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Sample records for charged colloidal sphere

  1. Phase behaviour of charged colloidal sphere dispersions with added polymer chains

    Fortini, Andrea; Dijkstra, Marjolein; Tuinier, Remco

    2005-01-01

    We study the stability of mixtures of highly screened repulsive charged spheres and non-adsorbing ideal polymer chains in a common solvent using free volume theory. The effective interaction between charged colloids in an aqueous salt solution is described by a screened Coulomb pair potential, which supplements the pure hard-sphere interaction. The ideal polymer chains are treated as spheres that are excluded from the colloids by a hard-core interaction, whereas the interaction between two ideal chains is set to zero. In addition, we investigate the phase behaviour of charged colloid-polymer mixtures in computer simulations, using the two-body (Asakura-Oosawa pair potential) approximation to the effective one-component Hamiltonian of the charged colloids. Both our results obtained from simulations and from free volume theory show similar trends. We find that the screened Coulomb repulsion counteracts the effect of the effective polymer-mediated attraction. For mixtures of small polymers and relatively large charged colloidal spheres, the fluid-crystal transition shifts to significantly larger polymer concentrations with increasing range of the screened Coulomb repulsion. For relatively large polymers, the effect of the screened Coulomb repulsion is weaker. The resulting fluid-fluid binodal is only slightly shifted towards larger polymer concentrations upon increasing the range of the screened Coulomb repulsion. In conclusion, our results show that the miscibility of dispersions containing charged colloids and neutral non-adsorbing polymers increases upon increasing the range of the screened Coulomb repulsion, or upon lowering the salt concentration, especially when the polymers are small compared to the colloids

  2. Self-diffusion of charged colloidal tracer spheres in transparent porous glass media: Effect of ionic strength and pore size

    Kluijtmans, Sebastiaan G. J. M.; de Hoog, Els H. A.; Philipse, Albert P.

    1998-05-01

    The influence of charge on diffusion in porous media was studied for fluorescent colloidal silica spheres diffusing in a porous glass medium. The bicontinuous porous silica glasses were optically matched with an organic solvent mixture in which both glass and tracers are negatively charged. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, the long-time self-diffusion coefficient DSL of the confined silica particles was monitored in situ as a function of the ionic strength and particle to pore size ratio. At high salt concentration DSL reaches a relatively high plateau value, which depends on the particle to pore size ratio. This plateau value is unexpectedly higher than the value found for uncharged silica spheres in these porous glasses, but still significantly smaller than the free particle bulk diffusion coefficient of the silica spheres. At low salt concentration DSL reduces markedly, up to the point where colloids are nearly immobilized. This peculiar retardation probably originates from potential traps and barriers at pore intersections due to deviations from cylinder symmetry in the double layer interactions between tracers and pore walls. This indicates that diffusion of charged particles in tortuous porous media may be very different from transport in long capillaries without such intersections.

  3. Structure of colloidal sphere-plate mixtures

    Doshi, N; Cinacchi, G; Van Duijneveldt, J S; Cosgrove, T; Prescott, S W; Grillo, I; Phipps, J; Gittins, D I

    2011-01-01

    In addition to containing spherical pigment particles, coatings usually contain plate-like clay particles. It is thought that these improve the opacity of the paint film by providing an efficient spacing of the pigment particles. This observation is counterintuitive, as suspensions of particles of different shapes and sizes tend to phase separate on increase of concentration. In order to clarify this matter a model colloidal system is studied here, with a sphere-plate diameter ratio similar to that found in paints. For dilute suspensions, small angle neutron scattering revealed that the addition of plates leads to enhanced density fluctuations of the spheres, in agreement with new theoretical predictions. On increasing the total colloid concentration the plates and spheres phase separate due to the disparity in their shape. This is in agreement with previous theoretical and experimental work on colloidal sphere-plate mixtures, where one particle acts as a depleting agent. The fact that no large scale phase separation is observed in coatings is ascribed to dynamic arrest in intimately mixed, or possibly micro-phase separated structures, at elevated concentration.

  4. Structure of colloidal sphere-plate mixtures

    Doshi, N; Cinacchi, G; Van Duijneveldt, J S; Cosgrove, T; Prescott, S W [School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom); Grillo, I [Institut Laue-Langevin, 6 rue Jules Horowitz BP 156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Phipps, J [Imerys Minerals Ltd, Par Moor Centre, Par Moor Road, Par, Cornwall PL24 2SQ (United Kingdom); Gittins, D I, E-mail: Giorgio.Cinacchi@bristol.ac.uk, E-mail: J.S.van-Duijneveldt@bristol.ac.uk [Imerys Performance and Filtration Minerals Ltd, 130 Castilian Drive, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States)

    2011-05-18

    In addition to containing spherical pigment particles, coatings usually contain plate-like clay particles. It is thought that these improve the opacity of the paint film by providing an efficient spacing of the pigment particles. This observation is counterintuitive, as suspensions of particles of different shapes and sizes tend to phase separate on increase of concentration. In order to clarify this matter a model colloidal system is studied here, with a sphere-plate diameter ratio similar to that found in paints. For dilute suspensions, small angle neutron scattering revealed that the addition of plates leads to enhanced density fluctuations of the spheres, in agreement with new theoretical predictions. On increasing the total colloid concentration the plates and spheres phase separate due to the disparity in their shape. This is in agreement with previous theoretical and experimental work on colloidal sphere-plate mixtures, where one particle acts as a depleting agent. The fact that no large scale phase separation is observed in coatings is ascribed to dynamic arrest in intimately mixed, or possibly micro-phase separated structures, at elevated concentration.

  5. Anomalous interactions in confined charge-stabilized colloid

    Grier, D G; Han, Y

    2004-01-01

    Charge-stabilized colloidal spheres dispersed in weak 1:1 electrolytes are supposed to repel each other. Consequently, experimental evidence for anomalous long-ranged like-charged attractions induced by geometric confinement inspired a burst of activity. This has largely subsided because of nagging doubts regarding the experiments' reliability and interpretation. We describe a new class of thermodynamically self-consistent colloidal interaction measurements that confirm the appearance of pairwise attractions among colloidal spheres confined by one or two bounding walls. In addition to supporting previous claims for this as-yet unexplained effect, these measurements also cast new light on its mechanism

  6. Thermodynamics and vibrational modes of hard sphere colloidal systems

    Zargar, R.

    2014-01-01

    The central question that we address in this thesis is the thermodynamics of colloidal glasses. The thermodynamics of colloidal hard sphere glasses are directly related to the entropy of the system, since the phase behavior of hard sphere systems is dictated only by entropic contributions, and also

  7. Manipulating colloids with charges and electric fields

    Leunissen, M. E.

    2007-02-01

    This thesis presents the results of experimental investigations on a variety of colloidal suspensions. Colloidal particles are at least a hundred times larger than atoms or molecules, but suspended in a liquid they display the same phase behavior, including fluid and crystalline phases. Due to their relatively large size, colloids are much easier to investigate and manipulate, though. This makes them excellent condensed matter model systems. With this in mind, we studied micrometer-sized perspex (‘PMMA’) spheres, labeled with a fluorescent dye for high-resolution confocal microscopy imaging, and suspended in a low-polar mixture of the organic solvents cyclohexyl bromide and cis-decalin. This system offered us the flexibility to change the interactions between the particles from ‘hard-sphere-like’ to long-ranged repulsive (between like-charged particles), long-ranged attractive (between oppositely charged particles) and dipolar (in an electric field). We investigated the phase behavior of our suspensions as a function of the particle concentration, the ionic strength of the solvent and the particles’ charges. In this way, we obtained new insight in the freezing and melting behavior of like-charged and oppositely charged colloids. Interestingly, we found that the latter can readily form large crystals, thus defying the common belief that plus-minus interactions inevitably lead to aggregation. Moreover, we demonstrated that these systems can serve as a reliable model system for classical ionic matter (‘salts’), and that opposite-charge interactions can greatly facilitate the self-assembly of new structures with special properties for applications. On a slightly different note, we also studied electrostatic effects in mixtures of the cyclohexyl bromide solvent and water, both with and without colloidal particles present. This provided new insight in the stabilization mechanisms of oil-water emulsions and gave us control over the self-assembly of various

  8. Long time diffusion in suspensions of interacting charged colloids

    Schepper, I.M. de; Cohen, E.G.D.; Pusey, P.N.; Lekkerkerker, H.N.W.

    1989-01-01

    A new expression is given for the long time diffusion coefficient DL(k) of charged interacting colloidal spheres in suspension, as a function of the wavenumber k, near k = km, where the static structure factor has a maximum. The expression is based on a physical analogy between a mode description

  9. Conductivity maximum in a charged colloidal suspension

    Bastea, S

    2009-01-27

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a charged colloidal suspension in the salt-free regime show that the system exhibits an electrical conductivity maximum as a function of colloid charge. We attribute this behavior to two main competing effects: colloid effective charge saturation due to counterion 'condensation' and diffusion slowdown due to the relaxation effect. In agreement with previous observations, we also find that the effective transported charge is larger than the one determined by the Stern layer and suggest that it corresponds to the boundary fluid layer at the surface of the colloidal particles.

  10. Colloidal alloys with preassembled clusters and spheres.

    Ducrot, Étienne; He, Mingxin; Yi, Gi-Ra; Pine, David J

    2017-06-01

    Self-assembly is a powerful approach for constructing colloidal crystals, where spheres, rods or faceted particles can build up a myriad of structures. Nevertheless, many complex or low-coordination architectures, such as diamond, pyrochlore and other sought-after lattices, have eluded self-assembly. Here we introduce a new design principle based on preassembled components of the desired superstructure and programmed nearest-neighbour DNA-mediated interactions, which allows the formation of otherwise unattainable structures. We demonstrate the approach using preassembled colloidal tetrahedra and spheres, obtaining a class of colloidal superstructures, including cubic and tetragonal colloidal crystals, with no known atomic analogues, as well as percolating low-coordination diamond and pyrochlore sublattices never assembled before.

  11. Anomalous columnar order of charged colloidal platelets

    Morales-Anda, L.; Wensink, H. H.; Galindo, A.; Gil-Villegas, A.

    2012-01-01

    Monte Carlo computer simulations are carried out for a model system of like-charged colloidal platelets in the isothermal-isobaric ensemble (NpT). The aim is to elucidate the role of electrostatic interactions on the structure of synthetic clay systems at high particle densities. Short-range repulsions between particles are described by a suitable hard-core model representing a discotic particle. This potential is supplemented with an electrostatic potential based on a Yukawa model for the screened Coulombic potential between infinitely thin disklike macro-ions. The particle aspect-ratio and electrostatic parameters were chosen to mimic an aqueous dispersion of thin, like-charged, rigid colloidal platelets at finite salt concentration. An examination of the fluid phase diagram reveals a marked shift in the isotropic-nematic transition compared to the hard cut-sphere reference system. Several statistical functions, such as the pair correlation function for the center-of-mass coordinates and structure factor, are obtained to characterize the structural organization of the platelets phases. At low salinity and high osmotic pressure we observe anomalous hexagonal columnar structures characterized by interpenetrating columns with a typical intercolumnar distance corresponding to about half of that of a regular columnar phase. Increasing the ionic strength leads to the formation of glassy, disordered structures consisting of compact clusters of platelets stacked into finite-sized columns. These so-called "nematic columnar" structures have been recently observed in systems of charge-stabilized gibbsite platelets. Our findings are corroborated by an analysis of the static structure factor from a simple density functional theory.

  12. Instability of extremal relativistic charged spheres

    Anninos, Peter; Rothman, Tony

    2002-01-01

    With the question 'Can relativistic charged spheres form extremal black holes?' in mind, we investigate the properties of such spheres from a classical point of view. The investigation is carried out numerically by integrating the Oppenheimer-Volkov equation for relativistic charged fluid spheres and finding interior Reissner-Nordstroem solutions for these objects. We consider both constant density and adiabatic equations of state, as well as several possible charge distributions, and examine stability by both a normal mode and an energy analysis. In all cases, the stability limit for these spheres lies between the extremal (Q=M) limit and the black hole limit (R=R + ). That is, we find that charged spheres undergo gravitational collapse before they reach Q=M, suggesting that extremal Reissner-Nordstroem black holes produced by collapse are ruled out. A general proof of this statement would support a strong form of the cosmic censorship hypothesis, excluding not only stable naked singularities, but stable extremal black holes. The numerical results also indicate that although the interior mass-energy m(R) obeys the usual m/R + as Q→M. In the Appendix we also argue that Hawking radiation will not lead to an extremal Reissner-Nordstroem black hole. All our results are consistent with the third law of black hole dynamics, as currently understood

  13. Detachment dynamics of colloidal spheres with adhesive interactions

    Bergenholtz, J.

    2018-04-01

    Escape of colloidal-size particles from various kinds of solids, such as aggregates and surfaces, occurs in a wide variety of settings of both fundamental and applied scientific interest. In this paper an exact solution for the detachment of adhesive spheres from each other by means of diffusion is presented. The solution takes into account repeated detachment and reattachment events in the course of time on the way toward the permanently separated state. For strongly adhesive spheres this state is approached in an exponential manner essentially regardless of how the bound state is specified. The analytical solution is shown to capture semiquantitatively the escape from more realistic potential wells using a mapping procedure whereby equality of second virial coefficients is imposed.

  14. Interaction between like-charged colloidal particles in aqueous electrolyte solution: Attractive component arising from solvent granularity

    R.Akiyama

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The potential of mean force (PMF between like-charged colloidal particles immersed in aqueous electrolyte solution is studied using the integral equation theory. Solvent molecules are modeled as neutral hard spheres, and ions and colloidal particles are taken to be charged hard spheres. The Coulomb potentials for ion-ion, ion-colloidal particle, and colloidal particle-colloidal particle pairs are divided by the dielectric constant of water. This simple model is employed to account for the effects of solvent granularity neglected in the so-called primitive model. The van der Waals attraction between colloidal particles, which is an essential constituent of conventional DLVO theory, is omitted in the present model. Nevertheless, when the electrolyte concentration is sufficiently high, attractive regions appear in the PMF. In particular, the interaction at small separations is significantly attractive and the contact of colloidal particles is stabilized. This interesting behavior arises from the effects of the translational motion of solvent molecules.

  15. Structure and dynamics of colloidal hard spheres in real-space

    Dullens, Roel P.A.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis deals with various aspects of the structure and dynamics of colloidal hard spheres. A general introduction on colloids as experimental realization of hard spheres is presented in Chapter 1. The basic principles of confocal microscopy, the main technique used in this thesis, as well as

  16. Oppositely charged colloids out of equilibrium

    Vissers, T.

    2010-11-01

    Colloids are particles with a size in the range of a few nanometers up to several micrometers. Similar to atomic and molecular systems, they can form gases, liquids, solids, gels and glasses. Colloids can be used as model systems because, unlike molecules, they are sufficiently large to be studied directly with light microscopy and move sufficiently slow to study their dynamics. In this thesis, we study binary systems of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) colloidal particles suspended in low-polar solvent mixtures. Since the ions can still partially dissociate, a surface charge builds up which causes electrostatic interactions between the colloids. By carefully tuning the conditions inside the suspension, we make two kinds of particles oppositely charged. To study our samples, we use Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM). The positively and negatively charged particles can be distinguished by a different fluorescent dye. Colloids constantly experience a random motion resulting from random kicks of surrounding solvent molecules. When the attractions between the oppositely charged particles are weak, the particles can attach and detach many times and explore a lot of possible configurations and the system can reach thermodynamic equilibrium. For example, colloidal ‘ionic’ crystals consisting of thousands to millions of particles can form under the right conditions. When the attractions are strong, the system can become kinetically trapped inside a gel-like state. We observe that when the interactions change again, crystals can even emerge again from this gel-like phase. By using local order parameters, we quantitatively study the crystallization of colloidal particles and identify growth defects inside the crystals. We also study the effect of gravity on the growth of ionic crystals by using a rotating stage. We find that sedimentation can completely inhibit crystal growth and plays an important role in crystallization from the gel-like state. The surface

  17. Probing the equilibrium dynamics of colloidal hard spheres above the mode-coupling glass transition

    Brambilla, G.; al Masri, J.H.M.; Pierno, M.; Berthier, L.; Cipelletti, L.

    2010-01-01

    We use dynamic light scattering and computer simulations to study equilibrium dynamics and dynamic heterogeneity in concentrated suspensions of colloidal hard spheres. Our study covers an unprecedented density range and spans seven decades in structural relaxation time, , including equilibrium

  18. Colloid Titration--A Rapid Method for the Determination of Charged Colloid.

    Ueno, Keihei; Kina, Ken'yu

    1985-01-01

    "Colloid titration" is a volumetric method for determining charged polyelectrolytes in aqueous solutions. The principle of colloid titration, reagents used in the procedure, methods of endpoint detection, preparation of reagent solutions, general procedure used, results obtained, and pH profile of colloid titration are considered. (JN)

  19. Structure and stability of charged colloid-nanoparticle mixtures

    Weight, Braden M.; Denton, Alan R.

    2018-03-01

    Physical properties of colloidal materials can be modified by addition of nanoparticles. Within a model of like-charged mixtures of particles governed by effective electrostatic interactions, we explore the influence of charged nanoparticles on the structure and thermodynamic phase stability of charge-stabilized colloidal suspensions. Focusing on salt-free mixtures of particles of high size and charge asymmetry, interacting via repulsive Yukawa effective pair potentials, we perform molecular dynamics simulations and compute radial distribution functions and static structure factors. Analysis of these structural properties indicates that increasing the charge and concentration of nanoparticles progressively weakens correlations between charged colloids. We show that addition of charged nanoparticles to a suspension of like-charged colloids can induce a colloidal crystal to melt and can facilitate aggregation of a fluid suspension due to attractive van der Waals interactions. We attribute the destabilizing influence of charged nanoparticles to enhanced screening of electrostatic interactions, which weakens repulsion between charged colloids. This interpretation is consistent with recent predictions of an effective interaction theory of charged colloid-nanoparticle mixtures.

  20. [Interaction of protein with charged colloidal particles].

    Durdenko, E V; Kuznetsova, S M; Basova, L V; Tikhonenko, S A; Saburova, E A

    2011-01-01

    The functional state of three proteins of different molecular weight (urease, lactate dehydrogenase, and hemoglobin) in the presence of the linear polyelectrolytes poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAA) and sodium poly(styrenesulfonate) (PSS) in the dissolved state and of the same polyelectrolytes bound to the surface of microspheres has been investigated. Microspheres were prepared by consecutive absorption of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes so that the outer layer of the shell was PAA for the acidic protein urease, and PSS for the alkaline proteins LDH and hemoglobin. It was shown that the dissolved polyelectrolyte completely inactivates all three proteins within one minute with a slight difference in the time constant. (By Hb inactivation are conventionally meant changes in the heme environment observed from the spectrum in the Soret band.) In the presence of microspheres, the proteins were adsorbed on their surface; in this case, more than 95% of the activity was retained within two hours. The proportion of the protein adsorbed on microspheres accounted for about 98% for urease, 72% for Hb, and 35% for LDH, as determined from the tryptophan fluorescence data. The interaction of hemoglobin with another type of charged colloidal particles, phospholipid vesicles, leads to the destruction of the tertiary structure of the protein, which made itself evident in the optical absorption spectra in the Soret band, as well as the spectra of tryptophan fluorescence and circular dichroism. In this case, according to circular dichroism, the percentage of alpha-helical structure of Hb was maintained. The differences in the physical and chemical mechanisms of interaction of proteins with these two types of charged colloidal particles that leads to differences in the degree of denaturing effects are discussed.

  1. Long-Ranged Oppositely Charged Interactions for Designing New Types of Colloidal Clusters

    Ahmet Faik Demirörs

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Getting control over the valency of colloids is not trivial and has been a long-desired goal for the colloidal domain. Typically, tuning the preferred number of neighbors for colloidal particles requires directional bonding, as in the case of patchy particles, which is difficult to realize experimentally. Here, we demonstrate a general method for creating the colloidal analogs of molecules and other new regular colloidal clusters without using patchiness or complex bonding schemes (e.g., DNA coating by using a combination of long-ranged attractive and repulsive interactions between oppositely charged particles that also enable regular clusters of particles not all in close contact. We show that, due to the interplay between their attractions and repulsions, oppositely charged particles dispersed in an intermediate dielectric constant (4<ϵ<10 provide a viable approach for the formation of binary colloidal clusters. Tuning the size ratio and interactions of the particles enables control of the type and shape of the resulting regular colloidal clusters. Finally, we present an example of clusters made up of negatively charged large and positively charged small satellite particles, for which the electrostatic properties and interactions can be changed with an electric field. It appears that for sufficiently strong fields the satellite particles can move over the surface of the host particles and polarize the clusters. For even stronger fields, the satellite particles can be completely pulled off, reversing the net charge on the cluster. With computer simulations, we investigate how charged particles distribute on an oppositely charged sphere to minimize their energy and compare the results with the solutions to the well-known Thomson problem. We also use the simulations to explore the dependence of such clusters on Debye screening length κ^{−1} and the ratio of charges on the particles, showing good agreement with experimental observations.

  2. Monodisperse, submicrometer-scale platinum colloidal spheres with high electrocatalytic activity

    Zhang, Lixue; Wang, Liang; Guo, Shaojun; Zhai, Junfeng; Dong, Shaojun; Wang, Erkang [State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, 130022 Jilin, Changchun (China)

    2009-02-15

    Monodisperse, submicrometer-scale platinum (Pt) colloidal spheres were prepared through a simple direct chemical reduction of p-phenylenediamine (PPD)-chloroplatinic acid (H{sub 2}PtCl{sub 6}) coordination polymer colloids. It was found that the prepared Pt colloids had the similar size and morphology with their coordination polymer precursors, and the prepared Pt colloids with rough surfaces were three-dimensional (3D) structured assemblies of high-density small Pt nanoparticles. The electrochemical experiments confirmed that the prepared Pt colloids possessed a high electrocatalytic activity towards mainly four-electron reduction of dioxygen to water, making the prepared Pt colloids potential candidates for the efficient cathode material in fuel cells. (author)

  3. Effect of three-body forces on the phase behavior of charged colloids

    Wu, J. Z.; Bratko, D.; Blanch, H. W.; Prausnitz, J. M.

    2000-01-01

    Statistical-thermodynamic theory for predicting the phase behavior of a colloidal solution requires the pair interaction potential between colloidal particles in solution. In practice, it is necessary to assume pairwise additivity for the potential of mean force between colloidal particles, but little is known concerning the validity of this assumption. This paper concerns interaction between small charged colloids, such as surfactant micelles or globular proteins, in electrolyte solutions and the multibody effect on phase behavior. Monte Carlo simulations for isolated colloidal triplets in equilateral configurations show that, while the three-body force is repulsive when the three particles are near contact, it becomes short-ranged attractive at further separations, contrary to a previous study where the triplet force is attractive at all separations. The three-body force arises mainly from hard-sphere collisions between colloids and small ions; it is most significant in solutions of monovalent salt at low concentration where charged colloids experience strong electrostatic interactions. To illustrate the effect of three-body forces on the phase behavior of charged colloids, we calculated the densities of coexisting phases using van der Waals-type theories for colloidal solutions and for crystals. For the conditions investigated in this work, even though the magnitude of the three-body force may be as large as 10% of the total force at small separations, three-body forces do not have a major effect on the densities of binary coexisting phases. However, coexisting densities calculated using Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek theory are much different from those calculated using our simulated potential of mean force. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  4. Orbital Motion of Electrically Charged Spheres in Microgravity

    Banerjee, Shubho; Andring, Kevin; Campbell, Desmond; Janeski, John; Keedy, Daniel; Quinn, Sean; Hoffmeister, Brent

    2008-01-01

    The similar mathematical forms of Coulomb's law and Newton's law of gravitation suggest that two uniformly charged spheres should be able to orbit each other just as two uniform spheres of mass are known to do. In this paper we describe an experiment that we performed to demonstrate such an orbit. This is the first published account of a…

  5. Charged hard spheres in a uniform neutralizing background: The role of thermodynamics selfconsistence

    Badirkhan, Z.; Pastore, G.; Tosi, M.P.

    1991-06-01

    Calculations of the thermodynamic properties and pair distribution function of a one-component classical fluid of charged hard spheres in a uniform neutralizing background are reported and compared with Monte Carlo results of Hansen and Weis. Thermodynamic selfconsistence between the virial pressure and the fluctuations formula for the isothermal compressibility is enforced in the calculations by various alternative approaches. The role of thermodynamic selfconsistence is crucial to obtain a satisfactory quantitative description of this model fluid, in view of its applications in the theory of liquid metals and of dispersions of charged colloidal particles. (author). 23 refs, 4 figs, 3 tabs

  6. Manipulating colloids with charges and electric fields

    Leunissen, M.E.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents the results of experimental investigations on a variety of colloidal suspensions. Colloidal particles are at least a hundred times larger than atoms or molecules, but suspended in a liquid they display the same phase behavior, including fluid and crystalline phases. Due to their

  7. Magnetically actuated and controlled colloidal sphere-pair swimmer

    Ran, Sijie; Guez, Allon; Friedman, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Magnetically actuated swimming of microscopic objects has been attracting attention partly due to its promising applications in the bio-medical field and partly due to interesting physics of swimming in general. While colloidal particles that are free to move in fluid can be an attractive swimming system due it its simplicity and ability to assemble in situ , stability of their dynamics and the possibility of stable swimming behavior in periodically varying magnetic fields has not been considered. Dynamic behavior of two magnetically interacting colloidal particles subjected to rotating magnetic field of switching frequency is analyzed here and is shown to result in stable swimming without any stabilizing feedback. A new mechanism of swimming that relies only on rotations of the particles themselves and of the particle pair axis is found to dominate the swimming dynamics of the colloidal particle pair. Simulation results and analytical arguments demonstrate that this swimming strategy compares favorably to dragging the particles with an external magnetic force when colloidal particle sizes are reduced. (paper)

  8. Transport and Deposition of Variably Charged Soil Colloids in Saturated Porous Media

    Sharma, Anu; Kawamoto, Ken; Møldrup, Per

    2011-01-01

    Okinawa (RYS colloids) in Japan. The VAS colloids exhibited a negative surface charge with a high pH dependency, whereas the RYS colloids exhibited a negative surface charge with less pH dependency. The soil colloids were applied as colloidal suspensions to 10-cm-long saturated sand columns packed...

  9. Connecting structural relaxation with the low frequency modes in a hard-sphere colloidal glass

    Ghosh, A.; Chikkadi, V.; Schall, P.; Bonn, D.

    2011-01-01

    Structural relaxation in hard-sphere colloidal glasses has been studied using confocal microscopy. The motion of individual particles is followed over long time scales to detect the rearranging regions in the system. We have used normal mode analysis to understand the origin of the rearranging

  10. Hard sphere colloidal dispersions: Mechanical relaxation pertaining to thermodynamic forces

    Mellema, J.; de Kruif, C.G.; Blom, C.; Vrij, A.

    1987-01-01

    The complex viscosity of sterically stabilized (hard) silica spheres in cyclohexane has been measured between 80 Hz and 170 kHz with torsion pendulums and a nickel tube resonator. The observed relaxation behaviour can be attributed to the interplay of hydrodynamic and thermodynamic forces. The

  11. Charge-extraction strategies for colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics

    Lan, Xinzheng

    2014-02-20

    The solar-power conversion efficiencies of colloidal quantum dot solar cells have advanced from sub-1% reported in 2005 to a record value of 8.5% in 2013. Much focus has deservedly been placed on densifying, passivating and crosslinking the colloidal quantum dot solid. Here we review progress in improving charge extraction, achieved by engineering the composition and structure of the electrode materials that contact the colloidal quantum dot film. New classes of structured electrodes have been developed and integrated to form bulk heterojunction devices that enhance photocharge extraction. Control over band offsets, doping and interfacial trap state densities have been essential for achieving improved electrical communication with colloidal quantum dot solids. Quantum junction devices that not only tune the optical absorption spectrum, but also provide inherently matched bands across the interface between p-and n-materials, have proven that charge separation can occur efficiently across an all-quantum-tuned rectifying junction. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited.

  12. Temperature-modified photonic bandgap in colloidal photonic crystals fabricated by vinyl functionalized silica spheres

    Deng Tiansong; Zhang Junyan; Zhu Kongtao; Zhang Qifeng; Wu Jinlei

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A thermal annealing procedure was described for fine modifying the photonic bandgap properties of colloidal photonic crystals, which were self-assembled from vinyl-functionalized silica spheres by a gravity sedimentation process. Highlights: → We described a thermal annealing procedure for fine modifying the photonic bandgap properties of colloidal photonic crystals. → The position of its stop band had more than 25% blue shift by annealing the sample from 60 to 600 deg. C. → The annealing temperature and the Bragg peak values have a linear relationship in the 120-440 deg. C range. → The effects provide a simple and controllable method for modifying the photonic bandgap properties of colloidal photonic crystals. - Abstract: A thermal annealing procedure for fine modifying the photonic bandgap properties of colloidal photonic crystals was described. The colloidal photonic crystals were assembled from monodisperse vinyl functionalized silica spheres by a gravity sedimentation process. The samples diffract light following Bragg's law combined with Snell's law. By annealing the sample at temperatures in the range of 60-600 deg. C, the position of its stop band shifted from 943 to 706 nm. It had more than 25% blue shift. In addition, the annealing temperature and the Bragg peak values have a linear relationship in the 120-440 deg. C range. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) curves of vinyl functionalized silica spheres confirmed the above results. The effects provide a simple and controllable method for modifying the photonic bandgap properties of colloidal photonic crystals.

  13. Liquid-liquid and liquid-solid phase separation and flocculation for a charged colloidal dispersion

    Lai, S.K.; Wu, K.L.

    2002-01-01

    We model the intercolloidal interaction by a hard-sphere Yukawa repulsion to which is added the long-range van der Waals attraction. In comparison with the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek repulsion, the Yukawa repulsion explicitly incorporates the spatial correlations between colloids and small ions. As a result, the repulsive part can be expressed analytically and has a coupling strength depending on the colloidal volume fraction. By use of this two-body potential of mean force and in conjunction with a second-order thermodynamic perturbation theory, we construct the colloidal Helmholtz free energy and use it to calculate the thermodynamic quantities, pressure and chemical potential, needed in the determination of the liquid-liquid and liquid-solid phase diagrams. We examine, in an aqueous charged colloidal dispersion, the effects of the Hamaker constant and particle size on the conformation of a stable liquid-liquid phase transition calculated with respect to the liquid-solid coexistence phases. We find that there exists a threshold Hamaker constant or particle size whose value demarcates the stable liquid-liquid coexistence phases from their metastable counterparts. Applying the same technique and using the energetic criterion, we extend our calculations to study the flocculation phenomenon in aqueous charged colloids. Here, we pay due attention to determining the loci of a stability curve stipulated for a given temperature T 0 , and obtain the parametric phase diagram of the Hamaker constant vs the coupling strength or, at given surface potential, the particle size. By imposing T 0 to be the critical temperature T c , i.e., setting k B T 0 (=k B T c ) equal to a reasonable potential barrier, we arrive at the stability curve that marks the irreversible reversible phase transition. The interesting result is that there occurs a minimum size for the colloidal particles below (above) which the colloidal dispersion is driven to an irreversible (reversible) phase

  14. Packings of a charged line on a sphere.

    Alben, Silas

    2008-12-01

    We find equilibrium configurations of open and closed lines of charge on a sphere, and track them with respect to varying sphere radius. Closed lines transition from a circle to a spiral-like shape through two low-wave-number bifurcations-"baseball seam" and "twist"-which minimize Coulomb energy. The spiral shape is the unique stable equilibrium of the closed line. Other unstable equilibria arise through tip-splitting events. An open line transitions smoothly from an arc of a great circle to a spiral as the sphere radius decreases. Under repulsive potentials with faster-than-Coulomb power-law decay, the spiral is tighter in initial stages of sphere shrinkage, but at later stages of shrinkage the equilibria for all repulsive potentials converge on a spiral with uniform spacing between turns. Multiple stable equilibria of the open line are observed.

  15. Connecting structural relaxation with the low frequency modes in a hard-sphere colloidal glass.

    Ghosh, Antina; Chikkadi, Vijayakumar; Schall, Peter; Bonn, Daniel

    2011-10-28

    Structural relaxation in hard-sphere colloidal glasses has been studied using confocal microscopy. The motion of individual particles is followed over long time scales to detect the rearranging regions in the system. We have used normal mode analysis to understand the origin of the rearranging regions. The low-frequency modes, obtained over short time scales, show strong spatial correlation with the rearrangements that happen on long time scales.

  16. Effective charge versus bare charge: an analytical estimate for colloids in the infinite dilution limit

    Aubouy, Miguel; Trizac, Emmanuel; Bocquet, Lyderic

    2003-01-01

    We propose an analytical approximation for the dependence of the effective charge on the bare charge for spherical and cylindrical macro-ions as a function of the size of the colloid and salt content, for the situation of a unique colloid immersed in a sea of electrolyte (where the definition of an effective charge is non-ambiguous). Our approach is based on the Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) mean-field theory. Mathematically speaking, our estimate is asymptotically exact in the limit κa >> 1, where a is the radius of the colloid and κ is the inverse screening length. In practice, a careful comparison with effective charge parameters, obtained by numerically solving the full nonlinear PB theory, proves that our estimate is good down to κa ∼ 1. This is precisely the limit appropriate to treat colloidal suspensions. A particular emphasis is put on the range of parameters suitable to describe both single and double strand DNA molecules under physiological conditions

  17. Supercooled liquid dynamics for the charged hard-sphere model

    Lai, S.K.; Chang, S.Y.

    1994-08-01

    We study the dynamics of supercooled liquid and the liquid-glass transition by applying the mode coupling theory to the charged hard-sphere model. By exploiting the two independent parameters inherent in the charged hard-sphere system we examine structurally the subtle and competitive role played by the short-range hard-core correlation and the long-range Coulomb tail. It is found in this work that the long-range Coulombic charge factor effect is generally a less effective contribution to structure when the plasma parameter is less than 500 and becomes dominant when it is greater thereof. To extend our understanding of the supercooled liquid and the liquid-glass transition, an attempt is made to calculate and to give physical relevance to the mode-coupling parameters which are frequently used as mere fitting parameters in analysis of experiments on supercooled liquid systems. This latter information enables us to discuss the possible application of the model to a realistic system. (author). 22 refs, 4 figs

  18. Polydispersity effects in the crystallisation of hard-sphere colloidal samples

    Martin, S.; Bryant, G.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Colloidal particles mimicking hard-sphere behaviour have been shown to undergo the freezing and melting transition as predicted from computer simulations. Due to the large size and slow movement of the colloidal particles, it is possible to measure the time dependence of the growth of the main Bragg reflection using laser light scattering. The new data presented here was taken on a newly built crystallisation spectrometer which averages the Bragg reflections over the whole Debye-Scherrer cone, where previous work has mostly been done with the detector fixed in one plane. This new apparatus allows us to observe the crystallisation process at earlier times, on lower density samples than had previously been possible. Measurements have been made on samples made from colloidal particles with radii 320nm and 247 nm and polydispersities of ∼6.9% and >8% respectively. The results have been compared with other results from particles with >4% polydispersity. The results show that increasing the polydispersity in the particles increases the time lag before significant crystal growth occurs, but polydispersity doesn't appear to directly affect the rate of crystal growth

  19. Polymer depletion-driven cluster aggregation and initial phase separation in charged nanosized colloids

    Gögelein, Christoph; Nägele, Gerhard; Buitenhuis, Johan; Tuinier, Remco; Dhont, Jan K. G.

    2009-05-01

    We study polymer depletion-driven cluster aggregation and initial phase separation in aqueous dispersions of charge-stabilized silica spheres, where the ionic strength and polymer (dextran) concentration are systematically varied, using dynamic light scattering and visual observation. Without polymers and for increasing salt and colloid content, the dispersions become increasingly unstable against irreversible cluster formation. By adding nonadsorbing polymers, a depletion-driven attraction is induced, which lowers the stabilizing Coulomb barrier and enhances the cluster growth rate. The initial growth rate increases with increasing polymer concentration and decreases with increasing polymer molar mass. These observations can be quantitatively understood by an irreversible dimer formation theory based on the classical Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek pair potential, with the depletion attraction modeled by the Asakura-Oosawa-Vrij potential. At low colloid concentration, we observe an exponential cluster growth rate for all polymer concentrations considered, indicating a reaction-limited aggregation mechanism. At sufficiently high polymer and colloid concentrations, and lower salt content, a gas-liquidlike demixing is observed initially. Later on, the system separates into a gel and fluidlike phase. The experimental time-dependent state diagram is compared to the theoretical equilibrium phase diagram obtained from a generalized free-volume theory and is discussed in terms of an initial reversible phase separation process in combination with irreversible aggregation at later times.

  20. Component-Customizable Porous Rare-Earth-Based Colloidal Spheres towards Highly Effective Catalysts and Bioimaging Applications.

    Li, Cheng Chao; Rui, Xianhong; Wei, Weifeng; Chen, Libao; Yu, Yan

    2017-11-16

    Multicomponent porous colloidal spheres are of interest because they not only show a combination of the properties associated with all different components, but also usually present synergy effects. However, a combination of different components in a single porous sphere is still greatly challenged due to the different precipitation behaviors of each component. In this work, we have developed a general synthetic route to prepare several categories of porous monodisperse rare-earth (RE)-based colloidal spheres with customizable elemental compositions and a uniform element distribution. The two-step synthetic strategy is based on the integration of coordination chemistry precipitation of RE ions and a subsequent ion-exchange process, which steers clear of obstacles, such as differences in solubility product constant, that are to be found in traditional co-precipitation methods. Our approach provides a new mixing mechanism to realize homogeneous distribution of each element within the porous spheres. An array of binary, ternary, and even senary RE colloidal porous spheres with diameters of 500 nm to 700 nm has been successfully synthesized. Taking advantage of their good dispersibility, porosity, and customizable components, these porous RE oxide spheres show excellent catalytic activity for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol, and promising application in single-phase multifunctional bioprobes. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Direct measurement of the free energy of aging hard sphere colloidal glasses.

    Zargar, Rojman; Nienhuis, Bernard; Schall, Peter; Bonn, Daniel

    2013-06-21

    The nature of the glass transition is one of the most important unsolved problems in condensed matter physics. The difference between glasses and liquids is believed to be caused by very large free energy barriers for particle rearrangements; however, so far it has not been possible to confirm this experimentally. We provide the first quantitative determination of the free energy for an aging hard sphere colloidal glass. The determination of the free energy allows for a number of new insights in the glass transition, notably the quantification of the strong spatial and temporal heterogeneity in the free energy. A study of the local minima of the free energy reveals that the observed variations are directly related to the rearrangements of the particles. Our main finding is that the probability of particle rearrangements shows a power law dependence on the free energy changes associated with the rearrangements similar to the Gutenberg-Richter law in seismology.

  2. The application of biofluid mechanics boundary effects on phoretic motions of colloidal spheres

    Chen, Po-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    "The Application of Biofluid Mechanics: Boundary Effects on Phoretic Motions of Colloidal Spheres" focuses on the phoretic motion behavior of various micron- to nanometer-size particles. The content of this book is divided into two parts: one on the concentration gradient-driven diffusiophoresis and osmophoresis, and one on thermocapillary motion and thermophoretic motion driven by temperature gradient. Diffusiophoresis and osmophoresis are mainly used in biomedical engineering applications, such as drug delivery, purification, and the description of the behavior of the immune system; thermocapillary motion and thermophoretic motion are applied in the field of semiconductors, as well as in suspended impurities removal. The book also provides a variety of computer programming source codes compiled using Fortran for researchers' future applications. This book is intended for chemical engineers, biomedical engineers and scientists, biophysicists, and fundamental chemotaxis researchers. Dr. Po-Yuan Chen is an Ass...

  3. Assembly of vorticity-aligned hard-sphere colloidal strings in a simple shear flow

    Cheng, X.

    2011-12-23

    Colloidal suspensions self-assemble into equilibrium structures ranging from face- and body-centered cubic crystals to binary ionic crystals, and even kagome lattices. When driven out of equilibrium by hydrodynamic interactions, even more diverse structures can be accessed. However, mechanisms underlying out-of-equilibrium assembly are much less understood, though such processes are clearly relevant in many natural and industrial systems. Even in the simple case of hard-sphere colloidal particles under shear, there are conflicting predictions about whether particles link up into string-like structures along the shear flow direction. Here, using confocal microscopy, we measure the shear-induced suspension structure. Surprisingly, rather than flow-aligned strings, we observe log-rolling strings of particles normal to the plane of shear. By employing Stokesian dynamics simulations, we address the mechanism leading to this out-of-equilibrium structure and show that it emerges from a delicate balance between hydrodynamic and interparticle interactions. These results demonstrate a method for assembling large-scale particle structures using shear flows.

  4. Instantaneous, Simple, and Reversible Revealing of Invisible Patterns Encrypted in Robust Hollow Sphere Colloidal Photonic Crystals.

    Zhong, Kuo; Li, Jiaqi; Liu, Liwang; Van Cleuvenbergen, Stijn; Song, Kai; Clays, Koen

    2018-05-04

    The colors of photonic crystals are based on their periodic crystalline structure. They show clear advantages over conventional chromophores for many applications, mainly due to their anti-photobleaching and responsiveness to stimuli. More specifically, combining colloidal photonic crystals and invisible patterns is important in steganography and watermarking for anticounterfeiting applications. Here a convenient way to imprint robust invisible patterns in colloidal crystals of hollow silica spheres is presented. While these patterns remain invisible under static environmental humidity, even up to near 100% relative humidity, they are unveiled immediately (≈100 ms) and fully reversibly by dynamic humid flow, e.g., human breath. They reveal themselves due to the extreme wettability of the patterned (etched) regions, as confirmed by contact angle measurements. The liquid surface tension threshold to induce wetting (revealing the imprinted invisible images) is evaluated by thermodynamic predictions and subsequently verified by exposure to various vapors with different surface tension. The color of the patterned regions is furthermore independently tuned by vapors with different refractive indices. Such a system can play a key role in applications such as anticounterfeiting, identification, and vapor sensing. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Electric field of not completely symmetric systems earthed sphere-uniformly charged dielectric plan

    Vila, F.

    1994-07-01

    In this paper we study theoretically the electric field in the not completely symmetric system, earthed metallic sphere-uniformly charged dielectric plan, for sphere surface points situated in the plan that contains sphere's center and vertical symmetry axe of dielectric plan. (author). 11 refs, 1 fig

  6. Finite Element in Angle Unit Sphere Meshing for Charged Particle Transport.

    Ortega, Mario Ivan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Drumm, Clifton R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Finite element in angle formulations of the charged particle transport equation require the discretization of the unit sphere. In Sceptre, a three-dimensional surface mesh of a sphere is transformed into a two-dimensional mesh. Projection of a sphere onto a two-dimensional surface is well studied with map makers spending the last few centuries attempting to create maps that preserve proportion and area. Using these techniques, various meshing schemes for the unit sphere were investigated.

  7. Modeling of monolayer charge-stabilized colloidal crystals with static hexagonal crystal lattice

    Nagatkin, A. N.; Dyshlovenko, P. E.

    2018-01-01

    The mathematical model of monolayer colloidal crystals of charged hard spheres in liquid electrolyte is proposed. The particles in the monolayer are arranged into the two-dimensional hexagonal crystal lattice. The model enables finding elastic constants of the crystals from the stress-strain dependencies. The model is based on the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann differential equation. The Poisson-Boltzmann equation is solved numerically by the finite element method for any spatial configuration. The model has five geometrical and electrical parameters. The model is used to study the crystal with particles comparable in size with the Debye length of the electrolyte. The first- and second-order elastic constants are found for a broad range of densities. The model crystal turns out to be stable relative to small uniform stretching and shearing. It is also demonstrated that the Cauchy relation is not fulfilled in the crystal. This means that the pair effective interaction of any kind is not sufficient to proper model the elasticity of colloids within the one-component approach.

  8. The response of a Bonner sphere spectrometer to charged hadrons

    Agosteo, S.; Dimovasili, E.; Fasso, A.; Silari, M.

    2004-01-01

    Bonner sphere spectrometers (BSSs) are employed in neutron spectrometry and dosimetry since many years. Recent developments have seen the addition to a conventional BSS of one or more detectors (moderator plus thermal neutron counter) specifically designed to improve the overall response of the spectrometer to neutrons above 10 MeV. These additional detectors employ a shell of material with a high mass number (such as lead) within the polyethylene moderator, in order to slow down high-energy neutrons via (n,xn) reactions. A BSS can be used to measure neutron spectra both outside accelerator shielding and from an unshielded target. Measurements were recently performed at CERN of the neutron yield and spectral fluence at various angles from unshielded, semi-thick copper, silver and lead targets, bombarded by a mixed proton/pion beam with 40 GeV per c momentum. These experiments have provided evidence that under certain circumstances, the use of lead-enriched moderators may present a problem: these detectors were found to have a significant response to the charged hadron component accompanying the neutrons emitted from the target. Conventional polyethylene moderators show a similar behaviour but less pronounced. These secondary hadrons interact with the moderator and generate neutrons, which are in turn detected by the counter. To investigate this effect and determine a correction factor to be applied to the unfolding procedure, a series of Monte Carlo simulations were performed with the FLUKA code. These simulations aimed at determining the response of the BSS to charged hadrons under the specific experimental situation. Following these results, a complete response matrix of the extended BSS to charged pions and protons was calculated with FLUKA. An experimental verification was carried out with a 120 GeV per c hadron beam at the CERF facility at CERN. (authors)

  9. The response of a bonner sphere spectrometer to charged hadrons.

    Agosteo, S; Dimovasili, E; Fassò, A; Silari, M

    2004-01-01

    Bonner sphere spectrometers (BSSs) are employed in neutron spectrometry and dosimetry since many years. Recent developments have seen the addition to a conventional BSS of one or more detectors (moderator plus thermal neutron counter) specifically designed to improve the overall response of the spectrometer to neutrons above 10 MeV. These additional detectors employ a shell of material with a high mass number (such as lead) within the polyethylene moderator, in order to slow down high-energy neutrons via (n,xn) reactions. A BSS can be used to measure neutron spectra both outside accelerator shielding and from an unshielded target. Measurements were recently performed at CERN of the neutron yield and spectral fluence at various angles from unshielded, semi-thick copper, silver and lead targets, bombarded by a mixed proton/pion beam with 40 GeV per c momentum. These experiments have provided evidence that under certain circumstances, the use of lead-enriched moderators may present a problem: these detectors were found to have a significant response to the charged hadron component accompanying the neutrons emitted from the target. Conventional polyethylene moderators show a similar behaviour but less pronounced. These secondary hadrons interact with the moderator and generate neutrons, which are in turn detected by the counter. To investigate this effect and determine a correction factor to be applied to the unfolding procedure, a series of Monte Carlo simulations were performed with the FLUKA code. These simulations aimed at determining the response of the BSS to charged hadrons under the specific experimental situation. Following these results, a complete response matrix of the extended BSS to charged pions and protons was calculated with FLUKA. An experimental verification was carried out with a 120 GeV per c hadron beam at the CERF facility at CERN.

  10. On adiabatic pair potentials of highly charged colloid particles

    Sogami, Ikuo S.

    2018-03-01

    Generalizing the Debye-Hückel formalism, we develop a new mean field theory for adiabatic pair potentials of highly charged particles in colloid dispersions. The unoccupied volume and the osmotic pressure are the key concepts to describe the chemical and thermodynamical equilibrium of the gas of small ions in the outside region of all of the colloid particles. To define the proper thermodynamic quantities, it is postulated to take an ensemble averaging with respect to the particle configurations in the integrals for their densities consisting of the electric potential satisfying a set of equations that are derived by linearizing the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. With the Fourier integral representation of the electric potential, we calculate first the internal electric energy of the system from which the Helmholtz free energy is obtained through the Legendre transformation. Then, the Gibbs free energy is calculated using both ways of the Legendre transformation with respect to the unoccupied volume and the summation of chemical potentials. The thermodynamic functions provide three types of pair potentials, all of which are inversely proportional to the fraction of the unoccupied volume. At the limit when the fraction factor reduces to unity, the Helmholtz pair potential turns exactly into the well known Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek repulsive potential. The Gibbs pair potential possessing a medium-range strong repulsive part and a long-range weak attractive tail can explain the Schulze-Hardy rule for coagulation in combination with the van der Waals-London potential and describes a rich variety of phenomena of phase transitions observed in the dilute dispersions of highly charged particles.

  11. Experimental investigation on the use of highly charged nanoparticles to improve the stability of weakly charged colloidal system.

    Zubir, Mohd Nashrul Mohd; Badarudin, A; Kazi, S N; Misran, Misni; Amiri, Ahmad; Sadri, Rad; Khalid, Solangi

    2015-09-15

    The present work highlighted on the implementation of a unique concept for stabilizing colloids at their incipiently low charge potential. A highly charged nanoparticle was introduced within a coagulated prone colloidal system, serving as stabilizer to resist otherwise rapid flocculation and sedimentation process. A low size asymmetry of nanoparticle/colloid serves as the new topic of investigation in addition to the well-established large size ratio nanoparticle/microparticle study. Highly charged Al2O3 nanoparticles were used within the present research context to stabilize TiO2 and Fe3O4 based colloids via the formation of composite structures. It was believed, based on the experimental evidence, that Al2O3 nanoparticle interact with the weakly charged TiO2 and Fe3O4 colloids within the binary system via absorption and/or haloing modes to increase the overall charge potential of the respective colloids, thus preventing further surface contact via van der Waal's attraction. Series of experimental results strongly suggest the presence of weakly charged colloids in the studied bimodal system where, in the absence of highly charged nanoparticle, experience rapid instability. Absorbance measurement indicated that the colloidal stability drops in accordance to the highly charged nanoparticle sedimentation rate, suggesting the dominant influence of nanoparticles to attain a well-dispersed binary system. Further, it was found that the level of colloidal stability was enhanced with increasing nanoparticle fraction within the mixture. Rheological observation revealed that each hybrid complexes demonstrated behavior reminiscence to water with negligible increase in viscosity which serves as highly favorable condition particularly in thermal transport applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Measuring Charge Carrier Diffusion in Coupled Colloidal Quantum Dot Solids

    Zhitomirsky, David

    2013-06-25

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) are attractive materials for inexpensive, room-temperature-, and solution-processed optoelectronic devices. A high carrier diffusion length is desirable for many CQD device applications. In this work we develop two new experimental methods to investigate charge carrier diffusion in coupled CQD solids under charge-neutral, i.e., undepleted, conditions. The methods take advantage of the quantum-size-effect tunability of our materials, utilizing a smaller-bandgap population of quantum dots as a reporter system. We develop analytical models of diffusion in 1D and 3D structures that allow direct extraction of diffusion length from convenient parametric plots and purely optical measurements. We measure several CQD solids fabricated using a number of distinct methods and having significantly different doping and surface ligand treatments. We find that CQD materials recently reported to achieve a certified power conversion efficiency of 7% with hybrid organic-inorganic passivation have a diffusion length of 80 ± 10 nm. The model further allows us to extract the lifetime, trap density, mobility, and diffusion coefficient independently in each material system. This work will facilitate further progress in extending the diffusion length, ultimately leading to high-quality CQD solid semiconducting materials and improved CQD optoelectronic devices, including CQD solar cells. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  13. MnO{sub 2}@colloid carbon spheres nanocomposites with tunable interior architecture for supercapacitors

    Zhang, Yuxin, E-mail: zhangyuxin@cqu.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); National Key Laboratory of Fundamental Science of Micro/Nano-Devices and System Technology, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Dong, Meng; Zhu, Shijin [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Liu, Chuanpu, E-mail: liuchuanpu@163.com [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Wen, Zhongquan [National Key Laboratory of Fundamental Science of Micro/Nano-Devices and System Technology, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • MnO{sub 2}@CSs nanocomposites have been successfully synthesized in room temperature. • The composites exhibited three structures: core–shell, yolk–shell and hollow structure. • The yolk–shell structure exhibited a high specific capacitance and cycling stability. - Abstract: MnO{sub 2}@colloid carbon spheres nanocomposites with tunable interior architecture have been synthesized by a facile and cost-effective strategy at room temperature. The structure and morphology of as-prepared nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), nitrogen adsorption, focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The as-obtained composites exhibited a three-dimensional architecture with core–shell, yolk–shell and hollow interior structure. Furthermore, the electrochemical properties of composites were evaluated by cycle voltammetric (CV) and galvanostatic charge–discharge measurements. The yolk–shell structure exhibited the optimized pseudocapacitance performance, revealing a specific capacitance (273 F g{sup −1}) with a good rate and cycling stability, owing to its unique structure and the poor crystallinity of MnO{sub 2} nanofilms. Therefore, this facile synthetic strategy could be useful to design and synthesis of tunable nanostructures with enhanced supercapacitor behavior.

  14. MnO2@colloid carbon spheres nanocomposites with tunable interior architecture for supercapacitors

    Zhang, Yuxin; Dong, Meng; Zhu, Shijin; Liu, Chuanpu; Wen, Zhongquan

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • MnO 2 @CSs nanocomposites have been successfully synthesized in room temperature. • The composites exhibited three structures: core–shell, yolk–shell and hollow structure. • The yolk–shell structure exhibited a high specific capacitance and cycling stability. - Abstract: MnO 2 @colloid carbon spheres nanocomposites with tunable interior architecture have been synthesized by a facile and cost-effective strategy at room temperature. The structure and morphology of as-prepared nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), nitrogen adsorption, focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The as-obtained composites exhibited a three-dimensional architecture with core–shell, yolk–shell and hollow interior structure. Furthermore, the electrochemical properties of composites were evaluated by cycle voltammetric (CV) and galvanostatic charge–discharge measurements. The yolk–shell structure exhibited the optimized pseudocapacitance performance, revealing a specific capacitance (273 F g −1 ) with a good rate and cycling stability, owing to its unique structure and the poor crystallinity of MnO 2 nanofilms. Therefore, this facile synthetic strategy could be useful to design and synthesis of tunable nanostructures with enhanced supercapacitor behavior

  15. Pair mobility functions for rigid spheres in concentrated colloidal dispersions: Force, torque, translation, and rotation.

    Zia, Roseanna N; Swan, James W; Su, Yu

    2015-12-14

    The formulation of detailed models for the dynamics of condensed soft matter including colloidal suspensions and other complex fluids requires accurate description of the physical forces between microstructural constituents. In dilute suspensions, pair-level interactions are sufficient to capture hydrodynamic, interparticle, and thermodynamic forces. In dense suspensions, many-body interactions must be considered. Prior analytical approaches to capturing such interactions such as mean-field approaches replace detailed interactions with averaged approximations. However, long-range coupling and effects of concentration on local structure, which may play an important role in, e.g., phase transitions, are smeared out in such approaches. An alternative to such approximations is the detailed modeling of hydrodynamic interactions utilizing precise couplings between moments of the hydrodynamic traction on a suspended particle and the motion of that or other suspended particles. For two isolated spheres, a set of these functions was calculated by Jeffrey and Onishi [J. Fluid Mech. 139, 261-290 (1984)] and Jeffrey [J. Phys. Fluids 4, 16-29 (1992)]. Along with pioneering work by Batchelor, these are the touchstone for low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamic interactions and have been applied directly in the solution of many important problems related to the dynamics of dilute colloidal dispersions [G. K. Batchelor and J. T. Green, J. Fluid Mech. 56, 375-400 (1972) and G. K. Batchelor, J. Fluid Mech. 74, 1-29 (1976)]. Toward extension of these functions to concentrated systems, here we present a new stochastic sampling technique to rapidly calculate an analogous set of mobility functions describing the hydrodynamic interactions between two hard spheres immersed in a suspension of arbitrary concentration, utilizing accelerated Stokesian dynamics simulations. These mobility functions provide precise, radially dependent couplings of hydrodynamic force and torque to particle translation

  16. Pair mobility functions for rigid spheres in concentrated colloidal dispersions: Force, torque, translation, and rotation

    Zia, Roseanna N.; Su, Yu; Swan, James W.

    2015-01-01

    The formulation of detailed models for the dynamics of condensed soft matter including colloidal suspensions and other complex fluids requires accurate description of the physical forces between microstructural constituents. In dilute suspensions, pair-level interactions are sufficient to capture hydrodynamic, interparticle, and thermodynamic forces. In dense suspensions, many-body interactions must be considered. Prior analytical approaches to capturing such interactions such as mean-field approaches replace detailed interactions with averaged approximations. However, long-range coupling and effects of concentration on local structure, which may play an important role in, e.g., phase transitions, are smeared out in such approaches. An alternative to such approximations is the detailed modeling of hydrodynamic interactions utilizing precise couplings between moments of the hydrodynamic traction on a suspended particle and the motion of that or other suspended particles. For two isolated spheres, a set of these functions was calculated by Jeffrey and Onishi [J. Fluid Mech. 139, 261–290 (1984)] and Jeffrey [J. Phys. Fluids 4, 16–29 (1992)]. Along with pioneering work by Batchelor, these are the touchstone for low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamic interactions and have been applied directly in the solution of many important problems related to the dynamics of dilute colloidal dispersions [G. K. Batchelor and J. T. Green, J. Fluid Mech. 56, 375–400 (1972) and G. K. Batchelor, J. Fluid Mech. 74, 1–29 (1976)]. Toward extension of these functions to concentrated systems, here we present a new stochastic sampling technique to rapidly calculate an analogous set of mobility functions describing the hydrodynamic interactions between two hard spheres immersed in a suspension of arbitrary concentration, utilizing accelerated Stokesian dynamics simulations. These mobility functions provide precise, radially dependent couplings of hydrodynamic force and torque to particle

  17. Van der Waals-like instability in suspensions of mutually repelling charged colloids

    Roij, R. van; Hansen, J.-P.

    1997-01-01

    We show theoretically that the purely repulsive screened-Coulomb (or Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey- Overbeek) interaction between charged colloidal particles is compatible with gas-liquid, gas-solid, and solid-solid coexistence in colloidal suspensions of low ionic strength of about 1026

  18. Charge transport and contact resistance in coplanar devices based on colloidal polyaniline dispersion

    Masillamani, A. M.; Peřinka, N.; Hajná, Milena; Stejskal, Jaroslav; Tondelier, D.; Bonnassieux, Y.; Vanel, J.-C.; Geffroy, B.; Mencaraglia, D.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 17 (2016), s. 1710-1716 ISSN 0887-6266 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-00270S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : charge transport * colloidal dispersion * colloids Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 2.838, year: 2016

  19. Hard-sphere fluid adsorbed in an annular wedge: The depletion force of hard-body colloidal physics

    Herring, A. R.; Henderson, J. R.

