo generators and are found to provide strong constraints on these. None of the Monte Carlo generators with their respective tunes are able to reproduce all the features of the data.

  13. Monte Carlo method of macroscopic modulation of small-angle charged particle reflection from solid surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Bratchenko, M I

    2001-01-01

    A novel method of Monte Carlo simulation of small-angle reflection of charged particles from solid surfaces has been developed. Instead of atomic-scale simulation of particle-surface collisions the method treats the reflection macroscopically as 'condensed history' event. Statistical parameters of reflection are sampled from the theoretical distributions upon energy and angles. An efficient sampling algorithm based on combination of inverse probability distribution function method and rejection method has been proposed and tested. As an example of application the results of statistical modeling of particles flux enhancement near the bottom of vertical Wehner cone are presented and compared with simple geometrical model of specular reflection.

  14. Explicit high-order symplectic integrators for charged particles in general electromagnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Tao, Molei

    2016-01-01

    This article considers non-relativistic charged particle dynamics in both static and non-static electromagnetic fields, which are governed by nonseparable, possibly time-dependent Hamiltonians. For the first time, explicit symplectic integrators of arbitrary high-orders are constructed for accurate and efficient simulations of such mechanical systems. Performances superior to the standard non-symplectic method of Runge-Kutta are demonstrated on two examples: the first is on the confined motion of a particle in a static toroidal magnetic field used in tokamak; the second is on how time-periodic perturbations to a magnetic field inject energy into a particle via parametric resonance at a specific frequency.

  15. Tunnelling of scalar and Dirac particles from squashed charged rotating Kaluza-Klein black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stetsko, M.M. [Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, Department of Theoretical Physics, Lviv (Ukraine)

    2016-02-15

    The thermal radiation of scalar particles and Dirac fermions from squashed charged rotating five-dimensional black holes is considered. To obtain the temperature of the black holes we use the tunnelling method. In the case of scalar particles we make use of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. To consider tunnelling of fermions the Dirac equation was investigated. The examination shows that the radial parts of the action for scalar particles and fermions in the quasi-classical limit in the vicinity of horizon are almost the same and as a consequence it gives rise to identical expressions for the temperature in the two cases. (orig.)

  16. Tunnelling of scalar and Dirac particles from squashed charged rotating Kaluza-Klein black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetsko, M. M.

    2016-02-01

    The thermal radiation of scalar particles and Dirac fermions from squashed charged rotating five-dimensional black holes is considered. To obtain the temperature of the black holes we use the tunnelling method. In the case of scalar particles we make use of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. To consider tunnelling of fermions the Dirac equation was investigated. The examination shows that the radial parts of the action for scalar particles and fermions in the quasi-classical limit in the vicinity of horizon are almost the same and as a consequence it gives rise to identical expressions for the temperature in the two cases.

  17. Three-loop Neutrino Mass Model with Doubly Charged Particles from Iso-Doublets

    CERN Document Server

    Okada, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new type of a three-loop induced neutrino mass model with dark matter candidates which are required for the neutrino mass generation. The smallness of neutrino masses can be naturally explained without introducing super heavy particles, namely, much heavier than a TeV scale and quite small couplings as compared to the gauge couplings. We find that as a bonus, the anomaly of the muon anomalous magnetic moment can simultaneously be explained by loop effects of new particles. In our model, there are doubly charged scalar bosons and leptons from isospin doublet fields which give characteristic collider signatures. In particular, the doubly charged scalar bosons can decay into the same sign dilepton with its chirality of both right-handed or left- and right-handed. This can be a smoking gun signature to identify our model and be useful to distinguish other models with doubly charged scalar bosons at collider experiments.

  18. Electron capture rates in stars studied with heavy ion charge exchange reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Bertulani, C A

    2015-01-01

    Indirect methods using nucleus-nucleus reactions at high energies (here, high energies mean $\\sim$ 50 MeV/nucleon and higher) are now routinely used to extract information of interest for nuclear astrophysics. This is of extreme relevance as many of the nuclei involved in stellar evolution are short-lived. Therefore, indirect methods became the focus of recent studies carried out in major nuclear physics facilities. Among such methods, heavy ion charge exchange is thought to be a useful tool to infer Gamow-Teller matrix elements needed to describe electron capture rates in stars and also double beta-decay experiments. In this short review, I provide a theoretical guidance based on a simple reaction model for charge exchange reactions.

  19. Trojan Horse particle invariance for 2H(d,p3H reaction: a detailed study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pizzone R.G.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades the Trojan Horse method has played a crucial role for the measurement of several charged particle induced reactions cross sections of astrophysical interest. To better understand its cornerstones and its applications to physical cases many tests were performed to verify all its properties and the possible future perspectives. The Trojan Horse nucleus invariance for the binary d(d,pt reaction was therefore tested using the quasi free 2H(6Li, pt4He and 2H(3He,ptH reactions after 6Li and 3He break-up, respectively. The astrophysical S(E-factor for the d(d,pt binary process was then extracted in the framework of the Plane Wave Approximation applied to the two different break-up schemes. The obtained results are compared with direct data as well as with previous indirect investigations. The very good agreement confirms the applicability of the plane wave approximation and suggests the independence of binary indirect cross section on the chosen Trojan Horse nucleus also for the present case.

  20. Experimental investigations of mechanical and reaction responses for drop-weight impacted energetic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiao-Wei; Wu, Yan-Qing; Wang, Ming-Yang; Huang, Feng-Lei

    2017-02-01

    Low-velocity drop-weight impact experiments on individual and multiple Cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX) energetic particles were performed using a modified drop-weight machine equipped with high-speed photography components. Multiple particles experienced more severe burning reactions than an individual particle. Comparisons between impacted salt and HMX particle show that jetting in HMX is mainly due to the motion of fragmented particles driven by gaseous reaction products. Velocity of jetting, flame propagation, and area expansion were measured via image processing, making it possible to quantify the chemical reaction or mechanical deformation violence at different stages.

  1. Heterogeneous reactions on the surface of fine particles in the atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Jie; ZHU Tong

    2003-01-01

    Fine particles play an important role in the atmosphere. Research on heterogeneous reactions on the surface of fine particles is one of the frontier areas of atmospheric science. In this paper, physical and chemical characteristics of fine particles in the atmosphere and the interactions between trace gases and fine particles are described, methods used in heterogeneous reactions research are discussed in detail, progress in the study of heterogeneous reactions on the surface of fine particles in the atmosphere is summarized, existing importantquestions are pointed out and future research directions are suggested.

  2. Size effect on solid solid reaction growth between Cu film and Se particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaito, Chihiro; Nonaka, Akira; Kimura, Seiji; Suzuki, Nobuhiko; Saito, Yoshio

    1998-03-01

    A recently developed experimental method of producing a compound by making use of the reaction between thin film and ultrafine particles has been used for copper selenide crystal formation to elucidate the particle size effect on the reaction process. In the case of reaction between Cu film Se particles with size of μm order, CuSe crystals were grown on Se particles by the diffusion of predominantly Cu atoms. In the case of Se particles of the order of 100 nm, amorphous Se particles changed into copper selenide particles by the mutual diffusion of Cu and Se atoms. If the size of Se particles was less than 20 nm, a part of the Cu film changed to copper selenide crystal due to the diffusion of Se atoms to the Cu film. Morphological differences have also been shown and discussed to be the result of the particle size effect.

  3. Simulation for Sludge Flocculation I: Brownian Dynamic Simulation for Perikinetic Flocculation of Charged Particle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linshuang Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate sludge drying process, a numerical simulation based on Brownian dynamic for the floc with uncharged and charged particles was conducted. The Langevin equation is used as dynamical equation for tracking each particle in a floc. An initial condition and periodic boundary condition which well conformed to reality is used for calculating the floc growth process. Each cell consists of 1000 primary particles with diameter 0.1 ∼ 4 μm. Floc growth is related to the thermal force and the electrostatic force. The electrostatic force on a particle in the simulation cell is considered as the sum of electrostatic forces from other particles in the original cell and its replicate cells. It is assumed that flocs are charged with precharged primary particles in dispersion system by ionization. By the analysis of the simulation figures, on one hand, the effects of initial particle size and sludge density on floc smashing time, floc radius of gyration, and fractal dimension were discussed. On the other hand, the effects of ionization on floc smashing time and floc structure were presented. This study has important practical value in the high-turbidity water treatment, especially for sludge drying.

