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Sample records for charged carboxy-terminal domain

  1. Hepatitis C virus NS4B carboxy terminal domain is a membrane binding domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spaan Willy JM

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV induces membrane rearrangements during replication. All HCV proteins are associated to membranes, pointing out the importance of membranes for HCV. Non structural protein 4B (NS4B has been reported to induce cellular membrane alterations like the membranous web. Four transmembrane segments in the middle of the protein anchor NS4B to membranes. An amphipatic helix at the amino-terminus attaches to membranes as well. The carboxy-terminal domain (CTD of NS4B is highly conserved in Hepaciviruses, though its function remains unknown. Results A cytosolic localization is predicted for the NS4B-CTD. However, using membrane floatation assays and immunofluorescence, we now show targeting of the NS4B-CTD to membranes. Furthermore, a profile-profile search, with an HCV NS4B-CTD multiple sequence alignment, indicates sequence similarity to the membrane binding domain of prokaryotic D-lactate dehydrogenase (d-LDH. The crystal structure of E. coli d-LDH suggests that the region similar to NS4B-CTD is located in the membrane binding domain (MBD of d-LDH, implying analogy in membrane association. Targeting of d-LDH to membranes occurs via electrostatic interactions of positive residues on the outside of the protein with negative head groups of lipids. To verify that anchorage of d-LDH MBD and NS4B-CTD is analogous, NS4B-CTD mutants were designed to disrupt these electrostatic interactions. Membrane association was confirmed by swopping the membrane contacting helix of d-LDH with the corresponding domain of the 4B-CTD. Furthermore, the functionality of these residues was tested in the HCV replicon system. Conclusion Together these data show that NS4B-CTD is associated to membranes, similar to the prokaryotic d-LDH MBD, and is important for replication.

  2. The carboxy-terminal domain of Erb1 is a seven-bladed ß-propeller that binds RNA.

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    Marcin Wegrecki

    Full Text Available Erb1 (Eukaryotic Ribosome Biogenesis 1 protein is essential for the maturation of the ribosomal 60S subunit. Functional studies in yeast and mammalian cells showed that altogether with Nop7 and Ytm1 it forms a stable subcomplex called PeBoW that is crucial for a correct rRNA processing. The exact function of the protein within the process remains unknown. The N-terminal region of the protein includes a well conserved region shown to be involved in PeBoW complex formation whereas the carboxy-terminal half was predicted to contain seven WD40 repeats. This first structural report on Erb1 from yeast describes the architecture of a seven-bladed β-propeller domain that revealed a characteristic extra motif formed by two α-helices and a β-strand that insert within the second WD repeat. We performed analysis of molecular surface and crystal packing, together with multiple sequence alignment and comparison of the structure with other β-propellers, in order to identify areas that are more likely to mediate protein-protein interactions. The abundance of many positively charged residues on the surface of the domain led us to investigate whether the propeller of Erb1 might be involved in RNA binding. Three independent assays confirmed that the protein interacted in vitro with polyuridilic acid (polyU, thus suggesting a possible role of the domain in rRNA rearrangement during ribosome biogenesis.

  3. The carboxy-terminal domain of Dictyostelium C-module-binding factor is an independent gene regulatory entity.

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    Jörg Lucas

    Full Text Available The C-module-binding factor (CbfA is a multidomain protein that belongs to the family of jumonji-type (JmjC transcription regulators. In the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, CbfA regulates gene expression during the unicellular growth phase and multicellular development. CbfA and a related D. discoideum CbfA-like protein, CbfB, share a paralogous domain arrangement that includes the JmjC domain, presumably a chromatin-remodeling activity, and two zinc finger-like (ZF motifs. On the other hand, the CbfA and CbfB proteins have completely different carboxy-terminal domains, suggesting that the plasticity of such domains may have contributed to the adaptation of the CbfA-like transcription factors to the rapid genome evolution in the dictyostelid clade. To support this hypothesis we performed DNA microarray and real-time RT-PCR measurements and found that CbfA regulates at least 160 genes during the vegetative growth of D. discoideum cells. Functional annotation of these genes revealed that CbfA predominantly controls the expression of gene products involved in housekeeping functions, such as carbohydrate, purine nucleoside/nucleotide, and amino acid metabolism. The CbfA protein displays two different mechanisms of gene regulation. The expression of one set of CbfA-dependent genes requires at least the JmjC/ZF domain of the CbfA protein and thus may depend on chromatin modulation. Regulation of the larger group of genes, however, does not depend on the entire CbfA protein and requires only the carboxy-terminal domain of CbfA (CbfA-CTD. An AT-hook motif located in CbfA-CTD, which is known to mediate DNA binding to A+T-rich sequences in vitro, contributed to CbfA-CTD-dependent gene regulatory functions in vivo.

  4. Assembly of spikes into coronavirus particles is mediated by the carboxy-terminal domain of the spike protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Godeke, G J; de Haan, C A; Rossen, J W; Vennema, H; Rottier, P J

    2000-01-01

    The type I glycoprotein S of coronavirus, trimers of which constitute the typical viral spikes, is assembled into virions through noncovalent interactions with the M protein. Here we demonstrate that incorporation is mediated by the short carboxy-terminal segment comprising the transmembrane and end

  5. Opitz G/BBB syndrome in Xp22: mutations in the MID1 gene cluster in the carboxy-terminal domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudenz, K; Roessler, E; Quaderi, N; Franco, B; Feldman, G; Gasser, D L; Wittwer, B; Horst, J; Montini, E; Opitz, J M; Ballabio, A; Muenke, M

    1998-01-01

    The MID1 gene in Xp22 codes for a novel member of proteins containing a RING finger, B-box, coiled-coil and a conserved C-terminal domain. Initially, three mutations in the C-terminal region were found in patients with Opitz G/BBB syndrome, a defect of midline development. Here we have determined the complete gene structure of the MID1 gene and have analyzed all nine exons for mutations in a set of 40 unrelated Opitz G/BBB patients. We now report six additional mutations all clustered in the carboxy-terminal domain of the MID1 protein. These data suggest that this conserved domain of the B-box proteins may play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of Opitz syndrome and in morphogenetic events at the midline during blastogenesis. PMID:9718340

  6. The Contributions of the Amino and Carboxy Terminal Domains of Flightin to the Biomechanical Properties of Drosophila Flight Muscle Thick Filaments

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    Nathan S. Gasek

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Flightin is a myosin binding protein present in Pancrustacea. In Drosophila, flightin is expressed in the indirect flight muscles (IFM, where it is required for the flexural rigidity, structural integrity, and length determination of thick filaments. Comparison of flightin sequences from multiple Drosophila species revealed a tripartite organization indicative of three functional domains subject to different evolutionary constraints. We use atomic force microscopy to investigate the functional roles of the N-terminal domain and the C-terminal domain that show different patterns of sequence conservation. Thick filaments containing a C-terminal domain truncated flightin (flnΔC44 are significantly shorter (2.68 ± 0.06 μm; p < 0.005 than thick filaments containing a full length flightin (fln+; 3.21 ± 0.05 μm and thick filaments containing an N-terminal domain truncated flightin (flnΔN62; 3.21 ± 0.06 μm. Persistence length was significantly reduced in flnΔN62 (418 ± 72 μm; p < 0.005 compared to fln+ (1386 ± 196μm and flnΔC44(1128 ± 193 μm. Statistical polymer chain analysis revealed that the C-terminal domain fulfills a secondary role in thick filament bending propensity. Our results indicate that the flightin amino and carboxy terminal domains make distinct contributions to thick filament biomechanics. We propose these distinct roles arise from the interplay between natural selection and sexual selection given IFM’s dual role in flight and courtship behaviors.

  7. Global gene expression analysis of fission yeast mutants impaired in Ser-2 phosphorylation of the RNA pol II carboxy terminal domain.

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    Reza Saberianfar

    Full Text Available In Schizosaccharomyces pombe the nuclear-localized Lsk1p-Lsc1p cyclin dependent kinase complex promotes Ser-2 phosphorylation of the heptad repeats found within the RNA pol II carboxy terminal domain (CTD. Here, we first provide evidence supporting the existence of a third previously uncharacterized Ser-2 CTD kinase subunit, Lsg1p. As expected for a component of the complex, Lsg1p localizes to the nucleus, promotes Ser-2 phosphorylation of the CTD, and physically interacts with both Lsk1p and Lsc1p in vivo. Interestingly, we also demonstrate that lsg1Δ mutants--just like lsk1Δ and lsc1Δ strains--are compromised in their ability to faithfully and reliably complete cytokinesis. Next, to address whether kinase mediated alterations in CTD phosphorylation might selectively alter the expression of genes with roles in cytokinesis and/or the cytoskeleton, global gene expression profiles were analyzed. Mutants impaired in Ser-2 phosphorylation display little change with respect to the level of transcription of most genes. However, genes affecting cytokinesis--including the actin interacting protein gene, aip1--as well as genes with roles in meiosis, are included in a small subset that are differentially regulated. Significantly, genetic analysis of lsk1Δ aip1Δ double mutants is consistent with Lsk1p and Aip1p acting in a linear pathway with respect to the regulation of cytokinesis.

  8. Recruitment of TATA-Binding Protein–TAFI Complex SL1 to the Human Ribosomal DNA Promoter Is Mediated by the Carboxy-Terminal Activation Domain of Upstream Binding Factor (UBF) and Is Regulated by UBF Phosphorylation

    OpenAIRE

    Tuan, JoAnn C.; Zhai, Weiguo; Comai, Lucio

    1999-01-01

    Human rRNA synthesis by RNA polymerase I requires at least two auxiliary factors, upstream binding factor (UBF) and SL1. UBF is a DNA binding protein with multiple HMG domains that binds directly to the CORE and UCE elements of the ribosomal DNA promoter. The carboxy-terminal region of UBF is necessary for transcription activation and has been shown to be extensively phosphorylated. SL1, which consists of TATA-binding protein (TBP) and three associated factors (TAFIs), does not have any seque...

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the Escherichia coli outer membrane cobalamin transporter BtuB in complex with the carboxy-terminal domain of TonB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shultis, David D.; Purdy, Michael D. [Department of Molecular Physiology and Biological Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908 (United States); Banchs, Christian N. [Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Biophysics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908 (United States); Wiener, Michael C., E-mail: mwiener@virginia.edu [Department of Molecular Physiology and Biological Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908 (United States); Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Biophysics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Crystals of a complex of the E. coli proteins BtuB (outer membrane cobalamin transporter) and TonB (carboxy-terminal domain) diffracting to 2.1 Å resolution have been obtained. The energy-dependent uptake of organometallic compounds and other micronutrients across the outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria is carried out by outer membrane active-transport proteins that utilize the proton-motive force of the inner membrane via coupling to the TonB protein. The Escherichia coli outer membrane cobalamin transporter BtuB and a carboxy-terminal domain of the TonB protein, residues 147–239 of the wild-type protein, were expressed and purified individually. A complex of BtuB and TonB{sup 147–239} was formed in the presence of the substrate cyanocobalamin (CN-Cbl; vitamin B{sub 12}) and calcium and was crystallized. BtuB was purified in the detergent LDAO (n-dodecyl-N,N-dimethylamine-N-oxide) and the complex was formed in a detergent mixture of LDAO and C{sub 8}E{sub 4} (tetraethylene glycol monooctylether). Crystals were obtained by sitting-drop vapor diffusion, with the reservoir containing 30%(v/v) polyethylene glycol (PEG 300) and 100 mM sodium acetate pH 5.2. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} (unit-cell parameters a = 74.3, b = 82.4, c = 122.6 Å). The asymmetric unit consists of a single BtuB–TonB complex. Data sets have been collected to 2.1 Å resolution at a synchrotron beamline (APS SER-CAT 22-ID)

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the Escherichia coli outer membrane cobalamin transporter BtuB in complex with the carboxy-terminal domain of TonB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystals of a complex of the E. coli proteins BtuB (outer membrane cobalamin transporter) and TonB (carboxy-terminal domain) diffracting to 2.1 Å resolution have been obtained. The energy-dependent uptake of organometallic compounds and other micronutrients across the outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria is carried out by outer membrane active-transport proteins that utilize the proton-motive force of the inner membrane via coupling to the TonB protein. The Escherichia coli outer membrane cobalamin transporter BtuB and a carboxy-terminal domain of the TonB protein, residues 147–239 of the wild-type protein, were expressed and purified individually. A complex of BtuB and TonB147–239 was formed in the presence of the substrate cyanocobalamin (CN-Cbl; vitamin B12) and calcium and was crystallized. BtuB was purified in the detergent LDAO (n-dodecyl-N,N-dimethylamine-N-oxide) and the complex was formed in a detergent mixture of LDAO and C8E4 (tetraethylene glycol monooctylether). Crystals were obtained by sitting-drop vapor diffusion, with the reservoir containing 30%(v/v) polyethylene glycol (PEG 300) and 100 mM sodium acetate pH 5.2. The crystals belong to space group P212121 (unit-cell parameters a = 74.3, b = 82.4, c = 122.6 Å). The asymmetric unit consists of a single BtuB–TonB complex. Data sets have been collected to 2.1 Å resolution at a synchrotron beamline (APS SER-CAT 22-ID)

  11. The Contributions of the Amino and Carboxy Terminal Domains of Flightin to the Biomechanical Properties of Drosophila Flight Muscle Thick Filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasek, Nathan S; Nyland, Lori R; Vigoreaux, Jim O

    2016-01-01

    Flightin is a myosin binding protein present in Pancrustacea. In Drosophila, flightin is expressed in the indirect flight muscles (IFM), where it is required for the flexural rigidity, structural integrity, and length determination of thick filaments. Comparison of flightin sequences from multiple Drosophila species revealed a tripartite organization indicative of three functional domains subject to different evolutionary constraints. We use atomic force microscopy to investigate the functional roles of the N-terminal domain and the C-terminal domain that show different patterns of sequence conservation. Thick filaments containing a C-terminal domain truncated flightin (fln(ΔC44)) are significantly shorter (2.68 ± 0.06 μm; p biomechanics. We propose these distinct roles arise from the interplay between natural selection and sexual selection given IFM's dual role in flight and courtship behaviors. PMID:27128952

  12. The Contributions of the Amino and Carboxy Terminal Domains of Flightin to the Biomechanical Properties of Drosophila Flight Muscle Thick Filaments

    OpenAIRE

    Nathan S. Gasek; Lori R. Nyland; Vigoreaux, Jim O.

    2016-01-01

    Flightin is a myosin binding protein present in Pancrustacea. In Drosophila, flightin is expressed in the indirect flight muscles (IFM), where it is required for the flexural rigidity, structural integrity, and length determination of thick filaments. Comparison of flightin sequences from multiple Drosophila species revealed a tripartite organization indicative of three functional domains subject to different evolutionary constraints. We use atomic force microscopy to investigate the function...

  13. Opitz G/BBB syndrome in Xp22: mutations in the MID1 gene cluster in the carboxy-terminal domain.

    OpenAIRE

    Gaudenz, K; Roessler, E.; Quaderi, N; B. Franco; Feldman, G.; Gasser, D L; Wittwer, B.; Horst, J; Montini, E; Opitz, J M; Ballabio, A; Muenke, M

    1998-01-01

    The MID1 gene in Xp22 codes for a novel member of proteins containing a RING finger, B-box, coiled-coil and a conserved C-terminal domain. Initially, three mutations in the C-terminal region were found in patients with Opitz G/BBB syndrome, a defect of midline development. Here we have determined the complete gene structure of the MID1 gene and have analyzed all nine exons for mutations in a set of 40 unrelated Opitz G/BBB patients. We now report six additional mutations all clustered in the ...

  14. Functions of the conserved thrombospondin carboxy-terminal cassette in cell-extracellular matrix interactions and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Josephine C

    2004-06-01

    Thrombospondins (TSPs) are extracellular, multidomain, calcium-binding glycoproteins that function at cell surfaces, in extracellular matrix (ECM) and as bridging molecules in cell-cell interactions. TSPs are multifunctional and modulate cell behavior during development, wound-healing, immune response, tumor growth and in the homeostasis of adult tissues. TSPs are assembled as oligomers that are composed of homologous polypeptides. In all the TSP polypeptides, the most highly-conserved region is the carboxyl-region, which contains a characteristic set of domains comprising EGF domains, TSP type 3 repeats and a globular carboxy-terminal domain. This large region is termed here the thrombospondin carboxy-terminal cassette (TSP-CTC). The strong conservation of the TSP-CTC suggests that it may mediate ancestral functions that are shared by all TSPs. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the TSP-CTC and areas of future interest. PMID:15094125

  15. Antibody of predetermined specificity to a carboxy-terminal region of H-ras gene products inhibits their guanine nucleotide-binding function.

    OpenAIRE

    Srivastava, S. K.; Lacal, J C; Reynolds, S.H.; Aaronson, S A

    1985-01-01

    The high prevalence of ras oncogenes in human tumors has given increasing impetus to efforts aimed at elucidating the structure and function of their p21 products. To identify functionally important domains of the p21 protein, antibodies were generated against synthetic peptides corresponding to various regions of the protein. Antibodies directed against a synthetic peptide fragment corresponding to amino acid residues 161 to 176 in the carboxy-terminal region of the H-ras-encoded p21 molecul...

  16. A key role for the carboxy-terminal tail of the murine coronavirus nucleocapsid protein in coordination of genome packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Lili; Koetzner, Cheri A; Masters, Paul S

    2016-07-01

    The prototype coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) exhibits highly selective packaging of its genomic positive-stranded RNA into assembled virions, despite the presence in infected cells of a large excess of subgenomic viral mRNAs. One component of this selectivity is the MHV packaging signal (PS), an RNA structure found only in genomic RNA and not in subgenomic RNAs. It was previously shown that a major determinant of PS recognition is the second of the two RNA-binding domains of the viral nucleocapsid (N) protein. We have now found that PS recognition additionally depends upon a segment of the carboxy-terminal tail (domain N3) of the N protein. Since domain N3 is also the region of N protein that interacts with the membrane (M) protein, this finding suggests a mechanism by which selective genome packaging is accomplished, through the coupling of genome encapsidation to virion assembly. PMID:27105451

  17. Elevated carboxy terminal cross linked telopeptide of type I collagen in alcoholic cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Hansen, M; Hillingsø, Jens;

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The carboxy terminal cross linked telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) has been put forward as a marker of bone resorption. Patients with alcoholic liver disease may have osteodystrophy. AIMS: To assess circulating and regional concentrations of ICTP in relation to liver dysfunction...

  18. The carboxy-terminal half of nonstructural protein 3A is not essential for foot-and-mouth disease virus replication in cultured cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behura, Mrutyunjay; Mohapatra, Jajati K; Pandey, Laxmi K; Das, Biswajit; Bhatt, Mukesh; Subramaniam, Saravanan; Pattnaik, Bramhadev

    2016-05-01

    In foot-and-mouth disease (FMD)-endemic parts of the globe, control is mainly implemented by preventive vaccination with an inactivated purified vaccine. ELISAs detecting antibodies to the viral nonstructural proteins (NSP) distinguish FMD virus (FMDV)-infected animals in the vaccinated population (DIVA). However, residual NSPs present in the vaccines are suspected to be a cause of occasional false positive results, and therefore, an epitope-deleted negative marker vaccine strategy is considered a more logical option. In this study, employing a serotype Asia 1 FMDV infectious cDNA clone, it is demonstrated that while large deletions differing in size and location in the carboxy-terminal half of 3A downstream of the putative hydrophobic membrane-binding domain (deletion of residues 86-110, 101-149, 81-149 and 81-153) are tolerated by the virus without affecting its infectivity in cultured cell lines, deletions in the amino-terminal half (residues 5-54, 21-50, 21-80, 55-80 and 5-149) containing the dimerization and the transmembrane domains are deleterious to its multiplication. Most importantly, the virus could dispense with the entire carboxy-terminal half of 3A (residues 81-153) including the residues involved in the formation of the 3A-3B1 cleavage junction. The rescue of a replication-competent FMDV variant carrying the largest deletion ever in 3A (residues 81-153) and the fact that the deleted region contains a series of linear B-cell epitopes inspired us to devise an indirect ELISA based on a recombinant 3A carboxy-terminal fragment and to evaluate its potential to serve as a companion diagnostic assay for differential serosurveillance if the 3A-truncated virus is used as a marker vaccine. PMID:26935917

  19. Metabolism of radioiodinated carboxy-terminal fragments of bovine parathyroid hormone in normal and anephric rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    [125I]Carboxy-terminal fragments were produced by incubating [125I]bovine PTH(1-84) with plasma membranes from the rat renal cortex. After purification by gel chromatography and characterization by sequence analysis, these fragments, mainly [125I]bovine PTH(41-84), were injected into normal and acutely nephrectomized rats during two different experiments. In each case, blood was obtained from five rats at various time points (2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 24, 48, and 96 min); tissue was taken after they had been killed (4, 8, 24, and 96 min). Plasma and weighted aliquots of tissues were counted. Plasma at each time point and the extract of various tissues at the 8-min mark were further analyzed by gel chromatography. Each radioactivity peak on each profile was identified and quantitated planimetrically. [125I]Carboxy-terminal fragments were extracted from serum biexponentially: the first exponential had a half-life of 2.3 min and the second 27.2 min in normal rats. These values increased to 3.2 min (X 1.4) and 74.0 min (X 2.7) in nephrectomized rats. In normal rats, 125I-extraction was 33.4% (kidney), 15.9% (muscle), 6.9% (bone), less than 2.7% (liver), and under 1% in other tissues. In nephrectomized rats, these values were significantly (P less than 0.005) increased to 24.6% (muscle), 10% (bone), and 6.8% (liver) with less than 1% in other tissues. Most of the 125I-radioactivity present in these tissues at the 8-min time point migrated in the same manner as injected fragments or smaller degradation products generated in situ. Tissues which play a secondary role in circulating carboxy-terminal fragment extraction in normal rats can therefore increase this activity in anephric animals

  20. The carboxy-terminal 14 amino acids of phage lambda N protein are dispensable for transcription antitermination.

    OpenAIRE

    Franklin, N. C.

    1992-01-01

    The analogous N proteins encoded by lambdoid bacteriophages lambda, 21, and 22 are very different in amino acid sequence, except at their carboxy-terminal ends. Since N lambda remains functional despite the deletion of most of its terminal region of homology to N21, that region of homology cannot represent a region of conserved function.

  1. Carboxy terminal peptide of type I procollagen and epidermal growth factor in patients with different viral hepatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author observed the serum levels of carboxy terminal peptide of type I procollagen (PICP) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) in the patients with viral hepatitis and cirrhosis. The serum PICP and EGF were detected in 164 cases by RIA. The results indicated that two indexes increased significantly in patients with severe chronic hepatitis, chronic persistent hepatitis and post hepatitis cirrhosis compared with normal control (P 0.05). The results showed that detection of serum PICP and EGF may be valuable diagnostic markers to assess the degree of liver inflammation and fibrosis in viral liver diseases

  2. Caspase-3-mediated cleavage of p65/RelA results in a carboxy-terminal fragment that inhibits IκBα and enhances HIV-1 replication in human T lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcamí José

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Degradation of p65/RelA has been involved in both the inhibition of NF-κB-dependent activity and the onset of apoptosis. However, the mechanisms of NF-κB degradation are unclear and can vary depending on the cell type. Cleavage of p65/RelA can produce an amino-terminal fragment that was shown to act as a dominant-negative inhibitor of NF-κB, thereby promoting apoptosis. However, the opposite situation has also been described and the production of a carboxy-terminal fragment that contains two potent transactivation domains has also been related to the onset of apoptosis. In this context, a carboxy-terminal fragment of p65/RelA (ΔNH2p65, detected in non-apoptotic human T lymphocytes upon activation, has been studied. T cells constitute one of the long-lived cellular reservoirs of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1. Because NF-κB is the most important inducible element involved in initiation of HIV-1 transcription, an adequate control of NF-κB response is of paramount importance for both T cell survival and viral spread. Its major inhibitor IκBα constitutes a master terminator of NF-κB response that is complemented by degradation of p65/RelA. Results and conclusions In this study, the function of a caspase-3-mediated carboxy-terminal fragment of p65/RelA, which was detected in activated human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs, was analyzed. Cells producing this truncated p65/RelA did not undergo apoptosis but showed a high viability, in spite of caspase-3 activation. ΔNH2p65 lacked most of DNA-binding domain but retained the dimerization domain, NLS and transactivation domains. Consequently, it could translocate to the nucleus, associate with NF-κB1/p50 and IκBα, but could not bind -κB consensus sites. However, although ΔNH2p65 lacked transcriptional activity by itself, it could increase NF-κB activity in a dose-dependent manner by hijacking IκBα. Thus, its expression resulted in a persistent

  3. Ubiquitin Carboxy-Terminal Hydrolase-L1 as a Serum Neurotrauma Biomarker for Exposure to Occupational Low-Level Blast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Walter; Yarnell, Angela M.; Ong, Ricardo; Walilko, Timothy; Kamimori, Gary H.; da Silva, Uade; McCarron, Richard M.; LoPresti, Matthew L.

    2015-01-01

    Repeated exposure to low-level blast is a characteristic of a few select occupations and there is concern that such occupational exposures present risk for traumatic brain injury. These occupations include specialized military and law enforcement units that employ controlled detonation of explosive charges for the purpose of tactical entry into secured structures. The concern for negative effects from blast exposure is based on rates of operator self-reported headache, sleep disturbance, working memory impairment, and other concussion-like symptoms. A challenge in research on this topic has been the need for improved assessment tools to empirically evaluate the risk associated with repeated exposure to blast overpressure levels commonly considered to be too low in magnitude to cause acute injury. Evaluation of serum-based neurotrauma biomarkers provides an objective measure that is logistically feasible for use in field training environments. Among candidate biomarkers, ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1) has some empirical support and was evaluated in this study. We used daily blood draws to examine acute change in UCH-L1 among 108 healthy military personnel who were exposed to repeated low-level blast across a 2-week period. These research volunteers also wore pressure sensors to record blast exposures, wrist actigraphs to monitor sleep patterns, and completed daily behavioral assessments of symptomology, postural stability, and neurocognitive function. UCH-L1 levels were elevated as a function of participating in the 2-week training with explosives, but the correlation of UCH-L1 elevation and blast magnitude was weak and inconsistent. Also, UCH-L1 elevations did not correlate with deficits in behavioral measures. These results provide some support for including UCH-L1 as a measure of central nervous system effects from exposure to low-level blast. However, the weak relation observed suggests that additional indicators of blast effect are needed

  4. Carboxy-terminal mutations of bile acid CoA:N-acyltransferase alter activity and substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styles, Nathan A; Shonsey, Erin M; Falany, Josie L; Guidry, Amber L; Barnes, Stephen; Falany, Charles N

    2016-07-01

    Bile acid CoA:amino acid N-acyltransferase (BAAT) is the terminal enzyme in the synthesis of bile salts from cholesterol and catalyzes the conjugation of taurine or glycine to bile acid CoA thioesters to form bile acid N-acylamidates. BAAT has a dual localization to the cytosol and peroxisomes, possibly due to an inefficient carboxy-terminal peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS), -serine-glutamine-leucine (-SQL). Mutational analysis was used to define the role of the carboxy terminus in peroxisomal localization and kinetic activity. Amidation activity of BAAT and BAAT lacking the final two amino acids (AAs) (BAAT-S) were similar, whereas the activity of BAAT with a canonical PTS sequence (BAAT-SKL) was increased >2.5-fold. Kinetic analysis of BAAT and BAAT-SKL showed that BAAT-SKL had a lower Km for taurine and glycine as well as a greater Vmax There was no difference in the affinity for cholyl-CoA. In contrast to BAAT, BAAT-SKL forms bile acid N-acylamidates with β-alanine. BAAT-S immunoprecipitated when incubated with peroxisomal biogenesis factor 5 (Pex5) and rabbit anti-Pex5 antibodies; however, deleting the final 12 AAs prevented coimmunoprecipitation with Pex5, indicating the Pex5 interaction involves more than the -SQL sequence. These results indicate that even small changes in the carboxy terminus of BAAT can have significant effects on activity and substrate specificity. PMID:27230263

  5. The central domain of Rhizobium leguminosarum DctD functions independently to activate transcription.

    OpenAIRE

    Huala, E; Stigter, J; Ausubel, F. M.

    1992-01-01

    Sigma 54-dependent transcriptional activators such as Escherichia coli NtrC, Rhizobium meliloti NifA, and Rhizobium leguminosarum DctD share similar central and carboxy-terminal domains but differ in the structure and function of their amino-terminal domains. We have deleted the amino-terminal and carboxy-terminal domains of R. leguminosarum DctD and have demonstrated that the central domain of DctD, like that of NifA, is transcriptionally competent.

  6. Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin carboxy-terminal fragment is a novel tumor-homing peptide for human ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of innovative, effective therapies against recurrent/chemotherapy-resistant ovarian cancer remains a high priority. Using high-throughput technologies to analyze genetic fingerprints of ovarian cancer, we have discovered extremely high expression of the genes encoding the proteins claudin-3 and claudin-4. Because claudin-3 and -4 are the epithelial receptors for Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE), and are sufficient to mediate CPE binding, in this study we evaluated the in vitro and in vivo bioactivity of the carboxy-terminal fragment of CPE (i.e., CPE290-319 binding peptide) as a carrier for tumor imaging agents and intracellular delivery of therapeutic drugs. Claudin-3 and -4 expression was examined with rt-PCR and flow cytometry in multiple primary ovarian carcinoma cell lines. Cell binding assays were used to assess the accuracy and specificity of the CPE peptide in vitro against primary chemotherapy-resistant ovarian carcinoma cell lines. Confocal microscopy and biodistribution assays were performed to evaluate the localization and uptake of the FITC-conjugated CPE peptide in established tumor tissue. Using a FITC-conjugated CPE peptide we show specific in vitro and in vivo binding to multiple primary chemotherapy resistant ovarian cancer cell lines. Bio-distribution studies in SCID mice harboring clinically relevant animal models of chemotherapy resistant ovarian carcinoma showed higher uptake of the peptide in tumor cells than in normal organs. Imunofluorescence was detectable within discrete accumulations (i.e., tumor spheroids) or even single chemotherapy resistant ovarian cancer cells floating in the ascites of xenografted animals while a time-dependent internalization of the FITC-conjugated CPE peptide was consistently noted in chemotherapy-resistant ovarian tumor cells by confocal microscopy. Based on the high levels of claudin-3 and -4 expression in chemotherapy-resistant ovarian cancer and other highly aggressive human epithelial

  7. Engineering of halophilic enzymes: Two acidic amino acid residues at the carboxy-terminal region confer halophilic characteristics to Halomonas and Pseudomonas nucleoside diphosphate kinases

    OpenAIRE

    Tokunaga, Hiroko; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Tokunaga, Masao

    2008-01-01

    Nucleoside diphosphate kinase from Halomonas sp. 593 (HaNDK) exhibits halophilic characteristics. Residues 134 and 135 in the carboxy-terminal region of HaNDK are Glu–Glu, while those of its homologous counterpart of non-halophilic Pseudomonas NDK (PaNDK) are Ala–Ala. The double mutation, E134A-E135A, in HaNDK results in the loss of the halophilic characteristics, and, conversely, the double mutation of A134E-A135E in PaNDK confers halophilic characters to this enzyme, indicating that the cha...

  8. Imaging Ferroelectric Domains and Domain Walls Using Charge Gradient Microscopy: Role of Screening Charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Sheng; Jung, Il Woong; Choi, Yoon-Young; Hong, Seungbum; Roelofs, Andreas

    2016-02-23

    Advanced scanning probe microscopies (SPMs) open up the possibilities of the next-generation ferroic devices that utilize both domains and domain walls as active elements. However, current SPMs lack the capability of dynamically monitoring the motion of domains and domain walls in conjunction with the transport of the screening charges that lower the total electrostatic energy of both domains and domain walls. Charge gradient microscopy (CGM) is a strong candidate to overcome these shortcomings because it can map domains and domain walls at high speed and mechanically remove the screening charges. Yet the underlying mechanism of the CGM signals is not fully understood due to the complexity of the electrostatic interactions. Here, we designed a semiconductor-metal CGM tip, which can separate and quantify the ferroelectric domain and domain wall signals by simply changing its scanning direction. Our investigation reveals that the domain wall signals are due to the spatial change of polarization charges, while the domain signals are due to continuous removal and supply of screening charges at the CGM tip. In addition, we observed asymmetric CGM domain currents from the up and down domains, which are originated from the different debonding energies and the amount of the screening charges on positive and negative bound charges. We believe that our findings can help design CGM with high spatial resolution and lead to breakthroughs in information storage and energy-harvesting devices. PMID:26751281

  9. Carboxy terminally truncated forms of ribophorin I are degraded in pre- Golgi compartments by a calcium-dependent process

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    Two COOH terminally truncated variants of ribophorin I (RI), a type I transmembrane glycoprotein of 583 amino acids that is segregated to the rough portions of the ER and is associated with the protein- translocating apparatus of this organelle, were expressed in permanent HeLa cell transformants. Both variants, one membrane anchored but lacking part of the cytoplasmic domain (RL467) and the other consisting of the luminal 332 NH2-terminal amino acids (RI332), were retained intracellularly bu...

  10. Structures of the human Pals1 PDZ domain with and without ligand suggest gated access of Crb to the PDZ peptide-binding groove

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanova, Marina E.; Fletcher, Georgina C.; O’Reilly, Nicola; Purkiss, Andrew G.; Thompson, Barry J. [Cancer Research UK, 44 Lincoln’s Inn Fields, London WC2A 3LY (United Kingdom); McDonald, Neil Q., E-mail: neil.mcdonald@cancer.org.uk [Cancer Research UK, 44 Lincoln’s Inn Fields, London WC2A 3LY (United Kingdom); Birkbeck College, University of London, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HX (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-01

    This study characterizes the interaction between the carboxy-terminal (ERLI) motif of the essential polarity protein Crb and the Pals1/Stardust PDZ-domain protein. Structures of human Pals1 PDZ with and without a Crb peptide are described, explaining the highly conserved nature of the ERLI motif and revealing a sterically blocked peptide-binding groove in the absence of ligand. Many components of epithelial polarity protein complexes possess PDZ domains that are required for protein interaction and recruitment to the apical plasma membrane. Apical localization of the Crumbs (Crb) transmembrane protein requires a PDZ-mediated interaction with Pals1 (protein-associated with Lin7, Stardust, MPP5), a member of the p55 family of membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUKs). This study describes the molecular interaction between the Crb carboxy-terminal motif (ERLI), which is required for Drosophila cell polarity, and the Pals1 PDZ domain using crystallography and fluorescence polarization. Only the last four Crb residues contribute to Pals1 PDZ-domain binding affinity, with specificity contributed by conserved charged interactions. Comparison of the Crb-bound Pals1 PDZ structure with an apo Pals1 structure reveals a key Phe side chain that gates access to the PDZ peptide-binding groove. Removal of this side chain enhances the binding affinity by more than fivefold, suggesting that access of Crb to Pals1 may be regulated by intradomain contacts or by protein–protein interaction.

  11. Anti-inflammatory and anti-endotoxin properties of peptides derived from the carboxy-terminal region of a defensin from the tick Ornithodoros savignyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malan, Melissa; Serem, June C; Bester, Megan J; Neitz, Albert W H; Gaspar, Anabella R M

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are small cationic peptides that possess a large spectrum of bioactivities, including antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. Several antimicrobial peptides are known to inhibit lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation in vitro and to protect animals from sepsis. In this study, the cellular anti-inflammatory and anti-endotoxin activities of Os and Os-C, peptides derived from the carboxy-terminal of a tick defensin, were investigated. Both Os and Os-C were found to bind LPS in vitro, albeit to a lesser extent than polymyxin B and melittin, known endotoxin-binding peptides. Binding to LPS was found to reduce the bactericidal activity of Os and Os-C against Escherichia coli confirming the affinity of both peptides for LPS. At a concentration of 25 µM, the nitric oxide (NO) scavenging activity of Os was higher than glutathione, a known NO scavenger. In contrast, Os-C showed no scavenging activity. Os and Os-C inhibited LPS/IFN-γ induced NO and TNF-α production in RAW 264.7 cells in a concentration-dependent manner, with no cellular toxicity even at a concentration of 100 µM. Although inhibition of NO and TNF-α secretion was more pronounced for melittin and polymyxin B, significant cytotoxicity was observed at concentrations of 1.56 µM and 25 µM for melittin and polymyxin B, respectively. In addition, Os, Os-C and glutathione protected RAW 264.7 cells from oxidative damage at concentrations as low as 25 µM. This study identified that besides previously reported antibacterial activity of Os and Os-C, both peptides have in addition anti-inflammatory and anti-endotoxin properties. PMID:26662999

  12. In Vitro and in Vivo Characterization of MOD-4023, a Long-Acting Carboxy-Terminal Peptide (CTP)-Modified Human Growth Hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershkovitz, Oren; Bar-Ilan, Ahuva; Guy, Rachel; Felikman, Yana; Moschcovich, Laura; Hwa, Vivian; Rosenfeld, Ron G; Fima, Eyal; Hart, Gili

    2016-02-01

    MOD-4023 is a novel long-acting version of human growth hormone (hGH), containing the carboxy-terminal peptide (CTP) of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). MOD-4023 is being developed as a treatment for adults and children with growth hormone deficiency (GHD), which would require fewer injections than currently available GH formulations and thus reduce patient discomfort and increase compliance. This study characterizes MOD-4023's binding affinities for the growth hormone receptor, as well as the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics, toxicology, and safety profiles of repeated dosing of MOD-4023 in Sprague-Dawley rats and Rhesus monkeys. Although MOD-4023 exhibited reduced in vitro potency and lower affinity to the GH receptor than recombinant hGH (rhGH), administration of MOD-4023 every 5 days in rats and monkeys resulted in exposure comparable to daily rhGH, and the serum half-life of MOD-4023 was significantly longer. Repeated administration of MOD-4023 led to elevated levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), and twice-weekly injections of MOD-4023 resulted in larger increase in weight gain with fewer injections and a lower accumulative hGH dose. Thus, the increased half-life of MOD-4023 in comparison to hGH may increase the frequency of protein-receptor interactions and compensate for its decreased in vitro potency. MOD-4023 was found to be well-tolerated in rats and monkeys, with minimal adverse events, suggesting an acceptable safety profile. These results provide a basis for the continued clinical development of MOD-4023 as a novel treatment of GHD in children and adults. PMID:26713839

  13. Development of a direct ELISA based on carboxy-terminal of penicillin-binding protein BlaR for the detection of β-lactam antibiotics in foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Juan; Cheng, Guyue; Huang, Lingli; Wang, Yulian; Hao, Haihong; Peng, Dapeng; Liu, Zhenli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2013-11-01

    β-Lactam antibiotics, including penicillins and cephalosporins, are commonly used in veterinary medicine. Illegal use and abuse of β-lactams could cause allergy and selected bacterial resistance. BlaR-CTD, the carboxy-terminal of penicillin-recognizing protein BlaR from Bacillus licheniformis ATCC 14580, was utilized in this study to develop a receptor-based ELISA for detection and determination of β-lactam antibiotics in milk, beef, and chicken. This assay was based on directly competitive inhibition of binding of horseradish peroxidase-labeled ampicillin to the immobilized BlaR-CTD by β-lactams. The assay was developed as screening test with the option as semiquantitative assay, when the identity of a single type of residual β-lactam was known. The IC50 values of 15 β-lactam antibiotics, including benzylpenicillin, ampicillin, amoxicillin, dicloxacillin, oxacillin, nafcillin, cefapirin, cefoperazone, cefalotin, cefazolin, cefquinome, ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, cefalexin, ceftiofur and its metabolite desfuroylceftiofur were evaluated and ranged from 0.18 to 170.81 μg L(-1). Simple sample extraction method was carried out with only phosphate-buffered saline, and the recoveries of selected β-lactam antibiotics in milk, beef, and chicken were in the range of 53.27 to 128.29 %, most ranging from 60 to 120 %. The inter-assay variability was below 30 %. Limits of detection in milk, beef, and chicken muscles with cefquinome matrix calibration were 2.10, 30.68, and 31.13 μg kg(-1), respectively. This study firstly established a rapid, simple, and accurate method for simultaneous detection of 15 β-lactams in edible tissues, among which 11 β-lactams controlled by European Union could be detected below maximum residue limits. PMID:24013636

  14. Formation of charged ferroelectric domain walls with controlled periodicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednyakov, Petr S; Sluka, Tomas; Tagantsev, Alexander K; Damjanovic, Dragan; Setter, Nava

    2015-01-01

    Charged domain walls in proper ferroelectrics were shown recently to possess metallic-like conductivity. Unlike conventional heterointerfaces, these walls can be displaced inside a dielectric by an electric field, which is of interest for future electronic circuitry. In addition, theory predicts that charged domain walls may influence the electromechanical response of ferroelectrics, with strong enhancement upon increased charged domain wall density. The existence of charged domain walls in proper ferroelectrics is disfavoured by their high formation energy and methods of their preparation in predefined patterns are unknown. Here we develop the theoretical background for the formation of charged domain walls in proper ferroelectrics using energy considerations and outline favourable conditions for their engineering. We experimentally demonstrate, in BaTiO3 single crystals the controlled build-up of high density charged domain wall patterns, down to a spacing of 7 μm with a predominant mixed electronic and ionic screening scenario, hinting to a possible exploitation of charged domain walls in agile electronics and sensing devices. PMID:26516026

  15. Formation of charged ferroelectric domain walls with controlled periodicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednyakov, Petr S.; Sluka, Tomas; Tagantsev, Alexander K.; Damjanovic, Dragan; Setter, Nava

    2015-10-01

    Charged domain walls in proper ferroelectrics were shown recently to possess metallic-like conductivity. Unlike conventional heterointerfaces, these walls can be displaced inside a dielectric by an electric field, which is of interest for future electronic circuitry. In addition, theory predicts that charged domain walls may influence the electromechanical response of ferroelectrics, with strong enhancement upon increased charged domain wall density. The existence of charged domain walls in proper ferroelectrics is disfavoured by their high formation energy and methods of their preparation in predefined patterns are unknown. Here we develop the theoretical background for the formation of charged domain walls in proper ferroelectrics using energy considerations and outline favourable conditions for their engineering. We experimentally demonstrate, in BaTiO3 single crystals the controlled build-up of high density charged domain wall patterns, down to a spacing of 7 μm with a predominant mixed electronic and ionic screening scenario, hinting to a possible exploitation of charged domain walls in agile electronics and sensing devices.

  16. Expression, purification and preliminary structural analysis of the head domain of Deinococcus radiodurans RecN

    OpenAIRE

    Pellegrino, Simone; Radzimanowski, Jens; McSweeney, Sean; Timmins, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    The head domain of the DNA-repair protein RecN from D. radiodurans, composed of the amino- and carboxy-terminal domains, was crystallized. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 3.0 Å resolution and the crystals belonged to space group P21.

  17. Domain-and species-specific monoclonal antibodies recognize the Von Willebrand Factor-C domain of CCN5

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Lan; McKeon, Frank; Russo, Joshua W.; Lemire, Joan; Castellot, John

    2009-01-01

    The CCN family of proteins typically consists of four distinct peptide domains: an insulin-like growth factor binding protein-type (IGFBP) domain, a Von Willebrand Factor C (VWC) domain, a thrombospondin type 1 repeat (TSP1) domain, and a carboxy-terminal (CT) domain. The six family members participate in many processes, including proliferation, motility, cell-matrix signaling, angiogenesis, and wound healing. Accumulating evidence suggests that truncated and alternatively spliced isoforms ar...

  18. Stability domain of systems of three arbitrary charges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present results on the stability of quantum systems consisting of a negative charge -q1 with mass m1 and two positive charges q2 and q3, with masses m2 and m3, respectively. We show that, for given masses mi, each instability domain is convex in the plane of the variables (q1/q2, q1/q3). A new proof is given of the instability of muonic ions (α, p, μ-). We then study stability in some critical regimes where q3 2: stability is sometimes restricted to large values of some mass ratios; the behavior of the stability frontier is established to leading order in q3/q2. Finally we present some conjectures about the shape of the stability domain, both for given masses and varying charges, and for given charges and varying masses. Refs. 19 (author)

  19. Interaction of the Tim44 C-terminal domain with negatively charged phospholipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marom, Milit; Safonov, Roman; Amram, Shay; Avneon, Yoav; Nachliel, Esther; Gutman, Menachem; Zohary, Keren; Azem, Abdussalam; Tsfadia, Yossi

    2009-12-01

    The translocation of proteins from the cytosol into the mitochondrial matrix is mediated by the coordinated action of the TOM complex in the outer membrane, as well as the TIM23 complex and its associated protein import motor in the inner membrane. The focus of this work is the peripheral inner membrane protein Tim44. Tim44 is a vital component of the mitochondrial protein translocation motor that anchors components of the motor to the TIM23 complex. For this purpose, Tim44 associates with the import channel by direct interaction with the Tim23 protein. Additionally, it was shown in vitro that Tim44 associates with acidic model membranes, in particular those containing cardiolipin. The latter interaction was shown to be mediated by the carboxy-terminal domain of Tim44 [Weiss, C., et al. (1999) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 96, 8890-8894]. The aim of this study was to determine the precise recognition site for negative lipids in the C-terminal domain of Tim44. In particular, we wanted to examine the recently suggested hypothesis that acidic phospholipids associate with Tim44 via a hydrophobic cavity that is observed in the high-resolution structure of the C-terminal domain of the protein [Josyula, R., et al. (2006) J. Mol. Biol. 359, 798-804]. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that (i) the hydrophobic tail of lipids may interact with Tim44 via the latter's hydrophobic cavity and (ii) a region, located in the N-terminal alpha-helix of the C-terminal domain (helices A1 and A2), may serve as a membrane attachment site. To validate this assumption, N-terminal truncations of yeast Tim44 were examined for their ability to bind cardiolipin-containing phospholipid vesicles. The results indicate that removal of the N-terminal alpha-helix (helix A1) abolishes the capacity of Tim44 to associate with cardiolipin-containing liposomes. We suggest that helices A1 and A2, in Tim44, jointly promote the association of the protein with acidic phospholipids. PMID:19863062

  20. Ferroelectric charged domain walls in an applied electric field

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gureev, M.Y.; Mokrý, Pavel; Tagantsev, A.K.; Setter, N.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 10 (2012), s. 104104-104104. ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/03.0079 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Charged ferroelectric domain walls * thermodynamics * ferroelectric domains * CRYSTALS * INVERSION * TITANATE Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.767, year: 2012 http://prb.aps.org/pdf/PRB/v86/i10/e104104

  1. Topological-charge anomalies in supersymmetric theories with domain walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domain walls in 1+2 dimensions are studied to clarify some general features of topological-charge anomalies in supersymmetric theories, by extensive use of a superfield supercurrent. For domain walls quantum modifications of the supercharge algebra arise not only from the short-distance anomaly but also from another source of long-distance origin, induced spin in the domain-wall background, and the latter dominates in the sum. A close look into the supersymmetric trace identity, which naturally accommodates the central-charge anomaly and its superpartners, shows an interesting consequence of the improvement of the supercurrent: Via an improvement the anomaly in the central-charge can be transferred from induced spin in the fermion sector to an induced potential in the boson sector. This fact reveals a dual character, both fermionic and bosonic, of the central-charge anomaly, which reflects the underlying supersymmetry. The one-loop superfield effective action is also constructed to verify the anomaly and Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) saturation of the domain-wall spectrum

  2. Charge domain filter operating up to 20 MHz clock frequency

    OpenAIRE

    Gal, R.A.J.; Wallinga, H.

    1983-01-01

    An analog sampled data low pass third order Butterworth filter has been realised in a buried channel CCD technology. This Charge Domain Filter, composed of transversal and recursive CCD filter sections, has been tested at clock frequencies up to 20 MHz.

  3. Charge, junctions, and the scaling of domain wall networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been shown that superconducting domain walls in a model with U(1)xZ2 symmetry can form long-lived loops called kinky vortons from random initial conditions in the broken field and a uniform charged background in (2+1) dimensions. In this paper we investigate a similar model with a hypercubic symmetry coupled to an unbroken U(1) in which the domain walls can form junctions and hence a lattice. We call this model the charge-coupled cubic-anisotropy (CCCA) model. First, we present a detailed parametric study of the U(1)xZ2 model; features which we vary include the nature of the initial conditions and the coupling constants. This allows us to identify interesting parameters to vary in the more complicated, and hence more computationally intensive, CCCA models. In particular we find that the coefficient of the interaction term can be used to engineer three separate regimes: phase mixing, condensation, and phase separation with the condensation regime corresponding to a single value of the coupling constant defined by the determinant of the quartic interaction terms being zero. We then identify the condensation regime in the CCCA model and show that, in this regime, the number of domain walls does not scale in the standard way if the initial conditions have a sufficiently high background charge. Instead of forming loops of domain wall, we find that, within the constraints of dynamic range, the network appears to be moving toward a glasslike configuration. We find that the results are independent of the dimension of the hypercube.

  4. Structure of the SthK carboxy-terminal region reveals a gating mechanism for cyclic nucleotide-modulated ion channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Kesters

    Full Text Available Cyclic nucleotide-sensitive ion channels are molecular pores that open in response to cAMP or cGMP, which are universal second messengers. Binding of a cyclic nucleotide to the carboxyterminal cyclic nucleotide binding domain (CNBD of these channels is thought to cause a conformational change that promotes channel opening. The C-linker domain, which connects the channel pore to this CNBD, plays an important role in coupling ligand binding to channel opening. Current structural insight into this mechanism mainly derives from X-ray crystal structures of the C-linker/CNBD from hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-modulated (HCN channels. However, these structures reveal little to no conformational changes upon comparison of the ligand-bound and unbound form. In this study, we take advantage of a recently identified prokaryote ion channel, SthK, which has functional properties that strongly resemble cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG channels and is activated by cAMP, but not by cGMP. We determined X-ray crystal structures of the C-linker/CNBD of SthK in the presence of cAMP or cGMP. We observe that the structure in complex with cGMP, which is an antagonist, is similar to previously determined HCN channel structures. In contrast, the structure in complex with cAMP, which is an agonist, is in a more open conformation. We observe that the CNBD makes an outward swinging movement, which is accompanied by an opening of the C-linker. This conformation mirrors the open gate structures of the Kv1.2 channel or MthK channel, which suggests that the cAMP-bound C-linker/CNBD from SthK represents an activated conformation. These results provide a structural framework for better understanding cyclic nucleotide modulation of ion channels, including HCN and CNG channels.

  5. Photon-activated charge domain in high-gain photoconductive switches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Shi(施卫); Huiying Dai(戴慧莹); Xiaowei Sun(孙小卫)

    2003-01-01

    We report our experimental observation of charge domain oscillation in semi-insulating GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switches (PCSSs). The high-gain PCSS is intrinsically a photon-activated charge domain device. It is the photon-activated carriers that satisfy the requirement of charge domain formation on carrier concentration and device length product of 1012 cm-2. We also show that, because of the repeated process of domain formation, the domain travels with a compromised speed of electron saturation velocity and the speed of light. As a result, the transit time of charge domains in PCSS is much shorter than that of traditional Gunn domains.