    2007-01-01

    Many important issues of colloidal physics can be expressed in the context of inhomogeneous fluid phenomena. When two large colloids approach one another in solvent, they interact at least partly by the response of the solvent to finding itself adsorbed in the annular wedge formed between the two colloids. At shortest range, this fluid mediated interaction is known as the depletion force/interaction because solvent is squeezed out of the wedge when the colloids approach closer than the diameter of a solvent molecule. An equivalent situation arises when a single colloid approaches a substrate/wall. Accurate treatment of this interaction is essential for any theory developed to model the phase diagrams of homogeneous and inhomogeneous colloidal systems. The aim of our paper is a test of whether or not we possess sufficient knowledge of statistical mechanics that can be trusted when applied to systems of large size asymmetry and the depletion force in particular. When the colloid particles are much larger than a solvent diameter, the depletion force is dominated by the effective two-body interaction experienced by a pair of solvated colloids. This low concentration limit of the depletion force has therefore received considerable attention. One route, which can be rigorously based on statistical mechanical sum rules, leads to an analytic result for the depletion force when evaluated by a key theoretical tool of colloidal science known as the Derjaguin approximation. A rival approach has been based on the assumption that modern density functional theories (DFT) can be trusted for systems of large size asymmetry. Unfortunately, these two theoretical predictions differ qualitatively for hard sphere models, as soon as the solvent density is higher than about 2/3 that at freezing. Recent theoretical attempts to understand this dramatic disagreement have led to the proposal that the Derjaguin and DFT routes represent opposite limiting behavior, for very large size asymmetry

  20. Monodisperse colloidal spheres for (Y,Eu2O3 red-emitting phosphors: establishment of processing window and size-dependent luminescence behavior

    Qi Zhu, Ji-Guang Li, Xiaodong Li, Xudong Sun and Yoshio Sakka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The urea-based homogeneous precipitation method was introduced in the preparation of monodisperse colloidal spheres for (Y0.95Eu0.052O3 red-emitting phosphors, and the processing window was defined. Particle size and shape are significantly affected by the ion concentration and the urea/RE3+ molar ratio R (RE3+=Y3++Eu3+. A low ion concentration is beneficial in forming monodisperse spheres and extending their formation domain. Increasing R results in a gradual change in the composition of spherical particles from the core-shell Eu(OHCO3@Y(OHCO3 structure to a homogeneous solid solution, thereby significantly lowering the calcination temperature at which precursors convert to oxides. Upon UV excitation into the charge-transfer band at 254 nm, the uniform phosphor spheres of (Y0.95Eu0.052O3 exhibit typical red emissions at 613 nm; the emission is stronger from larger particles mainly because of their smaller surface area. Both the luminescence intensity and quantum efficiency of the oxide phosphors increase with elevated calcination temperatures. The spherical shape and excellent dispersion of the precursor particles (~450 nm in diameter have been well retained after calcination at 1000 circleC for 4 h, and the resultant oxide phosphors exhibit external and internal quantum efficiencies of 50 and 82%, respectively.

  1. Sedimentation of bidisperse, uncharged colloidal sphere suspensions: Influence of viscosity and irregular surfaces

    Thies-Weesie, Dominique M. E.; Philipse, Albert P.; Lekkerkerker, Henk N. W.

    1996-01-01

    The sedimentation velocity of uncharged, nonaggregated silica spheres under gravity is strongly reduced after addition of small amounts of nonsedimenting small spheres. This reduction is largely due to surface irregularities on a nanoscale of the large spheres at which a limited number of small

  2. Self-Assembly of Colloidal Spheres into One, Two, and Three Dimensional Structures

    Guo, Y.

    2017-01-01

    The main goal of this thesis is to increase our understanding of colloidal self-assembly processes and develop new strategies to assemble colloidal building blocks into more sophisticated and well-defined super-structures. Self-assembly is a spontaneous process in which a disordered system of

  3. The effect of drainage channels on the hydrodynamic drag of non-colloidal spheres down an inclined plane

    Ryu, Brian; Dhong, Charles; Frechette, Joelle

    While it is well known that surface asperities and roughness alter the hydrodynamic drag of a non-colloidal sphere down an inclined plane, less is known about how the hydrodynamic drag is modified if the asperities and roughness are connected through a network of drainage channels, which allows the movement of fluid between asperities. We investigate the rotational and translation motion of spheres on several pairs of surfaces that have the same porosity and asperity size, but one surface has interconnected drainage channels whereas the other does not. These can have direct relevance to lubricated surfaces such as ball bearings in industrial settings, or biological relevance of leucocyte movement across rough surfaces. Provost's Undergraduate Research Awards, Office of Naval Research, National Science Foundation.

  4. Coupling effects of depletion interactions in a three-sphere colloidal system

    Chen Ze-Shun; Dai Gang; Gao Hai-Xia; Xiao Chang-Ming

    2013-01-01

    In a three-sphere system, the middle sphere is acted upon by two opposite depletion forces from the other two spheres. It is found that, in this system, the two depletion forces are coupled with each other and result in a strengthened depletion force. So the difference of the depletion forces of the three-sphere system and its corresponding two two-sphere systems is introduced to describe the coupling effect of the depletion interactions. The numerical results obtained by Monte-Carlo simulations show that this coupling effect is affected by both the concentration of small spheres and the geometrical confinement. Meanwhile, it is also found that the mechanisms of the coupling effect and the effect on the depletion force from the geometry factor are the same. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  5. The response of a Bonner Sphere spectrometer to charged hadrons

    Agosteo, S; Dimovasili, E; Fassò, A; Silari, M

    2004-01-01

    Bonner sphere spectrometers (BSSs) are employed in neutron spectrometry and dosimetry since many years. Recent developments have seen the addition to a conventional BSS of one or more detectors (moderator plus thermal neutron counter) specifically designed to improve the overall response of the spectrometer to neutrons above 10 MeV. These additional detectors employ a shell of material with a high mass number (such as lead) within the polyethylene moderator, in order to slow down high-energy ...

  6. Double layer for hard spheres with an off-center charge

    W. Silvestre-Alcantara

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Simulations for the density and potential profiles of the ions in the planar electrical double layer of a model electrolyte or an ionic liquid are reported. The ions of a real electrolyte or an ionic liquid are usually not spheres; in ionic liquids, the cations are molecular ions. In the past, this asymmetry has been modelled by considering spheres that are asymmetric in size and/or valence (viz., the primitive model or by dimer cations that are formed by tangentially touching spheres. In this paper we consider spherical ions that are asymmetric in size and mimic the asymmetrical shape through an off-center charge that is located away from the center of the cation spheres, while the anion charge is at the center of anion spheres. The various singlet density and potential profiles are compared to (i the dimer situation, that is, the constituent spheres of the dimer cation are tangentially tethered, and (ii the standard primitive model. The results reveal the double layer structure to be substantially impacted especially when the cation is the counterion. As well as being of intrinsic interest, this off-center charge model may be useful for theories that consider spherical models and introduce the off-center charge as a perturbation.

  7. Photoinduced charge separation in a colloidal system of exfoliated layered semiconductor controlled by coexisting aluminosilicate clay.

    Nakato, Teruyuki; Yamada, Yoshimi; Miyamoto, Nobuyoshi

    2009-02-05

    We investigated photoinduced charge separation occurring in a multicomponent colloidal system composed of oxide nanosheets of photocatalytically active niobate and photochemically inert clay and electron accepting methylviologen dications (MV2+). The inorganic nanosheets were obtained by exfoliation of layered hexaniobate and hectorite clay. The niobate and clay nanosheets were spatially separated in the colloidally dispersed state, and the MV2+ molecules were selectively adsorbed on the clay platelets. UV irradiation of the colloids led to electron transfer from the niobate nanosheets to the MV2+ molecules adsorbed on clay. The photoinduced electron transfer produced methylviologen radical cations (MV*+), which was characterized by high yield and long lifetime. The yield and stability of the MV*+ species were found to depend strongly on the clay content of the colloid: from a few mol % to approximately 70 mol % of the yield and several tens of minutes to more than 40 h of the lifetime. The contents of the niobate nanosheets and MV2+ molecules and the aging of the colloid also affected the photoinduced charge separation. In the absence of MV2+ molecules in the colloid, UV irradiation induced electron accumulation in the niobate nanosheets. The stability of the electron-accumulated state also depended on the clay content. The variation in the photochemical behavior is discussed in relation to the viscosity of the colloid.

  8. Charge-extraction strategies for colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics

    Lan, Xinzheng; Masala, Silvia; Sargent, E. H.

    2014-01-01

    The solar-power conversion efficiencies of colloidal quantum dot solar cells have advanced from sub-1% reported in 2005 to a record value of 8.5% in 2013. Much focus has deservedly been placed on densifying, passivating and crosslinking

  9. Static charged spheres with anisotropic pressure in general relativity

    Department of Mathematics, Vasavi Engineering College, Hyderabad 500 031, India. £ ... In both cases the field equations are integrated completely. ... 1. Introduction. Spherically symmetric static charged dust/perfect fluid distributions of null ...

  10. Single charging events on colloidal particles in a nonpolar liquid with surfactant

    Schreuer, Caspar; Vandewiele, Stijn; Brans, Toon; Strubbe, Filip; Neyts, Kristiaan; Beunis, Filip

    2018-01-01

    Electrical charging of colloidal particles in nonpolar liquids due to surfactant additives is investigated intensively, motivated by its importance in a variety of applications. Most methods rely on average electrophoretic mobility measurements of many particles, which provide only indirect information on the charging mechanism. In the present work, we present a method that allows us to obtain direct information on the charging mechanism, by measuring the charge fluctuations on individual particles with a precision higher than the elementary charge using optical trapping electrophoresis. We demonstrate the capabilities of the method by studying the influence of added surfactant OLOA 11000 on the charging of single colloidal PMMA particles in dodecane. The particle charge and the frequency of charging events are investigated both below and above the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and with or without applying a DC offset voltage. It is found that at least two separate charging mechanisms are present below the critical micelle concentration. One mechanism is a process where the particle is stripped from negatively charged ionic molecules. An increase in the charging frequency with increased surfactant concentration suggests a second mechanism that involves single surfactant molecules. Above the CMC, neutral inverse micelles can also be involved in the charging process.

  11. The response of a Bonner Sphere spectrometer to charged hadrons

    Agosteo, S; Fassò, A; Silari, M

    2004-01-01

    Bonner sphere spectrometers (BSSs) are employed in neutron spectrometry and dosimetry since many years. Recent developments have seen the addition to a conventional BSS of one or more detectors (moderator plus thermal neutron counter) specifically designed to improve the overall response of the spectrometer to neutrons above 10 MeV. These additional detectors employ a shell of material with a high mass number (such as lead) within the polyethylene moderator, in order to slow down high-energy neutrons via (n, xn) reactions. A BSS can be used to measure neutron spectra both outside accelerator shielding and from an unshielded target. Measurements were recently performed at CERN of the neutron yield and spectral fluence at various angles from unshielded, semithick copper, silver and lead targets, bombarded by a mixed proton/pion beam with 40 GeV per c momentum. These experiments have provided evidence that under certain circumstances, the use of lead-enriched moderators may present a problem: these detectors wer...

  12. Understanding colloidal charge renormilization from surface chemistry : experiment and theory

    Gisler, Thomas; Schulz, S. F.; Borkovec, Michal; Sticher, Hans; Schurtenberger, Peter; D'Aguanno, Bruno; Klein, Rudolf

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we report on the charging behavior of latex particles in aqueous suspensions. We use static light scattering and acid-base titrations as complementary techniques to observe both effective and bare particle charges. Acid-base titrations at various ionic strengths provide the pH dependent charging curves. The surface chemical parameters (dissociation constant of the acidic carboxylic groups, total density of ionizable sites and Stem capacitance) are determined from tits of a Stem ...

  13. Adsorption of polyelectrolytes and charged block copolymers on oxides consequences for colloidal stability

    Hoogeveen, N.G.

    1996-01-01


    The aim of the study described in this thesis was to examine the adsorption properties of polyelectrolytes and charged block copolymers on oxides, and the effect of these polymers on the colloidal stability of oxidic dispersions. For this purpose the interaction of some well-characterised

  14. Single-particle thermal diffusion of charged colloids: Double-layer theory in a temperature gradient

    Dhont, J.K.G.; Briels, Willem J.

    2008-01-01

    The double-layer contribution to the single-particle thermal diffusion coefficient of charged, spherical colloids with arbitrary double-layer thickness is calculated and compared to experiments. The calculation is based on an extension of the Debye-Hückel theory for the double-layer structure that

  15. Electrostatic solvation free energies of charged hard spheres using molecular dynamics with density functional theory interactions

    Duignan, Timothy T.; Baer, Marcel D.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Mundy, Chistopher J.

    2017-10-01

    Determining the solvation free energies of single ions in water is one of the most fundamental problems in physical chemistry and yet many unresolved questions remain. In particular, the ability to decompose the solvation free energy into simple and intuitive contributions will have important implications for models of electrolyte solution. Here, we provide definitions of the various types of single ion solvation free energies based on different simulation protocols. We calculate solvation free energies of charged hard spheres using density functional theory interaction potentials with molecular dynamics simulation and isolate the effects of charge and cavitation, comparing to the Born (linear response) model. We show that using uncorrected Ewald summation leads to unphysical values for the single ion solvation free energy and that charging free energies for cations are approximately linear as a function of charge but that there is a small non-linearity for small anions. The charge hydration asymmetry for hard spheres, determined with quantum mechanics, is much larger than for the analogous real ions. This suggests that real ions, particularly anions, are significantly more complex than simple charged hard spheres, a commonly employed representation.

  16. Colloids from oppositely charged polymers: reversibility and surface activity

    Hofs, P.S.

    2009-01-01

    The research described in this thesis concerns the formation, solution properties, and adsorption of polyelectrolyte complexes composed of at least one diblock copolymer with a neutral and a charged block and either an oppositely charged homopolyelectrolyte or a diblock copolymer, with a neutral

  17. Towards an analytical theory for charged hard spheres

    L.Blum

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Ion mixtures require an exclusion core to avoid collapse. The Debye Hueckel (DH theory, where ions are point charges, is accurate only in the limit of infinite dilution. The mean spherical approximation (MSA is the embedding of hard cores into DH, and is valid for higher densities. The properties of any ionic mixture can be represented by the single screening parameter Γ which for the equal ionic size restricted model is obtained from the Debye parameter κ. This Γ representation, the binding mean spherical approximation (BIMSA, is also valid for complex/associating systems, such as the general n-polyelectrolytes. The BIMSA is the only theory that satisfies the infinite dilution limit of the DH theory for any chain length. Furthermore, the contact pair distribution function calculated from our theory agrees with the Monte Carlo of Bresmeea. (Phys. Rev. E, 1995, 51, 289.

  18. Understanding colloidal charge renormalization from surface chemistry: Experiment and theory

    Gisler, T.; Schulz, S. F.; Borkovec, M.; Sticher, H.; Schurtenberger, P.; D'Aguanno, B.; Klein, R.

    1994-12-01

    In this paper we report on the charging behavior of latex particles in aqueous suspensions. We use static light scattering and acid-base titrations as complementary techniques to observe both effective and bare particle charges. Acid-base titrations at various ionic strengths provide the pH dependent charging curves. The surface chemical parameters (dissociation constant of the acidic carboxylic groups, total density of ionizable sites and Stern capacitance) are determined from fits of a Stern layer model to the titration data. We find strong evidence that the dissociation of protons is the only specific adsorption process. Effective particle charges are determined by fits of integral equation calculations of the polydisperse static structure factor to the static light scattering data. A generalization of the Poisson-Boltzmann cell model including the dissociation of the acidic surface groups and the autodissociation of water is used to predict effective particle charges from the surface chemical parameters determined by the titration experiments. We find that the light scattering data are best described by a model where a small fraction of the ionizable surface sites are sulfate groups which are completely dissociated at moderate pH. These effective charges are comparable to the predictions by a basic cell model where charge regulation is absent.

  19. Modified Mason number for charged paramagnetic colloidal suspensions

    Du, Di; Hilou, Elaa; Biswal, Sibani Lisa

    2016-06-01

    The dynamics of magnetorheological fluids have typically been described by the Mason number, a governing parameter defined as the ratio between viscous and magnetic forces in the fluid. For most experimental suspensions of magnetic particles, surface forces, such as steric and electrostatic interactions, can significantly influence the dynamics. Here we propose a theory of a modified Mason number that accounts for surface forces and show that this modified Mason number is a function of interparticle distance. We demonstrate that this modified Mason number is accurate in describing the dynamics of a rotating pair of paramagnetic colloids of identical or mismatched sizes in either high or low salt solutions. The modified Mason number is confirmed to be pseudoconstant for particle pairs and particle chains undergoing a stable-metastable transition during rotation. The interparticle distance term can be calculated using theory or can be measured experimentally. This modified Mason number is more applicable to magnetorheological systems where surface forces are not negligible.

  20. Phase behavior of charged colloids on spherical surfaces

    Kelleher, Colm; Guerra, Rodrigo; Chaikin, Paul

    For a broad class of 2D materials, the transition from isotropic fluid to crystalline solid is described by the theory of melting due to Kosterlitz, Thouless, Halperin, Nelson and Young. According to this theory, long-range order is achieved via elimination of the topological defects which proliferate in the fluid phase. However, many natural and man-made 2D systems posses spatial curvature and/or non-trivial topology, which require the presence of defects, even at T = 0 . In principle, the presence of these defects could profoundly affect the phase behavior of such a system. In this presentation, we describe experiments and simulations we have performed on repulsive particles which are bound to the surface of a sphere. We observe spatial structures and inhomogeneous dynamics that cannot be captured by the measures traditionally used to describe flat-space phase behavior. We show that ordering is achieved by a novel mechanism: sequestration of topological defects into freely-terminating grain boundaries (``scars''), and simultaneous spatial organization of the scars themselves on the vertices of an icosahedron. The emergence of icosahedral order coincides with the localization of mobility into isolated ``lakes'' of fluid or glassy particles, situated at the icosahedron vertices.

  1. Theoretical assessment of the disparity in the electrostatic forces between two point charges and two conductive spheres of equal radii

    Kolikov, Kiril

    2016-11-01

    The Coulomb's formula for the force FC of electrostatic interaction between two point charges is well known. In reality, however, interactions occur not between point charges, but between charged bodies of certain geometric form, size and physical structure. This leads to deviation of the estimated force FC from the real force F of electrostatic interaction, thus imposing the task to evaluate the disparity. In the present paper the problem is being solved theoretically for two charged conductive spheres of equal radii and arbitrary electric charges. Assessment of the deviation is given as a function of the ratio of the distance R between the spheres centers to the sum of their radii. For the purpose, relations between FC and F derived in a preceding work of ours, are employed to generalize the Coulomb's interactions. At relatively short distances between the spheres, the Coulomb force FC, as estimated to be induced by charges situated at the centers of the spheres, differ significantly from the real force F of interaction between the spheres. In the case of zero and non-zero charge we prove that with increasing the distance between the two spheres, the force F decrease rapidly, virtually to zero values, i.e. it appears to be short-acting force.

  2. A Colloidal-Quantum-Dot-Based Self-Charging System via the Near-Infrared Band.

    Baek, Se-Woong; Cho, Jungmin; Kim, Joo-Seong; Kim, Changjo; Na, Kwangmin; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Jun, Sunhong; Song, Jung Hoon; Jeong, Sohee; Choi, Jang Wook; Lee, Jung-Yong

    2018-05-11

    A novel self-charging platform is proposed using colloidal-quantum-dot (CQD) photovoltaics (PVs) via the near-infrared (NIR) band for low-power electronics. Low-bandgap CQDs can convert invisible NIR light sources to electrical energy more efficiently than wider spectra because of reduced thermalization loss. This energy-conversion strategy via NIR photons ensures an enhanced photostability of the CQD devices. Furthermore, the NIR wireless charging system can be concealed using various colored and NIR-transparent fabric or films, providing aesthetic freedom. Finally, an NIR-driven wireless charging system is demonstrated for a wearable healthcare bracelet by integrating a CQD PVs receiver with a flexible lithium-ion battery and entirely embedding them into a flexible strap, enabling permanent self-charging without detachment. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Electrical discharge occurring between a negatively charged particle cloud and a grounded sphere electrode

    Higashiyama, Y; Migita, S; Toki, K; Sugimoto, T

    2008-01-01

    Electrostatic discharge occurring between a space-charge cloud and a grounded object was investigated using a large-scale charged particle cloud formed by using three set of cloud generators consisting of a blower and corona charger. The ejecting velocity of the particles affects the formation of the charged cloud. At the lower velocity, the charged cloud spread due to electrostatic repulsion force, while at the higher velocity cloud forms an elongated conical shape. To cause electrostatic discharge between the cloud and a grounded object, a grounded sphere electrode with 100 mm in diameter was set at the inside or outside of the cloud. The brush-like discharge channels reached the maximum length of 0.55 m. The discharge current has a waveform with single or multi-peak, a current peak of several amperes, the maximum charge quantity of 2 μC, and the duration of several microseconds. The relationship between the charge quantity and the current peak or the duration in each discharge was examined. The discharge between the cloud and the electrode placed at the outside of the cloud has relatively longer channels and multi-peak current with the longer duration, while that at the inside of the cloud has the lower charge quantity with single peak.

  4. Soluble Supercapacitors: Large and Reversible Charge Storage in Colloidal Iron-Doped ZnO Nanocrystals.

    Brozek, Carl K; Zhou, Dongming; Liu, Hongbin; Li, Xiaosong; Kittilstved, Kevin R; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2018-05-09

    Colloidal ZnO semiconductor nanocrystals have previously been shown to accumulate multiple delocalized conduction-band electrons under chemical, electrochemical, or photochemical reducing conditions, leading to emergent semimetallic characteristics such as quantum plasmon resonances and raising prospects for application in multielectron redox transformations. Here, we demonstrate a dramatic enhancement in the capacitance of colloidal ZnO nanocrystals through aliovalent Fe 3+ -doping. Very high areal and volumetric capacitances (33 μF cm -2 , 233 F cm -3 ) are achieved in Zn 0.99 Fe 0.01 O nanocrystals that rival those of the best supercapacitors used in commercial energy-storage devices. The redox properties of these nanocrystals are probed by potentiometric titration and optical spectroscopy. These data indicate an equilibrium between electron localization by Fe 3+ dopants and electron delocalization within the ZnO conduction band, allowing facile reversible charge storage and removal. As "soluble supercapacitors", colloidal iron-doped ZnO nanocrystals constitute a promising class of solution-processable electronic materials with large charge-storage capacity attractive for future energy-storage applications.

  5. Influence of the shell thickness and charge distribution on the effective interaction between two like-charged hollow spheres.

    Angelescu, Daniel G; Caragheorgheopol, Dan

    2015-10-14

    The mean-force and the potential of the mean force between two like-charged spherical shells were investigated in the salt-free limit using the primitive model and Monte Carlo simulations. Apart from an angular homogeneous distribution, a discrete charge distribution where point charges localized on the shell outer surface followed an icosahedral arrangement was considered. The electrostatic coupling of the model system was altered by the presence of mono-, trivalent counterions or small dendrimers, each one bearing a net charge of 9 e. We analyzed in detail how the shell thickness and the radial and angular distribution of the shell charges influenced the effective interaction between the shells. We found a sequence of the potential of the mean force similar to the like-charged filled spheres, ranging from long-range purely repulsive to short-range purely attractive as the electrostatic coupling increased. Both types of potentials were attenuated and an attractive-to-repulsive transition occurred in the presence of trivalent counterions as a result of (i) thinning the shell or (ii) shifting the shell charge from the outer towards the inner surface. The potential of the mean force became more attractive with the icosahedrally symmetric charge model, and additionally, at least one shell tended to line up with 5-fold symmetry axis along the longest axis of the simulation box at the maximum attraction. The results provided a basic framework of understanding the non-specific electrostatic origin of the agglomeration and long-range assembly of the viral nanoparticles.

  6. Flocculation of Clay Colloids Induced by Model Polyelectrolytes: Effects of Relative Charge Density and Size.

    Sakhawoth, Yasine; Michot, Laurent J; Levitz, Pierre; Malikova, Natalie

    2017-10-06

    Flocculation and its tuning are of utmost importance in the optimization of several industrial protocols in areas such as purification of waste water and civil engineering. Herein, we studied the polyelectrolyte-induced flocculation of clay colloids on a model system consisting of purified clay colloids of well-defined size fractions and ionene polyelectrolytes presenting regular and tunable chain charge density. To characterize ionene-induced clay flocculation, we turned to the combination of light absorbance (turbidity) and ζ-potential measurements, as well as adsorption isotherms. Our model system allowed us to identify the exact ratio of positive and negative charges in clay-ionene mixtures, the (c+/c-) ratio. For all samples studied, the onset of efficient flocculation occurred consistently at c+/c- ratios significantly below 1, which indicated the formation of highly ionene-deficient aggregates. At the same time, the ζ-potential measurements indicated an apparent zero charge on such aggregates. Thus, the ζ-potential values could not provide the stoichiometry inside the clay-ionene aggregates. The early onset of flocculation in clay-ionene mixtures is reminiscent of the behavior of multivalent salts and contrasts that of monovalent salts, for which a large excess amount of ions is necessary to achieve flocculation. Clear differences in the flocculation behavior are visible as a function of the ionene charge density, which governs the conformation of the ionene chains on the clay surface. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Poisson-Boltzmann theory of charged colloids: limits of the cell model for salty suspensions

    Denton, A R

    2010-01-01

    Thermodynamic properties of charge-stabilized colloidal suspensions and polyelectrolyte solutions are commonly modelled by implementing the mean-field Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) theory within a cell model. This approach models a bulk system by a single macroion, together with counterions and salt ions, confined to a symmetrically shaped, electroneutral cell. While easing numerical solution of the nonlinear PB equation, the cell model neglects microion-induced interactions and correlations between macroions, precluding modelling of macroion ordering phenomena. An alternative approach, which avoids the artificial constraints of cell geometry, exploits the mapping of a macroion-microion mixture onto a one-component model of pseudo-macroions governed by effective interparticle interactions. In practice, effective-interaction models are usually based on linear-screening approximations, which can accurately describe strong nonlinear screening only by incorporating an effective (renormalized) macroion charge. Combining charge renormalization and linearized PB theories, in both the cell model and an effective-interaction (cell-free) model, we compute osmotic pressures of highly charged colloids and monovalent microions, in Donnan equilibrium with a salt reservoir, over a range of concentrations. By comparing predictions with primitive model simulation data for salt-free suspensions, and with predictions from nonlinear PB theory for salty suspensions, we chart the limits of both the cell model and linear-screening approximations in modelling bulk thermodynamic properties. Up to moderately strong electrostatic couplings, the cell model proves accurate for predicting osmotic pressures of deionized (counterion-dominated) suspensions. With increasing salt concentration, however, the relative contribution of macroion interactions to the osmotic pressure grows, leading predictions from the cell and effective-interaction models to deviate. No evidence is found for a liquid

  8. Renormalized charge in a two-dimensional model of colloidal suspension from hypernetted chain approach.

    Camargo, Manuel; Téllez, Gabriel

    2008-04-07

    The renormalized charge of a simple two-dimensional model of colloidal suspension was determined by solving the hypernetted chain approximation and Ornstein-Zernike equations. At the infinite dilution limit, the asymptotic behavior of the correlation functions is used to define the effective interactions between the components of the system and these effective interactions were compared to those derived from the Poisson-Boltzmann theory. The results we obtained show that, in contrast to the mean-field theory, the renormalized charge does not saturate, but exhibits a maximum value and then decays monotonically as the bare charge increases. The results also suggest that beyond the counterion layer near to the macroion surface, the ionic cloud is not a diffuse layer which can be handled by means of the linearized theory, as the two-state model claims, but a more complex structure is settled by the correlations between microions.

  9. Polyion-induced aggregation of oppositely charged liposomes and charged colloidal particles: the many facets of complex formation in low-density colloidal systems.

    Cametti, C

    2008-10-01

    This review focusses on recent developments in the experimental study of polyion-induced charged colloidal particle aggregation, with particular emphasis on the formation of cationic liposome clusters induced by the addition of anionic adsorbing polyions. These structures can be considered, under certain points of view, a new class of colloidal systems, with intriguing properties that opens interesting and promising new opportunities in various biotechnological applications. Lipidic structures of different morphologies and different structural complexities interacting with oppositely charged polyions give rise to a rich variety of self-assembled structures that present various orders of hierarchy in the sense that, starting from a basic level, for example a lipid bilayer, they arrange themselves into superstructures as, for example, multilamellar stacks or liquid-crystalline structures. These structures can be roughly divided into two classes according to the fact that the elementary structure, involved in building a more complex one, keeps or does not keeps its basic arrangement. To the first one, belong those aggregates composed by single structures that maintain their integrity, for example, lipidic vesicles assembled together by an appropriate external agent. The second one encompasses structures that do not resemble the ones of the original objects which form them, but, conversely, derive from a deep restructuring and rearrangement process, where the original morphology of the initial constitutive elements is completely lost. In this review, I will only briefly touch on higher level hierarchy structures and I will focus on the assembling processes involving preformed lipid bilayer vesicles that organize themselves into clusters, the process being induced by the adsorption of oppositely charged polyions. The scientific interest in polyion-induced liposome aggregates is two-fold. On the one hand, in soft-matter physics, they represent an interesting colloidal

  10. Effect of laundry surfactants on surface charge and colloidal stability of silver nanoparticles.

    Skoglund, Sara; Lowe, Troy A; Hedberg, Jonas; Blomberg, Eva; Wallinder, Inger Odnevall; Wold, Susanna; Lundin, Maria

    2013-07-16

    The stability of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) potentially released from clothing during a laundry cycle and their interactions with laundry-relevant surfactants [anionic (LAS), cationic (DTAC), and nonionic (Berol)] have been investigated. Surface interactions between Ag NPs and surfactants influence their speciation and stability. In the absence of surfactants as well as in the presence of LAS, the negatively charged Ag NPs were stable in solution for more than 1 day. At low DTAC concentrations (≤1 mM), DTAC-Ag NP interactions resulted in charge neutralization and formation of agglomerates. The surface charge of the particles became positive at higher concentrations due to a bilayer type formation of DTAC that prevents from agglomeration due to repulsive electrostatic forces between the positively charged colloids. The adsorption of Berol was enhanced when above its critical micelle concentration (cmc). This resulted in a surface charge close to zero and subsequent agglomeration. Extended DLVO theory calculations were in compliance with observed findings. The stability of the Ag NPs was shown to depend on the charge and concentration of the adsorbed surfactants. Such knowledge is important as it may influence the subsequent transport of Ag NPs through different chemical transients and thus their potential bioavailability and toxicity.

  11. Thermodynamics and structure of liquid alkali metals from the charged-hard-sphere reference fluid

    Lai, S.K.; Akinlade, O.; Tosi, M.P.

    1989-12-01

    The evaluation of thermodynamic properties of liquid alkali metals is re-examined in the approach based on the Gibbs-Bogoliubov inequality and using the fluid of charged hard spheres in the mean spherical approximation as reference system, with a view to achieving consistency with the liquid structure factor. The perturbative variational calculation of the Helmholtz free energy is based on an ab initio and highly reliable nonlocal pseudopotential. Only limited improvement is found in the calculated thermodynamic functions, even when full advantage is taken of the two variational parameters inherent in this approach. The role of thermodynamic self-consistency between the equations of state of the reference fluid derived from the routes of the internal energy and of the virial theorem is then discussed, using previous results by Hoye and Stell. An approximate evaluation of the corresponding contribution to the free energy of liquid alkali metals yields appreciable improvements in both the thermodynamic functions and the liquid structure factor. It thus appears that an accurate treatment of thermodynamic self-consistency in the charged-hard-sphere system may help to resolve some of the difficulties that are commonly met in the evaluation of thermodynamic and structural properties of liquid metals. (author). 55 refs, 4 figs, 4 tabs

  12. Hydrothermal-induced assembly of colloidal silver spheres into various nanoparticles on the basis of HTAB-modified silver mirror reaction.

    Yu, Dabin; Yam, Vivian Wing-Wah

    2005-03-31

    Small colloidal silver spheres (diameter synthesis process. Adjustment of the synthesis parameters, in particular the concentrations of HTAB and [Ag(NH3)2]+, led to an obvious shape evolution of silver nanoparticles, thus resulting in the shape-selective formation of the silver nanoparticles. The monodisperse nanocubes with a well-defined crystallographical structure (a single crystal bounded by six {200} facets) have a strong tendency to assemble into two-dimensional arrays on substrates. The nanowires with uniform diameter usually existed in the form of two-dimensional alignments. The findings suggested that hydrothermal-induced assembly of small silver colloidal particles should be a convenient and effective approach to the preparation of various silver nanoparticles.

  13. Analytical solutions of nonlocal Poisson dielectric models with multiple point charges inside a dielectric sphere

    Xie, Dexuan; Volkmer, Hans W.; Ying, Jinyong

    2016-04-01

    The nonlocal dielectric approach has led to new models and solvers for predicting electrostatics of proteins (or other biomolecules), but how to validate and compare them remains a challenge. To promote such a study, in this paper, two typical nonlocal dielectric models are revisited. Their analytical solutions are then found in the expressions of simple series for a dielectric sphere containing any number of point charges. As a special case, the analytical solution of the corresponding Poisson dielectric model is also derived in simple series, which significantly improves the well known Kirkwood's double series expansion. Furthermore, a convolution of one nonlocal dielectric solution with a commonly used nonlocal kernel function is obtained, along with the reaction parts of these local and nonlocal solutions. To turn these new series solutions into a valuable research tool, they are programed as a free fortran software package, which can input point charge data directly from a protein data bank file. Consequently, different validation tests can be quickly done on different proteins. Finally, a test example for a protein with 488 atomic charges is reported to demonstrate the differences between the local and nonlocal models as well as the importance of using the reaction parts to develop local and nonlocal dielectric solvers.

  14. Electrophoretic mobilities of dissolved polyelectrolyte charging agent and suspended non-colloidal titanium during electrophoretic deposition

    Lau, Kok-Tee; Sorrell, C.C.

    2011-01-01

    Coarse (≤20 μm) titanium particles were deposited on low-carbon steel substrates by cathodic electrophoretic deposition (EPD) with ethanol as suspension medium and poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDADMAC) as polymeric charging agent. Preliminary data on the electrophoretic mobilities and electrical conductivities on the suspensions of these soft particles as well as the solutions themselves as a function of PDADMAC level were used as the basis for the investigation of the EPD parameters in terms of the deposition yield as a function of five experimental parameters: (a) PDADMAC addition level, (b) solids loading, (c) deposition time, (d) applied voltage, and (e) electrode separation. These data were supported by particle sizing by laser diffraction and deposit surface morphology by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The preceding data demonstrated that Ti particles of ∼1-12 μm size, electrosterically modified by the PDADMAC charging agent, acted effectively as colloidal particles during EPD. Owing to the non-colloidal nature of the particles and the stabilization of the Ti particles by electrosteric forces, the relevance of the zeta potential is questionable, so the more fundamental parameter of electrophoretic mobility was used. A key finding from the present work is the importance of assessing the electrophoretic mobilities of both the suspensions and solutions since the latter, which normally is overlooked, plays a critical role in the ability to interpret the results meaningfully. Further, algebraic uncoupling of these data plus determination of the deposit yield as a function of charging agent addition allow discrimination between the three main mechanistic stages of the electrokinetics of the process, which are: (1) surface saturation; (2) compression of the diffuse layer, growth of polymer-rich layer, and/or competition between the mobility of Ti and PDADMAC; and (3) little or no decrease in electrophoretic mobility of Ti, establishment of

  15. Electrophoretic mobilities of dissolved polyelectrolyte charging agent and suspended non-colloidal titanium during electrophoretic deposition

    Lau, Kok-Tee [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Faculty of Manufacturing Engineering, Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka, 76109 Durian Tunggal, Melaka (Malaysia); Sorrell, C.C., E-mail: C.Sorrell@unsw.edu.au [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2011-03-25

    Coarse ({<=}20 {mu}m) titanium particles were deposited on low-carbon steel substrates by cathodic electrophoretic deposition (EPD) with ethanol as suspension medium and poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDADMAC) as polymeric charging agent. Preliminary data on the electrophoretic mobilities and electrical conductivities on the suspensions of these soft particles as well as the solutions themselves as a function of PDADMAC level were used as the basis for the investigation of the EPD parameters in terms of the deposition yield as a function of five experimental parameters: (a) PDADMAC addition level, (b) solids loading, (c) deposition time, (d) applied voltage, and (e) electrode separation. These data were supported by particle sizing by laser diffraction and deposit surface morphology by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The preceding data demonstrated that Ti particles of {approx}1-12 {mu}m size, electrosterically modified by the PDADMAC charging agent, acted effectively as colloidal particles during EPD. Owing to the non-colloidal nature of the particles and the stabilization of the Ti particles by electrosteric forces, the relevance of the zeta potential is questionable, so the more fundamental parameter of electrophoretic mobility was used. A key finding from the present work is the importance of assessing the electrophoretic mobilities of both the suspensions and solutions since the latter, which normally is overlooked, plays a critical role in the ability to interpret the results meaningfully. Further, algebraic uncoupling of these data plus determination of the deposit yield as a function of charging agent addition allow discrimination between the three main mechanistic stages of the electrokinetics of the process, which are: (1) surface saturation; (2) compression of the diffuse layer, growth of polymer-rich layer, and/or competition between the mobility of Ti and PDADMAC; and (3) little or no decrease in electrophoretic mobility of Ti

  16. On the calculation of the structure of charge-stabilized colloidal dispersions using density-dependent potentials

    Castañeda-Priego, R; Lobaskin, V; Mixteco-Sánchez, J C; Rojas-Ochoa, L F; Linse, P

    2012-01-01

    The structure of charge-stabilized colloidal dispersions has been studied through a one-component model using a Yukawa potential with density-dependent parameters examined with integral equation theory and Monte Carlo simulations. Partial thermodynamic consistency was guaranteed by considering the osmotic pressure of the dispersion from the approximate mean-field renormalized jellium and Poisson-Boltzmann cell models. The colloidal structures could be accurately described by the Ornstein-Zernike equation with the Rogers-Young closure by using the osmotic pressure from the renormalized jellium model. Although we explicitly show that the correct effective pair-potential obtained from the inverse Monte Carlo method deviates from the Yukawa shape, the osmotic pressure constraint allows us to have a good description of the colloidal structure without losing information on the system thermodynamics. Our findings are corroborated by primitive model simulations of salt-free colloidal dispersions. (paper)

  17. Influence of iron solubility and charged surface-active compounds on lipid oxidation in fatty acid ethyl esters containing association colloids.

    Homma, Rika; Johnson, David R; McClements, D Julian; Decker, Eric A

    2016-05-15

    The impact of iron compounds with different solubilities on lipid oxidation was studied in the presence and absence of association colloids. Iron (III) sulfate only accelerated lipid oxidation in the presence of association colloids while iron (III) oleate accelerated oxidation in the presence and absence of association colloids. Further, iron (III) oxide retarded lipid oxidation both with and without association colloids. The impact of charged association colloids on lipid oxidation in ethyl oleate was also investigated. Association colloids consisting of the anionic surface-active compound dodecyl sulphosuccinate sodium salt (AOT), cationic surface-active compound hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), and nonionic surface-active compound 4-(1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl)phenyl-polyethylene glycol (Triton X-100) retarded, promoted, and had no effect on lipid oxidation rates, respectively. These results indicate that the polarity of metal compounds and the charge of association colloids play a big role in lipid oxidation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Long-time self-diffusion of charged spherical colloidal particles in parallel planar layers.

    Contreras-Aburto, Claudio; Báez, César A; Méndez-Alcaraz, José M; Castañeda-Priego, Ramón

    2014-06-28

    The long-time self-diffusion coefficient, D(L), of charged spherical colloidal particles in parallel planar layers is studied by means of Brownian dynamics computer simulations and mode-coupling theory. All particles (regardless which layer they are located on) interact with each other via the screened Coulomb potential and there is no particle transfer between layers. As a result of the geometrical constraint on particle positions, the simulation results show that D(L) is strongly controlled by the separation between layers. On the basis of the so-called contraction of the description formalism [C. Contreras-Aburto, J. M. Méndez-Alcaraz, and R. Castañeda-Priego, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 174111 (2010)], the effective potential between particles in a layer (the so-called observed layer) is obtained from integrating out the degrees of freedom of particles in the remaining layers. We have shown in a previous work that the effective potential performs well in describing the static structure of the observed layer (loc. cit.). In this work, we find that the D(L) values determined from the simulations of the observed layer, where the particles interact via the effective potential, do not agree with the exact values of D(L). Our findings confirm that even when an effective potential can perform well in describing the static properties, there is no guarantee that it will correctly describe the dynamic properties of colloidal systems.

  19. Renormalization in charged colloids: non-monotonic behaviour with the surface charge

    Haro-Perez, C; Quesada-Perez, M; Callejas-Fernandez, J; Schurtenberger, P; Hidalgo-Alvarez, R

    2006-01-01

    The static structure factor S(q) is measured for a set of deionized latex dispersions with different numbers of ionizable surface groups per particle and similar diameters. For a given volume fraction, the height of the main peak of S(q), which is a direct measure of the spatial ordering of latex particles, does not increase monotonically with the number of ionizable groups. This behaviour cannot be described using the classical renormalization scheme based on the cell model. We analyse our experimental data using a renormalization model based on the jellium approximation, which predicts the weakening of the spatial order for moderate and large particle charges. (letter to the editor)

  20. Flocculation of colloidal clay by bacterial polysaccharides: effect of macromolecule charge and structure.

    Labille, J; Thomas, F; Milas, M; Vanhaverbeke, C

    2005-04-01

    The molecular mechanism of montmorillonite flocculation by bacterial polysaccharides was investigated, with special emphasis on the effect of carboxylic charges in the macromolecules on the mechanisms of interaction with the clay surface. An indirect way to quantify the energy of interaction was used, by comparing the flocculation ability of variously acidic polysaccharides. Data on tensile strength of aggregates in diluted suspension were collected by timed size measurements in the domain 0.1-600 microm, using laser diffraction. The flow behavior of settled aggregates was studied by rheology measurements. Flocculation of colloidal clay suspension by polysaccharides requires cancelling of the electrostatic repulsions by salts, which allows approach of clay surfaces close enough to be bridged by adsorbing macromolecules. The amount of acidic charges of the polysaccharides, and especially their location in the molecular structure, governs the bridging mechanism and the resulting tensile strength of the aggregates. The exposure of carboxylate groups located on side chains strongly promotes flocculation. In turn, charges located on the backbone of the polysaccharide are less accessible to interaction, and the flocculation ability of such polysaccharides is lowered. Measurements at different pH indicate that adsorption of acidic polysaccharides occurs via electrostatic interactions on the amphoteric edge surface of clay platelets, whereas neutral polysaccharides rather adsorb via weak interactions. Increased tensile strength in diluted aggregates due to strong surface interactions results in proportionally increased viscosity of the concentrated aggregates.

  1. Influences of surface charge, size, and concentration of colloidal nanoparticles on fabrication of self-organized porous silica in film and particle forms.

    Nandiyanto, Asep Bayu Dani; Suhendi, Asep; Arutanti, Osi; Ogi, Takashi; Okuyama, Kikuo

    2013-05-28

    Studies on preparation of porous material have attracted tremendous attention because existence of pores can provide material with excellent performances. However, current preparation reports described successful production of porous material with only partial information on charges, interactions, sizes, and compositions of the template and host materials. In this report, influences of self-assembly parameters (i.e., surface charge, size, and concentration of colloidal nanoparticles) on self-organized porous material fabrication were investigated. Silica nanoparticles (as a host material) and polystyrene (PS) spheres (as a template) were combined to produce self-assembly porous materials in film and particle forms. The experimental results showed that the porous structure and pore size were controllable and strongly depended on the self-assembly parameters. Materials containing highly ordered pores were effectively created only when process parameters fall within appropriate conditions (i.e., PS surface charge ≤ -30 mV; silica-to-PS size ratio ≤0.078; and silica-to-PS mass ratio of about 0.50). The investigation of the self-assembly parameter landscape was also completed using geometric considerations. Because optimization of these parameters provides significant information in regard to practical uses, results of this report could be relevant to other functional properties.

  2. Ionic pairing in binary liquids of charged hard spheres with non-additive diameters

    Pastore, G.; Giaquinta, P.V.; Thakur, J.S.; Tosi, M.P.

    1985-07-01

    We examine types of short range order that arise in binary liquids from a combination of Coulombic interactions and non-additivity of excluded volumes, the initial motivation being observations of complex formation by hydrated ions in concentrated aqueous solutions. The model is a fluid of charged hard spheres with contact distances σsub(+-)not=1/2(σsub(++)+σsub(--)), its structural functions being evaluated in the mean spherical approximation and in the hypernetted chain approximation. Cation-anion pairing is clearly seen in the calculated structural functions for negative deviations from additivity (σsub(+-) σsub(++)=σsub(--)) favour long-wavelength concentration fluctuations and demixing in a neutral mixture: these are suppressed by Coulombic interactions in favour of microscopic intermixing of the two species in the local liquid structure, up to like-ion pairing. Contact is made with diffraction from concentrated aqueous solutions of cadmium sulphate and other instances of possible applicability of the model are pointed out. (author)

  3. Predicting tensorial electrophoretic effects in asymmetric colloids

    Mowitz, Aaron J.; Witten, T. A.

    2017-12-01

    We formulate a numerical method for predicting the tensorial linear response of a rigid, asymmetrically charged body to an applied electric field. This prediction requires calculating the response of the fluid to the Stokes drag forces on the moving body and on the countercharges near its surface. To determine the fluid's motion, we represent both the body and the countercharges using many point sources of drag known as Stokeslets. Finding the correct flow field amounts to finding the set of drag forces on the Stokeslets that is consistent with the relative velocities experienced by each Stokeslet. The method rigorously satisfies the condition that the object moves with no transfer of momentum to the fluid. We demonstrate that a sphere represented by 1999 well-separated Stokeslets on its surface produces flow and drag force like a solid sphere to 1% accuracy. We show that a uniformly charged sphere with 3998 body and countercharge Stokeslets obeys the Smoluchowski prediction [F. Morrison, J. Colloid Interface Sci. 34, 210 (1970), 10.1016/0021-9797(70)90171-2] for electrophoretic mobility when the countercharges lie close to the sphere. Spheres with dipolar and quadrupolar charge distributions rotate and translate as predicted analytically to 4% accuracy or better. We describe how the method can treat general asymmetric shapes and charge distributions. This method offers promise as a way to characterize and manipulate asymmetrically charged colloid-scale objects from biology (e.g., viruses) and technology (e.g., self-assembled clusters).

  4. Real-Time Fluorescence Detection in Aqueous Systems by Combined and Enhanced Photonic and Surface Effects in Patterned Hollow Sphere Colloidal Photonic Crystals.

    Zhong, Kuo; Wang, Ling; Li, Jiaqi; Van Cleuvenbergen, Stijn; Bartic, Carmen; Song, Kai; Clays, Koen

    2017-05-16

    Hollow sphere colloidal photonic crystals (HSCPCs) exhibit the ability to maintain a high refractive index contrast after infiltration of water, leading to extremely high-quality photonic band gap effects, even in an aqueous (physiological) environment. Superhydrophilic pinning centers in a superhydrophobic environment can be used to strongly confine and concentrate water-soluble analytes. We report a strategy to realize real-time ultrasensitive fluorescence detection in patterned HSCPCs based on strongly enhanced fluorescence due to the photonic band-edge effect combined with wettability differentiation in the superhydrophobic/superhydrophilic pattern. The orthogonal nature of the two strategies allows for a multiplicative effect, resulting in an increase of two orders of magnitude in fluorescence.

  5. Origins of the anomalous stress behavior in charged colloidal suspensions under shear.

    Kumar, Amit; Higdon, Jonathan J L

    2010-11-01

    Numerical simulations are conducted to determine microstructure and rheology of sheared suspensions of charged colloidal particles at a volume fraction of ϕ=0.33. Over broad ranges of repulsive force strength F0 and Péclet number Pe, dynamic simulations show coexistence of ordered and disordered stable states with the state dependent on the initial condition. In contrast to the common view, at low shear rates, the disordered phase exhibits a lower viscosity (μ(r)) than the ordered phase, while this behavior is reversed at higher shear rates. Analysis shows the stress reversal is associated with different shear induced microstructural distortions in the ordered and disordered systems. Viscosity vs shear rate data over a wide range of F0 and Pe collapses well upon rescaling with the long-time self-diffusivity. Shear thinning viscosity in the ordered phase scaled as μ(r)∼Pe(-0.81) at low shear rates. The microstructural dynamics revealed in these studies explains the anomalous behavior and hysteresis loops in stress data reported in the literature.

  6. Continuous agglomerate model for identifying the solute- indifferent part of colloid nanoparticle's surface charge

    Alfimov, A V; Aryslanova, E M; Chivilikhin, S A

    2016-01-01

    This work proposes an explicit analytical model for the surface potential of a colloidal nano-agglomerate. The model predicts that when an agglomerate reaches a certain critical size, its surface potential becomes independent of the agglomerate radius. The model also provides a method for identifying and quantifying the solute-indifferent charge in nanocolloids, that allows to assess the stability of toxicologically significant parameters of the system. (paper)

  7. Kinetics of ergodic-to-nonergodic transitions in charged colloidal suspensions : aging and gelation

    Tanaka, H.; Jabbari-Farouji, S.; Meunier, J.; Bonn, D.

    2005-01-01

    There are two types of isotropic disordered nonergodic states in colloidal suspensions: colloidal glasses and gels. In a recent paper [H. Tanaka, J. Meunier, and D. Bonn, Phys. Rev. E 69, 031404 (2004)], we discussed the static aspect of the differences and the similarities between the two. In this

  8. Charge inversion and colloidal stability of carbon black in battery electrolyte solutions

    Zhang, Yan; Narayanan, Aditya; Mugele, Friedrich Gunther; Cohen Stuart, Martinus Abraham; Duits, Michael H.G.

    2016-01-01

    Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects is an international journal devoted to the science of the fundamentals, engineering fundamentals, and applications of colloidal and interfacial phenomena and processes. The journal aims at publishing research papers of high quality and

  9. Phase behavior of charged hydrophobic colloids on flat and spherical surfaces

    Kelleher, Colm P.

    For a broad class of two-dimensional (2D) materials, the transition from isotropic fluid to crystalline solid is described by the theory of melting due to Kosterlitz, Thouless, Halperin, Nelson and Young (KTHNY). According to this theory, long-range order is achieved via elimination of the topological defects which proliferate in the fluid phase. However, many natural and man-made 2D systems posses spatial curvature and/or non-trivial topology, which require the presence of topological defects, even at T=0. In principle, the presence of these defects could profoundly affect the phase behavior of such a system. In this thesis, we develop and characterize an experimental system of charged colloidal particles that bind electrostatically to the interface between an oil and an aqueous phase. Depending on how we prepare the sample, this fluid interface may be flat, spherical, or have a more complicated geometry. Focusing on the cases where the interface is flat or spherical, we measure the interactions between the particles, and probe various aspects of their phase behavior. On flat interfaces, this phase behavior is well-described by KTHNY theory. In spherical geometries, however, we observe spatial structures and inhomogeneous dynamics that cannot be captured by the measures traditionally used to describe flat-space phase behavior. We show that, in the spherical system, ordering is achieved by a novel mechanism: sequestration of topological defects into freely-terminating grain boundaries ("scars"), and simultaneous spatial organization of the scars themselves on the vertices of an icosahedron. The emergence of icosahedral order coincides with the localization of mobility into isolated "lakes" of fluid or glassy particles, situated at the icosahedron vertices. These lakes are embedded in a rigid, connected "continent" of locally crystalline particles.

  10. Charge characteristics of humic and fulvic acids: comparative analysis by colloid titration and potentiometric titration with continuous pK-distribution function model.

    Bratskaya, S; Golikov, A; Lutsenko, T; Nesterova, O; Dudarchik, V

    2008-09-01

    Charge characteristics of humic and fulvic acids of a different origin (inshore soils, peat, marine sediments, and soil (lysimetric) waters) were evaluated by means of two alternative methods - colloid titration and potentiometric titration. In order to elucidate possible limitations of the colloid titration as an express method of analysis of low content of humic substances we monitored changes in acid-base properties and charge densities of humic substances with soil depth, fractionation, and origin. We have shown that both factors - strength of acidic groups and molecular weight distribution in humic and fulvic acids - can affect the reliability of colloid titration. Due to deviations from 1:1 stoichiometry in interactions of humic substances with polymeric cationic titrant, the colloid titration can underestimate total acidity (charge density) of humic substances with domination of weak acidic functional groups (pK>6) and high content of the fractions with molecular weight below 1kDa.

  11. A family of solutions to the Einstein-Maxwell system of equations describing relativistic charged fluid spheres

    Komathiraj, K.; Sharma, Ranjan

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we present a formalism to generate a family of interior solutions to the Einstein-Maxwell system of equations for a spherically symmetric relativistic charged fluid sphere matched to the exterior Reissner-Nordström space-time. By reducing the Einstein-Maxwell system to a recurrence relation with variable rational coefficients, we show that it is possible to obtain closed-form solutions for a specific range of model parameters. A large class of solutions obtained previously are shown to be contained in our general class of solutions. We also analyse the physical viability of our new class of solutions.

  12. Elaboration of Stable and Antibody Functionalized Positively Charged Colloids by Polyelectrolyte Complexation between Chitosan and Hyaluronic Acid

    Ramona C. Polexe

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we describe the elaboration of multifunctional positively charged polyelectrolyte complex (PEC nanoparticles, designed to be stable at physiological salt concentration and pH, for effective targeted delivery. These nanoparticles were obtained by charge neutralization between chitosan (CS as polycation and hyaluronic acid (HA as polyanion. We showed that the course of the complexation process and the physico-chemical properties of the resulting colloids were impacted by (i internal parameters such as the Degree of Acetylation (DA, i.e., the molar ration of acetyl glucosamine residues and molar mass of CS, the HA molar mass and (ii external parameters like the charge mixing ratio and the polymer concentrations. As a result, nonstoichiometric colloidal PECs were obtained in water or PBS (pH 7.4 and remained stable over one month. The polymer interactions were characterized by thermal analysis (DSC and TGA and the morphology was studied by scanning electron microscopy. A model antibody, anti-ovalbumine (OVA immunoglobulin A (IgA was sorbed on the particle surface in water and PBS quantitatively in 4 h. The CS-HA/IgA nanoparticles average size was between 425–665 nm with a positive zeta potential. These results pointed out that CS-HA can be effective carriers for use in targeted drug delivery.

  13. Monte Carlo simulation and equation of state for flexible charged hard-sphere chain fluids: Polyampholyte and polyelectrolyte solutions

    Jiang, Hao; Adidharma, Hertanto

    2014-01-01

    The thermodynamic modeling of flexible charged hard-sphere chains representing polyampholyte or polyelectrolyte molecules in solution is considered. The excess Helmholtz energy and osmotic coefficients of solutions containing short polyampholyte and the osmotic coefficients of solutions containing short polyelectrolytes are determined by performing canonical and isobaric-isothermal Monte Carlo simulations. A new equation of state based on the thermodynamic perturbation theory is also proposed for flexible charged hard-sphere chains. For the modeling of such chains, the use of solely the structure information of monomer fluid for calculating the chain contribution is found to be insufficient and more detailed structure information must therefore be considered. Two approaches, i.e., the dimer and dimer-monomer approaches, are explored to obtain the contribution of the chain formation to the Helmholtz energy. By comparing with the simulation results, the equation of state with either the dimer or dimer-monomer approach accurately predicts the excess Helmholtz energy and osmotic coefficients of polyampholyte and polyelectrolyte solutions except at very low density. It also well captures the effect of temperature on the thermodynamic properties of these solutions

  14. MD simulation of pair correlation function and static structure of charged colloidal suspensions

    Allahyarov, E.A.; Schram, P.P.J.M.; Trigger, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    On the basis of molecular dynamics the radial distribution function (r.d.f.) of colloidal plasma is calculated by using the effective macroion interaction in TPS-form. The vital importance of the minimum in the potential, which is a consequences of the strong counterion-macroion interaction, is

  15. Temporary Charge Carrier Separation Dominates the Photoluminescence Decay Dynamics of Colloidal CdSe Nanoplatelets

    Rabouw, F.T.; van der Bok, J.C.; Spinicelli, Piernicola; Mahler, B.; Nasilowski, M.; Pedetti, S.; Dubertret, B.; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Luminescent colloidal CdSe nanoplatelets with atomically defined thicknesses have recently been developed, and their potential for various applications has been shown. To understand their special properties, experiments have until now focused on the relatively short time scales of at most a few

  16. High reduction of interfacial charge recombination in colloidal quantum dot solar cells by metal oxide surface passivation.

    Chang, Jin; Kuga, Yuki; Mora-Seró, Iván; Toyoda, Taro; Ogomi, Yuhei; Hayase, Shuzi; Bisquert, Juan; Shen, Qing

    2015-03-12

    Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells based on colloidal QDs and metal oxide nanowires (NWs) possess unique and outstanding advantages in enhancing light harvesting and charge collection in comparison to planar architectures. However, the high surface area of the NW structure often brings about a large amount of recombination (especially interfacial recombination) and limits the open-circuit voltage in BHJ solar cells. This problem is solved here by passivating the surface of the metal oxide component in PbS colloidal quantum dot solar cells (CQDSCs). By coating thin TiO2 layers onto ZnO-NW surfaces, the open-circuit voltage and power conversion efficiency have been improved by over 40% in PbS CQDSCs. Characterization by transient photovoltage decay and impedance spectroscopy indicated that the interfacial recombination was significantly reduced by the surface passivation strategy. An efficiency as high as 6.13% was achieved through the passivation approach and optimization for the length of the ZnO-NW arrays (device active area: 16 mm2). All solar cells were tested in air, and exhibited excellent air storage stability (without any performance decline over more than 130 days). This work highlights the significance of metal oxide passivation in achieving high performance BHJ solar cells. The charge recombination mechanism uncovered in this work could shed light on the further improvement of PbS CQDSCs and/or other types of solar cells.

  17. Roughness Versus Charge Contributions to Representative Discrete Heterogeneity Underlying Mechanistic Prediction of Colloid Attachment, Detachment and Breakthrough-Elution Behavior Under Environmental Conditions.

    Johnson, William; Farnsworth, Anna; Vanness, Kurt; Hilpert, Markus

    2017-04-01

    The key element of a mechanistic theory to predict colloid attachment in porous media under environmental conditions where colloid-collector repulsion exists (unfavorable conditions for attachment) is representation of the nano-scale surface heterogeneity (herein called discrete heterogeneity) that drives colloid attachment under unfavorable conditions. The observed modes of colloid attachment under unfavorable conditions emerge from simulations that incorporate discrete heterogeneity. Quantitative prediction of attachment (and detachment) requires capturing the sizes, spatial frequencies, and other properties of roughness asperities and charge heterodomains in discrete heterogeneity representations of different surfaces. The fact that a given discrete heterogeneity representation will interact differently with different-sized colloids as well as different ionic strengths for a given sized colloid allows backing out representative discrete heterogeneity via comparison of simulations to experiments performed across a range of colloid size, solution IS, and fluid velocity. This has been achieved on unfavorable smooth surfaces yielding quantitative prediction of attachment, and qualitative prediction of detachment in response to ionic strength or flow perturbations. Extending this treatment to rough surfaces, and representing the contributions of nanoscale roughness as well as charge heterogeneity is a focus of this talk. Another focus of this talk is the upscaling the pore scale simulations to produce contrasting breakthrough-elution behaviors at the continuum (column) scale that are observed, for example, for different-sized colloids, or same-sized colloids under different ionic strength conditions. The outcome of mechanistic pore scale simulations incorporating discrete heterogeneity and subsequent upscaling is that temporal processes such as blocking and ripening will emerge organically from these simulations, since these processes fundamentally stem from the

  18. Temperature-dependent charge transport mechanisms in carbon sphere/polyaniline composite

    Nieves, Cesar A.; Martinez, Luis M.; Meléndez, Anamaris; Ortiz, Margarita; Ramos, Idalia; Pinto, Nicholas J.; Zimbovskaya, Natalya

    2017-12-01

    Charge transport in the temperature range 80 K electrons between polymeric chains in PANi-filled gaps between CS is the predominant transport mechanism through CS/PANi composites. The high conductivity of the CS/PANi composite makes the material attractive for the fabrication of devices and sensors.