  4. Charge separation relative to the reaction plane in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$= 2.76 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abelev, Betty; Adamova, Dagmar; Adare, Andrew Marshall; Aggarwal, Madan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agocs, Andras Gabor; Agostinelli, Andrea; Aguilar Salazar, Saul; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Arshad; Ahmad, Nazeer; Ahn, Sang Un; Akindinov, Alexander; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Almaraz Avina, Erick Jonathan; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altini, Valerio; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anielski, Jonas; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshauser, Harald; Arbor, Nicolas; Arcelli, Silvia; Armesto, Nestor; Arnaldi, Roberta; Aronsson, Tomas Robert; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Awes, Terry; Aysto, Juha Heikki; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Bach, Matthias Jakob; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldini Ferroli, Rinaldo; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baldit, Alain; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Ban, Jaroslav; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Barret, Valerie; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batyunya, Boris; Baumann, Christoph Heinrich; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont-Moreno, Ernesto; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bergognon, Anais Annick Erica; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blanco, F; Blanco, Francesco; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Bock, Nicolas; Boettger, Stefan; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Bogolyubsky, Mikhail; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Bose, Suvendu Nath; Bossu, Francesco; Botje, Michiel; Boyer, Bruno Alexandre; Braidot, Ermes; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brun, Rene; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Bugaiev, Kyrylo; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Canoa Roman, Veronica; Cara Romeo, Giovanni; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carminati, Federico; Casanova Diaz, Amaya Ofelia; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Catanescu, Vasile; Cavicchioli, Costanza; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chawla, Isha; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chiavassa, Emilio; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Chinellato, David; Chochula, Peter; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Coccetti, Fabrizio; Colamaria, Fabio; Colella, Domenico; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa del Valle, Zaida; Constantin, Paul; Contin, Giacomo; Contreras, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Cotallo, Manuel Enrique; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Alaniz, Emilia; Cuautle, Eleazar; Cunqueiro, Leticia; D'Erasmo, Ginevra; Dainese, Andrea; Dalsgaard, Hans Hjersing; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Kushal; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; de Barros, Gabriel; De Caro, Annalisa; de Cataldo, Giacinto; de Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; de Rooij, Raoul Stefan; Delagrange, Hugues; Deloff, Andrzej; Demanov, Vyacheslav; Denes, Ervin; Deppman, Airton; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Giglio, Carmelo; Di Liberto, Sergio; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Dobrowolski, Tadeusz Antoni; Dominguez, Isabel; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Driga, Olga; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Dutta Majumdar, AK; Dutta Majumdar, Mihir Ranjan; Elia, Domenico; Emschermann, David Philip; Engel, Heiko; Erazmus, Barbara; Erdal, Hege Austrheim; Espagnon, Bruno; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Evans, David; Eyyubova, Gyulnara; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Falchieri, Davide; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Fedunov, Anatoly; Fehlker, Dominik; Feldkamp, Linus; Felea, Daniel; Fenton-Olsen, Bo; Feofilov, Grigory; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Ferretti, Alessandro; Ferretti, Roberta; Festanti, Andrea; Figiel, Jan; Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago, Alberto; Gallio, Mauro; Gangadharan, Dhevan Raja; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Garabatos, Jose; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo; Garishvili, Irakli; Gerhard, Jochen; Germain, Marie; Geuna, Claudio; Gheata, Andrei George; Gheata, Mihaela; Ghidini, Bruno; Ghosh, Premomoy; Gianotti, Paola; Girard, Martin Robert; Giubellino, Paolo; Gladysz-Dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez, Ramon; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Gonzalez-Trueba, Laura Helena; Gonzalez-Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Goswami, Ankita; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Grajcarek, Robert; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Alina Gabriela; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoriev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grinyov, Boris; Grion, Nevio; Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grossiord, Jean-Yves; Grosso, Raffaele; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerra Gutierrez, Cesar; Guerzoni, Barbara; Guilbaud, Maxime Rene Joseph; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Gutbrod, Hans; Haaland, Oystein Senneset; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Haiduc, Maria; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Hanratty, Luke David; Hansen, Alexander; Harmanova, Zuzana; Harris, John William; Hartig, Matthias; Hasegan, Dumitru; Hatzifotiadou, Despoina; Hayrapetyan, Arsen; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Heide, Markus Ansgar; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Herrmann, Norbert; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hicks, Bernard; Hille, Per Thomas; Hippolyte, Boris; Horaguchi, Takuma; Hori, Yasuto; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Hrivnacova, Ivana; Huang, Meidana; Humanic, Thomas; Hwang, Dae Sung; Ichou, Raphaelle; Ilkaev, Radiy; Ilkiv, Iryna; Inaba, Motoi; Incani, Elisa; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Ivan, Cristian George; Ivanov, Andrey; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Ivanytskyi, Oleksii; Jacobs, Peter; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Janik, Rudolf; Jayarathna, Sandun; Jena, Satyajit; Jha, Deeptanshu Manu; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jirden, Lennart; Jones, Peter Graham; Jung, Hyung Taik; Jusko, Anton; Kakoyan, Vanik; Kalcher, Sebastian; Kalinak, Peter; Kalliokoski, Tuomo Esa Aukusti; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kazantsev, Andrey; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Khan, Mohisin Mohammed; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Beomkyu; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Jonghyun; Kim, Jin Sook; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Mimae; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Seon Hee; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Jochen; Klein-Bosing, Christian; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Koch, Kathrin; Kohler, Markus; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kolojvari, Anatoly; Kondratiev, Valery; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Konevskih, Artem; Korneev, Andrey; Kour, Ravjeet; Kowalski, Marek; Kox, Serge; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kral, Jiri; Kralik, Ivan; Kramer, Frederick; Kraus, Ingrid Christine; Krawutschke, Tobias; Krelina, Michal; Kretz, Matthias; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Krus, Miroslav; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kucheriaev, Yury; Kugathasan, Thanushan; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paul; Kulakov, Igor; Kumar, Jitendra; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, A; Kurepin, AB; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kushpil, Vasily; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; La Rocca, Paola; Ladron de Guevara, Pedro; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; Lara, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Bornec, Yves; Lea, Ramona; Lechman, Mateusz; Lee, Graham Richard; Lee, Ki Sang; Lee, Sung Chul; Lefevre, Frederic; Lehnert, Joerg Walter; Leistam, Lars; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Lenti, Vito; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Leon Vargas, Hermes; Leoncino, Marco; Levai, Peter; Lien, Jorgen; Lietava, Roman; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Liu, Lijiao; Loggins, Vera; Loginov, Vitaly; Lohn, Stefan Bernhard; Lohner, Daniel; Loizides, Constantinos; Loo, Kai Krister; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lovhoiden, Gunnar; Lu, Xianguo; Luettig, Philipp; Lunardon, Marcello; Luo, Jiebin; Luparello, Grazia; Luquin, Lionel; Luzzi, Cinzia; Ma, Rongrong; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahapatra, Durga Prasad; Maire, Antonin; Mal'Kevich, Dmitry; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Ludmila; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manceau, Loic Henri Antoine; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Mao, Yaxian; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Marin, Ana Maria; Marin Tobon, Cesar Augusto; Markert, Christina; Martashvili, Irakli; Martinengo, Paolo; Martinez, Mario Ivan; Martinez Davalos, Arnulfo; Martinez Garcia, Gines; Martynov, Yevgen; Mas, Alexis Jean-Michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Matthews, Zoe Louise; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Meddi, Franco; Menchaca-Rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Mercado Perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Miake, Yasuo; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mlynarz, Jocelyn; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Molnar, Levente; Montano Zetina, Luis Manuel; Monteno, Marco; Montes, Esther; Moon, Taebong; Morando, Maurizio; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Moretto, Sandra; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Muller, Hans; Munhoz, Marcelo; Musa, Luciano; Musso, Alfredo; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Nattrass, Christine; Naumov, Nikolay; Navin, Sparsh; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nazarov, Gleb; Nedosekin, Alexander; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Niida, Takafumi; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikolic, Vedran; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Nilsen, Bjorn Steven; Nilsson, Mads Stormo; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Novitzky, Norbert; Nyanin, Alexandre; Nyatha, Anitha; Nygaard, Casper; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Oh, Sun Kun; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oppedisano, Chiara; Ortona, Giacomo; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pachr, Milos; Padilla, Fatima; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Painke, Florian; Pajares, Carlos; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Palaha, Arvinder Singh; Palmeri, Armando; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Park, Woo Jin; Passfeld, Annika; Patalakha, Dmitri Ivanovich; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Pavlinov, Alexei; Pawlak, Tomasz Jan; Peitzmann, Thomas; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, Elienos; Peresunko, Dmitri; Perez Lara, Carlos Eugenio; Perez Lezama, Edgar; Perini, Diego; Perrino, Davide; Peryt, Wiktor Stanislaw; Pesci, Alessandro; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petran, Michal; Petris, Mariana; Petrov, Plamen Rumenov; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Piano, Stefano; Piccotti, Anna; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Pitz, Nora; Piuz, Francois; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polichtchouk, Boris; Pop, Amalia; Porteboeuf-Houssais, Sarah; Pospisil, Vladimir; Potukuchi, Baba; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puchagin, Sergey; Puddu, Giovanna; Pujahari, Prabhat Ranjan; Pulvirenti, Alberto; Punin, Valery; Putis, Marian; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Quercigh, Emanuele; Qvigstad, Henrik; Rachevski, Alexandre; Rademakers, Alphonse; Raiha, Tomi Samuli; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Ramirez Reyes, Abdiel; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Read, Kenneth Francis; Real, Jean-Sebastien; Redlich, Krzysztof; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick; Reicher, Martijn; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Rettig, Felix Vincenz; Revol, Jean-Pierre; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riccati, Lodovico; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Rodrigues Fernandes Rabacal, Bartolomeu; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Rodriguez Manso, Alis; Roed, Ketil; Rohr, David; Rohrich, Dieter; Romita, Rosa; Ronchetti, Federico; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossegger, Stefan; Rossi, Andrea; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Rui, Rinaldo; Russo, Riccardo; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Rybicki, Andrzej; Sadovsky, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakaguchi, Hiroaki; Sakai, Shingo; Sakata, Dosatsu; Salgado, Carlos Albert; Salzwedel, Jai; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sanchez Castro, Xitzel; Sandor, Ladislav; Sandoval, Andres; Sano, Masato; Sano, Satoshi; Santo, Rainer; Santoro, Romualdo; Sarkamo, Juho Jaako; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Scharenberg, Rolf Paul; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schreiner, Steffen; Schuchmann, Simone; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Scott, Patrick Aaron; Scott, Rebecca; Segato, Gianfranco; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya; Senyukov, Serhiy; Seo, Jeewon; Serci, Sergio; Serradilla, Eulogio; Sevcenco, Adrian; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shabratova, Galina; Shahoyan, Ruben; Sharma, Natasha; Sharma, Satish; Shigaki, Kenta; Shimomura, Maya; Shtejer, Katherin; Sibiriak, Yury; Siciliano, Melinda; Sicking, Eva; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Silvestre, Catherine; Simatovic, Goran; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singha, Subhash; Singhal, Vikas; Sinha, Bikash; Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Skjerdal, Kyrre; Smakal, Radek; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Sogaard, Carsten; Soltz, Ron Ariel; Son, Hyungsuk; Song, Jihye; Song, Myunggeun; Soos, Csaba; Soramel, Francesca; Sputowska, Iwona; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, Martha; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stefanek, Grzegorz; Stefanini, Giorgio; Steinpreis, Matthew; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Steyn, Gideon Francois; Stiller, Johannes Hendrik; Stocco, Diego; Stolpovskiy, Mikhail; Strabykin, Kirill; Strmen, Peter; Suaide, Alexandre Alarcon do Passo; Subieta Vasquez, Martin Alfonso; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Sukhorukov, Mikhail; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Susa, Tatjana; Szanto de Toledo, Alejandro; Szarka, Imrich; Szczepankiewicz, Adam; Szostak, Artur Krzysztof; Szymanski, Maciej; Takahashi, Jun; Tapia Takaki, Daniel Jesus; Tarazona Martinez, Alfonso; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Terrevoli, Cristina; Thader, Jochen Mathias; Thomas, Deepa; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Timmins, Anthony; Toia, Alberica; Torii, Hisayuki; Tosello, Flavio; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ulery, Jason Glyndwr; Ullaland, Kjetil; Ulrich, Jochen; Uras, Antonio; Urban, Jozef; Urciuoli, Guido Marie; Usai, Gianluca; Vajzer, Michal; Vala, Martin; Valencia Palomo, Lizardo; Vallero, Sara; van der Kolk, Naomi; van Leeuwen, Marco; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Vannucci, Luigi; Vargas, Aurora Diozcora; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veldhoen, Misha; Venaruzzo, Massimo; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Verweij, Marta; Vickovic, Linda; Viesti, Giuseppe; Vikhlyantsev, Oleg; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Vinogradov, Yury; Virgili, Tiziano; Viyogi, Yogendra; Vodopianov, Alexander; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; von Haller, Barthelemy; Vranic, Danilo; Øvrebekk, Gaute; Vrlakova, Janka; Vulpescu, Bogdan; Vyushin, Alexey; Wagner, Boris; Wagner, Vladimir; Wan, Renzhuo; Wang, Dong; Wang, Mengliang; Wang, Yifei; Wang, Yaping; Watanabe, Kengo; Weber, Michael; Wessels, Johannes; Westerhoff, Uwe; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilde, Martin Rudolf; Wilk, Alexander; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Xaplanteris Karampatsos, Leonidas; Yaldo, Chris G; Yamaguchi, Yorito; Yang, Hongyan; Yang, Shiming; Yasnopolsky, Stanislav; Yi, JunGyu; Yin, Zhongbao; Yoo, In-Kwon; Yoon, Jongik; Yu, Weilin; Yuan, Xianbao; Yushmanov, Igor; Zach, Cenek; Zampolli, Chiara; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zaviyalov, Nikolai; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zelnicek, Pierre; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, Fengchu; Zhou, You; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhu, Xiangrong; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zoccarato, Yannick Denis; Zynovyev, Mykhaylo; Zyzak, Maksym