  6. Dual E1 activation systems for ubiquitin differentially regulate E2 enzyme charging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jianping; Li, Xue; Gygi, Steven P; Harper, J Wade

    2007-06-28

    Modification of proteins with ubiquitin or ubiquitin-like proteins (UBLs) by means of an E1-E2-E3 cascade controls many signalling networks. Ubiquitin conjugation involves adenylation and thioesterification of the carboxy-terminal carboxylate of ubiquitin by the E1-activating enzyme Ube1 (Uba1 in yeast), followed by ubiquitin transfer to an E2-conjugating enzyme through a transthiolation reaction. Charged E2s function with E3s to ubiquitinate substrates. It is currently thought that Ube1/Uba1 is the sole E1 for charging of E2s with ubiquitin in animals and fungi. Here we identify a divergent E1 in vertebrates and sea urchin, Uba6, which specifically activates ubiquitin but not other UBLs in vitro and in vivo. Human Uba6 and Ube1 have distinct preferences for E2 charging in vitro, and their specificity depends in part on their C-terminal ubiquitin-fold domains, which recruit E2s. In tissue culture cells, Uba6 is required for charging a previously uncharacterized Uba6-specific E2 (Use1), whereas Ube1 is required for charging the cell-cycle E2s Cdc34A and Cdc34B. Our data reveal unexpected complexity in the pathways that control the conjugation of ubiquitin, in which dual E1s orchestrate the charging of distinct cohorts of E2s. PMID:17597759

  7. Charge, junctions and the scaling dynamics of domain wall networks

    CERN Document Server

    Battye, Richard A

    2010-01-01

    It has been shown that superconducting domain walls in a model with U(1) x Z2 symmetry can form long-lived loops called kinky vortons from random initial conditions in the broken field and a uniform charged background in (2+1) dimensions. In this paper we investigate a similar model with a hyper-cubic symmetry coupled to an unbroken U(1) in which the domain walls can form junctions and hence a lattice. We call this model the charge-coupled cubic-anisotropy (CCCA) model. First, we present a detailed parametric study of the U(1) x Z2 model; features which we vary include the nature of the initial conditions and the coupling constants. This allows us to identify interesting parameters to vary in the more complicated, and hence more computationally intensive, CCCA models. In particular we find that the coefficient of the interaction term can be used to engineer three separate regimes: phase mixing, condensation and phase separation with the condensation regime corresponding to a single value of the coupling const...

  8. Functional interactions of the AF-2 activation domain core region of the human androgen receptor with the amino-terminal domain and with the transcriptional coactivator TIF2 (transcriptional intermediary factor2)

    OpenAIRE

    Berrevoets, Cor; P. Doesburg; Steketee, Karine; Trapman, Jan; Brinkmann, Albert

    1998-01-01

    textabstractPrevious studies in yeast and mammalian cells showed a functional interaction between the amino-terminal domain and the carboxy-terminal, ligand-binding domain (LBD) of the human androgen receptor (AR). In the present study, the AR subdomains involved in this in vivo interaction were determined in more detail. Cotransfection experiments in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and two-hybrid experiments in yeast revealed that two regions in the NH2-terminal domain are involved in the ...

  9. Charge-order domain walls with enhanced conductivity in a layered manganite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Eric Yue; Bryant, Benjamin; Tokunaga, Yusuke; Aeppli, Gabriel; Tokura, Yoshinori; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2015-07-01

    Interfaces and boundaries in condensed-matter systems often have electronic properties distinct from the bulk material and thus have become a topic of both fundamental scientific interest and technological importance. Here we identify, using microwave impedance microscopy, enhanced conductivity of charge-order domain walls in the layered manganite Pr(Sr0.1Ca0.9)2Mn2O7. We obtain a complete mesoscopic map of surface topography, crystalline orientation and electronic phase, and visualize the thermal phase transition between two charge-ordered phases. In both phases, charge-order domains occur with domain walls showing enhanced conductivity likely due to local lifting of the charge order. Finite element analysis shows that the resolved domain walls can be as narrow as few nanometres. The domain walls are stabilized by structural twins and have a strong history dependence, suggesting that they may be manipulated to create novel devices.

  10. Male-specific Fruitless isoforms have different regulatory roles conferred by distinct zinc finger DNA binding domains

    OpenAIRE

    Dalton, Justin E.; Fear, Justin M.; Knott, Simon; Baker, Bruce S.; McIntyre, Lauren M.; Arbeitman, Michelle N.

    2013-01-01

    Background Drosophila melanogaster adult males perform an elaborate courtship ritual to entice females to mate. fruitless (fru), a gene that is one of the key regulators of male courtship behavior, encodes multiple male-specific isoforms (FruM). These isoforms vary in their carboxy-terminal zinc finger domains, which are predicted to facilitate DNA binding. Results By over-expressing individual FruM isoforms in fru-expressing neurons in either males or females and assaying the global transcri...

  11. Differentiation of domains in composite surface structures by charge-contrast X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzer, Sefik; Dâna, Aykutlu; Ertas, Gulay

    2007-01-01

    An external bias is applied to two samples containing composite surface structures, while recording an XPS spectrum. Altering the polarity of the bias affects the extent of differential charging in domains that are chemically or electronically different to create a charge contrast. By utilizing this charge contrast, we show that two distinct silicon nitride and silicon oxynitride domains are present in one of the composite samples. Similarly, we use this technique to show that titanium oxide and silicon oxide domains exist as separate chemical entities in another composite sample. PMID:17194137

  12. Variation of the neurofilament medium KSP repeat sub-domain across mammalian species: implications for altering axonal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, D M; Carpenter, C; Yager, C; Golik, B; Barry, K J; Shen, H; Mikse, O; Eggert, L S; Schulz, D J; Garcia, M L

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of larger mammals resulted in a corresponding increase in peripheral nerve length. To ensure optimal nervous system functionality and survival, nerve conduction velocities were likely to have increased to maintain the rate of signal propagation. Increases of conduction velocities may have required alterations in one of the two predominant properties that affect the speed of neuronal transmission: myelination or axonal diameter. A plausible mechanism to explain faster conduction velocities was a concomitant increase in axonal diameter with evolving axonal length. The carboxy terminal tail domain of the neurofilament medium subunit is a determinant of axonal diameter in large caliber myelinated axons. Sequence analysis of mammalian orthologs indicates that the neurofilament medium carboxy terminal tail contains a variable lysine-serine-proline (KSP) repeat sub-domain flanked by two highly conserved sub-domains. The number of KSP repeats within this region of neurofilament medium varies among species. Interestingly, the number of repeats does not change within a species, suggesting that selective pressure conserved the number of repeats within a species. Mapping KSP repeat numbers onto consensus phylogenetic trees reveals independent KSP expansion events across several mammalian clades. Linear regression analyses identified three subsets of mammals, one of which shows a positive correlation in the number of repeats with head-body length. For this subset of mammals, we hypothesize that variations in the number of KSP repeats within neurofilament medium carboxy terminal tail may have contributed to an increase in axonal caliber, increasing nerve conduction velocity as larger mammals evolved. PMID:20008369

  13. Signal processing applications of massively parallel charge domain computing devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fijany, Amir (Inventor); Barhen, Jacob (Inventor); Toomarian, Nikzad (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is embodied in a charge coupled device (CCD)/charge injection device (CID) architecture capable of performing a Fourier transform by simultaneous matrix vector multiplication (MVM) operations in respective plural CCD/CID arrays in parallel in O(1) steps. For example, in one embodiment, a first CCD/CID array stores charge packets representing a first matrix operator based upon permutations of a Hartley transform and computes the Fourier transform of an incoming vector. A second CCD/CID array stores charge packets representing a second matrix operator based upon different permutations of a Hartley transform and computes the Fourier transform of an incoming vector. The incoming vector is applied to the inputs of the two CCD/CID arrays simultaneously, and the real and imaginary parts of the Fourier transform are produced simultaneously in the time required to perform a single MVM operation in a CCD/CID array.

  14. DNA Charge Transport: Conformationally Gated Hopping through Stacked Domains

    OpenAIRE

    O'Neill, Melanie A.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2004-01-01

    The role of base motions in delocalization and propagation of charge through double helical DNA must be established experimentally and incorporated into mechanistic descriptions of DNA-mediated charge transport (CT). Here, we address these fundamental issues by examining the temperature dependence of the yield of CT between photoexcited 2-aminopurine (Ap*) and G through DNA bridges of varied length and sequence. DNA assemblies (35-mers) were constructed containing adenine bridges Ap(A)_nG (n ...

  15. Dynamics of surface screening charges on domains of BiFeO3 films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jun-xing; Jin, Kui-juan; Ge, Chen; Ma, Chao; Yang, Guo-zhen

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of surface screening charges on BiFeO3 films with pre-written stripe domains was studied with surface potential measurements by Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy. The screening effect decays exponentially over time, and this decay is slower in the arrays with wider domains or larger intervals of domains, indicating that the in-plane diffusion of the surface screening charges plays a major role in the decay dynamics. The good agreement between experimental data and theoretical results based on diffusion-drift model confirms the mechanism of in-plane diffusion of the screening charges in the decay dynamics. Our work could provide a pathway to control the data stability of charge storage by artificially designing the ferroelectric domains.

  16. Dynamics of surface screening charges on domains of BiFeO3 films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-xing Gu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of surface screening charges on BiFeO3 films with pre-written stripe domains was studied with surface potential measurements by Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy. The screening effect decays exponentially over time, and this decay is slower in the arrays with wider domains or larger intervals of domains, indicating that the in-plane diffusion of the surface screening charges plays a major role in the decay dynamics. The good agreement between experimental data and theoretical results based on diffusion-drift model confirms the mechanism of in-plane diffusion of the screening charges in the decay dynamics. Our work could provide a pathway to control the data stability of charge storage by artificially designing the ferroelectric domains.

  17. Charge separation with fluctuating domains in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Shou, Qi-Ye; Ma, Guo-Liang; Ma, Yu-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Charge separation induced by the chiral magnetic effect suggested that some ${\\cal P}$- or ${\\cal CP}$-odd metastable domains could be produced in a QCD vacuum in the early stage of relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Based on a multi-phase transport model, our results suggest that a domain-based scenario with final state interactions can describe the solenoidal tracker at RHIC detector (STAR) measurements of both same- and opposite-charge azimuthal angle correlations, $$, in Au+Au collisions ...

  18. Differentiation of peptide molecular recognition by phospholipase C gamma-1 Src homology-2 domain and a mutant Tyr phosphatase PTP1bC215S.

    OpenAIRE

    Maclean, D; Sefler, A. M.; Zhu, G.; Decker, S J; Saltiel, A R; J. Singh; McNamara, D.; Dobrusin, E M; Sawyer, T K

    1995-01-01

    Activated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) undergoes autophosphorylation on several cytoplasmic tyrosine residues, which may then associate with the src homology-2 (SH2) domains of effector proteins such as phospholipase C gamma-1 (PLC gamma-1). Specific phosphotyrosine (pTyr)-modified EGFR fragment peptides can inhibit this intermolecular binding between activated EGFR and a tandem amino- and carboxy-terminal (N/C) SH2 protein construct derived from PLC gamma-1. In this study, we furt...

  19. Controlled creation and displacement of charged domain walls in ferroelectric thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigl, L.; Sluka, T.; McGilly, L. J.; Crassous, A.; Sandu, C. S.; Setter, N.

    2016-08-01

    Charged domain walls in ferroelectric materials are of high interest due to their potential use in nanoelectronic devices. While previous approaches have utilized complex scanning probe techniques or frustrative poling here we show the creation of charged domain walls in ferroelectric thin films during simple polarization switching using either a conductive probe tip or patterned top electrodes. We demonstrate that ferroelectric switching is accompanied - without exception - by the appearance of charged domain walls and that these walls can be displaced and erased reliably. We ascertain from a combination of scanning probe microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and phase field simulations that creation of charged domain walls is a by-product of, and as such is always coupled to, ferroelectric switching. This is due to the (110) orientation of the tetragonal (Pb,Sr)TiO3 thin films and the crucial role played by the limited conduction of the LSMO bottom electrode layer used in this study. This work highlights that charged domain walls, far from being exotic, unstable structures, as might have been assumed previously, can be robust, stable easily-controlled features in ferroelectric thin films.

  20. Crystal structure of the kinesin motor domain reveals a structural similarity to myosin

    OpenAIRE

    Kull, F. Jon; Sablin, Elena P.; Lau, Rebecca; Fletterick, Robert J; Vale, Ronald D.

    1996-01-01

    Kinesin is the founding member of a superfamily of microtubule-based motor proteins that perform force-generating tasks such as organelle transport and chromosome segregation1,2. It has two identical ~960-amino-acid chains containing an amino-terminal globular motor domain, a central α-helical region that enables dimer formation through a coiled-coil, and a carboxy-terminal tail domain that binds light chains and possibly an organelle receptor1. The kinesin motor domain of ~340 amino acids, w...

  1. Toward Efficient Orange Emissive Carbon Nanodots through Conjugated sp(2) -Domain Controlling and Surface Charges Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Songnan; Zhou, Ding; Li, Di; Ji, Wenyu; Jing, Pengtao; Han, Dong; Liu, Lei; Zeng, Haibo; Shen, Dezhen

    2016-05-01

    A strategy of achieving efficient orange emissive carbon nanodots (CNDs) with large sized conjugated sp(2) -domain is achieved in a solvothermal synthetic route using dimethylformamide as solvent, which is the basis of orange bandgap emission; enhanced orange emission with photoluminescent quantum yield of 46% is realized through surface charges engineering by surface metal-cation-functionalization. PMID:26919550

  2. Insights from the crystal structure of the sixth BRCT domain of topoisomerase IIβ binding protein 1

    OpenAIRE

    Leung, Charles Chung Yun; Kellogg, Elizabeth; Kuhnert, Anja; Hänel, Frank; Baker, David; Glover, J N Mark

    2009-01-01

    Topoisomerase IIβ binding protein 1 (TopBP1) is a major player in the DNA damage response and interacts with a number of protein partners via its eight BRCA1 carboxy-terminal (BRCT) domains. In particular, the sixth BRCT domain of TopBP1 has been implicated in binding to the phosphorylated transcription factor, E2F1, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), where the latter interaction is responsible for the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of TopBP1. To gain a better understanding of the nature of ...

  3. Increased Concentration of Polyvalent Phospholipids in the Adsorption Domain of a Charged Protein

    CERN Document Server

    Haleva, E; Diamant, H; Haleva, Emir; Ben-Tal, Nir; Diamant, Haim

    2004-01-01

    We studied the adsorption of a charged protein onto an oppositely charged membrane, composed of mobile phospholipids of differing valence, using a statistical-thermodynamical approach. A two-block model was employed, one block corresponding to the protein-affected region on the membrane, referred to as the adsorption domain, and the other to the unaffected remainder of the membrane. We calculated the protein-induced lipid rearrangement in the adsorption domain as arising from the interplay between the electrostatic interactions in the system and the mixing entropy of the lipids. Equating the electrochemical potentials of the lipids in the two blocks yields an expression for the relations among the various lipid fractions in the adsorption domain, indicating a sensitive (exponential) dependence on lipid valence. This expression is a result of the two-block picture but does not depend on further details of the protein-membrane interaction. We subsequently calculated the lipid fractions themselves using the Pois...

  4. Time domain analysis of superradiant instability for the charged stringy black hole–mirror system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available It has been proved that the charged stringy black holes are stable under the perturbations of massive charged scalar fields. However, superradiant instability can be generated by adding the mirror-like boundary condition to the composed system of charged stringy black hole and scalar field. The unstable boxed quasinormal modes have been calculated by using both analytical and numerical methods. In this paper, we further provide a time domain analysis by performing a long time evolution of charged scalar field configuration in the background of the charged stringy black hole with the mirror-like boundary condition imposed. We have used the ingoing Eddington–Finkelstein coordinates to derive the evolution equation, and adopted Pseudo-spectral method and the forth-order Runge–Kutta method to evolve the scalar field with the initial Gaussian wave packet. It is shown by our numerical scheme that Fourier transforming the evolution data coincides well with the unstable modes computed from frequency domain analysis. The existence of the rapid growth mode makes the charged stringy black hole a good test ground to study the nonlinear development of superradiant instability.

  5. Nano-domain formation in charged membranes: Beyond the Debye-Hückel approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Ryuichi; Shimokawa, Naofumi; Komura, Shigeyuki

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the microphase separation in a membrane composed of charged lipids, by taking into account explicitly the electrostatic potential and the ion densities in the surrounding solvent. While the overall (membrane and solvent) charge neutrality is assumed, the membrane can have a non-zero net charge. The static structure factor in the homogeneous state is analytically obtained without using the Debye-Hückel approximation and is found to have a peak at an intermediate wave number. For a binary membrane composed of anionic and neutral lipids, the characteristic wave number corresponds to a scale from several to tens of nanometers. Our numerical calculation further predicts the existence of nano-domains in charged membranes.

  6. Analysis of electron capture process in charge pumping sequence using time domain measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for analyzing the electron capture process in the charge pumping (CP) sequence is proposed and demonstrated. The method monitors the electron current in the CP sequence in time domain. This time-domain measurements enable us to directly access the process of the electron capture to the interface defects, which are obscured in the conventional CP method. Using the time-domain measurements, the rise time dependence of the capture process is systematically investigated. We formulate the capture process based on the rate equation and derive an analytic form of the current due to the electron capture to the defects. Based on the formula, the experimental data are analyzed and the capture cross section is obtained. In addition, the time-domain data unveil that the electron capture process completes before the electron channel opens, or below the threshold voltage in a low frequency range of the pulse

  7. Monopole Charge Domain in High-Gain Gallium Arsenide Photoconductive Switches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施卫; 陈二柱; 张显斌; 李琦

    2002-01-01

    Considering that semi-insulating gallium arsenide photoconductive switches can be triggered into the high gain mode and no reliable theories can account for the observed transient characteristics, we propose the monopole charge domain model to explain the peculiar switching phenomena occurring in the high gain mode and we discuss the requirements for the lock-on switching. During operation on this mode, the applied field across the switch and the lock-on field are all larger than the Gunn threshold field. Our developed monopole charge domain is based on the transferred-electron effect, but the domain is only composed of large numbers of electrons piled up due to the negative differential mobility. Using the model and taking the physical mechanism of the avalanche impact ionization and recombination radiation into consideration, we interpret the typical phenomena of the lock-on effect, such as the time delay between the beginning of optical illumination and turning-on of the switch, and the conduction mechanism of the sustaining phase. Under different conditions of bias field intensity and incident light energy, the time delay of the switching is calculated. The results show that the physical mechanisms of impact ionization and recombination radiation occurring in the monopole charge domain are responsible for the lock-on switching.

  8. Time domain analysis of superradiant instability for the charged stringy black hole-mirror system

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Ran; Zhang, Hongbao; Zhao, Junkun

    2015-01-01

    It has been proved that the charged stringy black holes are stable under the perturbations of massive charged scalar fields. However, superradiant instability can be generated by adding the mirror-like boundary condition to the composed system of charged stringy black hole and scalar field. The unstable boxed quasinormal modes have been calculated by using both analytical and numerical method. In this paper, we further provide a time domain analysis by performing a long time evolution of charged scalar field configuration in the background of the charged stringy black hole with the mirror-like boundary condition imposed. We have used the ingoing Eddington-Finkelstein coordinates to derive the evolution equation, and adopted Pseudo-spectral method and the forth-order Runge-Kutta method to evolve the scalar field with the initial Gaussian wave packet. It is shown by our numerical scheme that Fourier transforming the evolution data coincides well with the unstable modes computed from frequency domain analysis. T...

  9. Resolution of unsteady Maxwell equations with charges in non convex domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research thesis deals with the modelling and numerical resolution of problems related to plasma physics. The interaction of charged particles (electrons and ions) with electromagnetic fields is modelled with the system of unsteady Vlasov-Maxwell coupled equations (the Vlasov system describes the transport of charged particles and the Maxwell equations describe the wave propagation). The author presents definitions related to singular domains, establishes a Helmholtz decomposition in a space of electro-magnetostatic solutions. He reports a mathematical analysis of decompositions into a regular and a singular part of general functional spaces intervening in the investigation of the Maxwell system in complex geometries. The method is then implemented for bi-dimensional domains. A last part addressed the study and the numerical resolution of three-dimensional problems

  10. Quantum Collapse of a Charged $n$-dimensional BTZ-like Domain Wall

    CERN Document Server

    Greenwood, Eric

    2016-01-01

    We investigate both the classical and quantum gravitational collapse of a charged, non-rotating $n$-dimensional BTZ black hole in AdS space. This is done by first deriving the conserved mass of a "spherically" symmetric domain wall, which is then taken as the classical Hamiltonian of the domain wall. In the classical picture, we show that, as far as the asymptotic observer is concerned, the details of the collapse depend on the amount of charge present in the domain wall. In the both the extremal and non-extremal cases, the collapse takes an infinite amount of observer time to complete. However, in the over-charged case, the collapse never actually occurs, instead one finds an oscillatory solution which prevents the formation of a naked singularity. As far as the infalling observer is concerned, the collapse is completed within a finite amount of proper time. Thus, the gravitational collapse follows that of the typical formation of a black hole via gravitational collapse. Quantum mechanically, in the absence ...

  11. Conducting polymers as electron glasses: surface charge domains and slow relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortuño, Miguel; Escasain, Elisa; Lopez-Elvira, Elena; Somoza, Andres M.; Colchero, Jaime; Palacios-Lidon, Elisa

    2016-02-01

    The surface potential of conducting polymers has been studied with scanning Kelvin probe microscopy. The results show that this technique can become an excellent tool to really ‘see’ interesting surface charge interaction effects at the nanoscale. The electron glass model, which assumes that charges are localized by the disorder and that interactions between them are relevant, is employed to understand the complex behavior of conducting polymers. At equilibrium, we find surface potential domains with a typical lateral size of 50 nm, basically uncorrelated with the topography and strongly fluctuating in time. These fluctuations are about three times larger than thermal energy. The charge dynamics is characterized by an exponentially broad time distribution. When the conducting polymers are excited with light the surface potential relaxes logarithmically with time, as usually observed in electron glasses. In addition, the relaxation for different illumination times can be scaled within the full aging model.

  12. Contributions of Counter-Charge in a Potassium Channel Voltage-Sensor Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pless, Stephan A.; Galpin, Jason D.; Niciforovic, Ana P.; Ahern, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-sensor domains couple membrane potential to conformational changes in voltage-gated ion channels and phosphatases. Highly co-evolved acidic and aromatic side-chains assist the transfer of cationic side-chains across the transmembrane electric field during voltage-sensing. We investigated the functional contribution of negative electrostatic potentials from these residues to channel gating and voltage-sensing with unnatural amino acid mutagenesis, electrophysiology, voltage-clamp fluorometry and ab initio calculations. The data show that neutralization of two conserved acidic side-chains in transmembrane segments S2 and S3, Glu293 and Asp316 in Shaker potassium channels, have little functional effect on conductance-voltage relationships, although Glu293 appears to catalyze S4 movement. Our results suggest that neither Glu293 nor Asp316 engages in electrostatic state-dependent charge-charge interactions with S4, likely because they occupy, and possibly help create, a water-filled vestibule. PMID:21785425

  13. Topology density correlator on dynamical domain-wall ensembles with nearly frozen topological charge

    CERN Document Server

    Fukaya, H; Cossu, G; Hashimoto, S; Kaneko, T; Noaki, J

    2014-01-01

    Global topological charge decorrelates very slowly or even freezes in fine lattice simulations. On the other hand, its local fluctuations are expected to survive and lead to the correct physical results as long as the volume is large enough. We investigate this issue on recently generated configurations including dynamical domain-wall fermions at lattice spacings a = 0.08 fm and finer. We utilize the Yang-Mills gradient flow to define the topological charge density operator and calculate its long-distance correlation, through which we propose a new method for extracting the topological susceptibility in a sub-volume. This method takes care of the finite volume correction, which reduces the bias caused by the global topological charge. Our lattice data clearly show a shorter auto-correlation time than that of the naive definition using the whole lattice, and are less sensitive to the global topological history. Numerical results show a clear sea-quark mass dependence, which agrees well with the prediction of c...

  14. Fluorescent fusion proteins of soluble guanylyl cyclase indicate proximity of the heme nitric oxide domain and catalytic domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Haase

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To examine the structural organisation of heterodimeric soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET was measured between fluorescent proteins fused to the amino- and carboxy-terminal ends of the sGC beta1 and alpha subunits. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cyan fluorescent protein (CFP was used as FRET donor and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP as FRET acceptor. After generation of recombinant baculovirus, fluorescent-tagged sGC subunits were co-expressed in Sf9 cells. Fluorescent variants of sGC were analyzed in vitro in cytosolic fractions by sensitized emission FRET. Co-expression of the amino-terminally tagged alpha subunits with the carboxy-terminally tagged beta1 subunit resulted in an enzyme complex that showed a FRET efficiency of 10% similar to fluorescent proteins separated by a helix of only 48 amino acids. Because these findings indicated that the amino-terminus of the alpha subunits is close to the carboxy-terminus of the beta1 subunit we constructed fusion proteins where both subunits are connected by a fluorescent protein. The resulting constructs were not only fluorescent, they also showed preserved enzyme activity and regulation by NO. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on the ability of an amino-terminal fragment of the beta1 subunit to inhibit activity of an heterodimer consisting only of the catalytic domains (alphacatbetacat, Winger and Marletta (Biochemistry 2005, 44:4083-90 have proposed a direct interaction of the amino-terminal region of beta1 with the catalytic domains. In support of such a concept of "trans" regulation of sGC activity by the H-NOX domains our results indicate that the domains within sGC are organized in a way that allows for direct interaction of the amino-terminal regulatory domains with the carboxy-terminal catalytic region. In addition, we constructed "fluorescent-conjoined" sGC's by fusion of the alpha amino-terminus to the beta1 carboxy-terminus leading to a

  15. Interaction of the bovine papillomavirus type 1 E2 transcriptional control protein with the viral enhancer: purification of the DNA-binding domain and analysis of its contact points with DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Moskaluk, C A; Bastia, D

    1988-01-01

    The E2 gene of bovine papillomavirus type 1 positively and negatively regulates the transcriptional enhancer located in the long control region of the viral genome. The DNA-binding domain of the E2 gene product was suspected to interact with the DNA sequence motif ACCN6GGT. We have shown that the carboxy-terminal 126 amino acids of the E2 protein constitute the DNA-binding domain. In this paper we described the expression of the E2 carboxy terminus in Escherichia coli and its subsequent purif...

  16. Computational design of the Fyn SH3 domain with increased stability through optimization of surface charge–charge interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Schweiker, Katrina L.; Zarrine-Afsar, Arash; Davidson, Alan R.; Makhatadze, George I

    2007-01-01

    Computational design of surface charge–charge interactions has been demonstrated to be an effective way to increase both the thermostability and the stability of proteins. To test the robustness of this approach for proteins with predominantly β-sheet secondary structure, the chicken isoform of the Fyn SH3 domain was used as a model system. Computational analysis of the optimal distribution of surface charges showed that the increase in favorable energy per substitution begins to level off at...

  17. Fatty acyl chain-dependent but charge-independent association of the SH4 domain of Lck with lipid membranes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anoop Rawat; Avaronnan Harishchandran; Ramakrishnan Nagaraj

    2013-03-01

    The SH4 domain of Src family of nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinases represents the extreme N-terminal 1–16 amino acid region which mediates membrane association of these proteins and facilitates their functions. The SH4 domains among Src members lack well-defined sequence consensus and vary in the net charge. However, they readily anchor to the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane upon fatty acid acylation. Here, we report the membrane association of differentially acylated SH4 domain of Lck kinase, which has net negative charge at physiological pH. Our results suggest that despite the net negative charge, the SH4 domain of Lck associates with membranes upon fatty acid acylation. While myristoylation at the N-terminus is sufficient for providing membrane anchorage, multiple acylation determines orientation of the peptide chain with respect to the lipid bilayer. Hence, fatty acylation serves more than just a lipid anchor. It has an important role in regulating the spatial orientation of the peptide domain with respect to the lipid bilayer, which could be important for the interaction of the other domains of these kinases with their partners.

  18. Interplay of nanoscale domain purity and size on charge transport and recombination dynamics in polymer solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Swaminathan; Adhikari, Nirmal; Chen, Jihua; Ngo, Evan C.; Dubey, Ashish; Galipeau, David W.; Qiao, Qiquan

    2013-12-01

    Charge transport and bimolecular recombination dynamics were correlated with nanomorphology in polymer solar cells. The morphology of poly(diketopyrrolopyrrole-terthiophene) (PDPP3T) and phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PC60BM) blend films was modified using different solvent additives namely 1-chloronaphthalene (CN), 1,8-diiodooctane (DIO) and 1,8-octanedithiol (ODT) and their role on steady state and transient optoelectronic properties was investigated. The energy filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) images showed that additives (e.g. CN and DIO) improved the domain purity which leads to significantly higher short circuit current densities (Jsc). However when the cells were processed with the ODT additive, the fill factor (FF) and open circuit voltage (Voc) decreased dramatically. Films processed with the ODT additive showed a smaller domain size but were more connected compared to films processed using CN and DIO additives. Transient photocurrent analysis indicates faster charge collection in the case of CN and DIO processed solar cells and the slowest charge collection in ODT processed solar cells. Interestingly devices processed with the ODT additive also showed the longest charge carrier recombination lifetime and lowest bimolecular recombination coefficient. This is attributed to the smaller donor domains that are connected with each other to provide a more interconnected and efficient charge transport matrix but longer pathways in ODT films. Such a matrix helped the charge to escape from the donor-acceptor interfaces and thus reduces the bimolecular recombination, while the longer pathway increases the charge collection time. Further insight is provided into the selection of processing conditions to achieve an ideal active layer morphology consisting of domains with higher polymer purity and optimal size that lead to higher Jsc and FF.Charge transport and bimolecular recombination dynamics were correlated with nanomorphology in polymer

  19. Observations of charge-ordered and magnetic domains in LuFe2O4 using transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, T.; Murakami, Y.; Shindo, D.; Abe, N.; Arima, T.

    2012-08-01

    Both charge-ordered and magnetic domains produced in LuFe2O4, which have attracted significant attention due to the interplay of electronic and magnetic degrees of freedom, have been studied using transmission electron microscopy techniques. Dark-field images, obtained using a weak satellite reflection, revealed the nanometer-scale charge-ordered domains, which were observed over a wide temperature range below TCO (critical temperature of charge ordering; ˜310 K). Electron holography demonstrated an aspect of the long-range magnetic order wherein the magnetic flux lines were completely parallel to the c axis of LuFe2O4, in a specimen cooled to 17 K under an applied magnetic field. In contrast, there was no appreciable magnetic signal observed in a specimen cooled in a negligible magnetic field. These observations provide useful information for further understanding of the complex magnetic phase transitions in this compound.

  20. Human cytomegalovirus capsid assembly protein precursor (pUL80.5) interacts with itself and with the major capsid protein (pUL86) through two different domains.

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, L J; Baxter, M K; Plafker, S M; Gibson, W

    1997-01-01

    We have used the yeast GAL4 two-hybrid system to examine interactions between the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) major capsid protein (MCP, encoded by UL86) and the precursor assembly protein (pAP, encoded by UL80.5 and cleaved at its carboxyl end to yield AP) and found that (i) the pAP interacts with the MCP through residues located within the carboxy-terminal 21 amino acids of the pAP, called the carboxyl conserved domain (CCD); (ii) the pAP interacts with itself through a separate region, ca...

  1. Analysis of a β-helical region in the p55 domain of Helicobacter pylori vacuolating toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Algood Holly

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the human stomach and contributes to the development of gastric cancer and peptic ulcer disease. VacA, a toxin secreted by H. pylori, is comprised of two domains, designated p33 and p55. Analysis of the crystal structure of the p55 domain indicated that its structure is predominantly a right-handed parallel β-helix, which is a characteristic of autotransporter passenger domains. Substitution mutations of specific amino acids within the p33 domain abrogate VacA activity, but thus far, it has been difficult to identify small inactivating mutations within the p55 domain. Therefore, we hypothesized that large portions of the p55 domain might be non-essential for vacuolating toxin activity. To test this hypothesis, we introduced eight deletion mutations (each corresponding to a single coil within a β-helical segment spanning VacA amino acids 433-628 into the H. pylori chromosomal vacA gene. Results All eight of the mutant VacA proteins were expressed by the corresponding H. pylori mutant strains and underwent proteolytic processing to yield ~85 kDa passenger domains. Three mutant proteins (VacA Δ484-504, Δ511-536, and Δ517-544 were secreted and induced vacuolation of mammalian cells, which indicated that these β-helical coils were dispensable for vacuolating toxin activity. One mutant protein (VacA Δ433-461 exhibited reduced vacuolating toxin activity compared to wild-type VacA. Other mutant proteins, including those containing deletions near the carboxy-terminal end of the β-helical region (amino acids Val559-Asn628, exhibited marked defects in secretion and increased susceptibility to proteolytic cleavage by trypsin, which suggested that these proteins were misfolded. Conclusions These results indicate that within the β-helical segment of the VacA p55 domain, there are regions of plasticity that tolerate alterations without detrimental effects on protein

  2. Amplitude modulation of charge-density-wave domains in 1T-TaS2 at 300 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of the charge-density-wave (CDW) amplitude modulation in 1T-TaS2 at room temperature have been made using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) operating in the constant current mode. The amplitude profiles are in good agreement with the profile predicated by the CDW domain model of Nakanishi and Shiba. Interference effects between the atomic and CDW lattices have been analyzed and do not modify these profiles significantly. They represent the true CDW amplitude variation connected with the CDW domain structure

  3. Solution structure and peptide binding of the PTB domain from the AIDA1 postsynaptic signaling scaffolding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Smirnova

    Full Text Available AIDA1 links persistent chemical signaling events occurring at the neuronal synapse with global changes in gene expression. Consistent with its role as a scaffolding protein, AIDA1 is composed of several protein-protein interaction domains. Here we report the NMR structure of the carboxy terminally located phosphotyrosine binding domain (PTB that is common to all AIDA1 splice variants. A comprehensive survey of peptides identified a consensus sequence around an NxxY motif that is shared by a number of related neuronal signaling proteins. Using peptide arrays and fluorescence based assays, we determined that the AIDA1 PTB domain binds amyloid protein precursor (APP in a similar manner to the X11/Mint PTB domain, albeit at reduced affinity (∼10 µM that may allow AIDA1 to effectively sample APP, as well as other protein partners in a variety of cellular contexts.

  4. The amidase domain of lipoamidase specifically inactivates lipoylated proteins in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maroya D Spalding

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the 1950s, Reed and coworkers discovered an enzyme activity in Streptococcus faecalis (Enterococcus faecalis extracts that inactivated the Escherichia. coli and E. faecalis pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes through cleavage of the lipoamide bond. The enzyme that caused this lipoamidase activity remained unidentified until Jiang and Cronan discovered the gene encoding lipoamidase (Lpa through the screening of an expression library. Subsequent cloning and characterization of the recombinant enzyme revealed that lipoamidase is an 80 kDa protein composed of an amidase domain containing a classic Ser-Ser-Lys catalytic triad and a carboxy-terminal domain of unknown function. Here, we show that the amidase domain can be used as an in vivo probe which specifically inactivates lipoylated enzymes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We evaluated whether Lpa could function as an inducible probe of alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase inactivation using E. coli as a model system. Lpa expression resulted in cleavage of lipoic acid from the three lipoylated proteins expressed in E. coli, but did not result in cleavage of biotin from the sole biotinylated protein, the biotin carboxyl carrier protein. When expressed in lipoylation deficient E. coli, Lpa is not toxic, indicating that Lpa does not interfere with any other critical metabolic pathways. When truncated to the amidase domain, Lpa retained lipoamidase activity without acquiring biotinidase activity, indicating that the carboxy-terminal domain is not essential for substrate recognition or function. Substitution of any of the three catalytic triad amino acids with alanine produced inactive Lpa proteins. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The enzyme lipoamidase is active against a broad range of lipoylated proteins in vivo, but does not affect the growth of lipoylation deficient E. coli. Lpa can be truncated to 60% of its original size with only a partial loss of activity, resulting in a smaller probe that can

  5. Frizzled 7 and PIP2 binding by syntenin PDZ2 domain supports Frizzled 7 trafficking and signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea-Jimenez, Antonio Luis; Gallardo, Rodrigo; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Ivarsson, Ylva; Wawrzyniak, Anna Maria; Kashyap, Rudra; Loris, Remy; Schymkowitz, Joost; Rousseau, Frederic; Zimmermann, Pascale

    2016-07-01

    PDZ domain-containing proteins work as intracellular scaffolds to control spatio-temporal aspects of cell signalling. This function is supported by the ability of their PDZ domains to bind other proteins such as receptors, but also phosphoinositide lipids important for membrane trafficking. Here we report a crystal structure of the syntenin PDZ tandem in complex with the carboxy-terminal fragment of Frizzled 7 and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). The crystal structure reveals a tripartite interaction formed via the second PDZ domain of syntenin. Biophysical and biochemical experiments establish co-operative binding of the tripartite complex and identify residues crucial for membrane PIP2-specific recognition. Experiments with cells support the importance of the syntenin-PIP2 interaction for plasma membrane targeting of Frizzled 7 and c-jun phosphorylation. This study contributes to our understanding of the biology of PDZ proteins as key players in membrane compartmentalization and dynamics.

  6. The alpha/beta carboxy-terminal domains of p63 are required for skin and limb development. New insights from the Brdm2 mouse which is not a complete p63 knockout but expresses p63 gamma-like proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolff, S; Talos, F; Palacios, G; Beyer, U; Dobbelstein, M; Moll, U M

    2009-01-01

    p63, an ancestral transcription factor of the p53 family, has three C-terminal isoforms whose relative in vivo functions are elusive. The p63 gene is essential for skin and limb development, as vividly shown by two independent global knockout mouse models. Both strains, although constructed diffe...

  7. Contributions of counter-charge in a potassium channel voltage-sensor domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pless, Stephan Alexander; Galpin, Jason D; Niciforovic, Ana P;

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-sensor domains couple membrane potential to conformational changes in voltage-gated ion channels and phosphatases. Highly coevolved acidic and aromatic side chains assist the transfer of cationic side chains across the transmembrane electric field during voltage sensing. We investigated the...

  8. On the origin of differential phase contrast at a locally charged and globally charge-compensated domain boundary in a polar-ordered material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacLaren, Ian; Wang, LiQiu; McGrouther, Damien; Craven, Alan J.; McVitie, Stephen [SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Schierholz, Roland [Institute of Energy and Climate Research: Fundamental Electrochemistry (IEK-9), Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Kovács, András [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C) and Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Barthel, Juri [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C) and Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Central Facility for Electron Microscopy, RWTH Aachen University, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C) and Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Differential phase contrast (DPC) imaging in the scanning transmission electron microscope is applied to the study of a charged antiphase domain boundary in doped bismuth ferrite. A clear differential signal is seen, which matches the expected direction of the electric field at the boundary. However, further study by scanned diffraction reveals that there is no measurable deflection of the primary diffraction disc and hence no significant free E-field in the material. Instead, the DPC signal arises from a modulation of the intensity profile within the primary diffraction disc in the vicinity of the boundary. Simulations are used to show that this modulation arises purely from the local change in crystallographic structure at the boundary and not from an electric field. This study highlights the care that is required when interpreting signals recorded from ferroelectric materials using both DPC imaging and other phase contrast techniques. - Highlights: • We show clear differential phase contrast (DPC) at a charged boundary. • Scanning diffraction shows that the discs do not move. • Disc deflection by electric fields is not the source of the DPC signal. • Diffraction contrast within the disc is the source of the DPC signal. • DPC and holography of E fields is difficult due to diffraction contrast.

  9. On the origin of differential phase contrast at a locally charged and globally charge-compensated domain boundary in a polar-ordered material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Differential phase contrast (DPC) imaging in the scanning transmission electron microscope is applied to the study of a charged antiphase domain boundary in doped bismuth ferrite. A clear differential signal is seen, which matches the expected direction of the electric field at the boundary. However, further study by scanned diffraction reveals that there is no measurable deflection of the primary diffraction disc and hence no significant free E-field in the material. Instead, the DPC signal arises from a modulation of the intensity profile within the primary diffraction disc in the vicinity of the boundary. Simulations are used to show that this modulation arises purely from the local change in crystallographic structure at the boundary and not from an electric field. This study highlights the care that is required when interpreting signals recorded from ferroelectric materials using both DPC imaging and other phase contrast techniques. - Highlights: • We show clear differential phase contrast (DPC) at a charged boundary. • Scanning diffraction shows that the discs do not move. • Disc deflection by electric fields is not the source of the DPC signal. • Diffraction contrast within the disc is the source of the DPC signal. • DPC and holography of E fields is difficult due to diffraction contrast

  10. A 10-bit 250 MSPS charge-domain pipelined ADC with replica controlled PVT insensitive BCT circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Songren, Huang; Hong, Zhang; Zhenhai, Chen; Shuang, Zhu; Zongguang, Yu; Hongwen, Qian; Yue, Hao

    2015-05-01

    A low power 10-bit 250 MSPS charge-domain (CD) pipelined analog-to-digital converter (ADC) is introduced. The ADC is implemented in MOS bucket-brigade devices (BBDs) based CD pipelined architecture. A replica controlled boosted charge transfer (BCT) circuit is introduced to reject the influence of PVT variations on the charge transfer process. Based on replica controlled BCT, the CD pipelined ADC is designed and realized in a 1P6M 0.18 μm CMOS process. The ADC achieves an SFDR of 64.4 dB, an SNDR of 56.9 dB and an ENOB of 9.2 for a 9.9 MHz input; and an SFDR of 63.1 dB, an SNR of 55.2 dB, an SNDR of 54.5 dB and an ENOB of 8.7 for a 220.5 MHz input at full sampling rate. The DNL is +0.5/ -0.55 LSB and INL is +0.8/ -0.85 LSB. The power consumption of the prototype ADC is only 45 mW at 1.8 V supply and it occupies an active die area of 1.56 mm2. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61106027).

  11. Charge ordering, ferroelectric, and magnetic domains in LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} observed by scanning probe microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, I. K.; Jeong, Y. H., E-mail: yhj@postech.ac.kr [Department of Physics, POSTECH, 77 Cheongam-Ro, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeehoon [Department of Physics, POSTECH, 77 Cheongam-Ro, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); CALDES, Institute of Basic Science, 77 Cheongam-Ro, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, S. H. [YE Team, Samsung Electronics, 1 Samsungjeonja-Ro, Hwaseong 445-330 (Korea, Republic of); Cheong, S.-W. [Laboratory of Pohang Emergent Materials, POSTECH, 77 Cheongam-Ro, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States)

    2015-04-13

    LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} is a multiferroic system which exhibits charge order, ferroelectricity, and ferrimagnetism simultaneously below ∼230 K. The ferroelectric/charge order domains of LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} are imaged with both piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) and electrostatic force microscopy (EFM), while the magnetic domains are characterized by magnetic force microscopy (MFM). Comparison of PFM and EFM results suggests that the proposed ferroelectricity in LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} is not of usual displacive type but of electronic origin. Simultaneous characterization of ferroelectric/charge order and magnetic domains by EFM and MFM, respectively, on the same surface of LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} reveals that both domains have irregular patterns of similar shape, but the length scales are quite different. The domain size is approximately 100 nm for the ferroelectric domains, while the magnetic domain size is much larger and gets as large as 1 μm. We also demonstrate that the origin of the formation of irregular domains in LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} is not extrinsic but intrinsic.

  12. Domain-and species-specific monoclonal antibodies recognize the Von Willebrand Factor-C domain of CCN5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lan; McKeon, Frank; Russo, Joshua W; Lemire, Joan; Castellot, John

    2009-03-01

    The CCN family of proteins typically consists of four distinct peptide domains: an insulin-like growth factor binding protein-type (IGFBP) domain, a Von Willebrand Factor C (VWC) domain, a thrombospondin type 1 repeat (TSP1) domain, and a carboxy-terminal (CT) domain. The six family members participate in many processes, including proliferation, motility, cell-matrix signaling, angiogenesis, and wound healing. Accumulating evidence suggests that truncated and alternatively spliced isoforms are responsible for the diverse functions of CCN proteins in both normal and pathophysiologic states. Analysis of the properties and functions of individual CCN domains further corroborates this idea. CCN5 is unique among the CCN family members because it lacks the CT-domain. To dissect the domain functions of CCN5, we are developing domain-specific mouse monoclonal antibodies. Monoclonal antibodies have the advantages of great specificity, reproducibility, and ease of long-term storage and production. In this communication, we injected mixtures of GST-fused rat CCN5 domains into mice to generate monoclonal antibodies. To identify the domains recognized by the antibodies, we constructed serial expression plasmids that express dual-tagged rat CCN5 domains. All of the monoclonal antibodies generated to date recognize the VWC domain, indicating it is the most highly immunogenic of the CCN5 domains. We characterized one particular clone, 22H10, and found that it recognizes mouse and rat CCN5, but not human recombinant CCN5. Purified 22H10 was successfully applied in Western Blot analysis, immunofluorescence of cultured cells and tissues, and immunoprecipitation, indicating that it will be a useful tool for domain analysis and studies of mouse-human tumor models. PMID:19401828

  13. Primary charge separation within P870* in wild type and heterodimer mutants in femtosecond time domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatypov, R A; Khmelnitskiy, A Yu; Khristin, A M; Fufina, T Yu; Vasilieva, L G; Shuvalov, V A

    2012-08-01

    Primary charge separation dynamics in the reaction center (RC) of purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides and its P870 heterodimer mutants have been studied using femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy with 20 and 40fs excitation at 870nm at 293K. Absorbance increase in the 1060-1130nm region that is presumably attributed to P(A)(δ+) cation radical molecule as a part of mixed state with a charge transfer character P*(P(A)(δ+)P(B)(δ-)) was found. This state appears at 120-180fs time delay in the wild type RC and even faster in H(L173)L and H(M202)L heterodimer mutants and precedes electron transfer (ET) to B(A) bacteriochlorophyll with absorption band at 1020nm in WT. The formation of the P(A)(δ+)B(A)(δ-) state is a result of the electron transfer from P*(P(A)(δ+)P(B)(δ-)) to the primary electron acceptor B(A) (still mixed with P*) with the apparent time delay of ~1.1ps. Next step of ET is accompanied by the 3-ps appearance of bacteriopheophytin a(-) (H(A)(-)) band at 960nm. The study of the wave packet formation upon 20-fs illumination has shown that the vibration energy of the wave packet promotes reversible overcoming of an energy barrier between two potential energy surfaces P* and P*(P(A)(δ+)B(A)(δ-)) at ~500fs. For longer excitation pulses (40fs) this promotion is absent and tunneling through an energy barrier takes about 3ps. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Photosynthesis Research for Sustainability: from Natural to Artificial. PMID:22209778

  14. Spin-orbit-coupling induced torque in ballistic domain walls: Equivalence of charge-pumping and nonequilibrium magnetization formalisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhe; Kelly, Paul J.

    2016-06-01

    To study the effect of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) on spin-transfer torque in magnetic materials, we have implemented two theoretical formalisms that can accommodate SOC. Using the "charge-pumping" formalism, we find two contributions to the out-of-plane spin-transfer torque parameter β in ballistic Ni domain walls (DWs). For short DWs, the nonadiabatic reflection of conduction electrons caused by the rapid spatial variation of the exchange potential results in an out-of-plane torque that increases rapidly with decreasing DW length. For long DWs, the Fermi level conduction channel anisotropy that gives rise to an intrinsic DW resistance in the presence of SOC leads to a linear dependence of β on the DW length. To understand this counterintuitive divergence of β in the long DW limit, we use the "nonequilibrium magnetization" formalism to examine the spatially resolved spin-transfer torque. The SOC-induced out-of-plane torque in ballistic DWs is found to be quantitatively consistent with the values obtained using the charge-pumping calculations, indicating the equivalence of the two theoretical methods.

  15. Two-domain structure of the td intron-encoded endonuclease I-TevI correlates with the two-domain configuration of the homing site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derbyshire, V; Kowalski, J C; Dansereau, J T; Hauer, C R; Belfort, M

    1997-02-01

    I-TevI, the T4 td intron-encoded endonuclease, catalyzes the first step in intron homing by making a double-strand break in the intronless allele within a sequence designated the homing site. The 28 kDa enzyme, which interacts with the homing site over a span of 37 bp, binds as a monomer, contacting two domains of the substrate. In this study, limited proteolysis experiments indicate that I-TevI consists of two domains that behave as discrete physical entities as judged by a number of functional and structural criteria. Overexpression clones for each domain were constructed and the proteins were purified. The carboxy-terminal domain has DNA-binding activity coincident with the primary binding region of the homing site and binds with the same affinity as the full-length enzyme. The isolated amino-terminal domain, contains the conserved GIY-YIG motif, consistent with its being the catalytic domain. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis of a conserved arginine residue within the extended motif rendered the full-length protein catalytically inactive, although DNA-binding was maintained. This is the first evidence that the GIY-YIG motif is important for catalytic activity. An enzyme with an N-terminal catalytic domain and a C-terminal DNA-binding domain connected by a flexible linker is in accord with the bipartite structure of the homing site. PMID:9048944

  16. Glutamic Acid at Residue 125 of the prM Helix Domain Interacts with Positively Charged Amino Acids in E Protein Domain II for Japanese Encephalitis Virus-Like-Particle Production

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Jia-Guan; Wu, Suh-Chin

    2014-01-01

    Interaction between E and prM proteins in flavivirus-infected cells is a major factor for virus-like particle (VLP) production. The prM helical (prM-H) domain is topologically close to and may interact with domain II of the E protein (EDII). In this study, we investigated prM-H domain amino acid residues facing Japanese encephalitis virus EDII using site-directed mutagenesis to determine their roles in prM-E interaction and VLP production. Our results indicate that negatively charged prM-E125...

  17. A low power time-interleaved 10-bit 250-MSPS charge domain pipelined ADC for IF sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 10-bit 250-MSPS two-channel time-interleaved charge-domain (CD) pipelined analog-to-digital converter (ADC) is presented. MOS bucket-brigade device (BBD) based CD pipelined architecture is used to achieve low power consumption. An all digital low power DLL is used to alleviate the timing mismatches and to reduce the aperture jitter. A new bootstrapped MOS switch is designed in the sample and hold circuit to enhance the IF sampling capability. The ADC achieves a spurious free dynamic range (SFDR) of 67.1 dB, signal-to-noise ratio (SNDR) of 55.1 dB for a 10.1 MHz input, and SFDR of 61.6 dB, SNDR of 52.6 dB for a 355 MHz input at full sampling rate. Differential nonlinearity (DNL) is +0.5/−0.4 LSB and integral nonlinearity (INL) is +0.8/−0.75 LSB. Fabricated in a 0.18-μm 1P6M CMOS process, the prototype 10-bit pipelined ADC occupies 1.8 × 1.3 mm2 of active die area, and consumes only 68 mW at 1.8 V supply. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  18. A low power time-interleaved 10-bit 250-MSPS charge domain pipelined ADC for IF sampling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Zhenhai; Qian Hongwen; Huang Songren; Zhang Hong; Yu Zongguang

    2013-01-01

    A 10-bit 250-MSPS two-channel time-interleaved charge-domain (CD) pipelined analog-to-digital converter (ADC) is presented.MOS bucket-brigade device (BBD) based CD pipelined architecture is used to achieve low power consumption.An all digital low power DLL is used to alleviate the timing mismatches and to reduce the aperture jitter.A new bootstrapped MOS switch is designed in the sample and hold circuit to enhance the IF sampling capability.The ADC achieves a spurious free dynamic range (SFDR) of 67.1 dB,signal-to-noise ratio (SNDR) of 55.1 dB for a 10.1 MHz input,and SFDR of 61.6 dB,SNDR of 52.6 dB for a 355 MHz input at full sampling rate.Differential nonlinearity (DNL) is +0.5/-0.4 LSB and integral nonlinearity (INL) is +0.8/-0.75LSB.Fabricated in a 0.18-μm 1P6M CMOS process,the prototype 10-bit pipelined ADC occupies 1.8 × 1.3 mm2of active die area,and consumes only 68 mW at 1.8 V supply.