  19. A differential dielectric spectroscopy setup to measure the electric dipole moment and net charge of colloidal quantum dots

    Kortschot, R. J.; Bakelaar, I. A.; Erné, B. H.; Kuipers, B. W. M., E-mail: B.W.M.Kuipers@uu.nl [Van ' t Hoff Laboratory for Physical and Colloid Chemistry, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2014-03-15

    A sensitive dielectric spectroscopy setup is built to measure the response of nanoparticles dispersed in a liquid to an alternating electric field over a frequency range from 10{sup −2} to 10{sup 7} Hz. The measured complex permittivity spectrum records both the rotational dynamics due to a permanent electric dipole moment and the translational dynamics due to net charges. The setup consists of a half-transparent capacitor connected in a bridge circuit, which is balanced on pure solvent only, using a software-controlled compensating voltage. In this way, the measured signal is dominated by the contributions of the nanoparticles rather than by the solvent. We demonstrate the performance of the setup with measurements on a dispersion of colloidal CdSe quantum dots in the apolar liquid decalin.

  20. A differential dielectric spectroscopy setup to measure the electric dipole moment and net charge of colloidal quantum dots.

    Kortschot, R J; Bakelaar, I A; Erné, B H; Kuipers, B W M

    2014-03-01

    A sensitive dielectric spectroscopy setup is built to measure the response of nanoparticles dispersed in a liquid to an alternating electric field over a frequency range from 10(-2) to 10(7) Hz. The measured complex permittivity spectrum records both the rotational dynamics due to a permanent electric dipole moment and the translational dynamics due to net charges. The setup consists of a half-transparent capacitor connected in a bridge circuit, which is balanced on pure solvent only, using a software-controlled compensating voltage. In this way, the measured signal is dominated by the contributions of the nanoparticles rather than by the solvent. We demonstrate the performance of the setup with measurements on a dispersion of colloidal CdSe quantum dots in the apolar liquid decalin.

  1. Colloidal nematostatics

    V.M. Pergamenshchik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We give a review of the theory of large distance colloidal interaction via the nematic director field. The new area of nematic colloidal systems (or nematic emulsions has been guided by the analogy between the colloidal nematostatics and electrostatics. The elastic charge density representation of the colloidal nematostatics [V.M. Pergamenshchik, V.O. Uzunova, Eur. Phys. J. E, 2007, 23, 161; Phys. Rev. E, 2007, 76, 011707] develops this analogy at the level of charge density and Coulomb interaction. The analogy is shown to lie in common mathematics based on the solutions of Laplace equation. However, the 3d colloidal nematostatics substantially differs from electrostatics both in its mathematical structure and physical implications. The elastic charge is a vector fully determined by the torque exerted upon colloid, the role of Gauss' theorem is played by conservation of the torque components. Elastic multipoles consist of two tensors (dyads. Formulas for the elastic multipoles, the Coulomb-like, dipole-dipole, and quadrupole-quadrupole pair interaction potentials are derived and illustrated by particular examples. Based on the tensorial structure, we list possible types of elastic dipoles and quadrupoles. An elastic dipole is characterized by its isotropic strength, anisotropy, chirality, and its longitudinal component. An elastic quadrupole can be uniaxial and biaxial. Relation between the multipole type and its symmetry is discussed, sketches of some types of multipoles are given. Using the mirror image method of electrostatics as a guiding idea, we develop the mirror image method in nematostatics for arbitrary director tilt at the wall. The method is applied to the charge-wall and dipole-wall interaction.

  2. Facile preparation of ZIF-8@Pd-CSS sandwich-type microspheres via in situ growth of ZIF-8 shells over Pd-loaded colloidal carbon spheres with aggregation-resistant and leach-proof properties for the Pd nanoparticles

    Zhang, Tong; Lin, Lu [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China); Zhang, Xiongfu, E-mail: xfzhang@dlut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China); Liu, Haiou; Yan, Xinjuan [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China); Liu, Zhang; Yeung, King Lun [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong SAR (China)

    2015-10-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Uniform-sized colloidal carbon spheres were synthesized from low-cost glucose. • Pd nanoparticles were loaded onto the carbon spheres via self-reduction method. • A layer of ZIF-8 shell was in situ grown over the Pd-loaded carbon spheres. • The ZIF-8@Pd-CCS showed leach-proof and aggregation-resistant properties of Pd. - Abstract: Aiming to enhance the stability of noble metal nanoparticles that are anchored on the surface of colloidal carbon spheres (CCSs), we designed and prepared a new kind of sandwich-structured ZIF-8@Pd-CCS microsphere. Typically, uniform CCSs were first synthesized by the aromatization and carbonization of glucose under hydrothermal conditions. Subsequently, noble metal nanoparticles, herein Pd nanoparticles, were attached to the surface of CCSs via self-reduction route, followed by in situ assembly of a thin layer of ZIF-8 over the Pd nanoparticles to form the sandwich-type ZIF-8@Pd-CCS microspheres. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectra confirmed the presence of crystalline ZIF-8, while TEM analysis revealed that the ZIF-8 shells were closely bound to the Pd-loaded CCSs. The shell thickness could be tuned by varying the ZIF-8 assembly cycles. Further, liquid-phase hydrogenation of 1-hexene as the probe reaction was carried out over the ZIF-8@Pd-CCS microspheres and results showed that the prepared microspheres exhibited excellent agglomeration-resistant and leach-proof properties for the Pd nanoparticles, thus leading to the good reusability of the ZIF-8@Pd-CCS microspheres.

  3. Thermodynamic Charge-to-Mass Sensor for Colloids, Proteins, and Polyelectrolytes

    van Rijssel, Jos; Costo, Rocio; Vrij, Agienus; Philipse, Albert P.; Erne, Ben H.

    2016-01-01

    A sensor is introduced that gauges the ratio of charge z to mass m of macro-ions in liquid media. The conductivity is measured in a small volume of salt solution, separated from the macro-ions by a semipermeable membrane. The mobile counterions released by the macro-ions increase the measured salt

  4. Dynamic Arrest in Charged Colloidal Systems Exhibiting Large-Scale Structural Heterogeneities

    Haro-Perez, C.; Callejas-Fernandez, J.; Hidalgo-Alvarez, R.; Rojas-Ochoa, L. F.; Castaneda-Priego, R.; Quesada-Perez, M.; Trappe, V.

    2009-01-01

    Suspensions of charged liposomes are found to exhibit typical features of strongly repulsive fluid systems at short length scales, while exhibiting structural heterogeneities at larger length scales that are characteristic of attractive systems. We model the static structure factor of these systems using effective pair interaction potentials composed of a long-range attraction and a shorter range repulsion. Our modeling of the static structure yields conditions for dynamically arrested states at larger volume fractions, which we find to agree with the experimentally observed dynamics

  5. Electron beam patterning for writing of positively charged gold colloidal nanoparticles

    Zafri, Hadar; Azougi, Jonathan; Girshevitz, Olga; Zalevsky, Zeev; Zitoun, David

    2018-02-01

    Synthesis at the nanoscale has progressed at a very fast pace during the last decades. The main challenge today lies in precise localization to achieve efficient nanofabrication of devices. In the present work, we report on a novel method for the patterning of gold metallic nanoparticles into nanostructures on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer. The fabrication makes use of relatively accessible equipment, a scanning electron microscope (SEM), and wet chemical synthesis. The electron beam implants electrons into the insulating material, which further anchors the positively charged Au nanoparticles by electrostatic attraction. The novel fabrication method was applied to several substrates useful in microelectronics to add plasmonic particles. The resolution and surface density of the deposition were tuned, respectively, by the electron energy (acceleration voltage) and the dose of electronic irradiation. We easily achieved the smallest written feature of 68 ± 18 nm on SOI, and the technique can be extended to any positively charged nanoparticles, while the resolution is in principle limited by the particle size distribution and the scattering of the electrons in the substrate. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Silver colloidal effects on excited-state structure and intramolecular charge transfer of p-N, N-dimethylaminobenzoic acid in aqueous cyclodextrin solutions

    Choi, Jung Kwon; Kim, Yang Hee; Yoon, Min Joong; Lee, Seung Joon; Kim, Kwan; Jeoung, Sae Chae

    2001-01-01

    The silver colloidal effects on the excited-state structure and intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) of p-N,N-dimethylaminobenzoic acid (DMABA) in aqueous cyclodextrin (CD) solutions have been investigated by UV-VIS absorption, steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence, and transient Raman spectroscopy. As the concentration of silver colloids increases, the ratio of the ICT emission to the normal emission (I a /I b ) of DMABA in the aqueous α-CD solutions are greatly decreased while the I a /I b values in the aqueous β-CD solutions are significantly enhanced. It is also noteworthy that the ICT emission maxima are red-shifted by 15-40 nm upon addition of silver colloids, implying that DMABA encapsulated in α-CD or β-CD cavity is exposed to more polar environment. The transient resonance Raman spectra of DMABA in silver colloidal solutions demonstrate that DMABA in the excited-state is desorbed from silver colloidal surfaces as demonstrated by the disappearance of v s (CO 2 - )(1380 cm -1 ) with appearance of v (C-OH)(1280 cm -1 ) band, respectively. Thus, in the aqueous β-CD solutions the carboxylic acid group of DMABA in the excited-state can be readily hydrogen bonded with the secondary hydroxyl group of β-CD while in aqueous and α-CD solutions the carboxylic acid group of DMABA has the hydrogen-bonding interaction with water. Consequently, in the aqueous β-CD solutions the enhancement of the I a /I b value arises from the intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interaction between DMABA and the secondary hydroxyl group of β-CD as well as the lower polarity of the rim of the β-CD cavity compared to bulk water. This is also supported by the increase of the association constant for DMABA/β-CD complex in the presence of silver colloids

  7. Glass transition of soft colloids

    Philippe, Adrian-Marie; Truzzolillo, Domenico; Galvan-Myoshi, Julian; Dieudonné-George, Philippe; Trappe, Véronique; Berthier, Ludovic; Cipelletti, Luca

    2018-04-01

    We explore the glassy dynamics of soft colloids using microgels and charged particles interacting by steric and screened Coulomb interactions, respectively. In the supercooled regime, the structural relaxation time τα of both systems grows steeply with volume fraction, reminiscent of the behavior of colloidal hard spheres. Computer simulations confirm that the growth of τα on approaching the glass transition is independent of particle softness. By contrast, softness becomes relevant at very large packing fractions when the system falls out of equilibrium. In this nonequilibrium regime, τα depends surprisingly weakly on packing fraction, and time correlation functions exhibit a compressed exponential decay consistent with stress-driven relaxation. The transition to this novel regime coincides with the onset of an anomalous decrease in local order with increasing density typical of ultrasoft systems. We propose that these peculiar dynamics results from the combination of the nonequilibrium aging dynamics expected in the glassy state and the tendency of colloids interacting through soft potentials to refluidize at high packing fractions.

  8. Statistical Physics of Colloidal Dispersions.

    Canessa, E.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. This thesis is concerned with the equilibrium statistical mechanics of colloidal dispersions which represent useful model systems for the study of condensed matter physics; namely, charge stabilized colloidal dispersions and polymer stabilized colloidal dispersions. A one-component macroparticle approach is adopted in order to treat the macroscopic and microscopic properties of these systems in a simple and comprehensive manner. The thesis opens with the description of the nature of the colloidal state before reviewing some basic definitions and theory in Chapter II. In Chapter III a variational theory of phase equilibria based on the Gibbs-Bogolyobov inequality is applied to sterically stabilized colloidal dispersions. Hard spheres are chosen as the reference system for the disordered phases while an Einstein model is used for the ordered phases. The new choice of pair potential, taken for mathematical convenience, is a superposition of two Yukawa functions. By matching a double Yukawa potential to the van der Waals attractive potential at different temperatures and introducing a purely temperature dependent coefficient to the repulsive part, a rich variety of observed phase separation phenomena is qualitatively described. The behaviour of the potential is found to be consistent with a small decrease of the polymer layer thickness with increasing temperature. Using the same concept of a collapse transition the non-monotonic second virial coefficient is also explained and quantified. It is shown that a reduction of the effective macroparticle diameter with increasing temperature can only be partially examined from the point of view of a (binary-) polymer solution theory. This chapter concludes with the description of the observed, reversible, depletion flocculation behaviour. This is accomplished by using the variational formalism and by invoking the double Yukawa potential to allow

  9. Out-of-equilibrium processes in suspensions of oppositely charged colloids: liquid-to-crystal nucleation and gel formation

    Sanz, Eduardo

    2009-03-01

    We study the kinetics of the liquid-to-crystal transformation and of gel formation in colloidal suspensions of oppositely charged particles. We analyse, by means of both computer simulations and experiments, the evolution of a fluid quenched to a state point of the phase diagram where the most stable state is either a homogeneous crystalline solid or a solid phase in contact with a dilute gas. On the one hand, at high temperatures and high packing fractions, close to an ordered-solid/disordered-solid coexistence line, we find that the fluid-to-crystal pathway does not follow the minimum free energy route. On the other hand, a quench to a state point far from the ordered-crystal/disordered-crystal coexistence border is followed by a fluid-to-solid transition through the minimum free energy pathway. At low temperatures and packing fractions we observe that the system undergoes a gas-liquid spinodal decomposition that, at some point, arrests giving rise to a gel-like structure. Both our simulations and experiments suggest that increasing the interaction range favors crystallization over vitrification in gel-like structures. [4pt] In collaboration with Chantal Valeriani, Soft Condensed Matter, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University, Princetonplein 5, 3584 CC Utrecht, The Netherlands and SUPA, School of Physics, University of Edinburgh, JCMB King's Buildings, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ, UK; Teun Vissers, Andrea Fortini, Mirjam E. Leunissen, and Alfons van Blaaderen, Soft Condensed Matter, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University; Daan Frenke, FOM Institute for Atomic and Molecular Physics, Kruislaan 407, 1098 SJ Amsterdam, The Netherlands and Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, CB2 1EW, Cambridge, UK; and Marjolein Dijkstra, Soft Condensed Matter, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University.

  10. Record Charge Carrier Diffusion Length in Colloidal Quantum Dot Solids via Mutual Dot-To-Dot Surface Passivation.

    Carey, Graham H; Levina, Larissa; Comin, Riccardo; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Sargent, Edward H

    2015-06-03

    Through a combination of chemical and mutual dot-to-dot surface passivation, high-quality colloidal quantum dot solids are fabricated. The joint passivation techniques lead to a record diffusion length for colloidal quantum dots of 230 ± 20 nm. The technique is applied to create thick photovoltaic devices that exhibit high current density without losing fill factor. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Simulation of dense colloids

    Herrmann, H.J.; Harting, J.D.R.; Hecht, M.; Ben-Naim, E.

    2008-01-01

    We present in this proceeding recent large scale simulations of dense colloids. On one hand we simulate model clay consisting of nanometric aluminum oxide spheres in water using realistic DLVO potentials and a combination of MD and SRD. We find pronounced cluster formation and retrieve the shear

  12. From colloidal spheres to nanofibrils: extensional flow properties of mineral pigment and mixtures with micro and nanofibrils under progressive double layer suppression.

    Dimic-Misic, Katarina; Hummel, Michael; Paltakari, Jouni; Sixta, Herbert; Maloney, Thad; Gane, Patrick

    2015-05-15

    Suspensions of mineral pigment and cellulose fibrillar derivatives are materials regularly found in the forest products industries, particularly in paper and board production. Many manufacturing processes, including forming and coating employ flow geometries incorporating extensional flow. Traditionally, colloidal mineral pigment suspensions have been considered to show little to no non-linear behaviour in extensional viscosity. Additionally, recently, nanofibrillar materials, such as microfibrillar (MFC) and nanofibrillar cellulose (NFC), collectively termed MNFC, have been confirmed by their failure to follow the Cox-Merz rule to behave more as particulate material rather than showing polymeric rheological properties when dispersed in water. Such suspensions and their mixtures are currently intensively investigated to enable them to generate likely enhanced composite material properties. The processes frequently involve exposure to increasing levels of ionic strength, coming either from the weak solubility of pigments, such as calcium carbonate, or retained salts arising from the feed fibre source processing. By taking the simple case of polyacrylate stabilised calcium carbonate suspension and comparing the extensional viscosity as a function of post extension capillary-induced Hencky strain on a CaBER extensional rheometer over a range of increasing salt concentration, it has been shown that the regime of constriction changes as the classic DLVO double layer is progressively suppressed. This change is seen to lead to a characteristic double (bimodal) measured viscosity response for flocculated systems. With this novel characteristic established, more complex mixed suspensions of calcium carbonate, clay and MNFC have been studied, and the effects of fibrils versus flocculation identified and where possible separated. This technique is suggested to enable a better understanding of the origin of viscoelasticity in these important emerging water-based suspensions

  13. Colloidal organization

    Okubo, Tsuneo

    2015-01-01

    Colloidal Organization presents a chemical and physical study on colloidal organization phenomena including equilibrium systems such as colloidal crystallization, drying patterns as an example of a dissipative system and similar sized aggregation. This book outlines the fundamental science behind colloid and surface chemistry and the findings from the author's own laboratory. The text goes on to discuss in-depth colloidal crystallization, gel crystallization, drying dissipative structures of solutions, suspensions and gels, and similar-sized aggregates from nanosized particles. Special emphas

  14. Fabrication of Poly(styrene-co-maleic anhydride)@Ag Spheres with High Surface Charge Intensity and their Self-Assembly into Photonic Crystal Films.

    Bi, Jiajie; Fan, Genrui; Wu, Suli; Su, Xin; Xia, Hongbo; Zhang, Shu-Fen

    2017-10-01

    Herein, we developed a method to prepare monodisperse poly(styrene-co-maleic anhydride)@Ag (PSMA@Ag) core-shell microspheres with high surface charge intensity by using an in situ reduction method. In this method, ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid tetrasodium salt (Na 4 EDTA) was used as a reducing agent to promote the growth of Ag, and at the same time endowed the PSMA@Ag spheres with a surface charge. The monodispersity of PSMA and PSMA@Ag and the ordered array of the photonic crystal films were characterized by using SEM. The formation of Ag nanoparticles was confirmed by using TEM, HR-TEM, and XRD characterizations. Due to the existence of surface charges, the obtained PSMA@Ag microspheres easily self-assembled to form photonic crystal structures. In addition, the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity of the PSMA@Ag photonic crystal films was evaluated by detecting the signal from Raman probe molecules, 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP). The PSMA@Ag photonic crystal films exhibited a high SERS effect, a low detection limit of up to 10 -8 for 4-ATP, good uniformity, and reproducibility.

  15. EDITORIAL: Colloidal suspensions Colloidal suspensions

    Petukhov, Andrei; Kegel, Willem; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen

    2011-05-01

    N W 2002 Nature 416 811 [9] Borsboom M et al 1998 J. Synchrotron Radiat. 5 518 [10] Zernike F and Prins J A 1927 Z. Phys. 41 184 Colloidal suspensions contents How much does the core structure of a three-phase contact line contribute to the line tension near a wetting transition? J O Indekeu, K Koga and B Widom A systematic coarse-graining strategy for semi-dilute copolymer solutions: from monomers to micelles Barbara Capone, Ivan Coluzza and Jean-Pierre Hansen Structural searches using isopointal sets as generators: densest packings for binary hard sphere mixtures Toby S Hudson and Peter Harrowell The theory of delamination during drying of confined colloidal suspensions K J Wallenstein and W B Russel Electrostatics Modeling of equilibrium hollow objects stabilized by electrostatics Ethayaraja Mani, Jan Groenewold and Willem K Kegel The Donnan equilibrium: I. On the thermodynamic foundation of the Donnan equation of state A Philipse and A Vrij Colloidal rods and platelets Cholesteric order in systems of helical Yukawa rods H H Wensink and G Jackson Magnetic-field-induced nematic-nematic phase separation and droplet formation in colloidal goethite E van den Pol, A A Verhoeff, A Lupascu, M A Diaconeasa, P Davidson, I Dozov, B W M Kuipers, D M E Thies-Weesie and G J Vroege Structure of colloidal sphere-plate mixtures N Doshi, G Cinacchi, J S van Duijneveldt, T Cosgrove, S W Prescott, I Grillo, J Phipps and D I Gittins 3D structure of nematic and columnar phases of hard colloidal platelets A B G M Leferink op Reinink, J M Meijer, D Kleshchanok, D V Byelov, G J Vroege, A V Petukhov and H N W Lekkerkerker Phase behaviour of binary mixtures of diamagnetic colloidal platelets in an external magnetic field Jonathan Phillips and Matthias Schmidt Rheo-SAXS investigation of shear-thinning behaviour of very anisometric repulsive disc-like clay suspensions A M Philippe, C Baravian, M Imperor-Clerc, J De Silva, E Paineau, I Bihannic, P Davidson, F Meneau, P Levitz and L J Michot

  16. A general method to coat colloidal particles with titiana

    Demirors, A.F.; van Blaaderen, A.; Imhof, A.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a general one-pot method for coating colloidal particles with amorphous titania. Various colloidal particles such as silica particles, large silver colloids, gibbsite platelets, and polystyrene spheres were successfully coated with a titania shell. Although there are several ways of

  17. Viscoelasticity and diffusional properties of colloidal model dispersions

    Naegele, G

    2003-01-01

    We examine linear viscoelastic, and translational and rotational diffusion properties of colloidal model dispersions. Theoretical results are discussed, in comparison with experiments, for monodisperse suspensions of charged and neutral colloidal spheres, and for binary dispersions of differently sized tracer and host particles. The theoretical methods employed comprise a mode-coupling scheme for Brownian particles, and a rooted cluster expansion scheme of tracer diffusion with two- and three-body hydrodynamic interactions included. We analyse in particular the validity of various empirical generalized Stokes-Einstein-Debye (SED) relations between the (dynamic) shear viscosity and translational/rotational diffusion coefficients. Some of these generalized SED relations are basic to microrheological measurements aimed at characterizing the viscoelasticity of complex fluids on the basis of the diffusional properties of immersed tracer particles.

  18. Viscoelasticity and diffusional properties of colloidal model dispersions

    Naegele, Gerhard

    2003-01-01

    We examine linear viscoelastic, and translational and rotational diffusion properties of colloidal model dispersions. Theoretical results are discussed, in comparison with experiments, for monodisperse suspensions of charged and neutral colloidal spheres, and for binary dispersions of differently sized tracer and host particles. The theoretical methods employed comprise a mode-coupling scheme for Brownian particles, and a rooted cluster expansion scheme of tracer diffusion with two- and three-body hydrodynamic interactions included. We analyse in particular the validity of various empirical generalized Stokes-Einstein-Debye (SED) relations between the (dynamic) shear viscosity and translational/rotational diffusion coefficients. Some of these generalized SED relations are basic to microrheological measurements aimed at characterizing the viscoelasticity of complex fluids on the basis of the diffusional properties of immersed tracer particles

  19. Liquid crystal colloids

    Muševič, Igor

    2017-01-01

    This book brings together the many concepts and discoveries in liquid crystal colloids contributed over the last twenty years and scattered across numerous articles and book chapters. It provides both a historical overview of the development of the field and a clear perspective on the future applications in photonics. The book covers all phenomena observed in liquid crystal colloids with an emphasis on experimental tools and applications of topology in condensed matter, as well as practical micro-photonics applications. It includes a number of spectacular manifestations of new topological phenomena not found or difficult to observe in other systems. Starting from the early works on nematic colloids, it explains the basics of topological defects in ordered media, charge and winding, and the elastic forces between colloidal particles in nematics. Following a detailed description of experimental methods, such as optical tweezing and particle tracking, the book eases the reader into the theoretical part, which de...

  20. Effect of surface charge on the colloidal stability and in vitro uptake of carboxymethyl dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    Ayala, Vanessa; Herrera, Adriana P.; Latorre-Esteves, Magda; Torres-Lugo, Madeline; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticle physicochemical properties such as surface charge are considered to play an important role in cellular uptake and particle–cell interactions. In order to systematically evaluate the role of surface charge on the uptake of iron oxide nanoparticles, we prepared carboxymethyl-substituted dextrans with different degrees of substitution, ranging from 38 to 5 groups per chain, and reacted them using carbodiimide chemistry with amine–silane-coated iron oxide nanoparticles with narrow size distributions in the range of 33–45 nm. Surface charge of carboxymethyl-substituted dextran-coated nanoparticles ranged from −50 to 5 mV as determined by zeta potential measurements, and was dependent on the number of carboxymethyl groups incorporated in the dextran chains. Nanoparticles were incubated with CaCo-2 human colon cancer cells. Nanoparticle–cell interactions were observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy and uptake was quantified by elemental analysis using inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Mechanisms of internalization were inferred using pharmacological inhibitors for fluid-phase, clathrin-mediated, and caveola-mediated endocytosis. Results showed increased uptake for nanoparticles with greater negative charge. Internalization patterns suggest that uptake of the most negatively charged particles occurs via non-specific interactions

  1. Effect of surface charge on the colloidal stability and in vitro uptake of carboxymethyl dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    Ayala, Vanessa; Herrera, Adriana P.; Latorre-Esteves, Magda; Torres-Lugo, Madeline [University of Puerto Rico, Department of Chemical Engineering (United States); Rinaldi, Carlos, E-mail: carlos.rinaldi@bme.ufl.edu [University of Florida, J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Nanoparticle physicochemical properties such as surface charge are considered to play an important role in cellular uptake and particle-cell interactions. In order to systematically evaluate the role of surface charge on the uptake of iron oxide nanoparticles, we prepared carboxymethyl-substituted dextrans with different degrees of substitution, ranging from 38 to 5 groups per chain, and reacted them using carbodiimide chemistry with amine-silane-coated iron oxide nanoparticles with narrow size distributions in the range of 33-45 nm. Surface charge of carboxymethyl-substituted dextran-coated nanoparticles ranged from -50 to 5 mV as determined by zeta potential measurements, and was dependent on the number of carboxymethyl groups incorporated in the dextran chains. Nanoparticles were incubated with CaCo-2 human colon cancer cells. Nanoparticle-cell interactions were observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy and uptake was quantified by elemental analysis using inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Mechanisms of internalization were inferred using pharmacological inhibitors for fluid-phase, clathrin-mediated, and caveola-mediated endocytosis. Results showed increased uptake for nanoparticles with greater negative charge. Internalization patterns suggest that uptake of the most negatively charged particles occurs via non-specific interactions.

  2. Glass/Jamming Transition in Colloidal Aggregation

    Segre, Philip N.; Prasad, Vikram; Weitz, David A.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We have studied colloidal aggregation in a model colloid plus polymer system with short-range attractive interactions. By varying the colloid concentration and the strength of the attraction, we explored regions where the equilibrium phase is expected to consist of colloidal crystallites in coexistance with colloidal gas (i.e. monomers). This occurs for moderate values of the potential depth, U approximately equal to 2-5 kT. Crystallization was not always observed. Rather, over an extended sub-region two new metastable phases appear, one fluid-like and one solid-like. These were examined in detail with light scattering and microscopy techniques. Both phases consist of a near uniform distribution of small irregular shaped clusters of colloidal particles. The dynamical and structural characteristics of the ergodic-nonergodic transition between the two phases share much in common with the colloidal hard sphere glass transition.

  3. An insight into the mechanism of charge-transfer of hybrid polymer:ternary/quaternary chalcopyrite colloidal nanocrystals

    Parul Chawla

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we have demonstrated the structural and optoelectronic properties of the surface of ternary/quaternary (CISe/CIGSe/CZTSe chalcopyrite nanocrystallites passivated by tri-n-octylphosphine-oxide (TOPO and tri-n-octylphosphine (TOP and compared their charge transfer characteristics in the respective polymer: chalcopyrite nanocomposites by dispersing them in poly(3-hexylthiophene polymer. It has been found that CZTSe nanocrystallites due to their high crystallinity and well-ordered 3-dimensional network in its pristine form exhibit a higher steric- and photo-stability, resistance against coagulation and homogeneity compared to the CISe and CIGSe counterparts. Moreover, CZTSe nanocrystallites display efficient photoluminescence quenching as evident from the high value of the Stern–Volmer quenching constant (KSV and eventually higher charge transfer efficiency in their respective polymer P3HT:CZTSe composites. We modelled the dependency of the charge transfer from the donor and the charge separation mechanism across the donor–acceptor interface from the extent of crystallinity of the chalcopyrite semiconductors (CISe/CIGSe/CZTSe. Quaternary CZTSe chalcopyrites with their high crystallinity and controlled morphology in conjunction with regioregular P3HT polymer is an attractive candidate for hybrid solar cells applications.

  4. An insight into the mechanism of charge-transfer of hybrid polymer:ternary/quaternary chalcopyrite colloidal nanocrystals.

    Chawla, Parul; Singh, Son; Sharma, Shailesh Narain

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we have demonstrated the structural and optoelectronic properties of the surface of ternary/quaternary (CISe/CIGSe/CZTSe) chalcopyrite nanocrystallites passivated by tri-n-octylphosphine-oxide (TOPO) and tri-n-octylphosphine (TOP) and compared their charge transfer characteristics in the respective polymer: chalcopyrite nanocomposites by dispersing them in poly(3-hexylthiophene) polymer. It has been found that CZTSe nanocrystallites due to their high crystallinity and well-ordered 3-dimensional network in its pristine form exhibit a higher steric- and photo-stability, resistance against coagulation and homogeneity compared to the CISe and CIGSe counterparts. Moreover, CZTSe nanocrystallites display efficient photoluminescence quenching as evident from the high value of the Stern-Volmer quenching constant (K SV) and eventually higher charge transfer efficiency in their respective polymer P3HT:CZTSe composites. We modelled the dependency of the charge transfer from the donor and the charge separation mechanism across the donor-acceptor interface from the extent of crystallinity of the chalcopyrite semiconductors (CISe/CIGSe/CZTSe). Quaternary CZTSe chalcopyrites with their high crystallinity and controlled morphology in conjunction with regioregular P3HT polymer is an attractive candidate for hybrid solar cells applications.

  5. Density anomaly of charged hard spheres of different diameters in a mixture with core-softened model solvent. Monte Carlo simulation results

    B. Hribar-Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Very recently the effect of equisized charged hard sphere solutes in a mixture with core-softened fluid model on the structural and thermodynamic anomalies of the system has been explored in detail by using Monte Carlo simulations and integral equations theory (J. Chem. Phys., Vol. 137, 244502 (2012. Our objective of the present short work is to complement this study by considering univalent ions of unequal diameters in a mixture with the same soft-core fluid model. Specifically, we are interested in the analysis of changes of the temperature of maximum density (TMD lines with ion concentration for three model salt solutes, namely sodium chloride, potassium chloride and rubidium chloride models. We resort to Monte Carlo simulations for this purpose. Our discussion also involves the dependences of the pair contribution to excess entropy and of constant volume heat capacity on the temperature of maximum density line. Some examples of the microscopic structure of mixtures in question in terms of pair distributions functions are given in addition.

  6. Glass transition in soft-sphere dispersions

    RamIrez-Gonzalez, P E; Medina-Noyola, M

    2009-01-01

    The concept of dynamic equivalence among mono-disperse soft-sphere fluids is employed in the framework of the self-consistent generalized Langevin equation (SCGLE) theory of colloid dynamics to calculate the ideal glass transition phase diagram of model soft-sphere colloidal dispersions in the softness-concentration state space. The slow dynamics predicted by this theory near the glass transition is compared with available experimental data for the decay of the intermediate scattering function of colloidal dispersions of soft-microgel particles. Increasing deviations from this simple scheme occur for increasingly softer potentials, and this is studied here using the Rogers-Young static structure factor of the soft-sphere systems as the input of the SCGLE theory, without assuming a priori the validity of the equivalence principle above.

  7. Active colloids

    Aranson, Igor S

    2013-01-01

    A colloidal suspension is a heterogeneous fluid containing solid microscopic particles. Colloids play an important role in our everyday life, from food and pharmaceutical industries to medicine and nanotechnology. It is useful to distinguish two major classes of colloidal suspensions: equilibrium and active, i.e., maintained out of thermodynamic equilibrium by external electric or magnetic fields, light, chemical reactions, or hydrodynamic shear flow. While the properties of equilibrium colloidal suspensions are fairly well understood, active colloids pose a formidable challenge, and the research is in its early exploratory stage. One of the most remarkable properties of active colloids is the possibility of dynamic self-assembly, a natural tendency of simple building blocks to organize into complex functional architectures. Examples range from tunable, self-healing colloidal crystals and membranes to self-assembled microswimmers and robots. Active colloidal suspensions may exhibit material properties not present in their equilibrium counterparts, e.g., reduced viscosity and enhanced self-diffusivity, etc. This study surveys the most recent developments in the physics of active colloids, both in synthetic and living systems, with the aim of elucidation of the fundamental physical mechanisms governing self-assembly and collective behavior. (physics of our days)

  8. Self-Assembly of Charged Amphiphilic Diblock Copolymers with Insoluble Blocks of Decreasing Hydrophobicity: From Kinetically Frozen Colloids to Macrosurfactants

    M Jacquin; P Muller; H Cottet; O Theodoly

    2011-12-31

    We have investigated the self-assembly properties in aqueous solution of amphiphilic diblock copolymers with insoluble blocks of different hydrophobicity and demonstrated that the condition to obtain dynamic micelles is to design samples with insoluble blocks of low enough hydrophobicity. We focus here on results with new water-soluble amphiphilic diblock copolymers poly(diethyleneglycol ethylether acrylate)-b-poly(acrylic acid), or PDEGA-b-PAA. The physical characteristics of PDEGA-b-PAA micelles at high ionization have been determined by small angle neutron scattering (SANS). We show that PDEGA-b-PAA samples form micelles at thermodynamic equilibrium. The critical micelle concentrations (CMCs) decrease strongly with ionic strength and temperature due to a solvent quality decrease for, respectively, the corona and the core. This behavior of reversible aggregation is remarkable as compared to the behavior of kinetically frozen aggregation that has been widely observed with samples of similar architecture and different hydrophobic blocks, for example, poly(styrene)-b-poly(acrylic acid), PS-b-PAA, and poly(butyl acrylate)-b-poly(acrylic acid), PBA-b-PAA. We have measured the interfacial tension between water and the homopolymers PDEGA and PBA at, respectively, 3 and 20 mN/m at room temperature, which permits one to estimate the energy cost to extract a unimer from a micelle. The results are consistent with a micelle association that is fast for PDEGA-b-PAA and kinetically frozen PBA-b-PAA. Hence, PDEGA-b-PAA samples form a new system of synthetic charged macrosurfactant with unique properties of fast dynamic association, tunable charge, and water solubility even at temperatures and NaCl concentrations as high as 65 C and 1 M.

  9. Fabrication of Phase-Change Polymer Colloidal Photonic Crystals

    Tianyi Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the preparation of phase-change polymer colloidal photonic crystals (PCs by assembling hollow latex spheres encapsulated with dodecanol for the first time. The monodispersed hollow latex spheres were obtained by phase reversion of monodispersed core-shell latex spheres in the n-hexane, which dissolves the PS core and retains the PMMA/PAA shell. The as-prepared phase-change colloidal PCs show stable phase-change behavior. This fabrication of phase-change colloidal PCs would be significant for PC’s applications in functional coatings and various optic devices.

  10. Colloidal glasses

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Colloidal glasses. Glassy state is attained when system fails to reach equilibrium due to crowding of constituent particles. In molecular glasses, glassy state is reached by rapidly lowering the temperature. In colloidal glasses, glassy state is reached by increasing the ...

  11. Spinning the fuzzy sphere

    Berenstein, David; Dzienkowski, Eric; Lashof-Regas, Robin

    2015-01-01

    We construct various exact analytical solutions of the SO(3) BMN matrix model that correspond to rotating fuzzy spheres and rotating fuzzy tori. These are also solutions of Yang Mills theory compactified on a sphere times time and they are also translationally invariant solutions of the N=1"∗ field theory with a non-trivial charge density. The solutions we construct have a ℤ_N symmetry, where N is the rank of the matrices. After an appropriate ansatz, we reduce the problem to solving a set of polynomial equations in 2N real variables. These equations have a discrete set of solutions for each value of the angular momentum. We study the phase structure of the solutions for various values of N. Also the continuum limit where N→∞, where the problem reduces to finding periodic solutions of a set of coupled differential equations. We also study the topology change transition from the sphere to the torus.

  12. Public Sphere

    Trenz, Hans-Jörg

    2015-01-01

    In modern societies, the public sphere represents the intermediary realm that supports the communication of opinions, the discovery of problems that need to be dealt with collectively, the channeling of these problems through the filter of the media and political institutions, and the realization...... of the collective will of the people in the act of democratic self-government. The concept of the public sphere is used across the fields of media and communication research, cultural studies and the humanities, the history of ideas, legal and constitutional studies as well as democracy studies. Historically......, public spheres have undergone structural transformations that were closely connected to the emergence of different mass media. More recently, they are subject to trends of transnationalization and digitalization in politics and society....

  13. Size effects of solvent molecules on the phase behavior and effective interaction of colloidal systems with the bridging attraction

    Chen, Jie; Wang, Xuewu; Kline, Steven R; Liu, Yun

    2016-01-01

    There has been much recent research interest towards understanding the phase behavior of colloidal systems interacting with a bridging attraction, where the small solvent particles and large solute colloidal particles can be reversibly associated with each other. These systems show interesting phase behavior compared to the more widely studied depletion attraction systems. Here, we use Baxter’s two-component sticky hard sphere model with a Percus–Yevick closure to solve the Ornstein–Zernike equation and study the size effect on colloidal systems with bridging attractions. The spinodal decomposition regions, percolation transition boundaries and binodal regions are systematically investigated as a function of the relative size of the small solvent and large solute particles as well as the attraction strength between the small and large particles. In the phase space determined by the concentrations of small and large particles, the spinodal and binodal regions form isolated islands. The locations and shapes of the spinodal and binodal regions sensitively depend on the relative size of the small and large particles and the attraction strength between them. The percolation region shrinks by decreasing the size ratio, while the binodal region slightly expands with the decrease of the size ratio. Our results are very important in understanding the phase behavior for a bridging attraction colloidal system, a model system that provides insight into oppositely charged colloidal systems, protein phase behavior, and colloidal gelation mechanisms. (paper)

  14. Size effects of solvent molecules on the phase behavior and effective interaction of colloidal systems with the bridging attraction.

    Chen, Jie; Wang, Xuewu; Kline, Steven R; Liu, Yun

    2016-11-16

    There has been much recent research interest towards understanding the phase behavior of colloidal systems interacting with a bridging attraction, where the small solvent particles and large solute colloidal particles can be reversibly associated with each other. These systems show interesting phase behavior compared to the more widely studied depletion attraction systems. Here, we use Baxter's two-component sticky hard sphere model with a Percus-Yevick closure to solve the Ornstein-Zernike equation and study the size effect on colloidal systems with bridging attractions. The spinodal decomposition regions, percolation transition boundaries and binodal regions are systematically investigated as a function of the relative size of the small solvent and large solute particles as well as the attraction strength between the small and large particles. In the phase space determined by the concentrations of small and large particles, the spinodal and binodal regions form isolated islands. The locations and shapes of the spinodal and binodal regions sensitively depend on the relative size of the small and large particles and the attraction strength between them. The percolation region shrinks by decreasing the size ratio, while the binodal region slightly expands with the decrease of the size ratio. Our results are very important in understanding the phase behavior for a bridging attraction colloidal system, a model system that provides insight into oppositely charged colloidal systems, protein phase behavior, and colloidal gelation mechanisms.

  15. Moving charged particles in lattice Boltzmann-based electrokinetics

    Kuron, Michael; Rempfer, Georg; Schornbaum, Florian; Bauer, Martin; Godenschwager, Christian; Holm, Christian; de Graaf, Joost

    2016-12-01

    The motion of ionic solutes and charged particles under the influence of an electric field and the ensuing hydrodynamic flow of the underlying solvent is ubiquitous in aqueous colloidal suspensions. The physics of such systems is described by a coupled set of differential equations, along with boundary conditions, collectively referred to as the electrokinetic equations. Capuani et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 121, 973 (2004)] introduced a lattice-based method for solving this system of equations, which builds upon the lattice Boltzmann algorithm for the simulation of hydrodynamic flow and exploits computational locality. However, thus far, a description of how to incorporate moving boundary conditions into the Capuani scheme has been lacking. Moving boundary conditions are needed to simulate multiple arbitrarily moving colloids. In this paper, we detail how to introduce such a particle coupling scheme, based on an analogue to the moving boundary method for the pure lattice Boltzmann solver. The key ingredients in our method are mass and charge conservation for the solute species and a partial-volume smoothing of the solute fluxes to minimize discretization artifacts. We demonstrate our algorithm's effectiveness by simulating the electrophoresis of charged spheres in an external field; for a single sphere we compare to the equivalent electro-osmotic (co-moving) problem. Our method's efficiency and ease of implementation should prove beneficial to future simulations of the dynamics in a wide range of complex nanoscopic and colloidal systems that were previously inaccessible to lattice-based continuum algorithms.

  16. Effect of excluded volume interactions on the interfacial properties of colloid-polymer mixtures

    Fortini, A.; Bolhuis, P.G.; Dijkstra, M.

    2008-01-01

    We report a numerical study of equilibrium phase diagrams and interfacial properties of bulk and confined colloid-polymer mixtures using grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. Colloidal particles are treated as hard spheres, while the polymer chains are described as soft repulsive spheres. The

  17. The electrostatic interaction between interfacial colloidal particles

    Hurd, A. J.

    1985-11-01

    The electrostatic interaction between charged, colloidal particles trapped at an air-water interface is considered using linearised Poisson-Boltzmann results for point particles. In addition to the expected screened-Coulomb contribution, which decays exponentially, an algebraic dipole-dipole interaction occurs that may account for long-range interactions in interfacial colloidal systems.

  18. Radioactive colloids

    Bergqvist, L.

    1987-01-01

    Different techniques for the characterization of radioactive colloids, used in nuclear medicine, have been evaluated and compared. Several radioactive colloids have been characterized in vitro and in vivo and tested experimentally. Colloid biokinetics following interstitial or intravenous injection were evaluated with a scintillation camera technique. Lymphoscintigraphy with a Tc-99-labelled antimony sulphur colloid was performed in 32 patients with malignant melanoma in order to evaluate the technique. Based on the biokinetic results, absorbed doses in tissues and organs were calculated. The function of the reticuloendothelial system has been evaluated in rats after inoculation with tumour cells. Microfiltration and photon correlation spectroscopy were found to be suitable in determining activity-size and particle size distributions, respectively. Maximal lymph node uptake following subcutaneous injection was found to correspond to a colloid particle size between 10 and 50 nm. Lymphoscintigraphy was found to be useful in the study of lymphatic drainage from the primary tumour site in patients with malignant melanoma on the trunk. Quantitative analysis of ilio-inguinal lymph node uptake in patients with malignant melanoma on the lower extremities was, however, found to be of no value for the detection of metastatic disease in lymph nodes. High absorbed doses may be received in lymph nodes (up to 1 mGy/MBq) and at the injection site (about 10 mGy/MBq). In an experimental study it was found that the relative colloid uptake in bone marrow and spleen depended on the total number of intravenously injected particles. This may considerably affect the absorbed dose in these organs. (author)

  19. Colloid mobilization and transport during capillary fringe fluctuations.

    Aramrak, Surachet; Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B; Zollars, Richard L

    2014-07-01

    Capillary fringe fluctuations due to changing water tables lead to displacement of air-water interfaces in soils and sediments. These moving air-water interfaces can mobilize colloids. We visualized colloids interacting with moving air-water interfaces during capillary fringe fluctuations by confocal microscopy. We simulated capillary fringe fluctuations in a glass-bead-filled column. We studied four specific conditions: (1) colloids suspended in the aqueous phase, (2) colloids attached to the glass beads in an initially wet porous medium, (3) colloids attached to the glass beads in an initially dry porous medium, and (4) colloids suspended in the aqueous phase with the presence of a static air bubble. Confocal images confirmed that the capillary fringe fluctuations affect colloid transport behavior. Hydrophilic negatively charged colloids initially suspended in the aqueous phase were deposited at the solid-water interface after a drainage passage, but then were removed by subsequent capillary fringe fluctuations. The colloids that were initially attached to the wet or dry glass bead surface were detached by moving air-water interfaces in the capillary fringe. Hydrophilic negatively charged colloids did not attach to static air-bubbles, but hydrophobic negatively charged and hydrophilic positively charged colloids did. Our results demonstrate that capillary fringe fluctuations are an effective means for colloid mobilization.

  20. Colloidal superballs

    Rossi, L.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is organized in four parts as follows. Part 1 focuses on the synthetic aspects of the colloidal model systems that will be used throughout the work described in this thesis. In Chapter 2 we describe synthetic procedures for the preparation of polycrystalline hematite superballs and

  1. Shear-induced partial translational ordering of a colloidal solid

    Ackerson, B. J.; Clark, N. A.

    1984-08-01

    Highly charged submicrometer plastic spheres suspended in water at low ionic strength will order spontaneously into bcc crystals or polycrystals. A simple linear shear orients and disorders these crystals by forcing (110) planes to stack normal to the shear gradient and to slide relative to each other with a direction parallel to the solvent flow. In this paper we analyze in detail the disordering and flow processes occurring beyond the intrinsic elastic limit of the bcc crystal. We are led to a model in which the flow of a colloidal crystal is interpreted as a fundamentally different process from that found in atomic crystals. In the colloidal crystal the coupling of particle motion to the background fluid forces a homogeneous flow, where every layer is in motion relative to its neighboring layers. In contrast, the plastic flow in an atomic solid is defect mediated flow. At the lowest applied stress, the local bcc order in the colloidal crystal exhibits shear strains both parallel and perpendicular to the direction of the applied stress. The magnitude of these deformations is estimated using the configurational energy for bcc and distorted bcc crystals, assuming a screened Coulomb pair interaction between colloidal particles. As the applied stress is increased, the intrinsic elastic limit of the crystal is exceeded and the crystal begins to flow with adjacent layers executing an oscillatory path governed by the balance of viscous and screened Coulomb forces. The path takes the structure from the bcc1 and bcc2 twins observed at zero shear to a distorted two-dimensional hcp structure at moderate shear rates, with a loss of interlayer registration as the shear is increased. This theoretical model is consistent with other experimental observations, as well.

  2. Self-assembly of patchy colloidal dumbbells

    Avvisati, Guido|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/407630198; Vissers, Teun|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304829943; Dijkstra, Marjolein|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/123538807

    2015-01-01

    We employ Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the self-assembly of patchy colloidal dumbbells interacting via a modified Kern-Frenkel potential by probing the system concentration and dumbbell shape. We consider dumbbells consisting of one attractive sphere with diameter sigma(1) and one

  3. Dynamics of Colloids Confined in Microcylinders

    Ghosh, Somnath; Wijnperle, Daniël; Mugele, Friedrich Gunther; Duits, Michael H.G.

    2016-01-01

    We studied both global and local effects of cylindrical confinement on the diffusive behavior of hard sphere (HS) colloids. Using confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) and particle tracking, we measured the mean squared displacement (MSD) of 1 micron sized silica particles in water–glycerol.

  4. Cubic colloids : Synthesis, functionalization and applications

    Castillo, S.I.R.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis is a study on cubic colloids: micron-sized cubic particles with rounded corners (cubic superballs). Owing to their shape, particle packing for cubes is more efficient than for spheres and results in fascinating phase and packing behavior. For our cubes, the particle volume fraction when

  5. EDITORIAL: Colloidal dispersions in external fields Colloidal dispersions in external fields

    Löwen, Hartmut

    2012-11-01

    , Ojeda-Lopez M A and Arauz-Lara J L 2012 J. Phys. Condens. Matter 24 464126 [31]Leferink op Reinink A B G M, van den Pol E, Byelov D V, Petukhov A V and Vroege G J 2012 J. Phys. Condens. Matter 24 464127 [32]Taylor S L, Evans R and Royall C P 2012 J. Phys. Condens. Matter 24 464128 [33]Toner J, Tu Y H and Ramaswamy S 2012 J. Phys. Condens. Matter 24 464110 [34]Schmitz R and Dünweg B 2005 J. Phys. Condens. Matter 318 170 [35]Cates M E 2012 Rep. Prog. Phys. 75 042601 [36]Tarama M and Ohta T 2012 J. Phys. Condens. Matter 24 464129 [37]Wensink H H and Löwen H 2012 J. Phys. Condens. Matter 24 464130 Colloidal dispersions in external fields contents Colloidal dispersions in external fieldsHartmut Löwen Depletion induced clustering in mixtures of colloidal spheres and fd-virusD Guu, J K G Dhont, G A Vliegenthart and M P Lettinga Advanced rheological characterization of soft colloidal model systemsS Gupta, S K Kundu, J Stellbrink, L Willner, J Allgaier and D Richter Conformational and dynamical properties of ultra-soft colloids in semi-dilute solutions under shear flowSunil P Singh, Dmitry A Fedosov, Apratim Chatterji, Roland G Winkler and Gerhard Gompper Transient dynamics in dense colloidal suspensions under shear: shear rate dependenceM Laurati, K J Mutch, N Koumakis, J Zausch, C P Amann, A B Schofield, G Petekidis, J F Brady, J Horbach, M Fuchs and S U Egelhaaf Force-induced diffusion in microrheologyCh J Harrer, D Winter, J Horbach, M Fuchs and Th Voigtmann Micro-macro-discrepancies in nonlinear microrheology: I. Quantifying mechanisms in a suspension of Brownian ellipsoidsRyan J DePuit and Todd M Squires Micro-macro discrepancies in nonlinear microrheology: II. Effect of probe shapeRyan J DePuit and Todd M Squires Viscosity of electrolyte solutions: a mode-coupling theoryClaudio Contreras-Aburto and Gerhard Nägele Electro-kinetics of charged-sphere suspensions explored by integral low-angle super-heterodyne laser Doppler velocimetryThomas Palberg, Tetyana K

  6. Characteristics of colloids generated during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses in groundwater

    Feng, X.; Buck, E.C.; Mertz, C.; Bates, J.K.; Cunnane, J.C.; Chaiko, D.

    1993-10-01

    Aqueous colloidal suspensions were generated by reacting nuclear waste glasses with groundwater at 90 degrees C at different ratios of the glass surface area to solution volume (S/V). The colloids have been characterized in terms of size, charge, identity, and stability with respect to salt concentration, pH, and time, by examination using dynamic light scattering, electrophoretic mobility, and transmission electron microscopy. The colloids are predominately produced by precipitation from solution, possibly with contribution from reacted layers that have spallated from the glass. These colloids are silicon-rich minerals. The colloidal suspensions agglomerate when the salinity of the solutions increase. The following implications for modeling the colloidal transport of contaminants have been derived from this study: (1) The sources of the colloids are not only solubility-limited real colloids and the pseudo colloids formed by adsorption of radionuclides onto a groundwater colloid, but also from the spalled surface layers of reacted waste glasses. (2) In a repository, the local environment is likely to be glass-reaction dominated and the salt concentration is likely to be high, leading to rapid colloid agglomeration and settling; thus, colloid transport may be insignificant. (3) If large volumes of groundwater contact the glass reaction site, the precipitated colloids may become resuspended, and colloid transport may become important. (4) Under most conditions, the colloids are negatively charged and will deposit readily on positively charged surfaces. Negatively charged surfaces will, in general, facilitate colloid stability and transport

  7. Hydrodynamic interaction between bacteria and passive sphere

    Zhang, Bokai; Ding, Yang; Xu, Xinliang

    2017-11-01

    Understanding hydrodynamic interaction between bacteria and passive sphere is important for identifying rheological properties of bacterial and colloidal suspension. Over the past few years, scientists mainly focused on bacterial influences on tracer particle diffusion or hydrodynamic capture of a bacteria around stationary boundary. Here, we use superposition of singularities and regularized method to study changes in bacterial swimming velocity and passive sphere diffusion, simultaneously. On this basis, we present a simple two-bead model that gives a unified interpretation of passive sphere diffusion and bacterial swimming. The model attributes both variation of passive sphere diffusion and changes of speed of bacteria to an effective mobility. Using the effective mobility of bacterial head and tail as an input function, the calculations are consistent with simulation results at a broad range of tracer diameters, incident angles and bacterial shapes.

  8. Simulation of bentonite colloid migration through granite

    Rosicka, Dana; Hokr, Milan

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Colloidal bentonite particles generate at the interface of buffer and host rock in spent nuclear fuel repository due to an erosion process and migrate through granite by the water flow. Stability of these colloids and their migration possibilities have been studied on account of radionuclide transport possibility as colloid could carry adsorbed radionuclides in groundwater through granite. That is why a simulation of bentonite colloid migration in the surrounding of a repository might be requested. According to chemical condition as ionic strength and pH, the colloidal particles coagulate into clusters and that influence the migration of particles. The coagulation kinetics of natural bentonite colloids were experimentally studied in many articles, for example by light scattering techniques. We created a model of coagulation of bentonite colloids and simulation of a chosen experiment with use of the multicomponent reactive transport equation. The coagulation model describes clustering of particles due to attractive van der Waals forces as result of collision of particles due to heat fluctuation and different velocity of particles during sedimentation and velocity gradient of water flow. Next, the model includes influence of repulsive electrostatic forces among colloidal particles leading to stability of particles provided high surface charge of colloids. In the model, each group of clusters is transported as one solution component and the kinetics of coagulation are implemented as reactions between the components: a shift of particles among groups of particles with similar migration properties, according to size of the clusters of colloids. The simulation of migration of bentonite colloid through granite using the coagulation model was calibrated according to experiment results. On the basis of the simulation, one can estimate the basic processes that occur during bentonite colloid

  9. Linear Optical Properties of Gold Colloid

    Jingmin XIA

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Gold colloid was prepared by reducing HAuCl4·4H2O with Na3C6H5O7·2H2O. The morphology, size of gold nanoparticles and the optical property of colloid were characterized by transmission electron microscope and UV-Vis spectrophotometer, respectively. It shows that the gold nanoparticles are in the shape of spheres with diameters less than 8 nm, and the surface plasmon resonance absorption peak is located at about 438 nm. As the volume fraction of gold particles increases, the intensity of absorption peak strengthens. The optical property of gold colloid was analyzed by Maxwell-Garnett (MG effective medium theory in the company of Drude dispersion model. The results show that the matrix dielectric constant is a main factor, which influences the optical property of gold colloid.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.4.9558

  10. Facile Synthesis of Monodispersed Polysulfide Spheres for Building Structural Colors with High Color Visibility and Broad Viewing Angle.

    Li, Feihu; Tang, Bingtao; Wu, Suli; Zhang, Shufen

    2017-01-01

    The synthesis and assembly of monodispersed colloidal spheres are currently the subject of extensive investigation to fabricate artificial structural color materials. However, artificial structural colors from general colloidal crystals still suffer from the low color visibility and strong viewing angle dependence which seriously hinder their practical application in paints, colorimetric sensors, and color displays. Herein, monodispersed polysulfide (PSF) spheres with intrinsic high refractive index (as high as 1.858) and light-absorbing characteristics are designed, synthesized through a facile polycondensation and crosslinking process between sodium disulfide and 1,2,3-trichloropropane. Owing to their high monodispersity, sufficient surface charge, and good dispersion stability, the PSF spheres can be assembled into large-scale and high-quality 3D photonic crystals. More importantly, high structural color visibility and broad viewing angle are easily achieved because the unique features of PSF can remarkably enhance the relative reflectivity and eliminate the disturbance of scattering and background light. The results of this study provide a simple and efficient strategy to create structural colors with high color visibility, which is very important for their practical application. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Colloid transport in saturated porous media: Elimination of attachment efficiency in a new colloid transport model

    Landkamer, Lee L.; Harvey, Ronald W.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Ryan, Joseph N.

    2013-01-01

    A colloid transport model is introduced that is conceptually simple yet captures the essential features of colloid transport and retention in saturated porous media when colloid retention is dominated by the secondary minimum because an electrostatic barrier inhibits substantial deposition in the primary minimum. This model is based on conventional colloid filtration theory (CFT) but eliminates the empirical concept of attachment efficiency. The colloid deposition rate is computed directly from CFT by assuming all predicted interceptions of colloids by collectors result in at least temporary deposition in the secondary minimum. Also, a new paradigm for colloid re-entrainment based on colloid population heterogeneity is introduced. To accomplish this, the initial colloid population is divided into two fractions. One fraction, by virtue of physiochemical characteristics (e.g., size and charge), will always be re-entrained after capture in a secondary minimum. The remaining fraction of colloids, again as a result of physiochemical characteristics, will be retained “irreversibly” when captured by a secondary minimum. Assuming the dispersion coefficient can be estimated from tracer behavior, this model has only two fitting parameters: (1) the fraction of the initial colloid population that will be retained “irreversibly” upon interception by a secondary minimum, and (2) the rate at which reversibly retained colloids leave the secondary minimum. These two parameters were correlated to the depth of the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) secondary energy minimum and pore-water velocity, two physical forces that influence colloid transport. Given this correlation, the model serves as a heuristic tool for exploring the influence of physical parameters such as surface potential and fluid velocity on colloid transport.

  12. Two-dimensional nanopatterning by PDMS relief structures of polymeric colloidal crystals

    Nam, Hye Jin; Kim, Ju-Hee; Jung, Duk-Young; Park, Jong Bae; Lee, Hae Seong

    2008-06-01

    A new constructive method of fabricating a nanoparticle self-assembly on the patterned surface of a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) relief nanostructure was demonstrated. Patterned PDMS templates with close-packed microwells were fabricated by molding against a self-assembled monolayer of polystyrene spheres. Alkanethiol-functionalized gold nanoparticles with an average particle size of 2.5 nm were selectively deposited onto a hydrophobic self-assembled monolayer printed on the substrate by the micro-contact printing (μCP) of the prepared PDMS microwell, in which the patterned gold nanoparticles consisted of close-packed hexagons with an average diameter of 370 nm. In addition, two-dimensional colloidal crystals derived from PMMA microspheres with a diameter of 380 nm and a negative surface charge were successfully formed on the hemispherical microwells by electrostatic force using positively charged PAH-coated PDMS as a template to produce multidimensional nanostructures.

  13. Ultrasonic electrodeposition of silver nanoparticles on dielectric silica spheres

    Tang Shaochun; Tang Yuefeng; Gao Feng; Liu Zhiguo; Meng Xiangkang

    2007-01-01

    In the present study, a facile and one-step ultrasonic electrodeposition method is first applied to controllably coat colloidal silica spheres with silver nanoparticles. This method is additive-free and very direct, because processes necessary in many other approaches, such as pretreatment of the silica sphere surface and pre-preparation of silver nanoparticles, are not involved in it. Furthermore, it makes possible the coating of dielectric substrates with metal through an electrodeposition route. Under appropriate conditions, silver nanoparticles with sizes of 8-10 nm in diameter can be relatively homogeneously deposited onto the surface of preformed colloidal silica spheres. Silver particles with different sizes and dispersive uniformity on silica sphere surfaces can also be obtained by adjusting the current density (I), the concentration of electrolyte (C) and the electrolysis time (t). The possible ultrasonic electrodeposition mechanism is also suggested according to the experimental results

  14. Manipulating semiconductor colloidal stability through doping.

    Fleharty, Mark E; van Swol, Frank; Petsev, Dimiter N

    2014-10-10

    The interface between a doped semiconductor material and electrolyte solution is of considerable fundamental interest, and is relevant to systems of practical importance. Both adjacent domains contain mobile charges, which respond to potential variations. This is exploited to design electronic and optoelectronic sensors, and other enabling semiconductor colloidal materials. We show that the charge mobility in both phases leads to a new type of interaction between semiconductor colloids suspended in aqueous electrolyte solutions. This interaction is due to the electrostatic response of the semiconductor interior to disturbances in the external field upon the approach of two particles. The electrostatic repulsion between two charged colloids is reduced from the one governed by the charged groups present at the particles surfaces. This type of interaction is unique to semiconductor particles and may have a substantial effect on the suspension dynamics and stability.

  15. Anisotropic Model Colloids

    van Kats, C.M.