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of charge dependent azimuthal correlations with the ALICE detector at the LHC are reported for Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV. Two- and three-particle charge-dependent azimuthal correlations in the pseudo-rapidity range $|\\eta | < 0.8$ are presented as a function of the collision centrality, particle separation in pseudo-rapidity, and transverse momentum. A clear signal compatible with the expectation of a charge-dependent separation relative to the reaction plane is observed, which shows little or no collision energy dependence when compared to measurements at RHIC energies. Models incorporating effects of local parity violation in strong interactions fail to describe the observed collision energy dependence.

  5. Importance of temperature effect on the electrophoretic behavior of charge-regulated particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jyh-Ping; Tai, Yi-Hsuan; Yeh, Li-Hsien; Tseng, Shiojenn

    2012-01-10

    The Joule heating effect is inevitable in electrophoresis operations. To assess its influence on the performance of electrophoresis, we consider the case of a charge-regulated particle in a solution containing multiple ionic species at temperatures ranging from 298 to 308 K. Using an aqueous SiO(2) dispersion as an example, we show that an increase in the temperature leads to a decrease in both the dielectric constant and the viscosity of the liquid phase, and an increase in both the diffusivity of ions and the particle surface potential. For a particle having a constant surface potential, its electrophoretic mobility is most influenced by the variation in the liquid viscosity as the temperature varies, but for a charged-regulated particle both the liquid viscosity and the surface potential can play an important role. Depending upon the level of pH, the degree of increase in the mobility can be on the order of 40% for a 5 K increase in the temperature. The presence of double-layer polarization, which is significant when the surface potential is sufficiently high, has the effect of inhibiting that increase in the mobility. This implies that the influence of the temperature on the mobility of the particle is most significant when the pH is close to the point of zero charge.

  6. New Density Estimation Methods for Charged Particle Beams With Applications to Microbunching Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balsa Terzic, Gabriele Bassi

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we discuss representations of charge particle densities in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, analyze the sources and profiles of the intrinsic numerical noise, and present efficient methods for their removal. We devise two alternative estimation methods for charged particle distribution which represent significant improvement over the Monte Carlo cosine expansion used in the 2d code of Bassi, designed to simulate coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in charged particle beams. The improvement is achieved by employing an alternative beam density estimation to the Monte Carlo cosine expansion. The representation is first binned onto a finite grid, after which two grid-based methods are employed to approximate particle distributions: (i) truncated fast cosine transform (TFCT); and (ii) thresholded wavelet transform (TWT). We demonstrate that these alternative methods represent a staggering upgrade over the original Monte Carlo cosine expansion in terms of efficiency, while the TWT approximation also provides an appreciable improvement in accuracy. The improvement in accuracy comes from a judicious removal of the numerical noise enabled by the wavelet formulation. The TWT method is then integrated into Bassi's CSR code, and benchmarked against the original version. We show that the new density estimation method provides a superior performance in terms of efficiency and spatial resolution, thus enabling high-fidelity simulations of CSR effects, including microbunching instability.

  7. Secondary charging effects due to icy dust particle impacts on rocket payloads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kassa

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We report measurements of dust currents obtained with a small probe and a larger probe during the flight of the ECOMA-4 rocket through the summer polar mesosphere. The payload included two small dust probes behind a larger dust probe located centrally at the front. For certain phases of the payload rotation, the current registered by one of the small dust probes was up to 2 times the current measured with the larger probe, even though the effective collection area of the larger probe was 4 times that of the small one. We analyze the phase dependence of the currents and their difference with a model based on the assumption that the small probe was hit by charged dust fragments produced in collisions of mesospheric dust with the payload body. Our results confirm earlier findings that secondary charge production in the collision of a noctilucent cloud/Polar Summer Mesospheric Echo (NLC/PMSE dust particle with the payload body must be several orders of magnitude larger than might be expected from laboratory studies of collisions of pure ice particles with a variety of clean surfaces. An important consequence is that for some payload configurations, one should not assume that the current measured with a detector used to study mesospheric dust is simply proportional to the number density of ambient dust particles. The higher secondary charge production may be due to the NLC/PMSE particles containing multiple meteoric smoke particles.

  8. ORBXYZ: A 3D single-particle orbit code for following charged particle trajectories in equilibrium magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D. V.; Cohen, R. H.; Ferguson, J. R.; Johnston, B. M.; Sharp, C. B.; Willmann, P. A.

    1981-06-01

    The single particle orbit code, TIBRO, was modified extensively to improve the interpolation methods used and to allow use of vector potential fields in the simulation of charged particle orbits on a 3D domain. A 3D cubic B-spline algorithm is used to generate spline coefficients used in the interpolation. Smooth and accurate field representations are obtained. When vector potential fields are used, the 3D cubic spline interpolation formula analytically generates the magnetic field used to push the particles. This field has del.BETA = 0 to computer roundoff. When magnetic induction is used the interpolation allows del.BETA does not equal 0, which can lead to significant nonphysical results. Presently the code assumes quadrupole symmetry, but this is not an essential feature of the code and could be easily removed for other applications.

