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Sample records for charge-exchange-induced x-ray emission

  1. Charge Exchange Induced X-ray Emission of Fe XXV and Fe XXVI via a Streamlined Model

    CERN Document Server

    Mullen, P D; Lyons, D; Stancil, P C

    2016-01-01

    Charge exchange is an important process for the modeling of X-ray spectra obtained by the Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku X-ray observatories, as well as the anticipated Astro-H mission. The understanding of the observed X-ray spectra produced by many astrophysical environments is hindered by the current incompleteness of available atomic and molecular data -- especially for charge exchange. Here, we implement a streamlined program set that applies quantum defect methods and the Landau-Zener theory to generate total, n-resolved, and nlS-resolved cross sections for any given projectile ion/ target charge exchange collision. Using this data in a cascade model for X-ray emission, theoretical spectra for such systems can be predicted. With these techniques, Fe25+ and Fe26+ charge exchange collisions with H, He, H2, N2, H2O, and CO are studied for single electron capture. These systems have been selected as they illustrate computational difficulties for high projectile charges. Further, Fe XXV and Fe XXVI emission...

  2. Charge Exchange-induced X-Ray Emission of Fe xxv and Fe xxvI via a Streamlined Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, P. D.; Cumbee, R. S.; Lyons, D.; Stancil, P. C.

    2016-06-01

    Charge exchange (CX) is an important process for the modeling of X-ray spectra obtained by the Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku X-ray observatories, as well as the anticipated Astro-H mission. The understanding of the observed X-ray spectra produced by many astrophysical environments is hindered by the current incompleteness of available atomic and molecular data—especially for CX. Here, we implement a streamlined program set that applies quantum defect methods and the Landau–Zener theory to generate total, n-resolved, and n{\\ell }S-resolved cross sections for any given projectile ion/target CX collision. By using these data in a cascade model for X-ray emission, theoretical spectra for such systems can be predicted. With these techniques, Fe25+ and Fe26+ CX collisions with H, He, H2, N2, H2O, and CO are studied for single-electron capture (SEC). These systems have been selected because they illustrate computational difficulties for high projectile charges. Furthermore, Fe xxv and Fe xxvi emission lines have been detected in the Galactic center and Galactic ridge. Theoretical X-ray spectra for these collision systems are compared to experimental data generated by an electron-beam ion trap study. Several ℓ-distribution models have been tested for Fe25+ and Fe26+ SEC. Such analyses suggests that commonly used ℓ-distribution models struggle to accurately reflect the true distribution of electron capture as understood by more advanced theoretical methods.

  3. CRITICAL TEST OF SIMULATIONS OF CHARGE-EXCHANGE-INDUCED X-RAY EMISSION IN THE SOLAR SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental and theoretical state-selective X-ray spectra resulting from single-electron capture in charge exchange (CX) collisions of Ne10+ with He, Ne, and Ar are presented for a collision velocity of 933 km s-1 (4.54 keV nucleon-1), comparable to the highest velocity components of the fast solar wind. The experimental spectra were obtained by detecting scattered projectiles, target recoil ions, and X-rays in coincidence; with simultaneous determination of the recoil ion momenta. Use and interpretation of these spectra are free from the complications of non-coincident total X-ray measurements that do not differentiate between the primary reaction channels. The spectra offer the opportunity to critically test the ability of CX theories to describe such interactions at the quantum orbital angular momentum level of the final projectile ion. To this end, new classical trajectory Monte Carlo calculations are compared here with the measurements. The current work demonstrates that modeling of cometary, heliospheric, planetary, and laboratory X-ray emission based on approximate state-selective CX models may result in erroneous conclusions and deductions of relevant parameters.

  4. High-Resolution X-ray Emission and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    de Groot, F. M. F.

    2001-01-01

    In this review, high-resolution X-ray emission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy will be discussed. The focus is on the 3d transition-metal systems. To understand high-resolution X-ray emission and reso-nant X-ray emission, it is first necessary to spend some time discussing the X-ray absorption process. Section II discusses 1s X-ray absorption, i.e., the K edges, and section III deals with 2p X-ray absorption, the L edges. X-ray emission is discussed in, respectively, the L edges. X-ray emis...

  5. Proton induced X-ray emission analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The developments in proton induced X-ray emission analysis are reviewed. Techniques for analyzing thick and thin samples of different origin are described. Discussions on the application of proton induced X-ray emission analysis in different fields, comparison of the sensitivity of this method with other analytical techniques, its limitations and possible improvements are presented

  6. X-ray emission from Centaurus A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrell, N.J.

    1981-01-01

    Observations of 3 to 12 keV x-ray emission from NGC 5128 (Cen A) were made by Vela spacecraft over the period 1969 to 1979. These data are in good agreement with previously reported data, but are much more complete. Numerous peaks of x-ray intensity occurred during the period 1973 to 1975, characterized by rapid increases and equally rapid decreases (in less than 10 days). Thus it seems probable that most of the x-ray flux from the nucleus of Cen A came from a single source of small size.

  7. X-ray Emission from Solar Flares

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajmal Jain; Malini Aggarwal; Raghunandan Sharma

    2008-03-01

    Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS), the first space-borne solar astronomy experiment of India was designed to improve our current understanding of X-ray emission from the Sun in general and solar flares in particular. SOXS mission is composed of two solid state detectors, viz., Si and CZT semiconductors capable of observing the full disk Sun in X-ray energy range of 4–56 keV. The X-ray spectra of solar flares obtained by the Si detector in the 4–25 keV range show evidence of Fe and Fe/Ni line emission and multi-thermal plasma. The evolution of the break energy point that separates the thermal and non-thermal processes reveals increase with increasing flare plasma temperature. Small scale flare activities observed by both the detectors are found to be suitable to heat the active region corona; however their location appears to be in the transition region.

  8. X-ray Emission of Hollow Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhaoYongtao; XiaoGuoqing; ZhangXiaoan; YangZhihu; ChenXimeng; ZhangYanping

    2003-01-01

    We have systematically investigated the X-rays emission of hollow atoms (HA) which formed in the interaction of highly charged ions with a variety of solid surfaces at the atomic physics experimental setup of IMP. The X-ray spectra were measured by Si(Li) detectors with effective energy ranging from 1 keV to 60 keV. The results show that, the X-ray emission from the formed HA is closely correlated with the charge state of the projectile ions, and weakly correlated with the velocity of the projectile ions. For example, it was found that when Ar18+ ions interact with Be-target, the yield of K X-ray with character energy of 3.0 keV is 7.2×10-3 per ion, which is two times and 5 order of magnitude higher than those in the interactions of Ar17+ and Ar16+ ions respectively. When Ar15+ ions interact with the same targets, the Argon K X-ray would be too feeble to be detected. The X-ray yield with single ion in this experiment can be represented by the following equation,

  9. Particle induced X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accelerator based ion beam technique of Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) is discussed in some detail. This report pulls together all major reviews and references over the last ten years and reports on PIXE in vacuum and using external beams. The advantages, limitations, costs and types of studies that may be undertaken using an accelerator based ion beam technique such as PIXE, are also discussed. 25 refs., 7 tabs., 40 figs

  10. Resonant X-ray emission with a standing wave excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruotsalainen, Kari O; Honkanen, Ari-Pekka; Collins, Stephen P; Monaco, Giulio; Moretti Sala, Marco; Krisch, Michael; Hämäläinen, Keijo; Hakala, Mikko; Huotari, Simo

    2016-01-01

    The Borrmann effect is the anomalous transmission of x-rays in perfect crystals under diffraction conditions. It arises from the interference of the incident and diffracted waves, which creates a standing wave with nodes at strongly absorbing atoms. Dipolar absorption of x-rays is thus diminished, which makes the crystal nearly transparent for certain x-ray wave vectors. Indeed, a relative enhancement of electric quadrupole absorption via the Borrmann effect has been demonstrated recently. Here we show that the Borrmann effect has a significantly larger impact on resonant x-ray emission than is observable in x-ray absorption. Emission from a dipole forbidden intermediate state may even dominate the corresponding x-ray spectra. Our work extends the domain of x-ray standing wave methods to resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy and provides means for novel spectroscopic experiments in d- and f-electron systems. PMID:26935531

  11. Resonant X-ray emission with a standing wave excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruotsalainen, Kari O.; Honkanen, Ari-Pekka; Collins, Stephen P.; Monaco, Giulio; Moretti Sala, Marco; Krisch, Michael; Hämäläinen, Keijo; Hakala, Mikko; Huotari, Simo

    2016-01-01

    The Borrmann effect is the anomalous transmission of x-rays in perfect crystals under diffraction conditions. It arises from the interference of the incident and diffracted waves, which creates a standing wave with nodes at strongly absorbing atoms. Dipolar absorption of x-rays is thus diminished, which makes the crystal nearly transparent for certain x-ray wave vectors. Indeed, a relative enhancement of electric quadrupole absorption via the Borrmann effect has been demonstrated recently. Here we show that the Borrmann effect has a significantly larger impact on resonant x-ray emission than is observable in x-ray absorption. Emission from a dipole forbidden intermediate state may even dominate the corresponding x-ray spectra. Our work extends the domain of x-ray standing wave methods to resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy and provides means for novel spectroscopic experiments in d- and f-electron systems. PMID:26935531

  12. X-ray emission from Saturn

    CERN Document Server

    Ness, J U; Wolk, S J; Dennerl, K; Burwitz, V

    2004-01-01

    We report the first unambiguous detection of X-ray emission originating from Saturn with a Chandra observation, duration 65.5 ksec with ACIS-S3. Beyond the pure detection we analyze the spatial distribution of X-rays on the planetary surface, the light curve, and some spectral properties. The detection is based on 162 cts extracted from the ACIS-S3 chip within the optical disk of Saturn. We found no evidence for smaller or larger angular extent. The expected background level is 56 cts, i.e., the count rate is (1.6 +- 0.2) 10^-3 cts/s. The extracted photons are rather concentrated towards the equator of the apparent disk, while both polar caps have a relative photon deficit. The inclination angle of Saturn during the observation was -27 degrees, so that the northern hemisphere was not visible during the complete observation. In addition, it was occulted by the ring system. We found a small but significant photon excess at one edge of the ring system. The light curve shows a small dip twice at identical phases,...

  13. X-ray Emission from Elliptical Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Sarazin, Craig L.

    1996-01-01

    Elliptical galaxies are generally luminous sources of X-ray radiation, and contain large amounts of hot, interstellar gas. In the brighter X-ray galaxies, the inferred masses of hot gas are consistent with those expected given the present rates of stellar mass loss. The required rates of heating of the gas are also roughly consistent with those expected from the motions of gas losing stars. X-ray observations, particularly X-ray spectra, require a low rate of Type Ia supernova heating and che...

  14. X-ray emission from massive stars with magnetic fields

    OpenAIRE

    Oskinova, L.M.; Hamann, W. -R.; Cassinelli, J. P.; Brown, J.C.; Todt, H.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the connections between the magnetic fields and the X-ray emission from massive stars. Our study shows that the X-ray properties of known strongly magnetic stars are diverse: while some comply to the predictions of the magnetically confined wind model, others do not. We conclude that strong, hard, and variable X-ray emission may be a sufficient attribute of magnetic massive stars, but it is not a necessary one. We address the general properties of X-ray emission from "normal" m...

  15. X-ray emission properties of galaxies in Abell 3128

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, R J

    2003-01-01

    We use archival Chandra X-ray Observatory data to investigate X-ray emission from early-type galaxies in the rich z=0.06 cluster Abell 3128. By combining the X-ray count-rates from an input list of optically-selected galaxies, we obtain a statistical detection of X-ray flux, unbiased by X-ray selection limits. Using 87 galaxies with reliable Chandra data, X-ray emission is detected for galaxies down to M_B ~ -19.0, with only an upper limit determined for galaxies at M_B ~ -18.3. The ratio of X-ray to optical luminosities is consistent with recent determinations of the low-mass X-ray binary content of nearby elliptical galaxies. Taken individually, in contrast, we detect significant (3sigma) flux for only six galaxies. Of these, one is a foreground galaxy, while two are optically-faint galaxies with X-ray hardness ratios characteristic of active galactic nuclei. The remaining three detected galaxies are amongst the optically-brightest cluster members, and have softer X-ray spectra. Their X-ray flux is higher t...

  16. X-Ray Emission from the Soft X-Ray Transient Aquila X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavani, Marco

    1998-01-01

    Aquila X-1 is the most prolific of soft X-ray transients. It is believed to contain a rapidly spinning neutron star sporadically accreting near the Eddington limit from a low-mass companion star. The interest in studying the repeated X-ray outbursts from Aquila X-1 is twofold: (1) studying the relation between optical, soft and hard X-ray emission during the outburst onset, development and decay; (2) relating the spectral component to thermal and non-thermal processes occurring near the magnetosphere and in the boundary layer of a time-variable accretion disk. Our investigation is based on the BATSE monitoring of Aquila X-1 performed by our group. We observed Aquila X-1 in 1997 and re-analyzed archival information obtained in April 1994 during a period of extraordinary outbursting activity of the source in the hard X-ray range. Our results allow, for the first time for this important source, to obtain simultaneous spectral information from 2 keV to 200 keV. A black body (T = 0.8 keV) plus a broken power-law spectrum describe accurately the 1994 spectrum. Substantial hard X-ray emission is evident in the data, confirming that the accretion phase during sub-Eddington limit episodes is capable of producing energetic hard emission near 5 x 10(exp 35) ergs(exp -1). A preliminary paper summarizes our results, and a more comprehensive account is being written. We performed a theoretical analysis of possible emission mechanisms, and confirmed that a non-thermal emission mechanism triggered in a highly sheared magnetosphere at the accretion disk inner boundary can explain the hard X-ray emission. An anticorrelation between soft and hard X-ray emission is indeed prominently observed as predicted by this model.

  17. Chemical effects in x-ray emission spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical bond influence in X-ray emission spectra of hafnium, iodine, iron, sulphur, aluminium and magnesium is detected. The position of one X-ray emission line is determined by three methods: parabolic profile; Gaussian distribution and extra-heavy maximum. (author)

  18. Soft X-Ray Emissions from Planets and Moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, A.; Gladstone, G. R.; Elsner, R. F.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Grodent, D.; Lewis, W. S.; Crary, F. J.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Howell, R. R.; Johnson, R. E.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The soft x-ray energy band (less than 4 keV) is an important spectral regime for planetary remote sensing, as a wide variety of solar system objects are now known to shine at these wavelengths. These include Earth, Jupiter, comets, moons, Venus, and the Sun. Earth and Jupiter, as magnetic planets, are observed to emanate strong x-ray emissions from their auroral (polar) regions, thus providing vital information on the nature of precipitating particles and their energization processes in planetary magnetospheres. X rays from low latitudes have also been observed on these planets, resulting largely from atmospheric scattering and fluorescence of solar x-rays. Cometary x-rays are now a well established phenomena, more than a dozen comets have been observed at soft x-ray energies, with the accepted production mechanism being charge-exchange between heavy solar wind ions and cometary neutrals. Also, Lunar x-rays have been observed and are thought to be produced by scattering and fluorescence of solar x-rays from the Moon's surface. With the advent of sophisticated x-ray observatories, e.g., Chandra and XMM-Newton, the field of planetary x-ray astronomy is advancing at a much faster pace. The Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) has recently captured soft x-rays from Venus. Venusian x-rays are most likely produced through fluorescence of solar x-rays by C and O atoms in the upper atmosphere. Very recently, using CXO we have discovered soft x-rays from the moons of Jupiter-Io, Europa, and probably Ganymede. The plausible source of the x-rays from the Galilean satellites is bombardment of their surfaces by energetic (greater than 10 KeV) ions from the inner magnetosphere of Jupiter. The Io plasma Torus (IPT) is also discovered by CXO to be a source of soft x-rays by CXO have revealed a mysterious pulsating (period approx. 45 minutes) x-ray hot spot is fixed in magnetic latitude and longitude and is magnetically connected to a region in the outer magnetosphere of Jupiter. These

  19. Linking Jet Emission, X-ray States and Hard X-ray Tails in the Neutron Star X-ray Binary GX 17+2

    OpenAIRE

    Migliari, S.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Fender, R. P.; Homan, J.; T. Di Salvo; Rothschild, R. E.; Rupen, M P; Tomsick, J. A.; Wijnands, R.; van der Klis, M.

    2007-01-01

    We present the results from simultaneous radio (Very Large Array) and X-ray (Rossi-X-ray Timing Explorer) observations of the Z-type neutron star X-ray binary GX~17+2. The aim is to assess the coupling between X-ray and radio properties throughout its three rapidly variable X-ray states and during the time-resolved transitions. These observations allow us, for the first time, to investigate quantitatively the possible relations between the radio emission and the presence of the hard X-ray tai...

  20. Radio and X-ray emission from supernova remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper it was studied the statistical correlation between radio and X-ray emissions from shell-type supernova remnants (SNR). The primary aim of this study is to test the model of radio emission of shell-type SNRs presented by one of the authors. Based on this model of radio emission, by using the Monte Carlo techniques we have simulated statistical relations radio - X-ray luminosities (not surface brightnesses) which then were compared with the observations. X-ray emission is assumed to be thermal. To have a uniform statistical material it was used observational data on the SNRs in Magellanic Clouds

  1. X-ray emission from single Wolf-Rayet stars

    CERN Document Server

    Oskinova, Lidia

    2016-01-01

    This review briefly summarizes our knowledge of the X-ray emission from single WN, WC, and WO stars. These stars have relatively modest X-ray luminosities, typically not exceeding L_sun. The analysis of X-ray spectra usually reveals thermal plasma with temperatures reaching a few 10 MK. X-ray variability is detected in some WN stars. At present we don't fully understand how X-ray radiation in produced in WR stars, albeit there are some promising research avenues, such as the presence of CIRs in the winds of some stars. To fully understand WR stars we need to unravel mechanisms of X-ray production in their winds.

  2. Models for x-ray emission from Tycho's remnant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors reexamine the x-ray emission from Tycho's remnant using results from hydrodynamic models computed with a detailed spherically symmetric code. The observed synchrotron radio contours appear to require a cloudy circumstellar medium. The authors explore the x-ray emission properties of similar models. They find that they tend to produce broad shells of x-ray emission that resemble the observed x-ray observations, but it has little similarity to the evolution of remnants in cloudy media dominated by thermal conduction. More work needs to be done to ensure that the spectrum as well as the x-ray map can be modeled with the same cloudy circumstellar medium, although we believe it will not be difficult to obtain as good as statistical agreement with the spectral data as other models have achieved

  3. X-ray line emission produced in clump bow shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Cassinelli, Joe P.; Ignace, R.; Waldron, W.; Cho, J.; Murphy, N; Lazarian, A.

    2008-01-01

    We summarize Chandra observations of the emission line profiles from 17 OB stars. The lines tend to be broad and unshifted. The forbidden/intercombination line ratios arising from Helium-like ions provide radial distance information for the X-ray emission sources, while the H-like to He-like line ratios provide X-ray temperatures, and thus also source temperature versus radius distributions. OB stars usually show power law differential emission measure distributions versus temperature. In mod...

  4. Carbon nanotube based field emission X-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuan

    This dissertation describes the development of field emission (FE) x-ray sources with a carbon-nanotube (CNT) cathode. Field emission x-rays have advantages over conventional x-rays by replacing the thermionic cathode with a cold cathode so that electrons are emitted at room temperature and emission is voltage controllable. CNTs are found to be excellent electron emitters with low threshold fields and high current density which makes them ideal for generate field emission x-rays. Macroscopic CNT cold cathodes are prepared and the parameters to tune their field emission properties are studied: structure and morphology of CNT cathodes, temperature as well as electronic work function of CNT. Macroscopic CNT cathodes with optimized performance are chosen to build a high-resolution x-ray imaging system. The system can readily generate x-ray radiation with continuous variation of temporal resolution up to nanoseconds and spatial resolution down to 10 micron. Its potential applications for dynamic x-ray imaging and micro-computed tomography are also demonstrated. The performance characteristics of this compact and versatile system are promising for non-destructive testing and for non-invasive small-animal imaging for biomedical research.

  5. Rotation and X-ray emission from protostars

    OpenAIRE

    Montmerle, Thierry; Grosso, Nicolas; Tsuboi, Yohko; Koyama, Katsuji

    1999-01-01

    The ASCA satellite has recently detected variable hard X-ray emission from two Class I protostars in the rho Oph cloud, YLW15 (IRS43) and WL6, with a characteristic time scale ~20h. In YLW15, the X-ray emission is in the form of quasi-periodic energetic flares, which we explain in terms of strong magnetic shearing and reconnection between the central star and the accretion disk. In WL6, X-ray flaring is rotationally modulated, and appears to be more like the solar-type magnetic activity ubiqu...

  6. X-ray Emission from the Guitar Nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Romani, R W; Yadigaroglu, I A; Romani, Roger W.; Cordes, James M.

    1997-01-01

    We have detected weak soft X-ray emission from the Pulsar Wind Nebula trailing the high velocity star PSR 2224+65 (the `Guitar Nebula'). This X-ray flux gives evidence of \\gamma~10^7 eV particles in the pulsar wind and constrains the properties of the post-shock flow. The X-ray emission is most easily understood if the shocked pulsar wind is partly confined in the nebula and if magnetic fields in this zone can grow to near equipartition values.

  7. Low Mass X-ray Binaries As the Source of the Very Soft X-ray Emission in the X-ray Faintest Early-Type Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Irwin, Jimmy A.; Sarazin, Craig L.

    1997-01-01

    The X-ray emission from the faintest X-ray elliptical and S0 galaxies is characterized by a hard ~5 keV component, and a very soft ~0.2 keV component. The hard component has generally been regarded as the integrated emission from low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), but the origin of the soft component is unknown. We present evidence which suggests that LMXBs also exhibit a soft component, which is responsible for the very soft X-ray emission in the faintest early-type galaxies. This soft compone...

  8. X-ray emission from massive stars with magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Oskinova, L M; Cassinelli, J P; Brown, J C; Todt, H

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the connections between the magnetic fields and the X-ray emission from massive stars. Our study shows that the X-ray properties of known strongly magnetic stars are diverse: while some comply to the predictions of the magnetically confined wind model, others do not. We conclude that strong, hard, and variable X-ray emission may be a sufficient attribute of magnetic massive stars, but it is not a necessary one. We address the general properties of X-ray emission from "normal" massive stars, especially the long standing mystery about the correlations between the parameters of X-ray emission and fundamental stellar properties. The recent development in stellar structure modeling shows that small scale surface magnetic fields may be common. We suggest a "hybrid" scenario which could explain the X-ray emission from massive stars by a combination of magnetic mechanisms on the surface and shocks in the stellar wind. The magnetic mechanisms and the wind shocks are triggered by convective motions in su...

  9. Diffuse X-ray emission in spiral galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Tyler, K; La Page, A; Rieke, G H

    2003-01-01

    We compare the soft diffuse X-ray emission from Chandra images of 12 nearby intermediate inclination spiral galaxies to the morphology seen in Halpha, molecular gas, and mid-infrared emission. We find that diffuse X-ray emission is often located along spiral arms in the outer parts of spiral galaxies but tends to be distributed in a rounder morphology in the center. The X-ray morphology in the spiral arms matches that seen in the mid-infrared or Halpha and so implies that the X-ray emission is associated with recent active star formation. We see no strong evidence for X-ray emission trailing the location of high mass star formation in spiral arms. However, population synthesis models predict a high mechanical energy output rate from supernovae for a time period that is about 10 times longer than the lifetime of massive ionizing stars, conflicting with the narrow appearance of the arms in X-rays. The fraction of supernova energy that goes into heating the ISM must depend on environment and is probably higher n...

  10. The very soft X-ray emission of X-ray-faint early-type galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, S.; Fabbiano, G.

    1994-01-01

    A recent reanaylsis of Einstein data, and new ROSAT observations, have revealed the presence of at least two components in the X-ray spectra of X-ray faint early-type galaxies: a relatively hard component (kT greater than 1.5 keV), and a very soft component (kT approximately 0.2-0.3 keV). In this paper we address the problem of the nature of the very soft component and whether it can be due to a hot interstellar medium (ISM), or is most likely originated by the collective emission of very soft stellar sources. To this purpose, hydrodynamical evolutionary sequences for the secular behavior of gas flows in ellipticals have been performed, varying the Type Ia supernovae rate of explosion, and the dark matter amount and distribution. The results are compared with the observational X-ray data: the average Einstein spectrum for six X-ray faint early-type galaxies (among which are NGC 4365 and NGC 4697), and the spectrum obtained by the ROSAT pointed observation of NGC 4365. The very soft component could be entirely explained with a hot ISM only in galaxies such as NGC 4697, i.e., when the depth of the potential well-on which the average ISM temperature strongly depends-is quite shallow; in NGC 4365 a diffuse hot ISM would have a temperature larger than that of the very soft component, because of the deeper potential well. So, in NGC 4365 the softest contribution to the X-ray emission comes certainly from stellar sources. As stellar soft X-ray emitters, we consider late-type stellar coronae, supersoft sources such as those discovered by ROSAT in the Magellanic Clouds and M31, and RS CVn systems. All these candidates can be substantial contributors to the very soft emission, though none of them, taken separately, plausibly accounts entirely for its properties. We finally present a model for the X-ray emission of NGC 4365, to reproduce in detail the results of the ROSAT pointed observation, including the Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) spectrum and radial

  11. DIFFUSE X-RAY EMISSION IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER CORES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The unresolved X-ray emission in the cores of 10 globular clusters hosting millisecond pulsars is investigated. Subtraction of the known resolved point sources leads to detectable levels of unresolved emission in the core region of M28, NGC 6440, M62, and NGC 6752. The X-ray luminosities in the 0.3-8 keV energy band of this emission component were found to lie in the range ∼1.5 x 1031erg s-1 (NGC 6752) to ∼2.2 x 1032 erg s-1 (M28). The lowest limiting luminosity for X-ray source detections amongst these four clusters was 1.1 x 1030 erg s-1 for NGC 6752. The spectrum of the unresolved emission can be fit equally well by a power law, a thermal bremsstrahlung model, a blackbody plus power law, or a thermal bremsstrahlung model plus blackbody component. The unresolved emission is considered to arise from the cumulative contribution of active binaries, cataclysmic variables, and faint millisecond pulsars with their associated pulsar wind nebulae. In examining the available X-ray data, no evidence for any pulsar wind nebular emission in globular clusters is found. It is shown that the X-ray luminosity contribution of a faint source population based on an extrapolation of the luminosity function of detected point sources is compatible with the unresolved X-ray emission in the cores of NGC 6440 and NGC 6752. Adopting the same slope for the luminosity function for M62 as for NGC 6440 and NGC 6752 leads to a similar result for M62. For M28, the contribution from faint sources in the core can attain a level comparable with the observed value if a steeper slope is adopted. The characteristics on the faint source population as constrained by the properties of the unresolved X-ray emission are briefly discussed.

  12. X-ray and radio emission from colliding stellar winds

    OpenAIRE

    Pittard, J. M.; Dougherty, S. M.; Coker, R. F.; Corcoran, M. F

    2004-01-01

    The collision of the hypersonic winds in early-type binaries produces shock heated gas, which radiates thermal X-ray emission, and relativistic electrons, which emit nonthermal radio emission. We review our current understanding of the emission in these spectral regions and discuss models which have been developed for the interpretation of this emission. Physical processes which affect the resulting emission are reviewed and ideas for the future are noted.

  13. X-Ray Emission from Rotation-Powered Pulsars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Gui-Fang; ZHANG Li

    2005-01-01

    @@ We study the properties of pulsed component of hard (2-10keV) x-ray emission from pulsars based on the new version of outer gap model we proposed previously [Astrophys.J.604 (2004) 317].On the frame of this outer gap model, we derive an expression of non-thermal pulsed x-ray luminosity of rotation-powered pulsars, and then apply it to the pulsars whose pulsed x-rays are detected by ASCA.Using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test,we determine the model parameter.The present results indicate LX ∝ L1.15sd for these x-ray pulsars, which is consistent with the observed data.

  14. Is X-ray emissivity constant on magnetic flux surfaces?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowledge of the elongations and shifts of internal magnetic flux surfaces can be used to determine the q profile in elongated tokamak plasmas. X-ray tomography is thought to be a reasonable technique for independently measuring internal flux surface shapes, because it is widely believed that X-ray emissivity should be constant on a magnetic flux surface. In the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, the X-ray tomography diagnostic system consists of four arrays of 38 chords each. A comparison of reconstructed X-ray contours with magnetic flux surfaces shows a small but consistent discrepancy in the radial profile of elongation. Numerous computational tests have been performed to verify these findings, including tests of the sensitivity to calibration and viewing geometry errors, the accuracy of the tomography reconstruction algorithms, and other subtler effects. We conclude that the discrepancy between the X-ray contours and the magnetic flux surfaces is real, leading to the conclusion that X-ray emissivity is not exactly constant on a flux surface. (orig.)

  15. Auroral X ray emission at Jupiter: Depth effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auroral X-ray emissions from Jupiter with a total power of about 1 GW have been observed by the Einstein Observatory, Roentgen satellite, Chandra X-ray Observatory, and XMM-Newton. Previous theoretical studies have shown that precipitating energetic sulfur and oxygen ions can produce the observed X-rays. This study presents the results of a hybrid Monte Carlo (MC) model for sulfur and oxygen ion precipitation at high latitudes, looks at differences with the continuous slow-down model, and compares the results to synthetic spectra fitted to observations. We concentrate on the effects of altitude on the observed spectrum. The opacity of the atmosphere to the outgoing X-ray photons is found to be important for incident ion energies greater than about 1.2 MeV per nucleon for both sulfur and oxygen. Model spectra are calculated for intensities with and without any opacity effects. These synthetic spectra were compared with the results shown by Hui et al. (2010) which fit Chandra X-ray Observatory observations for the north and south Jovian auroral emissions. Quenching of long-lived excited states of the oxygen ions is found to be important. Opacity considerably diminishes the outgoing X-ray intensity calculated, particularly when the viewing geometry is not favorable.

  16. Synchrotron-Radiation Induced X-Ray Emission (SRIXE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Keith W.

    1999-09-01

    Elemental analysis using emission of characteristic x rays is a well-established scientific method. The success of this analytical method is highly dependent on the properties of the source used to produce the x rays. X-ray tubes have long existed as a principal excitation source, but electron and proton beams have also been employed extensively. The development of the synchrotron radiation x-ray source that has taken place during the past 40 years has had a major impact on the general field of x-ray analysis. Even tier 40 years, science of x-ray analysis with synchrotron x-ray beams is by no means mature. Improvements being made to existing synchrotron facilities and the design and construction of new facilities promise to accelerate the development of the general scientific use of synchrotron x-ray sources for at least the next ten years. The effective use of the synchrotron source technology depends heavily on the use of high-performance computers for analysis and theoretical interpretation of the experimental data. Fortunately, computer technology has advanced at least as rapidly as the x-ray technology during the past 40 years and should continue to do so during the next decade. The combination of these technologies should bring about dramatic advances in many fields where synchrotron x-ray science is applied. It is interesting also to compare the growth and rate of acceptance of this particular research endeavor to the rates for other technological endeavors. Griibler [1997] cataloged the time required for introduction, diffusion,and acceptance of technological, economic, and social change and found mean values of 40 to 50 years. The introduction of the synchrotron source depends on both technical and non-technical factors, and the time scale at which this seems to be occurring is quite compatible with what is seen for other major innovations such as the railroad or the telegraph. It will be interesting to see how long the present rate of technological change

  17. L X-ray emission induced by heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajek, M.; Banaś, D.; Braziewicz, J.; Majewska, U.; Semaniak, J.; Fijał-Kirejczyk, I.; Jaskóła, M.; Czarnacki, W.; Korman, A.; Kretschmer, W.; Mukoyama, T.; Trautmann, D.

    2015-11-01

    Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique is usually applied using typically 1 MeV to 3 MeV protons or helium ions, for which the ion-atom interaction is dominated by the single ionization process. For heavier ions the multiple ionization plays an increasingly important role and this process can influence substantially both the X-ray spectra and atomic decay rates. Additionally, the subshell coupling effects are important for the L- and M-shells ionized by heavy ions. Here we discuss the main features of the X-ray emission induced by heavy ions which are important for PIXE applications, namely, the effects of X-ray line shifts and broadening, vacancy rearrangement and change of the fluorescence and Coster-Kronig yields in multiple ionized atoms. These effects are illustrated here by the results of the measurements of L X-ray emission from heavy atoms bombarded by 6 MeV to 36 MeV Si ions, which were reported earlier. The strong L-subshell coupling effects are observed, in particular L2-subshell, which can be accounted for within the coupling subshell model (CSM) developed within the semiclassical approximation. Finally, the prospects to use heavy ions in PIXE analysis are discussed.

  18. Discovery of Diffuse Hard X-ray Emission Around Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezoe, Yuichiro; Ishikawa, K.; Ohashi, T.; Terada, N.; Miyoshi, Y.; Uchiyama, Y.

    2009-09-01

    Our discovery of diffuse hard (1-5 keV) X-ray emission around Jupiter is reported. Recent Chandra and XMM-Newton observations revealed several types of X-rays in the vicinity of Jupiter such as auroral and disk emission from Jupiter and faint diffuse X-rays from the Io Plasma Torus (see Bhardwaj et al. 2007 for review). To investigate possible diffuse hard X-ray emission around Jupiter with the highest sensitivity, we conducted data analysis of Suzaku XIS observations of Jupiter on Feb 2006. After removing satellite and planetary orbital motions, we detected a significant diffuse X-ray emission extending to 6 x 3 arcmin with the 1-5 keV X-ray luminosity of 3e15 erg/s. The emitting region very well coincided with the Jupiter's radiation belts and the bright spot seemed to move according to the Io's motion. The 1-5 keV X-ray spectrum was represented by a simple power law model with a photon index of 1.4. Such a flat continuum strongly suggests non-thermal origin. We hence examined three mechanisms: bremsstrahlung by keV electrons, synchrotron emission by TeV electrons, and inverse Compton scattering of solar photons by MeV electrons. The former two can be rejected because of the X-ray spectral shape and implausible existence of TeV electrons around Jupiter, respectively. The last possibility was found to be possible because tens MeV electrons, which have been confirmed in inner radiation belts (Bolton et al. 2002), can kick solar photons to the keV energy range and provide a simple power-law continuum. We estimated an average electron density from the X-ray luminosity assuming the oblate spheroid shaped emitting region with 8 x 8 x 4 Jovian radii. The necessary density was 0.02 1/cm3 for 50 MeV electrons. Hence, our results may suggest a new particle acceleration phenomenon related to Io.

  19. X-rays from protostellar jets: emission from continuous flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonito, R.; Orlando, S.; Peres, G.; Favata, F.; Rosner, R.

    2007-02-01

    Context: Recently X-ray emission from protostellar jets has been detected with both XMM-Newton and Chandra satellites, but the physical mechanism which can give rise to this emission is still unclear. Aims: We performed an extensive exploration of the parameter space for the main parameters influencing the jet/ambient medium interaction. Aims include: 1) to constrain the jet/ambient medium interaction regimes leading to the X-ray emission observed in Herbig-Haro objects in terms of the emission by a shock forming at the interaction front between a continuous supersonic jet and the surrounding medium; 2) to derive detailed predictions to be compared with optical and X-ray observations of protostellar jets; 3) to get insight into the protostellar jet's physical conditions. Methods: We performed a set of two-dimensional hydrodynamic numerical simulations, in cylindrical coordinates, modeling supersonic jets ramming into a uniform ambient medium. The model takes into account the most relevant physical effects, namely thermal conduction and radiative losses. Results: Our model explains the observed X-ray emission from protostellar jets in a natural way. In particular, we find that a protostellar jet that is less dense than the ambient medium well reproduces the observations of the nearest Herbig-Haro object, HH 154, and allows us to make detailed predictions of a possible X-ray source proper motion (v_sh ≈500 km s-1) detectable with Chandra. Furthermore, our results suggest that the simulated protostellar jets which best reproduce the X-rays observations cannot drive molecular outflows.

  20. X-Ray Emission from M32: X-Ray Binaries or a micro-AGN?

    OpenAIRE

    Eskridge, Paul B.; White III, Raymond E.; Davis, David S.

    1996-01-01

    We have analysed archival {\\it ROSAT} PSPC data for M32 in order to study the x-ray emission from this nearest elliptical galaxy. We fit spectra from three long exposures with Raymond-Smith, thermal bremsstrahlung, and power-law models. All models give excellent fits. The thermal fits have kT$\\approx$4 keV, the Raymond-Smith iron abundance is $0.4^{+0.7}_{-0.3}$ Solar, the power-law fit has $\\alpha$=1.6$\\pm$0.1, and all fits have $N_H$ consistent with the Galactic column. The source is center...

  1. X-ray gaseous emission in the galaxy M82

    CERN Document Server

    Ranalli, Piero; Origlia, Livia; Maiolino, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    The main results from a deep X-ray observation of M82 are summarised: spatially-dependent chemical abundances, temperature structure of the gas, charge-exchange emission lines in the spectrum. We also present an update of the chemical bundances, based on a more refined extraction of spectra.

  2. PIXE, Particel Induced X-Ray Emission A Concise Review

    OpenAIRE

    GARİP, A. İnhan

    1998-01-01

    PIXE-Particle Induced X-Ray Emission is a multielemental, sensitive and non-estructive method which has been in use in trace elemental analysis since 1970. This review aims to explain the main features of PIXE. References will be given at the end for those that seek more detailed knowledge on the principles and applications of this technique.

  3. TYPING SUPERNOVA REMNANTS USING X-RAY LINE EMISSION MORPHOLOGIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a new observational method to type the explosions of young supernova remnants (SNRs). By measuring the morphology of the Chandra X-ray line emission in 17 Galactic and Large Magellanic Cloud SNRs with a multipole expansion analysis (using power ratios), we find that the core-collapse SNRs are statistically more asymmetric than the Type Ia SNRs. We show that the two classes of supernovae can be separated naturally using this technique because X-ray line morphologies reflect the distinct explosion mechanisms and structure of the circumstellar material. These findings are consistent with recent spectropolarimetry results showing that core-collapse supernovae explosions are intrinsically more asymmetric.

  4. X-ray emission from early-type galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Pellegrini, S

    2010-01-01

    The past decade has seen a large progress in the X-ray investigation of early-type galaxies of the local universe, and first attempts have been made to reach redshifts z>0 for these objects, thanks to the high angular resolution and sensitivity of the satellites Chandra and XMM-Newton. Major advances have been obtained in our knowledge of the three separate contributors to the X-ray emission, that are the stellar sources, the hot gas and the galactic nucleus. Here a brief outline of the main results is presented, pointing out the questions that remain open, and finally discussing the prospects to solve them with a wide area X-ray survey mission such as WFXT.

  5. X-ray emission lines from photoionized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma emission codes have become a standard tool for the analysis of spectroscopic data from cosmic X-ray sources. However, the assumption of collisional equilibrium, typically invoked in these codes, renders them inapplicable to many important astrophysical situations, particularly those involving X-ray photoionized nebulae, which are likely to exist in the circumsource environments of compact X-ray sources. X-ray line production in a photoionized plasma is primarily the result of radiative cascades following recombination. Through the development of atomic models of several highly-charged ions, this work extends the range of applicability of discrete spectral models to plasmas dominated by recombination. Assuming that ambient plasma conditions lie in the temperature range 105--106 K and the density range 1011--1016 cm-3, X-ray line spectra are calculated over the wavelength range 5--45 angstrom using the HULLAC atomic physics package. Most of the work focuses on the Fe L-shell ions. Line ratios of the form (3s-2p)/(3d-2p) are shown to characterize the principal mode of line excitation, thereby providing a simple signature of photoionization. At electron densities exceeding 1012 cm-3, metastable state populations in the ground configurations approach their LTE value, resulting in the enrichment of the Fe L-shell recombination spectrum and a set of density-sensitive X-ray line ratios. Radiative recombination continua and emission lines produced selectively by Δn = 0 dielectronic recombination are shown to provide two classes of temperature diagnostics. Because of the extreme overionization, the recombination continua are expected to be narrow (ΔE/E much-lt 1), with ΔE = kT. Dielectronic recombination selectively drives radiative transitions that originate on states with vacancies in the 2s subshell, states that are inaccessible under pure RR population kinetics

  6. X-ray Emission from Thunderstorms and Lightning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    How lightning is initiated in the relatively low electric fields inside thunderclouds and how it can then propagate for tens of kilometers through virgin air are two of the great unsolved problems in the atmospheric sciences. Until very recently it was believed that lightning was entirely a conventional discharge, involving only low-energy (a few eV) electrons. This picture changed completely a few years ago with the discovery of intense x-ray emission from both natural cloud-to-ground lightning and rocket-triggered lightning. This energetic emission cannot be produced by a conventional discharge, and so the presence of x-rays strongly implies that runaway breakdown plays a role in lightning processes. During runaway breakdown, electrons are accelerated through air to nearly the speed of light by strong electric fields. These runaway electrons then emit bremsstrahlung x-rays and gamma-rays during collisions with air. Indeed, the x-ray and gamma-ray emission produced by runaway breakdown near the tops of thunderstorms is bright enough to be seen from outer space, 600 km away. As a result, the physics used for decades to describe thunderstorm electrification and lightning discharges is incomplete and needs to be revisited.

  7. Discovery of diffuse x-ray emission in 47 Tuc

    CERN Document Server

    Krockenberger, M; Krockenberger, Martin; Grindlay, J

    1995-01-01

    We present the results of a search for diffuse x-ray sources in a 65 ksec ROSAT PSPC exposure of 47 Tuc. There is faint, soft emission on the NE side of the cluster at a distance of 6 arcmin from the core. The location of this emission along the direction of proper motion of the cluster suggests that it might be due to a bow shock. We show that a simple shock model fits the observed luminosity and temperature. However, a bow shock can only form if the rotation of the halo gas at the height of 47 Tuc (z = 3.3 kpc) is small compared to the rotation of the galactic plane. Therefore this observation provides not only the first x-ray detection of hot gas in a globular cluster, but also constrains the dynamics of the halo gas. We also find two sources of diffuse x-ray emission to the NE of the cluster which are brighter and harder. We consider a variety of models for this emission, including thermal emission from a high velocity wind from a hot white dwarf, and propose that it is due to inverse Compton emission fro...

  8. X-ray absorption and selectively excited X-ray emission spectra of atenolol and nadolol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The biological function of a drug given by the oral route is ruled by its degree of absorption in the gastrointestinal tract. These absorption characteristics (dissolution, solubility, permeability, metabolism) of the drug are time consuming and expensive to investigate experimentally. The predictive power of traditional theoretical models is quite limited. This is especially so for solubility, where a model predicting values within one order of magnitude of the experimentally determined solubility is accepted by the research field. Aiming at a more detailed understanding of drug solubility, we are carrying out X-ray absorption and X-ray emission spectroscopy on a series of pharmaceutical model substances in solid form and in water solution. Changes in local geometry and electronic structure primarily associated with changes in the way the drug molecules are hydrogen bonded to surrounding molecules are directly reflected in the spectra. Here we present and analyze the spectra of two solid β-adrenoreceptors, atenolol and nadolol, at the carbon, nitrogen and oxygen K edges. Special attention is given to the influence on the spectra of hydrogen bonding. An increased understanding of hydrogen bonding is essential for improving solubility models

  9. Diffuse X-ray emission from star forming galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Sarkar, Kartick C; Sharma, Prateek; Shchekinov, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    We study the diffuse X-ray luminosity ($L_X$) of star forming galaxies using 2-D axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulations and analytical considerations of supernovae (SNe) driven galactic outflows. We find that the mass loading of the outflows, a crucial parameter for determining the X-ray luminosity, is constrained by the availability of gas in the central star forming region, and a competition between cooling and expansion. We show that the allowed range of the mass loading factor can explain the observed scaling of $L_X$ with star formation rate (SFR) as $L_X \\propto$ SFR$^2$ for SFR $\\gtrsim 1$ M$_\\odot$yr$^{-1}$, and a flatter relation at low SFRs. We also show that the emission from the hot circumgalactic medium (CGM) in the halo of massive galaxies can explain the sub-linear behaviour of the $L_X-$SFR relation as well as a large scatter in the diffuse X-ray emission for low SFRs ($\\lesssim$ few M$_\\odot$yr$^{-1}$). Our results point out that galaxies with small SFRs and large diffuse X-ray luminosities ...

  10. Particle-induced x-ray emission analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1970, Johansson demonstrated that the bombardment of a specimen with protons of a few MeV gives rise to the emission of characteristic x-rays and that this can form the basis for a highly sensitive elemental analysis. This landmark work formed the starting point of the x-ray emission analysis technique, which became known as particle-induced x-ray emission analysis (PIXE). Although PIXE is sometimes considered a variant of XRF, such a classification is not correct in a strict sense, since the technique does not rely on excitation of the sample by x-rays. Instead, heavy charged particles, that is, protons, α particles, or heavy ions, are used in PIXE to create inner-shell vacancies in the atoms of the specimen. The characteristic x-rays produced by deexcitation of the vacancies are almost always measured by an energy-dispersive spectrometer with an Si(Li) detector. The incident charged-particle beams in PIXE are invariably generated by particle accelerators. For the great majority of PIXE work, protons of 1--4 MeV, which can be produced by small accelerators (e.g., Van de Graaff accelerators or compact cyclotrons), are employed. The progress of PIXE over the years is exemplified by the proceedings of the five international conferences exclusively dedicated to the PIXE technique and its applications. By now, PIXE has evolved into a rather well-used and mature technique, as demonstrated by the increasing numbers of research papers in which PIXE provided the analytical results and by recent publication of the first textbook on the technique. 232 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab

  11. Spontaneous emission effects in optically pumped x-ray FEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smetanin, I.V.; Grigor`ev, S.V. [P.N. Lebedev Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    An effect of spontaneous emission in both quantum and classical regimes of the optically pumped X-ray free electron laser (FEL) in investigated. The quantum properties of an FEL are determined by the ratio of the separation {h_bar} between the absorption and emission lines (i.e. the quanta emitted) and their effective width {Delta}{epsilon} {eta}={h_bar}/{Delta}{epsilon}. In the conventional classical regime {eta} {much_lt} 1 an electron emits and absorbes a great number of shortwavelength photons over the interaction region, the gain in FEL being the result of these competitive processes. In the quantum limit {eta} {much_gt} 1 the emission and absorption lines are completely separated and thus the FEL becomes a two-level quantum oscillator with a completely inverted active medium. Spontaneous emission causes the electron to leave the range of energies where resonant interaction with the laser field occurs, thus effectively reducing the number of particles that take part in generating the induced X-ray signal. This effect is found to be crucial for lasing in optically pumped X-ray FEL. The characteristic relaxation times are calculated for both classical and quantum FEL regimes. It is shown that spontaneous emission results in FEL electron beam threshold current, which is of rather high value. An optimal range of pumping laser intensities is determined.

  12. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy of Faint Discrete X-ray Point Sources Constituting the Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Morihana, Kumiko; Dubath, Pierre; Yoshida, Tessei; Suzuki, Kensuke; Ebisawa, Ken

    2016-01-01

    The Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission (GRXE) is apparently extended X-ray emission along the Galactic Plane. The X-ray spectrum is characterized by hard continuum with a strong Fe K emission feature in the 6-7 keV band. A substantial fraction (~80%) of the GRXE in the Fe band was resolved into point sources by deep Chandra imaging observations, thus GRXE is mostly composed of dim Galactic X-ray point sources at least in this energy band. To investigate the populations of these dim X-ray point sources, we carried out Near-Infrared (NIR) follow-up spectroscopic observations in two deep Chandra fields located in the Galactic plane at (l,b)=(0.1{\\arcdeg}, -1.4{\\arcdeg}) and (28.5{\\arcdeg}, 0.0{\\arcdeg}) using NTT/SofI and Subaru/MOIRCS. We obtained well-exposed NIR spectra from 65 objects and found that there are three main classes of Galactic sources based on the X-ray color and NIR spectral features: those having (A) hard X-ray spectra and NIR emission features such as HI(Br{\\gamma}), HeI, and HeII (2 objects), (B)...

  13. X-rays from protostellar jets: emission from continuous flows

    CERN Document Server

    Bonito, R; Peres, G; Favata, F; Rosner, R

    2006-01-01

    Recently X-ray emission from protostellar jets has been detected with both XMM-Newton and Chandra satellites, but the physical mechanism which can give rise to this emission is still unclear. We performed an extensive exploration of a wide space of the main parameters influencing the jet/ambient interaction. Aims include: 1) to constrain the jet/ambient interaction regimes leading to the X-ray emission observed in Herbig-Haro objects in terms of the emission by a shock forming at the interaction front between a continuous supersonic jet and the surrounding medium; 2) to derive detailed predictions to be compared with optical and X-ray observations of protostellar jets; 3) to get insight into the protostellar jet's physical conditions. We performed a set of bidimensional hydrodynamic numerical simulations, in cylindrical coordinates, modeling supersonic jets ramming a uniform ambient medium. The model takes into account the most relevant physical effects, namely the thermal conduction and the radiative losses....

  14. Formation and X-ray Emission from Hot Bubbles in Planetary Nebulae. II. Hot bubble X-ray emission

    CERN Document Server

    Toalá, J A

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of the X-ray emission from numerical simulations of hot bubbles in planetary nebulae (PNe). High-resolution, two-dimensional, radiation-hydrodynamical simulations of the formation and evolution of hot bubbles in PNe, with and without thermal conduction, are used to calculate the X-ray emission and study its time-dependence and relationship to the changing stellar parameters. Instabilities in the wind-wind interaction zone produce clumps and filaments in the swept-up shell of nebular material. Turbulent mixing and thermal conduction at the corrugated interface can produce quantities of intermediate temperature and density gas between the hot, shocked wind bubble and the swept-up photoionized nebular material, which can emit in soft, diffuse X-rays. We use the CHIANTI software to compute synthetic spectra for the models and calculate their luminosities. We find that models both with conduction and those without can produce the X-ray temperatures and luminosities that are in the ranges reporte...

  15. X-ray emission of pseudo spark chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three types of X-ray sources can be classified in the high power Pseudo Spark: anode radiation, which is generated by the self-focused electron beam during the predischarge, radiation from the cathode surface, which has its origin in electrons hitting the walls at the beginning of the main discharge, and plasma radiation, which is emitted partially directed by a small plasma area in the hollow cathode region during the main discharge. The maximum quantum energies of anode and cathode wall radiation are corresponding to the discharge voltage, those of the plasma radiation are typically one to two orders of magnitude lower. The measurement of the X-ray emission is supporting the usual distinction of pre- and main discharge in the Pseudo Spark. Additionally can be shown, that the predischarge consists of a modified Townsend discharge with runaway-electrons in the discharge channel and a normal Townsend discharge with drifting electrons in the hollow cathode region. The events in the hollow cathode region are essential for the transition into the main discharge. A first application of the Pseudo Spark as an X-ray source was realised in an experimental upset for X-ray backlightning of ion beam targets. (orig.)

  16. The X-ray emission of the gamma Cassiopiae stars

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Myron A; Motch, C

    2015-01-01

    Long considered as the "odd man out" among X-ray emitting Be stars, \\gamma Cas (B0.5e\\,IV) is now recognized as the prototype of a class of stars that emit hard thermal X-rays. Our classification differs from the historical use of the term "gamma Cas stars" defined from optical properties alone. The luminosity output of this class contributes significantly to the hard X-ray production of massive stars in the Galaxy. The gamma Cas stars have light curves showing variability on a few broadly-defined timescales and spectra indicative of an optically thin plasma consisting of one or more hot thermal components. By now 9--13 Galactic \\approx B0-1.5e main sequence stars are judged to be members or candidate members of the \\gc\\ class. Conservative criteria for this designation are for a \\approxB0-1.5e III-V star to have an X-ray luminosity of 10^{32}--10^{33} ergs s^{-1}, a hot thermal spectrum containing the short wavelength Ly \\alpha FeXXV and FeXXVI lines and the fluorescence FeK feature all in emission. If therm...

  17. X-ray emission from clusters of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushotzky, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    Some X-ray spectral observations of approximately 30 clusters of galaxies from HEAO-1 are summarized. There exists strong correlation betwen X-ray luminosity, L(x), and temperature kT in the form L(x)alphaT to the 2.3 power. This result combined with the L(x) central galaxy density relation and the virial theorem indicates that the core dadius of the gas should be roughly independent of L(x) or Kt and that more luminous clusters have a greater fraction of their virial mass in gas. The poor correlation of KT and optical velocity dispersion seems to indicate that clusters have a variety of equations of state. There is poor agreement between X-ray imaging observations and optical and X-ray spectral measures of the polytropic index. Most clusters show Fe emission lines with a strong indication that they all have roughly 1/2 solar abundance. The evidence for cooling in the cores several clusters is discussed based on spectral observations with the Einstein solid state spectrometer.

  18. Neutron and x-ray emission time measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser fusion targets can produce implosions with a delay between the peak compression (neutron emission) and the laser pulse on the order of 0.2 to 2.5 ns. We use a fast detector system to measure x-ray and D-T neutron emission times with a resolution of 100 to 200 ps. An NE111 fluor (quenched with 2% benzophenone) coupled to a microchannel plate photomultiplier tube detects the arrival of neutrons and x rays. A separate biplanar vacuum photodiode detects the arrival of unabsorbed laser light scattered from the target. These signals are mixed, then recorded on a 500 MHz transient digitizer. The discussion includes a description of the time interval system, experimental data, data analysis techniques, and system calibration

  19. Quantifying the Exospheric Component of Soft X-ray Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Kip; Collier, Michael R.; Snowden, Steven L.; Robertson, Ina; Hansen, Kenneth; Cravens, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    High charge state heavy ions in the solar wind exchange charge with ambient neutral gas. This process creates a product ion in an excited state. During the radiative cascade process, EUV and X-ray photons are emitted with energies in the range of about 100 eV to 1 keV. Because the terrestrial exospheric density at the nominal magnetopause location is relatively high, approx. 10 cu cm, solar wind charge exchange, or SWCX, can be observed by Earth-orbiting soft X-ray instruments such as the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counters (PSPC). In this presentation, we will compare simulated and observed soft Xray emission during an event on August 18-19, 1991 and discuss the role of exospheric SWCX emission for this and other events.

  20. The X-ray emission of 3C273

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The X-ray emission of 3C273 in the 0.2-35 keV band has been studied, with EXOSAT and Ginga, over the period 1983 December to 1988 December. The overall flux is variable on a time-scale of weeks by a factor of 2. The spectral index in the 2-10 keV band (α ∼ 0.5) is significantly different from the 'canonical' AGN index of α = 0.7. There are small but significant variations with time in the spectral index which are not statistically correlated with the overall X-ray flux level. Iron emission with an equivalent width of ∼ 50 eV is detected in one of the Ginga observations. (author)

  1. The X-ray emission of 3C273

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, M.J.L.; Williams, O.R. (Leicester Univ. (UK). Dept. of Astronomy); Courvoisier, T.J.-L. (Geneva Observatory (Switzerland)) (and others)

    1990-05-15

    The X-ray emission of 3C273 in the 0.2-35 keV band has been studied, with EXOSAT and Ginga, over the period 1983 December to 1988 December. The overall flux is variable on a time-scale of weeks by a factor of 2. The spectral index in the 2-10 keV band ({alpha} {approx} 0.5) is significantly different from the 'canonical' AGN index of {alpha} = 0.7. There are small but significant variations with time in the spectral index which are not statistically correlated with the overall X-ray flux level. Iron emission with an equivalent width of {approx} 50 eV is detected in one of the Ginga observations. (author).

  2. X-ray emission of the night terrestrial atmosphere (experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugacheva, Galina; Pankov, Vladislav; Prokhin, Vladimir; Gusev, Anatoly; Spjeldvik, Walther; Martin, Inacio; Pugacheva, Galina

    A spectrometer RPS-1 onboard the LEO "CORONAS-F" satellite monitored solar X-rays in the energy range 3-31.5 keV (31.07.2001 - 06.12.2005 years) using CdTe solid state detector with thermoelectric semiconductor micro cooler. The device registered X-ray emission of the upper atmosphere at shadowed branches of the orbit. When touching the inner radiation belt in the South Atlantic anomaly and at high latitudes the device registered signals produced by energetic trapped particles. Among the other factors determining the flux registered by the device there are solar activity, the Earth position relatively the Sun (seasonality), satellite position, the telescope orientation relatively nadir when entering and leaving the Earth's shadow. This paper presents global maps of the atmospheric X-ray emission in four energy intervals 3-5; 5-8, 8-16, and 16-31.5 keV during the total period from 23.03.2002 up to 23.03.2003 and periods of 23.03.2002-23.09.2002 and 23.09.2002-23.03/2003 corresponding "summer" and "winter" seasons in the Northern hemisphere. The energy of the registered emission does not exceed 8 keV out of the radiation belt. Comparison of the seasonal maps reveals a gap between the radiation belts at low altitudes ( 500km) in the summer of 2002 probably due to compression of the magnetosphere and/or the seasonal atmospheric temperature changesin time period close to the maximum of solar activity and the absence of the gap in summer of 2004 year near to solar activity minimum. A weak emission of 3-5 keV x-rays in the gap within radiation belts is produced by interaction of galactic cosmic rays with the atmosphere.

  3. X-Ray Emission from Flare Collapsing Trap

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Karlický, Marian

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 122, 1-4 (2006), s. 161-168. ISSN 0038-6308 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3003202; GA AV ČR 1QS300120506; GA ČR GA205/04/0358 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : solar flares * X-ray emission Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 3.789, year: 2006

  4. THE CHANDRA CARINA COMPLEX PROJECT: DECIPHERING THE ENIGMA OF CARINA'S DIFFUSE X-RAY EMISSION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a 1.42 deg2 mosaic of diffuse X-ray emission in the Great Nebula in Carina from the Chandra X-ray Observatory Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer camera. After removing >14,000 X-ray point sources from the field, we smooth the remaining unresolved emission, tessellate it into segments of similar apparent surface brightness, and perform X-ray spectral fitting on those tessellates to infer the intrinsic properties of the X-ray-emitting plasma. By modeling faint resolved point sources, we estimate the contribution to the extended X-ray emission from unresolved point sources and show that the vast majority of Carina's unresolved X-ray emission is truly diffuse. Line-like correlated residuals in the X-ray spectral fits suggest that substantial X-ray emission is generated by charge exchange at the interfaces between Carina's hot, rarefied plasma and its many cold neutral pillars, ridges, and clumps.

  5. Backscatter of hard X-rays in the solar atmosphere. [Calculating the reflectance of solar x ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, T.; Ramaty, R.

    1977-01-01

    The solar photosphere backscatters a substantial fraction of the hard X rays from solar flares incident upon it. This reflection was studied using a Monte Carlo simulation which takes into account Compton scattering and photo-electric absorption. Both isotropic and anisotropic X ray sources are considered. The bremsstrahlung from an anisotropic distribution of electrons are evaluated. By taking the reflection into account, the inconsistency is removed between recent observational data regarding the center-to-limb variation of solar X ray emission and the predictions of models in which accelerated electrons are moving down toward the photosphere.

  6. The Soft X-Ray Emission Component of Spiral Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbiano, Giuseppina

    1998-01-01

    Work included the analysis of the HRJ observations of the Sombrero galaxy (Fabbiano and Juda) published in Ap.J. This paper discussed the discovery of a point-like x-ray source at the nucleus of the galaxy, which is suspected to host a massive black hole. More work was done on the analysis of the Observation of M94 in support of an AXAF proposal. We have also analyzed the M81 data by adding to our observation the entire set of the archival ROSAT data. We plan to write up the results for publication. Both galaxies have nuclei optically similar to that of the Sombrero galaxy. The nucleus of M81 is a known x-ray source. The M94 data has revealed a point-like nuclear source superposed on more diffuse emission.

  7. Spatially Varying X-ray Synchrotron Emission in SN 1006

    CERN Document Server

    Dyer, K K; Borkowski, K; Petre, R; Dyer, Kristy; Reynolds, Stephen P; Borkowski, Kazik; Petre, Rob

    2001-01-01

    A growing number of both galactic and extragalactic supernova remnants show non-thermal (non-plerionic) emission in the X-ray band. New synchrotron models, realized as SRESC and SRCUT in XSPEC 11, which use the radio spectral index and flux as inputs and include the full single-particle emissivity, have demonstrated that synchrotron emission is capable of producing the spectra of dominantly non-thermal supernova remnants with interesting consequences for residual thermal abundances and acceleration of particles. In addition, these models deliver a much better-constrained separation between the thermal and non-thermal components, whereas combining an unconstrained powerlaw with modern thermal models can produce a range of acceptable fits. While synchrotron emission can be approximated by a powerlaw over small ranges of energy, the synchrotron spectrum is in fact steepening over the X-ray band. Having demonstrated that the integrated spectrum of SN 1006, a remnant dominated by non-thermal emission, is well desc...

  8. Discovery of Soft X-Ray Emission From Io, Europa and the Io Plasma Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, R. F.; Gladstone, G. R.; Waite, J. H.; Crary, F. J.; Howell, R. R.; Johnson, R. E.; Ford, P. G.; Metzger, A. E.; Hurley, K. C.; Feigelson, E. D.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We report the discovery of soft (0.25 - 2 keV) x-ray emission from the moons Io and Europa, probably Ganymede, and from the Io Plasma Torus (IPT). Bombardment by energetic (greater than 10 keV) H, O, and S ions from the region of the IPT seems the likely source of the x-ray emission from the Galilean moons. According to our estimates, fluorescent x-ray emission excited by solar x-rays, even during flares from the active Sun, charge-exchange processes, previously invoked to explain Jupiter's x-ray aurora and cometary x-ray emission, and ion stripping by dust grains fall to account for the observed emission. On the other hand, bremsstrahlung emission of soft X-rays from non-thermal electrons in the few hundred to few thousand eV range may account for a substantial fraction of the observed x-ray flux from the IPT.

  9. X-ray emission lines from inhomogeneous stellar winds

    CERN Document Server

    Oskinova, L M; Hamann, W R

    2004-01-01

    It is commonly adopted that X-rays from O stars are produced deep inside the stellar wind, and transported outwards through the bulk of the expanding matter which attenuates the radiation and affects the shape of emission line profiles. None of the existing models was able to fit the observationed lines consistently. The possible caveat of these models was the assumption of a smooth stellar wind. Motivated by the various evidences that the stellar winds are in fact structured, we present a 2-D numerical model of a stochastic, inhomogeneous wind. Small parcels of hot, X-ray emitting gas are permeated with cool, absorbing wind material which is compressed into thin shell fragments. Wind fragmentation alters the radiative transfer drastically, compared to homogeneous models of the same mass-loss rate. X-rays produced deep inside the wind, which would be totally absorbed in a homogeneous flow, can effectively escape from a fragmented wind. The wind absorption becomes wavelength independent if the individual fragm...

  10. X-ray Emission Characteristics of Flares Associated with CMEs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Malini Aggarwal; Rajmal Jain; A. P. Mishra; P. G. Kulkarni; Chintan Vyas; R. Sharma; Meera Gupta

    2008-03-01

    We present the study of 20 solar flares observed by ``Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS)” mission during November 2003 to December 2006 and found associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) seen by LASCO/SOHO mission. In this investigation, X-ray emission characteristics of solar flares and their relationship with the dynamics of CMEs have been presented.We found that the fast moving CMEs, i.e., positive acceleration are better associated with short rise time (< 150 s) flares. However, the velocity of CMEs increases as a function of duration of the flares in both 4.1–10 and 10–20 keV bands. This indicates that the possibility of association of CMEs with larger speeds exists with long duration flare events. We observed that CMEs decelerate with increasing rise time, decay time and duration of the associated X-ray flares. A total 10 out of 20 CMEs under current investigation showed positive acceleration, and 5 of them whose speed did not exceed 589 km/s were associated with short rise time (< 150 s) and short duration (< 1300 s) flares. The other 5 CMEs were associated with long duration or large rise time flare events. The unusual feature of all these positive accelerating CMEs was their low linear speed ranging between 176 and 775 km/s. We do not find any significant correlation between X-ray peak intensity of the flares with linear speed as well as acceleration of the associated CMEs. Based on the onset time of flares and associated CMEs within the observing cadence of CMEs by LASCO, we found that in 16 cases CME preceded the flare by 23 to 1786 s, while in 4 cases flare occurred before the CME by 47 to 685 s. We argue that both events are closely associated with each other and are integral parts of one energy release system.

  11. Utilization of synchrotron radiation in analytical chemistry. Soft X-ray emission and absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron soft X-ray spectroscopy includes three major types of spectroscopy such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). This paper takes up XAS and XES of soft X-rays, and briefly describes the principle. XAS is roughly classified into XANES (X-ray absorption near-edge structure) and EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure), and XANES is mainly used in the analysis based on XAS of soft X-rays. As the examples of the latest soft X-ray analyses, the following are introduced: (1) bandgap of boron implantation diamond and the local structure of boron, (2) catalytic sites in solid fuel cell carbon electrode, and (3) soft X-ray analysis under atmospheric pressure. (A.O.)

  12. X-ray emission in manganese compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabua, Malkhaz; Gotta, Detlev; Strauch, Thomas; Weidemann, Christian; Fricke, Burkhard; Rashid, Khalid

    2016-07-01

    X-ray emission spectra of manganese compounds have been measured using an ultimate-resolution Bragg spectrometer optimised for long-term high-statistics measurements. Energies corresponding to the peak positions of the Kα lines were measured to a precision of 10-20 meV. Total line widths of the Kα1 and Kα2 components and their asymmetry have been determined to about 50 meV. A model-free parametrisation of the line pattern corrected for the spectrometer response may serve as testing ground for detailed theoretical considerations.

  13. The Hard X-ray Emission of Cen A

    CERN Document Server

    Beckmann, V; Lubinski, P; Soldi, S; Terrier, R

    2011-01-01

    The radio galaxy Cen A has been detected all the way up to the TeV energy range. This raises the question about the dominant emission mechanisms in the high-energy domain. Spectral analysis allows us to put constraints on the possible emission processes. Here we study the hard X-ray emission as measured by INTEGRAL in the 3-1000 keV energy range, in order to distinguish between a thermal and non-thermal inverse Compton process. The hard X-ray spectrum of Cen A shows a significant cut-off at energies Ec = 434 (+106 -73) keV with an underlying power law of photon index 1.73 +- 0.02. A more physical model of thermal Comptonisation (compPS) gives a plasma temperature of kT = 206+-62 keV within the optically thin corona with Compton parameter y = 0.42 (+0.09 -0.06). The reflection component is significant at the 1.9 sigma level with R = 0.12 (+0.09 -0.10), and a reflection strength R>0.3 can be excluded on a 3 sigma level. Time resolved spectral studies show that the flux, absorption, and spectral slope varied in ...

  14. Characterizing X-ray and Radio emission in the Black Hole X-Ray Binary V404 Cygni during Quiescence

    CERN Document Server

    Rana, Vikram; Corbel, Stephane; Tomsick, John A; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Walton, Dominic J; Barret, Didier; Boggs, Steven E; Christensen, Finn E; Craig, William; Fuerst, Felix; Gandhi, Poshak; Grefenstette, Brian W; Hailey, Charles; Harrison, Fiona A; Madsen, Kristin K; Rahoui, Farid; Stern, Daniel; Tendulkar, Shriharsh; Zhang, William W

    2015-01-01

    We present results from multi-wavelength simultaneous X-ray and radio observations of the black hole X-ray binary V404 Cyg in quiescence. Our coverage with NuSTAR provides the very first opportunity to study the X-ray spectrum of V404 Cyg at energies above 10 keV. The unabsorbed broad-band (0.3-30 keV) quiescent luminosity of the source is 8.9$\\times$10$^{32}$ erg s$^{-1}$ for a distance of 2.4 kpc. The source shows clear variability on short time scales in radio, soft X-ray and hard X-ray bands in the form of multiple flares. The broad-band X-ray spectra obtained from XMM-Newton and NuSTAR can be characterized with a power-law model having photon index {\\Gamma}=2.13$\\pm$0.07 (90% confidence errors); however, residuals at high energies indicate spectral curvature significant at a 3{\\sigma} confidence level with e-folding energy of the cutoff to be 19$^{+19}_{-7}$ keV. Such curvature can be explained using synchrotron emission from the base of a jet outflow. Radio observations using the JVLA reveal that the sp...

  15. Studies of soft x-ray emission during solar flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solar flare soft x-ray emission from 0.5 A to 8.5 A was observed during 1967-68 by Bragg crystal (LiF and EDDT) spectrometers aboard the OSO-4 satellite and also by NRL broad-band ionization detectors aboard the OGO-4 satellite. In this work, instrumental parameters for the LiF crystal spectrometer based on experimental values have been determined and used in the data analysis. The total continuum emission in the 0.5 to 3 A and the 1 to 8 A broad band segments has been determined from OGO-4 data for 21 flares. In doing this, a simple and approximate method of converting the total emission based on the gray body approximation (in which the OGO-4 data are reported) to one based on the thermal continuum spectrum has been developed. (author)

  16. X-ray/UV variability and the origin of soft X-ray excess emission from II Zw 177

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Main; Dewangan, Gulab C.; Misra, Ranjeev; Pawar, Pramod K.

    2016-03-01

    We study X-ray and UV emission from the narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy II Zw 177 using a 137 ks long and another 13 ks short XMM-Newton observation performed in 2012 and 2001, respectively. Both observations show soft X-ray excess emission contributing 76.9 ± 4.9 per cent in 2012 and 58.8 ± 10.2 per cent in 2001 in the 0.3-2 keV band. We find that both blurred reflection from an ionized disc and Comptonized disc emission describe the observed soft excess well. Time-resolved spectroscopy on scales of ˜20 ks reveals strong correlation between the soft excess and the power-law components. The fractional variability amplitude Fvar derived from EPIC-pn light curves at different energy bands is nearly constant (Fvar ˜ 20 per cent). This is in contrast to other active galactic nuclei where the lack of short term variation in soft X-ray excess emission has been attributed to intense light bending in the framework of the `lamppost' model. Thus, the variations in power-law emission are most likely intrinsic to corona rather than just due to the changes of height of compact corona. The variable UV emission (Fvar ˜ 1 per cent) is uncorrelated to any of the X-ray components on short time-scales suggesting that the UV emission is not dominated by the reprocessed emission. The gradual observed decline in the UV emission in 2012 may be related to the secular decline due to the changes in the accretion rate. In this case, the short term X-ray variability is not due to the changes in the seed photons but intrinsic to the hot corona.

  17. Near-infrared spectroscopy of faint discrete X-ray point sources constituting the Galactic ridge X-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morihana, Kumiko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Dubath, Pierre; Yoshida, Tessei; Suzuki, Kensuke; Ebisawa, Ken

    2016-08-01

    The Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission (GRXE) is an apparently extended X-ray emission along the Galactic plane. The X-ray spectrum is characterized by a hard continuum with a strong Fe K emission feature in the 6-7 keV band. A substantial fraction (˜80%) of the GRXE in the Fe band was resolved into point sources by deep Chandra imaging observations; thus GRXE is mostly composed of dim Galactic X-ray point sources, at least in this energy band. To investigate the populations of these dim X-ray point sources, we carried out near-infrared (NIR) follow-up spectroscopic observations in two deep Chandra fields located in the Galactic plane at (l, b) = (0.1°, -1.4°) and (28.5°, 0.0°) using NTT/SofI and Subaru/MOIRCS. We obtained well-exposed NIR spectra from 65 objects and found that there are three main classes of Galactic sources based on the X-ray color and NIR spectral features: those having (A) hard X-ray spectra and NIR emission features such as H I (Brγ), He I, and He II (2 objects), (B) soft X-ray spectra and NIR absorption features such as H I, Na I, Ca I, and CO (46 objects), and (C) hard X-ray spectra and NIR absorption features such as H I, Na I, Ca I, and CO (17 objects). From these features, we argue that class A sources are cataclysmic variables (CVs), and class B sources are late-type stars with enhanced coronal activity, which is in agreement with current knowledge. Class C sources possibly belong to a new group of objects, which has been poorly studied so far. We argue that the candidate sources for class C are the binary systems hosting white dwarfs and late-type companions with very low accretion rates. It is likely that this newly recognized class of sources contribute to a non-negligible fraction of the GRXE, especially in the Fe K band.

  18. Weak Hard X-ray Emission from Broad Absorption Line Quasars: Evidence for Intrinsic X-ray Weakness

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, B; Alexander, D M; Stern, D; Teng, S H; Arévalo, P; Bauer, F E; Boggs, S E; Christensen, F E; Comastri, A; Craig, W W; Farrah, D; Gandhi, P; Hailey, C J; Harrison, F A; Koss, M; Ogle, P; Puccetti, S; Saez, C; Scott, A E; Walton, D J; Zhang, W W

    2014-01-01

    We report NuSTAR observations of a sample of six X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars. These targets, at z=0.148-1.223, are among the optically brightest and most luminous BAL quasars known at z330 times weaker than expected for typical quasars. Our results from a pilot NuSTAR study of two low-redshift BAL quasars, a Chandra stacking analysis of a sample of high-redshift BAL quasars, and a NuSTAR spectral analysis of the local BAL quasar Mrk 231 have already suggested the existence of intrinsically X-ray weak BAL quasars, i.e., quasars not emitting X-rays at the level expected from their optical/UV emission. The aim of the current program is to extend the search for such extraordinary objects. Three of the six new targets are weakly detected by NuSTAR with 33%) of intrinsically X-ray weak objects among the BAL quasars with significantly weak <10 keV emission. We suggest that intrinsically X-ray weak quasars might be preferentially observed as BAL quasars.

  19. Weak hard X-ray emission from broad absorption line quasars: evidence for intrinsic X-ray weakness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report NuSTAR observations of a sample of six X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars. These targets, at z = 0.148-1.223, are among the optically brightest and most luminous BAL quasars known at z < 1.3. However, their rest-frame ≈2 keV luminosities are 14 to >330 times weaker than expected for typical quasars. Our results from a pilot NuSTAR study of two low-redshift BAL quasars, a Chandra stacking analysis of a sample of high-redshift BAL quasars, and a NuSTAR spectral analysis of the local BAL quasar Mrk 231 have already suggested the existence of intrinsically X-ray weak BAL quasars, i.e., quasars not emitting X-rays at the level expected from their optical/UV emission. The aim of the current program is to extend the search for such extraordinary objects. Three of the six new targets are weakly detected by NuSTAR with ≲ 45 counts in the 3-24 keV band, and the other three are not detected. The hard X-ray (8-24 keV) weakness observed by NuSTAR requires Compton-thick absorption if these objects have nominal underlying X-ray emission. However, a soft stacked effective photon index (Γeff ≈ 1.8) for this sample disfavors Compton-thick absorption in general. The uniform hard X-ray weakness observed by NuSTAR for this and the pilot samples selected with <10 keV weakness also suggests that the X-ray weakness is intrinsic in at least some of the targets. We conclude that the NuSTAR observations have likely discovered a significant population (≳ 33%) of intrinsically X-ray weak objects among the BAL quasars with significantly weak <10 keV emission. We suggest that intrinsically X-ray weak quasars might be preferentially observed as BAL quasars.

  20. Weak hard X-ray emission from broad absorption line quasars: evidence for intrinsic X-ray weakness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Scott, A. E. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Alexander, D. M.; Gandhi, P. [Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Stern, D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Teng, S. H. [Observational Cosmology Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Arévalo, P.; Bauer, F. E. [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Christensen, F. E. [DTU Space-National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Comastri, A. [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Farrah, D. [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Hailey, C. J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Harrison, F. A. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Koss, M. [Institute for Astronomy, Department of Physics, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Ogle, P. [IPAC, California Institute of Technology, Mail Code 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Puccetti, S. [ASDC—ASI, Via del Politecnico, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Saez, C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); and others

    2014-10-10

    We report NuSTAR observations of a sample of six X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars. These targets, at z = 0.148-1.223, are among the optically brightest and most luminous BAL quasars known at z < 1.3. However, their rest-frame ≈2 keV luminosities are 14 to >330 times weaker than expected for typical quasars. Our results from a pilot NuSTAR study of two low-redshift BAL quasars, a Chandra stacking analysis of a sample of high-redshift BAL quasars, and a NuSTAR spectral analysis of the local BAL quasar Mrk 231 have already suggested the existence of intrinsically X-ray weak BAL quasars, i.e., quasars not emitting X-rays at the level expected from their optical/UV emission. The aim of the current program is to extend the search for such extraordinary objects. Three of the six new targets are weakly detected by NuSTAR with ≲ 45 counts in the 3-24 keV band, and the other three are not detected. The hard X-ray (8-24 keV) weakness observed by NuSTAR requires Compton-thick absorption if these objects have nominal underlying X-ray emission. However, a soft stacked effective photon index (Γ{sub eff} ≈ 1.8) for this sample disfavors Compton-thick absorption in general. The uniform hard X-ray weakness observed by NuSTAR for this and the pilot samples selected with <10 keV weakness also suggests that the X-ray weakness is intrinsic in at least some of the targets. We conclude that the NuSTAR observations have likely discovered a significant population (≳ 33%) of intrinsically X-ray weak objects among the BAL quasars with significantly weak <10 keV emission. We suggest that intrinsically X-ray weak quasars might be preferentially observed as BAL quasars.

  1. Application of X-ray emission techniques for monitoring environmental pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray emission techniques are versatile and powerful methods used for multielement non-destructive analysis. They include X-ray fluorescence (XRF), particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE), scanning electron microscopy combined with X-ray spectrometry and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Since many years the IAEA has utilised and promoted these techniques for the analysis of environmental, biological and geological samples. In this paper recent progress at our laboratory in selected aspects related to the application of X-ray emission techniques is briefly overviewed. (authors)

  2. Direct and bulk-scattered forward-shock emissions: sources of X-ray afterglow diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Panaitescu, A.

    2008-01-01

    I describe the modifications to the standard forward-shock model required to account for the X-ray light-curve features discovered by Swift in the early afterglow emission and propose that a delayed, pair-enriched, and highly relativistic outflow, which bulk-scatters the forward-shock synchrotron emission, yields sometimes a brighter X-ray emission, producing short-lived X-ray flares, X-ray light-curve plateaus ending with chromatic breaks, and fast post-plateau X-ray decays.

  3. Soft X-ray Emissions from Planets, Moons, and Comets

    CERN Document Server

    Bhardwaj, A I

    2002-01-01

    A wide variety of solar system bodies are now known to radiate in the soft x-ray energy (10 keV) x-rays result mainly from the electron bremsstrahlung process. In this paper we present a brief review of the x-ray observations on each of the planetary bodies and discuss their characteristics and proposed source mechanisms.

  4. X-ray Emission from Early Universe Analog Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brorby, Matthew; Kaaret, Philip; Prestwich, Andrea H.; Mirabel, I. Felix; Feng, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Around 300,000 years after the Big Bang, the Universe had cooled enough to combine and form neutral atoms. This signified the beginning of a time known as the Dark Ages. Neutral matter began to fall into the dark matter gravitational wells that were seeded after the initial moments of the Big Bang. As the first stars and galaxies formed within these gravitational wells, the surrounding baryonic matter was heated and started to ionize. The source of energetic photons that heated and reionized the early Universe remains uncertain. Early galaxies had low metallicity and recent population synthesis calculations suggest that the number and luminosity of high-mass X-ray binaries are enhanced in star-forming galaxies with low metallicity, offering a potentially important and previously overlooked source of heating and reionization. Here we examine two types of local galaxies that have been shown to be good analogs to the early galaxies in the Universe: Blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDs) and Lyman Break Analogs (LBAs).A BCD is defined by its blue optical colors, low metallicities, and physically small size. This makes BCDs the best available local analogs for early star formation. We analyzed data from a sample of 25 metal-poor BCDs and compared our results with those of near-solar metallicity galaxies. Using a Bayesian approach, we showed that the X-ray luminosity function for the low-metallicity BCDs is significantly elevated relative to the XLF for near-solar metallicity galaxies.Larger, gas-rich galaxies may have formed shortly after these first galaxies. These larger galaxies would be similar in their properties to the high-redshift Lyman break galaxies (LBGs). LBAs provide the best local comparison to the LBGs. We studied a sample of 10 LBAs in order to measure the relation between star formation rate and X-ray luminosity for these galaxies. We found that for LBAs with intermediate sub-solar metallicities, there is enhanced X-ray emission relative to the expected

  5. Biomedical applications of PIXE [Particle Induced X-ray Emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern medicine recognizes a series of diseases for which it has been established that one or more trace elements is a significant factor in the etiology. Research about the adverse or beneficial effects of minerals and metals as well as nonmetals concern, at present, 17 elements, the essentiality of which has been proven or is indicated. Analytical methods with multielement capacity are required to study the complex phenomena involved in trace-element biology. PIXE (Particle-Induced X-ray Emission) is such a method with concentration sensitivity for most elements down to the parts-per-million level. When it comes to analytical efforts in biomedicine, the method is comparable to X-ray fluorescence. The greatest advantages accrue when the PIXE method is applied in a microprobe with micron resolution. Individual cells can thus be investigated for their contents of major and trace elements. Employing raster scanning in the microprobe, two-dimensional elemental maps can be constructed for most elements in tissue sections. In this paper, an overview of both biological and medical applications is presented. Special emphasis is paid to microprobe applications to toxicology, immunotoxicology and the role of trace elements in diabetes

  6. X-ray emission as a diagnostic from pseudospark-sourced electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowes, D., E-mail: david.bowes@strath.ac.uk [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Yin, H.; He, W.; Zhang, L.; Cross, A.W.; Ronald, K.; Phelps, A.D.R. [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Chen, D.; Zhang, P. [Computed Tomography Lab, School of Mathematical Sciences, Capital Normal University, Beijing 100048 (China); Chen, X.; Li, D. [Department of Electronic Engineering, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-15

    X-ray emission has been achieved using an electron beam generated by a pseudospark low-pressure discharge and utilised as a diagnostic for beam detection. A 300 A, 34 kV PS-sourced electron beam pulse of 3 mm diameter impacting on a 0.1 mm-thick molybdenum target generated X-rays which were detected via the use of a small, portable X-ray detector. Clear X-ray images of a micro-sized object were captured using an X-ray photodetector. This demonstrates the inducement of proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) not only as an indicator of beam presence but also as a future X-ray source for small-spot X-ray imaging of materials.

  7. X-ray emission simulation from hollow atoms produced by high intensity laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We theoretically study the x-ray emission from hollow atoms produced by collisions of multiply charged ions accelerated by a short pulse laser with a solid or foil. By using the multistep-capture-and-loss (MSCL) model a high conversion efficiency to x-rays in an ultrafast atomic process is obtained. It is also proposed to apply this x-ray emission process to the x-ray source. For a few keV x-rays this x-ray source has a clear advantage. The number of x-ray photons increases as the laser energy becomes larger. For a laser energy of 10 J, the number of x-ray photons of 3x1011 is estimated. (author)

  8. Characterizing X-Ray and Radio Emission in the Black Hole X-Ray Binary V404 Cygni during Quiescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Vikram; Loh, Alan; Corbel, Stephane; Tomsick, John A.; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Walton, Dominic J.; Barret, Didier; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William; Fuerst, Felix; Gandhi, Poshak; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Hailey, Charles; Harrison, Fiona A.; Madsen, Kristin K.; Rahoui, Farid; Stern, Daniel; Tendulkar, Shriharsh; Zhang, William W.

    2016-04-01

    We present results from multi-wavelength simultaneous X-ray and radio observations of the black hole X-ray binary V404 Cyg in quiescence. Our coverage with NuSTAR provides the very first opportunity to study the X-ray spectrum of V404 Cyg at energies above 10 keV. The unabsorbed broadband (0.3-30 keV) quiescent luminosity of the source is 8.9 × 1032 erg s-1 for a distance of 2.4 kpc. The source shows clear variability on short timescales (an hour to a couple of hours) in the radio, soft X-ray, and hard X-ray bands in the form of multiple flares. The broadband X-ray spectra obtained from XMM-Newton and NuSTAR can be characterized with a power-law model having a photon index of Γ = 2.12 ± 0.07 (90% confidence errors); however, residuals at high energies indicate spectral curvature significant at a 3σ confidence level with the e-folding energy of the cutoff as {20}-7+20 keV. Such curvature can be explained using synchrotron emission from the base of a jet outflow. Radio observations using the VLA reveal that the spectral index evolves on very fast timescales (as short as 10 minutes), switching between optically thick and thin synchrotron emission, possibly due to instabilities in the compact jet or stochastic instabilities in the accretion rate. We explore different scenarios to explain this very fast variability.

  9. NuSTAR Hard X-ray Survey of the Galactic Center Region. I. Hard X-ray Morphology and Spectroscopy of the Diffuse Emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mori, Kaya; Hailey, Charles J.; Krivonos, Roman;

    2015-01-01

    We present the first sub-arcminute images of the Galactic Center above 10 keV, obtained with NuSTAR. NuSTAR resolves the hard X-ray source IGR J17456-2901 into non-thermal X-ray filaments, molecular clouds, point sources, and a previously unknown central component of hard X-ray emission (CHXE). N...

  10. Soft X-ray emission studies of biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soft X-ray fluorescence measurements are used to characterize three groups of biomaterials: Vitamin B12 and derivatives, antioxidants (aspirin and paracetamol), and human teeth. We show that the chemical bonding in Vitamin B12 is characterized by the strong Co-C bond and the relatively weak Co-N bond. The Co-C bond in cyanocobalamin is found to be stronger than that of methylcobalamin leading to their different biological activity. The chemical bonding of paracetamol and aspirin is characterized by the formation of oxygen lone-pair π-orbitals, which can neutralize free radicals and therefore be related to antioxidant activity of these compounds. Carbon Kα emission spectra of a caries lesion suggest that the CaCO3 like phase exists in sound enamel and that a selective loss of carbonate occurs during the early stages of a caries attack

  11. Potpourri of proton induced x-ray emission analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A proton-induced x-ray emission analysis (PIXE) system using 2-MeV protons was developed. Measurements are being made in connection with several research projects. A study is being conducted to provide ecological baseline information in the region of the Navajo and the proposed Kaiparowits coal-fired electric generating stations. Trace-element measurements in this study are reported on air-particulate samples, small rodent tissues, soils, and plants. In another study air particulates collected near a source of SO2 are extracted from the collection filter with an HCl solution and sulfate and sulfite ions are determined by calorimetric methods. The extraction solution is also analyzed by PIXE to determine the elemental composition. The latter information is necessary for an understanding of possible interferences with the calorimetric method and also indicates the heavy metals emitted by the source. Studies on human autopsy tissues, archeological artifacts, and in regular graduate and undergraduate laboratory classes are mentioned briefly

  12. Soft X-ray emission studies of biomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurmaev, E.Z. E-mail: kurmaev@ifmlrs.uran.ru; Werner, J.P.; Moewes, A.; Chiuzbaian, S.; Bach, M.; Ching, W.-Y.; Motozaki, W.; Otsuka, T.; Matsuya, S.; Endo, K.; Neumann, M

    2004-07-01

    Soft X-ray fluorescence measurements are used to characterize three groups of biomaterials: Vitamin B{sub 12} and derivatives, antioxidants (aspirin and paracetamol), and human teeth. We show that the chemical bonding in Vitamin B{sub 12} is characterized by the strong Co-C bond and the relatively weak Co-N bond. The Co-C bond in cyanocobalamin is found to be stronger than that of methylcobalamin leading to their different biological activity. The chemical bonding of paracetamol and aspirin is characterized by the formation of oxygen lone-pair {pi}-orbitals, which can neutralize free radicals and therefore be related to antioxidant activity of these compounds. Carbon K{alpha} emission spectra of a caries lesion suggest that the CaCO{sub 3} like phase exists in sound enamel and that a selective loss of carbonate occurs during the early stages of a caries attack.

  13. Ultrafast soft X-ray emission spectroscopy of surface adsorbates using an X-ray free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Development of the soft X-ray spectroscopy setup to probe surfaces using free electron laser. •Probing surface chemical reactions using free electron laser. •Optical laser pump and soft X-ray probe study on a sub-picosecond timescale. -- Abstract: We report on an experimental system designed to probe chemical reactions on solid surfaces on a sub-picosecond timescale using soft X-ray emission spectroscopy at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) free electron laser (FEL) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We analyzed the O 1s X-ray emission spectra recorded from atomic oxygen adsorbed on a Ru(0 0 0 1) surface at a synchrotron beamline (SSRL, BL13-2) and an FEL beamline (LCLS, SXR). We have demonstrated conditions that provide negligible amount of FEL induced damage of the sample. In addition we show that the setup is capable of tracking the temporal evolution of electronic structure during a surface reaction of submonolayer quantities of CO molecules desorbing from the surface

  14. Ultrafast soft X-ray emission spectroscopy of surface adsorbates using an X-ray free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katayama, T.; Anniyev, T. [SIMES, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Beye, M. [SIMES, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Institute for Methods and Instrumentation in Synchrotron Radiation Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Wilhelm-Conrad-Röntgen Campus, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Coffee, R. [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Dell’Angela, M. [University of Hamburg and Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg (Germany); Föhlisch, A. [Institute for Methods and Instrumentation in Synchrotron Radiation Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Wilhelm-Conrad-Röntgen Campus, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Institut für Physik und Astronomie, Universität Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24-25, 14476 Potsdam (Germany); Gladh, J. [Department of Physics, AlbaNova University Center, Stockholm University, SE-10691 (Sweden); Kaya, S. [SIMES, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Krupin, O. [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); European XFEL GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); and others

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: •Development of the soft X-ray spectroscopy setup to probe surfaces using free electron laser. •Probing surface chemical reactions using free electron laser. •Optical laser pump and soft X-ray probe study on a sub-picosecond timescale. -- Abstract: We report on an experimental system designed to probe chemical reactions on solid surfaces on a sub-picosecond timescale using soft X-ray emission spectroscopy at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) free electron laser (FEL) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We analyzed the O 1s X-ray emission spectra recorded from atomic oxygen adsorbed on a Ru(0 0 0 1) surface at a synchrotron beamline (SSRL, BL13-2) and an FEL beamline (LCLS, SXR). We have demonstrated conditions that provide negligible amount of FEL induced damage of the sample. In addition we show that the setup is capable of tracking the temporal evolution of electronic structure during a surface reaction of submonolayer quantities of CO molecules desorbing from the surface.

  15. X-ray/UV variability and the origin of soft X-ray excess emission from II Zw 177

    CERN Document Server

    Pal, Main; Misra, Ranjeev; Pawar, Pramod K

    2016-01-01

    We study X-ray and UV emission from the narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy II~Zw~177 using a $137\\ks$ long and another $13\\ks$ short \\xmm{} observation performed in 2012 and 2001, respectively. Both observations show soft X-ray excess emission contributing $76.9\\pm4.9\\%$ in 2012 and $58.8\\pm10.2\\%$ in 2001 in the $0.3-2\\kev$ band. We find that both blurred reflection from an ionized disc and Comptonized disc emission describe the observed soft excess well. Time-resolved spectroscopy on scales of $\\sim20\\ks$ reveals strong correlation between the soft excess and the powerlaw components. The fractional variability amplitude $F_{var}$ derived from EPIC-pn lightcurves at different energy bands is nearly constant ($F_{var} \\sim20\\%$). This is in contrast to other AGNs where the lack of short term variation in soft X-ray excess emission has been attributed to intense light bending in the framework of the "lamppost" model. Thus, the variations in powerlaw emission are most likely intrinsic to corona rather than just due t...

  16. The cosmic X-ray background-IRAS galaxy correlation and the local X-ray volume emissivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaji, Takamitsu; Lahav, Ofer; Jahoda, Keith; Boldt, Elihu

    1994-01-01

    We have cross-correlated the galaxies from the IRAS 2 Jy redshift survey sample and the 0.7 Jy projected sample with the all-sky cosmic X-ray background (CXB) map obtained from the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO) 1 A-2 experiment. We have detected a significant correlation signal between surface density of IRAS galaxies and the X-ray background intensity, with W(sub xg) = (mean value of ((delta I)(delta N)))/(mean value of I)(mean value of N)) of several times 10(exp -3). While this correlation signal has a significant implication for the contribution of the local universe to the hard (E greater than 2 keV) X-ray background, its interpretation is model-dependent. We have developed a formulation to model the cross-correlation between CXB surface brightness and galaxy counts. This includes the effects of source clustering and the X-ray-far-infrared luminosity correlation. Using an X-ray flux-limited sample of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), which has IRAS 60 micrometer measurements, we have estimated the contribution of the AGN component to the observed CXB-IRAS galaxy count correlations in order to see whether there is an excess component, i.e., contribution from low X-ray luminosity sources. We have applied both the analytical approach and Monte Carlo simulations for the estimations. Our estimate of the local X-ray volume emissivity in the 2-10 keV band is rho(sub x) approximately = (4.3 +/- 1.2) x 10(exp 38) h(sub 50) ergs/s/cu Mpc, consistent with the value expected from the luminosity function of AGNs alone. This sets a limit to the local volume emissivity from lower luminosity sources (e.g., star-forming galaxies, low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs)) to rho(sub x) less than or approximately = 2 x 10(exp 38) h(sub 50) ergs/s/cu Mpc.

  17. Plasma Emission Profile Recreation using Soft X-Ray Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, J. W.; Mauel, M. E.; Levesque, J. P.

    2015-11-01

    With sufficient views from multiple diode arrays, soft X-ray tomography is an invaluable plasma diagnostic because it is a non-perturbing method to reconstruct the emission within the interior of the plasma. In preparation for the installation of new SXR arrays in HBT-EP, we compute high-resolution tomographic reconstructions of discharges having kink-like structures that rotate nearly rigidly. By assuming a uniform angular mapping from the kink mode rotation, Δϕ ~ ωΔ t, a temporal sequence from a single 16-diode fan array represents as many as 16 x 100 independent views. We follow the procedure described by Wang and Granetz and use Bessel basis functions to take the inverse Radon transform. This transform is fit to our data using a least-squares method to estimate the internal SXR emissivity as a sum of polar functions. By varying different parameters of the transformation, we optimize the quality of our recreation of the emission profile and quantify how the reconstruction changes with the azimuthal order of the transform. Supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-86ER53222.

  18. Working gas effects on the X-ray emission of a plasma focus device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments on the plasma focus device IPF-2/20 operating with argon, neon and mixtures of argon with deuterium were performed and some X-ray emission parameters measured. The time evolution of the X-ray emission and dependence of the X-ray yield on the working gas composition was analyzed. The softer X radiation was measured with time resolution in the energy bands from 4 to 40 keV, and the hard X-rays for energies above 200 keV. In deuterium-argon mixtures the soft X-ray yield increases both with pressure (for the same ratio of argon) and with the quantity of argon added to deuterium at the same total pressure. For argon or neon the hard X-ray yield is lower than for deuterium-heavy gas mixtures. The softer X-ray yield decreases with pressure both for neon and for argon. (author). 4 figs., 5 refs

  19. Weak Hard X-Ray Emission from Broad Absorption Line Quasars: Evidence for Intrinsic X-Ray Weakness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Alexander, D. M.;

    2014-01-01

    We report NuSTAR observations of a sample of six X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars. These targets, at z = 0.148-1.223, are among the optically brightest and most luminous BAL quasars known at z 330 times weaker than...... are not detected. The hard X-ray (8-24 keV) weakness observed by NuSTAR requires Compton-thick absorption if these objects have nominal underlying X-ray emission. However, a soft stacked effective photon index (Γeff ≈ 1.8) for this sample disfavors Compton-thick absorption in general. The uniform hard X...... expected for typical quasars. Our results from a pilot NuSTAR study of two low-redshift BAL quasars, a Chandra stacking analysis of a sample of high-redshift BAL quasars, and a NuSTAR spectral analysis of the local BAL quasar Mrk 231 have already suggested the existence of intrinsically X-ray weak BAL...

  20. X-Ray Emission from Jupiter, Saturn, and Earth: A Short Review

    OpenAIRE

    Bhardwaj, Anil

    2006-01-01

    Jupiter, Saturn, and Earth - the three planets having dense atmosphere and a well developed magnetosphere - are known to emit X-rays. Recently, Chandra X-ray Observatory has observed X-rays from these planets, and XMM-Newton has observed them from Jupiter and Saturn. These observations have provided improved morphological, temporal, and spectral characteristics of X-rays from these planets. Both auroral and non-auroral (low-latitude) 'disk' X-ray emissions have been observed on Earth and Jupi...

  1. X-ray Emission in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, You-Hua; Snowden, Steve; Gruendl, Robert; Points, Sean

    2003-01-01

    All HRI images of the LMC was mosaicked. The HRI mosaic has been presented in various meetings. We have identified point and diffuse X-ray sources and analyzing their X-ray properties. The HRI mosaic has been included in papers studying individual interstellar features as well as large-scale distribution of hot gas. The results have been published in several papers.

  2. Evolution of X-ray emission from young massive star clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Oskinova, L. M.

    2005-01-01

    The evolution of X-ray emission from young massive star clusters is modeled, taking into account the emission from the stars as well as from the cluster wind. It is shown that the level and character of the soft (0.2-10 keV) X-ray emission change drastically with cluster age and are tightly linked with stellar evolution. Using the modern X-ray observations of massive stars we show that the correlation between bolometric and X-ray luminosity known for single O stars also holds for O+O and O+Wo...

  3. Time dependence of X-ray emission from pyroelectric crystal measured with a digital oscilloscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We measured time dependence of X-ray and electron emission by changing temperature of a pyroelectric crystal in vacuum with a Geiger counter connected to a digital oscilloscope. We found the X-ray emission stops when the glow discharge occurs, and the glow discharge decreases the integral X-ray intensity. In order to generate a stable X-ray emission, we need to keep the temperature gradient of the pyroelectric crystal deliberately low and avoid the ballistic electric discharge between the pyroelectric surface and the target. (author)

  4. Linking Jet Emission, X-Ray States, and Hard X-Ray Tails in the Neutron Star X-Ray Binary GX 17+2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Migliari; J.C.A. Miller-Jones; R.P. Fender; J. Homan; T. di Salvo; R.E. Rothschild; M.P. Rupen; J.A. Tomsick; R. Wijnands; M. van der Klis

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of simultaneous radio (VLA) and X-ray (RXTE) observations of the Z-type neutron star X-ray binary GX 17+2. The aim is to assess the coupling between X-ray and radio properties throughout its three rapidly variable X-ray states and during the time-resolved transitions. These ob

  5. Observing Solvation Dynamics with Simultaneous Femtosecond X-ray Emission Spectroscopy and X-ray Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haldrup, Kristoffer; Gawelda, Wojciech; Abela, Rafael;

    2016-01-01

    and structural changes, and local solvent structural changes are desired. We have studied the intra- and intermolecular dynamics of a model chromophore, aqueous [Fe(bpy)3]2+, with complementary X-ray tools in a single experiment exploiting intense XFEL radiation as a probe. We monitored the ultrafast structural...... solute. By simultaneous combination of both methods only, we can extract new information about the solvation dynamic processes unfolding during the first picosecond (ps). The measured bulk solvent density increase of 0.2% indicates a dramatic change of the solvation shell around each photoexcited solute......, confirming previous ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Structural changes in the aqueous solvent associated with density and temperature changes occur with similar to 1 ps time constants, characteristic for structural dynamics in water. This slower time scale of the solvent response allows us...

  6. Extended hard-X-ray emission in the inner few parsecs of the Galaxy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez, Kerstin; Hailey, Charles J.; Bauer, Franz E.;

    2015-01-01

    of objects emitting soft X-rays (less than 10 kiloelectronvolts) within the surrounding hundreds of parsecs, as well as the population responsible for unresolved X-ray emission extending along the Galactic plane, is dominated by accreting white dwarf systems. Observations of diffuse hard-X-ray (more......-40 kiloelectronvolt range. This emission is more sharply peaked towards the Galactic Centre than is the surface brightness of the soft-X-ray population. This could indicate a significantly more massive population of accreting white dwarfs, large populations of low-mass X-ray binaries or millisecond pulsars, or...... than 10 kiloelectronvolts) emission in the inner 10 parsecs, however, have been hampered by the limited spatial resolution of previous instruments. Here we report the presence of a distinct hard-X-ray component within the central 4 × 8 parsecs, as revealed by subarcminute-resolution images in the 20...

  7. X-RAY EMISSION FROM OPTICALLY SELECTED RADIO-INTERMEDIATE AND RADIO-LOUD QUASARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the results of an investigation into the X-ray properties of radio-intermediate and radio-loud quasars (RIQs and RLQs, respectively). We combine large, modern optical (e.g., SDSS) and radio (e.g., FIRST) surveys with archival X-ray data from Chandra, XMM-Newton, and ROSAT to generate an optically selected sample that includes 188 RIQs and 603 RLQs. This sample is constructed independently of X-ray properties but has a high X-ray detection rate (85%); it provides broad and dense coverage of the l-z plane, including at high redshifts (22% of objects have z = 2-5), and it extends to high radio-loudness values (33% of objects have R* = 3-5, using logarithmic units). We measure the 'excess' X-ray luminosity of RIQs and RLQs relative to radio-quiet quasars (RQQs) as a function of radio loudness and luminosity, and parameterize the X-ray luminosity of RIQs and RLQs both as a function of optical/UV luminosity and also as a joint function of optical/UV and radio luminosity. RIQs are only modestly X-ray bright relative to RQQs; it is only at high values of radio loudness (R* ∼> 3.5) and radio luminosity that RLQs become strongly X-ray bright. We find no evidence for evolution in the X-ray properties of RIQs and RLQs with redshift (implying jet-linked IC/CMB emission does not contribute substantially to the nuclear X-ray continuum). Finally, we consider a model in which the nuclear X-ray emission contains both disk/corona-linked and jet-linked components and demonstrate that the X-ray jet-linked emission is likely beamed but to a lesser degree than applies to the radio jet. This model is used to investigate the increasing dominance of jet-linked X-ray emission at low inclinations.

  8. Analytical use of proton-induced x-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton-induced X-ray emission is capable of simultaneous quantitative determination of 10-15 elements. An introduction to the physical properties of the method is given and detection limits are shown for a routine analysis of a thin aerosol sample. Examples of applications to both thick and thin samples are presented. Human tooth dentine is analysed for lead, with simple sample preparation, indicating lead values of a few ppm for Swedish children. Quantitative analyses of several other elements are obtained simultaneously. Cascade impactors are used for sampling aerosols in work environment during welding operations giving information of size distribution and concentrations of the elements present. The aerosol dominated by particle sizes between 0.5 and 2 μm as measured by the impactor, but the size distributions are different for different elements and welding techniques and depend on the distance from the welding source. The relative abundance of the elements found in the aerosol indicates the presence of fractionation mechanisms. (author)

  9. Charge state effect on Si K X-ray emission induced by Iq+ ions impacting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yu; Zhao, Yongtao; Cheng, Rui; Zhou, Xianming; Sun, Yuanbo; Wang, Xing; Wang, Yuyu; Ren, Jieru; Li, Yongfeng; Yu, Yang; Liu, Shidong; Xu, Ge

    2014-04-01

    K X-ray emission of Si induced by Iq+ (q=20, 22, 25) ion impact has been investigated. The results show a much higher intensity of X-ray emission for I25+ ions bombardment compared to I20+ and I22+ ions. The experimental data are explained within the framework of 3dπ, δ-3dσ rotational coupling.

  10. X-ray emission from charge exchange of highly-charged ions in atoms and molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, J. B.; Williams, I. D.; Smith, S. J.; Chutjian, A.

    2000-01-01

    Charge exchange followed by radiative stabilization are the main processes responsible for the recent observations of X-ray emission from comets in their approach to the Sun. A new apparatus was constructed to measure, in collisions of HCIs with atoms and molecules, (a) absolute cross sections for single and multiple charge exchange, and (b) normalized X-ray emission cross sections.

  11. The 300 kpc Long X-ray Jet in PKS 1127-145, z=1.18 Quasar: Constraining X-ray Emission Models

    CERN Document Server

    Siemiginowska, A; Cheung, C C; Harris, D E; Sikora, M; Aldcroft, T L; Bechtold, J; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Stawarz, Lukasz; Sikora, Marek; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; Bechtold, Jill

    2006-01-01

    We present a ~100 ksec Chandra X-ray observation and new VLA radio data of the large scale, 300 kpc long X-ray jet in PKS1127-145, a radio loud quasar at redshift z=1.18. With this deep X-ray observation we now clearly discern the complex X-ray jet morphology and see substructure within the knots. The X-ray and radio jet intensity profiles are seen to be strikingly different with the radio emission peaking strongly at the two outer knots while the X-ray emission is strongest in the inner jet region. The jet X-ray surface brightness gradually decreases by an order of magnitude going out from the core. The new X-ray data contain sufficient counts to do spectral analysis of the key jet features. The X-ray energy index of the inner jet is relatively flat with alpha_X = 0.66 +/-0.15 and steep in the outer jet with alpha_X = 1.0 +/-0.2. We discuss the constraints implied by the new data on the X-ray emission models and conclude that ``one-zone'' models fail and at least a two component model is needed to explain th...

  12. On the Spectral Slopes of Hard X-ray Emission from Black Hole Candidates

    OpenAIRE

    Ebisawa, Ken; Titarchuk, Lev G.; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    1995-01-01

    Most black hole candidates exhibit characteristic power-law like hard X-ray emission above $\\sim$ 10 keV. In the {\\em high state}, in which 2 -- 10 keV luminosity is relatively high, the energy index of the hard X-ray emission is usually greater than 1 --- typically $\\sim 1.5$. On the other hand, in the {\\em low state}, the hard X-ray energy index is 0.3 -- 0.9. In this paper, we suggest that this difference of the hard X-ray spectral slopes may be due to two different Comptonization mechanis...

  13. X-ray Tube Using a Graphene Flower Cloth Field Emission Cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Yusuke; Muramatsu, Kazuo; Tsuboi, Shougo; Jyouzuka, Atsuo; Nakamura, Tomonori; Onizuka, Yoshihiro; Mimura, Hidenori

    2013-10-01

    We have successfully fabricated a filament-less X-ray tube using a graphene flower cloth (GFC) field emission cathode. The GFC has numerous nanoprotrusions formed by self-standing graphene structures. The field emission current and the field enhancement factor β were 500 µA and 5600, respectively. The stability of voltage defined as a variance coefficient (σ/mean) of voltage was calculated to be 0.04% while maintaining the X-ray tube current of 300 µA. We applied our X-ray tube with the GFC field emitter to the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis of stainless steel.

  14. X-ray emission from the A0p star IQ~Aur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Jurgen

    2008-10-01

    We propose to use XMM-Newton to obtain the first high-resolution X-ray spectrum of the peculiar magnetic A-type star IQ~Aur. From previous X-ray observations IQ~Aur is known as a strong, but very soft X-ray source. In addition to the HAeBe star HD~163296, IQ~Aur is a very good candidate for an A-type star with intrinsic X-ray emission. The XMM-Newton RGS spectrum will strongly constrain the location of the X-ray emission site from a measurement or upper limit to the strength of the OVII f/r line ratio, the overall RGS spectrum will determine the elemental abundances, which may be far from solar, and finally, the phase coverage of the EPIC data will be sufficient to search for a rotational modulation of IQ~Aur's X-ray flux.

  15. A carbon nanotube field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy application

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Sigen; Calderon, Xiomara; Peng, Rui; Schreiber, Eric C.; Zhou, Otto; Chang, Sha

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy for cancer research. The developed multipixel x-ray array source has 50 individually controllable pixels and it has several distinct advantages over other irradiation source including high-temporal resolution (millisecond level), the ability to electronically shape the form, and intensity distribution of the radiation fields. The x-ray array was generated by a CNT cathode array (5×10)...

  16. Relationship between X-ray and ultraviolet emission in 3C 273

    OpenAIRE

    Paltani, S.; Courvoisier, T. J. -L.; Turler, M.; R. Walter(ISDC)

    1997-01-01

    In 3C 273, ultraviolet flux and X-ray flux measured by BATSE are not well correlated, contrarily to predictions of several models, unless the X-ray flux lags the UV emission by 1.75 yr. The absence of observed correlation at small lag cannot be due to spectral variability. A Comptonizing corona model is however compatible with all UV and X-ray observations covering the BATSE period.

  17. Preface: X-ray emission from hot stars and their winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskinova, Lidia

    2016-09-01

    With the advent of highly sensitive X-ray observatories, X-ray astrophysics has become a versatile tool to study highly energetic processes in a wide variety of astrophysical contexts. Hot stars are no exception to this rule. Indeed, X-rays provide an important observational window for studies of such stars. Observations obtained with modern X-ray telescopes over the last decade and a half have revolutionized our understanding of hot stars and their winds. X-ray spectroscopy, time monitoring, and imaging allow us to probe stellar atmospheres, magnetospheres, stellar winds and give us new insight into their impact on the interstellar medium and the galactic ecology. While some questions about X-ray emission from massive stars have been answered, many unexpected findings point out that our picture of stellar winds is not yet complete. The new theories and models of X-ray emission from hot stars were developed in parallel or, sometimes, ahead of the arrival of the new data. This special issue is aimed at summarizing our current knowledge of X-ray emission from hot stars as well as at opening new avenues for investigation in anticipation of the next generation of X-ray telescopes.

  18. Characteristics of x-ray emission from optically thin high-Z plasmas in the soft x-ray region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Hayato; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Suzuki, Yuhei; Arai, Goki; Li, Bowen; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Kato, Daiji; Murakami, Izumi; Tamura, Naoki; Sudo, Shigeru; Koike, Fumihiro; Suzuki, Chihiro

    2015-07-01

    The characteristics of soft x-ray emission from optically thin high-Z plasmas of gold, lead and bismuth were investigated with the large helical device. Compared to optically thicker laser-produced plasmas, significantly different spectral structures were observed due to the difference in opacities and electron temperatures. Peak structures appearing in unresolved transition arrays were identified by calculations using atomic structure codes. The main contributors of discrete line emission in each case were Pd-, Ag-, and Rh-like ion stages. The present calculations point to the overestimation of contributions for 4p-4d transitions based on intensity estimates arising purely from gA distributions that predict strong emission from 4p-4d transitions. Understanding of such spectral emission is not only important for the completion of databases of high-Z highly ion charge states but also the development of promising high brightness sources for biological imaging applications.

  19. The 300 Kpc Long X-Ray Jet in PKS 1127-145, Z=1.18 Quasar: Constraining X-Ray Emission Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siemiginowska, Aneta; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Stawarz, Lukasz; /Heidelberg Observ. /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ. /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Cheung, C.C.; /KIPAC,; Harris, D.E.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Sikora, Marek; /Warsaw, Copernicus Astron. Ctr.; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Bechtold,; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ.

    2006-11-20

    We present a {approx} 100 ksec Chandra X-ray observation and new VLA radio data of the large scale, 300 kpc long X-ray jet in PKS 1127-145, a radio loud quasar at redshift z=1.18. With this deep X-ray observation we now clearly discern the complex X-ray jet morphology and see substructure within the knots. The X-ray and radio jet intensity profiles are seen to be strikingly different with the radio emission peaking strongly at the two outer knots while the X-ray emission is strongest in the inner jet region. The jet X-ray surface brightness gradually decreases by an order of magnitude going out from the core. The new X-ray data contain sufficient counts to do spectral analysis of the key jet features. The X-ray energy index of the inner jet is relatively flat with {alpha}{sub x} = 0.66 {+-} 0.15 and steep in the outer jet with {alpha}{sub x} = 1.0 {+-} 0.2. We discuss the constraints implied by the new data on the X-ray emission models and conclude that ''one-zone'' models fail and at least a two component model is needed to explain the jet's broad-band emission. We propose that the X-ray emission originates in the jet proper while the bulk of the radio emission comes from a surrounding jet sheath. We also consider intermittent jet activity as a possible cause of the observed jet morphology.

  20. EVIDENCE OF NON-THERMAL X-RAY EMISSION FROM HH 80

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protostellar jets appear at all stages of star formation when the accretion process is still at work. Jets travel at velocities of hundreds of km s–1, creating strong shocks when interacting with the interstellar medium. Several cases of jets have been detected in X-rays, typically showing soft emission. For the first time, we report evidence of hard X-ray emission possibly related to non-thermal processes not explained by previous models of the post-shock emission predicted in the jet/ambient interaction scenario. HH 80 is located at the south head of the jet associated with the massive protostar IRAS 18162-2048. It shows soft and hard X-ray emission in regions that are spatially separated, with the soft X-ray emission region situated behind the region of hard X-ray emission. We propose a scenario for HH 80 where soft X-ray emission is associated with thermal processes from the interaction of the jet with denser ambient matter and hard X-ray emission is produced by synchrotron radiation at the front shock

  1. Simulation of Soft X-ray Emission Lines from the Missing Baryons

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, T; Sanders, W T; Houck, J; Davé, R; Katz, N; Weinberg, D H; Hernquist, L

    2003-01-01

    We study the soft X-ray emission (0.1 - 1 keV) from the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM) in a hydrodynamic simulation of a Cold Dark Matter universe. Our main goal is to investigate how such emission can be explored with a combination of imaging and spectroscopy, and to motivate future X-ray missions. We first present high resolution images of the X-ray emission in several energy bands, in which emission from different ion species dominates. We pick three different areas to study the high resolution spectra of X-rays from the warm-hot IGM: (a) a galaxy group; (b) a filament and (c) an underluminous region. By taking into account the background X-ray emission from AGNs and foreground emission from the Galaxy, we compute composite X-ray spectra of the selected regions. We briefly investigate angular clustering of the soft-X-ray emission, finding a strong signal. Most interestingly, the combination of high spectral resolution and angular information allows us to map the emission from the WHIM in 3 dimensions...

  2. EVIDENCE OF NON-THERMAL X-RAY EMISSION FROM HH 80

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López-Santiago, J. [Instituto de Matemática Interdisciplinar, S. D. Astronomía y Geodesia, Facultad de Ciencias Matemáticas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Peri, C. S.; Benaglia, P. [Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomía (IAR), CCT La Plata (CONICET), C.C.5, 1894 Villa Elisa, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bonito, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Miceli, M. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Albacete-Colombo, J. F. [Universidad Nacional del COMAHUE, Monseñor Esandi y Ayacucho, 8500 Viedma, Río Negro (Argentina); De Castro, E. [Dpto. de Astrofísica y CC. de la Atmósfera, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-10-20

    Protostellar jets appear at all stages of star formation when the accretion process is still at work. Jets travel at velocities of hundreds of km s{sup –1}, creating strong shocks when interacting with the interstellar medium. Several cases of jets have been detected in X-rays, typically showing soft emission. For the first time, we report evidence of hard X-ray emission possibly related to non-thermal processes not explained by previous models of the post-shock emission predicted in the jet/ambient interaction scenario. HH 80 is located at the south head of the jet associated with the massive protostar IRAS 18162-2048. It shows soft and hard X-ray emission in regions that are spatially separated, with the soft X-ray emission region situated behind the region of hard X-ray emission. We propose a scenario for HH 80 where soft X-ray emission is associated with thermal processes from the interaction of the jet with denser ambient matter and hard X-ray emission is produced by synchrotron radiation at the front shock.

  3. DISCOVERY OF X-RAY EMISSION FROM YOUNG SUNS IN THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the discovery of extended X-ray emission within the young star cluster NGC 602a in the Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) based on observations obtained with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. X-ray emission is detected from the cluster core area with the highest stellar density and from a dusty ridge surrounding the H II region. We use a census of massive stars in the cluster to demonstrate that a cluster wind or wind-blown bubble is unlikely to provide a significant contribution to the X-ray emission detected from the central area of the cluster. We therefore suggest that X-ray emission at the cluster core originates from an ensemble of low- and solar-mass pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars, each of which would be too weak in X-rays to be detected individually. We attribute the X-ray emission from the dusty ridge to the embedded tight cluster of the newborn stars known in this area from infrared studies. Assuming that the levels of X-ray activity in young stars in the low-metallicity environment of NGC 602a are comparable to their Galactic counterparts, then the detected spatial distribution, spectral properties, and level of X-ray emission are largely consistent with those expected from low- and solar-mass PMS stars and young stellar objects (YSOs). This is the first discovery of X-ray emission attributable to PMS stars and YSOs in the SMC, which suggests that the accretion and dynamo processes in young, low-mass objects in the SMC resemble those in the Galaxy.

  4. DISCOVERY OF X-RAY EMISSION FROM YOUNG SUNS IN THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oskinova, L. M.; Hainich, R. [Institute for Physics and Astronomy, University Potsdam, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany); Sun, W.; Chen, Y. [Department of Astronomy, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093 Jiangsu (China); Evans, C. J. [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Henault-Brunet, V. [Scottish Universities Physics Alliance (SUPA), Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Chu, Y.-H.; Gruendl, R. A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Gallagher, J. S. III [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 5534 Sterling, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Guerrero, M. A. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia, IAA-CSIC, Glorieta de la Astronomia s/n, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Guedel, M. [Department of Astrophysics, University of Vienna, Tuerkenschanzstrasse 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Silich, S. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica Optica y Electronica, AP 51, 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Naze, Y. [GAPHE, Departement AGO, Universite de Liege, Allee du 6 Aout 17, Bat. B5C, B-4000 Liege (Belgium); Reyes-Iturbide, J. [LATO-DCET/Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, Rodovia Jorge Amado, km 16, 45662-000 Ilheus, BA (Brazil)

    2013-03-01

    We report the discovery of extended X-ray emission within the young star cluster NGC 602a in the Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) based on observations obtained with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. X-ray emission is detected from the cluster core area with the highest stellar density and from a dusty ridge surrounding the H II region. We use a census of massive stars in the cluster to demonstrate that a cluster wind or wind-blown bubble is unlikely to provide a significant contribution to the X-ray emission detected from the central area of the cluster. We therefore suggest that X-ray emission at the cluster core originates from an ensemble of low- and solar-mass pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars, each of which would be too weak in X-rays to be detected individually. We attribute the X-ray emission from the dusty ridge to the embedded tight cluster of the newborn stars known in this area from infrared studies. Assuming that the levels of X-ray activity in young stars in the low-metallicity environment of NGC 602a are comparable to their Galactic counterparts, then the detected spatial distribution, spectral properties, and level of X-ray emission are largely consistent with those expected from low- and solar-mass PMS stars and young stellar objects (YSOs). This is the first discovery of X-ray emission attributable to PMS stars and YSOs in the SMC, which suggests that the accretion and dynamo processes in young, low-mass objects in the SMC resemble those in the Galaxy.

  5. X-ray emission from supernova remnants with particular reference to the Cygnus Loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Observational or theoretical results related to the study of supernova remnants (SNRs) are described. Some background information is given by reviewing the present status of our knowledge of supernovae and supernova remnants, both from theory and observations. Also the distribution of all known radio, optical, and X-ray SNRs in the Galaxy is shown and a comparison is made. The X-ray observations of the well-known X-ray SNR the Cygnus Loop are discussed in detail and the discovery of a new X-ray emitting SNR W44 is described. Other radio sources are investigated, and the observed X-ray emission of SNRs are analysed using thermal spectra like exponential or bremsstrahlung spectra. The X-ray line spectrum that emerges from SNRs is described in detail. (Auth.)

  6. A Study of Nonthermal X-Ray and Radio Emission from the O Star 9 Sgr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, Wayne L.; Corcoran, Michael F.; Drake, Stephen A.

    1999-01-01

    The observed X-ray and highly variable nonthermal radio emission from OB stars has eluded explanation for more than 18 years. The most favorable model of X-ray production in these stars (shocks) predicts both nonthermal radio and X-ray emission. The nonthermal X-ray emission should occur above 2 keV and the variability of this X-ray component should also be comparable to the observed radio variability. To test this scenario, we proposed an ASC/VLA monitoring program to observe the OB star, 9 Sgr, a well known nonthermal, variable radio source and a strong X-ray source. We requested 625 ks ASCA observations with a temporal spacing of approximately 4 days which corresponds to the time required for a density disturbance to propagate to the 6 cm radio free-free photosphere. The X-ray observations were coordinated with 5 multi-wavelength VLA observations. These observations represent the first systematic attempt to investigate the relationship between the X-ray and radio emission in OB stars.

  7. Models of X-ray and gamma-ray emission from Seyfert galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Svensson, Roland

    1996-01-01

    X-ray and gamma-ray observations of Seyfert 1 galaxies are briefly reviewed. Both thermal and non-thermal model for X-ray and gamma-ray emission are discussed. Particular attention is given to various disc-corona models including both homogeneous and inhomogeneous (patchy) corona models. Recent work on exact radiative transfer in such geometries are reviewed.

  8. Stelllar wind induced soft X-ray emission from close-in exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kislyakova, Kristina; Fossati, Luca; Johnstone, Colin P.; Holmström, Mats; Zaitsev, Valery V.; Lammer, Helmut

    2016-04-01

    We estimate the X-ray emission from close-in exoplanets. We show that the Solar/Stellar Wind Charge Exchange Mechanism (SWCX) which produces soft X-ray radiation is very effective for hot Jupiters. In this mechanism, X-ray photons are produces by charge exchange between heavy ions in the solar wind and the atmospheric neutral particles. This mechanism is know to generate X-ray emission of comets in the Solar system. It has also been shown to operate in the heliosphere, in the terrestrial magnetosheath, and on Mars, Venus and Moon. Since the number of emitted photons is proportional to the solar wind mass flux, this mechanism is not effective for the Solar system giants. We present a simple estimate of the X-ray emission intensity that can be produced by close-in extrasolar Hot Jupiters due to charge exchange with the heavy ions of the stellar wind. Using the example of HD 209458b, we show that this mechanism alone can be responsible for an X-ray emission of ≈ 1022 erg s‑1, which is 106 times stronger than the emission from the Jovian aurora. We discuss the possibility to observe the predicted soft X-ray flux of hot Jupiters and show that despite high emission intensities they are unobservable with current facilities.

  9. STELLAR WIND INDUCED SOFT X-RAY EMISSION FROM CLOSE-IN EXOPLANETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kislyakova, K. G.; Lammer, H. [Space Research Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Graz (Austria); Fossati, L. [Argelander-Institut für Astronomie der Universität Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Johnstone, C. P. [Department of Astrophysics, University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Holmström, M. [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna (Sweden); Zaitsev, V. V., E-mail: kristina.kislyakova@oeaw.ac.at [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-30

    In this Letter, we estimate the X-ray emission from close-in exoplanets. We show that the Solar/Stellar Wind Charge Exchange Mechanism (SWCX), which produces soft X-ray emission, is very effective for hot Jupiters. In this mechanism, X-ray photons are emitted as a result of the charge exchange between heavy ions in the solar wind and the atmospheric neutral particles. In the solar system, comets produce X-rays mostly through the SWCX mechanism, but it has also been shown to operate in the heliosphere, in the terrestrial magnetosheath, and on Mars, Venus, and the Moon. Since the number of emitted photons is proportional to the solar wind mass flux, this mechanism is not very effective for the solar system giants. Here we present a simple estimate of the X-ray emission intensity that can be produced by close-in extrasolar giant planets due to charge exchange with the heavy ions of the stellar wind. Using the example of HD 209458b, we show that this mechanism alone can be responsible for an X-ray emission of ≈10{sup 22} erg s{sup –1}, which is 10{sup 6} times stronger than the emission from the Jovian aurora. We discuss also the possibility of observing the predicted soft X-ray flux of hot Jupiters and show that despite high emission intensities they are unobservable with current facilities.

  10. X-ray absorption and X-ray emission spectroscopy theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lamberti, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    During the last two decades, remarkable and often spectacular progress has been made in the methodological and instrumental aspects of x–ray absorption and emission spectroscopy. This progress includes considerable technological improvements in the design and production of detectors especially with the development and expansion of large-scale synchrotron reactors All this has resulted in improved analytical performance and new applications, as well as in the perspective of a dramatic enhancement in the potential of x–ray based analysis techniques for the near future. This comprehensive two-volume treatise features articles that explain the phenomena and describe examples of X–ray absorption and emission applications in several fields, including chemistry, biochemistry, catalysis, amorphous and liquid systems, synchrotron radiation, and surface phenomena. Contributors explain the underlying theory, how to set up X–ray absorption experiments, and how to analyze the details of the resulting spectra. X-R...

  11. Diffuse Thermal X-Ray Emission in the Core of the Young Massive Cluster Westerlund 1

    OpenAIRE

    Kavanagh, P.J.; Norci, L.; Meurs, E. J. A.

    2011-01-01

    We present an analysis of the diffuse hard X-ray emission in the core of the young massive Galactic cluster Westerlund 1 based on a 48 ks XMM-Newton observation. Chandra results for the diffuse X-ray emission have indicated a soft thermal component together with a hard component that could be either thermal or non-thermal. We seek to resolve this ambiguity regarding the hard component exploiting the higher sensitivity of XMM-Newton to diffuse emission. Our new X-ray spectra from the central (...

  12. Plasma focus as a powerful source of hard X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article is mainly about hard X-ray emission from the Dena which is a Filippov type plasma Focus device. In the first part of the article mechanism of the hard X-ray production in plasma Focus is discussed. Then using the differential absorption spectrometry, the energy spectrum of hard X-ray emission from a 37 kJ discharge in argon is measured, the energy flux density and the energy fluence of the emission have been calculated to be 1.9 kJ cm-2s-1 respectively 9.4 * 10-5Jcm-2.

  13. INTEGRAL hard X-ray spectra of the cosmic X-ray background and Galactic ridge emission

    CERN Document Server

    Turler, M; Courvoisier, T J -L; Lubinski, P; Neronov, A; Produit, N; Walter, R

    2010-01-01

    We derive the spectra of the cosmic X-ray background (CXB) and of the Galactic ridge X-ray emission (GRXE) in the ~20-200 keV range from the data of the IBIS instrument aboard the INTEGRAL satellite obtained during the four dedicated Earth-occultation observations of early 2006. We analyse the modulation of the IBIS/ISGRI detector counts induced by the passage of the Earth through the field of view of the instrument. Unlike previous studies, we do not fix the spectral shape of the various contributions, but model instead their spatial distribution and derive for each of them the expected modulation of the detector counts. The spectra of the diffuse emission components are obtained by fitting the normalizations of the model lightcurves to the observed modulation in different energy bins. The obtained CXB spectrum is consistent with the historic HEAO-1 results and falls slightly below the spectrum derived with Swift/BAT. A 10% higher normalization of the CXB cannot be completely excluded, but it would imply an ...

  14. BAT AGN Spectroscopic Survey II: X-ray Emission and High Ionization Optical Emission Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Berney, Simon; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Ricci, Claudio; Lamperti, Isabella; Schawinski, Kevin; Balokovic, Mislav; Crenshaw, D Michael; Fischer, Travis; Gehrels, Neil; Harrison, Fiona; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Ichikawa, Kohei; Mushotzky, Richard; Oh, Kyuseok; Stern, Daniel; Treister, Ezequiel; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Veilleux, Sylvain; Winter, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between X-ray and optical line emission in 340 nearby AGN selected above 10 keV using Swift BAT. We find a weak correlation between the extinction corrected [O III] and hard X-ray luminosity (14-195 keV) with a [OIII] large scatter (R_Pear = 0.64, sigma = 0.62 dex) and a similarly large scatter with the intrinsic 2-10 keV to [O III] luminosities (RPear=0.63, sigma = 0.63 dex). Correlations of the hard X-ray fluxes with the fluxes of high-ionization narrow lines ([O III], He II, [Ne III] and [Ne V]) are not significantly better than with the low ionization lines (Halpha, [SII]). Factors like obscuration or physical slit size are not found to be a significant part of the large scatter. In contrast, the optical emission lines show much better correlations with each other (sigma = 0.3 dex) than with the X-ray flux. The inherent large scatter questions the common usage of narrow emission lines as AGN bolometric luminosity indicators and suggests that other issues such as geometrical...

  15. Detection of x-ray emission in a nanosecond discharge in air at atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Shao, Tao; Yu, Yang; Niu, Zheng; Yan, Ping; Zhou, Yuanxiang

    2010-12-01

    Measurement of x-ray emission is an important parameter to investigate runaway behavior of fast electrons produced in nanosecond-pulse gas discharge. An online detection system of x rays is described in this paper, and the system consists of an x-ray detector with NaI (Tl) scintillator and photomultiplier tube, and an integrated multichannel analyzer. The system is responsible for detecting x-ray emission signal, processing the detected signals, and scaling the energy distribution. The calibration results show that every channel of the detection system represents a given x-ray energy and various x rays can be divided into different energy ranges between 10 and 130 keV. For a repetitive nanosecond-pulse breakdown between highly nonuniform gaps in open air, an energy distribution is obtained using the online detection system. It shows that the x-ray emission is a continuous spectrum and the x rays of above 60 keV dominate in the detected energy distribution. PMID:21198017

  16. A Comparison of X-Ray and Optical Emission in Cassiopeia A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaude, Daniel J.; Fesen, Robert A.

    2014-07-01

    Broadband optical and narrowband Si XIII X-ray images of the young Galactic supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (Cas A) obtained over several decades are used to investigate spatial and temporal emission correlations on both large and small angular scales. The data examined consist of optical and near-infrared ground-based and Hubble Space Telescope images taken between 1951 and 2011, and of X-ray images from Einstein, ROSAT, and Chandra taken between 1979 and 2013. We find weak spatial correlations between the remnant's X-ray and optical emission features on large scales, but several cases of good optical/X-ray correlations on small scales for features which have brightened due to recent interactions with the reverse shock. We also find instances (1) where a time delay is observed between the appearance of a feature's optical and X-ray emissions, (2) of displacements of several arcseconds between a feature's X-ray and optical emission peaks, and (3) of regions showing no corresponding X-ray or optical emissions. To explain this behavior, we propose a highly inhomogeneous density model for Cas A's ejecta consisting of small, dense optically emitting knots (n ~102-3 cm-3) and a much lower density (n ~0.1-1 cm-3) diffuse X-ray emitting component often spatially associated with optical emission knots. The X-ray emitting component is sometimes linked to optical clumps through shock-induced mass ablation generating trailing material leading to spatially offset X-ray/optical emissions. A range of ejecta densities can also explain the observed X-ray/optical time delays since the remnant's ≈5000 km s-1 reverse shock heats dense ejecta clumps to temperatures around 3 × 104 K relatively quickly, which then become optically bright while more diffuse ejecta become X-ray bright on longer timescales. Highly inhomogeneous ejecta as proposed here for Cas A may help explain some of the X-ray/optical emission features seen in other young core-collapse supernova remnants.

  17. The coevolution of decimetric millisecond spikes and hard X-ray emission during solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Guedel, Manuel

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented of an analysis of a comprehensive data set of 27 solar flares with decimetric millisecond spikes between 1980 and 1989, simultaneously observed with the Zuerich radio spectrometers and the Hard X-ray Burst Spectrometer on the SMM spacecraft. Two contradictory relationships of the coevolution of hard X-ray and spiky radio emissions during flares are found: the temporal evolution of both emissions reveals a close functional dependence, but there is a substantial time delay between the two emissions. Five possible scenarios for the hard-X-ray-associated radio spike emission which may account for both their detailed coevolution and their substantial intervening time delay are discussed. All five scenarios are able to explain both the close coevolution of hard X-ray and radio emission as well as their mutual delay to some degree, but none of them can explain all observational aspects in a simple way.

  18. X-ray emission from interacting wind massive binaries: A review of 15 years of progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauw, Gregor; Nazé, Yaël

    2016-09-01

    Previous generations of X-ray observatories revealed a group of massive binaries that were relatively bright X-ray emitters. This was attributed to emission of shock-heated plasma in the wind-wind interaction zone located between the stars. With the advent of the current generation of X-ray observatories, the phenomenon could be studied in much more detail. In this review, we highlight the progress that has been achieved in our understanding of the phenomenon over the last 15 years, both on theoretical and observational grounds. All these studies have paved the way for future investigations using the next generation of X-ray satellites that will provide crucial information on the X-ray emission formed in the innermost part of the wind-wind interaction.

  19. On the diffuse X-ray emission from the Wolf-Rayet Bubble NGC 2359

    CERN Document Server

    Toalá, J A; Chu, Y -H; Gruendl, R A

    2014-01-01

    A recent XMM-Newton observation (Zhekov 2014) has revealed diffuse X-ray emission inside the nebula NGC 2359 around the Wolf-Rayet star WR 7. Taking advantage of an improved point-source rejection and background subtraction, and a detailed comparison of optical and X-ray morphology, we have reanalyzed these X-ray observations. Our analysis reveals diffuse X-ray emission from a blowout and the presence of emission at energies from 1.0 to 2.0 keV. The X-ray emission from NGC 2359 can be described by an optically-thin plasma emission model, but contrary to previous analysis, we find that the chemical abundances of this plasma are similar to those of the optical nebula, with no magnesium enhancement, and that two components at temperatures T_1=2x10^6 K and T_2=5.7x10^7 K are required. The estimated X-ray luminosity in the 0.3 - 2.0 keV energy range is L_X=2x10^33 erg s^-1. The averaged rms electron density of the X-ray-emitting gas (n_e \\lesssim 0.6 cm^-3) reinforces the idea of mixing of material from the outer ...

  20. A Comprehensive Archival Chandra Search for X-ray Emission from Ultracompact Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Pandya, Viraj; Greene, Jenny E

    2016-01-01

    We present the first comprehensive archival study of the X-ray properties of ultracompact dwarf (UCD) galaxies, with the goal of identifying weakly-accreting central black holes in UCDs. Our study spans 578 UCDs distributed across thirteen different host systems, including clusters, groups, fossil groups, and isolated galaxies. Of the 336 spectroscopically-confirmed UCDs with usable archival Chandra imaging observations, 21 are X-ray-detected. Imposing a completeness limit of $L_X>2\\times10^{38}$ erg s$^{-1}$, the global X-ray detection fraction for the UCD population is $\\sim3\\%$. Of the 21 X-ray-detected UCDs, seven show evidence of long-term X-ray time variability on the order of months to years. X-ray-detected UCDs tend to be more compact than non-X-ray-detected UCDs, and we find tentative evidence that the X-ray detection fraction increases with surface luminosity density and global stellar velocity dispersion. The X-ray emission of UCDs is fully consistent with arising from a population of low-mass X-ra...

  1. [C ii] emission from galactic nuclei in the presence of X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, W. D.; Pineda, J. L.

    2015-08-01

    Context. The luminosity of [C ii] is used as a probe of the star formation rate in galaxies, but the correlation breaks down in some active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Models of the [C ii] emission from galactic nuclei do not include the influence of X-rays on the carbon ionization balance, which may be a factor in reducing the [C ii] luminosity. Aims: We aim to determine the properties of the ionized carbon and its distribution among highly ionized states in the interstellar gas in galactic nuclei under the influence of X-ray sources. We calculate the [C ii] luminosity in galactic nuclei under the influence of bright sources of soft X-rays. Methods: We solve the balance equation of the ionization states of carbon as a function of X-ray flux, electron, atomic hydrogen, and molecular hydrogen density. These are input to models of [C ii] emission from the interstellar medium (ISM) in galactic nuclei representing conditions in the Galactic central molecular zone and a higher density AGN model. The behavior of the [C ii] luminosity is calculated as a function of the X-ray luminosity. We also solve the distribution of the ionization states of oxygen and nitrogen in highly ionized regions. Results: We find that the dense warm ionized medium (WIM) and dense photon dominated regions (PDRs) dominate the [C ii] emission when no X-rays are present. The X-rays in galactic nuclei can affect strongly the C+ abundance in the WIM, converting some fraction to C2+ and higher ionization states and thus reducing its [C ii] luminosity. For an X-ray luminosity L(X-ray) ≳ 1043 erg s-1 the [C ii] luminosity can be suppressed by a factor of a few, and for very strong sources, L(X-ray) >1044 erg s-1 such as found for many AGNs, the [C ii] luminosity is significantly depressed. Comparison of the model with several extragalactic sources shows that the [C ii] to far-infrared ratio declines for L(X-ray) ≳ 1043 erg s-1, in reasonable agreement with our model. Conclusions: We conclude that X-rays

  2. NuSTAR Hard X-ray Survey of the Galactic Center Region I: Hard X-ray Morphology and Spectroscopy of the Diffuse Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Mori, Kaya; Krivonos, Roman; Hong, Jaesub; Ponti, Gabriele; Bauer, Franz; Perez, Kerstin; Nynka, Melania; Zhang, Shuo; Tomsick, John A; Alexander, David M; Baganoff, Frederick K; Barret, Didier; Barriere, Nicolas; Boggs, Steven E; Canipe, Alicia M; Christensen, Finn E; Craig, William W; Forster, Karl; Giommi, Paolo; Grefenstette, Brian W; Grindlay, Jonathan E; Harrison, Fiona A; Hornstrup, Allan; Kitaguchi, Takao; Koglin, Jason E; Luu, Vy; Madsen, Kristen K; Mao, Peter H; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Perri, Matteo; Pivovaroff, Michael J; Puccetti, Simonetta; Rana, Vikram; Stern, Daniel; Westergaard, Niels J; Zhang, William W; Zoglauer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    We present the first sub-arcminute images of the Galactic Center above 10 keV, obtained with NuSTAR. NuSTAR resolves the hard X-ray source IGR J17456-2901 into non-thermal X-ray filaments, molecular clouds, point sources and a previously unknown central component of hard X-ray emission (CHXE). NuSTAR detects four non-thermal X-ray filaments, extending the detection of their power-law spectra with $\\Gamma\\sim1.3$-$2.3$ up to ~50 keV. A morphological and spectral study of the filaments suggests that their origin may be heterogeneous, where previous studies suggested a common origin in young pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). NuSTAR detects non-thermal X-ray continuum emission spatially correlated with the 6.4 keV Fe K$\\alpha$ fluorescence line emission associated with two Sgr A molecular clouds: MC1 and the Bridge. Broad-band X-ray spectral analysis with a Monte-Carlo based X-ray reflection model self-consistently determined their intrinsic column density ($\\sim10^{23}$ cm$^{-2}$), primary X-ray spectra (power-laws wi...

  3. Simulation of Soft X-Ray Emission Lines from the Missing Baryons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Taotao; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Sanders, Wilton T.; Houck, John; Davé, Romeel; Katz, Neal; Weinberg, David H.; Hernquist, Lars

    2005-04-01

    We study the soft X-ray emission (0.1-1 keV) from the warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM) in a hydrodynamic simulation of a cold dark matter universe. Our main goal is to investigate how such emission can be explored with a combination of imaging and spectroscopy and to motivate future X-ray missions. We first present high-resolution images of the X-ray emission in several energy bands in which emission from different ion species dominates. We pick three different areas to study the high-resolution spectra of X-rays from the WHIM: (1) a galaxy group, (2) a filament, and (3) an underluminous region. By taking into account the background X-ray emission from AGNs and foreground emission from the Galaxy, we compute composite X-ray spectra of the selected regions. We briefly investigate angular clustering of the soft X-ray emission, finding a strong signal. Most interestingly, the combination of high spectral resolution and angular information allows us to map the emission from the WHIM in three dimensions. We cross-correlate the positions of galaxies in the simulation with this redshift map of emission and detect the presence of six different ion species (Ne IX, Fe XVII, O VII, O VIII, N VII, and C VI) in the large-scale structure traced by the galaxies. Finally, we show how such emission can be detected and studied with future X-ray satellites, with particular attention to a proposed mission, the Missing Baryon Explorer (MBE). We present simulated observations of the WHIM gas with MBE.

  4. Characterizing X-Ray and Radio Emission in the Black Hole X-Ray Binary V404 Cygni During Quiescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rana, Vikram; Loh, Alan; Corbel, Stephane;

    2016-01-01

    We present results from multi-wavelength simultaneous X-ray and radio observations of the black hole X-ray binary V404 Cyg in quiescence. Our coverage with NuSTAR provides the very first opportunity to study the X-ray spectrum of V404 Cyg at energies above 10 keV. The unabsorbed broadband (0...

  5. Coaxial gun parameters and X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the results of investigation with 3 kJ coaxial plasma gun, which operated with argon gas at pressure 0.8 torr. The coaxial plasma gun parameters are investigated by pick up coils, double electric probe, and x-ray probe. The mean electron temperature and density of the ejected plasma are 25 eV and 1015 cm-3 respectively. The maximum kinetic pressure of the ejected plasma in the expansion chamber appears after 10 μs from the start of the discharge current. The energetic electrons is detected by an x-ray probe which showed a single pulse of electrons with energy ≅ 3 Kev. (orig.)

  6. Simultaneous soft X-ray transmission and emission microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novel low-energy X-ray fluorescence (LEXRF) system based on a multiple Si drift detector (SDD) configuration has been developed and implemented in the European TwinMic X-ray microspectroscopy station operating at the Italian synchrotron radiation facility ELETTRA. The setup, hosting up to eight large-area SDDs with specially adapted readout electronics, has demonstrated excellent performance for elemental analysis in the 280-2200 eV photon energy range, which covers the K and L edges of light elements, starting from C. The great advantage is the simultaneous acquisition of LEXRF, absorption and phase contrast maps, providing complementary information on elemental composition and morphology of specimen at submicrometer length scales.

  7. Soft x-ray emission from classical novae in outburst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical modeling of novae in outburst predicts that they should be active emitters of radiation at soft x-ray wavelengths twice during their outburst. The first time occurs very early in the outburst when only a very sensitive all sky survey will be able to detect them. This period lasts only a few hours for the very fastest novae. They again become bright in x-rays late in the outburst when the remnant object becomes very hot and is still luminous. Both simulations and observations show that novae can remain very hot for months to years. It is important to observe them at these late times because a measurement both of the flux and temperature can provide information about the mass of the white dwarf, the turn-off time scale, and the energy budget of the outburst. 8 refs., 2 figs

  8. AGN X-Ray emission and black holes (Kelly+, 2008)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelly, B. C.; Bechtold, J.; Trump, J. R.;

    2009-01-01

    In this analysis we combine 169 RQQs from Kelly et al. (2007ApJ...665.1489K) with 149 RQQs from the main SDSS sample of Strateva et al. (2005, Cat. J/AJ/130/387) to create a sample of 318 RQQs. Out of these 318 sources, 276 (86.8%) are detected in the X-ray. (1 data file)....

  9. Alpha Particle Induced X-ray Emission in the Classroom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on an experimental demonstration in an introductory modern physics course to elucidate the X-ray line spectra, and how they arise from transitions of electrons to inner shells. We seek to determine the effect of limited use of an interactive component as a supplement to a traditional lecture, and how it would improve the student achievement. In this preliminary study the students were exposed to traditional lectures on X-ray production and Bohr's model, they then were given a homework on the abc of X-ray spectra, after which they were given a pre-test on the materials, followed by an in-class demonstration, and a final post-exam. The gain, as measured from pre- to post-exams appears to remark the differences in how students approached the subject before and after the use of the demonstration. This initial study shows the validity of in-class demonstrations as teaching tools and opens a wide new area of research in modern physics teaching

  10. AN XMM-NEWTON SURVEY OF THE SOFT X-RAY BACKGROUND. III. THE GALACTIC HALO X-RAY EMISSION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present measurements of the Galactic halo's X-ray emission for 110 XMM-Newton sight lines selected to minimize contamination from solar wind charge exchange emission. We detect emission from few million degree gas on ∼4/5 of our sight lines. The temperature is fairly uniform (median = 2.22 × 106 K, interquartile range = 0.63 × 106 K), while the emission measure and intrinsic 0.5-2.0 keV surface brightness vary by over an order of magnitude (∼(0.4-7) × 10–3 cm–6 pc and ∼(0.5-7) × 10–12 erg cm–2 s–1 deg–2, respectively, with median detections of 1.9 × 10–3 cm–6 pc and 1.5 × 10–12 erg cm–2 s–1 deg–2, respectively). The high-latitude sky contains a patchy distribution of few million degree gas. This gas exhibits a general increase in emission measure toward the inner Galaxy in the southern Galactic hemisphere. However, there is no tendency for our observed emission measures to decrease with increasing Galactic latitude, contrary to what is expected for a disk-like halo morphology. The measured temperatures, brightnesses, and spatial distributions of the gas can be used to place constraints on models for the dominant heating sources of the halo. We provide some discussion of such heating sources, but defer comparisons between the observations and detailed models to a later paper

  11. An XMM-Newton Survey of the Soft X-ray Background. III. The Galactic Halo X-ray Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Henley, David B

    2013-01-01

    We present measurements of the Galactic halo's X-ray emission for 110 XMM-Newton sight lines, selected to minimize contamination from solar wind charge exchange emission. We detect emission from few million degree gas on ~4/5 of our sight lines. The temperature is fairly uniform (median = 2.22e6 K, interquartile range = 0.63e6 K), while the emission measure and intrinsic 0.5--2.0 keV surface brightness vary by over an order of magnitude (~(0.4-7)e-3 cm^-6 pc and ~(0.5-7)e-12 erg cm^-2 s^-1 deg^-2, respectively, with median detections of 1.9e-3 cm^-6 pc and 1.5e-12 erg cm^-2 s^-1 deg^-2, respectively). The high-latitude sky contains a patchy distribution of few million degree gas. This gas exhibits a general increase in emission measure toward the inner Galaxy in the southern Galactic hemisphere. However, there is no tendency for our observed emission measures to decrease with increasing Galactic latitude, contrary to what is expected for a disk-like halo morphology. The measured temperatures, brightnesses, an...

  12. Inflow Generated X-ray Corona Around Supermassive Black Holes and Unified Model for X-ray Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Lile

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, covering the spatial domain from hundreds of Schwarzschild radii to $2\\ \\mathrm{pc}$ around the central supermassive black hole of mass $10^8 M_\\odot$, with detailed radiative cooling processes, are performed. Generically found is the existence of a significant amount of shock heated, high temperature ($\\geq 10^8\\ \\mathrm{K}$) coronal gas in the inner ($\\leq 10^4 r_\\mathrm{sch}$) region. It is shown that the composite bremsstrahlung emission spectrum due to coronal gas of various temperatures are in reasonable agreement with the overall ensemble spectrum of AGNs and hard X-ray background. Taking into account inverse Compton processes, in the context of the simulation-produced coronal gas, our model can readily account for the wide variety of AGN spectral shape, which can now be understood physically. The distinguishing feature of our model is that X-ray coronal gas is, for the first time, an integral part of the inflow gas and its observable characteristics are phys...

  13. A Pilot Deep Survey for X-Ray Emission from fuvAGB Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Sahai, R; Contreras, C Sanchez; Stute, M

    2015-01-01

    We report the results of a pilot survey for X-ray emission from a newly discovered class of AGB stars with far-ultraviolet excesses (fuvAGB stars) using XMM-Newton and Chandra. We detected X-ray emission in 3 of 6 fuvAGB stars observed -- the X-ray fluxes are found to vary in a stochastic or quasi-periodic manner on roughly hour-long times-scales, and simultaneous UV observations using the Optical Monitor on XMM for these sources show similar variations in the UV flux. These data, together with previous studies, show that X-ray emission is found only in fuvAGB stars. From modeling the spectra, we find that the observed X-ray luminosities are ~(0.002-0.2 ) Lsun, and the X-ray emitting plasma temperatures are ~(35-160) x 10^6 K. The high X-ray temperatures argue against the emission arising in stellar coronae, or directly in an accretion shock, unless it occurs on a WD companion. However, none of the detected objects is a known WD-symbiotic star, suggesting that if WD companions are present, they are relatively...

  14. Investigating the hard X-ray emission from the hottest Abell cluster A2163 with Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Ota, N; Pratt, G W; Kitayama, T; Oshima, T; Reiprich, T H

    2013-01-01

    We present the results from Suzaku observations of the hottest Abell galaxy cluster A2163 at $z=0.2$. To study the physics of gas heating in cluster mergers, we investigated hard X-ray emission from the merging cluster A2163, which hosts the brightest synchrotron radio halo. We analyzed hard X-ray spectra accumulated from two-pointed Suzaku observations. Non-thermal hard X-ray emission should result from the inverse Compton (IC) scattering of relativistic electrons by the CMB photons. To measure this emission, the dominant thermal emission in the hard X-ray band must be modeled in detail. To this end, we analyzed the combined broad-band X-ray data of A2163 collected by Suzaku and XMM-Newton, assuming single- and multi-temperature models for thermal emission and the power-law model for non-thermal emission. From the Suzaku data, we detected significant hard X-ray emission from A2163 in the 12-60 keV band at the $28\\sigma$ level (or at the $5.5\\sigma$ level if a systematic error is considered). The Suzaku HXD s...

  15. Laboratory simulation of charge exchange-produced X-ray emission from comets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiersdorfer, P; Boyce, K R; Brown, G V; Chen, H; Kahn, S M; Kelley, R L; May, M; Olson, R E; Porter, F S; Stahle, C K; Tillotson, W A

    2003-06-01

    In laboratory experiments using the engineering spare microcalorimeter detector from the ASTRO-E satellite mission, we recorded the x-ray emission of highly charged ions of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, which simulates charge exchange reactions between heavy ions in the solar wind and neutral gases in cometary comae. The spectra are complex and do not readily match predictions. We developed a charge exchange emission model that successfully reproduces the soft x-ray spectrum of comet Linear C/1999 S4, observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. PMID:12791989

  16. Origin of the X-ray disc-reflection steep radial emissivity

    OpenAIRE

    Svoboda, Jiří; Dovčiak, Michal; Goosmann, René W.; Jethwa, Prashin; Karas, Vladimír; Miniutti, Giovanni; Guainazzi, Matteo

    2012-01-01

    X-ray reflection off the accretion disc surrounding a black hole, together with the associated broad iron K$\\alpha$ line, has been widely used to constrain the innermost accretion-flow geometry and black hole spin. Some recent measurements have revealed steep reflection emissivity profiles in a number of active galactic nuclei and X-ray binaries. We explore the physically motivated conditions that give rise to the observed steep disc-reflection emissivity profiles. We perform a set of simulat...

  17. Three-hump curve of laser x-ray emission vs. varied focusing conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ryc, L.; Krása, Josef; Láska, Leoš; Parys, P.; Rohlena, Karel; Skála, Jiří

    Melville: American Institut of Physics , 2005 - (Sadowski, M.), s. 299-302. (AIP Conference Proceedings. 812). ISSN 0094-243X. [PLASMA 2005. Opole-Turawa (PL), 06.09.2005-09.09.2005] Grant ostatní: EU(XE) HPRI-CT-1999-00053 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : laser plasma * x-ray emission * measurement of x-ray emission Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  18. X-ray Imaging and preliminary studies of the X-ray self-emission from an innovative plasma-trap based on the Bernstein waves heating mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliri, C.; Romano, F. P.; Mascali, D.; Gammino, S.; Musumarra, A.; Castro, G.; Celona, L.; Neri, L.; Altana, C.

    2013-10-01

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRIS) are based on ECR heated plasmas emitting high fluxes of X-rays. Here we illustrate a pilot study of the X-ray emission from a compact plasma-trap in which an off-resonance microwave-plasma interaction has been attempted, highlighting a possible Bernstein-Waves based heating mechanism. EBWs-heating is obtained via the inner plasma EM-to-ES wave conversion and enables to reach densities much larger than the cut-off ones. At LNS-INFN, an innovative diagnostic technique based on the design of a Pinhole Camera (PHC) coupled to a CCD device for X-ray Imaging of the plasma (XRI) has been developed, in order to integrate X-ray traditional diagnostics (XRS). The complementary use of electrostatic probes measurements and X-ray diagnostics enabled us to gain knowledge about the high energy electrons density and temperature and about the spatial structure of the source. The combination of the experimental data with appropriate modeling of the plasma-source allowed to estimate the X-ray emission intensity in different energy domains (ranging from EUV up to Hard X-rays). The use of ECRIS as X-ray source for multidisciplinary applications, is now a concrete perspective due to the intense fluxes produced by the new plasma heating mechanism.

  19. Composition variations in Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} thin films analyzed by X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, particle induced X-ray emission, photoluminescence, and Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Dahyun [Department of Physics, Sogang University, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Opanasyuk, A.S.; Koval, P.V.; Ponomarev, A.G. [Department of Electronics and Computer Technology, Sumy State University, Sumy UA-40007 (Ukraine); Jeong, Ah Reum; Kim, Gee Yeong; Jo, William [Department of Physics, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of); Cheong, Hyeonsik, E-mail: hcheong@sogang.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Sogang University, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    Compositional and structural studies of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} (CZTSe) thin films were carried out by X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE), photoluminescence, and Raman spectroscopy. CZTSe thin films with different compositions were deposited on sodalime glass by co-evaporation. The composition of the films measured by two different methods, EDS and PIXE, showed significant differences. Generally, the Zn/Sn ratio measured by EDS is larger than that measured by PIXE. Both the micro-PIXE and the micro-Raman imaging results indicated the compositional and structural inhomogeneity of the sample. - Highlights: • Particle induced X-ray emission was used to analyze the composition of CZTSe films. • Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy tends to underestimate the Sn composition. • Local Raman intensity is related with the composition rather than the crystallinity.

  20. The diurnal and solar cycle variation of the charge exchange induced hydrogen escape flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, L. J.; Tinsley, B. A.

    1978-01-01

    On the basis of ion temperature and density data at specific points and times in June 1969 provided by the OGO 6 satellite, and altitude profiles of the ion and electron temperature and concentration provided by the Arecibo radar facility over the period February 1972-April 1974, the diurnal and solar cycle variation of the charge-exchange-induced hydrogen escape flux was investigated. It was calculated that for low to moderate solar activity at Arecibo, the diurnal ratio of the maximum-to-minimum charge-exchange-induced hydrogen escape flux was approximately 6 with a peak around noon and a minimum somewhere between 0100 and 0300 h LT. This study of a limited amount of OGO 6 and Arecibo data seems to indicate that the charge-exchange-induced hydrogen escape flux increases as the F(10.7) flux increases for low to moderate solar activity.

  1. A Johann-type X-ray emission spectrometer at the Rossendorf beamline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvashnina, Kristina O; Scheinost, Andreas C

    2016-05-01

    This paper gives a detailed description, including equations, of the Johann-type X-ray emission spectrometer which has been recently installed and tested at the Rossendorf beamline (ROBL) of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The spectrometer consists of a single spherically bent crystal analyzer and an avalanche photodiode detector positioned on the vertical Rowland cycle of 1 m diameter. The hard X-ray emission spectrometer (∼3.5-25 keV) operates at atmospheric pressure and covers the Bragg angles of 65°-89°. The instrument has been tested at high and intermediate incident energies, i.e. at the Zr K-edge and at the Au L3-edge, in the second experimental hutch of ROBL. The spectrometer is dedicated for studying actinides in materials and environmental samples by high-energy-resolution X-ray absorption and X-ray emission spectroscopies. PMID:27140166

  2. Waiting in the Wings: Reflected X-ray Emission from the Homunculus Nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Corcoran, M F; Gull, T R; Davidson, K; Petre, R; Hillier, D J; Smith, N; Damineli, A; Morse, J A; Walborn, N R; Verner, E; Collins, N; White, S; Pittard, J M; Weis, K; Bomans, D; Butt, Y

    2004-01-01

    We report the first detection of X-ray emission associated with the Homunculus Nebula which surrounds the supermassive star Eta Carinae. The emission is characterized by a temperature in excess of 100 MK, and is consistent with scattering of the time-delayed X-ray flux associated with the star. The nebular emission is bright in the northwestern lobe and near the central regions of the Homunculus, and fainter in the southeastern lobe. We also report the detection of an unusually broad Fe K fluorescent line, which may indicate fluorescent scattering off the wind of a companion star or some other high velocity outflow. The X-ray Homunculus is the nearest member of the small class of Galactic X-ray reflection nebulae, and the only one in which both the emitting and reflecting sources are distinguishable.

  3. Radio and X-ray emission from newly born remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radio and X-ray observations of SN 1979c and SN 1980k offer a unique opportunity of monitoring the transition from supernovae to remnants. By means of the two-frequency radio light curves, the hypothesis that these objects are surrounded by circumstellar matter, originated in a presupernova wind, is tested, and the relevant parameters are derived. Then the absorption-corrected light curves are used to test the various proposed models. SN 1980k appears to be powered by a canonical shock, while SN 1979c is a good plerion candidate. An optical pulsar could still be detected at its location. (Auth.)

  4. Exotic x-ray emission from dense plasmas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rosmej, F.B.; Dachicourt, R.; Deschaud, B.; Khaghani, D.; Dozières, M.; Šmíd, Michal; Renner, Oldřich

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 22 (2015), s. 224005. ISSN 0953-4075 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 284464 - LASER LAB-EUROPE Grant ostatní: ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061; AVČR(CZ) M100101208 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : hollow ions * x-ray spectroscopy * atomic physics Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.975, year: 2014

  5. Observation of solar high energy gamma and X-ray emission and solar energetic particles

    CERN Document Server

    Struminsky, Alexei

    2015-01-01

    We considered 18 solar flares observed between June 2010 and July 2012, in which high energy >100 MeV {\\gamma}-emission was registered by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard FermiGRO. We examined for these {\\gamma}-events soft X-ray observations by GOES, hard X-ray observations by the Anti-Coincidence Shield of the SPectrometer aboard INTEGRAL (ACS SPI) and the Gamma-Ray burst Monitor (GBM) aboard FermiGRO. Hard X-ray and {\\pi}0-decay {\\gamma}-ray emissions are used as tracers of electron and proton acceleration, respectively. Bursts of hard X-ray were observed by ACS SPI during impulsive phase of 13 events. Bursts of hard X-ray >100 keV were not found during time intervals, when prolonged hard {\\gamma}-emission was registered by LAT/FermiGRO. Those events showing prolonged high-energy gamma-ray emission not accompanied by >100 keV hard X-ray emission are interpreted as an indication of either different acceleration processes for protons and electrons or as the presence of a proton population accelerated du...

  6. A Search For X-ray Emission From Colliding Magnetospheres In Young Eccentric Stellar Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Getman, Konstantin V; Kospal, Agnes; Salter, Demerese M; Garmire, Gordon P

    2016-01-01

    Among young binary stars whose magnetospheres are expected to collide, only two systems have been observed near periastron in the X-ray band: the low-mass DQ Tau and the older and more massive HD 152404. Both exhibit elevated levels of X-ray emission at periastron. Our goal is to determine whether colliding magnetospheres in young high-eccentricity binaries commonly produce elevated average levels of X-ray activity. This work is based on Chandra snapshots of multiple periastron and non-periastron passages in four nearby young eccentric binaries (Parenago 523, RX J1622.7-2325 Nw, UZ Tau E, and HD 152404). We find that for the merged sample of all 4 binaries the current X-ray data show an increasing average X-ray flux near periastron (at about 2.5-sigma level). Further comparison of these data with the X-ray properties of hundreds of young stars in the Orion Nebula Cluster, produced by the Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project (COUP), indicates that the X-ray emission from the merged sample of our binaries can not be...

  7. The X-ray emission from the knots in 3C 120

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    3C 120 is a Seyfert galaxy with a well detected X-ray jet.We investigate the X-ray emission of its five jet knots and fit their spectral energy distributions(SEDs) from the radio to the X-ray bands with a single-zone lepton model.We find that the SEDs of knots k7,s2,and s3 can be explained by synchrotron radiation,and the X-rays are the simple extension of the radio-optical emission component,but that of the inner knot k4 requires the IC/CMB model,in which the X-rays are due to the inverse Compton scattering of the cosmic microwave background photons by relativistic electrons in the jet with a beaming factor δ-14.The outer knot k25 is resolved into a three-part sub-structure.It is shown that the fitting of the X-rays from this knot with the IC/CMB model needs an extraordinary beaming factor δ-15-25 for a jet at the kpc scale.If the X-rays of knot k25 are produced by synchrotron radiation similar to k7,s2,and s3,they may be contributed by a relativistic electron population whose radiations in other wavelengths are not detected.

  8. X-ray emission from young brown dwarfs in the Orion Nebula Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Preibisch, T; Grosso, N; Feigelson, E D; Flaccomio, E; Getman, K; Hillenbrand, L A; Meeus, G; Micela, G; Sciortino, S; Stelzer, B; Preibisch, Thomas; Caughrean, Mark J. Mc; Grosso, Nicolas; Feigelson, Eric D.; Flaccomio, Ettore; Getman, Konstantin; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Meeus, Gwendolyn; Micela, Giusi; Sciortino, Salvatore; Stelzer, Beate

    2005-01-01

    We use the sensitive X-ray data from the Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project (COUP) to study the X-ray properties of 34 spectroscopically-identified brown dwarfs with near-infrared spectral types between M6 and M9 in the core of the Orion Nebula Cluster. Nine of the 34 objects are clearly detected as X-ray sources. The apparently low detection rate is in many cases related to the substantial extinction of these brown dwarfs; considering only the BDs with $A_V \\leq 5$ mag, nearly half of the objects (7 out of 16) are detected in X-rays. Our 10-day long X-ray lightcurves of these objects exhibit strong variability, including numerous flares. While one of the objects was only detected during a short flare, a statistical analysis of the lightcurves provides evidence for continuous (`quiescent') emission in addition to flares for all other objects. Of these, the $\\sim$ M9 brown dwarf COUP 1255 = HC 212 is one of the coolest known objects with a clear detection of quiescent X-ray emission. The X-ray properties (spectra...

  9. Amplification and variability of the AGN X-ray emission due to microlensing

    OpenAIRE

    Popovic, L. C.; Jovanovic, P; Petrovic, T.; Shalyapin, V. N.

    2006-01-01

    We consider the contribution of microlensing to the AGN Fe K$\\alpha$ line and X-ray continuum amplification and variation. To investigate the variability of the line and X-ray continuum, we studied the effects of microlensing on quasar X-ray spectra produced by crossing of a microlensing pattern across a standard relativistic accretion disk. To describe the disk emission we used a ray tracing method considering both metrics, Schwarzschild and Kerr. We found that the Fe K$\\alpha$ and continuum...

  10. On the thermal line emission from the outflows in ultraluminous X-ray sources

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Ya-Di; Cao, Xinwu

    2016-01-01

    The atomic features in the X-ray spectra of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) may be associated with the outflow (Middleton et al. 2015), which may provide a way to explore the physics of the ULXs. We construct a conical outflow model, and calculate the thermal X-ray Fe emission lines from the outflows. Our results show that thermal line luminosity decreases with increasing outflow velocity or/and opening angle of the outflow for a fixed kinetic power of the outflows. Assuming the kinetic ...

  11. Ultra fast atomic process in X-ray emission by inner-shell ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moribayashi, Kengo; Sasaki, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment; Tajima, T.

    1998-03-01

    An ultra-fast atomic process together with X-ray emission by inner-shell ionization using high intensity (10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) short pulse (20fs) X-ray is studied. A new class of experiment is proposed and a useful pumping source is suggested. In this method, it is found that the gain value of X-ray laser amounts to larger than 1000(1/cm) with use of the density of 10{sup 22}/cm{sup 3} of carbon atom. Electron impact ionization effect and initial density effect as well as intensity of pumping source effect are also discussed. (author)

  12. Correlation of hard X-ray and white light emission in solar flares

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhar, Matej; Krucker, Säm; Oliveros, Juan Carlos Martínez; Battaglia, Marina; Kleint, Lucia; Casadei, Diego; Hudson, Hugh S.

    2015-01-01

    A statistical study of the correlation between hard X-ray and white light emission in solar flares is performed in order to search for a link between flare-accelerated electrons and white light formation. We analyze 43 flares spanning GOES classes M and X using observations from RHESSI (Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager) and HMI (Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager). We calculate X-ray fluxes at 30 keV and white light fluxes at 6173 \\r{A} summed over the hard X-ray flare ribbo...

  13. Distribution of X-ray Emission from Jet Knots of 3C273

    OpenAIRE

    Bannikova, E. Yu.; Mykhailova, M. S.

    2007-01-01

    The jet of the quasar 3C273 is observed at different spectral bands. This jet has a knot structure. Jet radiation in radio and optical bands are connected with synchrotron mechanism, while the emission mechanism producing the X-rays is controversial. We suppose that the X-rays observed for two knots nearest to the quasar can originate from the inverse Compton scattering of external source radiation on relativistic electrons. But in the jet region with constant low X-ray intensity the inverse ...

  14. Variable X-ray emission from the dMe star EXO 040830-7134.7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have identified the serendipitous X-ray source EXO 040830-7134.7 with a mv = 12.5 dMe star. A total of 30 observations of this source were made with the EXOSAT low energy telescope during an interval of 2 years, representing the most complete long term coverage of X-ray emission from a single dMe star. In the usually observed quiescent state, the X-ray luminosity of EXO 040830-7134.7 can be described by a normal distribution with a standard deviation of 0.4 times the average value

  15. Relation between X-Ray and -Ray Emissions for Fermi Blazars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bijun Li; Xiong Zhang

    2014-09-01

    Using -ray band data detected by Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and X-ray band data for 78 blazars, we find a medium correlation between X-ray and -ray fluxes in the average state. A medium anticorrelation is also found between X-ray (1 KeV) mean spectral index and -ray mean spectral index for blazars. Our results suggest that the most likely radiation mechanism for the high energy -ray would be SSC. And that the -ray emission mechanism may be somewhat different for BL Lacs and FSRQs.

  16. Experimental study of conversion from atomic high-order harmonics to x-ray emissions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王骐; 陈建新; 夏元钦; 陈德应

    2003-01-01

    There are two physical phenomena in a strong laser intensity. One is the high-order harmonic emission; the other is x-ray emission from optical-field ionized plasmas. The experiment of conversion from high-order harmonics to x-ray emissions was given with a 105fs Ti:sapphire laser by adjusting laser intensities. The ingredient in plasma was investigated by the numerical simulations. Our experimental results suggested that the free electrons have detrimental effects on harmonic generation but are favourable for x-ray emission from optical-field ionized plasmas. If we want to obtain more intense harmonic signals as a coherent light source in the soft x-ray region, we must avoid the production of free electrons in plasmas. At the same time, if we want to observe x-rays for the development of high-repetition-rate table-top soft x-ray lasers, we should strip all atoms in the plasmas to a necessary ionized stage by the optical-fieldionization in the field of a high-intensity laser pulse.

  17. On the Thermal Line Emission from the Outflows in Ultraluminous X-Ray Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ya-Di; Cao, Xinwu

    2016-08-01

    The atomic features in the X-ray spectra of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) may be associated with the outflow, which may provide a way to explore the physics of the ULXs. We construct a conical outflow model and calculate the thermal X-ray Fe emission lines from the outflows. Our results show that thermal line luminosity decreases with increasing outflow velocity and/or opening angle of the outflow for a fixed kinetic power of the outflows. Assuming the kinetic power of the outflows to be comparable with the accretion power in the ULXs, we find that the equivalent width can be several eV for the thermal X-ray Fe emission line from the outflows in the ULXs with stellar-mass black holes. The thermal line luminosity is proportional to 1/M bh (M bh is the black hole mass of the ULX). The equivalent width decreases with the black hole mass, which implies that the Fe line emission from the outflows can hardly be detected if the ULXs contain intermediate-mass black holes. Our results suggest that the thermal X-ray Fe line emission should be preferentially be detected in the ULXs with high kinetic power slowly moving outflows from the accretion disks surrounding stellar-mass black holes/neutron stars. The recently observed X-ray atomic features of the outflows in a ULX may imply that it contains a stellar-mass black hole.

  18. A Comparison of X-ray and Optical Emission in Cassiopeia A

    CERN Document Server

    Patnaude, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    Broadband optical and narrowband Si XIII X-ray images of the young Galactic supernova remnant Cas A obtained over several decades are used to investigate spatial and temporal correlations on both large and small scales. The data consist of optical and near infrared ground-based and Hubble Space Telescope images taken between 1951 and 2011, and X-ray images from Einstein, ROSAT, and Chandra taken between 1979 and 2013. We find weak spatial correlations between the remnant's emission features on large scales, but several cases of good optical/X-ray correlations on small scales for features which have brightened due to recent interaction with the reverse shock. We also find instances where: (i) a time delay is observed between the appearance of a feature's optical and X-ray emissions, (ii) displacements of several arcseconds between a feature's X-ray and optical emission peaks and, (iii) regions showing no corresponding X-ray or optical emissions. To explain this behavior, we propose a inhomogeneous model for Ca...

  19. Stellar wind induced soft X-ray emission from close-in exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Kislyakova, K G; Johnstone, C P; Holmström, M; Zaitsev, V V; Lammer, H

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we estimate the X-ray emission from close-in exoplanets. We show that the Solar/Stellar Wind Charge Exchange Mechanism (SWCX) which produces soft X-ray emission is very effective for hot Jupiters. In this mechanism, X-ray photons are emitted as a result of the charge exchange between heavy ions in the solar wind and the atmospheric neutral particles. In the Solar System, comets produce X-rays mostly through the SWCX mechanism, but it has also been shown to operate in the heliosphere, in the terrestrial magnetosheath, and on Mars, Venus and Moon. Since the number of emitted photons is proportional to the solar wind mass flux, this mechanism is not very effective for the Solar system giants. Here we present a simple estimate of the X-ray emission intensity that can be produced by close-in extrasolar giant planets due to charge exchange with the heavy ions of the stellar wind. Using the example of HD~209458b, we show that this mechanism alone can be responsible for an X-ray emission of $\\approx 10...

  20. Study of the x-ray emission scaling law in a low energy plasma focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of a low energy (0.6-1.8 kJ) Mather-type plasma focus (PF) device as a Cu-Kα x-ray source is examined. The Cu-Kα and total x-ray emissions are measured for argon and hydrogen filling. It is found that Cu-Kα emission varies as YK [J] ∼ [E(kJ)]3.5-4.5 ∼ [I(100 kA)]3.5-4.5, whereas the total x-ray emission is found to follow Ytot [J] ∼ [E( kJ)]4.5-5.5 ∼ [I(100 kA)]4.5-5.5. At optimum conditions, the system with discharge energy of 1.8 kJ is found to generate x-rays with 1.44 ± 0.07% efficiency. About 32% of the emission constitutes the Cu-Kα line radiation. With a cut at the anode tip, the x-ray flux in the side-on direction is increased three times. The modified geometry may help in using the PF as a radiation source for x-ray diffraction. (brief communication)

  1. CAN CHARGE EXCHANGE EXPLAIN ANOMALOUS SOFT X-RAY EMISSION IN THE CYGNUS LOOP?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent X-ray studies have shown that supernova shock models are unable to satisfactorily explain X-ray emission in the rim of the Cygnus Loop. In an attempt to account for this ''anomalously'' enhanced X-ray flux, we fit the region with a model including theoretical charge exchange (CX) data along with shock and background X-ray models. The model includes the CX collisions of O8 +, O7 +, N7 +, N6 +, C6 +, and C5 + with H with an energy of 1 keV u–1 (438 km s–1). The observations reveal a strong emission feature near 0.7 keV that cannot fully be accounted for by a shock model, nor the current CX data. Inclusion of CX, specifically O7 + + H, does provide for a statistically significant improvement over a pure shock model

  2. Chandra Observations and Modeling of Geocoronal Charge Exchange X-Ray Emission During Solar Wind Gusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornbleuth, Marc; Wargelin, Bradford J.; Juda, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) X-rays are emitted when highly charged solar wind ions such as O7+ collide with neutral gas. The best known examples of this occur around comets, but SWCX emission also arises in the Earth's tenuous outer atmosphere and throughout the heliosphere as neutral H and He from the interstellar medium flows into the solar system. This geocoronal and heliospheric emission comprises much of the soft X-ray background and is seen in every X-ray observation. Geocoronal emission, although usually weaker than heliospheric emission, arises within a few tens of Earth radii and therefore responds much more quickly (on time scales of less than an hour) to changes in solar wind intensity than the widely distributed heliospheric emission.We have studied a dozen Chandra observations when the flux of solar wind protons and O7+ ions was at its highest. These gusts of wind cause correspondingly abrupt changes in geocoronal SWCX X-ray emission,which may or may not be apparent in Chandra data depending on a given observation's line of sight through the magnetosphere. We compare observed changes in the X-ray background with predictions from a fully 3D analysis of SWCX emission based on magnetospheric simulations using the BATS-R-US model.

  3. X-ray Emission Lines in GRB Afterglows: Evidence for a Two-component Jet Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Hong Gao; Da-Ming Wei

    2005-01-01

    X-ray emission lines have been observed in X-ray afterglows of several γ-ray bursts (GRBs). It is a major breakthrough for understanding the nature of the progenitors. It has been proposed that the X-ray emission lines can be well explained by the Geometry-Dominated models, but in these models the illuminating angle is much larger than that of the collimated jet of the GRB. For GRB 011211, we have obtained an illuminating angle of about θ~ 45°, while the angle of the GRB jet is only 3.6°. So we propose that the outflow of GRBs with emission lines should have two distinct components: a wide component that illuminates the reprocessing material and produces the emission lines and a narrow one that produces the GRB. Observations show the energy for producing the emission lines is higher than that of the GRB. In this case, when the wide component dominates the afterglows, a bump should appear in the GRB afterglow. For GRB 011211,the bump should occur within 0.05 days of the GRB, which is obviously too early for the observation to catch it. Alongside the X-ray emission lines there should also be a bright emission component between the UV and the soft X-rays. These features can be tested by the Swift satellite in the near future.

  4. Electron and photon emissions from gold nanoparticles irradiated by X-ray photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we develop a totally new probabilistic model for the electron and photon emission of gold nanoparticles irradiated by X-ray photons. This model allows direct applications to recent researches about the radiotherapy enhancement by gold nanoparticles in the context of cancer treatment. Our model uses, in a complete original way, simulated Auger cascade and stopping power to compute electron emission spectra, photon emission spectra and released energy inside the material of gold nanoparticles. It allows us to present new results about the electron and photon emission of gold nanoparticle irradiated by hard X-rays

  5. Solar flares with similar soft but different hard X-ray emissions: case and statistical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharykin, Ivan N.; Struminsky, Alexei B.; Zimovets, Ivan V.; Gan, Wei-Qun

    2016-01-01

    From the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) catalog we select events which have approximately the same GOES class (high C - low M or 500-1200 counts s-1 within the RHESSI 6-12 keV energy band), but with different maximal energies of detected hard X-rays. The selected events are subdivided into two groups: (1) flares with X-ray emissions observed by RHESSI up to only 50 keV and (2) flares with hard X-ray emission observed also above 50 keV. The main task is to understand observational peculiarities of these two flare groups. We use RHESSI X-ray data to obtain spectral and spatial information in order to find differences between selected groups. Spectra and images are analyzed in detail for six events (case study). For a larger number of samples (85 and 28 flares in the low-energy and high-energy groups respectively) we only make some generalizations. In spectral analysis we use the thick-target model for hard X-ray emission and one temperature assumption for thermal soft X-ray emission. RHESSI X-ray images are used for determination of flare region sizes. Although thermal and spatial properties of these two groups of flares are not easily distinguishable, power law indices of hard X-rays show significant differences. Events from the high-energy group generally have a harder spectrum. Therefore, the efficiency of chromospheric evaporation is not sensitive to the hardness of nonthermal electron spectra but rather depends on the total energy flux of nonthermal electrons.

  6. X-ray emission from open star clusters with Spectrum-Rontgen-Gamma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, K.P.; Ojha, D.K.; Schnopper, H.W.;

    1998-01-01

    The study of X-ray emission from co-evolving populations of stars in open dusters is extremely important for understanding the dynamo activity among the stars. With this objective, we propose to observe a number of open clusters in the X-ray and UV bands using SPECTRUM-Rontgen-Gamma. The high...... of stars which include synchronous binaries, rapid rotators and peculiar stars, would also be carried out....

  7. Effects of multiple ionization on total L X-ray emission by proton impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of multiple ionization on L X-ray emission by proton with energy from 100 keV to 250 keV on iron target was studied. The total L X-ray production cross sections were measured. A multiple ioniza-tion model and an average fluorescence yield were used together. The theoretical predictions with the correction of atomic parameter were obtained

  8. Electron optics simulation for designing carbon nanotube based field emission x-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Shabana

    In this dissertation, electron optics simulation for designing carbon nanotube (CNT) based field emission x-ray source for medical imaging applications will be presented. However, for design optimization of x-ray tubes accurate electron beam optics simulation is essential. To facilitate design of CNT x-ray sources a commercial 3D finite element software has been chosen for extensive simulation. The results show that a simplified model of uniform electron field emission from the cathode surface is not sufficient when compared to experimental measurements. This necessitated the development of a refined model to describe a macroscopic field emission CNT cathode for electron beam optics simulations. The model emulates the random distribution of CNTs and the associated variation of local field enhancement factor. The main parameter of the model has been derived empirically from the experimentally measured I-V characteristics of the CNT cathode. Simulation results based on this model agree well with experiments which include measurements of the transmission rate and focus spot size. The model provides a consistent simulation platform for optimization of electron beam optics in CNT x-ray source design. A systematic study of electron beam optics in CNT x-ray tubes led to the development of a new generation of compact x-ray source with multiple pixels. A micro focus field emission x-ray source with a variable focal spot size has been fully characterized and evaluated. It has been built and successfully integrated into micro-CT scanners which are capable of dynamic cardiac imaging of free-breathing small animals with high spatial and temporal resolutions. In addition a spatially distributed high power multi-beam x-ray source has also been designed and integrated into a stationary digital breast tomosynthesis (s-DBT) configuration. This system has the potential to reduce the total scan time to 4 seconds and yield superior image quality in breast imaging.

  9. The x-ray emission from SN 1987A and the remnant of SN 1572 (Tycho)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal x-ray emission from SN 1987A may be enhanced to a detectable level when the blast shock hits the circumstellar medium which has formed in the red-supergiant stage of the progenitor. The x-ray spectrum of Tycho observed with the satellite Tenma can be explained approximately within the context of a carbon deflagration model for Type Ia supernovae, if the ejecta are assumed to be mixed partially

  10. The Morphology of the X-ray Emission above 2 keV from Jupiter's Aurorae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, R.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Galand, M.; Grodent, D.; Gladstone, G. R.; Waite, J. H.; Cravens, T.; Ford, P.

    2007-01-01

    The discovery in XMM-Newton X-ray data of X-ray emission above 2 keY from Jupiter's aurorae has led us to reexamine the Chandra ACIS-S observations taken in Feb 2003. Chandra's superior spatial resolution has revealed that the auroral X-rays with E > 2 keV are emitted from the periphery of the region emitting those with E < 1 keV. We are presently exploring the relationship of this morphology to that of the FUV emission from the main auroral oval and the polar cap. The low energy emission has previously been established as due to charge exchange between energetic precipitating ions of oxygen and either sulfur or carbon. It seems likely to us that the higher energy emission is due to precipitation of energetic electrons, possibly the same population of electrons responsible for the FUV emission. We discuss our analysis and interpretation.

  11. Scaling of x-ray emission and ion velocity in laser produced Cu plasmas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Y B S R Prasad; V K Senecha; H C Pant; M P Kamath; G S Solanki; P K Tripathi; A P Kulkarni; S Gupta; R Pareek; A S Joshi; N Sreedhar; Sameer Nigam; C P Navathe

    2000-11-01

    The x-ray emission from slab targets of copper irradiated by Nd:glass laser (1.054 m, 5 and 15 ns) at intensities between 1012 and 1014W/cm2 has been studied. The x-ray emissions were monitored with the help of high quantum efficiency x-ray silicon photo diodes and vacuum photo diodes, all covered with aluminium filters of different thickness. The x-ray intensity vs the laser intensity has a scaling factor of (1.2–1.92). The relative x-ray conversion efficiency follows an empirical relationship which is in close agreement with the one reported by Babonneau et al. The ion velocities were monitored using Langmuir probes placed at different angles and radial distances from the target position. The variation of the ion velocity with the laser intensity follows a scaling of the form where ∼ 0.22 which is in good agreement with the reported scaling factor values. The results on the x-ray emission from Cu plasma are reported.

  12. International workshop on X-ray emission techniques for forensic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP, Trieste, Italy), in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA, Vienna, Austria) and the Elettra Laboratory, Sincrotrone, Trieste, organised an International Workshop on X-ray Emission Techniques for Forensic Applications from 28 May - 1 June 2007. Forty scientists and practitioners from Member States gathered together at the ICTP to review the current status of and exchange up-to-date knowledge and experience in forensic applications of X-ray emission and accelerator based techniques such as X-ray fluorescence (XRF), scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDS), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF), and ion beam analysis (IBA) including particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE), Rutherford backscattering (RBS) and particle induced gamma emission (PIGE). The working definition of forensic science is science used for the purpose of the law, hence any branch of science used to resolve legal disputes, including environmental protection, health and safety at work and civil proceedings, but the term is more generally used with the meaning of science in the investigation of crime by police and courts. One of the major areas of forensic applications of X-ray emission techniques is evidence in criminal investigations. These techniques are attractive for forensic applications thanks to their unique features such as: non-destructive character of analysis (essential for archiving the evidence and for making possible further examinations), multi-elemental capabilities, simplicity, speed of operation, ability to analyse unprepared samples, good sensitivity, portability and ability to perform local and bulk analysis. Typical materials analysed by X-ray emission techniques to provide forensic evidences include: gunshot residue, paints, glass, oil, car bulb filaments, building materials, sediments, cultural

  13. Recent Advances in Computational Studies of Charge Exchange X-ray Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumbee, Renata

    2016-06-01

    Interest in astrophysical sources of charge exchange (CX) has grown since X-ray emission from comet Hyakutake was first observed, the origin of which is primarily due to CX processes between neutral species in the comet’s atmosphere and highly charged ions from the solar wind. More recent observations have shown that CX may have a significant contribution to the X-ray emission spectra of a wide variety of environments within our solar system including solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) with neutral gases in the heliosphere and in planetary atmospheres, as well as beyond the solar system in galaxy clusters, supernova remnants, and star forming galaxies.While the basic process of CX has been studied for many decades, the reliability of the existing data is not uniform, and the coverage of the astrophysically important projectile and target combinations and collisional velocities is insufficient. The need for reliable and robust CX X-ray emission models will only be amplified with the with the high resolution X-ray spectra expected from the soft X-ray imaging calorimeter spectrometer (SXS) onboard the Hitomi X-ray observatory. In this talk, I will discuss recent advances in theoretical CX cross sections and X-ray modeling with a focus on CX diagnostics. The need for experimental X-ray spectra and cross sections for benchmarking current theory will also be highlighted. This work was performed in collaboration with David Lyons, Patrick Mullen, David Schultz, Phillip Stancil, and Robin Shelton. Work at UGA was partially supported by NASA grant NNX09AC46G.

  14. Plasma code for astrophysical charge exchange emission at X-ray wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Liyi; Raassen, A J J

    2016-01-01

    Charge exchange X-ray emission provides unique insights into the interactions between cold and hot astrophysical plasmas. Besides its own profound science, this emission is also technically crucial to all observations in the X-ray band, since charge exchange with the solar wind often contributes a significant foreground component that contaminates the signal of interest. By approximating the cross sections resolved to $n$ and $l$ atomic subshells, and carrying out complete radiative cascade calculation, we create a new spectral code to evaluate the charge exchange emission in the X-ray band. Comparing to collisional thermal emission, charge exchange radiation exhibits enhanced lines from large-$n$ shells to the ground, as well as large forbidden-to-resonance ratios of triplet transitions. Our new model successfully reproduces an observed high-quality spectrum of comet C/2000 WM1 (LINEAR), which emits purely by charge exchange between solar wind ions and cometary neutrals. It demonstrates that a proper charge ...

  15. Microwave and X-Ray emission during a isentropic expansion and its application to solar bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gyro-synchrotron emission in microwaves and the free-free emission in X-rays of a plasma enclosed in a cylinder coincident with a magnetic force tube were calculated for an isentropic self-similar expansion, with plane and cylindrical symmetries. This expansion model was applied to a region of the low solar corona, and the results were compared to the emission observed in some simple solar events of low intensity. The calculations show satisfactory coincidence with the events in X-rays for energies around 1029 ergs. The solar events analyzed in microwaves, which are not the same that were studied in X-rays, in general do not fit the theoretical results. The origin of the discrepancy is probably the formulation of the processes of emission applied to the expansion. (Author)

  16. Weak Hard X-ray Emission from Two Broad Absorption Line Quasars Observed with NuSTAR: Compton-thick Absorption or Intrinsic X-ray Weakness?

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, B; Alexander, D M; Harrison, F A; Stern, D; Bauer, F E; Boggs, S E; Christensen, F E; Comastri, A; Craig, W W; Fabian, A C; Farrah, D; Fiore, F; Fuerst, F; Grefenstette, B W; Hailey, C J; Hickox, R; Madsen, K K; Matt, G; Ogle, P; Risaliti, G; Saez, C; Teng, S H; Walton, D J; Zhang, W W

    2013-01-01

    We present NuSTAR hard X-ray observations of two X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars, PG 1004+130 (radio loud) and PG 1700+518 (radio quiet). Many BAL quasars appear X-ray weak, probably due to absorption by the shielding gas between the nucleus and the accretion-disk wind. The two targets are among the optically brightest BAL quasars, yet they are known to be significantly X-ray weak at rest-frame 2-10 keV (16-120 times fainter than typical quasars). We would expect to obtain ~400-600 hard X-ray (>10 keV) photons with NuSTAR, provided that these photons are not significantly absorbed (NH<1E24 cm^{-2}). However, both BAL quasars are only detected in the softer NuSTAR bands (e.g., 4-20 keV) but not in its harder bands (e.g., 20-30 keV), suggesting that either the shielding gas is highly Compton-thick or the two targets are intrinsically X-ray weak. We constrain the column densities for both to be NH~7E24 cm^{-2} if the weak hard X-ray emission is caused by obscuration from the shielding gas. We d...

  17. Evidence for X-ray synchrotron emission from simultaneous mid-IR to X-ray observations of a strong Sgr A* flare

    CERN Document Server

    Dodds-Eden, K; Trap, G; Quataert, E; Haubois, X; Gillessen, S; Grosso, N; Pantin, E; Falcke, H; Rouan, D; Genzel, R; Hasinger, G; Goldwurm, A; Yusef-Zadeh, F; Clénet, Y; Trippe, S; Lagage, P -O; Bartko, H; Eisenhauer, F; Ott, T; Paumard, T; Perrin, G; Yuan, F; Fritz, T K; Mascetti, L

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports measurements of Sgr A* made with NACO in L' -band (3.80 um), Ks-band (2.12 um) and H-band (1.66 um) and with VISIR in N-band (11.88 um) at the ESO VLT, as well as with XMM-Newton at X-ray (2-10 keV) wavelengths. On 4 April, 2007, a very bright flare was observed from Sgr A* simultaneously at L'-band and X-ray wavelengths. No emission was detected using VISIR. The resulting SED has a blue slope (beta > 0 for nuL_nu ~ nu^beta, consistent with nuL_nu ~ nu^0.4) between 12 micron and 3.8 micron. For the first time our high quality data allow a detailed comparison of infrared and X-ray light curves with a resolution of a few minutes. The IR and X-ray flares are simultaneous to within 3 minutes. However the IR flare lasts significantly longer than the X-ray flare (both before and after the X-ray peak) and prominent substructures in the 3.8 micron light curve are clearly not seen in the X-ray data. From the shortest timescale variations in the L'-band lightcurve we find that the flaring region must...

  18. Lifetime-vibrational interference effects in resonantly excited x-ray emission spectra of CO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skytt, P.; Glans, P.; Gunnelin, K. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The parity selection rule for resonant X-ray emission as demonstrated for O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} can be seen as an effect of interference between coherently excited degenerate localized core states. One system where the core state degeneracy is not exact but somewhat lifted was previously studied at ALS, namely the resonant X-ray emission of amino-substituted benzene (aniline). It was shown that the X-ray fluorescence spectrum resulting from excitation of the C1s at the site of the {open_quotes}aminocarbon{close_quotes} could be described in a picture separating the excitation and the emission processes, whereas the spectrum corresponding to the quasi-degenerate carbons could not. Thus, in this case it was necessary to take interference effects between the quasi-degenerate intermediate core excited states into account in order to obtain agreement between calculations and experiment. The different vibrational levels of core excited states in molecules have energy splittings which are of the same order of magnitude as the natural lifetime broadening of core excitations in the soft X-ray range. Therefore, lifetime-vibrational interference effects are likely to appear and influence the band shapes in resonant X-ray emission spectra. Lifetime-vibrational interference has been studied in non-resonant X-ray emission, and in Auger spectra. In this report the authors discuss results of selectively excited soft X-ray fluorescence spectra of molecules, where they focus on lifetime-interference effects appearing in the band shapes.

  19. X-ray Line Emission from the Hot Stellar Wind of theta 1 Ori C

    OpenAIRE

    Schulz, N. S.; Canizares, C. R.; Huenemoerder, D.; Lee, J. C.

    2000-01-01

    We present a first emission line analysis of a high resolution X-ray spectrum of the stellar wind of theta 1 Ori C obtained with the High Energy Transmission grating Spectrometer onboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The spectra are resolved into a large number of emission lines from H- and He-like O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ar and Fe ions. The He-like Fe XXV and Li-like Fe XXIV appear quite strong indicating very hot emitting regions. From H/He flux ratios, as well as from Fe He/Li emission measure ...

  20. X-ray emission measurements from CO2-laser-created plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of the interaction of gigawatt nanosecond CO2 pulses with various solid targets are reported. The x-ray emission as a function of focusing is not critical within +- 1 mm of the on-target position. The x-ray intensity has an approximate power law dependance of 2.5 with laser energy for all elements. Densitometer analysis of sections of the x-ray pinhole pictures indicate nonuniformities in the plasma and localized hot spots. Line spectra taken with a Bragg crystal indicate temperatures of 200 eV for 4 J of incident energy. Continuum spectra taken with absorbants show characteristic nonthermal behavior, which may be related to parametric instabilities. The x-ray yield as a function of atomic number exhibits a series of peaks which are similar in position to the predictions of a coronal model

  1. X ray emission: a tool and a probe for laser - clusters interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In intense laser-cluster interaction, the experimental results show a strong energetic coupling between radiation and matter. We have measured absolute X-ray yields and charge state distributions under well control conditions as a function of physical parameters governing the interaction; namely laser intensity, pulse duration, wavelength or polarization state of the laser light, the size and the species of the clusters (Ar, Kr, Xe). We have highlighted, for the first time, an intensity threshold in the X-ray production very low (∼ 2.1014 W/cm2 for a pulse duration of 300 fs) which can results from an effect of the dynamical polarisation of clusters in an intense electric field. A weak dependence with the wavelength (400 nm / 800 nm) on the absolute X-ray yields has been found. Moreover, we have observed a saturation of the X-ray emission probability below a critical cluster size. (author)

  2. Directivity of non-thermal X-ray emission from solar flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An attempt has been made in the present work to reveal the directivity of solar non-thermal X-ray emission using the data obtained from the Prognoz and Explorer satellites. The frequency of occurrence of X-ray bursts and the mean intensities of the emission are studied as a function of distance from the central meridian. The most complete statistics have been obtained for the 4-24 keV X-ray bursts for the period 1970-1973. The X-ray burst frequency of occurrence normalized to the corresponding Hα flare frequency increases towards the solar limb. During the studied period this trend is more pronounced to the east than to the west. Distributions of the mean intensities of X-ray bursts are very similar to those of the frequency of occurrence of X-ray bursts; the effect is more noticeable for the low intensity bursts. The effect of the east-west asymmetry for Hα flares has been found to vary in magnitude and direction during the 20th solar activity cycle. (Auth.)

  3. On the origin of X-ray emission in some FR Is: ADAF or jet?

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Qingwen; Cao, Xinwu

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the X-ray origin in FR Is using the radio, submillimetre, optical, and {\\em Chandra} X-ray data of a small sample consisting of eight FR I sources. These sources are very dim, with X-ray luminosities $L_{\\rm X}/L_{\\rm Edd} \\sim 10^{-4}-10^{-8}$ ($L_{\\rm X}$ is the X-ray luminosity between 2-10 keV). We try to fit the multiwaveband spectrum using a coupled accretion-jet model. In this model, the accretion flow is described by an advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF) while in the innermost region of ADAF a fraction of accretion flow is transferred into the vertical direction and forms a jet. We find that X-ray emission in the source with the highest $L_{\\rm X}$ ($\\sim 1.8 \\times 10^{-4}L_{\\rm Edd}$) is from the ADAF. The results for the four sources with moderate $L_{\\rm X}$ ($\\sim$ several $\\times 10^{-6}L_{\\rm Edd}$) are complicated. Two are mainly from the ADAFs, one from the jet, and the other from the sum of the jet and ADAF. The X-ray emission in the three least luminous sources ($L_{\\r...

  4. A glass-sealed field emission x-ray tube based on carbon nanotube emitter for medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Seung Jun; Jeong, Jaeik; Ahn, Jeung Sun; Park, Hunkuk; Kwak, Junghwan; Noh, Eunkyong; Paik, Sanghyun; Kim, Seung Hoon; Ryu, Jehwang

    2016-04-01

    We report the design and fabrication of a carbon nanotube based a glass-sealed field emission x-ray tube without vacuum pump. The x-ray tube consists of four electrodes with anode, focuser, gate, and cathode electrode. The shape of cathode is rectangular for isotropic focal spot size at anode target. The obtained x-ray images show clearly micrometer scale.

  5. Discovery of Diffuse Hard X-ray Emission associated with Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezoe, Y.; Miyoshi, Y.; Ishikawa, K.; Ohashi, T.; Terada, N.; Uchiyama, Y.; Negoro, H.

    2009-12-01

    Our discovery of diffuse hard (1-5 keV) X-ray emission around Jupiter is reported. Recent Chandra and XMM-Newton observations revealed several types of X-rays in the vicinity of Jupiter such as auroral and disk emission from Jupiter and faint diffuse X-rays from the Io Plasma Torus (see Bhardwaj et al. 2007 for review). To investigate possible diffuse hard X-ray emission around Jupiter with the highest sensitivity, we conducted data analysis of Suzaku XIS observations of Jupiter on Feb 2006. After removing satellite and planetary orbital motions, we detected a significant diffuse X-ray emission extending to ~6 x 3 arcmin with the 1-5 keV X-ray luminosity of ~3e15 erg/s. The emitting region very well coincided with the Jupiter's radiation belts. The 1-5 keV X-ray spectrum was represented by a simple power law model with a photon index of 1.4. Such a flat continuum strongly suggests non-thermal origin. Although such an emission can be originated from multiple background point sources, its possibility is quite low. We hence examined three mechanisms, assuming that the emission is truly diffuse: bremsstrahlung by keV electrons, synchrotron emission by TeV electrons, and inverse Compton scattering of solar photons by MeV electrons. The former two can be rejected because of the X-ray spectral shape and implausible existence of TeV electrons around Jupiter, respectively. The last possibility was found to be possible because tens MeV electrons, which have been confirmed in inner radiation belts (Bolton et al. 2002), can kick solar photons to the keV energy range and provide a simple power-law continuum. We estimated an average electron density from the X-ray luminosity assuming the oblate spheroid shaped emitting region with 8 x 8 x 4 Jovian radii. The necessary density was 0.02 1/cm3 for 50 MeV electrons. Hence, our results may suggest a new particle acceleration phenomenon around Jupiter.

  6. Electron and X-ray emission in collisions of multiply charged ions and atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author presents experimental results of electron and X-ray emission following slow collisions of multiply charged ions and atoms. The aim of the investigation was to study the mechanisms which are responsible for the emission. (G.T.H.)

  7. X-Ray Emission from a prominent dust lane lenticular galaxy NGC 5866

    CERN Document Server

    Vagshette, N D; Pandey, S K; Patil, M K

    2015-01-01

    We report the multiband imagery with an emphasis on the X-ray emission properties of a prominent dust lane lenticular galaxy NGC 5866. X-ray emission from this galaxy is due to a diffuse component and a substantial contribution from the population of discrete X-ray binary sources. A total of 22 discrete sources have been detected within the optical D25 extent of the galaxy, few of which exhibit spatial association with the globular clusters hosted by this system. Composite spectrum of the diffuse emission from this galaxy was well constrained by a thermal plasma model plus a power law component to represent the emission from unresolved sources, while that of the discrete sources was well fitted by an absorbed power law component of photon index 1.82$\\pm$0.14. X-ray color-color plot for the resolved source was used to classify the detected sources. The cumulative X-ray luminosity function of the XRBs is well represented by a power law function of index of {\\Gamma} ~ 0.82$\\pm$0.12. Optical imagery of NGC 5866 r...

  8. Excess Ionization and Soft X-ray Emission from Cooling Flow Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Oh, S P

    2004-01-01

    X-ray spectroscopy of cooling-flow clusters reveal an unexpected deficit of soft X-ray emission lines from gas at ~1/3 of the ambient plasma temperature, across a wide range of X-ray luminosities and virial temperatures. We propose excess ionization from either a population of suprathermal electrons or photoionization by X-ray continuum emission from hot gas or a central AGN as a means of decoupling the thermal state of the gas from its emission line spectrum. The former effect is thought to operate in the solar corona. Because they generally become important at some fixed fraction of the cluster gas temperature, such mechanisms could in principle explain both the universality and temperature dependence of the emission line suppression, properties which none of the present-day models based on gas heating can explain. Ultimately these models cannot explain the observations; however, they have attractive and robust features which could be useful in elucidating a final solution to the soft X-ray deficit.

  9. The Chandra planetary nebula survey (CHANPLANS). II. X-ray emission from compact planetary nebulae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, M.; Kastner, J. H. [Center for Imaging Science and Laboratory for Multiwavelength Astrophysics, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Montez, R. Jr. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Balick, B. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Frew, D. J.; De Marco, O.; Parker, Q. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Macquarie Research Centre for Astronomy, Astrophysics and Astrophotonics, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Jones, D. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Atacama, Copayapu 485, Copiapó (Chile); Miszalski, B. [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory, 7935 (South Africa); Sahai, R. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, MS 183-900, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Blackman, E.; Frank, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Chu, Y.-H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL (United States); Guerrero, M. A. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía, IAA-CSIC, Glorieta de la Astronomía s/n, Granada, E-18008 (Spain); Lopez, J. A. [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Campus Ensenada, Apdo. Postal 22860, Ensenada, B. C. (Mexico); Zijlstra, A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Bujarrabal, V. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Corradi, R. L. M. [Departamento de Astrofísica, Universidad de La Laguna, E-38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Nordhaus, J. [NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Fellow, Center for Computational Relativity and Gravitation, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); and others

    2014-10-20

    We present results from the most recent set of observations obtained as part of the Chandra X-ray observatory Planetary Nebula Survey (CHANPLANS), the first comprehensive X-ray survey of planetary nebulae (PNe) in the solar neighborhood (i.e., within ∼1.5 kpc of the Sun). The survey is designed to place constraints on the frequency of appearance and range of X-ray spectral characteristics of X-ray-emitting PN central stars and the evolutionary timescales of wind-shock-heated bubbles within PNe. CHANPLANS began with a combined Cycle 12 and archive Chandra survey of 35 PNe. CHANPLANS continued via a Chandra Cycle 14 Large Program which targeted all (24) remaining known compact (R {sub neb} ≲ 0.4 pc), young PNe that lie within ∼1.5 kpc. Results from these Cycle 14 observations include first-time X-ray detections of hot bubbles within NGC 1501, 3918, 6153, and 6369, and point sources in HbDs 1, NGC 6337, and Sp 1. The addition of the Cycle 14 results brings the overall CHANPLANS diffuse X-ray detection rate to ∼27% and the point source detection rate to ∼36%. It has become clearer that diffuse X-ray emission is associated with young (≲ 5 × 10{sup 3} yr), and likewise compact (R {sub neb} ≲ 0.15 pc), PNe with closed structures and high central electron densities (n{sub e} ≳ 1000 cm{sup –3}), and is rarely associated with PNe that show H{sub 2} emission and/or pronounced butterfly structures. Hb 5 is one such exception of a PN with a butterfly structure that hosts diffuse X-ray emission. Additionally, two of the five new diffuse X-ray detections (NGC 1501 and NGC 6369) host [WR]-type central stars, supporting the hypothesis that PNe with central stars of [WR]-type are likely to display diffuse X-ray emission.

  10. Directional X-ray and gamma emission in experiments in condensed matter nuclear science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absence of energetic particles commensurate with the energy produced in the Fleischmann-Pons experiment hinders our ability to sort out the microscopic physics involved. Models that we have studied for excess heat are based on the fractionation of the large nuclear quantum to a large number of much smaller quanta. These models predict that it should also be possible to up-convert vibrational quanta to produce nuclear excitation. Such a mechanism could produce collimated X-ray and gamma emission. Collimated X-ray emission near 1.5 keV has been reported by Karabut. Other examples of collimated X-ray and gamma emission have been described in the literature. (author)

  11. HARD X-RAY AND ULTRAVIOLET EMISSION DURING THE 2011 JUNE 7 SOLAR FLARE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between X-ray and UV emission during flares, particularly in the context of quasi-periodic pulsations, remains unclear. To address this, we study the impulsive X-ray and UV emission during an eruptive flare on 2011 June 7 utilizing X-ray imaging from RHESSI and UV 1700 Å imaging from SDO/AIA. This event is associated with quasi-periodic pulsations in X-ray and possibly UV emission, as well as substantial parallel and perpendicular motion in the hard X-ray footpoints. The motion of the footpoints parallel to the flare ribbons is unusual; it reverses direction on at least two occasions. However, there is no associated short timescale motion of the UV bright regions. Over the same time interval, the footpoints also gradually move apart at v ≈ 12 km s–1, consistent with the gradual outward expansion of the UV ribbons and the standard flare model. Additionally, we find that the locations of the brightest X-ray and UV regions are different, particularly during the early portion of the flare impulsive phase, despite their integrated emission being strongly correlated in time. Correlation analysis of measured flare properties, such as the footpoint separation, flare shear, photospheric magnetic field, and coronal reconnection rate, reveals that—in the impulsive phase—the 25-50 keV hard X-ray flux is only weakly correlated with these properties, in contrast with previous studies. We characterize this event in terms of long-term behavior, where the X-ray non-thermal, thermal, and UV emission sources appear temporally and spatially consistent, and short-term behavior, where the emission sources are inconsistent and quasi-periodic pulsations are a dominant feature requiring explanation. We suggest that the short timescale behavior of hard X-ray footpoints and the nature of the observed quasi-periodic pulsations are determined by fundamental, as yet unobserved properties of the reconnection region and particle acceleration sites. This presents a

  12. Inverse Compton X-ray emission from the superluminal quasar 3C 345

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, S. C.; Wehrle, A. E.; Urry, C. M.; Gilmore, D. M.; Barton, E. J.; Kjerulf, B. C.; Zensus, J. A.; Rabaca, C. R.

    1994-01-01

    In quasars with strong radio cores, the inverse-Compton process is believed to be the dominant source X-ray emission. For objects with parsec-scale radio jets, simple models have predicted that components in the jet emerging from the quasar nucleus generate the observed X-ray emission. We have tested this hypothesis in detail for the quasar 3C 345 using a ROSAT X-ray observation in 1990 July, together with quasi-simultaneous very long base interferometry (VLBI) imaging of the parsec-scale jet at five frequencies. The ROSAT spectrum is well fitted by a power law with index alpha = -0.96 +/- -0.13, consistent with models in which the X-ray emission results from inverse-Compton scattering of radio radiation from high-energy electrons in compact components. We show that the radio properties of brightest `knot' in the jet (`C5') can be fitted with a homogeneous sphere model whose parameters require bulk relativistic motion of the emitting material; otherwise the predicted model whose parameters require bulk relativistic motion of the emitting material; otherwise the predicted inverse-Compton X-ray emission exceeds the observed flux. If C5 is the origin of the X-ray emission, then it has a Doppler factor delta = 7.5((sup +3 sub -2)). If the nucleus or other components contribute to the X-ray emission, then this becomes a firm lower limit to delta. The inhomogeneous jet model of Koenigl is a good fit both to the barely resolved (less than 1 pc) flat-spectrum nucleus in the radio, and also to the ROSAT X-ray spectrum. The synchrotron and inverse-Compton emitting fluid moves down a narrow cone (opening angle 2 phi approximately 5 deg) nucleus relativistically, with delta approximately 4.6. Doppler factors for the nucleus and C5, derived from our ROSAT observation, provide evidence for bulk relativistic motion in the jet. By combining these constraints with well-known superluminal motion of jet components, we can deduce geometry. For epoch 1990.5 we infer the Lorentz factor

  13. REBIRTH OF X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE BORN-AGAIN PLANETARY NEBULA A30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The planetary nebula A30 is believed to have undergone a very late thermal pulse resulting in the ejection of knots of hydrogen-poor material. Using multi-epoch Hubble Space Telescope images, we have detected the angular expansion of these knots and derived an age of 850+280–150 yr. To investigate the spectral and spatial properties of the soft X-ray emission detected by ROSAT, we have obtained Chandra and XMM-Newton deep observations of A30. The X-ray emission from A30 can be separated into two components: a point source at the central star and diffuse emission associated with the hydrogen-poor knots and the cloverleaf structure inside the nebular shell. To help us assess the role of the current stellar wind in powering this X-ray emission, we have determined the stellar parameters and wind properties of the central star of A30 using a non-LTE model fit to its optical and UV spectra. The spatial distribution and spectral properties of the diffuse X-ray emission are highly suggestive that it is generated by the post-born-again and present fast stellar winds interacting with the hydrogen-poor ejecta of the born-again event. This emission can be attributed to shock-heated plasma, as the hydrogen-poor knots are ablated by the stellar winds, under which circumstances the efficient mass loading of the present fast stellar wind raises its density and damps its velocity to produce the observed diffuse soft X-rays. Charge transfer reactions between the ions of the stellar winds and material of the born-again ejecta have also been considered as a possible mechanism for the production of diffuse X-ray emission, and upper limits on the expected X-ray production by this mechanism have been derived. The origin of the X-ray emission from the central star of A30 is puzzling: shocks in the present fast stellar wind and photospheric emission can be ruled out, while the development of a new, compact hot bubble confining the fast stellar wind seems implausible.

  14. New Chandra observations of the jet in 3C273. 1. Softer X-ray than radio spectra and the X-ray emission mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The jet in 3C273 is a high-power quasar jet with radio, optical and X-ray emission whose size and brightness allow a detailed study of the emission processes acting in it. We present deep Chandra observations of this jet and analyze the spectral properties of the jet emission from radio through X-rays. We find that the X-ray spectra are significantly softer than the radio spectra in all regions of the bright part of the jet except for the first bright ''knot A'', ruling out a model in which the X-ray emission from the entire jet arises from beamed inverse-Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background photons in a single-zone jet flow. Within two-zone jet models, we find that a synchrotron origin for the jet's X-rays requires fewer additional assumptions than an inverse-Compton model, especially if velocity shear leads to efficient particle acceleration in jet flows

  15. New Chandra observations of the jet in 3C273. 1. Softer X-ray than radio spectra and the X-ray emission mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jester, Sebastian; /Fermilab; Harris, D.E.; /Smithsonian Astrophys. Observ.; Marshall, H.L.; /MIT, MKI; Meisenheimer, K.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.

    2006-05-01

    The jet in 3C273 is a high-power quasar jet with radio, optical and X-ray emission whose size and brightness allow a detailed study of the emission processes acting in it. We present deep Chandra observations of this jet and analyze the spectral properties of the jet emission from radio through X-rays. We find that the X-ray spectra are significantly softer than the radio spectra in all regions of the bright part of the jet except for the first bright ''knot A'', ruling out a model in which the X-ray emission from the entire jet arises from beamed inverse-Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background photons in a single-zone jet flow. Within two-zone jet models, we find that a synchrotron origin for the jet's X-rays requires fewer additional assumptions than an inverse-Compton model, especially if velocity shear leads to efficient particle acceleration in jet flows.

  16. New Chandra observations of the jet in 3C273. I. Softer X-ray than radio spectra and the X-ray emission mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Jester, S; Marshall, H L; Meisenheimer, K

    2006-01-01

    The jet in 3C273 is a high-power quasar jet with radio, optical and X-ray emission whose size and brightness allow a detailed study of the emission processes acting in it. We present deep Chandra observations of this jet and analyse the spectral properties of the jet emission from radio through X-rays. We find that the X-ray spectra are significantly softer than the radio spectra in all regions of the bright part of the jet except for the first bright "knot A", ruling out a model in which the X-ray emission from the entire jet arises from beamed inverse-Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background photons in a single-zone jet flow. Within two-zone jet models, we find that a synchrotron origin for the jet's X-rays requires fewer additional assumptions than an inverse-Compton model, especially if velocity shear leads to efficient particle acceleration in jet flows.

  17. Thermal and Nonthermal X-Ray Emission in SNR RCW 86

    CERN Document Server

    Borkowski, K J; Reynolds, S P; Dyer, K K

    2000-01-01

    Supernova remnants may exhibit both thermal and nonthermal X-ray emission. Such remnants can be distinguished by the weakness of their X-ray lines, because of the presence of a strong nonthermal X-ray continuum. RCW 86 is a remnant with weak lines, resulting in low and peculiar abundances when thermal models alone are used to interpret its X-ray spectrum. This indicates the presence of a strong nonthermal synchrotron continuum. We analyze ASCA X-ray spectra of RCW 86 with the help of both nonequilibrium ionization thermal models and nonthermal synchrotron models. A two-temperature thermal model and a simple nonthermal model with an exponential cutoff (plus interstellar absorption) give reasonable results. We obtain blast wave velocity of 800 km/s, the shock ionization age of 1-3x10^11 s/cm^3, and the break in nonthermal spectra at 2-4x10^16 Hz. The strength of nonthermal continuum correlates well with the radio brightness in the bright SW section of the remnant. This is convincing evidence for X-ray synchrotr...

  18. X-ray Emission from the Taffy (VV254) Galaxies and Bridge

    CERN Document Server

    Appleton, Philip; Bitsakis, Theodoros; Wang, Junfeng; Peterson, Bradley; Lisenfeld, Ute; Alatalo, Katherine; Guillard, Pierre; Boulanger, Francois; Cluver, Michelle; Gao, Yu; Helou, George; Ogle, Patrick; Struck, Curtis

    2015-01-01

    We present the first X-ray observations of the Taffy galaxies (UGC 12914/5) with the Chandra observatory, and detect soft X-ray emission in the region of the gas-rich, radio-continuum-emitting Taffy bridge. The results are compared to Herschel observations of dust and diffuse [CII] line-emitting gas. The diffuse component of the Taffy bridge has an X-ray luminosity of L(X) (0.5-8keV) =5.4 x 10^39 erg s^-1, which accounts for 19% of the luminosity of the sum for the two galaxies. The total mass in hot gas is (0.8--1.3) x 10^8 M_sun, which is approximately 1% of the total (HI~+~H2) gas mass in the bridge, and ~11% of the mass of warm molecular hydrogen discovered by Spitzer. The soft X-ray and dense CO-emitting gas in the bridge have offset distributions, with the X-rays peaking along the north-western side of the bridge in the region where stronger far-IR dust and diffuse [CII] gas is observed by Herschel. We detect nine Ultra Luminous X-ray sources (ULXs) in the system, the brightest of which is found in the ...

  19. Volume effect of laser produced plasma on X-ray emissions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V K Senecha; Y B S R Prasad; M P Kamath; A S Joshi; G S Solanki; A P Kulkarni; S Gupta; R Pareek; H C Pant

    2000-11-01

    An investigation of x-ray emission from Cu plasma produced by 1.054 m Nd:glass laser pulses of 5 ns duration, at 2 × 1012-2 × 1013 W cm-2 is reported. The x-ray emission has been studied as a function of target position with respect to the laser beam focus position. It has been observed that x-ray emissions from ns duration plasma show a volume effect similar to subnanosecond plasmas. Due to this effect the x-ray yield increases when target is moved away relative to the best focal plane of the laser beam. This result supports the theoretical model of Tallents and has also been testified independently using suitably modified theoretical model for our experimental conditions. While above result is in good agreement with similar experimental results obtained for sub-nanosecond laser produced plasmas, it differs from result claiming filamentation rather than pure geometrical effect leading to x-ray enhancement for ns plasmas.

  20. MODELING THE THERMAL DIFFUSE SOFT AND HARD X-RAY EMISSION IN M17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velazquez, P. F.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, A.; Esquivel, A. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ap. 70-543, 04510 D.F. (Mexico); Rosado, M. [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ap. 70-248, 04510 D.F. (Mexico); Reyes-Iturbide, J., E-mail: pablo@nucleares.unam.mx, E-mail: ary@nucleares.unam.mx, E-mail: esquivel@nucleares.unam.mx, E-mail: margarit@astro.unam.mx [LATO-DCET/Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, Rodovia Jorge Amado, km 16, 45662-000 Ilheus, BA (Brazil)

    2013-04-10

    We present numerical models of very young wind driven superbubbles. The parameters chosen for the simulations correspond to the particular case of the M17 nebula, but are appropriate for any young superbubble in which the wind sources have not completely dispersed their parental cloud. From the simulations, we computed the diffuse emission in the soft ([0.5-1.5] keV) and hard ([1.5-5] keV) X-ray bands. The total luminosity in our simulations agrees with the observations of Hyodo et al., about two orders of magnitude below the prediction of the standard model of Weaver et al.. The difference with respect to the standard (adiabatic) model is the inclusion of radiative cooling, which is still important in such young bubbles. We show that for this type of object the diffuse hard X-ray luminosity is significant compared to that of soft X-rays, contributing as much as 10% of the total luminosity, in contrast with more evolved bubbles where the hard X-ray emission is indeed negligible, being at least four orders of magnitude lower than the soft X-ray emission.

  1. X-ray Emission from Eta Carinae near Periastron in 2009 I: A Two State Solution

    CERN Document Server

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Russell, Christopher; Pollock, Andrew M T; Gull, Theodore R; Teodoro, Mairan; Madura, Thomas I; Damineli, Augusto; Pittard, Julian M

    2014-01-01

    X-ray emission from the supermassive binary system Eta Carinae declines sharply around periastron. This X-ray minimum has two distinct phases - the lowest flux phase in the first ~3 weeks and a brighter phase thereafter. In 2009, the Chandra X-ray Observatory monitored the first phase five times and found the lowest observed flux at ~1.9e-12 ergs cm-2 s-1 (3-8 keV). The spectral shape changed such that the hard band above ~4 keV dropped quickly at the beginning and the soft band flux gradually decreased to its lowest observed value in ~2 weeks. The hard band spectrum had begun to recover by that time. This spectral variation suggests that the shocked gas producing the hottest X-ray gas near the apex of the wind-wind collision (WWC) is blocked behind the dense inner wind of the primary star, which later occults slightly cooler gas downstream. Shocked gas previously produced by the system at earlier orbital phases is suggested to produce the faint residual X-ray emission seen when the emission near the apex is ...

  2. X-ray Emission from the Radio Jet in 3C 120

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harris, D. E.; Hjorth, J.; Sadun, A. C.;

    1999-01-01

    We report the discovery of X-ray emission from a radio knot at a projected distance of 25" from the nucleus of the Seyfert galaxy, 3C 120. The data were obtained with the ROSAT High Resolution Imager (HRI). Optical upper limits for the knot preclude a simple power law extension of the radio...... spectrum and we calculate some of the physical parameters for thermal bremsstrahlung and synchrotron self-Compton models. We conclude that no simple model is consistent with the data but if the knot contains small regions with flat spectra, these could produce the observed X-rays (via synchrotron emission...

  3. Study of x-ray emission enhancement via high contrast femtosecond laser interacting with solid foil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied the hard x-ray emission and the Kα x-ray conversion efficiency (ηK) produced by 60 fs high contrast frequency doubled Ti: sapphire laser pulse focused on Cu foil target. Cu Kα photon emission obtained with second harmonic laser pulse is more intense than the case of fundamental laser pulse. The Cu ηK shows strong dependence on laser nonlinearly skewed pulse shape and reaches the maximum value 4x10-4 with 100 fs negatively skewed pulse. It shows the electron spectrum shaping contribute to the increase of ηK. (author)

  4. An X-Ray Reprocessing Model of Disk Thermal Emission in Type 1 Seyfert Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, James

    2002-06-01

    Using a geometry consisting of a hot central Comptonizing plasma surrounded by a thin accretion disk, we model the optical through hard X-ray spectral energy distributions of the type 1 Seyfert galaxies NGC 3516 and NGC 7469. As in the model proposed by Poutanen, Krolik, & Ryde for the X-ray binary Cyg X-1 and later applied to Seyfert galaxies by Zdziarski, Lubiński, & Smith, feedback between the radiation reprocessed by the disk and the thermal Comptonization emission from the hot central plasma plays a pivotal role in determining the X-ray spectrum and, as we show, the optical and ultraviolet spectra as well. Seemingly uncorrelated optical/UV and X-ray light curves, similar to those that have been observed from these objects can, in principle, be explained by variations in the size, shape, and temperature of the Comptonizing plasma. Furthermore, by positing a disk mass accretion rate that satisfies a condition for global energy balance between the thermal Comptonization luminosity and the power available from accretion, one can predict the spectral properties of the heretofore poorly measured hard X-ray continuum above ~50 keV in type 1 Seyfert galaxies. Conversely, forthcoming measurements of the hard X-ray continuum by more sensitive hard X-ray and soft γ-ray telescopes, such as those aboard the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory, in conjunction with simultaneous optical, UV, and soft X-ray monitoring, will allow the mass accretion rates to be directly constrained for these sources in the context of this model.

  5. X-ray Emission From Eta Carinae near Periastron in 2009 I: A Two State Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Corcoran, Michael F.; Russell, Christopher; Pollock, Andrew M. T.; Gull, Theodore R.; Teodoro, Mairan; Madura, Thomas I.; Damineli, Augusto; Pittard, Julian M.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray emission from the supermassive binary system Eta Carinae declines sharply around periastron. This X-ray minimum has two distinct phases the lowest flux phase in the first 3 weeks and a brighter phase thereafter. In 2009, the Chandra X-ray Observatory monitored the first phase five times and found the lowest observed flux at 1.91012 ergs/sq cm/s (38 keV). The spectral shape changed such that the hard band above 4 keV dropped quickly at the beginning and the soft band flux gradually decreased to its lowest observed value in 2 weeks. The hard band spectrum had begun to recover by that time. This spectral variation suggests that the shocked gas producing the hottest X-ray gas near the apex of the wind-wind collision (WWC) is blocked behind the dense inner wind of the primary star, which later occults slightly cooler gas down-stream. Shocked gas previously produced by the system at earlier orbital phases is suggested to produce the faint residual X-ray emission seen when the emission near the apex is completely blocked by the primary wind. The brighter phase is probably caused by the re-appearance of the WWC plasma, whose emissivity significantly declined during the occultation. We interpret this to mean that the X-ray minimum is produced by a hybrid mechanism of an occultation and a decline in emissivity of the WWC shock. We constrain timings of superior conjunction and periastron based on these results.

  6. WEAK HARD X-RAY EMISSION FROM TWO BROAD ABSORPTION LINE QUASARS OBSERVED WITH NuSTAR: COMPTON-THICK ABSORPTION OR INTRINSIC X-RAY WEAKNESS?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) hard X-ray observations of two X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars, PG 1004+130 (radio loud) and PG 1700+518 (radio quiet). Many BAL quasars appear X-ray weak, probably due to absorption by the shielding gas between the nucleus and the accretion-disk wind. The two targets are among the optically brightest BAL quasars, yet they are known to be significantly X-ray weak at rest-frame 2-10 keV (16-120 times fainter than typical quasars). We would expect to obtain ≈400-600 hard X-ray (∼> 10 keV) photons with NuSTAR, provided that these photons are not significantly absorbed (NH ∼24 cm–2). However, both BAL quasars are only detected in the softer NuSTAR bands (e.g., 4-20 keV) but not in its harder bands (e.g., 20-30 keV), suggesting that either the shielding gas is highly Compton-thick or the two targets are intrinsically X-ray weak. We constrain the column densities for both to be NH ≈ 7 × 1024 cm–2 if the weak hard X-ray emission is caused by obscuration from the shielding gas. We discuss a few possibilities for how PG 1004+130 could have Compton-thick shielding gas without strong Fe Kα line emission; dilution from jet-linked X-ray emission is one likely explanation. We also discuss the intrinsic X-ray weakness scenario based on a coronal-quenching model relevant to the shielding gas and disk wind of BAL quasars. Motivated by our NuSTAR results, we perform a Chandra stacking analysis with the Large Bright Quasar Survey BAL quasar sample and place statistical constraints upon the fraction of intrinsically X-ray weak BAL quasars; this fraction is likely 17%-40%

  7. Weak Hard X-Ray Emission from Two Broad Absorption Line Quasars Observed with NuStar: Compton-Thick Absorption or Intrinsic X-Ray Weakness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Alexander, D. M.; Harrison, F. A.; Stern, D.; Bauer, F. E.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Comastri, A.; Craig, W. W..; Fabian, A. C.; Farrah, D.; Fiore, F.; Fuerst, F.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Hailey, C. J.; Hickox, R.; Madsen, K. K.; Matt, G.; Ogle, P.; Risaliti, G.; Saez, C.; Teng, S. H.; Walton, D. J.; Zhang, W. W.

    2013-01-01

    We present Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) hard X-ray observations of two X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars, PG 1004+130 (radio loud) and PG 1700+518 (radio quiet). Many BAL quasars appear X-ray weak, probably due to absorption by the shielding gas between the nucleus and the accretion-disk wind. The two targets are among the optically brightest BAL quasars, yet they are known to be significantly X-ray weak at rest-frame 2-10 keV (16-120 times fainter than typical quasars). We would expect to obtain approx. or equal to 400-600 hard X-ray (is greater than or equal to 10 keV) photons with NuSTAR, provided that these photons are not significantly absorbed N(sub H) is less than or equal to 10(exp24) cm(exp-2). However, both BAL quasars are only detected in the softer NuSTAR bands (e.g., 4-20 keV) but not in its harder bands (e.g., 20-30 keV), suggesting that either the shielding gas is highly Compton-thick or the two targets are intrinsically X-ray weak. We constrain the column densities for both to be N(sub H) 7 × 10(exp 24) cm(exp-2) if the weak hard X-ray emission is caused by obscuration from the shielding gas. We discuss a few possibilities for how PG 1004+130 could have Compton-thick shielding gas without strong Fe Ka line emission; dilution from jet-linked X-ray emission is one likely explanation. We also discuss the intrinsic X-ray weakness scenario based on a coronal-quenching model relevant to the shielding gas and disk wind of BAL quasars. Motivated by our NuSTAR results, we perform a Chandra stacking analysis with the Large Bright Quasar Survey BAL quasar sample and place statistical constraints upon the fraction of intrinsically X-ray weak BAL quasars; this fraction is likely 17%-40%.

  8. EVIDENCE FOR X-RAY SYNCHROTRON EMISSION FROM SIMULTANEOUS MID-INFRARED TO X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF A STRONG Sgr A* FLARE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports measurements of Sgr A* made with NACO in L' band (3.80 μm), Ks band (2.12 μm), and H band (1.66 μm), and with VISIR in N band (11.88 μm) at the ESO VLT, as well as with XMM-Newton at X-ray (2-10 keV) wavelengths. On 2007 April 4, a very bright flare was observed from Sgr A* simultaneously at L' band and X-ray wavelengths. No emission was detected using VISIR. The resulting spectral energy distribution has a blue slope (β>0 for νL ν ∝ νβ, consistent with νL ν ∝ ν0.4) between 12 μm and 3.8 μm. For the first time, our high-quality data allow a detailed comparison of infrared (IR) and X-ray light curves with a resolution of a few minutes. The IR and X-ray flares are simultaneous to within 3 minutes. However, the IR flare lasts significantly longer than the X-ray flare (both before and after the X-ray peak), and prominent substructures in the 3.8 μm light curve are clearly not seen in the X-ray data. From the shortest timescale variations in the L'-band light curve, we find that the flaring region must be no more than 1.2RS in size. The high X-ray to IR flux ratio, blue νL ν slope MIR to L' band, and the soft νL ν spectral index of the X-ray flare together place strong constraints on possible flare emission mechanisms. We find that it is quantitatively difficult to explain this bright X-ray flare with inverse Compton processes. A synchrotron emission scenario from an electron distribution with a cooling break is a more viable scenario.

  9. WEAK HARD X-RAY EMISSION FROM TWO BROAD ABSORPTION LINE QUASARS OBSERVED WITH NuSTAR: COMPTON-THICK ABSORPTION OR INTRINSIC X-RAY WEAKNESS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Alexander, D. M.; Hickox, R. [Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Harrison, F. A.; Fuerst, F.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Madsen, K. K. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stern, D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Bauer, F. E. [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Christensen, F. E. [DTU Space-National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Comastri, A. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Fabian, A. C. [Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Farrah, D. [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Fiore, F. [Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio Catone (Italy); Hailey, C. J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Matt, G. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Universita degli Studi Roma Tre, via della Vasca Navale 84, I-00146 Roma (Italy); Ogle, P. [IPAC, California Institute of Technology, Mail Code 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); and others

    2013-08-01

    We present Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) hard X-ray observations of two X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars, PG 1004+130 (radio loud) and PG 1700+518 (radio quiet). Many BAL quasars appear X-ray weak, probably due to absorption by the shielding gas between the nucleus and the accretion-disk wind. The two targets are among the optically brightest BAL quasars, yet they are known to be significantly X-ray weak at rest-frame 2-10 keV (16-120 times fainter than typical quasars). We would expect to obtain Almost-Equal-To 400-600 hard X-ray ({approx}> 10 keV) photons with NuSTAR, provided that these photons are not significantly absorbed (N{sub H} {approx}< 10{sup 24} cm{sup -2}). However, both BAL quasars are only detected in the softer NuSTAR bands (e.g., 4-20 keV) but not in its harder bands (e.g., 20-30 keV), suggesting that either the shielding gas is highly Compton-thick or the two targets are intrinsically X-ray weak. We constrain the column densities for both to be N{sub H} Almost-Equal-To 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 24} cm{sup -2} if the weak hard X-ray emission is caused by obscuration from the shielding gas. We discuss a few possibilities for how PG 1004+130 could have Compton-thick shielding gas without strong Fe K{alpha} line emission; dilution from jet-linked X-ray emission is one likely explanation. We also discuss the intrinsic X-ray weakness scenario based on a coronal-quenching model relevant to the shielding gas and disk wind of BAL quasars. Motivated by our NuSTAR results, we perform a Chandra stacking analysis with the Large Bright Quasar Survey BAL quasar sample and place statistical constraints upon the fraction of intrinsically X-ray weak BAL quasars; this fraction is likely 17%-40%.

  10. Feedback from winds and supernovae in massive stellar clusters - II. X-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, H.; Pittard, J. M.

    2014-06-01

    The X-ray emission from a simulated massive stellar cluster is investigated. The emission is calculated from a 3D hydrodynamical model which incorporates the mechanical feedback from the stellar winds of three O stars embedded in a giant molecular cloud (GMC) clump containing 3240 M⊙ of molecular material within a 4 pc radius. A simple prescription for the evolution of the stars is used, with the first supernova (SN) explosion at t = 4.4 Myr. We find that the presence of the GMC clump causes short-lived attenuation effects on the X-ray emission of the cluster. However, once most of the material has been ablated away by the winds, the remaining dense clumps do not have a noticeable effect on the attenuation compared with the assumed interstellar medium (ISM) column. We determine the evolution of the cluster X-ray luminosity, LX, and spectra, and generate synthetic images. The intrinsic X-ray luminosity drops from nearly 1034 erg s-1 while the winds are `bottled up', to a near-constant value of 1.7 × 1032 erg s-1 between t = 1 and 4 Myr. LX reduces slightly during each star's red supergiant stage due to the depressurization of the hot gas. However, LX increases to ≈1034 erg s-1 during each star's Wolf-Rayet stage. The X-ray luminosity is enhanced by two to three orders of magnitude to ˜1037 erg s-1 for at least 4600 yr after each SN explosion, at which time the blast wave leaves the grid and the X-ray luminosity drops. The X-ray luminosity of our simulation is generally considerably fainter than predicted from spherically symmetric bubble models, due to the leakage of hot gas material through gaps in the outer shell. This process reduces the pressure within our simulation and thus the X-ray emission. However, the X-ray luminosities and temperatures which we obtain are comparable to similarly powerful massive young clusters.

  11. Optimization of x-ray emission from under-critical CH foam coated gold targets by laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Wanli; Yu, Ruizhen; Zhang, Wenhai; Yang, Jiamin

    2016-08-01

    Under-critical CH foam coated gold targets benefit laser-to-x-ray emission because CH plasma inhibits gold plasma expansion, which leads to higher gold plasma density and temperature. Conversely, the CH foam partially absorbs the incident laser energy, which lowers laser absorption into the gold plasma. An analytical model is built to solve the laser collisional deposition fraction in the CH foam layer. The optimization of x-ray emission from under-critical CH foam coated gold targets by laser irradiation is obtained numerically with different CH foam densities and thicknesses. The plasma and x-ray emission properties are investigated. It is found that different CH thicknesses lead to different increase mechanisms for x-ray emission. The x-ray spectrum distributions show that most of the x-ray emission increases occur with photon energy less than 2000 eV.

  12. A search for x-ray emission from rich clusters, extended halos around clusters, and superclusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The all-sky data base acquired with the HEAO A-2 experiment was searched for X-ray emission on a variety of metagalactic size scales which were either predicted or previously detected. Results in the 0.2-60 keV energy range are presented. The optically richest clusters, including those from which a microwave decrement was observed, appear to be relatively underluminous in X-rays. Observations of Abell 576 show its luminosity to be less than earlier estimates, and moreover less than the luminosity predicted from its microwave decrement, unless the intracluster gas is a factor of approximately 10 hotter than in typical clusters. Near SCO-627 there are two X-ray sources, and the identification of the dominant source with SCO-627 is probably incorrect. New spectral observations of Abell 401 and 2147, possible superclusters, reveal that they have typical cluster spectra with iron line emission

  13. Soft X-ray emission during application of lower hybrid waves on JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report, we study the local variation of the integrated X-ray emission between various photon energy ranges corresponding to a Si(Li) diode, when fast electrons are induced by lower hybrid waves. Carbon, oxygen, iron and nickel impurities are considered. The modification of the charge equilibrium of the plasma by fast electrons within the corona model is investigated, and the consequences on the radiated power discussed. Corrections due to multi-ionization and impurity transport are evaluated. The difference of the emitted X-ray power per ion between a maxwellian and a suprathermal distribution can yield also to a significant variation of the integrated X-ray emission. This effect is evaluated for various situations of suprathermal distributions and electronic temperatures. Some simple accomodations of existing diagnostic in JET are then proposed, in order to diagnose the fast electron tail

  14. X-ray emission and dynamics from large diameter superbubbles: The case of N 70 superbubble

    CERN Document Server

    Rodríguez-González, Ary; Rosado, Margarita; Esquivel, Alejandro; Reyes-Iturbide, Jorge; Toledo-Roy, J Claudio

    2011-01-01

    The morphology, dynamics and thermal X-ray emission of the superbubble N70 is studied by means of 3D hydrodynamical simulations, carried out with the {\\sc{yguaz\\'u-a}} code. We have considered different scenarios: the superbubble being the product of a single supernova remnant, of the stellar winds from an OB association, or the result of the joint action of stellar winds and a supernova event. Our results show that, in spite that all scenarios produce bubbles with the observed physical size, only those where the bubble is driven by stellar winds and a SN event are successful to explain the general morphology, dynamics and the X-ray luminosity of N70. Our models predict temperatures in excess of $10^8 \\mathrm{K}$ at the interior of the superbubble, however the density is too low and the emission in thermal X-ray above $2 \\mathrm{keV}$ is too faint to be detected.

  15. Multireference X-Ray Emission and Absorption Spectroscopy calculations from Monte Carlo Configuration Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Coe, J P

    2015-01-01

    We adapt the method of Monte Carlo configuration interaction to calculate core-hole states and use this for the computation of X-ray emission and absorption values. We consider CO, CH$_{4}$, NH$_{3}$, H$_{2}$O, HF, HCN, CH$_{3}$OH, CH$_{3}$F, HCl and NO using a 6-311G** basis. We also look at carbon monoxide with a stretched geometry and discuss the dependence of its results on the cutoff used. The Monte Carlo configuration interaction results are compared with EOM-CCSD values for X-ray emission and with experiment for X-ray absorption. Oscillator strengths are also computed and we quantify the multireference nature of the wavefunctions to suggest when approaches based on a single reference would be expected to be successful.

  16. Obtaining attosecond X-ray pulses using a self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a technique for the generation of a solitary attosecond X-ray pulse in a free electron laser (FEL), via a process of self-amplified spontaneous emission. In this method, electrons experience an energy modulation upon interacting with laser pulses having a duration of a few cycles within single-period wiggler magnets. Two consecutive modulation sections, followed by compression in a dispersive section, are used to obtain a single, sub-femtosecond spike in the electron peak current. This region of the electron beam experiences an enhanced growth rate for FEL amplification. After propagation through a long undulator,this current spike emits a ∼250 attosecond X-ray pulse whose intensity dominates the X-ray emission from the rest of the electron bunch

  17. Experimental study of X-ray emission in laser-cluster interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rare gas cluster jets are an intermediate medium between solid and gas targets. Laser-cluster jets interaction may generate a great number of energetic particles as X-rays, UV, high harmonics, ions, electrons and neutrons. To understand all the mechanisms involved in such an interaction we need to make a complete study of individual cluster response to an ultra-short laser pulse. We studied the laser interaction with our argon cluster gas jet, which is well characterized in cluster size and density, to enlarge the knowledge of this interaction. We measured absorption, heating and X-ray emission spectra versus laser parameters and clusters size (∼ 15-30 nm). We show that there is a strong refraction effect on laser propagation due to the residual gas density. This effect was confirmed by laser propagation simulation with a cylindrical 2-dimensional particle code WAKE. The role played by refraction was to limit maximum laser intensity on the focal spot and to increase interaction volume. By this way, X-ray emission was observed with laser intensity not so far from the ionization threshold (few 1014 W.cm-2). We also studied plasma expansion both at cluster scale and focal volume scale and deduced the deposited energy distribution as a function of time. Thanks to a simple hydrodynamic model, we used these results to study cluster expansion. X-ray emission is then simulated by TRANSPEC code in order to reproduce X-ray spectra and duration. Those results revealed an extremely brief X-ray emission consistent with a preliminary measure by streak camera (on ps scale). (author)

  18. The Physical Conditions of the X-ray Emission Line Regions in the Circinus Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Sako, M; Paerels, F B S; Liedahl, D A; Sako, Masao; Kahn, Steven M.; Paerels, Frits; Liedahl, Duane A.

    2000-01-01

    We present a detailed X-ray spectral analysis of the Circinus Galaxy using archival data obtained with the ASCA satellite. The spectrum shows numerous emission lines in the soft X-ray band from highly ionized ions, as well as Compton reflection and fluorescent lines from neutral or near-neutral matter. We analyze the spectrum in the context of a self-consistent recombination cascade model and find that a nearly flat differential emission measure (DEM) distribution in ionization parameter fits the data. For a fixed solid angle distribution of matter surrounding a point source, this corresponds to a run of electron density of the form, n(r) ~ r^(-3/2), which is suggestive of Bondi accretion onto a central compact mass. Using this density profile and comparing the resulting emission spectra with the ASCA data, the size of the X-ray emission line region is estimated to be < 1 kpc. We also show that the derived density as a function of radius is compatible with the X-ray recombination line emission region being...

  19. θ Car: X-ray Emission from Low Density Radiation-Driven Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle (Mizusawa), Trisha; Petit, Veronique; Held Cohen, David; Fullerton, Alexander W.; Gagne, Marc; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Li, Zequn; Owocki, Stanley P.; Sundqvist, Jon; Wade, Gregg

    2016-01-01

    We present Chandra X-ray grating spectroscopy (and IUE spectroscopy) of the B0.2 V star, θ Carina. θ Car is in a critical transition region between the earliest B stars and the latest O stars, where the density of the wind is observed to decrease more than theoretically expected. In general, X-ray emission in this low-density wind regime should be less prominent, but observations have shown that there is a higher than expected production of X-ray emission from the winds of these stars; this severely challenges predictions of radiatively driven wind theory. We measure the f/i ratio, widths, and velocities of several Helium-like lines in the X-ray spectrum. The f/i ratio is a diagnostic of the radial location of the X-ray emitting plasma, which is sensitive to the specific transition of each He-like ion. We use θ Car to study the radiatively-driven mass-loss of early B-type stars.

  20. The Sun's X-ray Emission During the Recent Solar Minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylwester, Janusz; Kowalinski, Mirek; Gburek, Szymon; Siarkowski, Marek; Kuzin, Sergey; Farnik, Frantisek; Reale, Fabio; Phillips, Kenneth J. H.

    2010-02-01

    The Sun recently underwent a period of a remarkable lack of major activity such as large flares and sunspots, without equal since the advent of the space age a half century ago. A widely used measure of solar activity is the amount of solar soft X-ray emission, but until recently this has been below the threshold of the X-ray-monitoring Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES). There is thus an urgent need for more sensitive instrumentation to record solar X-ray emission in this range. Anticipating this need, a highly sensitive spectrophotometer called Solar Photometer in X-rays (SphinX) was included in the solar telescope/spectrometer TESIS instrument package on the third spacecraft in Russia's Complex Orbital Observations Near-Earth of Activity of the Sun (CORONAS-PHOTON) program, launched 30 January 2009 into a near-polar orbit. SphinX measures X-rays in a band similar to the GOES longer-wavelength channel.

  1. Development of an X-ray tube for irradiation experiments using a field emission electron gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hidetoshi; O`Rourke, Brian E.; Suzuki, Ryoichi; Wang, Jiayu; Ooi, Takashi; Nakajima, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    A new X-ray tube using a ring-shaped emitter as a field emission electron source has been developed. By using a ring shaped cathode, X-rays can be extracted along the axial direction through the central hole. This cylindrically symmetrical design allows for the tube to be arranged in the axial direction with the high voltage target at one end and the X-ray beam at the other. The newly developed X-ray tube can operate at a tube voltage of more than 100 kV and at a tube current of more than 4 mA, and can be used for irradiation experiments with an irradiation dose range from mGy up to kGy. The X-ray tube can be used immediately after turning on (i.e. there is no stand-by time). In the experimental model, we demonstrated stable electron emission at a tube voltage of 100 kV and at a tube current of 4 mA during a 560 h continuous test.

  2. X-ray Emission from Hot Bubbles in nebulae around Evolved Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toalá Sánz, Jesús Alberto

    This thesis presents an observational and numerical study on the X-ray emission related to the formation and evolution from hot bubbles in nebulae around evolved stars. The observational part of this study consists mainly in observations obtained from the X-ray satellites X-ray Multi Mirror Mission (XMM-Newton) and Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO). We have made use of optical, infrared, and ultraviolet observations that have complemented our results and analysis. These observations have allowed us to study the Wolf-Rayet (WR) nebulae S 308 and NGC 6888 and that around the WR star WR 16. We have also studied the planetary nebulae (PNe) NGC 6543 and Abell 78 (A 78). The X-ray telescopes, XMM-Newton and CXO, have allowed us to study the distribution and physical characteristics of the hot and diffuse gas in the WR nebulae S 308 and NGC 6888 with exquisite detail. Even though the CXO observations do not map entirely NGC 6888, we are able to estimate global parameters of the X-ray emission making use of ROSAT observations. Previous observations performed with were hampered by Suzaku, ROSAT, and ASCA were hampered by a large number of point sources in the line of sight of the nebulae. S 308 was observed with XMM-Newton with four pointings. We have made use of the most up-to-date tools for the analysis of soft and diffuse X-ray emission (the ESAS tasks). We found that in both nebulae the hot gas has a plasma temperature of 1-1.5×10^6 K and it is delineated by the [O III] emission and not the Hα as stated in previous studies. A notable difference between these two WR nebulae is that S 308 has a limb-brightened morphology in the distribution of its hot gas, while NGC 6888 displays three maxima. We have studied the WR nebula around WR 16 with archived XMM-Newton observations. Even though it was expected that diffuse X-ray emission should be detected from a spherical, non-disrupted WR nebula, by comparison with S 308 and NGC 6888, we are not able to detect such emission

  3. Chandra X-ray Grating Spectrometry of Eta Carinae near X-ray Minimum: I. Variability of the Sulfur and Silicon Emission Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Henley, D B; Pittard, J M; Stevens, I R; Hamaguchi, K; Gull, T R

    2008-01-01

    We report on variations in important X-ray emission lines in a series of Chandra grating spectra of the supermassive colliding wind binary star Eta Carinae, including key phases around the X-ray minimum/periastron passage in 2003.5. The X-rays arise from the collision of the slow, dense wind of Eta Car with the fast, low-density wind of an otherwise hidden companion star. The X-ray emission lines provide the only direct measure of the flow dynamics of the companion's wind along the wind-wind collision zone. We concentrate here on the silicon and sulfur lines, which are the strongest and best resolved lines in the X-ray spectra. Most of the line profiles can be adequately fit with symmetric Gaussians with little significant skewness. Both the silicon and sulfur lines show significant velocity shifts and correlated increases in line widths through the observations. The R = forbidden-to-intercombination ratio from the Si XIII and S XV triplets is near or above the low-density limit in all observations, suggestin...

  4. Modeling the thermal X-ray emission around the Galactic center from colliding stellar winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post Russell, Christopher Michael; Wang, Daniel; Cuadra, Jorge

    2016-04-01

    The Galactic center is a hotbed of astrophysical activity. Powering these processes is the injection of wind material from ˜30 massive Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars orbiting within 12” of the super-massive black hole (SMBH). Hydrodynamic simulations of such colliding and accreting winds produce a complex density and temperature structure of cold wind material shocking with the ambient medium, creating a large reservoir of hot, X-ray-emitting gas. A Chandra X-ray Visionary Program that observed the Galactic center for 3 Ms resolved this diffuse emission. This work computes the X-ray emission from these hydrodynamic simulations of the WR winds with the aim of reproducing the Chandra observations, amid exploring a variety of SMBH feedback mechanisms. The success of the model is the spectrum from the 2”-5” ring around the SMBH matches the shape of the observed spectrum very well. This naturally explains that the hot gas comes from colliding WR winds, and that the winds speeds of these stars are in general well constrained. The model flux in this ring and over the ±6” images of 4-9keV is ˜2.2× lower than the observations, with stronger feedback mechanisms leading to weaker X-ray emission since more hot, X-ray-emitting gas is cleared from the spherical r simulation volume. Possible improvements to rectify this flux discrepancy are increasing the mass loss rates of the WRs and/or adding more gas into the simulation, such as from the O stars and their winds, so the adiabatic WR shocks occur closer to their stars, thereby becoming brighter in X-rays.

  5. X-ray fluorescence method in analyzing forest fire emission elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Composition of aerosols from large taiga forest fires was investigated using an X-ray fluorescence method that involves excitation of the characteristic spectrum by synchrotron radiation. Emissions were sampled directly from the convection column with the help of various instruments (including an impactor) mounted on a helicopter. We compared the results of the study with literature data

  6. The application of proton induced X-ray emission in criminalistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination method of trace elements in high pure gold by proton induced X-ray emission is reported. The target preparation, design of physical experiment, data proceeding and the analysis of gold samples by the internal standard of single-standard are discussed. Using this determination method, the identification of a sample of high pure gold is performed

  7. 14th International Conference on Particle Induced X-ray Emission ("PIXE 2015")

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybyłowicz, Wojciech Józef; Pineda-Vargas, Carlos

    2015-11-01

    This special issue of Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research B contains the proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Particle Induced X-ray Emission ("PIXE 2015") that was held in Somerset West (South Africa) from 25th February to 3rd March 2015.

  8. THE MULTIELEMENTAL ANALYSIS OF DRINKING WATER USING PROTON-INDUCED X-RAY EMISSION (PIXE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new, rapid, and economical method for the multielemental analysis of drinking water samples is described. The concentrations of 76 elements heavier than aluminum are determined using proton-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) technology. The concentration of sodium is evaluated using...

  9. Electron beam - plasma system with the return current and directivity of its X-ray emission

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Karlický, Marian; Kašparová, Jana

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 506, č. 3 (2009), s. 1437-1443. ISSN 0004-6361 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300030701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : solar flares * particle emission * X-rays Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.179, year: 2009

  10. X ray emission from Wolf-Rayet stars with recurrent dust formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawley, Gayle L.

    1993-01-01

    We were granted a ROSAT observation of the Wolf-Rayet star WR 137 (equals HD 192641) to test a proposed mechanism for producing the infrared variability reported by Williams et al. (1987). These studies showed one clear infrared outburst preceded by what may be the dimming of a previous outburst. The recurrent dust formation model was put forward by Williams et al. (1990) to account for similar variability seen in WR 140, which varies in both the infrared and X-ray bands. The detected X-ray flux from WR 140 was observed to decrease from its normally high (for Wolf-Rayet stars) level as the infrared flux increased. Observation of two apparently-periodic infrared outbursts led to the hypothesis that WR 140 had an O star companion in an eccentric orbit, and that the increase in infrared flux came from a dust formation episode triggered by the compression of the O star and Wolf-Rayet star winds. The absorption of the X-rays by the increased material explained the decrease in flux at those wavelengths. If the infrared variability in WR 137 were caused by a similar interaction of the Wolf-Rayet star with a companion, we might expect that WR 137 would show corresponding X-ray variability and an X-ray luminosity somewhat higher than typical WC stars, as well as a phase-dependent non-thermal X-ray spectrum. Our goals in this study were to obtain luminosity estimates from our counting rates for comparison with previous observations of WR 137 and other WC class stars, especially WR 140; to compare the luminosity with the IR lightcurve; and to characterize the spectral shape of the X-ray emission, including the column density.

  11. Soft X-ray Emission from the Spiral Galaxy NGC 1313

    OpenAIRE

    Colbert, E. J. M.; Petre, R.; Schlegel, E. M.; Ryder, S.D.

    1995-01-01

    The nearby barred spiral galaxy NGC 1313 has been observed with the PSPC instr- ument on board the ROSAT X-ray satellite. Ten individual sources are found. Three sources (X-1, X-2 and X-3 [SN~1978K]) are very bright (~10^40 erg/s) and are unusual in that analogous objects do not exist in our Galaxy. We present an X-ray image of NGC~1313 and \\xray spectra for the three bright sources. The emission from the nuclear region (R ~< 2 kpc) is dominated by source X-1, which is located ~1 kpc north of...

  12. Trace element analysis in liquids by proton induced x-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton induced x-ray emission (PIXE) from liquid has been developed for quantitative and simultaneous analysis of trace elements. Liquid drops and trickles are bombarded at atmospheric pressure, x-rays are detected in a non dispersive Si(Li) solid state detector. Absolute determinations are made by comparison with standard solutions. Detection limits in a 5 minutes run are in the ppm range for a single drop (0.05 ml). The application of this technique to the determination of trace elements in biological liquids is investigated (Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, in plant extracts, haemocyanine, albumins...). (author)

  13. 3C 33: another case of photoionized soft X-ray emission in radio galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Torresi, E.; Grandi, P; Guainazzi, M.; Palumbo, G. G. C.; Ponti, G; Bianchi, S.

    2009-01-01

    All the observations available in the Chandra and XMM-Newton archives have been used to investigate the X-ray spectral properties of 3C 33. In this paper is presented a complete X-ray analysis of the nuclear emission of this narrow line radio galaxy. The broad band spectrum of 3C 33 is complex. The hard part resembles that of Seyfert 2 galaxies, with a heavily obscured nuclear continuum (N_H~10^23 cm^-2) and a prominent Fe Kalpha line. This represents the nuclear radiation directly observed i...

  14. First Observation of Planet-Induced X-ray Emission: The System HD 179949

    OpenAIRE

    Saar, S. H.; Cuntz, M.; Kashyap, V. L.; Hall, J. C.

    2007-01-01

    We present the first observation of planet-induced stellar X-ray activity, identified for the HD 179949 system, using Chandra / ACIS-S. The HD 179949 system consists of a close-in giant planet orbiting an F9V star. Previous ground-based observations already showed enhancements in Ca II K in phase with the planetary orbit. We find an ~30% increase in the X-ray flux over quiescent levels coincident with the phase of the Ca II enhancements. There is also a trend for the emission to be hotter at ...

  15. Grazing-emission X-ray fluorescence spectrometry: principles and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bokx, P.K. de; Kok, C.; Bailleul, A.; Wiener, G.; Urbach, H.P. [Philips Research Labs., Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    1997-06-20

    In grazing emission X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (GEXRF), the sample is irradiated at approximately normal incidence, and only that part of fluorescence radiation is detected that is emitted at grazing angles. This configuration allows the use of wavelength-dispersive detection. This type of detection has the advantages of substantially better energy resolution at longer wavelengths (light elements, L and M lines of heavier elements) and a much larger dynamic range than the energy-dispersive detectors currently used in grazing X-ray techniques. Typical examples are presented of applications that are made possible by this new technique. (Author).

  16. Charge-transfer induced EUV and soft X-ray emissions in the heliosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Koutroumpa, Dimitra; Lallement, Rosine; Kharchenko, V.; Dalgarno, A.; Pepino, R.; Izmodenov, V.; Quémerais, Eric

    2006-01-01

    We study the EUV/soft X-ray emission generated by charge transfer between solar wind heavy ions and interstellar neutral atoms and variations of the X-ray intensities and spectra with the line of sight direction, the observer location, the solar cycle phase and the solar wind anisotropies, and a temporary enhancement of the solar wind similar to the event observed by Snowden et al. (2004) during the XMM-Hubble Deep Field North exposure. Methods.Using recent observations of the neutral atoms c...

  17. X-ray fluorescence analysis and optical emission spectrometry of an roman mirror from Tomis, Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The miscellaneous population of Roman Empire, their diverse cultural tradition, their ability to assimilate the roman civilization spirits, had determined a permanent reassessment superimposed upon the roman contribution. Analysis was undertaken using optical emission spectrometry and non-destructive X-ray fluorescence. X-ray fluorescence analysis is a well-established method and is often used in archaeometry and other work dealing with valuable objects pertaining to the history of art and civilization. Roman mirror analysed has been found not to be made of speculum (a high tin bronze). (authors)

  18. Linac-based, intense, coherent x-ray source using self-amplified spontaneous emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article, the author discusses the principles of self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), how the SASE could be the basis of next generation light sources exceeding the current performance -- by many orders of magnitude in spectral brightness, and by a factor of a hundred in time resolution. He also discusses how the SLAC linac, due to its high energy and its precision control, is ideally suited for the x-ray SASE. Therefore, using the SLAC linac for generation of x-ray SASE for the frontier of the photon sciences will ensure that the SLAC linac remain scientifically vigorous for a long time

  19. Charge-exchange-driven X-ray emission from highly ionized plasma jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosmej, F.B. [Universite de Provence et CNRS UMR 6633, Centre de St Jerome, 13 - Marseille (France); Lisitsa, V.S. [Russian Research Center Kurchatov, Moscow (Russian Federation); Schott, R.; Dalimier, E. [Paris-6 Univ., 75 - Paris (France); Schott, R.; Dalimier, E. [Ecole Polytechnique, LULI, 91 - Palaiseau (France); Riley, D.; Delserieys, A. [Queens Univ., Belfast (United Kingdom); Renner, O.; Krousky, E. [Institute of Physics, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2006-12-15

    The interaction of highly ionized laser-produced plasma jets with gases has been studied with X-ray microscopic methods. Simultaneous high spectral and 2-dimensional spatial resolution provided a detailed topological structure of the counter-propagating plasma and discovered a gas pressure-dependent X-ray emission structure inside the jets of H-like and He-like aluminum ions. At larger distances from the target, anomalous high (3 orders of magnitude) intensities of Li-like intercombination transitions from double excited states have been identified. Charge-exchange-driven cascading in autoionizing states is proposed to explain the experimental findings. (authors)

  20. EFFECT OF METALLICITY ON X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE WARM-HOT INTERGALACTIC MEDIUM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrodynamic simulations predict that a significant fraction of the gas in the current universe is in the form of high temperature, highly ionized plasma emitting and absorbing primarily in the soft X-ray and UV bands, dubbed the warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM). Its signature should be observable in redshifted emission and absorption lines from highly ionized elements. To determine the expected WHIM emission in the soft X-ray band we used the output of a large scale smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulation to generate images and spectra with angular resolution of 14'' and energy resolution of 1 eV. The current biggest limit of any hydrodynamic simulation in predicting the X-ray emission comes from metal diffusion. In our investigation, by using four different models for the WHIM metallicity we have found a strong dependence of the emission on the model used, with differences up to almost an order of magnitude. For each model, we have investigated the redshift distribution and angular scale of the emission, confirming that most photons come from redshift z < 1.2 and that the emission has a typical angular scale of less than a few arcminutes. We also compared our simulations with the few currently available observations and found that, within the variation of the metallicity models, our predictions are in good agreement with current constraints on the WHIM emission, and at this time the weak experimental constraints on the WHIM emission are not sufficient to exclude any of the models used.

  1. Chandra X-ray Grating Spectrometry of Eta Carinae near X-ray Minimum: I. Variability of the Sulfur and Silicon Emission Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, D. B.; Corcoran, M. F.; Pittard, J. M.; Stevens, I. R.; Hamaguchi, K.; Gull, T. R.

    2008-01-01

    We report on variations in important X-ray emission lines in a series of Chandra grating spectra of the supermassive colliding wind binary star eta Car, including key phases around the X-ray minimum/periastron passage in 2003.5. The X-rays arise from the collision of the slow, dense wind of eta Car with the fast, low-density wind of an otherwise hidden companion star. The X-ray emission lines provide the only direct measure of the flow dynamics of the companion's wind along the wind-wind collision zone. We concentrate here on the silicon and sulfur lines, which are the strongest and best resolved lines in the X-ray spectra. Most of the line profiles can be adequately fit with symmetric Gaussians with little significant skewness. Both the silicon and sulfur lines show significant velocity shifts and correlated increases in line widths through the observations. The R = forbidden-to-intercombination ratio from the Si XIII and S XV triplets is near or above the low-density limit in all observations, suggesting that the line-forming region is > 1.6 stellar radii from the companion star, and that the emitting plasma may be in a non-equilibrium state. We show that simple geometrical models cannot simultaneously fit both the observed centroid variations and changes in line width as a function of phase. We show that the observed profiles can be fitted with synthetic profiles with a reasonable model of the emissivity along the wind-wind collision boundary. We use this analysis to help constrain the line formation region as a function of orbital phase, and the orbital geometry. Subject headings: X-rays: stars -stars: early-type-stars: individual (q Car)

  2. Distribution of X-ray Emission from Jet Knots of 3C273

    CERN Document Server

    Bannikova, E Yu

    2007-01-01

    The jet of the quasar 3C273 is observed at different spectral bands. This jet has a knot structure. Jet radiation in radio and optical bands are connected with synchrotron mechanism, while the emission mechanism producing the X-rays is controversial. We suppose that the X-rays observed for two knots nearest to the quasar can originate from the inverse Compton scattering of external source radiation on relativistic electrons. But in the jet region with constant low X-ray intensity the inverse Compton scattering on cosmic microwave background photons (IC/CMB) is essential because the energy density of external source decreases. Upon this scenario the constraints on the angle between the jet axis and line sight values have been obtained. Also, some physical parameters for two nearest knots of the jet of 3C273 have been estimated.

  3. X-RAY EMISSION FROM SUPERNOVAE IN DENSE CIRCUMSTELLAR MATTER ENVIRONMENTS: A SEARCH FOR COLLISIONLESS SHOCKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ofek, E. O.; Gal-Yam, A.; Yaron, O.; Arcavi, I. [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovot (Israel); Fox, D. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Cenko, S. B.; Filippenko, A. V.; Bloom, J. S. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Sullivan, M. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Gnat, O. [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 91904 Jerusalem (Israel); Frail, D. A. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Horesh, A.; Kulkarni, S. R. [Division of Physics, Mathematics, and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Corsi, A. [LIGO Laboratory, Division of Physics, California Institute of Technology, MS 100-36, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Quimby, R. M. [Kavli IPMU, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa-shi, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Gehrels, N. [NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Nugent, P. E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kasliwal, M. M. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Bildsten, L. [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kohn Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Poznanski, D. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); and others

    2013-01-20

    The optical light curve of some supernovae (SNe) may be powered by the outward diffusion of the energy deposited by the explosion shock (the so-called shock breakout) in optically thick ({tau} {approx}> 30) circumstellar matter (CSM). Recently, it was shown that the radiation-mediated and radiation-dominated shock in an optically thick wind must transform into a collisionless shock and can produce hard X-rays. The X-rays are expected to peak at late times, relative to maximum visible light. Here we report on a search, using Swift/XRT and Chandra, for X-ray emission from 28 SNe that belong to classes whose progenitors are suspected to be embedded in dense CSM. Our sample includes 19 Type IIn SNe, one Type Ibn SN, and eight hydrogen-poor superluminous SNe (SLSN-I such as SN 2005ap). Two SNe (SN 2006jc and SN 2010jl) have X-ray properties that are roughly consistent with the expectation for X-rays from a collisionless shock in optically thick CSM. However, the X-ray emission from SN 2006jc can also be explained as originating in an optically thin region. Thus, we propose that the optical light curve of SN 2010jl is powered by shock breakout in CSM. We suggest that two other events (SN 2010al and SN 2011ht) were too X-ray bright during the SN maximum optical light to be explained by the shock-breakout model. We conclude that the light curves of some, but not all, SNe IIn/Ibn are powered by shock breakout in CSM. For the rest of the SNe in our sample, including all of the SLSN-I events, our X-ray limits are not deep enough and were typically obtained too early (i.e., near the SN maximum light) for definitive conclusions about their nature. Late-time X-ray observations are required in order to further test whether these SNe are indeed embedded in dense CSM. We review the conditions required for a shock breakout in a wind profile. We argue that the timescale, relative to maximum light, for the SN to peak in X-rays is a probe of the column density and the density profile

  4. Fabrication and Simulation of Self-Focusing Field Emission X-ray Tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Cheng

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A self-focusing field emission (FE X-ray tube with a large-area cathode design was simulated and fabricated. The designed X-ray tube had a cylindrically symmetric geometry; the diameter of the cathode and the anode was 15 mm, and the cathode-anode distance was 20 mm. Owing to the unique cup-shaped design of the cathode, the electron beam emitted from the large-area cathode was focused onto the anode without using magnetic lenses or extra biased electrodes. Carbon nanocoils, which were grown on the bottom of the circular cup-shaped cathode, were used as electron emitters because of their excellent FE properties. A simulation of the electron trajectories for various cup heights revealed that the optimal focal spot size (0.1 mm was obtained at a cup height of 5 mm when a voltage of 50 kV was applied. To verify this result, an X-ray tube was fabricated and tested. An X-ray photograph of the tested tooth and electric circuits showed good resolution and X-ray intensity. The large cathode area effectively reduces the current density and thereby improves the lifetime of the cathode.

  5. The origin of the puzzling hard X-ray emission of $\\gamma$ Cassiopeiae

    CERN Document Server

    Motch, Christian; Smith, Myron A

    2015-01-01

    Massive B and Be stars produce X-rays from shocks in high velocity winds with temperatures of a few million degrees and maximum X-ray luminosities of $\\approx$ 10$^{31}$ erg/s. Surprisingly, a sub-group of early Be stars exhibits > 20 times hotter X-ray temperatures and > 10 times higher X-ray luminosities than normal. This group of Be stars, dubbed Gamma-Cas analogs, contains about 10 known objects. The origin of this bizarre behavior has been extensively debated in the past decades. Two mechanisms have been put forward, accretion of circumstellar disk matter onto an orbiting white dwarf, or magnetic field interaction between the star and the circumstellar disk (Smith & Robinson 1999). We show here that the X-ray and optical emissions of the prototype of the class, Gamma-Cas, are very well correlated on year time scales with no significant time delay. Since the expected migration time from internal disk regions that emit most of the optical flux to the orbit of the companion star is of several years, the...

  6. Supernova Remnants in the Sedov Expansion Phase Thermal X-Ray Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Borkowski, K J; Reynolds, S P

    2001-01-01

    Improved calculations of X-ray spectra for supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Sedov-Taylor phase are reported, which for the first time include reliable atomic data for Fe L-shell lines. This new set of Sedov models also allows for a partial collisionless heating of electrons at the blast wave and for energy transfer from ions to electrons through Coulomb collisions. X-ray emission calculations are based on the updated Hamilton-Sarazin spectral model. The calculated X-ray spectra are succesfully interpreted in terms of three distribution functions: the electron temperature and ionization timescale distributions, and the ionization timescale averaged electron temperature distribution. The comparison of Sedov models with a frequently used single nonequilibrium ionization (NEI) timescale model reveals that this simple model is generally not an appropriate approximation to X-ray spectra of SNRs. We find instead that plane-parallel shocks provide a useful approximation to X-ray spectra of SNRs, particularly for youn...

  7. DISCOVERY OF X-RAY EMISSION IN THE OLD CLASSICAL NOVA DK LACERTAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the discovery of X-ray emission at the position of the old classical nova DK Lacertae using the Swift satellite. Three observations were conducted using the X-Ray Telescope 62 years after the discovery of the nova, yielding 46 source signals in an exposure time of 4.8 ks. A background-subtracted count rate was 9 ± 2 × 10–3 counts s–1, corresponding to a detection significance level of 5σ. The X-ray spectrum was characterized by a continuum extending up to about 7 keV, which can be modeled by a power-law component with a photon index of 1.4-5.6, or by a thermal bremsstrahlung component with a temperature of 0.7-13.3 keV, convolved with interstellar absorption with an equivalent hydrogen column density of 0.3-2.4 × 1022 cm–2. Assuming a distance of 3900 pc to the source, the luminosity was 1032-1034 erg s–1 in the 0.3-10 keV energy band. The origin of X-rays is considered to be either mass accretion on the white dwarf or adiabatic shocks in nova ejecta, with the former appearing much more likely. In either case, DK Lacertae represents a rare addition to the exclusive club of X-ray emitting old novae.

  8. Correlation of hard X-ray and white light emission in solar flares

    CERN Document Server

    Kuhar, Matej; Oliveros, Juan Carlos Martínez; Battaglia, Marina; Kleint, Lucia; Casadei, Diego; Hudson, Hugh S

    2015-01-01

    A statistical study of the correlation between hard X-ray and white light emission in solar flares is performed in order to search for a link between flare-accelerated electrons and white light formation. We analyze 43 flares spanning GOES classes M and X using observations from RHESSI (Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager) and HMI (Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager). We calculate X-ray fluxes at 30 keV and white light fluxes at 6173 \\r{A} summed over the hard X-ray flare ribbons with an integration time of 45 seconds around the peak hard-X ray time. We find a good correlation between hard X-ray fluxes and excess white light fluxes, with a highest correlation coefficient of 0.68 for photons with energy of 30 keV. Assuming the thick target model, a similar correlation is found between the deposited power by flare-accelerated electrons and the white light fluxes. The correlation coefficient is found to be largest for energy deposition by electrons above ~50 keV. At higher electron energies the co...

  9. X-RAY AND TeV EMISSIONS FROM HIGH-FREQUENCY-PEAKED BL LAC OBJECTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The majority of the extragalactic sources yet detected at TeV photon energies belong to the class of 'high-frequency-peaked BL Lac objects' (HBLs) that exhibit a spectral energy distribution with a lower peak in the X-ray band. Such spectra are well described in terms of a log-parabolic shape with considerable curvature, and widely interpreted as synchrotron emission from ultrarelativistic electrons outflowing in a relativistic jet; these are expected to radiate also in γ-rays through the inverse Compton process. Recently, we have compared the X-ray spectral parameter distributions of TeV detected HBLs (TBLs) with those undetected (UBLs), and found that the distributions of the peak energies Ep are similarly symmetric around a value of a few keVs for both subclasses, while the X-ray spectra are broader for TBLs than for UBLs. Here we propose an acceleration scenario to interpret both the Ep and the spectral curvature distributions in terms of a coherent and a stochastic acceleration mechanisms, respectively. We show how the curvature parameter b ≅ 0.3-0.7 of the synchrotron X-rays, which depends only on the latter acceleration component, can be related to the inverse Compton luminosity in γ-rays, thus introducing a link between the X-ray and the TeV observations of HBLs.

  10. Multiplexing radiography based on carbon nanotube field emission X-ray technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Yang, G.; Lee, Y.; Chang, S.; Lu, J. P.; Zhou, O.

    2007-03-01

    State-of-the-art tomographic imaging technique is based upon of simple serial imaging scheme. The tomographic scanners collect the projection images sequentially in the time domain, by a step-and-shoot process using a single-pixel x-ray source. The inefficient serial data collection scheme severely limits the data collection speed, which is critical for imaging of objects in rapid motion such as for diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases, CT fluoroscopy, and airport luggage inspection. Further improvement of the speed demands an increasingly high x-ray peak workload and gantry rotation speed, both of which have approached the engineering limits. Multiplexing technique, which has been widely adopted in communication devices and in certain analytical instruments, holds the promise to significantly increase the data throughput. It however, has not been applied to x-ray radiography, mainly due to limitations of the current x-ray source technology. Here we report a method for frequency multiplexing radiography (FMR) based on the frequency multiplexing principle and the carbon nanotube field emission x-ray technology. We show the feasibility of multiplexing radiography that enables simultaneous collection of multiple projection images. It has the potential to significantly increase the imaging speed for tomographic imaging without compromising the imaging quality.

  11. Energy-dispersive X-ray emission spectroscopy using an X-ray free-electron laser in a shot-by-shot mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Kern, Jan; Gildea, Richard J.; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Tran, Rosalie; Hattne, Johan; Laksmono, Hartawan; Hellmich, Julia; Glöckner, Carina; Echols, Nathaniel; Sierra, Raymond G.; Schafer, Donald W.; Sellberg, Jonas; Kenney, Christopher; Herbst, Ryan; Pines, Jack; Hart, Philip; Herrmann, Sven; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Latimer, Matthew J.; Fry, Alan R.; Messerschmidt, Marc M.; Miahnahri, Alan; Seibert, M. Marvin; Zwart, Petrus H.; White, William E.; Adams, Paul D.; Bogan, Michael J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J.; Zouni, Athina; Messinger, Johannes; Glatzel, Pieter; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko; Bergmann, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    The ultrabright femtosecond X-ray pulses provided by X-ray free-electron lasers open capabilities for studying the structure and dynamics of a wide variety of systems beyond what is possible with synchrotron sources. Recently, this “probe-before-destroy” approach has been demonstrated for atomic structure determination by serial X-ray diffraction of microcrystals. There has been the question whether a similar approach can be extended to probe the local electronic structure by X-ray spectroscopy. To address this, we have carried out femtosecond X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) at the Linac Coherent Light Source using redox-active Mn complexes. XES probes the charge and spin states as well as the ligand environment, critical for understanding the functional role of redox-active metal sites. Kβ1,3 XES spectra of MnII and Mn2III,IV complexes at room temperature were collected using a wavelength dispersive spectrometer and femtosecond X-ray pulses with an individual dose of up to >100 MGy. The spectra were found in agreement with undamaged spectra collected at low dose using synchrotron radiation. Our results demonstrate that the intact electronic structure of redox active transition metal compounds in different oxidation states can be characterized with this shot-by-shot method. This opens the door for studying the chemical dynamics of metal catalytic sites by following reactions under functional conditions. The technique can be combined with X-ray diffraction to simultaneously obtain the geometric structure of the overall protein and the local chemistry of active metal sites and is expected to prove valuable for understanding the mechanism of important metalloproteins, such as photosystem II. PMID:23129631

  12. Soft X-ray emissions of Si IX in Procyon

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, G; Liang, Guiyun; Zhao, Gang

    2006-01-01

    An analysis of $n=3 \\to 2$ transition lines of carbon-like silicon reveals that some ratios of line intensities are sensitive to the electron density. The ratio between two group of $3d\\to2p$ transition lines at 55.246 \\AA and 55.346 \\AA is a good $n_{\\rm e}$-diagnostic technique, due to its insensitivity to the electron temperature. Using this property, a lower limit of the density of 0.6$\\times10^8$cm$^{-3}$ is derived for Procyon, which is consistent with that constrained by C V and Si X emissions. Significant discrepancies in ratios of $3s\\to2p$ lines to $3d\\to2p$ lines between theoretical predictions and observed values, are found, by the spectral analysis of Procyon observed with the {\\it Chandra} High Resolution Transmission Grating spectra. The difference exceeding a factor of 3, cannot be explained by the uncertainty of atomic data. The opacity effect is also not a choice as reported by Ness and co-workers. For the $3s\\to2p$ line at 61.611 \\AA, present work indicates that the large discrepancy may be...

  13. Modeling of the EUV and X-Ray Emission Spectra Induced by the Solar Winds Ions in the Heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharchenko, Vasili

    2005-01-01

    We have carried out investigation of the EUV and X-ray emission spectra induced in interaction between the Solar Wind (SW) and interstellar neutral gas. The spectra of most important SW ions have been computed for the charge-exchange mechanism of X-ray emission using new accurate spectroscopic data from recent laboratory measurements and theoretical calculations. Total spectra have been constructed as a sum of spectra induced in the charge-exchange collisions by individual O(exp q+), C(exp q+), N(exp q+), Ne(exp q+), Mg (exp q+) and Fe(exp q+) ions. Calculations have been performed for X-ray emission from the heliospheric hydrogen and helium gas. X-ray maps of the heliosphere have been computed. The power density of X-ray sources in the heliospheric ecliptic plane is shown for the H gas and for the He gas. Distances from the Sun (0,0) are given in AU. The helium cone is clear seen in the X-ray map of the charge-exchange emission induced by the solar wind. X-ray emission spectra detected by the Chandra X-ray telescope from the "dark" side of Moon has been identified as a X-ray background emission induced by the solar wind from the geocorona. Spectra and intensities of this charge-exchange X-rays have been compared with the heliospheric component of the X-ray background. Observations and modeling of the SW spectra induced from the geocorona indicate a strong presence of emission lines of highly charged oxygen ions. Anisotropy in distribution of heliospheric X-rays has been predicted and calculated for the regions of the fast and slow solar winds.

  14. Laboratory measurements of the x-ray emission following dielectronic recombination onto highly charged argon ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gregory V.; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Bulbul, Esra; Hell, Natalie; Foster, Adam; Betancourt-Martinez, Gabriele; Porter, Frederick Scott; Smith, Randall K.

    2016-06-01

    We have used the LLNL EBIT-I electron beam ion trap to measure the X-ray emission following resonant dielectronic recombination (DR) onto helium-like and lithium-like argon as a function of electron energy. These measurements were completed by sweeping the energy of EBIT-I's near mono-energetic electron beam from below threshold for DR resonance to above threshold for direct excitation of K-shell transitions in helium-like argon. The X-ray emission was recorded as a function of electron beam energy using the EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer, whose energy resolution is ~ 5 eV, and also a relatively low resolution, solid-state X-ray detector. These results will be useful when analyzing and interpreting high resolution spectra from celestial sources measured with the Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) calorimeter instrument recently launched on the Hitomi X-ray Observatory (formerly known as Astro-H), as well as data measured using instruments on the Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray Observatories. Specifically, these data will help determine if the feature detected at ~ 3.56 keV (Bulbul et al. 2014, Boyarsky et al. 2014) in clusters is the result of the decay of a sterile neutrino, a long sought after dark matter particle candidate. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and Chandra Grant AR5-16012A.

  15. On the thermal line emission from the outflows in ultraluminous X-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Ya-Di

    2016-01-01

    The atomic features in the X-ray spectra of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) may be associated with the outflow (Middleton et al. 2015), which may provide a way to explore the physics of the ULXs. We construct a conical outflow model, and calculate the thermal X-ray Fe emission lines from the outflows. Our results show that thermal line luminosity decreases with increasing outflow velocity or/and opening angle of the outflow for a fixed kinetic power of the outflows. Assuming the kinetic power of the outflows to be comparable with the accretion power in the ULXs, we find that the equivalent width can be several eV for the thermal X-ray Fe emission line from the outflows in the ULXs with stellar mass black holes. The thermal line luminosity is proportional to 1/M (M is the black hole mass of the ULX). The equivalent width decreases with the black hole mass, which implies that the Fe line emission from the outflows can hardly be detected if the ULXs contain intermediate mass black holes. Our results suggest...

  16. Feedback from Winds and Supernovae in Massive Stellar Clusters - II. X-Ray Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Rogers, H

    2014-01-01

    The X-ray emission from a simulated massive stellar cluster is investigated. The emission is calculated from a 3D hydrodynamical model which incorporates the mechanical feedback from the stellar winds of 3 O-stars embedded in a giant molecular cloud clump containing 3240 M$_{\\odot}$ of molecular material within a 4 pc radius. A simple prescription for the evolution of the stars is used, with the first supernova explosion at t=4.4 Myrs. We find that the presence of the GMC clump causes short-lived attenuation effects on the X-ray emission of the cluster. However, once most of the material has been ablated away by the winds the remaining dense clumps do not have a noticable effect on the attenuation compared with the assumed interstellar medium column. We determine the evolution of the cluster X-ray luminosity, L$_X$, and spectra, and generate synthetic images. The intrinsic X-ray luminosity drops from nearly 10$^{34}$ ergs s$^{-1}$ while the winds are `bottled up', to a near constant value of 1.7$\\times 10^{32...

  17. Crushing of interstellar gas clouds in supernova remnants II. X-ray emission

    CERN Document Server

    Orlando, S; Peres, G; Reale, F; Plewa, T; Rosner, R

    2006-01-01

    AIMS. We study and discuss the time-dependent X-ray emission predicted by hydrodynamic modeling of the interaction of a SNR shock wave with an interstellar gas cloud. The scope includes: 1) to study the correspondence between modeled and X-ray emitting structures, 2) to explore two different physical regimes in which either thermal conduction or radiative cooling plays a dominant role, and 3) to investigate the effects of the physical processes at work on the emission of the shocked cloud in the two different regimes. METHODS. We use a detailed hydrodynamic model, including thermal conduction and radiation, and explore two cases characterized by different Mach numbers of the primary shock: M = 30 in which the cloud dynamics is dominated by radiative cooling and M = 50 dominated by thermal conduction. From the simulations, we synthesize the expected X-ray emission, using available spectral codes. RESULTS. The morphology of the X-ray emitting structures is significantly different from that of the flow structure...

  18. 3C 33: another case of photoionized soft X-ray emission in radio galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Torresi, E; Guainazzi, M; Palumbo, G G C; Ponti, G; Bianchi, S

    2009-01-01

    All the observations available in the Chandra and XMM-Newton archives have been used to investigate the X-ray spectral properties of 3C 33. In this paper is presented a complete X-ray analysis of the nuclear emission of this narrow line radio galaxy. The broad band spectrum of 3C 33 is complex. The hard part resembles that of Seyfert 2 galaxies, with a heavily obscured nuclear continuum (N_H~10^23 cm^-2) and a prominent Fe Kalpha line. This represents the nuclear radiation directly observed in transmission through a cold circumnuclear gas. On the other hand an unabsorbed continuum plus emission lines seem to fit well the soft part of the spectrum (0.5-2 keV) suggesting that the jet does not significantly contribute to the X-ray emission. We discuss the possible collisional or photoionized origin of the gas that emits the soft X-ray lines. Our results, strengthened by optical spectroscopy favor the photoionization scenario.

  19. The velocity dependence of X-ray emission due to Charge Exchange in the Cygnus Loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumbee, Renata; Lyons, David; Mullen, Patrick Dean; Shelton, Robin L.; Stancil, Phillip C.; Schultz, David R.

    2016-01-01

    The fundamental collisional process of charge exchange (CX) has been been established as a primary source of X-ray emission from the heliosphere [1], planetary exospheres [2], and supernova remnants [3,4]. In this process, X-ray emission results from the capture of an electron by a highly charged ion from a neutral atom or molecule, to form a highly-excited, high charge state ion. As the captured electron cascades down to the lowest energy level, photons are emitted, including X-rays.To provide reliable CX-induced X-ray spectral models to realistically simulate these environments, line ratios and spectra are computed using theoretical CX cross-sections obtained with the multi-channel Landau-Zener, atomic-orbital close-coupling, and classical-trajectory Monte Carlo methods for various collisional velocities relevant to astrophysics for collisions of bare and H-like C to Al ions with H, He, and H2. Using these line ratios, XSPEC models of CX emission in the northeast rim of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant will be shown as an example with ion velocity dependence.[1] Henley, D. B. & Shelton, R. L. 2010, ApJSS, 187, 388[2] Dennerl, K. et al. 2002, A&A 386, 319[3] Katsuda, S. et al. 2011, ApJ 730 24[4] Cumbee, R. S. et al. 2014, ApJ 787 L31This work was partially supported by NASA grant NNX09AC46G.

  20. Undistorted X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Using s-Core-Orbital Emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golnak, Ronny; Xiao, Jie; Atak, Kaan; Unger, Isaak; Seidel, Robert; Winter, Bernd; Aziz, Emad F

    2016-05-12

    Detection of secondary emissions, fluorescence yield (FY), or electron yield (EY), originating from the relaxation processes upon X-ray resonant absorption has been widely adopted for X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements when the primary absorption process cannot be probed directly in transmission mode. Various spectral distortion effects inherent in the relaxation processes and in the subsequent transportation of emitted particles (electron or photon) through the sample, however, undermine the proportionality of the emission signals to the X-ray absorption coefficient. In the present study, multiple radiative (FY) and nonradiative (EY) decay channels have been experimentally investigated on a model system, FeCl3 aqueous solution, at the excitation energy of the Fe L-edge. The systematic comparisons between the experimental spectra taken from various decay channels, as well as the comparison with the theoretically simulated Fe L-edge XA spectrum that involves only the absorption process, indicate that the detection of the Fe 3s → 2p partial fluorescence yield (PFY) gives rise to the true Fe L-edge XA spectrum. The two key characteristics generalized from this particular decay channel-zero orbital angular momentum (i.e., s orbital) and core-level emission-set a guideline for obtaining undistorted X-ray absorption spectra in the future. PMID:27101344

  1. Comparative study of x ray and microwave emissions during solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winglee, Robert M.

    1993-01-01

    The work supported by the grant consisted of two projects. The first project involved making detailed case studies of two flares using SMM data in conjunction with ground based observations. The first flare occurred at 1454 UT on June 20, 1989 and involved the eruption of a prominence near the limb. In the study we used data from many wavelength regimes including the radio, H-alpha, hard X-rays, and soft X-rays. We used a full gyrosynchrotron code to model the apparent presence of a 1.4 GHz source early in the flare that was in the form of a large coronal loop. The model results lead us to conclude that the initial acceleration occurs in small, dense loops which also produced the flare's hard X-ray emission. We also found evidence that a source at 1.4 GHz later in the event was due to second harmonic plasma emission. This source was adjacent to a leg of the prominence and comes from a dense column of material in the magnetic structure supporting the prominence. Finally, we investigated a source of microwaves and soft X-rays, occurring approximately 10 min after the hard X-ray peak, and calculate a lower limit for the density of the source. The second flare that was studied occurred at 2156 UT on June 20, 1989 and was observed with the VLA and the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO) Frequency Agile Array. We have developed a gyrosynchrotron model of the sources at flare peak using a new gyrosynchrotron approximation which is valid at very low harmonics of the gyrofrequency. We found that the accelerated particle densities of the sources decreased much more with radius from the source center than had been supposed in previous work, while the magnetic field varied less. We also used the available data to analyze a highly polarized source which appeared late in the flare. The second project involved compiling a statistical base for the relative timing of the hard X-ray peak, the turbulent and blue-shift velocities inferred from soft X-ray line emissions observed by

  2. The Discovery of X-ray Emission from Active Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvis, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Back in 1974 the UHURU catalog (3U) had been published with many UHGLS - unidentified high galactic latitude sources. Identifications were hampered by the square degree sized error boxes (positional uncertainties). Could these explain the cosmic X-ray background? Could UHGLS be "X-ray galaxies"? Only three active galaxies (AGNs) had been found as X-ray sources: 3C273, Cen A and NGC 4151, while others had upper limits. What was the difference between X-ray and non-X-ray AGNs? It turned out that the slightly better positioning capability and slightly deeper sensitivity of the Ariel V Sky Survey Instrument (SSI), launched in October 1974, were just enough to show that the UHGLS were Seyfert galaxies. And I was lucky enough that I'd joined the Leicester X-ray group and had taken on the UHGLS for my PhD thesis, with Ken Pounds as my supervisor. With the SSI we made a catalog of high latitude sources, the "2A" catalog, including about a dozen known Seyfert galaxies (lowish luminosity nearby AGNs) and, with Mike Penston and Martin Ward, we went on to identify many of them with both newly discovered normal broad emission line AGNs and a few new "narrow emission line galaxies", or NELGs, as we called them. We are now convinced that it is summation of many obscured NELGs that produce the flat spectrum of the X-ray background, and we are still searching for them in Chandra deep surveys and at higher energies with NuSTAR. There was an obvious connection between the X-ray obscuration and the optical reddening, which must lie outside the region emitting the broad optical spectral lines. Andy Lawrence and I, following a clue from Bill Keel, put this together into what we now call the Unified Scheme for AGN structure. This idea of a flattened torus obscuring the inner regions of the AGN was so dramatically confirmed a few years later -- by Ski Antonucci and Joe Miller's discovery of polarized broad emission lines in NGC1068 -- that the precursor papers became irrelevant. But Ariel

  3. Characterization of metallic nanoparticles by high-resolution X-ray absorption and X-ray emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehn, Timna-Josua

    2012-03-15

    In almost all areas of technology, metallic nanoparticles are of interest due to their special thermal, electronic, magnetic and optical properties. Their special properties are mainly due to their small size which implies the relevance of quantum effects as well as the significance of the surface: For 2 nm nanoparticles, the surface-to-volume ratio is already 1:1. However, the identification of surface-to-volume interactions - that are responsible for the new properties - is a difficult task due to the small size that inhibits a lot of 'standard' techniques to be applicable. Here X-ray absorption/emission spectroscopy (XAS/XES) is a favorable tool for the characterization of nanoparticles, independent on size, degree of crystallinity and shape/condition of the surface. Using XAS, a tempered nanosized Co{sub 3}Pt/C catalyst have been investigated. Its outstanding oxygen-reduction reaction (ORR) properties in a fuel cell could be related to a lowered Pt 5d-band center connected to a tightened Pt-Pt bonding distance, leading to a weakening of the oxygen adsorption strength so that the ORR may proceed faster. One drawback remains, however, as the properties found by (standard) XAS are summed up for different chemical environments of the chosen element. Thus, no distinction can be made between, e.g., the pure metal in a nanoparticles' interior and the ligated metal in the outer shells or surface. Here, high-resolution fluorescence-detected XAS (HRFD-XAS) provides additional opportunities as, due to its chemical sensitivity, it leads to site-selective XAS. For a system of 6 nm sized Co nanoparticles, build up of a metallic core surrounded by a protecting shell, that resulted from the 'smooth oxidation' process, this technique of site-selective XAS was proven to be applicable. For the first time, the interior and outer shell of a metallic nanoparticle could be characterized separately. In particular, the Co-hcp phase could be determined for the

  4. HINODE X-RAY TELESCOPE DETECTION OF HOT EMISSION FROM QUIESCENT ACTIVE REGIONS: A NANOFLARE SIGNATURE?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The X-Ray Telescope (XRT) on the Japanese/USA/UK Hinode (Solar-B) spacecraft has detected emission from a quiescent active region core that is consistent with nanoflare heating. The fluxes from 10 broadband X-ray filters and filter combinations were used to construct differential emission measure (DEM) curves. In addition to the expected active region peak at log T = 6.3-6.5, we find a high-temperature component with significant emission measure at log T > 7.0. This emission measure is weak compared to the main peak-the DEM is down by almost three orders of magnitude-which accounts of the fact that it has not been observed with earlier instruments. It is also consistent with spectra of quiescent active regions: no Fe XIX lines are observed in a CHIANTI synthetic spectrum generated using the XRT DEM distribution. The DEM result is successfully reproduced with a simple two-component nanoflare model.

  5. X-ray emission measurements following charge exchange between C$^{6+}$ and H$_2$

    CERN Document Server

    Fogle, M; Morgan, K; McCammon, D; Seely, D G; Draganić, I N; Havener, C C

    2014-01-01

    Lyman x-ray spectra following charge exchange between C$^{6+}$ and H$_2$ are presented for collision velocities between 400 and 2300 km/s (1--30 keV/amu). Spectra were measured by a microcalorimeter x-ray detector capable of fully resolving the C VI Lyman series emission lines though Lyman-$\\delta$. The ratios of the measured emission lines are sensitive to the angular momentum $l$-states populated during charge exchange and are used to gauge the effectiveness of different $l$-distribution models in predicting Lyman emission due to charge exchange. At low velocities, we observe that both single electron capture and double capture autoionization contribute to Lyman emission and that a statistical $l$-distribution best describes the measured line ratios. At higher velocities single electron capture dominates with the $l$-distribution peaked at the maximum $l$.

  6. Electronic emission of radio-sensitizing gold nanoparticles under X-ray irradiation : experiment and simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Casta, R; Sence, M; Moretto-Capelle, P; Cafarelli, P; Amsellem, A; Sicard-Roselli, C

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present new results on electronic emission of Gold Nanoparticles (GNPs) using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and compare them to the gold bulk electron emission. This subject has undergone new interest within the perspective of using GNPs as a radiotherapy enhancer. The experimental results were simulated using various models (Livermore and PENELOPE) of the Geant 4 simulation toolkit dedicated to the calculation of the transportation of particles through the matter. Our results show that the GNPs coating is a key parameter to correctly construe the experimental GNPs electronic emission after X-ray irradiation and point out some limitations of the PENELOPE model. Using XPS spectra and Geant4 Livermore simulations,we propose a method to determine precisely the coating surface density of the GNPs. We also show that the expected intrinsic nano-scale electronic emission enhancement effect - suspected to contribute to the GNPs radio-sensitizing properties - participates at most for a few pe...

  7. X-ray attenuation around -edge of Zr, Nb, Mo and Pd: A comparative study using proton-induced X-ray emission and 241Am gamma rays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K K Abdullah; K Karunakaran Nair; N Ramachandran; K M Varier; B R S Babu; Antony Joseph; Rajive Thomas; P Magudapathy; K G M Nair

    2010-09-01

    Mass attenuation coefficients (/ρ) for Zr, Nb, Mo and Pd elements around their -edges are measured at 14 energies in the range 15.744–28.564 keV using secondary excitation from thin Zr, Nb, Mo, Rh, Pd, Cd and Sn foils. The measurements were carried out at the and energy values of the target elements by two techniques: (1) Proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and (2) 241Am (300 mCi) source. In PIXE, 2 MeV proton-excited X-rays were detected by a Si(Li) detector. In the second case, X-rays excited by 59.54 keV photons from the targets were counted by an HPGe detector under a narrow beam good geometry set-up with sufficient shielding. The results are consistent with theoretical values derived from the XCOM package and indicate that the PIXE data have better statistical accuracy.

  8. Making use of x-ray optical effects in photoelectron-, Auger electron-, and x-ray emission spectroscopies: Total reflection, standing-wave excitation, and resonant effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a general theoretical methodology and related open-access computer program for carrying out the calculation of photoelectron, Auger electron, and x-ray emission intensities in the presence of several x-ray optical effects, including total reflection at grazing incidence, excitation with standing-waves produced by reflection from synthetic multilayers and at core-level resonance conditions, and the use of variable polarization to produce magnetic circular dichroism. Calculations illustrating all of these effects are presented, including in some cases comparisons to experimental results. Sample types include both semi-infinite flat surfaces and arbitrary multilayer configurations, with interdiffusion/roughness at their interfaces. These x-ray optical effects can significantly alter observed photoelectron, Auger, and x-ray intensities, and in fact lead to several generally useful techniques for enhancing surface and buried-layer sensitivity, including layer-resolved densities of states and depth profiles of element-specific magnetization. The computer program used in this study should thus be useful for a broad range of studies in which x-ray optical effects are involved or are to be exploited in next-generation surface and interface studies of nanoscale systems.

  9. Development of tomographic imaging systems using carbon-nanotube-based field-emission x-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian

    2005-11-01

    Conventional thermionic x-ray sources use hot filament cathodes to generate electrons for x-ray production. The thermionic technology has several inherent limitations such as high operating temperature, slow response time, and difficulty for miniaturization. On the other hand, field emission provides an alternative to generate electrons without all these limitations. The concept of field emission x-ray source has been proposed and tested in the early 1970s. Unfortunately all of the early field emission x-ray systems failed due primarily to the limitations on the electron field emitters. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have recently emerged as a promising class of electron emissive materials and field emission x-ray source based on CNTs are expected to have significantly improved properties. We have recently developed a CNT-based field emission micro-focus x-ray source. It shows stable tube current under high operating voltage, extraordinary dynamic imaging capability, and excellent potential for miniaturization. All of these new features make it very attractive for various potential industrial and medical applications. In order to demonstrate its applications, two sets of x-ray imaging systems using this field emission x-ray source were constructed in our lab. One is a micro-computed tomographic (micro-CT) imaging system using a single field emission x-ray source for dynamic radiographic and tomographic imaging applications. It shows great potential for the future development of dynamic micro-CT scanner. The other one is a multi-beam field emission x-ray source with multiple addressable focal spots which can provide scanning x-ray beams without mechanical movement. It can lead to fast data acquisition rates for future tomographic imaging systems with a simplified experimental set-up.

  10. Monte Carlo simulation of x-ray emission by kilovolt electron bombardment

    OpenAIRE

    Acosta, Eva; Llovet Ximenes, Xavier; Coleoni, Enrique Andrés; Riveros, J. A.; Salvat Gavaldà, Francesc

    1998-01-01

    A physical model for the simulation of x-ray emission spectra from samples irradiated with kilovolt electron beams is proposed. Inner shell ionization by electron impact is described by means of total cross sections evaluated from an optical-data model. A double differential cross section is proposed for bremsstrahlung emission, which reproduces the radiative stopping powers derived from the partial wave calculations of Kissel, Quarles and Pratt [At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 28, 381 (1983)]. Th...

  11. Intragroup and Galaxy-linked Diffuse X-ray Emission In Hickson Compact Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Tyler D.; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis; Mulchaey, John S.; Brandt, William N.; Charlton, Jane C.; Garmire, Gordon P.; Gronwall, Caryl; Cardiff, Ann; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis, S.; Zabludoff, Ann I.

    2013-01-01

    Isolated compact groups (CGs) of galaxies present a range of dynamical states, group velocity dispersions, and galaxy morphologies with which to study galaxy evolution, particularly the properties of gas both within the galaxies and in the intragroup medium. As part of a large, multiwavelength examination of CGs, we present an archival study of diffuse X-ray emission in a subset of nine Hickson compact groups (HCGs) observed with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. We find that seven of the groups in our sample exhibit detectable diffuse emission. However, unlike large-scale emission in galaxy clusters, the diffuse features in the majority of the detected groups are linked to the individual galaxies, in the form of both plumes and halos likely as a result of vigourous star formation or activity in the galaxy nucleus, as well as in emission from tidal features. Unlike previous studies from earlier X-ray missions, HCGs 31, 42, 59, and 92 are found to be consistent with the L(sub X-Tau) relationship from clusters within the errors, while HCGs 16 and 31 are consistent with the cluster L(sub X-sigma) relation, though this is likely coincidental given that the hot gas in these two systems is largely due to star formation. We find that L(sub X) increases with decreasing group Hi to dynamical-mass ratio with tentative evidence for a dependence in X-ray luminosity on Hi morphology whereby systems with intragroup Hi indicative of strong interactions are considerably more X-ray luminous than passively evolving groups. We also find a gap in the L(sub X) of groups as a function of the total group specific star formation rate. Our findings suggest that the hot gas in these groups is not in hydrostatic equilibrium and these systems are not low-mass analogs of rich groups or clusters, with the possible exception of HCG 62.

  12. A thin diffuse component of the Galactic Ridge X-ray emission and heating of the interstellar medium contributed by the radiation of Galactic X-ray binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Molaro, Margherita; Sunyaev, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    We suggest a thin (scale height ~80 pc) diffuse component to the Galactic Ridge X-ray emission (GRXE) arising from the scattering of the radiation of bright X-ray binaries (XBs) by the interstellar medium. The morphology of the scattered component is expected to trace the clumpy molecular and HI clouds. We calculate this contribution to the GRXE from known Galactic XBs assuming that they are all persistent. The known XBs sample is however incomplete as it is flux-limited and spans the small lifetime of X-ray astronomy (~50 years), compared to the characteristic time of 1000-10000 years that would contribute to the diffuse emission observed today due to time delays. We therefore also use a simulated sample of sources, to estimate the diffuse emission we should expect in an optimistic case assuming that the X-ray luminosity of our Galaxy is on average similar to that of other galaxies. In the calculations we also take into account the enhancement of the total scattering cross section due to coherence effects in...

  13. Gamma-ray emitting radio galaxies at hard X-rays: Seyfert core or jet emission?

    CERN Document Server

    Beckmann, V; Mattana, F; Saez, D; Soldi, S

    2013-01-01

    A number of radio galaxies has been detected by Fermi/LAT in the gamma-ray domain. In some cases, like Cen A and M 87, these objects have been seen even in the TeV range by Cherenkov telescopes. Whereas the gamma-ray emission is likely to be connected with the non-thermal jet emission, dominating also the radio band, the situation is less clear at hard X-rays. While the smoothly curved continuum emission and the overall spectral energy distribution indicate a non-thermal emission, other features such as the iron line emission and the low variability appear to be rather of Seyfert type, i.e. created in the accretion disk and corona around the central black hole. We investigate several prominent cases using combined X-ray and gamma-ray data in order to constrain the possible contributions of the jet and the accretion disk to the overall spectral energy distribution in radio galaxies. Among the three sources we study, three different origins of the hard X-ray flux can be identified. The emission can be purely no...

  14. EVIDENCE FOR ELEVATED X-RAY EMISSION IN LOCAL LYMAN BREAK GALAXY ANALOGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu-Zych, Antara R.; Lehmer, Bret D.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Ptak, Andrew F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Goncalves, Thiago S. [Observatorio do Valongo, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ladeira Pedro Antonio 43, Saude, Rio de Janeiro-RJ, CEP 22240-060 (Brazil); Fragos, Tassos [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Heckman, Timothy M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Overzier, Roderik A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Schiminovich, David, E-mail: antara.r.basu-zych@nasa.gov [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2013-09-10

    Our knowledge of how X-ray emission scales with star formation at the earliest times in the universe relies on studies of very distant Lyman break galaxies (LBGs). In this paper, we study the relationship between the 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity (L{sub X}), assumed to originate from X-ray binaries (XRBs), and star formation rate (SFR) in ultraviolet (UV) selected z < 0.1 Lyman break analogs (LBAs). We present Chandra observations for four new Galaxy Evolution Explorer selected LBAs. Including previously studied LBAs, Haro 11 and VV 114, we find that LBAs demonstrate L{sub X}/SFR ratios that are elevated by {approx}1.5{sigma} compared to local galaxies, similar to the ratios found for stacked LBGs in the early universe (z > 2). Unlike some of the composite LBAs studied previously, we show that these LBAs are unlikely to harbor active galactic nuclei, based on their optical and X-ray spectra and the spatial distribution of the X-rays in three spatially extended cases. Instead, we expect that high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) dominate the X-ray emission in these galaxies, based on their high specific SFRs (sSFRs {identical_to} SFR/M{sub *} {>=} 10{sup -9} yr{sup -1}), which suggest the prevalence of young stellar populations. Since both UV-selected populations (LBGs and LBAs) have lower dust attenuations and metallicities compared to similar samples of more typical local galaxies, we investigate the effects of dust extinction and metallicity on the L{sub X}/SFR for the broader population of galaxies with high sSFRs (>10{sup -10} yr{sup -1}). The estimated dust extinctions (corresponding to column densities of N{sub H} < 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}) are expected to have insignificant effects on observed L{sub X}/SFR ratio for the majority of galaxy samples. We find that the observed relationship between L{sub X}/SFR and metallicity appears consistent with theoretical expectations from XRB population synthesis models. Therefore, we conclude that lower metallicities, related to

  15. X-ray and radio emission from Type In supernova SN 2010jl

    CERN Document Server

    Chandra, Poonam; Chugai, Nikolai; Fransson, Claes; Soderberg, Alicia M

    2015-01-01

    We present all X-ray and radio observations of the Type IIn supernova SN 2010jl. The X-ray observations cover a period up to day 1500 with Chandra, XMM-Newton, NuSTAR and Swift-XRT. The Chandra observations after 2012 June, the XMM-Newton observation in 2013 November, and most of the Swift-XRT observations until 2014 December are presented for the first time. All the spectra can be fitted by an absorbed hot thermal model except for \\chandra spectra on 2011 October and 2012 June when an additional component is needed. Although the origin of this component is uncertain, it is spatially coincident with the supernova and occurs when there are changes to the supernova spectrum in the energy range close to that of the extra component, indicating that the emission is related to the supernova. The X-ray light curve shows an initial plateau followed by a steep drop starting at day $\\sim 300$. We attribute the drop to a decrease in the circumstellar density. The column density to the X-ray emission drops rapidly with t...

  16. Interpretation of perturbed temperature based on x ray emissivity in fusion plasma experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between the dynamical response to perturbations of the soft X ray emissivity (δE), the electron temperature (δTe), the electron density (δne) and the impurity concentration (δni) for a Maxwellian plasma is analyzed in detail. In particular, the so-called 'impurity function' F(Zeff) is also strongly dependent on Te via the direct radiative recombination (DRR) contribution to the X ray emission, which significantly affects the relation between the perturbed quantities as derived from the popular expression E is proportional F(Zeff)n2eTαe even if the impurity content (or Zeff) remains constant. In order to overcome this difficulty, a simple analytical approximation is derived for F(Zeff, Te) that can be used as a formula to relate the perturbed quantities δE, δTee, δne and δF with ease and accuracy. This simple approximation is illustrated by studying saw-toothing discharges on the Tokamak de Varennes (TdeV) with Te, ne and E measured by the Thomson scattering, the FIR interferometer and the X ray camera diagnostics, and its accuracy is tested against the predictions of a full X ray modelling code. (author). 9 refs, 2 figs

  17. X-ray emission from highly stripped 32S ions channeled along axis in Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have started the investigations of projectile X-ray yields for fully stripped 32S ions incident along the direction in a thin (0.2μm) Si single crystal. Different charge states of 32S ions like 13+, 14+, 15+, 16+ were obtained by passing 32S8+-10+ beam, from the TIFR-BARC 14UD pelletron accelerator, through a 8-10μg/cm2 carbon foil post-stripper. The charge state of the emerging ions was selected with the help of a 30deg beam switching magnet. A thin gold foil was placed downstream and the elastically scattered 32S ions from this gold foil were detected and used for the normalization. Both the target and projectile X-ray were detected by a Si(Li) detector kept at 20deg to the beam direction. It is observed K X-ray emission shows weaker channeling. This indicates that the impact parameters involved in the process is large (by a factor of ≅ √2) as compared to that in the target K X-ray emission. (author). 2 figs

  18. X-ray and HeI 1.0830 mu emission from protostellar jets

    CERN Document Server

    Liseau, R

    2006-01-01

    Context. The high energies of protostellar jets, implied by recent observations of X-rays from such flows, came very much as a surprise. Inferred shock velocities are considerably higher than what was previously known, hence putting even larger energy demands on the driving sources of the jets. The statistics of X-ray emitting jets are still poor, yet a few cases exist which seem to imply a correlation between the presence of HeI 1.0830 mu emission and X-ray radiation in a given source. Aims. This tentative correlation needs confirmation and explanation. If the jet regions of HeI 1.0830 mu emission are closely associated with those producing X-rays, high resolution infared spectroscopy can be used to observationally study the velocity fields in the hot plasma regions of the jets. This would provide the necessary evidence to test and further develop theoretical models of intermediately fast (> 500 - 1500 km/s) interstellar shock waves. Methods. The HH 154 jet flow from the embedded protostellar binary L 1551 I...

  19. RT Cru: a look into the X-ray emission of a peculiar symbiotic star

    CERN Document Server

    Ducci, L; Suleimanov, V; Nikolajuk, M; Santangelo, A; Ferrigno, C

    2016-01-01

    Symbiotic stars are a heterogeneous class of interacting binaries. Among them, RT Cru has been classified as prototype of a subclass that is characterised by hard X-ray spectra extending past ~20 keV. We analyse ~8.6 Ms of archival INTEGRAL data collected in the period 2003-2014, ~140 ks of Swift/XRT data, and a Suzaku observation of 39 ks, to study the spectral X-ray emission and investigate the nature of the compact object. Based on the 2MASS photometry, we estimate the distance to the source of 1.2-2.4 kpc. The X-ray spectrum obtained with Swift/XRT, JEM-X, IBIS/ISGRI, and Suzaku data is well fitted by a cooling flow model modified by an absorber that fully covers the source and two partial covering absorbers. Assuming that the hard X-ray emission of RT Cru originates from an optically thin boundary layer around a non-magnetic white dwarf, we estimated a mass of the WD of about 1.2 M_Sun. The mass accretion rate obtained for this source might be too high for the optically thin boundary layer scenario. Ther...

  20. The XMM-Newton X-ray emission of the SNR N120 in the LMC

    CERN Document Server

    Reyes-Iturbide, Jorge; Velazquez, Pablo F

    2009-01-01

    We present new XMM-Newton observations of the supernova remnant N120 in the LMC, and numerical simulations on the evolution of this supernova remnant which we compare with the X-ray observations. The supernova remnant N120, together with several HII regions, forms a large nebular complex5D (also called N120) whose shape resembles a semicircular ring. From the XMM-Newton data we generate images and spectra of this remnant in the energy band between 0.2 to 2.0 keV. The images show that the X-ray emission is brighter towards the east (i.e., towards the rim of the large nebular complex). The EPIC/MOS1 and MOS2 data reveal a thermal spectrum in soft X-rays. 2D axisymmetric numerical simulations with the Yguaz\\'u-a code were carried out assuming that the remnant is expanding into an inhomogeneous ISM with an exponential density gradient and showing that thermal conduction effects are negligible. Simulated X-ray emission maps were obtained from the numerical simulations in order to compare them with the observations...

  1. Deka-keV X-ray emission associated with the onset of radio noise storms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crosby, N.; Vilmer, N.; Lund, Niels;

    1996-01-01

    Radio noise storms show that suprathermal electrons (a few tens of keV) are present in the vicinity of active regions during several hours or even a few days. Where and how these electrons are energized is not yet well known. A flare-like sudden energy release in the active region is in general...... observed at the onset of noise storms, either as a fully developed flare or, more often, as a soft X-ray brightening without conspicuous Her signature. In order to investigate to what extent electrons energized in the active region contribute to the noise-storm emission in the overlying coronal structures...... from an isothermal fit to the GOES fluxes. Although the electron population producing the deka-keV X-ray emission would be energetic enough to power the simultaneous radio noise storm, the much longer duration of the radio emission requires time-extended particle acceleration. The acceleration probably...

  2. Development of soft X-ray emission spectrometer for EPMA/SEM and its application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, H.; Murano, T.; Takakura, M.; Asahina, S.; Terauchi, M.; Koike, M.; Imazono, T.; Koeda, M.; Nagano, T.

    2016-02-01

    A newly developed wavelength-dispersive soft X-ray emission spectrometer (WD-SXES) with two kinds of gratings, JS50XL and JS200N, were installed on electron probe microanalysers (EPMA) and scanning electron microscopes (SEM). The new detector covers the energy range from 50 to 210 eV with an energy resolution of better than 0.2 eV at Al-L emission on Al metal. With this low energy range and high energy resolution, various kinds of X-ray lines of K, L, M, N emission spectra from lithium to uranium could be observed and chemical state analysis carried out. This WD-SXES has also a high potential for analysing trace light elements under 100 ppm. The design, having no mechanically scanning components, allows parallel spectral acquisition over the entire energy range of each grating (50 to 170 eV and 70 to 210 eV).

  3. Solar Control on Jupiter's Equatorial X-ray Emissions: 26-29 November 2003 XMM-Newton Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella; Elsner, Ronald F.; Gladstone, G. Randall; Ramsay, G.; Rodriquez, P.; Soria, R.; Waite, J. Hunter, Jr.; Cravens, Thomas E.

    2004-01-01

    During November 26-29,2003 XMM-Newton observed X-ray emissions from Jupiter for 69 hours. The 0.7-2.0 keV X-ray disk of Jupiter is observed to be brightest at the subsolar point, and limb darkening is seen in the 0.2-2.0 keV and 0.7-2.0 keV images. We present simultaneous lightcurves of Jovian equatorial X-rays and solar X-rays measured by the GOES, SOHO/SEM, and TIMED/SEE satellites. The solar X-ray flares occurring on the Jupiter-facing side of the Sun are matched by corresponding features in the Jovian X- rays. These results support the hypothesis that X-ray emissions from Jovian low-latitudes are solar X-rays scattered and fluoresced from the planet's upper atmosphere, and confirm that the Sun directly controls the non-auroral X-rays fiom Jupiter's disk. Our study suggest that Jovian equatorial X-rays; during certain Jupiter phase, can be used to predict the occurrence of solar flare on the hemisphere of the Sun that is invisible to space weather satellites.

  4. Upper Limits on X-ray Emission from Two Rotating Radio Transients

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, D L; Chatterjee, S; Possenti, A; McLaughlin, M A; Camilo, F; Chakraborty, D; Slane, P O

    2009-01-01

    X-ray emission from the enigmatic Rotating RAdio Transients (RRATs) offers a vital clue to understanding these objects and how they relate to the greater neutron star population. An X-ray counterpart to J1819-1458 is known, and its properties are similar to those of other middle-aged (0.1 Myr) neutron stars. We have searched for X-ray emission with Chandra/ACIS at the positions of two RRATs with arcsecond (or better) localisation, J0847-4316 and J1846-0257. Despite deep searches (especially for J1847-0257) we did not detect any emission with 0.3-8 keV count-rate limits of 1 counts/ks and 0.068 counts/ks, respectively, at 3sigma confidence. Assuming thermal emission similar to that seen from J1819-1458 (a blackbody with radius of approximately 20 km), we derive effective temperature limits of 77 eV and 91 eV for the nominal values of the distances and column densities to both sources, although both of those quantities are highly uncertain and correlated. If we instead fix the temperature of the emission (a bla...

  5. Chandra Observations of Extended X-ray Emission in Arp 220

    CERN Document Server

    McDowell, J C; Lamb, S A; Shaked, S; Hearn, N C; Colina, L; Mundell, C; Borne, K; Baker, A C; Arribas, S

    2003-01-01

    We resolve the extended X-ray emission from the prototypical ultraluminous infrared galaxy Arp 220. Extended, faint edge-brightened, soft X-ray lobes outside the optical galaxy are observed to a distance of 10 to 15 kpc on each side of the nuclear region. Bright plumes inside the optical isophotes coincide with the optical line emission and extend 11 kpc from end to end across the nucleus. The data for the plumes cannot be fit by a single temperature plasma, and display a range of temperatures from 0.2 to 1 keV. The plumes emerge from bright, diffuse circumnuclear emission in the inner 3 kpc centered on the Halpha peak, which is displaced from the radio nuclei. There is a close morphological correspondence between the Halpha and soft X-ray emission on all spatial scales. We interpret the plumes as a starburst-driven superwind, and discuss two interpretations of the emission from the lobes in the context of simulations of the merger dynamics of Arp 220.

  6. Resonant x-ray emission from gas-phase TiCl{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hague, C.F.; Tronc, M. [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); De Groot, F. [Univ. of Groningen (Netherlands)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy (RXES) has proved to be a powerful tool for studying the electronic structure of condensed matter. Over the past few years it has been used mainly for studying the valence bands of solids and condensed molecules. Very recently the advent of high brightness photon beams provided by third generation synchrotron radiation source undulators, associated with efficient x-ray emission spectrometers has made it possible to perform experiments on free diatomic molecular systems. RXE spectra of free molecules are of prime importance to gain insight into their electronic structure and bonding as they reflect the symmetry of orbitals engaged in the two-electron, two-step process with the l = 0, {+-}2 parity-conserving selection rule, and are free from solid state effects which can introduce difficulties in the interpretation. They provide information (more so than XAS) on the core excited states, and, when performed at fixed incident photon energy as a function of the emitted photon energy, on the electronic excitation (charge transfer, multiplet states). Moreover the anisotropy of the angular distribution of resonant x-ray emission affects the relative intensity of the emission peaks and provides information concerning the symmetries of final states. This is a preliminary report on what are the first RXE spectra of a 3d transition metal complex in the gas phase. The experiment concerns the Ti 3d {yields}2p emission spectrum of TiCl{sub 4} over the 450 to 470 eV region.

  7. X-ray Line Emission from the Hot Stellar Wind of theta 1 Ori C

    CERN Document Server

    Schulz, N S; Huenemoerder, D P; Lee, J C

    2000-01-01

    We present a first emission line analysis of a high resolution X-ray spectrum of the stellar wind of theta 1 Ori C obtained with the High Energy Transmission grating Spectrometer onboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The spectra are resolved into a large number of emission lines from H- and He-like O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ar and Fe ions. The He-like Fe XXV and Li-like Fe XXIV appear quite strong indicating very hot emitting regions. From H/He flux ratios, as well as from Fe He/Li emission measure ratios we deduce temperatures ranging from 0.5 to 6.1 x 10^7 K. The He-triplets are very sensitive to density as well. At these temperatures the relative strengths of the intercombination and forbidden lines indicate electron densities well above 10^12 cm^-3. The lines appear significantly broadened from which we deduce a mean velocity of 770 km/s with a spread between 400 and 2000 km/s. Along with results of the deduced emission measure we conclude that the X-ray emission could originate in dense and hot regions with a c...

  8. The Soft X-Ray Emission in a Large Sample of Galaxy Clusters with ROSAT PSPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonamente, Massimiliano; Lieu, Richard; Joy, Marshall K.; Nevalainen, Jukka H.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The study of soft X-ray emission of 38 X-ray selected galaxy clusters observed by ROSAT PSPC indicates that the soft excess phenomenon may be a common occurrence in galaxy clusters. Excess soft X-ray radiation, above the contribution from the hot intra-cluster medium, is evident in a large fraction of sources, and is clearly detected with large statistical significance in the deepest observations. The investigation relies on new, high resolution 21 cm HI observations. The sample selection also features analysis of infrared images, to further ensure reliability of results with respect to the characteristics of Galactic absorption. The possibility of background or calibration effects as cause of the excess emission is likewise investigated; a detailed analysis of the distribution of the excess emission with respect to detector position and Galactic HI column density shows that the excess emission is a genuine celestial phenomenon. We find evidence for a preferential distribution of the soft excess emission at distances larger than approx. 150-200 kpc from the centers of clusters; this behavior may be naturally explained in the context of a non-thermal Inverse-Compton scenario. Alternatively, we propose that the phenomenon maybe caused by thermal emission of very large-scale 'warm' filaments seen in recent hydrodynamic simulations. This new interpretation relieves the very demanding requirements of either the traditional intra-cluster 'warm' gas and the non-thermal scenarios. We also investigate the possibility of the soft excess originating from unresolved, X-ray faint cluster galaxies.

  9. A Deep X-Ray View of the Bare AGN Ark 120. I. Revealing the Soft X-Ray Line Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, J. N.; Porquet, D.; Braito, V.; Nardini, E.; Lobban, A.; Turner, T. J.

    2016-09-01

    The Seyfert 1 galaxy Ark 120 is a prototype example of the so-called class of bare nucleus active galactic nuclei (AGNs), whereby there is no known evidence for the presence of ionized gas along the direct line of sight. Here deep (>400 ks exposure), high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of Ark 120 is presented from XMM-Newton observations that were carried out in 2014 March, together with simultaneous Chandra/High Energy Transmission Grating exposures. The high-resolution spectra confirmed the lack of intrinsic absorbing gas associated with Ark 120, with the only X-ray absorption present originating from the interstellar medium (ISM) of our own Galaxy, with a possible slight enhancement of the oxygen abundance required with respect to the expected ISM values in the solar neighborhood. However, the presence of several soft X-ray emission lines are revealed for the first time in the XMM-Newton RGS spectrum, associated with the AGN and arising from the He- and H-like ions of N, O, Ne, and Mg. The He-like line profiles of N, O, and Ne appear velocity broadened, with typical FWHMs of ∼5000 km s‑1, whereas the H-like profiles are unresolved. From the clean measurement of the He-like triplets, we deduce that the broad lines arise from a gas of density n e ∼ 1011 cm‑3, while the photoionization calculations infer that the emitting gas covers at least 10% of 4π steradian. Thus the broad soft X-ray profiles appear coincident with an X-ray component of the optical–UV broad-line region on sub-parsec scales, whereas the narrow profiles originate on larger parsec scales, perhaps coincident with the AGN narrow-line region. The observations show that Ark 120 is not intrinsically bare and substantial X-ray-emitting gas exists out of our direct line of sight toward this AGN.

  10. Optimization of neon soft X-ray emission from 200 J plasma focus device for application in soft X-ray lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaiselvi, S. M. P.; Tan, T. L.; Talebitaher, A.; Lee, P.; Rawat, R. S.

    2014-08-01

    The Fast Miniature Plasma Focus (FMPF) device is basically made up of coaxial electrodes with centrally placed anode and six cathode rods surrounding them concentrically. They are enclosed in a vacuum chamber, filled with low pressure operating gas. However, in our experiments, these cathode rods were removed to investigate the influence of them on neon soft X-ray (SXR) and hard X-ray (HXR) emission from the device. On removal of cathode rods, the cathode base plate serves as cathode and the plasma sheath is formed between the anode and the base plate of cathode. Neon was used as the operating gas for our experiments and the FMPF device used is of 235 J energy capacities. The experimental results showed that the FMPF device was able to focus better and the SXR emission efficiency was five times higher without cathode rods than with cathode rods. On the contrary, HXR emission did not vary with and without cathode rods. This observed phenomenon was further cross-checked through imaging of plasma dynamics, with and without cathode rods. FMPF device consists of 4 Pseudo Spark Gap (PSG) switches, which need to operate synchronously to deliver high voltage from capacitors to the anode. It was also seen that, the presence or absence of cathode rods also influence the synchronous operation of PSG switches. It also implies that this is one definite way to optimize the SXR emission from the FMPF device. This study reveals an important finding that, cathode rods play a vital role in the formation of plasma sheath with consequential influence on the radiation emission from plasma focus devices. Enhancement of the X-ray emission from this device is definitely a stepping stone in the realization of this device for industrial applications such as X-ray lithography for semiconductor industries.

  11. Optimization of neon soft X-ray emission from 200 J plasma focus device for application in soft X-ray lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fast Miniature Plasma Focus (FMPF) device is basically made up of coaxial electrodes with centrally placed anode and six cathode rods surrounding them concentrically. They are enclosed in a vacuum chamber, filled with low pressure operating gas. However, in our experiments, these cathode rods were removed to investigate the influence of them on neon soft X-ray (SXR) and hard X-ray (HXR) emission from the device. On removal of cathode rods, the cathode base plate serves as cathode and the plasma sheath is formed between the anode and the base plate of cathode. Neon was used as the operating gas for our experiments and the FMPF device used is of 235 J energy capacities. The experimental results showed that the FMPF device was able to focus better and the SXR emission efficiency was five times higher without cathode rods than with cathode rods. On the contrary, HXR emission did not vary with and without cathode rods. This observed phenomenon was further cross-checked through imaging of plasma dynamics, with and without cathode rods. FMPF device consists of 4 Pseudo Spark Gap (PSG) switches, which need to operate synchronously to deliver high voltage from capacitors to the anode. It was also seen that, the presence or absence of cathode rods also influence the synchronous operation of PSG switches. It also implies that this is one definite way to optimize the SXR emission from the FMPF device. This study reveals an important finding that, cathode rods play a vital role in the formation of plasma sheath with consequential influence on the radiation emission from plasma focus devices. Enhancement of the X-ray emission from this device is definitely a stepping stone in the realization of this device for industrial applications such as X-ray lithography for semiconductor industries. (author)

  12. Population synthesis of accreting white dwarfs - II. X-ray and UV emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hai-Liang; Woods, T. E.; Yungelson, L. R.; Gilfanov, M.; Han, Zhanwen

    2015-11-01

    Accreting white dwarfs (WDs) with non-degenerate companions are expected to emit in soft X-rays and the UV, if accreted H-rich material burns stably. They are an important component of the unresolved emission of elliptical galaxies, and their combined ionizing luminosity may significantly influence the optical line emission from warm interstellar medium (ISM). In an earlier paper, we modelled populations of accreting WDs, first generating WD with main-sequence, Hertzsprung gap and red giant companions with the population synthesis code BSE, and then following their evolution with a grid of evolutionary tracks computed with MESA. Now we use these results to estimate the soft X-ray (0.3-0.7 keV), H- and He II-ionizing luminosities of nuclear burning WDs and the number of supersoft X-ray sources for galaxies with different star formation histories. For the starburst case, these quantities peak at ˜1 Gyr and decline by ˜1-3 orders of magnitude by the age of 10 Gyr. For stellar ages of ˜10 Gyr, predictions of our model are consistent with soft X-ray luminosities observed by Chandra in nearby elliptical galaxies and He II 4686 Å/H β line ratio measured in stacked Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectra of retired galaxies, the latter characterizing the strength and hardness of the UV radiation field. However, the soft X-ray luminosity and He II 4686 Å/H β ratio are significantly overpredicted for stellar ages of ≲4-8 Gyr. We discuss various possibilities to resolve this discrepancy and tentatively conclude that it may be resolved by a modification of the typically used criteria of dynamically unstable mass-loss for giant stars.

  13. Measurements of fast electron beams and soft X-ray emission from plasma-focus experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surała Władysław

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports results of the recent experimental studies of pulsed electron beams and soft X-rays in plasma-focus (PF experiments carried out within a modified PF-360U facility at the NCBJ, Poland. Particular attention was focused on time-resolved measurements of the fast electron beams by means of two different magnetic analyzers, which could record electrons of energy ranging from about 41 keV to about 715 keV in several (6 or 8 measuring channels. For discharges performed with the pure deuterium filling, many strong electron signals were recorded in all the measuring channels. Those signals were well correlated with the first hard X-ray pulse detected by an external scintillation neutron-counter. In some of the analyzer channels, electron spikes (lasting about dozens of nanoseconds and appearing in different instants after the current peculiarity (so-called current dip were also recorded. For several discharges, fast ion beams, which were emitted along the z-axis and recorded with nuclear track detectors, were also investigated. Those measurements confirmed a multibeam character of the ion emission. The time-integrated soft X-ray images, which were taken side-on by means of a pinhole camera and sensitive X-ray films, showed the appearance of some filamentary structures and so-called hot spots. The application of small amounts of admixtures of different heavy noble gases, i.e. of argon (4.8% volumetric, krypton (1.6% volumetric, or xenon (0.8% volumetric, decreased intensity of the recorded electron beams, but increased intensity of the soft X-ray emission and showed more distinct and numerous hot spots. The recorded electron spikes have been explained as signals produced by quasi-mono-energetic microbeams emitted from tiny sources (probably plasma diodes, which can be formed near the observed hot spots.

  14. Study of X-ray emission in aluminium z-pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous experiments, at 0.1. TX level, have shown that stability and x-ray emission of fast Z-pinches, could be strongly increased by imploding an aluminium vapor jet onto a very thin coaxial wire. We present here first results of an aluminium Z-pinch, using a similar liner, but at mega-ampere level. The pinch is driven by AMBIORIX high-power facility, a 2 TW, 0.5 Ω, 2 MA, 50 ns pulse-line generator. We study the effect of an aluminium wire and its diameter (20-50 μm) on the implosion dynamics, on x-ray yield on MHD stability of the column at stagnation. Analysis of A1 jet on A1 wire shots demonstrates that x-ray yield due to emission processes in the H- and He- like ionization stages (i.e. the K-shell) is significantly enhanced, relative to that of A1 jet only ones. The wire also leads to better symmetry of the implosion, and to better reproducibility of shots. X-ray signals exhibit two similar pulses, 10 ns in width, 15 ns spaced. To discern spectral origin of both pulses, experiments are realized with stainless steel wire (25 μm in diameter). Results show that liner and wire radial simultaneously and contribute to both pulses. Analysis of a typical A1 jet on A1 wire shot, using detailed collisional-radiative equilibrium (CRE) model is also given in this thesis. View o the pinch at stagnation as a cola-dense core surrounded by a hot-low density corona reproduces all features of the X-ray data. (author)

  15. A SUZAKU SEARCH FOR NONTHERMAL EMISSION AT HARD X-RAY ENERGIES IN THE COMA CLUSTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The brightest cluster radio halo known resides in the Coma cluster of galaxies. The relativistic electrons producing this diffuse synchrotron emission should also produce inverse Compton emission that becomes competitive with thermal emission from the intracluster medium (ICM) at hard X-ray energies. Thus far, claimed detections of this emission in Coma are controversial. We present a Suzaku HXD-PIN observation of the Coma cluster in order to nail down its nonthermal hard X-ray content. The contribution of thermal emission to the HXD-PIN spectrum is constrained by simultaneously fitting thermal and nonthermal models to it and a spatially equivalent spectrum derived from an XMM-Newton mosaic of the Coma field. We fail to find statistically significant evidence for nonthermal emission in the spectra which are better described by only a single- or multitemperature model for the ICM. Including systematic uncertainties, we derive a 90% upper limit on the flux of nonthermal emission of 6.0 x 10-12 erg s-1 cm-2 (20-80 keV, for Γ = 2.0), which implies a lower limit on the cluster-averaged magnetic field of B>0.15 μG. Our flux upper limit is 2.5 times lower than the detected nonthermal flux from RXTE and BeppoSAX. However, if the nonthermal hard X-ray emission in Coma is more spatially extended than the observed radio halo, the Suzaku HXD-PIN may miss some fraction of the emission. A detailed investigation indicates that ∼50%-67% of the emission might go undetected, which could make our limit consistent with that of Rephaeli and Gruber and Fusco-Femiano et al. The thermal interpretation of the hard Coma spectrum is consistent with recent analyses of INTEGRAL and Swift data.

  16. Soft X-ray and Ultraviolet Emission Relations in Optically Selected AGN Samples

    CERN Document Server

    Strateva, I; Schneider, D; Vanden Berk, Daniel E; Vignali, C; Strateva, Iskra; Brandt, Niel; Schneider, Donald; Berk, Daniel Vanden; Vignali, Cristian

    2005-01-01

    Using a sample of 228 optically selected Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) in the 0.01-6.3 redshift range with a high fraction of X-ray detections (81-86%), we study the relation between rest-frame UV and soft X-ray emission and its evolution with cosmic time. The majority of the AGNs in our sample (155 objects) have been selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) in an unbiased way, rendering the sample results representative of all SDSS AGNs in particular, and highly complete optically selected AGN samples in general. The addition of two heterogeneous samples of 36 high-redshift and 37 low-redshift AGNs further supports and extends our conclusions. We confirm that the X-ray emission from AGNs is correlated with their UV emission, and that the ratio of the monochromatic luminosity emitted at 2keV compared to 2500A decreases with increasing luminosity (alpha_ox = -0.136l_uv+2.616, where l_uv is in log units), but does not change with cosmic time. These results apply to intrinsic AGN emission, as we correct...

  17. Soft X-Ray Emission Analysis Of A Pulsed Capillary Discharge Operated In Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia, M. P.; Valenzuela, J. C.; Wyndham, E. S.; Favre, M.; Chuaqui, H.; Bhuyan, H.

    2014-05-01

    We present results from a pulsed capillary ns discharge source, operated in Nitrogen and N/He mixtures, in an alumina capillary 2.1mm long with outer diameter of 6.3mm and inner diameter of 1.6mm. The electrical energy stored is 0.5J with peak current of 6kA. Fast charging from an IGBT based pulsed power circuit allows operation at 35-600 Hz with voltages in the range of 18-24kV. Characteristic time-integrated N/He spectra were recorded and analyzed for values of 20-200 Å, with clear evidence of He-like Nitrogen emission at 28.8Å, which represents a possible source for water window soft x-ray microscopy. Filtered diode measurements reveal the influence of axial electron beams, generated by hollow cathode dynamics, on the x-ray emission in the range of 300-450 eV. We discuss optimal voltage applied and pressure conditions for soft x-ray generation. Time-integrated MCP images of a filtered slit-wire system delivered clear evidence of full wall detachment with ~500μm in radial size for the entire emission range and ~200μm for the emission in the 300-450 eV range.

  18. An X-ray Reprocessing Model of Disk Thermal Emission in Type 1 Seyfert Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Chiang, J

    2002-01-01

    Using a geometry consisting of a hot central Comptonizing plasma surrounded by a thin accretion disk, we model the optical through hard X-ray spectral energy distributions of the type 1 Seyfert galaxies NGC 3516 and NGC 7469. As in the model proposed by Poutanen, Krolik, & Ryde for the X-ray binary Cygnus X-1 and later applied to Seyfert galaxies by Zdziarski, Lubi\\'nski, & Smith, feedback between the radiation reprocessed by the disk and the thermal Comptonization emission from the hot central plasma plays a pivotal role in determining the X-ray spectrum, and as we show, the optical and ultraviolet spectra as well. Seemingly uncorrelated optical/UV and X-ray light curves, similar to those which have been observed from these objects can be explained by variations in the size, shape, and temperature of the Comptonizing plasma. Furthermore, by positing a disk mass accretion rate which satisfies a condition for global energy balance between the thermal Comptonization luminosity and the power available fr...

  19. X-ray Emission from Ionized Wind-Bubbles around Wolf-Rayet Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Dwarkadas, Vikram V

    2015-01-01

    Using a code that employs a self-consistent method for computing the effects of photoionization on circumstellar gas dynamics, we model the formation of wind-driven nebulae around massive Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars. Our algorithm incorporates a simplified model of the photo-ionization source, computes the fractional ionization of hydrogen due to the photoionizing flux and recombination, and determines self-consistently the energy balance due to ionization, photo-heating and radiative cooling. We take into account changes in stellar properties and mass-loss over the star's evolution. Our multi-dimensional simulations clearly reveal the presence of strong ionization front instabilities. Using various X-ray emission models, and abundances consistent with those derived for W-R nebulae, we compute the X-ray flux and spectra from our wind bubble models. We show the evolution of the X-ray spectral features with time over the evolution of the star, taking the absorption of the X-rays by the ionized bubble into account. O...

  20. Diffuse X-ray emission from the superbubbles N 70 and N 185 in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Reyes-Iturbide., Jorge; Rodríguez-González., Ary; Velázquez., Pablo F; Sánchez-Cruces, Mónica; Ambrocio-Cruz, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of the diffuse X-ray emission from superbubbles N 70 (DEM L301) and N 185 (DEM L25) located in the Large Magellanic Cloud, based on data from the XMM-Newton Satellite. We obtained spectra and images of these objects in the soft X-ray energy band. These X-ray spectra were fitted by a thermal plasma model, with temperatures of $2.6 \\times 10^{6}$ K and $2.3 \\times 10^{6}$ K, for N 70 and N 185, respectively. For N 70, images show that X-ray emission comes from the inner regions of the superbubble, when we compare the distribution of the X-ray and the optical emission; while for N 185, the X-ray emission is partially confined by the optical shell. We suggest that the observed X-ray emission is caused by shock-heated gas, inside of the optical shells. We also obtained X-ray luminosities which exceed the values predicted by the standard analytical model. This fact shows that, in addition to the winds of the interior stars, it is necessary to consider another ingredient in the description, such a...

  1. Diffuse X-ray emission from the superbubbles N70 and N185 in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes-Iturbide, J.; Rodríguez-González, A.; Velázquez, P. F. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 70–543, D.F. México (Mexico); Rosado, M.; Sánchez-Cruces, M. [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 70–264, C.P. 04510, México, D.F. (Mexico); Ambrocio-Cruz, P. [Instituto de Ciencias Básicas e Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Hidalgo, Ciudad Universitaria, Km 4.5 Carretera Pachuca-Tulancingo, Col. Carboneras, C.P. 42184, Mineral de la Reforma, Hgo. (Mexico)

    2014-11-01

    We present a study of the diffuse X-ray emission from superbubbles (SBs) N70 (DEM L301) and N185 (DEM L25) located in the Large Magellanic Cloud, based on data from the XMM-Newton Satellite. We obtained spectra and images of these objects in the soft X-ray energy band. These X-ray spectra were fitted by a thermal plasma model, with temperatures of 2.6×10{sup 6} K and 2.3×10{sup 6} K, for N70 and N185, respectively. For N70, images show that X-ray emission comes from the inner regions of the SB when we compare the distribution of the X-ray and the optical emission, while for N185, the X-ray emission is partially confined by the optical shell. We suggest that the observed X-ray emission is caused by shock-heated gas, inside of the optical shells. We also obtained X-ray luminosities which exceed the values predicted by the standard analytical model. This fact shows that, in addition to the winds of the interior stars, it is necessary to consider another ingredient in the description, such as a supernova explosion, as has been proposed in previous numerical models.

  2. Time-resolved x-ray emission spectra from optically ionized helium and neon plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of high-power, subpicosecond laser pulses with gas targets is expected to produce highly nonequilibrium plasmas whose parameters are controlled by the laser wavelength and polarization. We investigate such plasmas by measuring time-resolved x-ray-emission spectra in highly ionized helium and neon plasmas produced by high-power optical ionization. Electron temperatures are observed to increase with increasing laser wavelength and with variation of the laser polarization from linear to circular. These results are in qualitative agreement with current models for production of tunnel-ionized laser plasmas. Limited quantitative agreement, however, reflects the complexity of the optical ionization process and suggests the important role rapid cooling processes can play in these plasmas. Emission spectra are combined with time-dependent kinetic simulations to assess prospects for x-ray lasers pumped by rapid electron-ion recombination. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  3. GAMMA-RAY AND X-RAY EMISSION FROM GAMMA-RAY-LOUD BLAZARS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG XIONG; ZHAO GANG; XIE GUANG-ZHONG; ZHENG GUANG-SHENG; ZHANG LI

    2001-01-01

    We present a strong correlation of the gamma-ray (above 100 MeV) mean spectral indices aγ and X-ray (1 keV)mean spectral indices cX for 34 gamma-ray-loud blazars (16 BL Lac objects and 18 flat spectrum radio quasars). Astrong correlation is also found between the gamma-ray flux densities F-γ and X-ray flux densities Fx in the low state for 47 blazars (17 BL Lac and 30 flat spectrum radio quasars). Possible correlation on the gamma-ray emission mechanism is discussed. We suggest that the main gamma-ray radiation mechanism is probably the synchrotron process. The gamma-ray emission may be somewhat different from that of BL Lac objects and flat spectrum radio quasars.

  4. Models of Heliospheric solar wind charge exchange X-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutroumpa, Dimitra

    2016-04-01

    The first models of the solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) X-ray production in the heliosphere were developed shortly after the discovery of SWCX emission at the end of 1990s. Since then, continuous monitoring of the global solar wind evolution through the solar cycle has allowed better constraints on its interaction with the interstellar neutrals. We have a fairly accurate description of the interstellar neutral density distributions in interplanetary space. However, the solar wind heavy ion fluxes, and especially their short term variability and propagation through interplanetary space, have remained relatively elusive due to the sparseness or lack of in situ data, especially towards high ecliptic latitudes. In this talk, I will present a summary the heliospheric SWCX modeling efforts, and an overview of the global solar cycle variability of heliospheric SWCX emission, while commenting on the difficulties of modeling the real-time variability of the heliospheric X-ray signal.

  5. New method for measuring stopping powers using ion induced x-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method for measuring the stopping power of matter for ions is presented. The techniques used are those developed for use in trace element analysis by proton induced x-ray emission. This new method has been validated by comparing the measured stopping powers for copper, silver, and gold at 100 keV with those reported by Allison and Warshaw for free standing foils. The agreement is excellent: +-1% for both copper and silver and +-2% for gold

  6. Method of evaluating chemical shifts of X-ray emission lines in molecules and solids

    OpenAIRE

    Lomachuk, Yuriy V.; Titov, Anatoly V.

    2013-01-01

    Method of evaluating chemical shifts of X-ray emission lines for sufficiently heavy atoms (beginning from period 4 elements) in chemical compounds is developed. This method is based on the pseudopotential model and one-center restoration method (to reconstruct the proper electronic structure in heavy-atom cores). The approximations of instantaneous transition and frozen inner core spinors of the atom are used for derivation of an expression for chemical shift as a difference between mean valu...

  7. Solar wind charge exchange X-ray emission from Mars Model and data comparison

    OpenAIRE

    Koutroumpa, Dimitra; Modolo, Ronan; Chanteur, Gerard; Chaufray, Jean-Yves; Kharchenko, Vasili; Lallement, Rosine

    2012-01-01

    Aims. We study the soft X-ray emission induced by charge exchange (CX) collisions between solar-wind, highly charged ions and neutral atoms of the Martian exosphere. Methods. A 3D multi species hybrid simulation model with improved spatial resolution (130 km) is used to describe the interaction between the solar wind and the Martian neutrals. We calculated velocity and density distributions of the solar wind plasma in the Martian environment with realistic planetary ions description, using sp...

  8. Variable X-Ray and UV emission from AGB stars: Accretion activity associated with binarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, Raghvendra; Sanz-Forcada, Jorge; Sánchez Contreras, Carmen

    2016-07-01

    Almost all of our current understanding of the late evolutionary stages of (1 — 8) Mʘ stars is based on single-star models. However, binarity can drastically affect late stellar evolution, producing dramatic changes in the history and geometry of mass loss that occurs in stars as they evolve off the AGB to become planetary nebulae (PNe). A variety of binary models have been proposed, which can lead to the generation of accretion disks and magnetic fields, which in turn produce the highly collimated jets that have been proposed as the primary agents for the formation of bipolar and multipolar PNe. However, observational evidence of binarity in AGB stars is sorely lacking simply these stars are very luminous and variable, invalidating standard techniques for binary detection. Using an innovative technique of searching for UV emission from AGB stars with GALEX, we have identified a class of AGB stars with far- ultraviolet excesses (fuvAGB stars), that are likely candidates for active accretion associated with a binary companion. We have carried out a pilot survey for X-ray emission from fuvAGB stars. The X-ray fluxes are found to vary in a stochastic or quasi-periodic manner on roughly hour-long times-scales, and simultaneous UV observations show similar variations in the UV fluxes. We discuss several models for the X-ray emission and its variability and find that the most likely scenario for the origin of the X-ray (and FUV) emission involves accretion activity around a main-sequence companion star, with confinement by strong magnetic fields associated with the companion and/or an accretion disk around it.

  9. Interaction delocalization in characteristic X-ray emission from light elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental results for characteristic X-ray emission in spinel are reported. Calculations of ionization cross sections and the effective ionization potential for each of the constituent atoms of the spinel MgAlsO4 have been carried out. This allows a quantitative theoretical insight into the channelling effect for the light elements Al, Mg and O which incorporates delocalization of the ionization interaction. 33 refs., 6 figs

  10. Low Frequency Flickering of TT Arietis Hard and Soft X-ray Emission Region

    CERN Document Server

    Baykal, A

    1997-01-01

    Using archival ASCA observations of TT Arietis, X-ray energy spectra and power spectra of the intensity time series are presented for the first time. The energy spectra are well-fitted by a two continuum plasma emission model with temperatures around 1 keV and 10 keV. A coherent feature at about 0.643 mHz appeared in the power spectra during the observation.

  11. Particle induced X-ray emission for quantitative trace-element analysis using the Eindhoven cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of a multi-elemental trace analysis technique using PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray Emission), was started almost five years ago at the Eindhoven University of Technology, in the Cyclotron Applications Group of the Physics Department. The aim of the work presented is to improve the quantitative aspects of trace-element analysis with PIXE, as well as versatility, speed and simplicity. (Auth.)

  12. Cosmic Rays, Radio Halos and Non-Thermal X-ray Emission in Clusters of Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    P. Blasi(INAF Arcetri); Colafrancesco, S.

    1999-01-01

    We calculate the flux of radio, hard X-ray and UV radiation from clusters of galaxies as produced by synchrotron emission and Inverse Compton Scattering of electrons generated as secondaries in cosmic ray interactions in the intracluster medium. Both the spatial distribution of cosmic rays due to their diffusion and the spatial distribution of the intracluster gas are taken into account. Our calculations are specifically applied to the case of the Coma cluster. The fluxes and spectra of the r...

  13. Detection of hard X-ray emission from the Galactic nuclear region with INTEGRAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belanger, G.; Goldwurm, A.; Goldoni, P.; Paul, Joachim; Terrier, R.; Falanga, M.; Ubertini, P.; Bazzano, A.; Del Santo, M.; Winkler, C.; Parmar, A.N.; Kuulkers, E.; Ebisawa, K.; Roques, J.P.; Lund, Niels; Melia, F.

    2004-01-01

    This Letter presents the first results of an observational campaign to study the Galactic center with INTEGRAL, the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory. Mosaicked images were constructed using data obtained with ISGRI, the soft gamma-ray instrument of the coded aperture IBIS imager, in...... the first report of significant hard X-ray emission from within the inner 10' of the Galaxy and a contribution from the Galactic supermassive black hole itself cannot be excluded....

  14. X-ray survey with microcalorimeters: from GRB in the far universe to diffuse emission in our galaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IMBOSS is an experiment based on X-ray microcalorimeters and aimed to perform a high spectral resolution all-sky survey. One of the primary scientific goals is the observation of the baryon 'missing' matter at z<2. This is expected to be in the form of a warm-hot medium emitting in soft X-rays. We aim to detect and study the WHIM via X-ray emission lines. Another key goal is the detection of X-ray features in the prompt emission of GRBs, ultimately leading to a measurement of z for those class of GRBs still embedded in the mystery. Finally, a high-resolution spectroscopy survey will clarify the origin of the many components thought to make up the diffuse galactic X-ray emission

  15. Discrete sources as the origin of the Galactic X-ray ridge emission

    CERN Document Server

    Revnivtsev, M; Churazov, E; Forman, W; Vikhlinin, A; Sunyaev, R

    2009-01-01

    An unresolved X-ray glow (at energies above a few kiloelectronvolts) was discovered about 25 years ago and found to be coincident with the Galactic disk -the Galactic ridge X-ray emission. This emission has a spectrum characteristic of a 1e8 K optically thin thermal plasma, with a prominent iron emission line at 6.7 keV. The gravitational well of the Galactic disk, however, is far too shallow to confine such a hot interstellar medium; instead, it would flow away at a velocity of a few thousand kilometres per second, exceeding the speed of sound in gas. To replenish the energy losses requires a source of 10^{43} erg/s, exceeding by orders of magnitude all plausible energy sources in the Milky Way. An alternative is that the hot plasma is bound to a multitude of faint sources, which is supported by the recently observed similarities in the X-ray and near-infrared surface brightness distributions (the latter traces the Galactic stellar distribution). Here we report that at energies of 6-7 keV, more than 80 per c...

  16. Modelling the Central Constant Emission X-ray component of eta Carinae

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Christopher M P; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Madura, Thomas I; Owocki, Stanley P; Hillier, D John

    2016-01-01

    The X-ray emission of $\\eta$ Carinae shows multiple features at various spatial and temporal scales. The central constant emission (CCE) component is centred on the binary and arises from spatial scales much smaller than the bipolar Homunculus nebula, but likely larger than the central wind--wind collision region between the stars as it does not vary over the $\\sim$2-3 month X-ray minimum when it can be observed. Using large-scale 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations, we model both the colliding-wind region between the stars, and the region where the secondary wind collides with primary wind ejected from the previous periastron passage. The simulations extend out to one hundred semimajor axes and make two limiting assumptions (strong coupling and no coupling) about the influence of the primary radiation field on the secondary wind. We perform 3D radiative transfer calculations on the SPH output to synthesize the X-ray emission, with the aim of reproducing the CCE spectrum. For the preferred pr...

  17. Energy relation between hard X-ray and O V emission in solar flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between energy emitted in hard X-rays and the ultraviolet during the impulsive phase of solar flares provides an important diagnostic for understanding the energy flow from nonthermal to thermal. Many flares were observed from the Solar Maximum Mission satellite simultaneously in hard X-rays and the O V line at 1371 A formed at 2.5 x 105 K, providing information relevant to this problem. Previous work has shown that short time scale peaks in emission of these two types of radiation coincide in time to within 1 s. In this work we investigate the energy relation between the two types of emission and find that for any given flare there is a difinite relation between hard X-ray and O V emissions throughout the flare, but from one flare to the next this relation varies markedly. We attribute these differences to the initial conditions in the flaring loops and present some exploratory model calculations to support this hypothesis

  18. Nonthermal emission model of isolated X-ray pulsar RX J0420.0-5022

    CERN Document Server

    Chkheidze, Nino

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper an alternative theoretical interpretation to the generally assumed thermal emission models of the observed X-ray spectrum of isolated pulsar RX J0420.0-5022 is presented. It is well known that the distribution function of relativistic particles is one-dimensional at the pulsar surface. However, cyclotron instability causes an appearance of transverse momenta of relativistic electrons, which as a result, start to radiate in the synchrotron regime. On the basis of the Vlasov's kinetic equation we study the process of the quasi-linear diffusion (QLD) developed by means of the cyclotron instability. This mechanism provides generation of optical and X-ray emission on the light cylinder lengthscales. The analysis of the three archival XMM-Newton observations of RX J0420.0-5022 is performed. Considering a different approach of the synchrotron emission theory, the spectral energy distribution is obtained that is in a good agreement with the observational data. A fit to the X-ray spectrum is perfo...

  19. Differential emission measure analysis of hot-flare plasma from solar-maximum mission X-ray data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrijver, J.; Jakimiec, J.; Sylwester, J.; Lemen, J.R.; Mewe, R.; Bentley, R.D.; Fludra, A.; Sylwester, B.

    1984-01-01

    We have investigated differential emission measure (DEM) distribution of hot flare plasma (T>10 MK) using SMM X-ray data from Bent Crystal Spectrometer (BCS) and Hard X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (HXIS). We have found that the analysis provide a very sensitive test of consistency of observational data

  20. Correlation of magnetic dichroism in x-ray absorption and photoelectron emission using ultrathin magnetic alloy films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, J.G.; Goodman, K.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Mankey, G.J.; Willis, R.F. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Denlinger, J.D.; Rotenberg, E.; Warwick, A. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    We have begun a program to characterize magnetic alloy overlays using both magnetic x-ray circular dichroism (MXCD) and magnetic x-ray linear dichroism (MXLD). This will allow a direct comparison of MXCD-absorption and MXLD-photoelectron emission. First results from the Advanced Light Source will be presented.

  1. Recent measurements of soft X-ray emission from the DPF-1000U facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surała Władysław

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Soft X-ray imaging is a very useful diagnostic technique in plasma-focus (PF experiments. This paper reports results of four experimental sessions which were carried out at the DPF-1000U plasma-focus facility in 2013 and 2014. Over 200 discharges were performed at various experimental conditions. Measurements were taken using two X-ray pinhole cameras with a line of sight perpendicular to the z-axis, at different azimuthal angles (about 20° and 200°, and looking towards the centre of the PF-pinch column. They were equipped with diaphragms 1000 μm or 200–300 μm in diameter and coated with filters of 500 μm Al foil and 10 μm Be foil, respectively. Data on the neutron emission were collected with silver activation counters. For time-resolved measurements the use was made of four PIN diodes equipped with various filters and oriented towards the centre of the PF-column, in the direction perpendicular to the electrode axis. The recorded X-ray images revealed that when the additional gas-puff system is activated during the discharge, the stability of the discharge is improved. The data collected in these experiments confirmed the appearance of a filamentary fine structure in the PF discharges. In the past years the formation of such filaments was observed in many Z-pinch type experiments. Some of the recorded X-ray images have also revealed the appearance of the so-called hot-spots, i.e. small plasma regions of a very intense X-ray emission. Such a phenomenon was observed before in many PF experiments, e.g. in the MAJA-PF device, but it has not been investigated so far in a large facility such as the DPF-1000U. The time-resolved measurements provided the evidence of a time lapse between the X-ray emission from plasma regions located at different distance from the anode surface. The formation of distinct ‘hot-spots’ in different instants of the DPF-1000U discharge was also observed.

  2. Non-thermal x-ray emission from wire array z-pinches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ampleford, David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hansen, Stephanie B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jennings, Christopher Ashley [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Webb, Timothy Jay [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Harper-Slaboszewicz, V. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Loisel, Guillaume Pascal [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Flanagan, Timothy McGuire [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bell, Kate Suzanne [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, Brent M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); McPherson, Leroy A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rochau, Gregory A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Chittenden, Jeremy P. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Sherlock, Mark [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Appelbe, Brian [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Giuliani, John [Naval Research Lab. (NRL), Washington, DC (United States); Ouart, Nicholas [Naval Research Lab. (NRL), Washington, DC (United States); Seely, John [Artep Inc., Ellicott City, MD (United States)

    2015-12-01

    We report on experiments demonstrating the transition from thermally-dominated K-shell line emission to non-thermal, hot-electron-driven inner-shell emission for z pinch plasmas on the Z machine. While x-ray yields from thermal K-shell emission decrease rapidly with increasing atomic number Z, we find that non-thermal emission persists with favorable Z scaling, dominating over thermal emission for Z=42 and higher (hn ≥ 17keV). Initial experiments with Mo (Z=42) and Ag (Z=47) have produced kJ-level emission in the 17-keV and 22-keV Kα lines respectively. We will discuss the electron beam properties that could excite these non - thermal lines. We also report on experiments that have attempted to control non - thermal K - shell line emission by modifying the wire array or load hardware setup.

  3. Modelling the Central Constant Emission X-ray component of η Carinae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Christopher M. P.; Corcoran, Michael F.; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Madura, Thomas I.; Owocki, Stanley P.; Hillier, D. John

    2016-05-01

    The X-ray emission of η Carinae shows multiple features at various spatial and temporal scales. The central constant emission (CCE) component is centred on the binary and arises from spatial scales much smaller than the bipolar Homunculus nebula, but likely larger than the central wind-wind collision region between the stars as it does not vary over the ˜2-3 month X-ray minimum when it can be observed. Using large-scale 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations, we model both the colliding-wind region between the stars, and the region where the secondary wind collides with primary wind ejected from the previous periastron passage. The simulations extend out to one hundred semimajor axes and make two limiting assumptions (strong coupling and no coupling) about the influence of the primary radiation field on the secondary wind. We perform 3D radiative transfer calculations on the SPH output to synthesize the X-ray emission, with the aim of reproducing the CCE spectrum. For the preferred primary mass-loss rate dot{M}_A≈ 8.5× 10^{-4} M_{⊙} yr-1, the model spectra well reproduce the observation as the strong- and no-coupling spectra bound the CCE observation for longitude of periastron ω ≈ 252°, and bound/converge on the observation for ω ≈ 90°. This suggests that η Carinae has moderate coupling between the primary radiation and secondary wind, that both the region between the stars and the comoving collision on the backside of the secondary generate the CCE, and that the CCE cannot place constraints on the binary's line of sight. We also discuss comparisons with common X-ray fitting parameters.

  4. Transient Extremely Soft X-ray Emission from the Unusually Bright CV in the Globular Cluster M3: a New CV X-ray Luminosity Record?

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, W S; Elsner, R F; Edmonds, P D; Weisskopf, M C; Grindlay, J E

    2011-01-01

    We observed the accreting white dwarf 1E1339.8+2837 (1E1339) in the globular cluster M3 in Nov. 2003, May 2004 and Jan. 2005, using the Chandra ACIS-S detector. The source was observed in 1992 to possess traits of a supersoft X-ray source (SSS), with a 0.1-2.4 keV luminosity as large as 2x10^{35} erg/s, after which time the source's luminosity fell by roughly two orders of magnitude, adopting a hard X-ray spectrum more typical of CVs. Our observations confirm 1E1339's hard CV-like spectrum, with photon index Gamma=1.3+-0.2. We found 1E1339 to be highly variable, with a 0.5-10 keV luminosity ranging from 1.4+-0.3x10^{34} erg/s to 8.5+4.9-4.6x10^{32} erg/s, with 1E1339's maximum luminosity being perhaps the highest yet recorded for hard X-ray emission onto a white dwarf. In Jan. 2005, 1E1339 displayed substantial low-energy emission below 0.3 keV. Although current Chandra responses cannot properly model this emission, its bolometric luminosity appears comparable to or greater than that of the hard spectral comp...

  5. Diffuse, Non-Thermal X-ray Emission from the Galactic Star Cluster Westerlund 1

    CERN Document Server

    Muno, M P; Clark, J S; Dougherty, S M; De Grijs, R; Zwart, S P; Yusef-Zadeh, F; Muno, Michael P.; Law, Casey; Dougherty, Sean M.; Grijs, Richard de; Zwart, Simon Portegies; Yusef-Zadeh, Farhad

    2006-01-01

    We present the diffuse X-ray emission identified in Chandra observations of the young, massive Galactic star cluster Westerlund 1. After removing point-like X-ray sources down to a completeness limit of 2e31 erg/s, we identify 3e34 erg/s (2--8 keV) of diffuse emission. The spatial distribution of the emission can be described as a slightly-elliptical Lorentzian core with a half-width half-maximum along the major axis of 25+/-1", similar to the distribution of point sources in the cluster, plus a 5' halo of extended emission. The spectrum of the diffuse emission is dominated by a hard continuum component that can be described as a kT>3 keV thermal plasma that has a low iron abundance (<0.3 solar), or as non-thermal emission that could be stellar light that is inverse-Compton scattered by MeV electrons. Only 5% of the flux is produced by a kT=0.7 keV plasma. The low luminosity of the thermal emission and the lack of a 6.7 keV iron line suggests that <40,000 unresolved stars with masses between 0.3 and 2 M...

  6. Neutron star population in the Galactic center region as a potential source of polarized X-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajacek, Michal; Karas, Vladimir; Eckart, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    We analyse the emission properties of neutron stars that are predicted to exist in large numbers of the order of 10000 in the innermost parts of the Galactic center. A part of the population of isolated neutron stars propagates supersonically through denser ionized streams of the Minispiral (Sgr A West), forming bow shocks where particles are accelerated and are expected to produce polarized X-ray synchrotron signal. Another source of the synchrotron emission is an elongated magnetosphere and tail. We investigate whether the polarized X-ray emission from Galactic center neutron stars will be potentially detectable in the framework of future X-ray polarimeters. A special case is a detected young neutron star - magnetar SGRJ1745-2900 - that has undergone a series of outbursts with a peak X-ray luminosity of the order of 10^{35} erg s^{-1} (1-10 keV). Apart from an intrinsic X-ray emission, the X-ray emission from neutron star outbursts may be scattered by molecular clouds in the Central Molecular Zone by Thomson scattering, which is another potential source of polarized X-ray emission.

  7. Role of screening and angular distributions in resonant soft-x-ray emission of CO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skytt, P.; Glans, P.; Gunnelin, K. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    In the present work the authors focus on two particular properties of resonant X-ray emission, namely core hole screening of the excited electron, and anisotropy caused by the polarization of the exciting synchrotron radiation. The screening of the core hole by the excited electron causes energy shifts and intensity variations in resonant spectra compared to the non-resonant case. The linear polarization of the synchrotron radiation and the dipole nature of the absorption process create a preferential alignment selection of the randomly oriented molecules in the case of resonant excitation, producing an anisotropy in the angular distribution of the emitted X-rays. The authors have chosen CO for this study because this molecule has previously served as a showcase for non-resonant X-ray emission, mapping the valence electronic structure differently according to the local selection rules. With the present work they take interest in how this characteristic feature of the spectroscopy is represented in the resonant case.

  8. Characterization of a few gem stones by x-ray emission techniques (EDXRF and external PIXE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray Emission Techniques (EDXRF) and External Proton Induced X-ray Emission Technique (PIXE) have been used to characterize 13 gem stones obtained from Gem Testing Laboratory, Jaipur, India. Radioisotope sources 109Cd and 241Am were used to excite the gem stones to generate K and L X-rays in the low and high Z region of the periodic table to investigate trace element inclusions besides the main matrix. A proton beam of 4 MeV energy and current of 8 nA intensity were extracted from the FOTIA (Folded Tandem Ion Accelerator) at VandeGaaff Accelerator, Trombay, Mumbai in air through a Kapton foil of 8 micrometer thick mounted on a Teflon cone. Gem stones such as Labradorite Feldspar, Moonstone Feldspar, Almandine Garnet, Tsavorite Garnet, Apatite, Natural Spinel, Natural Zircon, Spessartine Garnet, Natural Ruby (Lead filled), Natural Ruby were characterized for their elemental profile to see the differences in composition besides the main matrix differences. Elements such as Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Sr, Y and Zr were detected. (author)

  9. Diffuse X-ray Emission from Planetary Nebulae with Nebular O VI

    CERN Document Server

    Ruiz, N; Gruendl, R A; Guerrero, M A; Jacob, R; Schonberner, D; Steffen, M

    2013-01-01

    The presence of O VI ions can be indicative of plasma temperatures of a few times 10^5 K that is expected in heat conduction layers between the hot shocked stellar wind gas at several 10^6 K and the cooler (~10,000 K) nebular gas of planetary nebulae (PNe). We have used FUSE observations of PNe to search for nebular O VI emission or absorption as a diagnostic of conduction layer to ensure the presence of hot interior gas. Three PNe showing nebular O VI, namely IC 418, NGC 2392, and NGC 6826, have been selected for Chandra observations and diffuse X-ray emission is indeed detected in each of these PNe. Among the three, NGC 2392 has peculiarly high diffuse X-ray luminosity and plasma temperature compared with those expected from its stellar wind's mechanical luminosity and terminal velocity. The limited effects of heat conduction on the plasma temperature of a hot bubble at the low terminal velocity of the stellar wind of NGC 2392 may partially account for its high plasma temperature, but the high X-ray luminos...

  10. X-Ray and Radio Emission from the Luminous Supernova 2005kd

    CERN Document Server

    Dwarkadas, Vikram V; Reddy, R; Bauer, F E

    2016-01-01

    SN 2005kd is among the most luminous supernovae (SNe) to be discovered at X-ray wavelengths. We have re-analysed all good angular resolution (better than $20"$ FWHM PSF) archival X-ray data for SN 2005kd. The data reveal an X-ray light curve that decreases as t$^{-1.62 \\pm 0.06}$. Our modelling of the data suggests that the early evolution is dominated by emission from the forward shock in a high-density medium. Emission from the radiative reverse shock is absorbed by the cold dense shell formed behind the reverse shock. Our results suggest a progenitor with a mass-loss rate towards the end of its evolution of $\\ge$ 4.3 $\\times$ 10$^{-4} M_{\\odot} \\,{\\rm yr}^{-1}$, for a wind velocity of 10 km s$^{-1}$, at 4.0 $\\times$ 10$^{16}$ cm. This mass-loss rate is too high for most known stars, except perhaps hypergiant stars. A higher wind velocity would lead to a correspondingly higher mass-loss rate. A Luminous Blue Variable star undergoing a giant eruption could potentially fulfill this requirement, but would need...

  11. Human diseases and trace elements: investigation by proton-induced X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a conventional Si(Li) detection system, approximately 1500 autopsy samples of ashed human tissues (mostly from autopsies) have been analyzed for trace elements by proton-induced X-ray emission analysis (PIXE). Up to fifteen different organs from each autopsy and a variety of diseases including neoplasia, chronic degenerative diseases, arteriosclerosis, metabolic and inflammatory diseases have been investigated. In each organ, an average of twelve trace elements (with atomic number equal to or larger than 19) has been detected and quantitative measurements have been made for several elements including K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb, Se, Br, Rb, Sr, Cd, Sn and Ba. The elastically scattered protons were used for mass normalization: it was found that this technique is as accurate and much faster than any other technique previously used. Quantization has been obtained by serial doping of selected tissues, along with the use of NBS standards. These standards can also help evaluate elemental loss during ashing and self-absorption effects as they are prepared, after being spiked, in exactly the same manner as the unkown sample. Attempts are being made to compare the results obtained from ashed tissues and tissues which have been simply dried, and also to evaluate the respective merits of the proton-induced X-ray emission and the X-ray fluorescence techniques. The ultimate goal of this investigation is the possible correlations between trace element imbalances and human diseases. (Auth.)

  12. Population synthesis of accreting white dwarfs: II. X-ray and UV emission

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Hai-Liang; Yungelson, L R; Gilfanov, M; Han, Zhanwen

    2015-01-01

    Accreting white dwarfs (WDs) with non-degenerate companions are expected to emit in soft X-rays and the UV, if accreted H-rich material burns stably. They are an important component of the unresolved emission of elliptical galaxies, and their combined ionizing luminosity may significantly influence the optical line emission from warm ISM. In an earlier paper we modeled populations of accreting WDs, first generating WD with main-sequence, Hertzsprung gap and red giant companions with the population synthesis code \\textsc{BSE}, and then following their evolution with a grid of evolutionary tracks computed with \\textsc{MESA}. Now we use these results to estimate the soft X-ray (0.3-0.7keV), H- and He II-ionizing luminosities of nuclear burning WDs and the number of super-soft X-ray sources for galaxies with different star formation histories. For the starburst case, these quantities peak at $\\sim 1$ Gyr and decline by $\\sim 1-3$ orders of magnitude by the age of 10 Gyr. For stellar ages of $\\sim$~10 Gyr, predict...

  13. X-raying Extended emission and rapid decay of short gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Kagawa, Yasuaki; Sawano, Tatsuya; Toyanago, Asuka; Nakamura, Takashi; Takahashi, Keitaro; Kashiyama, Kazumi; Ioka, Kunihito

    2015-01-01

    Extended emission is a mystery in short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs). By making time resolved spectral analyses of brightest eight events observed by {\\it Swift} XRT, we obviously classify the early X-ray emission of SGRBs into two types. One is the extended emission with exponentially rapid decay, which shows significant spectral softening during hundreds seconds since the SGRB trigger and is also detected by {\\it Swift}-BAT. The other is a dim afterglow only showing power-law decay over $10^4$ s. The correlations between the temporal decay and spectral indices of the extended emissions are inconsistent with the $\\alpha$-$\\beta$ correlation expected for the high-latitude curvature emission from a uniform jet. The observed too-rapid decay suggests the emission from a photosphere or a patchy surface, and manifests the stopping central engine via such as magnetic reconnection at the black hole.

  14. Elemental analysis of thick obsidian samples by proton induced x-ray emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton induced x-ray emission is shown to be suitable for the analysis of thick obsidian samples and artifacts with no special treatment other than washing prior to mounting in a sample chamber vacuum system. X-ray spectra observed unfiltered and with plastic or pinhole filters are compared. Using a pinhole filter and a single measurement of approximately 4-min duration followed by thick target yield calculations, a fit to the observed spectra gives concentrations of such elements as K, Ca, Ti, V, Mn, Fe, Rb, Y, Sr, Zr, Nb, Ta, and Pb. Results for selected source samples from the Pacific region show that the technique provides a suitable method for distinguishing between many of the sources. 4 figures, 2 tables

  15. MCNP Simulation to Hard X-Ray Emission of KSU Dense Plasma Focus Machine

    CERN Document Server

    Mohamed, Amgad E

    2015-01-01

    The MCNP program used to simulate the hard x-ray emission from KSU dense plasma focus device, an electron beam spectrum of maximum energy 100 keV was used to hit anode target. The bremsstrahlung radiation was measured using the F2 tally functions on the chamber walls and on a virtual sphere surrounding the machine, the radiation spectrum was recorded for various anode materials like tungsten, stainless steel and molybdenum. It was found that tungsten gives the best and the most intense radiation for the same electron beam. An aluminum filter of thickness 2mm and 4mm was used to cutoff the lower energy band from the x-ray spectrum. It was found that the filters achieved the mission and there is no distinct difference in between.

  16. Supermassive binary black holes - possible observational effects in the x-ray emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Predrag

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we discuss the possible observational effects in the X-ray emission from two relativistic accretion disks in a supermassive binary black hole system. For that purpose we developed a model and performed numerical simulations of the X-ray radiation from a relativistic accretion disk around a supermassive black hole, based on the ray-tracing method in the Kerr metric, and applied it to the case of the close binary supermassive black holes. Our results indicate that the broad Fe Kα line is a powerful tool for detecting such systems and studying their properties. The most favorable candidates for observational studies are the supermassive binary black holes in the galactic mergers during the phase when the orbital velocities of their components are very large and exceed several thousand kms -1. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 176003: Gravitation and the Large Scale Structure of the Universe i br. 176001: Astrophysical Spectroscopy of Extragalactic Objects

  17. Particle induced x-ray emission (PIXE) measurement of the Cd content in animal tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Particle induced x-ray emission (PIXE) measurements were performed on thin samples prepared from different rabbit tissues, using 3 MeV proton beam for inducing x-rays from the animal tissues. This method is very sensitive and very small amounts of trace elements can be detected. Cadmium, one of the most toxic elements which can be concentrated in animal and human tissues due to environmental pollution, was detected with a limit of 0.7 ppm. The trace element concentrations obtained by PIXE were compared to those measured by atomic absorption spectrometry. PIXE method is proposed for routine analysis at the Veterinary and Food Investigating Service, Budapest, Hungary. (D.Gy.) 6 refs.; 3 figs

  18. Standardization of proton-induced x-ray emission technique for analysis of thick samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Shad; Zeb, Johar; Ahad, Abdul; Ahmad, Ishfaq; Haneef, M.; Akbar, Jehan

    2015-09-01

    This paper describes the standardization of the proton-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) technique for finding the elemental composition of thick samples. For the standardization, three different samples of standard reference materials (SRMs) were analyzed using this technique and the data were compared with the already known data of these certified SRMs. These samples were selected in order to cover the maximum range of elements in the periodic table. Each sample was irradiated for three different values of collected beam charges at three different times. A proton beam of 2.57 MeV obtained using 5UDH-II Pelletron accelerator was used for excitation of x-rays from the sample. The acquired experimental data were analyzed using the GUPIXWIN software. The results show that the SRM data and the data obtained using the PIXE technique are in good agreement.

  19. Proton induced x-ray emission analysis of trace elements in thick bread samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique has been used for identification and quantitative analysis of the elemental concentration in thick bread samples. Bread samples were air-oven dried at 60degC and milled in a clean agate mortar to homogenize the sample and pressed into a pellet. PIXE technique relies on the analysis of the energy spectra of the characteristic X-ray emitted from the thick bread sample and the orchard leaf standard (NIST-SRM-1571) bombarded with 2.0 MeV protons. The concentration of the elements (Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn) in the bread samples was determined by comparison with NIST orchard leaf standard. The accuracy of the measurements ranged between ±2% and ±10% for the most elements detected in this method. The aim of this study is to establish the reference concentration of trace elements in the Iraqi bread using PIXE technique. (author)

  20. Analysis of ancient pottery samples and reference materials by particle induced X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Particle Induced X-ray Emission using proton beam (1.5 and 3 MeV) from 3MV tandem accelerator at IOP was applied to ancient pottery samples for determination of major to trace element concentrations. Thick targets in graphite matrix were irradiated at about 10 nA current and characteristic X-rays were measured using a Si(Li) detector coupled to MCA. Concentrations of thirteen elements K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Ni, Rb, Sr and Zr were determined. The results of all elements including transition elements were used for grouping (same or different) the ancient potteries. IAEA RMs SL-1 and SL-3 were analyzed by PIXE as part of application and validation of method. (author)

  1. Three dimensional time-dependent hydrodynamic and propagation modeling of x-ray laser emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have carried out three dimensional time-dependent calculations of x-ray emission in exploding foil line focus produced plasmas relevant to neon-like yttrium experiments at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Hydrodynamic simulations using LASNEX and a simple gain profile based on XRASER are input into CASER, which solves the radiation transport equation along three dimensional ray orbits. Experimental observables such as farfield patterns and x-ray signal vs. laser length are then computed and compared with experiment. Similar two dimensional calculations have also been performed using the wave optics code WAVE to calculate coherence and confirm the accuracy of the ray optics treatment. We have found good agreement between both experiment and simulation and between the ray and wave optics codes

  2. Resonance scattering in the X-ray emission line profiles of Zeta Puppis

    CERN Document Server

    Leutenegger, M A; Kahn, S M; Owocki, S P; Paerels, F B S

    2007-01-01

    We present XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer observations of pairs of X-ray emission line profiles from the O star Zeta Pup that originate from the same He-like ion. The two profiles in each pair have different shapes and cannot both be consistently fit by models assuming the same wind parameters. We show that the differences in profile shape can be accounted for in a model including the effects of resonance scattering, which affects the resonance line in the pair but not the intercombination line. This implies that resonance scattering is also important in single resonance lines, where its effect is difficult to distinguish from a low effective continuum optical depth in the wind. Thus, resonance scattering may help reconcile X-ray line profile shapes with literature mass-loss rates.

  3. A review of molecular effects in gas-phase KL X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The unique capabilities of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) to provide a deep insight into molecular dynamics following core excitation are reviewed here. Characteristic features of molecular X-ray emission are experimentally observed and theoretically interpreted. Some of our most significant results on molecular dynamics following deep core excitation are presented. In particular, we provide several examples of nuclear dynamics on the femtosecond or subfemtosecond time scale; line-narrowing effects related to the quenching of vibrational structure due to parallelism of intermediate and final state curves; anomalous line dispersion across a resonance, which is due to core-hole lifetime effects; spin–orbit-state populations derived from polarized RIXS experiments. We also show how to connect the RIXS results to the general chemical properties of the investigated systems

  4. Spectroscopic evidence of charge exchange X-ray emission from galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Q. Daniel; Liu, Jiren

    2012-01-01

    What are the origins of the soft X-ray line emission from non-AGN galaxies? XMM-Newton RGS spectra of nearby non-AGN galaxies (including starforming ones: M82, NGC 253, M51, M83, M61, NGC 4631, M94, NGC 2903, and the Antennae galaxies, as well as the inner bulge of M31) have been analyzed. In particular, the K{\\alpha} triplet of O VII shows that the resonance line is typically weaker than the forbidden and/or inter-combination lines. This suggests that a substantial fraction of the emission m...

  5. X-Ray Absorption, Nuclear Infrared Emission, and Dust Covering Factors of AGNs: Testing Unification Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos, S.; Carrera, F. J.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Hernán-Caballero, A.; Barcons, X.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Watson, M. G.; Blain, A.; Caccianiga, A.; Ballo, L.; Braito, V.; Ramos Almeida, C.

    2016-03-01

    We present the distributions of the geometrical covering factors of the dusty tori (f2) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) using an X-ray selected complete sample of 227 AGNs drawn from the Bright Ultra-hard XMM-Newton Survey. The AGNs have z from 0.05 to 1.7, 2-10 keV luminosities between 1042 and 1046 erg s-1, and Compton-thin X-ray absorption. Employing data from UKIDSS, 2MASS, and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer in a previous work, we determined the rest-frame 1-20 μm continuum emission from the torus, which we model here with the clumpy torus models of Nenkova et al. Optically classified type 1 and type 2 AGNs are intrinsically different, with type 2 AGNs having, on average, tori with higher f2 than type 1 AGNs. Nevertheless, ˜20% of type 1 AGNs have tori with large covering factors, while ˜23%-28% of type 2 AGNs have tori with small covering factors. Low f2 are preferred at high AGN luminosities, as postulated by simple receding torus models, although for type 2 AGNs the effect is certainly small. f2 increases with the X-ray column density, which implies that dust extinction and X-ray absorption take place in material that share an overall geometry and most likely belong to the same structure, the putative torus. Based on our results, the viewing angle, AGN luminosity, and also f2 determine the optical appearance of an AGN and control the shape of the rest-frame ˜1-20 μm nuclear continuum emission. Thus, the torus geometrical covering factor is a key ingredient of unification schemes.

  6. Modeling Diffuse X-ray Emission around the Galactic Center from Colliding Stellar Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post Russell, Christopher Michael; Cuadra, Jorge; Wang, Q. Daniel; Kallman, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    The Galactic center is a hotbed of astrophysical phenomena. The ~30 evolved massive stars orbiting the super massive black hole (SMBH) on scales Program of the Galactic center provided unprecedented detail of this region by resolving the diffuse thermal emission around the SMBH, and also revealed the presence of SMBH feedback into its immediate surroundings. With the original intent of computing the accretion onto the SMBH, smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations with various feedback prescriptions modeled the 30 Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars orbiting the SMBH over 1100 years while ejecting their stellar winds, thus providing various descriptions of the hot shocked gas around Sgr A*. In this work, we perform 3D X-ray radiative transfer calculations on these hydrodynamic simulations with the goal of reproducing the Chandra observations in the central ±6" around Sgr A*. The model spectral shape from the 2"-5" ring agrees very well with the observations for all feedback models, and the X-ray flux levels of the no or weak feedback models agree with the observation for r<~3". The model flux is too low beyond this radius, while the strong feedback models produce too low a flux throughout the entire simulation region. This is because the strong outflow emanating from the SMBH clears out much of the hot, X-ray emitting gas from its vicinity. These strong feedback simulations are thus excluded from describing Sgr A*. We will conclude by discussing ways to improve the no and weak feedback models, such as by including the O stars and their winds, which should cause the WR-wind X-ray emission to increase as these adiabatic shocks (whose strength is inversely proportional to the distance to the shock) will occur closer to their WR stars.

  7. LATE-TIME RADIO EMISSION FROM X-RAY-SELECTED TIDAL DISRUPTION EVENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present new observations with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array of seven X-ray-selected tidal disruption events (TDEs). The radio observations were carried out between 9 and 22 years after the initial X-ray discovery, and thus probe the late-time formation of relativistic jets and jet interactions with the interstellar medium in these systems. We detect a compact radio source in the nucleus of the galaxy IC 3599 and a compact radio source that is a possible counterpart to RX J1420.4+5334. We find no radio counterparts for five other sources with flux density upper limits between 51 and 200 μJy (3σ). If the detections truly represent late radio emission associated with a TDE, then our results suggest that a fraction, ∼> 10%, of X-ray-detected TDEs are accompanied by relativistic jets. We explore several models for producing late radio emission, including interaction of the jet with gas in the circumnuclear environment (blast wave model), and emission from the core of the jet itself. Upper limits on the radio flux density from archival observations suggest that the jet formation may have been delayed for years after the TDE, possibly triggered by the accretion rate dropping below a critical threshold of ∼10–2-10-3 M-dot Edd. The non-detections are also consistent with this scenario; deeper radio observations can determine whether relativistic jets are present in these systems. The emission from RX J1420.4+5334 is also consistent with the predictions of the blast wave model; however, the radio emission from IC 3599 is substantially underluminous, and its spectral slope is too flat, relative to the blast wave model expectations. Future radio monitoring of IC 3599 and RX J1420.4+5334 will help to better constrain the nature of the jets in these systems.

  8. X-RAY SPECTRAL CUTOFF AND THE LACK OF HARD X-RAY EMISSION FROM TWO ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCES M81 X-6 AND HOLMBERG IX X-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present broadband X-ray spectral study of two ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs), M81 X-6 and Holmberg IX X-1, based on Suzaku and XMM-Newton observations. We perform joint broadband spectral analysis of the brightest sources in the field, i.e., the two ULXs and the active galactic nucleus (AGN) in M81, and demonstrate that the X-ray spectra of the ULXs cut off at energies ∼> 3 keV with negligible contribution at high energies in the Suzaku HXD/PIN band. The 90% upper limit on the 10-30 keV band luminosity of an underlying broadband power-law component is 3.5 × 1038 erg s–1 for M81 X-6 and 1.2 × 1039 erg s–1 for Holmberg IX X-1. These limits are more than an order of magnitude lower than the bolometric (0.1-30 keV) luminosity of 6.8 × 1039 erg s–1 for M81 X-6 and 1.9 × 1040 erg s–1 for Holmberg IX X-1. Our results confirm earlier indications of spectral cutoffs inferred from the XMM-Newton observations of bright ULXs and show that there is not an additional high-energy power-law component contributing significantly to the X-ray emission. The spectral form of the two ULXs are very different from those of Galactic black hole X-ray binaries (BHBs) or AGNs. This implies that the ULXs are neither simply scaled-up versions of stellar-mass BHBs nor scaled-down versions of AGNs.

  9. CORONAL THICK TARGET HARD X-RAY EMISSIONS AND RADIO EMISSIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeongwoo [Physics Department, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States); Lim, Daye; Choe, G. S.; Kim, Kap-Sung [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Minhwan [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-20

    A distinctive class of hard X-ray (HXR) sources located in the corona was recently found, which implies that the collisionally thick target model (CTTM) applies even to the corona. We investigated whether this idea can be independently verified by microwave radiations which have been known as the best companion to HXRs. This study is conducted on the GOES M2.3 class flare which occurred on 2002 September 9 and was observed by the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager and the Owens Valley Solar Array. Interpreting the observed energy-dependent variation of HXR source size under the CTTM, the coronal density should be as high as 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} over a distance of up to 12''. To explain the cutoff feature of the microwave spectrum at 3 GHz, however, we require a density no higher than 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}. Additional constraints must be placed on the temperature and magnetic field of the coronal source in order to reproduce the microwave spectrum as a whole. First, a spectral feature called the Razin suppression requires a magnetic field in a range of 250-350 G along with high viewing angles around 75 Degree-Sign . Second, to avoid excess fluxes at high frequencies due to the free-free emission that was not observed, we need a high temperature {>=}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} K. These two microwave spectral features, Razin suppression and free-free emissions, become more significant at regions of high thermal plasma density and are essential for validating and determining additional parameters of the coronal HXR sources.

  10. A Suzaku Search for Dark Matter Emission Lines in the X-ray Brightest Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Urban, O; Allen, S W; Simionescu, A; Kaastra, J S; Strigari, L E

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of a search for unidentified emission lines in deep Suzaku X-ray spectra for the central regions of the four X-ray brightest galaxy clusters: Perseus, Coma, Virgo and Ophiuchus. We employ an optimized energy range for our analysis (3.2-5.3 keV) that is relatively free of instrumental features, and a baseline plasma emission model that incorporates the abundances of elements with the strongest expected emission lines at these energies (S, Ar, Ca) as free parameters. For the Perseus Cluster core, employing this baseline model, we find evidence for an additional emission feature at an energy $3.51^{+0.02}_{-0.01}$ keV with a flux of ~$2.87\\times10^{-7}$ ph/s/cm^2/arcmin^2. At slightly larger radii, we detect an emission line at 3.59+/-0.02 keV with a flux of ~$4.8\\times10^{-8}$ ph/s/cm^2/arcmin^2. The energies and fluxes of these features are broadly consistent with previous claims, although the radial variation of the line strength appears in tension with standard dark matter (DM) model p...

  11. Chromospheric, transition layer and X-ray emission for stars with different rotational velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm-Vitense, E.

    1982-01-01

    In agreement with previous findings for the MgII k line emission in F stars an increase of Lya and transition layer emission with increasing V sub r sin i, if v sub r sin i greater than 30 km/sec. was not found. For V sub r sin i 30 km/sec., the measured line intensities are consistent with an increase in emission with increasing V sub r sin i. Such a relation between emission and rotation for single stars is also in agreement with X-ray observations. For the young F stars in the Hyades we find generally enhanced emission independently of rotational velocities. The enhancement is most pronounced for low excitation lines.

  12. X-ray emission from a nanosecond-pulse discharge in an inhomogeneous electric field at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes experimental studies of the dependence of the X-ray intensity on the anode material in nanosecond high-voltage discharges. The discharges were generated by two nanosecond-pulse generators in atmospheric air with a highly inhomogeneous electric field by a tube-plate gap. The output pulse of the first generator (repetitive pulse generator) has a rise time of about 15 ns and a full width at half maximum of 30–40 ns. The output of the second generator (single pulse generator) has a rise time of about 0.3 ns and a full width at half maximum of 1 ns. The electrical characteristics and the X-ray emission of nanosecond-pulse discharge in atmospheric air are studied by the measurement of voltage-current waveforms, discharge images, X-ray count and dose. Our experimental results showed that the anode material rarely affects electrical characteristics, but it can significantly affect the X-ray density. Comparing the density of X-rays, it was shown that the highest x-rays density occurred in the diffuse discharge in repetitive pulse mode, then the spark discharge with a small air gap, and then the corona discharge with a large air gap, in which the X-ray density was the lowest. Therefore, it could be confirmed that the bremsstrahlung at the anode contributes to the X-ray emission from nanosecond-pulse discharges.

  13. BAT AGN spectroscopic survey-II. X-ray emission and high-ionization optical emission lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berney, Simon; Koss, Michael; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Ricci, Claudio; Lamperti, Isabella; Schawinski, Kevin; Baloković, Mislav; Crenshaw, D. Michael; Fischer, Travis; Gehrels, Neil; Harrison, Fiona; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Ichikawa, Kohei; Mushotzky, Richard; Oh, Kyuseok; Stern, Daniel; Treister, Ezequiel; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Veilleux, Sylvain; Winter, Lisa

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the relationship between X-ray and optical line emission in 340 nearby (z ≃ 0.04) AGN selected above 10 keV using Swift BAT. We find a weak correlation between the extinction corrected [O III] and hard X-ray luminosity (L_[O III]^{int} ∝ L_{14-195}) with a large scatter (RPear = 0.64, σ = 0.62 dex) and a similarly large scatter with the intrinsic 2-10 keV to [O III] luminosities (RPear = 0.63, σ = 0.63 dex). Correlations of the hard X-ray fluxes with the fluxes of high-ionization narrow lines ([O III], He II, [Ne III] and [Ne V]) are not significantly better than with the low-ionization lines (H α, [S II]). Factors like obscuration or physical slit size are not found to be a significant part of the large scatter. In contrast, the optical emission lines show much better correlations with each other (σ = 0.3 dex) than with the X-ray flux. The inherent large scatter questions the common usage of narrow emission lines as AGN bolometric luminosity indicators and suggests that other issues such as geometrical differences in the scattering of the ionized gas or long-term AGN variability are important.

  14. X-Ray Emission from Young Stars in the Massive Star Forming Region IRAS 20126+4104

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Crystal Nicole; Hofner, Peter; Shepherd, Debra; Creech-Eakman, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    We present a $40\\,$ks Chandra observation of the IRAS$\\,$20126+4104 core region. In the inner $6^{\\prime\\prime}$ two X-ray sources were detected, which are coincident with the radio jet source I20S and the variable radio source I20Var. No X-ray emission was detected from the nearby massive protostar I20N. The spectra of both detected sources are hard and highly absorbed, with no emission below $3\\,$keV. For I20S, the measured $0.5-8\\,$keV count rate was $4.3\\,$cts$\\,$ks$^{-1}$. The X-ray spec...

  15. Intravenous coronary angiography utilizing K-emission and bremsstrahlung X-rays produced by electron bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The screening of the general population for coronary artery disease would be practical if a method existed for visualizing the extent of occlusion after an intravenous injection of contrast agent. Measurements performed with synchrotron radiation at SSRL and NSLS have shown that such an intravenous angiography procedure would be possible with an intense source of monochromatic X-rays. Because of the high cost of an electron synchrotron, theoretical analysis and experiments using inanimate phantoms has been undertaken to demonstrate the feasibility of using the spectrum produced by two appropriately chosen anode materials when bombarded with electrons in the 100--500 keV energy range for angiography. By using the X-rays emitted at 120 degree to the incident electron direction, about 20--30% of the X-ray intensity would be due to K-emission lines. Calculations using the TIGERP Monte Carlo Code, have shown that high quality angiograms of human coronary arteries should be possible with a contrast agent containing ytterbium, if an electron beam pulses of 16 kJ were used for each anode target. The experimental program supported in part by the DOE has consisted of these theoretical calculations and experiments at the Dynamitron Electron Accelerator Facility at BNL

  16. Analyzing x-ray emissions from meter-scale negative discharges in ambient air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochkin, Pavlo; Köhn, Christoph; Ebert, Ute; van Deursen, Lex

    2016-08-01

    When voltage pulses of 1 MV drive meter long air discharges, short and intense bursts of x-rays are measured. Here we develop a model for electron acceleration and subsequent photon generation within this discharge to understand these bursts. We start from the observation that the encounter of two streamers of opposite polarity launches the electrons, that they are further accelerated in the discharge field and then lose their energy, e.g., by photon emission through Bremsstrahlung. We model electron and photon dynamics in space and energy with a Monte Carlo model. Also the detector response to incoming photons is modelled in detail. The model justifies the approximation that the x-ray bursts are isotropic in space; this assumption is used to conclude that x-ray bursts near the high-voltage electrode with 6\\centerdot {{10}4} photons and characteristic energies of 160 keV closely reproduce the measured spectra and attenuation curves. The nanosecond duration of the bursts as well as their energy spectrum is consistent with model calculations.

  17. 3D numerical model of the Omega Nebula (M17): simulated thermal X-ray emission

    CERN Document Server

    Reyes-Iturbide, J; Rosado, M; Rodríguez-Gónzalez, A; González, R F; Esquivel, A

    2009-01-01

    We present 3D hydrodynamical simulations of the superbubble M17, also known as the Omega nebula, carried out with the adaptive grid code yguazu'-a, which includes radiative cooling. The superbubble is modelled considering the winds of 11 individual stars from the open cluster inside the nebula (NGC 6618), for which there are estimates of the mass loss rates and terminal velocities based on their spectral types. These stars are located inside a dense interstellar medium, and they are bounded by two dense molecular clouds. We carried out three numerical models of this scenario, considering different line of sight positions of the stars (the position in the plane of the sky is known, thus fixed). Synthetic thermal X-ray emission maps are calculated from the numerical models and compared with ROSAT observations of this astrophysical object. Our models reproduce successfully both the observed X-ray morphology and the total X-ray luminosity, without taking into account thermal conduction effects.

  18. Quasi-periodic Variations in the Hard X-ray emission of a Large Arcade Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Jakimiec, Jerzy

    2013-01-01

    Quasi-periodic oscillations of the hard X-ray (HXR) emission of the large flare of 2 November 1991 have been investigated using HXR light curves and soft X-ray and HXR images recorded by the {\\sl Yohkoh} X-ray telescopes. The results of the analysis of these observations are the following: i) The observations confirm that electrons are accelerated in oscillating magnetic traps which are contained within the cusp magnetic structure. ii) The amplitude of the HXR pulses increase due to the increase in the amplitude of the magnetic trap oscillations and the increase in the density within the traps caused by the chromospheric evaporation upflow. iii) The increase in the amplitude of the HXR pulses terminates when further increase in the density inside the traps inhibits the acceleration of electrons. iv) The model of oscillating magnetic traps is able to explain time variation of the electron precipitation, strong asymmetry in precipitation of accelerated electrons, and systematic differences in the precipitation ...

  19. Diffuse X-Ray Emission from Late-Type Galaxy Haloes

    CERN Document Server

    Benson, A J; Frenk, C S; White, S D M

    1999-01-01

    Current theories of galaxy formation predict that spiral galaxies are embedded in a reservoir of hot gas. This gas is able to cool onto the galaxy replenishing cold gas that is consumed in star formation. Estimates of the X-ray luminosity emitted in the cooling region suggest a bolometric luminosity of order 10 x 10^41 ergs/s. We have used ROSAT PSPC data to search for extended X-ray emission from the haloes of three nearby, massive, late-type galaxies: NGC 2841, NGC 4594 and NGC 5529. We infer 95% upper limits on the bolometric X-ray luminosities of the haloes of NGC 2841, NGC 4594 and NGC 5529 of 0.4, 1.2 and 3.8 x 10^41 ergs/s respectively. Thus the true luminosity lies well below the straightforward theoretical prediction. We discuss this discrepancy and suggest a number of ways in which the theoretical model can be brought into agreement with the observational results. A possible solution is that the gravitational potentials of these galaxies' dark matter haloes are weaker than assumed in the current mod...

  20. Investigation of the Ionic Hydration in Aqueous Salt Solutions by Soft X-ray Emission Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyachandran, Y L; Meyer, F; Benkert, A; Bär, M; Blum, M; Yang, W; Reinert, F; Heske, C; Weinhardt, L; Zharnikov, M

    2016-08-11

    Understanding the molecular structure of the hydration shells and their impact on the hydrogen bond (HB) network of water in aqueous salt solutions is a fundamentally important and technically relevant question. In the present work, such hydration effects were studied for a series of representative salt solutions (NaCl, KCl, CaCl2, MgCl2, and KBr) by soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and resonant inelastic soft X-ray scattering (RIXS). The oxygen K-edge XES spectra could be described with three components, attributed to initial state HB configurations in pure water, water molecules that have undergone an ultrafast dissociation initiated by the X-ray excitation, and water molecules in contact with salt ions. The behavior of the individual components, as well as the spectral shape of the latter component, has been analyzed in detail. In view of the role of ions in such effects as protein denaturation (i.e., the Hofmeister series), we discuss the ion-specific nature of the hydration shells and find that the results point to a predominant role of anions as compared to cations. Furthermore, we observe a concentration-dependent suppression of ultrafast dissociation in all salt solutions, associated with a significant distortion of intact HB configurations of water molecules facilitating such a dissociation. PMID:27442708

  1. Examining the hard X-ray emission of the redback PSR J2129-0429

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noori, Hind Al; Roberts, Mallory; McLaughlin, Maura; Hessels, Jason; Breton, Rene; 17077031498

    2016-06-01

    We present new NuStar data of the redback millisecond pulsar (MSP) system PSR J2129-0429. Redback systems are important when it comes to understanding the evolution of MSPs, in terms of pulsar recycling, as they have been observed to transition between a state of accretion, where emission is in the optical and X-ray regimes, and a state of eclipsed radio pulsation. This system is particularly interesting due to some peculiarities: it has a more massive companion as well as a stronger magnetic field than other redbacks, indicating that the system is in a fairly early stage of recycling. It’s X-ray lightcurve (as obtained from XMM-Newton data) has a very hard power-law component and exhibits an efficiency of a few percent in X-ray. With the NuStar data, the spectrum can be seen to extend to ~30 keV. Additionally, it shows strong orbital variation, about 5 times greater than is typical for other systems, and is also very clearly double peaked. Hints of similar peaks have been observed in the lightcurves of other redback systems; hence, this system can help in understanding the intrabinary shock of eclipsing MSPs.

  2. Observation of iron spin-states using tabletop x-ray emission spectroscopy and microcalorimeter sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joe, Y. I.; O'Neil, G. C.; Miaja-Avila, L.; Fowler, J. W.; Jimenez, R.; Silverman, K. L.; Swetz, D. S.; Ullom, J. N.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) is a powerful probe of the electronic and chemical state of elemental species embedded within complex compounds. X-ray sensors that combine high resolving power and high collecting efficiency are desirable for photon-starved XES experiments such as measurements of dilute, gaseous, and radiation-sensitive samples, time-resolved measurements, and in-laboratory XES. To assess whether arrays of cryogenic microcalorimeters will be useful in photon-starved XES scenarios, we demonstrate that these emerging energy-dispersive sensors can detect the spin-state of 3d electrons of iron in two different compounds, Fe2O3 and FeS2. The measurements were conducted with a picosecond pulsed laser-driven plasma as the exciting x-ray source. The use of this tabletop source suggests that time-resolved in-laboratory XES will be possible in the future. We also present simulations of {{K}}α and {{K}}β spectra that reveal the spin-state sensitivity of different combinations of sensor resolution and accumulated counts. These simulations predict that our current experimental apparatus can perform time-resolved XES measurements on some samples with a measurement time of a few 10 s of hours per time delay.

  3. Intravenous coronary angiography utilizing K-emission and bremsstrahlung X-rays produced by electron bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-12-31

    The screening of the general population for coronary artery disease would be practical if a method existed for visualizing the extent of occlusion after an intravenous injection of contrast agent. Measurements performed with synchrotron radiation at SSRL and NSLS have shown that such an intravenous angiography procedure would be possible with an intense source of monochromatic X-rays. Because of the high cost of an electron synchrotron, theoretical analysis and experiments using inanimate phantoms has been undertaken to demonstrate the feasibility of using the spectrum produced by two appropriately chosen anode materials when bombarded with electrons in the 100--500 keV energy range for angiography. By using the X-rays emitted at 120{degree} to the incident electron direction, about 20--30% of the X-ray intensity would be due to K-emission lines. Calculations using the TIGERP Monte Carlo Code, have shown that high quality angiograms of human coronary arteries should be possible with a contrast agent containing ytterbium, if an electron beam pulses of 16 kJ were used for each anode target. The experimental program supported in part by the DOE has consisted of these theoretical calculations and experiments at the Dynamitron Electron Accelerator Facility at BNL.

  4. Doppler Shifts and Broadening and the Structure of the X-ray Emission from Algol

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, S M; Kashyap, V L; Lin, L W; Ratzlaff, P W; Chung, Sun Mi; Drake, Jeremy J.; Kashyap, Vinay L.; Lin, Li Wei; Ratzlaff, Peter W.

    2004-01-01

    In a study of Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating spectra of Algol, we clearly detect Doppler shifts caused by the orbital motion of Algol B. These data provide the first definitive proof that the X-ray emission of Algol is dominated by the secondary, in concordance with expectations that Algol A (B8) is X-ray dark. The measured Doppler shifts are slightly smaller than expected, implying an effective orbital radius of about 10 Rsolar, instead of 11.5 Rsolar for the Algol B center of mass. This could be caused by a small contribution of X-ray flux from Algol A (10-15%), possibly through accretion. The more likely explanation is an asymmetric corona biased toward the system center of mass by the tidal distortion of the surface of Algol B. Analysis of the strongest lines indicates excess line broadening of ~150 km/s above that expected from thermal motion and surface rotation. Possible explanations include turbulence, flows or explosive events, or rotational broadening from a radially extended corona. We fa...

  5. X-ray emission of the hot gas and of accelerated particles in supernova remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current observations seem to support the theory that the shock wave of supernova remnants accelerate electrons (representing about 1% of cosmic rays) of the interstellar medium up to energies of about 1015 eV. However there is still no solid evidence that supernova remnants also accelerate protons (major component of cosmic rays). The X-ray observations of those supernova remnants with the satellite XMM-Newton can provide crucial information on the acceleration mechanisms and on this population of accelerated particles. This thesis presents the X-ray analysis of the supernova remnants RX J1713.7-3946 and SN 1006 for which it has been shown that they accelerate electrons efficiently. As a result, these objects are very good targets to compare the theoretical models of acceleration to the observation. For the first object, I constructed through new XMM-Newton observations, the first high-angular resolution mosaic of the entire supernova remnant. I then compared the X- and gamma-ray emission of this object in order to understand the nature of the gamma-ray emission. This spectral and morphological comparison allowed me to discuss the two possible origins of the gamma-ray radiation (issued by electrons or by protons). For SN 1006, I studied the density of the ambient medium in which the shock wave propagates. This density is a key parameter for the hydrodynamical evolution of the remnant and for studying a future gamma-ray emission. The study of X-ray emission of the gas heated by the shock wave allowed me to better estimate of the value of the density so far poorly constrained for this object. (author)

  6. New Limits on Radio Emission from X-ray Dim Isolated Neutron Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Kondratiev, V I; Lorimer, D R; Burgay, M; Possenti, A; Turolla, R; Popov, S B; Zane, S

    2009-01-01

    We have carried out a search for radio emission at 820 MHz from six X-ray dim isolated neutron stars with the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Radio Telescope. No transient or pulsed emission was found using fast folding, fast Fourier transform, and single-pulse searches. The corresponding flux limits are about 0.01 mJy for pulsed emission, depending on the integration time for the particular source and assuming a duty cycle of 2%, and 20 mJy for single dispersed pulses. These are the most sensitive limits to date on radio emission from X-ray dim isolated neutron stars. There is no evidence for isolated radio pulses, as seen in a class of neutron stars known as rotating radio transients. Our results imply that either the radio luminosities of these objects are lower than those of any known radio pulsars, or they could simply be long-period nearby radio pulsars with high magnetic fields beaming away from the Earth. To test the latter possibility, we would need around 40 similar sources to provide a 1 sigma probabilit...

  7. The Spectacular Radio-Near-IR-X-ray Jet of 3C 111: X-ray Emission Mechanism and Jet Kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Clautice, Devon; Georganopoulos, Markos; Lister, Matthew L; Tombesi, Francesco; Cara, Mihai; Marshall, Herman L; Hogan, Brandon; Kazanas, Demos

    2016-01-01

    Relativistic jets are the most energetic manifestation of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) phe- nomenon. AGN jets are observed from the radio through gamma-rays and carry copious amounts of matter and energy from the sub-parsec central regions out to the kiloparsec and often megaparsec scale galaxy and cluster environs. While most spatially resolved jets are seen in the radio, an in- creasing number have been discovered to emit in the optical/near-IR and/or X-ray bands. Here we discuss a spectacular example of this class, the 3C 111 jet, housed in one of the nearest, double-lobed FR II radio galaxies known. We discuss new, deep Chandra and HST observations that reveal both near-IR and X-ray emission from several components of the 3C 111 jet, as well as both the northern and southern hotspots. Important differences are seen between the morphologies in the radio, X-ray and near-IR bands. The long (over 100 kpc on each side), straight nature of this jet makes it an excellent prototype for future, deep observati...

  8. A deep X-ray view of the bare AGN Ark 120. I. Revealing the Soft X-ray Line Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Reeves, James; Braito, Valentina; Nardini, Emanuele; Lobban, Andrew; Turner, Jane

    2016-01-01

    The Seyfert 1 galaxy, Ark 120, is a prototype example of the so-called class of bare nucleus AGN, whereby there is no known evidence for the presence of ionized gas along the direct line of sight. Here deep ($>400$ ks exposure), high resolution X-ray spectroscopy of Ark 120 is presented, from XMM-Newton observations which were carried out in March 2014, together with simultaneous Chandra/HETG exposures. The high resolution spectra confirmed the lack of intrinsic absorbing gas associated with Ark 120, with the only X-ray absorption present originating from the ISM of our own Galaxy, with a possible slight enhancement of the Oxygen abundance required with respect to the expected ISM values in the Solar neighbourhood. However, the presence of several soft X-ray emission lines are revealed for the first time in the XMM-Newton RGS spectrum, associated to the AGN and arising from the He and H-like ions of N, O, Ne and Mg. The He-like line profiles of N, O and Ne appear velocity broadened, with typical FWHM widths o...

  9. Removing Spectral Diagnostics of Galactic and Stellar X-Ray Emission from Charged Exchange Recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wargelin, Brad

    2004-01-01

    Our research uses the electron beam ion trap (EBIT) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to study X-ray emission from the charge exchange (CX) of highly charged ions with neutral gases. The resulting data help to fill a void in existing experimental and theoretical understanding of this atomic physics process, and are needed to explain all or part of the observed X-ray emission from the soft X-ray background, stellar winds, the Galactic Center and Galactic Ridge, supernova ejecta, and photoionized nebulae. Appreciation of the astrophysical relevance of our work continues to grow with the publication of roughly a dozen papers in the past four years describing Chandra and XMM observations of geocoronal and heliospheric CX emission, the temporal variation of such emission and correlation with X-ray emission enhancements observed by ROSAT, the theoretical spatial distribution of that emission, and CX emission around other stars. A similar number of papers were also published during that time describing CX emission from planets and comets. We expect that the launch of ASTRSE2, with its second-generation XRS microcalo- (with 6-eV resolution), will reveal even more clearly the contributions of CX to astrophysical emission. In our EBIT work we collected CX spectra from such ions as H-like and He-like Ne, Ar, and Fe. Our early measurements were made with a high-purity Ge detector, but during the second year we began operation of the first-generation XRS microcalorimeter (a twin of the XRS on ASTRO-E) and greatly improved the resolution of our measurements from roughly 150 eV (FWHM) with the Ge detectors to 10 eV with the XRS. We found that saturation of the XRS counting apparatus, which we described in our proposal as a potential concern, is not a problem for studying CX. During the course of our research, we expanded the number of injection gases permitted by the LLNL safety team, purchased and eventually operated an atomic H source, and clearly demonstrated the

  10. Modeling Flare Hard X-ray Emission from Electrons in Contracting Magnetic Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidoni, Silvina E.; Allred, Joel C.; Alaoui, Meriem; Holman, Gordon D.; DeVore, C. Richard; Karpen, Judith T.

    2016-05-01

    The mechanism that accelerates particles to the energies required to produce the observed impulsive hard X-ray emission in solar flares is not well understood. It is generally accepted that this emission is produced by a non-thermal beam of electrons that collides with the ambient ions as the beam propagates from the top of a flare loop to its footpoints. Most current models that investigate this transport assume an injected beam with an initial energy spectrum inferred from observed hard X-ray spectra, usually a power law with a low-energy cutoff. In our previous work (Guidoni et al. 2016), we proposed an analytical method to estimate particle energy gain in contracting, large-scale, 2.5-dimensional magnetic islands, based on a kinetic model by Drake et al. (2010). We applied this method to sunward-moving islands formed high in the corona during fast reconnection in a simulated eruptive flare. The overarching purpose of the present work is to test this proposed acceleration model by estimating the hard X-ray flux resulting from its predicted accelerated-particle distribution functions. To do so, we have coupled our model to a unified computational framework that simulates the propagation of an injected beam as it deposits energy and momentum along its way (Allred et al. 2015). This framework includes the effects of radiative transfer and return currents, necessary to estimate flare emission that can be compared directly to observations. We will present preliminary results of the coupling between these models.

  11. Plasma heating in solar flares and their soft and hard X-ray emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the energy budgets of two single-loop-like flares observed in X-ray are analyzed under the assumption that nonthermal electrons (NTEs) are the only source of plasma heating during all phases of both events. The flares were observed by RHESSI and GOES on 2002 February 20 and June 2, respectively. Using a one-dimensional (1D) hydrodynamic code for both flares, the energy deposited in the chromosphere was derived applying RHESSI observational data. The use of the Fokker-Planck formalism permits the calculation of distributions of the NTEs in flaring loops and thus spatial distributions of the X-ray nonthermal emissions and integral fluxes for the selected energy ranges that were compared with the observed ones. Additionally, a comparative analysis of the spatial distributions of the signals in the RHESSI images was conducted for the footpoints and for all the flare loops in selected energy ranges with these quantities' fluxes obtained from the models. The best compatibility of the model and observations was obtained for the 2002 June 2 event in the 0.5-4 Å GOES range and total fluxes in the 6-12 keV, 12-25 keV, 20-25 keV, and 50-100 keV energy bands. Results of photometry of the individual flaring structures in a high energy range show that the best compliance occurred for the 2002 June 2 flare, where the synthesized emissions were at least 30% higher than the observed emissions. For the 2002 February 20 flare, synthesized emission is about four times lower than the observed one. However, in the low energy range the best conformity was obtained for the 2002 February 20 flare, where emission from the model is about 11% lower than the observed one. The larger inconsistency occurs for the 2002 June 2 solar flare, where synthesized emission is about 12 times greater or even more than the observed emission. Some part of these differences may be caused by inevitable flaws of the applied methodology, like by an assumption that the model of the flare is

  12. 0.5 to 6 MeV Ar ion induced X-ray emission in view to analytical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the X-ray emission induced by 0.5 to 6 MeV Ar ions has been realized in view of multielemental analytical applications. The historical development of the use of heavy ion induced X-ray emission in analysis and the theoretical background of inner-shell ionization in heavy ion-atom collisions are described. The emission of non characteristic X-rays and the effects related to the penetration of heavy ions in matter are also related. The experimental part contains a description of the experimental devices and of the X-ray spectra fitting method. Thick target yields as a function of the target Z and the Ar ion energy are reported. The analytical possibilities are examined and an application to the analysis of Si and Cl in cadmium telluride crystals is given

  13. Angular dependence of L X-rays emission for Ag by 10 keV electron-impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xing; Xu, Zhongfeng; Zhang, Ying; Ma, Chao; Zhu, Chengwei

    2016-08-01

    The characteristic X-ray intensities of Ag-Lα, Lβ1, Lβ2 and Lγ1 are measured in electron-impact ionization at energy of 10 keV. The emission angle in this work ranges from 0° to 20° at interval of 5°. The angular dependence of L X-ray intensity ratios has been investigated for Lα / Lβ1, Lβ2 / Lβ1 and Lγ1 / Lβ1. It is found from the experimental results that the emissions of Lβ1, Lβ2 and Lγ1 X-rays are spatially isotropic, while the Lα X-rays exhibit anisotropic emission. Consequently, the alignment behavior of vacancy states is discussed with thorough analysis of vacancy transfer process.

  14. Site-selective high-resolution X-ray absorption spectroscopy and high-resolution X-ray emission spectroscopy of cobalt nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, Timna-Josua; Hormes, Josef; Matoussevitch, Nina; Bönnemann, Helmut; Glatzel, Pieter

    2014-08-18

    The special (macroscopic) properties of nanoparticles are mainly due to their large surface-to-volume ratio. Thus, the separate characterization of geometric and electronic properties of surface and bulk would be favorable for a better understanding of the properties of nanoparticles. Because of the chemical sensitivity of X-ray fluorescence lines, in particular those involving higher lying electronic states, high-resolution fluorescence-detected X-ray absorption spectra (HRFD-XAS) offer these opportunities. In this study, three types of wet-chemically synthesized Co nanoparticles, ∼6 nm in diameter with varying thicknesses of a protective shell, were investigated at the ID26 beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. HRFD-XAS spectra at the Co K-edge, that is, X-ray absorption near-edge structure (HRFD-XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (HRFD-EXAFS) spectra, were recorded via detection of the Kβ1,3 fluorescence at specific energies. As these spectra are only partly site-selective due to a strong overlap of the emission lines, a numerical procedure was applied based on a least-squares fitting procedure, realized by singular value decomposition. The detailed analysis of the obtained site-selective spectra, regarding chemical composition and crystallographic phase, using measured and simulated FEFF9-based reference spectra, showed that the metallic core had mainly hexagonal close-packed structure with lattice constants matching bulk Co; the spectra for the shell could be satisfactorily fitted by a mixture of CoO and CoCO3; however, with an obvious need for at least a third compound. To obtain additional information about ligands attached to Co, valence-to-core X-ray emission spectra (VTC-XES) using the Kβ2,5 and the satellite structure Kβ″ and VTC-XANES spectra thereof were also recorded, by which the former results are confirmed. Further on, FEFF simulations indicate that a Co-N compound is a very likely candidate for the third

  15. SOFT X-RAY EMISSION SPECTRA AND THE BONDING OF ALUMINUM

    OpenAIRE

    Callcott, T.; Tsang, K.-L.; Zhang, C.; Ederer, D.; Arakawa, E.

    1987-01-01

    The L2,3 soft x-ray emission (SXE) spectra of Al in metallic Al, Al-Mn alloys, dilute Al-Mg alloys, the intermetallic compounds LiAl and Ni3Al, the semiconducting alloy (Al-Ga)As and insulating Al2O3 are presented. The spectra provide a measure of the s-like partial density of states (PDOS) localized at the Al atoms and show prominant qualitative features that may be identified with each of the major types of bonding in solids, ie. metallic, covalent and ionic. The spectra of metallic Al and ...

  16. Intra-tumor distribution of metallofullerene using micro-particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yohei; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Horiguchi, Yukichi; Shirakawa, Makoto; Satoh, Takahiro; Koka, Masashi; Nagasaki, Yukio; Nakai, Kei; Matsumura, Akira

    2014-06-01

    To clarify the intra tumor distribution of gadlinium containing fullerene (Gd@C82), micro particle induced X-ray emission (Micro-PIXE) analysis were performed. The tumor bearing BALB/c mice were injected Gd@C82 and subcutaneous tumors were taken from 48h after the intravenous injection. Using the Micro-PIXE method, we could visualize Gd intra tumor distribution. Therefore our results indicate the possibility that Micro-PIXE is useful technique for imaging the bioditribution of Gd, and Gd@C82 is potentially useful Gd carrier for NCT. PMID:24491681

  17. Elemental analysis of renal slices by proton-induced X-ray emission.

    OpenAIRE

    Lowe, T; Chen, Q; Fernando, Q; Keith, R; Gandolfi, A J

    1993-01-01

    We optimized proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) for tissue analysis in a toxicity-disposition study. We used cultured rabbit renal slices as the biological system to demonstrate the use of PIXE analysis. The renal slices were exposed to HgCl2, CdCl2, K2Cr2O7, or NaAsO2 alone or in a mixture. The PIXE analysis provides information on concentrations of elements above atomic number 11, and it is the only analytical technique that can determine 20-30 elements nondestructively in a single, small...

  18. X-ray spontaneous emission control by 1-dimensional photonic bandgap structure

    OpenAIRE

    André, Jean-Michel; Jonnard, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Paper available at http://epjd.edpsciences.org/index.php?option=com_article&access=standard&Itemid=129&url=/articles/epjd/abs/2010/06/d09549/d09549.html International audience The possibility of controlling the X-ray spontaneous emission of atoms embedded in a 1-dimensional photonic bandgap structure by the so-called Purcell effect, is studied. Calculations of the spontaneously emitted power are presented from Fermi's golden rule in the framework of the Wigner-time approach extended to ...

  19. Comparison Between X-rays Absorption and Emission Spectroscopy Measurements on a Ceramic Envelop Lamp

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bruno LAFITTE; Michel AUBES; Georges ZISSIS

    2007-01-01

    Burners of metal halide lamps used for illumination are generally made of polycrystalline alumina ceramic (PCA) which is translucent to visible light.We show that the difficulty of selecting a line of sight through the lamp prevents the use of optical emission diagnostic.X-rays photons are mainly absorbed and not scattered by PCA.Absorption by mercury atoms contributing to the discharge allowed us to determine the density of mercury in the lamp.By comparing diagnostic methods,we put in evidence the difficulty of taking into account the scattering of light mathematically.

  20. Projectile X-ray emission in relativistic ion-atom collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Salem, Shadi

    2010-01-01

    This work reports on the study of the projectile x-ray emission in relativistic ion-atom collisions. Excitation of K-shell in He-like uranium ions, electron capture into H-like uranium ions and Simultaneous ionization and excitation of initially He-like uranium ions have been studied using the experimental storage ring at GSI. Information about the population of the excited states for the H- and He-like uranium ions, can be obtained by measuring the angular distribution of the decay radiation...

  1. Resonance scattering in the X-ray emission lines profiles of ζ Puppis

    OpenAIRE

    Leutenegger, M. A.; Cohen, D. H.; Kahn, S. M.; Owocki, S. P.; Paerels, F. B. S.

    2008-01-01

    We present XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer observations of pairs of X-ray emission line profiles from the O star ζ Pup that originate from the same He-like ion. The two profiles in each pair have different shapes and cannot both be consistently fit by models assuming the same wind parameters. We show that the differences in profile shape can be accounted for in a model including the effects of resonance scattering, which affects the resonance line in the pair but not the intercombi...

  2. Resonance scattering in the X-ray emission line profiles of Zeta Puppis

    OpenAIRE

    Leutenegger, M. A.; Cohen, D. H.; Kahn, S. M.; Owocki, S. P.; Paerels, F. B. S.

    2007-01-01

    We present XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer observations of pairs of X-ray emission line profiles from the O star Zeta Pup that originate from the same He-like ion. The two profiles in each pair have different shapes and cannot both be consistently fit by models assuming the same wind parameters. We show that the differences in profile shape can be accounted for in a model including the effects of resonance scattering, which affects the resonance line in the pair but not the interco...

  3. Intra-tumor distribution of metallofullerene using micro-particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To clarify the intra tumor distribution of gadlinium containing fullerene (Gd@C82), micro particle induced X-ray emission (Micro-PIXE) analysis were performed. The tumor bearing BALB/c mice were injected Gd@C82 and subcutaneous tumors were taken from 48 h after the intravenous injection. Using the Micro-PIXE method, we could visualize Gd intra tumor distribution. Therefore our results indicate the possibility that Micro-PIXE is useful technique for imaging the bioditribution of Gd, and Gd@C82 is potentially useful Gd carrier for NCT

  4. Observation of π backbonding features appearing in Fe 2p X-ray absorption spectra and Fe 1s-4p-1s resonant X-ray emission spectra of RbMn[Fe(CN)6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satellite features by p backbonding (metal-to-ligand charge transfer) were observed in both Fe 2p (L3,2-edge) X-ray absorption spectra and 1s-4p-1s resonant X-ray emission spectra for RbMn[Fe(CN)6], which can be theoretically explained using common parameters. Fe L3,2-edge and Mn L3,2-edge X-ray absorption spectra for low temperature phase are also presented.

  5. Fe Line Diagnostics of Cataclysmic Variables and Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Xiao-jie; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2016-01-01

    The properties of the Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission (GRXE) observed in the 2-10 keV band place fundamental constraints on various types of X-ray sources in the Milky Way. Although the primarily discrete origin of the emission is now well established, the responsible populations of these sources remain uncertain, especially at relatively low fluxes. To provide insights into this issue, we systematically characterize the Fe emission line properties of the candidate types of the sources in the solar neighborhood and compare them with those measured for the GRXE. Our source sample includes 6 symbiotic stars (SSs), 16 intermediate polars (IPs), 3 polars, 16 quiescent dwarf novae (DNe) and 4 active binaries (ABs). We find that the mean equivalent width ($EW_{6.7}$) of the 6.7-keV line and the mean 7.0/6.7-keV line ratio are $107\\pm16.0$ eV and $0.71\\pm 0.04$ for intermediate polars and $221\\pm 135$ eV and $0.44\\pm 0.14$ for polars, respectively, which are all substantially different from those ($490\\pm15 $~eV and $...

  6. Control methods for the field emission x-ray spectra and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Control methods for the field emission x-ray spectra and their applications to biomedical imaging are described. The x-ray source used for this research was a single shot type and consisted of the following essential components: a high voltage generator, a simple low impedance pulser with a coaxial oil condenser of 0.2μF-100kV, an impulse switching system utilizing a light communication device, and two types of field emission tubes. The tubes were of the diode type and were connected to a turbo molecular pump which allowed operation at pressures of approximately less than 1 x 10-3Pa. The maximum intensity was about 30C/kg at 1m/pulse, and the exposure time was about 1 μs. The bremsstrahlung spectra from this source were determined by means of intensity attenuation analysis using a new type of spectrum function (derived by the authors) closely fitting the field emission spectrum distribution. The peak intensity and the energy latitude of the spectra could be controlled. Various kinds of high speed radiography, (e.g., single shot dual energy subtraction radiography, and three dimensional image analysis) were accomplished by controlling the spectrum distribution

  7. A study of diffuse radio sources and X-ray emission in six massive clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Parekh, Viral; Kale, Ruta; Intema, Huib

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the present study is to extend our current knowledge of the diffuse radio source (halo and relic) populations to $z$ $>$ 0.3. Here we report GMRT and EVLA radio observations of six galaxy clusters taken from the MAssive Cluster Survey (MACS) catalogue to detect diffuse radio emission. We used archival GMRT (150, 235 and 610 MHz) and EVLA (L band) data and made images at multiple radio frequencies of the following six clusters - MACSJ0417.5-1154, MACSJ1131.8-1955, MACSJ0308.9+2645, MACSJ2243.3-0935, MACSJ2228.5+2036 and MACSJ0358.8-2955. We detect diffuse radio emission (halo or relic or both) in the first four clusters. In the last two clusters we do not detect any diffuse radio emission but we put stringent upper-limits on their radio powers. We also use archival {\\it Chandra} X-ray data to carry out morphology and substructure analysis of these clusters. We find that based on X-ray data, these MACS clusters are non-relaxed and show substructures in their temperature distribution. The radio power...

  8. HARD X-RAY AND MICROWAVE EMISSIONS FROM SOLAR FLARES WITH HARD SPECTRAL INDICES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyze 10 flare events that radiate intense hard X-ray (HXR) emission with significant photons over 300 keV to verify that the electrons that have a common origin of acceleration mechanism and energy power-law distribution with solar flares emit HXRs and microwaves. Most of these events have the following characteristics. HXRs emanate from the footpoints of flare loops, while microwaves emanate from the tops of flare loops. The time profiles of the microwave emission show delays of peak with respect to those of the corresponding HXR emission. The spectral indices of microwave emissions show gradual hardening in all events, while the spectral indices of the corresponding HXR emissions are roughly constant in most of the events, though rather rapid hardening is simultaneously observed in some for both indices during the onset time and the peak time. These characteristics suggest that the microwave emission emanates from the trapped electrons. Then, taking into account the role of the trapping of electrons for the microwave emission, we compare the observed microwave spectra with the model spectra calculated by a gyrosynchrotron code. As a result, we successfully reproduce the eight microwave spectra. From this result, we conclude that the electrons that have a common acceleration and a common energy distribution with solar flares emit both HXR and microwave emissions in the eight events, though microwave emission is contributed to by electrons with much higher energy than HXR emission.

  9. X-Ray Emission from Stellar Jets by Collision against High-density Molecular Clouds: an Application to HH 248

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Santiago, J.; Bonito, R.; Orellana, M.; Miceli, M.; Orlando, S.; Ustamujic, S.; Albacete-Colombo, J. F.; de Castro, E.; Gómez de Castro, A. I.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the plausibility of detecting X-ray emission from a stellar jet that impacts a dense molecular cloud, a scenario that may be typical for classical T Tauri stars with jets in dense star-forming complexes. We first model the impact of a jet against a dense cloud using two-dimensional axisymmetric hydrodynamic simulations, exploring different configurations of the ambient environment. Then, we compare our results with XMM-Newton observations of the Herbig-Haro object HH 248, where extended X-ray emission aligned with the optical knots is detected at the edge of the nearby IC 434 cloud. Our simulations show that a jet can produce plasma with temperatures up to 107 K, consistent with production of X-ray emission, after impacting a dense cloud. We find that jets denser than the ambient medium but less dense than the cloud produce detectable X-ray emission only at impact with the cloud. From an exploration of the model parameter space, we constrain the physical conditions (jet density and velocity and cloud density) that reproduce the intrinsic luminosity and emission measure of the X-ray source possibly associated with HH 248 well. Thus, we suggest that the extended X-ray source close to HH 248 corresponds to a jet impacting a dense cloud.

  10. A Suzaku search for dark matter emission lines in the X-ray brightest galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, O.; Werner, N.; Allen, S. W.; Simionescu, A.; Kaastra, J. S.; Strigari, L. E.

    2015-08-01

    We present the results of a search for unidentified emission lines in deep Suzaku X-ray spectra of the central regions of the X-ray brightest galaxy clusters: Perseus, Coma, Virgo and Ophiuchus. We analyse an optimized energy range (3.2-5.3 keV) that is relatively free of instrumental features, and a plasma emission model incorporating the abundances of elements with the strongest expected emission lines at these energies (S, Ar, Ca) as free parameters. For the Perseus Cluster core, employing this model, we find evidence for an additional emission feature at an energy E=3.51^{+0.02}_{-0.01} keV with a flux of 2.87_{-0.38}^{+0.33}× 10^{-7} photons s^{-1} cm^{-2} arcmin^{-2}. At slightly larger radii, we detect an emission line at 3.59 ± 0.02 keV with a flux of 4.8_{-1.4}^{+1.7}× 10^{-8} photons s^{-1} cm^{-2} arcmin^{-2}. The properties of these features are broadly consistent with previous claims, although the radial variation of the line strength appears in tension with dark matter (DM) decay model predictions. Assuming a decaying DM origin for these features allows us to predict the energies and detected line fluxes for the other clusters. We do not detect an emission feature at the predicted energy and line flux in the Coma, Virgo and Ophiuchus clusters. The formal 99.5 per cent upper limits on the line strengths in each cluster are well below the decaying DM model predictions, disfavouring a decaying DM interpretation. The results of further analysis suggest that systematic effects associated with modelling the spectra for the Perseus Cluster, details of the assumed ionization balance and errors in the predicted spectral line emissivities may be largely responsible for the ˜3.55 keV feature.

  11. M-shell satellite structure of 74W x-ray emission lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spectra of the x-ray emission lines have a complex structure due to the presence of additional holes in the outer shell, which accompany the main transition. The additional holes are called spectator holes, and the induced transitions which are slightly shifted, usually on the higher energy side of the diagram line, are called satellite lines. Although the origin of these satellite lines can been explained by various mechanisms, there are few experimental studies which actually consider the presence of the satellite lines in the spectra on a theoretical ground. Compared to L-shell x-ray emission spectra, the spectra of M-shell x-ray spectra have a far more complicated structure, as the spectator holes can be created by an increased number of channels, such as shake-off, Auger, Coster-Kronig and super-Coster-Kronig transitions. In the present work we attempt to identify the contribution of the Coster-Kronig induced satellites in the M-shell spectra of 74W, both experimentally and theoretically. The 74W Mα,β emission lines generated by electron bombardment from a rotary target x-ray generator were measured by a high resolution single crystal spectrometer, using the (400) plane of a RAP single crystal. The spectra were fitted into Lorentzians; the satellite structure observed on the higher energy side of the corresponding diagram line in a energy range of 2-18 eV, is compared with the experimental results obtained by Munier. In order to identify the transition of the satellites, the transition energy was calculated by means of relativistic density-functional calculations for the case of single spectator holes which can accompany the diagram transition by subsequent Coster-Kronig transitions. The Coster-Kronig induced satellites have been found to be very close to their parent line (0.7 - 4.4 eV). The higher energy satellite structure which goes up to 18 eV apart from the parent line is considered to be due to M-shell spectator holes which can be created mainly

  12. Fusion plasma diagnostics by means of atomic emissions in X-ray range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ITER, a fusion reactor will also provide an ample opportunity for advance atomic physic data and understanding. The fusion plasma interactions with the internal machine components will release particles. These impurity elements of low to high atomic numbers, once enter into the plasma boundary and as transport towards the core will undergo numerous atomic processes like excitation, relaxation, recombination, or ionization; and will result in line and continuum emissions from the impurity atoms or ions. Currently application of Tungsten as diverter material is foreseen for ITER. So, there is a need of advancement in atomic modelling for Tungsten as enabling optical and spectroscopy diagnostic designs require extensive simulation data from the emission modelling. India is responsible for delivering two X-ray Crystal Spectrometers to ITER which are based on X-ray spectroscopy (XRCS) of Hydrogen or Helium like ions of low or high Z impurities in the plasmas. The XRCS-Survey, a broad-band X-ray spectrometer, is one of the important diagnostic systems which will be put in the first set of diagnostics on ITER helping the start-up of the plasma operations. The primary function of this spectrometer will be to accurately measure plasma impurity concentration and their in-flux at fast enough rates in order to protect and/or control the machine during all phases of the ITER operations. The XRCS-Edge, a modified Johann spectrometer, is dedicated to measure profiles of ion temperature and poloidal rotation velocity in the plasma edge regions. Edge spectrometer is mainly required for advanced plasma control and will provide valuable data for edge pedestal physics. These systems will have to reliably function in the high neutron environment of the ITER. Preliminary design of the spectrometers is currently on-going and performance has been simulated with the impurity emission data modelled with ADAS atomic database and SANCO impurity transport code. This presentation will focus on

  13. X-ray Emission of Low-Energy-Peaked BL Lacertae Objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presented here is an analysis of X-ray observations of the following seven low-energy-peaked BL Lacertae objects: BL Lacertae, S5 0716+71, W Comae, 3C 66A, S4 0954+65, OJ 287, and AO 0235+16. The spectral data for these objects were taken from observations by the XMM-Newton and/or Chandra X-ray observatories. These objects are being analyzed in an effort to reanalyze all XMM-Newton and Chandra data of low-energy BL Lacs, similar to the efforts of Perlman et al.[4] for high energy BL Lacs. The objects were studied in an effort to understand the nature of the X-ray and multi-waveband emissions in these objects, study the shape of the spectra, and compare the observations of low-energy-peaked BL Lacs to previous observations of these objects and also to observations of high-energy-peaked BL Lacs. Light curves and spectra were analyzed to look for evidence of spectral variability in the objects and as a comparison to previous research on these objects. Most data shows both synchrotron and Inverse-Compton emission, though only little correlation was seen between the emission strength and the spectral slope. Our data is generally well-fitted to a broken power law model with distinct bimodality seen in the first spectral index (six observations with Γ1∼0.4 and four observations with Γ1∼3.0), a break in energy between 0.6 and 1.4 keV, and a second spectral index Γ2∼2.0. None of the observations showed spectral lines, which is consistent with past results. For S5 0716+71 the XMM-Newton X-ray and optical data, along with radio data obtained from the University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory (UMRAO), a spectral energy distribution was created and peak frequencies were estimated.

  14. Geminga's soft x-ray emission and the structure of its surface

    CERN Document Server

    Page, D; Zavlin, V E; Page, Dany

    1995-01-01

    We present a model to explain the decrease in the amplitude of the pulse profile with increasing energy observed in Geminga's soft X-ray surface thermal emission. We assume the presence of plates surrounded by a surface with very distinct physical properties: these two regions emit spectra of very distinct shapes which present a crossover, the warm plates emitting a softer spectrum than the colder surrounding surface. The strongly pulsed emission from the plates dominates at low energy while the surroundings emission dominates at high energy, producing naturally a strong decrease in the pulsed fraction. In our illustrative example the plates are assumed to be magnetized while the rest of the surface is field free. This plate structure may be seen as a schematic representation of a continuous but very nonuniform distribution of the surface magnetic field or as a quasi realistic structure induced by past tectonic activity on Geminga.

  15. Ultrasoft x-ray resonance emission bands of lanthanide and actinide compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study is reported of the ultrasoft emission spectra of some lanthanide and actinide compounds at a low accelerating voltage in the X-ray tube: a strong and wide emission band was observed in the region of the giant resonance. The following results are shown: the lanthanum emission spectra in La2O3 obtained at accelerating voltages of 4, 1.5 and 0.5 KV and the absorption spectrum at the 4d threshold; similar measurements for Th in ThO2 (and absorption spectrum at the 5d threshold) and U in U3O8 (and absorption spectrum at the 5d threshold); and for Ce in CeO2 (and absorption spectrum at the 4d threshold). The results are discussed. (U.K.)

  16. Absolute X-ray emission cross section measurements of Fe K transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hell, Natalie; Brown, Gregory V.; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Boyce, Kevin R.; Grinberg, Victoria; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Porter, Frederick Scott; Wilms, Jörn

    2016-06-01

    We have measured the absolute X-ray emission cross sections of K-shell transitions in highly charged L- and K-shell Fe ions using the LLNL EBIT-I electron beam ion trap and the NASA GSFC EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer (ECS). The cross sections are determined by using the ECS to simultaneously record the spectrum of the bound-bound K-shell transitions and the emission from radiative recombination from trapped Fe ions. The measured spectrum is then brought to an absolute scale by normalizing the measured flux in the radiative recombination features to their theoretical cross sections, which are well known. Once the spectrum is brought to an absolute scale, the cross sections of the K-shell transitions are determined. These measurements are made possible by the ECS, which consists of a 32 channel array, with 14 channels optimized for detecting high energy photons (hν > 10 keV) and 18 channels optimized for detecting low energy photons (hν collection area, relatively high energy resolution, and a large bandpass; all properties necessary for this measurement technique to be successful. These data will be used to benchmark cross sections in the atomic reference data bases underlying the plasma modeling codes used to analyze astrophysical spectra, especially those measured by the Soft X-ray Spectrometer calorimeter instrument recently launched on the Hitomi X-ray Observatory.This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, and supported by NASA grants to LLNL and NASA/GSFC and by ESA under contract No. 4000114313/15/NL/CB.

  17. Spectral modeling of the charge-exchange X-ray emission from M82

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been proposed that the charge-exchange (CX) process at the interface between hot and cool interstellar gases could contribute significantly to the observed soft X-ray emission in star-forming galaxies. We analyze the XMM-Newton/reflection grating spectrometer (RGS) spectrum of M82 using a newly developed CX model combined with a single-temperature thermal plasma to characterize the volume-filling hot gas. The CX process is largely responsible for not only the strongly enhanced forbidden lines of the Kα triplets of various He-like ions but also good fractions of the Lyα transitions of C VI (∼87%), O VIII, and N VII (≳50%) as well. In total about a quarter of the X-ray flux in the RGS 6-30 Å band originates in the CX. We infer an ion incident rate of 3 × 1051 s–1 undergoing CX at the hot and cool gas interface and an effective area of the interface of ∼2 × 1045 cm2 that is one order of magnitude larger than the cross section of the global biconic outflow. With the CX contribution accounted for, the best-fit temperature of the hot gas is 0.6 keV, and the metal abundances are approximately solar. We further show that the same CX/thermal plasma model also gives an excellent description of the EPIC-pn spectrum of the outflow Cap, projected at 11.6 kpc away from the galactic disk of M82. This analysis demonstrates that the CX is potentially an important contributor to the X-ray emission from starburst galaxies and also an invaluable tool to probe the interface astrophysics.

  18. Radio and X-Ray Emission Associated with the Supernova Remnant G352.7-0.1

    OpenAIRE

    Giacani, E.; Loiseau, N.; Dubner, G.; Smith, M. J. S.

    2005-01-01

    We report on new VLA radio and XMM-Newton X-ray observations of the SNR G352.7-0.1. These high sensitivity, high resolution data reveal that G352.7-0.1 belongs to the thermal composite morphological class. Small scale structures in radio and X-ray emission are not always correlated and are different for the different X-rays bands examined. The distance to G352.7-0.1 can be constrained between 6.6 and 8.4 kpc. The study of the HI suggests that G352.7-0.1 is located within a cavity probably cre...

  19. Physiologically gated microbeam radiation using a field emission x-ray source array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chtcheprov, Pavel, E-mail: PavelC@unc.edu, E-mail: zhou@email.unc.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina, 152 MacNider Hall, Campus Box 7575, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Burk, Laurel; Inscoe, Christina; Ger, Rachel; Hadsell, Michael; Lu, Jianping [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Phillips Hall, CB #3255, 120 East Cameron Avenue, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Yuan, Hong [Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina, 2006 Old Clinic, CB #7510, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Zhang, Lei [Department of Applied Physical Sciences, University of North Carolina, Chapman Hall, CB#3216, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Chang, Sha [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, 101 Manning Drive, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514 and UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, 101 Manning Drive, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514 (United States); Zhou, Otto, E-mail: PavelC@unc.edu, E-mail: zhou@email.unc.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Phillips Hall, CB #3255, 120 East Cameron Avenue, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 and UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, 101 Manning Drive, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) uses narrow planes of high dose radiation beams to treat cancerous tumors. This experimental therapy method based on synchrotron radiation has been shown to spare normal tissue at up to 1000 Gy of peak entrance dose while still being effective in tumor eradication and extending the lifetime of tumor-bearing small animal models. Motion during treatment can lead to significant movement of microbeam positions resulting in broader beam width and lower peak to valley dose ratio (PVDR), which reduces the effectiveness of MRT. Recently, the authors have demonstrated the feasibility of generating microbeam radiation for small animal treatment using a carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array. The purpose of this study is to incorporate physiological gating to the CNT microbeam irradiator to minimize motion-induced microbeam blurring. Methods: The CNT field emission x-ray source array with a narrow line focal track was operated at 160 kVp. The x-ray radiation was collimated to a single 280 μm wide microbeam at entrance. The microbeam beam pattern was recorded using EBT2 Gafchromic{sup ©} films. For the feasibility study, a strip of EBT2 film was attached to an oscillating mechanical phantom mimicking mouse chest respiratory motion. The servo arm was put against a pressure sensor to monitor the motion. The film was irradiated with three microbeams under gated and nongated conditions and the full width at half maximums and PVDRs were compared. An in vivo study was also performed with adult male athymic mice. The liver was chosen as the target organ for proof of concept due to its large motion during respiration compared to other organs. The mouse was immobilized in a specialized mouse bed and anesthetized using isoflurane. A pressure sensor was attached to a mouse's chest to monitor its respiration. The output signal triggered the electron extraction voltage of the field emission source such that x-ray was generated only

  20. X-ray emission from a high-atomic-number z-pinch plasma created from compact wire arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal and nonthermal x-ray emission from the implosion of compact tungsten wire arrays in 5-MA Saturn discharges is reported. The timing of multiple implosions and the thermal x-ray spectra (1 to 10 keV) agree with 2D radiation-hydrocode simulations. Nonthermal x-ray emission (10 to 100 keV) correlates with pinch spots distributed along the z-axis. The similarities of the measured nonthermal spectrum, yield, and pinch-spot emission with those of 0.8-MA, single-exploded-wire discharges on Gamble-II suggest a common nonthermal-production mechanism. Nonthermal x-ray yields are lower than expected from current scaling of Gamble II results, suggesting that implosion geometries are not as efficient as single-wire geometries for nonthermal x-ray production. The instabilities, azimuthal asymmetries, and inferred multiple implosions that accompany the implosion geometry lead to larger, more irregular pinch spots, a likely reason for reduced nonthermal efficiency. A model for nonthermal-electron acceleration across magnetic fields in highly-collisional, high-atomic-number plasmas combined with 1D hydrocode simulations of Saturn compact loads predicts weak nonthermal x-ray emission. (author). 3 figs., 10 refs

  1. X-ray emission from a high-atomic-number z-pinch plasma created from compact wire arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal and nonthermal x-ray emission from the implosion of compact tungsten wire arrays in 5-MA Saturn discharges is reported. The timing of multiple implosions and the thermal x-ray spectra (1 to 10 keV) agree with 2D radiation-hydrocode simulations. Nonthermal x-ray emission (10 to 100 keV) correlates with pinch spots distributed along the z-axis. The similarities of the measured nonthermal spectrum, yield, and pinch-spot emission with those of 0.8-MA, single- exploded-wire discharges on Gamble-II suggest a common nonthermal- production mechanism. Nonthermal x-ray yields are lower than expected from current scaling of Gamble II results, suggesting that implosion geometries are not as efficient as single-wire geometries for nonthermal x-ray production. The instabilities, azimuthal asymmetries, and inferred multiple implosions that accompany the implosion geometry lead to larger, more irregular pinch spots, a likely reason for reduced nonthermal efficiency. A model for nonthermal-electron acceleration across magnetic fields in highly- collisional, high-atomic-number plasmas combined with 1D hydrocode simulations of Saturn compact loads predicts weak nonthermal x-ray emission

  2. A Search for X-ray emission from Saturn, Uranus and Neptune

    OpenAIRE

    Ness, Jan-Uwe; Schmitt, Juergen H. M. M.

    2000-01-01

    We present an analysis of X-ray observations of the trans-Jovian planets Saturn, Uranus and Neptune with the ROSAT PSPC in comparison with X-ray observations of Jupiter. For the first time a marginal X-ray detection of Saturn was found and 95% confidence upper limits for Uranus and Neptune were obtained. These upper limits show that Jupiter-like X-ray luminosities can be excluded for all three planets, while they are consistent assuming intrinsic Saturn-like X-ray luminosities. Similar X-ray ...

  3. Energetic electrons, hard x-ray emission and MHD activity studies in the IR-T1 tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agah, K Mikaili; Ghoranneviss, M; Elahi, A Salar

    2015-01-01

    Determinations of plasma parameters as well as the Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) activity, energetic electrons energy and energy confinement time are essential for future fusion reactors experiments and optimized operation. Also some of the plasma information can be deduced from these parameters, such as plasma equilibrium, stability, and MHD instabilities. In this contribution we investigated the relation between energetic electrons, hard x-ray emission and MHD activity in the IR-T1 Tokamak. For this purpose we used the magnetic diagnostics and a hard x-ray spectroscopy in IR-T1 tokamak. A hard x-ray emission is produced by collision of the runaway electrons with the plasma particles or limiters. The mean energy was calculated from the slope of the energy spectrum of hard x-ray photons. PMID:25882736

  4. Low-energy x-ray emission from magnetic-fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complex, transient, spatially inhomogeneous tokamak plasmas require careful diagnosis. As the reactor regime is approached, soft x rays become more important as a versatile diagnostic tool and an energy-loss mechanism. Continuum emission provides a measure of electron temperature and light impurity content. Impurity lines serve as a probe for ion and electron temperature, impurity behavior, and radiative cooling. The entire spectrum yields vital information on instabilities and disruptions. The importance of impurities is illustrated by the extensive efforts toward understanding impurity production, effects, and control. Minute heavy impurity concentrations can prevent reactor ignition. Si(Li) - detector arrays give a broad overview of continuum and line x-ray emission (.3 to 50 keV) with moderate energy (200 eV) and time (50 ms) resolution. Bragg crystal and grating spectrometers provide detailed information on impurity lines with moderate to excellent (E/ΔE = 100 to 23,000) resolving power and 1 to 50 ms time resolution. Imaging detector arrays measure rapid (approx. 10 μs) fluctuations due to MHD instabilities and probe impurity behavior and radiative cooling. Future tokamaks require more diagnostic channels to avoid spatial scanning, higher throughput for fast, single-shot diagnosis, increased spectral information per sample period via fast scanning or use of multi-element detectors with dispersive elements, and radiation shielding and hardening of detectors

  5. AGN emission processes of NGC 4945 in the X-rays and gamma-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Menzel, Marie-Luise; Mattana, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    NGC 4945 has an outstanding role among the Seyfert 2 active galatic nuclei (AGN) because it is one of the few non-blazars which have been detected in the gamma-rays. Here, we analyse the high energy spectrum using Suzaku, INTEGRAL and Fermi data. We reconstruct the spectral energy distribution in the soft X-ray to gamma-ray domain in order to provide a better understanding of the processes in the AGN. We present two models to fit the high-energy data. The first model assumes that the gamma-ray emission originates from one single non-thermal component, e.g. a shock-induced pion decay caused by the starburst processes in the host galaxy, or by interaction with cosmic rays. The second model describes the high-energy spectrum by two independent components: a thermal inverse Compton process of photons in the non-beamed AGN and a non-thermal emission of the gamma-rays. These components are represented by an absorbed cut-off power law for the thermal component in the X-ray energy range and a simple power law for the...

  6. Global Structure of Isothermal Diffuse X-Ray Emission along the Fermi Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, J.; Tahara, M.; Totani, T.; Sofue, Y.; Inoue, Y.; Nakashima, S.; Cheung, C. C.

    2015-07-01

    In our previous works, we found absorbed thermal X-ray plasma with kT ≃ 0.3 keV observed ubiquitously near the edges of the Fermi bubbles and interpreted this emission as weakly shock-heated Galactic halo gas. Here we present a systematic and uniform analysis of archival Suzaku (29 pointings; 6 newly presented) and Swift (68 pointings; 49 newly presented) data within Galactic longitudes | l| NPS), SE-claw, and NW-clump features. Moreover, the EM distribution of kT ≃ 0.30 keV plasma is highly asymmetric in the northern and southern bubbles. Although the association of the X-ray emission with the bubbles is not conclusive, we compare the observed EM properties with simple models assuming (i) a filled halo without bubbles, whose gas density follows a hydrostatic isothermal model (King profile), and (ii) a bubble-in-halo in which two identical bubbles expand into the halo, forming thick shells of swept halo gas. We argue that the EM profile in the north (b > 0°) favors (ii), whereas that of the south (b NPS (South Polar Spur). Such an asymmetry, if due to the bubbles, cannot be fully understood only by the inclination of bubbles’ axis against the Galactic disk normal, thus suggesting asymmetric outflow due to different environmental/initial conditions.

  7. X-ray narrow emission lines from the nuclear region of NGC 1365

    CERN Document Server

    Whewell, M; Page, M J

    2016-01-01

    NGC 1365 is a Seyfert 2 galaxy with a starburst ring in its nuclear region. In this work we look at the XMM Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) data from four 2012-13, three 2007 and two 2004 observations of NGC 1365. We characterise the narrow-line emitting gas visible by XMM RGS and make comparisons between the 2012-13 spectra and those from 2004-07, already published. This source is usually absorbed within the soft X-ray band, with a typical neutral column density of >1.5 x 10$^{23}$ cm$^{-2}$, and only 1 observation of the 9 we investigate shows low enough absorption for the continuum to emerge in the soft X-rays. We stack all observations from 2004-07, and separately three of the four observations from 2012-13, analysing the less absorbed observation separately. We first model the spectra using gaussian profiles representing the narrow line emission. We fit physically motivated models to the 2012-13 stacked spectra, with collisionally ionised components representing the starburst emission and photoioni...

  8. Solar X-ray Emission Measured by the Vernov Mission During September - October of 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myagkova, I. N.; Bogomolov, A. V.; Kashapova, L. K.; Bogomolov, V. V.; Svertilov, S. I.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Kuznetsova, E. A.; Rozhkov, G. V.

    2016-08-01

    Solar hard X-ray and γ-ray emissions were measured by the Detector of the Roentgen and Gamma-ray Emissions (DRGE) instrument, which is part of the RELEC set of instruments operated onboard the Russian satellite Vernov, from July 8, 2014 until December 10, 2014 (on a solar-synchronous orbit with an apogee of 830 km, perigee of 640 km, and an inclination of 98.4°. RELEC measurements of 18 flares with X-ray energy {>} 30 keV, taken in September - October 2014, were connected with the same active region with the number AR 12172 during the first rotation and AR 12192 during the next one. These measurements were compared to the data obtained with RHESSI, Konus-Wind, Fermi Observatory, Radio Solar Telescope Net (RSTN), and the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH) operating at the same time. Quasi-periodicities with similar periods of 7±2 s were found in about one third of all flares measured by RELEC (Vernov) from September 24 until October 30, 2014.

  9. Implications of the non-detection of X-ray emission from HD 149427

    CERN Document Server

    Stute, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    HD 149427 is a very enigmatic object. It has been classified either as a planetary nebula or as a D'-type symbiotic star. Its distance is also highly uncertain. Furthermore, HD 149427 is a potential jet source. We report the non-detection of X-ray emission from HD 149427 and explore the implications to its nature. We observed the object with XMM-Newton with an effective exposure time of 33.5 ks. The upper limit for the flux of the X-ray emission in the soft band (2 keV) it is about 10^-14 erg/s/cm^2. We discuss the implication of our results in light of the possible natures of HD 149427 -- being a planetary nebula or a symbiotic star, close or very distant. The derived upper limits on the mass accretion rate of the white dwarf are untypical for symbiotic stars and may favor the picture of HD 149427 being a young PN. HD 149427 might be a symbiotic star in hibernation -- if a symbiotic star at all. We estimate the possible mass-loss rate and kinetic luminosity of the jet and find no contradiction with our upper...

  10. On the diffuse soft X-ray emission from the nuclear region of M51

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jiren

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of the diffuse soft X-ray emission from the nuclear region of M51 combining both XMM-Newton RGS and Chandra data. Most of the RGS spectrum of M51 can be fitted with a thermal model with a temperature of $\\sim0.5$ keV except for the OVII triplet, which is forbidden-line dominated. The Fe L-shell lines peak around the southern cloud, where the OVIII and NVII Lya lines also peak. In contrast, the peak of the OVII forbidden line is about 10$"$ offset from that of the other lines, indicating that it is from a spatially distinct component. The spatial distribution of the OVII triplet mapped by the Chandra data shows that most of the OVII triplet flux is located at faint regions near edges, instead of the southern cloud where other lines peak. This distribution of the OVII triplet is inconsistent with the photoionization model. Other mechanisms that could produce the anomalous OVII triplet, including a recombining plasma and charge exchange X-ray emission, are discussed.

  11. RESIK observations of He-like Ar X-ray line emission in solar flares

    CERN Document Server

    Sylwester, J; Phillips, K J H

    2008-01-01

    The Ar XVII X-ray line group principally due to transitions 1s2 - 1s2l (l=s, p) near 4 Anstroms was observed in numerous flares by the RESIK bent crystal spectrometer aboard CORONAS-F between 2001 and 2003. The three line features include the Ar XVII w (resonance line), a blend of x and y (intercombination lines), and z (forbidden line), all of which are blended with Ar XVI dielectronic satellites. The ratio G, equal to [I(x+y) + I(z)]/I(w), varies with electron temperature Te mostly because of unresolved dielectronic satellites. With temperatures estimated from GOES X-ray emission, the observed G ratios agree fairly well with those calculated from CHIANTI and other data. With a two-component emission measure, better agreement is achieved. Some S XV and S XVI lines blend with the Ar lines, the effect of which occurs at temperatures greater than 8MK, allowing the S/Ar abundance ratio to be determined. This is found to agree with coronal values. A nonthermal contribution is indicated for some spectra in the rep...

  12. Resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy of liquid water: novel instrumentation, high resolution, and the "map" approach

    OpenAIRE

    Weinhardt, L.

    2010-01-01

    Techniques to study the electronic structure of liquids are rare. Most recently, resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) has been shown to be an extremely versatile spectroscopy to study both occupied and unoccupied electronic states for liquids in thermodynamic equilibrium. However, XES requires high-brilliance soft x-ray synchrotron radiation and poses significant technical challenges to maintain a liquid sample in an ultra-high vacuum environment. Our group has therefore developed and c...

  13. Investigation of the X-Ray Emission of the Large Arcade Flare of 2 March 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakimiec, J.; Tomczak, M.

    2014-06-01

    A large arcade flare, occurring on 2 March 1993, has been investigated using X-ray observations recorded by the Yohkoh and GOES satellites and the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. We analyzed the quasi-periodicity of the hard-X-ray (HXR) pulses in the impulsive phase of the flare and found a close similarity between the quasi-periodic sequence of the pulses to that observed in another large arcade flare, that of 2 November 1991. This similarity helped to explain the strong HXR pulses which were recorded at the end of the impulsive phase as due to the inflow of dense plasma (coming from the chromospheric evaporation) into the acceleration volume inside the cusp. In HXR images a high flaring loop was seen with a triangular cusp structure at the top, where the electrons were efficiently accelerated. The sequence of HXR images allowed us to investigate complicated changes in the precipitation of the accelerated electrons toward the flare footpoints. We have shown that all these impulsive-phase observations can be easily explained in terms of the model of electron acceleration in oscillating magnetic traps located within the cusp structure. Some soft-X-ray (SXR) images were available for the late decay phase. They show a long arcade of SXR loops. Important information about the evolution of the flare during the slow decay phase is contained in the time variation of the temperature, T( t), and emission measure, EM( t). This information is the following: i) weak heating occurs during the slow decay phase and it slowly decreases; ii) the decrease in the heating determines a slow and smooth decrease in EM; iii) the coupling between the heating and the amount of the hot plasma makes the flare evolve along a sequence of quasi-steady states during the slow decay phase (QSS evolution).

  14. A new sample of X-ray selected narrow emission-line galaxies. II. Looking for True Seyfert 2

    CERN Document Server

    Pons, Estelle

    2016-01-01

    A sample of X-ray and optically selected narrow emission-line galaxies (769 sources) from the 3XMM catalogue cross-correlated with SDSS (DR9) catalogue has been studied. Narrow-emission line active galactic nuclei (AGN; type-2) have been selected on the basis of their emission line ratios and/or X-ray luminosity. We have looked for X-ray unobscured type-2 AGN. As X-ray spectra were not available for our whole sample, we have checked the reliability of using the X-ray hardness ratio (HR) as a probe of the level of obscuration and we found a very good agreement with full spectral fitting results, with only 2% of the sources with apparently unobscured HR turning out to have an obscured spectrum. Despite the fact that type-2 AGN are supposed to be absorbed based on the Unified Model, about 60% of them show no sign or very low level of X-ray obscuration. After subtraction of contaminants to the sample, that is Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 and Compton-thick AGN, the fraction of unobscured Sy2 drops to 47%. For these sourc...

  15. Dominance of Magnetic Cataclysmic Variables in the Resolved Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission of the Limiting Window

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, JaeSub

    2012-01-01

    The diffuse appearance of the Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission (GRXE) has been puzzling since its discovery due to lack of compelling theories for sustainable hot diffuse X-ray emission in the Galactic plane. Recently (Revnivtsev et al. 2009; R09) claimed that about 90% of the 6.5-7.1 keV X-ray flux from a small section of a low extinction region at 1.4 degree south of the Galactic Center has been resolved to discrete sources with 2-10 keV L_X > 4x10^{-16} erg s cm^-2, using ultra-deep (1 Ms) Chandra ACIS-I observations. They also concluded thatcoronally active stars such as active binaries (ABs) contribute about 60% of the resolved flux. However, our recent discovery of a large population of magnetic cataclysmic variables (MCVs) in the same region suggests their significant role in the resolved hard X-ray flux. In addition, deep X-ray surveys of other several Galactic Bulge fields over the past decade have indicated that MCVs are likely the major contributor in the hard X-ray emission above 2-3 keV. To solve th...

  16. A vacuum-sealed compact x-ray tube based on focused carbon nanotube field-emission electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jin-Woo; Kim, Jae-Woo; Kang, Jun-Tae; Choi, Sungyoul; Ahn, Seungjoon; Song, Yoon-Ho

    2013-03-01

    We report on a fully vacuum-sealed compact x-ray tube based on focused carbon nanotube (CNT) field-emission electrons for various radiography applications. The specially designed two-step brazing process enabled us to accomplish a good vacuum level for the stable and reliable operation of the x-ray tube without any active vacuum pump. Also, the integrated focusing electrodes in the field-emission electron gun focused electron beams from the CNT emitters onto the anode target effectively, giving a small focal spot of around 0.3 mm with a large current of above 50 mA. The active-current control through the cathode electrode of the x-ray tube led a fast digital modulation of x-ray dose with a low voltage of below 5 V. The fabricated compact x-ray tube showed a stable and reliable operation, indicating good maintenance of a vacuum level of below 5 × 10(-6) Torr and the possibility of field-emission x-ray tubes in a stand-alone device without an active pumping system. PMID:23376878

  17. A vacuum-sealed compact x-ray tube based on focused carbon nanotube field-emission electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a fully vacuum-sealed compact x-ray tube based on focused carbon nanotube (CNT) field-emission electrons for various radiography applications. The specially designed two-step brazing process enabled us to accomplish a good vacuum level for the stable and reliable operation of the x-ray tube without any active vacuum pump. Also, the integrated focusing electrodes in the field-emission electron gun focused electron beams from the CNT emitters onto the anode target effectively, giving a small focal spot of around 0.3 mm with a large current of above 50 mA. The active-current control through the cathode electrode of the x-ray tube led a fast digital modulation of x-ray dose with a low voltage of below 5 V. The fabricated compact x-ray tube showed a stable and reliable operation, indicating good maintenance of a vacuum level of below 5 × 10−6 Torr and the possibility of field-emission x-ray tubes in a stand-alone device without an active pumping system. (paper)

  18. A vacuum-sealed compact x-ray tube based on focused carbon nanotube field-emission electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jin-Woo; Kim, Jae-Woo; Kang, Jun-Tae; Choi, Sungyoul; Ahn, Seungjoon; Song, Yoon-Ho

    2013-03-01

    We report on a fully vacuum-sealed compact x-ray tube based on focused carbon nanotube (CNT) field-emission electrons for various radiography applications. The specially designed two-step brazing process enabled us to accomplish a good vacuum level for the stable and reliable operation of the x-ray tube without any active vacuum pump. Also, the integrated focusing electrodes in the field-emission electron gun focused electron beams from the CNT emitters onto the anode target effectively, giving a small focal spot of around 0.3 mm with a large current of above 50 mA. The active-current control through the cathode electrode of the x-ray tube led a fast digital modulation of x-ray dose with a low voltage of below 5 V. The fabricated compact x-ray tube showed a stable and reliable operation, indicating good maintenance of a vacuum level of below 5 × 10-6 Torr and the possibility of field-emission x-ray tubes in a stand-alone device without an active pumping system.

  19. X-Ray Emission from the Super-Earth Host GJ 1214

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalitha, S.; Poppenhaeger, K.; Singh, K. P.; Czesla, S.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2014-07-01

    Stellar activity can produce large amounts of high-energy radiation, which is absorbed by the planetary atmosphere leading to irradiation-driven mass loss. We present the detection and an investigation of high-energy emission in a transiting super-Earth host system, GJ 1214, based on XMM-Newton observations. We derive an X-ray luminosity of LX = 7.4 × 1025 erg s-1 and a corresponding activity level of log (LX /L bol) ~ -5.3. Further, we determine a coronal temperature of about ~3.5 MK, which is typical for coronal emission of moderately active low-mass stars. We estimate that GJ 1214 b evaporates at a rate of 1.3× 1010 g s-1 and has lost a total of ≈2-5.6 M ⊕.

  20. X-ray emission from the super-Earth host GJ 1214

    CERN Document Server

    Lalitha, S; Singh, K P; Czesla, S; Schmitt, J H M M

    2014-01-01

    Stellar activity can produce large amounts of high-energy radiation, which is absorbed by the planetary atmosphere leading to irradiation-driven mass-loss. We present the detection and an investigation of high-energy emission in a transiting super-Earth host system, GJ 1214, based on an XMM-Newton observation. We derive an X-ray luminosity LX=7.4E25 erg/s and a corresponding activity level of log(LX/Lbol)~ -5.3. Further, we determine a coronal temperature of about -3.5 MK, which is typical for coronal emission of moderately active low-mass stars. We estimate that GJ 1214 b evaporates at a rate of 1.3E10 g/s and has lost a total of ~2-5.6 MEarth.

  1. X-Ray Emission Spectra of Ni-Like Gold Ions under Coronal Plasma Condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Jiao-Long; ZHAO Gang; YUAN Jian-Min

    2005-01-01

    @@ The strong x-ray line emission of n = 4 → n =3 and n = 5 → n =3 transitions of Ni-like Au has been investigated under a coronal plasma condition. A complete set of atomic data, including energy level, transition probability and collision strength, has been obtained to simulate the emission spectra. Under a typical coronal equilibrium (electron temperature of 2500eV and density of 1.0 × 1015), the predicted strongest line is due to the transition of (3d-3 2 4f5/2)1 → (3d10)0. Extensive studies show that the relative intensity is insensitive to temperature and density over a wide plasma condition.

  2. The use of proton induced X-ray emission in the design and evaluation of catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In preparing a heterogeneous catalyst, it is usual practice to disperse one or more catalytic elements over a suitable high surface area support, such as porous alumina. It is very useful then to be able to monitor all the catalytic elements (and the trace impurities) within the crucial first few microns of the surface. The technique of proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis is suited ideally to this purpose. The present work describes how it was used during the development of a new series of catalyst which were designed to be bounded to a special oxidation-resistant aluminium-containing steel, and used in vehicle exhaust emission control. In particular, we illustrate the use of PIXE in highlighting the relative resistances of different catalyst formulations to Pb poisoning. (orig.)

  3. Resonant scattering of X-ray emission lines in the hot intergalactic medium

    CERN Document Server

    Churazov, E; Sazonov, S; Sunyaev, R

    2010-01-01

    While very often a hot intergalactic medium (IGM) is optically thin to continuum radiation, the optical depth in resonant lines can be of order unity or larger. Resonant scattering in the brightest X-ray emission lines can cause distortions in the surface brightness distribution, spurious variations in the abundance of heavy elements, changes in line spectral shapes and even polarization of line emission. The magnitude of these effects not only depends on the density, temperature and ionization state of the gas, but is also sensitive to the characteristics of the gas velocity field. This opens a possibility to use resonant scattering as a convenient and powerful tool to study IGM properties. We discuss the application of these effects to galaxy clusters.

  4. Spectral analysis of x-ray emission created by intense laser irradiation of copper materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have measured the x-ray emission, primarily from Kα,Kβ, and Heα lines, of elemental copper foil and “foam” targets irradiated with a mid-1016 W/cm2 laser pulse. The copper foam at 0.1 times solid density is observed to produce 50% greater Heα line emission than copper foil, and the measured signal is well-fit by a sum of three synthetic spectra generated by the atomic physics code FLYCHK. Additionally, spectra from both targets reveal characteristic inner shell Kα transitions from hot electron interaction with the bulk copper. However, only the larger-volume foam target produced significant Kβ radiation, confirming a lower bulk temperature in the higher volume sample.

  5. Spectrometer for X-ray emission experiments at FERMI free-electron-laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A portable and compact photon spectrometer to be used for photon in-photon out experiments, in particular x-ray emission spectroscopy, is presented. The instrument operates in the 25–800 eV energy range to cover the full emissions of the FEL1 and FEL2 stages of FERMI. The optical design consists of two interchangeable spherical varied-lined-spaced gratings and a CCD detector. Different input sections can be accommodated, with/without an entrance slit and with/without an additional relay mirror, that allow to mount the spectrometer in different end-stations and at variable distances from the target area both at synchrotron and at free-electron-laser beamlines. The characterization on the Gas Phase beamline at ELETTRA Synchrotron (Italy) is presented

  6. Chandra & XMM-Newton Observations of NGC5253. Analysis of the X-ray Emission from a Dwarf Starburst Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Summers, L K; Strickland, D K; Heckman, T M; Summers, Lesley K.; Stevens, Ian R.; Strickland, David K.; Heckman, Timothy M.

    2004-01-01

    We present Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray data of NGC5253, a local starbursting dwarf elliptical galaxy, in the early stages of a starburst episode. Contributions to the X-ray emission come from discrete point sources and extended diffuse emission, in the form of what appear to be multiple superbubbles, and smaller bubbles probably associated with individual star clusters. Chandra detects 17 sources within the optical extent of NGC5253 down to a completeness level corresponding to a luminosity of 1.5E37 erg/s.The slope of the point source X-ray luminosity function is -0.54, similar to that of other nearby dwarf starburst galaxies. Several different types of source are detected within the galaxy, including X-ray binaries and the emission associated with star-clusters. Comparison of the diffuse X-ray emission with the observed Halpha emission shows similarities in their extent. The best spectral fit to the diffuse emission is obtained with an absorbed, two temperature model giving temperatures for the two gas com...

  7. Constraint of Non-thermal X-ray Emission from the On-going Merger Cluster Abell 3376 with Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Kawano, Naomi; Nishino, Sho; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Kitaguchi, Takao; Makishima, Kazuo; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Kokubun, Motohide; Ota, Naomi; Ohashi, Takaya; Isobe, Naoki; Henry, J Patrick; Hornschemeier, Ann

    2008-01-01

    Clusters of galaxies are among the best candidates for particle acceleration sources in the universe, a signature of which is non-thermal hard X-ray emission from the accelerated relativistic particles. We present early results on Suzaku observations of non-thermal emission from Abell 3376, which is a nearby on-going merger cluster. Suzaku observed the cluster twice, focusing on the cluster center containing the diffuse radio emission to the east, and cluster peripheral region to the west. For both observations, we detect no excess hard X-ray emission above the thermal cluster emission. An upper limit on the non-thermal X-ray flux of $2.1\\times10^{-11}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ (15--50 keV) at the 3$\\sigma$ level from a $34\\times34$ arcmin$^2$ region, derived with the Hard X-ray Detector (HXD), is similar to that obtained with the BeppoSAX/PDS. Using the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (XIS) data, the upper limit on the non-thermal emission from the West Relic is independently constrained to be $0.03\\mu$G (HXD) and ...

  8. Chandra Detection of X-ray Emission from Ultra-compact Dwarf Galaxies and Extended Star Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Hou, Meicun

    2016-01-01

    We have conducted a systematic study of X-ray emission from ultra-compact dwarf (UCD) galaxies and extended star clusters (ESCs), based on archival {\\sl Chandra} observations. Among a sample of 511 UCDs and ESCs complied from the literature, 17 X-ray counterparts with 0.5-8 keV luminosities above $\\sim$$5\\times10^{36} {\\rm~erg~s^{-1}}$ are identified, which are distributed in eight early-type host galaxies. To facilitate comparison, we also identify X-ray counterparts of 360 globular clusters (GCs) distributed in four of the eight galaxies. The X-ray properties of the UCDs and ESCs are found to be broadly similar to those of the GCs. The incidence rate of X-ray-detected UCDs and ESCs, $(3.3\\pm0.8)$\\%, while lower than that of the X-ray-detected GCs [($7.0\\pm0.4)$\\%], is substantially higher than expected from the field populations of external galaxies. A stacking analysis of the individually undetected UCDs/ESCs further reveals significant X-ray signals, which corresponds to an equivalent 0.5-8 keV luminosity...

  9. Timing analysis of hard X-ray emission and 22 GHz flux and polarization in a solar burst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A solar flare occurring on 26 February 1981 at 1932 UT was observed simultaneously, in hard X-rays and microwaves with a time resolution of a fraction of a second. The X-ray observations were made with the Hard X-ray Monitor on Hinotori, and the microwave observations were made at 22 GHz with the 13.7 m Itapetinga mm-wave antenna. Timing accuracy was restricted to 62.5 ms, the best time resolution obtained in hard X-rays for this burst. It is found that: (a) all 22 GHz flux structures were delayed by 0.2 - 0.9 second relative to similar structures in hard X-rays throughout the burst duration; (b) different burst structures showed different delays, suggesting that they are independent of each other; (c) the time structures of the degree of polarization at 22 GHz precede the total microwave flux time structures by 0.1-0.5 sec; (d) The time evolutions of time delays of microwaves with respect to hard X-rays and also the degree of microwave polarization show fluctuations with are not clearly related to any other time structures. If it is taken mean values for the 32 sec burst duration, it is found that hard X-ray emission precedes the degree of microwave polarization by 450 ms, which in turn precedes the total microwave flux by 110 ms. (Author)

  10. EBIS-A facility for the studies of X-ray emission from solids bombarded by highly charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report here on the progress in the X-ray spectroscopy program at the EBIS-A facility installed recently at the Institute of Physics of Jan Kochanowski University in Kielce. In this facility the beams of low-energy highly charged ions (HCI) produced by the Dresden EBIS-A ion source, after extraction and charge-state separation in the double focusing magnet, are directed to the experimental UHV chamber equipped with a 5-axis universal sample manipulator. The X-rays emitted in interaction of the highly charged ions with solids can be measured by an energy dispersive X-ray silicon drift detector (SDD) and/or a wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (WDS) mounted at the experimental chamber. The surface nanostructures formed by an impact of HCI will be studied by the grazing emission X-ray fluorescence (GEXRF) technique and using a multiprobe surface analysis system based on the X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS) coupled to the UHV chamber of the EBIS-A facility. In this paper a brief description of the facility, X-ray instrumentation and the surface analysis system is given and the first results are presented

  11. Transmission-grating spectrometer for highly efficient and high-resolution soft X-ray emission studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamane, Hiroyuki [Institute for Molecular Science and The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); Kosugi, Nobuhiro, E-mail: kosugi@ims.ac.jp [Institute for Molecular Science and The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); Hatsui, Takaki, E-mail: hatsui@spring8.or.jp [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, RIKEN, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: ► We develop a highly efficient and high-resolution soft X-ray emission spectrometer. ► We combine a transmission grating, a Wolter type I mirror, and normal-incident CCD. ► X-ray emission resolution proves to be 15–34 meV in the photon energy of 60–100 eV. -- Abstract: A high-resolution soft X-ray emission spectrometer has been developed for site-specific electronic structure analysis of functional materials in the photon energy range of 50–600 eV on the in-vacuum undulator beamline BL3U of the UVSOR facility. In order to realize the high detection efficiency without sacrificing the energy resolution to the signal intensity, the present X-ray emission spectrometer adopts an optical design, which was originally adopted in the field of astrophysics such as Chandra X-ray observatory. This new-type X-ray emission spectrometer consists of a Wolter type I mirror, a freestanding transmission grating, and a charge coupled device (CCD) detector, allowing the focusing with 20 times larger acceptance angle (1.5 × 10{sup −3} sr) than commercially available compact spectrometers with reflection-type gratings such as VG-SCIENTA XES350. The X-ray emission energy resolution of 15–34 meV has successfully been achieved in the photon energy of 60–100 eV by using a transmission grating with the groove density of 5555 lines/mm.

  12. Extranuclear X-ray Emission in the Edge-on Seyfert Galaxy NGC 2992

    OpenAIRE

    Colbert, Edward J. M.; Strickland, David K.; Veilleux, Sylvain; Weaver, Kimberly A.

    2005-01-01

    We found several extranuclear (r >~ 3") X-ray nebulae within 40" (6.3 kpc at 32.5 Mpc) of the nucleus of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 2992. The net X-ray luminosity from the extranuclear sources is ~2-3 E39 erg/s (0.3-8.0 keV). The X-ray core itself (r

  13. Determining the X-ray Emission Mechanism for the Large-Scale Quasar Jet of 3C 111

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clautice, Devon; Perlman, Eric S.; Georganopoulos, Markos; Lister, Matthew L.; Tombesi, Francesco; Cara, Mihai; Marshall, Herman L.; Hogan, Brandon Scott; Kazanas, Demos

    2016-04-01

    Relativistic jets from active galactic nuclei (AGN) are powerful phenomena that transport prodigious amounts of energy and mass from the core of a galaxy out to kiloparsec or even megaparsec distances. While most spatially-resolved jets are seen in the radio, an increasing number have been discovered to emit in the optical/near-IR and/or X-ray bands. Here we discuss a spectacular example of this class, the 3C 111 jet, housed in one of the nearest, double-lobed FR II radio galaxies known. The jet itself extends over 100 kpc on each side, making it one of the longest to be seen in the radio, near-IR/optical and X-ray bands. Its length and straight nature makes it ideal for studying jet physics over many kiloparsecs. We discuss new, deep Chandra and HST observations that reveal both near-IR and X-ray emission from several components of the 3C 111 jet, as well as both the approaching and receding hotspots. The near-IR and X-ray emission in the jet is restricted to several knots, and there are important differences between the morphologies seen in the radio, near-IR, and X-ray bands. In several jet regions we detect X-ray maxima significantly upstream of the radio maxima. We analyze the broad-band spectral energy distributions of the jet components and the X-ray spectra of the brightest regions. We compare competing models of emission as they relate to frequency-dependent relativistic beaming. The morphological differences coupled with the X-ray spectral slopes lead us to favor the two-component synchrotron model and disfavor the IC/CMB model.

  14. The Soft X-ray and Narrow-line Emission of Mrk 573 on Kiloparsec Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Martin, O.; Acosta-Pulido, J. A.; Perez Garcia, A. M.; Ramos Almeida, C.

    2010-11-01

    We present a study of the circumnuclear region of the nearby Seyfert galaxy Mrk 573 using Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data. We have studied the morphology of the soft (soft X-ray emission is resolved into a complex extended region. The X-ray morphology shows a biconical region extending up to 12 arcsec (4 kpc) in projection from the nucleus. A strong correlation between the X-rays and the highly ionized gas seen in the [O III]λ5007 Å image is reported. Moreover, we have studied the line intensities detected with the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) and used them to fit the low-resolution EPIC/XMM-Newton and ACIS/Chandra spectra. The RGS/XMM-Newton spectrum is dominated by emission lines of C VI, O VII, O VIII, Fe XVII, and Ne IX, among other highly ionized species. A good fit is obtained using these emission lines found in the RGS/XMM-Newton spectrum as a template for Chandra spectra of the nucleus and extended emission, coincident with the cone-like structures seen in the [O III]/Hα map. The photoionization model Cloudy provides a reasonable fit for both the nuclear region and the cone-like structures showing that the dominant excitation mechanism is photoionization. For the nucleus the emission is modeled using two phases: a high ionization [log (U) = 1.23] and a low ionization [log (U) = 0.13]. For the high-ionization phase the transmitted and reflected components are in a 1:2 ratio, whereas for the low ionization the reflected component dominates. For the extended emission, we successfully reproduced the emission with two phases. The first phase shows a higher ionization parameter for the northwest (log (U) = 0.9) than for the southeast cone (log (U) = 0.3). Moreover, this phase is transmission dominated for the southeast cone and reflection dominated for the northwest cone. The second phase shows a low-ionization parameter (log (U) = -3) and is rather uniform for northwest and southeast cones and equally distributed

  15. A statistical correlation of sunquakes based on their seismic, white light, and X-ray emission

    CERN Document Server

    Buitrago-Casas, J C; Lindsey, C; Calvo-Mozo, B; Krucker, S; Glesener, L; Zharkov, S

    2015-01-01

    Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the transient seis- mic emission, i.e., sunquakes, from some solar flares. Some theories associate high-energy electrons and/or white-light emission with sunquakes. High-energy charged particles and their subsequent heating of the photosphere and/or chro- mosphere could induce acoustic waves in the solar interior. We carried out a correlative study of solar flares with emission in hard-X rays (HXRs), enhanced continuum emission at 6173{\\AA}, and transient seismic emission. We selected those flares observed by RHESSI (Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager) with a considerable flux above 50 keV between January 1, 2010 and June 26, 2014. We then used data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager onboard the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO/HMI) to search for excess visible continuum emission and new sunquakes not previously reported. We found a total of 18 sunquakes out of 75 investigated. All of the sunquakes were associated with a enhancement of th...

  16. X-ray emission from the region of gamma 195 + 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray emission from the vicinity of the MeV gamma ray source, gamma 195+5, was observed with the HEAO-A2 detectors. A source with an intensity of (1.5 +- 0.5) x 10-11 erg/cm2 s (2-6 keV) was seen in each of two separate observations at a combined confidence level of 3.1 sigma. The location of the source is l2 = 194.56 degrees, b2 = 4.92 degrees with a 90% confidence error box of 1.4 square degrees, significantly smaller than the positional uncertainty of the gamma ray source, and consistent with its location. The chance overlap of such an X-ray source with the gamma ray region is estimated to be 9% and, therefore, they may be 9% and therefore they may be associated. The spectrum appears too steep to extrapolate simply to the 100 MeV flux value for gamma 195+5

  17. Potential Gamma-ray Emissions from Low-Mass X-ray Binary Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jian-Fu; Liu, Tong; Xue, Li; Lu, Ju-Fu

    2015-01-01

    By proposing a pure leptonic radiation model, we study the potential gamma-ray emissions from jets of the low-mass X-ray binaries. In this model, the relativistic electrons that are accelerated in the jets are responsible for radiative outputs. Nevertheless, dynamics of jets are dominated by the magnetic and proton-matter kinetic energies. The model involves all kinds of related radiative processes and considers the evolution of relativistic electrons along the jet by numerically solving the kinetic equation. Numerical results show that the spectral energy distributions can extend up to TeV bands, in which synchrotron radiation and synchrotron self-Compton scattering are dominant components. As an example, we apply the model to the low-mass X-ray binary GX 339-4. The results can not only reproduce the currently available observations from GX 339-4, but also predict detectable radiation at GeV and TeV bands by Fermi and CTA telescopes. The future observations with Fermi and CTA can be used to test our model, w...

  18. Quantitative analysis of resolved X-ray emission line profiles of O stars

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, David H; Townsend, Richard H D

    2007-01-01

    By quantitatively fitting simple emission line profile models that include both atomic opacity and porosity to the Chandra X-ray spectrum of $\\zeta$ Pup, we are able to explore the trade-offs between reduced mass-loss rates and wind porosity. We find that reducing the mass-loss rate of $\\zeta$ Pup by roughly a factor of four, to 1.5 \\times 10^{-6} M_sun/yr, enables simple non-porous wind models to provide good fits to the data. If, on the other hand, we take the literature mass-loss rate of 6 \\times 10^{-6} M_sun/yr, then to produce X-ray line profiles that fit the data, extreme porosity lengths -- of $h_{\\infty} \\approx 3$ Rstar -- are required. Moreover, these porous models do not provide better fits to the data than the non-porous, low optical depth models. Additionally, such huge porosity lengths do not seem realistic in light of 2-D numerical simulations of the wind instability.

  19. X-ray absorption, nuclear infrared emission and dust covering factors of AGN: testing Unification Schemes

    CERN Document Server

    Mateos, S; Alonso-Herrero, A; Hernán-Caballero, A; Barcons, X; Ramos, A Asensio; Watson, M G; Blain, A; Caccianiga, A; Ballo, L; Braito, V; Almeida, C Ramos

    2016-01-01

    We present the distributions of geometrical covering factors of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) dusty tori (f2) using an X-ray selected complete sample of 227 AGN drawn from the Bright Ultra-hard XMM-Newton Survey. The AGN have z from 0.05 to 1.7, 2-10 keV luminosities between 10^42 and 10^46 erg/s and Compton-thin X-ray absorption. Employing data from UKIDSS, 2MASS and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer in a previous work we determined the rest-frame 1-20 microns continuum emission from the torus which we model here with the clumpy torus models of Nenkova et al. Optically classified type 1 and type 2 AGN are intrinsically different, with type 2 AGN having on average tori with higher f2 than type 1 AGN. Nevertheless, ~20 per cent of type 1 AGN have tori with large covering factors while ~23-28 per cent of type 2 AGN have tori with small covering factors. Low f2 are preferred at high AGN luminosities, as postulated by simple receding torus models, although for type 2 AGN the effect is certainly small. f2 in...

  20. Fast simulation of Proton Induced X-Ray Emission Tomography using CUDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new 3D Proton Induced X-Ray Emission Tomography (PIXE-T) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy Tomography (STIM-T) simulation software has been developed in Java and uses NVIDIA™ Common Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) to calculate the X-ray attenuation for large detector areas. A challenge with PIXE-T is to get sufficient counts while retaining a small beam spot size. Therefore a high geometric efficiency is required. However, as the detector solid angle increases the calculations required for accurate reconstruction of the data increase substantially. To overcome this limitation, the CUDA parallel computing platform was used which enables general purpose programming of NVIDIA graphics processing units (GPUs) to perform computations traditionally handled by the central processing unit (CPU). For simulation performance evaluation, the results of a CPU- and a CUDA-based simulation of a phantom are presented. Furthermore, a comparison with the simulation code in the PIXE-Tomography reconstruction software DISRA (A. Sakellariou, D.N. Jamieson, G.J.F. Legge, 2001) is also shown. Compared to a CPU implementation, the CUDA based simulation is approximately 30× faster

  1. Resolving the hard X-ray emission of GX 5-1 with INTEGRAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paizis, A.; Ebisawa, K.; Tikkanen, T.;

    2005-01-01

    We present the study of one year of INTEGRAL data on the neutron star low mass X-ray binary GX 5-1. Thanks to the excellent angular resolution and sensitivity of INTEGRAL, we are able to obtain a high quality spectrum of GX 5-1 from similar to 5keV to similar to 100 keV, for the first time without...... contamination from the nearby black hole candidate GRS 1758-258 above 20 keV. During our observations, GX 5-1 was mostly found in the horizontal and normal branch of its hardness intensity diagram. A clear hard X-ray emission is observed above similar to 30 keV which exceeds the exponential cut-off spectrum...... expected from lower energies. This spectral flattening may have the same origin of the hard components observed in other Z sources as it shares the property of being characteristic to the horizontal branch. The hard excess is explained by introducing Compton up-scattering of soft photons from the neutron...

  2. Fast simulation of Proton Induced X-Ray Emission Tomography using CUDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, D. G.; Marques, A. C.; Alves, L. C.; da Silva, R. C.

    2013-07-01

    A new 3D Proton Induced X-Ray Emission Tomography (PIXE-T) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy Tomography (STIM-T) simulation software has been developed in Java and uses NVIDIA™ Common Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) to calculate the X-ray attenuation for large detector areas. A challenge with PIXE-T is to get sufficient counts while retaining a small beam spot size. Therefore a high geometric efficiency is required. However, as the detector solid angle increases the calculations required for accurate reconstruction of the data increase substantially. To overcome this limitation, the CUDA parallel computing platform was used which enables general purpose programming of NVIDIA graphics processing units (GPUs) to perform computations traditionally handled by the central processing unit (CPU). For simulation performance evaluation, the results of a CPU- and a CUDA-based simulation of a phantom are presented. Furthermore, a comparison with the simulation code in the PIXE-Tomography reconstruction software DISRA (A. Sakellariou, D.N. Jamieson, G.J.F. Legge, 2001) is also shown. Compared to a CPU implementation, the CUDA based simulation is approximately 30× faster.

  3. Pulse-periodic generation of supershort avalanche electron beams and X-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Erofeev, M. V.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2014-05-01

    Pulse-periodic generation of supershort avalanche electron beams (SAEBs) and X-ray emission in nitrogen, as well as the transition from a single-pulse mode to a pulse-periodic mode with a high repetition frequency, was studied experimentally. It is shown that, in the pulse-periodic mode, the full width at halfmaximum of the SAEB is larger and the decrease rate of the gap voltage is lower than those in the single-pulse mode. It is found that, when the front duration of the voltage pulse at a nitrogen pressure of 90 Torr decreases from 2.5 to 0.3 ns, the X-ray exposure dose in the pulse-periodic mode increases by more than one order of magnitude and the number of SAEB electrons also increases. It is shown that, in the pulse-periodic mode of a diffuse discharge, gas heating in the discharge gap results in a severalfold increase in the SAEB amplitude (the number of electrons in the beam). At a generator voltage of 25 kV, nitrogen pressure of 90 Torr, and pulse repetition frequency of 3.5 kHz, a runaway electron beam was detected behind the anode foil.

  4. Evidence for intermediate polars as the origin of the Galactic Center hard X-ray emission

    CERN Document Server

    Hailey, Charles J; Perez, Kerstin; Canipe, Alicia M; Hong, Jaesub; Tomsick, John A; Boggs, Steven E; Christensen, Finn E; Craig, William W; Fornasini, Francesca; Grindlay, Jonathan E; Harrison, Fiona A; Nynka, Melania; Rahoui, Farid; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, William W

    2016-01-01

    Recently, unresolved hard (20-40 keV) X-ray emission has been discovered within the central 10 pc of the Galaxy, possibly indicating a large population of intermediate polars (IPs). Chandra and XMM-Newton measurements in the surrounding ~50 pc imply a much lighter population of IPs with $\\langle M_{\\rm WD} \\rangle \\approx 0.5 M_\\odot$. Here we use broad-band NuSTAR observations of two IPs: TV Columbae, which has a fairly typical but widely varying reported mass of $M_{\\rm WD} \\approx 0.5-1.0 M_\\odot$, and IGR J17303-0601, with a heavy reported mass of $M_{\\rm WD} \\approx 1.0-1.2 M_\\odot$. We investigate how varying spectral models and observed energy ranges influence estimated white dwarf mass. Observations of the inner 10 pc can be accounted for by IPs with $\\langle M_{\\rm WD} \\rangle \\approx 0.9 M_\\odot$, consistent with that of the CV population in general, and the X-ray observed field IPs in particular. The lower mass derived by Chandra and XMM-Newton appears to be an artifact of narrow energy band fittin...

  5. X-RAY EMISSION FROM YOUNG STARS IN THE MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGION IRAS 20126+4104

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a 40 ks Chandra observation of the IRAS 20126+4104 core region. In the inner 6'' two X-ray sources were detected, which are coincident with the radio jet source I20S and the variable radio source I20Var. No X-ray emission was detected from the nearby massive protostar I20N. The spectra of both detected sources are hard and highly absorbed, with no emission below 3 keV. For I20S, the measured 0.5-8 keV count rate was 4.3 counts ks-1. The X-ray spectrum was fitted with an absorbed 1T APEC model with an energy of kT =10 keV and an absorbing column of NH = 1.2 x 1023 cm-2. An unabsorbed X-ray luminosity of about 1.4 x 1032 erg s-1 was estimated. The spectrum shows broad line emission between 6.4 and 6.7 keV, indicative of emission from both neutral and highly ionized iron. The X-ray light curve indicates that I20S is marginally variable; however, no flare emission was observed. The variable radio source I20Var was detected with a count rate of 0.9 counts ks-1 but there was no evidence of X-ray variability. The best-fit spectral model is a 1T APEC model with an absorbing hydrogen column of NH = 1.1 x 1023 cm-2 and a plasma energy of kT = 6.0 keV. The unabsorbed X-ray luminosity is about 3 x 1031 erg s-1.

  6. Weak hard X-ray emission from two broad absorption line quasars observed with NuSTAR: Compton-thick absorption or intrinsic X-ray weakness?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Alexander, D. M.;

    2013-01-01

    We present Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) hard X-ray observations of two X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars, PG 1004+130 (radio loud) and PG 1700+518 (radio quiet). Many BAL quasars appear X-ray weak, probably due to absorption by the shielding gas between the nucleus...

  7. X-RAY AND MULTIWAVELENGTH INSIGHTS INTO THE NATURE OF WEAK EMISSION-LINE QUASARS AT LOW REDSHIFT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the X-ray and multiwavelength properties of 11 radio-quiet quasars with weak or no emission lines identified by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) with redshift z = 0.4-2.5. Our sample was selected from the Plotkin et al. catalog of radio-quiet, weak-featured active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The distribution of relative X-ray brightness for our low-redshift weak-line quasar (WLQ) candidates is significantly different from that of typical radio-quiet quasars, having an excess of X-ray weak sources, but it is consistent with that of high-redshift WLQs. Over half of the low-redshift WLQ candidates are X-ray weak by a factor of ∼> 5, compared to a typical SDSS quasar with similar UV/optical luminosity. These X-ray weak sources generally show similar UV emission-line properties to those of the X-ray weak quasar PHL 1811 (weak and blueshifted high-ionization lines, weak semiforbidden lines, and strong UV Fe emission); they may belong to the notable class of PHL 1811 analogs. The average X-ray spectrum of these sources is somewhat harder than that of typical radio-quiet quasars. Several other low-redshift WLQ candidates have normal ratios of X-ray-to-optical/UV flux, and their average X-ray spectral properties are also similar to those of typical radio-quiet quasars. The X-ray weak and X-ray normal WLQ candidates may belong to the same subset of quasars having high-ionization 'shielding gas' covering most of the wind-dominated broad emission-line region, but be viewed at different inclinations. The mid-infrared-to-X-ray spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of these sources are generally consistent with those of typical SDSS quasars, showing that they are not likely to be BL Lac objects with relativistically boosted continua and diluted emission lines. The mid-infrared-to-UV SEDs of most radio-quiet weak-featured AGNs without sensitive X-ray coverage (34 objects) are also consistent with those of typical SDSS quasars. However, one source in our X-ray

  8. X-Ray and Multiwavelength Insights into the Nature of Weak Emission-line Quasars at Low Redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianfeng; Brandt, W. N.; Anderson, Scott F.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Hall, Patrick B.; Plotkin, Richard M.; Schneider, Donald P.; Shemmer, Ohad

    2012-03-01

    We report on the X-ray and multiwavelength properties of 11 radio-quiet quasars with weak or no emission lines identified by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) with redshift z = 0.4-2.5. Our sample was selected from the Plotkin et al. catalog of radio-quiet, weak-featured active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The distribution of relative X-ray brightness for our low-redshift weak-line quasar (WLQ) candidates is significantly different from that of typical radio-quiet quasars, having an excess of X-ray weak sources, but it is consistent with that of high-redshift WLQs. Over half of the low-redshift WLQ candidates are X-ray weak by a factor of >~ 5, compared to a typical SDSS quasar with similar UV/optical luminosity. These X-ray weak sources generally show similar UV emission-line properties to those of the X-ray weak quasar PHL 1811 (weak and blueshifted high-ionization lines, weak semiforbidden lines, and strong UV Fe emission); they may belong to the notable class of PHL 1811 analogs. The average X-ray spectrum of these sources is somewhat harder than that of typical radio-quiet quasars. Several other low-redshift WLQ candidates have normal ratios of X-ray-to-optical/UV flux, and their average X-ray spectral properties are also similar to those of typical radio-quiet quasars. The X-ray weak and X-ray normal WLQ candidates may belong to the same subset of quasars having high-ionization "shielding gas" covering most of the wind-dominated broad emission-line region, but be viewed at different inclinations. The mid-infrared-to-X-ray spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of these sources are generally consistent with those of typical SDSS quasars, showing that they are not likely to be BL Lac objects with relativistically boosted continua and diluted emission lines. The mid-infrared-to-UV SEDs of most radio-quiet weak-featured AGNs without sensitive X-ray coverage (34 objects) are also consistent with those of typical SDSS quasars. However, one source in our X-ray

  9. Proton-induced X-ray emission in the trace analysis of human tooth enamel and dentine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study the feasibility of applying proton-induced x-ray emission spectroscopy (PIXE) to the trace element analysis of human tooth enamel and dentine is investigated. Detection limits on the order of 1 to 10 ppm are obtained. Depth yields for different elements and proton energies are discussed. Enhancement calculations show that the effect for PIXE analysis is less important than for x-ray induced x-ray analysis. However, for elements with an absorption edge just below an intense x-ray line from a major element the enhancement effect is significant, and, due to the 40% calcium in the enamel matrix, it is estimated to be 15% for potassium. The importance of a smooth sample surface is discussed. (author)

  10. Characterization of offset printing ink tagged with rare-earth taggants by X-ray emission techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) techniques have been used for elemental characterization of offset printing ink tagged with rare-earth taggants. The offset printing ink was tagged with rare-earth (La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu and Gd) thenoyltrifluoroacetonate chelates at about 1000-ppm level for each element separately. Small aliquots (approximately 20 mg) of tagged inks were coated on paper supports in the form of small circles having diameter 10-15 mm each and then analyzed. In the case of PIXE, a proton beam of energy 4 MeV and in the case of EDXRF a radioisotope source of 241Am (100 mCi) was used to excite the samples. The PIXE analysis showed well-resolved rare-earth L X-rays and EDXRF analysis showed the K X-rays of rare earths. Satisfactory results to identify and quantify the taggants were achieved. (author)

  11. Influence of near-edge processes in the elemental analysis using X-ray emission-based techniques

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gurjeet Singh; Sunil Kumar; N Singh; J Goswamy; D Mehta

    2011-02-01

    The near-edge processes, such as X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) andresonant Raman scattering (RRS), are not incorporated in the available theoretical attenuation coefficients, which are known to be reliable at energies away from the shell/subshell ionization thresholds of the attenuator element. Theoretical coefficients are generally used to estimate matrix corrections in routine quantitative elemental analysis based on various X-ray emission techniques. A tabulation of characteristic X-ray energies across the periodic table is provided where those X-rays are expected to alter the attenuation coefficients due to XAFS from a particular shell/subshell of the attenuator element. The influence of XAFS to the attenuation coefficient depends upon the atomic environment and the photoelectron wave vector, i.e., difference in energies of incident X-ray and the shell/subshell ionization threshold of the attenuator element. Further, the XAFS at a shell/subshell will significantly alter the total attenuation coefficient if the jump ratio at that shell/subshell is large, e.g., the K shell, L3 subshell and M5 subshell. The tabulations can be considered as guidelines so as to know what can be expected due to XAFS in typical photon-induced X-ray emission spectrometry.

  12. The correlation of x-ray emission with pinch energy in a 1.5 kJ plasma focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correlation of x-ray emission with pinch energy from a 1.5 kJ Mather-type plasma focus device for Ag and Sn inserts at the Cu tapered anode tip is reported. The space and time resolved x-ray emission characteristics are investigated by using a simple pinhole camera with appropriate filters and a multichannel pin-diode spectrometer. High voltage probe and Rogowski coil signals are used to estimate the pinch energy. At optimum conditions, the maximum x-ray yield in 4π-geometry is found to be 9 and 8 J/shot with efficiency of 0.6% and 0.5% for Sn and Ag inserted anodes. This is despite the fact that input energy converted to pinch energy is lower at 8% for Sn insert compared with 15% for the Ag insert. An increase in x-ray yield with an increase in pinch energy is observed for Sn as well as Ag. Pinhole images reveal that x-rays of energy less than 5 keV are emitted from the focus region and the high-energy x-rays are emanated from the anode tip

  13. The correlation of x-ray emission with pinch energy in a 1.5 kJ plasma focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, S. S.; Ahmad, S.; Lee, S.; Zakaullah, M.

    2007-08-01

    Correlation of x-ray emission with pinch energy from a 1.5 kJ Mather-type plasma focus device for Ag and Sn inserts at the Cu tapered anode tip is reported. The space and time resolved x-ray emission characteristics are investigated by using a simple pinhole camera with appropriate filters and a multichannel pin-diode spectrometer. High voltage probe and Rogowski coil signals are used to estimate the pinch energy. At optimum conditions, the maximum x-ray yield in 4π-geometry is found to be 9 and 8 J/shot with efficiency of 0.6% and 0.5% for Sn and Ag inserted anodes. This is despite the fact that input energy converted to pinch energy is lower at 8% for Sn insert compared with 15% for the Ag insert. An increase in x-ray yield with an increase in pinch energy is observed for Sn as well as Ag. Pinhole images reveal that x-rays of energy less than 5 keV are emitted from the focus region and the high-energy x-rays are emanated from the anode tip.

  14. The Chandra Planetary Nebula Survey (ChanPlaNS). II. X-ray Emission from Compact Planetary Nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Freeman, M; Montez, R; Balick, B; Frew, D J; Jones, D; Miszalski, B; Sahai, R; Blackman, E; Chu, Y -H; De Marco, O; Frank, A; Guerrero, M A; Lopez, J A; Zijlstra, A; Bujarrabal, V; Corradi, R L M; Nordhaus, J; Parker, Q A; Sandin, C; Schönberner, D; Soker, N; Sokoloski, J L; Steffen, M; Toalá, J A; Ueta, T; Villaver, E

    2014-01-01

    We present results from the most recent set of observations obtained as part of the Chandra X-ray observatory Planetary Nebula Survey (ChanPlaNS), the first comprehensive X-ray survey of planetary nebulae (PNe) in the solar neighborhood (i.e., within ~1.5 kpc of the Sun). The survey is designed to place constraints on the frequency of appearance and range of X-ray spectral characteristics of X-ray-emitting PN central stars and the evolutionary timescales of wind-shock-heated bubbles within PNe. ChanPlaNS began with a combined Cycle 12 and archive Chandra survey of 35 PNe. ChanPlaNS continued via a Chandra Cycle 14 Large Program which targeted all (24) remaining known compact (R_neb ~1000 cm^-3), and rarely associated with PNe that show H_2 emission and/or pronounced butterfly structures. Hb 5 is one such exception of a PN with a butterfly structure that hosts diffuse X-ray emission. Additionally, of the five new diffuse X-ray detections, two host [WR]-type CSPNe, NGC 1501 and NGC 6369, supporting the hypothes...

  15. Hydrodynamic and radiative transfer modeling of X-ray emission from colliding WR winds: WR 140 & the Galactic center

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Christopher M P; Cuadra, Jorge; Owocki, Stanley P; Wang, Q Daniel; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Sugawara, Yasuharu; Pollock, Andrew M T; Kallman, Timothy R

    2015-01-01

    Colliding Wolf-Rayet (WR) winds produce thermal X-ray emission widely observed by X-ray telescopes. In wide WR+O binaries, such as WR 140, the X-ray flux is tied to the orbital phase, and is a direct probe of the winds' properties. In the Galactic center, $\\sim$30 WRs orbit the super massive black hole (SMBH) within $\\sim$10", leading to a smorgasbord of wind-wind collisions. To model the X-ray emission of WR 140 and the Galactic center, we perform 3D hydrodynamic simulations to trace the complex gaseous flows, and then carry out 3D radiative transfer calculations to compute the variable X-ray spectra. The model WR 140 RXTE light curve matches the data well for all phases except the X-ray minimum associated with periastron, while the model spectra agree with the RXTE hardness ratio and the shape of the Suzaku observations throughout the orbit. The Galactic center model of the Chandra flux and spectral shape match well in the region r$<$3", but the model flux falls off too rapidly beyond this radius.

  16. Masked-backlighter technique used to simultaneously image x-ray absorption and x-ray emission from an inertial confinement fusion plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, F J; Radha, P B

    2014-11-01

    A method to simultaneously image both the absorption and the self-emission of an imploding inertial confinement fusion plasma has been demonstrated on the OMEGA Laser System. The technique involves the use of a high-Z backlighter, half of which is covered with a low-Z material, and a high-speed x-ray framing camera aligned to capture images backlit by this masked backlighter. Two strips of the four-strip framing camera record images backlit by the high-Z portion of the backlighter, while the other two strips record images aligned with the low-Z portion of the backlighter. The emission from the low-Z material is effectively eliminated by a high-Z filter positioned in front of the framing camera, limiting the detected backlighter emission to that of the principal emission line of the high-Z material. As a result, half of the images are of self-emission from the plasma and the other half are of self-emission plus the backlighter. The advantage of this technique is that the self-emission simultaneous with backlighter absorption is independently measured from a nearby direction. The absorption occurs only in the high-Z backlit frames and is either spatially separated from the emission or the self-emission is suppressed by filtering, or by using a backlighter much brighter than the self-emission, or by subtraction. The masked-backlighter technique has been used on the OMEGA Laser System to simultaneously measure the emission profiles and the absorption profiles of polar-driven implosions. PMID:25430361

  17. Utilization of synchrotron radiation in analytical chemistry. Hard X-ray emission and absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper takes up X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) method, which has widely spread due to the energy selectivity of radiation, and fluorescent X-ray spectroscopy, which is utilized in non-destructive screening analysis and high precision quantitative analysis method for bulk materials due to the popularity of commercialized devices that usually use X-ray sources, and explains their devices, measurement principle, and applications. As the device, it introduces X-ray fluorescence spectrometer that was installed in SPring-8 beamline (BL05SS). As the application examples of fluorescent X-ray spectroscopy, it introduces the analysis of heavy elements due to high-energy X-ray excitation, and fluorescent X-ray analysis using microbeams. As the example of the use of XAFS method, it introduces the in-situ observation of the charging/discharging process of lithium battery. (A.O.)

  18. Elemental and mineralogical study of earth-based pigments using particle induced X-ray emission and X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nel, P., E-mail: pnel@unimelb.edu.a [Centre for Cultural Materials Conservation, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic. 3010 (Australia); Lynch, P.A. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Materials Science and Engineering, Clayton, Vic. 3168 (Australia); Laird, J.S. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Division of Exploration and Mining, School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic. 3010 (Australia); Centre of Excellence in Ore Deposits (CODES), University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tas. 7001 (Australia); Casey, H.M. [Centre for Cultural Materials Conservation, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic. 3010 (Australia); Goodall, L.J. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Materials Science and Engineering, Clayton, Vic. 3168 (Australia); Ryan, C.G. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Division of Exploration and Mining, School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic. 3010 (Australia); Centre of Excellence in Ore Deposits (CODES), University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tas. 7001 (Australia); Sloggett, R.J. [Centre for Cultural Materials Conservation, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic. 3010 (Australia)

    2010-07-21

    Artwork and precious artefacts demand non-destructive analytical methodologies for art authentication, attribution and provenance assessment. However, structural and chemical characterisation represents a challenging problem with existing analytical techniques. A recent authentication case based on an Australian Aboriginal artwork, indicate there is substantial benefit in the ability of particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE), coupled with dynamic analysis (DA) to characterise pigments through trace element analysis. However, this information alone is insufficient for characterising the mineralogical residence of trace elements. For this reason a combined methodology based on PIXE and X-ray diffraction (XRD) has been performed to explore the benefits of a more comprehensive data set. Many Aboriginal paintings and artefacts are predominantly earth pigment based. This makes these cultural heritage materials an ideal case study for testing the above combined methodological approach on earth-based pigments. Samples of synthetic and naturally occurring earth-based pigments were obtained from a range of sources, which include Indigenous communities within Australia's Kimberley region. PIXE analyses using a 3 MeV focussed proton beam at the CSIRO nuclear microprobe, as well as laboratory-based XRD was carried out on the above samples. Elemental signature spectra as well as mineralogical data were used to assess issues regarding synthetic and naturally occurring earth pigments with the ultimate aim of establishing provenance.

  19. Elemental and mineralogical study of earth-based pigments using particle induced X-ray emission and X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nel, P.; Lynch, P. A.; Laird, J. S.; Casey, H. M.; Goodall, L. J.; Ryan, C. G.; Sloggett, R. J.

    2010-07-01

    Artwork and precious artefacts demand non-destructive analytical methodologies for art authentication, attribution and provenance assessment. However, structural and chemical characterisation represents a challenging problem with existing analytical techniques. A recent authentication case based on an Australian Aboriginal artwork, indicate there is substantial benefit in the ability of particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE), coupled with dynamic analysis (DA) to characterise pigments through trace element analysis. However, this information alone is insufficient for characterising the mineralogical residence of trace elements. For this reason a combined methodology based on PIXE and X-ray diffraction (XRD) has been performed to explore the benefits of a more comprehensive data set. Many Aboriginal paintings and artefacts are predominantly earth pigment based. This makes these cultural heritage materials an ideal case study for testing the above combined methodological approach on earth-based pigments. Samples of synthetic and naturally occurring earth-based pigments were obtained from a range of sources, which include Indigenous communities within Australia's Kimberley region. PIXE analyses using a 3 MeV focussed proton beam at the CSIRO nuclear microprobe, as well as laboratory-based XRD was carried out on the above samples. Elemental signature spectra as well as mineralogical data were used to assess issues regarding synthetic and naturally occurring earth pigments with the ultimate aim of establishing provenance.

  20. Elemental and mineralogical study of earth-based pigments using particle induced X-ray emission and X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artwork and precious artefacts demand non-destructive analytical methodologies for art authentication, attribution and provenance assessment. However, structural and chemical characterisation represents a challenging problem with existing analytical techniques. A recent authentication case based on an Australian Aboriginal artwork, indicate there is substantial benefit in the ability of particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE), coupled with dynamic analysis (DA) to characterise pigments through trace element analysis. However, this information alone is insufficient for characterising the mineralogical residence of trace elements. For this reason a combined methodology based on PIXE and X-ray diffraction (XRD) has been performed to explore the benefits of a more comprehensive data set. Many Aboriginal paintings and artefacts are predominantly earth pigment based. This makes these cultural heritage materials an ideal case study for testing the above combined methodological approach on earth-based pigments. Samples of synthetic and naturally occurring earth-based pigments were obtained from a range of sources, which include Indigenous communities within Australia's Kimberley region. PIXE analyses using a 3 MeV focussed proton beam at the CSIRO nuclear microprobe, as well as laboratory-based XRD was carried out on the above samples. Elemental signature spectra as well as mineralogical data were used to assess issues regarding synthetic and naturally occurring earth pigments with the ultimate aim of establishing provenance.

  1. X-ray Emission Line Profiles from Wind Clump Bow Shocks in Massive Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Ignace, R; Cassinelli, J P

    2012-01-01

    The consequences of structured flows continue to be a pressing topic in relating spectral data to physical processes occurring in massive star winds. In a preceding paper, our group reported on hydrodynamic simulations of hypersonic flow past a rigid spherical clump to explore the structure of bow shocks that can form around wind clumps. Here we report on profiles of emission lines that arise from such bow shock morphologies. To compute emission line profiles, we adopt a two component flow structure of wind and clumps using two "beta" velocity laws. While individual bow shocks tend to generate double horned emission line profiles, a group of bow shocks can lead to line profiles with a range of shapes with blueshifted peak emission that depends on the degree of X-ray photoabsorption by the interclump wind medium, the number of clump structures in the flow, and the radial distribution of the clumps. Using the two beta law prescription, the theoretical emission measure and temperature distribution throughout the...

  2. X-ray emission from a 650-fs laser-produced barium plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have used x rays in the 9--15-A band emitted from a solid target of BaF2 irradiated by ∼120 mJ of 248-nm radiation in a 650-fs full width at half maximum Gaussian laser pulse to characterize spectroscopically the resulting ultrashort-pulse laser-produced plasma. The emission was spectrally resolved but space and time integrated. By comparing the spectrum with unresolved-transition-array calculations and measurements of plasma emission from longer-pulse experiments, it is clear that ions as highly stripped as titaniumlike barium are present. We have successfully modeled the observed spectrum by assuming an optically thin source in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and using the super-transition-array theory [A. Bar-Shalom et al., Phys. Rev. A 40, 3183 (1989)] for emission from a hot, dense plasma. The model indicates that the emitting region is at comparatively low temperature (200--300 eV) and high electron density (1023--1024 cm-3). The degree of agreement between the model and the measured spectrum also suggests that the emitting plasma is near LTE. We conclude that the emission in this band arises from a solid-density plasma formed early in time, and is thus localized in both space and time. This interpretation is reinforced by LASNEX [G. B. Zimmerman and W. L. Kruer, Comments Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 11, 51 (1975)] simulations that indicate that emission in this band closely tracks the laser pulse

  3. Hard X-ray emissions from Cassiopeia A observed by INTEGRAL

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Cassiopeia A (Cas A) as the nearby young remnant of a core-collapse supernova is the best candidate for astrophysical studies in supernova explosion and its environment. We studied hard X-ray emissions from Cas A using the ten-year data of INTEGRAL observations, and first detected non-thermal continuum emission from the source up to 220 keV. The $^{44}$Ti line emissions at 68 and 78 keV are confirmed by our observations with a mean flux of $\\sim (2.2\\pm 0.4)\\times 10^{-5}$ ph cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$, corresponding to a $^{44}$Ti yield in Cas A of $(1.3\\pm 0.4)\\times 10^{-4}$ \\ms. The continuum emission from 3 -- 500 keV can be fitted with a thermal bremsstrahlung of $kT\\sim 0.79\\pm 0.08$ keV plus a power-law model of $\\Gamma \\sim 3.13\\pm 0.03$. The non-thermal emission from Cas A is well fitted with a power-law model without a cutoff up to 220 keV. This radiation characteristic is inconsistent with the diffusive shock acceleration models with the remnant shock velocity of only 5000km s$^{-1}$. The central compact ...

  4. Discovery of X-ray Emission from the Galactic Supernova Remnant G32.8-0.1 with Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Bamba, Aya; Hewitt, John; Petre, Robert; Angelini, Lorella; Safi-Harb, Samar; Zhou, Ping; Bocchino, Fabrizio; Sawada, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    We present the first dedicated X-ray study of the supernova remnant (SNR) G32.8-0.1 (Kes 78) with Suzaku. X-ray emission from the whole SNR shell has been detected for the first time. The X-ray morphology is well correlated with the emission from the radio shell, while anti-correlated with the molecular cloud found in the SNR field. The X-ray spectrum shows not only conventional low-temperature (kT ~ 0.6 keV) thermal emission in a non-equilibrium ionization state, but also a very high temperature (kT ~ 3.4 keV) component with a very low ionization timescale (~ 2.7e9 cm^{-3}s), or a hard non-thermal component with a photon index Gamma~2.3. The average density of the low-temperature plasma is rather low, of the order of 10^{-3}--10^{-2} cm^{-3}, implying that this SNR is expanding into a low-density cavity. We discuss the X-ray emission of the SNR, also detected in TeV with H.E.S.S., together with multi-wavelength studies of the remnant and other gamma-ray emitting SNRs, such as W28 and RCW 86. Analysis of a ti...

  5. The merits of particle induced X-ray emission in revealing painting techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neelmeijer, C. E-mail: c.neelmeijer@fz-rossendorf.de; Maeder, M

    2002-04-01

    Particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) at the external proton beam has proved ideal to study individual techniques of creating art objects. In particular, PIXE is suitable for examining paintings because of the low level of background produced by organic components like binders and paper backings. Thus, traces of pigments as deposited from pens on cardboard can be identified by this method. The combination of PIXE with external Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) allows non-destructive characterisation of near surface and thin film arrangements of paint materials. Thicker but less complex layers of oil paintings can be identified by special procedures of depth-resolved PIXE investigation. In this case, RBS provides additional information on organic coverings like madder lake or varnishes.

  6. Detection of halogenated flame retardants in polyurethane foam by particle induced X-ray emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maley, Adam M.; Falk, Kyle A.; Hoover, Luke; Earlywine, Elly B.; Seymour, Michael D. [Department of Chemistry, Hope College, 35 E. 12th Street, Holland, MI 49423 (United States); DeYoung, Paul A. [Department of Physics, Hope College, 27 Graves Place, Holland, MI 49423 (United States); Blum, Arlene [Green Science Policy Institute, Box 5455, Berkeley, CA 94705 (United States); Stapleton, Heather M. [Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, LSRC Box 90328, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Peaslee, Graham F., E-mail: peaslee@hope.edu [Department of Chemistry, Hope College, 35 E. 12th Street, Holland, MI 49423 (United States)

    2015-09-01

    A novel application of particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) has been developed to detect the presence of chlorinated and brominated flame retardant chemicals in polyurethane foams. Traditional Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry (GC–MS) methods for the detection and identification of halogenated flame retardants in foams require extensive sample preparation and data acquisition time. The elemental analysis of the halogens in polyurethane foam performed by PIXE offers the opportunity to identify the presence of halogenated flame retardants in a fraction of the time and sample preparation cost. Through comparative GC–MS and PIXE analysis of 215 foam samples, excellent agreement between the two methods was obtained. These results suggest that PIXE could be an ideal rapid screening method for the presence of chlorinated and brominated flame retardants in polyurethane foams.

  7. Photon Temperatures of Hard X-Ray Emission of LHCD Plasmas in HT-7 Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jawad YOUNIS; WAN Baonian; CHEN Zhongyong; LIN Shiyao; SHI Yuejiang; SHAN Jiafang; LIU Fukun

    2008-01-01

    A detailed study of photon temperatures (Tph) of hard X-ray emission in lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) plasmas is presented.The photon temperature increases with the increase in plasma current and decreases with the increase in plasma density.In lower hybrid power and phase scanning experiments;there is no appreciable change in the photon temperature.The numerical results based on ray-tracing calculation and Fokker-Planck solver gives reasonable explanation for the experimental observation.Both experimental and numerical results reveal that the photon temperature depends mainly on global effects of the fast electron population,synergy between the fast electron and the loop voltage and the Coulomb slowing down.

  8. Application of proton-induced X-ray emission technique to gunshot residue analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, P.; Panigrahi, N.; Rao, M.S.; Varier, K.M.; Sen, S.; Mehta, G.K.

    1982-04-01

    The proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique was applied to the identification and analysis of gunshot residues. Studies were made of the type of bullet and bullet hole identification, firearm discharge element profiles, the effect of various target backings, and hand swabbings. The discussion of the results reviews the sensitivity of the PIXE technique, its nondestructive nature, and its role in determining the distance from the gun to the victim and identifying the type of bullet used and whether a wound was made by a bullet or not. The high sensitivity of the PIXE technique, which is able to analyze samples as small as 0.1 to 1 ng, and its usefulness for detecting a variety of elements should make it particularly useful in firearms residue investigations.

  9. Application of proton-induced X-ray emission technique to gunshot residue analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique was applied to the identification and analysis of gunshot residues. Studies were made of the type of bullet and bullet hole identification, firearm discharge element profiles, the effect of various target backings, and hand swabbings. The discussion of the results reviews the sensitivity of the PIXE technique, its nondestructive nature, and its role in determining the distance from the gun to the victim and identifying the type of bullet used and whether a wound was made by a bullet or not. The high sensitivity of the PIXE technique, which is able to analyze samples as small as 0.1 to 1 ng, and its usefulness for detecting a variety of elements should make it particularly useful in firearms residue investigations

  10. Soft X-ray observation of the prompt emission of GRB 100418A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imatani, Ritsuko; Tomida, Hiroshi; Nakahira, Satoshi; Kimura, Masashi; Sakamoto, Takanori; Arimoto, Makoto; Morooka, Yoshitaka; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Tsunemi, Hiroshi

    2016-06-01

    We have observed the prompt emission of GRB 100418A from its beginning captured by the MAXI SSC (0.7-7 keV) on board the International Space Station followed by the Swift XRT (0.3-10 keV) observation. The light curve can be fitted by a combination of a power-law component and an exponential component (the decay constant is 31.6 ± 1.6 s). The X-ray spectrum is well expressed by the Band function with Ep ≤ 8.3 keV. This is the brightest gamma-ray burst showing a very low value of Ep. It satisfies the Yonetoku relation (Ep-Lp). It is also consistent with the Amati relation (Ep-Eiso) within a 2.5σ level.

  11. Probing electron acceleration and X-ray emission in laser-plasma accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Thaury, C; Corde, S; Brijesh, P; Lambert, G; Mangles, S P D; Bloom, M S; Kneip, S; Malka, V

    2013-01-01

    While laser-plasma accelerators have demonstrated a strong potential in the acceleration of electrons up to giga-electronvolt energies, few experimental tools for studying the acceleration physics have been developed. In this paper, we demonstrate a method for probing the acceleration process. A second laser beam, propagating perpendicular to the main beam is focused in the gas jet few nanosecond before the main beam creates the accelerating plasma wave. This second beam is intense enough to ionize the gas and form a density depletion which will locally inhibit the acceleration. The position of the density depletion is scanned along the interaction length to probe the electron injection and acceleration, and the betatron X-ray emission. To illustrate the potential of the method, the variation of the injection position with the plasma density is studied.

  12. Optical emission spectroscopy of various materials irradiated by soft x-ray free-electron laser

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cihelka, Jaroslav; Juha, Libor; Chalupský, Jaromír; Rosmej, F.B.; Renner, Oldřich; Saksl, K.; Hájková, Věra; Vyšín, Luděk; Galtier, E.; Schott, R.; Khorsand, A.R.; Riley, D.; Dzelzainis, T.; Nelson, A.; Lee, R. W.; Heimann, P.; Nagler, B.; Vinko, S.; Wark, J.; Whitcher, T.; Toleikis, S.; Tschentscher, T.; Fäustlin, R.; Wabnitz, H.; Bajt, S.; Chapman, H.; Krzywinski, J.; Sobierajski, R.; Klinger, D.; Jurek, M.; Pelka, J.; Hau-Riege, S.; London, R.A.; Kuba, J.; Stojanovic, N.; Sokolowski-Tinten, K.; Gleeson, A.J.; Störmer, M.; Andreasson, J.; Hajdu, J.; Timneanu, N.

    Bellingham : SPIE, 2009 - (Juha, L.; Bajt, S.; Sobierajski, R.), 73610P/1-73610P/10 ISBN 9780819476357. ISSN 0277-786x. - (Proceedings of SPIE. 7361). [Damage to VUV, EUV, and X-Ray Optics II. Prague (CZ), 21.04.2009-23.04.2009] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN300100702; GA MŠk LC510; GA MŠk(CZ) LC528; GA MŠk LA08024; GA AV ČR IAA400100701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : optical emission spectroscopy * free-electron laser * atomic lines * plasma plume * warm dense matter Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.822766

  13. Global structure of isothermal X-ray emission along the Fermi bubbles

    CERN Document Server

    Kataoka, J; Totani, T; Sofue, Y; Inoue, Y; Nakashima, S; Cheung, C C

    2015-01-01

    In our previous works (Kataoka et al. 2013, Tahara et al. 2015), we found absorbed thermal X-ray plasma with kT ~ 0.3 keV observed ubiquitously near the edges of the Fermi bubbles and interpreted this emission as weakly shock-heated Galactic halo (GH) gas. Here we present a systematic and uniform analysis of archival Suzaku (29 pointings; 6 newly presented) and Swift (68 pointings; 49 newly presented) data within Galactic longitudes |l| 0 deg) favors (ii), whereas that of the south (b < 0 deg) is rather close to (i), but weak excess signature is clearly detected also in the south like NPS (South Polar Spur; SPS). Such an asymmetry, if due to the bubbles, cannot be fully understood only by the inclination of bubbles' axis against the Galactic disk normal, thus suggesting asymmetric outflow due to different environmental/initial condition.

  14. Detecting X-ray Synchrotron Emission in Supernova Remnants Implications for Abundances and Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Dyer, K K; Borkowski, K J; Petre, R; Dyer, Kristy K.; Reynolds, Stephen P; Borkowski, Kazik J.; Petre, Robert

    2000-01-01

    The 10^51 ergs released in a supernova have far reaching consequences in the galaxy, determining elemental abundances, accelerating cosmic rays, and affecting the makeup of the interstellar medium. Recently the spectra of several supernova remnants have been found to be dominated by nonthermal emission. Separating the thermal and nonthermal components is important not only for the understanding of cosmic-ray acceleration and shock microphysics properties but for accurate assessment of the temperatures and line strengths. New models designed to model spatially resolved synchrotron X-rays from type Ia supernovae can contribute to the understanding of both the thermal physics (dynamics, abundances) and nonthermal physics (shock acceleration, magnetic-field amplification) of supernova remnants. I will describe model fits to SN 1006, emphasizing the physical constraints that can be placed on SNRs, abundances, and the cosmic-ray acceleration process.

  15. Elemental analysis of agricultural soil samples by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In agriculture, elements essential to vital processes are also called nutrients. A suitable and reliable particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) methodology for content determination of essential nutrients in soil samples was developed and its effectiveness proved. The PIXE method is applied to intermediate thickness samples, whose mass per area unit are smaller than 1 μg/cm2. Precision and accuracy of the method was estimated after repeated measurements of a single reference material: CRM PACS-2 (estuarine sediment) with a matrix quite similar to the soil samples measured. This paper reports the results of elemental measurements in soil samples. A discussion of agricultural soil sample preparation for PIXE analysis is also presented

  16. Detection of halogenated flame retardants in polyurethane foam by particle induced X-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maley, Adam M.; Falk, Kyle A.; Hoover, Luke; Earlywine, Elly B.; Seymour, Michael D.; DeYoung, Paul A.; Blum, Arlene; Stapleton, Heather M.; Peaslee, Graham F.

    2015-09-01

    A novel application of particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) has been developed to detect the presence of chlorinated and brominated flame retardant chemicals in polyurethane foams. Traditional Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) methods for the detection and identification of halogenated flame retardants in foams require extensive sample preparation and data acquisition time. The elemental analysis of the halogens in polyurethane foam performed by PIXE offers the opportunity to identify the presence of halogenated flame retardants in a fraction of the time and sample preparation cost. Through comparative GC-MS and PIXE analysis of 215 foam samples, excellent agreement between the two methods was obtained. These results suggest that PIXE could be an ideal rapid screening method for the presence of chlorinated and brominated flame retardants in polyurethane foams.

  17. Particle induced x-ray emission studies of some Indian medicinal plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medicinal herbs have been used from antiquity by humanity. This paper discusses the elemental composition and concentration of ten Indian medicinal plants investigated by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique. The accuracy and precision of the technique were assured by analyzing three Certified Standard Reference Materials -cabbage- (GBW 08504, China), wheat flour (NIST-8436) and bovine liver (NIST-1577b). The element K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn were found to be present in all the samples in varying concentrations. No toxic heavy metals such as As, Pb and Hg were detected in the studied plants. The range of the elemental concentrations in dry weight has been found to vary from 4.69x104 mg/kg to 1.81 mg/kg in the plants. The results also show that these plants contain elements of vital importance in man's metabolism and that are needed for growth and developments, prevention and heating of diseases. (author)

  18. Detection of halogenated flame retardants in polyurethane foam by particle induced X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel application of particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) has been developed to detect the presence of chlorinated and brominated flame retardant chemicals in polyurethane foams. Traditional Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry (GC–MS) methods for the detection and identification of halogenated flame retardants in foams require extensive sample preparation and data acquisition time. The elemental analysis of the halogens in polyurethane foam performed by PIXE offers the opportunity to identify the presence of halogenated flame retardants in a fraction of the time and sample preparation cost. Through comparative GC–MS and PIXE analysis of 215 foam samples, excellent agreement between the two methods was obtained. These results suggest that PIXE could be an ideal rapid screening method for the presence of chlorinated and brominated flame retardants in polyurethane foams

  19. Silicon X-ray line emission from solar flares and active regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New observations of solar flare and active region X-ray spectra obtained with the Columbia University instrument on OSO-8 are presented and discussed. The high sensitivity of the graphite crystal panel has allowed both line and continuum spectra to be observed with moderate spectral resolution. Observations with higher spectral resolution have been made with a panel of pentaerythritol crystals. Twenty-nine lines between 1.5 and 7.0 A have been resolved and identified, including several dielectronic recombination satellite lines to Si XIV and Si XIII lines which have been observed for the first time. It has been found that thermal continuum models specified by single values of temperature and emission measure have fitted that data adequately, there being good agreement with the values of these parameters derived from line intensity ratios. (Auth.)

  20. Soft X-ray Observation of the Prompt Emission of GRB100418A

    CERN Document Server

    Imatani, Ritsuko; Nakahira, Satoshi; Kimura, Masashi; Sakamoto, Takanori; Arimoto, Makoto; Morooka, Yoshitaka; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Tsunemi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    We have observed the prompt emission of GRB100418A, from its beginning by the MAXI/SSC (0.7-7 keV) on board the International Space Station followed by the Swift/XRT (0.3-10 keV) observation. The light curve can be fitted by a combination of a power law component and an exponential component (decay constant is $31.6\\pm 1.6$). The X-ray spectrum is well expressed by the Band function with $E_{\\rm p}\\leq$8.3 keV. This is the brightest GRB showing a very low value of $E_{\\rm p}$. It is also consistent with the Yonetoku-relation ($E_{\\rm p}$-$L_{\\rm p}$) while it is not clear with the Amati-relation ($E_{\\rm p}$-$E_{\\rm iso}$).