    2008-01-01

    The driving forces for fundamental research in colloid science are the ability to manage the material properties of colloids and to unravel the forces that play a role between colloids to be able to control and understand the processes where colloids play an important role. Therefore we are

  16. Colloid Transport and Retention

    Yuan, Hao; Shapiro, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    related to historical prospective, synthesis, characterization, theoretical modeling and application of unique class of colloidal materials starting from colloidal gold to coated silica colloid and platinum, titania colloids. This book is unique in its design, content, providing depth of science about...

  17. Aqueous Colloid + Polymer Depletion System for Confocal Microscopy and Rheology

    Park, Nayoung; Umanzor, Esmeralda J.; Conrad, Jacinta C.

    2018-05-01

    We developed a model depletion system with colloidal particles that were refractive index- and density-matched to 80 (w/w)% glycerol in water, and characterized the effect of interparticle interactions on the structure and dynamics of non-equilibrium phases. 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl methacrylate-co-tert-butyl methacrylate copolymer particles were synthesized following Kodger et al. (Sci. Rep. 5, 14635 (2015)). Particles were dispersed in glycerol/water solutions to generate colloidal suspensions with good control over electrostatic interactions and a moderately high background viscosity of 55 mPa-s. To probe the effects of charge screening and depletion attractions on the suspension phase behavior, we added NaCl and polyacrylamide (M_w = 186 kDa) at various concentrations to particle suspensions formulated at volume fractions of phi = 0.05 and 0.3 and imaged the suspensions using confocal microscopy. The particles were nearly hard spheres at a NaCl concentration of 20 mM, but aggregated when the concentration of NaCl was further increased. Changes in the particle structure and dynamics with increasing concentration of the depletant polyacrylamide followed the trends expected from earlier experiments on depletion-driven gelation. Additionally, we measured the viscosity and corrected first normal stress difference of suspensions formulated at phi = 0.4 with and without added polymer. The solvent viscosity was suitable for rheology measurements without the onset of instabilities such as secondary flows or edge fracture. These results validate this system as an alternative to one common model system, suspensions of poly(methyl methacrylate) particles and polystyrene depletants in organic solvents, for investigating phase behavior and flow properties in attractive colloidal suspensions.

  18. Adsorption of a cationic dye molecule on polystyrene microspheres in colloids: effect of surface charge and composition probed by second harmonic generation.

    Eckenrode, Heather M; Jen, Shih-Hui; Han, Jun; Yeh, An-Gong; Dai, Hai-Lung

    2005-03-17

    Nonlinear optical probe, second harmonic generation (SHG), of the adsorption of the dye molecule malachite green (MG), in cationic form at pH polystyrene microspheres in aqueous solution is used to study the effect of surface charge and composition on molecular adsorption. Three types of polystyrene microspheres with different surface composition are investigated: (1) a sulfate terminated, anionic surface, (2) a neutral surface without any functional group termination, and (3) an amine terminated, cationic surface. The cationic dye was found to adsorb at all three surfaces, regardless of surface charge. The adsorption free energies, DeltaG's, measured for the three surfaces are -12.67, -12.39, and -10.46 kcal/mol, respectively, with the trend as expected from the charge interactions. The adsorption density on the anionic surface, where attractive charge-charge interaction dominates, is determined by the surface negative charge density. The adsorption densities on the neutral and cationic surfaces are on the other hand higher, perhaps as a result of a balance between minimizing repulsive charge interaction and maximizing attractive molecule-substrate and intermolecular interactions. The relative strength of the SH intensity per molecule, in combination of a model calculation, reveals that the C(2) axis of the MG molecule is nearly perpendicular to the surface on the anionic surface and tilts away from the surface norm when the surface is neutral and further away when cationic. Changing the pH of the solution may alter the surface charge and subsequently affect the adsorption configuration and SH intensity.

  19. Quantum-size colloid metal systems

    Roldugin, V.I.

    2000-01-01

    In the review dealing with quantum-dimensional metallic colloid systems the methods of preparation, electronic, optical and thermodynamic properties of metal nanoparticles and thin films are considered, the effect of ionizing radiation on stability of silver colloid sols and existence of a threshold radiation dose affecting loss of stability being discussed. It is shown that sol stability loss stems from particles charge neutralization due to reduction of sorbed silver ions induced by radiation, which results in destruction of double electric layer on colloid particles boundary [ru

  20. Hollow spheres: crucial building blocks for novel nanostructures and nanophotonics

    Zhong Kuo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we summarize the latest developments in research specifically derived from the unique properties of hollow microspheres, in particular, hollow silica spheres with uniform shells. We focus on applications in nanosphere (colloidal lithography and nanophotonics. The lithography from a layer of hollow spheres can result in nanorings, from a multilayer in unique nano-architecture. In nanophotonics, disordered hollow spheres can result in antireflection coatings, while ordered colloidal crystals (CCs of hollow spheres exhibit unique refractive index enhancement upon infiltration, ideal for optical sensing. Furthermore, whispering gallery mode (WGM inside the shell of hollow spheres has also been demonstrated to enhance light absorption to improve the performance of solar cells. These applications differ from the classical applications of hollow spheres, based only on their low density and large surface area, such as catalysis and chemical sensing. We provide a brief overview of the synthesis and self-assembly approaches of the hollow spheres. We elaborate on their unique optical features leading to defect mode lasing, optomicrofluidics, and the existence of WGMs inside shell for light management. Finally, we provide a perspective on the direction towards which future research relevant to hollow spheres might be directed.

  1. Hollow spheres: crucial building blocks for novel nanostructures and nanophotonics

    Zhong, Kuo; Song, Kai; Clays, Koen

    2018-03-01

    In this review, we summarize the latest developments in research specifically derived from the unique properties of hollow microspheres, in particular, hollow silica spheres with uniform shells. We focus on applications in nanosphere (colloidal) lithography and nanophotonics. The lithography from a layer of hollow spheres can result in nanorings, from a multilayer in unique nano-architecture. In nanophotonics, disordered hollow spheres can result in antireflection coatings, while ordered colloidal crystals (CCs) of hollow spheres exhibit unique refractive index enhancement upon infiltration, ideal for optical sensing. Furthermore, whispering gallery mode (WGM) inside the shell of hollow spheres has also been demonstrated to enhance light absorption to improve the performance of solar cells. These applications differ from the classical applications of hollow spheres, based only on their low density and large surface area, such as catalysis and chemical sensing. We provide a brief overview of the synthesis and self-assembly approaches of the hollow spheres. We elaborate on their unique optical features leading to defect mode lasing, optomicrofluidics, and the existence of WGMs inside shell for light management. Finally, we provide a perspective on the direction towards which future research relevant to hollow spheres might be directed.

  2. Self-assembly of charged microclusters of CdSe/ZnS core/shell nanodots and nanorods into hierarchically ordered colloidal arrays

    Sukhanova, Alyona; Baranov, Alexander V; Klinov, Dmitriy; Oleinikov, Vladimir; Berwick, Kevin; Cohen, Jacques H M; Pluot, Michel; Nabiev, Igor

    2006-01-01

    A thermodynamically driven self-organization of microclusters of semiconductor nanocrystals with a narrow size distribution into periodic two-dimensional (2D) arrays is an attractive low-cost technique for the fabrication of 2D photonic crystals. We have found that CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots or quantum rods, transferred in aqueous phase after capping with the bifunctional surface-active agent DL-cysteine, form on a poly-L-lysine coated surface homogeneously sized micro-particles, droplet-like spheroid clusters and hexagon-like colloidal crystals self-organized into millimetre-sized 2D hexagonal assemblies. The presence of an organic molecular layer around the micro-particles prevents immediate contact between them, forming an interstitial space which may be varied in thickness by changing the origin of the molecular layer capping nanocrystals. Due to the high refractive index of CdSe and the low refractive index of the interstitial spaces, these structures are expected to have deep gaps in their photonic band, forming hierarchically ordered 2D arrays of potentially photonic materials

  3. Detachment of colloidal particles from collector surfaces with different electrostatic charge and hydrophobicity by attachment to air bubbles in a parallel plate flow chamber

    Suarez, CG; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    1999-01-01

    The detachment of polystyrene particles adhering to collector surfaces with different electrostatic charge and hydrophobicity by attachment to a passing air bubble has been studied in a parallel plate flow chamber. Particle detachment decreased linearly with increasing air bubble velocity and

  4. Simple heuristic for the viscosity of polydisperse hard spheres

    Farr, Robert S.

    2014-12-01

    We build on the work of Mooney [Colloids Sci. 6, 162 (1951)] to obtain an heuristic analytic approximation to the viscosity of a suspension any size distribution of hard spheres in a Newtonian solvent. The result agrees reasonably well with rheological data on monodispserse and bidisperse hard spheres, and also provides an approximation to the random close packing fraction of polydisperse spheres. The implied packing fraction is less accurate than that obtained by Farr and Groot [J. Chem. Phys. 131(24), 244104 (2009)], but has the advantage of being quick and simple to evaluate.

  5. Crystallizing hard-sphere glasses by doping with active particles

    Ni, Ran; Cohen Stuart, Martien A.; Dijkstra, Marjolein; Bolhuis, Peter G.

    2014-01-01

    Crystallization and vitrification are two different routes to form a solid. Normally these two processes suppress each other, with the glass transition preventing crystallization at high density (or low temperature). This is even true for systems of colloidal hard spheres, which are commonly used as

  6. Mesoscopic model of temporal and spatial heterogeneity in aging colloids

    Becker, Nikolaj; Sibani, Paolo; Boettcher, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    We develop a simple and effective description of the dynamics of dense hard sphere colloids in the aging regime deep in the glassy phase. Our description complements the many efforts to understand the onset of jamming in low density colloids, whose dynamics is still time-homogeneous. Based...... scattering function and particle mean-square displacements for jammed colloidal systems, and we predict a growth for the peak of the χ4 mobility correlation function that is logarithmic in waiting-time. At the same time, our model suggests a novel unified description for the irreversible aging dynamics...

  7. Sedimentation dynamics and equilibrium profiles in multicomponent mixtures of colloidal particles

    Spruijt, E; Biesheuvel, P M

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we give a general theoretical framework that describes the sedimentation of multicomponent mixtures of particles with sizes ranging from molecules to macroscopic bodies. Both equilibrium sedimentation profiles and the dynamic process of settling, or its converse, creaming, are modeled. Equilibrium profiles are found to be in perfect agreement with experiments. Our model reconciles two apparently contradicting points of view about buoyancy, thereby resolving a long-lived paradox about the correct choice of the buoyant density. On the one hand, the buoyancy force follows necessarily from the suspension density, as it relates to the hydrostatic pressure gradient. On the other hand, sedimentation profiles of colloidal suspensions can be calculated directly using the fluid density as apparent buoyant density in colloidal systems in sedimentation–diffusion equilibrium (SDE) as a result of balancing gravitational and thermodynamic forces. Surprisingly, this balance also holds in multicomponent mixtures. This analysis resolves the ongoing debate of the correct choice of buoyant density (fluid or suspension): both approaches can be used in their own domain. We present calculations of equilibrium sedimentation profiles and dynamic sedimentation that show the consequences of these insights. In bidisperse mixtures of colloids, particles with a lower mass density than the homogeneous suspension will first cream and then settle, whereas particles with a suspension-matched mass density form transient, bimodal particle distributions during sedimentation, which disappear when equilibrium is reached. In all these cases, the centers of the distributions of the particles with the lowest mass density of the two, regardless of their actual mass, will be located in equilibrium above the so-called isopycnic point, a natural consequence of their hard-sphere interactions. We include these interactions using the Boublik–Mansoori–Carnahan–Starling–Leland (BMCSL

  8. Dynamic Colloidal Molecules Maneuvered by Light-Controlled Janus Micromotors.

    Gao, Yirong; Mou, Fangzhi; Feng, Yizheng; Che, Shengping; Li, Wei; Xu, Leilei; Guan, Jianguo

    2017-07-12

    In this work, we propose and demonstrate a dynamic colloidal molecule that is capable of moving autonomously and performing swift, reversible, and in-place assembly dissociation in a high accuracy by manipulating a TiO 2 /Pt Janus micromotor with light irradiation. Due to the efficient motion of the TiO 2 /Pt Janus motor and the light-switchable electrostatic interactions between the micromotor and colloidal particles, the colloidal particles can be captured and assembled one by one on the fly, subsequently forming into swimming colloidal molecules by mimicking space-filling models of simple molecules with central atoms. The as-demonstrated dynamic colloidal molecules have a configuration accurately controlled and stabilized by regulating the time-dependent intensity of UV light, which controls the stop-and-go motion of the colloidal molecules. The dynamic colloidal molecules are dissociated when the light irradiation is turned off due to the disappearance of light-switchable electrostatic interaction between the motor and the colloidal particles. The strategy for the assembly of dynamic colloidal molecules is applicable to various charged colloidal particles. The simulated optical properties of a dynamic colloidal molecule imply that the results here may provide a novel approach for in-place building functional microdevices, such as microlens arrays, in a swift and reversible manner.

  9. Mesoscopic electrohydrodynamic simulations of binary colloidal suspensions

    Rivas, Nicolas; Frijters, Stefan; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Harting, Jens

    2018-04-01

    A model is presented for the solution of electrokinetic phenomena of colloidal suspensions in fluid mixtures. We solve the discrete Boltzmann equation with a Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collision operator using the lattice Boltzmann method to simulate binary fluid flows. Solvent-solvent and solvent-solute interactions are implemented using a pseudopotential model. The Nernst-Planck equation, describing the kinetics of dissolved ion species, is solved using a finite difference discretization based on the link-flux method. The colloids are resolved on the lattice and coupled to the hydrodynamics and electrokinetics through appropriate boundary conditions. We present the first full integration of these three elements. The model is validated by comparing with known analytic solutions of ionic distributions at fluid interfaces, dielectric droplet deformations, and the electrophoretic mobility of colloidal suspensions. Its possibilities are explored by considering various physical systems, such as breakup of charged and neutral droplets and colloidal dynamics at either planar or spherical fluid interfaces.

  10. Simulations of wave propagation and disorder in 3D non-close-packed colloidal photonic crystals with low refractive index contrast.

    Glushko, O; Meisels, R; Kuchar, F

    2010-03-29

    The plane-wave expansion method (PWEM), the multiple-scattering method (MSM) and the 3D finite-difference time-domain method (FDTD) are applied for simulations of propagation of electromagnetic waves through 3D colloidal photonic crystals. The system investigated is not a "usual" artificial opal with close-packed fcc lattice but a dilute bcc structure which occurs due to long-range repulsive interaction between electrically charged colloidal particles during the growth process. The basic optical properties of non-close-packed colloidal PhCs are explored by examining the band structure and reflection spectra for a bcc lattice of silica spheres in an aqueous medium. Finite size effects and correspondence between the Bragg model, band structure and reflection spectra are discussed. The effects of size, positional and missing-spheres disorder are investigated. In addition, by analyzing the results of experimental work we show that the fabricated structures have reduced plane-to-plane distance probably due to the effect of gravity during growth.

  11. Transport of Intrinsic Plutonium Colloids in Saturated Porous Media

    Zhou, D.; Abdel-Fattah, A.; Boukhalfa, H.; Ware, S. D.; Tarimala, S.; Keller, A. A.

    2011-12-01

    column at a flow rate of ~ 6 mL/hr. Despite that the Pu intrinsic colloids are positively charged while the alluvium grain surfaces are negatively charged under the current experimental conditions, about 30% of the Pu colloids population transported through the column and broke through earlier than trillium. Our previous experiments in the same column have shown a highly unretarded transport of the negatively charged pseudo Pu colloids (Pu sorbed onto smectite colloids) and complete retardation of the dissolved Pu. The enhanced transport of Pu colloids was explained by the effective pore volume concept. Combining the results of these two experiments, it is concluded that the intrinsic Pu colloids transported in the column by adsorbing onto the background clay colloids due to electrostatic repulsion.

  12. The electrochemical reduction rate of colloidal particles of silver halides as a function of the electrolyte composition

    Selivanov, V.N.

    1997-01-01

    Influence of silver halide colloid particles concentration (AgI), electrolyte composition and signs of the electrode and colloids charges on their reduction threshold current densities has been studied. It has been discovered that reduction threshold current densities of positively charged colloid particles exceed by a factor of 3-4 the threshold densities of silver ions diffusion current. It is shown that the threshold density of colloids reduction current is limited by the rates of their electrophoretic transfer and diffusion

  13. Method for producing dustless graphite spheres from waste graphite fines

    Pappano, Peter J [Oak Ridge, TN; Rogers, Michael R [Clinton, TN

    2012-05-08

    A method for producing graphite spheres from graphite fines by charging a quantity of spherical media into a rotatable cylindrical overcoater, charging a quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater thereby forming a first mixture of spherical media and graphite fines, rotating the overcoater at a speed such that the first mixture climbs the wall of the overcoater before rolling back down to the bottom thereby forming a second mixture of spherical media, graphite fines, and graphite spheres, removing the second mixture from the overcoater, sieving the second mixture to separate graphite spheres, charging the first mixture back into the overcoater, charging an additional quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater, adjusting processing parameters like overcoater dimensions, graphite fines charge, overcoater rotation speed, overcoater angle of rotation, and overcoater time of rotation, before repeating the steps until graphite fines are converted to graphite spheres.

  14. Physics of Hard Spheres Experiment: Significant and Quantitative Findings Made

    Doherty, Michael P.

    2000-01-01

    Direct examination of atomic interactions is difficult. One powerful approach to visualizing atomic interactions is to study near-index-matched colloidal dispersions of microscopic plastic spheres, which can be probed by visible light. Such spheres interact through hydrodynamic and Brownian forces, but they feel no direct force before an infinite repulsion at contact. Through the microgravity flight of the Physics of Hard Spheres Experiment (PHaSE), researchers have sought a more complete understanding of the entropically driven disorder-order transition in hard-sphere colloidal dispersions. The experiment was conceived by Professors Paul M. Chaikin and William B. Russel of Princeton University. Microgravity was required because, on Earth, index-matched colloidal dispersions often cannot be density matched, resulting in significant settling over the crystallization period. This settling makes them a poor model of the equilibrium atomic system, where the effect of gravity is truly negligible. For this purpose, a customized light-scattering instrument was designed, built, and flown by the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field on the space shuttle (shuttle missions STS 83 and STS 94). This instrument performed both static and dynamic light scattering, with sample oscillation for determining rheological properties. Scattered light from a 532- nm laser was recorded either by a 10-bit charge-coupled discharge (CCD) camera from a concentric screen covering angles of 0 to 60 or by sensitive avalanche photodiode detectors, which convert the photons into binary data from which two correlators compute autocorrelation functions. The sample cell was driven by a direct-current servomotor to allow sinusoidal oscillation for the measurement of rheological properties. Significant microgravity research findings include the observation of beautiful dendritic crystals, the crystallization of a "glassy phase" sample in microgravity that did not crystallize for over 1 year in 1g

  15. Colloid chemistry: available sorption models and the question of colloid adhesion

    Grauer, R.

    1990-05-01

    A safety analysis of a radioactive waste repository should consider the possibility of nuclide transport by colloids. This would involve describing the sorption properties of the colloids and their transport in porous and fissured media. This report deals with a few selected aspects of the chemistry of this complex subject. Because the mechanisms of ion adsorption onto surfaces are material-specific, increased attention should be paid to identifying the material constitution of aquatic colloids. Suitable models already exist for describing reversible adsorption; these models describe sorption using mass action equations. The surface coordination model, developed for hydrous oxide surfaces, allows a uniform approach to be adopted for different classes of materials. This model is also predictive and has been applied successfully to natural systems. From the point of view of nuclide transport by colloids, irreversible sorption represents the most unfavourable situation. There is virtually no information available on the extent of reversibility and on the desorption kinetics of important nuclide/colloid combinations. Experimental investigations are therefore necessary in this respect. The only question considered in connection with colloid transport and its modelling is that of colloid sticking. Natural colloids, and the surfaces of the rock on which they may be collected, generally have negative surface charges so that colloid sticking will be difficult. The DLVO theory contains an approach for calculating the sticking factor from the surface potentials of the solid phases and the ionic strength of the water. However, it has been shown that this theory is inapplicable because of inherent shortcomings which lead to completely unrealistic predictions. The sticking probability of colloids should therefore be determined experimentally for systems which correspond as closely as possible to reality. (author) 66 figs., 12 tabs., 204 refs

  16. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    H. S. Viswanathan

    2004-01-01

    This scientific analysis provides retardation factors for colloids transporting in the saturated zone (SZ) and the unsaturated zone (UZ). These retardation factors represent the reversible chemical and physical filtration of colloids in the SZ. The value of the colloid retardation factor, R col is dependent on several factors, such as colloid size, colloid type, and geochemical conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, and ionic strength). These factors are folded into the distributions of R col that have been developed from field and experimental data collected under varying geochemical conditions with different colloid types and sizes. Attachment rate constants, k att , and detachment rate constants, k det , of colloids to the fracture surface have been measured for the fractured volcanics, and separate R col uncertainty distributions have been developed for attachment and detachment to clastic material and mineral grains in the alluvium. Radionuclides such as plutonium and americium sorb mostly (90 to 99 percent) irreversibly to colloids (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025], Section 6.3.3.2). The colloid retardation factors developed in this analysis are needed to simulate the transport of radionuclides that are irreversibly sorbed onto colloids; this transport is discussed in the model report ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]). Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this scientific analysis especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste-degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and americium may be irreversibly attached to colloids for the time scales of interest. A section of this report will also discuss the validity of using microspheres as analogs to colloids in some of the lab and field experiments used to obtain the colloid retardation factors. In addition, a small fraction of colloids travels with the groundwater without any significant retardation. Radionuclides irreversibly

  17. Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE) Science Overview

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ronald J.; Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Luna, Unique J.; Chaiken, Paul M.; Hollingsworth, Andrew; Secanna, Stefano; Weitz, David; Lu, Peter; Yodh, Arjun; hide

    2013-01-01

    The Advanced Colloids Experiment is being conducted on the International Space Station (ISS) using the Light Microscopy Module (LMM) in the Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR). Work to date will be discussed and future plans and opportunities will be highlighted. The LMM is a microscope facility designed to allow scientists to process, manipulate, and characterize colloidal samples in micro-gravity where the absence of gravitational settling and particle jamming enables scientists to study such things as:a.The role that disordered and ordered-packing of spheres play in the phase diagram and equation of state of hard sphere systems,b.crystal nucleation and growth, growth instabilities, and the glass transition, c.gelation and phase separation of colloid polymer mixtures,d.crystallization of colloidal binary alloys,e.competition between crystallization and phase separation,f.effects of anisotropy and specific interactions on packing, aggregation, frustration and crystallization,g.effects of specific reversible and irreversible interactions mediated in the first case by hybridization of complementary DNA strands attached to separate colloidal particles,h.Lock and key interactions between colloids with dimples and spheres which match the size and shape of the dimples,i.finding the phase diagrams of isotropic and interacting particles,j.new techniques for complex self-assembly including scenarios for self-replication, k.critical Casimir forces,l.biology (real and model systems) in microgravity,m.etc. By adding additional microscopy capabilities to the existing LMM, NASA will increase the tools available for scientists that fly experiments on the ISS enabling scientists to observe directly what is happening at the particle level. Presently, theories are needed to bridge the gap between what is being observed (at a macroscopic level when photographing samples) with what is happening at a particle (or microscopic) level. What is happening at a microscopic level will be directly

  18. Colloquium: Toward living matter with colloidal particles

    Zeravcic, Zorana; Manoharan, Vinothan N.; Brenner, Michael P.

    2017-07-01

    A fundamental unsolved problem is to understand the differences between inanimate matter and living matter. Although this question might be framed as philosophical, there are many fundamental and practical reasons to pursue the development of synthetic materials with the properties of living ones. There are three fundamental properties of living materials that we seek to reproduce: The ability to spontaneously assemble complex structures, the ability to self-replicate, and the ability to perform complex and coordinated reactions that enable transformations impossible to realize if a single structure acted alone. The conditions that are required for a synthetic material to have these properties are currently unknown. This Colloquium examines whether these phenomena could emerge by programming interactions between colloidal particles, an approach that bootstraps off of recent advances in DNA nanotechnology and in the mathematics of sphere packings. The argument is made that the essential properties of living matter could emerge from colloidal interactions that are specific—so that each particle can be programmed to bind or not bind to any other particle—and also time dependent—so that the binding strength between two particles could increase or decrease in time at a controlled rate. There is a small regime of interaction parameters that gives rise to colloidal particles with lifelike properties, including self-assembly, self-replication, and metabolism. The parameter range for these phenomena can be identified using a combinatorial search over the set of known sphere packings.

  19. Variable dislocation widths in colloidal crystals of soft thermosensitive spheres

    Hilhorst, J.; Petukhov, A.V.

    2011-01-01

    Themagnetic and structural properties of a cobalt inverse opal-like crystal have been studied by a combination of complementary techniques ranging from polarized neutron scattering and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry to x-ray diffraction. Microradian small-angle x-ray diffraction shows that the inverse opal-like structure (OLS) synthesized by the electrochemical method fully duplicates the threedimensional net of voids of the template artificial opal. The inve...

  20. Variable dislocation widths in colloidal crystals of soft thermosensitive spheres

    Hilhorst, J.; Petukhov, A.V.

    2011-01-01

    Themagnetic and structural properties of a cobalt inverse opal-like crystal have been studied by a combination of complementary techniques ranging from polarized neutron scattering and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry to x-ray diffraction. Microradian small-angle

  1. Startup of electrophoresis in a suspension of colloidal spheres.

    Chiang, Chia C; Keh, Huan J

    2015-12-01

    The transient electrophoretic response of a homogeneous suspension of spherical particles to the step application of an electric field is analyzed. The electric double layer encompassing each particle is assumed to be thin but finite, and the effect of dynamic electroosmosis within it is incorporated. The momentum equation for the fluid outside the double layers is solved through the use of a unit cell model. Closed-form formulas for the time-evolving electrophoretic and settling velocities of the particles in the Laplace transform are obtained in terms of the electrokinetic radius, relative mass density, and volume fraction of the particles. The time scale for the development of electrophoresis and sedimentation is significantly smaller for a suspension with a higher particle volume fraction or a smaller particle-to-fluid density ratio, and the electrophoretic mobility at any instant increases with an increase in the electrokinetic particle radius. The transient electrophoretic mobility is a decreasing function of the particle volume fraction if the particle-to-fluid density ratio is relatively small, but it may increase with an increase in the particle volume fraction if this density ratio is relatively large. The particle interaction effect in a suspension on the transient electrophoresis is much weaker than that on the transient sedimentation of the particles. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Colloid transport in model fracture filling materials

    Wold, S.; Garcia-Garcia, S.; Jonsson, M.

    2010-12-01

    Colloid transport in model fracture filling materials Susanna Wold*, Sandra García-García and Mats Jonsson KTH Chemical Science and Engineering Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden *Corresponding author: E-mail: wold@kth.se Phone: +46 8 790 6295 In colloid transport in water-bearing fractures, the retardation depends on interactions with the fracture surface by sorption or filtration. These mechanisms are difficult to separate. A rougher surface will give a larger area available for sorption, and also when a particle is physically hindered, it approaches the surface and enables further sorption. Sorption can be explained by electrostatics were the strongest sorption on minerals always is observed at pH below pHpzc (Filby et al., 2008). The adhesion of colloids to mineral surfaces is related to the surface roughness according to a recent study (Darbha et al., 2010). There is a large variation in the characteristics of water-bearing fractures in bedrock in terms of aperture distribution, flow velocity, surface roughness, mineral distributions, presence of fracture filling material, and biological and organic material, which is hard to implement in modeling. The aim of this work was to study the transport of negatively charged colloids in model fracture filling material in relation to flow, porosity, mineral type, colloid size, and surface charge distribution. In addition, the impact on transport of colloids of mixing model fracture filling materials with different retention and immobilization capacities, determined by batch sorption experiments, was investigated. The transport of Na-montmorillonite colloids and well-defined negatively charged latex microspheres of 50, 100, and 200 nm diameter were studied in either columns containing quartz or quartz mixed with biotite. The ionic strength in the solution was exclusively 0.001 and pH 6 or 8.5. The flow rates used were 0.002, 0.03, and 0.6 mL min-1. Sorption of the colloids on the model fracture

  3. Analysis of colloid transport

    Travis, B.J.; Nuttall, H.E.

    1985-01-01

    The population balance methodology is described and applied to the transport and capture of polydispersed colloids in packed columns. The transient model includes particle growth, capture, convective transport, and dispersion. We also follow the dynamic accumulation of captured colloids on the solids. The multidimensional parabolic partial differential equation was solved by a recently enhanced method of characteristics technique. This computational technique minimized numerical dispersion and is computationally very fast. The FORTRAN 77 code ran on a VAX-780 in less than a minute and also runs on an IBM-AT using the Professional FORTRAN compiler. The code was extensively tested against various simplified cases and against analytical models. The packed column experiments by Saltelli et al. were re-analyzed incorporating the experimentally reported size distribution of the colloid feed material. Colloid capture was modeled using a linear size dependent filtration function. The effects of a colloid size dependent filtration factor and various initial colloid size distributions on colloid migration and capture were investigated. Also, we followed the changing colloid size distribution as a function of position in the column. Some simple arguments are made to assess the likelihood of colloid migration at a potential NTS Yucca Mountain waste disposal site. 10 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  4. Colloid process engineering

    Peukert, Wolfgang; Rehage, Heinz; Schuchmann, Heike

    2015-01-01

    This book deals with colloidal systems in technical processes and the influence of colloidal systems by technical processes. It explores how new measurement capabilities can offer the potential for a dynamic development of scientific and engineering, and examines the origin of colloidal systems and its use for new products. The future challenges to colloidal process engineering are the development of appropriate equipment and processes for the production and obtainment of multi-phase structures and energetic interactions in market-relevant quantities. The book explores the relevant processes and for controlled production and how they can be used across all scales.

  5. UZ Colloid Transport Model

    McGraw, M.

    2000-01-01

    The UZ Colloid Transport model development plan states that the objective of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the development of a model for simulating unsaturated colloid transport. This objective includes the following: (1) use of a process level model to evaluate the potential mechanisms for colloid transport at Yucca Mountain; (2) Provide ranges of parameters for significant colloid transport processes to Performance Assessment (PA) for the unsaturated zone (UZ); (3) Provide a basis for development of an abstracted model for use in PA calculations

  6. A Powerful Public Sphere?

    Fiig, Christina

    The paper holds a critical discussion of the Habermasian model of the public sphere and proposes a revised model of a general public......The paper holds a critical discussion of the Habermasian model of the public sphere and proposes a revised model of a general public...

  7. Continuous separation of colloidal particles using dielectrophoresis.

    Yunus, Nurul Amziah Md; Nili, Hossein; Green, Nicolas G

    2013-04-01

    Dielectrophoresis is the movement of particles in nonuniform electric fields and has been of interest for application to manipulation and separation at and below the microscale. This technique has the advantages of being noninvasive, nondestructive, and noncontact, with the movement of particle achieved by means of electric fields generated by miniaturized electrodes and microfluidic systems. Although the majority of applications have been above the microscale, there is increasing interest in application to colloidal particles around a micron and smaller. This paper begins with a review of colloidal and nanoscale dielectrophoresis with specific attention paid to separation applications. An innovative design of integrated microelectrode array and its application to flow-through, continuous separation of colloidal particles is then presented. The details of the angled chevron microelectrode array and the test microfluidic system are then discussed. The variation in device operation with applied signal voltage is presented and discussed in terms of separation efficiency, demonstrating 99.9% separation of a mixture of colloidal latex spheres. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Fabrication of a three-dimensional photonic band-gap crystal of air-spheres in a titania matrix

    Diop, M.; Maurin, G.; Tork, Amir; Lessard, Roger A.

    2003-02-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) colloidal crystal have been grown from an aqueous colloidal solution of highly monodisperse submicrometer-sized polystyrene spheres using a self-assembly processing technique. The electromagnetic waves diffracted by this crystal can interfere and give rise to a photonic band-gap. However, due to the low refractive index contrast within this material the band-gap is incomplete. By filling the voids between the spheres of the colloidal crystal with titania and removing the polystyrene beads by sublimation, we obtained an inverse-opal structure with an increased refractive index contrast showing strong opalescence.

  9. Particles with changeable topology in nematic colloids

    Ravnik, Miha; Čopar, Simon; Žumer, Slobodan

    2015-01-01

    We show that nematic colloids can serve as a highly variable and controllable platform for studying inclusions with changeable topology and their effects on the surrounding ordering fields. We explore morphing of toroidal and knotted colloidal particles into effective spheres, distinctively changing their Euler characteristic and affecting the surrounding nematic field, including topological defect structures. With toroidal particles, the inner nematic defect eventually transitions from a wide loop to a point defect (a small loop). Trefoil particles become linked with two knotted defect loops, mutually forming a three component link, that upon tightening transform into a two-component particle-defect loop link. For more detailed topological analysis, Pontryagin-Thom surfaces are calculated and visualised, indicating an interesting cascade of defect rewirings caused by the shape morphing of the knotted particles. (paper)

  10. Le Châtelier's conjecture: Measurement of colloidal eigenstresses in chemically reactive materials

    Abuhaikal, Muhannad; Ioannidou, Katerina; Petersen, Thomas; Pellenq, Roland J.-M.; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2018-03-01

    Volume changes in chemically reactive materials, such as hydrating cement, play a critical role in many engineering applications that require precise estimates of stress and pressure developments. But a means to determine bulk volume changes in the absence of other deformation mechanisms related to thermal, pressure and load variations, is still missing. Herein, we present such a measuring devise, and a hybrid experimental-theoretical technique that permits the determination of colloidal eigenstresses. Applied to cementitious materials, it is found that bulk volume changes in saturated cement pastes at constant pressure and temperature conditions result from a competition of repulsive and attractive phenomena that originate from the relative distance of the solid particles - much as Henry Louis Le Châtelier, the father of modern cement science, had conjectured in the late 19th century. Precipitation of hydration products in confined spaces entails a repulsion, whereas the concurrent reduction in interparticle distance entails activation of attractive forces in charged colloidal particles. This cross-over from repulsion to attraction can be viewed as a phase transition between a liquid state (below the solid percolation) and the limit packing of hard spheres, separated by an energy barrier that defines the temperature-dependent eigenstress magnitude.

  11. Interface colloidal robotic manipulator

    Aronson, Igor; Snezhko, Oleksiy

    2015-08-04

    A magnetic colloidal system confined at the interface between two immiscible liquids and energized by an alternating magnetic field dynamically self-assembles into localized asters and arrays of asters. The colloidal system exhibits locomotion and shape change. By controlling a small external magnetic field applied parallel to the interface, structures can capture, transport, and position target particles.

  12. Capillary evaporation in colloid-polymer mixtures selectively confined to a planar slit

    Schmidt, Matthias; Fortini, Andrea; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2004-01-01

    Using density functional theory and Monte Carlo simulations we investigate the Asakura-Oosawa-Vrij mixture of hard sphere colloids and non-adsorbing ideal polymers under selective confinement of the colloids to a planar slab geometry. This is a model for confinement of colloid-polymer mixtures by either two parallel walls with a semi-permeable polymer coating or through the use of laser tweezers. We find that such a pore favours the colloidal gas over the colloidal liquid phase and induces capillary evaporation. A treatment based on the Kelvin equation gives a good account of the location of the capillary binodal for large slit widths. The colloid density profile is found to exhibit a minimum (maximum) at contact with the wall for large (small) slit widths

  13. Experiment SPHERE status 2008

    Shaulov, S.B.; Besshapov, S.P.; Kabanova, N.V.; Sysoeva, T.I.; Antonov, R.A.; Anyuhina, A.M.; Bronvech, E.A.; Chernov, D.V.; Galkin, V.I.; Tkaczyk, W.; Finger, M.; Sonsky, M.

    2009-01-01

    The expedition carried out in March, 2008 to Lake Baikal became an important stage in the development of the SPHERE experiment. During the expedition the SPHERE-2 installation was hoisted, for the first time, on a tethered balloon, APA, to a height of 700 m over the lake surface covered with ice and snow. A series of test measurements were made. Preliminary results of the data processing are presented. The next plan of the SPHERE experiment is to begin a set of statistics for constructing the CR spectrum in the energy range 10 16 -10 18 eV.

  14. Experiment SPHERE status 2008

    Shaulov, S.B., E-mail: shaul@sci.lebedev.r [P.N.Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky prospect 53, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Besshapov, S.P.; Kabanova, N.V.; Sysoeva, T.I. [P.N.Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky prospect 53, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Antonov, R.A.; Anyuhina, A.M.; Bronvech, E.A.; Chernov, D.V.; Galkin, V.I. [Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lomonosov State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Tkaczyk, W. [Department of Experimental Physics of University of Lodz (Poland); Finger, M. [Karlov University, Prague (Czech Republic); Sonsky, M. [COMPAS Consortium, Turnov (Czech Republic)

    2009-12-15

    The expedition carried out in March, 2008 to Lake Baikal became an important stage in the development of the SPHERE experiment. During the expedition the SPHERE-2 installation was hoisted, for the first time, on a tethered balloon, APA, to a height of 700 m over the lake surface covered with ice and snow. A series of test measurements were made. Preliminary results of the data processing are presented. The next plan of the SPHERE experiment is to begin a set of statistics for constructing the CR spectrum in the energy range 10{sup 16}-10{sup 18} eV.

  15. Fe2O3 hollow sphere nanocomposites for supercapacitor applications

    Zhao, Yu; Wen, Yang; Xu, Bing; Lu, Lu; Ren, Reiming

    2018-02-01

    Nanomaterials have attracted increasing interest in electrochemical energy storage and conversion. Hollow sphere Fe2O3 nanocomposites were successfully prepared through facile low temperature water-bath method with carbon sphere as hard template. The morphology and microstructure of samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Scanning electron microscope (SEM), respectively. Through hydrolysis mechanism, using ferric chloride direct hydrolysis, iron hydroxide coated on the surface of carbon sphere, after high temperature calcination can form the hollow spherical iron oxide materials. Electrochemical performances of the hollow sphere Fe2O3 nanocomposites electrodes were investigated by cyclic voltammery (CV) and galvanostatic charge/discharge. The Pure hollow sphere Fe2O3 nanocomposites achieves a specific capacitance of 125 F g-1 at the current density of 85 mA g-1. The results indicate that the uniform dispersion of hollow ball structure can effectively reduce the particle reunion in the process of charging and discharging.

  16. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    H. S. Viswanathan

    2004-10-07

    This scientific analysis provides retardation factors for colloids transporting in the saturated zone (SZ) and the unsaturated zone (UZ). These retardation factors represent the reversible chemical and physical filtration of colloids in the SZ. The value of the colloid retardation factor, R{sub col} is dependent on several factors, such as colloid size, colloid type, and geochemical conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, and ionic strength). These factors are folded into the distributions of R{sub col} that have been developed from field and experimental data collected under varying geochemical conditions with different colloid types and sizes. Attachment rate constants, k{sub att}, and detachment rate constants, k{sub det}, of colloids to the fracture surface have been measured for the fractured volcanics, and separate R{sub col} uncertainty distributions have been developed for attachment and detachment to clastic material and mineral grains in the alluvium. Radionuclides such as plutonium and americium sorb mostly (90 to 99 percent) irreversibly to colloids (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025], Section 6.3.3.2). The colloid retardation factors developed in this analysis are needed to simulate the transport of radionuclides that are irreversibly sorbed onto colloids; this transport is discussed in the model report ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]). Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this scientific analysis especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste-degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and americium may be irreversibly attached to colloids for the time scales of interest. A section of this report will also discuss the validity of using microspheres as analogs to colloids in some of the lab and field experiments used to obtain the colloid retardation factors. In addition, a small fraction of colloids travels with the groundwater without any significant

  17. Grimsel colloid exercise

    Degueldre, C.; Longworth, G.; Vilks, P.

    1989-11-01

    The Grimsel Colloid Exercise was an intercomparison exercise which consisted of an in situ sampling phase followed by a colloid characterisation step. The goal of this benchmark exercise, which involved 12 laboratories, was to evaluate both sampling and characterisation techniques with emphasis on the colloid specific size distribution. The sampling phase took place at the Grimsel Test Site between February 1 and 13, 1988 and the participating groups produced colloid samples using the following methods: 1. Cross-flow ultrafiltration with production of membranes loaded with colloids. 2. Tangential diaultrafiltration and production of colloid concentrates. 3. Filtrates produced by each group. 4. Unfiltered water was also collected by PSI in glass bottles, under controlled anaerobic conditions, and by the other sampling groups in various plastic bottles. In addition, on-line monitoring of pH, χ, [O-2] and T of the water and of [O-2] in the atmosphere of the sampling units was carried out routinely. All samples were shipped according to the CoCo Club scheme for characterisation, with emphasis on the size distribution. The exercise differentiates the colloid samples produced on site from those obtained after transfer of the fluid samples to the laboratories. The colloid concentration and size distribution can be determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), gravimetry (GRAV), chemical analysis of fluid samples after micro/ultrafiltration (MF/UF) and by transmission single particle counting (PC). The colloid concentration can also be evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), static and dynamic light scattering (SLS,DLS) and by laser-induced photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS). The results are discussed on the basis of the detection limit, lateral resolution and counting conditions of the technique (precision) as well as sample preparation, artefact production and measurement optimisation (accuracy). A good agreement between size distribution results was

  18. Clusters in attractive colloids

    Coniglio, A [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' , Complesso Universitario di Monte Sant' Angelo, via Cintia 80126 Naples (Italy); Arcangelis, L de [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione and CNISM II Universita di Napoli, Aversa (CE) (Italy); Candia, A de [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' , Complesso Universitario di Monte Sant' Angelo, via Cintia 80126 Naples (Italy); Gado, E Del [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' , Complesso Universitario di Monte Sant' Angelo, via Cintia 80126 Naples (Italy); Fierro, A [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' , Complesso Universitario di Monte Sant' Angelo, via Cintia 80126 Naples (Italy); Sator, N [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique de la Matiere Condensee, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris6, UMR (CNRS) 7600 Case 121, 4 Place Jussieu 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2006-09-13

    We discuss how the anomalous increase of the viscosity in colloidal systems with short-range attraction can be related to the formation of long-living clusters. Based on molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo numerical simulations of different models, we propose a similar picture for colloidal gelation at low and intermediate volume fractions. On this basis, we analyze the distinct role played by the formation of long-living bonds and the crowding of the particles in the slow dynamics of attractive colloidal systems.

  19. Colloids in Biotechnology

    Fanun, Monzer

    2010-01-01

    Colloids have come a long way from when Thomas Graham coined the term colloid to describe 'pseudo solutions'. This book enables scientists to close the gap between extensive research and translation into commercial options in biomedicine and biotechnology. It covers biosurfactants and surface properties, phase behavior, and orientational change of surfactant mixtures with peptides at the interface. It also covers adsorption of polymers and biopolymers on the surface and interface, discusses colloidal nanoparticles and their use in biotechnology, and delves into bioadhesion and microencapsulati

  20. The sphere-PAC fuel code 'SPHERE-3'

    Wallin, H.

    2000-01-01

    Sphere-PAC fuel is an advanced nuclear fuel, in which the cladding tube is filled with small fuel spheres instead of the more usual fuel pellets. At PSI, the irradiation behaviour of sphere-PAC fuel is calculated using the computer code SPHERE-3. The paper describes the present status of the SPHERE-3 code, and some results of the qualification process against experimental data. (author)

  1. The sphere-pac fuel code 'SPHERE-3'

    Wallin, H.; Nordstroem, L.A.; Hellwig, C.

    2001-01-01

    Sphere-pac fuel is an advanced nuclear fuel, in which the cladding tube is filled with small fuel spheres instead of the more usual fuel pellets. At PSI, the irradiation behaviour of sphere-pac fuel is calculated using the computer code SPHERE-3. The paper describes the present status of the SPHERE-3 code, and some results of the qualification process against experimental data. (author)

  2. Zeta potential in colloid science principles and applications

    Hunter, Robert J; Rowell, R L

    2013-01-01

    Zeta Potential in Colloid Science: Principles and Applications covers the concept of the zeta potential in colloid chemical theory. The book discusses the charge and potential distribution at interfaces; the calculation of the zeta potential; and the experimental techniques used in the measurement of electrokinetic parameters. The text also describes the electroviscous and viscoelectric effects; applications of the zeta potential to areas of colloid science; and the influence of simple inorganic ions or more complex adsorbates on zeta potential. Physical chemists and people involved in the stu

  3. A General Synthesis Strategy for Hierarchical Porous Metal Oxide Hollow Spheres

    Huadong Fu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The hierarchical porous TiO2 hollow spheres were successfully prepared by using the hydrothermally synthesized colloidal carbon spheres as templates and tetrabutyl titanate as inorganic precursors. The diameter and wall thickness of hollow TiO2 spheres were determined by the hard templates and concentration of tetrabutyl titanate. The particle size, dispersity, homogeneity, and surface state of the carbon spheres can be easily controlled by adjusting the hydrothermal conditions and adding certain amount of the surfactants. The prepared hollow spheres possessed the perfect spherical shape, monodispersity, and hierarchically pore structures, and the further experiment verified that the present approach can be used to prepare other metal oxide hollow spheres, which could be used as catalysis, fuel cells, lithium-air battery, gas sensor, and so on.

  4. Graphs with Eulerian unit spheres

    Knill, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    d-spheres in graph theory are inductively defined as graphs for which all unit spheres S(x) are (d-1)-spheres and that the removal of one vertex renders the graph contractible. Eulerian d-spheres are geometric d-spheres which are d+1 colorable. We prove here that G is an Eulerian sphere if and only if the degrees of all the (d-2)-dimensional sub-simplices in G are even. This generalizes a Kempe-Heawood result for d=2 and is work related to the conjecture that all d-spheres have chromatic numb...

  5. Liquid Crystal Colloids

    Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2018-03-01

    Colloids are abundant in nature, science, and technology, with examples ranging from milk to quantum dots and the colloidal atom paradigm. Similarly, liquid crystal ordering is important in contexts ranging from biological membranes to laboratory models of cosmic strings and liquid crystal displays in consumer devices. Some of the most exciting recent developments in both of these soft matter fields emerge at their interface, in the fast-growing research arena of liquid crystal colloids. Mesoscale self-assembly in such systems may lead to artificial materials and to structures with emergent physical behavior arising from patterning of molecular order and nano- or microparticles into precisely controlled configurations. Liquid crystal colloids show exceptional promise for new discovery that may impinge on composite material fabrication, low-dimensional topology, photonics, and so on. Starting from physical underpinnings, I review the state of the art in this fast-growing field, with a focus on its scientific and technological potential.

  6. Inner- and outer-sphere complexation of ions at the goethite-solution interface

    Rahnemaie, R.; Hiemstra, T.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.

    2006-01-01

    Formation of inner- and outer-sphere complexes of environmentally important divalent ions on the goethite surface was examined by applying the charge distribution CD model for inner- and outer-sphere complexation. The model assumes spatial charge distribution between the surface (0-plane) and the

  7. Yielding and flow of sheared colloidal glasses

    Petekidis, G; Vlassopoulos, D; Pusey, P N

    2004-01-01

    We have studied some of the rheological properties of suspensions of hard-sphere colloids with particular reference to behaviour near the concentration of the glass transition. First we monitored the strain on the samples during and after a transient step stress. We find that, at all values of applied step stress, colloidal glasses show a rapid, apparently elastic, recovery of strain after the stress is removed. This recovery is found even in samples which have flowed significantly during stressing. We attribute this behaviour to 'cage elasticity', the recovery of the stress-induced distorted environment of any particle to a more isotropic state when the stress is removed. Second, we monitored the stress as the strain rate dot γ of flowing samples was slowly decreased. Suspensions which are glassy at rest show a stress which becomes independent of dot γ as dot γ →0. This limiting stress can be interpreted as the yield stress of the glass and agrees well both with the yield stress deduced from the step stress and recovery measurements and that predicted by a recent mode coupling theory of sheared suspensions. Thus, the behaviours under steady shearing and transient step stress both support the idea that colloidal glasses have a finite yield stress. We note however that the samples do exhibit a slow accumulation of strain due to creep at stresses below the yield stress

  8. Filtration of polydispersed colloids

    Nuttall, H.E.

    1988-01-01

    In this study, the dynamic microscopic form of the population balance model is applied to the problem of polydispersed particle capture in one spatial diffusion. This mathematical modeling approach can be applied to the difficult and potentially important problem of particulate (radiocolloid) transport in the groundwater surrounding a nuclear waste disposal site. To demonstrate the population balance methodology, the equations were developed and used to investigate transport and capture of polydispersed colloids in packed columns. Modeling simulations were compared to experimental column data. The multidimensional form of the population balance equation was used to analyze the transport and capture of polydispersed colloids. A numerical model was developed to describe transport of polydispersed colloids through a one-dimensional porous region. The effects of various size distributions were investigated in terms of capture efficiency. For simulating the column data, it was found by trial and error that as part of the population balance model a linear size dependent filtration function gave a good fit to the measured colloid concentration profile. The effects of constant versus size dependent filtration coefficients were compared and the differences illustrated by the calculated colloid profile within the column. Also observed from the model calculations was the dramatically changing liquid-phase colloid-size distribution which was plotted as a function of position down the column. This modeling approach was excellent for describing and understanding microscopic filtration in porous media

  9. Erbium-implanted silica colloids with 80% luminescence quantum efficiency

    Slooff, L. H.; de Dood, M. J. A.; van Blaaderen, A.; Polman, A.

    2000-06-01

    Silica colloids with a diameter of 240-360 nm, grown by wet chemical synthesis using ethanol, ammonia, water, and tetraethoxysilane, were implanted with 350 keV Er ions, to peak concentrations of 0.2-1.1 at. % and put onto a silicon or glass substrate. After annealing at 700-900 °C the colloids show clear room-temperature photoluminescence at 1.53 μm, with lifetimes as high as 17 ms. By comparing data of different Er concentrations, the purely radiative lifetime is estimated to be 20-22 ms, indicating a high quantum efficiency of about 80%. This high quantum efficiency indicates that, after annealing, the silica colloids are almost free of OH impurities. Spinning a layer of polymethylmethacrylate over the silica spheres results in an optically transparent nanocomposite layer, that can be used as a planar optical waveguide amplifier at 1.5 μm that is fully compatible with polymer technology.

  10. Overview of the phase diagram of ionic magnetic colloidal dispersions

    Cousin, F.; Dubois, E.; Cabuil, V.; Boue, F.; Perzynski, R.

    2001-01-01

    We study ionic magnetic colloidal dispersions, which are constituted of γ-Fe 2 O 3 nanoparticles dispersed in water, and stabilized with electrostatic interparticle repulsion. The phase diagram PV versus Φ (P: osmotic pressure, V: particle volume, Φ: particle volume fraction) is explored, especially in the range of high Π and high Φ. The osmotic pressure P of the colloidal dispersion is known either by a measurement either because it is imposed during the sample preparation by osmotic compression. The structure of the colloidal dispersion is determined from Small Angle Neutron Scattering. Two regimes can be distinguished. At high pressure, fluid and solid phases can exist. Their structure is governed by strong electrostatic repulsion, the range of which is here evaluated. At low pressure, gas, liquid and glassy solids can exist. Their structure results from a sticky hard sphere potential. (author)

  11. Generation of colloidal granules and capsules from double emulsion drops

    Hess, Kathryn S.

    Assemblies of colloidal particles are extensively used in ceramic processing, pharmaceuticals, inks and coatings. In this project, the aim was to develop a new technique to fabricate monodispersed colloidal assemblies. The use of microfluidic devices and emulsion processing allows for the fabrication of complex materials that can be used in a variety of applications. A microfluidic device is used to create monodispersed water/oil/water (w/o/w) double emulsions with interior droplets of colloidal silica suspension ranging in size from tens to hundreds of microns. By tailoring the osmotic pressure using glycerol as a solute in the continuous and inner phases of the emulsion, we can control the final volume size of the monodispersed silica colloidal crystals that form in the inner droplets of the double emulsion. Modifying the ionic strength in the colloidal dispersion can be used to affect the particle-particle interactions and crystal formation of the final colloidal particle. This w/o/w technique has been used with other systems of metal oxide colloids and cellulose nanocrystals. Encapsulation of the colloidal suspension in a polymer shell for the generation of ceramic-polymer core-shell particles has also been developed. These core-shell particles have spawned new research in the field of locally resonant acoustic metamaterials. Systems and chemistries for creating cellulose hydrogels within the double emulsions have also been researched. Water in oil single emulsions and double emulsions have been used to create cellulose hydrogel spheres in the sub-100 micron diameter range. Oil/water/oil double emulsions allow us to create stable cellulose capsules. The addition of a second hydrogel polymer, such as acrylate or alginate, further strengthens the cellulose gel network and can also be processed into capsules and particles using the microfluidic device. This work could have promising applications in acoustic metamaterials, personal care products, pharmaceuticals

  12. Crystallization in polydisperse colloidal suspensions

    Martin, S.; Bryant, G.; Van Megen, W.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Crystallization and glass formation in colloidal hard spheres has been a very active area of research over the last 15-20 years. For most of this time particle polydispersity has been considered to be a minor concern in these studies. However, over the last few years an increasing number of simulations, theoretical work and experiments have shown that consideration of the polydispersity is critical in understanding these phenomena. In this paper we provide an overview of recent crystallization studies on particles with two very different particle size distributions. These particles exhibit very different equilibrium crystal structures and crystallization kinetics. Based on these measurements and time lapse photographs, we propose a growth mechanism whereby crystallization occurs in conjunction with a local fractionation process near the crystal-fluid interface, which significantly alters the kinetics of crystallite nucleation and growth. This fractionation effect becomes more significant as polydispersity or skewness increases. The unusual crystal structures observed are explained using a schematic model that explains the structure in terms of stacks of planes, which are unregistered due to a high incidence of stacking faults caused by the incorporation of a large number of small particles

  13. PHASE DIAGRAM OF GELATINE-POLYURONATE COLLOIDS: ITS APPLICATION FOR MICROENCAPSULATION AND NOT ONLY

    Alexei Baerle

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Phase state and the charge of colloidal particles in the gelatine-polyuronate system were studied. A method for comparative evaluation of molecular weight of colloids by means of viscosimetric measurements and electrophoresis was developed. It is shown that the Diagram {Phase state = f (composition, pH} contains six well-defined regions. The diagram explains and predicts the behaviour of protein-polysaccharide colloids, which are included in beverages or forms the shells of oil-containing microcapsules.

  14. Simulations of induced-charge electro-osmosis in microfluidic devices

    Ben, Yuxing

    2005-03-01

    Theories of nonlinear electrokinetic phenomena generally assume a uniform, neutral bulk electroylte in contact with a polarizable thin double layer near a metal or dielectric surface, which acts as a "capacitor skin". Induced-charge electro-osmosis (ICEO) is the general effect of nonlinear electro-osmotic slip, when an applied electric field acts on its own induced (diffuse) double-layer charge. In most theoretical and experimental work, ICEO has been studied in very simple geometries, such as colloidal spheres and planar, periodic micro-electrode arrays. Here we use finite-element simulations to predict how more complicated geometries of polarizable surfaces and/or electrodes yield flow profiles with subtle dependence on the amplitude and frequency of the applied voltage. We also consider how the simple model equations break down, due to surface conduction, bulk diffusion, and concentration polarization, for large applied voltages (as in most experiments).

  15. Field-scale colloid migration experiments in a granite fracture

    Vilks, P.; Frost, L.H.; Bachinski, D.B.

    1997-01-01

    An understanding of particle migration in fractured rock, required to assess the potential for colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides, can best be evaluated when the results of laboratory experiments are demonstrated in the field. Field-scale migration experiments with silica colloids were carried out at AECL's Underground Research Laboratory (URL), located in southern Manitoba, to develop the methodology for large-scale migration experiments and to determine whether colloid transport is possible over distances up to 17 m. In addition, these experiments were designed to evaluate the effects of flow rate and flow path geometry, and to determine whether colloid tracers could be used to provide additional information on subsurface transport to that provided by conservative tracers alone. The colloid migration studies were carried out as part of AECL's Transport Properties in Highly Fractured Rock Experiment, the objective of which was to develop and demonstrate methods for evaluating the solute transport characteristics of zones of highly fractured rock. The experiments were carried out within fracture zone 2 as two-well recirculating, two-well non-recirculating, and convergent flow tests, using injection rates of 5 and 101 min -1 . Silica colloids with a 20 nm size were used because they are potentially mobile due to their stability, small size and negative surface charge. The shapes of elution profiles for colloids and conservative tracers were similar, demonstrating that colloids can migrate over distances of 17 m. The local region of drawdown towards the URL shaft affected colloid migration and, to a lesser extent, conservative tracer migration within the flow field established by the two-well tracer tests. These results indicate that stable colloids, with sizes as small as 20 nm, have different migration properties from dissolved conservative tracers. (author)

  16. Actinide colloid generation in groundwater

    Kim, J.I.

    1990-05-01

    The progress made in the investigation of actinide colloid generation in groundwaters is summarized and discussed with particular examples relevant to an understanding of the migration behaviour of actinides in natural aquifer systems. The first part deals with the characterization of colloids: groundwater colloids, actinide real-colloids and actinide pseudocolloids. The second part concentrates on the generation processes and migration behaviour of actinide pseudocolloids, which are discussed with some notable experimental examples. Importance is stressed more on the chemical aspects of the actinide colloid generation in groundwater. This work is a contribution to the CEC project MIRAGE II, particularly, to research area: complexation and colloids. (orig.)

  17. Brownian dynamics of aggregation kinetics of hard spheres with flexibele bounds

    Rzepiela, A.A.; Opheusden, van J.; Vliet, van T.

    2001-01-01

    Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations have been performed on the aggregation dynamics of colloidal particles within the context of a ball-and-string model. Particles are treated as hard spheres that can bind irreversibly through a string attached to their surface. The model is set up to mimic some

  18. High Charge-Carrier Mobility of 2.5 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) from a Water-Borne Colloid of a Polymeric Semiconductor via Smart Surfactant Engineering.

    Cho, Jangwhan; Cheon, Kwang Hee; Ahn, Hyungju; Park, Kwang Hun; Kwon, Soon-Ki; Kim, Yun-Hi; Chung, Dae Sung

    2015-10-07

    Semiconducting polymer nanoparticles dispersed in water are synthesized by a novel method utilizing non-ionic surfactants. By developing a smart surfactant engineering technique involving a selective post-removal process of surfactants, an unprecedentedly high mobility of 2.51 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) from a water-borne colloid is demonstrated for the first time. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Impact of Redox Reactions on Colloid Transport in Saturated Porous Media: An Example of Ferrihydrite Colloids Transport in the Presence of Sulfide.

    Liao, Peng; Yuan, Songhu; Wang, Dengjun

    2016-10-18

    Transport of colloids in the subsurface is an important environmental process with most research interests centered on the transport in chemically stable conditions. While colloids can be formed under dynamic redox conditions, the impact of redox reactions on their transport is largely overlooked. Taking the redox reactions between ferrihydrite colloids and sulfide as an example, we investigated how and to what extent the redox reactions modulated the transport of ferrihydrite colloids in anoxic sand columns over a range of environmentally relevant conditions. Our results reveal that the presence of sulfide (7.8-46.9 μM) significantly decreased the breakthrough of ferrihydrite colloids in the sand column. The estimated travel distance of ferrihydrite colloids in the absence of sulfide was nearly 7-fold larger than that in the presence of 46.9 μM sulfide. The reduced breakthrough was primarily attributed to the reductive dissolution of ferrihydrite colloids by sulfide in parallel with formation of elemental sulfur (S(0)) particles from sulfide oxidation. Reductive dissolution decreased the total mass of ferrihydrite colloids, while the negatively charged S(0) decreased the overall zeta potential of ferrihydrite colloids by attaching onto their surfaces and thus enhanced their retention in the sand. Our findings provide novel insights into the critical role of redox reactions on the transport of redox-sensitive colloids in saturated porous media.