  9. Damaging impacts of energetic charge particles on materials in plasma energy explosive events

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Bai-Quan; Peng Li-Lin; Yan Jian-Cheng; Luo Zheng-Ming; Chen Zhi

    2006-01-01

    To provide some reference data for estimation of the erosion rates and lifetimes of some candidate plasma facing component (PF3 materials in the plasma stored energy explosive events (PSEEE), this paper calculates the sputtering yields of Mo, W and deuterium saturated Li surface bombarded by energetic charged particles by a new sputtering physics description method based on bipartition model of charge particle transport theory. The comparisons with Monte Carlo data of TRIM code and experimental results are made. The dependences of maximum energy deposition,particle and energy reflection coefficients on the incident energy of energetic runaway electrons impinging on the different material surfaces are also calculated. Results may be useful for estimating the lifetime of PFC and analysing the impurity contamination extent, especially in the PSEEE for high power density and with high plasma current fusion reactor.

  10. Ways to produce new superheavy isotopes with Z = 111-117 in charged particle evaporation channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Juhee; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.

    2017-01-01

    The excitation functions of the production of new heaviest isotopes of superheavy nuclei with charge numbers 111-117 in the pxn and αxn evaporation channels of the 48Ca-induced hot fusion reactions are predicted for the first time for future experiments.

  11. Design of asymmetric particles containing a charged interior and a neutral surface charge: comparative study on in vivo circulation of polyelectrolyte microgels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kai; Xu, Jing; Luft, J Christopher; Tian, Shaomin; Raval, Jay S; DeSimone, Joseph M

    2014-07-16

    Lowering the modulus of hydrogel particles could enable them to bypass in vivo physical barriers that would otherwise filter particles with similar size but higher modulus. Incorporation of electrolyte moieties into the polymer network of hydrogel particles to increase the swelling ratio is a straightforward and quite efficient way to decrease the modulus. In addition, charged groups in hydrogel particles can also help secure cargoes. However, the distribution of charged groups on the surface of a particle can accelerate the clearance of particles. Herein, we developed a method to synthesize highly swollen microgels of precise size with near-neutral surface charge while retaining interior charged groups. A strategy was employed to enable a particle to be highly cross-linked with very small mesh size, and subsequently PEGylated to quench the exterior amines only without affecting the internal amines. Acidic degradation of the cross-linker allows for swelling of the particles to microgels with a desired size and deformability. The microgels fabricated demonstrated extended circulation in vivo compared to their counterparts with a charged surface, and could potentially be utilized in in vivo applications including as oxygen carriers or nucleic acid scavengers.

  12. The quantum charged particle self-interaction problem within the Fock many temporal and Feynman proper time paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prykarpatski, A. K.; Bogolubov, N. N.

    2017-01-01

    A quantum fermionic massless charged particle self-intercating with its own self-generated bosonic electromagnetic field is reanalyzed in the framework of the Fock many-temporal and Feynman proper time approaches. The self-interaction phenomenon structure is discussed within the renormalized quantum Fock space. The quantum electromagnetic charged particle mass origin is suggested.

  13. Charge Identification of Highly Ionizing Particles in Desensitized Nuclear Emulsion Using High Speed Read-Out System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toshito, T.; Kodama, K.; Yusa, K.; Ozaki, M.; Amako, K.; Kameoka, S.; Murakami, K.; Sasaki, T.; Aoki, S.; Ban, T.; Fukuda, T.; Naganawa, N.; Nakamura, T.; Natsume, M.; Niwa, K.; Takahashi, S.; Kanazawa, M.; Kanematsu, N.; Komori, M.; Sato, S.; Asai, M.; /Nagoya U. /Aichi U. of Education /Gunma U., Maebashi /JAXA, Sagamihara /KEK, Tsukuba /Kobe

    2006-05-10

    We performed an experimental study of charge identification of heavy ions from helium to carbon having energy of about 290 MeV/u using an emulsion chamber. Emulsion was desensitized by means of forced fading (refreshing) to expand a dynamic range of response to highly charged particles. For the track reconstruction and charge identification, the fully automated high speed emulsion read-out system, which was originally developed for identifying minimum ionizing particles, was used without any modification. Clear track by track charge identification up to Z=6 was demonstrated. The refreshing technique has proved to be a powerful technique to expand response of emulsion film to highly ionizing particles.

  14. Solar Energetic Particle drifts and the energy dependence of 1 AU charge states

    CERN Document Server

    Dalla, S; Battarbee, M

    2016-01-01

    The event-averaged charge state of heavy ion Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs), measured at 1 AU from the Sun, typically increases with the ions' kinetic energy. The origin of this behaviour has been ascribed to processes taking place within the acceleration region. In this paper we study the propagation through interplanetary space of SEP Fe ions, injected near the Sun with a variety of charge states that are uniformly distributed in energy, by means of a 3D test particle model. In our simulations, due to gradient and curvature drifts associated with the Parker spiral magnetic field, ions of different charge propagate with very different efficiencies to an observer that is not magnetically well connected to the source region. As a result we find that, for many observer locations, the 1 AU event-averaged charge state , as obtained from our model, displays an increase with particle energy E, in qualitative agreement with spacecraft observations. We conclude that drift-associated propagation is a possible explan...

  15. Solar Energetic Particle Drifts and the Energy Dependence of 1 AU Charge States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla, S.; Marsh, M. S.; Battarbee, M.

    2017-01-01

    The event-averaged charge state of heavy ion solar energetic particles (SEPs), measured at 1 au from the Sun, typically increases with the ions’ kinetic energy. The origin of this behavior has been ascribed to processes taking place within the acceleration region. In this paper we study the propagation through interplanetary space of SEP Fe ions, injected near the Sun with a variety of charge states that are uniformly distributed in energy, by means of a 3D test particle model. In our simulations, due to gradient and curvature drifts associated with the Parker spiral magnetic field, ions of different charge propagate with very different efficiencies to an observer that is not magnetically well connected to the source region. As a result we find that, for many observer locations, the 1 au event-averaged charge state , as obtained from our model, displays an increase with particle energy E, in qualitative agreement with spacecraft observations. We conclude that drift-associated propagation is a possible explanation for the observed distribution of versus E in SEP events, and that the distribution measured in interplanetary space cannot be taken to represent that at injection.

  16. On the particle interpretation of the PVLAS data. Neutral versus charged particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlers, M.; Ringwald, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Gies, H. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Jaeckel, J. [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom). Centre for Particle Theory

    2006-12-15

    Recently the PVLAS collaboration reported the observation of a rotation of linearly polarized laser light induced by a transverse magnetic field - a signal being unexpected within standard QED. Two mechanisms have been proposed to explain this result: production of a single (pseudo-)scalar particle coupled to two photons or pair production of light millicharged particles. In this work, we study how the different scenarios can be distinguished. We summarize the expected signals for vacuum magnetic dichroism (rotation) and birefringence (ellipticity) for the different types of particles - including new results for the case of millicharged scalars. The sign of the rotation and ellipticity signals as well as their dependencies on experimental parameters, such as the strength of the magnetic field and the wavelength of the laser, can be used to obtain information about the quantum numbers of the particle candidates and to discriminate between the different scenarios. We perform a statistical analysis of all available data resulting in strongly restricted regions in the parameter space of all scenarios. These regions suggest clear target regions for upcoming experimental tests. As an illustration, we use preliminary PVLAS data to demonstrate that near future data may already rule out some of these scenarios. (orig.)