  19. Ca2(+)-dependent interaction of N-copine, a member of the two C2 domain protein family, with OS-9, the product of a gene frequently amplified in osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, T; Yaoi, T; Kuwajima, G; Yoshie, O; Sakata, T

    1999-06-18

    N-copine is a novel two C2 domain protein that shows Ca2(+)-dependent phospholipid binding and membrane association. By using yeast two-hybrid assays, we identified OS-9 as a protein capable of interacting with N-copine. We further revealed that the second C2 domain of N-copine bound with the carboxy-terminal region of OS-9. Their interaction in vivo was also confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation from 293E cells co-expressing transfected N-copine and OS-9. In vitro binding assays showed that this interaction was Ca2(+)-dependent. By Northern blot analysis, N-copine and OS-9 were co-expressed in the same regions of human brain. These results reveal that OS-9 is a potential target of N-copine. PMID:10403379

  20. Functional conservation of the hydrophobic domain of polypeptide 3AB between human rhinovirus and poliovirus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study we exchanged portions of the poliovirus type 1 (PV1) hydrophobic domain within the membrane-associated polypeptide 3AB for the analogous sequences from human rhinovirus 14 (HRV14). The sequence exchanges were based upon a previous report in which the 22 amino acid hydrophobic region was subdivided into two domains, I and II, the latter of which was shown to be required for membrane association (J. Biol. Chem. 271 (1996), 26810). Using these divisions, the HRV14 sequences were cloned into the complete poliovirus type 1 cDNA sequence. RNAs transcribed from these cDNAs were transfected into HeLa cell monolayers and used in HeLa cell-free translation/replication assays. The data indicated that 3AB sequences from PV1 and HRV14 are interchangeable; however, the substitutions cause a range of significant RNA replication defects, and in some cases, protein processing defects. Following transfection of RNAs encoding the domain substitutions into HeLa cell monolayers, virus isolates were harvested, and the corresponding viral RNAs were sequenced. The sequence data revealed that for the carboxy-terminal domain substitutions (domain II), multiple nucleotide changes were identified in the first, second, and third positions of different codons. In addition, the data indicated that for one of the PV1/HRV14 chimeras to replicate, compensatory mutations within poliovirus protein 2B may be required

  1. Structural criteria for regulation of membrane fusion and virion incorporation by the murine leukemia virus TM cytoplasmic domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cytoplasmic domains of viral glycoproteins influence the trafficking and subcellular localization of the glycoproteins and their incorporation into virions. They also promote correct virus morphology and viral budding. The cytoplasmic domains of murine-leukemia-virus envelope-protein TM subunits regulate membrane fusion. During virion maturation the carboxy-terminal 16 amino acid residues of the TM protein are removed by the retroviral protease. Deletion of these residues activates envelope-protein-mediated membrane fusion. Our quantitative analysis of the effects of Moloney murine leukemia virus TM mutations on envelope-protein function support the proposition that a trimeric coiled coil in the TM cytoplasmic domain inhibits fusion. The data demonstrate that cleavage of the TM cytoplasmic domain is not required for viral entry and provide evidence for a model in which fusogenic and nonfusogenic conformations of the envelope protein exists in an equilibrium that is regulated by the cytoplasmic domain. In addition, a conserved tyrosine residue in the TM cytoplasmic domain was shown to play an important role in envelope-protein incorporation into retroviral particles

  2. Robustness of magnetic and electric domains against charge carrier doping in multiferroic hexagonal ErMnO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanpour, E.; Wegmayr, V.; Schaab, J.; Yan, Z.; Bourret, E.; Lottermoser, Th; Fiebig, M.; Meier, D.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the effect of chemical doping on the electric and magnetic domain pattern in multiferroic hexagonal ErMnO3. Hole- and electron doping are achieved through the growth of Er1‑x Ca x MnO3 and Er1‑x Zr x MnO3 single crystals, which allows for a controlled introduction of divalent and tetravalent ions, respectively. Using conductance measurements, piezoresponse force microscopy and nonlinear optics we study doping-related variations in the electronic transport and image the corrsponding ferroelectric and antiferromagnetic domains. We find that moderate doping levels allow for adjusting the electronic conduction properties of ErMnO3 without destroying its characteristic domain patterns. Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of chemical doping for non-perturbative property-engineering of intrinsic domain states in this important class of multiferroics.

  3. Carboxy-terminal truncation of oryzacystatin II by oryzacystatin-insensitive insect digestive proteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, D; Cantin, L; Vrain, T C

    1995-10-01

    The biochemical interactions between digestive proteinases of the Coleoptera pest black vine weevil (Otiorynchus sulcatus) and two plant cysteine proteinase inhibitors, oryzacystatin I (OCI) and oryzacystatin II (OCII), were assessed using gelatin-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, OCI-affinity chromatography, and recombinant forms of the two plant inhibitors. The insect proteinases were resolved in gelatin-containing polyacrylamide gels as five major bands, only three of them being totally or partially inactivated by OCI and OCII. The maximal inhibitory effect of both OCs at pH 5.0 was estimated at 40% and the inhibition was stable with time despite the presence of OC-insensitive proteases, indicating the stability of the OCI and OCII effects. After removing OC-sensitive proteinases from the insect crude extract by OCI-affinity chromatography, the effects of the insect cystatin-insensitive proteases on the structural integrity of the free OCs were analyzed. While OCI remained stable, OCII was subjected to limited proteolysis leading to its gradual transformation into a approximately 10.5-kDa unstable intermediate, OCIIi. As shown by the degradation pattern of a glutathione S-transferase (GST)/OCII fusion protein, the appearance of OCIIi resulted from the C-terminal truncation of OCII. Either free or linked to GST, OCIIi was as active against papain and human cathepsin H as OCII, and the initial specificities of the inhibitor for these two cysteine proteinases were conserved after cleavage. Although these observations indicate the high conformational stability of OCII near its active (inhibitory) site, they also suggest a general conformational destabilization of this inhibitor following its initial cleavage, subsequently leading to its complete hydrolysis. This apparent susceptibility of OCII to proteolytic cleavage by the insect proteinases could have major implications when planning the use of this plant cystatin for insect pest control. PMID:7574723

  4. SpeB proteolysis with imaged capillary isoelectric focusing for the characterization of domain-specific charge heterogeneities of reference and biosimilar Rituximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zichuan; Perrault, Ronel; Zhao, Yun; Ding, Julia

    2016-05-01

    The charge variations of therapeutic monoclonal antibody reveal important information of the post-translational modifications that may potentially impact the potency and safety of pharmaceutical products, especially during the evaluation of biosimilarity of therapeutic proteins. In this work, a novel SpeB-based proteolysis strategy coupling with imaged capillary isoelectric focusing was developed for the determination of domain-specific charge heterogeneities of innovator and generic Rituximab drug products from United States, European and Indian markets. It was observed that innovator Rituximab from the United States and Europe share highly similar peak distributions and charge heterogeneities with 26.2-26.6% Fc/2, 28.9-29.3% LC and 44.4-44.5% Fd peak areas detected, respectively, while multiple basic variations of Fc/2 and less acidic LC and Fd species were found from generic Rituximab from India with 20.9% Fc/2, 32.3% LC and 46.9% Fd peak areas detected. It was also demonstrated that structural changes caused by Carboxypeptidase B treatment and deamidation study at pH extremes could be sensitively captured with the established method, with the results further indicating that the generic product's basic variations of Fc/2 were un-cleaved Lysine residues, while the lack of certain acidic peaks on LC and Fd probably was due to the lower level of deamidation. This new strategy could become a useful tool to reveal domain-specific charge heterogeneities profiles of a variety of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies in regulated environments. PMID:27038651

  5. A negative charge in transmembrane segment 1 of domain II of the cockroach sodium channel is critical for channel gating and action of pyrethroid insecticides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are the primary target of pyrethroids, an important class of synthetic insecticides. Pyrethroids bind to a distinct receptor site on sodium channels and prolong the open state by inhibiting channel deactivation and inactivation. Recent studies have begun to reveal sodium channel residues important for pyrethroid binding. However, how pyrethroid binding leads to inhibition of sodium channel deactivation and inactivation remains elusive. In this study, we show that a negatively charged aspartic acid residue at position 802 (D802) located in the extracellular end of transmembrane segment 1 of domain II (IIS1) is critical for both the action of pyrethroids and the voltage dependence of channel activation. Charge-reversing or -neutralizing substitutions (K, G, or A) of D802 shifted the voltage dependence of activation in the depolarizing direction and reduced channel sensitivity to deltamethrin, a pyrethroid insecticide. The charge-reversing mutation D802K also accelerated open-state deactivation, which may have counteracted the inhibition of sodium channel deactivation by deltamethrin. In contrast, the D802G substitution slowed open-state deactivation, suggesting an additional mechanism for neutralizing the action of deltamethrin. Importantly, Schild analysis showed that D802 is not involved in pyrethroid binding. Thus, we have identified a sodium channel residue that is critical for regulating the action of pyrethroids on the sodium channel without affecting the receptor site of pyrethroids.

  6. SCB1, a BURP-domain protein gene, from developing soybean seed coats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelor, Anthea K; Boutilier, Kim; Miller, S Shea; Hattori, Jiro; Bowman, Lu Anne; Hu, Ming; Lantin, Sylviane; Johnson, Douglas A; Miki, Brian L A

    2002-08-01

    We describe a gene, SCB1 (Seed Coat BURP-domain protein 1), that is expressed specifically within the soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merrill) seed coat early in its development. Northern blot analysis and mRNA in situ hybridization revealed novel patterns of gene expression during seed development. SCB1 mRNA accumulated first within the developing thick-walled parenchyma cells of the inner integument and later in the thick- and thin-walled parenchyma cells of the outer integument. This occurred prior to the period of seed coat maturation and seed filling and before either of the layers started to degrade. SCB1 may therefore play a role in the differentiation of the seed coat parenchyma cells. In addition, the protein product appears to be located within cell walls. The SCB1 gene codes for a new member of a class of modular proteins that possess a carboxy-terminal BURP domain and a variety of different repeated sequences. The sequence of the genomic clone revealed the insertion of a Tgm transposable element in the upstream promoter region but it is not certain whether it contributes to the tissue-specific pattern of SCB1 expression. PMID:12172833

  7. Photoelectric effect in the relativistic domain revealed by the time-reversed process for highly charged uranium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The photoelectric effect in the near relativistic energy regime of 80 to 350 keV is studied by the time-reversed process in ion-atom collisions, i.e. by the radiative capture of a quasi-free target electron. We review shell and subshell differential photon-angular distribution studies of radiative capture into highly-charged uranium ions. The experimental data are compared with exact relativistic calculations and give detailed insight into both the atomic structure of high-Z few-electron ions and into the fundamental electron-photon interaction process involved. In particular it is shown that the angular-differential measurements provide a unique method to study the magnetic interaction in relativistic electron-photon encoun- (orig.)

  8. Resonance assignment of an engineered amino-terminal domain of a major ampullate spider silk with neutralized charge cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaal, Daniel; Bauer, Joschka; Schweimer, Kristian; Scheibel, Thomas; Rösch, Paul; Schwarzinger, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    Spider dragline fibers are predominantly made out of the major ampullate spidroins (MaSp) 1 and 2. The assembly of dissolved spidroin into a stable fiber is highly controlled for example by dimerization of its amino-terminal domain (NRN) upon acidification, as well as removal of sodium chloride along the spinning duct. Clustered residues D39, E76 and E81 are the most highly conserved residues of the five-helix bundle, and they are hypothesized to be key residues for switching between a monomeric and a dimeric conformation. Simultaneous replacement of these residues by their non-titratable analogues results in variant D39N/E76Q/E81Q, which is supposed to fold into an intermediate conformation between that of the monomeric and the dimeric state at neutral pH. Here we report the resonance assignment of Latrodectus hesperus NRN variant D39N/E76Q/E81Q at pH 7.2 obtained by high-resolution triple resonance NMR spectroscopy. PMID:26892754

  9. Oxidation of p53 through DNA charge transport involves a network of disulfides within the DNA-binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Kathryn N; Geil, Wendy M; Sweredoski, Michael J; Moradian, Annie; Hess, Sonja; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2015-01-27

    Transcription factor p53 plays a critical role in the cellular response to stress stimuli. We have seen that p53 dissociates selectively from various promoter sites as a result of oxidation at long-range through DNA-mediated charge transport (CT). Here, we examine this chemical oxidation and determine the residues in p53 that are essential for oxidative dissociation, focusing on the network of cysteine residues adjacent to the DNA-binding site. Of the eight mutants studied, only the C275S mutation shows decreased affinity for the Gadd45 promoter site. However, both mutations C275S and C277S result in substantial attenuation of oxidative dissociation, with C275S causing the most severe attenuation. Differential thiol labeling was used to determine the oxidation states of cysteine residues within p53 after DNA-mediated oxidation. Reduced cysteines were iodoacetamide-labeled, whereas oxidized cysteines participating in disulfide bonds were (13)C2D2-iodoacetamide-labeled. Intensities of respective iodoacetamide-modified peptide fragments were analyzed by mass spectrometry. A distinct shift in peptide labeling toward (13)C2D2-iodoacetamide-labeled cysteines is observed in oxidized samples, confirming that chemical oxidation of p53 occurs at long range. All observable cysteine residues trend toward the heavy label under conditions of DNA CT, indicating the formation of multiple disulfide bonds among the cysteine network. On the basis of these data, it is proposed that disulfide formation involving C275 is critical for inducing oxidative dissociation of p53 from DNA. PMID:25584637

  10. The free energy barrier for arginine gating charge translation is altered by mutations in the voltage sensor domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine S Schwaiger

    Full Text Available The gating of voltage-gated ion channels is controlled by the arginine-rich S4 helix of the voltage-sensor domain moving in response to an external potential. Recent studies have suggested that S4 moves in three to four steps to open the conducting pore, thus visiting several intermediate conformations during gating. However, the exact conformational changes are not known in detail. For instance, it has been suggested that there is a local rotation in the helix corresponding to short segments of a 3(10-helix moving along S4 during opening and closing. Here, we have explored the energetics of the transition between the fully open state (based on the X-ray structure and the first intermediate state towards channel closing (C1, modeled from experimental constraints. We show that conformations within 3 Å of the X-ray structure are obtained in simulations starting from the C1 model, and directly observe the previously suggested sliding 3(10-helix region in S4. Through systematic free energy calculations, we show that the C1 state is a stable intermediate conformation and determine free energy profiles for moving between the states without constraints. Mutations indicate several residues in a narrow hydrophobic band in the voltage sensor contribute to the barrier between the open and C1 states, with F233 in the S2 helix having the largest influence. Substitution for smaller amino acids reduces the transition cost, while introduction of a larger ring increases it, largely confirming experimental activation shift results. There is a systematic correlation between the local aromatic ring rotation, the arginine barrier crossing, and the corresponding relative free energy. In particular, it appears to be more advantageous for the F233 side chain to rotate towards the extracellular side when arginines cross the hydrophobic region.

  11. Structure of the catalytic domain of the hepatitis C virus NS2-3 protease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz,I.; Marcotrigiano, J.; Dentzer, T.; Rice, C.

    2006-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus is a major global health problem affecting an estimated 170 million people worldwide. Chronic infection is common and can lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer. There is no vaccine available and current therapies have met with limited success. The viral RNA genome encodes a polyprotein that includes two proteases essential for virus replication. The NS2-3 protease mediates a single cleavage at the NS2/NS3 junction, whereas the NS3-4A protease cleaves at four downstream sites in the polyprotein. NS3-4A is characterized as a serine protease with a chymotrypsin-like fold, but the enzymatic mechanism of the NS2-3 protease remains unresolved. Here we report the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of the NS2-3 protease at 2.3 Angstroms resolution. The structure reveals a dimeric cysteine protease with two composite active sites. For each active site, the catalytic histidine and glutamate residues are contributed by one monomer, and the nucleophilic cysteine by the other. The carboxy-terminal residues remain coordinated in the two active sites, predicting an inactive post-cleavage form. Proteolysis through formation of a composite active site occurs in the context of the viral polyprotein expressed in mammalian cells. These features offer unexpected insights into polyprotein processing by hepatitis C virus and new opportunities for antiviral drug design.

  12. Crystal Structure of the Fibre Head Domain of the Atadenovirus Snake Adenovirus 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Abhimanyu K.; Menéndez-Conejero, Rosa; San Martín, Carmen; van Raaij, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    Adenoviruses are non-enveloped icosahedral viruses with trimeric fibre proteins protruding from their vertices. There are five known genera, from which only Mastadenoviruses have been widely studied. Apart from studying adenovirus as a biological model system and with a view to prevent or combat viral infection, there is a major interest in using adenovirus for vaccination, cancer therapy and gene therapy purposes. Adenoviruses from the Atadenovirus genus have been isolated from squamate reptile hosts, ruminants and birds and have a characteristic gene organization and capsid morphology. The carboxy-terminal virus-distal fibre head domains are likely responsible for primary receptor recognition. We determined the high-resolution crystal structure of the Snake Adenovirus 1 (SnAdV-1) fibre head using the multi-wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) method. Despite the absence of significant sequence homology, this Atadenovirus fibre head has the same beta-sandwich propeller topology as other adenovirus fibre heads. However, it is about half the size, mainly due to much shorter loops connecting the beta-strands. The detailed structure of the SnAdV-1 fibre head and other animal adenovirus fibre heads, together with the future identification of their natural receptors, may lead to the development of new strategies to target adenovirus vectors to cells of interest. PMID:25486282

  13. Crystal structure of the anti-viral APOBEC3G catalytic domain and functional implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, Lauren G.; Prochnow, Courtney; Chang, Y. Paul; Bransteitter, Ronda; Chelico, Linda; Sen, Udayaditya; Stevens, Raymond C.; Goodman, Myron F.; Chen, Xiaojiang S. (USC); (Scripps)

    2009-04-07

    The APOBEC family members are involved in diverse biological functions. APOBEC3G restricts the replication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus and retroelements by cytidine deamination on single-stranded DNA or by RNA binding. Here we report the high-resolution crystal structure of the carboxy-terminal deaminase domain of APOBEC3G (APOBEC3G-CD2) purified from Escherichia coli. The APOBEC3G-CD2 structure has a five-stranded {beta}-sheet core that is common to all known deaminase structures and closely resembles the structure of another APOBEC protein, APOBEC2. A comparison of APOBEC3G-CD2 with other deaminase structures shows a structural conservation of the active-site loops that are directly involved in substrate binding. In the X-ray structure, these APOBEC3G active-site loops form a continuous 'substrate groove' around the active centre. The orientation of this putative substrate groove differs markedly (by 90 degrees) from the groove predicted by the NMR structure. We have introduced mutations around the groove, and have identified residues involved in substrate specificity, single-stranded DNA binding and deaminase activity. These results provide a basis for understanding the underlying mechanisms of substrate specificity for the APOBEC family.

  14. Atomistic Time-Domain Simulations of Light-Harvesting and Charge-Transfer Dynamics in Novel Nanoscale Materials for Solar Hydrogen Production.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prezhdo, Oleg V.

    2012-03-22

    Funded by the DOE grant (i) we continued to study and analyze the atomistic detail of the electron transfer (ET) across the chromophore-TiO2 interface in Gratzel cell systems for solar hydrogen production. (ii) We extensively investigated the nature of photoexcited states and excited state dynamics in semiconductor quantum dots (QD) designed for photovoltaic applications. (iii) We continued a newly initiated research direction focusing on excited state properties and electron-phonon interactions in nanoscale carbon materials. Over the past year, the results of the DOE funded research were summarized in 3 review articles. 12 original manuscripts were written. The research results were reported in 28 invited talks at conferences and university seminars. 20 invitations were accepted for talks in the near future. 2 symposia at national and international meetings have being organized this year on topics closely related to the DOE funded project, and 2 more symposia have been planned for the near future. We summarized the insights into photoinduced dynamics of semiconductor QDs, obtained from our time-domain ab initio studies. QDs exhibit both molecular and bulk properties. Unlike either bulk or molecular materials, QD properties can be modified continuously by changing QD shape and size. However, the chemical and physical properties of molecular and bulk materials often contradict each other, which can lead to differing viewpoints about the behavior of QDs. For example, the molecular view suggests strong electron-hole and charge-phonon interactions, as well as slow energy relaxation due to mismatch between electronic energy gaps and phonon frequencies. In contrast, the bulk view advocates that the kinetic energy of quantum confinement is greater than electron-hole interactions, that charge-phonon coupling is weak, and that the relaxation through quasi-continuous bands is rapid. By synthesizing the bulk and molecular viewpoints, we clarified the controversies and

  15. Phosphorylation of APP-CTF-AICD domains and interaction with adaptor proteins: signal transduction and/or transcriptional role--relevance for Alzheimer pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schettini, Gennaro; Govoni, Stefano; Racchi, Marco; Rodriguez, Guido

    2010-12-01

    In recent decades, the study of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and of its proteolytic products carboxy terminal fragment (CTF), APP intracellular C-terminal domain (AICD) and amyloid beta has been mostly focussed on the role of APP as a producer of the toxic amyloid beta peptide. Here, we reconsider the role of APP suggesting, in a provocative way, the protein as a central player in a putative signalling pathway. We highlight the presence in the cytosolic tail of APP of the YENPTY motif which is typical of tyrosine kinase receptors, the phosphorylation of the tyrosine, serine and threonine residues, the kinases involved and the interaction with intracellular adaptor proteins. In particular, we examine the interaction with Shc and Grb2 regulators, which through the activation of Ras proteins elicit downstream signalling events such as the MAPK pathway. The review also addresses the interaction of APP, CTFs and AICD with other adaptor proteins and in particular with Fe65 for nuclear transcriptional activity and the importance of phosphorylation for sorting the secretases involved in the amyloidogenic or non-amyloidogenic pathways. We provide a novel perspective on Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis, focussing on the perturbation of the physiological activities of APP-CTFs and AICD as an alternative perspective from that which normally focuses on the accumulation of neurotoxic proteolytic fragments. PMID:21039524

  16. The Carboxy-Terminal Sequence of the Pestivirus Glycoprotein Erns Represents an Unusual Type of Membrane Anchor

    OpenAIRE

    Fetzer, Christiane; Tews, Birke Andrea; Meyers, Gregor

    2005-01-01

    The Erns protein is a structural glycoprotein of pestiviruses that lacks a typical membrane anchor sequence and is known to be secreted from the infected cell. However, major amounts of the protein are retained within the cell and attached to the virion by a so far unknown mechanism. Transient-expression studies with cDNA constructs showed that in a steady-state situation, 16% of the protein is found in the supernatant of the transfected cells while 84% appears as intracellular protein. We sh...

  17. Precursors of novel Gla-containing conotoxins contain a carboxy-terminal recognition site that directs gamma-carboxylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Mark A; Begley, Gail S; Czerwiec, Eva;

    2005-01-01

    Vitamin K-dependent gamma-glutamyl carboxylase catalyzes the conversion of glutamyl residues to gamma-carboxyglutamate. Its substrates include vertebrate proteins involved in blood coagulation, bone mineralization, and signal transduction and invertebrate ion channel blockers known as conotoxins....... novel precursor structure for vitamin K-dependent polypeptides. It also provides the first formal evidence to prove that gamma-carboxylation occurs as a post-translational rather than a cotranslational process....

  18. Phosphorylation of threonine in the proline-rich carboxy-terminal region of simian virus 40 large T antigen.

    OpenAIRE

    Scheidtmann, K H; Kaiser, A.; Carbone, A.; Walter, G.

    1981-01-01

    The position of phosphothreonine in the predicted primary structure of simian virus 40 large T antigen was determined by different methods. After digestion of large T antigen with trypsin and subsequent two-dimensional peptide mapping, a single peptide containing phosphothreonine could be separated from the bulk of phosphoserine-containing peptides. Its amino acid composition was determined by differential labeling with various amino acids in vivo. The high yield of proline (4.5 mol) within t...

  19. Expression and Immunological Characterization of the Carboxy-Terminal Region of the P1 Adhesin Protein of Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhry, Rama; Nisar, Nazima; Hora, Bhavna; Chirasani, Sridhar Reddy; Malhotra, Pawan

    2005-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is the causative agent of primary atypical pneumonia in humans. Adherence of M. pneumoniae to host cells requires several adhesin proteins, such as P1, P30, and P116. A major limitation in developing a specific diagnostic test for M. pneumoniae is the inability to express adhesin proteins in heterologous expression systems due to unusual usage of the UGA stop codon, leading to premature termination of these proteins in Escherichia coli. In the present study, we successfu...

  20. Crystallization of the carboxy-terminal region of the bacteriophage T4 proximal long tail fibre protein gp34

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystallization of three C-terminal fragments of the bacteriophage T4 protein gp34 is reported. Diffraction data have been obtained for three native crystal forms and two selenomethionine derivatives, one of which contained high-quality anomalous signal

  1. Crystal structure of FAS thioesterase domain with polyunsaturated fatty acyl adduct and inhibition by dihomo-[gamma]-linolenic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wei; Chakravarty, Bornali; Zheng, Fei; Gu, Ziwei; Wu, Hongmei; Mao, Jianqiang; Wakil, Salih J.; Quiocho, Florante A. (Baylor)

    2012-05-29

    Human fatty acid synthase (hFAS) is a homodimeric multidomain enzyme that catalyzes a series of reactions leading to the de novo biosynthesis of long-chain fatty acids, mainly palmitate. The carboxy-terminal thioesterase (TE) domain determines the length of the fatty acyl chain and its ultimate release by hydrolysis. Because of the upregulation of hFAS in a variety of cancers, it is a target for antiproliferative agent development. Dietary long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been known to confer beneficial effects on many diseases and health conditions, including cancers, inflammations, diabetes, and heart diseases, but the precise molecular mechanisms involved have not been elucidated. We report the crystal structure of the hFAS TE domain covalently modified and inactivated by methyl {gamma}-linolenylfluorophosphonate. Whereas the structure confirmed the phosphorylation by the phosphonate head group of the active site serine, it also unexpectedly revealed the binding of the 18-carbon polyunsaturated {gamma}-linolenyl tail in a long groove-tunnel site, which itself is formed mainly by the emergence of an {alpha} helix (the 'helix flap'). We then found inhibition of the TE domain activity by the PUFA dihomo-{gamma}-linolenic acid; {gamma}- and {alpha}-linolenic acids, two popular dietary PUFAs, were less effective. Dihomo-{gamma}-linolenic acid also inhibited fatty acid biosynthesis in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and selective human breast cancer cell lines, including SKBR3 and MDAMB231. In addition to revealing a novel mechanism for the molecular recognition of a polyunsaturated fatty acyl chain, our results offer a new framework for developing potent FAS inhibitors as therapeutics against cancers and other diseases.

  2. Homotypic interactions of the infectious bursal disease virus proteins VP3, pVP2, VP4, and VP5: mapping of the interacting domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), a nonenveloped double-stranded RNA virus of chicken, encodes five proteins. Of these, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (VP1) is specified by the smaller genome segment, while the large segment directs synthesis of a nonstructural protein (VP5) and a structural protein precursor from which the capsid proteins pVP2 and VP3 as well as the viral protease VP4 are derived. Using the recently redefined processing sites of the precursor, we have reevaluated the homotypic interactions of the viral proteins using the yeast two-hybrid system. Except for VP1, which interacted weakly, all proteins appeared to self-associate strongly. Using a deletion mutagenesis approach, we subsequently mapped the interacting domains in these polypeptides, where possible confirming the observations made in the two-hybrid system by performing coimmunoprecipitation analyses of tagged protein constructs coexpressed in avian culture cells. The results revealed that pVP2 possesses multiple interaction domains, consistent with available structural information about this external capsid protein. VP3-VP3 interactions were mapped to the amino-terminal part of the polypeptide. Interestingly, this domain is distinct from two other interaction domains occurring in this internal capsid protein: while binding to VP1 has been mapped to the carboxy-terminal end of the protein, interaction with the genomic dsRNA segments has been suggested to occur just upstream thereof. No interaction sites could be assigned to the VP4 protein; any deletion applied abolished its self-association. Finally, one interaction domain was detected in the central, most hydrophobic region of VP5, supporting the idea that this virulence determinant may function as a membrane pore-forming protein in infected cells

  3. Sequence Classification: 770331 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ks phosphorylation of the RNA polymerase II large subunit carboxy-terminal domain, Pharynx and Intestine in Excess PIE...-1 (38.4 kD) (pie-1) || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/17556058 ...

  4. Complete Monitoring of Coherent and Incoherent Spin Flip Domains in the Recombination of Charge-Separated States of Donor-Iridium Complex-Acceptor Triads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Johannes H; Schmidt, David; Steiner, Ulrich E; Lambert, Christoph

    2015-09-01

    The spin chemistry of photoinduced charge-separated (CS) states of three triads comprising one or two triarylamine donors, a cyclometalated iridium complex sensitizer and a naphthalene diimide (NDI) acceptor, was investigated by transient absorption spectroscopy in the ns-μs time regime. Strong magnetic-field effects (MFE) were observed for two triads with a phenylene bridge between iridium complex sensitizer and NDI acceptor. For these triads, the lifetimes of the CS states increased from 0.6 μs at zero field to 40 μs at about 2 T. Substituting the phenylene by a biphenyl bridge causes the lifetime of the CS state at zero field to increase by more than 2 orders of magnitude (τ = 79 μs) and the MFE to disappear almost completely. The kinetic MFE was analyzed in the framework of a generalized Hayashi-Nagakura scheme describing coherent (S, T0 ↔ T±) as well as incoherent (S, T0 ⇌ T±) processes by a single rate constant k±. The magnetic-field dependence of k± of the triads with phenylene bridge spans 2 orders of magnitude and exhibits a biphasic behavior characterized by a superposition of two Lorentzians. This biphasic MFE is observed for the first time and is clearly attributable to the coherent (B accounts for the reduction of the MFE on reducing the rate constant of charge recombination in the triad with the biphenyl bridge. PMID:26091082

  5. Domains and domain loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haberland, Hartmut

    2005-01-01

    politicians and in the media, especially in the discussion whether some languages undergo ‘domain loss’ vis-à-vis powerful international languages like English. An objection that has been raised here is that domains, as originally conceived, are parameters of language choice and not properties of languages...... theoretical constructs that can explain language choice which were supposed to be a more powerful explanatory tool than more obvious (and observable) parameters like topic, place (setting) and interlocutor. In the meantime, at least in Scandinavia, the term ‘domain’ has been taken up in the debate among...

  6. Diamagnetic (Condon) domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is the first systematic review of experimental research on diamagnetic (aka Condon) domains that form in nonmagnetic metals at low temperatures due to the development of Landau levels. A variety of methods were used to study the domains. Muon spectroscopy studies showed such domains to be present in all metals studied, pointing to the universal nature of the phenomenon. For silver, the domain structure size as measured by Hall microsensors turned out to be an order of magnitude larger than expected. In beryllium, it was found that domains do not come to the surface but rather remain in the bulk of the crystal. The magnetostriction of beryllium during domain formation is measured. It is shown that magnetization current in a domain wall is entirely caused by the charge density gradient in the wall, due to the lattice being deformed oppositely in neighboring domains. It is observed for the first time that the de Haas-van Alphen effect exhibits hysteresis at the transition to the domain state, and this fact was used for the experimental determination of the phase diagrams for the domain states of silver and beryllium. (reviews of topical problems)

  7. Domain Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørner, Dines

    Before software can be designed we must know its requirements. Before requirements can be expressed we must understand the domain. So it follows, from our dogma, that we must first establish precise descriptions of domains; then, from such descriptions, “derive” at least domain and interface requirements; and from those and machine requirements design the software, or, more generally, the computing systems.

  8. Soluble FasR ligand-binding domain: high-yield production of active fusion and non-fusion recombinant proteins using the baculovirus/insect cell system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahiou, J; Abastado, J P; Cabanie, L; Godeau, F

    1998-03-01

    We used the recombinant baculovirus/insect cell system to express two soluble forms of the mouse Fas receptor (mFasR) extracellular domain (ECD): a monomer comprising the entire ligand-binding portion of mFasR followed by a carboxy-terminal hexa-histidine extension aiding purification by immobilized metal affinity chromatography and an immunoadhesin in which the same 148 residues were fused to the Fc portion of a truncated human IgG1 immunoglobulin heavy chain. Both constructs harboured a 24 base pairs insertion placed upstream of the initiating ATG [Peakman, Charles, Sydenham, Gewert, Page, and Makoff (1992) Nucleic Acids Res. 20, 6111-6112]. Despite its hexa-histidine extension, the monovalent recombinant protein from crude culture media failed to bind immobilized Ni2+ unless proteins were first precipitated twice by ammonium sulphate. The overall procedure then yielded approximately 10mg/l of protein which could be purified to near homogeneity using two additional chromatographic steps. The glycosylated polypeptide migrated as a band of Mr=(21-31) x 10(3) in SDS/PAGE and was monomeric in physiological buffers. Under non-reducing conditions, denaturation in 6 M guanidinium chloride was reversible after slow removal of the denaturing agent. The mFasR immunoadhesin was secreted (approximately 5-10 mg/l) as a disulphide-linked homodimer, and endowed with ligand-binding activity since it could bind FasL on the surface of D11S, FasL-expressing cells. When tested for their ability to inhibit FasR-dependent cell lysis, the soluble dimeric immunoadhesin markedly inhibited FasL-mediated cytotoxicity (IC50 approximately 30 nM), and was approximately 6 times as effective as its monomeric counterpart. PMID:9480929

  9. Unusual domain evolution in semiconducting ferroelectrics: A phase field study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of electrical conductivity on the domain evolution of semiconducting ferroelectrics is investigated using a phase field model which includes the drift of space charges. Phase field simulations show that the tail-to-tail 90° charged domain wall appears during the domain formation in the semiconducting ferroelectrics at zero field, which is prohibited in common insulating ferroelectrics. Due to the screening of polarization charges, the domain switching takes place through the motion of head-to-head 180° charged domain wall in the semiconducting single-domain ferroelectrics subjected to an electric field. Comparing to the insulating ferroelectrics, the semiconducting ferroelectrics have a lower speed of domain evolution due to the decrease of mobility of charged domain walls. The response of semiconducting ferroelectrics to a mechanical load is also found different from that of insulating ferroelectrics. - Highlights: • Phase field simulations reveal an unusual domain evolution with charged domain wall in the semiconducting ferroelectrics. • The semiconducting ferroelectrics have a lower speed of domain evolution than the insulating ones. • The thickness of charged domain wall is found larger than that of neutral wall, which is consistent with the experimental observation. • The evolution of charged domain wall gives an insight into the current leakage in ferroelectric devices

  10. Fractional charges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    20 years ago fractional charges were imagined to explain values of conductivity in some materials. Recent experiments have proved the existence of charges whose value is the third of the electron charge. This article presents the experimental facts that have led theorists to predict the existence of fractional charges from the motion of quasi-particles in a linear chain of poly-acetylene to the quantum Hall effect. According to the latest theories, fractional charges are neither bosons nor fermions but anyons, they are submitted to an exclusive principle that is less stringent than that for fermions. (A.C.)

  11. Protein-chemical characterization of NF-H, the largest mammalian neurofilament component; intermediate filament-type sequences followed by a unique carboxy-terminal extension

    OpenAIRE

    Geisler, N; Fischer, S.; Vandekerckhove, J; Van Damme, J; Plessmann, U.; Weber, K.

    1985-01-01

    NF-H has the highest mol. wt. of the three mammalian neurofilament components (NF-L, NF-M, NF-H). In spite of its unusually large mol. wt., estimated to be 200 K by gel electrophoresis, NF-H contains sequences which identify it as an integral intermediate filament (IF) protein in its amino-terminal region. We have isolated and partially characterized a basic, non-α-helical segment located at the amino-terminal end with properties similar to headpieces of other non-epithelial IF proteins. The ...

  12. The co-crystal structure of ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCHL1) with a tripeptide fluoromethyl ketone (Z-VAE(OMe)-FMK)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, Christopher W.; Chaney, Joseph; Korbel, Gregory; Ringe, Dagmar; Petsko, Gregory A.; Ploegh, Hidde; Das, Chittaranjan (Whitehead); (Purdue); (Rosenstiel)

    2012-07-25

    UCHL1 is a 223 amino acid member of the UCH family of deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs), found abundantly and exclusively expressed in neurons and the testis in normal tissues. Two naturally occurring variants of UCHL1 are directly involved in Parkinson's disease (PD). Not only has UCHL1 been linked to PD, but it has oncogenic properties, having been found abnormally expressed in lung, pancreatic, and colorectal cancers. Although inhibitors of UCHL1 have been described previously the co-crystal structure of the enzyme bound to any inhibitor has not been reported. Herein, we report the X-ray structure of UCHL1 co-crystallized with a peptide-based fluoromethylketone inhibitor, Z-VAE(OMe)-FMK (VAEFMK) at 2.35 {angstrom} resolution. The co-crystal structure reveals that the inhibitor binds in the active-site cleft, irreversibly modifying the active-site cysteine; however, the catalytic histidine is still misaligned as seen in the native structure, suggesting that the inhibitor binds to an inactive form of the enzyme. Our structure also reveals that the inhibitor approaches the active-site cleft from the opposite side of the crossover loop as compared to the direction of approach of ubiquitin's C-terminal tail, thereby occupying the P1{prime} (leaving group) site, a binding site perhaps used by the unknown C-terminal extension of ubiquitin in the actual in vivo substrate(s) of UCHL1. This structure provides a view of molecular contacts at the active-site cleft between the inhibitor and the enzyme as well as furnishing structural information needed to facilitate further design of inhibitors targeted to UCHL1 with high selectivity and potency.

  13. Mutations in the Carboxi Terminal Region of E2 Glycoprotein of Classical Swine Fever Virus is Responsible for Viral Attenuation in Swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have reported that chimeric virus 319.1 virus containing the E2 glycoprotein gene from Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV) vaccine strain CS with the genetic background of virulent CSFV strain Brescia (BIC virus) was attenuated in pigs. To identify the amino acids mediating 319.1 virus attenuation...

  14. V-src oncogene-specific carboxy-terminal peptide is immunoprotective against Rous sarcoma growth in chickens with MHC class I allele B-F12

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hofmann, A.; Plachý, Jiří; Hunt, L.; Kaufman, J.; Hála, K.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 2003, č. 21 (2003), s. 4694-4699. ISSN 0264-410X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : Rous sarcoma * v-src peptide * chicken MHC class I allele Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.007, year: 2003

  15. Charged Condensation

    CERN Document Server

    Gabadadze, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    We consider Bose-Einstein condensation of massive electrically charged scalars in a uniform background of charged fermions. We focus on the case when the scalar condensate screens the background charge, while the net charge of the system resides on its boundary surface. A distinctive signature of this substance is that the photon acquires a Lorentz-violating mass in the bulk of the condensate. Due to this mass, the transverse and longitudinal gauge modes propagate with different group velocities. We give qualitative arguments that at high enough densities and low temperatures a charged system of electrons and helium-4 nuclei, if held together by laboratory devices or by force of gravity, can form such a substance. We briefly discuss possible manifestations of the charged condensate in compact astrophysical objects.

  16. Domain crossing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schraefel, M. C.; Rouncefield, Mark; Kellogg, Wendy; Ackerman, Mark; Marsden, Gary; Bødker, Susanne; Wyche, Susan; Reddy, Madhu

    In CSCW, how much do we need to know about another domain/culture before we observe, intersect and intervene with designs. What optimally would that other culture need to know about us? Is this a “how long is a piece of string” question, or an inquiry where we can consider a variety of contexts a...

  17. PrP charge structure encodes interdomain interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Javier Martínez; Rosa Sánchez; Milagros Castellanos; Natallia Makarava; Adriano Aguzzi; Baskakov, Ilia V; María Gasset

    2015-01-01

    Almost all proteins contain charged residues, and their chain distribution is tailored to fulfill essential ionic interactions for folding, binding and catalysis. Among proteins, the hinged two-domain chain of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) exhibits a peculiar charge structure with unclear consequences in its structural malleability. To decipher the charge design role, we generated charge-reverted mutants for each domain and analyzed their effect on conformational and metabolic features. W...

  18. Charge independence and charge symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, G A; Miller, Gerald A; van Oers, Willem T H

    1994-01-01

    Charge independence and charge symmetry are approximate symmetries of nature, violated by the perturbing effects of the mass difference between up and down quarks and by electromagnetic interactions. The observations of the symmetry breaking effects in nuclear and particle physics and the implications of those effects are reviewed.

  19. Charge independence and charge symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charge independence and charge symmetry are approximate symmetries of nature, violated by the perturbing effects of the mass difference between up and down quarks and by electromagnetic interactions. The observations of the symmetry breaking effects in nuclear and particle physics and the implications of those effects are reviewed. (author). 145 refs., 3 tabs., 11 figs

  20. Trusted Domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Theis Solberg; Torbensen, Rune

    2012-01-01

    remote access via IP-based devices such as smartphones. The Trusted Domain platform fits existing legacy technologies by managing their interoperability and access controls, and it seeks to avoid the security issues of relying on third-party servers outside the home. It is a distributed system that......In the digital age of home automation and with the proliferation of mobile Internet access, the intelligent home and its devices should be accessible at any time from anywhere. There are many challenges such as security, privacy, ease of configuration, incompatible legacy devices, a wealth of...

  1. Charged Leptons

    CERN Document Server

    Albrecht, J; Babu, K; Bernstein, R H; Blum, T; Brown, D N; Casey, B C K; Cheng, C -h; Cirigliano, V; Cohen, A; Deshpande, A; Dukes, E C; Echenard, B; Gaponenko, A; Glenzinski, D; Gonzalez-Alonso, M; Grancagnolo, F; Grossman, Y; Harnik, R; Hitlin, D G; Kiburg, B; Knoepfe, K; Kumar, K; Lim, G; Lu, Z -T; McKeen, D; Miller, J P; Ramsey-Musolf, M; Ray, R; Roberts, B L; Rominsky, M; Semertzidis, Y; Stoeckinger, D; Talman, R; Van De Water, R; Winter, P

    2013-01-01

    This is the report of the Intensity Frontier Charged Lepton Working Group of the 2013 Community Summer Study "Snowmass on the Mississippi", summarizing the current status and future experimental opportunities in muon and tau lepton studies and their sensitivity to new physics. These include searches for charged lepton flavor violation, measurements of magnetic and electric dipole moments, and precision measurements of the decay spectrum and parity-violating asymmetries.

  2. Functional domain walls in multiferroics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Dennis

    2015-11-01

    During the last decade a wide variety of novel and fascinating correlation phenomena has been discovered at domain walls in multiferroic bulk systems, ranging from unusual electronic conductance to inseparably entangled spin and charge degrees of freedom. The domain walls represent quasi-2D functional objects that can be induced, positioned, and erased on demand, bearing considerable technological potential for future nanoelectronics. Most of the challenges that remain to be solved before turning related device paradigms into reality, however, still fall in the field of fundamental condensed matter physics and materials science. In this topical review seminal experimental findings gained on electric and magnetic domain walls in multiferroic bulk materials are addressed. A special focus is put on the physical properties that emerge at so-called charged domain walls and the added functionality that arises from coexisting magnetic order. The research presented in this review highlights that we are just entering a whole new world of intriguing nanoscale physics that is yet to be explored in all its details. The goal is to draw attention to the persistent challenges and identify future key directions for the research on functional domain walls in multiferroics.

  3. AcEST: DK963142 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available TST39A01NGRL0015_L20 577 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: TST39A01NGRL0015_L20. 5' end seq ... sp|P58466|CTDS1_MOUSE Carboxy-terminal domain RNA polymer ase II polypeptide A small phosphatase 1 OS=Mus mus ... sp|P58466|CTDS1_MOUSE Carboxy-terminal domain RNA polymer ase II ... 114 5e-25 sp|Q9GZU7|CTDS1_HUMAN Carboxy- ...

  4. AcEST: DK950054 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available TST38A01NGRL0007_K06 660 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: TST38A01NGRL0007_K06. 5' end seq ... sp|P58466|CTDS1_MOUSE Carboxy-terminal domain RNA polymer ase II polypeptide A small phosphatase 1 OS=Mus mus ... sp|P58466|CTDS1_MOUSE Carboxy-terminal domain RNA polymer ase II ... 84 9e-16 sp|Q9GZU7|CTDS1_HUMAN Carboxy-t ...

  5. Isolated receptor binding domains of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 envelopes bind Glut-1 on activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montel-Hagen Amélie

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously identified the glucose transporter Glut-1, a member of the multimembrane-spanning facilitative nutrient transporter family, as a receptor for both HTLV-1 and HTLV-2. However, a recent report concluded that Glut-1 cannot serve as a receptor for HTLV-1 on CD4 T cells: This was based mainly on their inability to detect Glut-1 on this lymphocyte subset using the commercial antibody mAb1418. It was therefore of significant interest to thoroughly assess Glut-1 expression on CD4 and CD8 T cells, and its association with HTLV-1 and -2 envelope binding. Results As previously reported, ectopic expression of Glut-1 but not Glut-3 resulted in significantly augmented binding of tagged proteins harboring the receptor binding domains of either HTLV-1 or HTLV-2 envelope glycoproteins (H1RBD or H2RBD. Using antibodies raised against the carboxy-terminal peptide of Glut-1, we found that Glut-1 expression was significantly increased in both CD4 and CD8 cells following TCR stimulation. Corresponding increases in the binding of H1RBD as well as H2RBD, not detected on quiescent T cells, were observed following TCR engagement. Furthermore, increased Glut-1 expression was accompanied by a massive augmentation in glucose uptake in TCR-stimulated CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes. Finally, we determined that the apparent contradictory results obtained by Takenouchi et al were due to their monitoring of Glut-1 with a mAb that does not bind cells expressing endogenous Glut-1, including human erythrocytes that harbor 300,000 copies per cell. Conclusion Transfection of Glut-1 directly correlates with the capacities of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 envelope-derived ligands to bind cells. Moreover, Glut-1 is induced by TCR engagement, resulting in massive increases in glucose uptake and binding of HTLV-1 and -2 envelopes to both CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes. Therefore, Glut-1 is a primary binding receptor for HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 envelopes on activated CD4 as well as CD8

  6. Electric fingerprint of voltage sensor domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Caio S.; Amaral, Cristiano; Treptow, Werner

    2014-01-01

    A dynamic transmembrane voltage field has been suggested as an intrinsic element in voltage sensor (VS) domains. Here, the dynamic field contribution to the VS energetics was analyzed via electrostatic calculations applied to a number of atomistic structures made available recently. We find that the field is largely static along with the molecular motions of the domain, and more importantly, it is minimally modified across VS variants. This finding implies that sensor domains transfer approximately the same amount of gating charges when moving the electrically charged S4 helix between fixed microscopic configurations. Remarkably, the result means that the observed operational diversity of the domain, including the extension, rate, and voltage dependence of the S4 motion, as dictated by the free energy landscape theory, must be rationalized in terms of dominant variations of its chemical free energy. PMID:25422443

  7. Automotion of domain walls for spintronic interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Young, Ian A.

    2014-06-01

    We simulate "automotion," the transport of a magnetic domain wall under the influence of demagnetization and magnetic anisotropy, in nanoscale spintronic interconnects. In contrast to spin transfer driven magnetic domain wall motion, the proposed interconnects operate without longitudinal charge current transfer, with only a transient current pulse at domain wall creation and have favorable scaling down to the 20 nm dimension. Cases of both in-plane and out-of-plane magnetization are considered. Analytical dependence of the velocity of domain walls on the angle of magnetization are compared with full micromagnetic simulations. Deceleration, attenuation and disappearance, and reflection of domain walls are demonstrated through simulation. Dependences of the magnetization angle on the current pulse parameters are studied. The energy and delay analysis suggests that automotion is an attractive option for spintronic logic interconnects.

  8. Automotion of domain walls for spintronic interconnects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We simulate “automotion,” the transport of a magnetic domain wall under the influence of demagnetization and magnetic anisotropy, in nanoscale spintronic interconnects. In contrast to spin transfer driven magnetic domain wall motion, the proposed interconnects operate without longitudinal charge current transfer, with only a transient current pulse at domain wall creation and have favorable scaling down to the 20 nm dimension. Cases of both in-plane and out-of-plane magnetization are considered. Analytical dependence of the velocity of domain walls on the angle of magnetization are compared with full micromagnetic simulations. Deceleration, attenuation and disappearance, and reflection of domain walls are demonstrated through simulation. Dependences of the magnetization angle on the current pulse parameters are studied. The energy and delay analysis suggests that automotion is an attractive option for spintronic logic interconnects.

  9. Automotion of domain walls for spintronic interconnects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Young, Ian A. [Exploratory Integrated Circuits, Components Research, Intel Corp., Hillsboro, Oregon 97124 (United States)

    2014-06-07

    We simulate “automotion,” the transport of a magnetic domain wall under the influence of demagnetization and magnetic anisotropy, in nanoscale spintronic interconnects. In contrast to spin transfer driven magnetic domain wall motion, the proposed interconnects operate without longitudinal charge current transfer, with only a transient current pulse at domain wall creation and have favorable scaling down to the 20 nm dimension. Cases of both in-plane and out-of-plane magnetization are considered. Analytical dependence of the velocity of domain walls on the angle of magnetization are compared with full micromagnetic simulations. Deceleration, attenuation and disappearance, and reflection of domain walls are demonstrated through simulation. Dependences of the magnetization angle on the current pulse parameters are studied. The energy and delay analysis suggests that automotion is an attractive option for spintronic logic interconnects.

  10. Domain wall partition functions and KP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We observe that the partition function of the six-vertex model on a finite square lattice with domain wall boundary conditions is (a restriction of) a KP τ function and express it as an expectation value of charged free fermions (up to an overall normalization)

  11. Domain wall partition functions and KP

    CERN Document Server

    Foda, O; Zuparic, M

    2009-01-01

    We observe that the partition function of the six vertex model on a finite square lattice with domain wall boundary conditions is (a restriction of) a KP tau function and express it as an expectation value of charged free fermions (up to an overall normalization).

  12. Domain walls. II. Baryon-number generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domain walls present in the early universe due to a spontaneous breakdown of charge conjugation can leave behind net baryon number. SU/sub R/(2) instantons provide baryon nonconservation and the proton is effectively stable. Density perturbations (on scales large enough for galaxy formation) and monopole suppression can occur if walls dominate the energy density. Mechanisms for wall removal are discussed

  13. New Massive Gravity Domain Walls

    CERN Document Server

    dS, U Camara

    2010-01-01

    The properties of the asymptotic $AdS_3$ space-times representing flat domain walls (DW's) solutions of the New Massive 3D Gravity with scalar matter are studied. Our analysis is based on $I^{st}$ order BPS-like equations involving an appropriate superpotential. The Brown-York boundary stress-tensor is used for the calculation of DW's tensions as well as of the $CFT_2$'s central charges. The holographic renormalization group flows and the phase transitions in specific deformed $CFT_2$ dual to 3D massive gravity model with quadratic superpotential are discussed.

  14. Protein domain prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingolfsson, Helgi; Yona, Golan

    2008-01-01

    Domains are considered to be the building blocks of protein structures. A protein can contain a single domain or multiple domains, each one typically associated with a specific function. The combination of domains determines the function of the protein, its subcellular localization and the interacti

  15. CHARGE Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semanti Chakraborty

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present here a case of 17-year-old boy from Kolkata presenting with obesity, bilateral gynecomastia, mental retardation, and hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. The patient weighed 70 kg and was of 153 cm height. Facial asymmetry (unilateral facial palsy, gynecomastia, decreased pubic and axillary hair, small penis, decreased right testicular volume, non-palpable left testis, and right-sided congenital inguinal hernia was present. The patient also had disc coloboma, convergent squint, microcornea, microphthalmia, pseudohypertelorism, low set ears, short neck, and choanalatresia. He had h/o VSD repaired with patch. Laboratory examination revealed haemoglobin 9.9 mg/dl, urea 24 mg/dl, creatinine 0.68 mg/dl. IGF1 77.80 ng/ml (decreased for age, GH <0.05 ng/ml, testosterone 0.25 ng/ml, FSH-0.95 ΅IU/ml, LH 0.60 ΅IU/ml. ACTH, 8:00 A.M cortisol, FT3, FT4, TSH, estradiol, DHEA-S, lipid profile, and LFT was within normal limits. Prolactin was elevated at 38.50 ng/ml. The patient′s karyotype was 46XY. Echocardiography revealed ventricularseptal defect closed with patch, grade 1 aortic regurgitation, and ejection fraction 67%. Ultrasound testis showed small right testis within scrotal sac and undescended left testis within left inguinal canal. CT scan paranasal sinuses revealed choanalatresia and deviation of nasal septum to the right. Sonomammography revealed bilateral proliferation of fibroglandular elements predominantly in subareoalar region of breasts. MRI of brain and pituitary region revealed markedly atrophic pituitary gland parenchyma with preserved infundibulum and hypothalamus and widened suprasellar cistern. The CHARGE association is an increasingly recognized non-random pattern of congenital anomalies comprising of coloboma, heart defect, choanal atresia, retarded growth and development, genital hypoplasia, ear abnormalities, and/or deafness. [1] These anomalies have a higher probability of occurring together. In this report, we have

  16. The emerging role of krüppel-like factors in endocrine-responsive cancers of female reproductive tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüppel-like factors (KLFs), of which there are currently 17 known protein members, belong to the Specificity-protein (Sp) family of transcription factors and are characterized by the presence of Cys2/His2 zinc-finger motifs in their carboxy-terminal domains that confer preferential binding to GC/GT...

  17. Adapting Mathematical Domain Reasoners

    CERN Document Server

    Heeren, Bastiaan

    2010-01-01

    Mathematical learning environments help students in mastering mathematical knowledge. Mature environments typically offer thousands of interactive exercises. Providing feedback to students solving interactive exercises requires domain reasoners for doing the exercise-specific calculations. Since a domain reasoner has to solve an exercise in the same way a student should solve it, the structure of domain reasoners should follow the layered structure of the mathematical domains. Furthermore, learners, teachers, and environment builders have different requirements for adapting domain reasoners, such as providing more details, disallowing or enforcing certain solutions, and combining multiple mathematical domains in a new domain. In previous work we have shown how domain reasoners for solving interactive exercises can be expressed in terms of rewrite strategies, rewrite rules, and views. This paper shows how users can adapt and configure such domain reasoners to their own needs. This is achieved by enabling users...

  18. Charge transport in disordered materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagorik, Adam Gerald

    This thesis is focused on on using Monte Carlo simulation to extract device relevant properties, such as the current voltage behavior of transistors and the efficiency of photovoltaics, from the hopping transport of molecules. Specifically, simulation is used to study organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) and organic photo-voltaics (OPVs). For OFETs, the current was found to decrease with increasing concentration of traps and barriers in the system. As the barrier/trap concentration approaches 100%, the current recovers as carrier begin to travel through the manifold of connected trap states. Coulomb interactions between like charges are found to play a role in removing carriers from trap states. The equilibrium current in OFETs was found to be independent of charge injection method, however, the finite size of devices leads to an oscillatory current. Fourier transforms of the electrical current show peaks that vary non-linearly with device length, while being independent of device width. This has implications for the mobility of carriers in finite sized devices. Lastly, the presence of defects and high barriers (> 0.4 eV) was found to produce negative differential resistance in the saturation region of OFET curves, unlike traps. While defects and barriers prohibit carriers from reaching the drain at high voltages, the repulsive interaction between like charged carriers pushes charges around the defects. For OPVs, the effects of device morphology and charge delocalization were studied. Fill factors increased with domain size in monolayer isotropic morphologies, but decreased for band morphologies. In single-phase systems without Coulomb interactions, astonishingly high fill factors (. 70%) were found. In multilayer OPVs,a complex interplay of domain size, connectivity, tortuosity, interface trapping, and delocalization determined efficiency.

  19. Workplace Charging. Charging Up University Campuses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giles, Carrie [ICF International, Fairfax, VA (United States); Ryder, Carrie [ICF International, Fairfax, VA (United States); Lommele, Stephen [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This case study features the experiences of university partners in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Workplace Charging Challenge with the installation and management of plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) charging stations.

  20. Dynamics of domain wall networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Networks or webs of domain walls are admitted in Abelian or non-Abelian gauge theory coupled to fundamental Higgs fields with complex masses. We examine the dynamics of the domain wall loops by using the moduli approximation and find a phase rotation induces a repulsive force which can be understood as a Noether charge of Q-solitons. Non-Abelian gauge theory allows different types of loops which can be deformed to each other by changing a modulus. This admits the moduli geometry like a sandglass made by gluing the tips of the two cigar-(cone-)like metrics of a single triangle loop. We conclude that the sizes of all loops tend to grow for a late time in general models with complex Higgs masses, while the sizes are stabilized at some values once triplet masses are introduced for the Higgs fields. We also show that the stationary motion on the moduli space of the domain wall webs represents 1/4 Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield Q-webs of walls

  1. Low energy electron imaging of domains and domain walls in magnesium-doped lithium niobate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataf, G. F.; Grysan, P.; Guennou, M.; Kreisel, J.; Martinotti, D.; Rountree, C. L.; Mathieu, C.; Barrett, N.

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of domain structures, specifically domain walls, currently attracts a significant attention in the field of (multi)-ferroic materials. In this article, we analyze contrast formation in full field electron microscopy applied to domains and domain walls in the uniaxial ferroelectric lithium niobate, which presents a large 3.8 eV band gap and for which conductive domain walls have been reported. We show that the transition from Mirror Electron Microscopy (MEM – electrons reflected) to Low Energy Electron Microscopy (LEEM – electrons backscattered) gives rise to a robust contrast between domains with upwards (Pup) and downwards (Pdown) polarization, and provides a measure of the difference in surface potential between the domains. We demonstrate that out-of-focus conditions of imaging produce contrast inversion, due to image distortion induced by charged surfaces, and also carry information on the polarization direction in the domains. Finally, we show that the intensity profile at domain walls provides experimental evidence for a local stray, lateral electric field. PMID:27608605

  2. Low energy electron imaging of domains and domain walls in magnesium-doped lithium niobate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataf, G F; Grysan, P; Guennou, M; Kreisel, J; Martinotti, D; Rountree, C L; Mathieu, C; Barrett, N

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of domain structures, specifically domain walls, currently attracts a significant attention in the field of (multi)-ferroic materials. In this article, we analyze contrast formation in full field electron microscopy applied to domains and domain walls in the uniaxial ferroelectric lithium niobate, which presents a large 3.8 eV band gap and for which conductive domain walls have been reported. We show that the transition from Mirror Electron Microscopy (MEM - electrons reflected) to Low Energy Electron Microscopy (LEEM - electrons backscattered) gives rise to a robust contrast between domains with upwards (Pup) and downwards (Pdown) polarization, and provides a measure of the difference in surface potential between the domains. We demonstrate that out-of-focus conditions of imaging produce contrast inversion, due to image distortion induced by charged surfaces, and also carry information on the polarization direction in the domains. Finally, we show that the intensity profile at domain walls provides experimental evidence for a local stray, lateral electric field. PMID:27608605

  3. Frustratingly Easy Domain Adaptation

    CERN Document Server

    Daumé, Hal

    2009-01-01

    We describe an approach to domain adaptation that is appropriate exactly in the case when one has enough ``target'' data to do slightly better than just using only ``source'' data. Our approach is incredibly simple, easy to implement as a preprocessing step (10 lines of Perl!) and outperforms state-of-the-art approaches on a range of datasets. Moreover, it is trivially extended to a multi-domain adaptation problem, where one has data from a variety of different domains.

  4. CULTURAL DOMAINS: TRANSLATION PROBLEMS

    OpenAIRE

    Isabel Negro Alousque

    2009-01-01

    Much of the lexis of a language has a cultural referent and is thus specific to a speech community. The meaning of culturally marked words is often difficult to grasp without some cultural knowledge and poses translation problems, particularly when the words are associated with cultural domains (Nida, 2001). In the present paper we focus on the French cultural domain of cooking. After outlining the elements of the domain, we analyse the difficulties in translating the lexical units from the d...

  5. Visualizing latent domain knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, C.; Kuljis, J; Paul, RJ

    2001-01-01

    Knowledge discovery and data mining commonly rely on finding salient patterns of association from a vast amount of data. Traditional citation analysis of scientific literature draws insights from strong citation patterns. Latent domain knowledge, in contrast to the mainstream domain knowledge, often consists of highly relevant but relatively infrequently cited scientific works. Visualizing latent domain knowledge presents a significant challenge to knowledge discovery and quantitative studies...

  6. Multistep Charge Method by Charge Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segami, Go; Kusawake, Hiroaki; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Iwasa, Minoru; Kibe, Koichi

    2008-09-01

    We studied reduction of the size and weight of the Power Control Unit (PCU). In this study, we specifically examined the weight of the Battery Charge Regulator (BCR), which accounts for half of the PCU weight for a low earth orbit (LEO) satellite. We found a multistep charge method by charge arrays and adopted a similar method for GEO satellites, thereby enabling the BCR reduction. We found the possibility of reducing the size and weight of PCU through more detailed design than that for a conventional PCU.BCRC1R1batterySAPower Control UnitBCRC1R1batterySAPower UnitHowever, this method decreases the state of charge (SOC) of the battery. Battery tests, a battery simulator test, and numerical analysis were used to evaluate the SOC decrease. We also studied effects of this method on the battery lifetime. The multistep charge method by charge arrays enabled charging to the same level of SOC as the conventional constant current/ constant voltage (CC/CV) charge method for a LEO satellite.

  7. Domain topology and domain switching kinetics in a hybrid improper ferroelectric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, F-T; Xue, F; Gao, B; Wang, L H; Luo, X; Cai, W; Lu, X-Z; Rondinelli, J M; Chen, L Q; Cheong, S-W

    2016-01-01

    Charged polar interfaces such as charged ferroelectric walls or heterostructured interfaces of ZnO/(Zn,Mg)O and LaAlO3/SrTiO3, across which the normal component of electric polarization changes suddenly, can host large two-dimensional conduction. Charged ferroelectric walls, which are energetically unfavourable in general, were found to be mysteriously abundant in hybrid improper ferroelectric (Ca,Sr)3Ti2O7 crystals. From the exploration of antiphase boundaries in bilayer-perovskites, here we discover that each of four polarization-direction states is degenerate with two antiphase domains, and these eight structural variants form a Z4 × Z2 domain structure with Z3 vortices and five distinct types of domain walls, whose topology is directly relevant to the presence of abundant charged walls. We also discover a zipper-like nature of antiphase boundaries, which are the reversible creation/annihilation centres of pairs of two types of ferroelectric walls (and also Z3-vortex pairs) in 90° and 180° polarization switching. Our results demonstrate the unexpectedly rich nature of hybrid improper ferroelectricity. PMID:27215944

  8. Topological Domain Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Battenfeld, Ingo

    2008-01-01

    This thesis presents Topological Domain Theory as a powerful and flexible framework for denotational semantics. Topological Domain Theory models a wide range of type constructions and can interpret many computational features. Furthermore, it has close connections to established frameworks for denotational semantics, as well as to well-studied mathematical theories, such as topology and computable analysis.

  9. Modeling Protein Domain Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton "Buck"; Hull, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    This simple but effective laboratory exercise helps students understand the concept of protein domain function. They use foam beads, Styrofoam craft balls, and pipe cleaners to explore how domains within protein active sites interact to form a functional protein. The activity allows students to gain content mastery and an understanding of the…

  10. Domain Walls on Singularities

    CERN Document Server

    Halyo, Edi

    2009-01-01

    We describe domain walls that live on $A_2$ and $A_3$ singularities. The walls are BPS if the singularity is resolved and non--BPS if it is deformed and fibered. We show that these domain walls may interpolate between vacua that support monopoles and/or vortices.

  11. On Dust Charging Equation

    OpenAIRE

    Tsintsadze, Nodar L.; Tsintsadze, Levan N.

    2008-01-01

    A general derivation of the charging equation of a dust grain is presented, and indicated where and when it can be used. A problem of linear fluctuations of charges on the surface of the dust grain is discussed.

  12. Induced Charge Capacitive Deionization

    OpenAIRE

    Rubin, S.; Suss, M. E.; Biesheuvel, P. M.; Bercovici, M.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the phenomenon of induced-charge capacitive deionization (ICCDI) that occurs around a porous and conducting particle immersed in an electrolyte, under the action of an external electrostatic field. The external electric field induces an electric dipole in the porous particle, leading to capacitive charging of its volume by both cations and anions at opposite poles. This regime is characterized both by a large RC charging time and a small electrochemical charge relaxation time, ...

  13. Primitive Virtual Negative Charge

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Kiyoung

    2008-01-01

    Physical fields, such as gravity and electromagnetic field, are interpreted as results from rearrangement of vacuum particles to get the equilibrium of net charge density and net mass density in 4-dimensional complex space. Then, both fields should interact to each other in that physical interaction is considered as a field-to-field interaction. Hence, Mass-Charge interaction is introduced with primitive-virtual negative charge defined for the mass. With the concept of Mass-Charge interaction...

  14. Reversible Conformational Change in the Plasmodium falciparum Circumsporozoite Protein Masks Its Adhesion Domains

    OpenAIRE

    Herrera, Raul; Anderson, Charles; Kumar, Krishan; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Nguyen, Vu; Burkhardt, Martin; Reiter, Karine; Shimp, Richard; Howard, Randall F.; Srinivasan, Prakash; Nold, Michael J.; Ragheb, Daniel; Shi, Lirong; DeCotiis, Mark; Aebig, Joan

    2015-01-01

    The extended rod-like Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP) is comprised of three primary domains: a charged N terminus that binds heparan sulfate proteoglycans, a central NANP repeat domain, and a C terminus containing a thrombospondin-like type I repeat (TSR) domain. Only the last two domains are incorporated in RTS,S, the leading malaria vaccine in phase 3 trials that, to date, protects about 50% of vaccinated children against clinical disease. A seroepidemiological study in...

  15. Feature-Level Domain Adaptation

    OpenAIRE

    Kouw, Wouter M.; Krijthe, Jesse H.; Loog, Marco; van der Maaten, Laurens J. P.

    2015-01-01

    Domain adaptation is the supervised learning setting in which the training and test data originate from different domains: the so-called source and target domains. In this paper, we propose and study a domain adaption approach, called feature-level domain adaptation (flda), that models the dependence between two domains by means of a feature-level transfer distribution. The domain adapted classifier is trained by minimizing the expected loss under this transfer distribution. Our empirical eva...

  16. Charge exchange system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Oscar A.

    1978-01-01

    An improved charge exchange system for substantially reducing pumping requirements of excess gas in a controlled thermonuclear reactor high energy neutral beam injector. The charge exchange system utilizes a jet-type blanket which acts simultaneously as the charge exchange medium and as a shield for reflecting excess gas.

  17. Charged scalar perturbations around a regular magnetic black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yang; Liu, Dao-Jun

    2016-05-01

    We study charged scalar perturbations in the background of a regular magnetic black hole. In this case, the charged scalar perturbation does not result in superradiance. By using a careful time-domain analysis, we show that the charge of the scalar field can change the real part of the quasinormal frequency, but has little impact on the imaginary part of the quasinormal frequency and the behavior of the late-time tail. Therefore, the regular magnetic black hole may be stable under the perturbations of a charged scalar field at the linear level.

  18. Skyrmions and domain walls in (2+1) dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Kudryavtsev, A.; Piette, B.; Zakrzewski, W. J.

    1997-01-01

    We study classical solutions of the vector O(3) sigma model in (2+1) dimensions, spontaneously broken to O(2)xZ2. The model possesses Skyrmion-type solutions as well as stable domain walls which connect different vacua. We show that different types of waves can propagate on the wall, including waves carrying a topological charge. The domain wall can also absorb Skyrmions and, under appropriate initial conditions, it is possible to emit a Skyrmion from the wall.

  19. Domain-Specific Multimodeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hessellund, Anders

    Enterprise systems are complex artifacts. They are hard to build, manage, understand, and evolve. Existing software development paradigms fail to properly address challenges such as system size, domain complexity, and software evolution when development is scaled to enterprise systems. We propose...... domain-specific multimodeling as a development paradigm to tackle these challenges in a language-oriented manner. The different concerns of a system are conceptually separated and made explicit as independent domain-specific languages. This approach increases productivity and quality by raising the...

  20. The interaction of β2-glycoprotein I domain V with chaperonin GroEL: The similarity with the domain V and membrane interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Gozu, Masayo; Hoshino, Masaru; Higurashi, Takashi; Kato, Hisao; Goto, Yuji

    2002-01-01

    To clarify the mechanism of interaction between chaperonin GroEL and substrate proteins, we studied the conformational changes; of the fifth domain of human β2-glycoprotein I upon binding to GroEL. The fifth domain has a large flexible loop, containing several hydrophobic residues surrounded by positively charged residues, which has been proposed to be responsible for the binding of β2-glycoprotein I to negatively charged phospholipid membranes. The reduction by dithiothreitol of the three in...

  1. Space Charge Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrario, M; Palumbo, L

    2014-01-01

    The space charge forces are those generated directly by the charge distribution, with the inclusion of the image charges and currents due to the interaction of the beam with a perfectly conducting smooth pipe. Space charge forces are responsible for several unwanted phenomena related to beam dynamics, such as energy loss, shift of the synchronous phase and frequency , shift of the betatron frequencies, and instabilities. We will discuss in this lecture the main feature of space charge effects in high-energy storage rings as well as in low-energy linacs and transport lines.

  2. Visualizing Knowledge Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borner, Katy; Chen, Chaomei; Boyack, Kevin W.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews visualization techniques for scientific disciplines and information retrieval and classification. Highlights include historical background of scientometrics, bibliometrics, and citation analysis; map generation; process flow of visualizing knowledge domains; measures and similarity calculations; vector space model; factor analysis;…

  3. Conserved Domain Database (CDD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — CDD is a protein annotation resource that consists of a collection of well-annotated multiple sequence alignment models for ancient domains and full-length proteins.

  4. Simulating charge transport in flexible systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Clark

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Systems in which movements occur on two significantly different time domains, such as organic electronic components with flexible molecules, require different simulation techniques for the two time scales. In the case of molecular electronics, charge transport is complicated by the several different mechanisms (and theoretical models that apply in different cases. We cannot yet combine time scales of molecular and electronic movement in simulations of real systems. This review describes our progress towards this goal.

  5. Simulating charge transport in flexible systems

    OpenAIRE

    Timothy Clark

    2015-01-01

    Systems in which movements occur on two significantly different time domains, such as organic electronic components with flexible molecules, require different simulation techniques for the two time scales. In the case of molecular electronics, charge transport is complicated by the several different mechanisms (and theoretical models) that apply in different cases. We cannot yet combine time scales of molecular and electronic movement in simulations of real systems. This review describes our ...

  6. Fluctuation and dipolar interaction effects on the pinning of domain walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the effect of the dipolar interaction on the pinning of domain walls. Domain walls are usually pinned near the boundaries between grains. Magnetic charges accumulated at the domain wall make the wall more unstable and easier to depin. We discuss how the grain-orientation and thermal fluctuations affect these magnetic charges and hence the depinning of the domain walls. Our results are illustrated by finite temperature Monte Carlo simulation on periodic arrays of large cells separated by walls consisting of faces of pyramids

  7. Charge transfer reactions in nematic liquid crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiederrecht, G.P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.; Wasielewski, M.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.]|[Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Galili, T.; Levanon, H. [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel). Dept. of Physical Chemistry

    1998-07-01

    Ultrafast transient absorption studies of intramolecular photoinduced charge separation and thermal charge recombination were carried out on a molecule consisting of a 4-(N-pyrrolidino)naphthalene-1,8-imide donor (PNI) covalently attached to a pyromellitimide acceptor (PI) dissolved in the liquid crystal 4{prime}-(n-pentyl)-4-cyanobiphenyl (5CB). The temperature dependencies of the charge separation and recombination rates were obtained at temperatures above the nematic-isotropic phase transition of 5CB, where ordered microdomains exist and scattering of visible light by these domains is absent. The authors show that excited state charge separation is dominated by molecular reorientation of 5CB perpendicular to the director within the liquid crystal microdomains. They also show that charge recombination is adiabatic and is controlled by the comparatively slow collective reorientation of the liquid crystal microdomains relative to the orientation of PNI{sup +}-PI{sup {minus}}. They also report the results of time resolved electron paramagnetic resonance (TREPR) studies of photoinduced charge separation in a series of supramolecular compounds dissolved in oriented liquid crystal solvents. These studies permit the determination of the radical pair energy levels as the solvent reorganization energy increases from the low temperature crystalline phase, through the soft glass phase, to the nematic phase of the liquid crystal.

  8. Metastable magnetic domain walls in cylindrical nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stability of the asymmetric domain wall (ATDW) in soft magnetic cylindrical nanowires and nanotubes is investigated using micromagnetic simulations. Our calculated phase diagram shows that for cylindrical permalloy nanowires, the transverse domain wall (TDW) is the ground state for radii below 20 nm whilst the Bloch point wall (BPW) is favoured in thicker wires. The ATDW stabilises only as a metastable state but with energy close to that of the BPW. Characterisation of the DW spin structures reveals that the ATDW has a vortex-like surface spin state, in contrast to the divergent surface spins of the TDW. This results in lowering of surface charge above the critical radius. For both cylindrical nanotubes and nanowires we find that ATDWs only appear to exist as metastable static states and are particularly suppressed in nanotubes due to an increase in magnetostatic energy. - Highlights: • We simulate the micromagnetic structures of domain walls in cylindrical nanowires. • A phase diagram identifies ground and metastable states. • Asymmetric transverse walls are metastable in nanowires but suppressed in tubes. • Unrolling surface magnetisation aids visualisation of asymmetry and chirality. • We predict experimental discrimination based on magnetic charge distribution

  9. Identification of potential hot spots in the carboxy-terminal part of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) BNLF-1 gene in both malignant and benign EBV-associated diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvej, K; Peh, S C; Andresen, B S; Pallesen, G

    1994-01-01

    In this study, we have sequenced the C-terminal part of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-BNLF-1 gene encoding for the latent membrane protein-1 from tissues of EBV-positive Danish Hodgkin's disease (HD) and of Danish and Malaysian peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTLs) and from tonsils of Danish infectious...

  10. Action of space charge on aging and breakdown of polymers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The study on how space charges affect aging and breakdown of polymers becomes one of the most important domains. Most of the models are based on the injected charges increasing the local field to induce the breakdown of polymers and breaking the large molecule chains. These models ignore the effects of space charge on the microstruc-ture of dielectric materials. In this review, with the calcula-tion of the electromagnetic energy and the electromechanical energy around a trapped charge and with some new experi-mental results, it is proved that aging and breakdown in polymers are caused during the detrapping of the trapped charges. Aging and breakdown of the polymers are related to the release of the electromechanical energy around trapped charges.

  11. Modelling airport congestion charges

    OpenAIRE

    Janić, Milan

    2012-01-01

    This article deals with modelling congestion charges at an airport. In this context, congestion charging represents internalizing the cost of marginal delays that a flight imposes on other flights due to congestion. The modelling includes estimating congestion and flight delays, the cost of these delays and the efficiency of particular flights following the introduction ofa congestion charge. The models are applied to an airport / New York LaGuardia / to illustrate their ability to handle mor...

  12. An Interaction between the Nucleocapsid Protein and a Component of the Replicase-Transcriptase Complex Is Crucial for the Infectivity of Coronavirus Genomic RNA▿

    OpenAIRE

    Hurst, Kelley R.; Ye, Rong; Goebel, Scott J.; Jayaraman, Priya; Masters, Paul S.

    2010-01-01

    The coronavirus nucleocapsid (N) protein plays an essential role in virion assembly via interactions with the large, positive-strand RNA viral genome and the carboxy-terminal endodomain of the membrane protein (M). To learn about the functions of N protein domains in the coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus (MHV), we replaced the MHV N gene with its counterpart from the closely related bovine coronavirus (BCoV). The resulting viral mutant was severely defective, even though individual domains of...

  13. Axion domain wall baryogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daido, Ryuji; Kitajima, Naoya [Department of Physics, Tohoku University,Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Takahashi, Fuminobu [Department of Physics, Tohoku University,Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Kavli IPMU, TODIAS, University of Tokyo,Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan)

    2015-07-28

    We propose a new scenario of baryogenesis, in which annihilation of axion domain walls generates a sizable baryon asymmetry. Successful baryogenesis is possible for a wide range of the axion mass and decay constant, m≃10{sup 8}–10{sup 13} GeV and f≃10{sup 13}–10{sup 16} GeV. Baryonic isocurvature perturbations are significantly suppressed in our model, in contrast to various spontaneous baryogenesis scenarios in the slow-roll regime. In particular, the axion domain wall baryogenesis is consistent with high-scale inflation which generates a large tensor-to-scalar ratio within the reach of future CMB B-mode experiments. We also discuss the gravitational waves produced by the domain wall annihilation and its implications for the future gravitational wave experiments.

  14. Domain Theory for Concurrency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Mikkel

    Concurrent computation can be given an abstract mathematical treatment very similar to that provided for sequential computation by domain theory and denotational semantics of Scott and Strachey. A simple domain theory for concurrency is presented. Based on a categorical model of linear logic and...... nondeterministic dataflow. The domain theory can be generalised to presheaf models, providing a more refined treatment of nondeterministic branching and supporting notions of bisimulation. The operational semantics for HOPLA is guided by the idea that derivations of transitions in the operational semantics should...... correspond to elements of the presheaf denotations. Similar guidelines lead to an operational semantics for the first-order fragment of Affine HOPLA. An extension of the operational semantics to the full language is based on a stable denotational semantics which associates to each computation the minimal...

  15. Large domain graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xuesong; Magnuson, Carl W.; Venugopal, Archana; Vogel, Eric M.; Rodney S. Ruoff; Colombo, Luigi

    2010-01-01

    Graphene growth by chemical vapor deposition has received a lot of attention recently owing to the ease with which large area films can be grown, but growth of large domain or equivalently large grain size has not been reported yet. In this brevia, we report on a CVD process that yields graphene with domains of hundreds of micrometers, by very low pressure CVD, less than 50 mTorr, and very low precursor flow rates using methane as the source of carbon on the inside of copper foil enclosures a...

  16. Ferroelectric Domain Imaging Mechanism in High-Vacuum Scanning Force Microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Hua-Rong; YU Han-Feng; CHU Rui-Qing; LI Guo-Rong; YIN Qing-Rui

    2005-01-01

    @@ High-vacuum scanning force microscopy of the domain structures in PMN-PT single crystals is investigated. It has been shown that under high vacuum conditions, the polarization charges are not effectively compensated for by intrinsic screening charges from the ferroelectrics. This result suggests that the electrostatic tip-sample interaction plays a great contribution to the domain imaging mechanism in PMN-PT ferroelectric single crystals under high vacuum conditions.

  17. Decay of Electrical Charges on Polyethylene Terephthalate Surface

    OpenAIRE

    M. Nemamcha; M. Kachi; M. Remadnia; L. Herous

    2009-01-01

    Surface potential decay (SPD) characteristics of a corona charged polyethylene terephtalate (PET) are investigated experimentally.A negative corona discharge produced in a needle – grid – plate electrode system was employed to charge the surfaceof the film samples (thickness: 0.5 mm; surface: 50 mm x 50 mm). The temperature effect, initial potential and relativehumidity are presented. The variation domains for the three factors were respectively: 20 to 60°C; -1000 to -1800 V; 20 to80%. All su...

  18. Higher charge periodic monopoles

    OpenAIRE

    Maldonado, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    We consider singly periodic solutions to the SU(2) Bogomolny equations and use the Nahm transform to generate a class of monopoles of charge k>2, thereby extending known results for lower charge chains. Some simple scattering processes are presented and a comparison made with geodesic motion of monopoles in $\\mathbb{R}^3$.

  19. Charged weak currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this review of charged weak currents we shall concentrate on inclusive high energy neutrino physics. The plan of this review is the following: general structure of charged current; new results on total cross-section; Callan-Gross relation; antiquark distribution; scaling violations and tests of QCD. At the end we will give a very short summary on multilepton physics

  20. Atomic Pseudo-Valuation Domains

    CERN Document Server

    Stines, Elijah

    2012-01-01

    Pseudo-valuation domains have been studied since their introduction in 1978 by Hedstrom and Houston. Related objects, boundary valuation domains, were introduced by Maney in 2004. Here, it is shown that the class of atomic pseudo-valuation domains coincides with the class of boundary valuation domains. It is also shown that power series rings and generalized power series rings give examples of pseudo-valuation domains whose congruence lattices can be characterized. The paper also introduces, and makes use of, a sufficient condition on the group of divisibility of a domain to guarantee that it is a pseudo-valuation domain.

  1. Domain: Labour market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Mulders, J.; Wadensjö, E.; Hasselhorn, H.M.; Apt, W.

    2015-01-01

    This domain chapter is dedicated to summarize research on the effects of labour market contextual factors on labour market participation of older workers (aged 50+) and identify research gaps. While employment participation and the timing of (early) retirement is often modelled as an individual deci

  2. Skyrmions and domain walls

    OpenAIRE

    Piette, B.; Zakrzewski, W. J.

    1997-01-01

    We study the 3+1 dimensional Skyrme model with a mass term different from the usual one. We show that this new model possesses domain walls solutions. We describe how, in the equivalent 2+1 dimensional model, the Skyrmion is absorbed by the wall.

  3. Induced Charge Capacitive Deionization

    CERN Document Server

    Rubin, S; Biesheuvel, P M; Bercovici, M

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the phenomenon of induced-charge capacitive deionization (ICCDI) that occurs around a porous and conducting particle immersed in an electrolyte, under the action of an external electrostatic field. The external electric field induces an electric dipole in the porous particle, leading to capacitive charging of its volume by both cations and anions at opposite poles. This regime is characterized both by a large RC charging time and a small electrochemical charge relaxation time, which leads to rapid and significant deionization of ionic species from a volume which is on the scale of the particle. We show by theory and experiment that the transient response around a cylindrical particle results in spatially non-uniform charging and non-steady growth of depletion regions which emerge around the particle's poles. Potentially, ICCDI can be useful in applications where fast concentration changes of ionic species are required over large volumes.

  4. The anomalous transport of axial charge: topological vs non-topological fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Iatrakis, Ioannis; Yin, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Axial charge imbalance is an essential ingredient in novel effects associated with chiral anomaly such as chiral magnetic effects (CME). In a non-Abelian plasma with chiral fermions, local axial charge can be generated a) by topological fluctuations which would create domains with non-zero winding number b) by conventional non-topological thermal fluctuations. We provide a holographic evaluations of medium's response to dynamically generated axial charge density in hydrodynamic limit and examine if medium's response depends on the microscopic origins of axial charge imbalance. We show a local domain with non-zero winding number would induce a non-dissipative axial current due to chiral anomaly. We illustrate holographically that a local axial charge imbalance would be damped out with the damping rate related to Chern-Simon diffusive constant. By computing chiral magnetic current in the presence of dynamically generated axial charge density, we found that the ratio of CME current over the axial charge density ...

  5. Fuzzy Bases of Fuzzy Domains

    OpenAIRE

    Sanping Rao; Qingguo Li

    2013-01-01

    This paper is an attempt to develop quantitative domain theory over frames. Firstly, we propose the notion of a fuzzy basis, and several equivalent characterizations of fuzzy bases are obtained. Furthermore, the concept of a fuzzy algebraic domain is introduced, and a relationship between fuzzy algebraic domains and fuzzy domains is discussed from the viewpoint of fuzzy basis. We finally give an application of fuzzy bases, where the image of a fuzzy domain can be preserved under some special ...

  6. Atomic Pseudo-Valuation Domains

    OpenAIRE

    Stines, Elijah

    2012-01-01

    Pseudo-valuation domains have been studied since their introduction in 1978 by Hedstrom and Houston. Related objects, boundary valuation domains, were introduced by Maney in 2004. Here, it is shown that the class of atomic pseudo-valuation domains coincides with the class of boundary valuation domains. It is also shown that power series rings and generalized power series rings give examples of pseudo-valuation domains whose congruence lattices can be characterized. The paper also introduces, ...

  7. Cross-Domain Sparse Coding

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2013-01-01

    Sparse coding has shown its power as an effective data representation method. However, up to now, all the sparse coding approaches are limited within the single domain learning problem. In this paper, we extend the sparse coding to cross domain learning problem, which tries to learn from a source domain to a target domain with significant different distribution. We impose the Maximum Mean Discrepancy (MMD) criterion to reduce the cross-domain distribution difference of sparse codes, and also ...

  8. Baryon-antibaryon asymmetry in a model with domain structure and soft CP violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider a model with an abelian gauge symmetry, a Higgs potential involving two scalar fields, and two spinor fields coupled to the scalars through Yukawa couplings. The model accomodates soft violation of charge conjugation, and a domain structure of the universe with two different types of domains, which have identical energy but are governed by different effective lagrangians. The effective lagrangian has complex c-number coefficients that become parts of effective coupling constants, and these are different in the two kinds of domains. In spite of that fact the model neither predicts any domain-dependent effects, nor any particle-antiparticle asymmetries within domains. (orig.)

  9. Price Based Electric Vehicle Charging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahat, Pukar; Handl, Martin; Kanstrup, Kenneth;

    2012-01-01

    paper investigates the impact on a Danish distribution system when the EV charging aims to reduce the charging cost by charging at the cheapest hours. Results show that the charging based on the price signal only will have adverse effect on the grid. The paper also proposes an alternate EV charging...

  10. Decay of electric charge on corona charged polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a study on the surface potential decay of corona charged low density polyethylene (LDPE) films. A conventional corona charging process is used to deposit charge on the surface of film and surface potential is measured by a compact JCI 140 static monitor. The results from corona charged multilayer sample reveal that the bulk process dominates charge decay. In addition, the pulsed-electro-acoustic (PEA) technique has been employed to monitor charge profiles in corona charged LDPE films. By using the PEA technique, we are able to monitor charge migration through the bulk. Charge profiles in corona charged multilayer sample are consistent with surface potential results. Of further significance, the charge profiles clearly demonstrate that double injection has taken place in corona charged LDPE films

  11. Z p charged branes in flux compactifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berasaluce-González, M.; Cámara, P. G.; Marchesano, F.; Uranga, A. M.

    2013-04-01

    We consider 4d string compactifications in the presence of fluxes, and classify particles, strings and domain walls arising from wrapped branes which have charges conserved modulo an integer p, and whose annihilation is catalized by fluxes, through the Freed-Witten anomaly or its dual versions. The Z p -valued strings and particles are associated to Z p discrete gauge symmetries, which we show are realized as discrete subgroups of 4d U(1) symmetries broken by their Chern-Simons couplings to the background fluxes. We also describe examples where the discrete gauge symmetry group is actually non-Abelian. The Z p -valued domain walls separate vacua which have different flux quanta, yet are actually equivalent by an integer shift of axion fields (or further string duality symmetries). We argue that certain examples are related by T-duality to the realization of discrete gauge symmetries and Z p charges from torsion (co)homology. At a formal level, the groups classifying these discrete charges should correspond to a generalization of K-theory in the presence of general fluxes (and including fundamental strings and NS5-branes).

  12. Zp charged branes in flux compactifications

    CERN Document Server

    Berasaluce-González, Mikel; Marchesano, Fernando; Uranga, Ángel M

    2012-01-01

    We consider 4d string compactifications in the presence of fluxes, and classify particles, strings and domain walls arising from wrapped branes which have charges conserved modulo an integer p, and whose annihilation is catalized by fluxes, through the Freed-Witten anomaly or its dual versions. The Z_p-valued strings and particles are associated to Z_p discrete gauge symmetries, which we show are realized as discrete subgroups of 4d U(1) symmetries broken by their Chern-Simons couplings to the background fluxes. We also describe examples where the discrete gauge symmetry group is actually non-Abelian. The Z_p-valued domain walls separate vacua which have different flux quanta, yet are actually equivalent by an integer shift of axion fields (or further string duality symmetries). We argue that certain examples are related by T-duality to the realization of discrete gauge symmetries and Z_p charges from torsion (co)homology. At a formal level, the groups classifying these discrete charges should correspond to a...

  13. Time Domain Induced Polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiandaca, Gianluca; Auken, Esben; Christiansen, Anders Vest;

    2012-01-01

    Time-domain-induced polarization has significantly broadened its field of reference during the last decade, from mineral exploration to environmental geophysics, e.g., for clay and peat identification and landfill characterization. Though, insufficient modeling tools have hitherto limited the use...... of time-domaininduced polarization for wider purposes. For these reasons, a new forward code and inversion algorithm have been developed using the full-time decay of the induced polarization response, together with an accurate description of the transmitter waveform and of the receiver transfer...... is above 100%. Furthermore, the presence of low-pass filters in time-domain-induced polarization instruments affects the early times of the acquired decays (typically up to 100 ms) and has to be modeled in the forward response to avoid significant loss of resolution. The developed forward code has...

  14. Domain-specific languages

    OpenAIRE

    Jasný, Vojtěch

    2009-01-01

    The topic of the thesis are domain-specific languages (DSL) and their use in software development. The target audience are developers interested in learning more about this progressive area of software development. It starts with a necessary theoretical introduction to programming languages. Then, a classification of DSLs is given and software development methodologies based on DSLs are described, notably Language Oriented Programming and Intentional Programming. Another important piece in co...

  15. Implementing maritime domain awareness

    OpenAIRE

    Watts, Robert B.

    2006-01-01

    CHDS State/Local As an attempt to gain understanding of everything in the global maritime environment that can impact the security of the United States, the Maritime Domain Awareness initiative is one of the most ambitious projects ever undertaken by the U.S. government. Information that falls under the prevue of MDA is tremendously diverse and complex, having application in the regulatory, law enforcement, and military arenas. As such, MDA is a multi-agency effort that encompasses 16 resp...

  16. Activation of the pseudokinase MLKL unleashes the four-helix bundle domain to induce membrane localization and necroptotic cell death

    OpenAIRE

    Hildebrand, Joanne M.; Tanzer, Maria C; Lucet, Isabelle S; Young, Samuel N.; Spall, Sukhdeep K; Sharma, Pooja; Pierotti, Catia; Garnier, Jean-Marc; Dobson, Renwick C. J.; Andrew I Webb; Tripaydonis, Anne; Babon, Jeffrey J.; Mulcair, Mark D.; Scanlon, Martin J.; Alexander, Warren S

    2014-01-01

    The four-helix bundle (4HB) domain of Mixed Lineage Kinase Domain-Like (MLKL) bears two clusters of residues that are required for cell death by necroptosis. Mutations within a cluster centered on the α4 helix of the 4HB domain of MLKL prevented its membrane translocation, oligomerization, and ability to induce necroptosis. This cluster is composed principally of acidic residues and therefore challenges the idea that the 4HB domain engages negatively charged phospholipid membranes via a conve...

  17. Electric charge quantization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimentally it has been known for a long time that the electric charges of the observed particles appear to be quantized. An approach to understanding electric charge quantization that can be used for gauge theories with explicit U(1) factors - such as the standard model and its variants - is pedagogically reviewed and discussed in this article. This approach used the allowed invariances of the Lagrangian and their associated anomaly cancellation equations. It is demonstrated that charge may be de-quantized in the three-generation standard model with massless neutrinos, because differences in family-lepton-numbers are anomaly-free. The relevant experimental limits are also reviewed. This approach to charge quantization suggests that the minimal standard model should be extended so that family-lepton-number differences are explicitly broken. Some candidate extensions such as the minimal standard model augmented by Majorana right-handed neutrinos are also briefly discussed. 30 refs

  18. Primitive Virtual Negative Charge

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Kiyoung

    2008-01-01

    Physical fields, such as gravity and electromagnetic field, are interpreted as results from rearrangement of vacuum particles to get the equilibrium of net charge density and net mass density in 4-dimensional complex space. Then, both fields should interact to each other in that physical interaction is considered as a field-to-field interaction. Hence, Mass-Charge interaction is introduced with primitive-virtual negative charge defined for the mass. With the concept of Mass-Charge interaction electric equilibrium of the earth is discussed, especially about the electric field and magnetic field of the earth. For unsettled phenomena related with the earth's gravity, such as antigravity phenomenon, gravity anomalies during the solar eclipses, the connection between geomagnetic storms and earthquakes, etc., possible explanations are discussed.

  19. Space-Charge Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Chauvin, N

    2013-01-01

    First, this chapter introduces the expressions for the electric and magnetic space-charge internal fields and forces induced by high-intensity beams. Then, the root-mean-square equation with space charge is derived and discussed. In the third section, the one-dimensional Child-Langmuir law, which gives the maximum current density that can be extracted from an ion source, is exposed. Space-charge compensation can occur in the low-energy beam transport lines (located after the ion source). This phenomenon, which counteracts the spacecharge defocusing effect, is explained and its main parameters are presented. The fifth section presents an overview of the principal methods to perform beam dynamics numerical simulations. An example of a particles-in-cells code, SolMaxP, which takes into account space-charge compensation, is given. Finally, beam dynamics simulation results obtained with this code in the case of the IFMIF injector are presented.

  20. Photoinduced phase transition in charge order systems. Charge frustration and interplay with lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lattice effects on photoexcited states in an interacting charge-frustrated system are examined. Real-time dynamics in the interacting spinless fermion model on a triangular lattice coupled to lattice vibration are analyzed by applying the exact diagonalization method combined with the classical equation of motion. A photoinduced phase transition from the horizontal stripe-type charge order (CO) to the 3-fold CO occurs through a characteristic intermediate time domain. By analyzing the time evolution in detail, we find that these characteristic dynamics are seen when the electron and lattice sectors are not complementary to each other but show cooperative time evolutions. The dynamics are distinct from those from the vertical stripe-type CO, in which a monotonic CO melting occurs. A scenario of the photoinduced CO phase transition with lattice degree of freedom is presented from the viewpoint of charge frustration. (author)

  1. Domain decomposition method for solving elliptic problems in unbounded domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computational aspects of the box domain decomposition (DD) method for solving boundary value problems in an unbounded domain are discussed. A new variant of the DD-method for elliptic problems in unbounded domains is suggested. It is based on the partitioning of an unbounded domain adapted to the given asymptotic decay of an unknown function at infinity. The comparison of computational expenditures is given for boundary integral method and the suggested DD-algorithm. 29 refs.; 2 figs.; 2 tabs

  2. Charge-sensitive amplifier

    OpenAIRE

    Startsev V. I.; Yampolsky Ju. S.

    2008-01-01

    The authors consider design and circuit design techniques of reduction of the influence of the pyroelectric effect on operation of the charge sensitive amplifiers. The presented experimental results confirm the validity of the measures taken to reduce the impact of pyroelectric currents. Pyroelectric currents are caused by the influence of the temperature gradient on the piezoelectric sensor and on the output voltage of charge sensitive amplifiers.

  3. Comparison of the domain and frequency domain state feedbacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we present explicitly the equivalence of the time domain and frequency domain state feedbacks, as well as the dynamic state feedback and a modified frequency domain state feedback, from the closed-loop transfer function point of view. The difference of the two approaches is also shown

  4. On Free Z-domains%自由Z-domain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚丽娟; 徐晓泉

    2011-01-01

    给出由偏序集生成的自由Z-domain,讨论自由Z-domain和偏序集的Dedekind-MacNeille完备化的一些性质.%The free Z-domains generated by posets are given.Some properties of tte free Z-domains and the Dedekind-MacNeille completions of posets are investigated.

  5. Connection between elastic relativistic form factors and charge distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A scheme by means of which one can establish the connection between form factors and charge distribution (for particles of any spin) in proposed. Except for the nonrelativistic domain our results differ from previous ones. Consequences of our relations (some of them in agreement with experimental and previous theoretical results) are briefly discussed

  6. MOSFET Electric-Charge Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Paul A., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Charged-particle probe compact and consumes little power. Proposed modification enables metal oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) to act as detector of static electric charges or energetic charged particles. Thickened gate insulation acts as control structure. During measurements metal gate allowed to "float" to potential of charge accumulated in insulation. Stack of modified MOSFET'S constitutes detector of energetic charged particles. Each gate "floats" to potential induced by charged-particle beam penetrating its layer.

  7. Gaseous charge transfer reactions of multiply charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doubly charged ions produced in electron impact ionization have received relatively little study due to their low abundance and masking from singly charged ions which are detected at the same mass-to-charge ratio by a mass spectrometer. This interference problem was avoided by exploiting a technique in which doubly charged molecular and fragment ions are monitored using a collisional charge-exchange process where only fast singly charged product ions are allowed to reach the detector. Primary research efforts were to determine structures and energetics of multiply charged ions formed in high energy electron impact ionization processes and their reactivities in ion-molecule charge exchange interactions. Doubly charged ion mass distributions for various chemical classes (including acetylenes, alkenes, terpenes and organophosphorus compounds) were recorded and appearance energies of prominent doubly charged ions were measured. Computer molecular orbital calculations (at the MINDO/3 level) of ionic structures, energies and charge distributions were utilized to augment the analysis of experimental results

  8. Structures of the spectrin-ankyrin interaction binding domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ipsaro, Jonathan J.; Huang, Lei; Mondragón, Alfonso; (NWU)

    2010-01-07

    As key components of the erythrocyte membrane skeleton, spectrin and ankyrin specifically interact to tether the spectrin cytoskeleton to the cell membrane. The structure of the spectrin binding domain of ankyrin and the ankyrin binding domain of spectrin have been solved to elucidate the structural basis for ankyrin-spectrin recognition. The structure of repeats 14 and 15 of spectrin shows that these repeats are similar to all other spectrin repeats. One feature that could account for the preference of ankyrin for these repeats is the presence of a conserved, negatively charged patch on one side of repeat 14. The structure of the ankyrin ZU5 domain shows a novel structure containing a {beta} core. The structure reveals that the canonical ZU5 consensus sequence is likely to be missing an important region that codes for a {beta} strand that forms part of the core of the domain. In addition, a positively charged region is suggestive of a binding surface for the negatively charged spectrin repeat 14. Previously reported mutants of ankyrin that map to this region lie mostly on the surface of the protein, although at least one is likely to be part of the core.

  9. Anisotropic Friedel oscillations inside the domain wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghanbary, R. [Department of Physics, Payame Noor University, Urmia (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Phirouznia, A. [Department of Physics, Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, 53714-161 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Condensed Matter Computational Research Lab. Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, 53714-161 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-12-01

    The influence of the non-collinear magnetic configuration on Friedel oscillations is investigated theoretically. Specifically the influence of the magnetic configuration on the induced electric charge in a Néel type domain wall (DW) has been obtained. The well-known Levy and Zhang eigenstates for a linear DW have been employed. Then the dielectric function of this magnetic system has been obtained within the random phase approximation. Results of the current work demonstrate that magnetic configuration of the system manifests itself in the electric properties such as induced charge distribution. Meanwhile the anisotropy of the induced charge distribution in the real space provides a measurable way for the determination of the DW orientation. In addition anisotropy of the dielectric function in k-space arises as a result of the anisotropy of the magnetic configuration. Therefore the orientation of the magnetic DW could also be captured by full optical measurements. - Highlights: • Dielectric function of a non-collinear magnetic structure. • Anisotropic dielectric function in k-space. • Anisotropic optical absorption. • Anisotropic Friedel oscillations in non-collinear magnetic structures.

  10. Summarization by domain ontology navigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Troels; Bulskov, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    of the subject. In between these two extremes, conceptual summaries encompass selected concepts derived using background knowledge. We address in this paper an approach where conceptual summaries are provided through a conceptualization as given by an ontology. The ontology guiding the summarization can...... be a simple taxonomy or a generative domain ontology. A domain ontology can be provided by a preanalysis of a domain corpus and can be used to condense improved summaries that better reflects the conceptualization of a given domain....

  11. Domain Engineering: An Empirical Study

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Charles; Frakes, William B.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a summary and analysis of data gathered from thirteen domain engineering projects, participant surveys, and demographic information. Taking a failure modes approach, project data is compared to an ideal model of the DARE methodology, revealing valuable insights into points of failure in the domain engineering process. This study suggests that success is a function of the domain analyst’s command of a specific set of domain engineering concepts and skills, the time invested...

  12. A Convenient Category of Domains

    OpenAIRE

    Battenfeld, Ingo; Schröder, Matthias; Simpson, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    We motivate and define a category of topological domains, whose objects are certain topological spaces, generalising the usual ω-continuous dcppos of domain theory. Our category supports all the standard constructions of domain theory, including the solution of recursive domain equations. It also supports the construction of free algebras for (in)equational theories, can be used as the basis for a theory of computability, and provides a model of parametric polymorphism.

  13. A convenient category of domains

    OpenAIRE

    Battenfeld, Ingo; Schröder, Matthias; Simpson, Alex

    2007-01-01

    We motivate and define a category of "topological domains", whose objects are certain topological spaces, generalising the usual $omega$-continuous dcppos of domain theory. Our category supports all the standard constructions of domain theory, including the solution of recursive domain equations. It also supports the construction of free algebras for (in)equational theories, provides a model of parametric polymorphism, and can be used as the basis for a theory of computab...

  14. Layilin, a cell surface hyaluronan receptor, interacts with merlin and radixin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Layilin is a widely expressed integral membrane hyaluronan receptor, originally identified as a binding partner of talin located in membrane ruffles. We have identified merlin, the neurofibromatosis type 2 tumor suppressor protein and radixin, as other interactors with the carboxy-terminal domain of layilin. We show that the carboxy-terminal domain of layilin is capable of binding to the amino-terminal domain of radixin. An interdomain interaction between the amino- and the carboxy-terminal domains of radixin inhibits its ability to bind to layilin. In the presence of acidic phospholipids, the interdomain interaction of radixin is inhibited and layilin can bind to full-length radixin. In contrast, layilin binds both full-length and amino-terminal merlin-GST fusion proteins without a requirement for phospholipids. Furthermore, layilin antibody can immunoprecipitate merlin, confirming association in vivo between these two proteins, which also display similar subcellular localizations in ruffling membranes. No interaction was observed between layilin and ezrin or layilin and moesin. These findings expand the known binding partners of layilin to include other members of the talin/band 4.1/ERM (ezrin, radixin, and moesin) family of cytoskeletal-membrane linker molecules. This in turn suggests that layilin may mediate signals from extracellular matrix to the cell cytoskeleton via interaction with different intracellular binding partners and thereby be involved in the modulation of cortical structures in the cell

  15. Charge density glass from fictions to facts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty years ago Fukuyama [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 45 (1978) 1474] predicted a transition from charge density wave (CDW) state to the charge density glass (CDG) at a finite temperature as the consequence of the competition between the uniform commensurability pinning and the random impurity pinning. We present strong evidence that the CDG phase indeed exists as a generic feature of density wave systems. However, it arises from the competition of the random impurity pinning and the electrostatic intra-CDW interaction which tends to establish a uniform phase at low temperature. The glass transition occurs at the temperature at which the free carriers cannot efficiently screen the phase distortions. The characteristic length scale of the disorder, i.e. the size of the phase coherent domains, governs the glass properties

  16. Terahertz transport dynamics of graphene charge carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buron, Jonas Christian Due

    The electronic transport dynamics of graphene charge carriers at femtosecond (10-15 s) to picosecond (10-12 s) time scales are investigated using terahertz (1012 Hz) time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). The technique uses sub-picosecond pulses of electromagnetic radiation to gauge the electrodynamic...... response of thin conducting films at up to multi-terahertz frequencies. In this thesis THz-TDS is applied towards two main goals; (1) investigation of the fundamental carrier transport dynamics in graphene at femtosecond to picosecond timescales and (2) application of terahertz time-domain spectroscopy...... to rapid and non-contact electrical characterization of large-area graphene, relevant for industrial integration. We show that THz-TDS is an accurate and reliable probe of graphene sheet conductance, and that the technique provides insight into fundamental aspects of the nanoscopic nature of conduction...

  17. Frequency domain nonlinear optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legare, Francois

    2016-05-01

    The universal dilemma of gain narrowing occurring in fs amplifiers prevents ultra-high power lasers from delivering few-cycle pulses. This problem is overcome by a new amplification concept: Frequency domain Optical Parametric Amplification - FOPA. It enables simultaneous up-scaling of peak power and amplified spectral bandwidth and can be performed at any wavelength range of conventional amplification schemes, however, with the capability to amplify single cycles of light. The key idea for amplification of octave-spanning spectra without loss of spectral bandwidth is to amplify the broad spectrum ``slice by slice'' in the frequency domain, i.e. in the Fourier plane of a 4f-setup. The striking advantages of this scheme, are its capability to amplify (more than) one octave of bandwidth without shorting the corresponding pulse duration. This is because ultrabroadband phase matching is not defined by the properties of the nonlinear crystal employed but the number of crystals employed. In the same manner, to increase the output energy one simply has to increase the spectral extension in the Fourier plane and to add one more crystal. Thus, increasing pulse energy and shortening its duration accompany each other. A proof of principle experiment was carried out at ALLS on the sub-two cycle IR beam line and yielded record breaking performance in the field of few-cycle IR lasers. 100 μJ two-cycle pulses from a hollow core fibre compression setup were amplified to 1.43mJ without distorting spatial or temporal properties. Pulse duration at the input of FOPA and after FOPA remains the same. Recently, we have started upgrading this system to be pumped by 250 mJ to reach 40 mJ two-cycle IR few-cycle pulses and latest results will be presented at the conference. Furthermore, the extension of the concept of FOPA to other nonlinear optical processes will be discussed. Frequency domain nonlinear optics.

  18. Domain Bridging Associations Support Creativity

    OpenAIRE

    Kötter, Tobias; Thiel, Kilian; Berthold, Michael R

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a new approach to support creativity through assisting the discovery of unexpected associations across different domains. This is achieved by integrating information from heterogeneous domains into a single network, enabling the interactive discovery of links across the corresponding information resources. We discuss three different pattern of domain crossing associations in this context.

  19. Charged C-metric in conformal gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Yen-Kheng

    2016-01-01

    Using a C-metric-type ansatz, we obtain an exact solution to conformal gravity coupled to a Maxwell electromagnetic field. The solution resembles a C-metric spacetime carrying an electromagnetic charge. The metric is cast in a factorised form which allows us to study the domain structure of its static coordinate regions. This metric reduces to the well-known Mannheim-Kazanas metric under an appropriate limiting procedure, and also reduces to the (Anti-)de Sitter C-metric of Einstein gravity f...

  20. Charged C-metric in conformal gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Yen-Kheng

    2016-01-01

    Using a C-metric-type ansatz, we obtain an exact solution to conformal gravity coupled to a Maxwell electromagnetic field. The solution resembles a C-metric spacetime carrying an electromagnetic charge. The metric is cast in a factorised form which allows us to study the domain structure of its static coordinate regions. This metric reduces to the well-known Mannheim-Kazanas metric under an appropriate limiting procedure, and also reduces to the (Anti-)de Sitter C-metric of Einstein gravity for a particular choice of parameters.

  1. Charged C -metric in conformal gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yen-Kheng

    2016-04-01

    Using a C -metric-type ansatz, we obtain an exact solution to conformal gravity coupled to a Maxwell electromagnetic field. The solution resembles a C -metric spacetime carrying an electromagnetic charge. The metric is cast in a factorized form which allows us to study the domain structure of its static coordinate regions. This metric reduces to the well-known Mannheim-Kazanas metric under an appropriate limiting procedure, and also reduces to the (anti)de Sitter C -metric of Einstein gravity for a particular choice of parameters.

  2. Light-induced space-charge fields for the structuration of dielectric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Light-induced space-charge fields in lithium-niobate crystals are used for patterning of dielectric materials. This includes tailored ferroelectric domains in the bulk of the crystal, different sorts of micro and nanoparticles on a crystal surface, as well as poling of electrooptic chromophores. A stochastical model is introduced, which can describe the spatial inhomogeneous domain inversion. (orig.)

  3. Kin28 Is Found within TFIIH and a Kin28-Ccl1-Tfb3 Trimer Complex with Differential Sensitivities to T-Loop Phosphorylation

    OpenAIRE

    Keogh, Michael-Christopher; Cho, Eun-Jung; Podolny, Vladimir; Buratowski, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    Basal transcription factor TFIIH phosphorylates the RNA polymerase II (RNApII) carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) within the transcription initiation complex. The catalytic kinase subunit of TFIIH is a member of the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) family, designated Kin28 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Cdk7 in higher eukaryotes. Together with TFIIH subunits cyclin H and Mat1, Cdk7 kinase is also found in a trimer complex known as Cdk activating kinase (CAK). A yeast trimer complex has not previousl...

  4. Molecular evolution of dentin phosphoprotein among toothed and toothless animals

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher Larry W; McKnight Dianalee A

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) is the largest member of the SIBLING family and is the most abundant noncollagenous protein in dentin. DSPP is also expressed in non-mineralized tissues including metabolically active ductal epithelia and some cancers. Its function, however, is poorly defined. The carboxy-terminal fragment, dentin phosphoprotein (DPP) is encoded predominantly by a large repetitive domain that requires separate cloning/sequencing reactions and is, therefore...

  5. Tubulin phosphorylation by casein kinase II is similar to that found in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    Purified brain tubulin subjected to an exhaustive phosphatase treatment can be rephosphorylated by casein kinase II. This phosphorylation takes place mainly on a serine residue, which has been located at the carboxy- terminal domain of the beta-subunit. Interestingly, tubulin phosphorylated by casein kinase II retains its ability to polymerize in accordance with descriptions by other authors of in vivo phosphorylated tubulin. Moreover, the V8 phosphopeptide patterns of both tubulin phosphoryl...

  6. Expansion of protein domain repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asa K Björklund

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Many proteins, especially in eukaryotes, contain tandem repeats of several domains from the same family. These repeats have a variety of binding properties and are involved in protein-protein interactions as well as binding to other ligands such as DNA and RNA. The rapid expansion of protein domain repeats is assumed to have evolved through internal tandem duplications. However, the exact mechanisms behind these tandem duplications are not well-understood. Here, we have studied the evolution, function, protein structure, gene structure, and phylogenetic distribution of domain repeats. For this purpose we have assigned Pfam-A domain families to 24 proteomes with more sensitive domain assignments in the repeat regions. These assignments confirmed previous findings that eukaryotes, and in particular vertebrates, contain a much higher fraction of proteins with repeats compared with prokaryotes. The internal sequence similarity in each protein revealed that the domain repeats are often expanded through duplications of several domains at a time, while the duplication of one domain is less common. Many of the repeats appear to have been duplicated in the middle of the repeat region. This is in strong contrast to the evolution of other proteins that mainly works through additions of single domains at either terminus. Further, we found that some domain families show distinct duplication patterns, e.g., nebulin domains have mainly been expanded with a unit of seven domains at a time, while duplications of other domain families involve varying numbers of domains. Finally, no common mechanism for the expansion of all repeats could be detected. We found that the duplication patterns show no dependence on the size of the domains. Further, repeat expansion in some families can possibly be explained by shuffling of exons. However, exon shuffling could not have created all repeats.

  7. Highly Charged Ion Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work a study is made for the factors affecting the production and extraction of highly charged ion beams. Discussion is made for the production of highly charged ions from: the conventional vacuum are ion sources (Pinning PIG and Duoplasmatron DP) and the recent trends type which are (Electron Beam Ion Sources EBIS, Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources ECRIS and Laser Ion source LIS). The highly charged ions with charge state +7 , O+8 ,Ne+10 , Ar+18 have been extracted from the ECRIS while fully stripped Xe+54 has been extracted from EBIS. Improving the capabilities of the conventional RF ion source to produce multiply charged ions is achieved through the use of electron injection into the plasma or with the use of RF driven ion source. The later is based on coupling the RF power to the discharge through an internal antenna in vacuum are ion source. The argon ion species extracted from these upgraded RF ion sources could reach Ar+5

  8. Metaphors, domains and embodiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.E. Botha

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Investigations of metaphorical meaning constitution and meaning (in- variance have revealed the significance of semantic and semiotic domains and the contexts within which they function as basis for the grounding of metaphorical meaning. In this article some of the current views concerning the grounding of metaphorical meaning in experience and embodiment are explored. My provisional agreement with Lakoff, Johnson and others about the “conceptual” nature of metaphor rests on an important caveat, viz. that this bodily based conceptual structure which lies at the basis of linguistic articulations of metaphor, is grounded in a deeper ontic structure of the world and of human experience. It is the “metaphorical” (actually “analogical” ontological structure of this grounding that is of interest for the line of argumentation followed in this article. Because Johnson, Lakoff and other’s proposal to ground metaphorical meaning in embodiment and neural processes is open to being construed as subjectivist and materialist, I shall attempt to articulate the contours of an alternative theory of conceptual metaphor, meaning and embodiment which counteracts these possibilities. This theory grounds metaphorical meaning and meaning change in an ontological and anthropological framework which recognises the presence and conditioning functioning of radially ordered structures for reality. These categorisations in which humankind, human knowledge and reality participate, condition and constrain (ground analogical and metaphorical meaning transfer, cross-domain mappings, and blends in cognition and in language, provide the basis for the analogical concepts found in these disciplines.

  9. Ligand binding by PDZ domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Celestine N.; Bach, Anders; Strømgaard, Kristian;

    2012-01-01

    The postsynaptic density protein-95/disks large/zonula occludens-1 (PDZ) protein domain family is one of the most common protein-protein interaction modules in mammalian cells, with paralogs present in several hundred human proteins. PDZ domains are found in most cell types, but neuronal proteins......, for example, are particularly rich in these domains. The general function of PDZ domains is to bring proteins together within the appropriate cellular compartment, thereby facilitating scaffolding, signaling, and trafficking events. The many functions of PDZ domains under normal physiological as well...

  10. Fractional Charge and Quantized Current in the Quantum Spin Hall State

    OpenAIRE

    Qi, Xiao-Liang; Hughes, Taylor L.; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2007-01-01

    A profound manifestation of topologically non-trivial states of matter is the occurrence of fractionally charged elementary excitations. The quantum spin Hall insulator state is a fundamentally novel quantum state of matter that exists at zero external magnetic field. In this work, we show that a magnetic domain wall at the edge of the quantum spin Hall insulator carries one half of the unit of electron charge, and we propose an experiment to directly measure this fractional charge on an indi...

  11. Space charge dominated beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After an introductory section on the relationship between emittance and beam Coulomb energy we discuss the properties of space charge dominated beams in progressive steps: from uniformly charged bunched beams to non-uniformly charged beams to correlation effects between particles (simulation beams or 'crystalline' beams). A practical application can be found in the beam dynamics of a high-current injector. The concept of correlation energy is of practical interest in computer simulation of high-brilliance beams, where one deals with an artificially enhanced two-particle Coulomb energy, if many real particles are combined into one simulation super-particle. This can be a source of non-physical emittance growth. (orig./HSI)

  12. The framing of scientific domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam Christensen, Hans

    2014-01-01

    according to the agents that are charting them. As such, power in a Foucauldian sense is unavoidable in outlining a domain. Originality/value 1. The UNISIST models are applied to the domain of art history; and 2. the article discusses the instability of a scientific domain as well as, at the same time, the......Purpose: By using the UNISIST models this article argues for the necessity of domain analysis in order to qualify scientific information seeking. The models better understanding of communication processes in a scientific domain and embraces the point that domains are always both unstable over time...... and changeable according to the specific perspective. This understanding is even more important today as numerous digitally generated information tools as well as collaborative and interdisciplinary research are blurring the domain borders. Nevertheless, researchers navigate “intuitively” in “their...

  13. Sources for charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is a basic course on charged particle sources for post-graduate students and thematic schools on large facilities and accelerator physics. A simple but precise description of the creation and the emission of charged particles is presented. This course relies on every year upgraded reference documents. Following relevant topics are considered: electronic emission processes, technological and practical considerations on electron guns, positron sources, production of neutral atoms, ionization, plasma and discharge, different types of positive and negative ion sources, polarized particle sources, materials for the construction of ion sources, low energy beam production and transport. (N.T.)

  14. Charged conformal Killing spinors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the twistor equation on pseudo-Riemannian Spinc-manifolds whose solutions we call charged conformal Killing spinors (CCKSs). We derive several integrability conditions for the existence of CCKS and study their relations to spinor bilinears. A construction principle for Lorentzian manifolds admitting CCKS with nontrivial charge starting from CR-geometry is presented. We obtain a partial classification result in the Lorentzian case under the additional assumption that the associated Dirac current is normal conformal and complete the classification of manifolds admitting CCKS in all dimensions and signatures ≤5 which has recently been initiated in the study of supersymmetric field theories on curved space

  15. Charge configurations in viral proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Karlin, S; Brendel, V

    1988-01-01

    The spatial distribution of the charged residues of a protein is of interest with respect to potential electrostatic interactions. We have examined the proteins of a large number of representative eukaryotic and prokaryotic viruses for the occurrence of significant clusters, runs, and periodic patterns of charge. Clusters and runs of positive charge are prominent in many capsid and core proteins, whereas surface (glyco)proteins frequently contain a negative charge cluster. Significant charge ...

  16. Protein domain organisation: adding order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kummerfeld Sarah K

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Domains are the building blocks of proteins. During evolution, they have been duplicated, fused and recombined, to produce proteins with novel structures and functions. Structural and genome-scale studies have shown that pairs or groups of domains observed together in a protein are almost always found in only one N to C terminal order and are the result of a single recombination event that has been propagated by duplication of the multi-domain unit. Previous studies of domain organisation have used graph theory to represent the co-occurrence of domains within proteins. We build on this approach by adding directionality to the graphs and connecting nodes based on their relative order in the protein. Most of the time, the linear order of domains is conserved. However, using the directed graph representation we have identified non-linear features of domain organization that are over-represented in genomes. Recognising these patterns and unravelling how they have arisen may allow us to understand the functional relationships between domains and understand how the protein repertoire has evolved. Results We identify groups of domains that are not linearly conserved, but instead have been shuffled during evolution so that they occur in multiple different orders. We consider 192 genomes across all three kingdoms of life and use domain and protein annotation to understand their functional significance. To identify these features and assess their statistical significance, we represent the linear order of domains in proteins as a directed graph and apply graph theoretical methods. We describe two higher-order patterns of domain organisation: clusters and bi-directionally associated domain pairs and explore their functional importance and phylogenetic conservation. Conclusion Taking into account the order of domains, we have derived a novel picture of global protein organization. We found that all genomes have a higher than expected

  17. Charged particle beams

    CERN Document Server

    Humphries, Stanley

    2013-01-01

    Detailed enough for a text and sufficiently comprehensive for a reference, this volume addresses topics vital to understanding high-power accelerators and high-brightness-charged particle beams. Subjects include stochastic cooling, high-brightness injectors, and the free electron laser. Humphries provides students with the critical skills necessary for the problem-solving insights unique to collective physics problems. 1990 edition.

  18. Charged Particle Optics Theory

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hawkes, P. W.; Lencová, Bohumila

    -, č. 6 (2006), s. 6-8 Grant ostatní: EC 5RP(XE) G5RD-CT-2000-00344 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : optics of charged particles * design of ion lithography system * spot profile * the finite element method Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering www.phantomsnet.net

  19. Stability of charged membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Bensimon, D; David, F.; Leibler, S.; Pumir, A.

    1990-01-01

    The electrostatic contribution to the bending elastic modulus of charged phospholipid bilayers in an ionic solution is computed. It is found to be the same for conducting and non-conducting membranes and is always stabilizing. This stability for free membranes is shown to be a simple consequence of the vanishing of the physical surface tension.

  20. Spontaneous Emission of Charged Bosons from Supercritical Point Charges

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Sang Pyo

    2013-01-01

    We study the spontaneous emission of charged bosons from supercritical Coulomb potentials and charged black holes. We find the exact emission rate from the Bogoliubov transformation by applying the tunneling boundary condition on the Jost functions at the asymptotic boundaries. The emission rate for charged bosons in the supercritical Coulomb potential increases as the charge $Z\\alpha > 1/2$ of the superatom and the energy of the bosons increase but is suppressed for large angular momenta. We discuss physical implications of the emission of charged bosons from superatoms and charged black holes.

  1. Decay of electric charge on corona charged polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the surface potential decay of corona-charged low density polyethylene (LDPE) films has been investigated. It has been found that for the same sample thickness the faster decay occurs in the sample with a higher charging voltage. For the same charging voltage, the surface potential in the thinner sample shows rapid decay. Our new evidence from both the surface potential measurement on multilayer samples and space charge measurement suggests the surface potential decay is a bulk limited process. More importantly, space charge measurement indicates double injection has taken place during corona charging process.

  2. Frequency Domain Storage Ring Method for Electric Dipole Moment Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Talman, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Precise measurement of the electric dipole moments (EDM) of fundamental charged particles would provide a significant probe of physics beyond the standard model. Any measurably large EDM would imply violation of both time reversal and parity conservation, with implications for the matter/anti-matter imbalance of the universe, not currently understood within the standard model. A frequency domain (i.e. difference of frequencies) method is proposed for measuring the EDM of electrons or protons ...

  3. Determination of three characteristic regimes of weakly charged polyelectrolytes monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have demonstrated that monolayer films of randomly charged polystyrene sulfonated acid (PSSA) can be produced by the Langmuir technique, and observed the micro-domain structures, produced by the phase separation of electrostatically charged moieties and the hydrophobic moieties. Using atomic force microscopy and Langmuir isotherm, we found three specific regimes for the polyelectrolytes with various degrees of sulfonation (4-35%); very low charged PSSA (4-5%) in the hydrophobic regime, moderately charged PSSA (6-16%) which possessed a well-balanced nature between electrostatic and the hydrophobic interactions, and strongly amphiphilic nature of PSSA (6-16%) in the ionomer regime. Finally, we could categorize PSSA 35% in the polyelectrolyte regime, due to the dominance of the electrostatic interactions over the hydrophobic interactions

  4. Directional charge separation in isolated organic semiconductor crystalline nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labastide, J. A.; Thompson, H. B.; Marques, S. R.; Colella, N. S.; Briseno, A. L.; Barnes, M. D.

    2016-02-01

    One of the fundamental design paradigms in organic photovoltaic device engineering is based on the idea that charge separation is an extrinsically driven process requiring an interface for exciton fission. This idea has driven an enormous materials science engineering effort focused on construction of domain sizes commensurate with a nominal exciton diffusion length of order 10 nm. Here, we show that polarized optical excitation of isolated pristine crystalline nanowires of a small molecule n-type organic semiconductor, 7,8,15,16-tetraazaterrylene, generates a significant population of charge-separated polaron pairs along the π-stacking direction. Charge separation was signalled by pronounced power-law photoluminescence decay polarized along the same axis. In the transverse direction, we observed exponential decay associated with excitons localized on individual monomers. We propose that this effect derives from an intrinsic directional charge-transfer interaction that can ultimately be programmed by molecular packing geometry.

  5. Directional charge separation in isolated organic semiconductor crystalline nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labastide, J A; Thompson, H B; Marques, S R; Colella, N S; Briseno, A L; Barnes, M D

    2016-01-01

    One of the fundamental design paradigms in organic photovoltaic device engineering is based on the idea that charge separation is an extrinsically driven process requiring an interface for exciton fission. This idea has driven an enormous materials science engineering effort focused on construction of domain sizes commensurate with a nominal exciton diffusion length of order 10 nm. Here, we show that polarized optical excitation of isolated pristine crystalline nanowires of a small molecule n-type organic semiconductor, 7,8,15,16-tetraazaterrylene, generates a significant population of charge-separated polaron pairs along the π-stacking direction. Charge separation was signalled by pronounced power-law photoluminescence decay polarized along the same axis. In the transverse direction, we observed exponential decay associated with excitons localized on individual monomers. We propose that this effect derives from an intrinsic directional charge-transfer interaction that can ultimately be programmed by molecular packing geometry. PMID:26912040

  6. Optimization of BEV Charging Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Wei

    This paper presents different approaches to optimize fast charging and workplace charging strategy of battery electric vehicle (BEV) drivers. For the fast charging analysis, a rule-based model was built to simulate BEV charging behavior. Monte Carlo analysis was performed to explore to the potential range of congestion at fast charging stations which could be more than four hours at the most crowded stations. Genetic algorithm was performed to explore the theoretical minimum waiting time at fast charging stations, and it can decrease the waiting time at the most crowded stations to be shorter than one hour. A deterministic approach was proposed as a feasible suggestion that people should consider to take fast charging when the state of charge is approaching 40 miles. This suggestion is hoped to help to minimize potential congestion at fast charging stations. For the workplace charging analysis, scenario analysis was performed to simulate temporal distribution of charging demand under different workplace charging strategies. It was found that if BEV drivers charge as much as possible and as late as possible at workplace, it could increase the utility of solar-generated electricity while relieve grid stress of extra intensive electricity demand at night caused by charging electric vehicles at home.

  7. Domain wall networks on solitons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domain wall networks on the surface of a soliton are studied in a simple theory. It consists of two complex scalar fields, in 3+1 dimensions, with a global U(1)xZn symmetry, where n>2. Solutions are computed numerically in which one of the fields forms a Q ball and the other field forms a network of domain walls localized on the surface of the Q ball. Examples are presented in which the domain walls lie along the edges of a spherical polyhedron, forming junctions at its vertices. It is explained why only a small restricted class of polyhedra can arise as domain wall networks

  8. Gears, Pregears and Related Domains

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Philip R.; Porter, R. Michael

    2015-01-01

    We study conformal mappings from the unit disk to one-toothed gear-shaped planar domains from the point of view of the Schwarzian derivative. Gear-shaped (or "gearlike") domains fit into a more general category of domains we call "pregears" (images of gears under Mobius transformations), which aid in the study of the conformal mappings for gears and which we also describe in detail. Such domains being bounded by arcs of circles, the Schwarzian derivative of the Riemann mapping is known to be ...

  9. Charge Breeding of Radioactive Ions

    OpenAIRE

    Wenander, F. J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Charge breeding is a technique to increase the charge state of ions, in many cases radioactive ions. The singly charged radioactive ions, produced in an isotope separator on-line facility, and extracted with a low kinetic energy of some tens of keV, are injected into a charge breeder, where the charge state is increased to Q. The transformed ions are either directed towards a dedicated experiment requiring highly charged ions, or post-accelerated to higher beam energies. In this paper the phy...

  10. Intelligent battery charging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Hobert R., Jr.

    1991-09-01

    The present invention is a battery charging system that provides automatic voltage selection, short circuit protection, and delayed output to prevent arcing or pitting. A second embodiment of the invention provides a homing beacon which transmits a signal so that a battery powered mobile robot may home in on and contact the invention to charge its battery. The invention includes electric terminals isolated from one another. One terminal is grounded and the other has a voltage applied to it through a resistor connected to the output of a DC power supply. A voltage scaler is connected between the resistor and the hot terminal. An On/Off controller and a voltage mode selector sense the voltage provided at the output of the voltage scaler.

  11. High Voltage Charge Pump

    KAUST Repository

    Emira, Ahmed A.

    2014-10-09

    Various embodiments of a high voltage charge pump are described. One embodiment is a charge pump circuit that comprises a plurality of switching stages each including a clock input, a clock input inverse, a clock output, and a clock output inverse. The circuit further comprises a plurality of pumping capacitors, wherein one or more pumping capacitors are coupled to a corresponding switching stage. The circuit also comprises a maximum selection circuit coupled to a last switching stage among the plurality of switching stages, the maximum selection circuit configured to filter noise on the output clock and the output clock inverse of the last switching stage, the maximum selection circuit further configured to generate a DC output voltage based on the output clock and the output clock inverse of the last switching stage.

  12. Hidden Charged Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Jonathan L; Tu, Huitzu; Yu, Hai-Bo

    2009-01-01

    We examine the possibility that dark matter is hidden, that is, neutral under all standard model gauge interactions, but charged under an exact U(1) gauge symmetry of the hidden sector. Such candidates are predicted in simple WIMPless models, supersymmetric models in which hidden dark matter has the desired thermal relic density for a wide range of masses. Hidden charged dark matter has many potentially disastrous implications for astrophysics: (1) bound state formation and Sommerfeld-enhanced annihilation after chemical freeze out may destroy its relic density, (2) similar effects greatly enhance dark matter annihilation in protohalos at redshifts of z ~ 30, (3) Compton scattering off hidden photons delays kinetic decoupling, suppressing small scale structure, and (4) Rutherford scattering makes such dark matter self-interacting and collisional, potentially violating constraints from the Bullet Cluster and the observed morphology of galactic halos. We show that all of these constraints are satisfied and are ...

  13. Photoinduced Charge Separation in Porphyrin Ion Pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natali, Mirco; Scandola, Franco

    2016-03-10

    Ion pairs between porphyrin-type compounds have been successfully employed for spectral sensitization of semiconductor surfaces and for the preparation of collective binary ionic materials for photonic and (photo)catalytic applications. The understanding of the photophysical processes occurring within ion-paired porphyrin dimers is thus of remarkable importance for the optimization and improvement of such systems. Herein the ion-pair species formed between ZnTMePyP(4+) (Zn1) or H2TMePyP(4+) (H21) and ZnTPPS(4-) (Zn2) or H2TPPS(4-) (H22) in a variety of solvent mixtures are characterized and their photophysics thoroughly investigated by time-resolved techniques. In all the systems studied, very fast and efficient photoinduced charge separation is observed, with the cationic porphyrin being reduced and the anionic one oxidized. Interestingly, despite the very short charge separation distance, the lifetime for charge recombination, depending on the energy gap, can extend into the nanosecond time domain, showing great potential for the utilization of this molecular design within energy conversion schemes. PMID:26905260

  14. Controlling charge on levitating drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilger, Ryan T; Westphall, Michael S; Smith, Lloyd M

    2007-08-01

    Levitation technologies are used in containerless processing of materials, as microscale manipulators and reactors, and in the study of single drops and particles. Presented here is a method for controlling the amount and polarity of charge on a levitating drop. The method uses single-axis acoustic levitation to trap and levitate a single, initially neutral drop with a diameter between 400 microm and 2 mm. This drop is then charged in a controllable manner using discrete packets of charge in the form of charged drops produced by a piezoelectric drop-on-demand dispenser equipped with a charging electrode. The magnitude of the charge on the dispensed drops can be adjusted by varying the voltage applied to the charging electrode. The polarity of the charge on the added drops can be changed allowing removal of charge from the trapped drop (by neutralization) and polarity reversal. The maximum amount of added charge is limited by repulsion of like charges between the drops in the trap. This charging scheme can aid in micromanipulation and the study of charged drops and particles using levitation. PMID:17580951

  15. On the Remarkable Features of the Lower Limits of Charge and the Radiated Energy of Antennas as Predicted by Classical Electrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Vernon Cooray; Gerald Cooray

    2016-01-01

    Electromagnetic energy radiated by antennas working in both the frequency domain and time domain is studied as a function of the charge associated with the current in the antenna. The frequency domain results, obtained under the assumption of sinusoidal current distribution, show that, for a given charge, the energy radiated within a period of oscillation increases initially with L/λ and then starts to oscillate around a steady value when L/λ > 1. The results show that for the energy radia...

  16. Charge states of ions, and mechanisms of charge ordering transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To gain insight into the mechanism of charge ordering transitions, which conventionally are pictured as a disproportionation of an ion M as 2Mn+→M(n+1)+ + M(n−1)+, we (1) review and reconsider the charge state (or oxidation number) picture itself, (2) introduce new results for the putative charge ordering compound AgNiO2 and the dual charge state insulator AgO, and (3) analyze the cationic occupations of the actual (not formal) charge, and work to reconcile the conundrums that arise. We establish that several of the clearest cases of charge ordering transitions involve no disproportion (no charge transfer between the cations, and hence no charge ordering), and that the experimental data used to support charge ordering can be accounted for within density functional-based calculations that contain no charge transfer between cations. We propose that the charge state picture retains meaning and importance, at least in many cases, if one focuses on Wannier functions rather than atomic orbitals. The challenge of modeling charge ordering transitions with model Hamiltonians isdiscussed. (paper)

  17. Mesoscopic charge quantization

    OpenAIRE

    Aleiner, I.L.; Glazman, L. I.

    1997-01-01

    We study the Coulomb blockade in a chaotic quantum dot connected to a lead by a single channel at nearly perfect transmission. We take into account quantum fluctuations of the dot charge and a finite level spacing for electron states within the dot. Mesoscopic fluctuations of thermodynamic and transport properties in the Coulomb blockade regime exist at any transmission coefficient. In contrast to the previous theories, we show that by virtue of these mesoscopic fluctuations, the Coulomb bloc...

  18. Charged current review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental measurements of the τ lifetime and leptonic branching ratios are combined to give updated world averages for these quantities. The results are then used to test the universality of the electroweak charged current couplings to the three lepton species and are found to be consistent with Standard Model predictions at the level of 0.2%, permitting limits to be derived on non-Standard Model physics such as the mass of the τ neutrino

  19. General 2 charge geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, M

    2006-01-01

    Two charge BPS horizon free supergravity geometries are important in proposals for understanding black hole microstates. In this paper we construct a new class of geometries in the NS1-P system, corresponding to solitonic strings carrying fermionic as well as bosonic condensates. Such geometries are required to account for the full microscopic entropy of the NS1-P system. We then briefly discuss the properties of the corresponding geometries in the dual D1-D5 system.

  20. Charging mechanisms in persistent phosphors

    OpenAIRE

    Smet, Philippe; Van den Eeckhout, Koen; Korthout, Katleen; Botterman, Jonas; van der Kolk, Erik; Bos, Adrie; Dorenbos, Pieter; Poelman, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    The development of novel persistent phosphors is currently hampered by a limited understanding of the charging mechanism. Using x-ray absorption and thermoluminescence spectroscopy we evaluate the validity of recently proposed models for the charging mechanism.

  1. Distributed charging of electrical assets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumyadip; Phan, Dung; Sharma, Mayank; Wu, Chai Wah; Xiong, Jinjun

    2016-02-16

    The present disclosure relates generally to the field of distributed charging of electrical assets. In various examples, distributed charging of electrical assets may be implemented in the form of systems, methods and/or algorithms.

  2. Credentialing Data Scientists: A Domain Repository Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, K. A.; Furukawa, H.

    2015-12-01

    A career in data science can have many paths: data curation, data analysis, metadata modeling - all of these in different commercial or scientific applications. Can a certification as 'data scientist' provide the guarantee that an applicant or candidate for a data science position has just the right skills? How valuable is a 'generic' certification as data scientist for an employer looking to fill a data science position? Credentials that are more specific and discipline-oriented may be more valuable to both the employer and the job candidate. One employment sector for data scientists are the data repositories that provide discipline-specific data services for science communities. Data science positions within domain repositories include a wide range of responsibilities in support of the full data life cycle - from data preservation and curation to development of data models, ontologies, and user interfaces, to development of data analysis and visualization tools to community education and outreach, and require a substantial degree of discipline-specific knowledge of scientific data acquisition and analysis workflows, data quality measures, and data cultures. Can there be certification programs for domain-specific data scientists that help build the urgently needed workforce for the repositories? The American Geophysical Union has recently started an initiative to develop a program for data science continuing education and data science professional certification for the Earth and space sciences. An Editorial Board has been charged to identify and develop curricula and content for these programs and to provide input and feedback in the implementation of the program. This presentation will report on the progress of this initiative and evaluate its utility for the needs of domain repositories in the Earth and space sciences.

  3. Magneto-dynamic properties of CoFeB thin film elements: The role of magnetic domain walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding the role of the magnetic domain structure on the magneto-dynamic properties of patterned thin film structures is crucial for the optimization of high frequency devices, e.g. recording heads, integrated inductors and filters. We show that a controllable domain design offers the advantage of tuning the ferromagnetic zero and low field resonance frequency. Therefore we studied the dynamic response of closure domain structures in patterned amorphous Co40Fe40B20 stripe arrays with varying domain wall density using pulsed inductive microwave magnetometry. We show that the domain resonance frequency increases significantly the more neighboured crosstie walls interact with each other. A qualitative concept of dynamic magnetic charges is discussed as the origin of such a resonance frequency increase. The dynamic charge concept also allows the explanation of a pronounced resonance frequency increase in concertina domain structures that develop in lens shaped elements.

  4. Taxonomies of Educational Objective Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman Ghanem Nayef

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper highlights an effort to study the educational objective domain taxonomies including Bloom’s taxonomy, Lorin Anderson’s taxonomy, and Wilson’s taxonomy. In this study a comparison among these three taxonomies have been done. Results show that Bloom’s taxonomy is more suitable as an analysis tool to Educational Objective domain.

  5. Taxonomies of Educational Objective Domain

    OpenAIRE

    Eman Ghanem Nayef; Nik Rosila Nik Yaacob; Hairul Nizam Ismail

    2013-01-01

    This paper highlights an effort to study the educational objective domain taxonomies including Bloom’s taxonomy, Lorin Anderson’s taxonomy, and Wilson’s taxonomy. In this study a comparison among these three taxonomies have been done. Results show that Bloom’s taxonomy is more suitable as an analysis tool to Educational Objective domain.

  6. Submerged AUV Charging Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A.; Chao, Yi; Curtin, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) are becoming increasingly important for military surveillance and mine detection. Most AUVs are battery powered and have limited lifetimes of a few days to a few weeks. This greatly limits the distance that AUVs can travel underwater. Using a series of submerged AUV charging stations, AUVs could travel a limited distance to the next charging station, recharge its batteries, and continue to the next charging station, thus traveling great distances in a relatively short time, similar to the Old West “Pony Express.” One solution is to use temperature differences at various depths in the ocean to produce electricity, which is then stored in a submerged battery. It is preferred to have the upper buoy submerged a reasonable distance below the surface, so as not to be seen from above and not to be inadvertently destroyed by storms or ocean going vessels. In a previous invention, a phase change material (PCM) is melted (expanded) at warm temperatures, for example, 15 °C, and frozen (contracted) at cooler temperatures, for example, 8 °C. Tubes containing the PCM, which could be paraffin such as pentadecane, would be inserted into a container filled with hydraulic oil. When the PCM is melted (expanded), it pushes the oil out into a container that is pressurized to about 3,000 psi (approx equals 20.7 MPa). When a valve is opened, the high-pressure oil passes through a hydraulic motor, which turns a generator and charges a battery. The low-pressure oil is finally reabsorbed into the PCM canister when the PCM tubes are frozen (contracted). Some of the electricity produced could be used to control an external bladder or a motor to the tether line, such that depth cycling is continued for a very long period of time. Alternatively, after the electricity is generated by the hydraulic motor, the exiting low-pressure oil from the hydraulic motor could be vented directly to an external bladder on the AUV, such that filling of the bladder

  7. Banking Bank Charge Debates Continue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG PEI

    2006-01-01

    @@ The saying, "There's no such thing as a free lunch" is one that can be applied to the charges increasingly being imposed on savers by Chinese banks.Ranging from managementfees for small deposit accounts to charges for withdrawals of large amounts of cash, from ATM cross-bank withdrawal charges to annual fees for bank payment cards, charges by banks are becoming a unstoppable trend. But it is not a trend the general public is so keen to accept.

  8. Space charge effects of CSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooler Storage Ring (CSR), and upgrading program planned at the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL), will supply beams with higher quality and intensity. Space charge effects should be considered due to this magnitude of intensity in CSR. The concept and some phenomena of space charge effects are discussed. Space charge intensity limit and space charge tune shift of normal CSR operation are given. It is of significance for the construction and operation of the future facility

  9. Modular Battery Charge Controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Button, Robert; Gonzalez, Marcelo

    2009-01-01

    A new approach to masterless, distributed, digital-charge control for batteries requiring charge control has been developed and implemented. This approach is required in battery chemistries that need cell-level charge control for safety and is characterized by the use of one controller per cell, resulting in redundant sensors for critical components, such as voltage, temperature, and current. The charge controllers in a given battery interact in a masterless fashion for the purpose of cell balancing, charge control, and state-of-charge estimation. This makes the battery system invariably fault-tolerant. The solution to the single-fault failure, due to the use of a single charge controller (CC), was solved by implementing one CC per cell and linking them via an isolated communication bus [e.g., controller area network (CAN)] in a masterless fashion so that the failure of one or more CCs will not impact the remaining functional CCs. Each micro-controller-based CC digitizes the cell voltage (V(sub cell)), two cell temperatures, and the voltage across the switch (V); the latter variable is used in conjunction with V(sub cell) to estimate the bypass current for a given bypass resistor. Furthermore, CC1 digitizes the battery current (I1) and battery voltage (V(sub batt) and CC5 digitizes a second battery current (I2). As a result, redundant readings are taken for temperature, battery current, and battery voltage through the summation of the individual cell voltages given that each CC knows the voltage of the other cells. For the purpose of cell balancing, each CC periodically and independently transmits its cell voltage and stores the received cell voltage of the other cells in an array. The position in the array depends on the identifier (ID) of the transmitting CC. After eight cell voltage receptions, the array is checked to see if one or more cells did not transmit. If one or more transmissions are missing, the missing cell(s) is (are) eliminated from cell

  10. Texture of lipid bilayer domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Uffe Bernchou; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Midtiby, Henrik Skov; Ipsen, John Hjort; Bagatolli, Luis; Simonsen, Adam Cohen

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the texture of gel (g) domains in binary lipid membranes composed of the phospholipids DPPC and DOPC. Lateral organization of lipid bilayer membranes is a topic of fundamental and biological importance. Whereas questions related to size and composition of fluid membrane domain are...... chains. By imaging the intensity variations as a function of the polarization angle, we map the lateral variations of the lipid tilt within domains. Results reveal that gel domains are composed of subdomains with different lipid tilt directions. We have applied a Fourier decomposition method as a...... which correlates with the phase state of the membrane. This is quantified by the generalized polarization (GP) function, and we demonstrate that a GP analysis can be performed on supported membranes. The results show that although the gel domains have heterogeneous texture, the membrane phase state does...

  11. Static properties of Condon domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new nonlinear differential equation is used for description of the static properties of domain walls of magnetic domains of the non-spin type (Condon domains). This equation is derived on the basis of the exact expression for the thermodynamic potential density, enabling taking into account the oscillating behavior of the magnetization. Inhomogeneity is included in the generalized equation of state. The derived equation is solved analytically. A new shape of the domain wall is presented by the new kink solution of the obtained equation. The width and surface tension of the domain wall is presented as a function of the magnetic field strength, temperature, and Dingle temperature. They exhibit the critical behavior typical of the mean-field theory of second-order phase transitions. The calculated critical exponents are in agreement with nuclear magnetic resonance, muon spin-rotation spectroscopy and Hall probes measurements.

  12. Adsorption of highly charged Gaussian polyelectrolytes onto oppositely charged surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Sandipan; Jho, Y. S.

    2016-03-01

    In many biological processes highly charged biopolymers are adsorbed onto oppositely charged surfaces of macroions and membranes. They form strongly correlated structures close to the surface which cannot be explained by the conventional Poisson-Boltzmann theory. In this work strong coupling theory is used to study the adsorption of highly charged Gaussian polyelectrolytes. Two cases of adsorptions are considered, when the Gaussian polyelectrolytes are confined (a) by one charged wall, and (b) between two charged walls. The effects of salt and the geometry of the polymers on their adsorption-depletion transitions in the strong coupling regime are discussed.

  13. Measuring Charge Transport in an Amorphous Semiconductor Using Charge Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Maclean, K; Mentzel, T. S.; Kastner, M. A.

    2009-01-01

    We measure charge transport in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) using a nanometer scale silicon MOSFET as a charge sensor. This charge detection technique makes possible the measurement of extremely large resistances. At high temperatures, where the a-Si:H resistance is not too large, the charge detection measurement agrees with a direct measurement of current. The device geometry allows us to probe both the field effect and dispersive transport in the a-Si:H using charge sensing and t...

  14. Charging Users for Library Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Michael D.

    1978-01-01

    Examines the question of instituting direct charges for library service, using on-line bibliographic searching as an example, and contrasts this with the current indirect charging system where services are paid for by taxes. Information, as a merit good, should be supplied with or without direct charges, depending upon user status. (CWM)

  15. Transient analysis of charging system with centrifugal charging pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CARD (CVCS Analysis for Design) code has been developed for the transient analysis of the letdown and charging system of Korea Standard Nuclear Power Plant. The computer code has been already verified and validated by comparing with actual test results. Analyzed in this paper are the flow and pressure transients in the charging line. The sensitivity studies are performed to select the acceptable control parameters of charging line backpressure controller and seal injection flow controller. In addition, the seal injection system transient is evaluated for the pressurizer auxiliary spray operation. It is shown that the charging line backpressure controller control parameters yield a significant effect on the charging system stability. The results obtained from this study will be used to verify the system design and to select the optimum control parameters for the charging system with centrifugal charging pumps

  16. Control of magnetic domains and domain walls by themal gradients

    OpenAIRE

    Stärk, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study heat effects in thin magnetic films to verify the theoretical prediction of domain wall motion towards a heat source. In the theory, a domain wall moves from a cold region towards the hotter part due to energy minimization processes. It is shown that no electron transport is necessary for this effect as it has been observed in insulators. An analytical model describes the effective field that acts on a domain wall as an external applied magnetic field. This is pr...

  17. Fractional charge and spin states in topological insulator constrictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinovaja, Jelena; Loss, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    We theoretically investigate the properties of two-dimensional topological insulator constrictions both in the integer and fractional regimes. In the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field, the constriction functions as a spin filter with near-perfect efficiency and can be switched by electric fields only. Domain walls between different topological phases can be created in the constriction as an interface between tunneling, magnetic fields, charge density wave, or electron-electron interaction dominated regions. These domain walls host non-Abelian bound states with fractional charge and spin and result in degenerate ground states with parafermions. If a proximity gap is induced bound states give rise to an exotic Josephson current with 8 π periodicity.

  18. Topological charge membranes and Goldstone boson propagation in QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Thacker, H B

    2013-01-01

    Both theoretical arguments and Monte Carlo observations indicate that the topological structure of the QCD vacuum consists of a laminated array of extended, coherent codimension-one membranes of alternating sign. Large-$N_c$ arguments, supported by gauge/string holography, indicate that these membranes are domain walls which separate discrete "flux vacua" with values of the topological $\\theta$ parameter which differ by $\\pm 2\\pi$. This exposes a close analogy with 2D U(1) gauge theory, where $\\theta$ can be interpreted as electric polarization, and the domain walls are pointlike charged particles. In 4D QCD, the $\\theta$ parameter represents background Ramond-Ramond flux, which can be interpreted as a polarization of the charged membranes in the vacuum. In this framework, the chiral condensate is formed from the quark surface modes on the membranes. Massless Goldstone boson propagation takes place due to a coordination between bulk oscillations of the polarization field $\\theta$ and the surface currents repr...

  19. Price Based Electric Vehicle Charging

    OpenAIRE

    Mahat, Pukar; Handl, Martin; Kanstrup, Kenneth; Lozano, Alberto; Sleimovits, Aleksandr

    2012-01-01

    It is expected that a lot of the new light vehicles in the future will be electrical vehicles (EV). The storage capacity of these EVs has the potential to complement renewable energy resources and mitigate its intermittency. However, EV charging may have negative impact on the power grid. This paper investigates the impact on a Danish distribution system when the EV charging aims to reduce the charging cost by charging at the cheapest hours. Results show that the charging based on the price s...

  20. Branes, Charge and Intersections

    CERN Document Server

    Marolf, D M

    2001-01-01

    This is a brief summary of lectures given at the Fourth Mexican School on Gravitation and Mathematical Physics. The lectures gave an introduction to branes in eleven-dimensional supergravity and in type IIA supergravities in ten-dimensions. Charge conservation and the role of the so-called `Chern-Simons terms' were emphasized. Known exact solutions were discussed and used to provide insight into the question `Why don't fundamental strings fall off of D-branes,' which is often asked by relativists. The following is a brief overview of the lectures with an associated guide to the literature.

  1. Branes, Charge and Intersections

    OpenAIRE

    Marolf, Donald

    2001-01-01

    This is a brief summary of lectures given at the Fourth Mexican School on Gravitation and Mathematical Physics. The lectures gave an introduction to branes in eleven-dimensional supergravity and in type IIA supergravities in ten-dimensions. Charge conservation and the role of the so-called `Chern-Simons terms' were emphasized. Known exact solutions were discussed and used to provide insight into the question `Why don't fundamental strings fall off of D-branes,' which is often asked by relativ...

  2. Information Fusion: Moving from domain independent to domain literate approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuinness, D.

    2008-12-01

    Information Fusion has been a focus of research within the field of computer science for a number of years. Numerous environments aimed at general schema evaluation, diagnosis, and evolution have evolved within those communities including for example the Chimaera Ontology Evolution Environment and the Prompt environment for mapping schema alignment. General (domain independent) efforts have produced useful research results and numerous tools, however these results have predominantly been generated and used by computer scientists and have been focused largely on information schema integration and diagnosis. More recently semantically-enabled web-centric approaches have emerged that utilize domain knowledge to provide tools and services aimed at natural scientists needs for data fusion. In this talk, we will introduce some foundations for information fusion and provide deployed examples of how these foundations and evolving tools have been and are being used today in natural science domains by domain scientists. Some examples will be provided from deployed virtual observatory settings.

  3. Bulk charges in eleven dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Hawking, Stephen William

    1998-01-01

    Eleven dimensional supergravity has electric type currents arising from the Chern-Simon and anomaly terms in the action. However the bulk charge integrates to zero for asymptotically flat solutions with topological trivial spatial sections. We show that by relaxing the boundary conditions to generalisations of the ALE and ALF boundary conditions in four dimensions one can obtain static solutions with a bulk charge preserving between 1/16 and 1/4 of the supersymmetries. One can introduce membranes with the same sign of charge into these backgrounds. This raises the possibility that these generalized membranes might decay quantum mechanically to leave just a bulk distribution of charge. Alternatively and more probably, a bulk distribution of charge can decay into a collection of singlely charged membranes. Dimensional reductions of these solutions lead to novel representations of extreme black holes in four dimensions with up to four charges. We discuss how the eleven-dimensional Kaluza-Klein monopole wrapped a...

  4. Pixel-Level Domain Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, Donggeun; Kim, Namil; Park, Sunggyun; Paek, Anthony S.; Kweon, In So

    2016-01-01

    We present an image-conditional image generation model. The model transfers an input domain to a target domain in semantic level, and generates the target image in pixel level. To generate realistic target images, we employ the real/fake-discriminator in Generative Adversarial Nets, but also introduce a novel domain-discriminator to make the generated image relevant to the input image. We verify our model through a challenging task of generating a piece of clothing from an input image of a dr...

  5. Partial domain wall partition functions

    OpenAIRE

    Foda, O.; Wheeler, M.

    2012-01-01

    We consider six-vertex model configurations on an n-by-N lattice, n =< N, that satisfy a variation on domain wall boundary conditions that we define and call "partial domain wall boundary conditions". We obtain two expressions for the corresponding "partial domain wall partition function", as an (N-by-N)-determinant and as an (n-by-n)-determinant. The latter was first obtained by I Kostov. We show that the two determinants are equal, as expected from the fact that they are partition functions...

  6. Wavefield extrapolation in pseudodepth domain

    KAUST Repository

    Ma, Xuxin

    2013-02-01

    Wavefields are commonly computed in the Cartesian coordinate frame. Its efficiency is inherently limited due to spatial oversampling in deep layers, where the velocity is high and wavelengths are long. To alleviate this computational waste due to uneven wavelength sampling, we convert the vertical axis of the conventional domain from depth to vertical time or pseudodepth. This creates a nonorthognal Riemannian coordinate system. Isotropic and anisotropic wavefields can be extrapolated in the new coordinate frame with improved efficiency and good consistency with Cartesian domain extrapolation results. Prestack depth migrations are also evaluated based on the wavefield extrapolation in the pseudodepth domain.© 2013 Society of Exploration Geophysicists. All rights reserved.

  7. Directional charge separation in isolated organic semiconductor crystalline nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    Labastide, J. A.; Thompson, H. B.; Marques, S.R.; Colella, N. S.; Briseno, A. L.; M.D. Barnes

    2016-01-01

    One of the fundamental design paradigms in organic photovoltaic device engineering is based on the idea that charge separation is an extrinsically driven process requiring an interface for exciton fission. This idea has driven an enormous materials science engineering effort focused on construction of domain sizes commensurate with a nominal exciton diffusion length of order 10 nm. Here, we show that polarized optical excitation of isolated pristine crystalline nanowires of a small molecule n...

  8. Stability of atoms in the anionic domain (Z

    CERN Document Server

    Gil, G

    2013-01-01

    We study the stability and universal behaviour of the ionization energy of N-electron atoms with nuclear charge Z in the anionic domain (Zcharge Z as an arbitrary (non-integral) parameter. HF and CISD ground state energy calculations were performed for systems with N and N-1 electrons to compute the ionization energies for nuclear charges ranging from the neutral atom region to the anionic instability threshold. As testing systems we choose inert gases (He-like, Ne-like and Ar-like isoelectronic sequences) and alkali metals (Li-like, Na-like, K-like sequences). From the results, it is apparent that, for inert gases case, the stability relation with N is completely inverted in the singly-charged anion region (Z=N-1) with respect to the neutral atom region (Z=N), i.e. larger systems are more stable than the smaller ones. We devised a semi-analytical model (inspired by the zero-range forces theory) which lead us to establish the ionization energy dependence on the nuclear charge n...

  9. Charged Dust Aggregate Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2015-11-01

    A proper understanding of the behavior of dust particle aggregates immersed in a complex plasma first requires a knowledge of the basic properties of the system. Among the most important of these are the net electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments on the dust aggregate as well as the manner in which the aggregate interacts with the local electrostatic fields. The formation of elongated, fractal-like aggregates levitating in the sheath electric field of a weakly ionized RF generated plasma discharge has recently been observed experimentally. The resulting data has shown that as aggregates approach one another, they can both accelerate and rotate. At equilibrium, aggregates are observed to levitate with regular spacing, rotating about their long axis aligned parallel to the sheath electric field. Since gas drag tends to slow any such rotation, energy must be constantly fed into the system in order to sustain it. A numerical model designed to analyze this motion provides both the electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments of the aggregate while including the forces due to thermophoresis, neutral gas drag, and the ion wakefield. This model will be used to investigate the ambient conditions leading to the observed interactions. This research is funded by NSF Grant 1414523.

  10. On charge conjugation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The group of automorphisms of the conformal algebra su(2,2) has four components giving the usual four components of symmetries of space time. Only two of these components extend to symmetries of the conformal superalgebra - the identity component and the component which induces the parity transformation, P, on space time. There is no automorphism of the conformal superalgebra which induces T or PT on space time. Automorphisms of su(2,2) which belong to these last two components induce transformations on the conformal superalgebra which reverse the sign of the odd brackets. In this sense conformal supersymmetry prefers CP to CPT. The operator of charge conjugation acting on spinors, as is found in the standard texts, induces conformal inversion and hence a parity transformation on space time, when considered as acting on the odd generators of the conformal superalgebra. Although it commutes with Lorentz transformations, it does not commute with all of su(2,2). We propose a different operator for charge conjugation. Geometrically it is induced by the Hodge star operator acting on twistor space. Under the known realization of conformal states from the inclusion SU(2,2)→Sp(8) and the metaplectic representations, its action on states is induced by the unique (up to phase) antilinear intertwining operator between the two metaplectic representations. It is consistent with the split orthosymplectic algebras and hence, by the inclusion of the superconformal in the orthosymplectic, with the orthosymplectic algebra. (orig.)

  11. Charged Galileon black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babichev, Eugeny; Charmousis, Christos; Hassaine, Mokhtar

    2015-05-01

    We consider an Abelian gauge field coupled to a particular truncation of Horndeski theory. The Galileon field has translation symmetry and couples non minimally both to the metric and the gauge field. When the gauge-scalar coupling is zero the gauge field reduces to a standard Maxwell field. By taking into account the symmetries of the action, we construct charged black hole solutions. Allowing the scalar field to softly break symmetries of spacetime we construct black holes where the scalar field is regular on the black hole event horizon. Some of these solutions can be interpreted as the equivalent of Reissner-Nordstrom black holes of scalar tensor theories with a non trivial scalar field. A self tuning black hole solution found previously is extended to the presence of dyonic charge without affecting whatsoever the self tuning of a large positive cosmological constant. Finally, for a general shift invariant scalar tensor theory we demonstrate that the scalar field Ansatz and method we employ are mathematically compatible with the field equations. This opens up the possibility for novel searches of hairy black holes in a far more general setting of Horndeski theory.

  12. Charged Galileon black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Babichev, Eugeny; Hassaine, Mokhtar

    2015-01-01

    We consider an Abelian gauge field coupled to a particular truncation of Horndeski theory. The Galileon field has translation symmetry and couples non minimally both to the metric and the gauge field. When the gauge-scalar coupling is zero the gauge field reduces to a standard Maxwell field. By taking into account the symmetries of the action, we construct charged black hole solutions. Allowing the scalar field to softly break symmetries of spacetime we construct black holes where the scalar field is regular on the black hole event horizon. Some of these solutions can be interpreted as the equivalent of Reissner-Nordstrom black holes of scalar tensor theories with a non trivial scalar field. A self tuning black hole solution found previously is extended to the presence of dyonic charge without affecting whatsoever the self tuning of a large positive cosmological constant. Finally, for a general shift invariant scalar tensor theory we demonstrate that the scalar field Ansatz and method we employ are mathematic...

  13. Battery charging control methods, electric vehicle charging methods, battery charging apparatuses and rechargeable battery systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuffner, Francis K.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael C. W.; Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Pratt, Richard M.

    2012-05-22

    Battery charging control methods, electric vehicle charging methods, battery charging apparatuses and rechargeable battery systems. According to one aspect, a battery charging control method includes accessing information regarding a presence of at least one of a surplus and a deficiency of electrical energy upon an electrical power distribution system at a plurality of different moments in time, and using the information, controlling an adjustment of an amount of the electrical energy provided from the electrical power distribution system to a rechargeable battery to charge the rechargeable battery.

  14. Haloferax volcanii archaeosortase is required for motility, mating, and C-terminal processing of the S-layer glycoprotein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halim, Mohd F.; Pfeiffer, Friedhelm; Zou, James; Frisch, Andrew; Haft, Daniel H.; Wu, Si; Tolic, Nikola; Brewer, Heather M.; Payne, Samuel H.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Pohlschroder, Mechthild

    2013-06-01

    Cell surfaces are decorated by a variety of proteins that facilitate interactions with their environments and support cell stability.These secreted proteins are anchored to the cell by mechanisms that are diverse, and, in archaea, poorly understood. Recently published in silico data suggest that in some species a subset of secreted euryarchaeal proteins, which includes the S-­‐layer glycoprotein, is processed and covalently linked tot he cell membrane by enzymes referred to as archaeosortases. In silico work led to the proposal that an independent, sortase-like system for proteolysis-coupled carboxy-terminal lipid modification exists in bacteria (exosortase) and archaea (archaeosortase). Here, we provide the first in vivo characterization of an archaeosortase in the haloarchaeal model organism Haloferax volcanii. Deletion of the artA gene (HVO_0915) resulted in multiple biological phenotypes: (a) poor growth, especially under low-salt conditions, (b) alterations in cell shape and the S-layer, (c) impaired motility, suppressors of which still exhibit poor growth, and (d) impaired conjugation. We studied one of the ArtA substrates, the S-layer glycoprotein, using detailed proteomic analysis. While the carboxy-terminal region of S-layer glycoproteins, consisting of a threonine-rich O-glycosylated region followed by a hydrophobic transmembrane helix, has been notoriously resistant to any proteomic peptide identification, we were able to identify two overlapping peptides from the transmembrane domain present in the ΔartA strain but not in the wild-type strain. This clearly shows that ArtA is involved in carboxy-terminal posttranslational processing of the S-layer glycoprotein. As it is known from previous studies that a lipid is covalently attached to the carboxy-terminal region of the S-layer glycoprotein, our data strongly support the conclusion that archaeosortase functions analogously to sortase, mediating proteolysis-coupled, covalent cell surface attachment.

  15. Charging regime of pur spinel studied by secondary electron emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boughariou, A., E-mail: aicha_boughariou@yahoo.fr [LaMaCoP, Université de Sfax pour le sud, Faculté des Sciences, 3038 Sfax (Tunisia); Kallel, A. [LaMaCoP, Université de Sfax pour le sud, Faculté des Sciences, 3038 Sfax (Tunisia); Blaise, G. [LPS, Université Paris-Sud XI, Batiment 510, Orsay 91405 (France)

    2013-04-01

    Insulators are currently used in high technological devices. They are chosen because of their electrical properties of insulation and their thermal properties. It is well known that the presence of space charge in an insulator is correlated with an electric breakdown. Charging phenomena of insulator were studied thanks to a scanning electron microscope (SEM) which allows the injection of few electrons doses in a large domain of energies. SEM permits also the measurements of the secondary electron emission and the induced current created in the sample holder by the charges generated in the sample. The results showed that the secondary electron emission yield (SEE) σ is a very sensitive parameter to characterize the charging state of an insulator. In this work we investigate the charging effect of insulator surfaces like pur spinel (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) during 1.1, 5 and 15 keV. The results showed that the fundamental parameter controlling the charging kinetic is the current density J{sub 0}. At low energies 1.1 and 5 keV, two different kinds of self-regulated regime (σ=1) were observed as a function of current density. At 15 keV energy, the electron emission appears to be stimulated by the current density, due to the Poole–Frenkel effect.

  16. Light-induced space-charge fields for the structuration of dielectric materials; Lichtinduzierte Raumladungsfelder zur Strukturierung dielektrischer Materialien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggert, H.A.

    2006-11-15

    Light-induced space-charge fields in lithium-niobate crystals are used for patterning of dielectric materials. This includes tailored ferroelectric domains in the bulk of the crystal, different sorts of micro and nanoparticles on a crystal surface, as well as poling of electrooptic chromophores. A stochastical model is introduced, which can describe the spatial inhomogeneous domain inversion. (orig.)

  17. Engineered CH2 domains (nanoantibodies).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Dimiter S

    2009-01-01

    Currently, almost all FDA approved therapeutic antibodies (except ReoPro, Lucentis and Cimzia which are Fabs), and the vast majority of those in clinical trials are full-size antibodies mostly in IgG1 format of about 150 kDa size. A fundamental problem for such large molecules is their poor penetration into tissues (e.g., solid tumors) and poor or absent binding to regions on the surface of some molecules (e.g., on the HIV envelope glycoprotein) which are fully accessible only by molecules of smaller size. Therefore, much work especially during the last decade has been aimed at developing novel scaffolds of much smaller size and high stability. Here I briefly describe a proposition to use the immunoglobulin (Ig) constant CH2 domain (CH3 for IgE and IgM) as a scaffold. CH2 is critical for the Ig effector functions. Isolated CH2 is stable monomer in contrast to all other constant domains and most of the variable domains. CH2 and engineered CH2 domains with improved stability can be used as scaffolds for construction of libraries containing diverse binders to various antigens. Such binders based on a CH2 scaffold could also confer some effector functions. Because the CH2 domains are the smallest independently folded antibody domains that can be engineered to contain simultaneously antigen-binding sites and binding sites mediating effector and stability functions, and to distinguish them from domain antibodies which are used to denote engineered VH or VL domains or nanobodies which are used to denote camelid VHH, I termed them nanoantibodies (nAbs). PMID:20046570

  18. Charge Breeding of Radioactive Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Wenander, F J C

    2013-01-01

    Charge breeding is a technique to increase the charge state of ions, in many cases radioactive ions. The singly charged radioactive ions, produced in an isotope separator on-line facility, and extracted with a low kinetic energy of some tens of keV, are injected into a charge breeder, where the charge state is increased to Q. The transformed ions are either directed towards a dedicated experiment requiring highly charged ions, or post-accelerated to higher beam energies. In this paper the physics processes involved in the production of highly charged ions will be introduced, and the injection and extraction beam parameters of the charge breeder defined. A description of the three main charge-breeding methods is given, namely: electron stripping in gas jet or foil; external ion injection into an electron-beam ion source/trap (EBIS/T); and external ion injection into an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). In addition, some preparatory devices for charge breeding and practical beam delivery aspects ...

  19. Adsorption of highly charged Gaussian polyelectrolytes to oppositely charged surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Dutta, Sandipan; Jho, Y. S.

    2015-01-01

    In many biological processes highly charged biomolecules are adsorbed into oppositely charged surfaces of macroions and membranes. They form strongly correlated structures close to the surface which can not be explained by the conventional Poisson-Boltzmann theory. Many of the flexible biomolecules can be described by Gaussian polymers. In this work strong coupling theory is used to study the adsorption of highly charged Gaussian polyelectrolytes. Two cases of adsorptions are considered, when...

  20. Charge Transfer and Charge Transport on the Double Helix

    OpenAIRE

    N. P. Armitage; Briman, M.; Gruner, G.

    2003-01-01

    We present a short review of various experiments that measure charge transfer and charge transport in DNA. Some general comments are made on the possible connection between 'chemistry-style' charge transfer experiments that probe fluorescence quenching and remote oxidative damage and 'physics-style' measurements that measure transport properties as defined typically in the solid-state. We then describe measurements performed by our group on the millimeter wave response of DNA. By measuring ov...

  1. New Results on Charged Compact Boson Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Kulshreshtha, Daya Shankar

    2016-01-01

    In this work we present some new results which we have obtained in a study of the phase diagram of charged compact boson stars in the theory involving massive complex scalar fields coupled to the U(1) gauge field and gravity in a conical potential in the presence of a cosmological constant $\\Lambda$ which we treat as a free parameter taking positive and negative values and thereby allowing us to study the theory in the de Sitter and Anti de Sitter spaces respectively. In our studies, we obtain four bifurcation points (possibility of more bifurcation points being not ruled out) in the de Sitter region. We present a detailed discussion of the various regions in our phase diagram with respect to four bifurcation points. Our theory is seen to have rich physics in a particular domain for positive values of $\\Lambda$ which is consistent with the accelerated expansion of the universe.

  2. New results on charged compact boson stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Kulshreshtha, Usha; Kulshreshtha, Daya Shankar

    2016-05-01

    In this work we present some new results that we have obtained in a study of the phase diagram of charged compact boson stars in the theory involving massive complex scalar fields coupled to the U(1) gauge field and gravity in a conical potential in the presence of a cosmological constant Λ , which we treat as a free parameter taking positive and negative values and thereby allowing us to study the theory in de Sitter and anti de Sitter spaces, respectively. We obtain four bifurcation points (the possibility of more bifurcation points not being ruled out) in the de Sitter region. We present a detailed discussion of the various regions in our phase diagram with respect to four bifurcation points. Our theory is seen to have rich physics in a particular domain for positive values of Λ , which is consistent with the accelerated expansion of the Universe.

  3. Measurement of the incremental charge of a superconducting island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have measured the total charge of a superconducting electrode or 'island' which is free to exchange electrons with a metallic ground through a tunnel junction and which is capacitively coupled to a voltage source at potential U. We find that the island charge varies stepwise with U, the incremental charge being equal to 2e inside a low-temperature, low-magnetic-field domain, and to e elsewhere. In this latter case, steps corresponding to different parities of the number of electrons inside the island have unequal lenghts. The odd-even free energy difference deduced from the asymmetry of the steps is well explained by the theory of dirty superconductors. (orig.)

  4. Ac Hybrid Charge Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalini S. Durgam

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the primary needs for socio-economic development in any nation in the world is the provision of reliable electricity supply systems with lower carbon footprint levels. The purpose of this work is the development of a hybrid Power system that harnesses the renewable energy in sun and electricity to generate electricity. The working model can able to run on dual mode- solar and electricity. It can also be driven independently either by solar or electricity. The battery can be charge from solar panel (40W or by power supply. The household single phase A.C. power supply of 230V is converted into 12V D.C. using step down transformer and rectifying circuit. The working model can achieve energy saving, low carbon emission, environmental protection for the upcoming future of human life.

  5. Battery charging stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergey, M.

    1997-12-01

    This paper discusses the concept of battery charging stations (BCSs), designed to service rural owners of battery power sources. Many such power sources now are transported to urban areas for recharging. A BCS provides the opportunity to locate these facilities closer to the user, is often powered by renewable sources, or hybrid systems, takes advantage of economies of scale, and has the potential to provide lower cost of service, better service, and better cost recovery than other rural electrification programs. Typical systems discussed can service 200 to 1200 people, and consist of stations powered by photovoltaics, wind/PV, wind/diesel, or diesel only. Examples of installed systems are presented, followed by cost figures, economic analysis, and typical system design and performance numbers.

  6. Stable Charged Cosmic Strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the quantum stabilization of a cosmic string by a heavy fermion doublet in a reduced version of the standard model. We show that charged strings, obtained by populating fermionic bound state levels, become stable if the electroweak bosons are coupled to a fermion that is less than twice as heavy as the top quark. This result suggests that extraordinarily large fermion masses or unrealistic couplings are not required to bind a cosmic string in the standard model. Numerically we find the most favorable string profile to be a simple trough in the Higgs vacuum expectation value of radius ≅10-18 m. The vacuum remains stable in our model, because neutral strings are not energetically favored.

  7. Stable charged cosmic strings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, H; Quandt, M; Graham, N

    2011-03-11

    We study the quantum stabilization of a cosmic string by a heavy fermion doublet in a reduced version of the standard model. We show that charged strings, obtained by populating fermionic bound state levels, become stable if the electroweak bosons are coupled to a fermion that is less than twice as heavy as the top quark. This result suggests that extraordinarily large fermion masses or unrealistic couplings are not required to bind a cosmic string in the standard model. Numerically we find the most favorable string profile to be a simple trough in the Higgs vacuum expectation value of radius ≈10(-18)  m. The vacuum remains stable in our model, because neutral strings are not energetically favored. PMID:21469786

  8. Explosive bulk charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jacob Lee

    2015-04-21

    An explosive bulk charge, including: a first contact surface configured to be selectively disposed substantially adjacent to a structure or material; a second end surface configured to selectively receive a detonator; and a curvilinear side surface joining the first contact surface and the second end surface. The first contact surface, the second end surface, and the curvilinear side surface form a bi-truncated hemispherical structure. The first contact surface, the second end surface, and the curvilinear side surface are formed from an explosive material. Optionally, the first contact surface and the second end surface each have a substantially circular shape. Optionally, the first contact surface and the second end surface consist of planar structures that are aligned substantially parallel or slightly tilted with respect to one another. The curvilinear side surface has one of a smooth curved geometry, an elliptical geometry, and a parabolic geometry.

  9. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation of binary charged lipid membranes: Phase separation and morphological dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ito, Hiroaki; Shimokawa, Naofumi

    2016-01-01

    Biomembranes, which are mainly composed of neutral and charged lipids, exhibit a large variety of functional structures and dynamics. Here, we report a coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the phase separation and morphological dynamics in charged lipid bilayer vesicles. The screened long-range electrostatic repulsion among charged head groups delays or inhibits the lateral phase separation in charged vesicles compared with neutral vesicles, suggesting the transition of the phase-separation mechanism from spinodal decomposition to nucleation or homogeneous dispersion. Moreover, the electrostatic repulsion causes morphological changes, such as pore formation, and further transformations into disk, string, and bicelle structures, which are spatiotemporally coupled to the lateral segregation of charged lipids. Based on our coarse-grained MD simulation, we propose a plausible mechanism of pore formation at the molecular level. The pore formation in a charged-lipid-rich domain is initiated by the p...

  10. Nanodosimetry of charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In last year's annual report, the authors described the development of an ultra-miniature counter (UMC), described some of its physical characteristics, and presented some first measurements with this counter of microdosimetric spectra for neutrons (15 MeV) and photons (137Cs). It remains to investigate in more detail the operational characteristics of the UMC and if possible, to make a comparison of relevant physical parameters such as gain and multiplication radius with the Segur theory. In order to accomplish these objectives, it is necessary to build a wall-less version of the UMC, which will be amenable to calibration and investigation with collimated beams of charged particles. The design of such a counter has been worked out in principle. Investigations into the optimal design of electrode structures and dimensions are being carried out at present. The main problem occurs with the design of the grid structure which is required to define the outer boundary of the collecting volume. Our initial attempts would make it appear at present that a counter of 1 to 1.5 mm diameter is feasible. This should be more than adequate to provide an appropriately wall-less counter within a reasonable size cavity. It will probably be about a year before a working counter can be produced. In the interim, it is possible to make some initial efforts into the investigation of operational characteristics of a wall-less UMC by making use of similar design, but at a somewhat larger size. These first attempts at measurement of charged particle microdosimetric spectra at nanometer site provide added evidence that these counters can yield useful microdosimetric data at far smaller site sizes than heretofore attempted. They also provide added incentive and encouragement for development of wall-less UMC

  11. 12 CFR 226.4 - Finance charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Finance charge. 226.4 Section 226.4 Banks and... LENDING (REGULATION Z) General § 226.4 Finance charge. (a) Definition. The finance charge is the cost of...) Charges by third parties. The finance charge includes fees and amounts charged by someone other than...

  12. Charge contribution to patch-charged microparticle adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallabh, Chaitanya Krishna Prasad; Vahdat, Armin Saeedi; Cetinkaya, Cetin

    2014-11-01

    Microparticle adhesion influenced by electrostatic charge has been a significant research interest for over past three decades or so in a wide spectrum of areas of interest from manufacturing (electrophotography, powder technology, metallurgy, and semi-conductor manufacturing) to natural phenomena (desert sandstorms and northern lights (auroras)). However, over the years, as a result of the strong discrepancies between the experimental adhesion measurements data and theoretical predictions, some key issues regarding the contributors of adhesion forces in charged microparticles and the nature of surface charge distribution still remain unresolved. In the current work, a non-contact ultrasonic approach is presented and employed for understanding the nature of charge distribution on a single microparticle and determining the effect of electrostatic charge on its adhesion in a non-invasive manner. From the vibrational spectra of the charged particle response to the ultrasonic substrate oscillations under various electrostatic loading conditions, three distinct shifting patterns of vibrational (rocking) resonance frequencies are observed for each level of applied substrate surface voltage, implying an un-symmetric force field on the particle, thus depicting non-uniform non-symmetric surface charge distribution on its surface. Also, a simple mathematical model was presented and employed for predicting the equivalent bulk charge on a single microparticle (toner) from resonance frequency shifts. In summary, it is found that the charge levels reported here are consistent with the previously published data, and it is demonstrated that, in a non-invasive manner, non-uniform charge distribution on a single microparticle can be observed and its total charge can be predicted.

  13. Exact solutions of charged wormhole

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sung-Won; Lee, Hyunjoo

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, the backreaction to the traversable Lorentzian wormhole spacetime by the scalar field or electric charge is considered to find the exact solutions. The charges play the role of the additional matter to the static wormhole which is already constructed by the exotic matter. The stability conditions for the wormhole with scalar field and electric charge are found from the positiveness and flareness for the wormhole shape function.

  14. Charging graphene nanoribbon quantum dots

    OpenAIRE

    Żebrowski, D. P.; B. Szafran

    2015-01-01

    We describe charging a quantum dot induced electrostatically within a semiconducting graphene nanoribbon by electrons or holes. The applied model is based on a tight-binding approach with the electron-electron interaction introduced by a mean field local spin density approximation. The numerical approach accounts for the charge of all the $p_z$ electrons and screening of external potentials by states near the charge neutrality point. Both a homogenous ribbon and a graphene flake embedded with...

  15. Solar Charged Stand Alone Inverter

    OpenAIRE

    M.Vasugi; Prof R.Jayaraman

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with solar powered stand alone inverter which converts the variable dc output of a photovoltaic solar panel into ac that can be fed to loads. Stand alone inverters are used in systems where the inverter get its energy from batteries charged by photo voltaic arrays. A charge controller limits the rate at which electric current is added to or drawn from electric batteries. This charge discharge controller is needed to prevent the battery from being overcharged o...

  16. Engineering charge ordering into multiferroicity

    OpenAIRE

    He, Xu; Jin, Kui-juan

    2016-01-01

    Multiferroic materials have attracted great interests but are rare in nature. In many transitional metal oxides, charge ordering and magnetic ordering coexist, so that a method of engineering charge-ordered materials into ferroelectric materials would lead to a large class of multiferroic materials. We propose a strategy for designing new ferroelectric or even multiferroic materials by inserting a spacing layer into each two layers of charge-ordered materials and artificially making a superla...

  17. Domain Decomposition Solvers for Frequency-Domain Finite Element Equations

    KAUST Repository

    Copeland, Dylan

    2010-10-05

    The paper is devoted to fast iterative solvers for frequency-domain finite element equations approximating linear and nonlinear parabolic initial boundary value problems with time-harmonic excitations. Switching from the time domain to the frequency domain allows us to replace the expensive time-integration procedure by the solution of a simple linear elliptic system for the amplitudes belonging to the sine- and to the cosine-excitation or a large nonlinear elliptic system for the Fourier coefficients in the linear and nonlinear case, respectively. The fast solution of the corresponding linear and nonlinear system of finite element equations is crucial for the competitiveness of this method. © 2011 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  18. Charge transferred in brush discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talarek, M.; Kacprzyk, R.

    2015-10-01

    Electrostatic discharges from surfaces of plastic materials can be a source of ignition, when appear in explosive atmospheres. Incendivity of electrostatic discharges can be estimated using the transferred charge test. In the case of brush discharges not all the energy stored at the tested sample is released and the effective surface charge density (or surface potential) crater is observed after the discharge. Simplified model, enabling calculation of a charge transferred during electrostatic brush discharge, was presented. Comparison of the results obtained from the simplified model and from direct measurements of transferred charge are presented in the paper.

  19. Butterflies with rotation and charge

    CERN Document Server

    Reynolds, Alan P

    2016-01-01

    We explore the butterfly effect for black holes with rotation or charge. We perturb rotating BTZ and charged black holes in 2+1 dimensions by adding a small perturbation on one asymptotic region, described by a shock wave in the spacetime, and explore the effect of this shock wave on the length of geodesics through the wormhole and hence on correlation functions. We find the effect of the perturbation grows exponentially at a rate controlled by the temperature; dependence on the angular momentum or charge does not appear explicitly. We comment on issues affecting the extension to higher-dimensional charged black holes.

  20. Selective effects of charge on G protein activation by FSH-receptor residues 551-555 and 650-653.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, P; Deziel, M R; Reichert, L E

    1995-01-01

    Two cytosolic regions of the rat testicular FSH receptor (FSHR), residues 533-555 and 645-653, have been identified as G protein-coupling domains. We localized the activity in these domains to their C-terminal sequences, residues 551-555 (KIAKR, net charge +3) and 650-653 (RKSH, net charge +3), and examined the effects of charge on G protein activation by the C-terminal peptides, using synthetic analogs containing additions, through alanine (A) linkages, of arginine (R, +), histidine (H, +) or both. RA-KIAKR (net charge +4) mimicked the effect of FSHR-(551-555) on guanine nucleotide exchange in rat testis membranes, but reduced its ability to inhibit FSH-stimulated estradiol biosynthesis in cultured rat Sertoli cells. Further increasing net charge by the addition of H (HARA-KIAKR, net charge +5) increased guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) binding, but eliminated FSHR-(551-555) effects on FSH-stimulated steroidogenesis. HA-RKSH (net charge +4) significantly inhibited guanine nucleotide exchange in rat testis membranes, but stimulated basal and potentiated FSH-induced estradiol biosynthesis in cultured rat Sertoli cells. Addition of two H residues (HAHA-RKSH, net charge +5) restored GTP binding and further potentiated basal and FSH-stimulated steroidogenesis. These results suggest that positive charges in G protein-coupling domains of the FSHR play a role in modulating G protein activation and postbinding effects of FSH, such as steroidogenesis. PMID:8589550

  1. Domain patterning by electron beam of MgO doped lithium niobate covered by resist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shur, V. Ya., E-mail: vladimir.shur@urfu.ru; Chezganov, D. S.; Akhmatkhanov, A. R. [Institute of Natural Sciences, Ural Federal University, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Labfer Ltd., 620014 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, D. K. [Institute of Natural Sciences, Ural Federal University, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2015-06-08

    Periodical domain structuring by focused electron beam irradiation of MgO-doped lithium niobate (MgOCLN) single crystalline plate covered by resist layer was studied both experimentally and by computer simulation. The dependences of domain size on the charge dose and distance between isolated domains were measured. It has been shown that the quality of periodical domain pattern depends on the thickness of resist layer and electron energy. The experimentally obtained periodic domain structures have been divided into four types. The irradiation parameters for the most uniform patterning were obtained experimentally. It was shown by computer simulation that the space charge slightly touching the crystal surface produced the maximum value of electric field at the resist/LN interface thus resulting in the best pattern quality. The obtained knowledge allowed us to optimize the poling process and to make the periodical domain patterns in 1-mm-thick wafers with an area up to 1 × 5 mm{sup 2} and a period of 6.89 μm for green light second harmonic generation. Spatial distribution of the efficiency of light frequency conversion confirmed the high homogeneity of the tailored domain patterns.

  2. Domain wall conductivity in semiconducting hexagonal ferroelectric TbMnO3 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D. J.; Connell, J. G.; Seo, S. S. A.; Gruverman, A.

    2016-04-01

    Although enhanced conductivity of ferroelectric domain boundaries has been found in BiFeO3 and Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 films as well as hexagonal rare-earth manganite single crystals, the mechanism of the domain wall conductivity is still under debate. Using conductive atomic force microscopy, we observe enhanced conductance at the electrically-neutral domain walls in semiconducting hexagonal ferroelectric TbMnO3 thin films where the structure and polarization direction are strongly constrained along the c-axis. This result indicates that domain wall conductivity in ferroelectric rare-earth manganites is not limited to charged domain walls. We show that the observed conductivity in the TbMnO3 films is governed by a single conduction mechanism, namely, the back-to-back Schottky diodes tuned by the segregation of defects.

  3. Athermal domain-wall creep near a ferroelectric quantum critical point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Fumitaka; Minami, Nao; Horiuchi, Sachio; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Ferroelectric domain walls are typically stationary because of the presence of a pinning potential. Nevertheless, thermally activated, irreversible creep motion can occur under a moderate electric field, thereby underlying rewritable and non-volatile memory applications. Conversely, as the temperature decreases, the occurrence of creep motion becomes less likely and eventually impossible under realistic electric-field magnitudes. Here we show that such frozen ferroelectric domain walls recover their mobility under the influence of quantum fluctuations. Nonlinear permittivity and polarization-retention measurements of an organic charge-transfer complex reveal that ferroelectric domain-wall creep occurs via an athermal process when the system is tuned close to a pressure-driven ferroelectric quantum critical point. Despite the heavy masses of material building blocks such as molecules, the estimated effective mass of the domain wall is comparable to the proton mass, indicating the realization of a ferroelectric domain wall with a quantum-particle nature near the quantum critical point. PMID:26880041

  4. Magnetic domain wall gratings for magnetization reversal tuning and confined dynamic mode localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trützschler, Julia; Sentosun, Kadir; Mozooni, Babak; Mattheis, Roland; McCord, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    High density magnetic domain wall gratings are imprinted in ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic thin films by local ion irradiation by which alternating head-to-tail-to-head-to-tail and head-to-head-to-tail-to-tail spatially overlapping domain wall networks are formed. Unique magnetic domain processes result from the interaction of anchored domain walls. Non-linear magnetization response is introduced by the laterally distributed magnetic anisotropy phases. The locally varying magnetic charge distribution gives rise to localized and guided magnetization spin-wave modes directly constrained by the narrow domain wall cores. The exchange coupled multiphase material structure leads to unprecedented static and locally modified dynamic magnetic material properties. PMID:27487941

  5. Interactions of charged dust particles in clouds of charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundienkov, Vladimir; Yakovlenko, Sergey

    2004-03-01

    Two charged dust particles inside a cloud of charges are considered as Debye atoms forming a Debye molecule. Cassini coordinates are used for the numerical solution of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation for the charged cloud. The electric force acting on a dust particle by the other dust particle was determined by integrating the electrostatic pressure on the surface of the dust particle. It is shown that attractive forces appear when the following two conditions are satisfied. First, the average distance between dust particles should be approximately equal to two Debye radii. Second, attraction takes place when similar charges are concentrated predominantly on the dust particles. If the particles carry a small fraction of total charge of the same polarity, repulsion between the particles takes place at all distances. We apply our results to the experiments with thermoemission plasma and to the experiments with nuclear-pumped plasma.

  6. Local charge trapping in conjugated polymers resolved by scanning Kelvin probe microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Hallam, T.; Lee, M.; N. Zhao; Nandhakumar, I; Kemerink, M Martijn; Heeney, M.; McCulloch, I; Sirringhaus, H.

    2009-01-01

    The microstructure of conjugated polymers is heterogeneous on the length scale of individual polymer chains, but little is known about how this affects their electronic properties. Here we use scanning Kelvin probe microscopy with resolution-enhancing carbon nanotube tips to study charge transport on a 100 nm scale in a chain-extended, semicrystalline conjugated polymer. We show that the disordered grain boundaries between crystalline domains constitute preferential charge trapping sites and ...

  7. Charge Injection, Charge Trapping and Charge Transfer in Quantum-Dot Solids

    OpenAIRE

    Boehme, S.C.

    2015-01-01

    This study reports on fundamental processes in Quantum-Dot Solids, after light absorption. Transient Absorption and Time-resolved Photoluminescence spectrocopy reveal the dynamics of charge transfer and charge trapping processes. Typically, both occur on a picosecond time scale and compete with each other. We find that the efficiency of these processes depends on the Fermi level in the Quantum-Dot Solid. The latter can be controlled electrochemically, via charge injection into the Quantum-Dot...

  8. Domain walls at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is suggested that the phase transition of lambda phi 4 theory as a function of temperature coincides with the spontaneous appearance of domain walls. Based on one-loop calculations, T sub(c) = 4M/√ lambda is estimated as the temperature for these domains to because energetically favored, to be compared with T sub(c) = 4.9M/√ lambda from effective potential calculations (which are performed directly in the broken phase). Domain walls, as well as other Types of fluctuations, disorder the system above T sub(c), leading to =0. The critical exponent for the specific heat above T sub(c) is computed; and α=2/3 + 0 (√ lambda) is obtained. (Author)

  9. Learning processes across knowledge domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall-Andersen, Lene Bjerg; Broberg, Ole

    2014-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to shed light on the problematics of learning across knowledge boundaries in organizational settings. The paper specifically explores learning processes that emerge, when a new knowledge domain is introduced into an existing organizational practice...... informed by selected perspectives on learning processes and boundary processes was applied on three illustrative vignettes to illuminate learning potentials and shortcomings in boundary processes. Findings - In the engineering consultancy, it was found that while learning did occur in the consultancy...... between knowledge domains. Research limitations/implications - The finding in this paper is based on a single case study: hence, the findings' generalizability may be limited. Practical implications - The paper argues that learning across knowledge domains needs various forms of supporting initiatives...

  10. Improving the performance of DomainDiscovery of protein domain boundary assignment using inter-domain linker index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zomaya Albert Y

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge of protein domain boundaries is critical for the characterisation and understanding of protein function. The ability to identify domains without the knowledge of the structure – by using sequence information only – is an essential step in many types of protein analyses. In this present study, we demonstrate that the performance of DomainDiscovery is improved significantly by including the inter-domain linker index value for domain identification from sequence-based information. Improved DomainDiscovery uses a Support Vector Machine (SVM approach and a unique training dataset built on the principle of consensus among experts in defining domains in protein structure. The SVM was trained using a PSSM (Position Specific Scoring Matrix, secondary structure, solvent accessibility information and inter-domain linker index to detect possible domain boundaries for a target sequence. Results Improved DomainDiscovery is compared with other methods by benchmarking against a structurally non-redundant dataset and also CASP5 targets. Improved DomainDiscovery achieves 70% accuracy for domain boundary identification in multi-domains proteins. Conclusion Improved DomainDiscovery compares favourably to the performance of other methods and excels in the identification of domain boundaries for multi-domain proteins as a result of introducing support vector machine with benchmark_2 dataset.

  11. Ultrafast transient spectroscopy of nano-domains of polymer/fullerene blend for organic photovoltaic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sanjeev; Pandit, Bill; Hukic-Markosian, Golda; Basel, Tek P.; Valy Vardeny, Z.; Li, Sergey; Laird, Darin

    2012-12-01

    We measured the picoseconds (ps) transient photomodulation (PM) dynamics of photoexcitations in blends of regio-regular poly(3-hexyl-thiophene) [RR-P3HT] (donors-D) and indene-C60 bisadduct (fullerene derivative) [ICBA] (acceptor-A) that phase-separate into D- and A-nano-domains, in a broad spectral range from 0.25 to 2.5 eV; in comparison with steady state PM spectra. We correlate our measurements with organic photovoltaic solar cell performance made from the same D and A materials. In D-A blends of RR-P3HT/ICBA with (1.2:1) weight ratio having solar cell power conversion efficiency of ˜5.1%, we found that although the intrachain excitons in the polymer nano-domains decay within ˜10 ps, no charge polarons are generated on their expense up to ˜1 ns. Instead, there is a built-up of charge-transfer (CT) excitons at the D-A domain interfaces that occurs with the same kinetics as the exciton decay. The CT excitons dissociate into separate polarons in the D- and A-nano-domains at a much later time (≫1 ns). This "two-step" charge photogeneration process is typical in organic bulk heterojunction cells. Our results emphasize the important role of the CT state in generating free charge polarons in organic solar cells.

  12. Time domain simulations of preliminary breakdown pulses in natural lightning

    CERN Document Server

    Carlson, B E; Bitzer, P; Christian, H

    2016-01-01

    Lightning discharge is a complicated process with relevant physical scales spanning many orders of magnitude. In an effort to understand the electrodynamics of lightning and connect physical properties of the channel to observed behavior, we construct a simulation of charge and current flow on a narrow conducting channel embedded in three-dimensional space with the time domain electric field integral equation, the method of moments, and the thin-wire approximation. The method includes approximate treatment of resistance evolution due to lightning channel heating and the corona sheath of charge surrounding the lightning channel. Focusing our attention on preliminary breakdown in natural lightning by simulating stepwise channel extension with a simplified geometry, our simulation reproduces the broad features observed in data collected with the Huntsville Alabama Marx Meter Array. Some deviations in pulse shape details are evident, suggesting future work focusing on the detailed properties of the stepping mecha...

  13. Frequency Domain Storage Ring Method for Electric Dipole Moment Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Talman, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Precise measurement of the electric dipole moments (EDM) of fundamental charged particles would provide a significant probe of physics beyond the standard model. Any measurably large EDM would imply violation of both time reversal and parity conservation, with implications for the matter/anti-matter imbalance of the universe, not currently understood within the standard model. A frequency domain (i.e. difference of frequencies) method is proposed for measuring the EDM of electrons or protons or, with modifications, deuterons. Anticipated precision (i.e. reproducibility) is $10^{-30}\\,$e-cm for the proton EDM, with comparable accuracy (i.e. including systematic error). This would be almost six orders of magnitude smaller than the present upper limit, and will provide a stringent test of the standard model. Resonant polarimetry, made practical by the large polarized beam charge, is the key (most novel, least proven) element of the method. Along with the phase-locked, rolling polarization "Koop spin wheel," reso...

  14. Quantum charged rigid membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The early Dirac proposal to model the electron as a charged membrane is reviewed. A rigidity term, instead of the natural membrane tension, involving linearly the extrinsic curvature of the worldvolume swept out by the membrane is considered in the action modeling the bubble in the presence of an electromagnetic field. We set up this model as a genuine second-order derivative theory by considering a non-trivial boundary term which plays a relevant part in our formulation. The Lagrangian in question is linear in the bubble acceleration and by means of the Ostrogradski-Hamiltonian approach, we observed that the theory comprises the management of both first- and second-class constraints. We thus show that our second-order approach is robust allowing for a proper quantization. We found an effective quantum potential which permits us to compute bounded states for the system. We comment on the possibility of describing brane world universes by invoking this kind of second-order correction terms.

  15. Quantum charged rigid membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordero, Ruben [Departamento de Fisica, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas del I.P.N., Unidad Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Edificio 9, 07738 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Molgado, Alberto [Unidad Academica de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Zacatecas Zac. (Mexico); Rojas, Efrain, E-mail: cordero@esfm.ipn.mx, E-mail: amolgado@fisica.uaz.edu.mx, E-mail: efrojas@uv.mx [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Fisica e Inteligencia Artificial, Universidad Veracruzana, 91000 Xalapa, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2011-03-21

    The early Dirac proposal to model the electron as a charged membrane is reviewed. A rigidity term, instead of the natural membrane tension, involving linearly the extrinsic curvature of the worldvolume swept out by the membrane is considered in the action modeling the bubble in the presence of an electromagnetic field. We set up this model as a genuine second-order derivative theory by considering a non-trivial boundary term which plays a relevant part in our formulation. The Lagrangian in question is linear in the bubble acceleration and by means of the Ostrogradski-Hamiltonian approach, we observed that the theory comprises the management of both first- and second-class constraints. We thus show that our second-order approach is robust allowing for a proper quantization. We found an effective quantum potential which permits us to compute bounded states for the system. We comment on the possibility of describing brane world universes by invoking this kind of second-order correction terms.

  16. Space charge dominated beam transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider beam transport systems where space charge forces are comparable in strength with the external focusing force. Space charge then plays an important role for beam transmission and emittance growth. We use the envelope model for matching and the generalized field energy equations to study emittance growth. Analytic results are compared with numerical simulation. (orig.)

  17. Bulk charges in eleven dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawking, S. W.; Taylor-Robinson, M. M.

    1998-07-01

    Eleven dimensional supergravity has electric type currents arising from the Chern-Simon and anomaly terms in the action. However the bulk charge integrates to zero for asymptotically flat solutions with topological trivial spatial sections. We show that by relaxing the boundary conditions to generalisations of the ALE and ALF boundary conditions in four dimensions one can obtain static solutions with a bulk charge. Solutions involving anomaly terms preserve between 1/16 and 1/4 of the supersymmetries but Chern-Simons fluxes generally break all of the remaining supersymmetry. One can introduce membranes with the same sign of charge into these backgrounds. This raises the possibility that these generalized membranes might decay quantum mechanically to leave just a bulk distribution of charge. Alternatively and more probably, a bulk distribution of charge can decay into a collection of singly charged membranes. Dimensional reductions of these solutions lead to novel representations of extreme black holes in four dimensions with up to four charges. We discuss how the eleven-dimensional Kaluza-Klein monopole wrapped around a space with non-zero first Pontryagin class picks up an electric charge proportional to the Pontryagin number.

  18. Domain wall description of superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work we shall address the issue of electrical conductivity in superconductors in the perspective of superconducting domain wall solutions in the realm of field theory. We take our set up made out of a dynamical complex scalar field coupled to gauge field to be responsible for superconductivity and an extra scalar real field that plays the role of superconducting domain walls. The temperature of the system is interpreted through the fact that the soliton following accelerating orbits is a Rindler observer experiencing a thermal bath

  19. Inhomogeneity of charge-density-wave order and quenched disorder in a high-Tc superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campi, G.; Bianconi, A.; Poccia, N.; Bianconi, G.; Barba, L.; Arrighetti, G.; Innocenti, D.; Karpinski, J.; Zhigadlo, N. D.; Kazakov, S. M.; Burghammer, M.; Zimmermann, M. V.; Sprung, M.; Ricci, A.

    2015-09-01

    It has recently been established that the high-transition-temperature (high-Tc) superconducting state coexists with short-range charge-density-wave order and quenched disorder arising from dopants and strain. This complex, multiscale phase separation invites the development of theories of high-temperature superconductivity that include complexity. The nature of the spatial interplay between charge and dopant order that provides a basis for nanoscale phase separation remains a key open question, because experiments have yet to probe the unknown spatial distribution at both the nanoscale and mesoscale (between atomic and macroscopic scale). Here we report micro X-ray diffraction imaging of the spatial distribution of both short-range charge-density-wave `puddles' (domains with only a few wavelengths) and quenched disorder in HgBa2CuO4 + y, the single-layer cuprate with the highest Tc, 95 kelvin (refs 26, 27, 28). We found that the charge-density-wave puddles, like the steam bubbles in boiling water, have a fat-tailed size distribution that is typical of self-organization near a critical point. However, the quenched disorder, which arises from oxygen interstitials, has a distribution that is contrary to the usually assumed random, uncorrelated distribution. The interstitial-oxygen-rich domains are spatially anticorrelated with the charge-density-wave domains, because higher doping does not favour the stripy charge-density-wave puddles, leading to a complex emergent geometry of the spatial landscape for superconductivity.

  20. Inhomogeneity of charge-density-wave order and quenched disorder in a high-Tc superconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campi, G; Bianconi, A; Poccia, N; Bianconi, G; Barba, L; Arrighetti, G; Innocenti, D; Karpinski, J; Zhigadlo, N D; Kazakov, S M; Burghammer, M; Zimmermann, M v; Sprung, M; Ricci, A

    2015-09-17

    It has recently been established that the high-transition-temperature (high-Tc) superconducting state coexists with short-range charge-density-wave order and quenched disorder arising from dopants and strain. This complex, multiscale phase separation invites the development of theories of high-temperature superconductivity that include complexity. The nature of the spatial interplay between charge and dopant order that provides a basis for nanoscale phase separation remains a key open question, because experiments have yet to probe the unknown spatial distribution at both the nanoscale and mesoscale (between atomic and macroscopic scale). Here we report micro X-ray diffraction imaging of the spatial distribution of both short-range charge-density-wave 'puddles' (domains with only a few wavelengths) and quenched disorder in HgBa2CuO4 + y, the single-layer cuprate with the highest Tc, 95 kelvin (refs 26-28). We found that the charge-density-wave puddles, like the steam bubbles in boiling water, have a fat-tailed size distribution that is typical of self-organization near a critical point. However, the quenched disorder, which arises from oxygen interstitials, has a distribution that is contrary to the usually assumed random, uncorrelated distribution. The interstitial-oxygen-rich domains are spatially anticorrelated with the charge-density-wave domains, because higher doping does not favour the stripy charge-density-wave puddles, leading to a complex emergent geometry of the spatial landscape for superconductivity. PMID:26381983

  1. Study of neutralization kinetics in charged polymer-metal nanocomposite systems by photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In case of photoelectron spectroscopy of an insulating material the data obtained from the charged surface are often distorted due to differentially charged surface domains. Recently we have developed a controlled surface neutralization technique to study the kinetics of the surface charging. Here we demonstrate the application of the technique to study the neutralization kinetics of both thick and thin films of charged polymer-metal nanocomposite material using photoemission. Neutralization kinetics of grounded and floated pure polymer thin films was also studied. It was observed that for the thick sample the transition of positively charged domains to overcompensated ones occurs through percolation. In case of grounded thin films the growth of overcompensated domains exhibit a linear behavior followed by saturation. When electrons appear at both surfaces of a floated thin film, the neutralization kinetics show a completely different behavior. Present investigation indicates that for thin films of insulating materials appearing to be neutral in presence of an electron source, controlled neutralization technique may be an important tool to distinguish between presence of multiple chemical species and differential charging.

  2. Oriented Liquid Crystalline Polymer Semiconductor Films with Large Ordered Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xiao; Chandler, George; Zhang, Xinran; Kline, R Joseph; Fei, Zhuping; Heeney, Martin; Diemer, Peter J; Jurchescu, Oana D; O'Connor, Brendan T

    2015-12-01

    Large strains are applied to liquid crystalline poly(2,5-bis(3-tetradecylthiophen-2yl)thieno(3,2-b)thiophene) (pBTTT) films when held at elevated temperatures resulting in in-plane polymer alignment. We find that the polymer backbone aligns significantly in the direction of strain, and that the films maintain large quasi-domains similar to that found in spun-cast films on hydrophobic surfaces, highlighted by dark-field transmission electron microscopy imaging. The highly strained films also have nanoscale holes consistent with dewetting. Charge transport in the films is then characterized in a transistor configuration, where the field effect mobility is shown to increase in the direction of polymer backbone alignment, and decrease in the transverse direction. The highest saturated field-effect mobility was found to be 1.67 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), representing one of the highest reported mobilities for this material system. The morphology of the oriented films demonstrated here contrast significantly with previous demonstrations of oriented pBTTT films that form a ribbon-like morphology, opening up opportunities to explore how differences in molecular packing features of oriented films impact charge transport. Results highlight the role of grain boundaries, differences in charge transport along the polymer backbone and π-stacking direction, and structural features that impact the field dependence of charge transport. PMID:26552721

  3. High temperature meson propagators with domain-wall quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the chiral properties of domain-wall quarks at high temperatures on an ensemble of quenched configurations. Low lying eigenmodes of the Dirac operator are calculated and used to check the extent to which the Atiyah-Singer index theorem is obeyed on lattices with finite N5. We calculate the connected and disconnected screening propagators for the lowest mass scalar and pseudoscalar mesons in the sectors of different topological charge and note that they behave as expected. Separating out the would-be zero eigenmodes enables us to accurately estimate the disconnected propagators with far less effort than would be needed otherwise

  4. Domain wall universe in the Einstein-Born-Infeld theory

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Bum-Hoon(Center for Quantum Spacetime, Sogang University, Seoul, 121-742, Republic of Korea); Lee, Wonwoo; Minamitsuji, Masato

    2009-01-01

    In this Letter, we discuss the dynamics of a domain wall universe embedded into the charged black hole spacetime of the Einstein-Born-Infeld (EBI) theory. There are four kinds of possible spacetime structures, i.e., those with no horizon, the extremal one, those with two horizons (as the Reissner-Nordstr$\\rm{\\ddot o}$m black hole), and those with a single horizon (as the Schwarzshild black hole). We derive the effective cosmological equations on the wall. In contrast to the previous works, we...

  5. Domain wall fermion calculation of nucleon GA/GV*

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors present a preliminary domain-wall fermion lattice-QCD calculation of isovector vector and axial charges, gV and gA, of the nucleon. Since the lattice renormalizations, ZV and ZA, of the currents are identical with DWF, the lattice ratio (gA/gV)lattice directly yields the continuum value. Indeed ZV determined from the matrix element of the vector current agrees closely with ZA from a non-perturbative renormalization study of quark bilinears. They also obtain spin related quantities Δq/gV and δq/gV

  6. Shielding of moving line charges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Youmei; He, Bingyu [Department of Physics, School of Science, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Yu, Wei [Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Yu, M.Y., E-mail: myyu@zju.edu.cn [Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation and Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Institute for Theoretical Physics I, Ruhr University, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2015-07-03

    A charged object moving in plasma can excite plasma waves that inevitably modify its Debye shielding characteristics. When the excited waves propagate sufficiently fast, the shielding can even break down. Here the properties of finite amplitude plasma waves excited by a moving line charge are investigated. It is found that when the speed of the latter is close to but less than the thermal speed of the background plasma electrons, only a localized disturbance in the form of a soliton that moves together with the line charge is excited. That is, the line charge is well shielded even though it is moving at a high speed and has generated a large local electrostatic field. However, for a pair of line charges moving together, such complete shielding behavior could not be found.

  7. Piston-assisted charge pumping

    CERN Document Server

    Kaur, D; Mourokh, L

    2015-01-01

    We examine charge transport through a system of three sites connected in series in the situation when an oscillating charged piston modulates the energy of the middle site. We show that with an appropriate set of parameters, charge can be transferred against an applied voltage. In this scenario, when the oscillating piston shifts away from the middle site, the energy of the site decreases and it is populated by a charge transferred from the lower energy site. On the other hand, when the piston returns to close proximity, the energy of the middle site increases and it is depopulated by the higher energy site. Thus through this process, the charge is pumped against the potential gradient. Our results can explain the process of proton pumping in one of the mitochondrial enzymes, Complex I. Moreover, this mechanism can be used for electron pumping in semiconductor nanostructures.

  8. Collaborative Mobile Charging and Coverage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴杰

    2014-01-01

    Wireless energy charging using mobile vehicles has been a viable research topic recently in the area of wireless networks and mobile computing. This paper gives a short survey of recent research conducted in our research group in the area of collaborative mobile charging. In collaborative mobile charging, multiple mobile chargers work together to accomplish a given set of ob jectives. These ob jectives include charging sensors at different frequencies with a minimum number of mobile chargers and reaching the farthest sensor for a given set of mobile chargers, subject to various constraints, including speed and energy limits of mobile chargers. Through the process of problem formulation, solution construction, and future work extension for problems related to collaborative mobile charging and coverage, we present three principles for good practice in conducting research. These principles can potentially be used for assisting graduate students in selecting a research problem for a term project, which can eventually be expanded to a thesis/dissertation topic.

  9. TOPICAL REVIEW: Detection of charge distributions in insulator surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, C. A.; Gouveia, R. F.; da Silva, M. A.; Galembeck, F.

    2009-07-01

    Charge distribution in insulators has received considerable attention but still poses great scientific challenges, largely due to a current lack of firm knowledge about the nature and speciation of charges. Recent studies using analytical microscopies have shown that insulators contain domains with excess fixed ions forming various kinds of potential distribution patterns, which are also imaged by potential mapping using scanning electric probe microscopy. Results from the authors' laboratory show that solid insulators are seldom electroneutral, as opposed to a widespread current assumption. Excess charges can derive from a host of charging mechanisms: excess local ion concentration, radiochemical and tribochemical reactions added to the partition of hydroxonium and hydronium ions derived from atmospheric water. The last factor has been largely overlooked in the literature, but recent experimental evidence suggests that it plays a decisive role in insulator charging. Progress along this line is expected to help solve problems related to unwanted electrostatic discharges, while creating new possibilities for energy storage and handling as well as new electrostatic devices.

  10. CNS1 Encodes an Essential p60/Sti1 Homolog in Saccharomyces cerevisiae That Suppresses Cyclophilin 40 Mutations and Interacts with Hsp90

    OpenAIRE

    Dolinski, Kara J.; Cardenas, Maria E; Heitman, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    Cyclophilins are cis-trans-peptidyl-prolyl isomerases that bind to and are inhibited by the immunosuppressant cyclosporin A (CsA). The toxic effects of CsA are mediated by the 18-kDa cyclophilin A protein. A larger cyclophilin of 40 kDa, cyclophilin 40, is a component of Hsp90-steroid receptor complexes and contains two domains, an amino-terminal prolyl isomerase domain and a carboxy-terminal tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain. There are two cyclophilin 40 homologs in the yeast Saccharomyc...

  11. Automorphism group of exceptional symmetric domains RVI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许以超

    2000-01-01

    Here we give the definition of the exceptional symmetric Siegel domain RVI (27) in (?)27, and compute the exceptional symmetric domain .RvI(27) = r(RVI(27)), where τ is the Bergman mapping of the Siegel domain RVI(27). Moreover, we present the holomorphical automorphism group Aut(.RVI|(27)) of the exceptional symmetric domain .

  12. Computations of Bergman Kernels on Hua Domains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    殷慰萍; 王安; 赵振刚; 赵晓霞; 管冰辛

    2001-01-01

    @@The Bergman kernel function plays an important ro1e in several complex variables.There exists the Bergman kernel function on any bounded domain in Cn. But we can get the Bergman kernel functions in explicit formulas for a few types of domains only,for example:the bounded homogeneous domains and the egg domain in some cases.

  13. Simulation for signal charge transfer of charge coupled devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Zujun; Liu Yinong; Chen Wei; Tang Benqi; Xiao Zhigang; Huang Shaoyan; Liu Minbo; Zhang Yong

    2009-01-01

    Physical device models and numerical processing methods are presented to simulate a linear buried channel charge coupled devices (CCDs). The dynamic transfer process of CCD is carried out by a three-phase clock pulse driver. By using the semiconductor device simulation software MEDICI, dynamic transfer pictures of signal charges cells, electron concentration and electrostatic potential are presented. The key parameters of CCD such as charge transfer efficiency (CTE) and dark electrons are numerically simulated. The simulation results agree with the theoretic and experimental results.

  14. Heavy charged particle therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pilot study of heavy charged particles with heavy ion medical accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) for advanced H and N cancer has been carried out from June 1994 at National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). As of the beginning of August 1994, three patients were treated by 290 MeV carbon ions. The patients had adenocarcinoma of the cheek mucosa, squamous cell carcinoma of the ethmoid sinus and adenoid cystic carcinoma of the sublingual gland. Patients were immobilized by individual head coach and thermosplint facial shell. Individual collimators and bolus were also prepared for each ports. Dose fractionation for the initial pilot study group was 16.2 GyE/18 fractions/6 weeks, which would be equivalent to standard fractionation of 60.0 Gy/30 fractions/6 weeks with photons. This dose fractionation was considered to be 20% lesser than 75 GyE/37.5 fractions/7.5 weeks, which is estimated to be maximum tolerance dose for advanced H and N cancers. HIMAC worked well and there was no major trouble causing any treatment delay. Acute skin reactions of 3 patients were 2 cases of bright erythema with patchy moist desquamation and one of dull erythema, which were evaluated as equivalent reaction with irradiated dose. Acute mucosa reactions appeared to have lesser reaction than predicted mucositis. Tumor reactions of three patients were partial reaction (PR) at the end of treatment and nearly complete remission (CR) after 6 months of treatment. From October 1994, we started to treat patients with advanced H and N cancer with 10% high dose than previous dose. And new candidates of pilot study with non small cell lung cancer, brain tumor and carcinoma of the tongue were entered into pilot study. At the end of February 1995, a total of 21 patients were treated by carbon ions. (J.P.N.)

  15. Protein structural domains: definition and prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezkurdia, Iakes; Tress, Michael L

    2011-11-01

    Recognition and prediction of structural domains in proteins is an important part of structure and function prediction. This unit lists the range of tools available for domain prediction, and describes sequence and structural analysis tools that complement domain prediction methods. Also detailed are the basic domain prediction steps, along with suggested strategies for different protein sequences and potential pitfalls in domain boundary prediction. The difficult problem of domain orientation prediction is also discussed. All the resources necessary for domain boundary prediction are accessible via publicly available Web servers and databases and do not require computational expertise. PMID:22045561

  16. Ubiquitin domain proteins in disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Louise Kjær; Schulze, Andrea; Seeger, Michael;

    2007-01-01

    The human genome encodes several ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain proteins (UDPs). Members of this protein family are involved in a variety of cellular functions and many are connected to the ubiquitin proteasome system, an essential pathway for protein degradation in eukaryotic cells. Despite their...... and cancer. Publication history: Republished from Current BioData's Targeted Proteins database (TPdb; http://www.targetedproteinsdb.com)....

  17. Domain Building or Risk Taking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjort, Katrin; Abrahamsen, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    of the relations between gender, values and family obligation but reveals an interesting difference between two strategies for career development: Domain Building and Risk Taking. Both strategies are applied by both men and women. However, one of them seems to be the most effective with regard to achieve...

  18. Modules over discrete valuation domains

    CERN Document Server

    Tuganbaev, Askar A

    2008-01-01

    This book provides the first systematic treatment of modules over discrete valuation domains which plays an important role in various areas of algebra, especially in commutative algebra. Many important results representing the state of the art are presented in the text which is supplemented by exercises and interesting open problems. An important contribution to commutative algebra.

  19. Partial domain wall partition functions

    CERN Document Server

    Foda, O

    2012-01-01

    We consider six-vertex model configurations on a rectangular lattice with n (N) horizontal (vertical) lines, and "partial domain wall boundary conditions" defined as 1. all 2n arrows on the left and right boundaries point inwards, 2. n_u (n_l) arrows on the upper (lower) boundary, such that n_u + n_l = N - n, also point inwards, 3. all remaining n+N arrows on the upper and lower boundaries point outwards, and 4. all spin configurations on the upper and lower boundaries are summed over. To generate (n-by-N) "partial domain wall configurations", one can start from A. (N-by-N) configurations with domain wall boundary conditions and delete n_u (n_l) upper (lower) horizontal lines, or B. (2n-by-N) configurations that represent the scalar product of an n-magnon Bethe eigenstate and an n-magnon generic state on an N-site spin-1/2 chain, and delete the n lines that represent the Bethe eigenstate. The corresponding "partial domain wall partition function" is computed in construction {A} ({B}) as an N-by-N (n-by-n) det...

  20. Weakly distributive domains(Ⅱ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Ying; ZHANG Guo-Qiang

    2007-01-01

    In our previous work(Inform.and Comput.,2005,202:87-103),we have shown that for any ω-algebraic meet-cpo D,if all higher-order stable function spaces built from D are ω-algebraic,then D is finitary.This accomplishes the first of a possible,two-step process in solving the problem raised(LNCS,1991,530:16-33;Domainsand lambda-calculi,Cambridge Univ.Press,1998)whetherthe category of stable bifinite domains of Amadio-Droste-G(o)bel(LNCS,1991,530:16-33;Theor.Comput.Sci.,1993,111:89-101)is the largest cartesian closed full subcategory within the category of ω-algebraic meet-cpos with stable functions.This paper presents the results of the second step,which is to show that for any ω-algebraic meet-cpo D satisfying axioms M and I to be contained in a cartesian closed full sub-category using ω-algebraic meet-cpos with stable functions,it must not violate M I∞.We introduce a new class of domains called weakly distributive domains and show that for these domains to be in a cartesian closed category using ω-algebraic meet-cpos,property M I must not be violated.Further,we demonstrate that principally distributive domains(those for which each principle ideal is distributive)form a proper subclass of weakly distributive domains,and Birkhoff's M3 and N5(Introduction to Lattices and order,Cambridge Univ.Press,2002)are weakly distributive(but non-distributive).Then,we establish characterization results for weakly distributive domains.We also introduce the notion of meet-generators in constructing stable functions and show that if an ω-algebraic meet-cpo D contains an infinite number of meet-generators,then[D→D]fails I.However,the original problem of Amadio and Curien remains open.

  1. Compiling Dictionaries Using Semantic Domains*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Moe

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available

    Abstract: The task of providing dictionaries for all the world's languages is prodigious, re-quiring efficient techniques. The text corpus method cannot be used for minority languages lacking texts. To meet the need, the author has constructed a list of 1 600 semantic domains, which he has successfully used to collect words. In a workshop setting, a group of speakers can collect as many as 17 000 words in ten days. This method results in a classified word list that can be efficiently expanded into a full dictionary. The method works because the mental lexicon is a giant web or-ganized around key concepts. A semantic domain can be defined as an important concept together with the words directly related to it by lexical relations. A person can utilize the mental web to quickly jump from word to word within a domain. The author is developing a template for each domain to aid in collecting words and in de-scribing their semantics. Investigating semantics within the context of a domain yields many in-sights. The method permits the production of both alphabetically and semantically organized dic-tionaries. The list of domains is intended to be universal in scope and applicability. Perhaps due to universals of human experience and universals of linguistic competence, there are striking simi-larities in various lists of semantic domains developed for languages around the world. Using a standardized list of domains to classify multiple dictionaries opens up possibilities for cross-lin-guistic research into semantic and lexical universals.

    Keywords: SEMANTIC DOMAINS, SEMANTIC FIELDS, SEMANTIC CATEGORIES, LEX-ICAL RELATIONS, SEMANTIC PRIMITIVES, DOMAIN TEMPLATES, MENTAL LEXICON, SEMANTIC UNIVERSALS, MINORITY LANGUAGES, LEXICOGRAPHY

    Opsomming: Samestelling van woordeboeke deur gebruikmaking van se-mantiese domeine. Die taak van die voorsiening van woordeboeke aan al die tale van die wêreld is geweldig en vereis doeltreffende tegnieke. Die

  2. Decomposition and Removability Properties of John Domains

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Huang; S Ponnusamy; X Wang

    2008-08-01

    In this paper we characterize John domains in terms of John domain decomposition property. In addition, we also show that a domain in $\\mathbb{R}^n$ is a John domain if and only if $D\\backslash P$ is a John domain, where is a subset of containing finitely many points of . The best possibility and an application of the second result are also discussed.

  3. Charge transfer in a sharply nonuniform electric field mediated by swirling liquid flow with minimal hydraulic resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagorny, V. S.; Smirnovsky, A. A.; Chernyshev, A. S.; Kolodyazhny, D. Yu.

    2015-09-01

    A scheme of a fuel nozzle with "needle-plane" electrode system, the location of which enables one to minimize the imparted hydraulic resistance, is proposed. We consider the processes of charge transfer in a sharply inhomogeneous electric field in order to estimate the amount of charge coming out of the channel. For this purpose, we used the OpenFOAM software package, modified to account for the electrohydrodynamic effects. By using the k-ω SST turbulence model within an axial-symmetrical RANS problem, the vortex liquid flow and charge transfer are calculated. The impact of vorticity degree on the processes of charge transfer is studied. It is found that the charge flowing out of the calculation domain is about 80% of the injected charge. The vorticity degree in the above range of values has little effect on the process of charge transfer.

  4. Big break for charge symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, G A

    2003-01-01

    Two new experiments have detected charge-symmetry breaking, the mechanism responsible for protons and neutrons having different masses. Symmetry is a crucial concept in the theories that describe the subatomic world because it has an intimate connection with the laws of conservation. The theory of the strong interaction between quarks - quantum chromodynamics - is approximately invariant under what is called charge symmetry. In other words, if we swap an up quark for a down quark, then the strong interaction will look almost the same. This symmetry is related to the concept of sup i sospin sup , and is not the same as charge conjugation (in which a particle is replaced by its antiparticle). Charge symmetry is broken by the competition between two different effects. The first is the small difference in mass between up and down quarks, which is about 200 times less than the mass of the proton. The second is their different electric charges. The up quark has a charge of +2/3 in units of the proton charge, while ...

  5. Charge-pump voltage converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, John P.; Christenson, Todd R.

    2009-11-03

    A charge-pump voltage converter for converting a low voltage provided by a low-voltage source to a higher voltage. Charge is inductively generated on a transfer rotor electrode during its transit past an inductor stator electrode and subsequently transferred by the rotating rotor to a collector stator electrode for storage or use. Repetition of the charge transfer process leads to a build-up of voltage on a charge-receiving device. Connection of multiple charge-pump voltage converters in series can generate higher voltages, and connection of multiple charge-pump voltage converters in parallel can generate higher currents. Microelectromechanical (MEMS) embodiments of this invention provide a small and compact high-voltage (several hundred V) voltage source starting with a few-V initial voltage source. The microscale size of many embodiments of this invention make it ideally suited for MEMS- and other micro-applications where integration of the voltage or charge source in a small package is highly desirable.

  6. A new method of charged particle identification based on frequency spectrum analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin-Tao, Zhu; Guo-Fu, Liu; Jun, Yang; Xiao-Liang, Luo; Lei, Zhang; Li-Feng, Ji

    2016-03-01

    A new frequency domain method for charged particle identification, called Frequency Ratio Analysis (FRA), is proposed by analyzing the frequency spectra of proton pulses and alpha pulses acquired from a totally depleted Si detector. Identification performance of the FRA method is evaluated and compared with two time domain methods, the current pulse amplitude method and the second moment method. The results show that the FRA method is not only feasible and effective but also superior to the two time domain methods, as it achieves an obvious increase in value of the figure-of-merit (FOM). Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11175254, 11375264)

  7. PUBLIC DOMAIN PROTECTION. USES AND REUSES OF PUBLIC DOMAIN WORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Adriana LUPAȘCU

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study tries to highlight the necessity of an awareness of the right of access to the public domain, particularly using the example of works whose protection period has expired, as well as the ones which the law considers to be excluded from protection. Such works are used not only by large libraries from around the world, but also by rights holders, via different means of use, including incorporations into original works or adaptations. However, the reuse that follows these uses often only remains at the level of concept, as the notion of the public’s right of access to public domain works is not substantiated, nor is the notion of the correct or legal use of such works.

  8. Decoherence of charge qubit coupled to interacting background charges

    OpenAIRE

    Yurkevich, I. V.; Baldwin, J.; Lerner, I. V.; Altshuler, B. L.

    2009-01-01

    The major contribution to decoherence of a double quantum dot or a Josephson junction charge qubit comes from the electrostatic coupling to fluctuating background charges hybridized with the conduction electrons in the reservoir. However, estimations according to previously developed theories show that finding a sufficient number of effective fluctuators in a realistic experimental layout is quite improbable. We show that this paradox is resolved by allowing for a short-range Coulomb interact...

  9. Rewritable artificial magnetic charge ice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yong-Lei; Xiao, Zhili; Snezhko, Alexey; Xu, Jing; Ocola, Leonidas E.; Divan, Ralu; Pearson, John E.; Crabtree, George W.; Kwok, Wai-Kwong

    2016-05-20

    Artificial ices enable the study of geometrical frustration by design and through direct observation. However, it has proven difficult to achieve tailored long-range ordering of their diverse configurations, limiting both fundamental and applied research directions. We designed an artificial spin structure that produces a magnetic charge ice with tunable long-range ordering of eight different configurations. We also developed a technique to precisely manipulate the local magnetic charge states and demonstrate write-read-erase multifunctionality at room temperature. This globally reconfigurable and locally writable magnetic charge ice could provide a setting for designing magnetic monopole defects, tailoring magnonics, and controlling the properties of other two-dimensional materials.

  10. Rewritable artificial magnetic charge ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong-Lei; Xiao, Zhi-Li; Snezhko, Alexey; Xu, Jing; Ocola, Leonidas E.; Divan, Ralu; Pearson, John E.; Crabtree, George W.; Kwok, Wai-Kwong

    2016-05-01

    Artificial ices enable the study of geometrical frustration by design and through direct observation. However, it has proven difficult to achieve tailored long-range ordering of their diverse configurations, limiting both fundamental and applied research directions. We designed an artificial spin structure that produces a magnetic charge ice with tunable long-range ordering of eight different configurations. We also developed a technique to precisely manipulate the local magnetic charge states and demonstrate write-read-erase multifunctionality at room temperature. This globally reconfigurable and locally writable magnetic charge ice could provide a setting for designing magnetic monopole defects, tailoring magnonics, and controlling the properties of other two-dimensional materials.

  11. Mini-charged tau neutrinos?

    CERN Document Server

    Foot, R

    1993-01-01

    Theoretically, the electric charge of the tau neutrino may be non-zero. The experimental bound on the electric charge of the tau neutrino is many orders of magnitude weaker than that for any other known neutrino. If the tau neutrino does have a small electric charge, and its mass is greater than 1 MeV, then it can annihilate sufficiently in the early Universe by electromagnetic interactions to avoid conflict with the standard cosmology model. A novel feature of this scenario is that there can be effectively less than three neutrino species present during nucleosynthesis.

  12. Charge density waves in solids

    CERN Document Server

    Gor'kov, LP

    2012-01-01

    The latest addition to this series covers a field which is commonly referred to as charge density wave dynamics.The most thoroughly investigated materials are inorganic linear chain compounds with highly anisotropic electronic properties. The volume opens with an examination of their structural properties and the essential features which allow charge density waves to develop.The behaviour of the charge density waves, where interesting phenomena are observed, is treated both from a theoretical and an experimental standpoint. The role of impurities in statics and dynamics is considered and an

  13. Effects of induced charge in the kinestatic charge detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenaar, D J; Terwilliger, R A

    1995-05-01

    The principle of the kinestatic charge detector (KCD) for digital radiography depends on the synchronization of the scan velocity of a parallel plate drift chamber with the cation drift velocity. Compared with line-beam scanners, this motion-compensated imaging technique makes better use of the x-ray tube output. A Frisch grid traditionally has been used within the KCD to minimize unwanted signal contributions from both cations and negative charge carriers during irradiation. In this work the charge induction process in a parallel plate geometry was investigated for the special case of the KCD. In the limit of infinite plates, the cathode charge density due to both cations and negative charge carriers increases quadratically in time for a kinestatically scanned narrow slit. In the KCD the cathode is segmented into an array of narrow electrodes, each aligned with the incident x-ray beam. Our conformal mapping computation determined that the shape of the induced charge signal depends critically on delta x/w, the ratio of electrode width to drift gap. Our conclusion introduces the possibility of eliminating the Frisch grid from the KCD design because the value of delta x/w required for transverse sampling in the KCD is sufficiently low as to allow "self-gridding" to take effect. PMID:7643803

  14. Effect of Zn Adsorption on Charge of Variable Charge Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUNHAN-YUAN

    1993-01-01

    The variation in appa rent carge of two typical variable charge soils resulting from Zn adsorption were studied by KCl saturation and NH4NO3 replacement methods.Results showed that zinc were adsorbed specifically to those sites with negative charge.As in different pH ranges,the percantages of specific and electrostatic adsorptions of zine and the mechanisms of specific adsorption were different,the effects of Zn adsorption on apparent charge were varied and could be characterized as:when 1 mmol Zn2+ was adsorbed,a change about 1 mmol in the apparent charge was observed in the low pH range(1),1.4 to 1.5mmol in the moderate pH range(II) and 0.55 to 0.6mmol in the high pH range (III).These experimental data,in terms of soil charge,proved once more author's conclusion in the preceding paper(Sun,1993) that in accordance with the behaviors of Zn adsorption by the variable charge soils in relation to pH,three pH ranges with different adsorption mechanisms were delineated;that is,in Range I,specific adsorption was the predominant mechanism,in Ranges II and III,specific and electrostatic adsorptions co-existed,but their specific adsorption mechanisms were not identical.

  15. Impact of Charge Variation on the Encapsulation of Nanoparticles by Virus Coat Proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Hsiang-Ku; Zandi, Roya

    2012-01-01

    Electrostatic interaction is the driving force for the encapsulation by virus coat proteins of nanoparticles such as quantum dots, gold particles and magnetic beads for, e.g., imaging and therapeutic purposes. In recent experimental work, Daniel et al. [ACS Nano 4 (2010), 3853-3860] found the encapsulation efficiency to sensitively depend on the interplay between the surface charge density of negatively charged gold nanoparticles and the number of positive charges on the RNA binding domains of the proteins. Surprisingly, these experiments reveal that despite the highly cooperative nature of the co-assembly at low pH, the efficiency of encapsulation is a gradual function of their surface charge density. We present a simple all-or-nothing mass action law combined with an electrostatic interaction model to explain the experiments. We find quantitative agreement with experimental observations, supporting the existence of a natural statistical charge distribution between nanoparticles.

  16. The PDZ domain of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor PDZGEF directs binding to phosphatidic acid during brush border formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah V Consonni

    Full Text Available PDZGEF is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the small G protein Rap. It was recently found that PDZGEF contributes to establishment of intestinal epithelial polarity downstream of the kinase Lkb1. By binding to phosphatidic acid enriched at the apical membrane, PDZGEF locally activates Rap2a resulting in induction of brush border formation via a pathway that includes the polarity players TNIK, Mst4 and Ezrin. Here we show that the PDZ domain of PDZGEF is essential and sufficient for targeting PDZGEF to the apical membrane of polarized intestinal epithelial cells. Inhibition of PLD and consequently production of phosphatidic acid inhibitis targeting of PDZGEF to the plasma membrane. Furthermore, localization requires specific positively charged residues within the PDZ domain. We conclude that local accumulation of PDZGEF at the apical membrane during establishment of epithelial polarity is mediated by electrostatic interactions between positively charged side chains in the PDZ domain and negatively charged phosphatidic acid.

  17. Domain switching in nanometer scale in Bismuth-based relaxor solid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microscopic piezoresponse force microscopy observation in 0.9967(Na1/2Bi1/2)TiO3(NBT)-0.0033BaTiO3(BT) rhombohedral (001) plate reveals two kinds of piezoresponse images, one with domain switching characterized with superior piezoresponsibility and the other without one, whereas macroscopic observation reveals non-switching of domain. Such microscopic remarkable difference of domain switching depends on coercive field caused by localized nucleation of domains with reversed polarization. Such coercive fields depend on relaxor states induced by random fields due to built-in charge disorder resulting from lattice defects at A-site and oxygen vacancies in ABO3 perovskite. The random fields based on lattice defects on {110} plane lower activation barrier for domain switching, leading to nucleation and growth of domains, while for non-switching of domains, oxygen vacancies on {110} and/or {001} plane play a role as clamping center for restriction of domain switching.

  18. ELECTRIC CHARGE IN 6D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trunev A. P.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Wave solutions of Einstein's equations in the sixdimensional space-time with metric signature (+, +, +, -, -, - have been found. It is shown that solutions of this type can be used to model the structure of the electric charge

  19. ELECTRIC CHARGE IN 6D

    OpenAIRE

    Trunev A. P.

    2014-01-01

    Wave solutions of Einstein's equations in the sixdimensional space-time with metric signature (+, +, +, -, -, -) have been found. It is shown that solutions of this type can be used to model the structure of the electric charge

  20. Measurements of W Charge Asymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzbauer, J. L. [Mississippi U.

    2015-10-06

    We discuss W boson and lepton charge asymmetry measurements from W decays in the electron channel, which were made using 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ of RunII data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The electron charge asymmetry is presented as a function of pseudo-rapidity out to |$\\eta$| $\\le$ 3.2, in five symmetric and asymmetric kinematic bins of electron transverse momentum and the missing transverse energy of the event. We also give the W charge asymmetry as a function of W boson rapidity. The asymmetries are compared with next-to-leading order perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations. These charge asymmetry measurements will allow more accurate determinations of the proton parton distribution functions and are the most precise to date.

  1. Take Charge of Your Health

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, Austin

    2014-01-01

    Take Charge of Your Health is a promotional flyer for potential adult SNAP-Ed participants. This flyer encourages eligible adults to participate in the SNAP-Ed program to make healthy nutrition and physical activity behavior changes.

  2. Elementary charges in classical electrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    KAPU'{S}CIK, Edward

    1999-01-01

    In the framework of classical electrodynamics elementary particles are treated as capacitors. The electrostatic potentials satisfy equations of the Schrödinger type. An interesting "quantization condition" for elementary charges is derived.

  3. Piezoelectric control of the mobility of a domain wall driven by adiabatic and non-adiabatic torques

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ranieri, E.; Roy, P. E.; Fang, D.; Vehsthedt, E. K.; Irvine, A. C.; Heiss, D.; Casiraghi, A.; Campion, R. P.; Gallagher, B. L.; Jungwirth, T.; Wunderlich, J.

    2013-09-01

    The rich internal degrees of freedom of magnetic domain walls make them an attractive complement to electron charge for exploring new concepts of storage, transport and processing of information. Here we use the tunable internal structure of a domain wall in a perpendicularly magnetized GaMnAsP/GaAs ferromagnetic semiconductor and demonstrate devices in which piezoelectrically controlled magnetic anisotropy yields up to 500% mobility variations for an electrical-current-driven domain wall. We observe current-induced domain wall motion over a wide range of current-pulse amplitudes and report a direct observation and the piezoelectric control of the Walker breakdown separating two regimes with different mobilities. Our work demonstrates that in spin-orbit-coupled ferromagnets with weak extrinsic domain wall pinning, the piezoelectric control allows one to experimentally assess the upper and lower boundaries of the characteristic ratio of adiabatic and non-adiabatic spin-transfer torques in the current-driven domain wall motion.

  4. Electric charge in the stochastic electric field

    CERN Document Server

    Simonov, Yu A

    2016-01-01

    The influence of electric stochastic fields on the relativistic charged particles is investigated in the gauge invariant path integral formalism. Using the cumulant expansion one finds the exponential relaxation of the charge Green's function both for spinless and Dirac charges.

  5. Quantum physics: Destruction of discrete charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarov, Yuli V.

    2016-08-01

    Electric charge is quantized in units of the electron's charge. An experiment explores the suppression of charge quantization caused by quantum fluctuations and supports a long-standing theory that explains this behaviour. See Letter p.58

  6. Measuring momentum for charged particle tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Christopher; Fraser, Andrew Mcleod; Schultz, Larry Joe; Borozdin, Konstantin N.; Klimenko, Alexei Vasilievich; Sossong, Michael James; Blanpied, Gary

    2010-11-23

    Methods, apparatus and systems for detecting charged particles and obtaining tomography of a volume by measuring charged particles including measuring the momentum of a charged particle passing through a charged particle detector. Sets of position sensitive detectors measure scattering of the charged particle. The position sensitive detectors having sufficient mass to cause the charged particle passing through the position sensitive detectors to scatter in the position sensitive detectors. A controller can be adapted and arranged to receive scattering measurements of the charged particle from the charged particle detector, determine at least one trajectory of the charged particle from the measured scattering; and determine at least one momentum measurement of the charged particle from the at least one trajectory. The charged particle can be a cosmic ray-produced charged particle, such as a cosmic ray-produced muon. The position sensitive detectors can be drift cells, such as gas-filled drift tubes.

  7. Charged particle acceleration with plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under certain conditions it is possible to create spatial charge waves (OCE) in a plasma (ionized gas) through some disturbance mechanism, the phenomenon produces electric fields of high intensity that are propagated at velocities near to a c. When charged particles are connected to such OCE they may be accelerated to very high energies in short distances. At present electric fields of approximately 107 V/cm have been observed. (Author). 4 refs

  8. Charged rotating noncommutative black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we complete the program of the noncomutative geometry inspired black holes, providing the richest possible solution, endowed with mass, charge and angular momentum. After providing a prescription for employing the Newman-Janis algorithm in the case of nonvanishing stress tensors, we find regular axisymmetric charged black holes in the presence of a minimal length. We study also the new thermodynamics and we determine the corresponding higher-dimensional solutions. As a conclusion we make some consideration about possible applications.

  9. Charged rotating noncommutative black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modesto, Leonardo; Nicolini, Piero

    2010-11-01

    In this paper we complete the program of the noncomutative geometry inspired black holes, providing the richest possible solution, endowed with mass, charge and angular momentum. After providing a prescription for employing the Newman-Janis algorithm in the case of nonvanishing stress tensors, we find regular axisymmetric charged black holes in the presence of a minimal length. We study also the new thermodynamics and we determine the corresponding higher-dimensional solutions. As a conclusion we make some consideration about possible applications.

  10. Charged rotating noncommutative black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Modesto, Leonardo

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we complete the program of the Noncomutative Geometry inspired black holes, providing the richest possible solution, endowed with mass, charge and angular momentum. After providing a prescription for employing the Newmann-Janis algorithm in case of nonvanishing stress tensors, we find regular axisymmetric charged black holes in the presence of a minimal length. We study also the new thermodynamics and we determine the corresponding higher-dimensional solutions. As a conclusion we make some consideration about possible applications.

  11. Grain charging in protoplanetary discs

    OpenAIRE

    Ilgner, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Recent work identified a growth barrier for dust coagulation that originates in the electric repulsion between colliding particles. Depending on its charge state, dust material may have the potential to control key processes towards planet formation such as MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) turbulence and grain growth which are coupled in a two-way process. We quantify the grain charging at different stages of disc evolution and differentiate between two very extreme cases: compact spherical grains a...

  12. Weak charges of charmed particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The matrix elements between the lowest states of the ΔC=1 weak charges are evaluated including the effect of SU4 breaking. The charges are obtained from the corresponding generators of the classification group by a unitary transformation U, which is factorized as the product of operators acting on a single quark: the breaking is naturally introduced by having different mixing parameters for the different quarks

  13. Smart electric vehicle charging system

    OpenAIRE

    João C. Ferreira; Monteiro, Vítor Duarte Fernandes; João L Afonso; Silva, Alberto R.

    2011-01-01

    In this work is proposed the design of a system to create and handle Electric Vehicles (EV) charging procedures, based on intelligent process. Due to the electrical power distribution network limitation and absence of smart meter devices, Electric Vehicles charging should be performed in a balanced way, taking into account past experience, weather information based on data mining, and simulation approaches. In order to allow information exchange and to help user ...

  14. Irrigation externalities: pricing and charges

    OpenAIRE

    Gavan Dwyer; Robert Douglas; Deb Peterson; Jo Chong; Kate Maddern

    2006-01-01

    The Productivity Commission Staff Working Paper ‘Irrigation externalities: pricing and charges. by Gavan Dwyer, Robert Douglas, Deb Peterson, Jo Chong and Kate Maddern was released on 14 March 2006. The paper discusses the nature and causes of environmental change related to rural water use, and provides a taxonomy of the many diverse types. It also examines the issues surrounding possible charges on water use for water related externalities. There have been few attempts by water utilities to...

  15. Rewritable Artificial Magnetic Charge Ice

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yong-Lei; Xiao, Zhi-Li; Snezhko, Alexey; Xu, Jing; Ocola, Leonidas E.; Divan, Ralu; Pearson, John E.; Crabtree, George W.; Kwok, Wai-Kwong

    2016-01-01

    Artificial ices enable the study of geometrical frustration by design and through direct observation. However, it has proven difficult to achieve tailored long-range ordering of their diverse configurations, limiting both fundamental and applied research directions. We designed an artificial spin structure that produces a magnetic charge ice with tunable long-range ordering of eight different configurations. We also developed a technique to precisely manipulate the local magnetic charge state...

  16. Neutral and Charged Anyon Fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Hosotani, Yutaka

    1993-01-01

    (Review) Properties of neutral and charged anyon fluids are examined, with the main focus on the question whether or not a charged anyon fluid exhibits a superconductivity at zero and finite temperature. Quantum mechanics of anyon fluids is precisely described by Chern-Simons gauge theory. The random phase approximation (RPA), the linearized self-consistent field method (SCF), and the hydrodynamic approach employed in the early analysis of anyon fluids are all equivalent. Relations and differ...

  17. Charged-lepton flavour physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Andreas Hoecker

    2012-11-01

    This write-up on a talk at the 2011 Lepton–Photon symposium in Mumbai, India, summarizes recent results in the charged-lepton flavour sector. Searches for charged-lepton flavour violation, lepton electric dipole moments and flavour-conserving CP violation are reviewed here. Recent progress in -lepton physics and in the Standard Model prediction of the muon anomalous magnetic moment is also discussed.

  18. Stopbands in the existence domains of acoustic solitons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nsengiyumva, F., E-mail: franco.nseng@gmail.com; Hellberg, M. A., E-mail: hellberg@ukzn.ac.za; Mace, R. L., E-mail: macer@ukzn.ac.za [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4000 (South Africa); Verheest, F., E-mail: frank.verheest@ugent.be [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4000 (South Africa); Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281, B–9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2014-10-15

    A fully nonlinear Sagdeev pseudopotential approach is used to study the existence domain of fast mode ion-acoustic solitons in a three-species plasma composed of cold and warm adiabatic positive ion species and Boltzmann electrons. It is shown that for appropriate values of the cold-to-warm ion charge-to-mass ratio, μ, and the effective warm ion-to-electron temperature ratio, τ, there is a range in cold to warm ion charge density ratio, f, over which a stopband in soliton speed exists. Solitons do not propagate in the stopband, although they can occur for both higher and lower speeds. The stopbands are associated with a limiting curve of the existence domain that is double-valued in speed for a range of values of f. Analytical estimates of the upper and lower limits of τ and μ that support stopbands are found. It is suggested that, inter alia, the analysis should be applicable to the solar wind plasma.

  19. Modeling charge polarization voltage for large lithium-ion batteries in electric vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Jiang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Polarization voltage of the lithium-ion battery is an important parameter that has direct influence on battery performance. The paper aims to analyze the impedance characteristics of the lithium-ion battery based on EIS data. Design/methodology/approach: The effects of currents, initial SOC of the battery on charge polarization voltage are investigated, which is approximately linear function of charge current. The change of charge polarization voltage is also analyzed with the gradient analytical method in the SOC domain. The charge polarization model with two RC networks is presented, and parts of model parameters like Ohmic resistance and charge transfer impedance are estimated by both EIS method and battery constant current testing method. Findings: This paper reveals that the Ohmic resistance accounts for much contribution to battery total polarization compared to charge transfer impedance. Practical implications: Experimental results demonstrate the efficacy of the model with the proposed identification method, which provides the foundation for battery charging optimization. Originality/value: The paper analyzed the impedance characteristics of the lithium-ion battery based on EIS data, presented a charge polarization model with two RC networks, and estimated parameters like Ohmic resistance and charge transfer impedance.

  20. d-Density Wave Scenario Description of the New Hidden Charge Order in Cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhfudz, Imam

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we show that the theory of high Tc superconductivity based on a microscopic model with d-density wave (DDW) scenario in the pseudogap phase is able to reproduce some of the most important features of the recent experimentally discovered hidden charge order in several families of Cuprates. In particular, by computing and comparing energies of charge orders of different modulation directions derived from a full microscopic theory with d-density wave scenario, the axial charge order ϕX(Y) with wavevector {Q} = (Q0,0)((0,Q0)) is shown to be unambiguously energetically more favorable over the diagonal charge order ϕX±Y with wavevector {Q} = (Q0, ± Q0) at least in commensurate limit, to be expected also to hold even to more general incommensurate case, in agreement with experiment. The two types of axial charge order ϕX and ϕY are degenerate by symmetry. We find that within the superconducting background, biaxial (checkerboard) charge order is energetically more favorable than uniaxial (stripe) charge order, and therefore checkerboard axial charge order should be the one observed in experiments, assuming a single domain of charge ordered state on each CuO2 plane.

  1. The three-domain model

    OpenAIRE

    Nakata, Miyuki; Okada, Kiyotaka

    2012-01-01

    Blade outgrowth and region-specific cell differentiation are crucial events during the early development of plant leaves, and the progression of both of these events requires a normal adaxial-abaxial pattern. In a recent study, we had demonstrated that two WUSCHEL-RELATED HOMEOBOX (WOX) family genes, i.e., PRESSED FLOWER (PRS) and WOX1, act redundantly in blade outgrowth and adaxial-abaxial patterning. During leaf development, the two genes are expressed in the domain between the adaxial and ...

  2. Superconductivity in domains with corners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnaillie-Noel, Virginie; Fournais, Søren

    2007-01-01

    We study the two-dimensional Ginzburg-Landau functional in a domain with corners for exterior magnetic field strengths near the critical field where the transition from the superconducting to the normal state occurs. We discuss and clarify the definition of this field and obtain a complete...... asymptotic expansion for it in the large $\\kappa$ regime. Furthermore, we discuss nucleation of superconductivity at the boundary....

  3. Categorization in the Affective Domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauciuc, Gabriela-Alina

    2011-01-01

    Data collected in Romance and Scandinavian languages (N=474) in a superordinate category name production task indicate that a multiple-strategy approach would be more suitable for accounting of categorization in the affective domain instead of a prototype approach as suggested by previous studies....... This paper will highlight performance aspects which appear to be consistent with such an interpretation, as well as an important layman- expert knowledge asymmetry in affective categorization....

  4. Flexible time domain averaging technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming; Lin, Jing; Lei, Yaguo; Wang, Xiufeng

    2013-09-01

    Time domain averaging(TDA) is essentially a comb filter, it cannot extract the specified harmonics which may be caused by some faults, such as gear eccentric. Meanwhile, TDA always suffers from period cutting error(PCE) to different extent. Several improved TDA methods have been proposed, however they cannot completely eliminate the waveform reconstruction error caused by PCE. In order to overcome the shortcomings of conventional methods, a flexible time domain averaging(FTDA) technique is established, which adapts to the analyzed signal through adjusting each harmonic of the comb filter. In this technique, the explicit form of FTDA is first constructed by frequency domain sampling. Subsequently, chirp Z-transform(CZT) is employed in the algorithm of FTDA, which can improve the calculating efficiency significantly. Since the signal is reconstructed in the continuous time domain, there is no PCE in the FTDA. To validate the effectiveness of FTDA in the signal de-noising, interpolation and harmonic reconstruction, a simulated multi-components periodic signal that corrupted by noise is processed by FTDA. The simulation results show that the FTDA is capable of recovering the periodic components from the background noise effectively. Moreover, it can improve the signal-to-noise ratio by 7.9 dB compared with conventional ones. Experiments are also carried out on gearbox test rigs with chipped tooth and eccentricity gear, respectively. It is shown that the FTDA can identify the direction and severity of the eccentricity gear, and further enhances the amplitudes of impulses by 35%. The proposed technique not only solves the problem of PCE, but also provides a useful tool for the fault symptom extraction of rotating machinery.

  5. Domains of bosonic functional integrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a mathematical framework for bosonic Euclidean quantum field functional integrals based on the theory of integration on the dual algebraic vector space of classical field sources. We present a generalization of the Minlos-Dao Xing theorem and apply it to determine exactly the domain of integration associated to the functional integral representation of the two-dimensional quantum electrodynamics Schwinger generating functional. (author)

  6. Finite Domain Bounds Consistency Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Chiu Wo; Harvey, Warwick; Lee, Jimmy Ho-Man; Stuckey, Peter J.

    2004-01-01

    A widely adopted approach to solving constraint satisfaction problems combines systematic tree search with constraint propagation for pruning the search space. Constraint propagation is performed by propagators implementing a certain notion of consistency. Bounds consistency is the method of choice for building propagators for arithmetic constraints and several global constraints in the finite integer domain. However, there has been some confusion in the definition of bounds consistency. In t...

  7. Safe explosives for shaped charges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was demonstrated that high-performance shaped charges could be developed using as the explosive charge mixtures of ingredients that are not, by themselves, considered explosives. At least one of the ingredients needed to be a liquid, stored separately, that could be quickly injected into the shaped charge cavity to generate the active explosive. Precision copper shaped charge cones in diameters of 65.2, 83.8, and 100.2 mm (about 2.6, 3.3, and 4.0 in.) were obtained and appropriate hardware was fabricated. It was demonstrated that 4 cone diameters of penetration were obtained in 255 BHN armor plate steel if the explosive charge was nitromethane or a combination of fine crystalline ammonium nitrate at a density of 1.0 Mg/m3 with nitromethane. However, when prilled ammonium nitrate was used with nitromethane, the jet failed to form. The shaped charges would be used to destroy the high explosive in a nuclear warhead in case of imminent enemy threat to the weapon

  8. Solar Charged Stand Alone Inverter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Vasugi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with solar powered stand alone inverter which converts the variable dc output of a photovoltaic solar panel into ac that can be fed to loads. Stand alone inverters are used in systems where the inverter get its energy from batteries charged by photo voltaic arrays. A charge controller limits the rate at which electric current is added to or drawn from electric batteries. This charge discharge controller is needed to prevent the battery from being overcharged or discharged thus prolonging its life. The charge/discharge control is necessary in order to achieve safety and increase the capacity of the battery. The project has been tested according its operational purposes. Maximum power rating of the experimented solar charge controller is 100W according battery capacities. Cost effective solar charge controller has been designed and implemented to have efficient system and much longer battery lifetime. The dc output is given to inverter and then it is supplied to loads. This method is very cheap and cost effective.

  9. Jet Charge at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Krohn, David; Schwartz, Matthew D; Waalewijn, Wouter J

    2013-01-01

    Knowing the charge of the parton initiating a light-quark jet could be extremely useful both for testing aspects of the Standard Model and for characterizing potential beyond-the-Standard-Model signals. We show that despite the complications of hadronization and out-of-jet radiation such as pile-up, a weighted sum of the charges of a jet's constituents can be used at the LHC to distinguish among jets with different charges. Potential applications include measuring electroweak quantum numbers of hadronically decaying resonances or supersymmetric particles, as well as Standard Model tests, such as jet charge in dijet events or in hadronically-decaying W bosons in t-tbar events. We develop a systematically improvable method to calculate moments of these charge distributions by combining multi-hadron fragmentation functions with perturbative jet functions and pertubative evolution equations. We show that the dependence on energy and jet size for the average and width of the jet charge can be calculated despite th...

  10. Engineering charge ordering into multiferroicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xu; Jin, Kui-juan

    2016-04-01

    Multiferroic materials have attracted great interest but are rare in nature. In many transition-metal oxides, charge ordering and magnetic ordering coexist, so that a method of engineering charge-ordered materials into ferroelectric materials would lead to a large class of multiferroic materials. We propose a strategy for designing new ferroelectric or even multiferroic materials by inserting a spacing layer into each two layers of charge-ordered materials and artificially making a superlattice. One example of the model demonstrated here is the perovskite (LaFeO3)2/LaTiO3 (111) superlattice, in which the LaTiO3 layer acts as the donor and the spacing layer, and the LaFeO3 layer is half doped and performs charge ordering. The collaboration of the charge ordering and the spacing layer breaks the space inversion symmetry, resulting in a large ferroelectric polarization. As the charge ordering also leads to a ferrimagnetic structure, (LaFeO3)2/LaTiO3 is multiferroic. It is expected that this work can encourage the designing and experimental implementation of a large class of multiferroic structures with novel properties.

  11. Two-dimensional charge transport in self-organized, high-mobility conjugated polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sirringhaus, H.; Brown, P.J.; Friend, R.H.;

    1999-01-01

    Self-organization in many solution-processed, semiconducting conjugated polymers results in complex microstructures, in which ordered microcrystalline domains are embedded in an amorphous matrix(I). This has important consequences for electrical properties of these materials: charge transport is ...

  12. Subharmonic Fourier domain mode locking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eigenwillig, Christoph M; Wieser, Wolfgang; Biedermann, Benjamin R; Huber, Robert

    2009-03-15

    We demonstrate a subharmonically Fourier domain mode-locked wavelength-swept laser source with a substantially reduced cavity fiber length. In contrast to a standard Fourier domain mode-locked configuration, light is recirculated repetitively in the delay line with the optical bandpass filter used as switch. The laser has a fundamental optical round trip frequency of 285 kHz and can be operated at integer fractions thereof (subharmonics). Sweep ranges up to 95 nm full width centred at 1317 nm are achieved at the 1/5th subharmonic. A maximum sensitivity of 116 dB and an axial resolution of 12 microm in air are measured at an average sweep power of 12 mW. A sensitivity roll-off of 11 dB over 4 mm and 25 dB over 10 mm is observed and optical coherence tomography imaging is demonstrated. Besides the advantage of a reduced fiber length, subharmonic Fourier domain mode locking (shFDML) enables simple scaling of the sweep speed by extracting light from the delay part of the resonator. A sweep rate of 570 kHz is achieved. Characteristic features of shFDML operation, such as power leakage during fly-back and cw breakthrough, are investigated. PMID:19282912

  13. Directly created electrostatic micro-domains on hydroxyapatite: probing with a Kelvin Force probe and a protein

    CERN Document Server

    Plecenik, Tomas; Gregor, Maros; Truchly, Martin; Lang, Sidney; Gandhi, Abbasi; Zahoran, Miroslav; Laffir, Fathima; Soulimane, Tewfik; Vargova, Melinda; Plesch, Gustav; Kus, Peter; Plecenik, Andrej; Tofail, S A M; 10.1007/s10856-011-4498-x

    2013-01-01

    Micro-domains of modified surface potential (SP) were created on hydroxyapatite (HAp) films by direct patterning by midenergy focused electron beam, typically available as a microprobe of Scanning Electron Microscopes. The SP distribution of these patterns has been studied on sub-micrometer scale by the Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy method as well as lysozyme adsorption. Since the lysozyme is positively charged at physiological pH, it allows us to track positively and negatively charged areas of the SP patterns. Distribution of the adsorbed proteins over the domains was in good agreement with the observed SP patterns.

  14. Directly created electrostatic micro-domains on hydroxyapatite: probing with a Kelvin Force probe and a protein

    OpenAIRE

    Plecenik, Tomas; Robin, Sylvain; Gregor, Maros; Truchly, Martin; Lang, Sidney; Gandhi, Abbasi; Zahoran, Miroslav; Laffir, Fathima; Soulimane, Tewfik; Vargova, Melinda; Plesch, Gustav; Kus, Peter; Plecenik, Andrej; Tofail, S. A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Micro-domains of modified surface potential (SP) were created on hydroxyapatite (HAp) films by direct patterning by midenergy focused electron beam, typically available as a microprobe of Scanning Electron Microscopes. The SP distribution of these patterns has been studied on sub-micrometer scale by the Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy method as well as lysozyme adsorption. Since the lysozyme is positively charged at physiological pH, it allows us to track positively and negatively charged areas...

  15. Local Charge and Spin Currents in Magnetothermal Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Mathias; Althammer, Matthias; Czeschka, Franz D.; Huebl, Hans; Wagner, Martin S.; Opel, Matthias; Imort, Inga-Mareen; Reiss, Günter; Thomas, Andy; Gross, Rudolf; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.

    2012-03-01

    A scannable laser beam is used to generate local thermal gradients in metallic (Co2FeAl) or insulating (Y3Fe5O12) ferromagnetic thin films. We study the resulting local charge and spin currents that arise due to the anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) and the spin Seebeck effect (SSE), respectively. In the local ANE experiments, we detect the voltage in the Co2FeAl thin film plane as a function of the laser-spot position and external magnetic field magnitude and orientation. The local SSE effect is detected in a similar fashion by exploiting the inverse spin Hall effect in a Pt layer deposited on top of the Y3Fe5O12. Our findings establish local thermal spin and charge current generation as well as spin caloritronic domain imaging.

  16. Charged Polymers Transport under Applied Electric Fields in Periodic Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin Nedelcu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available By molecular dynamics simulations, we investigated the transport of charged polymers in applied electric fields in confining environments, which were straight cylinders of uniform or non-uniform diameter. In the simulations, the solvent was modeled explicitly and, also, the counterions and coions of added salt. The electrophoretic velocities of charged chains in relation to electrolyte friction, hydrodynamic effects due to the solvent, and surface friction were calculated. We found that the velocities were higher if counterions were moved away from the polymeric domain, which led to a decrease in hydrodynamic friction. The topology of the surface played a key role in retarding the motion of the polyelectrolyte and, even more so, in the presence of transverse electric fields. The present study showed that a possible way of improving separation resolution is by controlling the motion of counterions or electrolyte friction effects.

  17. Fast electronic resistance switching involving hidden charge density wave states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaskivskyi, I.; Mihailovic, I. A.; Brazovskii, S.; Gospodaric, J.; Mertelj, T.; Svetin, D.; Sutar, P.; Mihailovic, D.

    2016-05-01

    The functionality of computer memory elements is currently based on multi-stability, driven either by locally manipulating the density of electrons in transistors or by switching magnetic or ferroelectric order. Another possibility is switching between metallic and insulating phases by the motion of ions, but their speed is limited by slow nucleation and inhomogeneous percolative growth. Here we demonstrate fast resistance switching in a charge density wave system caused by pulsed current injection. As a charge pulse travels through the material, it converts a commensurately ordered polaronic Mott insulating state in 1T-TaS2 to a metastable electronic state with textured domain walls, accompanied with a conversion of polarons to band states, and concurrent rapid switching from an insulator to a metal. The large resistance change, high switching speed (30 ps) and ultralow energy per bit opens the way to new concepts in non-volatile memory devices manipulating all-electronic states.

  18. Study of Charge Carrier Transport in GaN Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenijus Gaubas

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Capacitor and Schottky diode sensors were fabricated on GaN material grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition techniques using plasma etching and metal deposition. The operational characteristics of these devices have been investigated by profiling current transients and by comparing the experimental regimes of the perpendicular and parallel injection of excess carrier domains. Profiling of the carrier injection location allows for the separation of the bipolar and the monopolar charge drift components. Carrier mobility values attributed to the hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE GaN material have been estimated as μe = 1000 ± 200 cm2/Vs for electrons, and μh = 400 ± 80 cm2/Vs for holes, respectively. Current transients under injection of the localized and bulk packets of excess carriers have been examined in order to determine the surface charge formation and polarization effects.

  19. Zero dead time spectroscopy without full charge collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Savannah River Technology Center has built a remote gamma monitoring instrument which employs data sampling techniques rather than full charge collection to perform energy spectroscopy without instrument dead time. The raw, unamplified anode output of a photomultiplier tube is directly coupled to the instrument to generate many digital samples during the charge collection process, so that all pulse processing is done in the digital domain. The primary components are a free running, 32 MSPS, 10-bit A/D, a field programmable gate array, FIFO buffers, and a digital signal processor (DSP). Algorithms for pulse integration, pile-up rejection, and other shape-based criteria are being developed in DSP code for migration into the gate array. Spectra taken with a 2 in NaI(Tl) detector have been obtained at rates as high as 59 000 counts per second without dead time with peak resolution at 662 keV measuring 7.3%

  20. Local charge and spin currents in magnetothermal landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Mathias; Althammer, Matthias; Czeschka, Franz D; Huebl, Hans; Wagner, Martin S; Opel, Matthias; Imort, Inga-Mareen; Reiss, Günter; Thomas, Andy; Gross, Rudolf; Goennenwein, Sebastian T B

    2012-03-01

    A scannable laser beam is used to generate local thermal gradients in metallic (Co2FeAl) or insulating (Y3Fe5O12) ferromagnetic thin films. We study the resulting local charge and spin currents that arise due to the anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) and the spin Seebeck effect (SSE), respectively. In the local ANE experiments, we detect the voltage in the Co2FeAl thin film plane as a function of the laser-spot position and external magnetic field magnitude and orientation. The local SSE effect is detected in a similar fashion by exploiting the inverse spin Hall effect in a Pt layer deposited on top of the Y3Fe5O12. Our findings establish local thermal spin and charge current generation as well as spin caloritronic domain imaging. PMID:22463435

  1. Fast electronic resistance switching involving hidden charge density wave states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaskivskyi, I; Mihailovic, I A; Brazovskii, S; Gospodaric, J; Mertelj, T; Svetin, D; Sutar, P; Mihailovic, D

    2016-01-01

    The functionality of computer memory elements is currently based on multi-stability, driven either by locally manipulating the density of electrons in transistors or by switching magnetic or ferroelectric order. Another possibility is switching between metallic and insulating phases by the motion of ions, but their speed is limited by slow nucleation and inhomogeneous percolative growth. Here we demonstrate fast resistance switching in a charge density wave system caused by pulsed current injection. As a charge pulse travels through the material, it converts a commensurately ordered polaronic Mott insulating state in 1T-TaS2 to a metastable electronic state with textured domain walls, accompanied with a conversion of polarons to band states, and concurrent rapid switching from an insulator to a metal. The large resistance change, high switching speed (30 ps) and ultralow energy per bit opens the way to new concepts in non-volatile memory devices manipulating all-electronic states. PMID:27181483

  2. Piezoelectric properties of twinned ferroelectric perovskites with head-to-head and tail-to-tail domain walls

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ondrejkovič, Petr; Márton, Pavel; Guennou, Mael; Setter, N.; Hlinka, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 2 (2013), "024114-1"-"024114-9". ISSN 1098-0121 Grant ostatní: 7th Framework Programme(XE) 268058 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : piezoelectric properties * charged domain walls * domain structure * twinned ferroelectric Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.664, year: 2013 http://link.aps.org/doi/10.1103/PhysRevB.88.024114

  3. Nanoscale and macroscopic electrical ac transport along conductive domain walls in lithium niobate single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrical impedance properties of UV-illuminated (λ = 310 nm) charged, conductive domain walls (CDWs) in 5 mol% magnesium-doped lithium niobate (LNO) single crystals are investigated on the nm-length scale using nanoimpedance microscopy (NIM) as well as by comparing the macroscopically measured complex impedance response between multi- and single-domain LNO samples. Similar to the case of dc conductivity, a higher conductivity of domain walls (DWs) compared to the bulk insulating matrix was observed. The contrast between DWs and bulk is most pronounced at lower frequencies (f < 200 Hz) due to the large bulk capacitance at higher frequencies. Moreover, the simultaneous application of both an ac and dc bias results in an increased real part of the ac DW current. Also, equivalent circuits accurately describing both the domain and CDW contributions were developed; as a result we are able to analyze and quantify the complex dielectric conductive behavior of both bulk and CDWs in LNO within the framework of the mixed conduction model. Hopping of excited charge carriers along the CDWs was identified as the dominant charge transport process. (paper)

  4. The role of electron capture and energy exchange of positively charged particles passing through matter

    CERN Document Server

    Ulmer, W

    2011-01-01

    The conventional treatment of the Bethe-Bloch equation for protons accounts for electron capture at the end of the projectile track by the small Barkas correction. This is only a possible way for protons, whereas for light and heavier charged nuclei the exchange of energy and charge along the track has to be accounted for by regarding the projectile charge q as a function of the residual energy. This leads to a significant modification of the Bethe-Bloch equation, otherwise the range in a medium is incorrectly determined. The LET in the Bragg peak domain and distal end is significantly influenced by the electron capture. A rather significant result is that in the domain of the Bragg peak the superiority of carbon ions is reduced compared to protons.

  5. Azimuthal Charged-Particle Correlations and Possible Local Strong Parity Violation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05

    Parity-odd domains, corresponding to non-trivial topological solutions of the QCD vacuum, might be created during relativistic heavy-ion collisions. These domains are predicted to lead to charge separation of quarks along the system's orbital momentum axis. We investigate a three particle azimuthal correlator which is a {Rho} even observable, but directly sensitive to the charge separation effect. We report measurements of charged hadrons near center-of-mass rapidity with this observable in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV using the STAR detector. A signal consistent with several expectations from the theory is detected. We discuss possible contributions from other effects that are not related to parity violation.

  6. Azimuthal Charged-Particle Correlations and Possible Local Strong Parity Violation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bnzarov, I.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bridgeman, A.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Calderón de La Barca Sánchez, M.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Silva, L. C.; Dedovich, T. G.; Dephillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Konzer, J.; Kopytine, M.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lapointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C.-H.; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; Levine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, N.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, A.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Semertzidis, Y.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X.-H.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C., Jr.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xie, W.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Y.; Yepes, P.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yue, Q.; Zawisza, M.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhan, W.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, W. M.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, Y.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zuo, J. X.

    2009-12-01

    Parity-odd domains, corresponding to nontrivial topological solutions of the QCD vacuum, might be created during relativistic heavy-ion collisions. These domains are predicted to lead to charge separation of quarks along the system’s orbital momentum axis. We investigate a three-particle azimuthal correlator which is a P even observable, but directly sensitive to the charge separation effect. We report measurements of charged hadrons near center-of-mass rapidity with this observable in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at sNN=200GeV using the STAR detector. A signal consistent with several expectations from the theory is detected. We discuss possible contributions from other effects that are not related to parity violation.

  7. Beyond cross-domain learning: Multiple-domain nonnegative matrix factorization

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jingyan

    2014-02-01

    Traditional cross-domain learning methods transfer learning from a source domain to a target domain. In this paper, we propose the multiple-domain learning problem for several equally treated domains. The multiple-domain learning problem assumes that samples from different domains have different distributions, but share the same feature and class label spaces. Each domain could be a target domain, while also be a source domain for other domains. A novel multiple-domain representation method is proposed for the multiple-domain learning problem. This method is based on nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF), and tries to learn a basis matrix and coding vectors for samples, so that the domain distribution mismatch among different domains will be reduced under an extended variation of the maximum mean discrepancy (MMD) criterion. The novel algorithm - multiple-domain NMF (MDNMF) - was evaluated on two challenging multiple-domain learning problems - multiple user spam email detection and multiple-domain glioma diagnosis. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm is experimentally verified. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Nonlinear charge transport in the helicoidal DNA molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang Koko, A; Tabi, C B; Ekobena Fouda, H P; Mohamadou, A; Kofané, T C

    2012-12-01

    Charge transport in the twist-opening model of DNA is explored via the modulational instability of a plane wave. The dynamics of charge is shown to be governed, in the adiabatic approximation, by a modified discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation with next-nearest neighbor interactions. The linear stability analysis is performed on the latter and manifestations of the modulational instability are discussed according to the value of the parameter α, which measures hopping interaction correction. In so doing, increasing α leads to a reduction of the instability domain and, therefore, increases our chances of choosing appropriate values of parameters that could give rise to pattern formation in the twist-opening model. Our analytical predictions are verified numerically, where the generic equations for the radial and torsional dynamics are directly integrated. The impact of charge migration on the above degrees of freedom is discussed for different values of α. Soliton-like and localized structures are observed and thus confirm our analytical predictions. We also find that polaronic structures, as known in DNA charge transport, are generated through modulational instability, and hence reinforces the robustness of polaron in the model we study. PMID:23278045

  9. Decay of Electrical Charges on Polyethylene Terephthalate Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nemamcha

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface potential decay (SPD characteristics of a corona charged polyethylene terephtalate (PET are investigated experimentally.A negative corona discharge produced in a needle – grid – plate electrode system was employed to charge the surfaceof the film samples (thickness: 0.5 mm; surface: 50 mm x 50 mm. The temperature effect, initial potential and relativehumidity are presented. The variation domains for the three factors were respectively: 20 to 60°C; -1000 to -1800 V; 20 to80%. All surface potential decay measurements were carried out in a commercial climatic chamber, where relative humidityRH and temperature T were rigorously controlled. The aim of the present work is to demonstrate the effectiveness of the Experimentalmethodology for evaluating the effects of these factors. This investigation has showed that the surface potentialdecay is highly conditioned by temperature, relative humidity and charge density initially lay down on the material. Chargeinjection mechanism in material bulk seems to be the more probable hypothesis to explain charge flow in PET. More over,the experiment results confirm the influence and the role of thermal activation and electrical field on the potential decay

  10. Nonlinear charge transport in the helicoidal DNA molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang Koko, A.; Tabi, C. B.; Ekobena Fouda, H. P.; Mohamadou, A.; Kofané, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    Charge transport in the twist-opening model of DNA is explored via the modulational instability of a plane wave. The dynamics of charge is shown to be governed, in the adiabatic approximation, by a modified discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation with next-nearest neighbor interactions. The linear stability analysis is performed on the latter and manifestations of the modulational instability are discussed according to the value of the parameter α, which measures hopping interaction correction. In so doing, increasing α leads to a reduction of the instability domain and, therefore, increases our chances of choosing appropriate values of parameters that could give rise to pattern formation in the twist-opening model. Our analytical predictions are verified numerically, where the generic equations for the radial and torsional dynamics are directly integrated. The impact of charge migration on the above degrees of freedom is discussed for different values of α. Soliton-like and localized structures are observed and thus confirm our analytical predictions. We also find that polaronic structures, as known in DNA charge transport, are generated through modulational instability, and hence reinforces the robustness of polaron in the model we study.

  11. Charged Particle Multiplicities in Deep Inelastic Scattering at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aïd, S; Andreev, V; Andrieu, B; Appuhn, R D; Babaev, A; Ban, Y; Baranov, P S; Barrelet, E; Barschke, R; Bartel, Wulfrin; Barth, Monique; Bassler, U; Beck, H P; Behrend, H J; Belousov, A; Berger, C; Bernardi, G; Bertrand-Coremans, G H; Besançon, M; Beyer, R; Biddulph, P; Bispham, P; Bizot, J C; Blobel, Volker; Borras, K; Botterweck, F; Boudry, V; Braemer, A; Braunschweig, W; Brisson, V; Bruel, P; Bruncko, Dusan; Brune, C R; Buchholz, R; Buniatian, A Yu; Burke, S; Burton, M; Bähr, J; Büngener, L; Bürger, J; Büsser, F W; Calvet, D; Campbell, A J; Carli, T; Charlet, M; Chechelnitskii, S; Chernyshov, V; Clarke, D; Clegg, A B; Clerbaux, B; Cocks, S P; Contreras, J G; Cormack, C; Coughlan, J A; Courau, A; Cousinou, M C; Cozzika, G; Criegee, L; Cussans, D G; Cvach, J; Dagoret, S; Dainton, J B; Dau, W D; Daum, K; David, M; Davis, C L; De Wolf, E A; Delcourt, B; Di Nezza, P; Dirkmann, M; Dixon, P; Dlugosz, W; Dollfus, C; Dowell, John D; Dreis, H B; Droutskoi, A; Duhm, H; Dünger, O; Ebert, J; Ebert, T R; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eichler, R; Eisele, Franz; Eisenhandler, Eric F; Ellison, R J; Elsen, E E; Erdmann, M; Erdmann, W; Evrard, E; Fahr, A B; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Feeken, D; Felst, R; Feltesse, Joel; Ferencei, J; Ferrarotto, F; Flamm, K; Fleischer, M; Flieser, M; Flügge, G; Fomenko, A; Fominykh, B A; Formánek, J; Foster, J M; Franke, G; Fretwurst, E; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gabathuler, K; Gaede, F; Garvey, J; Gayler, J; Gebauer, M; Genzel, H; Gerhards, R; Glazov, A; Goerlach, U; Gogitidze, N; Goldberg, M; Goldner, D; Golec-Biernat, Krzysztof J; González-Pineiro, B; Gorelov, I V; Grab, C; Greenshaw, T J; Griffiths, R K; Grindhammer, G; Gruber, A; Gruber, C; Grässler, Herbert; Grässler, R; Görlich, L; Haack, J; Hadig, T; Haidt, Dieter; Hajduk, L; Hampel, M; Haynes, W J; Heinzelmann, G; Henderson, R C W; Henschel, H; Herynek, I; Hess, M F; Hewitt, K; Hildesheim, W; Hiller, K H; Hilton, C D; Hladky, J; Hoeger, K C; Hoffmann, D; Holtom, T; Hoppner, M; Horisberger, R P; Hudgson, V L; Hufnagel, H; Hütte, M; Ibbotson, M; Itterbeck, H; Jacholkowska, A; Jacobsson, C; Jaffré, M; Janoth, J; Jansen, T; Johnson, D P; Jung, H; Jönsson, L B; Kalmus, Peter I P; Kander, M; Kant, D; Kaschowitz, R; Kathage, U; Katzy, J M; Kaufmann, H H; Kaufmann, O; Kazarian, S; Kenyon, Ian Richard; Kermiche, S; Keuker, C; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Knies, G; Kolanski, H; Kole, F; Kolya, S D; Korbel, V; Korn, M; Kostka, P; Kotelnikov, S K; Krasny, M W; Krehbiel, H; Krämerkämper, T; Krücker, D; Kuhlen, M; Kurca, T; Kurzhofer, J; Köhler, T; Köhne, J H; Küster, H; Lacour, D; Laforge, B; Lander, R; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Langenegger, U; Laporte, J F; Lebedev, A; Lehner, F; Levonian, S; Lindström, G; Lindstrøm, M; Link, J; Linsel, F; Lipinski, J; List, B; Lobo, G; Loch, P; Lomas, J W; Lubimov, V; Lüke, D; López, G C; Magnussen, N; Malinovskii, E I; Mani, S; Maracek, R; Marage, P; Marks, J; Marshall, R; Martens, J; Martin, G; Martin, R D; Martyn, H U; Martyniak, J; Mavroidis, A; Maxfield, S J; McMahon, S J; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Meyer, A; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Meyer, P O; Migliori, A; Mikocki, S; Milstead, D; Moeck, J; Moreau, F; Morris, J V; Mroczko, E; Murín, P; Müller, G; Müller, K; Nagovitsin, V; Nahnhauer, R; Naroska, Beate; Naumann, T; Negri, I; Newman, P R; Newton, D; Neyret, D; Nguyen, H K; Nicholls, T C; Niebergall, F; Niebuhr, C B; Niedzballa, C; Niggli, H; Nisius, R; Nowak, G; Noyes, G W; Nyberg-Werther, M; Oakden, M N; Oberlack, H; Olsson, J E; Ozerov, D; Palmen, P; Panaro, E; Panitch, A; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Pawletta, H; Peppel, E; Phillips, J P; Pieuchot, A; Pitzl, D; Pope, G; Prell, S; Pérez, E; Rabbertz, K; Reimer, P; Reinshagen, S; Rick, Hartmut; Riech, V; Riedlberger, J; Riepenhausen, F; Riess, S; Rizvi, E; Robertson, S M; Robmann, P; Roloff, H E; Roosen, R; Rosenbauer, K; Rostovtsev, A A; Rouse, F; Royon, C; Rusakov, S V; Rybicki, K; Rädel, G; Rüter, K; Sankey, D P C; Schacht, P; Schiek, S; Schleif, S; Schleper, P; Schmidt, D; Schmidt, G; Schröder, V; Schuhmann, E; Schwab, B; Schöning, A; Sefkow, F; Seidel, M; Sell, R; Semenov, A A; Shekelian, V I; Shevyakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Siegmon, G; Siewert, U; Sirois, Y; Skillicorn, Ian O; Smirnov, P; Smith, J R; Solochenko, V; Soloviev, Yu V; Specka, A E; Spiekermann, J; Spielman, S; Spitzer, H; Squinabol, F; Starosta, R; Steenbock, M; Steffen, P; Steinberg, R; Steiner, H; Steinhart, J; Stella, B; Stellberger, A; Stier, J; Stiewe, J; Stolze, K; Straumann, U; Struczinski, W; Stösslein, U; Sutton, J P; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tasevsky, M; Theissen, J; Thiebaux, C; Thompson, G; Truöl, P; Tsipolitis, G; Turnau, J; Tutas, J; Uelkes, P; Usik, A; Valkár, S; Valkárová, A; Vallée, C; Van Esch, P; Van Mechelen, P; Van den Plas, D; Vazdik, Ya A; Verrecchia, P; Villet, G; Wacker, K; Wagener, A; Wagener, M; Walther, A; Waugh, B; Weber, G; Weber, M; Wegener, D; Wegner, A; Wengler, T; Werner, M; West, L R; Wiesand, S; Wilksen, T; Willard, S; Winde, M; Winter, G G; Wittek, C; Wobisch, M; Wünsch, E; Zarbock, D; Zhang, Z; Zhokin, A S; Zini, P; Zomer, F; Zsembery, J; Zuber, K; Zur Nedden, M; Zácek, J; de Roeck, A; von Schlippe, W

    1996-01-01

    Using the H1 detector at HERA, charged particle multiplicity distributions in deep inelastic ep scattering have been measured over a large kinematical region. The evolution with $W$ and $Q^2$ of the multiplicity distribution and of the multiplicity moments in pseudorapidity domains of varying size is studied in the current fragmentation region of the hadronic centre-of-mass frame. The results are compared with data from fixed target lepton-nucleon interactions, $e^+e^-$ annihilations and hadron-hadron collisions as well as with expectations from QCD based parton models. Fits to the Negative Binomial and Lognormal distributions are presented.

  12. A Domain Standard for Land Administration

    OpenAIRE

    Lemmen, C.; Van Oosterom, P.; P. Van Der Molen

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a Domain Model for Land Administration (LA). As a result a formal International Standard is available: ISO 19152 Geographic Information – Land Administration Domain Model (LADM) (ISO, 2012). Domain specific standardisation is needed to capture the semantics of the land administration domain on top of the agreed foundation of basic standards for geometry, temporal aspects, metadata and also observations and measurements from the field. A standard is required f...

  13. Issues in Planning Domain Model Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    McCluskey, T.L.; Vaquero, Tiago; Vallati, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    The paper raises some issues relating to the engineering of domain models for automated planning. It studies the idea of a domain model as a formal specification of a domain, and considers properties of that specification. It proposes some definitions, which the planning and, more generally, the artificial intelligence community needs to consider, in order to properly deal with engineering issues in domain model creation.

  14. Application Domain Name-Based Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Václavík

    2009-01-01

    Information about the problem domain of the software and the solution it implements is often embedded by developers in comments and identifiers. When using software developed by others or when are new to a project, programmers know little about how domain information is reflected in the source code. In the paper, the way to establish a commonly used domain vocabulary automatically is presented. Two domains have been selected: application servers and web frameworks. In the paper we are also in...

  15. DENN Domain Proteins: Regulators of Rab GTPases*

    OpenAIRE

    Marat, Andrea L.; Dokainish, Hatem; McPherson, Peter S

    2011-01-01

    The DENN domain is a common, evolutionarily ancient, and conserved protein module, yet it has gone largely unstudied; until recently, little was known regarding its functional roles. New studies reveal that various DENN domains interact directly with members of the Rab family of small GTPases and that DENN domains function enzymatically as Rab-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factors. Thus, DENN domain proteins appear to be generalized regulators of Rab function. Study of these proteins w...

  16. Bisociative Discovery of Interesting Relations between Domains

    OpenAIRE

    Nagel, Uwe; Thiel, Kilian; Kötter, Tobias; Piatek, Dawid; Berthold, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of surprising relations in large, heterogeneous information repositories is gaining increasing importance in real world data analysis. If these repositories come from diverse origins, forming different domains, domain bridging associations between otherwise weakly connected domains can provide insights into the data that can otherwise not be accomplished. In this paper, we propose a first formalization for the detection of such potentially interesting, domain-crossing relations ...

  17. Multiple graph regularized protein domain ranking

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Jim; Bensmail Halima; Gao Xin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Protein domain ranking is a fundamental task in structural biology. Most protein domain ranking methods rely on the pairwise comparison of protein domains while neglecting the global manifold structure of the protein domain database. Recently, graph regularized ranking that exploits the global structure of the graph defined by the pairwise similarities has been proposed. However, the existing graph regularized ranking methods are very sensitive to the choice of the graph m...

  18. Identification of alternative topological domains in chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Filippova, Darya; Patro, Rob; Duggal, Geet; Kingsford, Carl

    2014-01-01

    Chromosome conformation capture experiments have led to the discovery of dense, contiguous, megabase-sized topological domains that are similar across cell types and conserved across species. These domains are strongly correlated with a number of chromatin markers and have since been included in a number of analyses. However, functionally-relevant domains may exist at multiple length scales. We introduce a new and efficient algorithm that is able to capture persistent domains across various r...

  19. Multiscale Identification of Topological Domains in Chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Filippova, Darya; Patro, Rob; Duggal, Geet; Kingsford, Carl

    2013-01-01

    Recent chromosome conformation capture experiments have led to the discovery of dense, contiguous, megabase-sized topological domains that are similar across cell types and conserved across species. These domains are strongly correlated with a number of chromatin markers and have since been included in a number of analyses. However, functionally-relevant domains may exist at multiple length scales. We introduce a new and efficient algorithm that is able to capture persistent domains across va...

  20. Space Charge Modulated Electrical Breakdown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shengtao; Zhu, Yuanwei; Min, Daomin; Chen, George

    2016-01-01

    Electrical breakdown is one of the most important physical phenomena in electrical and electronic engineering. Since the early 20(th) century, many theories and models of electrical breakdown have been proposed, but the origin of one key issue, that the explanation for dc breakdown strength being twice or higher than ac breakdown strength in insulating materials, remains unclear. Here, by employing a bipolar charge transport model, we investigate the space charge dynamics in both dc and ac breakdown processes. We demonstrate the differences in charge accumulations under both dc and ac stresses and estimate the breakdown strength, which is modulated by the electric field distortion induced by space charge. It is concluded that dc breakdown initializes in the bulk whereas ac breakdown initializes in the vicinity of the sample-electrode interface. Compared with dc breakdown, the lower breakdown strength under ac stress and the decreasing breakdown strength with an increase in applied frequency, are both attributed to the electric field distortion induced by space charges located in the vicinity of the electrodes. PMID:27599577

  1. A Domain Standard for Land Administration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemmen, C.; Van Oosterom, P.; Van der Molen, P.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a Domain Model for Land Administration (LA). As a result a formal International Standard is available: ISO 19152 Geographic Information – Land Administration Domain Model (LADM) (ISO, 2012). Domain specific standardisation is needed to capture the semantics of the

  2. Convex mappings on some circular domains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In this paper,we consider some circular domains.And we give an extension theorem for some normalized biholomorphic convex mapping on some circular domains.Especially,we discover the normalized biholomorphic convex mapping on some circular domains have the form f(z) =(f1(z1),...,fn(zn)),where fj:D → C are normalized biholomorphic convex mapping.

  3. Casimir force for cosmological domain walls

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuda, Tomohiro

    2011-01-01

    We calculate the vacuum fluctuations that may affect the evolution of cosmological domain walls. Considering domain walls, which are classically stable and have interaction with a scalar field, we show that explicit symmetry violation in the interaction may cause quantum bias that can solve the cosmological domain wall problem.

  4. Safe domain and elementary geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Richard, J M

    2004-01-01

    A classical problem of mechanics involves a projectile fired from a given point with a given velocity whose direction is varied. This results in a family of trajectories whose envelope defines the border of a 'safe' domain. In the simple cases of a constant force, harmonic potential and Kepler or Coulomb motion, the trajectories are conic curves whose envelope in a plane is another conic section which can be derived either by simple calculus or by geometrical considerations. The case of harmonic forces reveals a subtle property of the maximal sum of distances within an ellipse.

  5. Structuring very large domain models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Störrle, Harald

    2010-01-01

    a lower level of detail have not been dealt with. This paper aims at filling this gap by reporting personal experiences from a very large scale industrial domain modeling project. There, structuring the logical view turned out to be a critical success factor. We explain the project and its setting......, analyze the role and repercussions of model structuring, and examine the implications model structuring decisions have on other parts of the project. We then explain the model structure abstracted from a very large scale industrial modeling project. Finally, we discuss lessons learned....

  6. The Promise of Domain Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahabal, Ashish A.; Li, Jingling; Vaijanapurkar, Samarth; Bue, Brian; Miller, Adam; Donalek, Ciro; Djorgovski, Stanislav G.; Drake, Andrew J.; Graham, Matthew; CRTS, iPTF

    2016-01-01

    Most new surveys spend an appreciable time in collecting data on which to train classifiers before they can be used on future observations from the same dataset. The result generating phase can start much earlier if the training could incorporate data accumulated from older surveys enhanced with a small set from the new survey. This is exactly what Domain Adaptation (DA) allows us to do. The main idea behind DAs can be summarized thus: if we have two classes of separable objects in some feature space of a Source survey (S), we can define a hyperplane to separate the two types. In a second Target survey (T), for the same features the hyperplane would be inclined differently. DA methods get the mapping between the two hyperplanes using a small fraction of data from the Target (T) survey and can then be used to predict the classes of the remaining majority of data in T. We discuss the parameters that need to be tuned, the difficulties involved, and ways to improve the results. As we move towards bigger, and deeper surveys, being able to use existing labelled information to conduct classification in future surveys will be more cost-effective and promote time efficiency as well. Starting with the light curve data of 50,000 periodic objects from Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey (CRTS), we have applied domain adaptation techniques such as Geodesic Flow Kernel (GFK) with Random forest classifier and Co-training for domain adaptation (CODA) to the CRTS data which has 35,000 points overlapping with Palomar Transient Factory (PTF), and 12,000 with Lincoln Near-Earth Asteroid Research (LINEAR). The results suggest that domain adaptation is an area worth exploring as the knowledge between these surveys is transferable and the approaches to find the mappings between these surveys can be applied to the remaining data as well as for near future surveys such as CRTS-II, Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) to name a few at the optical

  7. Alternator control for battery charging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunstetter, Craig A.; Jaye, John R.; Tallarek, Glen E.; Adams, Joseph B.

    2015-07-14

    In accordance with an aspect of the present disclosure, an electrical system for an automotive vehicle has an electrical generating machine and a battery. A set point voltage, which sets an output voltage of the electrical generating machine, is set by an electronic control unit (ECU). The ECU selects one of a plurality of control modes for controlling the alternator based on an operating state of the vehicle as determined from vehicle operating parameters. The ECU selects a range for the set point voltage based on the selected control mode and then sets the set point voltage within the range based on feedback parameters for that control mode. In an aspect, the control modes include a trickle charge mode and battery charge current is the feedback parameter and the ECU controls the set point voltage within the range to maintain a predetermined battery charge current.

  8. Singularities of noncompact charged objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, M.; G., Abbas

    2013-03-01

    We formulate a model for noncompact spherical charged objects in the framework of noncommutative field theory. The Einstein—Maxwell field equations are solved with charged anisotropic fluid. We choose matter and charge densities as functions of the two parameters, instead of defining these quantities in terms of the Gaussian distribution function. It is found that the corresponding densities and the Ricci scalar are singular in origin, whereas the metric is nonsingular, indicating a spacelike singularity. The numerical solution of the horizon equation implies that there are two or one or no horizon(s), depending on the mass. We also evaluate the Hawking temperature and find that a black hole with two horizons is evaporated to an extremal black hole with one horizon.

  9. Singularities of noncompact charged objects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.Sharif; G.Abbas

    2013-01-01

    We formulate a model for noncompact spherical charged objects in the framework of noncommutative field theory.The Einstein-Maxwell field equations are solved with charged anisotropic fluid.We choose matter and charge densities as functions of the two parameters,instead of defining these quantities in terms of the Gaussian distribution function.It is found that the corresponding densities and the Ricci scalar are singular in origin,whereas the metric is nonsingular,indicating a spacelike singularity.The numerical solution of the horizon equation implies that there are two or one or no horizon(s),depending on the mass.We also evaluate the Hawking temperature and find that a black hole with two horizons is evaporated to an extremal black hole with one horizon.

  10. Singularities of Noncompact Charged Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Sharif, M; 10.1088/1674-1056/22/3/030401

    2013-01-01

    We formulate a model of noncompact spherical charged objects in the framework of noncommutative field theory. The Einstein-Maxwell field equations are solved with charged anisotropic fluid. We choose the forms of mass and charge densities which belong to two parameter family of density distribution functions instead of densities as Gaussian width length. It is found that the corresponding densities and the Ricci scalar are singular at origin whereas the metric is nonsingular indicating a spacelike singularity. The numerical solution of the horizon equation implies that there are either two or one or no horizon depending on the mass. We also evaluate the Hawking temperature which implies that a black hole with two horizons is evaporated to an extremal black hole with one horizon.

  11. Charging transient in polyvinyl formal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Khare; P L Jain; R K Pandey

    2001-08-01

    In the present paper charging and discharging transient currents in polyvinyl formal (PVF) were measured as a function of temperatures (40–80°C), poling fields (9.0 × 103–9.0 × 104 V/cm) and electrode combinations (Al–Al, Au–Al, Zn–Al, Bi–Al, Cu–Al and Ag–Al). The current–time characteristics have different values of slope lying between 0.42–0.56 and 1.42–1.63. The polarization is considered to be due to dipolar reorientation associated with structural motions and space charge relaxations due to trapping of injected charge carriers in energetically distributed traps.

  12. Nonlinear screening of charge impurities in graphene

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    It is shown that a ``vacuum polarization'' induced by Coulomb potential in graphene leads to a strong suppression of electric charges even for undoped case (no charge carriers). A standard linear response theory is therefore not applicable to describe the screening of charge impurities in graphene. In particular, it overestimates essentially the contributions of charge impurities into the resistivity of graphene.

  13. Nanotribology of charged polymer brushes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Jacob

    Polymers at surfaces, whose modern understanding may be traced back to early work by Sam Edwards1, have become a paradigm for modification of surface properties, both as steric stabilizers and as remarkable boundary lubricants2. Charged polymer brushes are of particular interest, with both technological implications and especially biological relevance where most macromolecules are charged. In the context of biolubrication, relevant in areas from dry eye syndrome to osteoarthritis, charged polymer surface phases and their complexes with other macromolecules may play a central role. The hydration lubrication paradigm, where tenaciously-held yet fluid hydration shells surrounding ions or zwitterions serve as highly-efficient friction-reducing elements, has been invoked to understand the excellent lubrication provided both by ionized3 and by zwitterionic4 brushes. In this talk we describe recent advances in our understanding of the nanotribology of such charged brush systems. We consider interactions between charged end-grafted polymers, and how one may disentangle the steric from the electrostatic surface forces5. We examine the limits of lubrication by ionized brushes, both synthetic and of biological origins, and how highly-hydrated zwitterionic chains may provide extremely effective boundary lubrication6. Finally we describe how the lubrication of articular cartilage in the major joints, a tribosystem presenting some of the greatest challenges and opportunities, may be understood in terms of a supramolecular synergy between charged surface-attached polymers and zwitterionic groups7. Work supported by European Research Council (HydrationLube), Israel Science Foundation (ISF), Petroleum Research Fund of the American Chemical Society, ISF-NSF China Joint Program.

  14. Charge transfer processes of low charge state heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, some aspects of the collision processes of accelerated heavy ions in very low charge state is reviewed, and the beam loss due to such collisions is estimated. The processes included in ion-atom collisions are electron capture, the electron stripping of ions, and target ionization. The stripping cross sections decrease slowly at high energy, and are much larger than the electron capture cross sections. At low energy, the electron capture is dominant, and this process plays a principal role near ion sources and preacceleration regions. This has not been taken into account properly. In order to keep the beam loss less than 0.1 percent, it is estimated that the average vacuum of about 10-7 to 10-8 Torr is required. An empirical formula to calculate the stripping cross sections of heavy ions in low charge state in collisions is derived. The beam loss due to ion-atom collisions can be estimated. The charge transfer and stripping processes in ion-ion collisions are also discussed. The typical processes in ion-ion collisions are almost same as those in ion-atom collisions. In order to minimize the ion beam loss due to charge-changing processes, it is important to choose the heavy ions with closed shell configurations, which correspond to the slightly more ionized states than the singly ionized state. (Kato, T.)

  15. High-charge-state ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sources of high charge state positive ions have uses in a variety of research fields. For heavy ion particle accelerators higher charge state particles give greater acceleration per gap and greater bending strength in a magnet. Thus higher energies can be obtained from circular accelerators of a given size, and linear accelerators can be designed with higher energy gain per length using higher charge state ions. In atomic physics the many atomic transitions in highly charged ions supplies a wealth of spectroscopy data. High charge state ion beams are also used for charge exchange and crossed beam experiments. High charge state ion sources are reviewed

  16. Charge-exchange straggling in equilibrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigmund, P. [Department of Physics and Chemistry, University of Southern Denmark, DK-5230 Odense M (Denmark); Osmani, O. [Department of Physics, University of Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Kaiserslautern and Research Center OPTIMAS, D-67653 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Schinner, A. [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Johannes, Kepler Universitaet, A-4040 Linz (Austria)

    2011-05-01

    A general expression has been derived that allows computation of charge-exchange straggling of swift heavy ions when many charge states are involved. Charge exchange is found to hinge on the variation of the stopping cross section with the ion charge and on the transient behavior of the charge population as a function of traveled pathlength. These effects appear factorized in the final formula. The focus of this paper is on straggling in charge equilibrium. The case of MeV/u sulfur ions in carbon has been used as an illustration. Charge-exchange straggling is found to be dominating straggling over a considerable range of beam energies.

  17. Integral charge SUSY in strong nuclear gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Till today there is no reason for the question: why there exists 6 individual quarks? Till today no experiment reported a free fractional charge quark. Authors humble opinion is nuclear charge (either positive or negative) constitutes 6 different flavors and each flavor holds certain mass, charged flavor can be called as a quark. It is neither a fermion nor a boson. A fermion is a container for different charges, a charge is a container for different flavors and each flavor is a container for certain matter. If charged matter rests in a fermionic container it is a fermion and if charged matter rests in a bosonic container it is a boson

  18. Charge transfer and transport in DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Jortner, Joshua; Bixon, Mordechai; Langenbacher, Thomas; Michel-Beyerle, Maria E.

    1998-01-01

    We explore charge migration in DNA, advancing two distinct mechanisms of charge separation in a donor (d)–bridge ({Bj})–acceptor (a) system, where {Bj} = B1,B2, … , BN are the N-specific adjacent bases of B-DNA: (i) two-center unistep superexchange induced charge transfer, d*{Bj}a → d∓{Bj}a±, and (ii) multistep charge transport involves charge injection from d* (or d+) to {Bj}, charge hopping within {Bj}, and charge trapping by a. For off-resonance coupling, mechanism i prevails with the char...

  19. Charge Qubit-Atom Hybrid

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Deshui; Hufnagel, C; Kwek, L C; Amico, Luigi; Dumke, R

    2016-01-01

    We investigate a novel hybrid system of a superconducting charge qubit interacting directly with a single neutral atom via electric dipole coupling. Interfacing of the macroscopic superconducting circuit with the microscopic atomic system is accomplished by varying the gate capacitance of the charge qubit. To achieve strong interaction, we employ two Rydberg states with an electric-dipole-allowed transition, which alters the polarizability of the dielectric medium of the gate capacitor. Sweeping the gate voltage with different rates leads to a precise control of hybrid quantum states. Furthermore, we show a possible implementation of a universal two-qubit gate.

  20. Charge-qubit-atom hybrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Deshui; Valado, María Martínez; Hufnagel, Christoph; Kwek, Leong Chuan; Amico, Luigi; Dumke, Rainer

    2016-04-01

    We investigate a hybrid system of a superconducting charge qubit interacting directly with a single neutral atom via electric dipole coupling. Interfacing of the macroscopic superconducting circuit with the microscopic atomic system is accomplished by varying the gate capacitance of the charge qubit. To achieve a strong interaction, we employ two Rydberg states with an electric-dipole-allowed transition, which alters the polarizability of the dielectric medium of the gate capacitor. Sweeping the gate voltage with different rates leads to a precise control of hybrid quantum states. Furthermore, we show a possible implementation of a universal two-qubit gate.

  1. Th economics of workplace charging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fetene, Gebeyehu Manie; Hirte, Georg; Kaplan, Sigal;

    2016-01-01

    To overcome the range-anxiety problem and further shortcomings associated with electric vehicles, workplace charging (WPC) is gaining increasing attention. We propose a microeconomic model of WPC and use the approach to shed light on the incentives and barriers employees and employers face when...... subsidies to charging facility costs and adjustments in electricity tariffs or loading technologies. We find that direct subsidies to WPC facilities or subsidies combined with specific energy price policies could be a way to foster WPC provision. In contrast measures on the employee side that may help to...

  2. New charged anisotropic compact models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kileba Matondo, D.; Maharaj, S. D.

    2016-07-01

    We find new exact solutions to the Einstein-Maxwell field equations which are relevant in the description of highly compact stellar objects. The relativistic star is charged and anisotropic with a quark equation of state. Exact solutions of the field equations are found in terms of elementary functions. It is interesting to note that we regain earlier quark models with uncharged and charged matter distributions. A physical analysis indicates that the matter distributions are well behaved and regular throughout the stellar structure. A range of stellar masses are generated for particular parameter values in the electric field. In particular the observed mass for a binary pulsar is regained.

  3. A charged spherically symmetric solution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Moodley; S D Maharaj; K S Govinder

    2003-09-01

    We find a solution of the Einstein–Maxwell system of field equations for a class of accelerating, expanding and shearing spherically symmetric metrics. This solution depends on a particular ansatz for the line element. The radial behaviour of the solution is fully specified while the temporal behaviour is given in terms of a quadrature. By setting the charge contribution to zero we regain an (uncharged) perfect fluid solution found previously with the equation of state =+ constant, which is a generalisation of a stiff equation of state. Our class of charged shearing solutions is characterised geometrically by a conformal Killing vector.

  4. Vortex Motion In Charged Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Stratopoulos, G N

    1994-01-01

    A non-relativistic scalar field coupled minimally to electromagnetism supports in the presence of a homogeneous background electric charge density the existence of smooth, finite-energy topologically stable flux vortices. The static properties of such vortices are studied numerically in the context of a two parameter model describing this system as a special case. It is shown that the electrostatic and the mexican hat potential terms of the energy are each enough to ensure the existence of vortex solutions. The interaction potential of two minimal vortices is obtained for various values of the parameters. It is proven analytically that a free isolated vortex with topological charge $N\

  5. Butterflies with rotation and charge

    OpenAIRE

    Reynolds, Alan P.; Ross, Simon F.

    2016-01-01

    We explore the butterfly effect for black holes with rotation or charge. We perturb rotating BTZ and charged black holes in 2+1 dimensions by adding a small perturbation on one asymptotic region, described by a shock wave in the spacetime, and explore the effect of this shock wave on the length of geodesics through the wormhole and hence on correlation functions. We find the effect of the perturbation grows exponentially at a rate controlled by the temperature; dependence on the angular momen...

  6. Faraday instability in deformable domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrodynamical instabilities are usually studied either in bounded regions or free to grow in space. In this article we review the experimental results of an intermediate situation, in which an instability develops in deformable domains. The Faraday instability, which consists in the formation of surface waves on a liquid experiencing a vertical forcing, is triggered in floating liquid lenses playing the role of deformable domains. Faraday waves deform the lenses from the initial circular shape and the mutual adaptation of instability patterns with the lens boundary is observed. Two archetypes of behaviour have been found. In the first archetype a stable elongated shape is reached, the wave vector being parallel to the direction of elongation. In the second archetype the waves exceed the response of the lens border and no equilibrium shape is reached. The lens stretches and eventually breaks into fragments that have a complex dynamics. The difference between the two archetypes is explained by the competition between the radiation pressure the waves exert on the lens border and its response due to surface tension.

  7. Interfaces between Block Copolymer Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaeup; Jeong, Seong-Jun; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2011-03-01

    Block copolymers naturally form nanometer scale structures which repeat their geometry on a larger scale. Such a small scale periodic pattern can be used for various applications such as storage media, nano-circuits and optical filters. However, perfect alignment of block copolymer domains in the macroscopic scale is still a distant dream. The nanostructure formation usually occurs with spontaneously broken symmetry; hence it is easily infected by topological defects which sneak in due to entropic fluctuation and incomplete annealing. Careful annealing can gradually reduce the number of defects, but once kinetically trapped, it is extremely difficult to remove all the defects. One of the main reasons is that the defect finds a locally metastable morphology whose potential depth is large enough to prohibit further morphology evolution. In this work, the domain boundaries between differently oriented lamellar structures in thin film are studied. For the first time, it became possible to quantitatively study the block copolymer morphology in the transitional region, and it was shown that the twisted grain boundary is energetically favorable compared to the T-junction grain boundary. [Nano Letters, 9, 2300 (2010)]. This theoretical method successfully explained the experimental results.

  8. Multiple, but Concerted Cellular Activities of the Human Protein Hap46/BAG-1M and Isoforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Gehring

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The closely related human and murine proteins Hap46/BAG-1M and BAG-1, respectively, were discovered more than a decade ago by molecular cloning techniques. These and the larger isoform Hap50/BAG-1L, as well as shorter isoforms, have the ability to interact with a seemingly unlimited array of proteins of completely unrelated structures. This problem was partially resolved when it was realized that molecular chaperones of the hsp70 heat shock protein family are major primary association partners, binding being mediated by the carboxy terminal BAG-domain and the ATP-binding domain of hsp70 chaperones. The latter, in turn, can associate with an almost unlimited variety of proteins through their substrate-binding domains, so that ternary complexes may result. The protein folding activity of hsp70 chaperones is affected by interactions with Hap46/BAG-1M or isoforms. However, there also exist several proteins which bind to Hap46/BAG-1M and isoforms independent of hsp70 mediation. Moreover, Hap46/BAG-1M and Hap50/BAG-1L, but not the shorter isoforms, can bind to DNA in a sequence-independent manner by making use of positively charged regions close to their amino terminal ends. This is the molecular basis for their effects on transcription which are of major physiological relevance, as discussed here in terms of a model. The related proteins Hap50/BAG-1L and Hap46/BAG-1M may thus serve as molecular links between such diverse bioactivities as regulation of gene expression and protein quality control. These activities are coordinated and synergize in helping cells to cope with conditions of external stress. Moreover, they recently became markers for the aggressiveness of several cancer types.

  9. Single-domain antibodies for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krah, Simon; Schröter, Christian; Zielonka, Stefan; Empting, Martin; Valldorf, Bernhard; Kolmar, Harald

    2016-02-01

    Single-domain antibodies are the smallest antigen-binding units of antibodies, consisting either only of one variable domain or one engineered constant domain that solely facilitates target binding. This class of antibody derivatives comprises naturally occurring variable domains derived from camelids and sharks as well as engineered human variable or constant antibody domains of the heavy or light chain. Because of their high affinity and specificity as well as stability, small size and benefit of multiple re-formatting opportunities, those molecules emerged as promising candidates for biomedical applications and some of these entities have already proven to be successful in clinical development. PMID:26551147

  10. Word Domain Disambiguation via Word Sense Disambiguation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Tratz, Stephen C.; Gregory, Michelle L.

    2006-06-04

    Word subject domains have been widely used to improve the perform-ance of word sense disambiguation al-gorithms. However, comparatively little effort has been devoted so far to the disambiguation of word subject do-mains. The few existing approaches have focused on the development of al-gorithms specific to word domain dis-ambiguation. In this paper we explore an alternative approach where word domain disambiguation is achieved via word sense disambiguation. Our study shows that this approach yields very strong results, suggesting that word domain disambiguation can be ad-dressed in terms of word sense disam-biguation with no need for special purpose algorithms.

  11. Phase solitons and domain dynamics in an optically injected semiconductor laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustave, F.; Columbo, L.; Tissoni, G.; Brambilla, M.; Prati, F.; Barland, S.

    2016-06-01

    We analyze experimentally and theoretically the spatiotemporal dynamics of a highly multimode semiconductor laser with coherent optical injection. Due to the particular geometry of the device (a 1-m-long ring cavity), the multimode dynamics can be resolved in real time and we observe stable chiral solitons and domain dynamics. The experiment is analyzed in the framework of a set of effective semiconductor Maxwell-Bloch equations. We analyze the stability of stationary solutions and simulate both the complete model and a reduced rate equation model. This allows us to predict domain shrinking and the stability of only one chiral charge that we ascribe to the finite active medium response time.

  12. Phase solitons and domain dynamics in an optically injected semiconductor laser

    CERN Document Server

    Gustave, F; Tissoni, G; Brambilla, M; Prati, F; Barland, S

    2016-01-01

    We analyze experimentally and theoretically the spatio-temporal dynamics of a highly multimode semiconductor laser with coherent optical injection. Due to the particular geometry of the device (a 1~m long ring cavity), the multimode dynamics can be resolved in real time and we observe stable chiral solitons and domain dynamics. The experiment is analyzed in the framework of a set of effective semiconductor Maxwell-Bloch equations. We analyze the stability of stationary solutions and simulate both the complete model and a reduced rate equation model. This allows us to predict domain shrinking and the stability of only one chiral charge that we ascribe to the finite active medium response time.

  13. Interoperable domain models: The ISO land administration domain model LADM and its external classes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemmen, C.H.J.; Van Oosterom, P.J.M.; Uitermark, H.T.; Zevenbergen, J.A.; Cooper, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of one of the first spatial domain standards: a standard for the domain of Land Administration (LA). This standard is in the draft stage of development now (May 2011). The development of domain standards is a logical follow up after domain-independent standards,

  14. Intrinsic Charges and the Strong Forc

    OpenAIRE

    Lehnert B.

    2013-01-01

    According to a revised quantum electrodynamic theory, there are models of leptons such as the electron which possess both a net integrated electric charge and a much larger intrinsic charge of both polarities. From estimates based on such models, the corresponding Coulomb force due to the intrinsic charges then becomes two orders of magnitude larger than that due to the conventional net charge. This intrinsic charge force can also have the features of a short-range interaction. If these resul...

  15. Chromatin domain boundaries: insulators and beyond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gong Hong WEI; De Pei LIU; Chih Chuan LIANG

    2005-01-01

    The eukaryotic genome is organized into functionally and structurally distinct domains, representing regulatory units for gene expression and chromosome behavior. DNA sequences that mark the border between adjacent domains are the insulators or boundary elements, which are required in maintenance of the function of different domains. Some insulators need others enable to play insulation activity. Chromatin domains are defined by distinct sets of post-translationally modified histones. Recent studies show that these histone modifications are also involved in establishment of sharp chromatin boundaries in order to prevent the spreading of distinct domains. Additionally, in some loci, the high-order chromatin structures for long-range looping interactions also have boundary activities, suggesting a correlation between insulators and chromatin loop domains. In this review, we will discuss recent progress in the field of chromatin domain boundaries.

  16. Functional innovation from changes in protein domains and their combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, Jonathan G; Dawson, Natalie L; Sillitoe, Ian; Orengo, Christine A

    2016-06-01

    Domains are the functional building blocks of proteins. In this work we discuss how domains can contribute to the evolution of new functions. Domains themselves can evolve through various mechanisms, altering their intrinsic function. Domains can also facilitate functional innovations by combining with other domains to make novel proteins. We discuss the mechanisms by which domain and domain combinations support functional innovations. We highlight interesting examples where changes in domain combination promote changes at the domain level. PMID:27309309

  17. Structure and Function of KH Domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valverde, R.; Regan, E

    2008-01-01

    The hnRNP K homology (KH) domain was first identified in the protein human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) 14 years ago. Since then, KH domains have been identified as nucleic acid recognition motifs in proteins that perform a wide range of cellular functions. KH domains bind RNA or ssDNA, and are found in proteins associated with transcriptional and translational regulation, along with other cellular processes. Several diseases, e.g. fragile X mental retardation syndrome and paraneoplastic disease, are associated with the loss of function of a particular KH domain. Here we discuss the progress made towards understanding both general and specific features of the molecular recognition of nucleic acids by KH domains. The typical binding surface of KH domains is a cleft that is versatile but that can typically accommodate only four unpaired bases. Van der Waals forces and hydrophobic interactions and, to a lesser extent, electrostatic interactions, contribute to the nucleic acid binding affinity. 'Augmented' KH domains or multiple copies of KH domains within a protein are two strategies that are used to achieve greater affinity and specificity of nucleic acid binding. Isolated KH domains have been seen to crystallize as monomers, dimers and tetramers, but no published data support the formation of noncovalent higher-order oligomers by KH domains in solution. Much attention has been given in the literature to a conserved hydrophobic residue (typically Ile or Leu) that is present in most KH domains. The interest derives from the observation that an individual with this Ile mutated to Asn, in the KH2 domain of fragile X mental retardation protein, exhibits a particularly severe form of the syndrome. The structural effects of this mutation in the fragile X mental retardation protein KH2 domain have recently been reported. We discuss the use of analogous point mutations at this position in other KH domains to dissect both structure and

  18. Take Charge of Your Career

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Marshall A.

    2013-01-01

    Today's work world is full of uncertainty. Every day, people hear about another organization going out of business, downsizing, or rightsizing. To prepare for these uncertain times, one must take charge of their own career. This article presents some tips for surviving in today's world of work: (1) Be self-managing; (2) Know what you…

  19. Dust particle charging in sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The charging and the screening of spherical dust particles in sheaths near the wall were studied using computer simulation. The three-dimensional PIC/MCC method and molecular dynamics method were applied to describe plasma particles motion and interaction with macroscopic dust grain. Calculations were carried out at different neutral gas pressures and wall potentials. Values of the charge of the dust particles and spatial distributions of plasma parameters are obtained by modelling. The results have shown that the charge of the dust particles in the sheath, as well as the spatial distribution of the ions and electrons near the dust particles, depend strongly on the wall potential. It is shown that for large negative values of the wall potential the negative charge of a dust particle decreases due to the decline of the electron density in its vicinity. In addition, the flow of energy of the ions on the surface of dust particles is increased due to better focusing effect of the dust particle field on ions.

  20. Stability of charged thin shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article we study the mechanical stability of spherically symmetric thin shells with charge, in Einstein-Maxwell and Einstein-Born-Infeld theories. We analyze linearized perturbations preserving the symmetry, for shells around vacuum and shells surrounding noncharged black holes.