  20. Liquid Crystal Phases of Colloidal Platelets and their Use as Nanocomposite Templates

    Mourad, M.C.D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304837563

    2009-01-01

    This thesis explores the gelation and liquid crystal phase behavior of colloidal dispersions of platelike particles as well as the use of such dispersions for the generation of nanocomposites. We report on the sol-gel, sol-glass and liquid crystal phase transitions of positively charged colloidal

  1. Experimental Studies to Evaluate the Role of Colloids on the Radionuclide Migration in a Crystalline Medium

    Albarran, Nairoby; Missana, Tiziana; Alonso, Ursula; Garcia-Gutierrez, Miguel; Mingarro, Manuel; Lopez, Trinidad

    2008-01-01

    In a deep geological repository (DGR) of high level radioactive waste, all the possible phenomena affecting radionuclide migration have to be studied to assess its security over time. Colloids can play an important role for contaminant transport if the following conditions are fulfilled: colloids exist in a non negligible concentration, they are mobile and stable in the environment of interest, and they are able to adsorb radionuclides irreversibly. In this study, different transport experiments where performed to improve the knowledge on the main mechanisms affecting the radionuclide migration in the presence of colloids in a crystalline medium. Firstly, colloid stability was analysed and then transport experiments in an artificial granite longitudinal fracture were carried out. Synthetic colloids of different size and bentonite clay colloids were used to evaluate the effects of colloid size, charge, and water flow rate on their mobility. Results showed that both major importance of the water flow rate on the mobility of colloids and their recovery and a higher interaction of smaller particles with the surface. Finally, the migration behaviour of Sr, and Sr adsorbed onto bentonite colloids was compared. The elution curves of Sr adsorbed onto colloid were significantly different from the ones of Sr alone, pointing out that sorption/desorption mechanisms must be taken into account to understand the radionuclide migration in the fracture in the presence of colloids. (authors)

  2. ORGANIZATION IN CONTEMPORARY PUBLIC SPHERE

    Rosemarie HAINES

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The critical analysis of Habermas’ Public Sphere Theory and the comparative undertaking to the current day enables us to assert that in contemporary society, public sphere is no longer a political public sphere, this dimension being completed by a societal dimension, the public sphere has extended and now we can talk about partial public spheres in an ever more commercial environment. The new rebuilding and communication technologies create a new type of public character: the visible sphere – non-located, non-dialogical and open. Information and communication are more and more involved in the restructuring of capitalism on an international scale and the reorganization of leadership and management systems. The reevaluation of the public sphere, public opinion, communication allows us to define public sphere according to the profound mutations from today’s democratic societies.

  3. Polymeric membranes: surface modification for minimizing (bio)colloidal fouling.

    Kochkodan, Victor; Johnson, Daniel J; Hilal, Nidal

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents an overview on recent developments in surface modification of polymer membranes for reduction of their fouling with biocolloids and organic colloids in pressure driven membrane processes. First, colloidal interactions such as London-van der Waals, electrical, hydration, hydrophobic, steric forces and membrane surface properties such as hydrophilicity, charge and surface roughness, which affect membrane fouling, have been discussed and the main goals of the membrane surface modification for fouling reduction have been outlined. Thereafter the recent studies on reduction of (bio)colloidal of polymer membranes using ultraviolet/redox initiated surface grafting, physical coating/adsorption of a protective layer on the membrane surface, chemical reactions or surface modification of polymer membranes with nanoparticles as well as using of advanced atomic force microscopy to characterize (bio)colloidal fouling have been critically summarized. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Extraction and characterisation of colloids in waste repository leachate

    Verrall, K.E.

    1998-10-01

    found that humic coated colloids follow the SchuIze-Hardy rule for mono and divalent cations, with the exception of copper ions. Trivalent ions do not follow the SchuIze-Hardy rule because of their relatively strong complexation with humates. It was also found that the size of the ion has an effect on destabilisation, irrespective of charge. (author)

  5. Scattering from correlations in colloidal systems

    Hayter, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    Colloidal suspensions typically exhibit spatial correlations over distances of order 10-10 4 A, corresponding either to the size of individual particles (e.g., polymer chains, surfactant micelles) or to the range of interaction between particles (e.g., charged polymer lattices at low ionic strength). Apart from having fundamental intrinsic interest, such systems are also extremely useful as model systems with which to study, for example, non-Newtonian hydrodynamics, since temporal correlations are generally much longer lived (10 -8 -10 -3 sec) than those found in simple atomic or small molecular systems (10 -13 -10 -10 sec). Colloids have long been the subject of macroscopic phenomenological research (on rheological properties, for example), but it is only recently that microscopic light, x-ray and neutron scattering techniques have been applied to their study, in large part because of theoretical difficulties in understanding the scattering from dense liquid-like systems of interacting particles. For spherical colloids, such theoretical problems have now been largely overcome, and for anisotropic colloids experimental techniques are being developed which circumvent the intractable theoretical areas. This paper will first review some static light and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) results on colloidal suspensions, both at equilibrium and in steady-state non-equilibrium situations, and will then discuss some dynamic measurements on polymer solutions and melts made using the neutron spin-echo (NSE) technique. Emphasis is placed on experiments which have a possible counterpart in synchrotron radiation studies. In particular, NSE extends the results of photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) to larger momentum transfers and shorter time-scales than are available with visible light, and the extension of PCS to short wavelength on a synchrotron source would be of similar fundamental interest

  6. Laser diffraction analysis of colloidal crystals

    Sogami, Ikuo S.; Shinohara, Tadatomi; Yoshiyama, Tsuyoshi [Kyoto Sangyo Univ., Department of Physics, Kyoto (Japan)

    2001-10-01

    Laser diffraction analysis is made on crystallization in salt-free aqueous suspensions of highly-charged colloidal particles for semi-dilute specimens of concentration 0.1-10.0 vol%. Kossel diffraction patterns which represent faithfully accurate information on lattice symmetries in the suspensions enable us to investigate the time evolution of colloidal crystals. The results show that the crystallization proceeds by way of the following intermediate phase transitions: two-dimensional hcp structure {yields} random layer structure {yields} layer structure with one sliding degree of freedom {yields} stacking disorder structure {yields} stacking structure with multivariant periodicity {yields} fcc twin structure with twin plane (111) {yields} normal fcc structure {yields} bcc twin structure with twin plane (11-bar2) or (1-bar12) {yields} normal bcc structure. For concentrated suspensions (>2 vol %), the phase transition ceases to proceed at the normal fcc structure. (author)

  7. Laser diffraction analysis of colloidal crystals

    Sogami, Ikuo S.; Shinohara, Tadatomi; Yoshiyama, Tsuyoshi

    2001-01-01

    Laser diffraction analysis is made on crystallization in salt-free aqueous suspensions of highly-charged colloidal particles for semi-dilute specimens of concentration 0.1-10.0 vol%. Kossel diffraction patterns which represent faithfully accurate information on lattice symmetries in the suspensions enable us to investigate the time evolution of colloidal crystals. The results show that the crystallization proceeds by way of the following intermediate phase transitions: two-dimensional hcp structure → random layer structure → layer structure with one sliding degree of freedom → stacking disorder structure → stacking structure with multivariant periodicity → fcc twin structure with twin plane (111) → normal fcc structure → bcc twin structure with twin plane (11-bar2) or (1-bar12) → normal bcc structure. For concentrated suspensions (>2 vol %), the phase transition ceases to proceed at the normal fcc structure. (author)

  8. VMware vSphere Design

    Guthrie, Forbes; Saidel-Keesing, Maish

    2011-01-01

    The only book focused on designing VMware vSphere implementations.VMware vSphere is the most widely deployed virtualization platform today. Considered the most robust and sophisticated hypervisor product, vSphere is the de facto standard for businesses, both large and small. This book is the only one of its kind to concisely explain how to execute a successful vSphere architecture, tailored to meet your company's needs. Expert authors share with you the factors that shape the design of a vSphere implementation. Learn how to make the right design decisions for your environment.Explores the late

  9. Medical applications of colloids

    Matijevic, Egon

    2008-01-01

    The first book of its type on the medical and biomedical applications of colloids, although there are some related titles on different topicsDiscusses the effects of uniform particles in drug formulations and releaseEvaluates particle transport and deposition in the human body.

  10. Enhanced charge carrier transport properties in colloidal quantum dot solar cells via organic and inorganic hybrid surface passivation† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6ta06835a Click here for additional data file.

    Hong, John; Hou, Bo; Lim, Jongchul; Pak, Sangyeon; Kim, Byung-Sung; Cho, Yuljae; Lee, Juwon; Lee, Young-Woo; Giraud, Paul; Lee, Sanghyo; Park, Jong Bae; Morris, Stephen M.; Snaith, Henry J.; Kim, Jong Min

    2016-01-01

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) are extremely promising as photovoltaic materials. In particular, the tunability of their electronic band gap and cost effective synthetic procedures allow for the versatile fabrication of solar energy harvesting cells, resulting in optimal device performance. However, one of the main challenges in developing high performance quantum dot solar cells (QDSCs) is the improvement of the photo-generated charge transport and collection, which is mainly hindered by imperfect surface functionalization, such as the presence of surface electronic trap sites and the initial bulky surface ligands. Therefore, for these reasons, finding effective methods to efficiently decorate the surface of the as-prepared CQDs with new short molecular length chemical structures so as to enhance the performance of QDSCs is highly desirable. Here, we suggest employing hybrid halide ions along with the shortest heterocyclic molecule as a robust passivation structure to eliminate surface trap sites while decreasing the charge trapping dynamics and increasing the charge extraction efficiency in CQD active layers. This hybrid ligand treatment shows a better coordination with Pb atoms within the crystal, resulting in low trap sites and a near perfect removal of the pristine initial bulky ligands, thereby achieving better conductivity and film structure. Compared to halide ion-only treated cells, solar cells fabricated through this hybrid passivation method show an increase in the power conversion efficiency from 5.3% for the halide ion-treated cells to 6.8% for the hybrid-treated solar cells. PMID:29308200

  11. Self-assembly of monodisperse starburst carbon spheres into hierarchically organized nanostructured supercapacitor electrodes.

    Kim, Sung-Kon; Jung, Euiyeon; Goodman, Matthew D; Schweizer, Kenneth S; Tatsuda, Narihito; Yano, Kazuhisa; Braun, Paul V

    2015-05-06

    We report a three-dimensional (3D) porous carbon electrode containing both nanoscale and microscale porosity, which has been hierarchically organized to provide efficient ion and electron transport. The electrode organization is provided via the colloidal self-assembly of monodisperse starburst carbon spheres (MSCSs). The periodic close-packing of the MSCSs provides continuous pores inside the 3D structure that facilitate ion and electron transport (electrode electrical conductivity ∼0.35 S m(-1)), and the internal meso- and micropores of the MSCS provide a good specific capacitance. The capacitance of the 3D-ordered porous MSCS electrode is ∼58 F g(-1) at 0.58 A g(-1), 48% larger than that of disordered MSCS electrode at the same rate. At 1 A g(-1) the capacitance of the ordered electrode is 57 F g(-1) (95% of the 0.24 A g(-1) value), which is 64% greater than the capacitance of the disordered electrode at the same rate. The ordered electrode preserves 95% of its initial capacitance after 4000 charging/discharging cycles.

  12. Cholesteric colloidal liquid crystals from phytosterol rod-like particles

    Rossi, L.; Sacanna, S.; Velikov, K.P.

    2011-01-01

    We report the first observation of chiral colloidal liquid crystals of rod-like particles from a low molecular weight organic compound— phytosterols. Based on the particles shape and crystal structure, we attribute this phenomenon to chiral distribution of surface charge on the surface of

  13. Beyond fuzzy spheres

    Govindarajan, T R; Padmanabhan, Pramod; Shreecharan, T

    2010-01-01

    We study polynomial deformations of the fuzzy sphere, specifically given by the cubic or the Higgs algebra. We derive the Higgs algebra by quantizing the Poisson structure on a surface in R 3 . We find that several surfaces, differing by constants, are described by the Higgs algebra at the fuzzy level. Some of these surfaces have a singularity and we overcome this by quantizing this manifold using coherent states for this nonlinear algebra. This is seen in the measure constructed from these coherent states. We also find the star product for this non-commutative algebra as a first step in constructing field theories on such fuzzy spaces.

  14. Falling-sphere radioactive viscometry

    Souza, R. de.

    1987-01-01

    In this work the falling sphere viscometric method was studies experimentally using a sphere tagged with 198 Au radiosotopo, the objective being the demosntration of the advantages of this technique in relation to the traditional method. The utilisation of the falling radioactive sphere permits the point-point monitoring of sphere position as a function of count rate. The fall tube wall and end effects were determined by this technique. Tests were performed with spheres of different diameters in four tubes. The application of this technique demosntrated the wall and end effects in sphere speed. The case of sphere fall in the steady slow regime allowed the determination of the terminal velocity, showing the increase of botton end effect as the sphere approaches the tube base. In the case the transient slow regime, the sphere was initially in a state of respose near the top surface. The data obtained show the influence of the free surface and wall on the sphere acceleration. These experimental data were applied to the Basset equation on order to verify the behaviour of the terms in this equation. (author) [pt

  15. Flow-induced structure in colloidal suspensions

    Vermant, J [Department of Chemical Engineering, K U Leuven, W de Croylaan 46, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Solomon, M J [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136 (United States)

    2005-02-02

    We review the sequences of structural states that can be induced in colloidal suspensions by the application of flow. Structure formation during flow is strongly affected by the delicate balance among interparticle forces, Brownian motion and hydrodynamic interactions. The resulting non-equilibrium microstructure is in turn a principal determinant of the suspension rheology. Colloidal suspensions with near hard-sphere interactions develop an anisotropic, amorphous structure at low dimensionless shear rates. At high rates, clustering due to strong hydrodynamic forces leads to shear thickening rheology. Application of steady-shear flow to suspensions with repulsive interactions induces a rich sequence of transitions to one-, two-and three-dimensional order. Oscillatory-shear flow generates metastable ordering in suspensions with equilibrium liquid structure. On the other hand, short-range attractive interactions can lead to a fluid-to-gel transition under quiescent suspensions. Application of flow leads to orientation, breakup, densification and spatial reorganization of aggregates. Using a non-Newtonian suspending medium leads to additional possibilities for organization. We examine the extent to which theory and simulation have yielded mechanistic understanding of the microstructural transitions that have been observed. (topical review)

  16. Fundamental measure theory for hard-sphere mixtures: a review

    Roth, Roland

    2010-01-01

    Hard-sphere systems are one of the fundamental model systems of statistical physics and represent an important reference system for molecular or colloidal systems with soft repulsive or attractive interactions in addition to hard-core repulsion at short distances. Density functional theory for classical systems, as one of the core theoretical approaches of statistical physics of fluids and solids, has to be able to treat such an important system successfully and accurately. Fundamental measure theory is up to date the most successful and most accurate density functional theory for hard-sphere mixtures. Since its introduction fundamental measure theory has been applied to many problems, tested against computer simulations, and further developed in many respects. The literature on fundamental measure theory is already large and is growing fast. This review aims to provide a starting point for readers new to fundamental measure theory and an overview of important developments. (topical review)

  17. Normal modes of weak colloidal gels

    Varga, Zsigmond; Swan, James W.

    2018-01-01

    The normal modes and relaxation rates of weak colloidal gels are investigated in calculations using different models of the hydrodynamic interactions between suspended particles. The relaxation spectrum is computed for freely draining, Rotne-Prager-Yamakawa, and accelerated Stokesian dynamics approximations of the hydrodynamic mobility in a normal mode analysis of a harmonic network representing several colloidal gels. We find that the density of states and spatial structure of the normal modes are fundamentally altered by long-ranged hydrodynamic coupling among the particles. Short-ranged coupling due to hydrodynamic lubrication affects only the relaxation rates of short-wavelength modes. Hydrodynamic models accounting for long-ranged coupling exhibit a microscopic relaxation rate for each normal mode, λ that scales as l-2, where l is the spatial correlation length of the normal mode. For the freely draining approximation, which neglects long-ranged coupling, the microscopic relaxation rate scales as l-γ, where γ varies between three and two with increasing particle volume fraction. A simple phenomenological model of the internal elastic response to normal mode fluctuations is developed, which shows that long-ranged hydrodynamic interactions play a central role in the viscoelasticity of the gel network. Dynamic simulations of hard spheres that gel in response to short-ranged depletion attractions are used to test the applicability of the density of states predictions. For particle concentrations up to 30% by volume, the power law decay of the relaxation modulus in simulations accounting for long-ranged hydrodynamic interactions agrees with predictions generated by the density of states of the corresponding harmonic networks as well as experimental measurements. For higher volume fractions, excluded volume interactions dominate the stress response, and the prediction from the harmonic network density of states fails. Analogous to the Zimm model in polymer

  18. Analytic functionals on the sphere

    Morimoto, Mitsuo

    1998-01-01

    This book treats spherical harmonic expansion of real analytic functions and hyperfunctions on the sphere. Because a one-dimensional sphere is a circle, the simplest example of the theory is that of Fourier series of periodic functions. The author first introduces a system of complex neighborhoods of the sphere by means of the Lie norm. He then studies holomorphic functions and analytic functionals on the complex sphere. In the one-dimensional case, this corresponds to the study of holomorphic functions and analytic functionals on the annular set in the complex plane, relying on the Laurent series expansion. In this volume, it is shown that the same idea still works in a higher-dimensional sphere. The Fourier-Borel transformation of analytic functionals on the sphere is also examined; the eigenfunction of the Laplacian can be studied in this way.

  19. Fermions, Skyrmions and the 3-sphere

    Goatham, Stephen W; Krusch, Steffen

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates a background charge one Skyrme field chirally coupled to light fermions on the 3-sphere. The Dirac equation for the system commutes with a generalized angular momentum or grand spin. It can be solved explicitly for a Skyrme configuration given by the hedgehog form. The energy spectrum and degeneracies are derived for all values of the grand spin. Solutions for non-zero grand spin are each characterized by a set of four polynomials. The paper also discusses the energy of the Dirac sea using zeta-function regularization.

  20. Patterned Colloidal Photonic Crystals.

    Hou, Jue; Li, Mingzhu; Song, Yanlin

    2018-03-01

    Colloidal photonic crystals (PCs) have been well developed because they are easy to prepare, cost-effective, and versatile with regards to modification and functionalization. Patterned colloidal PCs contribute a novel approach to constructing high-performance PC devices with unique structures and specific functions. In this review, an overview of the strategies for fabricating patterned colloidal PCs, including patterned substrate-induced assembly, inkjet printing, and selective immobilization and modification, is presented. The advantages of patterned PC devices are also discussed in detail, for example, improved detection sensitivity and response speed of the sensors, control over the flow direction and wicking rate of microfluidic channels, recognition of cross-reactive molecules through an array-patterned microchip, fabrication of display devices with tunable patterns, well-arranged RGB units, and wide viewing-angles, and the ability to construct anti-counterfeiting devices with different security strategies. Finally, the perspective of future developments and challenges is presented. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Flocking ferromagnetic colloids.

    Kaiser, Andreas; Snezhko, Alexey; Aranson, Igor S

    2017-02-01

    Assemblages of microscopic colloidal particles exhibit fascinating collective motion when energized by electric or magnetic fields. The behaviors range from coherent vortical motion to phase separation and dynamic self-assembly. Although colloidal systems are relatively simple, understanding their collective response, especially under out-of-equilibrium conditions, remains elusive. We report on the emergence of flocking and global rotation in the system of rolling ferromagnetic microparticles energized by a vertical alternating magnetic field. By combing experiments and discrete particle simulations, we have identified primary physical mechanisms, leading to the emergence of large-scale collective motion: spontaneous symmetry breaking of the clockwise/counterclockwise particle rotation, collisional alignment of particle velocities, and random particle reorientations due to shape imperfections. We have also shown that hydrodynamic interactions between the particles do not have a qualitative effect on the collective dynamics. Our findings shed light on the onset of spatial and temporal coherence in a large class of active systems, both synthetic (colloids, swarms of robots, and biopolymers) and living (suspensions of bacteria, cell colonies, and bird flocks).

  2. Hydrodynamic capture of microswimmers into sphere-bound orbits.

    Takagi, Daisuke; Palacci, Jérémie; Braunschweig, Adam B; Shelley, Michael J; Zhang, Jun

    2014-03-21

    Self-propelled particles can exhibit surprising non-equilibrium behaviors, and how they interact with obstacles or boundaries remains an important open problem. Here we show that chemically propelled micro-rods can be captured, with little change in their speed, into close orbits around solid spheres resting on or near a horizontal plane. We show that this interaction between sphere and particle is short-range, occurring even for spheres smaller than the particle length, and for a variety of sphere materials. We consider a simple model, based on lubrication theory, of a force- and torque-free swimmer driven by a surface slip (the phoretic propulsion mechanism) and moving near a solid surface. The model demonstrates capture, or movement towards the surface, and yields speeds independent of distance. This study reveals the crucial aspects of activity–driven interactions of self-propelled particles with passive objects, and brings into question the use of colloidal tracers as probes of active matter.

  3. Microscopic dynamics of binary mixtures and quasi-colloidal systems

    Smorenburg, H.E.

    1996-01-01

    In the study on the title subject two questions are addressed. One is whether the microscopic dynamics of binary mixtures and quasi-colloidal systems can be understood theoretically with kinetic theories for equivalent hard sphere mixtures. The other question that arises is whether the similarity in the dynamics of dense simple fluids and concentrated colloidal suspensions also holds for binary mixtures and quasi-colloidal systems. To answer these questions, we have investigated a number of binary gas mixtures and quasi-colloidal system with different diameter ratios and concentrations. We obtain the experimental dynamic structure factors S expt (κ,ω) of the samples from inelastic neutron scattering. We compare S expt (κ,ω) with the dynamic structure S HS (κ,ω) of an equivalent hard sphere fluid, that we calculate with the Enskog theory. In chapter 2, 3 and 4 we study dense He-Ar gas mixtures (diameter ratio R=1.4, and mass ratio M=10) at low and high Ar concentrations. Experiment and kinetic theory are in good agreement. In chapter 5 we study dilute quasi-colloidal suspensions of fullerene C60 molecules dissolved in liquid CS2. The diameter ratio R=2.2 is larger than in previous experiments while the mass ratio M=9.5 is more or less the same. We obtain the self diffusion coefficient D S of one C60 molecule in CS2 and find D s ≤D SE ≤D E , with D E obtained from kinetic theory and D SE from the Stokes-Einstein description. It appears that both descriptions are relevant but not so accurate. In chapter 6 we study three dense mixtures of neopentane in 40 Ar (diameter ratio R=1.7, mass ratio M=2) at low and high neopentane concentrations. At low concentration, we find a diffusion coefficient of neopentane in Ar, which is in good agreement with kinetic theory and in moderate agreement with the Stokes-Einstein description. At high concentration the collective translational dynamics of neopentane shows a similar behaviour as in dense colloids and simple fluids

  4. Colloid migration in fractured media

    Hunt, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    Field studies at the Nevada Test Site by researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have demonstrated that radionuclides are being transported by colloidal material suspended in groundwater. This observation is counter to most predictions from contaminant transport models because the models assume adsorbed species are immobile. The purpose of this research is to quantify the transport processes for colloidal materials and develop the mechanistic understanding necessary to predict radionuclide transport in fractured media. There were three areas of investigation during this year that have addressed these issues: chemical control of colloid deposition on clean mineral surfaces, colloid accumulation on fracture surfaces, and the influence of deposited colloids on colloid and tracer migration. 7 refs

  5. The nature of the colloidal 'glass' transition.

    Dawson, Kenneth A; Lawlor, A; DeGregorio, Paolo; McCullagh, Gavin D; Zaccarelli, Emanuela; Foffi, Giuseppe; Tartaglia, Piero

    2003-01-01

    The dynamically arrested state of matter is discussed in the context of athermal systems, such as the hard sphere colloidal arrest. We believe that the singular dynamical behaviour near arrest expressed, for example, in how the diffusion constant vanishes may be 'universal', in a sense to be discussed in the paper. Based on this we argue the merits of studying the problem with simple lattice models. This, by analogy with the the critical point of the Ising model, should lead us to clarify the questions, and begin the program of establishing the degree of universality to be expected. We deal only with 'ideal' athermal dynamical arrest transitions, such as those found for hard sphere systems. However, it is argued that dynamically available volume (DAV) is the relevant order parameter of the transition, and that universal mechanisms may be well expressed in terms of DAV. For simple lattice models we give examples of simple laws that emerge near the dynamical arrest, emphasising the idea of a near-ideal gas of 'holes', interacting to give the power law diffusion constant scaling near the arrest. We also seek to open the discussion of the possibility of an underlying weak coupling theory of the dynamical arrest transition, based on DAV.

  6. Microscopic Behavior Of Colloidal Particles Under The Effect Of Acoustic Stimulations In The Ultrasonic To Megasonic Range

    Abdel-Fattah, Amr I.; Roberts, Peter M.

    2006-05-01

    It is well known that colloid attachment and detachment at solid surfaces are influenced strongly by physico-chemical conditions controlling electric double layer (EDL) and solvation-layer effects. We present experimental observations demonstrating that, in addition, acoustic waves can produce strong effects on colloid/surface interactions that can alter the behavior of colloid and fluid transport in porous media. Microscopic colloid visualization experiments were performed with polystyrene micro-spheres suspended in water in a parallel-plate glass flow cell. When acoustic energy was applied to the cell at frequencies from 500 kHz to 5 MHz, changes in colloid attachment to and detachment from the glass cell surfaces were observed. Quantitative measurements of acoustically-induced detachment of 300-nm microspheres in 0.1M NaCl solution demonstrated that roughly 30% of the colloids that were attached to the glass cell wall during flow alone could be detached rapidly by applying acoustics at frequencies in the range of 0.7 to 1.2 MHz. The remaining attached colloids could not be detached by acoustics. This implies the existence of both "strong" and "weak" attachment sites at the cell surface. Subsequent re-attachment of colloids with acoustics turned off occurred only at new, previously unoccupied sites. Thus, acoustics appears to accelerate simultaneously both the deactivation of existing weak sites where colloids are already attached, and the activation of new weak sites where future attachments can occur. Our observations indicate that acoustics (and, in general, dynamic stress) can influence colloid-colloid and colloid-surface interactions in ways that could cause significant changes in porous-media permeability and mass transport. This would occur due to either buildup or release of colloids present in the porous matrix.

  7. Bidispersed Sphere Packing on Spherical Surfaces

    Atherton, Timothy; Mascioli, Andrew; Burke, Christopher

    Packing problems on spherical surfaces have a long history, originating in the classic Thompson problem of finding the ground state configuration of charges on a sphere. Such packings contain a minimal number of defects needed to accommodate the curvature; this is predictable using the Gauss-Bonnet theorem from knowledge of the topology of the surface and the local symmetry of the ordering. Famously, the packing of spherical particles on a sphere contains a 'scar' transition, where additional defects over those required by topology appear above a certain critical number of particles and self-organize into chains or scars. In this work, we study the packing of bidispersed packings on a sphere, and hence determine the interaction of bidispersity and curvature. The resultant configurations are nearly crystalline for low values of bidispersity and retain scar-like structures; these rapidly become disordered for intermediate values and approach a so-called Appollonian limit at the point where smaller particles can be entirely accommodated within the voids left by the larger particles. We connect our results with studies of bidispersed packings in the bulk and on flat surfaces from the literature on glassy systems and jamming. Supported by a Cottrell Award from the Research Corporation for Science Advancement.

  8. Pele's tears and spheres

    Porritt, L. A.; Quane, S.; Russell, K.

    2011-12-01

    Pele's tears are a well known curiosity commonly associated with low viscosity basaltic explosive eruptions. However, these pyroclasts are rarely studied in detail and there is no full explanation for their formation. These intriguing pyroclasts have smooth glassy surfaces, vesiculated interiors, and fluidal morphologies tending towards droplets and then spheres as they decrease in size to Pele's tears from the 1959 fire-fountaining eruption of Kilauea Iki involving size and density measurements. Using thin section and SEM analysis we also consider their internal and external morphologies, porosity and bubble size distributions, and surface textures. Finally we consider the mechanisms of magma fragmentation, timescales of relaxation, and cooling rates that are responsible for their formation.

  9. Panoramic stereo sphere vision

    Feng, Weijia; Zhang, Baofeng; Röning, Juha; Zong, Xiaoning; Yi, Tian

    2013-01-01

    Conventional stereo vision systems have a small field of view (FOV) which limits their usefulness for certain applications. While panorama vision is able to "see" in all directions of the observation space, scene depth information is missed because of the mapping from 3D reference coordinates to 2D panoramic image. In this paper, we present an innovative vision system which builds by a special combined fish-eye lenses module, and is capable of producing 3D coordinate information from the whole global observation space and acquiring no blind area 360°×360° panoramic image simultaneously just using single vision equipment with one time static shooting. It is called Panoramic Stereo Sphere Vision (PSSV). We proposed the geometric model, mathematic model and parameters calibration method in this paper. Specifically, video surveillance, robotic autonomous navigation, virtual reality, driving assistance, multiple maneuvering target tracking, automatic mapping of environments and attitude estimation are some of the applications which will benefit from PSSV.

  10. The axial dipole moment of two intersecting spheres of equal radii

    McAllister, Iain Wilson

    1988-01-01

    The use of a finite number of image charges to solve electrostatic problems associated with two conducting spheres intersecting at an angle of pi/n (n an integer) has been known for over a century. If, however, only spheres of equal radii are considered, it is possible to extend the permissible...

  11. Holographic characterization of colloidal particles in turbid media

    Cheong, Fook Chiong; Kasimbeg, Priya; Ruffner, David B.; Hlaing, Ei Hnin; Blusewicz, Jaroslaw M.; Philips, Laura A.; Grier, David G.

    2017-10-01

    Holographic particle characterization uses in-line holographic microscopy and the Lorenz-Mie theory of light scattering to measure the diameter and the refractive index of individual colloidal particles in their native dispersions. This wealth of information has proved invaluable in fields as diverse as soft-matter physics, biopharmaceuticals, wastewater management, and food science but so far has been available only for dispersions in transparent media. Here, we demonstrate that holographic characterization can yield precise and accurate results even when the particles of interest are dispersed in turbid media. By elucidating how multiple light scattering contributes to image formation in holographic microscopy, we establish the range conditions under which holographic characterization can reliably probe turbid samples. We validate the technique with measurements on model colloidal spheres dispersed in commercial nanoparticle slurries.

  12. Optimizing colloidal nanocrystals for applications

    Sytnyk, M.

    2015-01-01

    details of these developments were worked out by another PhD student. Thus the full story of the Ag-chalcogenide nanocrystals is presented in Appendix A. Chapter 5 of the thesis introduces another possibility to obtain non-toxic nanocrystals. It describes a procedure to transform powders of archetypical organic pigments into colloidal solutions of semiconductor nanocrystals. These nanocrystals are synthesized with controlled sizes and shapes. They are eventually covered with smart ligands, providing rapid charge separation, and exhibit emission in the visible and near-infrared spectral region. Based on them, photodetectors with responsivities up to 0.9 A/W, humidity sensors with a dynamic range of 7 orders of magnitude, and field effect transistors are demonstrated, fabricated by drop-casting or paint-brushing. These results show up an enormous potential of these colloidal pigment nanocrystals for the development of an environmentally-friendly, biocompatible, and low-cost electronics. (author)

  13. Spherical Approximation on Unit Sphere

    Eman Samir Bhaya

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we introduce a Jackson type theorem for functions in LP spaces on sphere And study on best approximation of  functions in  spaces defined on unit sphere. our central problem is to describe the approximation behavior of functions in    spaces for  by modulus of smoothness of functions.

  14. Sampling silica and ferrihydrite colloids with fiberglass wicks under unsaturated conditions.

    Shira, Jason M; Williams, Barbara C; Flury, Markus; Czigány, Szabolcs; Tuller, Markus

    2006-01-01

    The suitability of passive capillary samplers (PCAPS) for collection of representative colloid samples under partially saturated conditions was evaluated by investigating the transport of negatively and positively charged colloids in fiberglass wicks. A synthetic pore water solution was used to suspend silica microspheres (330 nm in diameter) and ferrihydrite (172 nm in diameter) for transport experiments on fiberglass wicks. Breakthrough curves were collected for three unsaturated flow rates with silica microspheres and one unsaturated flow rate with ferrihydrite colloids. A moisture characteristic curve, relating tensiometer measurements of matric potential to moisture content, was developed for the fiberglass wick. Results indicate that retention of the silica and the ferrihydrite on the wick occurred; that is, the wicks did not facilitate quantitative sampling of the colloids. For silica microspheres, 90% of the colloids were transmitted through the wicks. For ferrihydrite, 80 to 90% of the colloids were transmitted. The mechanisms responsible for the retention of the colloids on the fiberglass wicks appeared to be physicochemical attachment and not thin-film, triple-phase entrapment, or mechanical straining. Visualization of pathways by iron staining indicates that flow is preferential at the center of twisted bundles of filaments. Although axial preferential flow in PCAPS may enhance their hydraulic suitability for sampling mobile colloids, we conclude that without specific preparation to reduce attachment or retention, fiberglass wicks should only be used for qualitative sampling of pore water colloids.

  15. Transport of synthetic colloids through single saturated fractures: A literature review

    Reimus, P.W.

    1995-07-01

    Colloids having the same surface charge sign as the bulk of the geologic media in a groundwater system may be able to travel through the system faster than soluble species because they will follow fluid streamlines more closely and they should have less tendency to diffuse into pores or dead spaces in the media than soluble species. Synthetic colloids with uniform, controlled properties may be ideal for serving as open-quotes worst-caseclose quotes tracers that provide lower-bound estimates of contaminant travel times in hydrologic systems. This report discusses a review of the literature pertaining to colloid transport in single saturated natural fractures. After a brief background discussion to put the literature review in perspective, the phenomenon of colloid transport in saturated fractures is divided into three major topics, each of which is reviewed in detail: (1) saturated fluid flow through fractures; (2) colloid transport by convection, diffusion, and force fields; and (3) colloid interactions with surfaces. It is suggested that these phenomena be accounted for in colloid transport models by using (1) lubrication theory to describe water flow through fractures, (2) particle tracking methods to describe colloid transport in fractures, and (3) a kinetic boundary layer approximation to describe colloid interactions with fracture walls. These methods offer better computational efficiency and better experimental accessibility to model parameters than rigorously solving the complete governing equations

  16. Polymers and colloids

    Schurtenberger, P.

    1996-01-01

    A wealth of structural information from colloid and polymer solutions on a large range of length scales can be obtained using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments. After a general introduction to the field of soft condensed matter, I shall give a few selected examples on how SANS combined with suitable contrast variation schemes can be used to extract information on the size and conformation of polymer coils in solution and in the melt, and on the local structure and flexibility of polymerlike micelles and microemulsions. (author) 8 figs., tabs., 44 refs

  17. Polymers and colloids

    Schurtenberger, P [ETH Zurich, Inst. fuer Polymere, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1996-11-01

    A wealth of structural information from colloid and polymer solutions on a large range of length scales can be obtained using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments. After a general introduction to the field of soft condensed matter, I shall give a few selected examples on how SANS combined with suitable contrast variation schemes can be used to extract information on the size and conformation of polymer coils in solution and in the melt, and on the local structure and flexibility of polymerlike micelles and microemulsions. (author) 8 figs., tabs., 44 refs.

  18. Isostructural solid-solid transition of (colloidal) simple fluids

    Tejero, C.F.; Daanoun, A.; Lakkerkerker, H.N.W.; Baus, M.

    1995-01-01

    A variational approach based on the Gibbs-Bogoliubov inequality is used in order to evaluate the free energy of simple fluids described by a double-Yukawa pair potential. A hard-sphere reference fluid is used to describe the fluid phases, and an Einstein reference crystal to describe the solid phases. Apart from the usual type of phase diagram, typical of atomic simple fluids with long-ranged attractions, we find two types of phase diagrams, specific to colloidal systems with intermediate and short-ranged attractions. One of the latter phase diagrams exhibits an isostructural solid-solid transition, which has not yet been observed experimentally

  19. A tunable colloidal quantum dot photo field-effect transistor

    Ghosh, Subir; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Sukhovatkin, Vlad; Levina, Larissa; Sargent, Edward H.

    2011-01-01

    We fabricate and investigate field-effect transistors in which a light-absorbing photogate modulates the flow of current along the channel. The photogate consists of colloidal quantum dots that efficiently transfer photoelectrons to the channel across a charge-separating (type-II) heterointerface, producing a primary and sustained secondary flow that is terminated via electron back-recombination across the interface. We explore colloidal quantum dot sizes corresponding to bandgaps ranging from 730 to 1475 nm and also investigate various stoichiometries of aluminum-doped ZnO (AZO) channel materials. We investigate the role of trap state energies in both the colloidal quantum dot energy film and the AZO channel. © 2011 American Institute of Physics.

  20. Quantum black holes: the event horizon as a fuzzy sphere

    Dolan, Brian P.

    2005-01-01

    Modeling the event horizon of a black hole by a fuzzy sphere leads us to modify some suggestions in the literature concerning black hole mass spectra. We derive a formula for the mass spectrum of quantum black holes in terms of four integers which define the area, angular momentum, electric and magnetic charge of the black hole. Although the event horizon becomes a commutative sphere in the classical limit a vestige of the quantum theory still persists in that the event horizon stereographically projects onto the non-commutative plane. We also suggest how the classical bounds on extremal black holes might be modified in the quantum theory. (author)

  1. Smith-Purcell radiation from a chain of spheres

    Lekomtsev, K V; Strikhanov, M N; Tishchenko, A A

    2010-01-01

    Smith-Purcell and diffraction radiation were investigated. These types of radiation appear when a charged particle moves close to a conducting target. Spectral and angular distribution of diffraction radiation from the non-periodic chain of spheres is obtained analytically; local field effects are discussed. Analytical expression for the distribution of Smith-Purcell radiation from the periodic chain of spheres is obtained as well. For the first time it has been shown, that Smith-Purcell radiation for such a system is distributed over the cone. The results are investigated for the particles of different sizes, dielectric and metal, and for both ultrarelativistic and nonrelativistic cases.

  2. Chancellor Water Colloids: Characterization and Radionuclide Associated Transport

    Reimus, Paul William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Boukhalfa, Hakim [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-09-26

    Column transport experiments were conducted in which water from the Chancellor nuclear test cavity was transported through crushed volcanic tuff from Pahute Mesa. In one experiment, the cavity water was spiked with solute 137Cs, and in another it was spiked with 239/240Pu(IV) nanocolloids. A third column experiment was conducted with no radionuclide spike at all, although the 137Cs concentrations in the water were still high enough to quantify in the column effluent. The radionuclides strongly partitioned to natural colloids present in the water, which were characterized for size distribution, mass concentration, zeta potential/surface charge, critical coagulation concentration, and qualitative mineralogy. In the spiked water experiments, the unanalyzed portion of the high-concentration column effluent samples were combined and re-injected into the respective columns as a second pulse. This procedure was repeated again for a third injection. Measurable filtration of the colloids was observed after each initial injection of the Chancellor water into the columns, but the subsequent injections (spiked water experiments only) exhibited no apparent filtration, suggesting that the colloids that remained mobile after relatively short transport distances were more resistant to filtration than the initial population of colloids. It was also observed that while significant desorption of 137Cs from the colloids occurred after the first injection in both the spiked and unspiked waters, subsequent injections of the spiked water exhibited much less 137Cs desorption (much greater 137Cs colloid-associated transport). This result suggests that the 137Cs that remained associated with colloids during the first injection represented a fraction that was more strongly adsorbed to the mobile colloids than the initial 137Cs associated with the colloids. A greater amount of the 239/240

  3. Surface adhesion properties of graphene and graphene oxide studied by colloid-probe atomic force microscopy

    Ding Yanhuai; Zhang Ping; Ren Huming; Zhuo Qin; Yang Zhongmei; Jiang Xu; Jiang Yong

    2011-01-01

    Surface adhesion properties are important to various applications of graphene-based materials. Atomic force microscopy is powerful to study the adhesion properties of samples by measuring the forces on the colloidal sphere tip as it approaches and retracts from the surface. In this paper we have measured the adhesion force between the colloid probe and the surface of graphene (graphene oxide) nanosheet. The results revealed that the adhesion force on graphene and graphene oxide surface were 66.3 and 170.6 nN, respectively. It was found the adhesion force was mainly determined by the water meniscus, which was related to the surface contact angle of samples.

  4. Colloidal suspensions hydrodynamic retention mechanisms in model porous media

    Salehi, N.

    1996-01-01

    This study deals with the retention mechanisms of colloidal particles in porous media flows, and the subsequent reduction in permeability in the case of stable and non adsorbing colloids. It combines experimental results and modelling. This study has been realised with stable dispersion of monodispersed carboxylate polystyrene latexes negatively charged injected through negatively charged polycarbonate membranes having mono-sized cylindrical pores. The mean particle diameter is smaller than the mean pore diameter. Both batch and flow experiments in Nuclepore membranes have been done. The results of batch experiments have proved no adsorption of the colloidal latex particles on the surface of the Nuclepore membranes without flow at low salinity. In flow experiments at low particle concentration, only deposition on the upstream side of the membrane have been induced by hydrodynamic forces even for non adsorbing particles without creating any permeability reduction. The retention levels are zero at low and high Peclet numbers with a maximum at intermediate values. Partial plugging was observed at higher colloid concentration even at low salinity without any upstream surface deposition. The modelling of plugging processes is achieved by considering the particle concentration, fluid rate and ratio between the mean pore diameter and the mean particle diameter. This study can be particularly useful in the fields of water treatment and of restoration of lands following radioactive contamination. (author). 96 refs., 99 figs., 29 tabs

  5. Microrheology of colloidal systems

    Puertas, A M; Voigtmann, T

    2014-01-01

    Microrheology was proposed almost twenty years ago as a technique to obtain rheological properties in soft matter from the microscopic motion of colloidal tracers used as probes, either freely diffusing in the host medium, or subjected to external forces. The former case is known as passive microrheology, and is based on generalizations of the Stokes–Einstein relation between the friction experienced by the probe and the host-fluid viscosity. The latter is termed active microrheology, and extends the measurement of the friction coefficient to the nonlinear-response regime of strongly driven probes. In this review article, we discuss theoretical models available in the literature for both passive and active microrheology, focusing on the case of single-probe motion in model colloidal host media. A brief overview of the theory of passive microrheology is given, starting from the work of Mason and Weitz. Further developments include refined models of the host suspension beyond that of a Newtonian-fluid continuum, and the investigation of probe-size effects. Active microrheology is described starting from microscopic equations of motion for the whole system including both the host-fluid particles and the tracer; the many-body Smoluchowski equation for the case of colloidal suspensions. At low fluid densities, this can be simplified to a two-particle equation that allows the calculation of the friction coefficient with the input of the density distribution around the tracer, as shown by Brady and coworkers. The results need to be upscaled to agree with simulations at moderate density, in both the case of pulling the tracer with a constant force or dragging it at a constant velocity. The full many-particle equation has been tackled by Fuchs and coworkers, using a mode-coupling approximation and the scheme of integration through transients, valid at high densities. A localization transition is predicted for a probe embedded in a glass-forming host suspension. The

  6. Public Sphere as Digital Assemblage

    Salovaara-Moring, Inka

    the 1990s onwards digitalization brought concepts of network and complexity into the theoretical discourse. This relational turn changed the social ontology of the public sphere into a dynamic and complex system, erasing the division between the fields of reality (the world), representation (discourse......Normative theories of public sphere have struggled with the topic of materiality. The historical narrative of the ‘public sphere’ situated the phenomenon in specific spaces, where practices (public deliberation) and language (discourse) constructed political agencies, and further publics. From......), and subjectivity (agency). This changed the public sphere into an assemblage consisting of both human and non-human actors interactingin a highly dynamic, networked environment. This paper proposes a framework for considering this new materiality in the field of the public sphere: the assemblage and complexity...

  7. Colloid migration in groundwaters: Geochemical interactions of radionuclides with natural colloids. Appendix III

    Wolf, M.; Geyer, S.; Fritz, P.; Klotz, D.; Lazik, D.

    1994-01-01

    The results obtained from the 152 Eu migration experiment in various columns packed with fine grained sand and equilibrated with a humic substance rich groundwater are: The retardation of mobile Eu-pseudocolloids (Eu-humate) is negligible, since the recovery is 152 Eu concentration is irreversible sorbed on the column, the degree of filtration expressed by the recovery is strongly dependant on the filtration velocity (flow rate): The recovery increases with increasing flow rates, indicating decreasing filtration, since the humic substances are negatively charged, the migration of the Eu pseudocolloids (humic colloids) is slightly accelerated relative to the migration of the 3 HHO tracer, due to anion repulsion. (orig.)

  8. Liquid crystal boojum-colloids

    Tasinkevych, M; Silvestre, N M; Telo da Gama, M M

    2012-01-01

    Colloidal particles dispersed in a liquid crystal (LC) lead to distortions of the director field. The distortions are responsible for long-range effective colloidal interactions whose asymptotic behaviour is well understood. The short-distance behaviour depends on the structure and dynamics of the topological defects nucleated near the colloidal particles and a full nonlinear theory is required to describe it. Spherical colloidal particles with strong planar degenerate anchoring nucleate a pair of antipodal surface topological defects, known as boojums. We use the Landau-de Gennes theory to resolve the mesoscopic structure of the boojum cores and to determine the pairwise colloidal interactions. We compare the results in three (3D) and two (2D) spatial dimensions for spherical and disc-like colloidal particles, respectively. The corresponding free energy functionals are minimized numerically using finite elements with adaptive meshes. Boojums are always point-like in 2D, but acquire a rather complex structure in 3D, which depends on the combination of the anchoring potential, the radius of the colloid, the temperature and the LC elastic anisotropy. We identify three types of defect cores in 3D that we call single, double and split-core boojums, and investigate the associated structural transitions. The split-core structure is favoured by low temperatures, strong anchoring and small twist to splay or bend ratios. For sufficiently strong anchoring potentials characterized by a well-defined uniaxial minimum, the split-core boojums are the only stable configuration. In the presence of two colloidal particles, we observe substantial re-arrangements of the inner defects in both 3D and 2D. These re-arrangements lead to qualitative changes in the force-distance profile when compared to the asymptotic quadrupole-quadrupole interaction. In line with the experimental results, the presence of the defects prevents coalescence of the colloidal particles in 2D, but not in 3D

  9. Differential Calculus on Quantum Spheres

    Welk, Martin

    1998-01-01

    We study covariant differential calculus on the quantum spheres S_q^2N-1. Two classification results for covariant first order differential calculi are proved. As an important step towards a description of the noncommutative geometry of the quantum spheres, a framework of covariant differential calculus is established, including a particular first order calculus obtained by factorization, higher order calculi and a symmetry concept.

  10. Colloid and radionuclide retention mechanisms in fractured rock under near-natural flow conditions

    Delos, A.; Schaefer, T.; Geckeis, H.; Guimera, J.; Carrera, J.; Fanghaenel, T.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Experiments in fractured host rock (Grimsel Test Site, GTS, Switzerland) revealed that the colloid relevance for actinide migration is high due to the specific geochemical groundwater conditions [1]. However, even under such conditions it is found that retention of colloids and colloid-borne actinides becomes significant under near-natural groundwater flow rates (1-10 m/a) [2]. Underlying mechanisms of colloid and radionuclide retention are not well understood up to now. The present study co-funded by the NoE ACTINET-6 focuses on (i) the kinetics of actinide-colloid interactions and (ii) the relevance of matrix diffusion as a competition process to other retention mechanisms which affect the actinides behavior in fractured rock systems such as the Grimsel granodiorite. Colloid migration is studied with well defined model colloids as e.g. fluorescence dyed carboxylated polystyrene particles, and natural colloids extracted from bentonite (FEBEX) and from fracture filling material (GTS). In order to study the influence of matrix porosity on actinides migration, those experiments are performed in columns of well defined geometry filled with microporous unmodified silica spheres, porous ceramic material and natural fracture filling material from the GTS. The behaviour of actinides (Pu(IV) and Am(III)) sorbed onto bentonite colloids is investigated in column and batch experiments. All experiments are performed under anoxic conditions. Colloid characterization methods used in this study include the combination of photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), laser-induced breakdown detection (LIBD), fluorimetry and field flow fractionation (FFF). Experimental results and their application to the parametrisation of reactive colloid transport models are discussed. [1] Geckeis H, Schaefer T, Hauser W, Rabung T, Missana T, Degueldre C, Moeri A, Eikenberg J, Fierz T, Alexander WR (2004) Results of the Colloid and Radionuclide Retention experiment

  11. Actinide colloid generation in groundwater. Part 2

    Kim, J.I.

    1991-01-01

    The progress made in the investigation of actinide colloid generation in groundwater is summarized and discussed with particular examples relevant to an understanding of the migration behaviour of actinides in natural aquifer systems. The first part deals with the characterization of colloids: groundwater colloids, actinide real-colloids and actinide pseudocolloids. The second part concentrates on the generation processes and migration behaviour of actinide pseudo colloids, which are discussed with some notable experimental examples. Importance is stressed more on the chemical aspects of the actinide colloid generation in groundwater. This work is a contribution to the CEC Mirage II project, in particular the complexation and colloids research area

  12. The dynamical crossover in attractive colloidal systems

    Mallamace, Francesco [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Corsaro, Carmelo [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); Stanley, H. Eugene [Center for Polymer Studies and Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Mallamace, Domenico [Dipartimento di Scienze dell’Ambiente, della Sicurezza, del Territorio, degli Alimenti e della Salute, Università di Messina, I-98166 Messina (Italy); Chen, Sow-Hsin [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2013-12-07

    We study the dynamical arrest in an adhesive hard-sphere colloidal system. We examine a micellar suspension of the Pluronic-L64 surfactant in the temperature (T) and volume fraction (ϕ) phase diagram. According to mode-coupling theory (MCT), this system is characterized by a cusp-like singularity and two glassy phases: an attractive glass (AG) phase and a repulsive glass (RG) phase. The T − ϕ phase diagram of this system as confirmed by a previous series of scattering data also exhibits a Percolation Threshold (PT) line, a reentrant behavior (AG-liquid-RG), and a glass-to-glass transition. The AG phase can be generated out of the liquid phase by using T and ϕ as control parameters. We utilize viscosity and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. NMR data confirm all the characteristic properties of the colloidal system phase diagram and give evidence of the onset of a fractal-like percolating structure at a precise threshold. The MCT scaling laws used to study the shear viscosity as a function of ϕ and T show in both cases a fragile-to-strong liquid glass-forming dynamic crossover (FSC) located near the percolation threshold where the clustering process is fully developed. These results suggest a larger thermodynamic generality for this phenomenon, which is usually studied only as a function of the temperature. We also find that the critical values of the control parameters, coincident with the PT line, define the locus of the FSC. In the region between the FSC and the glass transition lines the system dynamics are dominated by clustering effects. We thus demonstrate that it is possible, using the conceptual framework provided by extended mode-coupling theory, to describe the way a system approaches dynamic arrest, taking into account both cage and hopping effects.

  13. Pharmacology of colloids and crystalloids.

    Griffel, M I; Kaufman, B S

    1992-04-01

    We have attempted to review body fluid distribution by compartments so that the reader understands the physiology of ICF and ECF, and the relationship between interstitial and intravascular fluids. Crystalloids such as NS and RL are distributed to the ECF, whereas colloids primarily remain intravascular for longer periods. Although effective, crystalloids tend to require larger volumes for infusion, and edema remains a problem. Colloids as a group are extremely effective volume expanders, but none is ideal. Albumin, hetastarch, dextran, and the less commonly used colloids each have significant toxicities that must be considered when using them. Intelligent choices can be made to optimize use of these fluids.

  14. Driving dynamic colloidal assembly using eccentric self-propelled colloids

    Ma, Zhan; Lei, Qun-li; Ni, Ran

    2017-01-01

    Designing protocols to dynamically direct the self-assembly of colloidal particles has become an important direction in soft matter physics because of the promising applications in fabrication of dynamic responsive functional materials. Here using computer simulations, we found that in the mixture of passive colloids and eccentric self-propelled active particles, when the eccentricity and self-propulsion of active particles are high enough, the eccentric active particles can push passive coll...

  15. Adsorption of iodide and iodate on colloidal silver surface

    Zhang Aiping; Tie Xiaoyun; Zhang Jinzhi; An Yanwei; Li Lingjie

    2008-01-01

    'Chemically pure' silver colloids were prepared by laser ablated method to investigate their adsorption-induced spectral and morphologic changes, using UV-visible absorption, Raman and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, when nucleophilic different anions (IO 3 - and I - ) were added into sols. It reveals that the adsorption of nucleophiles on silver surfaces leads to an excess negative charge in the metal interior and modifies both surface charge density and the Fermi levels of metal, which is responsible for the colloidal aggregation, reconstruction and appearance of new resonance absorption bands or with wavelength shift. In addition, two models regarding different adsorption effects of these two anions on silver surfaces were proposed to explain their variant spectral and TEM phenomena.

  16. Interaction Heterogeneity can Favorably Impact Colloidal Crystal Nucleation

    Jenkins, Ian C.; Crocker, John C.; Sinno, Talid

    2017-10-01

    Colloidal particles with short-ranged attractions, e.g., micron-scale spheres functionalized with single-stranded DNA oligomers, are susceptible to becoming trapped in disordered configurations even when a crystalline arrangement is the ground state. Moreover, for reasons that are not well understood, seemingly minor variations in the particle formulation can lead to dramatic changes in the crystallization outcome. We demonstrate, using a combination of equilibrium and nonequilibrium computer simulations, that interaction heterogeneity—variations in the energetic interactions among different particle pairs in the population—may favorably impact crystal nucleation. Specifically, interaction heterogeneity is found to lower the free energy barrier to nucleation via the formation of clusters comprised preferentially of strong-binding particle pairs. Moreover, gelation is inhibited by "spreading out over time" the nucleation process, resulting in a reduced density of stable nuclei, allowing each to grow unhindered and larger. Our results suggest a simple and robust approach for enhancing colloidal crystallization near the "sticky sphere" limit, and support the notion that differing extents of interaction heterogeneity arising from various particle functionalization protocols may contribute to the otherwise unexplained variations in crystallization outcomes reported in the literature.

  17. COLLOID-FACILITATED TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES THROUGH THE VADOSE ZONE

    Flury, Markus

    2003-01-01

    Contaminants have leaked into the vadose zone at the USDOE Hanford reservation. It is important to understand the fate and transport of these contaminants to design remediation strategies and long-term waste management plans at the Hanford reservation. Colloids may play an important role in fate and transport of strongly sorbing contaminants, such as Cs or Pu. This project seeks to improve the basic understanding of colloid and colloid-facilitated transport of contaminants in the vadose zone. The specific objectives addressed are: (1) Determine the structure, composition, and surface charge characteristics of colloidal particles formed under conditions similar to those occurring during leakage of waste typical of Hanford tank supernatants into soils and sediments surrounding the tanks. (2) Characterize the mutual interactions between colloids, contaminant, and soil matrix in batch experiments under various ionic strength and pH conditions. We will investigate the nature of the solid-liquid interactions and the kinetics of the reactions. (3) Evaluate mobility of colloids through soil under different degrees of water saturation and solution chemistry (ionic strength and pH). (4) Determine the potential of colloids to act as carriers to transport the contaminant through the vadose zone and verify the results through comparison with field samples collected under leaking tanks. (5) Improve conceptual characterization of colloid-contaminant-soil interactions and colloid-facilitated transport for implementation into reactive chemical transport models. This project was in part supported by an NSF-IGERT grant to Washington State University. The IGERT grant provided funding for graduate student research and education, and two graduate students were involved in the EMSP project. The IGERT program also supported undergraduate internships. The project is part of a larger EMSP program to study fate and transport of contaminants under leaking Hanford waste tanks. The project has

  18. Large-scale assembly of colloidal particles

    Yang, Hongta

    increase of the effective refractive index of the diffractive medium, resulting in the red-shift of the optical stop bands. The wavelength shift is linearly proportional to the vapor partial pressure for a spectrum of vapors. Optical simulation and theoretical prediction based on Kelvin equation suggest that a liquid film is formed on the walls of the macropores during vapor condensation. The third topic describes introducing doctor blade coating fabricated large area and low cost macroporous films for thermochromic smart windows, which are useful for energy control in glazed buildings. The fabricated macroporous polymer films exhibit brilliant colors and are capable of reflecting solar radiation when in-situ heated, and become transparent as cavities are filled with a solvent which has the same refractive index as that of the polymer when cooled to building temperature. The fourth topic reports the roll-to roll fabricated excellent water-repelling and self-cleaning macroporous polymer films. The size of the voids can be easily controlled by tuning the duration of an oxygen reactive-ion etching process prior to the removal of the templating silica spheres from silica colloidal-polymer composites. After surface functionalization with fluorosilane, superhydrophobic surface with large apparent water contact angle and small sliding angle can be obtained. The self-cleaning functionality can be achieved on superhydrophobic macroporous coatings by preventing bacterial contamination is further demonstrated. The fifth topic presented is that the template macroporous polymer films with interconnected voids and uniform interconnecting nanopores can be directly used as filtration membranes to achieve size-exclusive separation of particles. The results also demonstrate that more than 85% of small sized particles are recovered after filtration. The results also demonstrate that Escherichia coli can be filtrated by the from macroporous polymer films aqueous solution.

  19. Frost Heave in Colloidal Soils

    Peppin, Stephen; Majumdar, Apala; Style, Robert; Sander, Graham

    2011-01-01

    We develop a mathematical model of frost heave in colloidal soils. The theory accountsfor heave and consolidation while not requiring a frozen fringe assumption. Two solidificationregimes occur: a compaction regime in which the soil consolidates

  20. Testing the paradigms of the glass transition in colloids

    Zia, Roseanna; Wang, Jialun; Peng, Xiaoguang; Li, Qi; McKenna, Gregory

    2017-11-01

    Many molecular liquids freeze upon fast enough cooling. This so-called glass state is path dependent and out of equilibrium, as measured by the Kovacs signature experiments, i.e. intrinsic isotherms, asymmetry of approach and memory effect. The reasons for this path- and time-dependence are not fully understood, due to fast molecular relaxations. Colloids provide a natural way to model such behavior, owing to disparity in colloidal versus solvent time scales that can slow dynamics. To shed light on the ambiguity of glass transition, we study via large-scale dynamic simulation of hard-sphere colloidal glass after volume-fraction jumps, where particle size increases at fixed system volume followed by protocols of the McKenna-Kovacs signature experiments. During and following each jump, the positions, velocities, and particle-phase stress are tracked and utilized to characterize relaxation time scales. The impact of both quench depth and quench rate on arrested dynamics and ``state'' variables is explored. In addition, we expand our view to various structural signatures, and rearrangement mechanism is proposed. The results provide insight into not only the existence of an ``ideal'' glass transition, but also the role of structure in such a dense amorphous system.

  1. Colloid migration in porous media

    Hunt, J.R.; McDowell-Boyer; Sitar, N.

    1985-01-01

    Retention of radionuclides for long periods near waste repositories depends upon multiple barriers, one of which is adsorption to immobile solid surfaces. Since small particles and colloidal matter have high adsorption capacities per unit mass and can be mobile in subsurface flows, colloidal transport of waste components requires analysis. Theories for predicting colloid migration through porous media have been developed in the filtration literature. The applicability of filtration theories for predicting particle and colloid transport. Emphasis is on suspended matter much smaller than pore sizes, where physical and chemical forces control migration rather than size dependent physical straining. In general, experimentally verifiable theories exist for particle filtration by clean media, and a sensitivity analysis is possible on particle and media properties and fluid flow rate. When particle aggregates accumulate within pores, media permeability decreases, resulting in flow field alteration and possible radionuclide isolation. An analysis of the limited experimental data available indicates that present theories cannot predict long-term colloid transport when permeability reduction occurs. The coupling of colloid attachment processes and the hydrologic flow processes requires more extensive laboratory field research than has currently been carried out. An emphasis on the fundamental mechanisms is necessary to enhance long-term predictability

  2. Characterization of colloids in groundwater

    Kim, J.I.; Buckau, G.; Klenze, R.

    1987-07-01

    Natural colloids in the Gorleben aquifer systems have been investigated as for their chemical composition, quantification and size distribution. Humic substances appear to be the major organic materials in these groundwaters, generating humic colloids which are analysed to be humic acid (and fulvic acid) loaded with a large number of trace heavy metal ions. These metal ions include natural homologues of actinides and some fission products in trivalent, tetravalent and hexavalent state. Concentrations of trivalent and tetravalent heavy metal ions are linearly correlated with the dissolved organic carbon (DDC) concentration in different groundwaters. The DOC is found to be present as humic colloids. The Am 3+ ions introduced in such a groundwater readily undergo the generation of its pseudocolloids through sorption or ion exchange reactions with humic colloids. The chemical behaviour of Am(III), being similar to the trivalent metal ions, e.g. Fe 3+ , REE etc. found in natural colloids, has been investigated by laser induced photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS). Groundwaters from Ispra, Markham Clinton and Felslabor Grimsel. Bidistilled water and one of Gorleben groundwaters, Gohy 1011, are taken for the purpose of comparison. This groundwater contains the least amount of natural colloids of all Gorleben groundwaters hitherto investigated. An indirect quantification is made by comparison of the LPAS results with experiment from Latex solution. (orig./IRB)

  3. Synthesis of highly uniform Cu2O spheres by a two-step approach and their assembly to form photonic crystals with a brilliant color.

    Su, Xin; Chang, Jie; Wu, Suli; Tang, Bingtao; Zhang, Shufen

    2016-03-21

    Monodisperse semiconductor colloidal spheres with a high refractive index hold great potential for building photonic crystals with a strong band gap, but the difficulty in separating the nucleation and growth processes makes it challenging to prepare highly uniform semiconductor colloidal spheres. Herein, real monodisperse Cu2O spheres were prepared via a hot-injection & heating-up two-step method using diethylene glycol as a milder reducing agent. The diameter of the as prepared Cu2O spheres can be tuned from 90 nm to 190 nm precisely. The SEM images reveal that the obtained Cu2O spheres have a narrow size distribution, which permits their self-assembly to form photonic crystals. The effects of precursor concentration and heating rates on the size and morphology of the Cu2O spheres were investigated in detail. The results indicate that the key points of the method include the burst nucleation to form seeds at a high temperature followed by rapid cooling to prevent agglomeration, and appropriate precursor concentration as well as a moderate growth rate during the further growth process. Importantly, photonic crystal films exhibiting a brilliant structural color were fabricated with the obtained monodisperse Cu2O spheres as building blocks, proving the possibility of making photonic crystals with a strong band gap. The developed method was also successfully applied to prepare monodisperse CdS spheres with diameters in the range from 110 nm to 210 nm.

  4. Studying the dynamics of colloidal particles with digital holographic microscopy and electromagnetic scattering solutions

    V. N. Manoharan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Digital holographic microscopy (DHM can measure the 3D positions as well as the scattering properties of colloidal particles in a single 2D image. We describe DHM and our analysis of recorded holograms with exact scattering solutions, which permit the measurement of 3D particle positions with ∼10 nm precision and millisecond time resolution, and discuss studies of the Brownian dynamics of clusters of spheres with DHM.

  5. Unidirectional Wave Propagation in Low-Symmetric Colloidal Photonic-Crystal Heterostructures

    Yannopapas, Vassilios

    2015-01-01

    We show theoretically that photonic crystals consisting of colloidal spheres exhibit unidirectional wave propagation and one-way frequency band gaps without breaking time-reversal symmetry via, e.g., the application of an external magnetic field or the use of nonlinear materials. Namely, photonic crystals with low symmetry such as the monoclinic crystal type considered here as well as with unit cells formed by the heterostructure of different photonic crystals show significant unidirectional ...

  6. Colloid remediation in groundwater by polyelectrolyte capture

    Nuttall, H.E.; Rao, S.; Jain, R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes an ongoing study to characterize groundwater colloids, to understand the geochemical factors affecting colloid transport in groundwater, and to develop an in-situ colloid remediation process. The colloids and suspended particulate matter used in this study were collected from a perched aquifer site that has radiation levels several hundred times the natural background and where previous researchers have measured and reported the presence of radiocolloids containing plutonium and americium. At this site, radionuclides have spread over several kilometers. Inorganic colloids collected from water samples are characterized with respect to concentration, mineralogy, size distribution, electrophoretic mobility (zeta potential), and radioactivity levels. Presented are the methods used to investigate the physiochemical factors affecting colloid transport and the preliminary analytical results. Included below are a description of a colloid transport model and the corresponding computational code, water analyses, characterization of the inorganic colloids, and a conceptual description of a process for in-situ colloid remediation using the phenomenon of polyelectrolyte capture

  7. New Colloidal Lithographic Nanopatterns Fabricated by Combining Pre-Heating and Reactive Ion Etching

    Cong Chunxiao

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report a low-cost and simple method for fabrication of nonspherical colloidal lithographic nanopatterns with a long-range order by preheating and oxygen reactive ion etching of monolayer and double-layer polystyrene spheres. This strategy allows excellent control of size and morphology of the colloidal particles and expands the applications of the colloidal patterns as templates for preparing ordered functional nanostructure arrays. For the first time, various unique nanostructures with long-range order, including network structures with tunable neck length and width, hexagonal-shaped, and rectangular-shaped arrays as well as size tunable nanohole arrays, were fabricated by this route. Promising potentials of such unique periodic nanostructures in various fields, such as photonic crystals, catalysts, templates for deposition, and masks for etching, are naturally expected.

  8. Sedimentation equilibria of ferrofluids: II. Experimental osmotic equations of state of magnetite colloids

    Luigjes, Bob; Thies-Weesie, Dominique M E; Erné, Ben H; Philipse, Albert P

    2012-01-01

    The first experimental osmotic equation of state is reported for well-defined magnetic colloids that interact via a dipolar hard-sphere potential. The osmotic pressures are determined from the sedimentation equilibrium concentration profiles in ultrathin capillaries using a low-velocity analytical centrifuge, which is the subject of the accompanying paper I. The pressures of the magnetic colloids, measured accurately to values as low as a few pascals, obey Van ’t Hoff’s law at low concentrations, whereas at increasing colloid densities non-ideality appears in the form of a negative second virial coefficient. This virial coefficient corresponds to a dipolar coupling constant that agrees with the coupling constant obtained via independent magnetization measurements. The coupling constant manifests an attractive potential of mean force that is significant but yet not quite strong enough to induce dipolar chain formation. Our results disprove van der Waals-like phase behavior of dipolar particles for reasons that are explained. (paper)

  9. The Coulomb gas representation of critical RSOS models on the sphere and the torus

    Foda, O.; Nienhuis, B.

    1989-01-01

    We derive the Coulomb gas formulation of the c<1 discrete unitary series, on the sphere and the torus, starting from the corresponding regime-III RSOS models on a square lattice with appropriate topology. We clarify the origin of the background charge, the screening charges, and the choice of operator representations in a correlation function. In the scaling limit, we obtain a bosonic action coupled to the background curvature in addition to topological terms that vanish on the Riemann sphere. Its Virasoro algebra has the central charge expected on the basis of comparing conformal dimensions. As an application, we derive general expressions for the correlation functions on the torus. (orig.)

  10. The Coulomb gas representation of critical RSOS models on the sphere and the torus

    Foda, O. (Rijksuniversiteit Utrecht (Netherlands). Inst. voor Theoretische Fysica); Nienhuis, B. (Rijksuniversiteit Leiden (Netherlands). Inst. Lorentz voor Theoretische Natuurkunde)

    1989-10-02

    We derive the Coulomb gas formulation of the c<1 discrete unitary series, on the sphere and the torus, starting from the corresponding regime-III RSOS models on a square lattice with appropriate topology. We clarify the origin of the background charge, the screening charges, and the choice of operator representations in a correlation function. In the scaling limit, we obtain a bosonic action coupled to the background curvature in addition to topological terms that vanish on the Riemann sphere. Its Virasoro algebra has the central charge expected on the basis of comparing conformal dimensions. As an application, we derive general expressions for the correlation functions on the torus. (orig.).

  11. Screened Coulomb interactions in metallic alloys. I. Universal screening in the atomic-sphere approximation

    Ruban, Andrei; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    2002-01-01

    We have used the locally self-consistent Green's-function (LSGF) method in supercell calculations to establish the distribution of the net charges assigned to the atomic spheres of the alloy components in metallic alloys with different compositions and degrees of order. This allows us to determine......-site local interaction zone. We demonstrate that the basic mechanism that governs the charge distribution is the screening of the net charges of the alloy components that makes the direct Coulomb interactions short ranged. In the atomic-sphere approximation, this screening appears to be almost independent...

  12. Coulomb-like elastic interaction induced by symmetry breaking in nematic liquid crystal colloids.

    Lee, Beom-Kyu; Kim, Sung-Jo; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Lev, Bohdan

    2017-11-21

    It is generally thought that colloidal particles in a nematic liquid crystal do not generate the first multipole term called deformation elastic charge as it violates the mechanical equilibrium. Here, we demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that this is not the case, and deformation elastic charges, as well as dipoles and quadrupoles, can be induced through anisotropic boundary conditions. We report the first direct observation of Coulomb-like elastic interactions between colloidal particles in a nematic liquid crystal. The behaviour of two spherical colloidal particles with asymmetric anchoring conditions induced by asymmetric alignment is investigated experimentally; the interaction of two particles located at the boundary of twist and parallel aligned regions is observed. We demonstrate that such particles produce deformation elastic charges and interact by Coulomb-like interactions.

  13. Water evaporation in silica colloidal deposits.

    Peixinho, Jorge; Lefèvre, Grégory; Coudert, François-Xavier; Hurisse, Olivier

    2013-10-15

    The results of an experimental study on the evaporation and boiling of water confined in the pores of deposits made of mono-dispersed silica colloidal micro-spheres are reported. The deposits are studied using scanning electron microscopy, adsorption of nitrogen, and adsorption of water through attenuated total reflection-infrared spectroscopy. The evaporation is characterized using differential scanning calorimetry and thermal gravimetric analysis. Optical microscopy is used to observe the patterns on the deposits after evaporation. When heating at a constant rate and above boiling temperature, the release of water out of the deposits is a two step process. The first step is due to the evaporation and boiling of the surrounding and bulk water and the second is due to the desorption of water from the pores. Additional experiments on the evaporation of water from membranes having cylindrical pores and of heptane from silica deposits suggest that the second step is due to the morphology of the deposits. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Glass-liquid-glass reentrance in mono-component colloidal dispersions

    Ramirez-Gonzalez, P E; Medina-Noyola, M; Vizcarra-Rendon, A; Guevara-Rodriguez, F de J

    2008-01-01

    The self-consistent generalized Langevin equation (SCGLE) theory of colloid dynamics is employed to describe the ergodic-non-ergodic transition in model mono-disperse colloidal dispersions whose particles interact through hard-sphere plus short-ranged attractive forces. The ergodic-non-ergodic phase diagram in the temperature-concentration state space is determined for the hard-sphere plus attractive Yukawa model within the mean spherical approximation for the static structure factor by solving a remarkably simple equation for the localization length of the colloidal particles. Finite real values of this property signals non-ergodicity and determines the non-ergodic parameters f(k) and f s (k). The resulting phase diagram for this system, which involves the existence of reentrant (repulsive and attractive) glass states, is compared with the corresponding prediction of mode coupling theory. Although both theories coincide in the general features of this phase diagram, there are also clear qualitative differences. One of the most relevant is the SCGLE prediction that the ergodic-attractive glass transition does not preempt the gas-liquid phase transition, but always intersects the corresponding spinodal curve on its high-concentration side. We also calculate the ergodic-non-ergodic phase diagram for the sticky hard-sphere model to illustrate the dependence of the predicted SCGLE dynamic phase diagram on the choice of one important constituent element of the SCGLE theory

  15. Glass-liquid-glass reentrance in mono-component colloidal dispersions

    Ramirez-Gonzalez, P E; Medina-Noyola, M [Instituto de Fisica ' Manuel Sandoval Vallarta' , Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, 78000 San Luis Potosi, SLP (Mexico); Vizcarra-Rendon, A [Unidad Academica de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Paseo la Bufa y Calzada Solidaridad, 98600, Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico); Guevara-Rodriguez, F de J [Coordinacion de IngenierIa Molecular, Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, 07730 Mexico, DF (Mexico)

    2008-05-21

    The self-consistent generalized Langevin equation (SCGLE) theory of colloid dynamics is employed to describe the ergodic-non-ergodic transition in model mono-disperse colloidal dispersions whose particles interact through hard-sphere plus short-ranged attractive forces. The ergodic-non-ergodic phase diagram in the temperature-concentration state space is determined for the hard-sphere plus attractive Yukawa model within the mean spherical approximation for the static structure factor by solving a remarkably simple equation for the localization length of the colloidal particles. Finite real values of this property signals non-ergodicity and determines the non-ergodic parameters f(k) and f{sub s}(k). The resulting phase diagram for this system, which involves the existence of reentrant (repulsive and attractive) glass states, is compared with the corresponding prediction of mode coupling theory. Although both theories coincide in the general features of this phase diagram, there are also clear qualitative differences. One of the most relevant is the SCGLE prediction that the ergodic-attractive glass transition does not preempt the gas-liquid phase transition, but always intersects the corresponding spinodal curve on its high-concentration side. We also calculate the ergodic-non-ergodic phase diagram for the sticky hard-sphere model to illustrate the dependence of the predicted SCGLE dynamic phase diagram on the choice of one important constituent element of the SCGLE theory.

  16. Hybrid passivated colloidal quantum dot solids

    Ip, Alex

    2012-07-29

    Colloidal quantum dot (CQD) films allow large-area solution processing and bandgap tuning through the quantum size effect. However, the high ratio of surface area to volume makes CQD films prone to high trap state densities if surfaces are imperfectly passivated, promoting recombination of charge carriers that is detrimental to device performance. Recent advances have replaced the long insulating ligands that enable colloidal stability following synthesis with shorter organic linkers or halide anions, leading to improved passivation and higher packing densities. Although this substitution has been performed using solid-state ligand exchange, a solution-based approach is preferable because it enables increased control over the balance of charges on the surface of the quantum dot, which is essential for eliminating midgap trap states. Furthermore, the solution-based approach leverages recent progress in metal:chalcogen chemistry in the liquid phase. Here, we quantify the density of midgap trap states in CQD solids and show that the performance of CQD-based photovoltaics is now limited by electrong-"hole recombination due to these states. Next, using density functional theory and optoelectronic device modelling, we show that to improve this performance it is essential to bind a suitable ligand to each potential trap site on the surface of the quantum dot. We then develop a robust hybrid passivation scheme that involves introducing halide anions during the end stages of the synthesis process, which can passivate trap sites that are inaccessible to much larger organic ligands. An organic crosslinking strategy is then used to form the film. Finally, we use our hybrid passivated CQD solid to fabricate a solar cell with a certified efficiency of 7.0%, which is a record for a CQD photovoltaic device. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  17. Hybrid passivated colloidal quantum dot solids

    Ip, Alex; Thon, Susanna; Hoogland, Sjoerd H.; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Zhitomirsky, David; Debnath, Ratan K.; Levina, Larissa; Rollny, Lisa R.; Carey, Graham H.; Fischer, Armin H.; Kemp, Kyle W.; Kramer, Illan J.; Ning, Zhijun; Labelle, André J.; Chou, Kang Wei; Amassian, Aram; Sargent, E. H.

    2012-01-01

    Colloidal quantum dot (CQD) films allow large-area solution processing and bandgap tuning through the quantum size effect. However, the high ratio of surface area to volume makes CQD films prone to high trap state densities if surfaces are imperfectly passivated, promoting recombination of charge carriers that is detrimental to device performance. Recent advances have replaced the long insulating ligands that enable colloidal stability following synthesis with shorter organic linkers or halide anions, leading to improved passivation and higher packing densities. Although this substitution has been performed using solid-state ligand exchange, a solution-based approach is preferable because it enables increased control over the balance of charges on the surface of the quantum dot, which is essential for eliminating midgap trap states. Furthermore, the solution-based approach leverages recent progress in metal:chalcogen chemistry in the liquid phase. Here, we quantify the density of midgap trap states in CQD solids and show that the performance of CQD-based photovoltaics is now limited by electrong-"hole recombination due to these states. Next, using density functional theory and optoelectronic device modelling, we show that to improve this performance it is essential to bind a suitable ligand to each potential trap site on the surface of the quantum dot. We then develop a robust hybrid passivation scheme that involves introducing halide anions during the end stages of the synthesis process, which can passivate trap sites that are inaccessible to much larger organic ligands. An organic crosslinking strategy is then used to form the film. Finally, we use our hybrid passivated CQD solid to fabricate a solar cell with a certified efficiency of 7.0%, which is a record for a CQD photovoltaic device. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  18. Troubleshooting vSphere storage

    Preston, Mike

    2013-01-01

    This is a step-by-step example-oriented tutorial aimed at showing the reader how to troubleshoot a variety of vSphere storage problems, and providing the reader with solutions that can be completed with minimal effort and time in order to limit damage to work.If you are a vSphere administrator, this is the book for you. This book will provide you with 'need to know' information about the various storage transports that ESXi utilizes, the tools and techniques we can use to identify problems, and the fundamental knowledge and steps to take to troubleshoot storage-related issues. Prior knowledge

  19. inner-sphere complexation of cations at the rutile-water interface: A concise surface structural interpretation with the CD and MUSIC model

    Ridley, Mora K. [Texas Tech University, Lubbock; Hiemstra, T [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Van Riemsdijk, Willem H. [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Machesky, Michael L. [Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign, IL

    2009-01-01

    Acid base reactivity and ion-interaction between mineral surfaces and aqueous solutions is most frequently investigated at the macroscopic scale as a function of pH. Experimental data are then rationalized by a variety of surface complexation models. These models are thermodynamically based which in principle does not require a molecular picture. The models are typically calibrated to relatively simple solid-electrolyte solution pairs and may provide poor descriptions of complex multicomponent mineral aqueous solutions, including those found in natural environments. Surface complexation models may be improved by incorporating molecular-scale surface structural information to constrain the modeling efforts. Here, we apply a concise, molecularly-constrained surface complexation model to a diverse suite of surface titration data for rutile and thereby begin to address the complexity of multi-component systems. Primary surface charging curves in NaCl, KCl, and RbCl electrolyte media were fit simultaneously using a charge distribution (CD) and multisite complexation (MUSIC) model [Hiemstra T. and Van Riemsdijk W. H. (1996) A surface structural approach to ion adsorption: the charge distribution (CD) model. J. Colloid Interf. Sci. 179, 488 508], coupled with a Basic Stern layer description of the electric double layer. In addition, data for the specific interaction of Ca2+ and Sr2+ with rutile, in NaCl and RbCl media, were modeled. In recent developments, spectroscopy, quantum calculations, and molecular simulations have shown that electrolyte and divalent cations are principally adsorbed in various inner-sphere configurations on the rutile 110 surface [Zhang Z., Fenter P., Cheng L., Sturchio N. C., Bedzyk M. J., Pr edota M., Bandura A., Kubicki J., Lvov S. N., Cummings P. T., Chialvo A. A., Ridley M. K., Be ne zeth P., Anovitz L., Palmer D. A., Machesky M. L. and Wesolowski D. J. (2004) Ion adsorption at the rutile water interface: linking molecular and macroscopic

  20. Inner-sphere complexation of cations at the rutile-water interface: A concise surface structural interpretation with the CD and MUSIC model

    Ridley, Moira K.; Hiemstra, Tjisse; van Riemsdijk, Willem H.; Machesky, Michael L.

    2009-04-01

    Acid-base reactivity and ion-interaction between mineral surfaces and aqueous solutions is most frequently investigated at the macroscopic scale as a function of pH. Experimental data are then rationalized by a variety of surface complexation models. These models are thermodynamically based which in principle does not require a molecular picture. The models are typically calibrated to relatively simple solid-electrolyte solution pairs and may provide poor descriptions of complex multi-component mineral-aqueous solutions, including those found in natural environments. Surface complexation models may be improved by incorporating molecular-scale surface structural information to constrain the modeling efforts. Here, we apply a concise, molecularly-constrained surface complexation model to a diverse suite of surface titration data for rutile and thereby begin to address the complexity of multi-component systems. Primary surface charging curves in NaCl, KCl, and RbCl electrolyte media were fit simultaneously using a charge distribution (CD) and multisite complexation (MUSIC) model [Hiemstra T. and Van Riemsdijk W. H. (1996) A surface structural approach to ion adsorption: the charge distribution (CD) model. J. Colloid Interf. Sci. 179, 488-508], coupled with a Basic Stern layer description of the electric double layer. In addition, data for the specific interaction of Ca 2+ and Sr 2+ with rutile, in NaCl and RbCl media, were modeled. In recent developments, spectroscopy, quantum calculations, and molecular simulations have shown that electrolyte and divalent cations are principally adsorbed in various inner-sphere configurations on the rutile 1 1 0 surface [Zhang Z., Fenter P., Cheng L., Sturchio N. C., Bedzyk M. J., Předota M., Bandura A., Kubicki J., Lvov S. N., Cummings P. T., Chialvo A. A., Ridley M. K., Bénézeth P., Anovitz L., Palmer D. A., Machesky M. L. and Wesolowski D. J. (2004) Ion adsorption at the rutile-water interface: linking molecular and macroscopic

  1. Density Fluctuations of Hard-Sphere Fluids in Narrow Confinement

    Kim Nygård

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Spatial confinement induces microscopic ordering of fluids, which in turn alters many of their dynamic and thermodynamic properties. However, the isothermal compressibility has hitherto been largely overlooked in the literature, despite its obvious connection to the underlying microscopic structure and density fluctuations in confined geometries. Here, we address this issue by probing density profiles and structure factors of hard-sphere fluids in various narrow slits, using x-ray scattering from colloid-filled nanofluidic containers and integral-equation-based statistical mechanics at the level of pair distributions for inhomogeneous fluids. Most importantly, we demonstrate that density fluctuations and isothermal compressibilities in confined fluids can be obtained experimentally from the long-wavelength limit of the structure factor, providing a formally exact and experimentally accessible connection between microscopic structure and macroscopic, thermodynamic properties. Our approach will thus, for example, allow direct experimental verification of theoretically predicted enhanced density fluctuations in liquids near solvophobic interfaces.

  2. Wave oscillations in colloid oxyhydrates wave oscillations in colloid oxyhydrates

    Sucharev, Yuri I

    2010-01-01

    The importance of coherent chemistry, that is, the chemistry of periodic oscillatory processes, is increasing at a rapid rate in specific chemical disciplines. While being perfectly understood and highly developed in the fields of physical chemistry, chemical physics and biological chemistry, the periodic developmental paradigm of processes and phenomena still remains poorly developed and misunderstood in classical inorganic chemistry and related branches, such as colloid chemistry. The probability is that we miss subtle colloid chemical phenomena that could be of utmost importance if taken into consideration when catalysis or adsorption is involved. The author here reveals all of the astonishing vistas that periodic wave paradigms open up to researchers in certain colloid chemical systems, and will doubtless stimulate researchers to look at them in a new light.Review from Book News Inc.: Coherent chemistry, the chemistry of periodical oscillatory processes, is well established in physical chemistry, chemical...

  3. The quantum mechanical description of the dot-dot interaction in ionic colloids

    Morais, P.C.; Qu, Fanyao

    2007-01-01

    In this study the dot-dot interaction in ionic colloids is systematically investigated by self-consistently solving the coupled Schroedinger and Poisson equations in the frame of finite difference method (FDM). In a first approximation the interacting two-dot system (dimer) is described using the picture of two coupled quantum wells. It was found that the dot-dot interaction changes the colloid characteristic by changing the hopping coefficient (t) and consequently the nanodot surface charge density (σ). The hopping coefficient and the surface charge density were investigated as a function of the dot size and dot-dot distance

  4. The radiation chemistry of colloids

    Sellers, R.M.

    1976-08-01

    One of the most important problems associated with water cooled reactors is the accumulation on the pipework of radio-active deposits. These are formed from corrosion products which become activated during their passage through the reactor core. The first step of the activation process involves the deposition of the corrosion products, which are present as either colloidal or particulate matter, onto surfaces in the reactor core, i.e. within the radiation zone. A review of the literature on the effect of radiation on colloids is presented. Particular emphasis is given to the dependence of colloidal parameters such as particle size, turbidity and electrophoretic mobility on radiation dose. Most of the data available is of a qualitative nature only. Evidence is presented that colloids of iron are affected (in some cases precipitated) by radiation, and it is suggested that this process plays a part in the deposition of corrosion products in nuclear reactor cores. The bulk of the information available can be rationalized in terms of the radiation chemistry of aqueous solutions, and the interaction of the radicals produced with the atoms or molecules at the surface of the colloidal particles. This approach is very successful in explaining the variation of the mean particle size of monodisperse sulphur hydrosols with dose, for which quantitative experimental data are available. (author)

  5. Spheres of discharge of springs

    Springer, Abraham E.; Stevens, Lawrence E.

    2009-02-01

    Although springs have been recognized as important, rare, and globally threatened ecosystems, there is as yet no consistent and comprehensive classification system or common lexicon for springs. In this paper, 12 spheres of discharge of springs are defined, sketched, displayed with photographs, and described relative to their hydrogeology of occurrence, and the microhabitats and ecosystems they support. A few of the spheres of discharge have been previously recognized and used by hydrogeologists for over 80 years, but others have only recently been defined geomorphologically. A comparison of these spheres of discharge to classification systems for wetlands, groundwater dependent ecosystems, karst hydrogeology, running waters, and other systems is provided. With a common lexicon for springs, hydrogeologists can provide more consistent guidance for springs ecosystem conservation, management, and restoration. As additional comprehensive inventories of the physical, biological, and cultural characteristics are conducted and analyzed, it will eventually be possible to associate spheres of discharge with discrete vegetation and aquatic invertebrate assemblages, and better understand the habitat requirements of rare or unique springs species. Given the elevated productivity and biodiversity of springs, and their highly threatened status, identification of geomorphic similarities among spring types is essential for conservation of these important ecosystems.

  6. Neuroscience in the public sphere.

    O'Connor, Cliodhna; Rees, Geraint; Joffe, Helene

    2012-04-26

    The media are increasingly fascinated by neuroscience. Here, we consider how neuroscientific discoveries are thematically represented in the popular press and the implications this has for society. In communicating research, neuroscientists should be sensitive to the social consequences neuroscientific information may have once it enters the public sphere. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Neuroscience in the Public Sphere

    O'Connor, Cliodhna; Rees, Geraint; Joffe, Helene

    2012-01-01

    The media are increasingly fascinated by neuroscience. Here, we consider how neuroscientific discoveries are thematically represented in the popular press and the implications this has for society. In communicating research, neuroscientists should be sensitive to the social consequences neuroscientific information may have once it enters the public sphere.

  8. Initiating fibro-proliferation through interfacial interactions of myoglobin colloids with collagen in solution.

    Dhanasekaran, Madhumitha; Dhathathreyan, Aruna

    2017-08-01

    This work examines fibro-proliferation through interaction of myoglobin (Mb), a globular protein with collagen, an extracellular matrix fibrous protein. Designed colloids of Mb at pH 4.5 and 7.5 have been mixed with collagen solution at pH 7.5 and 4.5 in different concentrations altering their surface charges. For the Mb colloids, 100-200nm sizes have been measured from Transmission electron micrographs and zeta sizer. CD spectra shows a shift to beta sheet like structure for the protein in the colloids. Interaction at Mb/Collagen interface studied using Dilational rheology, Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation and Differential Scanning calorimetry show that the perturbation is not only by the charge compensation arising from the difference in pH of the colloids and collagen, but also by the organized assembly of collagen at that particular pH. Results demonstrate that positive Mb colloids at pH 4.5, having more% of entrained water stabilize the collagen fibrils (pH 7.5) around them. Ensuing dehydration leads to effective cross-linking and inherently anisotropic growth of fibrils/fibres of collagen. In the case of Mb colloids at pH 7.5, the fibril formation seems to supersede the clustering of Mb suggesting that the fibro-proliferation is both pH and hydrophilic-hydrophobic balance dependent at the interface. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. An identification of the soft polyelectrolyte gel-like layer on silica colloids using atomic force and electron microscopy.

    Škvarla, Jiří; Škvarla, Juraj

    2017-10-01

    A procedure is introduced for measuring the radius of spherical colloid particles from the curvature of upper parts of their central cross-sectional profiles obtained by atomic force microscopy (AFM). To minimize the possible compression and displacement of the spheres, AFM is operated in a mode rendering a constant ultralow pN force on the tip. The procedure allows us to evaluate the mean radius of nearly monodisperse submicrometer spheres of silica in their natively hydrated state in aqueous electrolyte solutions, irrespective of whether they are coagulated or not. A variation in the volume (swelling degree) of layers delimited by the AFM mean radii of these spheres in KCl solutions and their invariable mean radius in vacuum is obtained that follows a scaling power law derived in polymer physics for swellable polyelectrolyte gels and deduced previously by us from coagulation tests. This supports our former suggestion about the existence of soft polyelectrolyte gel-like layer developed spontaneously around silica surfaces and colloids. We discuss this finding in the context of recent knowledge about the structure of the silica/water interface obtained from direct surface force measurements between macroscopic silica surfaces and from particle size measurements of silica colloids and highlight its importance for colloid chemistry and condensed mattter physics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Phase transitions in local equation-of-state approximation and anomalies of spatial charge profiles in non-uniform plasma

    Chigvintsev, A. Yu; Zorina, I. G.; Noginova, L. Yu; Iosilevskiy, I. L.

    2018-01-01

    Impressive appearance of discontinuities in equilibrium spatial charge profiles in non-uniform Coulomb systems is under discussions in wide number of thermoelectrostatics problems. Such discontinuities are considered as peculiar micro-level manifestation of phase transitions and intrinsic macro-level non-ideality effects in local equation of state (EOS), which should be used for description of non-ideal ionic subsystem in frames of local-density (or “pseudofluid”, or “jellium” etc) approximation. Such discontinuities were discussed already by the authors for electronic subsystems. Special emphasis is made in present paper on the mentioned above non-ideality effects in non-uniform ionic subsystems, such as micro-ions profile within screening “cloud” around macro-ion in complex (dusty, colloid etc) plasmas, equilibrium charge profile in ionic traps or (and) in the neighborhood vicinity of “charged wall” etc). Multiphase EOS for simplified ionic model of classical charged hard spheres on uniformly compressible electrostatic compensating background was constructed and several illustrative examples of discussed discontinuous ionic profiles were calculated.

  11. Crack formation and prevention in colloidal drops

    Kim, Jin Young; Cho, Kun; Ryu, Seul-A.; Kim, So Youn; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-08-01

    Crack formation is a frequent result of residual stress release from colloidal films made by the evaporation of colloidal droplets containing nanoparticles. Crack prevention is a significant task in industrial applications such as painting and inkjet printing with colloidal nanoparticles. Here, we illustrate how colloidal drops evaporate and how crack generation is dependent on the particle size and initial volume fraction, through direct visualization of the individual colloids with confocal laser microscopy. To prevent crack formation, we suggest use of a versatile method to control the colloid-polymer interactions by mixing a nonadsorbing polymer with the colloidal suspension, which is known to drive gelation of the particles with short-range attraction. Gelation-driven crack prevention is a feasible and simple method to obtain crack-free, uniform coatings through drying-mediated assembly of colloidal nanoparticles.

  12. Colloid Thrusters, Physics, Fabrication and Performance

    Martinez-Sanchez, Manuel; Akinwande, Akintunde I

    2005-01-01

    ... discovered pure ionic mode, the microfabrication in Silicon of two types of arrays of colloid or electrospray emitters, and the development of a quantitative theory for the colloidal regime (no ions...

  13. Entropy favours open colloidal lattices

    Mao, Xiaoming; Chen, Qian; Granick, Steve

    2013-03-01

    Burgeoning experimental and simulation activity seeks to understand the existence of self-assembled colloidal structures that are not close-packed. Here we describe an analytical theory based on lattice dynamics and supported by experiments that reveals the fundamental role entropy can play in stabilizing open lattices. The entropy we consider is associated with the rotational and vibrational modes unique to colloids interacting through extended attractive patches. The theory makes predictions of the implied temperature, pressure and patch-size dependence of the phase diagram of open and close-packed structures. More generally, it provides guidance for the conditions at which targeted patchy colloidal assemblies in two and three dimensions are stable, thus overcoming the difficulty in exploring by experiment or simulation the full range of conceivable parameters.

  14. Colloid Release from Soil Aggregates

    Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per

    2012-01-01

    The content of water-dispersible colloids (WDC) has a major impact on soil functions and structural stability. In addition, the presence of mobile colloids may increase the risk of colloid-facilitated transport of strongly sorbing environmental contaminants. The WDC content was measured in 39 soils......, using laser diffraction, by agitating the samples using a wet-dispersion unit. This approach eliminated the need for long sedimentation times required by the more classical end-over-end shaking approach and provided information about the time-dependent release of WDC. The total clay content of the soils...... ranged from 0.1 to 0.44 kg kg−1. The WDC content was measured on air-dry and moist 1- to 2-mm aggregates. The WDC content at a reference time was highly correlated to the total clay content (r > 0.91, P soils. Only for two sites was the WDC content correlated to the content of clay...

  15. Sampling and physical and actinide characterization of colloids from the Grimsel test site

    Longworth, G.; Ivanovich, M.

    1990-01-01

    Samples of groundwater from a granite fracture at the Grimsel test site in Switzerland have been collected as part of a second intercomparison of groundwater colloid sampling and characterization techniques carried out by members of the Coco Club (colloids and complexes) sponsored by the CEC. This report describes the Harwell contribution to this exercise. The bulk of naturally occurring actinides were found to reside in solution with 10 particles/I (detection limit ∼50 nm) for samples determined by three laboratories. The colloids were shown to be negatively charged using microelectrophoresis and to be relatively stable. There was evidence of a reduction in the pH of the water after storage due to air contamination. This work has served to identify the problems associated with colloid sampling and characterization techniques

  16. Theory to determine the critical charge density

    Vila, F.

    1997-08-01

    In this paper we theoretically determine the critical charge density in the system earthed metallic sphere-uniformly charged dielectric plane, in presence of earthed surfaces. This is a situation frequently encountered in industrial condition and has a great importance to evaluate the danger of the electrostatic discharges. (author)

  17. Transport coefficients and mechanical response in hard-disk colloidal suspensions

    Zhang Bo-Kai; Ma Yu-Qiang; Li Jian; Chen Kang; Tian Wen-De

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the transport properties and mechanical response of glassy hard disks using nonlinear Langevin equation theory. We derive expressions for the elastic shear modulus and viscosity in two dimensions on the basis of thermal-activated barrier-hopping dynamics and mechanically accelerated motion. Dense hard disks exhibit phenomena such as softening elasticity, shear-thinning of viscosity, and yielding upon deformation, which are qualitatively similar to dense hard-sphere colloidal suspensions in three dimensions. These phenomena can be ascribed to stress-induced “landscape tilting”. Quantitative comparisons of these phenomena between hard disks and hard spheres are presented. Interestingly, we find that the density dependence of yield stress in hard disks is much more significant than in hard spheres. Our work provides a foundation for further generalizing the nonlinear Langevin equation theory to address slow dynamics and rheological behavior in binary or polydisperse mixtures of hard or soft disks. (rapid communication)

  18. An Experimental Study of the Equation of State of Nano Colloids Using a Novel Dielectrophoresis Osmometer

    Shen, Chong; Sirorattanakul, Krittanon; Huang, Hao; Ou-Yang, H. Daniel

    This talk reports a novel method to measure equation of state (EOS) relating the colloidal osmotic pressure with particle concentration. Recent theories and simulations have made predictions for such EOS for various particle interactions, but measurements are rare. Conventional methods to determine the osmotic pressure in colloid suspensions use gravity or centrifugation. However, the nano colloidal system requires a long time to reach equilibrium when the particle sizes are small or their mass densities are close to that of the solvent. Here, we propose a new method involving electric bottle that will solve all such challenges. In the equilibrium under dielectrophoresis (DEP) force field, the spatial distribution of the particle density can be determined from fluorescent microscopy. According to Einstein's osmotic equilibrium theory, the osmotic pressure of the colloid suspensions can be calculated. Then, the DEP force field is calibrated using the well-established EOS of colloidal hard spheres. Using the known force field, we determine the EOS for other particles with various interactions and compare the results with theoretical predictions. This work supports by NSF-DMR 0923299, Lehigh department of physics, Emulsion Polymers Institute.

  19. Colloidal phytosterols: synthesis, characterization and bioaccessibility

    Rossi, L.; Seijen ten Hoorn, J.W.M.; Melnikov, S.M.; Velikov, K.P.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the synthesis of phytosterol colloidal particles using a simple food grade method based on antisolvent precipitation in the presence of a non-ionic surfactant. The resulting colloidal particles have a rod-like shape with some degree of crystallinity. The colloidal dispersions display

  20. Self-Assembly of Faceted Colloidal Particles

    Gantapara, A.P.

    2015-01-01

    A colloidal dispersion consists of insoluble microscopic particles that are suspended in a solvent. Typically, a colloid is a particle for which at least one of its dimension is within the size range of a nanometer to a micron. Due to collisions with much smaller solvent molecules, colloids perform

  1. Colloid formation during waste glass corrosion

    Mertz, C.J.; Buck, E.C.; Fortner, J.A.; Bates, J.K.

    1996-01-01

    The long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass in a geologic repository may require a technical consideration of the role of colloids in the release and transport of radionuclides. The neglect of colloidal properties in assessing the near- and far-field migration behavior of actinides may lead to significant underestimates and poor predictions of biosphere exposure from high-level waste (HLW) disposal. Existing data on colloid-facilitated transport suggests that radionuclide migration may be enhanced, but the importance of colloids is not adequately assessed. Indeed, the occurrence of radionuclide transport, attributed to colloidal species, has been reported at Mortandad Canyon, Los Alamos and at the Nevada Test Site; both unsaturated regions are similar to the proposed HLW repository at Yucca Mountain. Although some developments have been made on understanding the transport characteristics of colloids, the characterization of colloids generated from the corrosion of the waste form has been limited. Colloids are known to incorporate radionuclides either from hydrolysis of dissolved species (real colloids) or from adsorption of dissolved species onto existing groundwater colloids (pseudocolloids); however, these colloids may be considered secondary and solubility limited when compared to the colloids generated during glass alteration

  2. Tessellating the Sphere with Regular Polygons

    Soto-Johnson, Hortensia; Bechthold, Dawn

    2004-01-01

    Tessellations in the Euclidean plane and regular polygons that tessellate the sphere are reviewed. The regular polygons that can possibly tesellate the sphere are spherical triangles, squares and pentagons.

  3. Bonding assembled colloids without loss of colloidal stability

    Vutukuri, H.R.; Stiefelhagen, J.C.P.; Vissers, T; Imhof, A.; van Blaaderen, A.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years the diversity of self-assembled colloidal structures has strongly increased, as it is fueled by a wide range of applications in materials science and also in soft condensed-matter physics.[1–4] Some potential applications include photonic bandgap (PBG) crystals, materials for

  4. Colloidal quantum dot solids for solution-processed solar cells

    Yuan, Mingjian

    2016-02-29

    Solution-processed photovoltaic technologies represent a promising way to reduce the cost and increase the efficiency of solar energy harvesting. Among these, colloidal semiconductor quantum dot photovoltaics have the advantage of a spectrally tuneable infrared bandgap, which enables use in multi-junction cells, as well as the benefit of generating and harvesting multiple charge carrier pairs per absorbed photon. Here we review recent progress in colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics, focusing on three fronts. First, we examine strategies to manage the abundant surfaces of quantum dots, strategies that have led to progress in the removal of electronic trap states. Second, we consider new device architectures that have improved device performance to certified efficiencies of 10.6%. Third, we focus on progress in solution-phase chemical processing, such as spray-coating and centrifugal casting, which has led to the demonstration of manufacturing-ready process technologies.

  5. High-performance carbon nanotube-implanted mesoporous carbon spheres for supercapacitors with low series resistance

    Yi, Bin [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Chen, Xiaohua, E-mail: hudacxh62@yahoo.com.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Guo, Kaimin [College of Physics and Electronic Science, Changsha University of Science and Technology (China); Xu, Longshan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Xiamen University of Technology, Xiamen 361024 (China); Chen, Chuansheng [College of Physics and Electronic Science, Changsha University of Science and Technology (China); Yan, Haimei; Chen, Jianghua [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2011-11-15

    Research highlights: {yields} CNTs-implanted porous carbon spheres are prepared by using gelatin as soft template. {yields} Homogeneously distributed CNTs form a well-develop network in carbon spheres. {yields} CNTs act as a reinforcing backbone assisting the formation of pore structure. {yields} CNTs improve electrical conductivity and specific capacitance of supercapacitor. -- Abstract: Carbon nanotube-implanted mesoporous carbon spheres were prepared by an easy polymerization-induced colloid aggregation method using gelatin as a soft template. Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurements reveal that the materials are mesoporous carbon spheres, with a diameter of {approx}0.5-1.0 {mu}m, a specific surface area of 284 m{sup 2}/g and average pore size of 3.9 nm. Using the carbon nanotube-implanted mesoporous carbon spheres as electrode material for supercapacitors in an aqueous electrolyte solution, a low equivalent series resistance of 0.83 {Omega} cm{sup 2} and a maximum specific capacitance of 189 F/g with a measured power density of 8.7 kW/kg at energy density of 6.6 Wh/kg are obtained.

  6. Hard sphere-like glass transition in eye lens α-crystallin solutions.

    Foffi, Giuseppe; Savin, Gabriela; Bucciarelli, Saskia; Dorsaz, Nicolas; Thurston, George M; Stradner, Anna; Schurtenberger, Peter

    2014-11-25

    We study the equilibrium liquid structure and dynamics of dilute and concentrated bovine eye lens α-crystallin solutions, using small-angle X-ray scattering, static and dynamic light scattering, viscometry, molecular dynamics simulations, and mode-coupling theory. We find that a polydisperse Percus-Yevick hard-sphere liquid-structure model accurately reproduces both static light scattering data and small-angle X-ray scattering liquid structure data from α-crystallin solutions over an extended range of protein concentrations up to 290 mg/mL or 49% vol fraction and up to ca. 330 mg/mL for static light scattering. The measured dynamic light scattering and viscosity properties are also consistent with those of hard-sphere colloids and show power laws characteristic of an approach toward a glass transition at α-crystallin volume fractions near 58%. Dynamic light scattering at a volume fraction beyond the glass transition indicates formation of an arrested state. We further perform event-driven molecular dynamics simulations of polydisperse hard-sphere systems and use mode-coupling theory to compare the measured dynamic power laws with those of hard-sphere models. The static and dynamic data, simulations, and analysis show that aqueous eye lens α-crystallin solutions exhibit a glass transition at high concentrations that is similar to those found in hard-sphere colloidal systems. The α-crystallin glass transition could have implications for the molecular basis of presbyopia and the kinetics of molecular change during cataractogenesis.

  7. Colloid properties in groundwaters from crystalline formations

    Degueldre, C.A.

    1994-09-01

    Colloids are present in all groundwaters. The role they may play in the migration of safety-relevant radionuclides in the geosphere therefore must be studied. Colloid sampling and characterisation campaigns have been carried out in Switzerland. On the bases of the results from studies in the Grimsel area, Northern Switzerland and the Black Forest, as well as those obtained by other groups concerned with crystalline waters, a consistent picture is emerging. The groundwater colloids in crystalline formations are predominantly comprised of phyllosilicates and silica originating from the aquifer rock. Under constant hydrogeochemical conditions, the colloid concentration is not expected to exceed 100 ng.ml -1 when the calcium concentration is greater than 10 -4 . However, under transient chemical or physical conditions, such as geothermal or tectonic activity, colloid generation may be enhanced and the colloid concentration may reach 10 μg.ml -1 or more, if both the calcium and sodium concentrations are low. In the Nagra Crystalline Reference Water the expected colloid concentration is -1 . This can be compared, for example, to a colloid concentration of about 10 ng.ml -1 found in Zurzach water. The small colloid concentration in the reference water is a consequence of an attachment factor for clay colloids (monmorillonite) close to 1. A model indicates that at pH 8, the nuclide partition coefficients between water and colloid (K p ) must be smaller than 10 7 ml.g -1 if sorption takes place by surface complexation on colloids, = AIOH active groups forming the dominant sorption sites. This pragmatic model is based on the competition between the formation of nuclide hydroxo complexes in solution and their sorption on colloids. Experimental nuclide sorption data on colloids are compared with those obtained by applying this model. For a low colloid concentration, a sorption capacity of the order of 10 -9 M and reversible surface complexation, their presence in the

  8. Colloidal quantum dot light-emitting devices

    Vanessa Wood

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal quantum dot light-emitting devices (QD-LEDs have generated considerable interest for applications such as thin film displays with improved color saturation and white lighting with a high color rendering index (CRI. We review the key advantages of using quantum dots (QDs in display and lighting applications, including their color purity, solution processability, and stability. After highlighting the main developments in QD-LED technology in the past 15 years, we describe the three mechanisms for exciting QDs – optical excitation, Förster energy transfer, and direct charge injection – that have been leveraged to create QD-LEDs. We outline the challenges facing QD-LED development, such as QD charging and QD luminescence quenching in QD thin films. We describe how optical downconversion schemes have enabled researchers to overcome these challenges and develop commercial lighting products that incorporate QDs to achieve desirable color temperature and a high CRI while maintaining efficiencies comparable to inorganic white LEDs (>65 lumens per Watt. We conclude by discussing some current directions in QD research that focus on achieving higher efficiency and air-stable QD-LEDs using electrical excitation of the luminescent QDs.

  9. Transport of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts in Charge Heterogeneous Porous Media: Microfluidics Experiment and Numerical Simulation

    Liu, Y.; Meng, X.; Guo, Z.; Zhang, C.; Nguyen, T. H.; Hu, D.; Ji, J.; Yang, X.

    2017-12-01

    Colloidal attachment on charge heterogeneous grains has significant environmental implications for transport of hazardous colloids, such as pathogens, in the aquifer, where iron, manganese, and aluminium oxide minerals are the major source of surface charge heterogeneity of the aquifer grains. A patchwise surface charge model is often used to describe the surface charge heterogeneity of the grains. In the patchwise model, the colloidal attachment efficiency is linearly correlated with the fraction of the favorable patches (θ=λ(θf - θu)+θu). However, our previous microfluidic study showed that the attachment efficiency of oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum, a waterborne protozoan parasite, was not linear correlated with the fraction of the favorable patches (λ). In this study, we developed a pore scale model to simulate colloidal transport and attachment on charge heterogeneous grains. The flow field was simulated using the LBM method and colloidal transport and attachment were simulated using the Lagrange particle tracking method. The pore scale model was calibrated with experimental results of colloidal and oocyst transport in microfluidic devices and was then used to simulate oocyst transport in charge heterogeneous porous media under a variety of environmental relative conditions, i.e. the fraction of favorable patchwise, ionic strength, and pH. The results of the pore scale simulations were used to evaluate the effect of surface charge heterogeneity on upscaling of oocyst transport from pore to continuum scale and to develop an applicable correlation between colloidal attachment efficiency and the fraction of the favorable patches.

  10. Ligand-mediated adhesive mechanics of two static, deformed spheres.

    Sircar, Sarthok; Nguyen, Giang; Kotousov, Andrei; Roberts, Anthony J

    2016-10-01

    A self-consistent model is developed to investigate attachment/detachment kinetics of two static, deformable microspheres with irregular surface and coated with flexible binding ligands. The model highlights how the microscale binding kinetics of these ligands as well as the attractive/repulsive potential of the charged surface affects the macroscale static deformed configuration of the spheres. It is shown that in the limit of smooth, neutrally charged surface (i.e., the dimensionless inverse Debye length, [Formula: see text]), interacting via elastic binders (i.e., the dimensionless stiffness coefficient, [Formula: see text]) the adhesion mechanics approaches the regime of application of the JKR theory, and in this particular limit, the contact radius, R c , scales with the particle radius, R, according to the scaling law, [Formula: see text]. We show that static, deformed, highly charged, ligand-coated surface of micro-spheres exhibit strong adhesion. Normal stress distribution within the contact area adjusts with the binder stiffness coefficient, from a maximum at the center to a maximum at the periphery of the region. Although reported in some in vitro experiments involving particle adhesion, until now a physical interpretation for this variation of the stress distribution for deformable, charged, ligand-coated microspheres is missing. Surface roughness results in a diminished adhesion with a distinct reduction in the pull-off force, larger separation gap, weaker normal stress and limited area of adhesion. These results are in agreement with the published experimental findings.

  11. Capillary holdup between vertical spheres

    S. Zeinali Heris

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The maximum volume of liquid bridge left between two vertically mounted spherical particles has been theoretically determined and experimentally measured. As the gravitational effect has not been neglected in the theoretical model, the liquid interface profile is nonsymmetrical around the X-axis. Symmetry in the interface profile only occurs when either the particle size ratio or the gravitational force becomes zero. In this paper, some equations are derived as a function of the spheres' sizes, gap width, liquid density, surface tension and body force (gravity/centrifugal to estimate the maximum amount of liquid that can be held between the two solid spheres. Then a comparison is made between the result based on these equations and several experimental results.

  12. Archaic artifacts resembling celestial spheres

    Dimitrakoudis, S.; Papaspyrou, P.; Petoussis, V.; Moussas, X.

    We present several bronze artifacts from the Archaic Age in Greece (750-480 BC) that resemble celestial spheres or forms of other astronomical significance. They are studied in the context of the Dark Age transition from Mycenaean Age astronomical themes to the philosophical and practical revival of astronomy in the Classical Age with its plethora of astronomical devices. These artifacts, mostly votive in nature are spherical in shape and appear in a variety of forms their most striking characteristic being the depiction of meridians and/or an equator. Most of those artifacts come from Thessaly, and more specifically from the temple of Itonia Athena at Philia, a religious center of pan-Hellenic significance. Celestial spheres, similar in form to the small artifacts presented in this study, could be used to measure latitudes, or estimate the time at a known place, and were thus very useful in navigation.

  13. Spheres of Justice within Schools

    Sabbagh, Clara; Resh, Nura; Mor, Michal

    2006-01-01

    This article argues that there are distinct spheres of justice within education and examines a range of justice norms and distribution rules that characterize the daily life of schools and classrooms. Moving from the macro to micro level, we identify the following five areas: the right to education......, the allocation of (or selection into) learning places, teaching–learning practices, teachers’ treatment of students, and student evaluations of grade distribution. We discuss the literature on the beliefs by students and teachers about the just distribution of educational goods in these five domains......, and on the practices used in the actual allocation of these goods. In line with normative ‘spheres of justice’ arguments in social theory, we conclude that the ideals of social justice within schools vary strongly according to the particular resource to be distributed. Moreover, these ideals often do not correspond...

  14. Numerical experiments on charging of a spherical body in a plasma with Maxwellian distributions of charged particles

    Krasovsky, Victor L.; Kiselyov, Alexander A.

    2017-12-01

    New results of numerical simulation of collisionless plasma perturbation caused by a sphere absorbing electrons and ions are presented. Consideration is given to nonstationary phenomena accompanying the process of charging as well as to plasma steady state reached at long times. Corresponding asymptotic values of charges of the sphere and trapped-ion cloud around it have been found along with self-consistent electric field pattern depending on parameters of the unperturbed plasma. It is established that contribution of the trapped ions to screening of the charged sphere can be quite significant, so that the screening becomes essentially nonlinear in nature. A simple interconnection between the sphere radius, electron and ion Debye lengths has been revealed as the condition for maximum trapped-ion effect. Kinetic structure of the space charge induced in the plasma is discussed with relation to the specific form of the unperturbed charged particle distribution functions.

  15. Microbial effects on colloidal agglomeration

    Hersman, L.

    1995-11-01

    Colloidal particles are known to enhance the transport of radioactive metals through soil and rock systems. This study was performed to determine if a soil microorganism, isolated from the surface samples collected at Yucca Mountain, NV, could affect the colloidal properties of day particles. The agglomeration of a Wyoming bentonite clay in a sterile uninoculated microbial growth medium was compared to the agglomeration in the medium inoculated with a Pseudomonas sp. In a second experiment, microorganisms were cultured in the succinate medium for 50 h and removed by centrifugation. The agglomeration of the clay in this spent was compared to sterile uninoculated medium. In both experiments, the agglomeration of the clay was greater than that of the sterile, uninoculated control. Based on these results, which indicate that this microorganism enhanced the agglomeration of the bentonite clay, it is possible to say that in the presence of microorganisms colloidal movement through a rock matrix could be reduced because of an overall increase in the size of colloidal particle agglomerates. 32 refs

  16. Characterization of Complex Colloidal Suspensions

    Seaman, J. C.; Guerin, M.; Jackson, B. P.; Ranville, J. M.

    2003-04-01

    Surface chemical reactions play a major role in controlling contaminant fate and transport in the subsurface environment. Recent field and laboratory evidence suggests that mobile soil and groundwater colloids may facilitate the migration of sparingly soluble groundwater contaminants. Colloidal suspensions collected in the field or generated in laboratory column experiments tend to be fairly dilute in nature and comprised of relatively small particulates (reserved for studying ideal systems to the characterization of mobile colloids. However, many of these analytical techniques, including total/selective dissolution methods, dynamic light scattering, micro-electrophoresis, streaming potential, and even scanning electron microscopy (SEM), can be biased in of larger size fractions, and therefore, extremely sensitive to sampling, storage, and fractionation artifacts. In addition, surface modifiers such as sorbed oxides or organics can alter particulate appearance, composition, and behavior when compared to synthetic analogues or mineral standards. The current presentation will discuss the limitations and inherent biases associated with a number of analytical characterization techniques that are commonly applied to the study of mobile soil and groundwater colloids, including field flow fractionation (FFF) and acoustic based methods that have only recently become available.

  17. A short textbook of colloid chemistry

    Jirgensons, B

    1962-01-01

    A Short Textbook of Colloid Chemistry, Second Revised Edition details the factual aspect of colloid chemistry that includes the basic facts, established empirical and mathematical relationships, and practical applications. The chapters of the title are organized into two parts. In the first part, the text discusses the general concepts of colloid chemistry, such as the history and scope, basic terms, and basic methods in experiment with colloids. Part Two covers the technical aspect of colloid chemistry, such as the optical properties, electrical properties, and viscosity. The book will be of

  18. The optical levitation of spheres

    Roosen, G.

    1979-01-01

    In this article we are dealing with optical levitation, that is the possibility of maintaining particles in a stable equilibrium position in air or vacuum by means of laser beams. In the first part, we review the methods used to calculate the force exerted on a sphere by a laser beam. The axial and transverse force components could be obtained either by applying Debye theory to laser beams which have a non-uniform energy distribution or by using, in the case of large spheres, a geometrical optics approach. From the results achieved with the geometrical optics approach, we derive, in a second part, the required stable equilibrium conditions for a sphere placed either in a vertical beam or in two horizontal ones having the same axis but opposite direction. In the last part, we describe in detail the levitation experiments carried out using either a vertical or two horizontal beams. In conclusion, we point out some applications of optical levitation, emphasizing especially the suspension by optical levitation of the targets used in laser fusion experiments. (author) [fr

  19. Inner-Sphere versus Outer-Sphere Coordination of BF4– in a NHC-Gold(I) Complex

    Veenboer, Richard M. P.

    2017-07-20

    The role of counterions in chemistry mediated by gold complexes stretches much further than merely providing charge balance to cationic gold species. Interplay between their basicities and coordination strengths influences interactions with both the gold center and substrates in catalysis. Actual monogold(I) active species are generally believed to be monocoordinated species, formed from the abstraction or the decoordination of a second ligand from precursor complexes, but only a small amount of experimental evidence exists to underpin the existence of these transient species. The formation of a bench-stable neutral IPrCl-gold(I) tetrafluoroborate complex is reported herein. Experimental studies by X-ray diffraction analysis and NMR spectroscopy and theoretical studies by DFT calculations were conducted to determine the composition, structure, and behavior of this complex. The absence of an auxiliary ligand resulted in inner-sphere coordination of the counterion in the solid state. In solution, an equilibrium between two conformations was found with the counterion occupying inner-sphere and outer-sphere positions, respectively. Stoichiometric and catalytic reactivity studies with the tetrafluoroborate complex have been conducted. These confirmed the lability of the inner-sphere coordinating counterion that gives the IPrCl-gold(I) fragment behavior similar to that of related systems.

  20. Inner-Sphere versus Outer-Sphere Coordination of BF4– in a NHC-Gold(I) Complex

    Veenboer, Richard M. P.; Collado, Alba; Dupuy, Sté phanie; Lebl, Tomas; Falivene, Laura; Cavallo, Luigi; Cordes, David B.; Slawin, Alexandra M. Z.; Cazin, Catherine S. J.; Nolan, Steven P.

    2017-01-01

    The role of counterions in chemistry mediated by gold complexes stretches much further than merely providing charge balance to cationic gold species. Interplay between their basicities and coordination strengths influences interactions with both the gold center and substrates in catalysis. Actual monogold(I) active species are generally believed to be monocoordinated species, formed from the abstraction or the decoordination of a second ligand from precursor complexes, but only a small amount of experimental evidence exists to underpin the existence of these transient species. The formation of a bench-stable neutral IPrCl-gold(I) tetrafluoroborate complex is reported herein. Experimental studies by X-ray diffraction analysis and NMR spectroscopy and theoretical studies by DFT calculations were conducted to determine the composition, structure, and behavior of this complex. The absence of an auxiliary ligand resulted in inner-sphere coordination of the counterion in the solid state. In solution, an equilibrium between two conformations was found with the counterion occupying inner-sphere and outer-sphere positions, respectively. Stoichiometric and catalytic reactivity studies with the tetrafluoroborate complex have been conducted. These confirmed the lability of the inner-sphere coordinating counterion that gives the IPrCl-gold(I) fragment behavior similar to that of related systems.

  1. Mastering VMware vSphere 5

    Lowe, Scott

    2011-01-01

    A new and updated edition of bestselling Mastering VMware vSphere 4 Written by leading VMware expert, this book covers all the features and capabilities of VMware vSphere. You'll learn how to install, configure, operate, manage, and secure the latest release.Covers all the new features and capabilities of the much-anticipated new release of VMware vSphereDiscusses the planning, installation, operation, and management for the latest releaseReviews migration to the latest vSphere softwareOffers hands-on instruction and clear explanations with real-world examples Mastering VMware vSphere is the

  2. The sphere-PAC fuel code 'SPHERE-3'

    Wallin, H

    2000-07-01

    Sphere-PAC fuel is an advanced nuclear fuel, in which the cladding tube is filled with small fuel spheres instead of the more usual fuel pellets. At PSI, the irradiation behaviour of sphere-PAC fuel is calculated using the computer code SPHERE-3. The paper describes the present status of the SPHERE-3 code, and some results of the qualification process against experimental data. (author)

  3. A FEW CONSIDERATIONS REGARDING THE SPHERE OF FINANCIAL RELATIONS

    Bota Anton Florin

    2009-01-01

    The author discusses his financial affairs sphere, looking at this issue under a double aspect: analysis of the financial relations sphere and analyzing the financial activity sphere. Analysis of the financial relations sphere is made on the basis of fou

  4. Generating perfect fluid spheres in general relativity

    Boonserm, Petarpa; Visser, Matt; Weinfurtner, Silke

    2005-06-01

    Ever since Karl Schwarzschild’s 1916 discovery of the spacetime geometry describing the interior of a particular idealized general relativistic star—a static spherically symmetric blob of fluid with position-independent density—the general relativity community has continued to devote considerable time and energy to understanding the general-relativistic static perfect fluid sphere. Over the last 90 years a tangle of specific perfect fluid spheres has been discovered, with most of these specific examples seemingly independent from each other. To bring some order to this collection, in this article we develop several new transformation theorems that map perfect fluid spheres into perfect fluid spheres. These transformation theorems sometimes lead to unexpected connections between previously known perfect fluid spheres, sometimes lead to new previously unknown perfect fluid spheres, and in general can be used to develop a systematic way of classifying the set of all perfect fluid spheres.

  5. Generating perfect fluid spheres in general relativity

    Boonserm, Petarpa; Visser, Matt; Weinfurtner, Silke

    2005-01-01

    Ever since Karl Schwarzschild's 1916 discovery of the spacetime geometry describing the interior of a particular idealized general relativistic star--a static spherically symmetric blob of fluid with position-independent density--the general relativity community has continued to devote considerable time and energy to understanding the general-relativistic static perfect fluid sphere. Over the last 90 years a tangle of specific perfect fluid spheres has been discovered, with most of these specific examples seemingly independent from each other. To bring some order to this collection, in this article we develop several new transformation theorems that map perfect fluid spheres into perfect fluid spheres. These transformation theorems sometimes lead to unexpected connections between previously known perfect fluid spheres, sometimes lead to new previously unknown perfect fluid spheres, and in general can be used to develop a systematic way of classifying the set of all perfect fluid spheres

  6. SURFACES OF HARD-SPHERE SYSTEMS

    Dietrich Stoyan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In various situations surfaces appear that are formed by systems of hard spheres. Examples are porous layers as surfaces of sand heaps and biofilms or fracture surfaces of concrete. The present paper considers models where a statistically homogeneous system of hard spheres with random radii is intersected by a plane and the surface is formed by the spheres with centers close to this plane. Formulae are derived for various characteristics of such surfaces: for the porosity profile, i.e. the local porosity in dependence on the distance from the section plane and for the geometry of the sphere caps that look above the section plane.It turns out that these characteristics only depend on the first-order characteristics of the sphere system, its sphere density and the sphere radius distribution.Comparison with empirically studied biofilms shows that the model is realistic.

  7. Fusion breeder sphere - PAC blanket design

    Sullivan, J.D.; Palmer, B.J.F.

    1987-11-01

    There is a considerable world-wide effort directed toward the production of materials for fusion reactors. Many ceramic fabrication groups are working on making lithium ceramics in a variety of forms, to be incorporated into the tritium breeding blanket which will surround the fusion reactor. Current blanket designs include ceramic in either monolithic or packed sphere bed (sphere-pac) forms. The major thrust at AECL is the production of lithium aluminate spheres to be incorporated in a sphere-pac bed. Contemporary studies on breeder blanket design offer little insight into the requirements on the sizes of the spheres. This study examined the parameters which determine the properties of pressure drop and coolant requirements. It was determined that an optimised sphere-pac bed would be composed of two diameters of spheres: 75 weight % at 3 mm and 25 weight % at 0.3 mm

  8. Nanoimprint-Transfer-Patterned Solids Enhance Light Absorption in Colloidal Quantum Dot Solar Cells

    Kim, Younghoon; Bicanic, Kristopher; Tan, Hairen; Ouellette, Olivier; Sutherland, Brandon R.; Garcí a de Arquer, F. Pelayo; Jo, Jea Woong; Liu, Mengxia; Sun, Bin; Liu, Min; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Sargent, Edward H.

    2017-01-01

    Colloidal quantum dot (CQD) materials are of interest in thin-film solar cells due to their size-tunable bandgap and low-cost solution-processing. However, CQD solar cells suffer from inefficient charge extraction over the film thicknesses required

  9. Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon, Methods Of Making Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon, And Methods Of Using Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon

    Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2015-04-09

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, methods of making a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, methods of using a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, and the like.

  10. Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon, Methods Of Making Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon, And Methods Of Using Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon

    Chaieb, Saharoui; Mughal, Asad Jahangir

    2015-01-01

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, methods of making a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, methods of using a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, and the like.

  11. Towards an understanding of induced-charge electrokinetics at large applied voltages in concentrated solutions.

    Bazant, Martin Z; Kilic, Mustafa Sabri; Storey, Brian D; Ajdari, Armand

    2009-11-30

    The venerable theory of electrokinetic phenomena rests on the hypothesis of a dilute solution of point-like ions in quasi-equilibrium with a weakly charged surface, whose potential relative to the bulk is of order the thermal voltage (kT/e approximately 25 mV at room temperature). In nonlinear electrokinetic phenomena, such as AC or induced-charge electro-osmosis (ACEO, ICEO) and induced-charge electrophoresis (ICEP), several V approximately 100 kT/e are applied to polarizable surfaces in microscopic geometries, and the resulting electric fields and induced surface charges are large enough to violate the assumptions of the classical theory. In this article, we review the experimental and theoretical literatures, highlight discrepancies between theory and experiment, introduce possible modifications of the theory, and analyze their consequences. We argue that, in response to a large applied voltage, the "compact layer" and "shear plane" effectively advance into the liquid, due to the crowding of counterions. Using simple continuum models, we predict two general trends at large voltages: (i) ionic crowding against a blocking surface expands the diffuse double layer and thus decreases its differential capacitance, and (ii) a charge-induced viscosity increase near the surface reduces the electro-osmotic mobility; each trend is enhanced by dielectric saturation. The first effect is able to predict high-frequency flow reversal in ACEO pumps, while the second may explain the decay of ICEO flow with increasing salt concentration. Through several colloidal examples, such as ICEP of an uncharged metal sphere in an asymmetric electrolyte, we show that nonlinear electrokinetic phenomena are generally ion-specific. Similar theoretical issues arise in nanofluidics (due to confinement) and ionic liquids (due to the lack of solvent), so the paper concludes with a general framework of modified electrokinetic equations for finite-sized ions.

  12. Magnetic Assisted Colloidal Pattern Formation

    Yang, Ye

    Pattern formation is a mysterious phenomenon occurring at all scales in nature. The beauty of the resulting structures and myriad of resulting properties occurring in naturally forming patterns have attracted great interest from scientists and engineers. One of the most convenient experimental models for studying pattern formation are colloidal particle suspensions, which can be used both to explore condensed matter phenomena and as a powerful fabrication technique for forming advanced materials. In my thesis, I have focused on the study of colloidal patterns, which can be conveniently tracked in an optical microscope yet can also be thermally equilibrated on experimentally relevant time scales, allowing for ground states and transitions between them to be studied with optical tracking algorithms. In particular, I have focused on systems that spontaneously organize due to particle-surface and particle-particle interactions, paying close attention to systems that can be dynamically adjusted with an externally applied magnetic or acoustic field. In the early stages of my doctoral studies, I developed a magnetic field manipulation technique to quantify the adhesion force between particles and surfaces. This manipulation technique is based on the magnetic dipolar interactions between colloidal particles and their "image dipoles" that appear within planar substrate. Since the particles interact with their own images, this system enables massively parallel surface force measurements (>100 measurements) in a single experiment, and allows statistical properties of particle-surface adhesion energies to be extracted as a function of loading rate. With this approach, I was able to probe sub-picoNewton surface interactions between colloidal particles and several substrates at the lowest force loading rates ever achieved. In the later stages of my doctoral studies, I focused on studying patterns formed from particle-particle interaction, which serve as an experimental model of

  13. Adsorption of charged diblock copolymers : effect on colloidal stability

    Israels, R.

    1994-01-01

    In this thesis we present Scheutjens-Fleer (SF) calculations on the adsorption of diblock copolymers. More specifically, we restrict ourselves to adsorption at uncharged surfaces, while the specific type of block copolymers we consider have one uncharged adsorbing "anchor" block and one

  14. The Kinetics of Crystallization of Colloids and Proteins: A Light Scattering Study

    McClymer, Jim

    2002-01-01

    Hard-sphere colloidal systems serve as model systems for aggregation, nucleation, crystallization and gelation as well as interesting systems in their own right.There is strong current interest in using colloidal systems to form photonic crystals. A major scientific thrust of NASA's microgravity research is the crystallization of proteins for structural determination. The crystallization of proteins is a complicated process that requires a great deal of trial and error experimentation. In spite of a great deal of work, "better" protein crystals cannot always be grown in microgravity and conditions for crystallization are not well understood. Crystallization of colloidal systems interacting as hard spheres and with an attractive potential induced by entropic forces have been studied in a series of static light scattering experiments. Additionally, aggregation of a protein as a function of pH has been studied using dynamic light scattering. For our experiments we used PMMA (polymethylacrylate) spherical particles interacting as hard spheres, with no attractive potential. These particles have a radius of 304 nanometers, a density of 1.22 gm/ml and an index of refraction of 1.52. A PMMA colloidal sample at a volume fraction of approximately 54% was index matched in a solution of cycloheptyl bromide (CHB) and cis-decalin. The sample is in a glass cylindrical vial that is placed in an ALV static and dynamic light scattering goniometer system. The vial is immersed in a toluene bath for index matching to minimize flair. Vigorous shaking melts any colloidal crystals initially present. The sample is illuminated with diverging laser light (632.8 nanometers) from a 4x microscope objective placed so that the beam is approximately 1 cm in diameter at the sample location. The sample is rotated about its long axis at approximately 3.5 revolutions per minute (highest speed) as the colloidal crystal system is non-ergodic. The scattered light is detected at various angles using the

  15. Electrophoretic Retardation of Colloidal Particles in Nonpolar Liquids

    Filip Strubbe

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We have measured the electrophoretic mobility of single, optically trapped colloidal particles, while gradually depleting the co-ions and counterions in the liquid around the particle by applying a dc voltage. This is achieved in a nonpolar liquid, where charged reverse micelles act as co-ions and counterions. By increasing the dc voltage, the mobility first increases when the concentrations of co-ions and counterions near the particle start to decrease. At sufficiently high dc voltage (around 2 V, the mobility reaches a saturation value when the co-ions and counterions are fully separated. The increase in mobility is larger when the equilibrium ionic strength is higher. The dependence of the experimental data on the equilibrium ionic strength and on the applied voltage is in good agreement with the standard theory of electrophoretic retardation, assuming that the bare particle charge remains constant. This method is useful for studying the electrophoretic retardation effect and charging mechanisms for nonpolar colloids, and it sheds light on previously unexplained particle acceleration in electronic ink devices.

  16. Charging of nonspherical macroparticles in a plasma

    Holgate, J. T.; Coppins, M.

    2016-03-01

    The current theories of macroparticle charging in a plasma are limited to spheres, and are unsuitable for the multitude of nonspherical objects existing in astrophysical, atmospheric, laboratory, and fusion plasmas. This paper extends the most widely used spherical charging theory, orbit motion limited theory, to spheroids and, as such, provides a comprehensive study of the charging of nonspherical objects in a plasma. The spherical charging theory is shown to be a reasonable approximation for a considerable range of spheroids. However, the electric potential of highly elongated spheroids can be almost twice the spherical value. Furthermore, the total charge on the spheroids increases by a significantly larger factor than their potential.

  17. VMware vSphere design

    Guthrie, Forbes

    2013-01-01

    Achieve the performance, scalability, and ROI your business needs What can you do at the start of a virtualization deployment to make things run more smoothly? If you plan, deploy, maintain, and optimize vSphere solutions in your company, this unique book provides keen insight and solutions. From hardware selection, network layout, and security considerations to storage and hypervisors, this book explains the design decisions you'll face and how to make the right choices. Written by two virtualization experts and packed with real-world strategies and examples, VMware v

  18. Colloid electrochemistry of conducting polymer: towards potential-induced in-situ drug release

    Sankoh, Supannee; Vagin, Mikhail Yu.; Sekretaryova, Alina N.; Thavarungkul, Panote; Kanatharana, Proespichaya; Mak, Wing Cheung

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Pulsed electrode potential induced an in-situ drug release from dispersion of conducting polymer microcapsules. • Fast detection of the released drug within the colloid microenvironment. • Improved the efficiency of localized drug release at the electrode interface. - Abstract: Over the past decades, controlled drug delivery system remains as one of the most important area in medicine for various diseases. We have developed a new electrochemically controlled drug release system by combining colloid electrochemistry and electro-responsive microcapsules. The pulsed electrode potential modulation led to the appearance of two processes available for the time-resolved registration in colloid microenvironment: change of the electronic charge of microparticles (from 0.5 ms to 0.1 s) followed by the drug release associated with ionic equilibration (1–10 s). The dynamic electrochemical measurements allow the distinction of drug release associated with ionic relaxation and the change of electronic charge of conducting polymer colloid microparticles. The amount of released drug (methylene blue) could be controlled by modulating the applied potential. Our study demonstrated a surface-potential driven controlled drug release of dispersion of conducting polymer carrier at the electrode interfaces, while the bulk colloids dispersion away from the electrode remains as a reservoir to improve the efficiency of localized drug release. The developed new methodology creates a model platform for the investigations of surface potential-induced in-situ electrochemical drug release mechanism.

  19. CTCN: Colloid transport code -- nuclear

    Jain, R.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the CTCN computer code, designed to solve the equations of transient colloidal transport of radionuclides in porous and fractured media. This Fortran 77 package solves systems of coupled nonlinear differential-algebraic equations with a wide range of boundary conditions. The package uses the Method of Lines technique with a special section which forms finite-difference discretizations in up to four spatial dimensions to automatically convert the system into a set of ordinary differential equations. The CTCN code then solves these equations using a robust, efficient ODE solver. Thus CTCN can be used to solve population balance equations along with the usual transport equations to model colloid transport processes or as a general problem solver to treat up to four-dimensional differential-algebraic systems

  20. THE COLLOIDAL BEHAVIOR OF EDESTIN

    Hitchcock, David I.

    1922-01-01

    1. It has been shown by titration experiments that the globulin edestin behaves like an amphoteric electrolyte, reacting stoichiometrically with acids and bases. 2. The potential difference developed between a solution of edestin chloride or acetate separated by a collodion membrane from an acid solution free from protein was found to be influenced by salt concentration and hydrogen ion concentration in the way predicted by Donnan's theory of membrane equilibrium. 3. The osmotic pressure of such edestin-acid salt solutions was found to be influenced by salt concentration and by hydrogen ion concentration in the same way as is the potential difference. 4. The colloidal behavior of edestin is thus completely analogous to that observed by Loeb with gelatin, casein, and egg albumin, and may be explained by Loeb's theory of colloidal behavior, which is based on the idea that proteins react stoichiometrically as amphoteric electrolytes and on Donnan's theory of membrane equilibrium. PMID:19871959

  1. Kinetically guided colloidal structure formation

    Hecht, Fabian M.; Bausch, Andreas R.

    2016-01-01

    The well-studied self-organization of colloidal particles is predicted to result in a variety of fascinating applications. Yet, whereas self-assembly techniques are extensively explored, designing and producing mesoscale-sized objects remains a major challenge, as equilibration times and thus structure formation timescales become prohibitively long. Asymmetric mesoscopic objects, without prior introduction of asymmetric particles with all its complications, are out of reach––due to the underl...

  2. Jingle-bell-shaped ferrite hollow sphere with a noble metal core: Simple synthesis and their magnetic and antibacterial properties

    Li Siheng; Wang Enbo; Tian Chungui; Mao Baodong; Kang Zhenhui; Li Qiuyu; Sun Guoying

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a simple strategy is developed for rational fabrication of a class of jingle-bell-shaped hollow structured nanomaterials marked as Ag(MFe 2 O 4 ) (M=Ni, Co, Mg, Zn), consisting of ferrite hollow shells and metal nanoparticle cores, using highly uniform colloidal Ag(C) microspheres as template. The final composites were obtained by direct adsorption of metal cations Fe 3+ and M 2+ on the surface of the Ag(C) spheres followed by calcination process to remove the middle carbon shell and transform the metal ions into pure phase ferrites. The as-prepared composites were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-vis spectroscopy and SQUID magnetometer. The results showed that the composites possess the magnetic property of the ferrite shell and the optical together with antibacterial property of the Ag core. - Graphical abstract: MFe 2 O 4 (M=Ni, Co, Mg, Zn) hollow spheres with a noble metal nanoparticle core were successfully prepared by using colloidal metal(C) core-shell spheres as templates with no need of surface modification. The shell thickness and magnetic properties of the ferrite hollow spheres could be controlled by varying the synthetic parameters

  3. Towards vibrational spectroscopy on surface-attached colloids performed with a quartz crystal microbalance

    Diethelm Johannsmann

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal spheres attached to a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM produce the so-called “coupled resonances”. They are resonators of their own, characterized by a particle resonance frequency, a resonance bandwidth, and a modal mass. When the frequency of the main resonator comes close to the frequency of the coupled resonance, the bandwidth goes through a maximum. A coupled resonance can be viewed as an absorption line in acoustic shear-wave spectroscopy. The known concepts from spectroscopy apply. This includes the mode assignment problem, selection rules, and the oscillator strength. In this work, the mode assignment problem was addressed with Finite Element calculations. These reveal that a rigid sphere in contact with a QCM displays two modes of vibration, termed “slipping” and “rocking”. In the slipping mode, the sphere rotates about its center; it exerts a tangential force onto the resonator surface at the point of contact. In the rocking mode, the sphere rotates about the point of contact; it exerts a torque onto the substrate. In liquids, both axes of rotation are slightly displaced from their ideal positions. Characteristic for spectroscopy, the two modes do not couple to the mechanical excitation equally well. The degree of coupling is quantified by an oscillator strength. Because the rocking mode mostly exerts a torque (rather than a tangential force, its coupling to the resonator's tangential motion is weak; the oscillator strength consequently is small. Recent experiments on surface-adsorbed colloidal spheres can be explained by the mode of vibration being of the rocking type. Keywords: Quartz crystal microbalance, Coupled resonance, Biocolloids, Adsorption

  4. Implant materials modified by colloids

    Zboromirska-Wnukiewicz Beata

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in general medicine led to the development of biomaterials. Implant material should be characterized by a high biocompatibility to the tissue and appropriate functionality, i.e. to have high mechanical and electrical strength and be stable in an electrolyte environment – these are the most important properties of bioceramic materials. Considerations of biomaterials design embrace also electrical properties occurring on the implant-body fluid interface and consequently the electrokinetic potential, which can be altered by modifying the surface of the implant. In this work, the surface of the implants was modified to decrease the risk of infection by using metal colloids. Nanocolloids were obtained using different chemical and electrical methods. It was found that the colloids obtained by physical and electrical methods are more stable than colloids obtained by chemical route. In this work the surface of modified corundum implants was investigated. The implant modified by nanosilver, obtained by electrical method was selected. The in vivo research on animals was carried out. Clinical observations showed that the implants with modified surface could be applied to wounds caused by atherosclerotic skeleton, for curing the chronic and bacterial inflammations as well as for skeletal reconstruction surgery.

  5. The migration of colloidal particles through glacial sand

    Harrison, I.; Higgo, J.J.W.; Leader, R.; Noy, D.; Smith, B.; Wealthall, G.; Williams, G.M.

    1991-02-01

    Significant concentrations of colloids exist in groundwater and radionuclides may be associated with this colloidal material. This must be taken into consideration in any safety case for a radionuclide waste repository. This report describes column experiments with monodisperse latex beads. A selection of beads with diameters ranging from 0.055 μm to 0.6 μm, some plain and some with carboxyl groups attached, were passed through columns of glacial sand. The breakthrough curves and profiles on the sand columns were studied and will be used to develop and validate colloid migration models. The mobility depended on both size and charge, and the beads appeared to move ahead of a 36Cl tracer until they were trapped. After trapping movement was slow with plain beads appearing to be slightly more mobile than carboxylated beads. The beads were shown to sorb strongly on the fine clay particles in the sand and there was evidence to suggest that they moved with the fines rather than independently. (author)

  6. Poisson denoising on the sphere

    Schmitt, J.; Starck, J. L.; Fadili, J.; Grenier, I.; Casandjian, J. M.

    2009-08-01

    In the scope of the Fermi mission, Poisson noise removal should improve data quality and make source detection easier. This paper presents a method for Poisson data denoising on sphere, called Multi-Scale Variance Stabilizing Transform on Sphere (MS-VSTS). This method is based on a Variance Stabilizing Transform (VST), a transform which aims to stabilize a Poisson data set such that each stabilized sample has an (asymptotically) constant variance. In addition, for the VST used in the method, the transformed data are asymptotically Gaussian. Thus, MS-VSTS consists in decomposing the data into a sparse multi-scale dictionary (wavelets, curvelets, ridgelets...), and then applying a VST on the coefficients in order to get quasi-Gaussian stabilized coefficients. In this present article, the used multi-scale transform is the Isotropic Undecimated Wavelet Transform. Then, hypothesis tests are made to detect significant coefficients, and the denoised image is reconstructed with an iterative method based on Hybrid Steepest Descent (HST). The method is tested on simulated Fermi data.

  7. Crystallization of DNA-coated colloids

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Yufeng; Zheng, Xiaolong; Ducrot, Étienne; Yodh, Jeremy S.; Weck, Marcus; Pine, David J.

    2015-01-01

    DNA-coated colloids hold great promise for self-assembly of programmed heterogeneous microstructures, provided they not only bind when cooled below their melting temperature, but also rearrange so that aggregated particles can anneal into the structure that minimizes the free energy. Unfortunately, DNA-coated colloids generally collide and stick forming kinetically arrested random aggregates when the thickness of the DNA coating is much smaller than the particles. Here we report DNA-coated colloids that can rearrange and anneal, thus enabling the growth of large colloidal crystals from a wide range of micrometre-sized DNA-coated colloids for the first time. The kinetics of aggregation, crystallization and defect formation are followed in real time. The crystallization rate exhibits the familiar maximum for intermediate temperature quenches observed in metallic alloys, but over a temperature range smaller by two orders of magnitude, owing to the highly temperature-sensitive diffusion between aggregated DNA-coated colloids. PMID:26078020

  8. FEBEX bentonite colloid stability in ground water

    Seher, H.; Schaefer, T.; Geckeis, H. [Inst. fuer Nukleare Entsorgung (INE), Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)]. e-mail: holger.seher@ine.fzk .de; Fanghaenel, T. [Ruprecht-Karls-Univ. Heidelberg, Physikalisch-Chemisches In st., D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2007-06-15

    Coagulation experiments are accomplished to identify the geochemical conditions for the stability of Febex bentonite colloids in granite ground water. The experiments are carried out by varying pH, ionic strength and type of electrolyte. The dynamic light scattering technique (photon correlation spectroscopy) is used to measure the size evolution of the colloids with time. Agglomeration rates are higher in MgCl{sub 2} and CaCl{sub 2} than in NaCl solution. Relative agglomeration rates follow approximately the Schulze-Hardy rule. Increasing agglomeration rates at pH>8 are observed in experiments with MgCl{sub 2} and CaCl{sub 2} which are, however, caused by coprecipitation phenomena. Bentonite colloid stability fields derived from the colloid agglomeration experiments predict low colloid stabilization in granite ground water taken from Aespoe, Sweden, and relatively high colloid stability in Grimsel ground water (Switzerland)

  9. Preparation of radioactive colloidal gold 198Au

    Cammarosano, S.A.

    1979-01-01

    The preparation with simple equipment of radioactive colloidal gold of particle size about approximately 300 A from seed colloid stabilized by gelatine is described. Some physico-chemical parameters which can affect the process of formation of these colloidal particles are analysed; particle size has been meassured with an electron microscope. The colloid stability has been studied as a function of dilution, age and pH. Nucleation and growth of radioactive colloidal gold have been studied using spectrophotometry. Absorption spectra of the two ones are presented and compared. Quality control of the production process is verified through measurement of parameters, such as radioactive and radiochemical purity and biological distribution in laboratorial animals. This distribution was evalusted for rats injected endovenously with the gold colloidal solution.(Author) [pt

  10. Simulating colloid hydrodynamics with lattice Boltzmann methods

    Cates, M E; Stratford, K; Adhikari, R; Stansell, P; Desplat, J-C; Pagonabarraga, I; Wagner, A J

    2004-01-01

    We present a progress report on our work on lattice Boltzmann methods for colloidal suspensions. We focus on the treatment of colloidal particles in binary solvents and on the inclusion of thermal noise. For a benchmark problem of colloids sedimenting and becoming trapped by capillary forces at a horizontal interface between two fluids, we discuss the criteria for parameter selection, and address the inevitable compromise between computational resources and simulation accuracy

  11. Hydrodynamic interactions in active colloidal crystal microrheology

    Weeber, R; Harting, JDR Jens

    2012-01-01

    In dense colloids it is commonly assumed that hydrodynamic interactions do not play a role. However, a found theoretical quantification is often missing. We present computer simulations that are motivated by experiments where a large colloidal particle is dragged through a colloidal crystal. To qualify the influence of long-ranged hydrodynamics, we model the setup by conventional Langevin dynamics simulations and by an improved scheme with limited hydrodynamic interactions. This scheme signif...

  12. Assembly of vorticity-aligned hard-sphere colloidal strings in a simple shear flow

    Cheng, X.; Xu, X.; Rice, S. A.; Dinner, A. R.; Cohen, I.

    2011-01-01

    under shear, there are conflicting predictions about whether particles link up into string-like structures along the shear flow direction. Here, using confocal microscopy, we measure the shear-induced suspension structure. Surprisingly, rather than flow

  13. From the depletion attraction to the bridging attraction: the effect of solvent molecules on the effective colloidal interactions.

    Chen, Jie; Kline, Steven R; Liu, Yun

    2015-02-28

    Depletion attraction induced by non-adsorbing polymers or small particles in colloidal solutions has been widely used as a model colloidal interaction to understand aggregation behavior and phase diagrams, such as glass transitions and gelation. However, much less attention has been paid to study the effective colloidal interaction when small particles/molecules can be reversibly attracted to large colloidal particles. At the strong attraction limit, small particles can introduce bridging attraction as it can simultaneously attach to neighbouring large colloidal particles. We use Baxter's multi-component method for sticky hard sphere systems with the Percus-Yevick approximation to study the bridging attraction and its consequence to phase diagrams, which are controlled by the concentration of small particles and their interaction with large particles. When the concentration of small particles is very low, the bridging attraction strength increases very fast with the increase of small particle concentration. The attraction strength eventually reaches a maximum bridging attraction (MBA). Adding more small particles after the MBA concentration keeps decreasing the attraction strength until reaching a concentration above which the net effect of small particles only introduces an effective repulsion between large colloidal particles. These behaviors are qualitatively different from the concentration dependence of the depletion attraction on small particles and make phase diagrams very rich for bridging attraction systems. We calculate the spinodal and binodal regions, the percolation lines, the MBA lines, and the equivalent hard sphere interaction line for bridging attraction systems and have proposed a simple analytic solution to calculate the effective attraction strength using the concentrations of large and small particles. Our theoretical results are found to be consistent with experimental results reported recently.

  14. Electrorotation of a metal sphere immersed in an electrolyte of finite Debye length.

    García-Sánchez, Pablo; Ramos, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    We theoretically study the rotation induced on a metal sphere immersed in an electrolyte and subjected to a rotating electric field. The rotation arises from the interaction of the field with the electric charges induced at the metal-electrolyte interface, i.e., the induced electrical double layer (EDL). Particle rotation is due to the torque on the induced dipole, and also from induced-charge electro-osmostic flow (ICEO). The interaction of the electric field with the induced dipole on the system gives rise to counterfield rotation, i.e., the direction opposite to the rotation of the electric field. ICEO generates co-field rotation of the sphere. For thin EDL, ICEO generates negligible rotation. For increasing size of EDL, co-field rotation appears and, in the limit of very thick EDL, it compensates the counter-field rotation induced by the electrical torque. We also report computations of the rotating fluid velocity field around the sphere.

  15. Colloidal paradigm in supercapattery electrode systems

    Chen, Kunfeng; Xue, Dongfeng

    2018-01-01

    Among decades of development, electrochemical energy storage systems are now sorely in need of a new design paradigm at the nano size and ion level to satisfy the higher energy and power demands. In this review paper, we introduce a new colloidal electrode paradigm for supercapattery that integrates multiple-scale forms of matter, i.e. ion clusters, colloidal ions, and nanosized materials, into one colloid system, coupled with multiple interactions, i.e. electrostatic, van der Waals forces, and chemical bonding, thus leading to the formation of many redox reactive centers. This colloidal electrode not only keeps the original ionic nature in colloidal materials, but also creates a new attribute of high electroactivity. Colloidal supercapattery is a perfect application example of the novel colloidal electrode, leading to higher specific capacitance than traditional electrode materials. The high electroactivity of the colloidal electrode mainly comes from the contribution of exposed reactive centers, owing to the confinement effect of carbon and a binder matrix. Systematic and thorough research on the colloidal system will significantly promote the development of fundamental science and the progress of advanced energy storage technology.

  16. Method for producing small hollow spheres

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1979-01-01

    A method is described for producing small hollow spheres of glass, metal or plastic, wherein the sphere material is mixed with or contains as part of the composition a blowing agent which decomposes at high temperature (T >approx. 600 0 C). As the temperature is quickly raised, the blowing agent decomposes and the resulting gas expands from within, thus forming a hollow sphere of controllable thickness. The thus produced hollow spheres (20 to 10 3 μm) have a variety of application, and are particularly useful in the fabrication of targets for laser implosion such as neutron sources, laser fusion physics studies, and laser initiated fusion power plants

  17. The Positive Freedom of the Public Sphere

    Hansen, Ejvind

    2015-01-01

    calls for new reflections on the possible relationship between media, public sphere and democracy. This paper argues that we should change the questions that are raised when we try to assess the public sphere. It is argued that the traditional (Enlightenment) focus upon negative liberties and the truth-value......The relationship between democracy and the media since the appearance of Habermas' major texts in the 1960s has been articulated through theories of the public sphere. The structure of the public sphere is significantly influenced by the communicative media, and the emergence of the internet thus...

  18. New collector efficiency equation for colloid filtration in both natural and engineered flow conditions

    Nelson, Kirk E.; Ginn, Timothy R.

    2011-05-01

    A new equation for the collector efficiency (η) of the colloid filtration theory (CFT) is developed via nonlinear regression on the numerical data generated by a large number of Lagrangian simulations conducted in Happel's sphere-in-cell porous media model over a wide range of environmentally relevant conditions. The new equation expands the range of CFT's applicability in the natural subsurface primarily by accommodating departures from power law dependence of η on the Peclet and gravity numbers, a necessary but as of yet unavailable feature for applying CFT to large-scale field transport (e.g., of nanoparticles, radionuclides, or genetically modified organisms) under low groundwater velocity conditions. The new equation also departs from prior equations for colloids in the nanoparticle size range at all fluid velocities. These departures are particularly relevant to subsurface colloid and colloid-facilitated transport where low permeabilities and/or hydraulic gradients lead to low groundwater velocities and/or to nanoparticle fate and transport in porous media in general. We also note the importance of consistency in the conceptualization of particle flux through the single collector model on which most η equations are based for the purpose of attaining a mechanistic understanding of the transport and attachment steps of deposition. A lack of sufficient data for small particles and low velocities warrants further experiments to draw more definitive and comprehensive conclusions regarding the most significant discrepancies between the available equations.

  19. Super-resolution optical microscopy resolves network morphology of smart colloidal microgels.

    Bergmann, Stephan; Wrede, Oliver; Huser, Thomas; Hellweg, Thomas

    2018-02-14

    We present a new method to resolve the network morphology of colloidal particles in an aqueous environment via super-resolution microscopy. By localization of freely diffusing fluorophores inside the particle network we can resolve the three dimensional structure of one species of colloidal particles (thermoresponsive microgels) without altering their chemical composition through copolymerization with fluorescent monomers. Our approach utilizes the interaction of the fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G with the polymer network to achieve an indirect labeling. We calculate the 3D structure from the 2D images and compare the structure to previously published models for the microgel morphology, e.g. the fuzzy sphere model. To describe the differences in the data an extension of this model is suggested. Our method enables the tailor-made fabrication of colloidal particles which are used in various applications, such as paints or cosmetics, and are promising candidates for drug delivery, smart surface coatings, and nanocatalysis. With the precise knowledge of the particle morphology an understanding of the underlying structure-property relationships for various colloidal systems is possible.

  20. Tuning plasmons layer-by-layer for quantitative colloidal sensing with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Anderson, William J; Nowinska, Kamila; Hutter, Tanya; Mahajan, Sumeet; Fischlechner, Martin

    2018-04-19

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is well known for its high sensitivity that emerges due to the plasmonic enhancement of electric fields typically on gold and silver nanostructures. However, difficulties associated with the preparation of nanostructured substrates with uniform and reproducible features limit reliability and quantitation using SERS measurements. In this work we use layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly to incorporate multiple functional building blocks of collaborative assemblies of nanoparticles on colloidal spheres to fabricate SERS sensors. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are packaged in discrete layers, effectively 'freezing nano-gaps', on spherical colloidal cores to achieve multifunctionality and reproducible sensing. Coupling between layers tunes the plasmon resonance for optimum SERS signal generation to achieve a 10 nM limit of detection. Significantly, using the layer-by-layer construction, SERS-active AuNP layers are spaced out and thus optically isolated. This uniquely allows the creation of an internal standard within each colloidal sensor to enable highly reproducible self-calibrated sensing. By using 4-mercaptobenzoic acid (4-MBA) as the internal standard adenine concentrations are quantified to an accuracy of 92.6-99.5%. Our versatile approach paves the way for rationally designed yet quantitative colloidal SERS sensors and their use in a variety of sensing applications.

  1. Human serum albumin mediated self-assembly of gold nanoparticles into hollow spheres

    Nayak, Nimai C [Singapore-MIT Alliance, Manufacturing Systems and Technology Programme, Nanyang Technological University, 65 Nanyang Drive, 637460 (Singapore); Shin, Kwanwoo [Interdisciplinary Program of Integrated Biotechnology, Sogang University, Shinsoo-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: ncnayak@gmail.com

    2008-07-02

    The assembly of nanoparticles in topologically predefined superstructures is an important area in nanoscale architecture. In this paper, we report an unusual aggregation phenomenon involving L-lysine capped gold nanoparticles and human serum albumin into hollow nanospheres. The electrostatic interaction between positively charged L-lysine capped gold nanoparticles and negatively charged human serum albumin at physiological pH led to the assembly of the gold nanoparticles into hollow spheres. The phenomenon can be explained by the dry hole opening mechanism.

  2. Human serum albumin mediated self-assembly of gold nanoparticles into hollow spheres

    Nayak, Nimai C; Shin, Kwanwoo

    2008-01-01

    The assembly of nanoparticles in topologically predefined superstructures is an important area in nanoscale architecture. In this paper, we report an unusual aggregation phenomenon involving L-lysine capped gold nanoparticles and human serum albumin into hollow nanospheres. The electrostatic interaction between positively charged L-lysine capped gold nanoparticles and negatively charged human serum albumin at physiological pH led to the assembly of the gold nanoparticles into hollow spheres. The phenomenon can be explained by the dry hole opening mechanism

  3. Potentiometric Titrations for Measuring the Capacitance of Colloidal Photodoped ZnO Nanocrystals.

    Brozek, Carl K; Hartstein, Kimberly H; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2016-08-24

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals offer a unique opportunity to bridge molecular and bulk semiconductor redox phenomena. Here, potentiometric titration is demonstrated as a method for quantifying the Fermi levels and charging potentials of free-standing colloidal n-type ZnO nanocrystals possessing between 0 and 20 conduction-band electrons per nanocrystal, corresponding to carrier densities between 0 and 1.2 × 10(20) cm(-3). Potentiometric titration of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals has not been described previously, and little precedent exists for analogous potentiometric titration of any soluble reductants involving so many electrons. Linear changes in Fermi level vs charge-carrier density are observed for each ensemble of nanocrystals, with slopes that depend on the nanocrystal size. Analysis indicates that the ensemble nanocrystal capacitance is governed by classical surface electrical double layers, showing no evidence of quantum contributions. Systematic shifts in the Fermi level are also observed with specific changes in the identity of the charge-compensating countercation. As a simple and contactless alternative to more common thin-film-based voltammetric techniques, potentiometric titration offers a powerful new approach for quantifying the redox properties of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals.

  4. Focused ion beam milling of nanocavities in single colloidal particles and self-assembled opals

    Woldering, Leon A; Otter, A M; Husken, Bart H; Vos, Willem L

    2006-01-01

    We present a new method of realizing single nanocavities in individual colloidal particles on the surface of silicon dioxide artificial opals using a focused ion beam milling technique. We show that both the radius and the position of the nanocavity can be controlled with nanometre precision, to radii as small as 40 nm. The relation between the defect size and the milling time has been established. We confirmed that milling not only occurs on the surface of the spheres, but into and through them as well. We also show that an array of nanocavities can be fashioned. Structurally modified colloids have interesting potential applications in nanolithography, as well as in chemical sensing and solar cells, and as photonic crystal cavities

  5. Hierarchical VOOH hollow spheres for symmetrical and asymmetrical supercapacitor devices

    Jing, Xuyang; Wang, Cong; Feng, Wenjing; Xing, Na; Jiang, Hanmei; Lu, Xiangyu; Zhang, Yifu; Meng, Changgong

    2018-01-01

    Hierarchical VOOH hollow spheres with low crystallinity composed of nanoparticles were prepared by a facile and template-free method, which involved a precipitation of precursor microspheres in aqueous solution at room temperature and subsequent hydrothermal reaction. Quasi-solid-state symmetric and asymmetric supercapacitor (SSC and ASC) devices were fabricated using hierarchical VOOH hollow spheres as the electrodes, and the electrochemical properties of the VOOH//VOOH SSC device and the VOOH//AC ASC device were studied by cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge-discharge (GCD) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Results demonstrated that the electrochemical performance of the VOOH//AC ASC device was better than that of the VOOH//VOOH SSC device. After 3000 cycles, the specific capacitance of the VOOH//AC ASC device retains 83% of the initial capacitance, while the VOOH//VOOH SSC device retains only 7.7%. Findings in this work proved that hierarchical VOOH hollow spheres could be a promising candidate as an ideal electrode material for supercapacitor devices.

  6. Sphere Rényi entropies

    Dowker, J S

    2013-01-01

    I give some scalar field theory calculations on a d-dimensional lune of arbitrary angle, evaluating, numerically, the effective action which is expressed as a simple quadrature, for conformal coupling. Using this, the entanglement and Rényi entropies are computed. Massive fields are also considered and a renormalization to make the (one-loop) effective action vanish for infinite mass is suggested and used, not entirely successfully. However a universal coefficient is derived from the large mass expansion. From the deformation of the corresponding lune result, I conjecture that the effective action on all odd manifolds with a simple conical singularity has an extremum when the singularity disappears. For the round sphere, I show how to convert the quadrature form of the conformal Laplacian determinant into the more usual sum of Riemann ζ-functions (and log 2). (paper)

  7. Colloid transport in dual-permeability media

    Leij, Feike J.; Bradford, Scott A.

    2013-07-01

    It has been widely reported that colloids can travel faster and over longer distances in natural structured porous media than in uniform structureless media used in laboratory studies. The presence of preferential pathways for colloids in the subsurface environment is of concern because of the increased risks for disease caused by microorganisms and colloid-associated contaminants. This study presents a model for colloid transport in dual-permeability media that includes reversible and irreversible retention of colloids and first-order exchange between the aqueous phases of the two regions. The model may also be used to describe transport of other reactive solutes in dual-permeability media. Analytical solutions for colloid concentrations in aqueous and solid phases were obtained using Laplace transformation and matrix decomposition. The solutions proved convenient to assess the effect of model parameters on the colloid distribution. The analytical model was used to describe effluent concentrations for a bromide tracer and 3.2- or 1-μm-colloids that were observed after transport through a composite 10-cm long porous medium made up of a cylindrical lens or core of sand and a surrounding matrix with sand of a different grain size. The tracer data were described very well and realistic estimates were obtained for the pore-water velocity in the two flow domains. An accurate description was also achieved for most colloid breakthrough curves. Dispersivity and retention parameters were typically greater for the larger 3.2-μm-colloids while both reversible and irreversible retention rates tended to be higher for the finer sands than the coarser sand. The relatively small sample size and the complex flow pattern in the composite medium made it difficult to reach definitive conclusions regarding transport parameters for colloid transport.

  8. Fabricating colloidal crystals and construction of ordered nanostructures

    Sun Zhiqiang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractColloidal crystals of polymeric or inorganic microspheres are of extensive interest due to their potential applications in such as sensing, optics, photonic bandgap and surface patterning. The article highlights a set of approaches developed in our group, which are efficient to prepare colloidal crystals with ordered voids, patterned colloidal crystals on non-planar surfaces, heterogeneous colloidal crystals of different building blocks, colloidal crystals composed of non-spherical polyhedrons, and colloidal crystals of non-close-packed colloidal microspheres in particular. The use of these colloidal crystals as templates for different microstructures range from nanoscale to micron-scale is also summarized.

  9. Charge imbalance

    Clarke, J.

    1981-01-01

    This article provides a long theoretical development of the main ideas of charge imbalance in superconductors. Concepts of charge imbalance and quasiparticle charge are introduced, especially in regards to the use of tunnel injection in producing and detecting charge imbalance. Various mechanisms of charge relaxation are discussed, including inelastic scattering processes, elastic scattering in the presence of energy-gap anisotropy, and various pair-breaking mechanisms. In each case, present theories are reviewed in comparison with experimental data

  10. Frost Heave in Colloidal Soils

    Peppin, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    We develop a mathematical model of frost heave in colloidal soils. The theory accountsfor heave and consolidation while not requiring a frozen fringe assumption. Two solidificationregimes occur: a compaction regime in which the soil consolidates to accommodate the ice lenses, and a heave regime during which liquid is sucked into the consolidated soil from an external reservoir, and the added volume causes the soil to heave. The ice fraction is found to vary inversely with thefreezing velocity V , while the rate of heave is independent of V , consistent with field and laboratoryobservations. © 2011 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  11. Coulomb interactions in charged fluids.

    Vernizzi, Graziano; Guerrero-García, Guillermo Iván; de la Cruz, Monica Olvera

    2011-07-01

    The use of Ewald summation schemes for calculating long-range Coulomb interactions, originally applied to ionic crystalline solids, is a very common practice in molecular simulations of charged fluids at present. Such a choice imposes an artificial periodicity which is generally absent in the liquid state. In this paper we propose a simple analytical O(N(2)) method which is based on Gauss's law for computing exactly the Coulomb interaction between charged particles in a simulation box, when it is averaged over all possible orientations of a surrounding infinite lattice. This method mitigates the periodicity typical of crystalline systems and it is suitable for numerical studies of ionic liquids, charged molecular fluids, and colloidal systems with Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations.

  12. Electric dipoles on the Bloch sphere

    Vutha, Amar C.

    2014-01-01

    The time evolution of a two-level quantum mechanical system can be geometrically described using the Bloch sphere. By mapping the Bloch sphere evolution onto the dynamics of oscillating electric dipoles, we provide a physically intuitive link between classical electromagnetism and the electric dipole transitions of atomic & molecular physics.

  13. Reversible thermal gelation in soft spheres

    Kapnistos, M.; Vlassopoulos, D.; Fytas, G.

    2000-01-01

    Upon heating, concentrated solutions of star polymers and block copolymer micelles in a good solvent, representing soft spheres, undergo a reversible gelation. This phenomenon is attributed to the formation of clusters causing a partial dynamic arrest of the swollen interpenetrating spheres at hi...

  14. Electric dipoles on the Bloch sphere

    Vutha, Amar C

    2015-01-01

    The time evolution of a two-level quantum mechanical system can be geometrically described using the Bloch sphere. By mapping the Bloch sphere evolution onto the dynamics of oscillating electric dipoles, we provide a physically intuitive link between classical electromagnetism and the electric dipole transitions of atomic and molecular physics. (paper)

  15. Unidirectional Wave Propagation in Low-Symmetric Colloidal Photonic-Crystal Heterostructures

    Vassilios Yannopapas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We show theoretically that photonic crystals consisting of colloidal spheres exhibit unidirectional wave propagation and one-way frequency band gaps without breaking time-reversal symmetry via, e.g., the application of an external magnetic field or the use of nonlinear materials. Namely, photonic crystals with low symmetry such as the monoclinic crystal type considered here as well as with unit cells formed by the heterostructure of different photonic crystals show significant unidirectional electromagnetic response. In particular, we show that the use of scatterers with low refractive-index contrast favors the formation of unidirectional frequency gaps which is the optimal route for achieving unidirectional wave propagation.

  16. Unidirectional Wave Propagation in Low-Symmetric Colloidal Photonic-Crystal Heterostructures.

    Yannopapas, Vassilios

    2015-03-19

    We show theoretically that photonic crystals consisting of colloidal spheres exhibit unidirectional wave propagation and one-way frequency band gaps without breaking time-reversal symmetry via, e.g., the application of an external magnetic field or the use of nonlinear materials. Namely, photonic crystals with low symmetry such as the monoclinic crystal type considered here as well as with unit cells formed by the heterostructure of different photonic crystals show significant unidirectional electromagnetic response. In particular, we show that the use of scatterers with low refractive-index contrast favors the formation of unidirectional frequency gaps which is the optimal route for achieving unidirectional wave propagation.

  17. Colloid cysts of the third ventricle

    Pina, J.I.; Medrano, J.; Benito, J.L. de; Lasierra, R.; Lopez, S.; Fernandez, J.A.; Villavieja, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Colloid cysts (CC) are uncommon cystic endo dermal tumors located in the roof of the third ventricle. The clinical features depend on their capacity for obstructing the foramen of Monro, which results in univentricular or biventricular hydrocephalus. We present three cases of colloid cysts of the third ventricle, diagnosed by CT, reviewing their diagnostic, clinical and pathological features

  18. Colloidal assemblies modified by ion irradiation

    Snoeks, E.; Blaaderen, A. van; Dillen, T. van; Kats, C.M. van; Velikov, K.P.; Brongersma, M.L.; Polman, A.

    2001-01-01

    Spherical SiO2 and ZnS colloidal particles show a dramatic anisotropic plastic deformation under 4 MeV Xe ion irradiation, that changes their shape into oblate into oblate ellipsional, with an aspect ratio that can be precisely controlled by the ion fluence. The 290 nm and 1.1 um diameter colloids

  19. Analytical estimation of effective charges at saturation in Poisson-Boltzmann cell models

    Trizac, Emmanuel; Aubouy, Miguel; Bocquet, Lyderic

    2003-01-01

    We propose a simple approximation scheme for computing the effective charges of highly charged colloids (spherical or cylindrical with infinite length). Within non-linear Poisson-Boltzmann theory, we start from an expression for the effective charge in the infinite-dilution limit which is asymptotically valid for large salt concentrations; this result is then extended to finite colloidal concentration, approximating the salt partitioning effect which relates the salt content in the suspension to that of a dialysing reservoir. This leads to an analytical expression for the effective charge as a function of colloid volume fraction and salt concentration. These results compare favourably with the effective charges at saturation (i.e. in the limit of large bare charge) computed numerically following the standard prescription proposed by Alexander et al within the cell model

  20. Dislocations and vacancies in two-dimensional mixed crystals of spheres and dimers

    Gerbode, Sharon J.; Ong, Desmond C.; Liddell, Chekesha M.; Cohen, Itai

    2010-01-01

    In colloidal crystals of spheres, dislocation motion is unrestricted. On the other hand, recent studies of relaxation in crystals of colloidal dimer particles have demonstrated that the dislocation dynamics in such crystals are reminiscent of glassy systems. The observed glassy dynamics arise as a result of dislocation cages formed by certain dimer orientations. In the current study, we use experiments and simulations to investigate the transition that arises when a pure sphere crystal is doped with an increasing concentration of dimers. Specifically, we focus on both dislocation caging and vacancy motion. Interestingly, we find that any nonzero fraction of dimers introduces finite dislocation cages, suggesting that glassy dynamics are present for any mixed crystal. However, we have also identified a vacancy-mediated uncaging mechanism for releasing dislocations from their cages. This mechanism is dependent on vacancy diffusion, which slows by orders of magnitude as the dimer concentration is increased. We propose that in mixed crystals with low dimer concentrations vacancy diffusion is fast enough to uncage dislocations and delay the onset of glassy dislocation dynamics. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  1. Dislocations and vacancies in two-dimensional mixed crystals of spheres and dimers

    Gerbode, Sharon J.

    2010-10-15

    In colloidal crystals of spheres, dislocation motion is unrestricted. On the other hand, recent studies of relaxation in crystals of colloidal dimer particles have demonstrated that the dislocation dynamics in such crystals are reminiscent of glassy systems. The observed glassy dynamics arise as a result of dislocation cages formed by certain dimer orientations. In the current study, we use experiments and simulations to investigate the transition that arises when a pure sphere crystal is doped with an increasing concentration of dimers. Specifically, we focus on both dislocation caging and vacancy motion. Interestingly, we find that any nonzero fraction of dimers introduces finite dislocation cages, suggesting that glassy dynamics are present for any mixed crystal. However, we have also identified a vacancy-mediated uncaging mechanism for releasing dislocations from their cages. This mechanism is dependent on vacancy diffusion, which slows by orders of magnitude as the dimer concentration is increased. We propose that in mixed crystals with low dimer concentrations vacancy diffusion is fast enough to uncage dislocations and delay the onset of glassy dislocation dynamics. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  2. Colloid formation in groundwater by subsurface aeration: characterisation of the geo-colloids and their counterparts

    Wolthoorn, Anke; Temminghoff, Erwin J.M.; Riemsdijk, Willem H. van

    2004-01-01

    Subsurface aeration is used to oxidise Fe in situ in groundwater to make the water potable. In a groundwater system with pH > 7, subsurface aeration results in a non-mobile Fe precipitate and mobile Fe colloids. Since originally the goal of subsurface aeration is to remove Fe in situ, the formation of non-mobile Fe precipitate is the desired result. In addition to this intended effect, subsurface aeration may also strongly enhance the microbiological removal of NH 4 in the purification station. A hypothesis is that mobile Fe colloids may be the link between subsurface aeration and the positive effect on the microbiological removal of NH 4 . The objective of this study is to characterise the mobile Fe colloids and to derive a synthetic substitute for the naturally formed Fe colloids in order to be able to apply the Fe colloids as a management tool to enhance the removal of NH 4 in the process of producing drinking water from groundwater. At a purification station in The Netherlands natural Fe colloids from an aerated well were sampled. Furthermore, eight synthetic Fe colloids were prepared by oxidising synthetic solutions differing in elemental composition. The colloids were analysed using chemical analysis and electron microscopy (SEM and SEM-EDAX). The Fe colloids sampled in the field contained Fe, Ca, Na, PO 4 and Mn. Also in the synthetic Fe colloids PO 4 , Ca, Na and Mn were the most important elements next to Fe. Phosphate and dissolved organic C strongly influenced the morphology of the synthetic Fe colloids. When both the elemental composition and the morphology of the Fe colloids are taken into account, the synthetic Fe colloids formed in the synthetic solution containing Fe, Mn, PO 4 , SiO 4 and dissolved organic matter best match the Fe colloids from the field

  3. Colloid formation in groundwater by subsurface aeration: characterisation of the geo-colloids and their counterparts

    Wolthoorn, Anke; Temminghoff, Erwin J.M.; Riemsdijk, Willem H. van

    2004-09-01

    Subsurface aeration is used to oxidise Fe in situ in groundwater to make the water potable. In a groundwater system with pH > 7, subsurface aeration results in a non-mobile Fe precipitate and mobile Fe colloids. Since originally the goal of subsurface aeration is to remove Fe in situ, the formation of non-mobile Fe precipitate is the desired result. In addition to this intended effect, subsurface aeration may also strongly enhance the microbiological removal of NH{sub 4} in the purification station. A hypothesis is that mobile Fe colloids may be the link between subsurface aeration and the positive effect on the microbiological removal of NH{sub 4}. The objective of this study is to characterise the mobile Fe colloids and to derive a synthetic substitute for the naturally formed Fe colloids in order to be able to apply the Fe colloids as a management tool to enhance the removal of NH{sub 4} in the process of producing drinking water from groundwater. At a purification station in The Netherlands natural Fe colloids from an aerated well were sampled. Furthermore, eight synthetic Fe colloids were prepared by oxidising synthetic solutions differing in elemental composition. The colloids were analysed using chemical analysis and electron microscopy (SEM and SEM-EDAX). The Fe colloids sampled in the field contained Fe, Ca, Na, PO{sub 4} and Mn. Also in the synthetic Fe colloids PO{sub 4}, Ca, Na and Mn were the most important elements next to Fe. Phosphate and dissolved organic C strongly influenced the morphology of the synthetic Fe colloids. When both the elemental composition and the morphology of the Fe colloids are taken into account, the synthetic Fe colloids formed in the synthetic solution containing Fe, Mn, PO{sub 4}, SiO{sub 4} and dissolved organic matter best match the Fe colloids from the field.

  4. Study of the spectra of silica colloidal crystals with assembled silver obtained from a photolysis method

    Li, Wenjiang; He, Jinglong; He, Sailing

    2005-02-01

    The colorful artificial 3D silica colloidal crystals (opal) were prepared through self-assembly of silica spheres in the visible frequency range. We directly synthesized nano silver particles in the void of the silica artificial opal film using the photolysis of silver nitrate under UV light, nano silver particles were self-deposited around the surface of silica sphere. The shifts of the stop band of the artificial crystals after exposing different time under UV light were studied. Synthetic silica opal with three-dimensional (3D) structure is potentially useful for the development of diffractive optical devices, micro mechanical systems, and sensory elements because photonic band gaps obtained from self-assembled closely packed periodic structures.

  5. Recommendations for plutonium colloid size determination

    Kosiewicz, S.T.

    1984-02-01

    This report presents recommendations for plutonium colloid size determination and summarizes a literature review, discussions with other researchers, and comments from equipment manufacturers. Four techniques suitable for plutonium colloid size characterization are filtration and ultrafiltration, gel permeation chromatography, diffusion methods, and high-pressure liquid chromatography (conditionally). Our findings include the following: (1) Filtration and ultrafiltration should be the first methods used for plutonium colloid size determination because they can provide the most rapid results with the least complicated experimental arrangement. (2) After expertise has been obtained with filtering, gel permeation chromatography should be incorporated into the colloid size determination program. (3) Diffusion methods can be used next. (4) High-pressure liquid chromatography will be suitable after appropriate columns are available. A plutonium colloid size characterization program with filtration/ultrafiltration and gel permeation chromatography has been initiated

  6. Colloid-Associated Radionuclide Concentration Limits: ANL

    Mertz, C.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose and scope of this report is to describe the analysis of available colloidal data from waste form corrosion tests at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to extract characteristics of these colloids that can be used in modeling their contribution to the source term for sparingly soluble radioelements (e.g., Pu). Specifically, the focus is on developing a useful description of the following waste form colloid characteristics: (1) composition, (2) size distribution, and (3) quantification of the rate of waste form colloid generation. The composition and size distribution information are intended to support analysis of the potential transport of the sparingly soluble radionuclides associated with the waste form colloids. The rate of colloid generation is intended to support analysis of the waste form colloid-associated radionuclide concentrations. In addressing the above characteristics, available data are interpreted to address mechanisms controlling colloid formation and stability. This report was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report for SR'' (CRWMS M and O 2000). Because the end objective is to support the source term modeling we have organized the conclusions into two categories: (1) data analysis conclusions and (2) recommendations for colloid source term modeling. The second category is included to facilitate use of the conclusions from the data analysis in the abstraction of a colloid source term model. The data analyses and conclusions that are presented in this report are based on small-scale laboratory tests conducted on a limited number of waste glass compositions and spent fuel types

  7. Vavilov-Cherenkov and transition radiations on the dielectric and metallic spheres

    Afanasiev, G.N.; Kartavenko, V.G.; Stepanovsky, Yu.P.

    2003-01-01

    Closed expressions are obtained for angular and frequency radiation intensities produced by a charge moving inside the dielectric sphere S, with observations made outside S (in fact, this is a typical experimental situation when a charge moves in one medium while measurements are made in the other one). It is shown that the difference in media properties inside and outside S drastically affects angular and frequency distributions. Also, a charge motion is considered which begins and terminates in medium 2 and which passes either through the dielectric sphere filled with medium 1 or through the metallic one. The energy flux in medium 2 involves the Vavilov-Cherenkov, transition radiation and the one arising from the charge instantaneous beginning and termination of motion. The evaluated angular and frequency distributions for various charge velocities and medium properties inside and outside S show that the standard identification of the charge velocity by its radiation on the part of the charge trajectory where βn>1 is not always valid. We analyze also the frequently used interpretation of the transition radiation in terms of instantaneous charge deceleration in one medium and its sudden acceleration in another one, and find them as to be insufficient. On the other hand, attempts to interpret the transition radiation in terms of semi-infinite motions terminating in one medium and beginning in the other one turn out to be correct if one takes into account the terms corresponding to the Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation

  8. Incorporation of polyoxotungstate complexes in silica spheres and in situ formation of tungsten trioxide nanoparticles.

    Zhao, Yuanyuan; Fan, Haimei; Li, Wen; Bi, Lihua; Wang, Dejun; Wu, Lixin

    2010-09-21

    In this paper, we demonstrated a new convenient route for in situ fabrication of well separated small sized WO(3) nanoparticles in silica spheres, through a predeposition of surfactant encapsulated polyoxotungates as tungsten source, and followed by a calcination process. In a typical procedure, selected polyoxotungates with different charges were enwrapped with dioctadecyldimethylammonium cations through electrostatic interaction. Elemental analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, and spectral characterization confirmed the formation of prepared complexes with the anticipated chemical structure. The complexes were then phase-transferred into aqueous solution that predissolved surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, and finally incorporated into silica spheres through a joint sol-gel reaction with tetraethyl orthosilicate in a well dispersed state under the protection of organic layer for polyoxotungates from the alkaline reaction condition. Transmission electron microscopic images illustrated the well dispersed WO(3) nanoparticles in the size range of ca. 2.2 nm in the silica spheres after the calcination at 465 °C. The sizes of both the silica spheres and WO(3) nanoparticles could be adjusted independently through changing the doping content to a large extent. Meanwhile, the doped polyoxotungate complexes acted as the template for the mesoporous structure in silica spheres after the calcination. Along with the increase of doping content and surfactant, the mesopore size changed little (2.0-2.9 nm), but the specific surface areas increased quite a lot. Importantly, the WO(3)-nanoparticle-doped silica spheres displayed an interesting photovoltaic property, which is favorable for the funtionalization of these nanomaterials.

  9. Anomalies, conformal manifolds, and spheres

    Gomis, Jaume [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics,Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Hsin, Po-Shen [Department of Physics, Princeton University,Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Komargodski, Zohar; Schwimmer, Adam [Weizmann Institute of Science,Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Seiberg, Nathan [School of Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study,Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Theisen, Stefan [Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut,14476 Golm (Germany)

    2016-03-04

    The two-point function of exactly marginal operators leads to a universal contribution to the trace anomaly in even dimensions. We study aspects of this trace anomaly, emphasizing its interpretation as a sigma model, whose target space M is the space of conformal field theories (a.k.a. the conformal manifold). When the underlying quantum field theory is supersymmetric, this sigma model has to be appropriately supersymmetrized. As examples, we consider in some detail N=(2,2) and N=(0,2) supersymmetric theories in d=2 and N=2 supersymmetric theories in d=4. This reasoning leads to new information about the conformal manifolds of these theories, for example, we show that the manifold is Kähler-Hodge and we further argue that it has vanishing Kähler class. For N=(2,2) theories in d=2 and N=2 theories in d=4 we also show that the relation between the sphere partition function and the Kähler potential of M follows immediately from the appropriate sigma models that we construct. Along the way we find several examples of potential trace anomalies that obey the Wess-Zumino consistency conditions, but can be ruled out by a more detailed analysis.

  10. Theorising Public and Private Spheres

    Sima Remina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The 19th century saw an expression of women’s ardent desire for freedom, emancipation and assertion in the public space. Women hardly managed to assert themselves at all in the public sphere, as any deviation from their traditional role was seen as unnatural. The human soul knows no gender distinctions, so we can say that women face the same desire for fulfillment as men do. Today, women are more and more encouraged to develop their skills by undertaking activities within the public space that are different from those that form part of traditional domestic chores. The woman of the 19th century felt the need to be useful to society, to make her contribution visible in a variety of domains. A woman does not have to become masculine to get power. If she is successful in any important job, this does not mean that she thinks like a man, but that she thinks like a woman. Women have broken through the walls that cut them off from public life, activity and ambition. There are no hindrances that can prevent women from taking their place in society.

  11. TWO FERROMAGNETIC SPHERES IN HOMOGENEOUS MAGNETIC FIELD

    Yury A. Krasnitsky

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of two spherical conductors is studied quite in detail with bispherical coordinates usage and has numerous appendices in an electrostatics. The boundary-value problem about two ferromagnetic spheres enclosed on homogeneous and infinite environment in which the lack of spheres exists like homogeneous magnetic field is considered. The solution of Laplace's equation in the bispherical system of coordinates allows us to find the potential and field distribution in all spaces, including area between spheres. The boundary conditions in potential continuity and in ordinary density constituent of spheres surfaces induction flux are used. It is supposed that spheres are identical, and magnetic permeability of their material is expressed in  >> 0. The problem about falling of electromagnetic plane wave on the system of two spheres, which possesses electrically small sizes, can be considered as quasistationary. The scalar potentials received as a result of Laplace's equation solution are represented by the series containing Legendre polynomials. The concept of two spheres system effective permeability is introduced. It is equal to the advantage in magnitude of magnetic induction flux vector through a certain system’s section arising due to its magnetic properties. Necessary ratios for the effective permeability referred to the central system’s section are obtained. Particularly, the results can be used during the analysis of ferroxcube core clearance, which influences on the magnetic antenna properties. 

  12. Unsteady flow over a decelerating rotating sphere

    Turkyilmazoglu, M.

    2018-03-01

    Unsteady flow analysis induced by a decelerating rotating sphere is the main concern of this paper. A revolving sphere in a still fluid is supposed to slow down at an angular velocity rate that is inversely proportional to time. The governing partial differential equations of motion are scaled in accordance with the literature, reducing to the well-documented von Kármán equations in the special circumstance near the pole. Both numerical and perturbation approaches are pursued to identify the velocity fields, shear stresses, and suction velocity far above the sphere. It is detected that an induced flow surrounding the sphere acts accordingly to adapt to the motion of the sphere up to some critical unsteadiness parameters at certain latitudes. Afterward, the decay rate of rotation ceases such that the flow at the remaining azimuths starts revolving freely. At a critical unsteadiness parameter corresponding to s = -0.681, the decelerating sphere rotates freely and requires no more torque. At a value of s exactly matching the rotating disk flow at the pole identified in the literature, the entire flow field around the sphere starts revolving faster than the disk itself. Increasing values of -s almost diminish the radial outflow. This results in jet flows in both the latitudinal and meridional directions, concentrated near the wall region. The presented mean flow results will be useful for analyzing the instability features of the flow, whether of a convective or absolute nature.

  13. Highly Tunable Complementary Micro/Submicro-Nanopatterned Surfaces Combining Block Copolymer Self-Assembly and Colloidal Lithography.

    Chang, Tongxin; Du, Binyang; Huang, Haiying; He, Tianbai

    2016-08-31

    Two kinds of large-area ordered and highly tunable micro/submicro-nanopatterned surfaces in a complementary manner were successfully fabricated by elaborately combining block copolymer self-assembly and colloidal lithography. Employing a monolayer of polystyrene (PS) colloidal spheres assembled on top as etching mask, polystyrene-block-poly(2-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P2VP) or polystyrene-block-poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P4VP) micelle films were patterned into micro/submicro patches by plasma etching, which could be further transferred into micropatterned metal nanoarrays by subsequent metal precursor loading and a second plasma etching. On the other hand, micro/submicro-nanopatterns in a complementary manner were generated via preloading a metal precursor in initial micelle films before the assembly of PS colloidal spheres on top. Both kinds of micro/submicro-nanopatterns showed good fidelity at the micro/submicroscale and nanoscale; meanwhile, they could be flexibly tuned by the sample and processing parameters. Significantly, when the PS colloidal sphere size was reduced to 250 nm, a high-resolution submicro-nanostructured surface with 3-5 metal nanoparticles in each patch or a single-nanoparticle interconnected honeycomb network was achieved. Moreover, by applying gold (Au) nanoparticles as anchoring points, micronanopatterned Au arrays can serve as a flexible template to pattern bovine serum albumin (BSA) molecules. This facile and cost-effective approach may provide a novel platform for fabrication of micropatterned nanoarrays with high tunability and controllability, which are promising in the applications of biological and microelectronic fields.

  14. Finding a source inside a sphere

    Tsitsas, N L; Martin, P A

    2012-01-01

    A sphere excited by an interior point source or a point dipole gives a simplified yet realistic model for studying a variety of applications in medical imaging. We suppose that there is an exterior field (transmission problem) and that the total field on the sphere is known. We give analytical inversion algorithms for determining the interior physical characteristics of the sphere as well as the location, strength and orientation of the source/dipole. We start with static problems (Laplace’s equation) and then proceed to acoustic problems (Helmholtz equation). (paper)

  15. The physics of the colloidal glass transition.

    Hunter, Gary L; Weeks, Eric R

    2012-06-01

    As one increases the concentration of a colloidal suspension, the system exhibits a dramatic increase in viscosity. Beyond a certain concentration, the system is said to be a colloidal glass; structurally, the system resembles a liquid, yet motions within the suspension are slow enough that it can be considered essentially frozen. For several decades, colloids have served as a valuable model system for understanding the glass transition in molecular systems. The spatial and temporal scales involved allow these systems to be studied by a wide variety of experimental techniques. The focus of this review is the current state of understanding of the colloidal glass transition, with an emphasis on experimental observations. A brief introduction is given to important experimental techniques used to study the glass transition in colloids. We describe features of colloidal systems near and in glassy states, including increases in viscosity and relaxation times, dynamical heterogeneity and ageing, among others. We also compare and contrast the glass transition in colloids to that in molecular liquids. Other glassy systems are briefly discussed, as well as recently developed synthesis techniques that will keep these systems rich with interesting physics for years to come.

  16. The physics of the colloidal glass transition

    Hunter, Gary L; Weeks, Eric R

    2012-01-01

    As one increases the concentration of a colloidal suspension, the system exhibits a dramatic increase in viscosity. Beyond a certain concentration, the system is said to be a colloidal glass; structurally, the system resembles a liquid, yet motions within the suspension are slow enough that it can be considered essentially frozen. For several decades, colloids have served as a valuable model system for understanding the glass transition in molecular systems. The spatial and temporal scales involved allow these systems to be studied by a wide variety of experimental techniques. The focus of this review is the current state of understanding of the colloidal glass transition, with an emphasis on experimental observations. A brief introduction is given to important experimental techniques used to study the glass transition in colloids. We describe features of colloidal systems near and in glassy states, including increases in viscosity and relaxation times, dynamical heterogeneity and ageing, among others. We also compare and contrast the glass transition in colloids to that in molecular liquids. Other glassy systems are briefly discussed, as well as recently developed synthesis techniques that will keep these systems rich with interesting physics for years to come. (review article)

  17. Towards conducting inks: Polypyrrole–silver colloids

    Omastová, Mária; Bober, Patrycja; Morávková, Zuzana; Peřinka, Nikola; Kaplanová, Marie; Syrový, Tomáš; Hromádková, Jiřina; Trchová, Miroslava; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Composite colloidal particles combining conducting polymer and metal have been prepared. • Conducting colloids are suitable for printing applications. • Polypyrrole/silver colloids are prepared in a single reaction step. • The conductivity control is discussed and still needs improvement. - Abstract: The oxidation of pyrrole with silver nitrate in the presence of suitable water-soluble polymers yields composite polypyrrole–silver colloids. The polypyrrole–silver nanoparticles stabilized with poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) have a typical size around 350 nm and polydispersity index 0.20, i.e. a moderate polydispersity in size. Similar results have been obtained with poly(vinyl alcohol) as stabilizer. The effect of stabilizer concentration on the particle size is marginal. In the present study, several types of stabilizers have been tested in addition to currently used poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone). Transmission electron microscopy and optical microscopy revealed the gemini morphology of polypyrrole and silver colloidal nanoparticles and confirmed their size and size-distribution determined by dynamic light scattering. The use of colloidal dispersions provides an efficient tool for the UV–vis and FT Raman spectroscopic characterization of polypyrrole, including the transition between polypyrrole salt and corresponding polypyrrole base. The dispersions were used for the preparation of coatings on polyethylene terephthalate foils, and the properties for polypyrrole–silver composites have been compared with those produced from polypyrrole colloids alone

  18. Influences on physicians' choices of intravenous colloids.

    Miletin, Michael S; Stewart, Thomas E; Norton, Peter G

    2002-07-01

    Controversy over the optimal intravenous fluid for volume resuscitation continues unabated. Our objectives were to characterize the demographics of physicians who prescribe intravenous colloids and determine factors that enter into their decision to choose a colloid. Questionnaire with 61 items. Ten percent ( n = 364) of frequent intravenous fluid prescribers in the province of Ontario, Canada. The response rate was 74%. Colloid use in the past year was reported by 79% of the responding physicians. Important reasons for choosing a colloid included blood loss and manipulation of oncotic pressure. Physicians tended to prefer either albumin or pentastarch, but no important reasons were found for choosing between the two. Albumin with or without crystalloid was preferred in 5/13 scenarios by more than 50% of the respondents, whereas pentastarch was not favored by more than 50% of respondents in any scenario. Physicians practising in critical care areas and teaching hospitals generally preferred pentastarch to albumin. Physicians reporting pentastarch as representing greater than 90% of total colloid use were more likely to have been visited by a drug detailer for pentastarch than those who used less synthetic colloid (54 vs 22%, p distribution. Although albumin appeared to be preferred in more clinical niches, most physicians did not state reasons for choosing between products. Marketing, specialty, location of practice and clinical scenario appear to play significant roles in the utilization of colloid products.

  19. Phosphate binding by natural iron-rich colloids in streams

    Baken, S.; Moens, C.; Griffioen, J.J.; Smolders, E.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) in natural waters may be bound to iron (Fe) bearing colloids. However, the natural variation in composition and P binding strength of these colloids remain unclear. We related the composition of "coarse colloids" (colloids in the 0.1-1.2 μm size range) in 47 Belgian streams to the

  20. Formation mechanisms of metal colloids

    Halaciuga, Ionel

    Highly dispersed uniform metallic particles are widely used in various areas of technology and medicine and are likely to be incorporated into many other applications in the future. It is commonly accepted that size, shape and composition of the particles represent critical factors in most applications. Thus, understanding the mechanisms of formation of metal particles and the ways to control the physical (e.g. shape, size) and chemical (e.g. composition) properties is of great importance. In the current research, the formation of uniform silver spheres is investigated experimentally. The parameters that influence the formation of silver particles when concentrated iso-ascorbic acid and silver-polyamine complex solutions are rapidly mixed were studied in the absence of dispersants. We found that by varying the nature of the amine, temperature, concentration of reactants, silver/amine molar ratio, and the nature of the silver salt, the size of the resulting silver particles can be varied in a wide range (0.08--1.5 microm). The silver particles were formed by aggregation of nanosize subunits as substantiated by both electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques and by the vivid rapid color changes during the chemical precipitation process. From the practical standpoint, the goal of this research was to prepare well dispersed spherical silver particles having a relatively smooth surface and a diameter of about 1 microm to satisfy the demands of the current electronic materials market. A two stage particle growth model previously developed to explain the narrow size distribution occurring in synthesis of gold spheres was applied to the present experimental system, and the parameters that control the size distribution characteristics were identified. The kinetic parameter required to match the final particle size was found to be in agreement with the one used previously in modeling formation of gold spheres, suggesting that similar kinetics governs the

  1. Fractional charges

    Saminadayar, L.

    2001-01-01

    20 years ago fractional charges were imagined to explain values of conductivity in some materials. Recent experiments have proved the existence of charges whose value is the third of the electron charge. This article presents the experimental facts that have led theorists to predict the existence of fractional charges from the motion of quasi-particles in a linear chain of poly-acetylene to the quantum Hall effect. According to the latest theories, fractional charges are neither bosons nor fermions but anyons, they are submitted to an exclusive principle that is less stringent than that for fermions. (A.C.)

  2. Cracking in Drying Colloidal Films

    Singh, Karnail B.; Tirumkudulu, Mahesh S.

    2007-05-01

    It has long been known that thick films of colloidal dispersions such as wet clays, paints, and coatings crack under drying. Although capillary stresses generated during drying have been recently identified as the cause for cracking, the existence of a maximum crack-free film thickness that depends on particle size, rigidity, and packing has not been understood. Here, we identify two distinct regimes for crack-free films based on the magnitude of compressive strain at the maximum attainable capillary pressure and show remarkable agreement of measurements with our theory. We anticipate our results to not only form the basis for design of coating formulations for the paints, coatings, and ceramics industry but also assist in the production of crack-free photonic band gap crystals.

  3. Colloidal QDs-polymer nanocomposites

    Gordillo, H.; Suárez, I.; Rodríguez-Cantó, P.; Abargues, R.; García-Calzada, R.; Chyrvony, V.; Albert, S.; Martínez-Pastor, J.

    2012-04-01

    Nanometer-size colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals, or Quantum Dots (NQD), are very prospective active centers because their light emission is highly efficient and temperature-independent. Nanocomposites based on the incorporation of QDs inside a polymer matrix are very promising materials for application in future photonic devices because they combine the properties of QDs with the technological feasibility of polymers. In the present work some basic applications of these new materials have been studied. Firstly, the fabrication of planar and linear waveguides based on the incorporation of CdS, CdSe and CdTe in PMMA and SU-8 are demonstrated. As a result, photoluminescence (PL) of the QDs are coupled to a waveguide mode, being it able to obtain multicolor waveguiding. Secondly, nanocomposite films have been evaluated as photon energy down-shifting converters to improve the efficiency of solar cells.

  4. Carbon Nanomaterials as Antibacterial Colloids

    Michael Maas

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanomaterials like graphene, carbon nanotubes, fullerenes and the various forms of diamond have attracted great attention for their vast potential regarding applications in electrical engineering and as biomaterials. The study of the antibacterial properties of carbon nanomaterials provides fundamental information on the possible toxicity and environmental impact of these materials. Furthermore, as a result of the increasing prevalence of resistant bacteria strains, the development of novel antibacterial materials is of great importance. This article reviews current research efforts on characterizing the antibacterial activity of carbon nanomaterials from the perspective of colloid and interface science. Building on these fundamental findings, recent functionalization strategies for enhancing the antibacterial effect of carbon nanomaterials are described. The review concludes with a comprehensive outlook that summarizes the most important discoveries and trends regarding antibacterial carbon nanomaterials.

  5. Colloidal CdSe Quantum Rings.

    Fedin, Igor; Talapin, Dmitri V

    2016-08-10

    Semiconductor quantum rings are of great fundamental interest because their non-trivial topology creates novel physical properties. At the same time, toroidal topology is difficult to achieve for colloidal nanocrystals and epitaxially grown semiconductor nanostructures. In this work, we introduce the synthesis of luminescent colloidal CdSe nanorings and nanostructures with double and triple toroidal topology. The nanorings form during controlled etching and rearrangement of two-dimensional nanoplatelets. We discuss a possible mechanism of the transformation of nanoplatelets into nanorings and potential utility of colloidal nanorings for magneto-optical (e.g., Aharonov-Bohm effect) and other applications.

  6. Hydrodynamic interactions in active colloidal crystal microrheology.

    Weeber, R; Harting, J

    2012-11-01

    In dense colloids it is commonly assumed that hydrodynamic interactions do not play a role. However, a found theoretical quantification is often missing. We present computer simulations that are motivated by experiments where a large colloidal particle is dragged through a colloidal crystal. To qualify the influence of long-ranged hydrodynamics, we model the setup by conventional Langevin dynamics simulations and by an improved scheme with limited hydrodynamic interactions. This scheme significantly improves our results and allows to show that hydrodynamics strongly impacts the development of defects, the crystal regeneration, as well as the jamming behavior.

  7. Characterization of natural groundwater colloids at Palmottu

    Vuorinen, U.; Kumpulainen, H.

    1993-01-01

    Characterization of groundwater colloids (size range from 2 nm to 500 nm) in the Palmottu natural analogue (for radioactive waste disposal in Finland) area was continued by sampling another drill hole, 346, at three depths. Results evaluated so far indicate the presence of both organic and inorganic colloids. In terms of chemical composition and morphology, the inorganic colloids differ from those found in previous studies. According to SEM/EDS and STEM/EDS they mostly contain Ca and are spherical in shape. At this stage further characterization and evaluation of results is provisional and does not allow very accurate conclusions to be drawn

  8. Propagation of waves in a multicomponent plasma having charged ...

    Propagation of waves in a multicomponent plasma having charged dust particles has been investigated by various authors in recent times as the presence of charged dust grains give rise to a new kind of modes called dust modes and it has wide applications in magneto- sphere and space plasma [1–3]. In fact, Rao et al [4] ...

  9. Colloidal Stability of Gold Nanoparticles Coated with Multithiol-Poly(ethylene glycol) Ligands: Importance of Structural Constraints of the Sulfur Anchoring Groups

    2013-08-13

    order: monothiol < flexible dithiol < constrained dithiol < disulfide. The present study indicates that the colloidal stability of thiolated ligand...protein/ polymer - negatively charged AuNP) and hydrophobic adsorption (hydrophobic protein pockets - AuNP).1, 20 Each mechanism will also be...colloidal stability has been significantly improved by preparing a relatively thicker shell with polymers or polyelectrolytes such as poly(N-vinyl-2

  10. Acoustic levitation of a large solid sphere

    Andrade, Marco A. B.; Bernassau, Anne L.; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that acoustic levitation can levitate spherical objects much larger than the acoustic wavelength in air. The acoustic levitation of an expanded polystyrene sphere of 50 mm in diameter, corresponding to 3.6 times the wavelength, is achieved by using three 25 kHz ultrasonic transducers arranged in a tripod fashion. In this configuration, a standing wave is created between the transducers and the sphere. The axial acoustic radiation force generated by each transducer on the sphere was modeled numerically as a function of the distance between the sphere and the transducer. The theoretical acoustic radiation force was verified experimentally in a setup consisting of an electronic scale and an ultrasonic transducer mounted on a motorized linear stage. The comparison between the numerical and experimental acoustic radiation forces presents a good agreement.

  11. Acoustic levitation of a large solid sphere

    Andrade, Marco A. B., E-mail: marcobrizzotti@gmail.com [Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, São Paulo 05508-090 (Brazil); Bernassau, Anne L. [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Adamowski, Julio C. [Department of Mechatronics and Mechanical Systems Engineering, Escola Politécnica, University of São Paulo, São Paulo 05508-030 (Brazil)

    2016-07-25

    We demonstrate that acoustic levitation can levitate spherical objects much larger than the acoustic wavelength in air. The acoustic levitation of an expanded polystyrene sphere of 50 mm in diameter, corresponding to 3.6 times the wavelength, is achieved by using three 25 kHz ultrasonic transducers arranged in a tripod fashion. In this configuration, a standing wave is created between the transducers and the sphere. The axial acoustic radiation force generated by each transducer on the sphere was modeled numerically as a function of the distance between the sphere and the transducer. The theoretical acoustic radiation force was verified experimentally in a setup consisting of an electronic scale and an ultrasonic transducer mounted on a motorized linear stage. The comparison between the numerical and experimental acoustic radiation forces presents a good agreement.

  12. Spheres of SA Government, responsibilities and delivery

    Oelofse, Suzanna HH

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The institutional framework for government in South Africa was established in 1996 with the adoption of the first democratic Constitution. National, provincial and local government was established as three elected spheres of government, each...

  13. Gender, Diversity and the European Public Sphere

    Pristed Nielsen, Helene

    2009-01-01

    This paper argues that feminist criticism of Habermasian theory leads to new ways of approaching empirical analyses of public sphere deliberation, and gives some concrete indications of which methodological consequences such a critique may lead to....

  14. Acoustic levitation of a large solid sphere

    Andrade, Marco A. B.; Bernassau, Anne L.; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that acoustic levitation can levitate spherical objects much larger than the acoustic wavelength in air. The acoustic levitation of an expanded polystyrene sphere of 50 mm in diameter, corresponding to 3.6 times the wavelength, is achieved by using three 25 kHz ultrasonic transducers arranged in a tripod fashion. In this configuration, a standing wave is created between the transducers and the sphere. The axial acoustic radiation force generated by each transducer on the sphere was modeled numerically as a function of the distance between the sphere and the transducer. The theoretical acoustic radiation force was verified experimentally in a setup consisting of an electronic scale and an ultrasonic transducer mounted on a motorized linear stage. The comparison between the numerical and experimental acoustic radiation forces presents a good agreement.

  15. 1-Public sphere Ambadiang.pmd

    \\376\\377\\000s\\000e\\000r\\000i\\000a\\000n\\000e\\000.\\000c\\000a\\000m\\000a\\000r\\000a

    2011-03-09

    Mar 9, 2011 ... Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa, 2010 .... Ambadiang: Public Sphere, Linguistic Sphericules and Discourse Communities in Africa ...... eds., Media, Ritual, Identity, London: Routledge, pp.

  16. Higher-dimensional relativistic-fluid spheres

    Patel, L. K.; Ahmedabad, Gujarat Univ.

    1997-01-01

    They consider the hydrostatic equilibrium of relativistic-fluid spheres for a D-dimensional space-time. Three physically viable interior solutions of the Einstein field equations corresponding to perfect-fluid spheres in a D-dimensional space-time are obtained. When D = 4 they reduce to the Tolman IV solution, the Mehra solution and the Finch-Skea solution. The solutions are smoothly matched with the D-dimensional Schwarzschild exterior solution at the boundary r = a of the fluid sphere. Some physical features and other related details of the solutions are briefly discussed. A brief description of two other new solutions for higher-dimensional perfect-fluid spheres is also given

  17. Elastic spheres can walk on water.

    Belden, Jesse; Hurd, Randy C; Jandron, Michael A; Bower, Allan F; Truscott, Tadd T

    2016-02-04

    Incited by public fascination and engineering application, water-skipping of rigid stones and spheres has received considerable study. While these objects can be coaxed to ricochet, elastic spheres demonstrate superior water-skipping ability, but little is known about the effect of large material compliance on water impact physics. Here we show that upon water impact, very compliant spheres naturally assume a disk-like geometry and dynamic orientation that are favourable for water-skipping. Experiments and numerical modelling reveal that the initial spherical shape evolves as elastic waves propagate through the material. We find that the skipping dynamics are governed by the wave propagation speed and by the ratio of material shear modulus to hydrodynamic pressure. With these insights, we explain why softer spheres skip more easily than stiffer ones. Our results advance understanding of fluid-elastic body interaction during water impact, which could benefit inflatable craft modelling and, more playfully, design of elastic aquatic toys.

  18. which spheres of government are responsible

    XXX

    basic guidelines for a land use management system in the municipality. 38. The issue ... property in Linden to permit the establishment of a restaurant and gift shop. 40. The .... spheres of government do not operate in sealed compartments. 65.

  19. Scintillation forward spectrometer of the SPHERE setup

    Anisimov, Yu.S.; Afanas'ev, S.V.; Bondarev, V.K.

    1991-01-01

    The construction of the forward spectrometer for the 4π SPHERE setup to study multiple production of particles in nucleus-nucleus interactions is described. The measured parameters of the spectrometer detectors are presented. 7 refs.; 14 figs.; 1 tab

  20. Low temperature synthesis and photocatalytic property of perovskite-type LaCoO{sub 3} hollow spheres

    Fu, Shasha [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Anhui University, Hefei 230039 (China); Niu, Helin, E-mail: niuhelin@ahu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Anhui University, Hefei 230039 (China); Tao, Zhiyin; Song, Jiming; Mao, Changjie; Zhang, Shengyi [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Anhui University, Hefei 230039 (China); Chen, Changle, E-mail: changle@ustc.edu.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Soft Matter Chemistry and Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Wang, Dong [Department of Bio-Health Technology, College of Biomedical Science, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon, Gangwon-Do 200-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-05

    Highlights: •Hollow perovskite-type LaCoO{sub 3} is fabricated by green colloidal template method. •Carbonaceous colloids acted as templates and offered internal heat source. •The calcination temperature to form perovskite-type LaCoO{sub 3} was dropped to 550 °C. •The photocatalytic properties were studied upon UV irradiation. •Hollow perovskite-type LaCoO{sub 3} shows excellent photocatalytic activity on dyes. -- Abstract: Hollow perovskite-type LaCoO{sub 3} was successfully fabricated by surface-ion adsorption method utilizing the carbonaceous colloids as template under relatively low calcination temperature. Carbonaceous colloids not only acted as templates but also offered internal heat source during calcination process. The impact of calcined temperature and time on the structure and morphology of the product were studied and the possible formation process of perovskite-type LaCoO{sub 3} hollow spheres was illustrated. The obtained product was characterized by SEM, TEM, XRD, TG-DSC, ICP-OES, BET and UV–visible absorption spectra. The photocatalytic activities for degradation of methylene blue, methyl orange and neutral red were tested. The good photocatalytic degradation activity of the three different dyes and the band gap of 2.07 eV make it a promising candidate material for photocatalytic applications.

  1. Low temperature synthesis and photocatalytic property of perovskite-type LaCoO3 hollow spheres

    Fu, Shasha; Niu, Helin; Tao, Zhiyin; Song, Jiming; Mao, Changjie; Zhang, Shengyi; Chen, Changle; Wang, Dong

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Hollow perovskite-type LaCoO 3 is fabricated by green colloidal template method. •Carbonaceous colloids acted as templates and offered internal heat source. •The calcination temperature to form perovskite-type LaCoO 3 was dropped to 550 °C. •The photocatalytic properties were studied upon UV irradiation. •Hollow perovskite-type LaCoO 3 shows excellent photocatalytic activity on dyes. -- Abstract: Hollow perovskite-type LaCoO 3 was successfully fabricated by surface-ion adsorption method utilizing the carbonaceous colloids as template under relatively low calcination temperature. Carbonaceous colloids not only acted as templates but also offered internal heat source during calcination process. The impact of calcined temperature and time on the structure and morphology of the product were studied and the possible formation process of perovskite-type LaCoO 3 hollow spheres was illustrated. The obtained product was characterized by SEM, TEM, XRD, TG-DSC, ICP-OES, BET and UV–visible absorption spectra. The photocatalytic activities for degradation of methylene blue, methyl orange and neutral red were tested. The good photocatalytic degradation activity of the three different dyes and the band gap of 2.07 eV make it a promising candidate material for photocatalytic applications

  2. Sol-gel transitions and liquid crystal phase transitions in concentrated aqueous suspensions of colloidal gibbsite platelets

    Mourad, M.C.D.; Byelov, D.V.; Petukhov, A.V.; de Winter, D.A.M.; Verkleij, A.J.; Lekkerkerker, H.N.W.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a comprehensive study of the sol-gel transitions and liquid crystal phase transitions in aqueous suspensions of positively charged colloidal gibbsite platelets at pH 4-5 over a wide range of particle concentrations (50-600 g/L) and salt concentrations (10-4-10-1 M NaCl). A

  3. Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Radionuclides through the Vadose Zone

    Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B.; Zachara, John M.; McCarthy, John F.; Lichtner, Peter C.

    2006-01-01

    This project seeks to improve the basic understanding of the role of colloids in facilitating the transport of contaminants in the vadose zone. We focus on three major thrusts: (1) thermodynamic stability and mobility of colloids formed by reactions of sediments with highly alkaline tank waste solutions, (2) colloid-contaminant interactions, and (3) in-situ colloid mobilization and colloid facilitated contaminant transport occurring in both contaminated and uncontaminated Hanford sediments

  4. Geometrical Dynamics in a Transitioning Superconducting Sphere

    Claycomb J. R.

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent theoretical works have concentrated on calculating the Casimir effect in curved spacetime. In this paper we outline the forward problem of metrical variation due to the Casimir effect for spherical geometries. We consider a scalar quantum field inside a hollow superconducting sphere. Metric equations are developed describing the evolution of the scalar curvature after the sphere transitions to the normal state.

  5. New trends in the ICRU sphere

    Morstin, K.; Kawecka, B.; Booz, J.

    1985-01-01

    A space transformation has been applied that enables the transport equation to be efficiently solved for spheres exposed to radiations of almost arbitrary angular distribution. Depth dose distributions in the ICRU sphere have been calculated with the 1-D ANISN transport code for neutron energies from thermal up to 20 MeV and for photons up to 15 MeV. Several irradiation geometries are considered. For deep-penetrating radiations, maximum possible dose equivalent index significantly exceeds Hsub(10) star

  6. Hardy type inequalities on the sphere

    Xiaomei Sun

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, we consider the L p $L^{p}$ -Hardy inequalities on the sphere. By the divergence theorem, we establish the L p $L^{p}$ -Hardy inequalities on the sphere. Furthermore, we also obtain their best constants. Our results can be regarded as the extension of Xiao’s (J. Math. Inequal. 10:793-805, 2016.

  7. vSphere virtual machine management

    Fitzhugh, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    This book follows a step-by-step tutorial approach with some real-world scenarios that vSphere businesses will be required to overcome every day. This book also discusses creating and configuring virtual machines and also covers monitoring virtual machine performance and resource allocation options. This book is for VMware administrators who want to build their knowledge of virtual machine administration and configuration. It's assumed that you have some experience with virtualization administration and vSphere.

  8. vSphere high performance cookbook

    Sarkar, Prasenjit

    2013-01-01

    vSphere High Performance Cookbook is written in a practical, helpful style with numerous recipes focusing on answering and providing solutions to common, and not-so common, performance issues and problems.The book is primarily written for technical professionals with system administration skills and some VMware experience who wish to learn about advanced optimization and the configuration features and functions for vSphere 5.1.

  9. Grimsel colloid exercise, an international intercomparison exercise on the sampling and characterization of groundwater colloids

    Degueldre, C.

    1990-01-01

    The Grimsel colloid exercise was an intercomparison exercise which consisted of an in situ sampling phase followed by a colloid characterization step. The goal of this benchmark exercise, which involved 12 laboratories, was to evaluate both sampling and characterization techniques with emphasis on the colloid specific size distribution. The sampling phase took place at the Grimsel test site between 1 and 13 February 1988 and the participating groups produced colloid samples using various methods. This work was carried out within the Community COCO Club, as a component of the Mirage project (second phase)

  10. Heteroaggregation of titanium dioxide nanoparticles with natural clay colloids.

    Labille, Jérôme; Harns, Carrie; Bottero, Jean-Yves; Brant, Jonathan

    2015-06-02

    To better understand and predict the fate of engineered nanoparticles in the water column, we assessed the heteroaggregation of TiO2 nanoparticles with a smectite clay as analogues for natural colloids. Heteroaggregation was evaluated as a function of water salinity (10(-3) and 10(-1) M NaCl), pH (5 and 8), and selected nanoparticle concentration (0-4 mg/L). Time-resolved laser diffraction was used, coupled to an aggregation model, to identify the key mechanisms and variables that drive the heteroaggregation of the nanoparticles with colloids. Our data show that, at a relevant concentration, nanoparticle behavior is mainly driven by heteroaggregation with colloids, while homoaggregation remains negligible. The affinity of TiO2 nanoparticles for clay is driven by electrostatic interactions. Opposite surface charges and/or high ionic strength favored the formation of primary heteroaggregates via the attachment of nanoparticles to the clay. The initial shape and dispersion state of the clay as well as the nanoparticle/clay concentration ratio also affected the nature of the heteroaggregation mechanism. With dispersed clay platelets (10(-3) M NaCl), secondary heteroaggregation driven by bridging nanoparticles occurred at a nanoparticle/clay number ratio of greater than 0.5. In 10(-1) M NaCl, the clay was preaggregated into larger and more spherical units. This favored secondary heteroaggregation at lower nanoparticle concentration that correlated to the nanoparticle/clay surface area ratio. In this latter case, a nanoparticle to clay sticking efficiency could be determined.

  11. Rational design and dynamics of self-propelled colloidal bead chains: from rotators to flagella.

    Vutukuri, Hanumantha Rao; Bet, Bram; van Roij, René; Dijkstra, Marjolein; Huck, Wilhelm T S

    2017-12-01

    The quest for designing new self-propelled colloids is fuelled by the demand for simple experimental models to study the collective behaviour of their more complex natural counterparts. Most synthetic self-propelled particles move by converting the input energy into translational motion. In this work we address the question if simple self-propelled spheres can assemble into more complex structures that exhibit rotational motion, possibly coupled with translational motion as in flagella. We exploit a combination of induced dipolar interactions and a bonding step to create permanent linear bead chains, composed of self-propelled Janus spheres, with a well-controlled internal structure. Next, we study how flexibility between individual swimmers in a chain can affect its swimming behaviour. Permanent rigid chains showed only active rotational or spinning motion, whereas longer semi-flexible chains showed both translational and rotational motion resembling flagella like-motion, in the presence of the fuel. Moreover, we are able to reproduce our experimental results using numerical calculations with a minimal model, which includes full hydrodynamic interactions with the fluid. Our method is general and opens a new way to design novel self-propelled colloids with complex swimming behaviours, using different complex starting building blocks in combination with the flexibility between them.

  12. Kinetic arrest and glass-glass transition in short-ranged attractive colloids

    Sztucki, M.; Narayanan, T.; Belina, G.; Moussaied, A.; Pignon, F.; Hoekstra, H.

    2006-01-01

    A thermally reversible repulsive hard-sphere to sticky-sphere transition was studied in a model colloidal system over a wide volume fraction range. The static microstructure was obtained from high resolution small angle x-ray scattering, the colloid dynamics was probed by dynamic x-ray and light scattering, and supplementary mechanical properties were derived from bulk rheology. At low concentration, the system shows features of gas-liquid type phase separation. The bulk phase separation is presumably interrupted by a gelation transition at the intermediate volume fraction range. At high volume fractions, fluid-attractive glass and repulsive glass-attractive glass transitions are observed. It is shown that the volume fraction of the particles can be reliably deduced from the absolute scattered intensity. The static structure factor is modeled in terms of an attractive square-well potential, using the leading order series expansion of Percus-Yevick approximation. The ensemble-averaged intermediate scattering function shows different levels of frozen components in the attractive and repulsive glassy states. The observed static and dynamic behavior are consistent with the predictions of a mode-coupling theory and numerical simulations for a square-well attractive system

  13. Suspensions of colloidal particles and aggregates

    Babick, Frank

    2016-01-01

    This book addresses the properties of particles in colloidal suspensions. It has a focus on particle aggregates and the dependency of their physical behaviour on morphological parameters. For this purpose, relevant theories and methodological tools are reviewed and applied to selected examples. The book is divided into four main chapters. The first of them introduces important measurement techniques for the determination of particle size and interfacial properties in colloidal suspensions. A further chapter is devoted to the physico-chemical properties of colloidal particles—highlighting the interfacial phenomena and the corresponding interactions between particles. The book’s central chapter examines the structure-property relations of colloidal aggregates. This comprises concepts to quantify size and structure of aggregates, models and numerical tools for calculating the (light) scattering and hydrodynamic properties of aggregates, and a discussion on van-der-Waals and double layer interactions between ...

  14. Structural properties of dendrimer-colloid mixtures

    Lenz, Dominic A; Blaak, Ronald; Likos, Christos N

    2012-01-01

    We consider binary mixtures of colloidal particles and amphiphilic dendrimers of the second generation by means of Monte Carlo simulations. By using the effective interactions between monomer-resolved dendrimers and colloids, we compare the results of simulations of mixtures stemming from a full monomer-resolved description with the effective two-component description at different densities, composition ratios, colloid diameters and interaction strengths. Additionally, we map the two-component system onto an effective one-component model for the colloids in the presence of the dendrimers. Simulations based on the resulting depletion potentials allow us to extend the comparison to yet another level of coarse graining and to examine under which conditions this two-step approach is valid. In addition, a preliminary outlook into the phase behavior of this system is given. (paper)

  15. Dynamics and Rheology of Soft Colloidal Glasses

    Wen, Yu Ho; Schaefer, Jennifer L.; Archer, Lynden A.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. The linear viscoelastic (LVE) spectrum of a soft colloidal glass is accessed with the aid of a time-concentration superposition (TCS) principle, which unveils the glassy particle dynamics from in-cage rattling

  16. Thermal Jamming of a Colloidal Glass

    Agarwal, Praveen; Srivastava, Samanvaya; Archer, Lynden A.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the effect of temperature on structure and dynamics of a colloidal glass created by tethering polymers to the surface of inorganic nanoparticles. Contrary to the conventional assumption, an increase in temperature slows down glassy

  17. Mobility of radioactive colloidal particles in groundwater

    Nuttall, H.E.; Long, R.L.

    1993-01-01

    Radiocolloids are a major factor in the rapid migration of radioactive waste in groundwater. For at least two Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sites, researchers have shown that groundwater colloidal particles were responsible for the rapid transport of radioactive waste material in groundwater. On an international scale, a review of reported field observations, laboratory column studies, and carefully collected field samples provides compelling evidence that colloidal particles enhance both radioactive and toxic waste migration. The objective of this project is to understand and predict colloid-contaminant migration through fundamental mathematical models, water sampling, and laboratory experiments and use this information to develop an effective and scientifically based colloid immobilization strategy. The article focuses on solving the suspected radiocolloid transport problems at LANL's Mortandad Canyon site. (author) 6 figs., 5 tabs., 18 refs

  18. Crust formation in drying colloidal suspensions

    Style, R. W.; Peppin, S. S. L.

    2010-01-01

    and the equations of poroelasticity, while the equations of colloid physics govern processes in the suspension. We derive new equations describing this process, including unique boundary conditions coupling the two regions, yielding a moving-boundary model

  19. Colloidal Quantum Dot Photovoltaics: A Path Forward

    Kramer, Illan J.; Sargent, Edward H.

    2011-01-01

    spectrum. CQD materials' ease of processing derives from their synthesis, storage, and processing in solution. Rapid advances have brought colloidal quantum dot photovoltaic solar power conversion efficiencies of 6% in the latest reports. These achievements

  20. Living Colloidal Metal Particles from Solvated Metal Atoms. Clustering of Metal Atoms in Organic Media 15.

    1986-09-23

    attributed to these solutions, especially toward heart disease. And in 1618 Antoni published Panacea Aurea : Auro Potabile 4 which centered on the...probably a slow process (discussed next under the electrophoresis section ). Electrophoresis: Electrophoresis, the movement of charged particles in...electrical properties. Experimental Section Preparation of a Typical Au-Acetone Colloid The metal atom reactor has been described previo sly. 3 9 ’ 5 9 ’ 6 0

  1. Ultrasmall iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications: improving the colloidal and magnetic properties.

    Costo, Rocio; Bello, Valentina; Robic, Caroline; Port, Marc; Marco, Jose F; Puerto Morales, M; Veintemillas-Verdaguer, Sabino

    2012-01-10

    A considerable increase in the saturation magnetization, M(s) (40%), and initial susceptibility of ultrasmall (<5 nm) iron oxide nanoparticles prepared by laser pyrolysis was obtained through an optimized acid treatment. Moreover, a significant enhancement in the colloidal properties, such as smaller aggregate sizes in aqueous media and increased surface charge densities, was found after this chemical protocol. The results are consistent with a reduction in nanoparticle surface disorder induced by a dissolution-recrystallization mechanism.

  2. arXiv Supersymmetric gauged matrix models from dimensional reduction on a sphere

    Closset, Cyril; Seong, Rak-Kyeong

    2018-05-04

    It was recently proposed that $ \\mathcal{N} $ = 1 supersymmetric gauged matrix models have a duality of order four — that is, a quadrality — reminiscent of infrared dualities of SQCD theories in higher dimensions. In this note, we show that the zero-dimensional quadrality proposal can be inferred from the two-dimensional Gadde-Gukov-Putrov triality. We consider two-dimensional $ \\mathcal{N} $ = (0, 2) SQCD compactified on a sphere with the half-topological twist. For a convenient choice of R-charge, the zero-mode sector on the sphere gives rise to a simple $ \\mathcal{N} $ = 1 gauged matrix model. Triality on the sphere then implies a triality relation for the supersymmetric matrix model, which can be completed to the full quadrality.

  3. Reactions of organic free radicals at colloidal silver in aqueous solution. Electron pool effect and water decomposition

    Henglein, A.

    1979-01-01

    Organic free radicals of high negative redox potential such as α-alcohol radicals were found to transfer electrons to colloidal silver particles stabilized by sodium dodecyl sulfate in aqueous solution. The colloidal particles thus became a pool of stored electrons that could reduce water to form hydrogen or react with suitable acceptors in solution. The organic radicals were produced by irradiation, using suitable scavengers for the primary radicals from the radiolysis of the aqueous solvent. The solutions initially contained silver ions at 1 x 10 -4 - 2 x 10 -3 M. At doses below 10 5 rd, the silver ions were completely reduced to form the colloidal catalyst. In this dose range, the corresponding hydrogen yield amounted to 1 molecule per 100 eV. It increased steeply at higher doses up to 3 molecules per 100 eV. The H 2 yield decreased with increasing dose rate and with increasing pH in alkaline solutions. It was highest at a concentration of sodium dodecyl sulfate of 1 x 10 -3 M, i.e., far below the critical micelle concentration of this surfactant. Changes in the absorption spectrum of the colloid are attributed to changes in the size of the silver particles upon charging up with electrons. The competition of radical-colloid reactions with radical-radical deactivation in the bulk of solution or at the surface of the colloidal particles is also discussed. 11 figures

  4. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF 3D SELF-ASSEMBLED PHOTONIC CRYSTALS AND COLLOIDAL CORE-SHELL SEMICONDUCTOR QUANTUM DOTS

    Pham Thu Nga

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution we present an experimental study of 3D opal photonic crystals. The samples are opals constituted by colloidal silica spheres, realized with self-assembly technique. The sphere diameter is selected in order to obtain coupling of the photonic band gap with the emission from CdSe/ZnS colloidal quantum dots. The quantum dots infiltrated in the opals is expected to be enhanced or suppressed depending on the detection angle from the photonic crystal. The structural and optical characterization of the SiO2 opal photonic crystals are performed by field-emission scanning electron microscopy and reflectivity spectroscopy. Measurements performed on samples permits to put into evidence the influence of the different preparation methods on the optical properties. Study of self-activated luminescence of the pure opals is also presented. It is shown that the luminescence of the sample with QDs have original QD emission and not due to the photonic crystal structure. The optical properties of colloidal core-shell semiconductor quantum dots of CdSe/ZnS which are prepared in our lab will be mention.

  5. Sensitive chemical neutron dosimetry using silver colloids

    Brede, O.; Boes, J.; Hoesselbarth, B.

    1982-01-01

    The radiation-induced formation of silver colloid was checked for its use as a sensitive dosimeter for neutron irradiation. For non-monoenergetic pulsed neutron irradiation in the Dubna IBR-30 reactor, the colloid dosimeter was found to be suitable to indicate the chemical neutron effect, i.e., to determine the sum concentration of the primary particles of water radiolysis: esub(aq)sup(-), OH and H. (author)

  6. Colloidal Silver Not Approved for Treating Animals

    Bagley, Clell V, DVM

    1997-01-01

    FDA has received reports that products containing colloidal silver are being promoted for use in the treatment of mastitis and other serious disease conditions of dairy cattle, as well as for various conditions of companion animals. For example, FDA’s Center for Veterinary Medicine has received reports from the Agency's regional milk specialists and State inspectors that colloidal silver products have been found on some dairy farms. Also, recent articles in some farm newspapers and journals p...

  7. Internal Charging

    Minow, Joseph I.

    2014-01-01

    (1) High energy (>100keV) electrons penetrate spacecraft walls and accumulate in dielectrics or isolated conductors; (2) Threat environment is energetic electrons with sufficient flux to charge circuit boards, cable insulation, and ungrounded metal faster than charge can dissipate; (3) Accumulating charge density generates electric fields in excess of material breakdown strenght resulting in electrostatic discharge; and (4) System impact is material damage, discharge currents inside of spacecraft Faraday cage on or near critical circuitry, and RF noise.

  8. Electroluminescence of colloidal ZnSe quantum dots

    Dey, S.C.; Nath, S.S.

    2011-01-01

    The article reports a green chemical synthesis of colloidal ZnSe quantum dots at a moderate temperature. The prepared colloid sample is characterised by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. UV-vis spectroscopy reveals as-expected blue-shift with strong absorption edge at 400 nm and micrographs show a non-uniform size distribution of ZnSe quantum dots in the range 1-4 nm. Further, photoluminescence and electroluminescence spectroscopies are carried out to study optical emission. Each of the spectroscopies reveals two emission peaks, indicating band-to-band transition and defect related transition. From the luminescence studies, it can be inferred that the recombination of electrons and holes resulting from interband transition causes violet emission and the recombination of a photon generated hole with a charged state of Zn-vacancy gives blue emission. Meanwhile electroluminescence study suggests the application of ZnSe quantum dots as an efficient light emitting device with the advantage of colour tuning (violet-blue-violet). - Highlights: → Synthesis of ZnSe quantum dots by a green chemical route. → Characterisation: UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. → Analysis of UV-vis absorption spectrum and transmission electron micrographs. → Study of electro-optical properties by photoluminescence and electroluminescence. → Conclusion: ZnSe quantum dots can be used as LED with dual colour emission.

  9. Redox active polymers and colloidal particles for flow batteries

    Gavvalapalli, Nagarjuna; Moore, Jeffrey S.; Rodriguez-Lopez, Joaquin; Cheng, Kevin; Shen, Mei; Lichtenstein, Timothy

    2018-05-29

    The invention provides a redox flow battery comprising a microporous or nanoporous size-exclusion membrane, wherein one cell of the battery contains a redox-active polymer dissolved in the non-aqueous solvent or a redox-active colloidal particle dispersed in the non-aqueous solvent. The redox flow battery provides enhanced ionic conductivity across the electrolyte separator and reduced redox-active species crossover, thereby improving the performance and enabling widespread utilization. Redox active poly(vinylbenzyl ethylviologen) (RAPs) and redox active colloidal particles (RACs) were prepared and were found to be highly effective redox species. Controlled potential bulk electrolysis indicates that 94-99% of the nominal charge on different RAPs is accessible and the electrolysis products are stable upon cycling. The high concentration attainable (>2.0 M) for RAPs in common non-aqueous battery solvents, their electrochemical and chemical reversibility, and their hindered transport across porous separators make them attractive materials for non-aqueous redox flow batteries based on size-selectivity.

  10. Electron transport in gold colloidal nanoparticle-based strain gauges

    Moreira, Helena; Grisolia, Jérémie; Sangeetha, Neralagatta M.; Decorde, Nicolas; Farcau, Cosmin; Viallet, Benoit; Chen, Ke; Viau, Guillaume; Ressier, Laurence

    2013-03-01

    A systematic approach for understanding the electron transport mechanisms in resistive strain gauges based on assemblies of gold colloidal nanoparticles (NPs) protected by organic ligands is described. The strain gauges were fabricated from parallel micrometer wide wires made of 14 nm gold (Au) colloidal NPs on polyethylene terephthalate substrates, elaborated by convective self-assembly. Electron transport in such devices occurs by inter-particle electron tunneling through the tunnel barrier imposed by the organic ligands protecting the NPs. This tunnel barrier was varied by changing the nature of organic ligands coating the nanoparticles: citrate (CIT), phosphines (BSPP, TDSP) and thiols (MPA, MUDA). Electro-mechanical tests indicate that only the gold NPs protected by phosphine and thiol ligands yield high gauge sensitivity. Temperature-dependent resistance measurements are explained using the ‘regular island array model’ that extracts transport parameters, i.e., the tunneling decay constant β and the Coulomb charging energy EC. This reveals that the Au@CIT nanoparticle assemblies exhibit a behavior characteristic of a strong-coupling regime, whereas those of Au@BSPP, Au@TDSP, Au@MPA and Au@MUDA nanoparticles manifest a weak-coupling regime. A comparison of the parameters extracted from the two methods indicates that the most sensitive gauges in the weak-coupling regime feature the highest β. Moreover, the EC values of these 14 nm NPs cannot be neglected in determining the β values.

  11. A FEW CONSIDERATIONS REGARDING THE SPHERE OF FINANCIAL RELATIONS

    Bota Anton Florin

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The author discusses his financial affairs sphere, looking at this issue under a double aspect: analysis of the financial relations sphere and analyzing the financial activity sphere. Analysis of the financial relations sphere is made on the basis of fou

  12. The Separate Spheres Model of Gendered Inequality.

    Miller, Andrea L; Borgida, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Research on role congruity theory and descriptive and prescriptive stereotypes has established that when men and women violate gender stereotypes by crossing spheres, with women pursuing career success and men contributing to domestic labor, they face backlash and economic penalties. Less is known, however, about the types of individuals who are most likely to engage in these forms of discrimination and the types of situations in which this is most likely to occur. We propose that psychological research will benefit from supplementing existing research approaches with an individual differences model of support for separate spheres for men and women. This model allows psychologists to examine individual differences in support for separate spheres as they interact with situational and contextual forces. The separate spheres ideology (SSI) has existed as a cultural idea for many years but has not been operationalized or modeled in social psychology. The Separate Spheres Model presents the SSI as a new psychological construct characterized by individual differences and a motivated system-justifying function, operationalizes the ideology with a new scale measure, and models the ideology as a predictor of some important gendered outcomes in society. As a first step toward developing the Separate Spheres Model, we develop a new measure of individuals' endorsement of the SSI and demonstrate its reliability, convergent validity, and incremental predictive validity. We provide support for the novel hypotheses that the SSI predicts attitudes regarding workplace flexibility accommodations, income distribution within families between male and female partners, distribution of labor between work and family spheres, and discriminatory workplace behaviors. Finally, we provide experimental support for the hypothesis that the SSI is a motivated, system-justifying ideology.

  13. The Separate Spheres Model of Gendered Inequality.

    Andrea L Miller

    Full Text Available Research on role congruity theory and descriptive and prescriptive stereotypes has established that when men and women violate gender stereotypes by crossing spheres, with women pursuing career success and men contributing to domestic labor, they face backlash and economic penalties. Less is known, however, about the types of individuals who are most likely to engage in these forms of discrimination and the types of situations in which this is most likely to occur. We propose that psychological research will benefit from supplementing existing research approaches with an individual differences model of support for separate spheres for men and women. This model allows psychologists to examine individual differences in support for separate spheres as they interact with situational and contextual forces. The separate spheres ideology (SSI has existed as a cultural idea for many years but has not been operationalized or modeled in social psychology. The Separate Spheres Model presents the SSI as a new psychological construct characterized by individual differences and a motivated system-justifying function, operationalizes the ideology with a new scale measure, and models the ideology as a predictor of some important gendered outcomes in society. As a first step toward developing the Separate Spheres Model, we develop a new measure of individuals' endorsement of the SSI and demonstrate its reliability, convergent validity, and incremental predictive validity. We provide support for the novel hypotheses that the SSI predicts attitudes regarding workplace flexibility accommodations, income distribution within families between male and female partners, distribution of labor between work and family spheres, and discriminatory workplace behaviors. Finally, we provide experimental support for the hypothesis that the SSI is a motivated, system-justifying ideology.

  14. The Separate Spheres Model of Gendered Inequality

    Miller, Andrea L.; Borgida, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Research on role congruity theory and descriptive and prescriptive stereotypes has established that when men and women violate gender stereotypes by crossing spheres, with women pursuing career success and men contributing to domestic labor, they face backlash and economic penalties. Less is known, however, about the types of individuals who are most likely to engage in these forms of discrimination and the types of situations in which this is most likely to occur. We propose that psychological research will benefit from supplementing existing research approaches with an individual differences model of support for separate spheres for men and women. This model allows psychologists to examine individual differences in support for separate spheres as they interact with situational and contextual forces. The separate spheres ideology (SSI) has existed as a cultural idea for many years but has not been operationalized or modeled in social psychology. The Separate Spheres Model presents the SSI as a new psychological construct characterized by individual differences and a motivated system-justifying function, operationalizes the ideology with a new scale measure, and models the ideology as a predictor of some important gendered outcomes in society. As a first step toward developing the Separate Spheres Model, we develop a new measure of individuals’ endorsement of the SSI and demonstrate its reliability, convergent validity, and incremental predictive validity. We provide support for the novel hypotheses that the SSI predicts attitudes regarding workplace flexibility accommodations, income distribution within families between male and female partners, distribution of labor between work and family spheres, and discriminatory workplace behaviors. Finally, we provide experimental support for the hypothesis that the SSI is a motivated, system-justifying ideology. PMID:26800454

  15. Radiation-electrochemistry of the colloidal gold micro-electrode: Hydrogen formation by organic free radicals

    Westerhausen, J.; Henglein, A.; Lilie, J.

    1981-01-01

    Various organic free radicals as well as Ni + ions produce hydrogen in the presence of some 10 -4 M of colloidal gold. The gold catalyst was prepared via the reduction of HAuCl 4 either thermally by citrate or by γ-irradiation. The organic radicals were radiolytically produced. The mechanism of H 2 formation includes electron transfer from the organic radicals to the gold particles, storage of a large number of electrons per gold particle, conversion of the electrons into adsorbed H-atoms and desorption of the latter to form H 2 . - The rates of some of these steps were measured using the method of pulse radiolysis. 1-Hydroxy-1-methyl ethyl radicals, (CH 3 ) 2 COH, react with colloidal gold particles almost diffusion controlled provided that the gold particles are not charged with excess electrons. Charged gold particles react at a substantially lower rate. The stored electrons live seconds or even minutes depending on their number per gold particle. In the stationary state, up to 0.38 Coulomb of electrons could be stored per liter of a 2.9x10 -4 molar gold solution, each gold particle carrying about 39 electrons. A comparison is also made between the catalytic activities of colloidal gold and silver. Due to the relative fast conversion of electrons into adsorbed H-atoms, colloidal gold has less capacity for the storage of electrons than colloidal silver. - The dependence of the hydrogen yield on the pH of the solution, the concentration of gold, the size of the gold particles, the concentration of the polyvinyl alcohol stabilizer, and the intensity of radiation was also investigated. At high intensities, some of the radicals are destroyed in a gold catalysed disproportionation. (orig.)

  16. Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Radionuclides Through The Vadose Zone

    Markus Flury; James B. Harsh; John F. McCarthy' Peter C. Lichtner; John M. Zachara

    2007-01-01

    The main purpose of this project was to advance the basic scientific understanding of colloid and colloid-facilitated Cs transport of radionuclides in the vadose zone. We focused our research on the hydrological and geochemical conditions beneath the leaking waste tanks at the USDOE Hanford reservation. Specific objectives were (1) to determine the lability and thermodynamic stability of colloidal materials, which form after reacting Hanford sediments with simulated Hanford Tank Waste, (2) to characterize the interactions between colloidal particles and contaminants, i.e., Cs and Eu, (3) to determine the potential of Hanford sediments for in situ mobilization of colloids, (4) to evaluate colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport through sediments under unsaturated flow, (5) to implement colloid-facilitated contaminant transport mechanisms into a transport model, and (6) to improve conceptual characterization of colloid-contaminant-soil interactions and colloid-facilitated transport for clean-up procedures and long-term risk assessment

  17. Synthesis and characterization of hollow α-Fe2O3 sub-micron spheres prepared by sol–gel

    León, Lizbet; Bustamante, Angel; Osorio, Ana; Olarte, G. S.; Santos Valladares, Luis De Los; Barnes, Crispin H. W.; Majima, Yutaka

    2011-01-01

    In this work we report the preparation of magnetic hematite hollow sub-micron spheres (α-Fe 2 O 3 ) by colloidal suspensions of ferric nitrate nine-hydrate (Fe(NO 3 ) 3 ·9H 2 O) particles in citric acid solution by following the sol–gel method. After the gel formation, the samples were annealed at different temperatures in an oxidizing atmosphere. Annealing at 180°C resulted in an amorphous phase, without iron oxide formation. Annealing at 250°C resulted in coexisting phases of hematite, maghemite and magnetite, whereas at 400°C, only hematite and maghemite were found. Pure hematite hollow sub-micron spheres with porous shells were formed after annealing at 600°C. The characterization was performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  18. Influence of Protamine Functionalization on the Colloidal Stability of 1D and 2D Titanium Oxide Nanostructures.

    Rouster, Paul; Pavlovic, Marko; Horváth, Endre; Forró, László; Dey, Sandwip K; Szilagyi, Istvan

    2017-09-26

    The colloidal stability of titanium oxide nanosheets (TNS) and nanowires (TiONW) was studied in the presence of protamine (natural polyelectrolyte) in aqueous dispersions, where the nanostructures possessed negative net charge, and the protamine was positively charged. Regardless of their shape, similar charging and aggregation behaviors were observed for both TNS and TiONW. Electrophoretic experiments performed at different protamine loadings revealed that the adsorption of protamine led to charge neutralization and charge inversion depending on the polyelectrolyte dose applied. Light scattering measurements indicated unstable dispersions once the surface charge was close to zero or slow aggregation below and above the charge neutralization point with negatively or positively charged nanostructures, respectively. These stability regimes were confirmed by the electron microscopy images taken at different polyelectrolyte loadings. The protamine dose and salt-dependent colloidal stability confirmed the presence of DLVO-type interparticle forces, and no experimental evidence was found for additional interactions (e.g., patch-charge, hydrophobic, or steric forces), which are usually present in similar polyelectrolyte-particle systems. These findings indicate that the polyelectrolyte adsorbs on the TNS and TiONW surfaces in a flat and extended conformation giving rise to the absence of surface heterogeneities. Therefore, protamine is an excellent biocompatible candidate to form smooth surfaces, for instance in multilayers composed of polyelectrolytes and particles to be used in biomedical applications.

  19. Charge Control And Wettability Alteration At Solid-liquid Interfaces

    Mugele, Friedrich Gunther; Sîretanu, Igor; Kumar, Naveen; Bera, B.; Wang, Lei; Maestro, Armando; Duits, Michael H.G.; van den Ende, Henricus T.M.; Collins, I

    2014-01-01

    Most solid surfaces acquire a finite surface charge upon exposure to aqueous environments due to desorption and/or adsorption of ionic species. The resulting electrostatic forces play a crucial role in many fields of science, including colloidal stability, self-assembly, wetting, and biophysics as

  20. Dynamic Trap Formation and Elimination in Colloidal Quantum Dots

    Voznyy, O.

    2013-03-21

    Using first-principles simulations on PbS and CdSe colloidal quantum dots, we find that surface defects form in response to electronic doping and charging of the nanoparticles. We show that electronic trap states in nanocrystals are dynamic entities, in contrast with the conventional picture wherein traps are viewed as stable electronic states that can be filled or emptied, but not created or destroyed. These traps arise from the formation or breaking of atomic dimers at the nanoparticle surface. The dimers\\' energy levels can reside within the bandgap, in which case a trap is formed. Fortunately, we are also able to identify a number of shallow-electron-affinity cations that stabilize the surface, working to counter dynamic trap formation and allowing for trap-free doping. © 2013 American Chemical Society.