  17. Charged-particle multiplicities in pp interactions measured with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdesselam, Abdelouahab; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acerbi, Emilio; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Ackers, Mario; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Aderholz, Michael; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov , Andrei; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Aleppo, Mario; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Aliyev, Magsud; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Jose; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral, Pedro; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amorim, Antonio; Amorós, Gabriel; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Andrieux, Marie-Laure; Anduaga, Xabier; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonelli, Stefano; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Archambault, John-Paul; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arms, Kregg; Armstrong, Stephen Randolph; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Astvatsatourov, Anatoli; Atoian, Grigor; Aubert, Bernard; Auerbach, Benjamin; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; 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D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; D'Orazio, Alessia; Da Rocha Gesualdi Mello, Aline; Da Silva, Paulo Vitor; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dahlhoff, Andrea; Dai, Tiesheng; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dallison, Steve; Dam, Mogens; Dameri, Mauro; Damiani, Daniel; Danielsson, Hans Olof; Dankers, Reinier; Dannheim, Dominik; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Daum, Cornelis; Dauvergne , Jean-Pierre; Davey, Will; Davidek, Tomas; Davidson, Nadia; Davidson, Ruth; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Adam; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Dawson, John; Daya, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; De La Taille, Christophe; De Lotto, Barbara; De Mora, Lee; De Nooij, Lucie; De Oliveira Branco, Miguel; De Pedis, Daniele; de Saintignon, Paul; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dean, Simon; Dedes, George; Dedovich, Dmitri; 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Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Grau, Nathan; Gray, Heather; Gray, Julia Ann; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenfield, Debbie; Greenshaw, Timothy; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griesmayer, Erich; Griffiths, Justin; Grigalashvili, Nugzar; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grognuz, Joel; Groh, Manfred; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Gruwe, Magali; Grybel, Kai; Guarino, Victor; Guicheney, Christophe; Guida, Angelo; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Guler, Hulya; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Bin; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Ambreesh; Gusakov, Yury; Gushchin, Vladimir; Gutierrez, Andrea; Gutierrez, Phillip; Guttman, Nir; Gutzwiller, Olivier; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haas, Stefan; Haber, Carl; Hackenburg, Robert; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Hadley, David; Haefner, Petra; Hahn, Ferdinand; Haider, Stefan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haller, Johannes; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Han, Hongguang; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hance, Michael; Handel, Carsten; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, Christian Johan; Hansen, John Renner; Hansen, Jorgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hansson, Per; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Gabriel; Harenberg, Torsten; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Karl; Hart, John; Hartert, Jochen; Hartjes, Fred; Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Harvey, Alex; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hassani, Samira; Hatch, Mark; Hauff, Dieter; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawes, Brian; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Donovan; Hayakawa, Takashi; Hayden, Daniel; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Hazen, Eric; He, Mao; Head, Simon; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heinemann, Beate; Heisterkamp, Simon; Helary, Louis; Heldmann, Michael; Heller, Mathieu; Hellman, Sten; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, Robert; Henke, Michael; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Henry-Couannier, Frédéric; Hensel, Carsten; Henss, Tobias; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg, Ruth; Hershenhorn, Alon David; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hessey, Nigel; Hidvegi, Attila; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Daniel; Hill, John; Hill, Norman; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirsch, Florian; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holder, Martin; Holmes, Alan; Holmgren, Sven-Olof; Holy, Tomas; Holzbauer, Jenny; Homer, Jim; Homma, Yasuhiro; Horazdovsky, Tomas; Horn, Claus; Horner, Stephan; Horton, Katherine; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hott, Thomas; Hou, Suen; Houlden, Michael; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howarth, James; Howell, David; Hristova , Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hruska, Ivan; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Guang Shun; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Hughes-Jones, Richard; Huhtinen, Mika; Hurst, Peter; Hurwitz, Martina; Husemann, Ulrich; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibbotson, Michael; Ibragimov, Iskander; Ichimiya, Ryo; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idarraga, John; Idzik, Marek; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Yuri; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Imbault, Didier; Imhaeuser, Martin; Imori, Masatoshi; Ince, Tayfun; Inigo-Golfin, Joaquin; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Ionescu, Gelu; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Ishii, Koji; Ishikawa, Akimasa; Ishino, Masaya; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Isobe, Tadaaki; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Itoh, Yuki; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakubek, Jan; Jana, Dilip; Jankowski, Ernest; Jansen, Eric; Jantsch, Andreas; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Jeanty, Laura; Jelen, Kazimierz; Jen-La Plante, Imai; Jenni, Peter; Jeremie, Andrea; Jez, Pavel; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Ge; Jin, Shan; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Joffe, David; Johansen, Lars; Johansen, Marianne; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johnert, Sebastian; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tegid; Jones, Tim; Jonsson, Ove; Joo, Kwang; Joram, Christian; Jorge, Pedro; Joseph, John; Ju, Xiangyang; Juranek, Vojtech; Jussel, Patrick; Kabachenko, Vasily; Kabana, Sonja; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kadlecik, Peter; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kaiser, Steffen; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalinin, Sergey; Kalinovskaya, Lidia; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kanno, Takayuki; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kaplon, Jan; Kar, Deepak; Karagoz, Muge; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karr, Kristo; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasmi, Azzedine; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Mayuko; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katsoufis, Elias; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kayl, Manuel; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Kazi, Sandor Istvan; Keates, James Robert; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Kekelidze, George; Kelly, Marc; Kennedy, John; Kenney, Christopher John; Kenyon, Mike; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerschen, Nicolas; Kersevan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Ketterer, Christian; Khakzad, Mohsen; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchenko, Dmitri; Khodinov, Alexander; Kholodenko, Anatoli; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khovanskiy, Nikolai; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kilvington, Graham; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Min Suk; Kim, Peter; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; Kirk, Julie; Kirsch, Guillaume; Kirsch, Lawrence; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiver, Andrey; Kiyamura, Hironori; Kladiva, Eduard; Klaiber-Lodewigs, Jonas; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klemetti, Miika; Klier, Amit; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinkby, Esben; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Klous, Sander; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluge, Thomas; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knobloch, Juergen; Knue, Andrea; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Koblitz, Birger; Kocian, Martin; Kocnar, Antonin; Kodys, Peter; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Koenig, Sebastian; König, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Koetsveld, Folkert; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kohn, Fabian; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kokott, Thomas; Kolachev, Guennady; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolesnikov, Vladimir; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Kollar, Daniel; Kollefrath, Michael; Kolya, Scott; Komar, Aston; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Kondo, Takahiko; Kono, Takanori; Kononov, Anatoly; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kootz, Andreas; Koperny, Stefan; Kopikov, Sergey; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Koreshev, Victor; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotamäki, Miikka Juhani; Kotov, Serguei; Kotov, Vladislav; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasel, Olaf; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, James; Kreisel, Arik; Krejci, Frantisek; Kretzschmar, Jan; Krieger, Nina; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruth, Andre; Kubota, Takashi; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kuhn, Dietmar; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kummer, Christian; Kuna, Marine; Kundu, Nikhil; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurata, Masakazu; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuykendall, William; Kuze, Masahiro; Kuzhir, Polina; Kvasnicka, Ondrej; Kwee, Regina; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Labarga, Luis; Labbe, Julien; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Rémi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laisne, Emmanuel; Lamanna, Massimo; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lancon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Landsman, Hagar; Lane, Jenna; Lange, Clemens; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lapin, Vladimir; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Larionov , Anatoly; Larner, Aimee; Lasseur, Christian; Lassnig, Mario; Lau, Wing; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavorato, Antonia; Lavrijsen, Wim; Laycock, Paul; Lazarev, Alexandre; Lazzaro, Alfio; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Maner, Christophe; Le Menedeu, Eve; Leahu, Marius; Lebedev, Alexander; Lebel, Céline; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Michel; Legendre, Marie; Leger, Annie; LeGeyt, Benjamin; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lehto, Mark; Lei, Xiaowen; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lellouch, Jeremie; Leltchouk, Mikhail; Lendermann, Victor; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatiana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lessard, Jean-Raphael; Lesser, Jonas; Lester, Christopher; Leung Fook Cheong, Annabelle; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levitski, Mikhail; Lewandowska, Marta; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Shu; Li, Xuefei; Liang, Zhihua; Liang, Zhijun; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lichtnecker, Markus; Lie, Ki; Liebig, Wolfgang; Lifshitz, Ronen; Lilley, Joseph; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linde, Frank; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipinsky, Lukas; Lipniacka, Anna; Liss, Tony; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Chuanlei; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Shengli; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Lloyd, Stephen; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Lockwitz, Sarah; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Loken , James; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Losty, Michael; Lou, Xinchou; Lounis, Abdenour; Loureiro, Karina; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lu, Jiansen; Lu, Liang; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Ludwig, Andreas; Ludwig, Dörthe; Ludwig, Inga; Ludwig, Jens; Luehring, Frederick; Luijckx, Guy; Lumb, Debra; Luminari, Lamberto; Lund, Esben; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lundberg, Björn; Lundberg, Johan; Lundquist, Johan; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lupi, Anna; Lutz, Gerhard; Lynn, David; Lys, Jeremy; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maassen, Michael; Macana Goia, Jorge Andres; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macek, Bostjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Mackeprang, Rasmus; Madaras, Ronald; Mader, Wolfgang; Maenner, Reinhard; Maeno, Tadashi; Mättig, Peter; Mättig, Stefan; Magalhaes Martins, Paulo Jorge; Magnoni, Luca; Magradze, Erekle; Magrath, Caroline; Mahalalel, Yair; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahout, Gilles; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malecki, Pawel; Malecki, Piotr; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mameghani, Raphael; Mamuzic, Judita; Manabe, Atsushi; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandic, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Mangeard, Pierre-Simon; Manjavidze, Ioseb; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Manz, Andreas; Mapelli, Alessandro; Mapelli, Livio; March , Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchese, Fabrizio; Marchesotti, Marco; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marin, Alexandru; Marino, Christopher; Marroquim, Fernando; Marshall, Robin; Marshall, Zach; Martens, Kalen; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Andrew; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian; Martin, Franck Francois; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Philippe; Martin, Tim; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Mass, Martin; Massa, Ignazio; Massaro, Graziano; Massol, Nicolas; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mathes, Markus; Matricon, Pierre; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mattravers, Carly; Maugain, Jean-Marie; Maxfield, Stephen; May, Edward; Mayne, Anna; Mazini, Rachid; Mazur, Michael; Mazzanti, Marcello; Mazzoni, Enrico; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; McGlone, Helen; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McLaren, Robert Andrew; Mclaughlan, Tom; McMahon, Steve; McMahon, Tania; McMahon, Tom; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Mechtel, Markus; Medinnis, Mike; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Meguro, Tatsuma; Mehdiyev, Rashid; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meinhardt, Jens; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Mendoza Navas, Luis; Meng, Zhaoxia; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Menot, Claude; Meoni, Evelin; Merkl, Doris; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meuser, Stefan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer, Joerg; Meyer, Thomas Christian; Meyer, W. Thomas; Miao, Jiayuan; Michal, Sebastien; Micu, Liliana; Middleton, Robin; Miele, Paola; Migas, Sylwia; Mijovic, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikulec, Bettina; Mikuz, Marko; Miller, David; Miller, Robert; Mills, Bill; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Miñano, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Miralles Verge, Lluis; Misiejuk, Andrzej; Mitra, Ankush; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitrofanov, Gennady; Mitsou, Vasiliki A.; Mitsui, Shingo; Miyagawa, Paul; Miyazaki, Kazuki; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mockett, Paul; Moed, Shulamit; Moeller, Victoria; Mönig, Klaus; Möser, Nicolas; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohn, Bjarte; Mohr, Wolfgang; Mohrdieck-Möck, Susanne; Moisseev, Artemy; Moles-Valls, Regina; Molina-Perez, Jorge; Moneta, Lorenzo; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montesano, Simone; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Moorhead, Gareth; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morais, Antonio; Morange, Nicolas; Morel, Julien; Morello, Gianfranco; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morii, Masahiro; Morin, Jerome; Morita, Youhei; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morone, Maria-Christina; Morris, John; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Mudrinic, Mihajlo; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Müller, Thomas; Muenstermann, Daniel; Muijs, Sandra; Muir, Alex; Munwes, Yonathan; Murakami, Koichi; Murray, Bill; Mussche, Ido; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakano, Itsuo; Nanava, Gizo; Napier, Austin; Nash, Michael; Nasteva, Irina; Nation, Nigel; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Neal, Homer; Nebot, Eduardo; Nechaeva, Polina; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Silke; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Nesterov, Stanislav; Neubauer, Mark; Neusiedl, Andrea; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicolas, Ludovic; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Niedercorn, Francois; Nielsen, Jason; Niinikoski, Tapio; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolaev, Kirill; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Henrik; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya , Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nishiyama, Tomonori; Nisius, Richard; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nomoto, Hiroshi; Nordberg, Markus; Nordkvist, Bjoern; Norniella Francisco, Olga; Norton, Peter; Novakova, Jana; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozicka, Miroslav; Nugent, Ian Michael; Nuncio-Quiroz, Adriana-Elizabeth; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nyman, Tommi; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'Neale, Steve; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Odier, Jerome; Odino, Gian Andrea; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Ohshita, Hidetoshi; Ohska, Tokio Kenneth; Ohsugi, Takashi; Okada, Shogo; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olcese, Marco; Olchevski, Alexander; Oliveira, Miguel Alfonso; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olivito, Dominick; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Omachi, Chihiro; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Ordonez, Gustavo; Oreglia, Mark; Orellana, Frederik; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlov, Iliya; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Ortega, Eduardo; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Osuna, Carlos; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Ottersbach, John; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Ouyang, Qun; Owen, Mark; Owen, Simon; Oyarzun, Alejandro; Øye, Ola; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Paganis, Efstathios; Paige, Frank; Pajchel, Katarina; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panes, Boris; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Panuskova, Monika; Paolone, Vittorio; Paoloni, Alessandro; Papadelis, Aras; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Paramonov, Alexander; Park, Su-Jung; Park, Woochun; Parker, Andy; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor , Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pecsy, Martin; Pedraza Morales, Maria Isabel; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Peng, Haiping; Pengo, Ruggero; Penson, Alexander; Penwell, John; Perantoni, Marcelo; Perez, Kerstin; Perez Cavalcanti, Tiago; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Peric, Ivan; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Perrodo, Pascal; Persembe, Seda; Perus, Antoine; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Onne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Jorgen; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Petschull, Dennis; Petteni, Michele; Pezoa, Raquel; Phan, Anna; Phillips, Alan; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickford, Andrew; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Ping, Jialun; Pinto, Belmiro; Pirotte, Olivier; Pizio, Caterina; Placakyte, Ringaile; Plamondon, Mathieu; Plano, Will; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskach, Anatoly; Poblaguev, Andrei; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poggioli, Luc; Poghosyan, Tatevik; Pohl, Martin; Polci, Francesco; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polini, Alessandro; Poll, James; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pomarede, Daniel Marc; Pomeroy, Daniel; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Porter, Robert; Posch, Christoph; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Prabhu, Robindra; Pralavorio, Pascal; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Pretzl, Klaus Peter; Pribyl, Lukas; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Price, Michael John; Prichard, Paul; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Prudent, Xavier; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Psoroulas, Serena; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Purdham, John; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Pylypchenko, Yuriy; Qian, Jianming; Qian, Zuxuan; Qin, Zhonghua; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Quinonez, Fernando; Raas, Marcel; Radescu, Voica; Radics, Balint; Rador, Tonguc; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rahimi, Amir; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rajek, Silke; Rammensee, Michael; Rammes, Marcus; Ramstedt, Magnus; Randrianarivony, Koloina; Ratoff, Peter; Rauscher, Felix; Rauter, Emanuel; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Reichold, Armin; Reinherz-Aronis, Erez; Reinsch, Andreas; Reisinger, Ingo; Reljic, Dusan; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Renkel, Peter; Rensch, Bertram; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resende, Bernardo; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richards, Alexander; Richter, Robert; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ridel, Melissa; Rieke, Stefan; Rijpstra, Manouk; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Rios, Ryan Randy; Riu, Imma; Rivoltella, Giancesare; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robinson, Mary; Robson, Aidan; Rocha de Lima, Jose Guilherme; Roda, Chiara; Roda Dos Santos, Denis; Rodier, Stephane; Rodriguez, Diego; Rodriguez Garcia, Yohany; Roe, Adam; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rojo, Victoria; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romanov, Victor; Romeo, Gaston; Romero Maltrana, Diego; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rose, Matthew; Rosenbaum, Gabriel; Rosenberg, Eli; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosselet, Laurent; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rossi, Lucio; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rottländer, Iris; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexander; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubinskiy, Igor; Ruckert, Benjamin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Gerald; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rulikowska-Zarebska, Elzbieta; Rumiantsev, Viktor; Rumyantsev, Leonid; Runge, Kay; Runolfsson, Ogmundur; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Rust, Dave; Rutherfoord, John; Ruwiedel, Christoph; Ruzicka, Pavel; Ryabov, Yury; Ryadovikov, Vasily; Ryan, Patrick; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Rzaeva, Sevda; Saavedra, Aldo; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvachua Ferrando, Belén; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Samset, Björn Hallvard; Sandaker, Heidi; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandhu, Pawan; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sandvoss, Stephan; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Saraiva, João; Sarangi, Tapas; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward; Sarri, Francesca; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Takashi; Sasao, Noboru; Satsounkevitch, Igor; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Savard, Pierre; Savinov, Vladimir; Savva , Panagiota; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Says, Louis-Pierre; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scallon, Olivia; Scannicchio, Diana; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schäfer, Uli; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R.~Dean; Schamov, Andrey; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schlereth, James; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmidt, Michael; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitz, Martin; Schöning, André; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schram, Malachi; Schreiner, Alexander; Schroeder, Christian; Schroer, Nicolai; Schuh, Silvia; Schuler, Georges; Schultes, Joachim; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Jan; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwierz, Rainer; Schwindling, Jerome; Scott, Bill; Searcy, Jacob; Sedykh, Evgeny; Segura, Ester; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellden, Bjoern; Sellers, Graham; Seman, Michal; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sevior, Martin; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shank, James; Shao, Qi Tao; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaver, Leif; Shaw, Christian; Shaw, Kate; Sherman, Daniel; Sherwood, Peter; Shibata, Akira; Shimizu, Shima; Shimojima, Makoto; Shin, Taeksu; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sidoti, Antonio; Siebel, Anca-Mirela; Siegert, Frank; Siegrist, James; Sijacki, Djordje; Silbert, Ohad; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simmons, Brinick; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinnari, Louise Anastasia; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Skvorodnev, Nikolai; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Sloan, Terrence; Sloper, John erik; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Ben Campbell; Smith, Douglas; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snow, Steve; Snow, Joel; Snuverink, Jochem; Snyder, Scott; Soares, Mara; Sobie, Randall; Sodomka, Jaromir; Soffer, Abner; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldevila, Urmila; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Solovyanov, Oleg; Sondericker, John; Soni, Nitesh; Sopko, Vit; Sopko, Bruno; Sorbi, Massimo; Sosebee, Mark; Soukharev, Andrey; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spila, Federico; Spiriti, Eleuterio; Spiwoks, Ralf; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St. Denis, Richard Dante; Stahl, Thorsten; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staude, Arnold; Stavina, Pavel; Stavropoulos, Georgios; Steele, Genevieve; Steinbach, Peter; Steinberg, Peter; Stekl, Ivan; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stevenson, Kyle; Stewart, Graeme; Stockmanns, Tobias; Stockton, Mark; Stoerig, Kathrin; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stonjek, Stefan; Strachota, Pavel; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strang, Michael; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Strong, John; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strube, Jan; Stugu, Bjarne; Stumer, Iuliu; Stupak, John; Sturm, Philipp; Soh, Dart-yin; Su, Dong; Subramania, Siva; Sugaya, Yorihito; Sugimoto, Takuya; Suhr, Chad; Suita, Koichi; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Sushkov, Serge; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Sviridov, Yuri; Swedish, Stephen; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Szeless, Balazs; Sánchez, Javier; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taga, Adrian; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takahashi, Yuta; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tamsett, Matthew; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanaka, Yoshito; Tani, Kazutoshi; Tannoury, Nancy; Tappern, Geoffrey; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tardif, Dominique; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tassi, Enrico; Tatarkhanov, Mous; Taylor, Christopher; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Gary; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Tennenbaum-Katan, Yaniv-David; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terwort, Mark; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Tevlin, Christopher; Thadome, Jocelyn; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thioye, Moustapha; Thoma, Sascha; Thomas, Juergen; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Stan; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thun, Rudolf; Tic, Tomas; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timmermans, Charles; Tipton, Paul; Tique Aires Viegas, Florbela De Jes; Tisserant, Sylvain; Tobias, Jürgen; Toczek, Barbara; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokunaga, Kaoru; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tonazzo, Alessandra; Tong, Guoliang; Tonoyan, Arshak; Topfel, Cyril; Topilin, Nikolai; Torchiani, Ingo; Torrence, Eric; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Traynor, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Treis, Johannes; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alesandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Trinh, Thi Nguyet; Tripiana, Martin; Triplett, Nathan; Trischuk, William; Trivedi, Arjun; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiakiris, Menelaos; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsung, Jieh-Wen; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tua, Alan; Tuggle, Joseph; Turala, Michal; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turlay, Emmanuel; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Typaldos, Dimitrios; Tyrvainen, Harri; Tzanakos, George; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Uhrmacher, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Underwood, David; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Unno, Yoshinobu; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urkovsky, Evgeny; Urquijo, Phillip; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Uslenghi, Massimiliano; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Vahsen, Sven; Valderanis, Chrysostomos; Valenta, Jan; Valente, Paolo; Valentinetti, Sara; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; van der Graaf, Harry; van der Kraaij, Erik; van der Poel, Egge; van der Ster, Daniel; Van Eijk, Bob; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; van Kesteren, Zdenko; van Vulpen, Ivo; Vandelli, Wainer; Vandoni, Giovanna; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Varela Rodriguez, Fernando; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vassilakopoulos, Vassilios; Vazeille, Francois; Vegni, Guido; Veillet, Jean-Jacques; Vellidis, Constantine; Veloso, Filipe; Veness, Raymond; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Ventura , Silvia; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinek, Elisabeth; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virchaux, Marc; Viret, Sébastien; Virzi, Joseph; Vitale , Antonio; Vitells, Ofer; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vlasak, Michal; Vlasov, Nikolai; Vogel, Adrian; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Matteo; Volpini, Giovanni; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Loeben, Joerg; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobiev, Alexander; Vorwerk, Volker; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Voss, Thorsten Tobias; Vossebeld, Joost; Vovenko, Anatoly; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wagner, Peter; Wahlen, Helmut; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walbersloh, Jorg; Walch, Shannon; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Joshua C.; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Warsinsky, Markus; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Anthony; Waugh, Ben; Weber, Jens; Weber, Marc; Weber, Michele; Weber, Pavel; Weidberg, Anthony; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Wellenstein, Hermann; Wells, Phillippa; Wen, Mei; Wenaus, Torre; Wendler, Shanti; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Werth, Michael; Wessels, Martin; Whalen, Kathleen; Wheeler-Ellis, Sarah Jane; Whitaker, Scott; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Sebastian; Whitehead, Samuel Robert; Whiteson, Daniel; Whittington, Denver; Wicek, Francois; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik, Liv Antje Mari; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilhelm, Ivan; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Eric; Williams, Hugh; Willis, William; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wilson, Michael Galante; Wilson, Alan; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winkelmann, Stefan; Winklmeier, Frank; Wittgen, Matthias; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wooden, Gemma; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Catherine; Wrona, Bozydar; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wunstorf, Renate; Wynne, Benjamin; Xaplanteris, Leonidas; Xella, Stefania; Xie, Song; Xie, Yigang; Xu, Chao; Xu, Da; Xu, Guofa; Yabsley, Bruce; Yamada, Miho; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamaoka, Jared; Yamazaki, Takayuki; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zhaoyu; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Weiming; Yao, Yushu; Yasu, Yoshiji; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Riktura; Young, Charles; Youssef, Saul; Yu, Dantong; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Zaets , Vassilli; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zajacova, Zuzana; Zalite , Youris; Zanello, Lucia; Zarzhitsky, Pavel; Zaytsev, Alexander; Zdrazil, Marian; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeller, Michael; Zema, Pasquale Federico; Zemla, Andrzej; Zendler, Carolin; Zenin, Anton; Zenin, Oleg; Zenis, Tibor; Zenonos, Zenonas; Zenz, Seth; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhan, Zhichao; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Tianchi; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zheng, Shuchen; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Ning; Zhou, Yue; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhuravlov, Vadym; Zieminska, Daria; Zilka, Branislav; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zitoun, Robert; Zivkovic, Lidija; Zmouchko, Viatcheslav; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; Zolnierowski, Yves; Zsenei, Andras; zur Nedden, Martin; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2011-01-01

    Measurements are presented from proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of sqrt(s) = 0.9, 2.36 and 7 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Events were collected using a single-arm minimum-bias trigger. The charged-particle multiplicity, its dependence on transverse momentum and pseudorapidity and the relationship between the mean transverse momentum and charged-particle multiplicity are measured. Measurements in different regions of phase-space are shown, providing diffraction-reduced measurements as well as more inclusive ones. The observed distributions are corrected to well-defined phase-space regions, using model-independent corrections. The results are compared to each other and to various Monte Carlo models, including a new AMBT1 PYTHIA 6 tune. In all the kinematic regions considered, the particle multiplicities are higher than predicted by the Monte Carlo models. The central charged-particle multiplicity per event and unit of pseudorapidity, for tracks with pT >100 MeV, is...

  18. Charged particle's flux measurement from PMMA irradiated by 80 MeV/u carbon ion beam

    CERN Document Server

    Agodi, C; Bellini, F; Cirrone, G A P; Collamati, F; Cuttone, G; De Lucia, E; De Napoli, M; Di Domenico, A; Faccini, R; Ferroni, F; Fiore, S; Gauzzi, P; Iarocci, E; Marafini, M; Mattei, I; Muraro, S; Paoloni, A; Patera, V; Piersanti, L; Romano, F; Sarti, A; Sciubba, A; Vitale, E; Voena, C

    2012-01-01

    Hadrontherapy is an emerging technique in cancer therapy that uses beams of charged particles. To meet the improved capability of hadrontherapy in matching the dose release with the cancer position, new dose monitoring techniques need to be developed and introduced into clinical use. The measurement of the fluxes of the secondary particles produced by the hadron beam is of fundamental importance in the design of any dose monitoring device and is eagerly needed to tune Monte Carlo simulations. We report the measurements done with charged secondary particles produced from the interaction of a 80 MeV/u fully stripped carbon ion beam at the INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania, with a Poly-methyl methacrylate target. Charged secondary particles, produced at 90$\\degree$ with respect to the beam axis, have been tracked with a drift chamber, while their energy and time of flight has been measured by means of a LYSO scintillator. Secondary protons have been identified exploiting the energy and time of flight in...

  19. Survival of Deinococcus radiodurans against laboratory-simulated solar wind charged particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulino-Lima, Ivan Gláucio; Janot-Pacheco, Eduardo; Galante, Douglas; Cockell, Charles; Olsson-Francis, Karen; Brucato, John Robert; Baratta, Giuseppe Antonio; Strazzulla, Giovanni; Merrigan, Tony; McCullough, Robert; Mason, Nigel; Lage, Claudia

    2011-11-01

    In this experimental study, cells of the radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans were exposed to several different sources of radiation chosen to replicate the charged particles found in the solar wind. Naked cells or cells mixed with dust grains (basalt or sandstone) differing in elemental composition were exposed to electrons, protons, and ions to determine the probability of cell survival after irradiation. Doses necessary to reduce the viability of cell population to 10% (LD(10)) were determined under different experimental conditions. The results of this study indicate that low-energy particle radiation (2-4 keV), typically present in the slow component of the solar wind, had no effect on dehydrated cells, even if exposed at fluences only reached in more than 1000 years at Sun-Earth distance (1 AU). Higher-energy ions (200 keV) found in solar flares would inactivate 90% of exposed cells after several events in less than 1 year at 1 AU. When mixed with dust grains, LD(10) increases about 10-fold. These results show that, compared to the highly deleterious effects of UV radiation, solar wind charged particles are relatively benign, and organisms protected under grains from UV radiation would also be protected from the charged particles considered in this study.

  20. Measurement of the charged-particle multiplicity in proton-proton collisions with the ALICE detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan Fiete

    2009-04-17

    This thesis has introduced the theoretical framework to describe multiple-particle production. The functioning of two event generators, Pythia and Phojet, as well as theoretical descriptions of the charged-particle multiplicity have been discussed. A summary of pseudorapidity-density (dN{sub ch}/d{eta}) and multiplicity-distribution measurements of charged particles has been presented. Existing results have been shown in an energy range of {radical}(s) = 6GeV to 1.8TeV from bubble chamber experiments and detectors at the ISR, Sp anti pS, and Tevatron. The validity of the introduced models was reviewed and the behavior as function of {radical}(s) was discussed. Analysis procedures for two basic measurements with ALICE, the pseudorapidity density and the multiplicity distribution of charged particles, have been developed. The former allows corrections on a bin-by-bin basis, while the latter requires unfolding of the measured distribution. The procedures have been developed for two independent subdetectors of ALICE, the Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) and the Time-Projection Chamber (TPC). This allows the comparison of the analysis result in the overlapping regions as an independent cross-check of the measured distribution. Their implementation successfully reproduces different assumed spectra. The procedures have been extensively tested on simulated data using two different event generators, Pythia and Phojet. A comprehensive list of systematic uncertainties was evaluated. Some of these uncertainties still require measured data to verify or extract their magnitude. (orig.)

  1. The Effect of the Charge Fluctuation of Dust Particles on Ion-acoustic Wave Excited Through Ioniza tion Instability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    华建军; 刘金远; 马腾才

    2002-01-01

    The effect of the charge fluctuation of dust particles on ion acoustic wave (IAW) excited through ionization instability was investigated. The hydrodynamic equations and linear time-dependent perturbation theory served as the starting point of theory, by which the dispersion relation and growth rate of the IAW were given. By comparing the results with the case of constant dust charges, it was found that the charge fluctuation of dust particles reduces the instability of the wave mode.

  2. Extension of a Kinetic Approach to Chemical Reactions to Electronic Energy Levels and Reactions Involving Charged Species with Application to DSMC Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liechty, Derek S.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to compute rarefied, ionized hypersonic flows is becoming more important as missions such as Earth reentry, landing high mass payloads on Mars, and the exploration of the outer planets and their satellites are being considered. Recently introduced molecular-level chemistry models that predict equilibrium and nonequilibrium reaction rates using only kinetic theory and fundamental molecular properties are extended in the current work to include electronic energy level transitions and reactions involving charged particles. These extensions are shown to agree favorably with reported transition and reaction rates from the literature for near-equilibrium conditions. Also, the extensions are applied to the second flight of the Project FIRE flight experiment at 1634 seconds with a Knudsen number of 0.001 at an altitude of 76.4 km. In order to accomplish this, NASA's direct simulation Monte Carlo code DAC was rewritten to include the ability to simulate charge-neutral ionized flows, take advantage of the recently introduced chemistry model, and to include the extensions presented in this work. The 1634 second data point was chosen for comparisons to be made in order to include a CFD solution. The Knudsen number at this point in time is such that the DSMC simulations are still tractable and the CFD computations are at the edge of what is considered valid because, although near-transitional, the flow is still considered to be continuum. It is shown that the inclusion of electronic energy levels in the DSMC simulation is necessary for flows of this nature and is required for comparison to the CFD solution. The flow field solutions are also post-processed by the nonequilibrium radiation code HARA to compute the radiative portion.

  3. A 128-channel picoammeter system and its application on charged particle beam current distribution measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Deyang; Xue, Yingli; Zhang, Mingwu; Cai, Xiaohong; Hu, Jianjun; Dong, Jinmei; Li, Xin

    2015-01-01

    A 128-channel picoammeter system is constructed based on instrumentation amplifiers. Taking the advantages of high electric potential and narrow bandwidth in DC energetic charged beam measurements, current resolution better than 5 fA can be achieved. Two 128-channel Faraday cup arrays are built, and are employed for ion and electron beam current distribution measurements. Tests with 60 keV O3+ ions and 2 keV electrons show that it can provide exact boundaries when a positive charged particle beam current distribution is measured.

  4. A 128-channel picoammeter system and its application on charged particle beam current distribution measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Deyang, E-mail: d.yu@impcas.ac.cn; Liu, Junliang; Xue, Yingli; Zhang, Mingwu; Cai, Xiaohong; Hu, Jianjun; Dong, Jinmei [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Li, Xin [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2015-11-15

    A 128-channel picoammeter system is constructed based on instrumentation amplifiers. Taking advantage of a high electric potential and narrow bandwidth in DC energetic charged beam measurements, a current resolution better than 5 fA can be achieved. Two sets of 128-channel strip electrodes are implemented on printed circuit boards and are employed for ion and electron beam current distribution measurements. Tests with 60 keV O{sup 3+} ions and 2 keV electrons show that it can provide exact boundaries when a positive charged particle beam current distribution is measured.

  5. A New Method to Study Hawking Radiation of Charged Particle from Stationary Axisymmetric Sen Black Hole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Shu-Zheng; CHEN De-You

    2007-01-01

    @@ Taking the self-gravitation interaction and energy conservation, charge conservation and angular momentum conservation into account, we discuss the tunnelling characteristics of the charged particle from Sen black hole by the Hamilton-Jacobi method. The result shows that the tunnelling probability is related to the change of Bekenstein-Hawking entropy, and the actual radiation spectrum deviates from the pure thermal one, which is consistent with the result of Parikh and Wilczek and gives a new method to correct the Hawking pure thermal spectrum of Sen black hole.

  6. Radiation reaction and radiative losses derived from the kinetic power of the electric inertial mass of a charge

    CERN Document Server

    Singal, Ashok K

    2016-01-01

    It is shown that formulas for radiation reaction and radiative losses from a charge can be derived from the kinetic power of its electric inertial mass. The derivation assumes a non-relativistic but otherwise an arbitrary motion of the charge. We exploit the fact that as the charge velocity changes because of a constant acceleration, there are accompanying modifications in its electromagnetic fields which can remain concurrent with the charge motion because the velocity as well as acceleration information enters into the field expression. However, if the acceleration of the charge is varying, information about that being not present in the field expressions, the electromagnetic fields get "out of step" with the actual charge motion. Accordingly we arrive at a radiation reaction formula for an arbitrarily moving charge, obtained hitherto in literature from the self-force, derived in a rather cumbersome way from the detailed mutual interaction between various constituents of a small charged sphere. This way we ...

  7. A family of solutions with radiation reaction and retarded interactions for two charges in classical electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, R.; Villarroel, D.

    2002-10-01

    A family of solutions of the Lorentz-Dirac equation is constructed. It consists in the motion of two charges e1 and e2 of masses m1 and m2 in two coplanar and concentric circles of radii a and b. The charges rotate with constant angular velocity, and have an angular separation ψ. The radiation reaction forces and the retarded interactions between the charges are taken into account. The external electromagnetic field that allows the motion consists of a tangential time-independent electric field that takes a fixed value on each orbit, and a homogeneous time-independent magnetic field perpendicular to the plane of the motion. For all the solutions energy conservation is rigorously demonstrated by evaluating the energy radiated, with independence of the equation of motion, through the calculation of the instantaneous energy flux across a sphere of an infinitely large radius.

  8. Nuclear fragmentation and charge-exchange reactions induced by pions in the $\\Delta$-resonance region

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Dynamics of the nuclear fragmentations and the charge exchange reactions in pion-nucleus collisions near the $\\Delta$(1232) resonance energies has been investigated within the Lanzhou quantum molecular dynamics (LQMD) transport model. An isospin, momentum and density-dependent pion-nucleon potential is implemented in the model, which influences the pion dynamics, in particular the kinetic energy spectra, but weakly impacts the fragmentation mechanism. The absorption process in pion-nucleon collisions to form the $\\Delta$(1232) resonance dominates the heating mechanism of target nucleus. The excitation energy transferred to the target nucleus increases with the pion kinetic energy and is similar for both $\\pi^{-}$ and $\\pi^{+}$ induced reactions. The magnitude of fragmentation of target nucleus weakly depends on the pion energy. The isospin ratio in the pion double charge exchange is influenced by the isospin ingredient of target nucleus.

  9. Search for long-lived heavy charged particles using a ring imaging Cherenkov technique at LHCb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaij, R. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Adeva, B. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Adinolfi, M. [Bristol Univ. (United Kingdom). H.H. Wills Physics Lab.; and others

    2015-12-15

    A search is performed for heavy long-lived charged particles using 3.0 fb{sup -1} of proton-proton collisions collected at √(s) = 7 and 8 TeV with the LHCb detector. The search is mainly based on the response of the ring imaging Cherenkov detectors to distinguish the heavy, slow-moving particles from muons. No evidence is found for the production of such long-lived states. The results are expressed as limits on the Drell-Yan production of pairs of long-lived particles, with both particles in the LHCb pseudorapidity acceptance, 1.8 < η < 4.9. The mass-dependent cross-section upper limits are in the range 2-4 fb (at 95 % CL) for masses between 14 and 309 GeV/c{sup 2}. (orig.)

  10. Search for long-lived heavy charged particles using a ring imaging Cherenkov technique at LHCb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaij, R. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Adeva, B. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Adinolfi, M. [H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Bristol (United Kingdom); Affolder, A. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Ajaltouni, Z. [Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, CNRS/IN2P3, LPC, Clermont-Ferrand (France); and others

    2015-12-15

    A search is performed for heavy long-lived charged particles using 3.0 fb{sup -1} of proton–proton collisions collected at √s= 7 and 8 TeV with the LHCb detector. The search is mainly based on the response of the ring imaging Cherenkov detectors to distinguish the heavy, slow-moving particles from muons. No evidence is found for the production of such long-lived states. The results are expressed as limits on the Drell–Yan production of pairs of long-lived particles, with both particles in the LHCb pseudorapidity acceptance, 1.8<η<4.9. The mass-dependent cross-section upper limits are in the range 2–4 fb (at 95 % CL) for masses between 14 and 309 GeV /c{sup 2}.

  11. Search for long-lived heavy charged particles using a ring imaging Cherenkov technique at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casanova Mohr, Raimon; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruscio, Francesco; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Geraci, Angelo; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Osorio Rodrigues, Bruno; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skillicorn, Ian; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Sterpka, Christopher Francis; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tekampe, Tobias; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Todd, Jacob; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth;