WorldWideScience

Sample records for charge neutrality conditions

  1. Dynamics of neutral and charged aerosol particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppae, J.

    2012-07-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles have various climate effects and adverse health effects, which both depend on the size and number concentration of the particles. Freshly-formed particles are not large enough to impact neither health nor climate and they are most susceptible to removal by collisions with larger pre-existing particles. Consequently, the knowledge of both the formation and the growth rate of particles are crucially important when assessing the health and climate effects of atmospheric new particle formation. The purpose of this thesis is to increase our knowledge of the dynamics of neutral and charged aerosol particles with a specific interest towards the particle growth rate and processes affecting the aerosol charging state. A new model, Ion-UHMA, which simulates the dynamics of neutral and charged particles, was developed for this purpose. Simple analytical formulae that can be used to estimate the growth rate due to various processes were derived and used to study the effects of charged particles on the growth rate. It was found that the growth rate of a freshly-formed particle population due to condensation and coagulation could be significantly increased when a considerable fraction of the particles are charged. Finally, recent data-analysis methods that have been applied to the aerosol charging states obtained from the measurements were modified for a charge asymmetric framework. The methods were then tested on data obtained from aerosol dynamics simulations. The methods were found to be able to provide reasonable estimates on the growth rate and proportion of particles formed via ion-induced nucleation, provided that the growth rate is high enough and that the charged particles do not grow much more rapidly than the neutral ones. A simple procedure for estimating whether the methods are suitable for analysing data obtained in specific conditions was provided. In this thesis, the dynamics of neutral and charged aerosol particles were studied in

  2. Local charge neutrality condition, Fermi level and majority carrier density of a semiconductor with multiple localized multi-level intrinsic/impurity defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ken K. Chin

    2011-01-01

    For semiconductors with localized intrinsic/impurity defects,intentionally doped or unintentionally incorporated,that have multiple transition energy levels among charge states,the general formulation of the local charge neutrality condition is given for the determination of the Fermi level and the majority carrier density.A graphical method is used to illustrate the solution of the problem.Relations among the transition energy levels of the multi-level defect are derived using the graphical method.Numerical examples are given for p-doping of the CdTe thin film used in solar panels and semi-insulating Si to illustrate the relevance and importance of the issues discussed in this work.

  3. Modeling Transport in Ultrathin Si Nanowires: Charged versus Neutral Impurities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rurali, Riccardo; Markussen, Troels; Suné, Jordi;

    2008-01-01

    of this effect are obtained by computing the electronic transmission through wires with either charged or neutral P and B dopants. The dopant potential is obtained from density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Contrary to the neutral case, the transmission through charged dopants cannot be converged within...

  4. Single neutral pion production by charged-current $\\bar{\

    CERN Document Server

    Aliaga, L; Bercellie, A; Bodek, A; Bravar, A; Brooks, W K; Butkevich, A; Caicedo, D A Martinez; Carneiro, M F; Christy, M E; Chvojka, J; da Motta, H; Devan, J; Dytman, S A; Díaz, G A; Eberly, B; Felix, J; Fields, L; Fine, R; Gago, A M; Gallagher, H; Gran, R; Harris, D A; Higuera, A; Hurtado, K; Kordosky, M; Le, T; Maher, E; Manly, S; Mann, W A; Marshall, C M; McFarland, K S; McGivern, C L; McGowan, A M; Miller, J; Morfín, J G; Mousseau, J; Nelson, J K; Norrick, A; Osta, J; Palomino, J L; Paolone, V; Park, J; Patrick, C E; Perdue, G N; Rakotondravohitra, L; Ramirez, M A; Ransome, R D; Ray, H; Ren, L; Rodrigues, P A; Ruterbories, D; Schellman, H; Schmitz, D W; Sobczyk, J T; Salinas, C J Solano; Tagg, N; Tice, B G; Valencia, E; Walton, T; Wolcott, J; Yepes-Ramirez, H; Zavala, G; Zhang, D; Ziemer, B P

    2015-01-01

    Single neutral pion production via muon antineutrino charged-current interactions in plastic scintillator (CH) is studied using the \\minerva detector exposed to the NuMI low-energy, wideband antineutrino beam at Fermilab. Measurement of this process constrains models of neutral pion production in nuclei, which is important because the neutral-current analog is a background for $\\bar{\

  5. Multiplicity distributions and charged-neutral fluctuations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tapan K Nayak; M M Aggarwal; A Agnihotri; Z Ahammed; A L S Angelis; V Antonenko; V Arefiev; V Astakhov; V Avdeitchikov; T C Awes; P V K S Baba; S K Badyal; A Baldine; L Barabach; C Barlag; S Bathe; B Tatiounia; T Bernier; K B Bhalla; V S Bhatia; C Blume; R Bock; E-M Bohne; D Bucher; A Buijs; E-J Buis; H Büsching; L Carlen; V Chalyshev; S Chattopadhyay; K E Chenawi; R Cherbatchev; T Chujo; A Claussen; A C Das; M P Decowski; V Djordjadze; P Donni; I Doubovik; A K Dubey; M R Dutta Majumdar; S Eliseev; K Enosawa; H Feldmann; P Foka; S Fokin; V Frolov; M S Ganti; S Garpman; O Gavrishchuk; F J M Geurts; T K Ghosh; R Glasow; S K Gupta; B Guskov; H A Gustafsson; H H Gutbrod; R Higuchi; I Hrivnacova; M Ippolitov; H Kalechofsky; R Kamermans; K-H Kampert; K Karadjev; K Karpio; S Kato; S Kees; H Kim; B W Kolb; I Kosarev; I Koutcheryaev; A Kugler; P Kulinich; V Kumar; M Kurata; K Kurita; K Kuzmin; I Langbein; A Lebedev; Y Y Lee; H Löhner; D P Mahapatra; V Manko; M Martin; A Maximov; R Mehdiyev; G Mgebrichvili; Y Miake; D Mikhalev; G C Mishra; Y Miyamoto; B Mohanty; D Morrison; D S Mukhopadhyay; V Myalkovski; H Naef; B K Nandi; S K Nayak; T K Nayak; S Neumaier; A Nianine; V Nikitine; S Nikolaev; S Nishimura; P Nomokov; J Nystrand; F E Obenshain; A Oskarsson; I Otterlund; M Pachr; A Parfenov; S Pavliouk; T Peitzmann; V Petracek; F Plasil; M L Purschke; B Raeven; J Rak; R Raniwala; S Raniwala; V S Ramamurthy; N K Rao; F Retiere; K Reygers; G Roland; L Rosselet; I Roufanov; J M Rubio; S S Sambyal; R Santo; S Sato; H Schlagheck; H-R Schmidt; G Shabratova; I Sibiriak; T Siemiarczuk; B C Sinha; N Slavine; K Söderström; N Solomey; G Sood; S P Sørensen; P Stankus; G Stefanek; P Steinberg; E Stenlund; D Stüken; M Sumbera; T Svensson; M D Trivedi; A Tsvetkov; C Twenhöfel; L Tykarski; J Urbahn; N V Eijndhoven; W H V Heeringen; G J V Nieuwenhuizen; A Vinogradov; Y P Viyogi; A Vodopianov; S Vörös; M A Vos; B Wyslouch; K Yogi; Y Yokota; G R Young

    2001-08-01

    Results from the multiplicity distributions of inclusive photons and charged particles, scaling of particle multiplicities, event-by-event multiplicity fluctuations, and charged-neutral fluctuations in 158 GeV Pb+Pb collisions are presented and discussed. A scaling of charged particle multiplicity as $N^{1.07± 0:05}_{\\text{part}}$ and photons as $N^{1.12± 0:03}_{\\text{part}}$ have been observed, indicating violation of naive wounded nucleon model. The analysis of localized charged-neutral fluctuation indicates a model-independent demonstration of non-statistical fluctuations in both charged particles and photons in limited azimuthal regions. However, no correlated charged-neutral fluctuations are observed.

  6. Charged and Neutral Current Neutrino Induced Nucleon Emission Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Nieves, J; Vacas, M J V

    2006-01-01

    By means of a Monte Carlo cascade method, to account for the rescattering of the outgoing nucleon, we study the charged and neutral current inclusive one nucleon knockout reactions off nuclei induced by neutrinos. The nucleon emission process studied here is a clear signal for neutral--current neutrino driven reactions, and can be used in the analysis of future neutrino experiments.

  7. Millimeter Wave Scattering from Neutral and Charged Water Droplets

    CERN Document Server

    Heifetz, Alexander; Liao, Shaolin; Gopalsami, N Sami; Raptis, A C Paul

    2010-01-01

    We investigated 94GHz millimeter wave (MMW) scattering from neutral and charged water mist produced in the laboratory with an ultrasonic atomizer. Diffusion charging of the mist was accomplished with a negative ion generator (NIG). We observed increased forward and backscattering of MMW from charged mist, as compared to MMW scattering from an uncharged mist. In order to interpret the experimental results, we developed a model based on classical electrodynamics theory of scattering from a dielectric sphere with diffusion-deposited mobile surface charge. In this approach, scattering and extinction cross-sections are calculated for a charged Rayleigh particle with effective dielectric constant consisting of the volume dielectric function of the neutral sphere and surface dielectric function due to the oscillation of the surface charge in the presence of applied electric field. For small droplets with (radius smaller than 100nm), this model predicts increased MMW scattering from charged mist, which is qualitative...

  8. Positive, Neutral, and Negative Mass-Charges in General Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borissova L.

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available As shown, any four-dimensional proper vector has two observable projections onto time line, attributed to our world and the mirror world (for a mass-bearing particle, the projections posses are attributed to positive and negative mass-charges. As predicted, there should be a class of neutrally mass-charged particles that inhabit neither our world nor the mirror world. Inside the space-time area (membrane the space rotates at the light speed, and all particles move at as well the light speed. So, the predicted particles of the neutrally mass-charged class should seem as light-like vortices.

  9. Dynamics of Ion Beam Charge Neutralization by Ferroelectric Plasma Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, Anton D.; Gilson, Erik P.; Grisham, Larry R.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Ji, Qing; Persaud, Arun; Seidl, Peter A.; Schenkel, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Ferroelectric Plasma Sources (FEPSs) can generate plasma that provides effective space-charge neutralization of intense high-perveance ion beams. Here we present experimental results on charge neutralization of a high-perveance 38 keV Ar+ beam by a FEPS plasma. By comparing the measured beam radius with the envelope model for space-charge expansion, it is shown that a charge neutralization fraction of 98% is attainable. The transverse electrostatic potential of the ion beam is reduced from 15 V before neutralization to 0.3 V, implying that the energy of the neutralizing electrons is below 0.3 eV. Near-complete charge neutralization is established 5 μs after the driving pulse is applied to the FEPS, and can last for 35 μs. It is argued that the duration of neutralization is much longer than a reasonable lifetime of the plasma produced in the sub- μs surface discharge. Measurements of current flow in the driving circuit of the FEPS suggest that plasma can be generated for tens of μs after the high voltage pulse is applied. This is confirmed by fast photography of the plasma in the 1-meter long FEPS on NDCX-II, where effective charge neutralization of the beam was achieved with the optimized FEPS timing. This work was supported by the Office of Science of the US Department of Energy under contracts DE-AC0209CH11466 (PPPL) and DE-AC0205CH11231 (LBNL).

  10. Charge neutrality breakdown in confined aqueous electrolytes: Theory and simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colla, Thiago; Girotto, Matheus; Dos Santos, Alexandre P; Levin, Yan

    2016-09-01

    We study, using Density Functional theory (DFT) and Monte Carlo simulations, aqueous electrolyte solutions between charged infinite planar surfaces, in contact with a bulk salt reservoir. In agreement with recent experimental observations [Z. Luo et al., Nat. Commun. 6, 6358 (2015)], we find that the confined electrolyte lacks local charge neutrality. We show that a DFT based on a bulk-HNC expansion properly accounts for strong electrostatic correlations and allows us to accurately calculate the ionic density profiles between the charged surfaces, even for electrolytes containing trivalent counterions. The DFT allows us to explore the degree of local charge neutrality violation, as a function of plate separation and bulk electrolyte concentration, and to accurately calculate the interaction force between the charged surfaces.

  11. Auger neutralization rates of multiply charged ions near metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nedeljkovic, N.N.; Janev, R.K.; Lazur, V.Y.

    1988-08-15

    Transition rates for the Auger neutralization processes of multiply charged ions on metal surfaces are calculated in closed analytical form. The core potential of a multiply charged ion is represented by a pseudopotential, which accounts for the electron screening effects and allows transition to the pure Coulomb case (fully stripped ions). The relative importance of various neutralization channels in slow-ion--surface collisions is discussed for the examples of He/sup 2+/+Mo(100) and C/sup 3+/+Mo(100) collisional systems.

  12. Controlled surface neutralization: A quantitative approach to study surface charging in photoemission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, S. [Surface Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Mukherjee, M. [Surface Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)], E-mail: manabendra.mukherjee@saha.ac.in

    2007-02-15

    Photons when used to probe poorly conducting materials induce emission of secondary electrons that are inadequately compensated from the sample ground giving rise to a phenomenon commonly known as sample charging. In case of photoemission spectroscopy of an insulating material the data obtained from the charged surface are accordingly distorted. Here we have used a controlled neutralization technique to obtain photoemission data from continuously varying equilibrium charging conditions from two dissimilar insulating polymeric systems. A quantitative scheme for data analysis has been developed to demonstrate systematic behavior in the apparently distorted spectra and the charging peak shift has been described by an effective model. It is shown that the neutralization responses are non-linear for both the systems and possess intrinsic similarity. Around a critical electron flux the neutralization of the samples appears to occur through the percolation of homogeneously dispersed surface domains.

  13. Semileptonic branching fractions of charged and neutral B mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Athanas, M; Masek, G E; Paar, H P; Gronberg, J B; Kutschke, R; Menary, S R; Morrison, R J; Nakanishi, S; Nelson, H N; Nelson, T K; Qiao, C; Richman, J D; Ryd, A; Tajima, H; Sperka, D; Witherell, M S; Balest, R; Cho, K; Ford, W T; Johnson, D R; Lingel, K; Lohner, M; Rankin, P; Smith, J G; Alexander, J P; Bebek, C; Berkelman, K; Bloom, K; Browder, T E; Cassel, David G; Cho, H A; Coffman, D M; Crowcroft, D S; Drell, P S; Dumas, D J P; Ehrlich, R; Gaidarev, P B; García-Sciveres, M; Geiser, B; Gittelman, B; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Henderson, S; Jones, C D; Jones, S L; Kandaswamy, J; Katayama, N; Kim, P C; Kreinick, D L; Ludwig, G S; Masui, J; Mevissen, J; Mistry, N B; Ng, C R; Nordberg, E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Salman, S; Sapper, M; Würthwein, F; Avery, P; Freyberger, A P; Rodríguez, J; Yang, S; Yelton, J; Cinabro, D; Liu, T; Saulnier, M; Wilson, R; Yamamoto, H; Bergfeld, T; Eisenstein, B I; Gollin, G; Ong, B; Palmer, M; Selen, M; Thaler, J J; Edwards, K W; Ogg, M; Bellerive, A; Britton, D I; Hyatt, E R F; MacFarlane, D B; Patel, P M; Spaan, B; Sadoff, A J; Ammar, R; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Besson, D; Coppage, D; Copty, N K; Davis, R; Hancock, N; Kelly, M S; Kotov, S A; Kravchenko, I V; Kwak, N; Lam, H; Kubota, Y; Lattery, M; Momayezi, M; Nelson, J K; Patton, S; Poling, R A; Savinov, V; Schrenk, S; Wang, R; Alam, M S; Kim, I J; Ling, Z; Mahmood, A H; O'Neill, J J; Severini, H; Sun, C R; Wappler, F; Crawford, G; Daubenmier, C M; Fulton, R; Fujino, D; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Lee, J; Malchow, R L; Skovpen, Y; Sung, M; White, C; Zoeller, M M; Butler, F; Fu, X; Nemati, B; Ross, W R; Skubic, P L; Wood, M; Bishai, M; Fast, J; Gerndt, E; McIlwain, R L; Miao, T; Miller, D H; Modesitt, M; Payne, D; Shibata, E I; Shipsey, I P J; Wang Pei Ning; Battle, M; Ernst, J; Gibbons, L K; Kwon, Y; Roberts, S; Thorndike, E H; Wang, C H; Dominick, J; Lambrecht, M; Sanghera, S; Shelkov, V; Skwarnicki, T; Stroynowski, R; Volobuev, I P; Wei, G; Zadorozhny, P; Artuso, M; Gao, M; Golberg, M; He, D; Horwitz, N; Kennett, R; Mountain, R; Moneti, G C; Muheim, F; Mukhin, Y; Playfer, S; Rozen, Y; Stone, S; Vasseur, G; Xing, X; Zhu, G; Bartelt, J; Csorna, S E; Egyed, Z; Jain, V; Gibaut, D; Kinoshita, K; Pomianowski, P A; Barish, B C; Chadha, M; Chan, S; Cowen, D F; Eigen, G; Miller, J S; O'Grady, C; Urheim, J; Weinstein, A J

    1994-01-01

    An examination of leptons in {\\Upsilon (4S)} events tagged by reconstructed B decays yields semileptonic branching fractions of b_-=(10.1 \\pm 1.8\\pm 1.4)\\% for charged and b_0=(10.9 \\pm 0.7\\pm 1.1)\\% for neutral B mesons. This is the first measurement for charged B. Assuming equality of the charged and neutral semileptonic widths, the ratio b_-/b_0=0.93 \\pm 0.18 \\pm 0.12 is equivalent to the ratio of lifetimes. A postscript version is available through World-Wide-Web in http://w4.lns.cornell.edu/publi c/CLNS/1994

  14. Phase Diagrams and Ordering in Charged Membranes: Binary Mixtures of Charged and Neutral Lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimokawa, Naofumi; Himeno, Hiroki; Hamada, Tsutomu; Takagi, Masahiro; Komura, Shigeyuki; Andelman, David

    2016-07-07

    We propose a model describing the phase behavior of two-component membranes consisting of binary mixtures of electrically charged and neutral lipids. We take into account the structural phase transition (main-transition) of the hydrocarbon chains, and investigate the interplay between this phase transition and the lateral phase separation. The presence of charged lipids significantly affects the phase behavior of the multicomponent membrane. Due to the conservation of lipid molecular volume, the main-transition temperature of charged lipids is lower than that of neutral ones. Furthermore, as compared with binary mixtures of neutral lipids, the membrane phase separation in binary mixtures of charged lipids is suppressed, in accord with recent experiments. We distinguish between two types of charged membranes: mixtures of charged saturated lipid/neutral unsaturated lipid and a second case of mixtures of neutral saturated lipid/charged unsaturated lipid. The corresponding phase behavior is calculated and shown to be very different. Finally, we discuss the effect of added salt on the phase separation and the temperature dependence of the lipid molecular area.

  15. Simulations of space charge neutralization in a magnetized electron cooler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerity, James [Texas A-M; McIntyre, Peter M. [Texas A-M; Bruhwiler, David Leslie [RadiaSoft, Boulder; Hall, Christopher [RadiaSoft, Boulder; Moens, Vince Jan [Ecole Polytechnique, Lausanne; Park, Chong Shik [Fermilab; Stancari, Giulio [Fermilab

    2017-02-02

    Magnetized electron cooling at relativistic energies and Ampere scale current is essential to achieve the proposed ion luminosities in a future electron-ion collider (EIC). Neutralization of the space charge in such a cooler can significantly increase the magnetized dynamic friction and, hence, the cooling rate. The Warp framework is being used to simulate magnetized electron beam dynamics during and after the build-up of neutralizing ions, via ionization of residual gas in the cooler. The design follows previous experiments at Fermilab as a verification case. We also discuss the relevance to EIC designs.

  16. Space charge neutralization by electron-transparent suspended graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srisonphan, Siwapon; Kim, Myungji; Kim, Hong Koo

    2014-01-20

    Graphene possesses many fascinating properties originating from the manifold potential for interactions at electronic, atomic, or molecular levels. Here we report measurement of electron transparency and hole charge induction response of a suspended graphene anode on top of a void channel formed in a SiO2/Si substrate. A two-dimensional (2D) electron gas induced at the oxide interface emits into air and makes a ballistic transport toward the suspended graphene. A small fraction (>~0.1%) of impinging electrons are captured at the edge of 2D hole system in graphene, demonstrating good transparency to very low energy (graphene anode have the effect of neutralizing the electron space charge in the void channel. This charge compensation dramatically enhances 2D electron gas emission at cathode to the level far surpassing the Child-Langmuir's space-charge-limited emission.

  17. Neutral and positively charged excitons in narrow quantum ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porras Monroy, L. C.; Rodríguez-Prada, F. A.; Mikhailov, I. D. [Escuela de Física, Universidad Industrial de Santander, A. A. 678, Bucaramanga (Colombia)

    2014-05-15

    We study theoretically quantized states of a neutral and a positively charged exciton (trion X{sup +}) confined in a heterostructure with the ring-like geometry. In order to assess the experimentally relevant domain of parameters, we adopt a simple model of a narrow ring when 3D wave equations for the neutral and positively charged excitons can be separated. By using the Fourier series method, we have calculated the energy spectra of excitons complexes in a quantum ring as a function of the electron-to-hole mass ratio, the ring radius, and the magnetic field strength. The quantum-size effect and the size-dependent magnetic oscillations of energy levels of excitons' complexes spectra have been revealed.

  18. Ferroelectric Plasma Source for Heavy Ion Beam Charge Neutralization

    CERN Document Server

    Efthimion, Philip; Gilson, Erik P; Grisham, Larry; Logan, B G; Waldron, William; Yu, Simon

    2005-01-01

    Plasmas are employed as a medium for charge neutralizing heavy ion beams to allow them to focus to a small spot size. Calculations suggest that plasma at a density of 1-100 times the ion beam density and at a length ~ 0.1-1 m would be suitable. To produce 1 meter plasma, large-volume plasma sources based upon ferroelectric ceramics are being considered. These sources have the advantage of being able to increase the length of the plasma and operate at low neutral pressures. The source will utilize the ferroelectric ceramic BaTiO3 to form metal plasma. The drift tube inner surface of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) will be covered with ceramic. High voltage (~ 1-5 kV) is applied between the drift tube and the front surface of the ceramic by placing a wire grid on the front surface. A prototype ferroelectric source 20 cm long produced plasma densities ~ 5x1011 cm-3. The source was integrated into the experiment and successfully charge neutralized the K ion beam. Presently, the 1 meter source ...

  19. Whistler oscillitons revisited: the role of charge neutrality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Verheest

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available When studying transverse modes propagating parallel to a static magnetic field, an apparent contradiction arises between the weakly nonlinear results obtained from the derivative nonlinear Schrödinger equation, predicting envelope solitons (where the amplitude is stationary in the wave frame, but the phase is not, and recent results for whistler oscillitons, indicating that really stationary structures of large amplitude are possible. Revisiting this problem in the fluid dynamic approach, care has been taken not to introduce charge neutrality from the outset, because this not only neglects electric stresses compared to magnetic stresses, which is reasonable, but could also imply from Poisson's equation a vanishing of the wave electric field. Nevertheless, the fixed points of the remaining equations are the same, whether charge neutrality is assumed from the outset or not, so that the solitary wave solutions at not too large amplitudes will be very similar. This is borne out by numerical simulations of the solutions under the two hypotheses, showing that the lack of correspondence with the DNLS envelope solitons indicates the limitations of the reductive perturbation approach, and is not a consequence of assuming charge neutrality.

  20. Obliquely propagating large amplitude solitary waves in charge neutral plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Verheest

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals in a consistent way with the implications, for the existence of large amplitude stationary structures in general plasmas, of assuming strict charge neutrality between electrons and ions. With the limit of pair plasmas in mind, electron inertia is retained. Combining in a fluid dynamic treatment the conservation of mass, momentum and energy with strict charge neutrality has indicated that nonlinear solitary waves (as e.g. oscillitons cannot exist in electron-ion plasmas, at no angle of propagation with respect to the static magnetic field. Specifically for oblique propagation, the proof has turned out to be more involved than for parallel or perpendicular modes. The only exception is pair plasmas that are able to support large charge neutral solitons, owing to the high degree of symmetry naturally inherent in such plasmas. The nonexistence, in particular, of oscillitons is attributed to the breakdown of the plasma approximation in dealing with Poisson's law, rather than to relativistic effects. It is hoped that future space observations will allow to discriminate between oscillitons and large wave packets, by focusing on the time variability (or not of the phase, since the amplitude or envelope graphs look very similar.

  1. Dosimetry of charged and neutral particles onboard a stratospheric balloon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dönsdorf, Esther Miriam; Burmeister, Soenke; Heber, Bernd; Benton, Eric; Berger, Thomas

    The interaction of the primary galactic cosmic rays with constituents of the atmosphere leads to a complex secondary radiation field at high altitudes. Of special interest for aviation and thereby also for radiation protection is the height up to 30 km where the radiation field consists of charged and neutral particles. For the determination of the dose rates up to this altitude in the Earth's atmosphere a stratopheric balloon flight will be performed in central Oklahoma which has a cutoff rigidity of about 4 GV. Onboard there will be two different active radiation detector systems to measure the dose of charged and neutral particles in the stratosphere. The first one is a silicon telescope which consists of two 2 cm2 silicon PIN-photodiodes used as semiconductor detectors. This instrument will mainly be used to measure the charged component of the radiation field due to the fact that the silicon detectors have a rather low efficiency for the detection of neutrons and gammas with energies higher than 60 keV. The second instrument is a so called phoswich detector. It is composed of two dissimilar scintillators optically coupled to each other and to a common photomultiplier tube. For this experimental setup a combination of a fast plastic scintillator BC412 and a slow inorganic scintillator CsI(Na) is used. The pulses from the two scintillators will be separated by applying pulse shape analysis. These two different scintillator materials have been chosen because BC412 is hydrogen rich and thus the cross section for fast neutrons is relatively high and CsI(Na) has a high cross section for gamma radiation. The objective of the phoswich detector is to distinguish between gammas and neutrons but it is also possible to measure charged particles with this setup. The aim of the balloon flight is to determine the dose measured with these two different instruments and in particular to differentiate between the dose induced by charged particles and by the different neutral

  2. Ionization and Charge Exchange Reactions in Neutral Entrainment of a Field Reversed Configuration Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-16

    non - Maxwellian . This indicates that a kinetic approach has to be used to model neutral entrainment in FRC thrusters. Strong impact of electron...radiative cooling can be problematic for high-Z plasma (due to a Z2 dependence) and in radiative non -equilibrium conditions (volumetric emission).1...dg, (1) where g is the relative collision velocity and fe is the Maxwellian distribution function. 2. Single charge exchange (SCX, A+ +A → A+A+) For

  3. Structures, energies and bonding in neutral and charged Li microclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yepes, Diana; Kirk, Steven Robert; Jenkins, Samantha; Restrepo, Albeiro

    2012-09-01

    Structural and chemical properties of charged and neutral Lithium microclusters are investigated for [Formula: see text]. A total of 18 quantum conformational spaces are randomly walked to produce candidate structures for local minima. Very rich potential energy surfaces are produced, with the largest structural complexity predicted for anionic clusters. Analysis of the electron charge distributions using the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) predicts major stabilizing roles of Non-nuclear attractors (NNAs) via NNA···Li interactions with virtually no direct Li···Li interactions, except in the least stable configurations. A transition in behavior for clusters containing more than seven nuclei is observed by using the recently introduced quantum topology to determine in a quantum mechanically consistent fashion the number of spatial dimensions each cluster has. We experiment with a novel scheme for extracting persistent structural motifs with increase in cluster size. The new structural motifs correlate well with the energetic stability, particularly in highlighting the least stable structures. Quantifying the degree of covalent character in Lithium bonding independently agrees with the observation in the transition in cluster behavior for lithium clusters containing more than seven nuclei. Good correlation with available experimental data is obtained for all properties reported in this work.

  4. A device for precision neutralization of electric charge of small drops using ionized air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Sewan; Kim, Peter C.; Lee, Eric R.; Lee, Irwin T.; Perl, Martin L.; Rogers, Howard; Loomba, Dinesh

    2003-10-01

    For use in our Millikan type liquid drop searches for fractional charge elementary particles we have developed a simple ionized air device for neutralizing a narrow stream of small drops. The neutralizer has been used for drops ranging in diameter from 10 to 25 μm. The width of the produced charge distribution is given by the Boltzmann equilibrium charge distribution and the mean of the distribution is set by a bias voltage. Using the bias voltage, the mean can be set with a precision of better than e, the electron charge. The use of the neutralizer is illustrated in an application to mineral oil drops produced with charges of the order of 1000e. We also show the interesting case of silicone oil drops that are produced in our drop generator with a charge distribution narrower than the Boltzmann equilibrium charge distribution, the charge distribution being broadened by the neutralizer.

  5. A Device for Precision Neutralization of Electric Charge of Small Drops Using Ionized Air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Sewan

    2003-03-17

    For use in our Millikan type liquid drop searches for fractional charge elementary particles we have developed a simple ionized air device for neutralizing a narrow stream of small drops. The neutralizer has been used for drops ranging in diameter from 10 to 25 {micro}m. The width of the produced charge distribution is given by the Boltzmann equilibrium charge distribution and the mean of the distribution is set by a bias voltage. Using the bias voltage, the mean can be set with a precision of better than e, the electron charge. The use of the neutralizer is illustrated in an application to mineral oil drops produced with charges of the order of 1000e. We also show the interesting case of silicone oil drops that are produced in our drop generator with a charge distribution narrower than the Boltzmann equilibrium charge distribution, the charge distribution being broadened by the neutralizer.

  6. Charge exchange fast neutral measurement with natural diamond detectors in neon plasma on LHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saida, T.; Sasao, M.; Isobe, M.; Krasilnikov, A. V.

    2003-03-01

    Charge exchange (CX) fast neutral spectra produced by ion cyclotron resonance frequency hydrogen minority heating in neon and helium majority plasmas sustained by neutral beam injection were measured with perpendicular Natural Diamond Detectors during the fifth campaign in 2002 on large helical devices (LHDs). It was observed that there were differences between fast neutral spectra shapes in neon plasma and those in helium of the same discharge condition with similar plasma parameters. Dominant CX processes in neon and helium plasmas were studied for ionization components from outside of the last closed flux surface. High-energy proton spectra were obtained by taking account of each charge state distribution and responsible charge exchange cross sections. The high-energy proton tail formations in both plasmas were similar for the same heating regime. The relaxation time tendencies of the effective temperatures of a high-energy proton have also shown no differences, indicating that the acceleration and confinement of energetic ions in LHDs are similar in neon and helium plasmas.

  7. Kinetic Modeling of the Neutral Gas, Ions, and Charged Dust in Europa's Exosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenishev, V.; Borovikov, D.; Rubin, M.; Jia, X.; Combi, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of the Jovian magnetosphere with Europa has been a subject of active research during the last few decades both through in-situ and remote sensing observations as well as theoretical considerations. Linking the magnetosphere and the moon's surface and interior, Europa's exosphere has become one of the primary objects of study in the field. Understanding the physical processes occurring in the exosphere and its chemical composition is required for the understanding of the interaction between Europa and Jupiter. Europa's surface-bound exosphere originates mostly from ion sputtering of the water ice surface. Minor neutral species and ions of exospheric origin are produced via photolytic and electron impact reactions. The interaction of the Jovian magnetosphere and Europa affects the exospheric population of both neutrals and ions via source and loss processes. Moreover, the Lorentz force causes the newly created exospheric ions to move preferably aligned with the magnetic field lines. Contrary to the ions, heavier and slow-moving charged dust grains are mostly affected by gravity and the electric field component of the Lorentz force. As a result, escaping dust forms a narrow tail aligned in the direction of the convection electric field. Here we present results of a kinetic model of the neutral species (H2O, OH, O2, O, and H), ions (O+, O2+, H+, H2+, H2O+, and OH+), and neutral and charged dust in Europa's exosphere. In our model H2O and O2 are produced via sputtering and other exospheric neutral and ions species are produced via photolytic and electron impact reactions. For the charged dust we compute the equilibrium grain charge by balancing the electron and ion collecting currents according to the local plasma flow conditions at the grain's location. For the tracking of the ions, charged dust, and the calculation of the grains' charge we use plasma density and velocity, and the magnetic field derived from our multi-fluid MHD model of Europa

  8. Supersymmetric electrodynamics of charged and neutral fermions in the extended Wheeler-Feynman approach

    OpenAIRE

    Tugai, V. V.; Zheltukhin, A. A.

    1996-01-01

    A supersymmetric formulation of the classical action of interacting charged and neutral fermions with arbitrary anomalous magnetic moment is considered. This formulation generalizes the known action for scalar charged particles investigated in papers by Fokker, Schwarzschild, Tetrode, Wheeler and Feynman. The superfield formulation of the electrodynamics of the Maxwell supermultiplet, constructed from the world coordinates of charged or neutral fermions is carried out basing on the proposed a...

  9. Supersymmetric electrodynamics of charged and neutral fermions in the extended Wheeler-Feynman approach

    CERN Document Server

    Tugai, V V

    1996-01-01

    A supersymmetric formulation of the classical action of interacting charged and neutral fermions with arbitrary anomalous magnetic moment is considered. This formulation generalizes the known action for scalar charged particles investigated in papers by Fokker, Schwarzschild, Tetrode, Wheeler and Feynman. The superfield formulation of the electrodynamics of the Maxwell supermultiplet, constructed from the world coordinates of charged or neutral fermions is carried out basing on the proposed action.

  10. NONDENSELY DEFINED IMPULSIVE NEUTRAL FUNCTIONAL DIFFERENTIAL INCLUSIONS WITH NONLOCAL CONDITIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yueju Cao; Xianlong Fu

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, using a fixed point theorem for condensing multi-valued maps, we investigate the existence of integral solutions to a class of nondensely defined neutral evolution impulsive differential inclusions with nonlocal conditions in Banach spaces.

  11. Electric field observations of time constants related to charging and charge neutralization processes in the ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, N. C.; Evans, D. S.; Troim, J.

    1982-01-01

    The Polar 5 electric field results are reviewed, and the transients from Polar 3 are presented. The phenomena are discussed from the standpoint of space charge. On the basis of the Polar 5 results, the large magnitude of the electric field from Polar 3 is seen as indicating that the observed space charge was probably within a few km or less of the payload. Reference is made to Cole's prediction (1960) that charges in the ionosphere would reach equilibrium with a time constant of the order of a few microsec. The processes involved in the two cases presented here require time constants of the order of ms. If the sheath dimensions are taken to be between 50 and 100 m, which is not considered unreasonable in view of the electric field measurements, then a qualitative estimate of the neutralization time would be the transit time for ions across the sheath. Since the kinetic velocity of a 1-eV proton is approximately 14 m/s, it would traverse the distance in 4 to 8 ms, assuming freedom of movement across magnetic field lines. This is the order of the decay times observed on Polar 5.

  12. The impact of neutral impurity concentration on charge drift mobility in germanium

    CERN Document Server

    Mei, H; Wang, G -J; Yang, G

    2016-01-01

    We report a new result of the neutral impurity scattering of electrons and holes that has impact on the charge drift mobility in high purity germanium crystals at 77 Kelvin. The charge carrier concentration, mobility and resistivity are measured by Hall Effect system at 77 Kelvin. We investigated the contribution to the total charge drift mobility from ionized impurity scattering, lattice scattering, and neutral impurity scattering with the best theoretical models and experimental data. Several samples with measured Hall mobility from the grown crystals are used for this investigation. With the measured Hall mobility and ionized impurity concentration as well as the theoretical models, we calculated the neutral impurity concentration by the Matthiessen's rule. As a result, the distributions of the neutral impurity concentrations with respect to the radius of the crystals are obtained. Consequently, we demonstrate that neutral impurity scattering is a significant contribution to the charge drift mobility, whic...

  13. Bose-Einstein Correlations of Charged and Neutral Kaons in Deep Inelastic Scattering at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Chekanov, S; Magill, S; Musgrave, B; Nicholass, D; Repond, J; Yoshida, R; Mattingly, M C K; Jechow, M; Pavel, N; Yagues-Molina, A G; Antonelli, S; Antonioli, P; Bari, G; Basile, M; Bellagamba, L; Bindi, M; Boscherini, D; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; Contin, A; Corradi, M; De Pasquale, S; Iacobucci, G; Margotti, A; Nania, R; Polini, A; Sartorelli, G; Zichichi, A; Bartsch, D; Brock, I; Goers, S; Hartmann, H; Hilger, E; Jakob, H P; Jüngst, M; Kind, O M; Nuncio-Quiroz, A E; Paul, E; Renner, R; Samson, U; Schonberg, V; Shehzadi, R; Wlasenko, M; Brook, N H; Heath, G P; Morris, J D; Namsoo, T; Capua, M; Fazio, S; Mastroberardino, A; Schioppa, M; Susinno, G; Tassi, E; Kim, J Y; Ma, K J; Ibrahim, Z A; Kamaluddin, B; Wan-Abdullah, W A T; Ning, Y; Ren, Z; Sciulli, F; Chwastowski, J; Eskreys, A; Figiel, J; Galas, A; Gil, M; Olkiewicz, K; Stopa, P; Zawiejski, L; Adamczyk, L; Bold, T; Grabowska-Bold, I; Kisielewska, D; Lukasik, J; Przybycien, M; Suszycki, L; Kotanski, A; Slominski, W; Adler, V; Behrens, U; Bloch, I; Blohm, C; Bonato, A; Borras, K; Ciesielski, R; Coppola, N; Dossanov, A; Drugakov, V; Fourletova, J; Geiser, A; Gladkov, D; Göttlicher, P; Grebenyuk, J; Gregor, I; Haas, T; Hain, W; Horn, C; Huttmann, A; Kahle, B; Katkov, I I; Klein, U; Kötz, U; Kowalski, H; Lobodzinska, E; Löhr, B; Mankel, R; Melzer-Pellmann, I A; Miglioranzi, S; Montanari, A; Notz, D; Rinaldi, L; Roloff, P; Rubinsky, I; Santamarta, R; Schneekloth, U; Spiridonov, A; Stadie, H; Szuba, D; Szuba, J; Theedt, T; Wolf, G; Wrona, K; Youngman, C; Zeuner, W; Lohmann, W; Schlenstedt, S; Barbagli, G; Gallo, E; Pelfer, P G; Bamberger, A; Dobur, D; Karstens, F; Vlasov, N N; Bussey, P J; Doyle, A T; Dunne, W; Ferrando, J; Forrest, M; Saxon, D H; Skillicorn, I O; Gialas, I; Papageorgiu, K; Gosau, T; Holm, U; Klanner, R; Lohrmann, E; Salehi, H; Schleper, P; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Sztuk, J; Wichmann, K; Wick, K; Foudas, C; Fry, C; Long, K R; Tapper, A D; Kataoka, M; Matsumoto, T; Nagano, K; Tokushuku, K; Yamada, S; Yamazaki, Y; Barakbaev, A N; Boos, E G; Pokrovskiy, N S; Zhautykov, B O; Aushev, V; Son, D; De Favereau, J; Piotrzkowski, K; Barreiro, F; Glasman, C; Jiménez, M; Labarga, L; Del Peso, J; Ron, E; Soares, M; Terron, J; Zambrana, M; Corriveau, F; Liu, C; Walsh, R; Zhou, C; Tsurugai, T; Antonov, A; Dolgoshein, B A; Sosnovtsev, V; Stifutkin, A; Suchkov, S; Dementiev, R K; Ermolov, P F; Gladilin, L K; Khein, L A; Korzhavina, I A; Kuzmin, V A; Levchenko, B B; Lukina, O Yu; Proskuryakov, A S; Shcheglova, L M; Zotkin, D S; Zotkin, S A; Abt, I; Büttner, C; Caldwell, A; Kollar, D; Schmidke, W B; Sutiak, J; Grigorescu, G; Keramidas, A; Koffeman, E; Kooijman, P; Pellegrino, A; Tiecke, H; Vázquez, M; Wiggers, L; Brümmer, N; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Lee, A; Ling, T Y; Allfrey, P D; Bell, M A; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Cottrell, A; Devenish, R C E; Foster, B; Korcsak-Gorzo, K; Patel, S; Roberfroid, V; Robertson, A; Straub, P B; Uribe-Estrada, C; Walczak, R; Bellan, P; Bertolin, A; Brugnera, R; Carlin, R; Dal Corso, F; Dusini, S; Garfagnini, A; Limentani, S; Longhin, A; Stanco, L; Turcato, M; Oh, B Y; Raval, A; Ukleja, J; Whitmore, J J; Iga, Y; D'Agostini, G; Marini, G; Nigro, A; Cole, J E; Hart, J C; Abramowicz, H; Gabareen, A; Ingbir, R; Kananov, S; Levy, A; Kuze, M; Maeda, J; Hori, R; Kagawa, S; Okazaki, N; Shimizu, S; Tawara, T; Hamatsu, R; Kaji, H; Kitamura, S; Ota, O; Ri, Y D; Ferrero, M I; Monaco, V; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Arneodo, M; Ruspa, M; Fourletov, S; Martin, J F; Boutle, S K; Butterworth, J M; Gwenlan, C; Jones, T W; Loizides, J H; Sutton, M R; Wing, M; Brzozowska, B; Ciborowski, J; Grzelak, G; Kulinski, P; Luzniak, P; Malka, J; Nowak, R J; Pawlak, J M; Tymieniecka, T; Ukleja, A; Zarnecki, A F; Adamus, M; Plucinsky, P P; Eisenberg, Y; Giller, I; Hochman, D; Karshon, U; Rosin, M; Brownson, E; Danielson, T; Everett, A; Kcira, D; Reeder, D D; Ryan, P; Savin, A A; Smith, W H; Wolfe, H; Bhadra, S; Catterall, C D; Cui, Y; Hartner, G; Menary, S; Noor, U; Standage, J; Whyte, J

    2007-01-01

    Bose-Einstein correlations of charged and neutral kaons have been measured in e+-p deep inelastic scattering with an integrated luminosity of 121 pb-1 using the ZEUS detector at HERA. The two-particle correlation function was studied as a function of the four-momentum difference of the kaon pairs, Q_12=sqrt{-(p_1-p_2)^2}, assuming a Gaussian shape for the particle source. The values of the radius of the production volume, r, and of the correlation strength, lambda, were obtained for both neutral and charged kaons. The radii for charged and neutral kaons are similar and are consistent with those obtained at LEP.

  14. Neutral Chemistry in Titan's Ionospheric Simulated Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, David; Carrasco, Nathalie; Petrucciani, Marie; Tigrine, Sarah; Vettier, Ludovic

    2016-10-01

    Titan's atmospheric gas phase chemistry leading to the formation of organic aerosols can be simulated in laboratory experiments. Typically, plasma reactors can be used to achieve Titan-like conditions. Such a discharge induces dissociation and ionization processes to the N2-CH4 mixture by electron impact. This faithfully reproduces the electron energy range of magnetospheric electrons entering Titan's atmosphere and can also approximate the solar UV input at Titan's ionosphere. In this context, it is deemed necessary to apply and exploit such a technique in order to better understand the chemical reactivity occurring in Titan-like conditions.In the present work, we use the PAMPRE cold dusty plasma experiment with an N2-CH4 gaseous mixture under controlled pressure and gas influx, hence, emphasizing on the gas phase which we know is key to the formation of aerosols on Titan. Besides, an internal cryogenic trap has been developed to accumulate the gas products during their formation and facilitate their detection. These products are identified and quantified by in situ mass spectroscopy and Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. We present here results from this experiment in two experimental conditions: 90-10% and 99-1% N2-CH4 mixing ratios respectively. We use a quantitative approach on nitriles and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.Key organic compounds reacting with each other are thus detected and quantified in order to better follow the chemistry occuring in the gas phase of Titan-like conditions. Indeed, these species acting as precursors to the solid phase are assumed to be relevant in the formation of Titan's organic aerosols. These organic aerosols are what make up Titan's hazy atmosphere.

  15. On the difference between the charge-free and the charge-neutral solutions of Maxwell equations

    CERN Document Server

    Chubykalo, A E; Smirnov-Rueda, R; Chubykalo, Andrew E.; Munera, Hector A.; Smirnov-Rueda, Roman

    1998-01-01

    It is conventionally believed that solutions of so called "free" Maxwell equations for \\varrho=0 (density of charge) describe the free electromagnetic field in empty space (if one considers the free field as a field, whose flux lines neither begin nor end in a charge). We consider three types of regions: (i) "isolated charge-free" region (where all electric fields, generated by charges outside that particular region, are zero), for example, inside a hollow conductor of any shape or in a free-charge Universe; (ii) ``non-isolated charge-free" region (where all electric fields, generated by charges outside that particular region, are not zero) and (iii) "charge-neutral" region (where point charges exist but their algebraic sum is zero). The paper notes that there are two families of solutions: (1) In "isolated charge-free" regions electric free field does not exist in the context of Maxwell's equations, but there may exist a time-independent background magnetic field. (2) In both "charge-neutral" and "non-isolat...

  16. Charged and Neutral Particles Channeling Phenomena Channeling 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabagov, Sultan B.; Palumbo, Luigi

    2010-04-01

    regime by a buried oxide layer / V. Guidi, A. Mazzolari and V. V. Tikhomirov -- A positron source using channeling in crystals for linear colliders / X. Artru ... [et al.] -- Parametric channeling and collapse of charged particles beams in crystals / M. Vysotskyy and V. Vysotskii.The formation and usage of coherent correlated charged particles states in the physics of channeling in crystals / S. V. Adamenko, V. I. Vysotskii and M. V. Vysotskyy -- Surface channeling of magnetic-charged particles on multilayer surface / S. V. Adamenko and V. I. Vysotskii -- Coherent creation of anti-hydrogen atoms in a crystal by relativistic antiproton / Yu. P. Kunashenko -- Thermal equilibrium of light ions in heavy crystals / E. Tsyganov -- Photon emission of electrons in a crystalline undulator / H. Backe ... [et al.] -- Channeling radiation from relativistic electrons in a crystal target as complementary x-ray and gamma ray source at synchrotron light facilities / K. B. Korotchenko, Yu. L. Pivovarov and T. A. Tukhfatullin -- Diffracted channeling radiation and other compound radiation processes / H. Nitta -- Collective scattering on the atom planes under the condition of full transition / A. R. Mkrtchyan ... [et al.] -- The proposal of the experiment on the research of the diffracted channeling radiation / D. A. Baklanov ... [et al.] -- Positron channeling at the DaOne BTF Facility: the cup experiment / L. Quintieri ... [et al.] -- Radiation spectra of 200 MeV electrons in diamond and silicon crystals at axial and planar orientations / K. Fissum ... [et al.] -- Channeling experiments with electrons at the Mainz Microtron Mami / W. Lauth ... [et al.] -- Dechanneling of positrons by dislocations: effects of anharmonic interactions / J. George and A. P. Pathak -- Diffracted channeling radiation from axially channeled relativistic electrons / K. B. Korotchenko ... [et al.] -- Intensive quasi-monochromatic, directed x-ray radiation of planar channeled positron bunch / L. Gevorgian

  17. A Neutral Plasma Source for Active Spacecraft Charge Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-08-01

    potentials are generally negative since electrons have higher mobilities as compared to ions. Overall spacecraft frame charging enhances surface contamination...Cuchanski, M., Kremer, P. C., "Surface Micro-Discharges on Spacecraft Dielectrics", Paper 111-7, Proceedings of the Spacecraft Charging Techonology

  18. The charging of neutral dimethylamine and dimethylamine-sulphuric acid clusters using protonated acetone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ruusuvuori

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Sulphuric acid is generally considered one of the most important substances taking part in atmospheric particle formation. However, in typical atmospheric conditions in the lower troposphere sulphuric acid and water alone are unable to form particles. It has been suggested that strong bases may stabilize sulphuric acid clusters so that particle formation may occur. More to the point, amines – strong organic bases – have become the subject of interest as possible cause for such stabilisation. To probe whether amines play a role in atmospheric nucleation, we need to be able to measure accurately the gas-phase amine vapour concentration. Such measurements often include charging the neutral molecules and molecular clusters in the sample. Since amines are bases, the charging process should introduce a positive charge. This can be achieved for example using a positively charged reagent with a suitable proton affinity. In our study, we have used quantum chemical methods combined with a cluster dynamics code to study the use of acetone as a reagent in chemical ionization and compared the results with measurements performed with a chemical ionization atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight mass spectrometer (CI-APi-TOF. The computational results indicate that protonated acetone is an effective reagent in chemical ionization. However, in the experiments the charger ions were not depleted at the predicted dimethylamine concentrations, indicating that either the modelling scheme or the experimental results – or both – contain unidentified sources of error.

  19. Neutrality point of graphene with coplanar charged impurities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogler, Michael M

    2009-12-04

    The ground state and the transport properties of graphene subject to the potential of in-plane charged impurities are studied. The screening of the impurity potential is shown to be nonlinear, producing a fractal structure of electron and hole puddles. Statistical properties of this density distribution as well as the charge compressibility of the system are calculated in the leading-log approximation. The conductivity depends logarithmically on alpha, the dimensionless strength of the Coulomb interaction. The theory is asymptotically exact when alpha is small, which is the case for graphene on a substrate with a high dielectric constant.

  20. Studies on space charge neutralization and emittance measurement of beam from microwave ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misra, Anuraag; Goswami, A.; Sing Babu, P.; Srivastava, S.; Pandit, V. S., E-mail: pandit@vecc.gov.in, E-mail: vspandit12@gmail.com [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1-AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)

    2015-11-15

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source together with a beam transport system has been developed at VECC to study the problems related with the injection of high current beam into a compact cyclotron. This paper presents the results of beam profile measurement of high current proton beam at different degrees of space charge neutralisation with the introduction of neon gas in the beam line using a fine leak valve. The beam profiles have been measured at different pressures in the beam line by capturing the residual gas fluorescence using a CCD camera. It has been found that with space charge compensation at the present current level (∼5 mA at 75 keV), it is possible to reduce the beam spot size by ∼34%. We have measured the variation of beam profile as a function of the current in the solenoid magnet under the neutralised condition and used these data to estimate the rms emittance of the beam. Simulations performed using equivalent Kapchinsky-Vladimirsky beam envelope equations with space charge neutralization factor are also presented to interpret the experimental results.

  1. Bose-Einstein correlations of charged and neutral kaons in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (US)] (and others)

    2007-05-15

    Bose-Einstein correlations of charged and neutral kaons have been measured in e{sup {+-}}p deep inelastic scattering with an integrated luminosity of 121 pb{sup -1} using the ZEUS detector at HERA. The two-particle correlation function was studied as a function of the four-momentum difference of the kaon pairs, Q{sub 12}={radical}(-(p{sub 1}-p{sub 2}){sup 2}), assuming a Gaussian shape for the particle source. The values of the radius of the production volume, r, and of the correlation strength, {lambda}, were obtained for both neutral and charged kaons. The radii for charged and neutral kaons are similar and are consistent with those obtained at LEP. (orig.)

  2. Dijet Production in Charged and Neutral Current $e^{+}p$ Interactions at High $Q^{2}$

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C; Andrieu, B; Arkadov, V; Astvatsaturov, A R; Ayyaz, I; Babaev, A; Bähr, J; Baranov, P S; Barrelet, E; Bartel, Wulfrin; Bassler, U; Bate, P; Beglarian, A; Behnke, O; Beier, C; Belousov, A; Benisch, T; Berger, C; Bernardi, G; Berndt, T; Bizot, J C; Borras, K; Boudry, V; Braunschweig, W; Brisson, V; Broker, H B; Brown, D P D; Brückner, W; Bruel, P; Bruncko, Dusan; Bürger, J; Büsser, F W; Bunyatyan, A; Burkhardt, H; Burrage, A; Buschhorn, G W; Campbell, A J; Cao, J; Carli, T; Caron, S; Chabert, E; Clarke, D; Clerbaux, B; Collard, Caroline; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cousinou, M C; Cox, B E; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Dau, W D; Daum, K; David, M; Davidsson, M; Delcourt, B; Delerue, N; Demirchyan, R A; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C A; Dixon, P; Dodonov, V; Dowell, John D; Droutskoi, A; Duprel, C; Eckerlin, G; Eckstein, D; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eichler, R; Eisele, Franz; Eisenhandler, Eric F; Ellerbrock, M; Elsen, E E; Erdmann, M; Erdmann, W; Faulkner, P J W; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Ferencei, J; Ferron, S; Fleischer, M; Flügge, G; Fomenko, A; Foresti, I; Formánek, J; Foster, J M; Franke, G; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gabathuler, K; Garvey, J; Gassner, J; Gayler, J; Gerhards, R; Kazarian, S; Görlich, L; Gogitidze, N; Goldberg, M; Goodwin, C; Grab, C; Grässler, Herbert; Greenshaw, T; Grindhammer, G; Hadig, T; Haidt, Dieter; Hajduk, L; Haynes, W J; Heinemann, B; Heinzelmann, G; Henderson, R C W; Hengstmann, S; Henschel, H; Heremans, R; Herrera-Corral, G; Herynek, I; Hilgers, M; Hiller, K H; Hladky, J; Hoting, P; Hoffmann, D; Hoprich, W; Horisberger, R P; Hurling, S; Ibbotson, M; Jacquet, M; Jaffré, M; Janauschek, L; Jansen, D M; Janssen, X; Jemanov, V; Jönsson, L B; Johnson, D P; Jones, M A S; Jung, H; Kastli, H K; Kant, D; Kapichine, M; Karlsson, M; Karschnick, O; Kaufmann, O; Kausch, M; Keil, F; Keller, N; Kennedy, J; Kenyon, Ian Richard; Kermiche, S; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Knies, G; Koblitz, B; Kolya, S D; Korbel, V; Kostka, P; Kotelnikov, S K; Krasny, M W; Krehbiel, H; Kroseberg, J; Krücker, D; Krüger, K; Küpper, A; Kuhr, T; Kurca, T; Kutuev, R K; Lachnit, W A; Lahmann, R; Lamb, D; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastoviicka, T; Lebedev, A; Leiner, B; Lemrani, R; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Lindstrøm, M; List, B; Lobodzinska, E; Lobodzinski, B; Loktionova, N A; Lubimov, V; Lüders, S; Lüke, D; Lytkin, L K; Magnussen, N; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Malden, N; Malinovskii, E I; Maracek, R; Marage, P; Marks, J; Marshall, R; Martyn, H U; Martyniak, J; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Merkel, P; Metlica, F; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Meyer, P O; Mikocki, S; Milstead, D; Mkrtchyan, T; Mohr, R F; Mohrdieck, S; Mondragón, M N; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Müller, K; Murn, P; Nagovizin, V; Naroska, Beate; Naumann, J; Naumann, T; Nellen, G; Newman, P R; Nicholls, T C; Niebergall, F; Niebuhr, C B; Nix, O; Nowak, G; Nunnemann, T; Olsson, J E; Ozerov, D; Panassik, V; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Pérez, E; Phillips, J P; Pitzl, D; Pöschl, R; Potachnikova, I; Povh, B; Rabbertz, K; Rädel, G; Rauschenberger, J; Reimer, P; Reisert, B; Reyna, D; Riess, S; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A A; Royon, C; Rusakov, S V; Rybicki, K; Sankey, D P C; Scheins, J; Schilling, F P; Schleper, P; Schmidt, D; Schoeffel, L; Schöning, A; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, V; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Sedlak, K; Sefkow, F; Shekelian, V I; Shevyakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Siegmon, G; Sievers, P; Sirois, Y; Sloan, Terence; Smirnov, P; Solochenko, V; Soloviev, Yu V; Spaskov, V N; Specka, A E; Spitzer, H; Stamen, R; Steinhart, J; Stella, B; Stellberger, A; Stiewe, J; Straumann, U; Struczinski, W; Swart, M; Tasevsky, M; Chernyshov, V; Chechelnitskii, S; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Tobien, N; Traynor, D; Truöl, P; Tsipolitis, G; Turnau, J; Turney, J E; Tzamariudaki, E; Udluft, S; Usik, A; Valkár, S; Valkárová, A; Vallée, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vazdik, Ya A; Von Dombrowski, S; Wacker, K; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Waugh, B; Weber, G; Weber, M; Wegener, D; Wegner, A; Wengler, T; Werner, M; White, G; Wiesand, S; Wilksen, T; Winde, M; Winter, G G; Wissing, C; Wobisch, M; Wollatz, H; Wünsch, E; Wyatt, A C; Zaleisak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhokin, A S; Zomer, F; Zsembery, J

    2001-01-01

    Jet production in charged and neutral current events in the kinematic range of Q^2 from 640 to 35000 GeV^2 is studied in deep-inelastic positron-proton scattering at HERA. The measured rate of multi-jet events and distributions of jet polar angle, transverse energy, dijet mass, and other dijet variables are presented. Using parton densities derived from inclusive DIS cross sections, perturbative QCD calculations in NLO are found to give a consistent description of both the neutral and charged current dijet production. A direct, model independent comparison of the jet distributions in charged and neutral current events confirms that the QCD dynamics of the hadronic final state is independent of the underlying electroweak scattering process.

  3. Neutralization Of Multiply Charged Rydberg Ions Interacting With Solid Surfaces Under The Grazing Incidence Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majkic, M. D.; Nedeljkovic, N. N.; Galijas, S. M. D.

    2010-07-01

    We elaborated the time-symmetric, two-state vector model to investigate the intermediate stages of the electron capture into the Rydberg states of multiply charged ions interacting with solid surface under the grazing incidence geometry. The neutralization distances for the ions XeZ+ interacting with Al-surface are calculated, for core charges Z ?[5,30]. The corresponding mean neutralization distances are in agreement with the data deduced from the measured kinetic energy gain due to the image acceleration of the ions.

  4. Glucosamine derived DISAL donors for stereoselective glycosylations under neutral conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grathe, S.; Thygesen, M.B.; Larsen, K.

    2005-01-01

    DISAL (methyl 3,5-dinitrosa/icylate) D-glcosyl, D-galactosyl, D-mannosyl, and L-quinovosyl donors have previously provided the efficient glycosylation of a range of substrates under either strictly neutral, mildly basic, or very mildly Lewis acidic (LiClO4) conditions. Herein we report the synthe...... the difficult glycosylation of the 3-OH of a glucosamine derivative....

  5. Charge-Neutral Constant pH Molecular Dynamics Simulations Using a Parsimonious Proton Buffer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnini, Serena; Ullmann, R Thomas; Groenhof, Gerrit; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2016-03-08

    In constant pH molecular dynamics simulations, the protonation states of titratable sites can respond to changes of the pH and of their electrostatic environment. Consequently, the number of protons bound to the biomolecule, and therefore the overall charge of the system, fluctuates during the simulation. To avoid artifacts associated with a non-neutral simulation system, we introduce an approach to maintain neutrality of the simulation box in constant pH molecular dynamics simulations, while maintaining an accurate description of all protonation fluctuations. Specifically, we introduce a proton buffer that, like a buffer in experiment, can exchange protons with the biomolecule enabling its charge to fluctuate. To keep the total charge of the system constant, the uptake and release of protons by the buffer are coupled to the titration of the biomolecule with a constraint. We find that, because the fluctuation of the total charge (number of protons) of a typical biomolecule is much smaller than the number of titratable sites of the biomolecule, the number of buffer sites required to maintain overall charge neutrality without compromising the charge fluctuations of the biomolecule, is typically much smaller than the number of titratable sites, implying markedly enhanced simulation and sampling efficiency.

  6. Dalitz Plot Analysis Of Neutral B-meson Decays To Charged Kaon, Charged Pion, And Neutral Pion Final States

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Z

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes a Dalitz plot analysis of B0 → K+π−π 0 decays. The data sample comprises 213 million &Ugr;(4 S) → BB¯ decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California (SLAGC). Preliminary results are presented for measurements of the inclusive branching fraction, quasi-two-body fractions and CP-violating charge asymmetries for intermediate states including K*(892)+π − and ρ(770)−K +. Observations of B0 decays to the Kπ S-wave intermediate states, K*0 (1430)+π− and K*0 (1430)0π0, are reported. Evidence of the decay B0 → K*(892) 0π0 is seen. We set tipper limits at 90% confidence level on branching fractions of the nonresonant and other less significant intermediate states.

  7. Weibel and Two-Stream Instabilities for Intense Charged Particle Beam Propagation through Neutralizing Background Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald C. Davidson; Igor Kaganovich; Edward A. Startsev

    2004-04-09

    Properties of the multi-species electromagnetic Weibel and electrostatic two-stream instabilities are investigated for an intense ion beam propagating through background plasma. Assuming that the background plasma electrons provide complete charge and current neutralization, detailed linear stability properties are calculated within the framework of a macroscopic cold-fluid model for a wide range of system parameters.

  8. Charge neutrality of fine particle (dusty) plasmas and fine particle cloud under gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totsuji, Hiroo

    2017-03-01

    The enhancement of the charge neutrality due to the existence of fine particles is shown to occur generally under microgravity and in one-dimensional structures under gravity. As an application of the latter, the size and position of fine particle clouds relative to surrounding plasmas are determined under gravity.

  9. Theoretical modeling of infrared emission from neutral and charged polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. II.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakes, ELO; Tielens, AGGM; Bauschlicher, CW; Hudgins, DM; Allamandola, LJ

    2001-01-01

    The nature of the carriers of the interstellar infrared (IR) emission features between 3.3 and 12.7 mum is complex. We must consider emission from a family of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in a multiplicity of cationic charge states (+1, +2, +3, and so on), along with neutral and anionic P

  10. Aqueous lubricating properties of charged (ABC) and neutral (ABA) triblock copolymer chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røn, Troels; Javakhishvili, Irakli; Patil, Navin J.

    2014-01-01

    Application of charged polymer chains as additives for lubricating neutral surfaces in aqueous envi- ronment, especially via polymer physisorption, is generally impeded by the electrostatic repulsion be- tween adjacent polymers on the surface. In this study, we have investigated the adsorption an...

  11. Cold neutral atoms via charge exchange from excited state positronium: a proposal

    CERN Document Server

    Bertsche, W A; Eriksson, S

    2016-01-01

    We present a method for generating cold neutral atoms via charge exchange reactions between trapped ions and Rydberg positronium. The high charge exchange reaction cross section leads to efficient neutralisation of the ions and since the positronium-ion mass ratio is small, the neutrals do not gain appreciable kinetic energy in the process. When the original ions are cold the reaction produces neutrals that can be trapped or further manipulated with electromagnetic fields. Because a wide range of species can be targeted we envisage that our scheme may enable experiments at low temperature that have been hitherto intractable due to a lack of cooling methods. We present an estimate for achievable temperatures, neutral number and density in an experiment where the neutrals are formed at a milli-Kelvin temperature from either directly or sympathetically cooled ions confined on an ion chip. The neutrals may then be confined by their magnetic moment in a co-located magnetic minimum well also formed on the chip. We ...

  12. Condition monitoring for a neutral beam injector cryopumping system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, N., E-mail: n.wright@lboro.ac.uk [School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Dixon, R., E-mail: r.dixon@lboro.ac.uk [School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Verhoeven, R., E-mail: roel.verhoeven@ccfe.ac.uk [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► The development of a cryopumping condition monitoring scheme is presented. ► A residual generation scheme is used to detect two faults. ► Kalman filtering is used to generate the residuals. ► A filtering and voting arrangement is used to evaluate the residuals. ► A non-linear simulation model is used to verify the scheme. -- Abstract: For neutral beam injection systems, the maintenance of a vacuum inside the injector box is essential for normal operation. Cryogenic pumping systems are often used to create and maintain this vacuum. Cryogenic pumping systems have been deployed on the neutral beam heating systems supporting the Joint European Torus. With these as a target application, the development of a condition monitoring scheme is presented. The scheme uses a residual generation approach. A bank of Kalman filters is used to estimate measured process variables. A residual evaluator is used to map residual signals onto a set of faults. Two example faults are simulated to demonstrate the response of the scheme. This paper contributes to the wider fusion development programme by demonstrating how a contemporary condition monitoring technique can be applied to a fusion support system, in order to improve its availability.

  13. Jump Conditions of a Non-Neutral Plasma Shock with Current and Potential Difference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡希伟

    2002-01-01

    Jump conditions about the total momentum flux and energy flux in a non-neutral plasma shock with electric current and field are given, which are derived from the double fluid equations and the Poisson equation for electron and ion fluids. Furthermore, we derive the relations between the upstream and downstream velocities and temperatures, and the minimum upstream Mach number for the plasma shock existence M1min, which depend on the current through the shock front J0, the electric potential difference between the upstream and downstream of shock △φ, and the ion charge Z.

  14. Jump Conditions of a Shock with Current in Cylindrical Non-Neutral Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Yong; HU Xi-Wei; HU Ye-Min

    2006-01-01

    Jump conditions of the parameters (mass flow, momentum flow and energy Bow) of a shock with current (thereby, electric and magnetic field) in cylindrical non-neutral plasma are presented and derived from Maxwell's equations and two fluid equations for electron and ion fluid. The critical Mach number for the shock existence is calculated, which depends on the shock carried current, the ion charge, and the composition of the magnetic and thermal pressure. The numerical results show that both the strength and profiles of the downstream shock parameters will be affected obviously by the shock carried current, electric and magnetic field in the two-dimensional shock.

  15. Interplay of electronic and geometry shell effects in properties of neutral and charged Sr clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyalin, Andrey; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2007-01-01

    that the size evolution of structural and electronic properties of strontium clusters is governed by an interplay of the electronic and geometry shell closures. Influence of the electronic shell effects on structural rearrangements can lead to violation of the icosahedral growth motif of strontium clusters......The optimized structure and electronic properties of neutral, singly, and doubly charged strontium clusters have been investigated using ab initio theoretical methods based on density-functional theory. We have systematically calculated the optimized geometries of neutral, singly, and doubly...... charged strontium clusters consisting of up to 14 atoms, average bonding distances, electronic shell closures, binding energies per atom, the gap between the highest occupied and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals, and spectra of the density of electronic states (DOS). It is demonstrated...

  16. QED corrections to isospin-related decay rates of charged and neutral B mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Nam, S

    2004-01-01

    We estimate the isospin-violating QED radiative corrections to the charged-to-neutral ratios of the decay rates for B^+ and B^0 in non-leptonic B meson decays. In particular, these corrections are potentially important for precision measurement of the charged-to-neutral production ratio of B meson in e^+e^- annihilation. We calculate explicitly the QED corrections to the ratios of two different types of decay rates \\Gamma(B^+ \\to J/\\psi K^+)/\\Gamma(B^0 \\to J/\\psi K^0) and \\Gamma(B^+ \\to D^+_S \\bar{D^0})/\\Gamma(B^0 \\to D^+_S D^-) taking into account the form factors of the mesons based on the vector meson dominance model, and compare them with the results obtained for the point-like mesons.

  17. Charge-Exchange Neutral Particle Analyzer Diagnostic of TJ-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontdecaba, J. M.; Balbin, R.; Petrov, S.; TJ-II team

    2003-07-01

    A description of the Charge Exchange Neutral Particle Analyzers in operation in the heliac flexible TJ-II is reported. A description of the detectors, as well as the operation characteristics, hardware and software used in the control and analysis of the data obtained with the diagnostic is detailed. Two NPAs are in operation in TJ-II. One of them is a 5-channel analyzer and another one is an Acord-12. The 5-channel analyzer provides measurements of charge exchange neutral fluxes at five energy channels, whereas the Acord-12 can measure simultaneously two different hydrogen isotopes (H and D) at six energy channels. Their lines of sight can be varied poloidally in order to observe the different sections of the plasma. (Author) 10 refs.

  18. Sub-diffusion and trapped dynamics of neutral and charged probes in DNA-protein coacervates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najmul Arfin

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The physical mechanism leading to the formation of large intermolecular DNA-protein complexes has been studied. Our study aims to explain the occurrence of fast coacervation dynamics at the charge neutralization point, followed by the appearance of smaller complexes and slower coacervation dynamics as the complex experiences overcharging. Furthermore, the electrostatic potential and probe mobility was investigated to mimic the transport of DNA / DNA-protein complex in a DNA-protein complex coacervate medium [N. Arfin and H. B. Bohidar, J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 13192 (2012] by assigning neutral, negative, or positive charge to the probe particle. The mobility of the neutral probe was maximal at low matrix concentrations and showed random walk behavior, while its mobility ceased at the jamming concentration of c = 0.6, showing sub-diffusion and trapped dynamics. The positively charged probe showed sub-diffusive random walk followed by trapped dynamics, while the negatively charged probe showed trapping with occasional hopping dynamics at much lower concentrations. Sub-diffusion of the probe was observed in all cases under consideration, where the electrostatic interaction was used exclusively as the dominant force involved in the dynamics. For neutral and positive probes, the mean square displacement ⟨R2⟩ exhibits a scaling with time as ⟨R2⟩ ∼ tα, distinguishing random walk and trapped dynamics at α = 0.64 ± 0.04 at c = 0.12 and c = 0.6, respectively. In addition, the same scaling factors with the exponent β = 0.64 ± 0.04 can be used to distinguish random walk and trapped dynamics for the neutral and positive probes using the relation between the number of distinct sites visited by the probe, S(t, which follows the scaling, S(t ∼ tβ/ln (t. Our results established the occurrence of a hierarchy of diffusion dynamics experienced by a probe in a dense medium that is either charged or neutral.

  19. Sub-diffusion and trapped dynamics of neutral and charged probes in DNA-protein coacervates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfin, Najmul; Yadav, Avinash Chand; Bohidar, H. B.

    2013-11-01

    The physical mechanism leading to the formation of large intermolecular DNA-protein complexes has been studied. Our study aims to explain the occurrence of fast coacervation dynamics at the charge neutralization point, followed by the appearance of smaller complexes and slower coacervation dynamics as the complex experiences overcharging. Furthermore, the electrostatic potential and probe mobility was investigated to mimic the transport of DNA / DNA-protein complex in a DNA-protein complex coacervate medium [N. Arfin and H. B. Bohidar, J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 13192 (2012)] by assigning neutral, negative, or positive charge to the probe particle. The mobility of the neutral probe was maximal at low matrix concentrations and showed random walk behavior, while its mobility ceased at the jamming concentration of c = 0.6, showing sub-diffusion and trapped dynamics. The positively charged probe showed sub-diffusive random walk followed by trapped dynamics, while the negatively charged probe showed trapping with occasional hopping dynamics at much lower concentrations. Sub-diffusion of the probe was observed in all cases under consideration, where the electrostatic interaction was used exclusively as the dominant force involved in the dynamics. For neutral and positive probes, the mean square displacement ⟨R2⟩ exhibits a scaling with time as ⟨R2⟩ ˜ tα, distinguishing random walk and trapped dynamics at α = 0.64 ± 0.04 at c = 0.12 and c = 0.6, respectively. In addition, the same scaling factors with the exponent β = 0.64 ± 0.04 can be used to distinguish random walk and trapped dynamics for the neutral and positive probes using the relation between the number of distinct sites visited by the probe, S(t), which follows the scaling, S(t) ˜ tβ/ln (t). Our results established the occurrence of a hierarchy of diffusion dynamics experienced by a probe in a dense medium that is either charged or neutral.

  20. Sub-diffusion and trapped dynamics of neutral and charged probes in DNA-protein coacervates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arfin, Najmul [Polymer and Biophysics Laboratory, School of Physical Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi-110067 (India); Yadav, Avinash Chand [Nonlinear Dynamics Laboratory, School of Physical Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi-110067 (India); Bohidar, H. B., E-mail: bohi0700@mail.jnu.ac.in [Polymer and Biophysics Laboratory, School of Physical Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi-110067 (India); Special Centre for Nanosciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi-110067 (India)

    2013-11-15

    The physical mechanism leading to the formation of large intermolecular DNA-protein complexes has been studied. Our study aims to explain the occurrence of fast coacervation dynamics at the charge neutralization point, followed by the appearance of smaller complexes and slower coacervation dynamics as the complex experiences overcharging. Furthermore, the electrostatic potential and probe mobility was investigated to mimic the transport of DNA / DNA-protein complex in a DNA-protein complex coacervate medium [N. Arfin and H. B. Bohidar, J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 13192 (2012)] by assigning neutral, negative, or positive charge to the probe particle. The mobility of the neutral probe was maximal at low matrix concentrations and showed random walk behavior, while its mobility ceased at the jamming concentration of c = 0.6, showing sub-diffusion and trapped dynamics. The positively charged probe showed sub-diffusive random walk followed by trapped dynamics, while the negatively charged probe showed trapping with occasional hopping dynamics at much lower concentrations. Sub-diffusion of the probe was observed in all cases under consideration, where the electrostatic interaction was used exclusively as the dominant force involved in the dynamics. For neutral and positive probes, the mean square displacement 〈R{sup 2}〉 exhibits a scaling with time as 〈R{sup 2}〉 ∼ t{sup α}, distinguishing random walk and trapped dynamics at α = 0.64 ± 0.04 at c = 0.12 and c = 0.6, respectively. In addition, the same scaling factors with the exponent β = 0.64 ± 0.04 can be used to distinguish random walk and trapped dynamics for the neutral and positive probes using the relation between the number of distinct sites visited by the probe, S(t), which follows the scaling, S(t) ∼ t{sup β}/ln (t). Our results established the occurrence of a hierarchy of diffusion dynamics experienced by a probe in a dense medium that is either charged or neutral.

  1. Cross-sections for neutral atoms and molecules collisions with charged spherical nanoparticle

    CERN Document Server

    Shneider, M N

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents cross sections for collisions of neutral atoms/molecules with a charged nanoparticle, which is the source of the dipole potential. The accuracy of the orbital limited motion (OLM) approximation is estimated. It is shown that simple analytical formulas for the atoms/molecules and heat fluxes, obtained in the OLM approximation, give an error of not more than 15%, and are applicable in all reasonable range of nanoparticles and weakly ionized plasma parameters.

  2. Discrimination of charged particles in a neutral beam line by using a solid scintillation detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Jong-Kwan; Ko, Jewou; Liu, Dong

    2017-01-01

    In the past several decades, many studies have been conducted to search for non-baryonic dark matter, such as weakly interactive massive particles (WIMPs). In the search for WIMPs, charged particles incident on the detector are background particles because WIMPs are neutral. Charged particles originate from various sources, such as cosmic rays and laboratory materials surrounding the main detector. Therefore, a veto that discriminates charged particles can improve the particle-detection efficiency of the entire experiment for detecting WIMPs. Here, we investigate in the thickness range of 1 mm to 5 mm, the optimal thickness of a polystyrene scintillator as a chargedparticle veto detector. We found that 3-mm-thick polystyrene provides the best performance to veto charged particles and the charged-particle background in the search for the WIMP signal. Furthermore, we fabricated 3-mm-thick and 5-mm-thick polystyrene charged particle veto detectors that will be used in an underground laboratory in the search for WIMP dark matter. After exposing those detectors are the actual beam line, we compared the rate of charged particles measured using those detectors and the rate simulated through a Monte Carlo simulation.

  3. THE EFFECT OF OFFSET PRINTING INK ON LASER TONER INK AGGLOMERATION UNDER NEUTRAL PULPING CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujin Xie,

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available 1-octadecanol is known to be a highly effective agglomerating agent for laser toner ink. However, the office waste paper used in the actual production often contains various types of inks. The effect of the offset ink and types of surfactants with different charge characteristics were studied relative to the agglomeration of the laser toner ink under neutral pulping conditions. It was found that the addition of a small amount of the offset ink printed waste paper was beneficial for the agglomeration of the laser toner ink. The optimal percentage of addition is 12.5% to 25%. The offset printed ink had a positive charge of 0.001±0.0005 mEq/g when the offset ink was treated by 70˚C water at neutral conditions. Addition of a proper amount of cationic surfactant was beneficial to improve the agglomeration at any ratio of the mixed laser printed and offset waste papers. When the percentage of offset waste paper was less than 50%, the addition of anionic surfactant and nonionic surfactant was harmful for agglomeration, and there was no significant effect at higher offset content.

  4. Resonant vs. non-resonant neutralization of multiply charged ions in the interaction with solid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedeljkovic, N. N.; Galijas, S. M. D.; Obradovic, M. B.

    2008-07-01

    The two-state vector model is used to investigate the intermediate stages of the electron capture into the Rydberg states of multiply charged ArVIII ion, escaping solid surface. Two cases of the ionic velocities are considered: the low velocities (v approx 0 a.u.) and the intermediate velocities (v approx1 a.u.). Within the framework of the two-state vector description of the neutralization dynamics the two wave functions are used to determine the state of a single active electron. The intermediate stages of the process are characterized by the two-amplitude, the neutralization probability and rate. These quantities are obtained in two different analytical forms in the two considered cases of the projectile velocities. The key difference of the intermediate velocity case in respect to the low-velocity case, is the non- resonant character of the electron transitions. The obtained rates in the low velocity case are well localized. The neutralization rates in the intermediate velocity case are oscillatory in character. At larger ion-surface distances R the neutralization is stabilized; the behavior of the rates becomes similar to that obtained for the low ionic velocities.

  5. Charge Neutral Fermionic States and Current Oscillation in a Graphene-Superconductor Hybrid Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Wenye; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Chao; Jin, Kuijuan; Ma, Zhongshui

    2016-10-01

    The proximity properties of edge currents in the vicinity of the interface between the graphene and superconductor in the presence of magnetic field are investigated. It is shown that the edge states introduced by Andreev reflection at the graphene-superconductor (G/S) interface give rise to the charge neutral states in all Landau levels. We note that in a topological insulator-superconductor (TI/S) hybrid structure, only N = 0 Landau level can support this type of charge neutral states. The different interface states of a G/S hybrid and a TI/S hybrid is due to that graphene consists of two distinct sublattices. The armchair edge consists of two inequivalent atoms. This gives rise to unique electronic properties of edge states when connected to a superconductor. A direct consequence of zero charge states in all Landau levels is that the current density approaches zero at interface. The proximity effect leads to quantum magnetic oscillation of the current density in the superconductor region. The interface current density can also be tuned with a finite interface potential. For sharp δ-type interface potential, the derivative of the wavefunction is discontinuous. As a result, we found that there is current density discontinuity at the interface. The step of the current discontinuity is proportional to the strength of the interface potential.

  6. Quantum mechanical investigations on the role of neutral and negatively charged enamine intermediates in organocatalyzed reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubin, Pierre O., E-mail: pierre.hubin@unamur.be [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie Informatique (PCI), Unité de Chimie Physique Théorique et Structurale, University of Namur, 61 rue de Bruxelles, 5000 Namur (Belgium); Jacquemin, Denis [Laboratoire CEISAM – UMR CNRS 6230, Université de Nantes, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP92208, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Institut Universitaire de France 103, Boulevard St Michel, 75005 Paris Cedex 5 (France); Leherte, Laurence; Vercauteren, Daniel P. [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie Informatique (PCI), Unité de Chimie Physique Théorique et Structurale, University of Namur, 61 rue de Bruxelles, 5000 Namur (Belgium)

    2014-04-15

    Highlights: • M06-2X functional is suitable to model key steps of proline-catalyzed reactions. • Investigation of the proline-catalyzed aldol reaction mechanism. • Influence of water molecules on the C–C bond formation step. • Mechanism for the reaction of proline-derived enamines with benzhydrylium cations. - Abstract: The proline-catalyzed aldol reaction is the seminal example of asymmetric organocatalysis. Previous theoretical and experimental studies aimed at identifying its mechanism in order to rationalize the outcome of this reaction. Here, we focus on key steps with modern first principle methods, i.e. the M06-2X hybrid exchange–correlation functional combined to the solvation density model to account for environmental effects. In particular, different pathways leading to the formation of neutral and negatively charged enamine intermediates are investigated, and their reactivity towards two electrophiles, i.e. an aldehyde and a benzhydrylium cation, are compared. Regarding the self-aldol reaction, our calculations confirm that the neutral enamine intermediate is more reactive than the negatively charged one. For the reaction with benzhydrylium cations however, the negatively charged enamine intermediate is more reactive.

  7. Impact of updraft on neutralized charge rate by lightning in thunderstorms: A simulation case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Zhang, Yijun; Zheng, Dong

    2015-12-01

    The rate of neutralized charge by lightning (RNCL) is an important parameter indicating the intensity of lightning activity. The total charging rate (CR), the CR of one kind of polarity (e.g., negative) charge (CROP), and the outflow rate of charge on precipitation (ORCP) are proposed as key factors impacting RNCL, based on the principle of conservation of one kind of polarity charge in a thunderstorm. In this paper, the impacts of updraft on CR and CROP are analyzed by using a 3D cloud resolution model for a strong storm that occurred in Beijing on 6 september 2008. The results show that updraft both promotes and inhibits RNCL at the same time. (1) Updraft always has a positive influence on CR. The correlation coefficient between the updraft volume and CR can reach 0.96. Strengthening of the updraft facilitates strengthening of RNCL through this positive influence. (2) Strengthening of the updraft also promotes reinforcement of CROP. The correlation coefficient between the updraft volume and CROP is high (about 0.9), but this promotion restrains the strengthening of RNCL because the strengthening of CROP will, most of the time, inhibit the increasing of RNCL. (3) Additionally, increasing of ORCP depresses the strengthening of RNCL. In terms of magnitude, the peak of ORCP is equal to the peak of CR. Because precipitation mainly appears after the lightning activity finishes, the depression effect of ORCP on RNCL can be ignored during the active lightning period.

  8. On the Distribution of Neutral and Charged Pions through the Production of a Classical Pion Field

    CERN Document Server

    Anselm, A A; Bander, Myron

    1994-01-01

    High energy reactions may produce a state around the collision point that is best described by a classical pion field. Such a field might be an isospin rotated vacuum of the chiral $\\sigma$-model or, as discussed in this work, a solution of the equations of motion resultinng from the coupling of fields of this model to quarks produced in the collision. In such configurations all directions in isospin space are allowed leading to a sizable probability of events with, essentially, only charged particles (Centauros) or all neutral particles (anti-Centauros). (In more common statistical models of multiparticle production, the probability of such events is suppressed exponentially by the total multiplicity.) We find that the isospin violation due to the mass difference of the up and down quarks has a significant effect on these distributions and enhances the production of events consisting predominantly of neutral particles.

  9. Multi critical point structure for chiral phase transition induce by charge neutrality and vector interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zhao

    2010-01-01

    The combined effect of the repulsive vector interaction and the positive electric chemical potential on the chiral phase transition is investigated by considering neutral color superconductivity. Under the charge-neutrality constraint, the chiral condensate, diquark condensate and quark number densities are obtained in two-plus-one-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with the so called Kobayashi-Maskawa-'t Hooft term. We demonstrate that multiple chiral critical-point structures always exist in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model within the self-consistent mean-field approximation, and that the number of chiral critical points can vary from zero to four, which is dependent on the magnitudes of vector interaction and the diquark coupling.

  10. Charge transfer reactions at interfaces between neutral gas and plasma: Dynamical effects and X-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provornikova, E.; Izmodenov, V. V.; Lallement, R.

    2012-04-01

    Charge-transfer is the main process linking neutrals and charged particles in the interaction regions of neutral (or partly ionized) gas with a plasma. In this paper we illustrate the importance of charge-transfer with respect to the dynamics and the structure of neutral gas-plasma interfaces. We consider the following phenomena: (1) the heliospheric interface - region where the solar wind plasma interacts with the partly-ionized local interstellar medium (LISM) and (2) neutral interstellar clouds embedded in a hot, tenuous plasma such as the million degree gas that fills the so-called ``Local Bubble". In (1), we discuss several effects in the outer heliosphere caused by charge exchange of interstellar neutral atoms and plasma protons. In (2) we describe the role of charge exchange in the formation of a transition region between the cloud and the surrounding plasma based on a two-component model of the cloud-plasma interaction. In the model the cloud consists of relatively cold and dense atomic hydrogen gas, surrounded by hot, low density, fully ionized plasma. We discuss the structure of the cloud-plasma interface and the effect of charge exchange on the lifetime of interstellar clouds. Charge transfer between neutral atoms and minor ions in the plasma produces X-ray emission. Assuming standard abundances of minor ions in the hot gas surrounding the cold interstellar cloud, we estimate the X-ray emissivity consecutive to the charge transfer reactions. Our model shows that the charge-transfer X-ray emission from the neutral cloud-plasma interface may be comparable to the diffuse thermal X-ray emission from the million degree gas cavity itself.

  11. Measurement of the inclusive production of neutral pions and charged particles on the Z0 resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeva, B.; Adriani, O.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Akbari, H.; Alcaraz, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alverson, G.; Alviggi, M. G.; An, Q.; Anderhub, H.; Anderson, A. L.; Andreev, V. P.; Angelov, T.; Antonov, L.; Antreasyan, D.; Arce, P.; Arefiev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Baba, P. V. K. S.; Bagnaia, P.; Bakken, J. A.; Baksay, L.; Ball, R. C.; Banerjee, S.; Bao, J.; Barone, L.; Bay, A.; Becker, U.; Behrens, J.; Beingessner, S.; Bencze, Gy. L.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B. L.; Biland, A.; Bizzarri, R.; Blaising, J. J.; Blömeke, P.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bocciolini, M.; Bock, R.; Böhm, A.; Borgia, B.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Boutigny, D.; Bouwens, B.; Branson, J. G.; Brock, I. C.; Bruyant, F.; Buisson, C.; Bujak, A.; Burger, J. D.; Burq, J. P.; Busenitz, J.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Carbonara, F.; Cardenal, P.; Carminati, F.; Cartacci, A. M.; Cerrada, M.; Cesaroni, F.; Chang, Y. H.; Chaturvedi, U. K.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, C.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, W. Y.; Chiefari, G.; Chien, C. Y.; Chollet, F.; Civinini, C.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Cohn, H. O.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Commichau, V.; Conforto, G.; Contin, A.; Crijns, F.; Cui, X. Y.; Dai, T. S.; D'Alessandro, R.; de Asmundis, R.; Degré, A.; Deiters, K.; Dénes, E.; Denes, P.; Denotaristefani, F.; Dhina, M.; Dibitonto, D.; Diemoz, M.; Diez-Hedo, F.; Dimitrov, H. R.; Dionisi, C.; Diviá, R.; Dova, M. T.; Drago, E.; Driever, T.; Duchesneau, D.; Duinker, P.; Duran, I.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Erné, F. C.; Extermann, P.; Fabbretti, R.; Faber, G.; Fabre, M.; Falciano, S.; Fan, Q.; Fan, S. J.; Fackler, O.; Fay, J.; Fehlmann, J.; Ferguson, T.; Fernandez, G.; Ferroni, F.; Fesefeldt, H.; Field, J.; Filthaut, F.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisher, P. H.; Forconi, G.; Foreman, T.; Freudenreich, K.; Friebel, W.; Fukushima, M.; Gailloud, M.; Galaktionov, Yu.; Gallo, E.; Ganguli, S. N.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gau, S. S.; Gele, D.; Gentile, S.; Glaubman, M.; Goldfarb, S.; Gong, Z. F.; Gonzales, E.; Gordeev, A.; Göttlicher, P.; Goujon, D.; Gratta, G.; Grinnell, C.; Gruenewald, M.; Guanziroli, M.; Guo, J. K.; Gurtu, A.; Gustafson, H. R.; Gutay, L. J.; Haan, H.; Hasan, A.; Hauschildt, D.; He, C. F.; Hebbeker, T.; Hebert, M.; Herten, G.; Herten, U.; Hervé, A.; Hilgers, K.; Hofer, H.; Hoorani, H.; Hsu, L. S.; Hu, G.; Hu, G. Q.; Ille, B.; Ilyas, M. M.; Innocente, V.; Isiksal, E.; Janssen, H.; Jin, B. N.; Jones, L. W.; Kasser, A.; Khan, R. A.; Kamyshkov, Yu.; Karyotakis, Y.; Kaur, M.; Khokhar, S.; Khoze, V.; Kienzle-Focacci, M. N.; Kinnison, W.; Kirkby, D.; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; König, A. C.; Kornadt, O.; Koutsenko, V.; Krammer, R. W.; Kramer, T.; Krastev, V. R.; Krenz, W.; Krizmanic, J.; Kumar, K. S.; Kumar, V.; Kunin, A.; Lalieu, V.; Landi, G.; Lanske, D.; Lanzano, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Lee, D.; Leedom, I.; Le Goff, J. M.; Leistam, L.; Leiste, R.; Lenti, M.; Leonardi, E.; Lettry, J.; Levchenko, P. M.; Leytens, X.; Li, C.; Li, H. T.; Li, J. F.; Li, L.; Li, P. J.; Li, Q.; Lli, X. G.; Liao, J. Y.; Lin, Z. Y.; Linde, F. L.; Lindemann, B.; Linnhofer, D.; Liu, R.; Liu, Y.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y. S.; Lubbers, J. M.; Lübelsmeyer, K.; Luci, C.; Luckey, D.; Ludovici, L.; Lue, X.; Luminari, L.; Ma, W. G.; MacDermott, M.; Magahiz, R.; Maire, M.; Malhotra, P. K.; Malik, R.; Malinin, A.; Manña, C.; Mao, D. N.; Mao, Y. F.; Maolinbay, M.; Marchesini, P.; Marchionni, A.; Martin, B.; Martin, J. P.; Martinez-Laso, L.; Marzano, F.; Massaro, G. G. G.; Matsuda, T.; Mazumdar, K.; McBride, P.; McMahon, T.; McNally, D.; Meinholz, Th.; Merk, M.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W. J.; Mi, Y.; Mills, G. B.; Mir, Y.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Möller, M.; Monteleoni, B.; Morand, G.; Morand, R.; Morganti, S.; Moulai, N. E.; Mount, R.; Müller, S.; Nagy, E.; Napolitano, M.; Newman, H.; Neyer, C.; Niaz, M. A.; Niessen, L.; Nowak, H.; Pandoulas, D.; Plasil, F.; Passaleva, G.; Paternoster, G.; Patricelli, S.; Pei, Y. J.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Perrier, J.; Pevsner, A.; Pieri, M.; Piroué, P. A.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Produit, N.; Qian, J. M.; Qureshi, K. N.; Raghavan, R.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Razis, P.; Read, K.; Ren, D.; Ren, Z.; Reucroft, S.; Ricker, A.; Riemann, S.; Rind, O.; Rippich, C.; Rizvi, H. A.; Roe, B. P.; Röhner, M.; Röhner, S.; Roeser, U.; Romero, L.; Rose, J.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rosmalen, R.; Rosselet, Ph.; Rubbia, A.; Rubio, J. A.; Rubio, M.; Ruckstuhl, W.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sachwitz, M.; Salicio, J.; Sanders, G.; Sarakinos, M. S.; Sartorelli, G.; Sauvage, G.; Savin, A.; Schegelsky, V.; Schmiemann, K.; Schmitz, D.; Schmitz, P.; Schneegans, M.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D. J.; Shotkin, S.; Schreiber, H. J.; Schulte, R.; Schulte, S.; Schultze, K.; Schütte, J.; Schwenke, J.

    1991-04-01

    We present a study of the inclusive production of neutral pions and charged particles from 112 000 hadronic Z0 decays. The measured inclusive momentum distributions can be reproduced by parton shower Monte Carlo programs and also by an analytical QCD calculation. Comparing our results to e+e- data between √s = 9 and 91 GeV, we findfind that the evolution of the spectra with center of mass energy is consistent with the QCD predictions. Supported by the German Bundesministerium für Forschung und Technologie.

  12. Neutral and charged current cross section measurements and searches for new physics at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Malden, N; Abramowicz, H; Adamczyk, L; Adamus, M; Adler, V; Aghuzumtsyan, G; Antonioli, P; Antonov, A; Arneodo, M; Bailey, D S; Bamberger, A; Barakbaev, A N; Barbagli, G; Barbi, M; Bari, G; Barreiro, F; Bartsch, D; Basile, M; Bauerdick, L A T; Behrens, U; Bell, M; Bellagamba, L; Benen, A; Bertolin, A; Bhadra, S; Bloch, I; Bodmann, B; Bold, T; Boos, E G; Borras, K; Boscherini, D; Brock, I; Brook, N H; Brugnera, R; Brümmer, N; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bussey, P J; Butterworth, J M; Bylsma, B; Caldwell, A; Capua, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carli, T; Carlin, R; Catterall, C D; Chekanov, S; Chiochia, V; Chwastowski, J; Ciborowski, J; Ciesielski, R; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Cloth, P; Cole, J E; Collins-Tooth, C; Contin, A; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Coppola, N; Cormack, C; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F; Cottrell, A; D'Agostini, Giulio; Dal Corso, F; Danilov, P; Dannheim, D; De Pasquale, S; Dementiev, R K; Derrick, M; Deshpande, Abhay A; Devenish, R C E; Dhawan, S; Dolgoshein, B A; Doyle, A T; Drews, G; Durkin, L S; Dusini, S; Eisenberg, Y; Ermolov, P F; Eskreys, Andrzej; Ferrando, J; Ferrero, M I; Figiel, J; Filges, D; Foster, B; Foudas, C; Fourletov, S; Fourletova, J; Fricke, U; Fusayasu, T; Gabareen, A; Gallo, E; Garfagnini, A; Geiser, A; Genta, C; Gialas, I; Giusti, P; Gladilin, L K; Gladkov, D; Glasman, C; Gliga, S; Goers, S; Golubkov, Yu A; Goncalo, R; González, O; Göttlicher, P; Grabowska-Bold, I; Grijpink, S; Grzelak, G; Gutsche, O; Gwenlan, C; Haas, T; Hain, W; Hall-Wilton, R; Hamatsu, R; Hamilton, J; Hanlon, S; Hart, J C; Hartmann, H; Hartner, G; Hartner, G F; Heaphy, E A; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Helbich, M; Heusch, C A; Hilger, E; Hillert, S; Hirose, T; Hochman, D; Holm, U; Iacobucci, G; Iga, Y; Inuzuka, M; Irrgang, P; Jakob, H P; Jones, T W; Kagawa, S; Kahle, B; Kaji, H; Kananov, S; Kappes, A; Kataoka, Y; Yamazaki, M; Katkov, I I; Katz, U F; Kcira, D; Khein, L A; Kim, J Y; Kim, Y K; Kind, O; Kisielewska, D; Kitamura, S; Klimek, K; Koffeman, E; Kohno, T; Kooijman, P; Koop, T; Korzhav, I A; Kotanski, A; Kötz, U; Kowal, A M; Kowal, M; Kowalski, H; Kowalski, T; Krakauer, D; Kramberger, G; Kreisel, A; Krumnack, N; Kuze, M; Kuzmin, V A; Labarga, L; Labes, H; Lainesse, J; Lammers, S; Lee, J H; Lee, S W; Lelas, D; Levchenko, B B; Levman, G M; Levy, A; Li, L; Lightwood, M S; Lim, H; Lim, I T; Limentani, S; Ling, T Y; Liu, X; Löhr, B; Lohrmann, E; Loizides, J H; Long, K R; Longhin, A; Lukina, O Yu; Lupi, A; Luzniak, P; Maddox, E; Magill, S; Mankel, R; Margotti, A; Marini, G; Martin, J F; Mastroberardino, A; Matsuzawa, K; Mattingly, M C K; McCubbin, N A; Mellado, B; Melzer-Pellmann, I A; Menary, S R; Metlica, F; Meyer, U; Milite, M; Mirea, A; Monaco, V; Montanari, A; Moritz, M; Musgrave, B; Nagano, K; Nania, R; Nguyen, C N; Nigro, A; Ning, Y; Nishimura, T; Notz, D; Nowak, R J; Oh, B Y; Olkiewicz, K; Pac, M Y; Padhi, S; Paganis, S; Palmonari, F; Parenti, A; Park, I H; Patel, S; Paul, E; Pavel, N; Pawlak, J M; Pelfer, P G; Pellegrino, A; Pesci, A; Petrucci, M C; Piotrzkowski, K; Plucinsky, P P; Pokrovskiy, N S; Polini, A; Posocco, M; Proskuryakov, A S; Przybycien, M B; Rautenberg, J; Raval, A; Reeder, D D; Ren, Z; Renner, R; Repond, J; Riveline, U; Karshon, M; Robins, S; Rodrigues, E; Rosin, M; Rurua, L; Ruspa, M; Sacchi, R; Salehi, H; Sartorelli, G; Savin, A A; Saxon, D H; Schagen, S; Schioppa, M; Schlenstedt, S; Schmidke, W B; Schneekloth, U; Sciulli, F; Scott, J; Selonke, F; Shcheglova, L M; Skillicorn, I O; Slominski, W; Smith, W H; Soares, M; Solano, A; Son, D; Sosnovtsev, V V; Stairs, D G; Stanco, L; Standage, J; Stifutkin, A; Stoesslein, U; Stonjek, S; Stopa, P; Straub, P B; Suchkov, S; Susinno, G; Suszycki, L; Sutton, M R; Sztuk, J; Szuba, D; Szuba, J; Tandler, J; Tapper, A D; Tapper, R J; Tassi, E; Tawara, T; Terron, J; Tiecke, H G; Tokushuku, K; Tsurugai, T; Turcato, M; Tymieniecka, T; Ukleja, A; Ukleja, J; Vázquez, M; Velthuis, J J; Vlasov, N N; Voss, K C; Walczak, R; Walsh, R; Wang, M; Weber, A; Wessoleck, H; West, B J; Whitmore, J J; Wick, K; Wiggers, L; Wills, H H; Wing, M; Wolf, G; Yamada, S; Yamashita, T; Yoshida, R; Youngman, C; Zawiejski, L; Zeuner, W; Zhautykov, B O; Zichichi, A; Ziegler, A; Zotkin, S A; De Wolf, E; Del Peso, J; Malden, Nicholas

    2004-01-01

    HERA is the only high energy electron-proton collider in the world today and hence has unique opportunities both to probe the structure of the proton and to search for physics beyond the Standard Model. Results are presented for measurements of both neutral and charged current cross sections, and for searches for exotic processes involving direct electron-quark interactions (leptoquarks and R-parity violating SUSY), generic coupling models (contact interactions) and exclusive final states (isolated leptons and missing PT, single top production and pentaquarks). Exclusion limits on proposed models are set where no deviation from Standard Model predictions are found.

  13. Uniformly rotating neutron stars in the global and local charge neutrality cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belvedere, Riccardo, E-mail: riccardo.belvedere@icra.it [Dipartimento di Fisica and ICRA, Sapienza Universita' di Roma, P.le Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Rome (Italy); ICRANet, P.zza della Repubblica 10, I-65122 Pescara (Italy); Boshkayev, Kuantay, E-mail: kuantay@icra.it [Physical–Technical Faculty, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Al-Farabi ave. 71, 050040 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Rueda, Jorge A., E-mail: jorge.rueda@icra.it [Dipartimento di Fisica and ICRA, Sapienza Universita' di Roma, P.le Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Rome (Italy); ICRANet, P.zza della Repubblica 10, I-65122 Pescara (Italy); Ruffini, Remo, E-mail: ruffini@icra.it [Dipartimento di Fisica and ICRA, Sapienza Universita' di Roma, P.le Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Rome (Italy); ICRANet, P.zza della Repubblica 10, I-65122 Pescara (Italy); ICRANet, University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis, 28 Av. de Valrose, 06103 Nice Cedex 2 (France)

    2014-01-15

    In our previous treatment of neutron stars, we have developed the model fulfilling global and not local charge neutrality. In order to implement such a model, we have shown the essential role by the Thomas–Fermi equations, duly generalized to the case of electromagnetic field equations in a general relativistic framework, forming a coupled system of equations that we have denominated Einstein–Maxwell–Thomas–Fermi (EMTF) equations. From the microphysical point of view, the weak interactions are accounted for by requesting the β stability of the system, and the strong interactions by using the σ–ω–ρ nuclear model, where σ, ω and ρ are the mediator massive vector mesons. Here we examine the equilibrium configurations of slowly rotating neutron stars by using the Hartle formalism in the case of the EMTF equations indicated above. We integrate these equations of equilibrium for different central densities ρ{sub c} and circular angular velocities Ω and compute the mass M, polar R{sub p} and equatorial R{sub eq} radii, angular momentum J, eccentricity ϵ, moment of inertia I, as well as quadrupole moment Q of the configurations. Both the Keplerian mass-shedding limit and the axisymmetric secular instability are used to construct the new mass–radius relation. We compute the maximum and minimum masses and rotation frequencies of neutron stars. We compare and contrast all the results for the global and local charge neutrality cases.

  14. Variable Charge State Impurities in Coupled Kinetic Plasma-Kinetic Neutral Transport Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotler, D. P.; Hager, R.; Kim, K.; Koskela, T.; Park, G.

    2015-11-01

    A previous version of the XGC0 neoclassical particle transport code with two fully stripped impurity species was used to study kinetic neoclassical transport in the DIII-D H-mode pedestal. To properly simulate impurities in the scrape-off layer and divertor and to account for radiative cooling, however, the impurity charge state distributions must evolve as the particles are transported into regions of different electron temperatures and densities. To do this, the charge state of each particle in XGC0 is included as a parameter in the list that represents the particle's location in phase space. Impurity ionizations and recombinations are handled with a dedicated collision routine. The associated radiative cooling is accumulated during the process and applied to the electron population later in the time step. The density profiles of the neutral impurities are simulated with the DEGAS 2 neutral transport code and then used as a background for electron impact ionization in XGC0 via a test particle Monte Carlo method analogous to that used for deuterium. This work supported by US DOE contracts DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  15. Physics of Neutralization of Intense Charged Particle Beam Pulses by a Background Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaganovich, I.D.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.A.; Startsev, E.A.; Sefkow, A.B; Friedman, A.F.; Lee, E.P.

    2009-09-03

    Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by a background plasma forms the basis for a wide range of applications to high energy accelerators and colliders, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. For example, for ballistic propagation of intense ion beam pulses, background plasma can be used to effectively neutralize the beam charge and current, so that the self-electric and self-magnetic fields do not affect the ballistic propagation of the beam. From the practical perspective of designing advanced plasma sources for beam neutralization, a robust theory should be able to predict the self-electric and self-magnetic fields during beam propagation through the background plasma. The major scaling relations for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of intense ion charge bunches propagating through background plasma have been determined taking into account the effects of transients during beam entry into the plasma, the excitation of collective plasma waves, the effects of gas ionization, finite electron temperature, and applied solenoidal and dipole magnetic fields. Accounting for plasma production by gas ionization yields a larger self-magnetic field of the ion beam compared to the case without ionization, and a wake of current density and self-magnetic field perturbations is generated behind the beam pulse. A solenoidal magnetic field can be applied for controlling the beam propagation. Making use of theoretical models and advanced numerical simulations, it is shown that even a small applied magnetic field of about 100G can strongly affect the beam neutralization. It has also been demonstrated that in the presence of an applied magnetic field the ion beam pulse can excite large-amplitude whistler waves, thereby producing a complex structure of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. The presence of an applied solenoidal magnetic field may also cause a strong enhancement of the radial self-electric field of the beam pulse propagating

  16. Effects of neutral gas release on current collection during the CHARGE-2 rocket experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, B. E.; Banks, P. M.; Neubert, T.; Williamson, P. R.; Myers, Neil B.; Raitt, W. John; Sasaki, S.

    1990-01-01

    Observations of current collection enhancements due to cold nitrogen gas control jet emissions from a highly charged rocket payload in the ionosphere are reported. These observations were made during the second cooperative high altitude rocket gun experiment (CHARGE-2) which was an electrically tethered mother/daughter payload system. The current collection enhancement was observed at the daughter payload located 100 to 400 m away from the mother which was firing an energetic electron beam. The authors interpret these results in terms of an electrical discharge forming in close proximity to the daughter during the short periods of gas emission. The results indicate that it is possible to enhance the electron current collection capability of positively charged vehicles by means of deliberate neutral gas releases into an otherwise undisturbed space plasma. These results can also be compared with recent laboratory observations of hollow cathode plasma contactors operating in the ignited mode. Experimental observations of current collection enhancements due to cold nitrogen gas control jet emissions from a highly charged, isolated daughter payload in the nighttime ionosphere were made. These observations were derived from the second cooperative high altitude rocket gun experiment (CHARGE-2) which was an electrically tethered mother-daughter payload system. The rocket flew from White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) in December, 1985. The rocket achieved an altitude of 261 km and carried a 1 keV electron beam emitting up to 48 mA of current (Myers, et al., 1989a). The mother payload, carried the electron beam source, while the daughter acted as a remote current collection and observation platform and reached a distance of 426 m away from the main payload. Gas emissions at the daughter were due to periodic thruster jet firings to maintain separation velocity between the two payloads.

  17. Tribological Properties of Neutral Polysaccharide Solutions under Simulated Oral Conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zinoviadou, K.; Janssen, A.M.; Jongh, de H.H.J.

    2008-01-01

    Predictability of the perception of foods thickened by polysaccharides is only poor. Therefore, the effect of saliva on the lubrication properties of 2 types of neutral polysaccharides, cross-linked starch and locust bean gum, was studied. Despite the similar bulk rheological behavior of the 2 polys

  18. Charging Neutral Cues with Aggressive Meaning through Violent Video Game Play

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Krahé

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available When playing violent video games, aggressive actions are performed against the background of an originally neutral environment, and associations are formed between cues related to violence and contextual features. This experiment examined the hypothesis that neutral contextual features of a virtual environment become associated with aggressive meaning and acquire the function of primes for aggressive cognitions. Seventy-six participants were assigned to one of two violent video game conditions that varied in context (ship vs. city environment or a control condition. Afterwards, they completed a Lexical Decision Task to measure the accessibility of aggressive cognitions in which they were primed either with ship-related or city-related words. As predicted, participants who had played the violent game in the ship environment had shorter reaction times for aggressive words following the ship primes than the city primes, whereas participants in the city condition responded faster to the aggressive words following the city primes compared to the ship primes. No parallel effect was observed for the non-aggressive targets. The findings indicate that the associations between violent and neutral cognitions learned during violent game play facilitate the accessibility of aggressive cognitions.

  19. Two charges on plane in a magnetic field: II. Moving neutral quantum system across magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Escobar-Ruiz, M A

    2014-01-01

    The moving neutral system of two Coulomb charges on a plane subject to a constant magnetic field $B$ perpendicular to the plane is considered. It is shown that the composite system of finite total mass is bound for any center-of-mass momentum $P$ and magnetic field strength; the energy of the ground state is calculated accurately using a variational approach. Their accuracy is cross-checked in Lagrange-mesh method for $B=1$\\,a.u. and in a perturbation theory at small $B$ and $P$. The constructed trial function has a property to be a uniform approximation of the exact eigenfunction. For Hydrogen atom and Positronium a double perturbation theory in $B$ and $P$ is developed and the first corrections are found algebraically. A phenomenon of a sharp change of energy behavior for a certain center-of-mass momentum but a fixed magnetic field is indicated.

  20. Dispersive MHD waves and alfvenons in charge non-neutral plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Stasiewicz

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Dispersive properties of linear and nonlinear MHD waves, including shear, kinetic, electron inertial Alfvén, and slow and fast magnetosonic waves are analyzed using both analytical expansions and a novel technique of dispersion diagrams. The analysis is extended to explicitly include space charge effects in non-neutral plasmas. Nonlinear soliton solutions, here called alfvenons, are found to represent either convergent or divergent electric field structures with electric potentials and spatial dimensions similar to those observed by satellites in auroral regions. Similar solitary structures are postulated to be created in the solar corona, where fast alfvenons can provide acceleration of electrons to hundreds of keV during flares. Slow alfvenons driven by chromospheric convection produce positive potentials that can account for the acceleration of solar wind ions to 300–800 km/s. New results are discussed in the context of observations and other theoretical models for nonlinear Alfvén waves in space plasmas.

  1. A Neutrally Charged Trimethylmanganese(III) Complex: Synthesis, Characterization, and Disproportionation Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stalzer, Madelyn M.; Telser, Joshua; Krzystek, Jurek; Motta, Alessandro; Delferro, Massimiliano; Marks, Tobin J.

    2016-08-22

    The synthesis and properties of an unusual, neutrally charged and volatile N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine trimethyl manganese(III) complex, (TMEDA)MnMe3, are described, along with its facile disproportionation to the corresponding Mn(II) and Mn(IV) complexes. Characterization by single-crystal XRD, UV-vis spectroscopy, high-frequency and -field EPR (HFEPR), magnetic susceptibility, and density functional theory (DFT) computations indicate that the (TMEDA)MnMe3 electronic structure can be described as largely square pyramidal Mn(III) centered. The paucity of manganese(III) polyalkyls and the simplicity and reactivity of this compound implicate it as a potentially useful synthetic building block.

  2. Consistent analysis of neutral- and charged-current (anti)neutrino scattering off carbon

    CERN Document Server

    Ankowski, Artur M

    2013-01-01

    Good understanding of the cross sections for (anti)neutrino scattering off nuclear targets in the few-GeV energy region is a prerequisite for the correct interpretation of results of ongoing and planned oscillation experiments. To clarify a possible source of disagreement between recent measurements of the cross sections on carbon, we analyze the available data within an approach based on the realistic spectral function of carbon, treating neutral-current elastic (NCE) and charged-current quasielastic (CCQE) processes on equal footing. We show that the axial mass from the shape analysis of the MiniBooNE data is in good agreement with the results reported by the BNL E734 and NOMAD Collaborations. However, the combined analysis of the NCE and CCQE data does not seem to support the contribution of multinucleon final states being large enough to explain the normalization of the MiniBooNE-reported cross sections.

  3. Consistent analysis of neutral- and charged-current (anti)neutrino scattering off carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankowski, Artur M.

    2015-05-01

    Good understanding of the cross sections for (anti)neutrino scattering off nuclear targets in the few-GeV energy region is a prerequisite for the correct interpretation of results of ongoing and planned oscillation experiments. To clarify a possible source of disagreement between recent measurements of the cross sections on carbon, we analyze the available data within an approach based on the realistic spectral function of carbon, treating neutral-current elastic (NCE) and charged-current quasielastic (CCQE) processes on equal footing. We show that the axial mass from the shape analysis of the MiniBooNE data is in good agreement with the results reported by the BNL E734 and NOMAD Collaborations. However, the combined analysis of the NCE and CCQE data does not seem to support the contribution of multinucleon final states being large enough to explain the normalization of the MiniBooNE-reported cross sections.

  4. Consistent analysis of neutral- and charged-current (anti)neutrino scattering off carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ankowski, Artur M. [INFN and Department of Physics,“Sapienza” Università di Roma, I-00185 Roma (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    Good understanding of the cross sections for (anti)neutrino scattering off nuclear targets in the few-GeV energy region is a prerequisite for the correct interpretation of results of ongoing and planned oscillation experiments. To clarify a possible source of disagreement between recent measurements of the cross sections on carbon, we analyze the available data within an approach based on the realistic spectral function of carbon, treating neutral-current elastic (NCE) and charged-current quasielastic (CCQE) processes on equal footing. We show that the axial mass from the shape analysis of the MiniBooNE data is in good agreement with the results reported by the BNL E734 and NOMAD Collaborations. However, the combined analysis of the NCE and CCQE data does not seem to support the contribution of multinucleon final states being large enough to explain the normalization of the MiniBooNE-reported cross sections.

  5. QCD analysis of neutral and charged current cross sections and search for contact interactions at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirumov, Hayk

    2013-11-15

    A QCD analysis of the inclusive deep inelastic ep scattering cross section measured by the H1 experiment at HERA is presented. The data correspond to a total integrated luminosity of about 0.5 fb{sup -1} and covers a kinematic range of 0.5 GeV{sup 2} - 30000 GeV{sup 2} in the negative four-momentum transfer Q{sup 2} and 3 . 10{sup -5} - 0.65 in Bjorken x. The performed QCD analysis of the double differential neutral and charged current cross sections results in a set of parton distribution functions H1PDF 2012. The precise data from HERA II period in the kinematic region of high Q{sup 2} considerably improve the accuracy of the PDFs at the high x. In addition a search for signs of new physics using single differential neutral current cross section measurements at high Q{sup 2} is performed. The observed good agreement of the analysed data with the Standard Model predictions allows to set constraints on various new physics models within the framework of contact interactions. Limits are derived on the compositeness scale for general contact interactions, on the ratio of mass to the Yukawa coupling for heavy leptoquark models, on the effective Plank-mass scale in the large extra dimension models and on the quark radius.

  6. Understanding self-assembly of charged-neutral block copolymer (BCP) and surfactant complexes using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Monojoy; Sumpter, Bobby; Kilbey, Michael

    Here we report the formation of phase separated BCP-surfactant complexes resulting from the electrostatic self-assembly of charge-neutral block copolymers with oppositely charged surfactants. Complexation behaviors of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes has gained considerable attention in the field of soft condensed matter physics due to their potential application as functional nanomaterials for batteries, wastewater treatment and drug delivery systems. Numerous experiments have examined the self-assembled structures resulting from complexation of charge-neutral BCP and surfactants, however, there is a lack of comprehensive understanding at the fundamental level. To help bridge this gap, we use, MD simulations to study self-assembly and dynamics of the BCP-surfactant complex at the molecular level. Our results show an overcharging effect in BCPs with hydrophobic neutral blocks and a formation of core-shell colloidal structure. Hydrophilic neutral blocks, on the other hand, show stable, hairy colloidal structures with neutral blocks forming a loosely-bound, fuzzy outer layer. Our results qualitatively agree with previous SANS and SAXS experiments. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Science and Engineering Division.

  7. CFD Modeling of Non-Neutral Atmospheric Boundary Layer Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koblitz, Tilman

    to the atmospheric boundary-layer, are mostly ignored so far. In order to decrease the uncertainty of wind resource assessment, the present work focuses on atmospheric flows that include atmospheric stability and the Coriolis effect. Within the present work a RANS model framework is developed and implemented......For wind resource assessment, the wind industry is increasingly relying on Computational Fluid Dynamics models that focus on modeling the airflow in a neutrally stratified surface-layer. Physical processes like the Coriolis force, buoyancy forces and heat transport, that are important...

  8. Grafted polymers layers: neutral chains to charged chains; Couches de polymeres greffes: des chaines neutres aux chaines chargees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mir, Y.

    1995-09-29

    This work concerns an experimental study, by small angle neutrons scattering, of neutral or charged grafted polymers layers structures. The method consisted in exploiting the acknowledges got on neutral brushes, to reach the problem of grafted polyelectrolyte layers. The difficulty of charged layers making has been, until this day, an important obstacle to the experimental study of these systems. It has been partially resolved in the case of sodium sulfonate polystyrene layers, and allowed to study their structure. (N.C.). 72 refs., 74 figs., 24 tabs.

  9. Dust dynamics and evolution in expanding HII regions. I. Radiative drift of neutral and charged grains

    CERN Document Server

    Akimkin, V V; Pavlyuchenkov, Ya N; Wiebe, D S

    2015-01-01

    We consider dust drift under the influence of stellar radiation pressure during the pressure-driven expansion of an HII region using the chemo-dynamical model MARION. Dust size distribution is represented by four dust types: conventional polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), very small grains (VSGs), big grains (BGs) and also intermediate-sized grains (ISGs), which are larger than VSGs and smaller than BGs. The dust is assumed to move at terminal velocity determined locally from the balance between the radiation pressure and gas drag. As Coulomb drag is an important contribution to the overall gas drag, we evaluate a grain charge evolution within the HII region for each dust type. BGs are effectively swept out of the HII region. The spatial distribution of ISGs within the HII region has a double peak structure, with a smaller inner peak and a higher outer peak. PAHs and VSGs are mostly coupled to the gas. The mean charge of PAHs is close to zero, so they can become neutral from time to time because of char...

  10. Charge neutral MoS2 field effect transistors through oxygen plasma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhall, Rohan; Li, Zhen; Kosmowska, Ewa; Cronin, Stephen B.

    2016-11-01

    Lithographically fabricated MoS2 field effect transistors suffer from several critical imperfections, including low sub-threshold swings, large turn-on gate voltages (VT), and wide device-to-device variability. The large magnitude and variability of VT stems from unclean interfaces, trapped charges in the underlying substrate, and sulfur vacancies created during the mechanical exfoliation process. In this study, we demonstrate a simple and reliable oxygen plasma treatment, which mitigates the effects of unintentional doping created by surface defect sites, such as S vacancies, and surface contamination. This plasma treatment restores charge neutrality to the MoS2 and shifts the threshold turn-on voltage towards 0 V. Out of the 10 devices measured, all exhibit a shift of the FET turn-on voltage from an average of -18 V to -2 V. The oxygen plasma treatment passivates these defects, which reduces surface scattering, causing increased mobility and improved subthreshold swing. For as-prepared devices with low mobilities (˜0.01 cm2/V s), we observe up to a 190-fold increase in mobility after exposure to the oxygen plasma. Perhaps the most important aspect of this oxygen plasma treatment is that it reduces the device-to-device variability, which is a crucial factor in realizing any practical application of these devices.

  11. Electrostatically Embedded Many-Body Expansion for Neutral and Charged Metalloenzyme Model Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbanov, Elbek K; Leverentz, Hannah R; Truhlar, Donald G; Amin, Elizabeth A

    2012-01-10

    The electrostatically embedded many-body (EE-MB) method has proven accurate for calculating cohesive and conformational energies in clusters, and it has recently been extended to obtain bond dissociation energies for metal-ligand bonds in positively charged inorganic coordination complexes. In the present paper, we present four key guidelines that maximize the accuracy and efficiency of EE-MB calculations for metal centers. Then, following these guidelines, we show that the EE-MB method can also perform well for bond dissociation energies in a variety of neutral and negatively charged inorganic coordination systems representing metalloenzyme active sites, including a model of the catalytic site of the zinc-bearing anthrax toxin lethal factor, a popular target for drug development. In particular, we find that the electrostatically embedded three-body (EE-3B) method is able to reproduce conventionally calculated bond-breaking energies in a series of pentacoordinate and hexacoordinate zinc-containing systems with an average absolute error (averaged over 25 cases) of only 0.98 kcal/mol.

  12. Edge Charge Neutralization of Clay for Improved Oxygen Gas Barrier in Multilayer Nanobrick Wall Thin Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yixuan; Hagen, David A; Qin, Shuang; Holder, Kevin M; Falke, Kyle; Grunlan, Jaime C

    2016-12-21

    Layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled polymer-clay multilayer thin films are known to provide transparent and flexible gas barrier. In an effort to further lower the oxygen transmission rate (OTR) of these nanobrick wall thin films, sodium chloride was introduced into montmorillonite (MMT) suspension as an "indifferent electrolyte". At pH 6.5 the amphoteric edge sites of MMT have a neutral net charge, and a moderate concentration of NaCl effectively shields the charge from neighboring platelets, allowing van der Waals forces to attract the edges to one another. This edge-to-edge bonding creates a much more tortuous path for diffusing oxygen molecules. An eight-bilayer (BL) polyethylenimine (PEI)/MMT multilayer coating (∼50 nm thick), assembled with 5 mM NaCl in the aqueous clay suspension, exhibited an order of magnitude reduction in oxygen permeability (∼4 × 10(-20) cm(3)·cm/(cm(2)·Pa·s)) relative to its salt-free counterpart. This result represents the best barrier among polymer-clay bilayer systems, which is also lower than SiOx or AlxOy thin films. At higher NaCl concentration, the strong charge screening causes edge-to-face bonding among MMT nanoplatelets, which leads to misalignment in assembled films and increased OTR. This "salty-clay" strategy provides an efficient way to produce better multilayer oxygen barrier thin films by altering ionic strength of the MMT suspension. This simple modification reduces the number of layers necessary for high gas barrier, potentially making these multilayer films interesting for commercial packaging applications.

  13. Adsorption of hydrogen on neutral and charged fullerene: experiment and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, A; Leidlmair, C; Bartl, P; Zöttl, S; Denifl, S; Mauracher, A; Probst, M; Scheier, P; Echt, O

    2013-02-21

    Helium droplets are doped with fullerenes (either C60 or C70) and hydrogen (H2 or D2) and investigated by high-resolution mass spectrometry. In addition to pure helium and hydrogen cluster ions, hydrogen-fullerene complexes are observed upon electron ionization. The composition of the main ion series is (H2)(n)HC(m)(+) where m = 60 or 70. Another series of even-numbered ions, (H2)(n)C(m)(+), is slightly weaker in stark contrast to pure hydrogen cluster ions for which the even-numbered series (H2)(n)(+) is barely detectable. The ion series (H2)(n)HC(m)(+) and (H2)(n)C(m)(+) exhibit abrupt drops in ion abundance at n = 32 for C60 and 37 for C70, indicating formation of an energetically favorable commensurate phase, with each face of the fullerene ion being covered by one adsorbate molecule. However, the first solvation layer is not complete until a total of 49 H2 are adsorbed on C60(+); the corresponding value for C70(+) is 51. Surprisingly, these values do not exhibit a hydrogen-deuterium isotope effect even though the isotope effect for H2/D2 adsorbates on graphite exceeds 6%. We also observe doubly charged fullerene-deuterium clusters; they, too, exhibit abrupt drops in ion abundance at n = 32 and 37 for C60 and C70, respectively. The findings imply that the charge is localized on the fullerene, stabilizing the system against charge separation. Density functional calculations for C60-hydrogen complexes with up to five hydrogen atoms provide insight into the experimental findings and the structure of the ions. The binding energy of physisorbed H2 is 57 meV for H2C60(+) and (H2)2C60(+), and slightly above 70 meV for H2HC60(+) and (H2)2HC60(+). The lone hydrogen in the odd-numbered complexes is covalently bound atop a carbon atom but a large barrier of 1.69 eV impedes chemisorption of the H2 molecules. Calculations for neutral and doubly charged complexes are presented as well.

  14. Adsorption and Aqueous Lubricating Properties of Charged and Neutral Amphiphilic Diblock Copolymers at a Compliant, Hydrophobic Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røn, Troels; Javakhishvili, Irakli; Jankova Atanasova, Katja;

    2013-01-01

    ) or negatively charged poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and of a hydrophobic block of polystyrene (PS) or poly(2-methoxyethyl acrylate) (PMEA), thus generating PEG-b-X or PAA-b-X, where X block is either PS or PMEA. The molecular weight ratios were roughly 1:1 with each block ca. 5 kDa. Comparing the neutral PEG...

  15. NECESSARY AND SUFFICIENT CONDITIONS FOR OSCILLATIONS OF NEUTRAL HYPERBOLIC PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS WITH DELAYS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Jun; Wang Chunyan; Li Jing; Meng Zhijuan

    2006-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the oscillations of neutral hyperbolic partial differential equations with delays. Necessary and sufficient conditions are obtained for the oscillations of all solutions of the equations, and these results are illustrated by some examples.

  16. Brushing abrasion of luting cements under neutral and acidic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchalla, W; Attin, T; Hellwig, E

    2000-01-01

    Four resin based materials (Compolute Aplicap, ESPE; Variolink Ultra, Vivadent; C&B Metabond, Parkell and Panavia 21, Kuraray), two carboxylate cements (Poly-F Plus, Dentsply DeTrey and Durelon Maxicap, ESPE), two glass-ionomer cements (Fuji I, GC and Ketac-Cem Aplicap, ESPE), one resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitremer, 3M) one polyacid-modified resin composite (Dyract Cem, Dentsply DeTrey) and one zinc phosphate cement (Harvard, Richter & Hoffmann) were investigated according to their brushing resistance after storage in neutral and acidic buffer solutions. For this purpose 24 cylindrical acrylic molds were each filled with the materials. After hardening, the samples were stored for seven days in 100% relative humidity and at 37 degrees C. Subsequently, they were ground flat and polished. Then each specimen was covered with an adhesive tape leaving a 4 mm wide window on the cement surface. Twelve samples of each material were stored for 24 hours in a buffer solution with a pH of 6.8. The remaining 12 samples were placed in a buffer with a pH of 3.0. All specimens were then subjected to a three media brushing abrasion (2,000 strokes) in an automatic brushing machine. Storage and brushing were performed three times. After 6,000 brushing strokes per specimen, the tape was removed. Brushing abrasion was measured with a computerized laser profilometer and statistically analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey's Standardized Range Test (p < or = 0.05). The highest brushing abrasion was found for the two carboxylate cements. The lowest brushing abrasion was found for one resin based material, Compolute Aplicap. With the exception of three resin-based materials, a lower pH led to a higher brushing abrasion.

  17. Non-additive sputtering of niobium and tantalum as neutral and charged clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Belykh, S F; Veryovkin, I V; Adriaens, A; Adams, F

    2003-01-01

    An analysis of available literature data on both positive ion emission from Nb and Ta bombarded with 6 keV/atom Au sub m sup - atomic and molecular ions (m=1, 2, 3) and positive ionization probabilities of Nb sub n and Ta sub n neutral clusters sputtered from the same metals by 5 keV Ar sup + ions has been conducted. Dependencies of cluster yields Y sub n sub , sub m (regardless of charge state) on the number of atoms n in a sputtered particles were found to follow a power law as Y sub n sub , sub m approx n sup - supsigma sup sub m where sigma sub m decreases with an increase of m. A non-linear enhancement of yields for large Nb sub n sup + and Ta sub n sup + cluster ions (n>4) appeared to be a result of a non-additive process of sputtering rather than of a non-additive process of their ionization. A manifestation of the non-additive sputtering in kinetic energy distribution of secondary ions was found to be different for atomic and cluster ions.

  18. A Measurement of Neutrino-Induced Charged-Current Neutral Pion Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Robert H. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2010-01-01

    This work presents the first comprehensive measurement of neutrino-induced charged-current neutral pion production (CCπ0) off a nuclear target. The Mini Booster Neutrino Experiment (MiniBooNE) and Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) are discussed in detail. MiniBooNE is a high-statistics (~ 1, 000, 000 interactions) low-energy (Evϵ 2 0.5 - 2.0 GeV) neutrino experiment located at Fermilab. The method for selecting and reconstructing CCπ0 events is presented. The π0 and μ- are fully reconstructed in the final state allowing for the measurement of, among other things, the neutrino energy. The total observable CCπ0 cross-section is presented as a function of neutrino energy, along with five differential cross-sections in terms of the final state kinematics and Q2. The results are combined to yield a flux-averaged total cross-section of <σ>Φ = (9.2 ± 0.3stat. ± 1.5syst.) × 10-39 cm2/CH2 at energy 965 MeV. These measurements will aid future neutrino experiments with the prediction of their neutrino interaction rates.

  19. Consistent analysis of neutral- and charged-current neutrino scattering off carbon

    CERN Document Server

    Ankowski, Artur M

    2012-01-01

    Background: Good understanding of the cross sections for (anti)neutrino scattering off nuclear targets in the few-GeV energy region is a prerequisite for correct interpretation of results of ongoing and planned oscillation experiments. Purpose: Clarify possible source of disagreement between recent measurements of the cross sections on carbon. Method: Nuclear effects in (anti)neutrino scattering off carbon nucleus are described using the spectral function approach. The effect of two- and multi-nucleon final states is accounted for by applying an effective value of the axial mass, fixed to 1.23 GeV. Neutral-current elastic (NCE) and charged-current quasielastic (CCQE) processes are treated on equal footing. Results: The differential and total cross sections for the energy ranging from a few hundreds of MeV to 100 GeV are obtained and compared to the available data from the BNL E734, MiniBooNE, and NOMAD experiments. Conclusions: Nuclear effects in NCE and CCQE scattering seem to be very similar. Within the spe...

  20. Conditional Genealogies and the Age of a Neutral Mutant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiuf, Carsten; Donelly, P

    1999-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the structure of the genealogy of a sample in which it is observed that some subset of chromosomes carries a particular mutation, assumed to have arisen uniquely in the history of the population. A rigorous theoretical study of this conditional genealogy is given using...

  1. Atmospheric new particle formation: real and apparent growth of neutral and charged particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Leppä

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we have provided simple analytical formulae to estimate the growth rate of a nucleation mode due to self-coagulation and the apparent growth rate due to coagulation scavenging by larger particles. These formulae were used on a set of simulations covering a wide range of atmospheric conditions. The modal growth rates were determined from the simulation results by summing the contribution of each process, by calculating the increase rate in the count mean diameter of the mode and by following the peak concentration of the mode. The results of these three methods were compared with each other and the means used to estimate the growth rate due to self-coagulation and coagulation scavenging were found to work quite well. We also investigated the role of charged particles and electric interactions in the growth of a nucleation mode. Charged particles were found to increase the growth rate due to both self-coagulation and coagulation scavenging by a factor of ~1.5 to 2. In case of increased condensation onto charged particles, the total condensational growth rate of a nucleation mode may increase significantly in the very early steps of the growth. The analytical formulae provided by this paper were designed to provide the growth rates due to different processes from aerosol dynamic simulations, but the same principles can be used to determine the growth rates from measurement data.

  2. Atmospheric new particle formation: real and apparent growth of neutral and charged particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Leppä

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study we have provided simple analytical formulae to estimate the growth rate of a nucleation mode due to self-coagulation and the apparent growth rate due to coagulation scavenging by larger particles. These formulae were used on a set of simulations covering a wide range of atmospheric conditions. The modal growth rates were determined from the simulation results by summing the contribution of each process, by calculating the increase rate in the count mean diameter of the mode and by following the peak concentration of the mode. The results of these three methods were compared with each other and the means used to estimate the growth rate due to self-coagulation and coagulation scavenging were found to give accurate values. We also investigated the role of charged particles and electric interactions in the growth of a nucleation mode. Charged particles were found to increase the growth rate due to both self-coagulation and coagulation scavenging by a factor of ~1.5 to 2. In case of increased condensation onto charged particles, the total condensational growth rate of a nucleation mode may increase significantly in the very early steps of the growth. The analytical formulae provided by this paper were designed to provide the growth rates due to different processes from aerosol dynamic simulations, but the same principles can be used to determine the growth rates from measurement data.

  3. Unequal associative changes when excitors and neutral stimuli are conditioned in compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rescorla, R A

    2001-02-01

    In four experiments a compound of a previously conditioned excitor and a neutral stimulus was either reinforced with food or nonreinforced. Two experiments used a magazine approach procedure in rats, and two used an autoshaping procedure in pigeons. All experiments employed a novel compound test procedure, which permitted evaluation of the size of the associative change that took place for the excitatory and neutral stimuli. Reinforcement of the compound resulted in greater increments in the associative strength of the neutral stimulus than of the excitor. Nonreinforcement of the compound resulted in greater decrements in the associative strength of the excitor than of the neutral stimulus. These results agree with earlier experiments with compounds of excitors and inhibitors and provide an additional challenge to contemporary error-correction models of conditioning.

  4. A measurement of the branching fractions of the b-quark into charged and neutral b-hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J; Adam, W; Adzic, P; Albrecht, T; Alderweireld, T; Alemany-Fernandez, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Amaldi, Ugo; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anashkin, E; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Anjos, N; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Ballestrero, A; Bambade, P; Barbier, R; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benekos, N C; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Berntzon, L; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Besson, N; Bloch, D; Blom, M; Bluj, M; Bonesini, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bracko, M; Brenner, R; Brodet, E; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buschmann, P; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Castro, N; Cavallo, F R; Chapkin, M M; Charpentier, P; Checchia, P; Chierici, R; Shlyapnikov, P; Chudoba, J; Chung, S U; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Costa, M J; Crawley, B; Crennell, D J; Cuevas-Maestro, J; D'Hondt, J; Dalmau, J; Da Silva, T; Da Silva, W; Della Ricca, G; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Maria, N; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Simone, A; Doroba, K; Drees, J; Dris, M; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Espirito-Santo, M C; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, M; Fernández, J; Ferrer, A; Ferro, F; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Gandelman, M; García, C; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Guy, J; Haag, C; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hamilton, K; Haug, S; Hauler, F; Hedberg, V; Hennecke, M; Herr, H; Hoffman, J; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Houlden, M A; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jeans, D; Johansson, E K; Johansson, P D; Jonsson, P; Joram, C; Jungermann, L; Kapusta, F; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Kernel, G; Kersevan, Borut P; Kerzel, U; Kiiskinen, A P; King, B T; Kjaer, N J; Kluit, P; Kokkinias, P; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krumshtein, Z; Kucharczyk, M; Lamsa, J; Leder, G; Ledroit, F; Leinonen, L; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liebig, W; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lopes, J H; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J; Malek, A; Maltezos, S; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Masik, J; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McNulty, R; Meroni, C; Meyer, W T; Migliore, E; Mitaroff, W A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Mönig, K; Monge, R; Montenegro, J; Moraes, D; Moreno, S; Morettini, P; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L M; Murray, W; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Myklebust, T; Nassiakou, M; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Nawrocki, K; Nicolaidou, R; Nikolenko, M; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Oyanguren, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Palacios, J P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Peralta, L; Perepelitsa, V F; Perrotta, A; Petrolini, A; Piedra, J; Pieri, L; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Poireau, V; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Rames, J; Ramler, L; Read, A; Rebecchi, P; Rehn, J; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rivero, M; Rodríguez, D; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Rosenberg, E I; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ryabtchikov, D; Sadovskii, A; Salmi, L; Salt, J; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schwickerath, U; Segar, A; Sekulin, R L; Siebel, M; Sissakian, A N; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O G; Sokolov, A; Sopczak, A; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Stanitzki, M; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Szumlak, T; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Taffard, A C; Tegenfeldt, F; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Tobin, M; Todorovova, S; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortosa, P; Travnicek, P; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyapkin, P; Tzamarias, S; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; van Dam, P; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Van Remortel, N; Van Vulpen, I B; Vegni, G; Veloso, F; Venus, W A; Verdier, P; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Washbrook, A J; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wilkinson, G; Winter, M; Witek, M; Yushchenko, O P; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, P; Zavrtanik, D; Zhuravlov, V; Zimin, N I; Zinchenko, A I; Zupan, M

    2003-01-01

    The production fractions of charged and neutral b-hadrons in b-quark events from Z0 decays have been measured with the DELPHI detector at LEP. An algorithm has been developed, based on a neural network, to estimate the charge of the weakly-decaying b-hadron by distinguishing its decay products from particles produced at the primary vertex. From the data taken in the years 1994 and 1995, the fraction of bbar-quarks fragmenting into positively charged weakly-decaying b-hadrons has been measured to be: f^+ = (42.09 +/- 0.82 (stat.) +/- 0.89 (syst.))%. Subtracting the rates for charged Xibar_b^+ and Omegabar_b^+ baryons gives the production fraction of B^+ mesons: f_Bu = (40.99 +/- 0.82 (stat.) +/- 1.11 (syst.))%.

  5. Calculations of current densities for neutral and doubly charged persubstituted benzenes using effective core potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauhalahti, Markus; Taubert, Stefan; Sundholm, Dage; Liégeois, Vincent

    2017-03-08

    Magnetically induced current density susceptibilities and ring-current strengths have been calculated for neutral and doubly charged persubstituted benzenes C6X6 and C6X6(2+) with X = F, Cl, Br, I, At, SeH, SeMe, TeH, TeMe, and SbH2. The current densities have been calculated using the gauge-including magnetically induced current (GIMIC) method, which has been interfaced to the Gaussian electronic structure code rendering current density calculations using effective core potentials (ECP) feasible. Relativistic effects on the ring-current strengths have been assessed by employing ECP calculations of the current densities. Comparison of the ring-current strengths obtained in calculations on C6At6 and C6At6(2+) using relativistic and non-relativistic ECPs show that scalar relativistic effects have only a small influence on the ring-current strengths. Comparisons of the ring-current strengths and ring-current profiles show that the C6I6(2+), C6At6(2+), C6(SeH)6(2+), C6(SeMe)6(2+), C6(TeH)6(2+), C6(TeMe)6(2+), and C6(SbH2)6(2+) dications are doubly aromatic sustaining spatially separated ring currents in the carbon ring and in the exterior of the molecule. The C6I6(+) radical cation is also found to be doubly aromatic with a weaker ring current than obtained for the dication.

  6. Moving from Classical Ru-NHC to Neutral or Charged Rh-NHC Based Catalysts in Olefin Metathesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Poater

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the versatility of oxidation states of rhodium together with the successful background of ruthenium-N-heterocyclic carbene based catalysts in olefin metathesis, it is envisaged the exchange of the ruthenium of the latter catalysts by rhodium, bearing an open-shell neutral rhodium center, or a +1 charged one. In the framework of in silico experiments, density functional theory (DFT calculations have been used to plot the first catalytic cycle that as a first step includes the release of the phosphine. DFT is, in this case, the tool that allows the discovery of the less endergonic reaction profile from the precatalytic species for the neutral catalyst with respect to the corresponding ruthenium one; increasing the endergonic character when dealing with the charged system.

  7. Moving from Classical Ru-NHC to Neutral or Charged Rh-NHC Based Catalysts in Olefin Metathesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poater, Albert

    2016-01-30

    Considering the versatility of oxidation states of rhodium together with the successful background of ruthenium-N-heterocyclic carbene based catalysts in olefin metathesis, it is envisaged the exchange of the ruthenium of the latter catalysts by rhodium, bearing an open-shell neutral rhodium center, or a +1 charged one. In the framework of in silico experiments, density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been used to plot the first catalytic cycle that as a first step includes the release of the phosphine. DFT is, in this case, the tool that allows the discovery of the less endergonic reaction profile from the precatalytic species for the neutral catalyst with respect to the corresponding ruthenium one; increasing the endergonic character when dealing with the charged system.

  8. Charge-exchange Coupling between Pickup Ions across the Heliopause and its Effect on Energetic Neutral Hydrogen Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirnstein, E. J.; Heerikhuisen, J.; Zank, G. P.; Pogorelov, N. V.; McComas, D. J.; Desai, M. I.

    2014-03-01

    Pickup ions (PUIs) appear to play an integral role in the multi-component nature of the plasma in the interaction between the solar wind (SW) and local interstellar medium (LISM). Three-dimensional (3D) MHD simulations with a kinetic treatment for neutrals and PUIs are currently still not viable. In light of recent energetic neutral atom (ENA) observations by the Interstellar Boundary EXplorer, the purpose of this paper is to illustrate the complex coupling between PUIs across the heliopause (HP) as facilitated by ENAs using estimates of PUI properties extracted from a 3D MHD simulation of the SW-LISM interaction with kinetic neutrals. First, we improve upon the multi-component treatment of the inner heliosheath (IHS) plasma from Zank et al. by including the extinction of PUIs through charge-exchange. We find a significant amount of energy is transferred away from hot, termination shock-processed PUIs into a colder, "freshly injected" PUI population. Second, we extend the multi-component approach to estimate ENA flux from the outer heliosheath (OHS), formed from charge-exchange between interstellar hydrogen atoms and energetic PUIs. These PUIs are formed from ENAs in the IHS that crossed the HP and experienced charge-exchange. Our estimates, based on plasma-neutral simulations of the SW-LISM interaction and a post-processing analysis of ENAs and PUIs, suggest the majority of flux visible at 1 AU from the front of the heliosphere, between ~0.02 and 10 keV, originates from OHS PUIs, indicating strong coupling between the IHS and OHS plasmas through charge-exchange.

  9. Controllability of neutral impulsive stochastic quasilinear integrodifferential systems with nonlocal conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnan Balachandran

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We establish sufficient conditions for controllability of neutral impulsive stochastic quasilinear integrodifferential systems with nonlocal conditions in Hilbert spaces. The results are obtained by using semigroup theory, evolution operator and a fixed point technique. An example is provided to illustrate the obtained results.

  10. Measurement of Neutral and Charged Current Cross Sections in Electron-Proton Collisions at High $Q^{2}$

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C; Andrieu, B; Anthonis, T; Arkadov, V; Astvatsaturov, A R; Ayyaz, I; Babaev, A; Bähr, J; Baranov, P S; Barrelet, E; Bartel, Wulfrin; Bassler, U; Bate, P; Beglarian, A; Behnke, O; Beier, C; Belousov, A; Benisch, T; Berger, C; Bernardi, G; Berndt, T; Bizot, J C; Boudry, V; Braunschweig, W; Brisson, V; Broker, B; Brown, D P; Brückner, W; Bruel, P; Bruncko, Dusan; Bürger, J; Büsser, F W; Bunyatyan, A; Burkhardt, H; Burrage, A; Buschhorn, G W; Campbell, A J; Cao, J; Carli, T; Caron, S; Chabert, E; Clarke, D; Clerbaux, B; Collard, Caroline; Contreras, J G; Coppens, Y R; Coughlan, J A; Cousinou, M C; Cox, B E; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Dau, W D; Daum, K; Davidsson, M; Delcourt, B; Delerue, N; Demirchyan, R A; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C A; Dixon, P; Dodonov, V; Dowell, John D; Droutskoi, A; Dubak, A; Duprel, C; Eckerlin, G; Eckstein, D; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eichler, R; Eisele, Franz; Eisenhandler, Eric F; Ellerbrock, M; Elsen, E E; Erdmann, M; Erdmann, W; Faulkner, P J W; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Ferencei, J; Ferron, S; Fleischer, M; Fleming, Y H; Flügge, G; Fomenko, A; Foresti, I; Formánek, J; Foster, J M; Franke, G; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gabathuler, K; Garvey, J; Gassner, J; Gayler, J; Gerhards, R; Kazarian, S; Görlich, L; Gogitidze, N; Goldberg, M; Goodwin, C; Grab, C; Grässler, Herbert; Greenshaw, T; Grindhammer, G; Hadig, T; Haidt, Dieter; Hajduk, L; Haynes, W J; Heinemann, B; Heinzelmann, G; Henderson, R C W; Hengstmann, S; Henschel, H; Heremans, R; Herrera-Corral, G; Herynek, I; Hildebrandt, M; Hilgers, M; Hiller, K H; Hladky, J; Hoting, P; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R P; Hurling, S; Ibbotson, M; Issever, C; Jacquet, M; Jaffré, M; Janauschek, L; Jansen, D M; Janssen, X; Jemanov, V; Jönsson, L B; Johnson, D P; Jones, M A S; Jung, H; Kastli, H K; Kant, D; Kapichine, M; Karlsson, M; Karschnick, O; Keil, F; Keller, N; Kennedy, J; Kenyon, Ian Richard; Kermiche, S; Kiesling, C; Kjellberg, P; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Knies, G; Koblitz, B; Kolya, S D; Korbel, V; Kostka, P; Kotelnikov, S K; Koutouev, R; Koutov, A; Krasny, M W; Krehbiel, H; Kroseberg, J; Krüger, K; Küpper, A; Kuhr, T; Kurca, T; Lahmann, R; Lamb, D; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastoviicka, T; Laycock, P; Lebailly, E; Lebedev, A; Leiner, B; Lemrani, R; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Lindstrøm, M; List, B; Lobodzinska, E; Lobodzinski, B; Loginov, A; Loktionova, N A; Lubimov, V; Lüders, S; Lüke, D; Lytkin, L K; Magnussen, N; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Malden, N; Malinovskii, E I; Maracek, R; Marage, P; Marks, J; Marshall, R; Martyn, U; Martyniak, J; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Merkel, P; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Meyer, P O; Mikocki, S; Milstead, D; Mkrtchyan, T; Mohr, R F; Mohrdieck, S; Mondragón, M N; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Müller, K; Murn, P; Nagovizin, V; Naroska, Beate; Naumann, J; Naumann, T; Nellen, G; Newman, P R; Nicholls, T C; Niebergall, F; Niebuhr, C B; Nix, O; Nowak, G; Nunnemann, T; Olsson, J E; Ozerov, D; Panassik, V; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Pérez, E; Phillips, J P; Pitzl, D; Pöschl, R; Potachnikova, I; Povh, B; Rabbertz, K; Rädel, G; Rauschenberger, J; Reimer, P; Reisert, B; Reyna, D; Riess, S; Risler, C; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A A; Royon, C; Rusakov, S V; Rybicki, K; Sankey, D P C; Scheins, J; Schilling, F P; Schleper, P; Schmidt, D; Schmitt, S; Schoeffel, L; Schöning, A; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, V; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Schwanenberger, C; Sedlak, K; Sefkow, F; Shekelian, V I; Shevyakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Sievers, P; Sirois, Y; Sloan, Terence; Smirnov, P; Solochenko, V; Soloviev, Yu V; Spaskov, V N; Specka, A E; Spitzer, H; Stamen, R; Steinhart, J; Stella, B; Stellberger, A; Stiewe, J; Straumann, U; Struczinski, W; Swart, M; Tasevsky, M; Chernyshov, V; Chechelnitskii, S; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Tobien, N; Traynor, D; Truöl, P; Tsipolitis, G; Tsurin, I; Turnau, J; Turney, J E; Tzamariudaki, E; Udluft, S; Usik, A; Valkár, S; Valkárová, A; Vallée, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vasilev, S; Vazdik, Ya A; Vichnevski, A; Wacker, K; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Waugh, B; Weber, G; Weber, M; Wegener, D; Werner, M; White, G; Wiesand, S; Wilksen, T; Winde, M; Winter, G G; Wissing, C; Wobisch, M; Wollatz, H; Wünsch, E; Wyatt, A C; Zaicek, J; Zaleisak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhokin, A S; Zomer, F; Zsembery, J; Zur Nedden, M

    2001-01-01

    The inclusive e^-p single and double differential cross sections for neutral and charged current processes are measured with the H1 detector at HERA, in the range of four-momentum transfer squared Q^2 between 150 and 30000 GeV^2, and Bjorken x between 0.002 and 0.65. The data were taken in 1998 and 1999 with a centre-of-mass energy of 320 GeV and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 16.4 pb^(-1). The data are compared with recent measurements of the inclusive neutral and charged current e^+p cross sections. For Q^2>1000 GeV^2 clear evidence is observed for an asymmetry between e^+p and e^-p neutral current scattering and the generalised structure function xF_3 is extracted for the first time at HERA. A fit to the charged current data is used to extract a value for the W boson propagator mass. The data are found to be in good agreement with Standard Model predictions.

  11. Spin dynamics and magneto-optical response in charge-neutral tunnel-coupled quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawełczyk, Michał; Machnikowski, Paweł

    2017-04-01

    We model the electron and hole spin dynamics in an undoped double quantum dot structure, considering the carrier tunneling between quantum dots. Taking the presence of an additional in-plane or tilted magnetic field into account, we enable the simulation of magneto-optical experiments, like the time-resolved Kerr rotation measurement, which are currently performed on such structures to probe the temporal spin dynamics. With our model, we reproduce the experimentally observed effect of the extension of the spin polarization lifetime caused by spatial charge separation, which may occur in structures of this type. Moreover, we provide a number of qualitative predictions concerning the necessary conditions for observation of this effect as well as about possible channels of its suppression, including the spin–orbit coupling, which leads to tunneling of carriers accompanied by a spin flip. We also consider the impact of the magnetic field tilting, which results in an interesting spin polarization dynamics.

  12. Energetic neutral atoms emitted from ice by ion bombardment under Ganymede surface conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieser, Martin; Barabash, Stas; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Wurz, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Magnetospheric or solar wind ions directly interacting with a planetary surface result in backscattering or sputtering of energetic neutral atoms. One example is the solar wind interaction with the surface of the Moon, where the produced energetic neutral atoms were observed by the Sub-keV Atom Reflecting Analyzer instrument (SARA) on Chandrayaan-1. At Jupiter, magnetospheric plasma interacts in a similar way with the surface of the Galilean moons. However, the emission of energetic neutral atoms from "dirty" ices as found e.g. on Ganymede's surface is poorly understood. We set up an experiment to study the ion to surface interaction under Ganymede surface environment conditions using the unique capabilities of the MEFISTO test facility at University of Bern. Ions of various species and energies up to 33 keV/q were impacted on a block of ice made from a mixture of water, NaCl and dry ice. The energetic neutral atoms produced by the interaction were detected with the prototype of the Jovian Neutrals Analyzer instrument (JNA.) JNA is proposed as part of the Particle Environment Package (PEP) for ESA's JUICE mission to Jupiter and instrument is based on the Energetic Energetic Neutral Atom instrument (ENA) built for the BepiColombo Magnetospheric Orbiter. We present energy spectra for different ion beam species and energetic neutral atom species combinations. The data show high yields for energetic neutral atoms up to the upper end of the instrument energy range of 3.3 keV. The energy spectra of the neutral atom flux emitted from the ice could only partially be fitted by the Sigmund-Thompson formula. In some cases, but not all, a Maxwellian distribution provides a reasonable description of the data.

  13. Energy Recovery from a Space-Charge Neutralized Positive Ion Beam by Means of Magnetic Electron Suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Philip Michael

    The charge-exchange neutralization efficiency of positive ion based neutral beams used in plasma heating applications decreases as the beam energy increases. Direct energy recovery from the charged particles can be accomplished by electrostatically decelerating the positive ions; the problem is to effect this without accelerating the space -charge neutralizing electrons residing in the beam. Prior work with both electrostatic and magnetic electron suppression is reviewed. A finite difference ion optics code which solves the nonlinear Vlasov-Poisson equation is adapted to energy recovery application and used to analyze the transverse magnetic field electron suppression experiments carried out at Oak Ridge National Laboratory between 1980 and 1982. Three numerical models are discussed and evaluated. The double plasma model, which assumes an equilibrium Boltzmann distribution of electrons at both the neutralizer potential and the ion collector potential, most successfully duplicates the experimental results with beams in the 40 keV, 10 A range. It is used to analyze the effects of the magnetic field strength, the ion "boost" energy, and the ion beam current density on the ion collection efficiency. Conclusions of the study are: (1) the electron leakage current scales as B('-1), necessitating magnetic suppression fields in excess of 0.1 tesla; (2) the neutralizer geometry should provide an electrostatic field to counteract the magnetic force on the ions; (3) fractional energy beam ions should be confined to the neutralizer interior; (4) the neutral line density in the recovery region should be less than 3 x 10('-3) torr(.)cm. Recovery efficiency decreases with increasing beam current density; a net recovery efficiency of 30% (ion collection efficiency of 75%) at 5 mA/cm('2) falls to zero at 10 mA/cm('2) for a 40 keV beam. New designs are presented and analyzed: an ion collection efficiency of close to 90% is predicted for an 80 keV D ion beam with an ion current

  14. The pair production of Charged and Neutral Higgs bosons in W and Z gauge boson fusion process

    CERN Document Server

    Morozumi, Takuya

    2012-01-01

    We study the signatures of a two Higgs doublet model of Davidson and Logan. The model includes an extra Higgs doublet with the vacuum expectation value (VEV) much smaller than the one of the standard model like Higgs. The smaller VEV is related to the origin of the small neutrino mass in the two Higgs doublet model. In the model, a single non-standard model like Higgs production of weak gauge boson fusion is suppressed due to the smallness of the vacuum expectation value. In contrast to the single Higgs production, the cross section of the Higgs pair production due to gauge boson fusion is not suppressed. Using the model, we compute the charged Higgs and neutral Higgs pair production cross section in W Z annihilation channel. In the two Higgs doublet model, the charged Higgs H^+ decays into a pair of the charged anti-lepton and right-handed neutrino. The neutral Higgs boson decays into right-handed neutrino and left-handed anti-neutrino pair which is invisible. A single charged anti-lepton and three neutrinos...

  15. Design of asymmetric particles containing a charged interior and a neutral surface charge: comparative study on in vivo circulation of polyelectrolyte microgels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kai; Xu, Jing; Luft, J Christopher; Tian, Shaomin; Raval, Jay S; DeSimone, Joseph M

    2014-07-16

    Lowering the modulus of hydrogel particles could enable them to bypass in vivo physical barriers that would otherwise filter particles with similar size but higher modulus. Incorporation of electrolyte moieties into the polymer network of hydrogel particles to increase the swelling ratio is a straightforward and quite efficient way to decrease the modulus. In addition, charged groups in hydrogel particles can also help secure cargoes. However, the distribution of charged groups on the surface of a particle can accelerate the clearance of particles. Herein, we developed a method to synthesize highly swollen microgels of precise size with near-neutral surface charge while retaining interior charged groups. A strategy was employed to enable a particle to be highly cross-linked with very small mesh size, and subsequently PEGylated to quench the exterior amines only without affecting the internal amines. Acidic degradation of the cross-linker allows for swelling of the particles to microgels with a desired size and deformability. The microgels fabricated demonstrated extended circulation in vivo compared to their counterparts with a charged surface, and could potentially be utilized in in vivo applications including as oxygen carriers or nucleic acid scavengers.

  16. Wake meandering under non-neutral atmospheric stability conditions – theory and facts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Machefaux, Ewan; Chougule, Abhijit S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with modelling of wake dynamics under influence of atmospheric stability conditions different from neutral. In particular, it is investigated how the basic split in turbulent scales, on which the Dynamic Wake Meandering model is based, can be utilized to include atmospheric stabi...

  17. Enhanced Memory for both Threat and Neutral Information Under Conditions of Intergroup Threat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong eZhu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Few studies have examined the effect of intergroup threat on cognitive outcomes such as memory. Different theoretical perspectives can inform how intergroup threat should affect memory for threat-relevant and neutral information, such as the mood-congruency approach, Yerkes-Dodson law, Easterbrook’s theory, and also evolutionary perspectives. To test among these, we conducted two experiments to examine how exposure to intergroup threats affected memory compared to control conditions. In study 1, we manipulated symbolic threat and examined participants’ memory for threat and neutral words. In study 2, memory performance was assessed following the induction of realistic threat. Across the studies, in the control condition participants showed better memory for threat-related than neutral information. However, participants under threat remembered neutral information as well as threat-related information. In addition, participants in the threat condition remembered threat-related information as well as participants in the control condition. The findings are discussed in terms of automatic vigilance processes but also the effects of threat on arousal and its effect on information processing. This latter perspective, suggests paradoxically, that under some circumstances involving an outgroup threat, non-threatening information about outgroups can be extensively processed.

  18. Strong Enrichment of Aromatic Residues in Binding Sites from a Charge-neutralized Hyperthermostable Sso7d Scaffold Library*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Jonathan D.; Srinivas, Raja R.; Lobner, Elisabeth; Tisdale, Alison W.; Mehta, Naveen K.; Yang, Nicole J.; Tidor, Bruce; Wittrup, K. Dane

    2016-01-01

    The Sso7d protein from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus is an attractive binding scaffold because of its small size (7 kDa), high thermal stability (Tm of 98 °C), and absence of cysteines and glycosylation sites. However, as a DNA-binding protein, Sso7d is highly positively charged, introducing a strong specificity constraint for binding epitopes and leading to nonspecific interaction with mammalian cell membranes. In the present study, we report charge-neutralized variants of Sso7d that maintain high thermal stability. Yeast-displayed libraries that were based on this reduced charge Sso7d (rcSso7d) scaffold yielded binders with low nanomolar affinities against mouse serum albumin and several epitopes on human epidermal growth factor receptor. Importantly, starting from a charge-neutralized scaffold facilitated evolutionary adaptation of binders to differentially charged epitopes on mouse serum albumin and human epidermal growth factor receptor, respectively. Interestingly, the distribution of amino acids in the small and rigid binding surface of enriched rcSso7d-based binders is very different from that generally found in more flexible antibody complementarity-determining region loops but resembles the composition of antibody-binding energetic hot spots. Particularly striking was a strong enrichment of the aromatic residues Trp, Tyr, and Phe in rcSso7d-based binders. This suggests that the rigidity and small size of this scaffold determines the unusual amino acid composition of its binding sites, mimicking the energetic core of antibody paratopes. Despite the high frequency of aromatic residues, these rcSso7d-based binders are highly expressed, thermostable, and monomeric, suggesting that the hyperstability of the starting scaffold and the rigidness of the binding surface confer a high tolerance to mutation. PMID:27582495

  19. Neutral molecular cluster formation of sulfuric acid–dimethylamine observed in real time under atmospheric conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Kürten, Andreas; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Sarnela, Nina; Junninen, Heikki; Adamov, Alexey; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Hutterli, Manuel; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kirkby, Jasper; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Seinfeld, John H; Steiner, Gerhard; Tomé, António; Tröstl, Jasmin; Winkler, Paul M; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R; Curtius, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    For atmospheric sulfuric acid (SA) concentrations the presence of dimethylamine (DMA) at mixing ratios of several parts per trillion by volume can explain observed boundary layer new particle formation rates. However, the concentration and molecular composition of the neutral (uncharged) clusters have not been reported so far due to the lack of suitable instrumentation. Here we report on experiments from the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research revealing the formation of neutral particles containing up to 14 SA and 16 DMA molecules, corresponding to a mobility diameter of about 2 nm, under atmospherically relevant conditions. These measurements bridge the gap between the molecular and particle perspectives of nucleation, revealing the fundamental processes involved in particle formation and growth. The neutral clusters are found to form at or close to the kinetic limit where particle formation is limited only by the collision rate of SA molecules. Even tho...

  20. Micro-structured PDMS piezoelectric enhancement through charging conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachroudi, Achraf; Basrour, Skandar; Rufer, Libor; Sylvestre, Alain; Jomni, Fathi

    2016-10-01

    Micro-structured cellular polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) materials were prepared by a low-cost molding process allowing us to control geometry and sample size. Cellular structures are charged with a triangular quasi-static voltage with amplitudes between 1 kV and 4 kV and a frequency of 0.5 Hz fixed after having evaluated the conditions enhancing the piezoelectric response of the cellular PDMS. The piezo-electret PDMS material charged at room temperature has a piezoelectric coefficient d 33 of 350 pC/N, which is ten times larger than that of polyvinylidene fluoride. The high piezoelectric coefficient with a very low elastic modulus of 300 kPa makes these materials very useful for wearable device applications. The piezoelectric coefficient d 33 of the samples poled at high temperatures improves thermal stability but reduces PDMS piezo-electret piezoelectricity, which is explained by the structure’s stiffness. These results are useful and allow us to set the conditions for the preparation of the piezo-electret materials according to desired applications.

  1. Charged and neutral minimal supersymmetric standard model Higgs boson decays and measurement of tan at the compact linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E Coniavitis; A Ferrari

    2007-11-01

    The minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model (MSSM) predicts the existence of new charged and neutral Higgs bosons. The pair creation of these new particles at the multi-TeV + − compact linear collider (CLIC), followed by decays into standard model particles, were simulated along with the corresponding background. High-energy beam–beam effects such as ISR, beamstrahlung and hadronic background were included. We have investigated the possibility of using the ratio between the number of events found in various decay channels to determine the MSSM parameter tan and we have derived the corresponding statistical error from the uncertainties on the measured cross-sections and Higgs boson masses.

  2. Photogeneration Action Spectroscopy of Neutral and Charged Excitations in Films of a Ladder-Type Poly(Para-Phenylene)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlgenannt, M.; Graupner, W.; Leising, G.; Vardeny, Z. V.

    1999-04-01

    The photogeneration quantum efficiency action spectra of long-lived neutral and charged excitations in films of a ladder-type poly(para-phenylene) were measured. We found that both triplet and polaron action spectra show, in addition to a step function increase at the optical gap, a monotonic rise at higher energies. For triplets this rise is explained by singlet exciton fission into triplet pairs from which the triplet exciton energy in the gap was obtained; this energy was also confirmed by measuring the weak phosphorescence band. For polarons the photogeneration increase at high energies is modeled by a novel hot electron interchain tunneling process.

  3. On the charge neutrality level and the electronic properties of interphase boundaries in the layered ε-GaSe semiconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brudnyi, V. N., E-mail: brudnyi@mail.tsu.ru; Sarkisov, S. Yu. [Tomsk State University (Russian Federation); Kosobutsky, A. V. [Kemerovo State University (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    The height of the (Au, Pd, Pt, Cu, Ag, Sn, In, Al, Mg, Ca, Li, Cs)/GaSe(0001) Schottky barrier as a function of the metal work function and the energy-band offsets in InSe(0001)/GaSe(0001) and GaSe(0001)/Si(111) heteropairs are analyzed within the context of the concept of the charge neutrality level, CNL{sub vb}(GaSe) = E{sub v} + 0.83 eV, with consideration for partial screening of the interface electrostatic dipole by metal- or semiconductor-induced tunneling states at the GaSe(0001) surface.

  4. Streptococcus oligofermentans Inhibits Streptococcus mutans in Biofilms at Both Neutral pH and Cariogenic Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xudong Bao

    Full Text Available Homeostasis of oral microbiota can be maintained through microbial interactions. Previous studies showed that Streptococcus oligofermentans, a non-mutans streptococci frequently isolated from caries-free subjects, inhibited the cariogenic Streptococcus mutans by the production of hydrogen peroxide (HP. Since pH is a critical factor in caries formation, we aimed to study the influence of pH on the competition between S. oligofermentans and S. mutans in biofilms. To this end, S. mutans and S. oligofermentans were inoculated alone or mixed at 1:1 ratio in buffered biofilm medium in a 96-well active attachment model. The single- and dual-species biofilms were grown under either constantly neutral pH or pH-cycling conditions. The latter includes two cycles of 8 h neutral pH and 16 h pH 5.5, used to mimic cariogenic condition. The 48 h biofilms were analysed for the viable cell counts, lactate and HP production. The last two measurements were carried out after incubating the 48 h biofilms in buffers supplemented with 1% glucose (pH 7.0 for 4 h. The results showed that S. oligofermentans inhibited the growth of S. mutans in dual-species biofilms under both tested pH conditions. The lactic acid production of dual-species biofilms was significantly lower than that of single-species S. mutans biofilms. Moreover, dual-species and single-species S. oligofermentans biofilms grown under pH-cycling conditions (with a 16 h low pH period produced a significantly higher amount of HP than those grown under constantly neutral pH. In conclusion, S. oligofermentans inhibited S. mutans in biofilms not only under neutral pH, but also under pH-cycling conditions, likely through HP production. S. oligofermentans may be a compelling probiotic candidate against caries.

  5. Search for neutral and charged Higgs bosons in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}= 161 GeV$ and $172 GeV$

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Adzic, P; Ajinenko, I; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andersson, P; Andreazza, A; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barbi, M S; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bizouard, M A; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borgland, A W; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chen, M; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Chudoba, J; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Colomer, M; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Cowell, J H; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Damgaard, G; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Diodato, A; Djannati, A; Dolbeau, J; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Durand, J D; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Fenyuk, A; Ferrari, P; Ferrer, A; Fichet, S; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gerdyukov, L N; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gonçalves, P; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Green, C; Grefrath, A; Gris, P; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Heuser, J M; Higón, E; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Karvelas, E; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khokhlov, Yu A; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klapp, O; Klein, H; Kluit, P M; Knoblauch, D; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Korcyl, K; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leisos, A; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Lethuillier, M; Libby, J; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; Naughton, J M; Maehlum, G; Mahon, J R; Maio, A; Malmgren, T G M; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Masik, J; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; McPherson, G; Medbo, J; Meroni, C; Meyer, S; Meyer, W T; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Myklebust, T; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Nikolenko, M; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Nygren, A; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Orazi, G; Ortuno, S; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Pain, R; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Røhne, O M; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rosinsky, P; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rybicki, K; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sannino, M; Schneider, H; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Serbelloni, L; Shellard, R C; Sheridan, A; Siegrist, P; Silvestre, R; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sokolov, A; Solovyanov, O; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stampfer, D; Stanescu, C; Stanic, S; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stevenson, K; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Chernyaev, E; Chikilev, O G; Tegenfeldt, F; Terranova, F; Thomas, J; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Todorova, S; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Waldner, F; Weiser, C; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Wlodek, T; Yi, J; Yip, K; Yushchenko, O P; Zach, F; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1998-01-01

    A search for neutral and charged Higgs bosons has been performed in the data collected by the {\\sc DELPHI} detector at centre-of-mass energies of 161~GeV and 172~GeV. The analysis assumes either the pair-production of charged Higgs bosons, ${\\mathrm H}^{\\pm}$, or the production of the lightest neutral Higgs boson, h, with either a Z or a neutral pseudoscalar Higgs boson, A. All final state topologies expected from the decay of h and A %neutral Higgs particles into hadrons or a pair of $\\tau$ leptons, and from the decay of ${\\mathrm H}^{\\pm}$ %charged Higgs bosons into a pair of quarks or a $\\tau \

  6. Asymptotic conditions of motion for radiating charged particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James L.

    1997-10-01

    Approximate asymptotic conditions on the motion of compact, electrically charged particles are derived within the framework of general relativity using the Einstein-Infeld-Hoffmann (EIH) surface integral method. While superficially similar to the Abraham-Lorentz and Lorentz-Dirac equations, these conditions differ from them in several fundamental ways. They are not equations of motion in the usual sense but rather a set of conditions which these motions must obey asymptotically in the future of an initial starting time. And furthermore, they do not admit the runaway solutions of these other equations. As in the original EIH work, they are integrability conditions gotten from integrating the empty-space (i.e., sourceless) Einstein-Maxwell equations of general relativity over closed two-surfaces surrounding the sources of the fields appearing in these equations. No additional ad hoc assumptions, such as the form of a force law or the introduction of inertial reaction terms, are required for this purpose, nor is there a need for any infinite mass renormalizations such as are required in other derivations since all integrals are over surfaces and thus finite. In addition to being asymptotic, the conditions of motion derived here are also approximate and apply, as do the original EIH equations, only to slowly moving systems. A ``slowness'' parameter ɛ is identified as the ratio of the light travel time across the system divided by a characteristic time, e.g., a period. Use is made of both the method of matched asymptotic expansions and the method of multiple time scales to obtain an asymptotic expansion in ɛ and the expansion is carried to sufficiently high order ɛ7 to obtain the lowest-order radiation reaction terms. The resulting conditions of motion are shown to not allow runaway motions.

  7. Associated Production of the Charged and Neutral Higgs Bosons at the ILC within the Higgs Triplet Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan-Ju; Cao, Jun; Zhang, Wen-Qing

    2016-09-01

    The Higgs Triplet Model (HTM) predicts the existences of the extra neutral scalars H i ( H i = H, A) and the charged Higgs bosons ( H ± and H ±±). In this work, we make a systematic investigation for the associated production of the singly-charged and neutral Higgs bosons via the processes: e+e-→ H+W-H and e+e-→ H+W-A. From the numerical evaluations for the production cross sections and relevant phenomenological analysis we find that (i) the production rates of these processes can reach the level of several fb with reasonable parameter values; (ii) due to the large production rates and small backgrounds, the signals of these scalars might be detected via these processes at the future ILC experiments; and (iii) for the case of m_{Hi}> m_{H^{± }}> m_{H^{± ± }}, the cascade decay modes Hito H^{± }W^{∓ ast } with H^{± }to H^{± ± }W^{∓ ast } would lead to production of H ++ H - accompanied by several virtual W bosons. Such characteristic feature can help us to distinguish the HTM from the Two-Higgs-Doublet Model (2HDM) and the Minimal Supersymmetric Model (MSSM).

  8. Comparison of chiral separation of basic drugs in capillary electrophoresis and liquid chromatography using neutral and negatively charged cyclodextrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwaterczak, Arkadiusz; Duszczyk, Kazimiera; Bielejewska, Anna

    2009-07-10

    Liquid chromatography (LC) and capillary electrophoresis (CE) are very widely used as chiral separation methods. In this publication we try to find if the results obtained in CE and LC with the chiral selector added to the electrolyte and the mobile phase, respectively, can be used as tools for studying weak stereoselective interactions, and how this information can be useful for optimizing chiral separation processes. The manuscript presents a systematic comparison of chiral discrimination of model compounds in HPLC and CE using neutral and negatively charged cyclodextrins. The enantiomeric separation of basic chiral pharmaceuticals such as pheniramine, brompheniramine, metoxyphenamine, cyclopentolate, doxylamine and ketamine was investigated in capillary electrophoresis (CE) and liquid chromatography (HPLC) using negatively charged sulfated-beta-cyclodextrin (S-beta-CD) and neutral cyclodextrins (CDs). The apparent stability constants between the model compounds and cyclodextrins were estimated in both techniques. We discuss the influence of the stability constant and K1/K2 ratio of the investigated complexes on chiral separation obtained in both techniques.

  9. Design of a Fast Neutral He Beam System for Feasibility Study of Charge-Exchange Alpha-Particle Diagnostics in a Thermonuclear Fusion Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Shinto, Katsuhiro; Kitajima, Sumio; Kiyama, Satoru; Nishiura, Masaki; Sasao, Mamiko; Sugawara, Hiroshi; Takenaga, Mahoko; Takeuchi, Shu; Wada, Motoi

    2005-01-01

    For alpha-particle diagnostics in a thermonuclear fusion reactor, neutralization using a fast (~2 MeV) neutral He beam produced by the spontaneous electron detachment of a He- is considered most promising. However, the beam transport of produced fast neutral He has not been studied, because of difficulty for producing high-brightness He- beam. Double-charge-exchange He- sources and simple beam transport systems were developed and their results were reported in the PAC99* and other papers.** To accelerate an intense He- beam and verify the production of the fast neutral He beam, a new test stand has been designed. It consists of a multi-cusp He+

  10. Charged-to-neutral correlation at forward rapidity in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$=200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abdelwahab, N M; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Leyva, A Davila; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; de Souza, R Derradi; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kosarzewski, L K; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Page, B S; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandacz, A; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Simko, M; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen,, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-01-01

    Event-by-event fluctuations of the ratio of inclusive charged to photon multiplicities at forward rapidity in Au+Au collision at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$=200 GeV have been studied. Dominant contribution to such fluctuations is expected to come from correlated production of charged and neutral pions. We search for evidences of dynamical fluctuations of different physical origins. Observables constructed out of moments of multiplicities are used as measures of fluctuations. Mixed events and model calculations are used as baselines. Results are compared to the dynamical net-charge fluctuations measured in the same acceptance. A non-zero statistically significant signal of dynamical fluctuations is observed in excess to the model prediction when charged particles and photons are measured in the same acceptance. We find that, unlike dynamical net-charge fluctuation, charge-neutral fluctuation is not dominated by correlation due to particle decay. Results are compared to the expectations based on the generic production mech...

  11. Adsorption of charged and neutral polymer chains on silica surfaces: The role of electrostatics, volume exclusion, and hydrogen bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruijt, Evan; Biesheuvel, P. M.; de Vos, Wiebe M.

    2015-01-01

    We develop an off-lattice (continuum) model to describe the adsorption of neutral polymer chains and polyelectrolytes to surfaces. Our continuum description allows taking excluded volume interactions between polymer chains and ions directly into account. To implement those interactions, we use a modified hard-sphere equation of state, adapted for mixtures of connected beads. Our model is applicable to neutral, charged, and ionizable surfaces and polymer chains alike and accounts for polarizability effects of the adsorbed layer and chemical interactions between polymer chains and the surface. We compare our model predictions to data of a classical system for polymer adsorption: neutral poly(N -vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) on silica surfaces. The model shows that PVP adsorption on silica is driven by surface hydrogen bonding with an effective maximum binding energy of about 1.3 kBT per PVP segment at low p H . As the p H increases, the Si-OH groups become increasingly dissociated, leading to a lower capacity for H bonding and simultaneous counterion accumulation and volume exclusion close to the surface. Together these effects result in a characteristic adsorption isotherm, with the adsorbed amount dropping sharply at a critical p H . Using this model for adsorption data on silica surfaces cleaned by either a piranha solution or an O2 plasma, we find that the former have a significantly higher density of silanol groups.

  12. PIC code modeling of spacecraft charging potential during electron beam injection into a background of neutral gas and plasma, part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, J. K.; Lin, C. S.; Winglee, R. M.

    1989-01-01

    Injections of nonrelativistic electron beams from an isolated equipotential conductor into a uniform background of plasma and neutral gas were simulated using a 2-D electrostatic particle code. The ionization effects on spacecraft charging are examined by including interactions of electrons with neutral gas. The simulations show that the conductor charging potential decreases with increasing neutral background density due to the production of secondary electrons near the conductor surface. In the spacecraft wake, the background electrons accelerated towards the charged spacecraft produce an enhancement of secondary electrons and ions. Simulations run for longer times indicate that the spacecraft potential is further reduced and short wavelength beam-plasma oscillations appear. The results are applied to explain the spacecraft charging potential measured during the SEPAC experiments from Spacelab 1.

  13. Abnormal Noise Source Identification and Control for Automobile Transmission in the Neutral Idle Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongxiang Li

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at the abnormal noise of a domestically-made automobile transmission in the neutral idle condition, seriously affecting the vehicle market competitiveness and the riding comfort ability for customers, the objective of this study to reduce the noise and vibration of the automobile transmission by accurately identifying the noise source of the transmission in the neutral idle condition. For this purpose, based on the working characteristics of the transmission, modal analysis of automobile transmission housing is formulated using 3D graphics software Pro/E together with Finite Element Method. In addition, the calculation of meshing frequency of gear pair is conducted also. Finally, through comparing model analysis results to the calculation results, it is indicated that the gear meshing impact noise of the third gear pair was identified as the noise resource of the automobile transmission in neutral idle condition, which will provide the theoretic basis to analyze its dynamic characteristics of the transmission as well as its improvement to reduce vibration and noise.

  14. Photogeneration and recombination processes of neutral and charged excitations in films of a ladder-type poly(para-phenylene)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlgenannt, M.; Graupner, W.; Leising, G.; Vardeny, Z. V.

    1999-08-01

    We introduce a version of the cw photomodulation technique, measured far from the steady state, for obtaining the quantum efficiency, η, of long-lived photoexcitations in π-conjugated polymers. We apply this technique to films of a ladder-type poly(para-phenylene) [mLPPP] for studying the photogeneration action spectra, η(E), and recombination kinetics of photogenerated neutral and charged excitations such as singlet and triplet excitons and charged polarons. Whereas the η(E) spectrum for singlet excitons shows a step function increase at a photon energy, E, close to the optical gap (~=2.6 eV), both triplet and polaron η(E) spectra show, in addition, a monotonous rise at higher E. The rise for triplets is explained by singlet exciton fission into triplet pairs, and from a model fit we get the triplet exciton energy (~=1.6 eV). For polarons this rise is modeled by an electron intersegment tunneling process. The electroabsorption spectrum is also measured and analyzed in terms of Stark shift of the lowest lying exciton, 1Bu, and enhanced oscillator strength of the important mAg exciton. A consistent picture for the lowest excited state energy levels and optical transitions in the neutral (singlet and triplet) and charged manifolds is presented. From both the exciton binding energy of ~=0.6 eV and the singlet-triplet energy splitting of ~=1 eV, we conclude that the e-e interaction in mLPPP is relatively strong. Our results are in good agreement with recent ab initio band structure calculations for several π-conjugated polymers.

  15. Change of pH during excess sludge fermentation under alkaline, acidic and neutral conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yue; Peng, Yongzhen; Liu, Ye; Jin, Baodan; Wang, Bo; Wang, Shuying

    2014-12-01

    The change in pH during excess sludge (ES) fermentation of varying sludge concentrations was investigated in a series of reactors at alkaline, acidic, and neutral pHs. The results showed that the changes were significantly affected by fermentative conditions. Under different conditions, pH exhibited changing profiles. When ES was fermented under alkaline conditions, pH decreased in a range of (10±1). At the beginning of alkaline fermentation, pH dropped significantly, at intervals of 4h, 4h, and 5h with sludge concentrations of 8665.6mg/L, 6498.8mg/L, and 4332.5mg/L, then it would become moderate. However, under acidic conditions, pH increased from 4 to 5. Finally, under neutral conditions pH exhibited a decrease then an increase throughout entire fermentation process. Further study showed short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), ammonia nitrogen and cations contributed to pH change under various fermentation conditions. This study presents a novel strategy based on pH change to predict whether SCFAs reach their stable stage.

  16. Structural and physical properties of collagen extracted from moon jellyfish under neutral pH conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Ayako; Inaba, Satomi; Baba, Takayuki; Kihira, Koji; Fukada, Harumi; Oda, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    We extracted collagen from moon jellyfish under neutral pH conditions and analyzed its amino acid composition, secondary structure, and thermal stability. The content of hydroxyproline was 4.3%, which is lower than that of other collagens. Secondary structure analysis using circular dichroism (CD) showed a typical collagen helix. The thermal stability of this collagen at pH 3.0 was lower than those from fish scale and pig skin, which also correlates closely with jellyfish collagen having lower hydroxyproline content. Because the solubility of jellyfish collagen used in this study at neutral pH was quite high, it was possible to analyze its structural and physical properties under physiological conditions. Thermodynamic analysis using CD and differential scanning calorimetry showed that the thermal stability at pH 7.5 was higher than at pH 3.0, possibly due to electrostatic interactions. During the process of unfolding, fibrillation would occur only at neutral pH.

  17. Search for Mixing and Charge Parity Violation in Neutral Charm Mesons through Semileptonic $B$ Meson Decay

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Adam; Meadows, Brian

    We present the measurement of mixing and Charge Parity violation parameters in the $D^0$ meson system using the decay \\begin{align} \\overline{B}\\to \\mu^- D^{*+} X\\\\ D^{*+}\\to D^0 \\pi^+\\\\ D^0\\to K \\pi \\end{align} and charge conjugate decays using the full Run I dataset collected by the LHCb Collaboration at the LHC at CERN from 2011 to 2012. By fitting the time dependent ratio of ``Wrong Sign'' $D^0$ decays to ``Right Sign'' $D^0$ decays, we extract the parameters sensitive to mixing and charge parity violation. The resulting mixing fit yields \\begin{align} R_D &= (3.48 \\pm 0.11 \\pm 0.01)\\times10^{-3}\\\\ y' &= (4.60 \\pm 3.50 \\pm 0.18)\\times 10^{-3}\\\\ x'^2&= (0.28 \\pm 3.10 \\pm 0.11)\\times 10^{-4}. \\end{align} The results for the no Direct CP Violation fits are \\begin{align} R_D &= (3.48 \\pm 0.11 \\pm 0.01)\\times 10^{-3}\\\\ y'^+ &= (2.79 \\pm 3.99 \\pm 1.17)\\times 10^{-3}\\\\ x'^{2+}&= (1.94 \\pm 3.47 \\pm 0.98)\\times 10^{-4}\\\\ y...

  18. Critical point for the canted antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic phase transition at charge neutrality in bilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzini, S.; Cobaleda, C.; Piot, B. A.; Bellani, V.; Diez, E.

    2014-09-01

    We report on magnetotransport measurements up to 30 T performed on a bilayer graphene Hall bar, enclosed by two thin hexagonal boron nitride flakes. In the quantum Hall regime, our high-mobility sample exhibits an insulating state at the neutrality point which evolves into a metallic phase when a strong in-plane field is applied, as expected for a transition from a canted antiferromagnetic to a ferromagnetic spin-ordered phase. We individuate a temperature-independent crossing in the four-terminal resistance as a function of the total magnetic field, corresponding to the critical point of the transition. We show that the critical field scales linearly with the perpendicular component of the field, as expected from the underlying competition between the Zeeman energy and interaction-induced anisotropies. A clear scaling of the resistance is also found and a universal behavior is proposed in the vicinity of the transition.

  19. Recombination kinetics in a silicon solar cell at low concentration: electro-analytical characterization of space-charge and quasi-neutral regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Pankaj; Tripathi, Brijesh; Pandey, Kavita; Kumar, Manoj

    2014-08-01

    The present work reports a detailed electro-analytical framework for studying commercially available mono-crystalline silicon solar cells under varying illumination conditions to explore their application in the up-and-coming field of low concentration photovoltaics (LCPVs). The effect of low concentration illumination (>1-12 suns) on performance indicating parameters, i.e., short circuit current, open circuit voltage, fill factor, efficiency and ideality factor, was investigated using DC characterization. The same framework can be used for AC characterization in order to explore diffusion capacitance, transition capacitance, diffusion resistance and recombination kinetics under varying illumination. Recent developments in the impedance spectroscopy technique have broadened its horizon and have allowed its use in addressing unexplored material and performance aspects of mono-crystalline Si solar cells under non-equilibrium conditions. The obtained DC and AC experimental results are coupled with theoretical treatment to demonstrate the characteristic features of charge recombination in the space-charge region and the quasi-neutral region.

  20. Measurement of charged and neutral current e$^{-}$p deep inelastic scattering cross sections at high Q$^{2}$

    CERN Document Server

    Derrick, Malcolm; Magill, S; Mikunas, D; Musgrave, B; Repond, J; Stanek, R; Talaga, R L; Zhang, H; Ayad, R; Bari, G; Basile, M; Bellagamba, L; Boscherini, D; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bruni, P; Cara Romeo, G; Castellini, G; Chiarini, M; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Contin, A; Corradi, M; Gialas, I; Giusti, P; Iacobucci, G; Laurenti, G; Levi, G; Margotti, A; Massam, Thomas; Nania, R; Nemoz, C; Palmonari, F; Polini, A; Sartorelli, G; Timellini, R; Zamora-Garcia, Yu E; Zichichi, Antonino; Bargende, A; Crittenden, James Arthur; Desch, Klaus; Diekmann, B; Doeker, T; Eckert, M; Feld, L; Frey, A; Geerts, M; Geitz, G; Grothe, M; Haas, T; Hartmann, H; Haun, D; Heinloth, K; Hilger, E; Jakob, H P; Katz, U F; Mari, S M; Mass, A; Mengel, S; Mollen, J; Paul, E; Rembser, C; Schattevoy, R; Schramm, D; Stamm, J; Wedemeyer, R; Campbell-Robson, S; Cassidy, A; Dyce, N; Foster, B; George, S; Gilmore, R; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Llewellyn, T J; Morgado, C J S; Norman, D J P; O'Mara, J A; Tapper, R J; Wilson, S S; Yoshida, R; Rau, R R; Arneodo, M; Iannotti, L; Schioppa, M; Susinno, G; Bernstein, A M; Caldwell, A; Cartiglia, N; Parsons, J A; Ritz, S; Sciulli, F; Straub, P B; Wai, L; Yang, S; Zhu, Q; Borzemski, P; Chwastowski, J; Eskreys, Andrzej; Piotrzkowski, K; Zachara, M; Zawiejski, L; Adamczyk, L; Bednarek, B; Jelen, K; Kisielewska, D; Kowalski, T; Rulikowska-Zarebska, E; Suszycki, L; Zajac, J; Kotanski, Andrzej; Przybycien, M B; Bauerdick, L A T; Behrens, U; Beier, H; Bienlein, J K; Coldewey, C; Deppe, O; Desler, K; Drews, G; Flasinski, M; Gilkinson, D J; Glasman, C; Göttlicher, P; Grosse-Knetter, J; Gutjahr, B; Hain, W; Hasell, D; Hessling, H; Hultschig, H; Iga, Y; Joos, P; Kasemann, M; Klanner, Robert; Koch, W; Köpke, L; Kötz, U; Kowalski, H; Labs, J; Ladage, A; Löhr, B; Loewe, M; Lüke, D; Manczak, O; Ng, J S T; Nickel, S; Notz, D; Ohrenberg, K; Roco, M T; Rohde, M; Roldán, J; Schneekloth, U; Schulz, W; Selonke, F; Stiliaris, E; Surrow, B; Voss, T; Westphal, D; Wolf, G; Youngman, C; Zhou, J F; Grabosch, H J; Kharchilava, A I; Leich, A; Mattingly, M C K; Meyer, A; Schlenstedt, S; Wulff, N; Barbagli, G; Pelfer, P G; Anzivino, Giuseppina; Maccarrone, G D; De Pasquale, S; Votano, L; Bamberger, Andreas; Eisenhardt, S; Freidhof, A; Söldner-Rembold, S; Schröder, J; Trefzger, T M; Brook, N H; Bussey, Peter J; Doyle, A T; Fleck, I; Saxon, D H; Utley, M L; Wilson, A S; Dannemann, A; Holm, U; Horstmann, D; Neumann, T; Sinkus, R; Wick, K; Badura, E; Burow, B D; Hagge, L; Lohrmann, E; Mainusch, J; Milewski, J; Nakahata, M; Pavel, N; Poelz, G; Schott, W; Zetsche, F; Bacon, Trevor C; Butterworth, Ian; Gallo, E; Harris, V L; Hung, B Y H; Long, K R; Miller, D B; Morawitz, P P O; Prinias, A; Sedgbeer, J K; Whitfield, A F; Mallik, U; McCliment, E; Wang, M Z; Wang, S M; Wu, J T; Zhang, Y; Cloth, P; Filges, D; An Shiz Hong; Hong, S M; Nam, S W; Park, S K; Suh, M H; Yon, S H; Imlay, R; Kartik, S; Kim, H J; McNeil, R R; Metcalf, W; Nadendla, V K; Barreiro, F; Cases, G; Graciani, R; Hernández, J M; Hervás, L; Labarga, L; Del Peso, J; Puga, J; Terrón, J; De Trocóniz, J F; Smith, G R; Corriveau, F; Hanna, D S; Hartmann, J; Hung, L W; Lim, J N; Matthews, C G; Patel, P M; Sinclair, L E; Stairs, D G; Saint-Laurent, M G; Ullmann, R T; Zacek, G; Bashkirov, V; Dolgoshein, B A; Stifutkin, A; Bashindzhagian, G L; Ermolov, P F; Gladilin, L K; Golubkov, Yu A; Kobrin, V D; Kuzmin, V A; Proskuryakov, A S; Savin, A A; Shcheglova, L M; Solomin, A N; Zotov, N P; Botje, M; Chlebana, F S; Dake, A P; Engelen, J; De Kamps, M; Kooijman, P M; Kruse, A; Tiecke, H G; Verkerke, W; Vreeswijk, M; Wiggers, L; De Wolf, E; Van Woudenberg, R; Acosta, D; Bylsma, B G; Durkin, L S; Honscheid, K; Li Chuan; Ling, T Y; McLean, K W; Murray, W N; Park, I H; Romanowsky, T A; Seidlein, R; Bailey, D S; Blair, G A; Byrne, A; Cashmore, Roger J; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Daniels, D C; Devenish, R C E; Harnew, N; Lancaster, M; Luffman, P; Lindemann, L; McFall, J D; Nath, C; Noyes, V A; Quadt, A; Uijterwaal, H; Walczak, R; Wilson, F F; Yip, T; Abbiendi, G; Bertolin, A; Brugnera, R; Carlin, R; Dal Corso, F; De Giorgi, M; Dosselli, U; Limentani, S; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Stanco, L; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Bulmahn, J; Butterworth, J M; Feild, R G; Oh, B Y; Whitmore, J; D'Agostini, Giulio; Marini, G; Nigro, A; Tassi, E; Hart, J C; McCubbin, N A; Prytz, K; Shah, T P; Short, T L; Barberis, E; Dubbs, T; Heusch, C A; Van Hook, M; Hubbard, B; Lockman, W; Rahn, J T; Sadrozinski, H F W; Seiden, A; Biltzinger, J; Seifert, R J; Walenta, Albert H; Zech, G; Abramowicz, H; Briskin, G M; Dagan, S; Levy, A; Hasegawa, T; Hazumi, M; Ishii, T; Kuze, M; Mine, S; Nagasawa, Y; Nakao, M; Susuki, I; Tokushuku, K; Yamada, S; Yamazaki, Y; Chiba, M; Hamatsu, R; Hirose, T; Homma, K; Kitamura, S; Nakamitsu, Y; Yamauchi, K; Cirio, R; Costa, M; Ferrero, M I; Lamberti, L; Maselli, S; Peroni, C; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Staiano, A; Dardo, M; Bailey, D C; Bandyopadhyay, D; Bénard, F; Brkic, M; Crombie, M B; Gingrich, D M; Hartner, G F; Joo, K K; Levman, G M; Martin, J F; Orr, R S; Sampson, C R; Teuscher, R; Catterall, C D; Jones, T W; Kaziewicz, P B; Lane, J B; Saunders, R L; Shulman, J; Blankenship, K; Kochocki, J A; Lu, B; Mo, L W; Bogusz, W; Charchula, K; Ciborowski, J; Gajewski, J; Grzelak, G; Kasprzak, M; Krzyzanowski, M; Muchorowski, K; Nowak, R J; Pawlak, J M; Tymieniecka, T; Wróblewski, A K; Zakrzewski, J A; Zarnecki, A F; Adamus, M; Eisenberg, Y; Karshon, U; Revel, D; Zer-Zion, D; Ali, I; Badgett, W F; Behrens, B H; Dasu, S; Fordham, C; Foudas, C; Goussiou, A; Loveless, R J; Reeder, D D; Silverstein, S; Smith, W H; Vaiciulis, A W; Wodarczyk, M; Tsurugai, T; Bhadra, S; Cardy, M L; Fagerstroem, C P; Frisken, W R; Furutani, K M; Khakzad, M; Schmidke, W B

    1995-01-01

    Deep inelastic e^-p scattering has been studied in both the charged-current (CC) and neutral-current (NC) reactions at momentum transfers squared, Q^2, between 400 GeV^2 and the kinematic limit of 87500 GeV^2 using the ZEUS detector at the HERA ep collider. The CC and NC total cross sections, the NC to CC cross section ratio, and the differential cross sections, d\\sigma/dQ^2 , are presented. For Q^2 \\simeq M_W^2, where M_W is the mass of the W boson, the CC and NC cross sections have comparable magnitudes, demonstrating the equal strengths of the weak and electromagnetic interactions at high Q^2. The Q^2 dependence of the CC cross section determines the mass term in the CC propagator to be M_{W} = 76 \\pm 16 \\pm 13~GeV.

  1. HERA Inclusive Neutral and Charged Current Cross Sections and a New PDF Fit, HERAPDF 2.0

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2015-01-01

    In this talk, I present the brand new results from the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations on the combination of all previously published inclusive deep inelastic cross sections at HERA for neutral and charged current $e^\\pm p$ scattering for zero beam polarisation and the corresponding parton distributions functions, HERAPDF 2.0, at up to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO). The results also include a new precise determination at next-to-leading order (NLO) of the strong coupling constant $\\alpha_s(M^2_Z)=0.1184\\pm 0.0016$ (excluding scale uncertainties) based on a simultaneous fit to the combined inclusive cross section data and jet production data.

  2. Local phonon mode in thermoelectric Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 2}Se from charge neutral antisites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Yao [Department of Physics and Institute of Optical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A7 (Canada); Osterhoudt, Gavin B.; Burch, Kenneth S., E-mail: ks.burch@bc.edu [Department of Physics, Boston College, 140 Commonwealth Ave., Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 02467-3804 (United States); Jia, Shuang; Cava, R. J. [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2016-01-25

    Local modes caused by defects play a significant role in the thermal transport properties of thermoelectrics. Of particular interest are charge-neutral defects that suppress thermal conductivity, without significantly reducing electrical transport. Here, we report a temperature dependent Raman study that identifies such a mode in a standard thermoelectric material, Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 2}Se. One of the modes observed, whose origin has been debated for decades, was shown most likely to be an antisite defect induced local mode. The anomalous temperature independent broadening of the local mode is ascribed to the random arrangement of Se atoms. The temperature renormalization of all modes is well explained by an anharmonic model–Klemens's model.

  3. Strong subadditivity, null energy condition and charged black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caceres, Elena [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Colima,Bernal Diaz del Castillo 340, Colima (Mexico); Theory Group, Department of Physics, The University of Texas,Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Kundu, Arnab [Theory Group, Department of Physics, The University of Texas,Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Pedraza, Juan F.; Tangarife, Walter [Theory Group, Department of Physics, The University of Texas,Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Texas Cosmology Center, The University of Texas,Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2014-01-16

    Using the Hubeny-Rangamani-Takayanagi (HRT) conjectured formula for entanglement entropy in the context of the AdS/CFT correspondence with time-dependent backgrounds, we investigate the relation between the bulk null energy condition (NEC) of the stress-energy tensor with the strong sub-additivity (SSA) property of entanglement entropy in the boundary theory. In a background that interpolates between an AdS to an AdS-Reissner-Nordstrom-type geometry, we find that generically there always exists a critical surface beyond which the violation of NEC would naively occur. However, the extremal area surfaces that determine the entanglement entropy for the boundary theory, can penetrate into this forbidden region only for certain choices for the mass and the charge functions in the background. This penetration is then perceived as the violation of SSA in the boundary theory. We also find that this happens only when the critical surface lies above the apparent horizon, but not otherwise. We conjecture that SSA, which is thus non-trivially related to NEC, also characterizes the entire time-evolution process along which the dual field theory may thermalize.

  4. Strong Subadditivity, Null Energy Condition and Charged Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Caceres, Elena; Pedraza, Juan F; Tangarife, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Using the Hubeny-Rangamani-Takayanagi (HRT) conjectured formula for entanglement entropy in the context of the AdS/CFT correspondence with time-dependent backgrounds, we investigate the relation between the bulk null energy condition (NEC) of the stress-energy tensor with the strong sub-additivity (SSA) property of entanglement entropy in the boundary theory. In a background that interpolates between an AdS to an AdS-Reissner-Nordstrom-type geometry, we find that generically there always exists a critical surface beyond which the violation of NEC would naively occur. However, the extremal area surfaces that determine the entanglement entropy for the boundary theory, can penetrate into this forbidden region only for certain choices for the mass and the charge functions in the background. This penetration is then perceived as the violation of SSA in the boundary theory. We also find that this happens only when the critical surface lies above the apparent horizon, but not otherwise. We conjecture that SSA, which...

  5. Simulation of pyrite oxidation in fresh mine tailings under near-neutral conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alakangas, Lena; Lundberg, Angela; Nason, Peter

    2012-08-01

    Sulphidic residual products from ore processing may produce acid rock drainage, when exposed to oxygen and water. Predictions of the magnitude of ARD and sulphide oxidation rates are of great importance in mine planning because they can be used to minimize or eliminate ARD and the associated economic and environmental costs. To address the lack of field data of sulphide oxidation rate in fresh sulphide-rich tailings under near-neutral conditions, determination and simulation of the rate was performed in pilot-scale at Kristineberg, northern Sweden. The quality of the drainage water was monitored, along with oxygen and carbon dioxide concentrations. The chemical composition of the solid tailings was also determined. The field data were compared to predictions from simulations of pyrite oxidation using a 1-D numerical model. The simulations' estimates of the amount of Fe and S released over a seven year period (52 kg and 178 kg, respectively) were in reasonably good agreement with those obtained by analysing the tailings (34 kg and 155 kg, respectively). The discrepancy is probably due to the formation of secondary precipitates such as iron hydroxides and gypsum; which are not accounted for in the model. The observed mass transport of Fe and S (0.05 and 1.0 kg per year, respectively) was much lower than expected on the basis of the simulations and the core data. Neutralization reactions involving carbonates in the tailings result in a near-neutral pH at all depths except at the oxidation front (pH < 5), indicating that the dissolution of carbonates was too slow for the acid to be neutralized, which instead neutralized deeper down in the tailings. This was also indicated by the reduced abundance of solid Ca at greater depths and the high levels of carbon dioxide both of which are consistent with the dissolution of carbonates. It could be concluded that the near-neutral pH in the tailings has no decreasing effect on the rate of sulphide oxidation, but does reduce the

  6. A method for the separation and reconstructions of charged hadron and neutral hadron from their overlapped showers in an electromagnetic calorimeter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Song; TAO Jun-Quan; SHEN Yu-Qiao; FAN Jia-Wei; XIAO Hong; CHEN Guo-Ming; CHEN He-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    The separation and reconstructions of charged hadron and neutral hadron from their overlapped showers in an electromagnetic calorimeter is very important for the reconstructions of some particles with hadronic decays,for example the tau reconstruction in the searches for the Standard Model and supersymmetric Higgs bosons at the LHC.In this paper,a method combining the shower cluster in an electromagnetic calorimeter and the parametric formula for hadron showers,was developed to separate the overlapped showers between charged hadron and neutral hadron.Taking the hadronic decay containing one charged pion and one neutral pion in the final status of tau for example,satisfied results of the separation of the overlapped showers,the reconstructions of the energy and positions of the hadrons were obtained.An improved result for the tau reconstruction with this decay model can be also achieved after the application of the proposed method.

  7. Excitation and charge transfer in low-energy hydrogen atom collisions with neutral atoms: Theory, comparisons, and application to Ca

    CERN Document Server

    Barklem, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    A theoretical method for the estimation of cross sections and rates for excitation and charge transfer processes in low-energy hydrogen atom collisions with neutral atoms, based on an asymptotic two-electron model of ionic-covalent interactions in the neutral atom-hydrogen atom system, is presented. The calculation of potentials and non-adiabatic radial couplings using the method is demonstrated. The potentials are used together with the multi-channel Landau-Zener model to calculate cross sections and rate coefficients. The main feature of the method is that it employs asymptotically exact atomic wavefunctions, which can be determined from known atomic parameters. The method is applied to Li+H, Na+H, and Mg+H collisions, and the results compare well with existing detailed full-quantum calculations. The method is applied to the astrophysically important problem of Ca+H collisions, and rate coefficients are calculated for temperatures in the range 1000-20000 K.

  8. THE EFFECT OF CHARGE AND CHEMICAL STRUCTURE OF CATIONIC SURFACTANTS ON LASER TONER AGGLOMERATION UNDER ALKALINE PULPING CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Jiang,

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory-scale agglomeration experiments followed by image analysis were used to evaluate the effectiveness of different cationic surfactants on the 1-octadecanol agglomeration of a negatively charged laser toner. Various types of surfactants with different geometric structures were investigated. It was found that this toner became agglomerated under neutral pulping conditions, but it did not agglomerate under alkaline conditions at all. A small amount of the cationic surfactant compensated for the agglomeration disruption caused by the negative surface charge of the toner and made this toner agglomerate very well. These cationic surfactants consist of a chemical structure of C12 to C18 saturated alkyl hydrophobic chains. The positive charge of these surfactants played the major role in alleviating agglomeration disruption. Additionally, an extra phenol group on these surfactants contributed only minor advantages for toner agglomeration in the presence of 1-octadecanol. The best co-agglomeration performance occurred within a very narrow range of similar total positive charge densities based on the total toner weight. It was also found that this positive charge effect could not be applied to the chemical compounds of high molecular weight polymeric materials.

  9. Highly selective palladium–benzothiazole carbene-catalyzed allylation of active methylene compounds under neutral conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Monopoli

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Pd–benzothiazol-2-ylidene complex I was found to be a chemoselective catalyst for the Tsuji–Trost allylation of active methylene compounds carried out under neutral conditions and using carbonates as allylating agents. The proposed protocol consists in a simplified procedure adopting an in situ prepared catalyst from Pd2dba3 and 3-methylbenzothiazolium salt V as precursors. A comparison of the performance of benzothiazole carbene with phosphanes and an analogous imidazolium carbene ligand is also proposed.

  10. a Study of the Charged Two-Body Decays of the Neutral D Mesons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Kuang-Chung (K. C.).

    1995-01-01

    The charged two-body decays of D^0 mesons produced by 500 GeV/c pi -incident on platium and carbon foil targets at the Fermilab Tagged Particle Laboratory have been analyzed. Three measurements are presented in this thesis: (1) Branching Ratios of Charged Two-body Decays: {Gamma(D^0to K^+K^-)overGamma(D^0to K^-pi^+)}= 0.107+/-0.003 +/-0.003, {Gamma(D^0to pi^+pi^-)over Gamma(D ^0to K^-pi^+)} =0.040 +/-0.002+/-0.002, {Gamma(D^0 to K^+K^-)overGamma(D^0 topi^+pi^-)}=2.65+/-0.14 +/-0.13, and {Gamma(D^0 to K^-pi^-pi^+pi ^+)overGamma(D^0to K^ -pi^+)} =2.19+/-.0.3+/-.0.08; (2) Lifetime Difference: tau_ {KK}=0.414+/-0.012+/-0.014, tau _{Kpi}=0.409+/-0.003+/-0.004, with Deltagamma= {-}0.06 +/-0.15+/-0.15, or the upper limit of Mixing rate as {cal R}_sp {rm mix}{it y}<0.00079 (due to lifetime difference only) at mix 90% confidence level; and (3) CP Asymmetry Parameters: A_sp{CP}{BR}(K^+/- K^mp) = {-}0.018+/-0.054+/-0.012, A_sp{CP}{BR}( pi^+/-pi^mp) = { -}0.053+/-0.093+/-0.029, and A _sp{CP}{BR}(K3pi) - {-}0.018+/-0.023+/-0.002.. All measurements are consistent with most theoretical predictions and world average experimental values.

  11. Dissipative particle dynamics simulations of weak polyelectrolyte adsorption on charged and neutral surfaces as a function of the degree of ionization

    CERN Document Server

    Alarcón, F; Goicochea, A Gama

    2012-01-01

    The influence of the chain degree of ionization on the adsorption of weak polyelectrolytes on neutral and on oppositely and likely charged surfaces is investigated for the first time, by means of Monte Carlo simulations with the mesoscopic interaction model known as dissipative particle dynamics. The electrostatic interactions are calculated using the three-dimensional Ewald sum method, with an appropriate modification for confined systems. Effective wall forces confine the linear polyelectrolytes, and electric charges on the surfaces are included. The solvent is included explicitly also and it is modeled as an athermal solvent for the polyelectrolytes. The number of solvent particles is allowed to fluctuate. The results show that the polyelectrolytes adsorb both onto neutral and charged surfaces, with the adsorption regulated by the chain degree of ionization, being larger at lower ionization degrees, where polyelectrolytes are less charged. Furthermore, polyelectrolyte adsorption is strongly modulated by th...

  12. Mixing of charged and neutral Bose condensates at nonzero temperature and magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, Alexander; Schmitt, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    It is expected that in the interior of compact stars a proton superconductor coexists with and couples to a neutron superfluid. Starting from a field-theoretical model for two complex scalar fields - one of which is electrically charged - we derive a Ginzburg-Landau potential which includes entrainment between the two fluids and temperature effects from thermal excitations of the two scalar fields and the gauge field. The Ginzburg-Landau description is then used for an analysis of the phase structure in the presence of an external magnetic field. In particular, we study the effect of the superfluid on the flux tube phase by computing the various critical magnetic fields and deriving an approximation for the flux tube interaction. As a result, we point out differences to the naive expectations from an isolated superconductor, for instance the existence of a first-order flux tube onset, resulting in a more complicated phase structure in the region between type-I and type-II superconductivity.

  13. Mixing of charged and neutral Bose condensates at nonzero temperature and magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haber Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is expected that in the interior of compact stars a proton superconductor coexists with and couples to a neutron superfluid. Starting from a field-theoretical model for two complex scalar fields – one of which is electrically charged – we derive a Ginzburg-Landau potential which includes entrainment between the two fluids and temperature effects from thermal excitations of the two scalar fields and the gauge field. The Ginzburg-Landau description is then used for an analysis of the phase structure in the presence of an external magnetic field. In particular, we study the effect of the superfluid on the flux tube phase by computing the various critical magnetic fields and deriving an approximation for the flux tube interaction. As a result, we point out differences to the naive expectations from an isolated superconductor, for instance the existence of a first-order flux tube onset, resulting in a more complicated phase structure in the region between type-I and type-II superconductivity.

  14. 3-loop contributions to heavy flavor Wilson coefficients of neutral and charged current DIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasselhuhn, Alexander

    2013-11-15

    . A new method is presented for the calculation of such diagrams with equal masses, contributing to the OMEs A{sub gq,Q} and A{sub gg,Q}. The method uses a Mellin-Barnes representation instead of a generalized hypergeometric function and keeps, for convergence reasons, one of the Feynman parameter integrals unintegrated. The above symbolic summation methods are used to solve the sum of residues in terms of cyclotomic harmonic polylogarithms. Many properties of these functions are implemented in the package Harmonic Sums. Since the result is first derived as a generating function, the symbolic summation machinery is applied a second time, solving difference equations and simplifying sums needed to derive the Nth Taylor coefficient for symbolic N. First the O({alpha}{sub s}) contributions are revisited, due to partly different results in the foregoing literature, which can be clarified. At 1-loop order, an efficient representation in Mellin space allowing for fast numerical evaluations is designed, including power corrections. Also here errors in the literature are corrected. Here the 1-loop expressions are also expanded for 1>>m{sup 2}/Q{sup 2} up to the constant term. A careful recalculation of the gluonic contribution is performed as well as a calculation in leading logarithmic approximation. The leading logarithmic calculation shows that the same sign error occurs for the pure-singlet contribution at two loops. The heavy quark corrections of charged current deep-inelastic scattering are extended to 2-loop order. The factorization of the heavy flavor Wilson coefficients at large values of Q{sup 2} is derived for the charged current case. Using the light flavor Wilson coefficients and operator matrix elements up to 2-loop order from the literature, x- and N-space expressions for all heavy flavor Wilson coefficients at two loops are given.

  15. The origin of high PCE in PTB7 based photovoltaics: proper charge neutrality level and free energy of charge separation at PTB7/PC71BM interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soohyung; Jeong, Junkyeong; Hyun, Gyeongho; Kim, Minju; Lee, Hyunbok; Yi, Yeonjin

    2016-10-01

    The energy level alignments at donor/acceptor interfaces in organic photovoltaics (OPVs) play a decisive role in device performance. However, little is known about the interfacial energetics in polymer OPVs due to technical issues of the solution process. Here, the frontier ortbial line-ups at the donor/acceptor interface in high performance polymer OPVs, PTB7/PC71BM, were investigated using in situ UPS, XPS and IPES. The evolution of energy levels during PTB7/PC71BM interface formation was investigated using vacuum electrospray deposition, and was compared with that of P3HT/PC61BM. At the PTB7/PC71BM interface, the interface dipole and the band bending were absent due to their identical charge neutrality levels. In contrast, a large interfacial dipole was observed at the P3HT/PC61BM interface. The measured photovoltaic energy gap (EPVG) was 1.10 eV for PTB7/PC71BM and 0.90 eV for P3HT/PC61BM. This difference in the EPVG leads to a larger open-circuit voltage of PTB7/PC71BM than that of P3HT/PC61BM.

  16. Search for unstable sequential neutral and charged heavy leptons in e+e- annihilation at √s = 130 and 136 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acciarri, M.; Adam, A.; Adriani, O.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Ahlen, S.; Alpat, B.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alverson, G.; Alviggi, M. G.; Ambrosi, G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, V. P.; Angelescu, T.; Antreasyan, D.; Arefiev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Baksay, L.; Ball, R. C.; Banerjee, S.; Banicz, K.; Barillère, R.; Barone, L.; Bartalini, P.; Baschirotto, A.; Basile, M.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B. L.; Biasini, M.; Biland, A.; Bilei, G. M.; Blaising, J. J.; Blyth, S. C.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bock, R.; Böhm, A.; Borgia, B.; Boucham, A.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Brambilla, E.; Branson, J. G.; Brigljevic, V.; Brock, I. C.; Buijs, A.; Bujak, A.; Burger, J. D.; Burger, W. J.; Busenitz, J.; Buytenhuijs, A.; Cai, X. D.; Campanelli, M.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Caria, M.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A. M.; Casaus, J.; Castellini, G.; Castello, R.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Cesaroni, F.; Chamizo, M.; Chan, A.; Chang, Y. H.; Chaturvedi, U. K.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, H. S.; Chereau, X.; Chiefari, G.; Chien, C. Y.; Choi, M. T.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Civinini, C.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Cohn, H. O.; Coignet, G.; Colijn, A. P.; Colino, N.; Commichau, V.; Costantini, S.; Cotorobai, F.; de la Cruz, B.; Dai, T. S.; D'Alessandro, R.; de Asmundis, R.; De Boeck, H.; Degré, A.; Deiters, K.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; DiBitonto, D.; Diemoz, M.; van Dierendonck, D.; Di Lodovico, F.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Dominguez, A.; Doria, A.; Dorne, I.; Dova, M. T.; Drago, E.; Duchesneau, D.; Duinker, P.; Duran, I.; Dutta, S.; Easo, S.; Efremenko, Yu; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Erné, F. C.; Ernenwein, J. P.; Extermann, P.; Fabre, M.; Faccini, R.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Felcini, M.; Furetta, C.; Ferguson, T.; Fernandez, D.; Ferroni, F.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J. H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P. H.; Forconi, G.; Fredj, L.; Freudenreich, K.; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S. N.; Gau, S. S.; Gentile, S.; Gerald, J.; Gheordanescu, N.; Giagu, S.; Goldfarb, S.; Goldstein, J.; Gong, Z. F.; Gougas, A.; Gratta, G.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Gupta, V. K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L. J.; Hangarter, K.; Hartmann, B.; Hasan, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Hervé, A.; van Hoek, W. C.; Hofer, H.; Hoorani, H.; Hou, S. R.; Hu, G.; Ilyas, M. M.; Innocente, V.; Janssen, H.; Jin, B. N.; Jones, L. W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Kasser, A.; Khan, R. A.; Kamyshkov, Yu; Kapinos, P.; Kapustinsky, J. S.; Karyotakis, Y.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M. N.; Kim, D.; Kim, J. K.; Kim, S. C.; Kim, Y. G.; Kinnison, W. W.; Kirkby, A.; Kirkby, D.; Kirkby, J.; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; König, A. C.; Köngeter, A.; Korolko, I.; Koutsenko, V.; Koulbardis, A.; Kraemer, R. W.; Kramer, T.; Krenz, W.; Kuijten, H.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Landi, G.; Lapoint, C.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, K. Y.; Le Goff, J. M.; Leiste, R.; Lenti, M.; Leonardi, E.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Lieb, E.; Lin, W. T.; Linde, F. L.; Lindemann, B.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z. A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, W.; Lu, Y. S.; Lübelsmeyer, K.; Luci, C.; Luckey, D.; Ludovici, L.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W. G.; Macchiolo, S.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Maña, C.; Mangla, S.; Marchesini, P.; Marin, A.; Martin, J. P.; Marzano, F.; Massaro, G. G. G.; Mazumdar, K.; McNally, D.; McNeil, R. R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W. J.; von der Mey, M.; Mi, Y.; Mihul, A.; van Mil, A. J. W.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Möller, M.; Monteleoni, B.; Moore, R.; Morganti, S.; Mount, R.; Müller, S.; Muheim, F.; Nagy, E.; Nahn, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Nippe, A.; Nowak, H.; Organtini, G.; Ostonen, R.; Pandoulas, D.; Paoletti, S.; Paolucci, P.; Park, H. K.; Pascale, G.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, T.; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Peach, D.; Pei, Y. J.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petrak, S.; Pevsner, A.; Piccolo, D.; Pieri, M.; Pinto, J. C.; Piroué, P. A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Postema, H.; Produit, N.; Raghavan, R.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rattaggi, M.; Raven, G.; Razis, P.; Read, K.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; van Rhee, T.; Ricker, A.; Riemann, S.; Riemers, B. C.; Riles, K.; Ro, S.; Robohm, A.; Rodin, J.; Rodriguez, F. J.; Roe, B. P.; Röhner, S.; Romero, L.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rosselet, Ph; van Rossum, W.; Roth, S.; Rubio, J. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Santocchia, A.; Sarakinos, M. E.; Sarkar, S.; Sassowsky, M.; Schäfer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schmidt-Kaerst, S.; Schmitz, D.; Schmitz, P.; Schneegans, M.; Schoeneich, B.; Scholz, N.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D. J.; Schulte, R.; Schultze, K.; Schwenke, J.; Schwering, G.; Sciacca, C.; Sciarrino, D.; Sens, J. C.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shukla, J.; Shumilov, E.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Sopczak, A.; Smith, B.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D. P.; Sticozzi, F.; Stone, H.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Strauch, K.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L. Z.; Susinno, G. F.; Suter, H.; Swain, J. D.; Tang, X. W.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Toker, O.; Tonisch, F.; Tonutti, M.; Tonwar, S. C.; Tóth, J.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tully, C.; Tuchscherer, H.; Tung, K. L.; Ulbricht, J.; Uwer, U.; Valente, E.; Van de Walle, R. T.; Vetlitsky, I.; Viertel, G.; Vivargent, M.; Völkert, R.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Vorobyov, A. A.; Vorobyov, An. A.; Vorvolakos, A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wallraff, W.; Wang, J. C.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Z. M.; Weber, A.; Wittgenstein, F.; Wu, S. X.; Wynhoff, S.; Xu, J.; Xu, Z. Z.; Yang, B. Z.; Yang, C. G.; Yao, X. Y.; Ye, J. B.; Yeh, S. C.; You, J. M.; Zaccardelli, C.; Zalite, An; Zemp, P.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, G. Y.; Zhu, R. Y.; Zichichi, A.; L3 Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    A search for unstable sequential neutral and charged heavy leptons has been made at center-of-mass energies 130 and 136 GeV with the L3 detector at LEP. The neutral leptons are assumed to decay via mixing to electrons and muons. No evidence for their existence was found. We exclude unstable Dirac neutrinos for masses below 59.3 (57.9) GeV and unstable Majorana neutrinos below 48.6 (47.2) GeV if the neutrino couples to the electron(muon) family. We exclude unstable charged heavy leptons for masses below 61 GeV for a wide range of the associated neutral lepton mass.

  17. Search for unstable sequential neutral and charged heavy leptons in $e^{+}e^{-}$ annihilation at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130 and 136 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Adriani, O; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alpat, B; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Antreasyan, D; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Ball, R C; Banerjee, S; Banicz, K; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Borgia, B; Boucham, A; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Brambilla, Elena; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buijs, A; Bujak, A T; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Buytenhuijs, A O; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Caria, M; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Castello, R; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chan, A; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Choi, M T; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; De Boeck, H; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dorne, I; Dova, M T; Drago, E; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Felcini, Marta; Furetta, C; Ferguson, T; Fernández, D; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gerald, J; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hangarter, K; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Ilyas, M M; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janssen, H; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapinos, P; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Köngeter, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Koulbardis, A; Krämer, R W; Kramer, T; Krenz, W; Kuijten, H; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee Jae Sik; Lee, K Y; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Lenti, M; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lieb, E H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lindemann, B; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Ludovici, L; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Macchiolo, A; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; Mazumdar, K; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Möller, M; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Nagy, E; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nippe, A; Nowak, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Raghavan, R; Rahal-Callot, G; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Ricker, A; Riemann, S; Riemers, B C; Riles, K; Ro, S; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Rodríguez-Calonge, F J; Roe, B P; Röhner, S; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Santocchia, A; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Schneegans, M; Schöneich, B; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schulte, R; Schultze, K; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Sens, Johannes C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Sticozzi, F; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Toker, O; Tonisch, F; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tsaregorodtsev, A Yu; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Y F; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zaccardelli, C; Zalite, A; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhou, Y; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino

    1996-01-01

    A search for unstable sequential neutral and charged heavy leptons has been made at center-of-mass energies 130 and 136 \\GeV\\ with the L3 detector at LEP. The neutral leptons are assumed to decay via mixing to electrons and muons. No evidence for their existence was found. We exclude unstable Dirac neutrinos for masses below 59.3 (57.9) \\GeV\\ and unstable Majorana neutrinos below 48.6 (47.2) \\GeV\\ if the neutrino couples to the electron(muon) family. We exclude unstable charged heavy leptons for masses below 61 \\GeV\\ for a wide range of the associated neutral lepton mass.

  18. Single neutral pion production by charged-current ν¯μ interactions on hydrocarbon at 〈Eν〉=3.6 GeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Le

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Single neutral pion production via muon antineutrino charged-current interactions in plastic scintillator (CH is studied using the MINERvA detector exposed to the NuMI low-energy, wideband antineutrino beam at Fermilab. Measurement of this process constrains models of neutral pion production in nuclei, which is important because the neutral-current analog is a background for ν¯e appearance oscillation experiments. The differential cross sections for π0 momentum and production angle, for events with a single observed π0 and no charged pions, are presented and compared to model predictions. These results comprise the first measurement of the π0 kinematics for this process.

  19. Search for heavy neutral and charged leptons in $e^+ e^-$ annihilation at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 GeV and $\\sqrt{s}$ = 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    A search for unstable neutral and charged heavy leptons as well as for stable charged heavy leptons has been made at center-of-mass energies $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 GeV and $\\sqrt{s}$ = 172 GeV with the L3 detector at LEP. No evidence for their existence was found. We exclude unstable neutral leptons of Dirac (Majorana) type for masses below 78.0 (66.7), 78.0 (66.7) and 72.2 (58.2) GeV, if the heavy neutrino couples to the electron, muon or tau family, respectively. We exclude unstable charged heavy leptons for masses below 81.0 GeV for a wide mass range of the associated neutral heavy lepton. The production of stable charged heavy leptons with a mass less than 84.2 GeV is also excluded. If the unstable charged heavy lepton decays via mixing into a massless neutrino, we exclude masses below 78.7 GeV.

  20. Search for Heavy Neutral and Charged Leptons in $e^+ e^-$ Annihilation at $\\sqrt{s}$= 183 GeV and 189 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Adriani, O; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Balandras, A; Ball, R C; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brochu, F; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; Cozzoni, B; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Cucciarelli, S; Dai, T S; van Dalen, J A; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Dufournaud, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hidas, P; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Holzner, G; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Iashvili, I; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M H; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Lacentre, P E; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lavorato, A; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee, H J; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Lugnier, L; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Marchesini, P A; Marian, G; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Migani, D; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pedace, M; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Pothier, J; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosier-Lees, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Seganti, A; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, M; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Weber, M; Wienemann, P; Wilkens, H; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F; Zilizi, G; Zöller, M

    1999-01-01

    A search for unstable neutral and charged heavy leptons as well as for stable charged heavy leptons is performed at center-of-mass energies $\\sqrt{s}$ = 183 and 189 GeV with the L3 detector at LEP. No evidence for their existence is found. We exclude neutral heavy leptons which couple to the electron, muon or tau family, of the Dirac type for masses below 92.4, 93.3 and 83.3 GeV, and of the Majorana type for masses below 81.8, 84.1 and 73.5 GeV, respectively. We exclude unstable charged heavy leptons for masses below 93.9 GeV for a wide range of the associated neutral heavy lepton mass. If the unstable charged heavy lepton decays to a light neutrino, we exclude masses below 92.4 GeV. The production of stable charged heavy leptons with mass less than 93.5 GeV is also excluded.

  1. Compact, accurate description of diagnostic neutral beam propagation and attenuation in a high temperature plasma for charge exchange recombination spectroscopy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bespamyatnov, Igor O; Rowan, William L; Granetz, Robert S

    2008-10-01

    Charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on Alcator C-Mod relies on the use of the diagnostic neutral beam injector as a source of neutral particles which penetrate deep into the plasma. It employs the emission resulting from the interaction of the beam atoms with fully ionized impurity ions. To interpret the emission from a given point in the plasma as the density of emitting impurity ions, the density of beam atoms must be known. Here, an analysis of beam propagation is described which yields the beam density profile throughout the beam trajectory from the neutral beam injector to the core of the plasma. The analysis includes the effects of beam formation, attenuation in the neutral gas surrounding the plasma, and attenuation in the plasma. In the course of this work, a numerical simulation and an analytical approximation for beam divergence are developed. The description is made sufficiently compact to yield accurate results in a time consistent with between-shot analysis.

  2. Measurement of the Relative Branching Fraction of $\\Upsilon(4S)$ to Charged and Neutral B-Meson Pairs

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, J P; Bebek, C; Berger, B E; Berkelman, K; Blanc, F; Boisvert, V; Cassel, David G; Dickson, M; Drell, P S; Ecklund, K M; Ehrlich, R; Foland, A D; Gaidarev, P B; Gibbons, L K; Gittelman, B; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hopman, P I; Jones, C D; Kreinick, D L; Lohner, M; Magerkurth, A; Meyer, T O; Mistry, N B; Nordberg, E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Thayer, J G; Thies, P G; Valant-Spaight, B L; Warburton, A; Avery, P; Prescott, C; Rubiera, A I; Yelton, J; Zheng, J; Brandenburg, G; Ershov, A; Gao, Y S; Kim, D Y J; Wilson, R; Browder, T E; Li, Y; Rodríguez, J L; Yamamoto, H; Bergfeld, T; Eisenstein, B I; Ernst, J; Gladding, G E; Gollin, G D; Hans, R M; Johnson, E; Karliner, I; Marsh, M A; Palmer, M; Plager, C; Sedlack, C; Selen, M; Thaler, J J; Williams, J; Edwards, K W; Janicek, R; Patel, P M; Sadoff, A J; Ammar, R; Bean, A; Besson, D; Davis, R; Kwak, N; Zhao, X; Anderson, S; Frolov, V V; Kubota, Y; Lee, S J; Mahapatra, R; O'Neill, J J; Poling, R A; Riehle, T; Smith, A; Urheim, J; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Athar, S B; Jian, L; Ling, L; Mahmood, A H; Saleem, M; Timm, S; Wappler, F; Anastassov, A; Duboscq, J E; Gwon, E Eckhart C; Hart, T; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pedlar, T K; Schwarthoff, H; Thayer, J B; Von Törne, E; Zoeller, M M; Richichi, S J; Severini, H; Skubic, P L; Undrus, A; Chen, S; Fast, J; Hinson, J W; Lee, J; Menon, N; Miller, D H; Shibata, E I; Shipsey, I P J; Pavlunin, V; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Kwon, Y; Lyon, A L; Thorndike, E H; Jessop, C P; Marsiske, H; Perl, Martin Lewis; Savinov, V; Ugolini, D W; Zhou, X; Coan, T E; Fadeev, V; Maravin, Y; Narsky, I; Stroynowski, R; Ye, J; Wlodek, T; Artuso, M; Ayad, R; Boulahouache, C; Bukin, K; Dambasuren, E; Karamov, S; Majumder, G; Moneti, G C; Mountain, R; Schuh, S; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Viehhauser, G; Wang, J C; Wolf, A; Wu, J; Kopp, S E; Csorna, S E; Danko, I; McLean, K W; Marka, S; Xu, Z; Godang, R; Kinoshita, K; Lai, I C; Schrenk, S; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; McGee, S; Perera, L P; Zhou, G J; Lipeles, E; Schmidtler, M; Shapiro, A; Sun, W M; Weinstein, A J; Würthwein, F; Jaffe, D E; Masek, G E; Paar, H P; Potter, E M; Prell, S; Sharma, V; Asner, D M; Eppich, A; Hill, T S; Morrison, R J; Briere, R A; Behrens, B H; Ford, W T; Gritsan, A; Roy, J D; Smith, J G

    2001-01-01

    We analyze 9.7 x 10^6 B\\bar{B}$ pairs recorded with the CLEO detector to determine the production ratio of charged to neutral B-meson pairs produced at the Y(4S) resonance. We measure the rates for B^0 -> J/psi K^{(*)0} and B^+ -> J/psi K^{(*)+} decays and use the world-average B-meson lifetime ratio to extract the relative widths f+-/f00 = Gamma(Y(4S) -> B+B-)/Gamma(Y(4S) -> B0\\bar{B0}) = = 1.04 +/- 0.07(stat) +/- 0.04(syst). With the assumption that f+- + f00 = 1, we obtain f00 = 0.49 +/- 0.02(stat) +/- 0.01(syst) and f+- = 0.51 +/- 0.02(stat) +/- 0.01(syst). This production ratio and its uncertainty apply to all exclusive B-mescon branching fractions measured at the Y(4S) resonance.

  3. Exploring adsorption and desorption characteristics of molecular hydrogen on neutral and charged Mg nanoclusters: A first principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Paramita; Chandrakumar, K. R. S.; Das, G. P.

    2016-05-01

    To surmount the limitations of bulk MgH2 for the purpose of hydrogen storage, we report here, a detailed first principles density functional theory (DFT) based study on the structure and stability of neutral (Mgm) and positively charged (Mgm+) Mg nanoclusters of different sizes (m = 2, 4, 8 and 12) and their interaction with molecular hydrogen (H2). Our results demonstrate that H2 is weakly bound to the Mg nanoclusters through van der Waals interactions. Incorporation of Grimme's dispersion correction (D3) in the DFT based exchange-correlation functionals leads to improved accuracy of H2 interaction energy (IE) values that fall within an energy window (between physisorption and chemisorption) desirable for hydrogen storage. Energy decomposition analysis reveals the significance of polarization energy for these Mg-H2 binding. Ab-initio molecular dynamics simulation shows that complete dehydrogenation from these Mg nanoclusters occur at ∼100 °C which is a significant improvement over bulk MgH2 (∼300 °C).

  4. Protein adsorption to poly(ethylenimine)-modified Sepharose FF: VI. Partial charge neutralization drastically increases uptake rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yangyang; Dong, Xiaoyan; Yu, Linling; Sun, Yan

    2016-01-04

    The adsorption and elution behaviors of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on poly(ethylenimine) (PEI)-grafted Sepharose FF resins were recently studied and a critical ionic capacity (cIC; 600 mmol/L) was found, above which the uptake rate increased drastically due to the occurrence of significant "chain delivery" effect. Moreover, above the cIC value, higher salt concentrations were required for protein elution due to the high charge density of the resins. In this work, we have reduced the charge density on the PEI chains of a PEI-grafted resin by neutralization of the amine groups with sodium acetate. PEI-modified resin with IC of 740 mmol/L (FF-PEI-L740, IC>cIC) was chosen as the starting material, and three resins with residual IC values of 660, 560 and 440 mmol/L (FF-PEI-R440) were obtained. The adsorption and chromatographic behaviors of these resins for BSA were investigated. It was found that, with IC decreasing from 740 to 440 mmol/L, the adsorption capacity kept almost unchanged; the effective protein diffusivity (De) also showed negligible variations as IC decreased from 740 to 560 mmol/L (De/D0=0.38 ± 0.04). However, it was interesting to observe a three-fold increase of the De value for FF-PEI-R440 (De/D0=1.23 ± 0.08). It is considered that the occurrence of the drastic uptake rate increase in FF-PEI-R440 was attributed to the decreased available binding sites for protein molecule, which led to the decrease of binding strength, thus facilitated the happenings of "chain delivery" effect of bound proteins. Besides, a study on the effect of ionic strength clarified that the lower the IC value, the higher the sensitivity of protein binding to salt concentration due to the easily screened electrostatic interactions at low surface charge densities. The ionic strength at the elution peak also decreased with decreasing IC in accordance with the salt sensitivity order. Column breakthrough studies demonstrated that the dynamic adsorption capacity of FF-PEI-R440 was

  5. Association thermodynamics and conformational stability of beta-sheet amyloid beta(17-42) oligomers: effects of E22Q (Dutch) mutation and charge neutralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinov, Nikolay; Dorosh, Lyudmyla; Wishart, David; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2010-01-20

    Amyloid fibrils are associated with many neurodegenerative diseases. It was found that amyloidogenic oligomers, not mature fibrils, are neurotoxic agents related to these diseases. Molecular mechanisms of infectivity, pathways of aggregation, and molecular structure of these oligomers remain elusive. Here, we use all-atom molecular dynamics, molecular mechanics combined with solvation analysis by statistical-mechanical, three-dimensional molecular theory of solvation (also known as 3D-RISM-KH) in a new MM-3D-RISM-KH method to study conformational stability, and association thermodynamics of small wild-type Abeta(17-42) oligomers with different protonation states of Glu(22), as well the E22Q (Dutch) mutants. The association free energy of small beta-sheet oligomers shows near-linear trend with the dimers being thermodynamically more stable relative to the larger constructs. The linear (within statistical uncertainty) dependence of the association free energy on complex size is a consequence of the unilateral stacking of monomers in the beta-sheet oligomers. The charge reduction of the wild-type Abeta(17-42) oligomers upon protonation of the solvent-exposed Glu(22) at acidic conditions results in lowering the association free energy compared to the wild-type oligomers at neutral pH and the E22Q mutants. The neutralization of the peptides because of the E22Q mutation only marginally affects the association free energy, with the reduction of the direct electrostatic interactions mostly compensated by the unfavorable electrostatic solvation effects. For the wild-type oligomers at acidic conditions such compensation is not complete, and the electrostatic interactions, along with the gas-phase nonpolar energetic and the overall entropic effects, contribute to the lowering of the association free energy. The differences in the association thermodynamics between the wild-type Abeta(17-42) oligomers at neutral pH and the Dutch mutants, on the one hand, and the Abeta(17

  6. The TWINS exospheric neutral H-density distribution under solar minimum conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Zoennchen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial exospheric atomic hydrogen (H resonantly scatters solar Lyman-α (121.567 nm radiation, observed as the glow of the H-geocorona. The Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers (TWINS satellites are equiped with two Lyman-α line-of-sight Detectors (LADs each. Since during the past solar minimum conditions the relevant solar control parameters practically did not vary, we are using LAD data between June and September 2008 to create a time averaged hydrogen geocorona model representative for these solar minimum conditions. In this averaged model we assume that the H-geocorona is longitudinally symmetric with respect to the earth-sun line. We find a 3-dimensional H-density distribution in the range from 3 to 8 earth radii which with some caution can also be extrapolated to larger distances. For lower geocentric distances than 3 earth radii a best fitting r-dependent Chamberlain (1963-like model is adapted. Main findings are larger than conventionally expected H-densities at heights above 5 RE and a pronounced day-to-night side H-density asymmetry. The H-geocorona presented here should serve as a reference H-atmosphere for the earth during solar minimum conditions.

  7. An ERP investigation of conditional reasoning with emotional and neutral contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchette, Isabelle; El-Deredy, Wael

    2014-11-01

    In two experiments we investigate conditional reasoning using event-related potentials (ERPs). Our goal was to examine the time course of inference making in two conditional forms, one logically valid (Modus Ponens, MP) and one logically invalid (Affirming the Consequent, AC). We focus particularly on the involvement of semantically-based inferential processes potentially marked by modulations of the N400. We also compared reasoning about emotional and neutral contents with separate sets of stimuli of differing linguistic complexity across the two experiments. Both MP and AC modulated the N400 component, suggesting the involvement of a semantically-based inferential mechanism common across different logical forms, content types, and linguistic features of the problems. Emotion did not have an effect on early components, and did not interact with components related to inference making. There was a main effect of emotion in the 800-1050 ms time window, consistent with an effect on sustained attention. The results suggest that conditional reasoning is not a purely formal process but that it importantly implicates semantic processing, and that the effect of emotion on reasoning does not primarily operate through a modulation of early automatic stages of information processing.

  8. Hydrolysis mechanism of anticancer drug lobaplatin in aqueous medium under neutral and acidic conditions: A DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy B., Venkata P.; Mukherjee, Subhajit; Mitra, Ishani; Mahata, Sujay; Linert, Wolfgang; Moi, Sankar Ch.

    2016-10-01

    We have studied the hydrolysis mechanism of lobaplatin in aqueous medium under neutral and acidic conditions using density functional theory combining with CPCM model. The stationary states located on potential energy surface were fully optimized and characterised. The rate limiting step in neutral conditions, ring opening reaction with an activation energy of 110.21 kJ mol-1. The completely hydrolysed complex is expected to be the reactive species towards the DNA purine bases. In acidic conditions, ligand detachment is the rate limiting step with an activation energy of 113.82 kJ mol-1. Consequently, monohydrated complex is expected to be the species reacting with DNA.

  9. The Role of Nucleus Accumbens Shell in Learning about Neutral versus Excitatory Stimuli during Pavlovian Fear Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradfield, Laura A.; McNally, Gavan P.

    2010-01-01

    We studied the role of nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh) in Pavlovian fear conditioning. Rats were trained to fear conditioned stimulus A (CSA) in Stage I, which was then presented in compound with a neutral stimulus and paired with shock in Stage II. AcbSh lesions had no effect on fear-learning to CSA in Stage I, but selectively prevented learning…

  10. Site-resolved neutralization of slow singly and multiply charged ions during large-angle backscattering collisions with RbI(1 0 0)

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, F W; Vane, C R

    2003-01-01

    Preliminary results are reported of projectile neutralization during 120 deg. backscattering from RbI[1 0 0] of singly and multiply charged incident ions in the keV energy range. Scattered charge fractions are reported for 4.4 keV Ne sup 8 sup + and 4.2 keV F sup + normally incident on the ionic crystal. Collisions associated with scattering from a Rb or I site can be clearly distinguished for each scattered final charge state. Significant differences are observed in the intensities of the higher scattered charge states resulting from collisions with Rb and I sites. In contrast, at the target azimuth orientation of the present measurement, only minor differences in F sup - yield are observed for hard scattering from the two lattice sites.

  11. Observation of pion - bottom meson charge-flavor correlations and measurement of time-dependent neutral bottom meson - anti-neutral bottom meson mixing in proton - anti-proton collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimovic, Petar

    1998-12-01

    We present a study of time-dependent B0-/bar B0 mixing in pp collisions at 1.8 TeV using 110 pb-1 collected with the CDF detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. B mesons are partially reconstructed using the semileptonic decays B0/tol+D(*)-X and B+/to l+/overline[D0]X (and their charge conjugates). B meson-charged pion correlations are used in order to determine the flavor of the B meson at t = 0. Such correlations are expected to arise from pions produced in the fragmentation chain and also from B** decays. We measure the efficiency and purity of this flavor tagging method for both charged and neutral B mesons. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)

  12. Conditionally Averaged Large-Scale Motions in the Neutral Atmospheric Boundary Layer: Insights for Aeolian Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Chinthaka; Anderson, William

    2016-06-01

    Aeolian erosion of flat, arid landscapes is induced (and sustained) by the aerodynamic surface stress imposed by flow in the atmospheric surface layer. Conceptual models typically indicate that sediment mass flux, Q (via saltation or drift), scales with imposed aerodynamic stress raised to some exponent, n, where n > 1 . This scaling demonstrates the importance of turbulent fluctuations in driving aeolian processes. In order to illustrate the importance of surface-stress intermittency in aeolian processes, and to elucidate the role of turbulence, conditional averaging predicated on aerodynamic surface stress has been used within large-eddy simulation of atmospheric boundary-layer flow over an arid, flat landscape. The conditional-sampling thresholds are defined based on probability distribution functions of surface stress. The simulations have been performed for a computational domain with ≈ 25 H streamwise extent, where H is the prescribed depth of the neutrally-stratified boundary layer. Thus, the full hierarchy of spatial scales are captured, from surface-layer turbulence to large- and very-large-scale outer-layer coherent motions. Spectrograms are used to support this argument, and also to illustrate how turbulent energy is distributed across wavelengths with elevation. Conditional averaging provides an ensemble-mean visualization of flow structures responsible for erosion `events'. Results indicate that surface-stress peaks are associated with the passage of inclined, high-momentum regions flanked by adjacent low-momentum regions. Fluid in the interfacial shear layers between these adjacent quasi-uniform momentum regions exhibits high streamwise and vertical vorticity.

  13. Conditionally Averaged Large-Scale Motions in the Neutral Atmospheric Boundary Layer: Insights for Aeolian Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Chinthaka; Anderson, William

    2017-01-01

    Aeolian erosion of flat, arid landscapes is induced (and sustained) by the aerodynamic surface stress imposed by flow in the atmospheric surface layer. Conceptual models typically indicate that sediment mass flux, Q (via saltation or drift), scales with imposed aerodynamic stress raised to some exponent, n, where n > 1. This scaling demonstrates the importance of turbulent fluctuations in driving aeolian processes. In order to illustrate the importance of surface-stress intermittency in aeolian processes, and to elucidate the role of turbulence, conditional averaging predicated on aerodynamic surface stress has been used within large-eddy simulation of atmospheric boundary-layer flow over an arid, flat landscape. The conditional-sampling thresholds are defined based on probability distribution functions of surface stress. The simulations have been performed for a computational domain with ≈ 25 H streamwise extent, where H is the prescribed depth of the neutrally-stratified boundary layer. Thus, the full hierarchy of spatial scales are captured, from surface-layer turbulence to large- and very-large-scale outer-layer coherent motions. Spectrograms are used to support this argument, and also to illustrate how turbulent energy is distributed across wavelengths with elevation. Conditional averaging provides an ensemble-mean visualization of flow structures responsible for erosion `events'. Results indicate that surface-stress peaks are associated with the passage of inclined, high-momentum regions flanked by adjacent low-momentum regions. Fluid in the interfacial shear layers between these adjacent quasi-uniform momentum regions exhibits high streamwise and vertical vorticity.

  14. The context of discrimination: workplace conditions, institutional environments, and sex and race discrimination charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsh, C Elizabeth; Kornrich, Sabino

    2008-03-01

    This article explores the organizational conditions under which discrimination charges occur. Drawing on structural and organizational theories of the workplace, the authors demonstrate how organizational conditions affect workers' and regulatory agents' understandings of unlawful discrimination. Using a national sample of work establishments, matched to discrimination-charge data obtained from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the authors examine how characteristics of the workplace and institutional environment affect variation in the incidence of workers' charges of sex and race discrimination and in the subset of discrimination claims that are verified by EEOC investigators. The findings indicate that workplace conditions, including size, composition, and minority management, affect workers' charges as well as verified claims; the latter are also affected by institutional factors, such as affirmative action requirements, subsidiary status, and industrial sector. These results suggest that internal workplace conditions affect both workers' and regulatory agents' interpretations of potentially discriminatory experiences, while institutional conditions matter only for regulatory agents' interpretations of those events.

  15. Charged particle production under EMCal trigger condition with ALICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huhn, Patrick [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The ALICE experiment at the LHC is designed to study the properties of the Quark-Gluon-Plasma (QGP). The measured transverse momentum (p{sub T}) distribution in heavy ion collisions can be compared to that measured in pp collisions in terms of the nuclear modification factor (R{sub AA}). The minimum bias pp reference at √(s) = 2.76 TeV and therefore R{sub AA} in Pb-Pb collisions are currently limited in their p{sub T} range to p{sub T} = 50 GeV/c. To extend the p{sub T} distribution to higher p{sub T} (p{sub T} > 50 GeV/c), triggers can be used. We present an analysis of the cross section of inclusive charged particles in pp collisions as a function of p{sub T} with a selection on deposited energy in the electromagnetic calorimeter (EMCal). Results based on a Toy Monte Carlo simulation including realistic EMCal geometry and acceptance to evaluate trigger biases are presented.

  16. Electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution under densely buffered neutral pH conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Shinagawa, Tatsuya

    2015-08-18

    Under buffered neutral pH conditions, solute concentrations drastically influence the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). The iR-free HER performance as a function of solute concentration was found to exhibit a volcano-shaped trend in sodium phosphate solution at pH 5, with the maximum occurring at 2 M. A detailed microkinetic model that includes calculated activity coefficients, solution resistance, and mass-transport parameters accurately describes the measured values, clarifying that the overall HER performance is predominantly governed by mass-transport of slow phosphate ions (weak acid). In the HER at the optimum concentration of approximately 2 M sodium phosphate at pH 5, our theoretical model predicts that the concentration overpotential accounts for more than half of the required overpotential. The substantial concentration overpotential would originate from the electrolyte property, suggesting that the proper electrolyte engineering will result in an improved apparent HER performances. The significance of concentration overpotential shown in the study is critical in the advancement of electrocatalysis, biocatalysis, and photocatalysis.

  17. A novel method for remediation of nickel containing wastewater at neutral conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hase, Haruko; Nishiuchi, Toru; Sato, Tsutomu; Otake, Tsubasa; Yaita, Tsuyoshi; Kobayashi, Tohru; Yoneda, Tetsuro

    2017-05-05

    Heavy metals contained in wastewater are generally removed by adding antalkaline to increase the pH, and Ni is commonly precipitated as Ni-hydroxides at pH 10. However, a more sustainable remediation method of treatment at neutral conditions would be attractive due to the high cost of chemical reagents and inefficient treatment at present. Based on natural attenuation, the method of adding Al ions has been used in wastewater treatment to precipitate layered double hydroxides (LDH). Here, we investigated the use of Al ion addition in the Ni containing wastewater treatment, experimentally and thermodynamically. By co-precipitation experiments adding Al ions to Ni-containing water, Ni was selectively incorporated into the structure of LDH, and the removal efficiency of Ni was close to 100% even in pH 7 and 8 samples (lower pH than conventional methods) with initial Ni concentrations of 200-10,000mg/L. Geochemical modeling results replicate the experimental results well when the Al/Ni ratio of LDH is assumed to be 0.33. This model makes it possible to estimate the amount of Al ions and additive agents necessary for use in treatment of wastewater containing different Ni concentrations.

  18. Existence of mild solutions of second-order neutral functional differential inclusions with nonlocal conditions in Banach spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Marshal Anthoni

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the existence of mild solutions of the nonlinear second-order neutral functional differential and integrodifferential inclusions with nonlocal conditions in Banach spaces. The results are obtained by using the theory of strongly continuous cosine families of bounded linear operators and a fixed point theorem for condensing maps due to Martelli.

  19. Air Conditioner Charging. Automotive Mechanics. Air Conditioning. Instructor's Guide [and] Student Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spignesi, B.

    This instructional package, one in a series of individualized instructional units on automobile air conditioning, consists of a student guide and an instructor guide dealing with air conditioning charging. Covered in the module are checking the air conditioning system for leaks, checking and adding refrigerant oil as needed, evacuating the system,…

  20. The Influence of Pre-Conditioning on Space Charge Formation in LDPE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleming, Robert J.; Henriksen, Mogens; Holbøll, Joachim T.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we present space charge accumulation data for planar low density polyethylene samples subjected to 20 kV/mm dc fields at room temperature. The data were obtained using the laser-induced-pressure-pulse (LIPP) technique. Some of the samples were conditioned by holding them at 40oC in ......C in short-circuit at rotary pump pressure for 48 hr prior to measurement. Such conditioning had no consistent effect on the space charge. The extent of charge injection/extraction at the semicon electrodes appeared to vary considerably between samples....

  1. Influences of acidic reaction and hydrolytic conditions on monosaccharide composition analysis of acidic, neutral and basic polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing-Chi; Zhao, Xia; Pu, Jiang-Hua; Luan, Xiao-Hong

    2016-06-05

    Monosaccharide composition analysis is important for structural characterization of polysaccharides. To investigate the influences of acidic reaction and hydrolytic conditions on monosaccharide composition analysis of polysaccharides, we chose alginate, starch, chitosan and chondroitin sulfate as representative of acidic, neutral, basic and complex polysaccharides to compare the release degree of monosaccharides under different hydrolytic conditions. The hydrolysis stability of 10 monosaccharide standards was also explored. Results showed that the basic sugars were hard to release but stable, the acidic sugars (uronic acids) were easy to release but unstable, and the release and stability of neutral sugars were in between acidic and basic sugars. In addition, the hydrolysis process was applied to monosaccharide composition analysis of Hippocampus trimaculatus polysaccharide and the appropriate hydrolytic condition was accorded with that of the above four polysaccharides. Thus, different hydrolytic conditions should be used for the monosaccharide composition analysis of polysaccharides based on their structural characteristics.

  2. Probing Neutrino Mass Hierarchy by Comparing the Charged-Current and Neutral-Current Interaction Rates of Supernova Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Lai, Kwang-Chang; Lee, Feng-Shiuh; Lin, Guey-Lin; Liu, Tsung-Che; Yang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The neutrino mass hierarchy is one of the neutrino fundamental properties yet to be determined. We introduce a method to determine neutrino mass hierarchy by comparing the interaction rate of neutral current (NC) interactions, $\

  3. Toxic effects of Al-based coagulants on Brassica chinensis and Raphanus sativus growing in acid and neutral conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kaisong; Zhou, Qixing

    2005-04-01

    The ecotoxicological effects of aluminum (Al)-based coagulants are of concern because of their wide-ranging applications in wastewater treatment and water purification. As important Al-based coagulants, AlCl(3) and PAC (polyaluminum-chloride) were selected as examples to examine the toxic effects on representative vegetables including the cabbage Brassica chinensis and the radish Raphanus sativus over a range of exposure concentrations in neutral (pH 7.00) and acidic (pH 4.00) conditions, using seed germination and root elongation in the early-growth stage as indicators of toxicity. The results showed that root elongation of the two vegetables was a more sensitive indicator than was seed germination for evaluating the toxicity of Al. As a single influencing factor, H(+) had no significant direct effects on root elongation of Brassica chinensis and Raphanus sativus under the experimental conditions. The toxicity of Al played the main role in inhibiting root elongation and seed germination and was strongly related to changes in pH. There was a markedly positive relationship between the inhibitory rate of root elongation, seed germination, and the concentration of Al at pH 4.00 (p < 0.01). The toxic effect of AlCl(3) on Brassica chinensis was less with a neutral pH than at pH 4.00, but Raphanus sativus was more susceptible to AlCl(3) toxicity at a neutral pH than at pH 4.00. Both Raphanus sativus and Brassica chinensis had a more toxic response to a low concentration (<64 mg . L(-1)) of PAC in a neutral condition than in an acidic condition. Undoubtedly, the Al toxicity caused by Al-based coagulants at a neutral pH is relevant when treatment solids are used in agriculture.

  4. A nonlinear electrophoretic model for PeakMaster: part III. Electromigration dispersion in systems that contain a neutral complex-forming agent and a fully charged analyte. Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruška, Vlastimil; Svobodová, Jana; Beneš, Martin; Gaš, Bohuslav

    2012-12-07

    We introduce a new nonlinear electrophoretic model for complex-forming systems with a fully charged analyte and a neutral ligand. The background electrolyte is supposed to be composed of two constituents, which do not interact with the ligand. In order to characterize the electromigration dispersion (EMD) of the analyte zone we define a new parameter, the nonlinear electromigration mobility slope, S(EMD,A). The parameter can be easily utilized for quantitative prediction of the EMD and for comparisons of the model with the simulated and experimental profiles. We implemented the model to the new version of PeakMaster 5.3 Complex that can calculate some characteristic parameters of the electrophoretic system and can plot the dependence of S(EMD,A) on the concentration of the ligand. Besides S(EMD,A), also the relative velocity slope, S(X), can be calculated. It is commonly used as a measure of EMD in electrophoretic systems. PeakMaster 5.3 Complex software can be advantageously used for optimization of the separation conditions to avoid high EMD in complexing systems. Based on the theoretical model we analyze the S(EMD,A) and reveal that this parameter is composed of six terms. We show that the major factor responsible for the electromigration dispersion in complex-forming electrophoretic systems is the complexation equilibrium and particularly its impact on the effective mobility of the analyte. To prove the appropriateness of the model we showed that there is a very good agreement between peak shapes calculated by PeakMaster 5.3 Complex (plotted using the HVLR function) and the profiles simulated by means of Simul 5 Complex. The detailed experimental verification of the new mode of PeakMaster 5.3 Complex is in the next part IV of the series.

  5. Space Charge Formation in XLPE - the Influence of Electrodes and Pre-conditioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbøll, Joachim T.; Henriksen, Mogens; Fleming, R.J.

    1999-01-01

    The composition of the inner and outer “semicon” shields in modern ac cables, and the temperature/pressure conditions under which the various manufacturing procedures are carried out, would be expected to influence space charge accumulation under dc stress significantly. However, few systematic...... investigations of the influence of these factors, on space charge accumulation or other electrical properties of XLPE, have been reported. In this paper we present space charge profiles for a range of XLPE planar samples under dc stress. Three different types of semicon electrodes were investigated, as well...

  6. Neutral lipid accumulation at elevated temperature in conditional mutants of two microalgae species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, Shuo; Brandt, Anders Bøving; Egsgaard, Helge

    2012-01-01

    mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Chlorella vulgaris, nine out of fourty-one mutants in C. reinhardtii and eleven out of fifty-three mutants in C. vulgaris contained increased amounts of neutral lipids, predominantly as triacylglycerols. Upon temperature induced cell-cycle arrest, these mutants...

  7. A Neutral Odor May Become a Sexual Incentive through Classical Conditioning in Male Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvitvik, Inger-Line; Berg, Kristine Marit; Agmo, Anders

    2010-01-01

    A neutral olfactory stimulus was employed as CS in a series of experiments with a sexually receptive female as UCS and the execution of an intromission as the UCR. Each experimental session lasted until the male ejaculated. The time the experimental subject spent in a zone adjacent to the source of the olfactory stimulus during the 10 s of CS…

  8. Charge neutralization of the central lysine cluster in prion protein (PrP) promotes PrP(Sc)-like folding of recombinant PrP amyloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groveman, Bradley R; Kraus, Allison; Raymond, Lynne D; Dolan, Michael A; Anson, Kelsie J; Dorward, David W; Caughey, Byron

    2015-01-09

    The structure of the infectious form of prion protein, PrP(Sc), remains unclear. Most pure recombinant prion protein (PrP) amyloids generated in vitro are not infectious and lack the extent of the protease-resistant core and solvent exclusion of infectious PrP(Sc), especially within residues ∼90-160. Polyanionic cofactors can enhance infectivity and PrP(Sc)-like characteristics of such fibrils, but the mechanism of this enhancement is unknown. In considering structural models of PrP(Sc) multimers, we identified an obstacle to tight packing that might be overcome with polyanionic cofactors, namely, electrostatic repulsion between four closely spaced cationic lysines within a central lysine cluster of residues 101-110. For example, in our parallel in-register intermolecular β-sheet model of PrP(Sc), not only would these lysines be clustered within the 101-110 region of the primary sequence, but they would have intermolecular spacings of only ∼4.8 Å between stacked β-strands. We have now performed molecular dynamics simulations predicting that neutralization of the charges on these lysine residues would allow more stable parallel in-register packing in this region. We also show empirically that substitution of these clustered lysine residues with alanines or asparagines results in recombinant PrP amyloid fibrils with extended proteinase-K resistant β-sheet cores and infrared spectra that are more reminiscent of bona fide PrP(Sc). These findings indicate that charge neutralization at the central lysine cluster is critical for the folding and tight packing of N-proximal residues within PrP amyloid fibrils. This charge neutralization may be a key aspect of the mechanism by which anionic cofactors promote PrP(Sc) formation.

  9. Study of charged and neutral minimal supersymmetric standard model Higgs boson decays and measurement of tan at the compact linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E Coniavitis; A Ferrari

    2007-12-01

    The minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model (MSSM) predicts the existence of new charged and neutral Higgs bosons. The pair creation of these new particles at the multi-TeV + - compact linear collider (CLIC), followed by decays into standard model particles, were simulated along with the corresponding background. High-energy beam-beam effects such as ISR, beamstrahlung and hadronic background were included. We have investigated the possibility of using the ratio between the number of events found in various decay channels to determine the MSSM parameter tan and we have derived the corresponding statistical error from the uncertainties on the measured cross-sections and Higgs boson masses.

  10. Electrostatic point charge fitting as an inverse problem: Revealing the underlying ill-conditioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Maxim V.; Talipov, Marat R.; Timerghazin, Qadir K., E-mail: qadir.timerghazin@marquette.edu [Department of Chemistry, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201-1881 (United States)

    2015-10-07

    Atom-centered point charge (PC) model of the molecular electrostatics—a major workhorse of the atomistic biomolecular simulations—is usually parameterized by least-squares (LS) fitting of the point charge values to a reference electrostatic potential, a procedure that suffers from numerical instabilities due to the ill-conditioned nature of the LS problem. To reveal the origins of this ill-conditioning, we start with a general treatment of the point charge fitting problem as an inverse problem and construct an analytical model with the point charges spherically arranged according to Lebedev quadrature which is naturally suited for the inverse electrostatic problem. This analytical model is contrasted to the atom-centered point-charge model that can be viewed as an irregular quadrature poorly suited for the problem. This analysis shows that the numerical problems of the point charge fitting are due to the decay of the curvatures corresponding to the eigenvectors of LS sum Hessian matrix. In part, this ill-conditioning is intrinsic to the problem and is related to decreasing electrostatic contribution of the higher multipole moments, that are, in the case of Lebedev grid model, directly associated with the Hessian eigenvectors. For the atom-centered model, this association breaks down beyond the first few eigenvectors related to the high-curvature monopole and dipole terms; this leads to even wider spread-out of the Hessian curvature values. Using these insights, it is possible to alleviate the ill-conditioning of the LS point-charge fitting without introducing external restraints and/or constraints. Also, as the analytical Lebedev grid PC model proposed here can reproduce multipole moments up to a given rank, it may provide a promising alternative to including explicit multipole terms in a force field.

  11. Electrostatic Point Charge Fitting as an Inverse Problem: Revealing the Underlying Ill-Conditioning

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, Maxim V; Timerghazin, Qadir K

    2015-01-01

    Atom-centered point charge model of the molecular electrostatics---a major workhorse of the atomistic biomolecular simulations---is usually parameterized by least-squares (LS) fitting of the point charge values to a reference electrostatic potential, a procedure that suffers from numerical instabilities due to the ill-conditioned nature of the LS problem. Here, to reveal the origins of this ill-conditioning, we start with a general treatment of the point charge fitting problem as an inverse problem, and construct an analytically soluble model with the point charges spherically arranged according to Lebedev quadrature naturally suited for the inverse electrostatic problem. This analytical model is contrasted to the atom-centered point-charge model that can be viewed as an irregular quadrature poorly suited for the problem. This analysis shows that the numerical problems of the point charge fitting are due to the decay of the curvatures corresponding to the eigenvectors of LS sum Hessian matrix. In part, this i...

  12. Investigation of edge neutral flux on the ISX-B tokamak using a low-energy charge-exchange analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, D. M.

    1983-08-01

    To study the emission of D/sup 0/ from the periphery of a tokamak plasma, a low-energy neutral particle spectrometer optimized for (16 < E < 500 eV) has been built and employed on the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B) tokamak. The diagnostic utilizes a cesium vapor cell to form negative ions from the incident D/sup 0/ neutrals and a four-channel electrostatic analyzer to energy analyze the negative ions. The spectrometer was absolutely calibrated using D/sup 0/ beams formed by electron capture by positive ions in a gas cell and by photo-detachment of negative ions by a yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser. For the observation region chosen on ISX-B (120/sup 0/ toroidally away from the limiter, near the gas puff), the neutral particle flux has a two-component nature. These data are well fit by two separate exponential distributions of equivalent temperatures 6 to 8 eV for particle energies below about 80 eV and 70 to 80 eV for particle energies above 80 eV. For ohmically heated discharges, the measured particle flux in the energy range 25 to 700 eV is approx. 2.5 x 10/sup 15/ cm/sup -2/.s/sup -1/; the mean particle energy is approx. 70 eV, and the calculated flux at the wall is approx. 30 mW/cm/sup 2/. The major effect of neutral beam heating is to increase the particle flux in the 25- to 700-eV range by a factor of 3.

  13. The Influence of Pre-conditioning on the Space Charge Formation in LDPE and XLPE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Mogens; Holbøll, Joachim T.; Fleming, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    Planar LDPE and XLPE samples were conditioned by holding in short circuit for 48 hrs. at 40oC under rotary pump pressure, and space charge accumulation in these samples under DC fields of 20 kV/mm was then compared with the corresponding accumulation in unconditioned samples.The test results were...

  14. HiggsBounds 2.0.0. Confronting neutral and charged Higgs sector predictions with exclusion bounds from LEP and the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtle, P.; Weiglein, G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Brein, O. [Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Heinemeyer, S. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria (CSIC-UC), Santander (Spain); Williams, K.E. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics

    2011-03-15

    HiggsBounds 2.0.0 is a computer code which tests both neutral and charged Higgs sectors of arbitrary models against the current exclusion bounds from the Higgs searches at LEP and the Tevatron. As input, it requires a selection of model predictions, such as Higgs masses, branching ratios, effective couplings and total decay widths. HiggsBounds 2.0.0 then uses the expected and observed topological cross section limits from the Higgs searches to determine whether a given parameter scenario of a model is excluded at the 95% C.L. by those searches. Version 2.0.0 represents a significant extension of the code since its first release (1.0.0). It includes now 28/53 LEP/Tevatron Higgs search analyses, compared to the 11/22 in the first release, of which many of the ones from the Tevatron are replaced by updates. As a major extension, the code allows now the predictions for (singly) charged Higgs bosons to be confronted with LEP and Tevatron searches. Furthermore, the newly included analyses contain LEP searches for neutral Higgs bosons (H) decaying invisibly or into (non flavour tagged) hadrons as well as decay-mode independent searches for neutral Higgs bosons, LEP searches via the production modes {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}H and b anti bH, and Tevatron searches via t anti tH. Also, all Tevatron results presented at the ICHEP'10 are included in version 2.0.0. As physics applications of HiggsBounds 2.0.0 we study the allowed Higgs mass range for model scenarios with invisible Higgs decays and we obtain exclusion results for the scalar sector of the Randall-Sundrum model using up-to-date LEP and Tevatron direct search results. (orig.)

  15. Neutralization of Gating Charges in Domain II of the Sodium Channel α Subunit Enhances Voltage-Sensor Trapping by a β-Scorpion Toxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cestèle, Sandrine; Scheuer, Todd; Mantegazza, Massimo; Rochat, Hervé; Catterall, William A.

    2001-01-01

    β-Scorpion toxins shift the voltage dependence of activation of sodium channels to more negative membrane potentials, but only after a strong depolarizing prepulse to fully activate the channels. Their receptor site includes the S3–S4 loop at the extracellular end of the S4 voltage sensor in domain II of the α subunit. Here, we probe the role of gating charges in the IIS4 segment in β-scorpion toxin action by mutagenesis and functional analysis of the resulting mutant sodium channels. Neutralization of the positively charged amino acid residues in the IIS4 segment by mutation to glutamine shifts the voltage dependence of channel activation to more positive membrane potentials and reduces the steepness of voltage-dependent gating, which is consistent with the presumed role of these residues as gating charges. Surprisingly, neutralization of the gating charges at the outer end of the IIS4 segment by the mutations R850Q, R850C, R853Q, and R853C markedly enhances β-scorpion toxin action, whereas mutations R856Q, K859Q, and K862Q have no effect. In contrast to wild-type, the β-scorpion toxin Css IV causes a negative shift of the voltage dependence of activation of mutants R853Q and R853C without a depolarizing prepulse at holding potentials from −80 to −140 mV. Reaction of mutant R853C with 2-aminoethyl methanethiosulfonate causes a positive shift of the voltage dependence of activation and restores the requirement for a depolarizing prepulse for Css IV action. Enhancement of sodium channel activation by Css IV causes large tail currents upon repolarization, indicating slowed deactivation of the IIS4 voltage sensor by the bound toxin. Our results are consistent with a voltage-sensor–trapping model in which the β-scorpion toxin traps the IIS4 voltage sensor in its activated position as it moves outward in response to depolarization and holds it there, slowing its inward movement on deactivation and enhancing subsequent channel activation. Evidently

  16. Three-dimensional kinetic modeling of the neutral and charged dust in the coma of Rosetta’s target comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenishev, Valeriy; Borovikov, Dmitry; Combi, Michael R.; Fougere, Nicolas; Huang, Zhenguang; Bieler, Andre; Hansen, Kenneth; Toth, Gabor; Jia, Xianzhe; Shou, Yinsi; Gombosi, Tamas; Rubin, Martin; Rotundi, Alessandra; Della Corte, Vincenzo

    2015-11-01

    Rosetta is the first mission that escorts a comet along its way through the Solar System for an extended amount of time. As a result, the target of the mission, comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, is an object of great scientific interest.Dust ejected from the nucleus is entrained into the coma by the escaping gas. Interacting with the ambient plasma the dust particles are charged by the electron and ion collection currents. The photo and secondary emission currents can also change the particle charge. The resulting Lorentz force together with the gas drag, gravity, and radiation pressure define the dust particle trajectories.At altitudes comparable to those of the Rosetta trajectory, direction of a dust particle velocity can be significantly different from that in the innermost vicinity of the coma near the nucleus. At such altitudes the angular distribution of the dust grains velocity has a pronounced tail-like structure. This is consistent with Rosetta’s GIADA dust observations showing dust grains moving in the anti-sunward direction.Here, we present results of our model study of the neutral and charged dust in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, combining the University of Michigan AMPS kinetic particle model and the BATSRUS MHD model. Trajectories of dust particles within the observable size range of Rosetta’s GIADA dust instrument have been calculated accounting for the radiation pressure, gas drag, the nucleus gravity, the Lorentz force, and the effect of the nucleus rotation. The dust grain electric charge is calculated by balancing the collection currents at the grain’s location. We present angular velocity distribution maps of these charged dust grains for a few locations representative of Rosetta's trajectory around the comet.This work was supported by US Rosetta project contracts JPL-1266313 and JPL-1266314 and NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NNX14AG84G

  17. Neutral thermospheric temperature from ion concentration measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breig, E. L.; Donaldson, J. S.; Hanson, W. B.; Hoffman, J. H.; Power, R. A.; Kayser, D. C.; Spencer, N. W.; Wharton, L. E.

    1981-01-01

    A technique for extracting information on neutral temperature from in situ F region measurements of O(+) and H(+) ion concentrations is analyzed and evaluated. Advantage is taken of the condition of charge-exchange equilibrium of these species in the neighborhood of 320 km to infer the associated relative abundances of neutral oxygen and hydrogen. Results are shown to be generally consistent with other concurrent in situ measurements.

  18. Charged hadrons in local finite-volume QED+QCD with C* boundary conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Lucini, Biagio; Ramos, Alberto; Tantalo, Nazario

    2016-01-01

    In order to calculate QED corrections to hadronic physical quantities by means of lattice simulations, a coherent description of electrically-charged states in finite volume is needed. In the usual periodic setup, Gauss's law and large gauge transformations forbid the propagation of electrically-charged states. A possible solution to this problem, which does not violate the axioms of local quantum field theory, has been proposed by Wiese and Polley, and is based on the use of C* boundary conditions. We present a thorough analysis of the properties and symmetries of QED in isolation and QED coupled to QCD, with C* boundary conditions. In particular we learn that a certain class of electrically-charged states can be constructed in this setup in a fully consistent fashion, without relying on gauge fixing. We argue that this class of states covers most of the interesting phenomenological applications in the framework of numerical simulations. We also calculate finite-volume corrections to the mass of stable charg...

  19. Tuning the g-factor of neutral and charged excitons confined to self-assembled (Al,Ga)As shell quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corfdir, P., E-mail: corfdir@pdi-berlin.de; Van Hattem, B.; Phillips, R. T. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J. J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Fontana, Y.; Russo-Averchi, E.; Heiss, M.; Fontcuberta i Morral, A. [Laboratoire des Matériaux Semiconducteurs, Institut des Matériaux, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2014-12-01

    We study the neutral exciton (X) and charged exciton (CX) transitions from (Al,Ga)As shell quantum dots located in core-shell nanowires, in the presence of a magnetic field. The g-factors and the diamagnetic coefficients of both the X and the CX depend on the orientation of the field with respect to the nanowire axis. The aspect ratio of the X wavefunction is quantified based on the anisotropy of the diamagnetic coefficient. For specific orientations of the magnetic field, it is possible to cancel the g-factor of the bright states of the X and the CX by means of an inversion of the sign of the hole's g-factor, which is promising for quantum information processing applications.

  20. Magnetic field control of the neutral and charged exciton fine structure in single quantum dashes emitting at 1.55 μm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mrowiński, P.; Musiał, A.; Maryński, A.; Syperek, M.; Misiewicz, J.; Sęk, G. [Laboratory for Optical Spectroscopy of Nanostructures, Department of Experimental Physics, Wrocław University of Technology, Wybrzeże Wyspiańskiego 27, Wrocław (Poland); Somers, A. [Technische Physik, University of Würzburg and Wilhelm-Conrad-Röntgen-Research Center for Complex Material Systems, Am Hubland, D-97074 Würzburg (Germany); Reithmaier, J. P. [Technische Physik, University of Würzburg and Wilhelm-Conrad-Röntgen-Research Center for Complex Material Systems, Am Hubland, D-97074 Würzburg (Germany); Institute of Nanostructure Technologies and Analytics (INA), CINSaT, University of Kassel, Heinrich-Plett-Str. 40, 34132 Kassel (Germany); Höfling, S. [Technische Physik, University of Würzburg and Wilhelm-Conrad-Röntgen-Research Center for Complex Material Systems, Am Hubland, D-97074 Würzburg (Germany); SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, North Haugh, KY16 9SS St. Andrews (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-02

    We investigated the neutral and charged exciton fine structure in single InAs/InGaAlAs/InP quantum dashes emitting at 1.55 μm using polarization-resolved microphotoluminescence in a magnetic field. Inverted spin configuration of horizontally [1–10] and vertically [110] polarized transitions has been observed. An in-plane magnetic field of up to 5 Tesla has been applied to tailor the fine structure, and eventually to reduce the splitting of the bright exciton states down to zero. This inverted structure has been observed for all the investigated excitons, making it a characteristic feature for this class of nanostructures with the largest splitting reduction of 170 μeV.

  1. Work function measurements during plasma exposition at conditions relevant in negative ion sources for the ITER neutral beam injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutser, R; Wimmer, C; Fantz, U

    2011-02-01

    Cesium seeded sources for surface generated negative hydrogen ions are major components of neutral beam injection systems in future large-scale fusion experiments such as ITER. The stability and delivered current density depend highly on the work function during vacuum and plasma phases of the ion source. One of the most important quantities that affect the source performance is the work function. A modified photocurrent method was developed to measure the temporal behavior of the work function during and after cesium evaporation. The investigation of cesium exposed Mo and MoLa samples under ITER negative hydrogen ion based neutral beam injection relevant surface and plasma conditions showed the influence of impurities which result in a fast degradation when the plasma exposure or the cesium flux onto the sample is stopped. A minimum work function close to that of bulk cesium was obtained under the influence of the plasma exposition, while a significantly higher work function was observed under ITER-like vacuum conditions.

  2. Modeling Charge-Sign Asymmetric Solvation Free Energies With Nonlinear Boundary Conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Bardhan, Jaydeep P

    2014-01-01

    We show that charge-sign-dependent asymmetric hydration can be modeled accurately using linear Poisson theory but replacing the standard electric-displacement boundary condition with a simple nonlinear boundary condition. Using a single multiplicative scaling factor to determine atomic radii from molecular dynamics Lennard-Jones parameters, the new model accurately reproduces MD free-energy calculations of hydration asymmetries for (i) monatomic ions, (ii) titratable amino acids in both their protonated and unprotonated states, and (iii) the Mobley "bracelet" and "rod" test problems [J. Phys. Chem. B, v. 112:2408, 2008]. Remarkably, the model also justifies the use of linear response expressions for charging free energies. Our boundary-element method implementation demonstrates the ease with which other continuum-electrostatic solvers can be extended to include asymmetry.

  3. Silicification and biosilicification Part 5. An investigation of the silica structures formed at weakly acidic pH and neutral pH as facilitated by cationically charged macromolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patwardhan, Siddharth V.; Clarson, Stephen J

    2003-06-10

    Biosilicification in diatoms has been reported to occur at (or close to) neutral pH and it has been shown that protein molecules can act as catalysts/templates/scaffolds for this elegant materials chemistry. Here we report the formation of silica spheres from an aqueous silica precursor as facilitated by both poly-L-lysine (PLL) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) at pH 6.0 and under ambient conditions. It was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) that there were morphological differences in the silica formed at pH 6 when compared to the silica morphologies formed using the same macromolecules at neutral pH. Notably, a bimodal distribution of silica particles was seen for both the PLL and PAH systems at pH 6. These results are compared and contrasted with those previously reported for the pH dependence of silicification and biosilicification and in particular, those obtained for the pH dependence of silica formation in the presence silaffin proteins isolated form the diatom C. fusiformis. The findings for these cationically charged macromolecules suggest that lysine may be an important amino acid in the primary sequence of proteins that catalyze the formation of silica structures in vivo.

  4. Resonance assignment of an engineered amino-terminal domain of a major ampullate spider silk with neutralized charge cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaal, Daniel; Bauer, Joschka; Schweimer, Kristian; Scheibel, Thomas; Rösch, Paul; Schwarzinger, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    Spider dragline fibers are predominantly made out of the major ampullate spidroins (MaSp) 1 and 2. The assembly of dissolved spidroin into a stable fiber is highly controlled for example by dimerization of its amino-terminal domain (NRN) upon acidification, as well as removal of sodium chloride along the spinning duct. Clustered residues D39, E76 and E81 are the most highly conserved residues of the five-helix bundle, and they are hypothesized to be key residues for switching between a monomeric and a dimeric conformation. Simultaneous replacement of these residues by their non-titratable analogues results in variant D39N/E76Q/E81Q, which is supposed to fold into an intermediate conformation between that of the monomeric and the dimeric state at neutral pH. Here we report the resonance assignment of Latrodectus hesperus NRN variant D39N/E76Q/E81Q at pH 7.2 obtained by high-resolution triple resonance NMR spectroscopy.

  5. Probing neutrino mass hierarchy by comparing the charged-current and neutral-current interaction rates of supernova neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Kwang-Chang [Center for General Education, Chang Gung University,Kwei-Shan, Taoyuan, 333, Taiwan (China); Leung Center for Cosmology and Particle Astrophysics (LeCosPA), National Taiwan University, Taipei, 106, Taiwan (China); Lee, Fei-Fan [Institute of Physics, National Chiao Tung University,Hsinchu, 300, Taiwan (China); Lee, Feng-Shiuh [Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao Tung University,Hsinchu, 300, Taiwan (China); Lin, Guey-Lin [Leung Center for Cosmology and Particle Astrophysics (LeCosPA), National Taiwan University, Taipei, 106, Taiwan (China); Institute of Physics, National Chiao Tung University,Hsinchu, 300, Taiwan (China); Liu, Tsung-Che [Leung Center for Cosmology and Particle Astrophysics (LeCosPA), National Taiwan University, Taipei, 106, Taiwan (China); Yang, Yi [Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao Tung University,Hsinchu, 300, Taiwan (China)

    2016-07-22

    The neutrino mass hierarchy is one of the neutrino fundamental properties yet to be determined. We introduce a method to determine neutrino mass hierarchy by comparing the interaction rate of neutral current (NC) interactions, ν(ν-bar)+p→ν(ν-bar)+p, and inverse beta decays (IBD), ν-bar{sub e}+p→n+e{sup +}, of supernova neutrinos in scintillation detectors. Neutrino flavor conversions inside the supernova are sensitive to neutrino mass hierarchy. Due to Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein effects, the full swapping of ν-bar{sub e} flux with the ν-bar{sub x} (x=μ, τ) one occurs in the inverted hierarchy, while such a swapping does not occur in the normal hierarchy. As a result, more high energy IBD events occur in the detector for the inverted hierarchy than the high energy IBD events in the normal hierarchy. By comparing IBD interaction rate with the mass hierarchy independent NC interaction rate, one can determine the neutrino mass hierarchy.

  6. Charge Accumulation in LDPE and XLPE Conditioned at 80oC under Reduced Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleming, Robert J.; Henriksen, Mogens; Holbøll, Joachim T.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of thermal conditioning, under reduced pressure, on space accumulation in planar LDPE and XLPE samples under DC stress, have been investigated. The samples were conditioned prior to voltage application by being held at 80oC for 2-3 days in short circuit at rotary pump pressure. Some...... were then cooled to room temperature over a period of at least 6hr, still under rotary pump pressure and in short circuit, while others were cooled to room temperature in less than 1.5hr in the laboratory air. DC fields of 18kV/mm were then applied at room temperature, and space charge accumulation...

  7. Measurement of CP asymmetries and branching fractions in two-body neutral B meson decays to charged pions and kaons with the BABAR detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farbin, Amir

    This dissertation presents a measurement of CP asymmetries and branching fractions for neutral B meson decays to two-body final states of charged pions and kaons. The results are obtained from a data sample of about 88 million Upsilon(4S) → BB¯ decays collected between 1999 and 2002 with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. A fit to kinematic, topological, and particle identification information measures the charge-averaged branching fractions B (B0 → pi+pi -) = (4.7 +/- 0.6 +/- 0.2) x 10-6 and B (B0 → K+pi -) = (17.9 +/- 0.9 +/- 0.7) x 10-6 ; the 90% confidence level upper limit B (B0 → K+ K-) b-flavor tagging information measures the CP-violating parameters for B0 → pi +pi- decays Spipi = 0.02 +/- 0.34 +/- 0.05 [-0.54, +0.58] and Cpipi = -0.30 +/- 0.25 +/- 0.04 [-0.72, +0.12].

  8. Simple Fabrication of Mesoporous Silica with Remarkable High Temperature Stability at Neutral pH and Ambient Conditions from TEOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, David; Vippagunta, Radha; Watkins, James

    2007-03-01

    Traditional silica synthesis processes can yield well ordered materials, but the synthesis conditions also lead to incomplete condensation of the silica network, which results in significant structural contraction upon calcination and limited thermal, hydrothermal and mechanical stability. Here we report the synthesis that, surprisingly, yields nearly complete condensation of the silica network (virtually all Q4 linkages) using cysteamine as the catalyst and polyoxyethylene surfactants as the structure directing agents in buffered solution at neutral pH and ambient temperature. Recently, small molecule bifunctional amines, including cysteamine, were evaluated by Morse and co-workers and found to produce silica from TEOS(JACS 2005, 127, 35). Our work combines the cysteamine catalyst system with structure-directing block copolymer surfactants at neutral pH and ambient temperature to produce mesoporous silica. The addition of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) to a solution of containing cysteamine, citrate buffer (pH 7.2) and 5wt Brij amphiphilic block copolymer (polyethylene oxide-polyethylene) yields mesoporous silica. The resulting mesoporous silica powder was analyzed using XRD, TGA, FTIR, TEM, and NMR. The materials were found to exhibit stability under extreme temperature calcinations (up to 800 C) in the presence of water. SAXS shows that 1.0 shrinkage upon calcination up to 800C. 29Si NMR analysis indicates a fully condensed silica network, Q4 linkages, in accordance with this observation.

  9. The Influence of Pre-conditioning on Space Charge Formation in LDPE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Mogens; Holbøll, Joachim T.; Fleming, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of thermal conditioning, at reduced pressure, on space charge accumulation in planar LDPE samples under DC stress has been investigated. The samples were 1.8 mm thick, including two 0.1 mm thick semicon electrodes, and they were conditioned prior to voltage application by being held...... at 80oC for 48 hrs in short-circuit at rotary pump pressure. Some were then cooled to 20oC, over a 6 hr period, still under rotary pump pressure and in short circuit, while others were cooled to 20oC in less than 5 minutes, in the laboratory air (still in short circuit). DC fields of 20 kV/mm were...... then applied at room temperature, and space charge accumulation was monitored as a function of time, using the pulsed-electro-acoustic (PEA) method (Denmark) and the laser-induced-pressure-pulse (LIPP) method (Australia). The space charge density was calibrated from measurements at fields up to 5 kV/mm, where...

  10. New multigroup Monte Carlo scattering algorithm suitable for neutral- and charged-particle Boltzmann and Fokker-Planck calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloan, D.P.

    1983-05-01

    Morel (1981) has developed multigroup Legendre cross sections suitable for input to standard discrete ordinates transport codes for performing charged-particle Fokker-Planck calculations in one-dimensional slab and spherical geometries. Since the Monte Carlo neutron transport code, MORSE, uses the same multigroup cross section data that discrete ordinates codes use, it was natural to consider whether Fokker-Planck calculations could be performed with MORSE. In order to extend the unique three-dimensional forward or adjoint capability of MORSE to Fokker-Planck calculations, the MORSE code was modified to correctly treat the delta-function scattering of the energy operator, and a new set of physically acceptable cross sections was derived to model the angular operator. Morel (1979) has also developed multigroup Legendre cross sections suitable for input to standard discrete ordinates codes for performing electron Boltzmann calculations. These electron cross sections may be treated in MORSE with the same methods developed to treat the Fokker-Planck cross sections. The large magnitude of the elastic scattering cross section, however, severely increases the computation or run time. It is well-known that approximate elastic cross sections are easily obtained by applying the extended transport (or delta function) correction to the Legendre coefficients of the exact cross section. An exact method for performing the extended transport cross section correction produces cross sections which are physically acceptable. Sample calculations using electron cross sections have demonstrated this new technique to be very effective in decreasing the large magnitude of the cross sections.

  11. Determining the power-law wind-profile exponent under near-neutral stability conditions at sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, S. A.; Meindl, Eric A.; Gilhousen, David B.

    1994-01-01

    On the basis of 30 samples from near-simultaneous overwater measurements by pairs of anemometers located at different heights in the Gulf of Mexico and off the Chesapeake Bay, Virginia, the mean and standard deviation for the exponent of the power-law wind profile over the ocean under near-neutral atmospheric stability conditions were determined to be 0.11 +/- 0.03. Because this mean value is obtained from both deep and shallow water environments, it is recommended for use at sea to adjust the wind speed measurements at different heights to the standard height of 10 m above the mean sea surface. An example to apply this P value to estimate the momentum flux or wind stress is provided.

  12. The interplay between neutral exciton and charge transfer states in single-strand polyadenine: a quantum dynamical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Fabrizio; Improta, Roberto; Avila, Francisco; Segado, Mireia; Lami, Alessandro

    2013-08-01

    We investigate the quantum dynamics of the internal conversion of excitons into charge transfer (CT) states in single-strand oligomers of adenine (An) of different length (n up to 10 units) excited by a short-time laser pulse. Calculations are based on a model vibronic Hamiltonian whose parameters are fitted to accurate time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations, which was shown to reproduce the experimental absorption spectrum with the increase of n. As a first step, we analyze the impact of the vibrational motion on the population transfer in the dimer, highlighting that it causes loss of coherence and slows down the dynamics. For longer oligomers we resort to a simplified approach considering only electronic states and solving the equation of motion for the density matrix driven by inter-state couplings. In this way we are able also to include phenomenologically dephasing terms that mainly simulate intra-molecular effects, and lifetimes of local excitations mimicking monomer-like decay processes. Relaxation effects, whose role is to drive the system towards the thermal equilibrium allowing population exchange among states, are deliberately not considered here, since the focus is on very short-time dynamics. We consider both the cases of an instantaneous and of a finite-time (full width at half maximum 50 fs) laser pulse. According to our calculations, the photoexcited oligomers exhibit a complex dynamics and CT population rises on a 20-30 fs timescale and it persists even on the picosecond timescale. CT population increases with the length of the oligomer and it is only weakly dependent on the relative stability of CT and exciton states (within a range of 1500 cm(-1)). The chain length already modifies the photoexcited dynamics for A2 and A4 systems, but this effect saturates for small n so that the A10 oligomer is also representative of longer chains.

  13. Theoretical study of chlordecone and surface groups interaction in an activated carbon model under acidic and neutral conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboa-Carballo, Juan José; Melchor-Rodríguez, Kenia; Hernández-Valdés, Daniel; Enriquez-Victorero, Carlos; Montero-Alejo, Ana Lilian; Gaspard, Sarra; Jáuregui-Haza, Ulises Javier

    2016-04-01

    Activated carbons (ACs) are widely used in the purification of drinking water without almost any knowledge about the adsorption mechanisms of the persistent organic pollutants. Chlordecone (CLD, Kepone) is an organochlorinated synthetic compound that has been used mainly as agricultural insecticide. CLD has been identified and listed as a persistent organic pollutant by the Stockholm Convention. The selection of the best suited AC for this type of contaminants is mainly an empirical and costly process. A theoretical study of the influence of AC surface groups (SGs) on CLD adsorption is done in order to help understanding the process. This may provide a first selection criteria for the preparation of AC with suitable surface properties. A model of AC consisting of a seven membered ring graphene sheet (coronene) with a functional group on the edge was used to evaluate the influence of the SGs over the adsorption. Multiple Minima Hypersurface methodology (MMH) coupled with PM7 semiempirical Hamiltonian was employed in order to study the interactions of the chlordecone with SGs (hydroxyl and carboxyl) at acidic and neutral pH and different hydration conditions. Selected structures were re-optimized using CAM-B3LYP to achieve a well-defined electron density to characterize the interactions by the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules approach. The deprotonated form of surface carboxyl and hydroxyl groups of AC models show the strongest interactions, suggesting a chemical adsorption. An increase in carboxylic SGs content is proposed to enhance CLD adsorption onto AC at neutral pH conditions.

  14. Infrared spectra and structures of the neutral and charged CrCO2 and Cr(CO2)2 isomers in solid neon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingnan; Chen, Mohua; Zhou, Mingfei

    2014-08-01

    The reactions from codeposition of laser-ablated chromium atoms with carbon dioxide in excess neon are studied by infrared absorption spectroscopy. The species formed are identified by the effects of isotopic substitution on their infrared spectra. Density functional calculations are performed to support the spectral assignments and to interpret the geometric and electronic structures of the experimentally observed species. Besides the previously reported insertion products OCrCO and O2Cr(CO)2, the one-to-one Cr(CO2) complex and the one-to-two Cr(CO2)2 complex as well as the CrOCrCO and OCCrCO3 complexes are also formed. The Cr(CO2) complex is characterized to be side-on η(2)-C,O-coordinated. The Cr(CO2)2 complex is identified to involve a side-on η(2)-C,O-coordinated CO2 and an end-on η(1)-O-coordinated CO2. OCCrCO3 is a carbonate carbonyl complex predicted to have a planar structure with a η(2)-O,O-coordinated carbonate ligand. The CrOCrCO complex is predicted to be linear with a high-spin ground state. Besides the neutral molecules, charged species are also produced. The Cr(CO2)(+) and Cr(CO2)2(+) cation complexes are characterized to have linear end-on η(1)-O-coordinated structures with blue-shifted antisymmetric CO2 stretching vibrational frequencies. The OCrCO(-) anion is bent with the Cr-O and CO stretching frequencies red-shifted from those of OCrCO neutral molecule.

  15. Solute and solvent dynamics in confined equal-sized aqueous environments of charged and neutral reverse micelles: a combined dynamic fluorescence and all-atom molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guchhait, Biswajit; Biswas, Ranjit; Ghorai, Pradip K

    2013-03-28

    Here a combined dynamic fluorescence and all-atom molecular dynamics simulation study of aqueous pool-size dependent solvation energy and rotational relaxations of a neutral dipolar solute, C153, trapped in AOT (charged) and IGPAL (neutral) reverse micelles (RMs) at 298 K, is described. RMs in simulations have been represented by a reduced model where SPC/E water molecules interact with a trapped C153 that possesses realistic charge distributions for both ground and excited states. In large aqueous pools, measured average solvation and rotation rates are smaller for the neutral RMs than those in charged ones. Interestingly, while the measured average solvation and rotation rates increase with pool size for the charged RMs, the average rotation rates for the neutral RMs exhibit a reverse dependence. Simulations have qualitatively reproduced this experimental trend and suggested interfacial location for the solute for all cases. The origin for the subnanosecond Stokes shift dynamics has been investigated and solute-interface interaction contribution quantified. Simulated layer-wise translational and rotational diffusions of water molecules re-examine the validity of the core-shell model and provide a resolution to a debate regarding the origin of the subnanosecond solvation component in dynamic Stokes shift measurements with aqueous RMs but not detected in ultrafast IR measurements.

  16. A highly specific and sensitive electroanalytical strategy for microRNAs based on amplified silver deposition by the synergic TiO2 photocatalysis and guanine photoreduction using charge-neutral probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Li, Shuying; Dong, Minmin; Zhang, Liyan; Qiao, Yuchun; Jiang, Yao; Qi, Wei; Wang, Hua

    2015-11-18

    TiO2 photocatalysis and guanine photoreduction were synergically combined for amplifying silver deposition for the electroanalysis of short-chain microRNAs with guanine bases using charge-neutral probes. It could allow for the highly specific and sensitive detection of microRNAs in the blood as well as the identification of their mutant levels.

  17. Hemodynamic responses in amygdala and hippocampus distinguish between aversive and neutral cues during Pavlovian fear conditioning in behaving rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Stephen B; Marques-Smith, Andre; Li, Jennifer; Rawlins, J N P; Lowry, John; Conway, Michael; Gilmour, Gary; Tricklebank, Mark; Bannerman, David M

    2013-02-01

    Lesion and electrophysiological studies in rodents have identified the amygdala and hippocampus (HPC) as key structures for Pavlovian fear conditioning, but human functional neuroimaging studies have not consistently found activation of these structures. This could be because hemodynamic responses cannot detect the sparse neuronal activity proposed to underlie conditioned fear. Alternatively, differences in experimental design or fear levels could account for the discrepant findings between rodents and humans. To help distinguish between these alternatives, we used tissue oxygen amperometry to record hemodynamic responses from the basolateral amygdala (BLA), dorsal HPC (dHPC) and ventral HPC (vHPC) in freely-moving rats during the acquisition and extinction of conditioned fear. To enable specific comparison with human studies we used a discriminative paradigm, with one auditory cue [conditioned stimulus (CS)+] that was always followed by footshock, and another auditory cue (CS-) that was never followed by footshock. BLA tissue oxygen signals were significantly higher during CS+ than CS- trials during training and early extinction. In contrast, they were lower during CS+ than CS- trials by the end of extinction. dHPC and vHPC tissue oxygen signals were significantly lower during CS+ than CS- trials throughout extinction. Thus, hemodynamic signals in the amygdala and HPC can detect the different patterns of neuronal activity evoked by threatening vs. neutral stimuli during fear conditioning. Discrepant neuroimaging findings may be due to differences in experimental design and/or fear levels evoked in participants. Our methodology offers a way to improve translation between rodent models and human neuroimaging.

  18. Electroweak-Higgs unification in the two Higgs doublet model: masses and couplings of the neutral and charged Higgs bosons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz C, J.L. [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas, BUAP, A.P. 1364, 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Rosado, A. [Instituto de Fisica, BUAP, A.P. J-48, 72570 Puebla (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    We obtain the mass spectrum and the Higgs self-couplings of the two Higgs doublet model (THDM) in an alternative unification scenario where the parameters of the Higgs potential {lambda} (i = 1, 2, 3, 4, 5) are determined by imposing their unification on the electroweak gauge couplings. An attractive feature of this scenario is the possibility of determining the Higgs boson masses by evolving the {lambda}{sub i} from the electroweak-Higgs unification scale M{sub GH} down to the electroweak scale. The unification condition for the gauge (g{sub 1}, g{sub 2}) and Higgs couplings is written as g{sub 1} g{sub 2} = f ({lambda}{sub i}), where g{sub 1} = k{sub Y}{sup 1/2}g{sub Y}, and k{sub Y} is the normalization constant. Two variants for the unification condition are discussed: Scenario l is defined through the linear relation: g{sub 1} = g{sub 2} = k{sub H} (i){lambda}{sub i} (M{sub GH}), while Scenario ll assumes a quadratic relation g{sub 1}{sup 2} = g{sub 2}{sup 2} k{sub H} (i) {lambda}{sub i}(M{sub GH}) In Scenario l, by setting ad hoc - k{sub H}(5) = 1/2k{sub H}(4) 3/2k{sub H}(3) = k{sub H}(2) = k{sub H}(I) = 1, taking tan {beta} = 1 and using the standard normalization (k{sub Y} = 5/3), we obtain the following spectrum for the Higgs boson masses: m{sub h}{sup 0} = 109.1 GeV, m{sub H}{sup 0} = 123.2 GeV, m{sub A}{sup 0} = 115.5 GeV, and m{sub H}{sup +-} = 80.3 GeV, with similar results for other normalizations such as k{sub Y} = 3/2 and k{sub Y} = 7/4. (Author)

  19. Purine and pyrimidine nucleosides preserve human astrocytoma cell adenylate energy charge under ischemic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestri, Francesco; Giannecchini, Michela; Sgarrella, Francesco; Carta, Maria Caterina; Tozzi, Maria Grazia; Camici, Marcella

    2007-02-01

    The brain depends on both glycolysis and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation for maintenance of ATP pools. Astrocytes play an integral role in brain functions providing trophic supports and energy substrates for neurons. In this paper, we report that human astrocytoma cells (ADF) undergoing ischemic conditions may use both purine and pyrimidine nucleosides as energy source to slow down cellular damage. The cells are subjected to metabolic stress conditions by exclusion of glucose and incubation with oligomycin (an inhibitor of oxidative phosphorylation). This treatment brings about a depletion of the ATP pool, with a concomitant increase in the AMP levels, which results in a significant decrease of the adenylate energy charge. The presence of purine nucleosides in the culture medium preserves the adenylate energy charge, and improves cell viability. Besides purine nucleosides, also pyrimidine nucleosides, such as uridine and, to a lesser extent, cytidine, are able to preserve the ATP pool. The determination of lactate in the incubation medium indicates that nucleosides can preserve the ATP pool through anaerobic glycolysis, thus pointing to a relevant role of the phosphorolytic cleavage of the N-glycosidic bond of nucleosides which generates, without energy expense, the phosphorylated pentose, which through the pentose phosphate pathway and glycolysis can be converted to energetic intermediates also in the absence of oxygen. In fact, ADF cells possess both purine nucleoside phosphorylase and uridine phosphorylase activities.

  20. The glow discharge inception and post-discharge relaxation of charged and neutral active particles in synthetic air at low pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanović, A. P.; Marković, V. Lj; Stamenković, S. N.; Stankov, M. N.

    2015-11-01

    The study of dc glow discharge inception and post-discharge relaxation of charged and neutral active particles in synthetic air at low pressure is presented. The breakdown time delay dependence as a function of relaxation time \\overline{{{t}\\text{d}}}(τ ) (the memory curve) is measured and modelled from milliseconds to the saturation region determined by the cosmic rays and natural radioactivity level. Due to fast conversion \\text{N}2++{{\\text{O}}2}\\to {{\\text{N}}2}+\\text{O}2+ , relaxation of dc discharge in synthetic air in the time interval from one to about ninety milliseconds is dominated by the diffusion decay of molecular oxygen {{O}}_2^ + ions. The change of regimes, from ambipolar to the free diffusion limit, is investigated and the variation of effective diffusion coefficients is determined. The late relaxation is explained by the kinetics of nitrogen atoms, recombining on the surfaces of gas discharge tube and stainless steel electrodes and relevant surface recombination coefficients are determined.

  1. The effects of charge-neutralizing mutation D6.30N on the functions of CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebane, Ntsang M; Kellie, Brandon; Song, Zhao-Hui

    2006-10-02

    Charge-neutralizing mutation D6.30N of the human cannabinoid receptor subtype 1 (CB1) and cannabinoid receptor subtype 2 (CB2) cannabinoid receptors was made to test two hypotheses: (1) D6.30 may be crucial for the functions of CB1 and CB2 receptors. (2) D6.30 may participate in an ionic lock with R3.50 that keeps the receptors in an inactive conformation. Specific ligand binding and ligand-induced inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation were observed with human embryonic kidney epithelial cell line (HEK293) cells expressing wild-type CB1 and CB2, as well as CB1D6.30N and CB2D6.30N mutant receptors. There was however a decrease in maximum response of the mutant receptors compared to their wild-type counterparts, suggesting that D6.30 is essential for full activation of both CB1 and CB2 receptors. Both CB1D6.30N and CB2D6.30N demonstrated a level of constitutive activity no greater than that of their wild-type counterparts, indicating that either D6.30 does not participate in a salt bridge with R3.50, or the salt bridge is not critical for keeping cannabinoid receptors in the inactive conformation.

  2. Electronic properties of GaSe, InSe, GaS and GaTe layered semiconductors: charge neutrality level and interface barrier heights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brudnyi, V. N.; Sarkisov, S. Yu; Kosobutsky, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been applied to study the structural and electronic properties of layered ɛ-GaSe, γ-InSe, β-GaS and GaTe compounds. The optimized lattice parameters have been obtained using vdW-DF2-C09 exchange-correlation functional, which is able to describe dispersion forces and produces interlayer distances in close agreement with experiments. Based on the calculated electronic band structures, the energy position of the charge neutrality level (CNL) in the III-VI semiconductors has been estimated for the first time. The room-temperature values of CNL are found to be 0.80 eV, 1.02 eV, 0.72 eV and 0.77 eV for ɛ-GaSe, β-GaS, GaTe and γ-InSe, respectively. The persistent p-type conductivity of the intentionally undoped ɛ-GaSe, β-GaS and GaTe and n-type conductivity of γ-InSe crystals are discussed and explained using the concept of CNL. We also estimated the barrier heights for a number of metal/semiconductor and semiconductor/semiconductor interfaces assuming partial Fermi level pinning at the CNL. A reasonable agreement between our calculations and the available experimental data has been obtained.

  3. Composition of structural carbohydrates in biomass: precision of a liquid chromatography method using a neutral detergent extraction and a charged aerosol detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Bruno; Agneessens, Richard; Gerin, Patrick A; Delcarte, Jérôme

    2011-09-30

    We adapted and optimized a method to quantify the cellulose, hemicellulose, xylan, arabinan, mannan, galactan contents in lignocellulosic biomass. This method is based on a neutral detergent extraction (NDE) of the interfering biomass components, followed by a sulfuric acid hydrolysis (SAH) of the structural polysaccharides, and a liquid chromatography with charged aerosol detection (LC-CAD) to analyze the released monosaccharides. The first step of this NDE-SAH-LC-CAD method aims at removing all compounds that interfere with the subsequent sulphuric acid hydrolysis or with the subsequent chromatographic quantification of the cellulosic and hemicellulosic monosaccharides. This step includes starch hydrolysis with an analytical thermostable α-amylase followed by an extraction of soluble compounds by a Van Soest neutral detergent solution (NDE). The aim of this paper was to assess the precision of this method when choosing fiber sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench), tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) and fiber hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) as representative lignocellulosic biomass. The cellulose content of fiber sorghum, tall fescue and fiber hemp determined by the NDE-SAH-LC-CAD method were 28.7 ± 1.0, 29.7 ± 1.0 and 43.6 ± 1.2g/100g dry matter, respectively, and their hemicellulose content were 18.6 ± 0.5, 16.5 ± 0.5 and 14.5 ± 0.2g/100g dry matter, respectively. Cellulose, mannan and galactan contents were higher in fiber hemp (dicotyledon) as compared to tall fescue and fiber sorghum (monocotyledons). The xylan, arabinan and total hemicellulose contents were higher in tall fescue and fiber sorghum as compared to fiber hemp. The precision of the NDE-SAH-LC-CAD method was better for polysaccharide concentration levels above 1g/100g dry matter. Galactan analysis offered a lower precision, due to a lower CAD response intensity to galactose as compared to the other monosaccharides. The dispersions of the results (expanded uncertainty) of the NDE

  4. Ion-exchange and hydrophobic interactions affecting selectivity for neutral and charged solutes on three structurally similar agglomerated ion-exchange and mixed-mode stationary phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazarian, Artaches A; Taylor, Mark R; Haddad, Paul R; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Paull, Brett

    2013-11-25

    The nature and extent of mixed-mode retention mechanisms evident for three structurally related, agglomerated, particle-based stationary phases were evaluated. These three agglomerated phases were Thermo Fisher ScientificIon PacAS11-HC - strong anion exchange, Thermo Fisher Scientific IonPac CS10--strong cation-exchange PS-DVB, and the Thermo Fisher Scientific Acclaim Trinity P1silica-based substrate, which is commercially marketed as a mixed-mode stationary phase. All studied phases can exhibit zwitterionic and hydrophobic properties, which contribute to the retention of charged organic analytes. A systematic approach was devised to investigate the relative ion-exchange capacities and hydrophobicities for each of the three phases, together with the effect of eluent pH upon selectivity, using a specifically selected range of anionic, cationic and neutral aromatic compounds. Investigation of the strong anion-exchange column and the Trinity P1 mixed-mode substrate, in relation to ion-exchange capacity and pH effects, demonstrated similar retention behaviour for both the anionic and ampholytic solutes, as expected from the structurally related phases. Further evaluation revealed that the ion-exchange selectivity of the mixed-mode phase exhibited properties similar to that of the strong anion-exchange column, with secondary cation-exchange selectivity, albeit with medium to high anion-exchange and cation-exchange capacities, allowing selective retention for each of the anionic, cationic and ampholytic solutes. Observed mixed-mode retention upon the examined phases was found to be a sum of anion- and cation-exchange interactions, secondary ion-exchange and hydrophobic interactions, with possible additional hydrogen bonding. Hydrophobic evaluation of the three phases revealed logP values of 0.38-0.48, suggesting low to medium hydrophobicity. These stationary phases were also benchmarked against traditional reversed-phase substrates namely, octadecylsilica YMC-Pac Pro C18

  5. Non-random pre-transcriptional evolution in HIV-1: a refutation of the foundational conditions for neutral evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Y Valenzuela

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The complete base sequence of HIV-1 virus and GP120 ENV gene were analyzed to establish their distance to the expected neutral random sequence. An especial methodology was devised to achieve this aim. Analyses included: a proportion of dinucleotides (signatures; b homogeneity in the distribution of dinucleotides and bases (isochores by dividing both segments in ten and three sub-segments, respectively; c probability of runs of bases and No-bases according to the Bose-Einstein distribution. The analyses showed a huge deviation from the random distribution expected from neutral evolution and neutral-neighbor influence of nucleotide sites. The most significant result is the tremendous lack of CG dinucleotides (p < 10-50, a selective trait of eukaryote and not of single stranded RNA virus genomes. Results not only refute neutral evolution and neutral neighbor influence, but also strongly indicate that any base at any nucleotide site correlates with all the viral genome or sub-segments. These results suggest that evolution of HIV-1 is pan-selective rather than neutral or nearly neutral.

  6. Structural, morphological and catalytic characterization of neutral Ag salt of 12-tungstophosphoric acid: Influence of preparation conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holclajtner-Antunović, Ivanka; Bajuk-Bogdanović, Danica [Faculty of Physical Chemistry, University of Belgrade, Studentski trg 12-16, 11158 Belgrade (Serbia); Popa, Alexandru [Institute of Chemistry Timişoara, Bl. Mihail Viteazul 24, 300223 Timişoara (Romania); Nedić Vasiljević, Bojana [Faculty of Physical Chemistry, University of Belgrade, Studentski trg 12-16, 11158 Belgrade (Serbia); Krstić, Jugoslav [Institute of Chemistry, Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Njegoševa 12, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Mentus, Slavko [Faculty of Physical Chemistry, University of Belgrade, Studentski trg 12-16, 11158 Belgrade (Serbia); Uskoković-Marković, Snežana, E-mail: snezaum@pharmacy.bg.ac.rs [Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Belgrade, Vojvode Stepe 450, 11221 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2015-02-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Preparation conditions influence to self-assembly of nanocrystallites of Ag{sub 3}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}. • Ag{sub 3}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40} obtained by filtration is microporous, Ag{sub 3}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40} obtained by evaporation is non-porous. • Thermal properties of Ag{sub 3}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}, H{sub 3}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40} and its soluble salts are similar. - Abstract: The objective of this study is the structural and morphological characterization of the Ag{sub 3}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40} salts (AgWPA) of 12-tungstophosphoric acid (WPA) obtained under different preparation conditions and testing of their acid catalytic activity in dehydration of ethanol. The structure, morphology and physicochemical characteristics were determined by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen physisorption at −196 °C, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and differential thermal (DTA) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). It is shown that the preparation process has a significant influence on the morphological properties of the obtained materials which may be explained by the supposed mechanism of the formation of nanocrystallite′s aggregates with more or less epitaxial connection. Neutral AgWPA obtained by filtration from supernatant forms porous aggregates of a symmetric dodecahedral shape, having average sizes about 2 μm. This sample shows higher specific area in comparison with the salt obtained by evaporation due to the higher micropore volume, while mesopore volumes are the same for both salts. Thus conversion of ethanol and selectivities of the main products, ethylene and diethyl ether, are almost the same and constant for both prepared salts, while their values are changed over the reaction time for the parent WPA acid.

  7. Probing the electronic structures and properties of neutral and charged monomethylated arsenic species (CH3As(n)((-1,0,+1)), n = 1-7) using Gaussian-3 theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xue; Zhang, Qiancheng; Yang, Jucai; Ning, Hongmei

    2012-09-20

    The structures and energies of neutral and charged monomethylated arsenic species CH(3)As(n)((-1,0,+1)) (n = 1-7) have been systematically investigated with the Gaussian-3 (G3) method. The ground-state structures of monomethylated arsenic species including the neutrals and the ions are vertex-methylated type. The lowest-energy structures of neutral methylated arsenic species and their ions can be viewed as being derived from corresponding to neutral and ionic arsenic clusters, respectively. The reliable electron affinities and ionization potentials of CH(3)As(n) have been evaluated. And there are odd-even alternations in both electron affinities and ionization potentials as a function of size of CH(3)As(n). The dissociation energies of CH(3) from neutral CH(3)As(n) and their ions have been calculated to examine relative stabilities. The results characterized the odd-numbered neutral CH(3)As(n) as more stable than the even-numbered systems, and the even-numbered cationic CH(3)As(n)(+) as more stable than the odd-numbered species with the exception of n = 1. The dissociation energy of CH(3)As(+) is the maximum among all of these values. There are no odd-even alternations for anionic CH(3)As(n)(-) with n ≤ 7.

  8. A nonlinear electrophoretic model for PeakMaster: part IV. Electromigration dispersion in systems that contain a neutral complex-forming agent and a fully charged analyte. Experimental verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneš, Martin; Svobodová, Jana; Hruška, Vlastimil; Dvořák, Martin; Zusková, Iva; Gaš, Bohuslav

    2012-12-07

    The complete mathematical model of electromigration dispersion in systems that contain a neutral complex forming agent and a fully charged analyte was introduced in the previous part of this series of papers (Part III - Theory). The model was implemented in the newest version of our simulation program PeakMaster 5.3 that calculates the effective mobility of the analyte and its nonlinear electromigration mobility slope, S(EMD), in the presence of a complex forming agent in the background electrolyte. The mathematical model was verified by both experiments and simulations, which were performed by our dynamic simulator Simul 5 Complex. Three separation systems differing in the chiral selector used (having different values for the complexation constant and the mobility of the complex) were chosen for the verification. The nonlinear electromigration mobility slope values were calculated from the simulations and the experiments that were performed at different complex forming agent concentrations. These data agree very well with those predicted by the mathematical model and provided the foundation for the discussion and explanation of the electromigration dispersion process that occurs in systems which contain a complex forming agent. The new version of PeakMaster 5.3 was shown to be a powerful tool for optimization of the separation conditions by minimizing electromigration dispersion which improves the symmetry of the analyte peaks and their resolution.

  9. Impact of Charge Degradation on the Life Cycle Climate Performance of a Residential Air-Conditioning System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beshr, Mohamed [University of Maryland, College Park; Aute, Vikrant [University of Maryland, College Park; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Fricke, Brian A [ORNL; Radermacher, Reinhard [University of Maryland, College Park

    2014-01-01

    Vapor compression systems continuously leak a small fraction of their refrigerant charge to the environment, whether during operation or servicing. As a result of the slow leak rate occurring during operation, the refrigerant charge decreases until the system is serviced and recharged. This charge degradation, after a certain limit, begins to have a detrimental effect on system capacity, energy consumption, and coefficient of performance (COP). This paper presents a literature review and a summary of previous experimental work on the effect of undercharging or charge degradation of different vapor compression systems, especially those without a receiver. These systems include residential air conditioning and heat pump systems utilizing different components and refrigerants, and water chiller systems. Most of these studies show similar trends for the effect of charge degradation on system performance. However, it is found that although much experimental work exists on the effect of charge degradation on system performance, no correlation or comparison between charge degradation and system performance yet exists. Thus, based on the literature review, three different correlations that characterize the effect of charge on system capacity and energy consumption are developed for different systems as follows: one for air-conditioning systems, one for vapor compression water-to-water chiller systems, and one for heat pumps. These correlations can be implemented in vapor compression cycle simulation tools to obtain a better prediction of the system performance throughout its lifetime. In this paper, these correlations are implemented in an open source tool for life cycle climate performance (LCCP) based design of vapor compression systems. The LCCP of a residential air-source heat pump is evaluated using the tool and the effect of charge degradation on the results is studied. The heat pump is simulated using a validated component-based vapor compression system model and

  10. Analysis of flame propagation phenomenon in simplified stratified charge conditions; Tanjunkasareta sojo kyukiba ni okeru kaen denpa gensho no kansatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriyoshi, Y.; Morikawa, H. [Chiba University, Chiba (Japan); Kamimoto, T. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    Since the local inhomogeneity of mixture concentration inside the cylinder affects the combustion characteristics, a basic research on combustion phenomenon in stratified charge conditions is required. The authors have made experiments with a constant-volume chamber, which can simulate an idealized stratified charge field by using a removable partition, to obtain the combustion characteristics. Also, numerical calculations are made using some combustion models. As a result, the important feature that the combustion speed is faster in stratified condition than in homogeneous condition can be predicted by the two-step reaction model. 4 refs., 8 figs.

  11. Simulation of charge-discharge cycling of lithium-ion batteries under low-earth-orbit conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Won; Anguchamy, Yogesh K.; Popov, Branko N.

    Charge-discharge behavior of SONY 18650 lithium-ion batteries for aerospace applications was simulated under low-earth-orbit (LEO) conditions, by using a first-principles based mathematical model. The model determines the capacity fade on the basis of the irreversible loss of active lithium ions due to electrolyte reduction. The capacity fade during LEO cycling was studied for 5 years of continuous operation with 20% depth of discharge as a function of the cycling parameters such as the end of charge voltage and the charging rate.

  12. Nonadiabatic ionic--covalent transitions. Exponential-linear model for the charge exchange and neutralization reactions Na+H arrow-right-left Na/sup +/+H/sup -/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Errea, L.F.; Mendez, L.; Mo, O.; Riera, A.

    1986-01-01

    A previous study of charge exchange processes taking place through ionic--covalent transitions is extended to the case of Na+H and Na/sup +/+H/sup -/ collisions. A five-state molecular expansion, with the inclusion of two-electron translation factors, is employed to calculate the charge exchange and neutralization cross sections. Transitions at the first two pseudocrossings between the energy curves, practically determine the cross sections in the energy range 0.16--5 keV amu/sup -1/. We also show that the widely used multichannel Landau--Zener theory is totally inadequate, to treat these transitions.

  13. AN EXPERIMENTAL ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECT OF REFRIGERANT CHARGE LEVEL AND OUTDOOR CONDITION ON A WINDOW AIR CONDITIONER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Herbert Raj

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available R22 is an hydrochlorofluorocarbon widely used in refrigerant and air conditioning plants and although it has a low ozone depletion potential (0.05, it is necessary to consider the large amount that commonly escapes from commercial units to the atmosphere. This paper presents experimental investigation on the performance of a window air conditioner operated with R22 and the M20 (80% R407C and 20% HC blend by wt. refrigerant mixture tested under different refrigerant charge levels and outdoor conditions. Experiments were conducted in accordance with the Bureau of Indian standards procedure in a psychrometric test facility. Capillary and charge optimization tests were conducted for the both R22 and the M20 refrigerant mixture based on maximum coefficient of performance. Refrigerant charge in the air conditioner was systematically varied and the influences of refrigerant charge quantities and outdoor conditions on system performance are studied for both R22 and the M20 refrigerant mixture. At each charge levels, the outdoor room conditions were changed in accordance with Bureau of Indian standards. It is observed that R22 is more sensitive to deviations in charge levels as compared to the M20 refrigerant mixture. A decrease in charge level of about 7% reduced the system refrigerating capacity by 11.3% with R22 while with the M20 refrigerant mixture it reduces by 6.9% only. Similarly an over charge by 7% reduces the refrigerating capacity of the system by 13.8% with R22 while with M20 it reduces by 6.5% only.

  14. EIS Behavior of Experimental High-Strength Steel in Near-Neutral pH and Load Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraza-Fierro, Jesus Israel; Serna-Barquera, Sergio Alonso; Campillo-Illanes, Bernardo Fabian; Castaneda, Homero

    2017-04-01

    Two thermomechanical heat treatments were applied to a high-strength low carbon steel with an experimental chemical composition, and as a result two different microstructures were obtained. Steel A had a ferritic microstructure, and steel B had a bainitic-martensitic one. The corrosion behavior was reviewed at long times in samples without load by means of Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) in a near-neutral pH (NNpH) environment. The results showed that the quantity and adherence of corrosion products on the sample surface at long times are different. Hence, the impedance was higher for steel B. Slow strain rate testing (SSRT) was applied to tempered samples of the two steels at 473 K, 673 K, and 873 K (200 °C, 400 °C, and 600 °C), and the corrosion behavior was acquired using EIS at the same time as the SSRT in NNpH conditions. This is a novel result because the tension samples were not electrically isolated from the rest of the load frame. The impedance for the ferritic steel was higher than the bainitic-martensitic one, while it slightly decreased for both steel over time. Tempering improved the corrosion resistance for steel A, while it was not modified for steel B. The corrosion behavior could be associated with the susceptibility of these steels to stress corrosion cracking. A transmission line model was proposed to show qualitatively the corrosion behavior of a crack in the steel, if there is a potential profile inside the crack. A hypothetical potential profile was acquired as well as different impedance behaviors based on electrochemical variables.

  15. Influence of sampling, storage, processing and optimal experimental conditions on adenylate energy charge in penaeid shrimp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robles-Romo Arlett

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenylate energy charge (AEC has been used as a practical index of the physiological status and health in several disciplines, such as ecotoxicology and aquaculture. This study standardizes several procedures for AEC determination in penaeid shrimp that are very sensitive to sampling. We concluded that shrimp can be frozen in liquid nitrogen and then stored at -76°C for up to two years for further analysis, or freshly dissected and immediately homogenized in acid. Other cooling procedures, such as immersion in cold water or placing shrimp on ice for 15 min resulted in 50% and 73% decreases in ATP levels, and 9-fold and 10-fold increases in IMP levels, respectively. Optimal values of AEC (0.9 were obtained in shrimp recently transferred from ponds to indoor conditions, but decreased to 0.77 after one month in indoor tanks when stocked at high densities; the AEC re-established to 0.85 when the shrimps were transferred to optimal conditions (lower density and dark tanks. While the levels of arginine phosphate followed the same pattern, its levels did not fully re-establish. Comparison of different devices for sample homogenization indicated that a cryogenic ball mill mixer is the more suitable procedure.

  16. Limited Neutrality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Ebbe Juul

    2006-01-01

    Article Concerning the prospect of a kind of limited neutrality in place of the standard liberal egalitarian "neutrality of justification."......Article Concerning the prospect of a kind of limited neutrality in place of the standard liberal egalitarian "neutrality of justification."...

  17. Innovative sol–gel route in neutral hydroalcoholic condition to obtain antibacterial cotton finishing by zinc precursor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poli, R.; Colleoni, C.; Calvimontes, A.; Polaskova, H.; Dutschk, V.; Rosace, G.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, a possibility to realize a transparent sol by zinc-based precursors in a neutral medium without acidic or alkaline catalyst was investigated.Moreover, to study the influence of an inorganic–organic hybrid polymer on the proposed antibacterial finishing, the Zn-based sol was mix

  18. Measurements of underlying-event properties using neutral and charged particles in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 900 GeV and $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdesselam, Abdelouahab; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acerbi, Emilio; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Aderholz, Michael; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Aleppo, Mario; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Aliyev, Magsud; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral, Pedro; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amorim, Antonio; Amorós, Gabriel; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Andrieux, Marie-Laure; Anduaga, Xabier; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonelli, Stefano; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Archambault, John-Paul; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Astvatsatourov, Anatoli; Atoian, Grigor; Aubert, Bernard; Auerbach, Benjamin; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Austin, Nicholas; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Ay, Cano; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Bachy, Gerard; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahinipati, Seema; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Mark; Baker, Sarah; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barashkou, Andrei; Barbaro Galtieri, Angela; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Detlef; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Battistoni, Giuseppe; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beare, Brian; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Behera, Prafulla; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellina, Francesco; Bellomo, Giovanni; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Ben Ami, Sagi; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Benchouk, Chafik; Bendel, Markus; Benedict, Brian Hugues; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernardet, Karim; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertin, Antonio; Bertinelli, Francesco; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bitenc, Urban; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanchot, Georges; Blocker, Craig; Blocki, Jacek; Blondel, Alain; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocci, Andrea; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Jennifer; Boelaert, Nele; Böser, Sebastian; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Bona, Marcella; Bondarenko, Valery; Boonekamp, Maarten; Boorman, Gary; Booth, Chris; Booth, Peter; Bordoni, Stefania; Borer, Claudia; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borjanovic, Iris; Borroni, Sara; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Botterill, David; Bouchami, Jihene; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boulahouache, Chaouki; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozhko, Nikolay; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Bracinik, Juraj; Braem, André; Brambilla, Elena; Branchini, Paolo; Brandenburg, George; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brelier, Bertrand; Bremer, Johan; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Breton, Dominique; Brett, Nicolas; Bright-Thomas, Paul; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Brodbeck, Timothy; Brodet, Eyal; Broggi, Francesco; Bromberg, Carl; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, William; Brown, Gareth; Brubaker, Erik; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Buanes, Trygve; Bucci, Francesca; Buchanan, James; Buchanan, Norman; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Budick, Burton; Büscher, Volker; Bugge, Lars; Buira-Clark, Daniel; Buis, Ernst-Jan; Bulekov, Oleg; Bunse, Moritz; Buran, Torleiv; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgess, Thomas; Burke, Stephen; Busato, Emmanuel; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butin, François; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Buttinger, William; Byatt, Tom; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caccia, Massimo; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Caloi, Rita; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camard, Arnaud; Camarri, Paolo; Cambiaghi, Mario; Cameron, David; Cammin, Jochen; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Canale, Vincenzo; Canelli, Florencia; Canepa, Anadi; Cantero, Josu; Capasso, Luciano; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capriotti, Daniele; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Caramarcu, Costin; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Bryan; Caron, Sascha; Carpentieri, Carmen; Carrillo Montoya, German D; Carter, Antony; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Cascella, Michele; Caso, Carlo; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo Martin; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cataldi, Gabriella; Cataneo, Fernando; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cauz, Diego; Cavallari, Alvise; Cavalleri, Pietro; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Cazzato, Antonio; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerqueira, Augusto Santiago; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Cevenini, Francesco; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chan, Kevin; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Chapman, John Wehrley; Chareyre, Eve; Charlton, Dave; Chavda, Vikash; Cheatham, Susan; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Li; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Tingyang; Chen, Xin; Cheng, Shaochen; Cheplakov, Alexander; Chepurnov, Vladimir; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Cheung, Sing-Leung; Chevalier, Laurent; Chevallier, Florent; Chiefari, Giovanni; Chikovani, Leila; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chizhov, Mihail; Choudalakis, Georgios; Chouridou, Sofia; Christidi, Illectra-Athanasia; Christov, Asen; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciba, Krzysztof; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciobotaru, Matei Dan; Ciocca, Claudia; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirilli, Manuela; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Benoit; Clement, Christophe; Clifft, Roger; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coe, Paul; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cogneras, Eric; Cojocaru, Claudiu; Colas, Jacques; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collard, Caroline; Collins, Neil; Collins-Tooth, Christopher; Collot, Johann; Colon, German; Coluccia, Rita; Comune, Gianluca; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Consonni, Michele; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conventi, Francesco; Cook, James; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cooper-Smith, Neil; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Costin, Tudor; Côté, David; Coura Torres, Rodrigo; Courneyea, Lorraine; Cowan, Glen; Cowden, Christopher; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cristinziani, Markus; Crosetti, Giovanni; Crupi, Roberto; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Cuenca Almenar, Cristóbal; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cuneo, Stefano; Curatolo, Maria; Curtis, Chris; Cwetanski, Peter; Czirr, Hendrik; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; D'Orazio, Alessia; Da Rocha Gesualdi Mello, Aline; Da Silva, Paulo Vitor; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dahlhoff, Andrea; Dai, Tiesheng; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dallison, Steve; Dam, Mogens; Dameri, Mauro; Damiani, Daniel; Danielsson, Hans Olof; Dankers, Reinier; Dannheim, Dominik; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Daum, Cornelis; Dauvergne, Jean-Pierre; Davey, Will; Davidek, Tomas; Davidson, Nadia; Davidson, Ruth; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Adam; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Dawson, John; Daya, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Castro Faria Salgado, Pedro; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De La Taille, Christophe; De Lotto, Barbara; De Mora, Lee; De Nooij, Lucie; De Oliveira Branco, Miguel; De Pedis, Daniele; de Saintignon, Paul; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dean, Simon; Dedovich, Dmitri; Degenhardt, James; Dehchar, Mohamed; Deile, Mario; Del Papa, Carlo; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delpierre, Pierre; Delruelle, Nicolas; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demirkoz, Bilge; Deng, Jianrong; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Devetak, Erik; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; DeWilde, Burton; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Dhullipudi, Ramasudhakar; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Luise, Silvestro; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diblen, Faruk; Diehl, Edward; Dietl, Hans; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dindar Yagci, Kamile; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djilkibaev, Rashid; Djobava, Tamar; do Vale, Maria Aline Barros; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobbs, Matt; Dobinson, Robert; Dobos, Daniel; Dobson, Ellie; Dobson, Marc; Dodd, Jeremy; Dogan, Ozgen Berkol; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Doi, Yoshikuni; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolenc, Irena; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Dohmae, Takeshi; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donega, Mauro; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dos Anjos, Andre; Dosil, Mireia; Dotti, Andrea; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Dowell, John; Doxiadis, Alexander; Doyle, Tony; Drasal, Zbynek; Drees, Jürgen; Dressnandt, Nandor; Drevermann, Hans; Driouichi, Chafik; Dris, Manolis; Drohan, Janice; Dubbert, Jörg; Dubbs, Tim; Dube, Sourabh; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Dührssen, Michael; Duerdoth, Ian; Duflot, Laurent; Dufour, Marc-Andre; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Duxfield, Robert; Dwuznik, Michal; Dydak, Friedrich; Dzahini, Daniel; Düren, Michael; Ebenstein, William; Ebke, Johannes; Eckert, Simon; Eckweiler, Sebastian; Edmonds, Keith; Edwards, Clive; Efthymiopoulos, Ilias; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Ehrich, Thies; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Eisenhandler, Eric; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Katherine; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Ely, Robert; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Engelmann, Roderich; Engl, Albert; Epp, Brigitte; Eppig, Andrew; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Escobar, Carlos; Espinal Curull, Xavier; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienne, Francois; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evangelakou, Despoina; Evans, Hal; Fabbri, Laura; Fabre, Caroline; Facius, Katrine; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falou, Alain; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farley, Jason; Farooque, Trisha; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fasching, Damon; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Fatholahzadeh, Baharak; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Fazio, Salvatore; Febbraro, Renato; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Ivan; Fedorko, Woiciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Fellmann, Denis; Felzmann, Ulrich; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Fenyuk, Alexander; Ferencei, Jozef; Ferland, Jonathan; Fernandes, Bruno; Fernando, Waruna; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrara, Valentina; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrer, Maria Lorenza; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filippas, Anastasios; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Gordon; Fischer, Peter; Fisher, Matthew; Fisher, Steve; Flammer, Joachim; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleckner, Johanna; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Flick, Tobias; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Föhlisch, Florian; Fokitis, Manolis; Fonseca Martin, Teresa; Forbush, David Alan; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Foster, Joe; Fournier, Daniel; Foussat, Arnaud; Fowler, Andrew; Fowler, Ken; Fox, Harald; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Frank, Tal; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; Fratina, Sasa; French, Sky; Froeschl, Robert; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gadfort, Thomas; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallas, Manuel; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galyaev, Eugene; Gan, KK; Gao, Yongsheng; Gapienko, Vladimir; Gaponenko, Andrei; Garberson, Ford; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garitaonandia, Hegoi; Garonne, Vincent; Garvey, John; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaumer, Olivier; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gayde, Jean-Christophe; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniel Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Simon; Gerlach, Peter; Gershon, Avi; Geweniger, Christoph; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghez, Philippe; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Victoria; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Adam; Gibson, Stephen; Gieraltowski, Gerry; Gilbert, Laura; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gilewsky, Valentin; Gillberg, Dag; Gillman, Tony; Gingrich, Douglas; Ginzburg, Jonatan; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giovannini, Paola; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giusti, Paolo; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glazov, Alexandre; Glitza, Karl-Walter; Glonti, George; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goebel, Martin; Göpfert, Thomas; Goeringer, Christian; Gössling, Claus; Göttfert, Tobias; Goldfarb, Steven; Goldin, Daniel; Golling, Tobias; Golovnia, Serguei; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Gonella, Laura; Gonidec, Allain; Gonzalez, Saul; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goodson, Jeremiah Jet; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorfine, Grant; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Gorokhov, Serguei; Goryachev, Vladimir; Gosdzik, Bjoern; Gosselink, Martijn; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gouanère, Michel; Gough Eschrich, Ivo; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grabski, Varlen; Grafström, Per; Grah, Christian; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Grancagnolo, Francesco; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Grau, Nathan; Gray, Heather; Gray, Julia Ann; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenfield, Debbie; Greenshaw, Timothy; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griesmayer, Erich; Griffiths, Justin; Grigalashvili, Nugzar; Grillo, Alexander; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grognuz, Joel; Groh, Manfred; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Gruwe, Magali; Grybel, Kai; Guarino, Victor; Guest, Daniel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guida, Angelo; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Guler, Hulya; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Bin; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Ambreesh; Gusakov, Yury; Gushchin, Vladimir; Gutierrez, Andrea; Gutierrez, Phillip; Guttman, Nir; Gutzwiller, Olivier; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haas, Stefan; Haber, Carl; Hackenburg, Robert; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Hadley, David; Haefner, Petra; Hahn, Ferdinand; Haider, Stefan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haller, Johannes; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Han, Hongguang; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hance, Michael; Handel, Carsten; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, Christian Johan; Hansen, John Renner; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hansson, Per; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Gabriel; Harenberg, Torsten; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Karl; Hartert, Jochen; Hartjes, Fred; Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Harvey, Alex; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hassani, Samira; Hatch, Mark; Hauff, Dieter; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawes, Brian; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Donovan; Hayakawa, Takashi; Hayden, Daniel; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Hazen, Eric; He, Mao; Head, Simon; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heinemann, Beate; Heisterkamp, Simon; Helary, Louis; Heldmann, Michael; Heller, Mathieu; Hellman, Sten; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, Robert; Henke, Michael; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Henry-Couannier, Frédéric; Hensel, Carsten; Henß, Tobias; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg, Ruth; Hershenhorn, Alon David; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hessey, Nigel; Hidvegi, Attila; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Daniel; Hill, John; Hill, Norman; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirsch, Florian; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holder, Martin; Holmes, Alan; Holmgren, Sven-Olof; Holy, Tomas; Holzbauer, Jenny; Homma, Yasuhiro; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Horazdovsky, Tomas; Horn, Claus; Horner, Stephan; Horton, Katherine; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hott, Thomas; Hou, Suen; Houlden, Michael; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howarth, James; Howell, David; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hruska, Ivan; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Guang Shun; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Hughes-Jones, Richard; Huhtinen, Mika; Hurst, Peter; Hurwitz, Martina; Husemann, Ulrich; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibbotson, Michael; Ibragimov, Iskander; Ichimiya, Ryo; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idarraga, John; Idzik, Marek; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Yuri; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Imbault, Didier; Imhaeuser, Martin; Imori, Masatoshi; Ince, Tayfun; Inigo-Golfin, Joaquin; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Ionescu, Gelu; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Ishii, Koji; Ishikawa, Akimasa; Ishino, Masaya; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Isobe, Tadaaki; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Itoh, Yuki; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakubek, Jan; Jana, Dilip; Jankowski, Ernest; Jansen, Eric; Jantsch, Andreas; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Jeanty, Laura; Jelen, Kazimierz; Jen-La Plante, Imai; Jenni, Peter; Jeremie, Andrea; Jež, Pavel; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Jha, Manoj Kumar; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Ge; Jin, Shan; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Joffe, David; Johansen, Lars; Johansen, Marianne; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johnert, Sebastian; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tegid; Jones, Tim; Jonsson, Ove; Joram, Christian; Jorge, Pedro; Joseph, John; Ju, Xiangyang; Juranek, Vojtech; Jussel, Patrick; Kabachenko, Vasily; Kabana, Sonja; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kadlecik, Peter; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kaiser, Steffen; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalinin, Sergey; Kalinovskaya, Lidia; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kanno, Takayuki; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kaplon, Jan; Kar, Deepak; Karagoz, Muge; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karr, Kristo; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasmi, Azzedine; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Mayuko; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katsoufis, Elias; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kayl, Manuel; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Kazi, Sandor Istvan; Keates, James Robert; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Kekelidze, George; Kelly, Marc; Kennedy, John; Kenyon, Mike; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerschen, Nicolas; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Ketterer, Christian; Khakzad, Mohsen; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchenko, Dmitri; Khodinov, Alexander; Kholodenko, Anatoli; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khovanskiy, Nikolai; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kilvington, Graham; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Min Suk; Kim, Peter; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; Kirk, Julie; Kirsch, Guillaume; Kirsch, Lawrence; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiver, Andrey; Kiyamura, Hironori; Kladiva, Eduard; Klaiber-Lodewigs, Jonas; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klemetti, Miika; Klier, Amit; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinkby, Esben; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Klous, Sander; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluge, Thomas; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knobloch, Juergen; Knoops, Edith B F G; Knue, Andrea; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Koblitz, Birger; Kocian, Martin; Kocnar, Antonin; Kodys, Peter; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Koenig, Sebastian; König, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Koetsveld, Folkert; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kohn, Fabian; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kokott, Thomas; Kolachev, Guennady; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolesnikov, Vladimir; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Kollar, Daniel; Kollefrath, Michael; Kolya, Scott; Komar, Aston; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Kondo, Takahiko; Kono, Takanori; Kononov, Anatoly; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kootz, Andreas; Koperny, Stefan; Kopikov, Sergey; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Koreshev, Victor; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotamäki, Miikka Juhani; Kotov, Serguei; Kotov, Vladislav; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasel, Olaf; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, James; Kreisel, Arik; Krejci, Frantisek; Kretzschmar, Jan; Krieger, Nina; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruth, Andre; Kubota, Takashi; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kuhn, Dietmar; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kummer, Christian; Kuna, Marine; Kundu, Nikhil; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurata, Masakazu; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuykendall, William; Kuze, Masahiro; Kuzhir, Polina; Kvasnicka, Ondrej; Kwee, Regina; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Labarga, Luis; Labbe, Julien; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Rémi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laisne, Emmanuel; Lamanna, Massimo; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lancon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Landsman, Hagar; Lane, Jenna; Lange, Clemens; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lapin, Vladimir; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Larionov, Anatoly; Larner, Aimee; Lasseur, Christian; Lassnig, Mario; Lau, Wing; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavorato, Antonia; Lavrijsen, Wim; Laycock, Paul; Lazarev, Alexandre; Lazzaro, Alfio; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Maner, Christophe; Le Menedeu, Eve; Leahu, Marius; Lebedev, Alexander; Lebel, Céline; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Michel; Legendre, Marie; Leger, Annie; LeGeyt, Benjamin; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lellouch, Jeremie; Leltchouk, Mikhail; Lendermann, Victor; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatiana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lessard, Jean-Raphael; Lesser, Jonas; Lester, Christopher; Leung Fook Cheong, Annabelle; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levitski, Mikhail; Lewandowska, Marta; Lewis, George; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Shu; Li, Xuefei; Liang, Zhihua; Liang, Zhijun; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lichtnecker, Markus; Lie, Ki; Liebig, Wolfgang; Lifshitz, Ronen; Lilley, Joseph; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linde, Frank; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipinsky, Lukas; Lipniacka, Anna; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Chuanlei; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Shengli; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Lloyd, Stephen; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Lockwitz, Sarah; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Loken, James; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Losty, Michael; Lou, Xinchou; Lounis, Abdenour; Loureiro, Karina; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lu, Jiansen; Lu, Liang; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Ludwig, Andreas; Ludwig, Dörthe; Ludwig, Inga; Ludwig, Jens; Luehring, Frederick; Luijckx, Guy; Lumb, Debra; Luminari, Lamberto; Lund, Esben; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lundberg, Björn; Lundberg, Johan; Lundquist, Johan; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lupi, Anna; Lutz, Gerhard; Lynn, David; Lys, Jeremy; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Macana Goia, Jorge Andres; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Mackeprang, Rasmus; Madaras, Ronald; Mader, Wolfgang; Maenner, Reinhard; Maeno, Tadashi; Mättig, Peter; Mättig, Stefan; Magalhaes Martins, Paulo Jorge; Magnoni, Luca; Magradze, Erekle; Magrath, Caroline; Mahalalel, Yair; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahout, Gilles; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malecki, Pawel; Malecki, Piotr; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mameghani, Raphael; Mamuzic, Judita; Manabe, Atsushi; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Mangeard, Pierre-Simon; Manjavidze, Ioseb; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Manz, Andreas; Mapelli, Alessandro; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchese, Fabrizio; Marchesotti, Marco; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marin, Alexandru; Marino, Christopher; Marroquim, Fernando; Marshall, Robin; Marshall, Zach; Martens, Kalen; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Andrew; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian; Martin, Franck Francois; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Philippe; Martin, Tim; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Maß, Martin; Massa, Ignazio; Massaro, Graziano; Massol, Nicolas; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mathes, Markus; Matricon, Pierre; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mattravers, Carly; Maugain, Jean-Marie; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; May, Edward; Mayne, Anna; Mazini, Rachid; Mazur, Michael; Mazzanti, Marcello; Mazzoni, Enrico; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; McGlone, Helen; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McLaren, Robert Andrew; Mclaughlan, Tom; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Mechtel, Markus; Medinnis, Mike; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Meguro, Tatsuma; Mehdiyev, Rashid; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meinhardt, Jens; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Mendoza Navas, Luis; Meng, Zhaoxia; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Menot, Claude; Meoni, Evelin; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meuser, Stefan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer, Joerg; Meyer, Thomas Christian; Meyer, W Thomas; Miao, Jiayuan; Michal, Sebastien; Micu, Liliana; Middleton, Robin; Miele, Paola; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikulec, Bettina; Mikuž, Marko; Miller, David; Miller, Robert; Mills, Bill; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Miñano, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Miralles Verge, Lluis; Misiejuk, Andrzej; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitrofanov, Gennady; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miyagawa, Paul; Miyazaki, Kazuki; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mockett, Paul; Moed, Shulamit; Moeller, Victoria; Mönig, Klaus; Möser, Nicolas; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohn, Bjarte; Mohr, Wolfgang; Mohrdieck-Möck, Susanne; Moisseev, Artemy; Moles-Valls, Regina; Molina-Perez, Jorge; Moneta, Lorenzo; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montesano, Simone; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Moorhead, Gareth; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morais, Antonio; Morange, Nicolas; Morel, Julien; Morello, Gianfranco; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morii, Masahiro; Morin, Jerome; Morita, Youhei; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morone, Maria-Christina; Morozov, Sergey; Morris, John; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Mudrinic, Mihajlo; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Müller, Thomas; Muenstermann, Daniel; Muijs, Sandra; Muir, Alex; Munwes, Yonathan; Murakami, Koichi; Murray, Bill; Mussche, Ido; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakano, Itsuo; Nanava, Gizo; Napier, Austin; Nash, Michael; Nation, Nigel; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Neal, Homer; Nebot, Eduardo; Nechaeva, Polina; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Silke; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Nesterov, Stanislav; Neubauer, Mark; Neusiedl, Andrea; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicolas, Ludovic; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Niedercorn, Francois; Nielsen, Jason; Niinikoski, Tapio; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolaev, Kirill; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Henrik; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nishiyama, Tomonori; Nisius, Richard; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nomoto, Hiroshi; Nordberg, Markus; Nordkvist, Bjoern; Norton, Peter; Novakova, Jana; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nožička, Miroslav; Nugent, Ian Michael; Nuncio-Quiroz, Adriana-Elizabeth; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nyman, Tommi; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'Neale, Steve; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Odier, Jerome; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Ohshita, Hidetoshi; Ohska, Tokio Kenneth; Ohsugi, Takashi; Okada, Shogo; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olcese, Marco; Olchevski, Alexander; Oliveira, Miguel Alfonso; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olivito, Dominick; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Omachi, Chihiro; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Ordonez, Gustavo; Oreglia, Mark; Orellana, Frederik; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlov, Iliya; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Ortega, Eduardo; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Osuna, Carlos; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Ottersbach, John; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Ouyang, Qun; Owen, Mark; Owen, Simon; Oyarzun, Alejandro; Øye, Ola; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Paganis, Efstathios; Paige, Frank; Pajchel, Katarina; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panes, Boris; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Panuskova, Monika; Paolone, Vittorio; Paoloni, Alessandro; Papadelis, Aras; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Paramonov, Alexander; Park, Woochun; Parker, Andy; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pecsy, Martin; Pedraza Morales, Maria Isabel; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Peng, Haiping; Pengo, Ruggero; Penson, Alexander; Penwell, John; Perantoni, Marcelo; Perez, Kerstin; Perez Cavalcanti, Tiago; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Peric, Ivan; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Perrodo, Pascal; Persembe, Seda; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Onne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Jorgen; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Petschull, Dennis; Petteni, Michele; Pezoa, Raquel; Phan, Anna; Phillips, Alan; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickford, Andrew; Piec, Sebastian Marcin; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Ping, Jialun; Pinto, Belmiro; Pirotte, Olivier; Pizio, Caterina; Placakyte, Ringaile; Plamondon, Mathieu; Plano, Will; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskach, Anatoly; Poblaguev, Andrei; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poggioli, Luc; Poghosyan, Tatevik; Pohl, Martin; Polci, Francesco; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polini, Alessandro; Poll, James; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pomarede, Daniel Marc; Pomeroy, Daniel; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Porter, Robert; Posch, Christoph; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Prabhu, Robindra; Pralavorio, Pascal; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Pretzl, Klaus Peter; Pribyl, Lukas; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Price, Michael John; Prichard, Paul; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Prudent, Xavier; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Psoroulas, Serena; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Purdham, John; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Pylypchenko, Yuriy; Qian, Jianming; Qian, Zuxuan; Qin, Zhonghua; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Quinonez, Fernando; Raas, Marcel; Radescu, Voica; Radics, Balint; Rador, Tonguc; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rahimi, Amir; Rahm, David; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rajek, Silke; Rammensee, Michael; Rammes, Marcus; Ramstedt, Magnus; Randrianarivony, Koloina; Ratoff, Peter; Rauscher, Felix; Rauter, Emanuel; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Reichold, Armin; Reinherz-Aronis, Erez; Reinsch, Andreas; Reisinger, Ingo; Reljic, Dusan; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Renkel, Peter; Rensch, Bertram; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resende, Bernardo; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richards, Alexander; Richter, Robert; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ridel, Melissa; Rieke, Stefan; Rijpstra, Manouk; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Rios, Ryan Randy; Riu, Imma; Rivoltella, Giancesare; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robinson, Mary; Robson, Aidan; Rocha de Lima, Jose Guilherme; Roda, Chiara; Roda Dos Santos, Denis; Rodier, Stephane; Rodriguez, Diego; Rodriguez Garcia, Yohany; Roe, Adam; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rojo, Victoria; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romanov, Victor; Romeo, Gaston; Romero Maltrana, Diego; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rose, Matthew; Rosenbaum, Gabriel; Rosenberg, Eli; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosselet, Laurent; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rossi, Lucio; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rottländer, Iris; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexander; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubinskiy, Igor; Ruckert, Benjamin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Gerald; Rühr, Frederik; Ruggieri, Federico; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rulikowska-Zarebska, Elzbieta; Rumiantsev, Viktor; Rumyantsev, Leonid; Runge, Kay; Runolfsson, Ogmundur; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Rust, Dave; Rutherfoord, John; Ruwiedel, Christoph; Ruzicka, Pavel; Ryabov, Yury; Ryadovikov, Vasily; Ryan, Patrick; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Rzaeva, Sevda; Saavedra, Aldo; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvachua Ferrando, Belén; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Samset, Björn Hallvard; Sandaker, Heidi; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandhu, Pawan; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sandvoss, Stephan; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Saraiva, João; Sarangi, Tapas; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward; Sarri, Francesca; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Takashi; Sasao, Noboru; Satsounkevitch, Igor; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Savard, Pierre; Savinov, Vladimir; Savu, Dan Octavian; Savva, Panagiota; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Says, Louis-Pierre; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scallon, Olivia; Scannicchio, Diana; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schäfer, Uli; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R~Dean; Schamov, Andrey; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schlereth, James; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmidt, Michael; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitz, Martin; Schöning, André; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schram, Malachi; Schroeder, Christian; Schroer, Nicolai; Schuh, Silvia; Schuler, Georges; Schultes, Joachim; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Jan; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwierz, Rainer; Schwindling, Jerome; Scott, Bill; Searcy, Jacob; Sedykh, Evgeny; Segura, Ester; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellden, Bjoern; Sellers, Graham; Seman, Michal; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sevior, Martin; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shank, James; Shao, Qi Tao; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaver, Leif; Shaw, Christian; Shaw, Kate; Sherman, Daniel; Sherwood, Peter; Shibata, Akira; Shimizu, Shima; Shimojima, Makoto; Shin, Taeksu; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sidoti, Antonio; Siebel, Anca-Mirela; Siegert, Frank; Siegrist, James; Sijacki, Djordje; Silbert, Ohad; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simmons, Brinick; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinnari, Louise Anastasia; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Skvorodnev, Nikolai; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Sloan, Terrence; Sloper, John erik; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Ben Campbell; Smith, Douglas; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snow, Steve; Snow, Joel; Snuverink, Jochem; Snyder, Scott; Soares, Mara; Sobie, Randall; Sodomka, Jaromir; Soffer, Abner; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldevila, Urmila; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Solovyanov, Oleg; Sondericker, John; Soni, Nitesh; Sopko, Vit; Sopko, Bruno; Sorbi, Massimo; Sosebee, Mark; Soukharev, Andrey; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spila, Federico; Spiriti, Eleuterio; Spiwoks, Ralf; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stahl, Thorsten; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staude, Arnold; Stavina, Pavel; Stavropoulos, Georgios; Steele, Genevieve; Steinbach, Peter; Steinberg, Peter; Stekl, Ivan; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stevenson, Kyle; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockmanns, Tobias; Stockton, Mark; Stoerig, Kathrin; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stonjek, Stefan; Strachota, Pavel; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strang, Michael; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Strong, John; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strube, Jan; Stugu, Bjarne; Stumer, Iuliu; Stupak, John; Sturm, Philipp; Soh, Dart-yin; Su, Dong; Subramania, Siva; Sugaya, Yorihito; Sugimoto, Takuya; Suhr, Chad; Suita, Koichi; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Sushkov, Serge; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Sviridov, Yuri; Swedish, Stephen; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Szeless, Balazs; Sánchez, Javier; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taga, Adrian; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takahashi, Yuta; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tamsett, Matthew; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanaka, Yoshito; Tani, Kazutoshi; Tannoury, Nancy; Tappern, Geoffrey; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tardif, Dominique; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tassi, Enrico; Tatarkhanov, Mous; Taylor, Christopher; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Tennenbaum-Katan, Yaniv-David; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terwort, Mark; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Tevlin, Christopher; Thadome, Jocelyn; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thioye, Moustapha; Thoma, Sascha; Thomas, Juergen; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Stan; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thun, Rudolf; Tic, Tomas; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timmermans, Charles; Tipton, Paul; Tique Aires Viegas, Florbela De Jes; Tisserant, Sylvain; Tobias, Jürgen; Toczek, Barbara; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokunaga, Kaoru; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tonazzo, Alessandra; Tong, Guoliang; Tonoyan, Arshak; Topfel, Cyril; Topilin, Nikolai; Torchiani, Ingo; Torrence, Eric; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Traynor, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Treis, Johannes; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alesandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Trinh, Thi Nguyet; Tripiana, Martin; Triplett, Nathan; Trischuk, William; Trivedi, Arjun; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiakiris, Menelaos; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsung, Jieh-Wen; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tua, Alan; Tuggle, Joseph; Turala, Michal; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turlay, Emmanuel; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Typaldos, Dimitrios; Tyrvainen, Harri; Tzanakos, George; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Uhrmacher, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Underwood, David; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Unno, Yoshinobu; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urkovsky, Evgeny; Urquijo, Phillip; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Uslenghi, Massimiliano; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Vahsen, Sven; Valderanis, Chrysostomos; Valenta, Jan; Valente, Paolo; Valentinetti, Sara; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; van der Graaf, Harry; van der Kraaij, Erik; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van der Poel, Egge; van der Ster, Daniel; Van Eijk, Bob; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; van Kesteren, Zdenko; van Vulpen, Ivo; Vandelli, Wainer; Vandoni, Giovanna; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Varela Rodriguez, Fernando; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vassilakopoulos, Vassilios; Vazeille, Francois; Vegni, Guido; Veillet, Jean-Jacques; Vellidis, Constantine; Veloso, Filipe; Veness, Raymond; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinek, Elisabeth; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virchaux, Marc; Viret, Sébastien; Virzi, Joseph; Vitale, Antonio; Vitells, Ofer; Viti, Michele; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vlasak, Michal; Vlasov, Nikolai; Vogel, Adrian; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Matteo; Volpini, Giovanni; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Loeben, Joerg; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobiev, Alexander; Vorwerk, Volker; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Voss, Thorsten Tobias; Vossebeld, Joost; Vovenko, Anatoly; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wagner, Peter; Wahlen, Helmut; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walbersloh, Jorg; Walch, Shannon; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Joshua C; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Warsinsky, Markus; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Anthony; Waugh, Ben; Weber, Jens; Weber, Marc; Weber, Michele; Weber, Pavel; Weidberg, Anthony; Weigell, Philipp; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Wellenstein, Hermann; Wells, Phillippa; Wen, Mei; Wenaus, Torre; Wendler, Shanti; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Werth, Michael; Wessels, Martin; Whalen, Kathleen; Wheeler-Ellis, Sarah Jane; Whitaker, Scott; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Sebastian; Whitehead, Samuel Robert; Whiteson, Daniel; Whittington, Denver; Wicek, Francois; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik, Liv Antje Mari; Wijeratne, Peter Alexander; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilhelm, Ivan; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Eric; Williams, Hugh; Willis, William; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wilson, Michael Galante; Wilson, Alan; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winkelmann, Stefan; Winklmeier, Frank; Wittgen, Matthias; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wooden, Gemma; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Catherine; Wrona, Bozydar; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wunstorf, Renate; Wynne, Benjamin; Xaplanteris, Leonidas; Xella, Stefania; Xie, Song; Xie, Yigang; Xu, Chao; Xu, Da; Xu, Guofa; Yabsley, Bruce; Yamada, Miho; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamaoka, Jared; Yamazaki, Takayuki; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zhaoyu; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Weiming; Yao, Yushu; Yasu, Yoshiji; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Riktura; Young, Charles; Youssef, Saul; Yu, Dantong; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Zaets, Vassilli; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zajacova, Zuzana; Zalite, Youris; Zanello, Lucia; Zarzhitsky, Pavel; Zaytsev, Alexander; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeller, Michael; Zema, Pasquale Federico; Zemla, Andrzej; Zendler, Carolin; Zenin, Anton; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zenonos, Zenonas; Zenz, Seth; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhan, Zhichao; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Tianchi; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zheng, Shuchen; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Ning; Zhou, Yue; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhuravlov, Vadym; Zieminska, Daria; Zilka, Branislav; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zitoun, Robert; Živković, Lidija; Zmouchko, Viatcheslav; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; Zolnierowski, Yves; Zsenei, Andras; zur Nedden, Martin; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2011-01-01

    We present first measurements of charged and neutral particle-flow correlations in pp collisions using the ATLAS calorimeters. Data were collected in 2009 and 2010 at centre-of-mass energies of 900 GeV and 7 TeV. Events were selected using a minimum-bias trigger which required a charged particle in scintillation counters on either side of the interaction point. Particle flows, sensitive to the underlying event, are measured using clusters of energy in the ATLAS calorimeters, taking advantage of their fine granularity. No Monte Carlo generator used in this analysis can accurately describe the measurements. The results are independent of those based on charged particles measured by the ATLAS tracking systems and can be used to constrain the parameters of Monte Carlo generators.

  19. Stress corrosion cracking behaviour in welded X-70 linepipe steel under near-neutral pH conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adeleke, A.H.; Luo, J.L.; Ivey, D.G. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Materials Engineering

    2005-07-01

    This study examined the relationship between the near neutral pH stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance and the yield strength of pipelines steels. In particular, double-edge-notched flat tensile samples of X70 steel were used for both slow strain-rate testing (SSRT) and cyclic loading testing with the notch located in the zone of interest. This included the weld metal (WM), base metal (BM) and heat-affected zone (HAZ). In all samples, the mode of failure was mostly transgranular with cleavage facets around the edges of the fracture surface. One of the objectives of this study was to better understand the microstructural effect of the relationship. The 3 main parameters that were used to assess the SCC susceptibility in a near-neutral pH environment were the elongation ratio, the estimated percentage of the fracture surface that showed brittle fractures, and the relative crack growth at a given exposure time. It was shown that resistance to near-neutral pH SCC depends greatly on the microstructure of the pipeline steels. Fine-grained bainite and ferrite structured steels were found to have a much better combination of strength and SCC resistance compared to ferrite and pearlite structures. The high-to-low sensitivity ranking of the X70 linepipe steel to SCC was established to be: WM is greater than HAZ which is greater than BM. 20 refs., 1 tab., 9 figs.

  20. Controllability of Nonlinear Neutral Evolution Equations with Nonlocal Conditions%具非局部条件的非线性中立型非线性发展方程的可控性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘明姬; 吕悦; 吕显瑞

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we establish sufficient conditions for the controllability of nonlinear neutral evolution equations with nonlocal conditions. The result is obtained by using Krasnoselski-Schaefer type fixed point theorem.

  1. Constraining the Europa Neutral Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Howard T.; Mitchell, Donald; mauk, Barry; Johnson, Robert E.; clark, george

    2016-10-01

    "Neutral tori" consist of neutral particles that usually co-orbit along with their source forming a toroidal (or partial toroidal) feature around the planet. The distribution and composition of these features can often provide important, if not unique, insight into magnetospheric particles sources, mechanisms and dynamics. However, these features can often be difficult to directly detect. One innovative method for detecting neutral tori is by observing Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs) that are generally considered produced as a result of charge exchange interactions between charged and neutral particles.Mauk et al. (2003) reported the detection of a Europa neutral particle torus using ENA observations. The presence of a Europa torus has extremely large implications for upcoming missions to Jupiter as well as understanding possible activity at this moon and providing critical insight into what lies beneath the surface of this icy ocean world. However, ENAs can also be produced as a result of charge exchange interactions between two ionized particles and in that case cannot be used to infer the presence of neutral particle population. Thus, a detailed examination of all possible source interactions must be considered before one can confirm that likely original source population of these ENA images is actually a Europa neutral particle torus. For this talk, we examine the viability that the Mauk et al. (2003) observations were actually generated from a neutral torus emanating from Europa as opposed to charge particle interactions with plasma originating from Io. These results help constrain such a torus as well as Europa source processes.

  2. Measurement of transverse single-spin asymmetries for midrapidity production of neutral pions and charged hadrons in polarized p + p collisions at square root(s) = 200 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, S S; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Amirikas, R; Aphecetche, L; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, R; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bauer, F; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Berdnikov, Y; Bhagavatula, S; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Borenstein, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Chai, J-S; Chand, P; Chang, W C; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Constantin, P; d'Enterria, D; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Devismes, A; Dietzsch, O; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; du Rietz, R; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Efremenko, Y V; El Chenawi, K; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Gogiberidze, G; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hartouni, E P; Harvey, M; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jeong, Y; Jia, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kang, J H; Kapoor, S S; Katou, K; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, E; Kim, G-B; Kim, H J; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Kiyoyama, K; Klein-Boesing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kuberg, C H; Kurita, K; Kuroki, Y; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Ladygin, V; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, S; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Liu, Y; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Messer, F; Miake, Y; Milan, J; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Nakamura, T; Nandi, B K; Nara, M; Newby, J; Nilsson, P; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Parmar, A; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Peng, J-C; Peresedov, V; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Plasil, F; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosnet, P; Ryu, S S; Sadler, M E; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, M; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shaw, M R; Shea, T K; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarján, P; Tepe, J D; Thomas, T L; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Veszprémi, V; Villatte, L; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yang, Y; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zhou, S J; Zolin, L

    2005-11-11

    Transverse single-spin asymmetries to probe the transverse-spin structure of the proton have been measured for neutral pions and nonidentified charged hadrons from polarized proton-proton collisions at midrapidity and square root(s) = 200 GeV. The data cover a transverse momentum (pT) range 1.0-5.0 GeV/c for neutral pions and 0.5-5.0 GeV/c for charged hadrons, at a Feynman-x value of approximately zero. The asymmetries seen in this previously unexplored kinematic region are consistent with zero within errors of a few percent. In addition, the inclusive charged hadron cross section at midrapidity from 0.5 < pT < 7.0 GeV/c is presented and compared to next-to-leading order perturbative QCD (pQCD) calculations. Successful description of the unpolarized cross section above approximately 2 GeV/c suggests that pQCD is applicable in the interpretation of the asymmetry results in the relevant kinematic range.

  3. Measurement of Transverse Single-Spin Asymmetries for Mid-rapidity Production of Neutral Pions and Charged Hadrons in Polarized p+p Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adler, S S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Amirikas, R; Aphecetche, L; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, R; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, Alberto; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bauer, F; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Berdnikov, Yu A; Bhagavatula, S; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Borenstein, S R; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Büsching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Chai, J S; Chand, P; Chang, W C; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Constantin, P; D'Enterria, D G; Dávid, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, Abhay A; Desmond, E J; Devismes, A; Dietzsch, O; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Du Rietz, R; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Chenawi, K F; Enokizono, A; Enyo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L A; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Zeev; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Gogiberidze, G; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, Hans Åke; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hartouni, E P; Harvey, M; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jeong, Y; Jia, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kang, J H; Kapoor, S S; Katou, K; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, E; Kim, G B; Kim, H J; Kistenev, E P; Kiyomichi, A; Kiyoyama, K; Klein-Bösing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kuberg, C H; Kurita, K; Kuroki, Y; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Ladygin, V P; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, S; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A G; Liu, M X; Liu, Y; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Man'ko, V I; Mao, Y; Martínez, G; Marx, M D; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E A; Messer, F; Miake, Y; Milan, J; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Muhlbacher, F; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Nakamura, T; Nandi, B K; Nara, M; Newby, J; Nilsson, P; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Ono, M; Onuchin, V A; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V S; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Parmar, A; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Peng, J C; Peresedov, V; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Plasil, F; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosnet, P; Ryu, S S; Sadler, M E; Saitô, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, M; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shaw, M R; Shea, T K; Shibata, T A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sørensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarjan, P; Tepe, J D; Thomas, T L; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, Itzhak; Tsuruoka, H; Tuli, S K; Tydesjo, H; Tyurin, N; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Veszpremi, V; Villatte, L; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vznuzdaev, E A; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yang, Y; Yanovich, A A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zhou, S J; Zolin, L

    2005-01-01

    The transverse single-spin asymmetries of neutral pions and non-identified charged hadrons have been measured at mid-rapidity in polarized proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 200 GeV. The data cover a transverse momentum (p_T) range 0.5-5.0 GeV/c for charged hadrons and 1.0-5.0 GeV/c for neutral pions, at a Feynman-x (x_F) value of approximately zero. The asymmetries seen in this previously unexplored kinematic region are consistent with zero within statistical errors of a few percent. In addition, the inclusive charged hadron cross section at mid-rapidity from 0.5 < p_T < 7.0 GeV/c is presented and compared to NLO pQCD calculations. Successful description of the unpolarized cross section above ~2 GeV/c using NLO pQCD suggests that pQCD is applicable in the interpretation of the asymmetry results in the relevant kinematic range.

  4. Zinc-promoted simple synthesis of oligomer-free N(alpha)-Fmoc-amino acids using Fmoc-Cl as an acylating agent under neutral conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopi, H N; Suresh Babu, V V

    2000-04-01

    A range of N(alpha)-Fmoc-protected amino acids, including those that contain t-butyl moiety, have been synthesized by employing Fmoc-Cl utilizing the activated, commercial zinc dust-promoted synthesis of carbamates under neutral conditions. A general procedure is described that circumvents the oligomerization side reaction normally noticed in Schotten-Baumann conditions. It is a simple, convenient and clean method. Thus, Fmoc-amino acids are obtained in high yield (85-92%) and purity as checked by thin-layer chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography and other physical methods.

  5. Probing the electronic structures and properties of neutral and charged arsenic sulfides [Asn S₂ (⁻¹,⁰,⁺¹), n = 1-6] with Gaussian-3 theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Liyuan; Yang, Jucai; Ning, Hongmei

    2014-10-01

    The structures and energies of neutral and charged arsenic sulfides As n S2 ((-1,0,+1)) (n = 1-6) were investigated systematically by means of the Gaussian-3 (G3) scheme. The ground-state structures of these species are presented. The ground-state structures of As n S2 can be viewed as the lowest-energy structure of neutral As n+1S by replacing an As atom with a S atom. To be more precise, the ground-state structures of As n S2 can be viewed as the lowest-energy structure of neutral As n+2 by replacing two As atoms with two S atoms, in which the feature of sulfur bonding is edge-bridging. No rule could be found for the ground state structure of As n S2 (-) and As n S2 (+). In As n S2 (-), the feature of sulfur bonding is either edge-bridging or a terminal atom, and in AsnS2 (+) the feature of sulfur bonding is edge-bridging analogous to As n S2. The potential energy surfaces of As4S2 and its charged species are very flat. So co-existence for many isomers of As4S2 and its charged species are possible. The reliable adiabatic electron affinities (AEAs) and adiabatic ionization potentials (AIPs) of As n S2 were estimated. There are odd-even alternations in both AEAs and AIPs as a function of size of As n S2. The dissociation energies (DEs) of S [and/or its ion S((-/+))] from As n S2 clusters and their ions were calculated and used to reveal relative stability.

  6. Investigation of a CTS solar cell test patch under simulated geomagnetic substorm charging conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogus, K. P.

    1977-01-01

    The CTS solar array technology experiment which consists of a solar cell test patch on the Kapton-substrate solar array and the appertaining electronics unit has been operating in geostationary orbit for nearly 1 year without any malfunction although it is expected to be strongly influenced by charging effects on the array surface. The results of a post-launch test program show that the experiment would not survive a discharge due to electrostatic charging in the test patch area. In a simulated substorm, environment discharges were obtained only below a temperature threshold of about 30 C. With solar illumination, this threshold is reduced below 0 C.

  7. Electrolyte Engineering Toward Efficient Hydrogen Production Electrocatalysis with Oxygen-crossover Regulation under Densely Buffered Near-neutral pH Conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Shinagawa, Tatsuya

    2015-12-30

    This study tackles the core issues associated with near-neutral pH water splitting, particularly regarding electrolyte engineering in the electrocatalysis and product cross-over. We demonstrate that solute engineering has a major impact on water splitting electrocatalysis because the diffusion component, often not well integrated into performance descriptions, largely determines the overall performance. The hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) was investigated on Pt, Ni and NiMo catalysts in various concentrations of cations (Li+, K+, Na+) and anions (H2PO4−, HPO42−, PO43− and HCO3−) to describe its performance by quantifying kinetics, diffusion and solution resistance. In fact, the choice of electrolyte in terms of its identity and activity drastically altered the HER rate and oxygen mass-transport flux at near-neutral pH. Electrolyte properties (activity coefficient, kinematic viscosity and diffusion coefficient) accurately described the diffusion contribution, which can be easily isolated when a highly active Pt catalyst was used for the HER. By analyzing these properties, we maximized the HER rate on the Pt by tuning the solute concentration (typically 1.5 – 2.0 M). Moreover, the kinematic viscosity and oxygen solubility in such densely buffered conditions governed the oxygen mass-transport flux in the electrolyte, which in turn tuned the cross-over flux. At near-neutral pH, as high as 90 % selectivity toward the HER was achieved even under an oxygen saturated condition, where only a 40 mV overpotential was needed to achieve 10 mA cm−2 for the HER. This information can be regarded as an important milestone for achieving a highly efficient water splitting system at near-neutral pH.

  8. Instabilities in a Plasma Coupled to a Neutral Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daughton, W.; Coppi, B.; Catto, P.; Krasheninnikov, S.

    1996-11-01

    Low temperature plasmas are often coupled to a neutral population through charge exchange or elastic collisions. The edge and divertor region of a tokamak and the ionosphere are a few well know examples. The linear stability of a coupled plasma - neutral system in plane geometry is examined and several relevant instabilities have been identified. One of these instabilities is an interchange type flute mode driven by the neutral pressure gradient. The second is a dissipative velocity shear instability^1 driven by the perpendicular gradient of a parallel velocity. Previously(B. Basu and B. Coppi, Journal of Geophysical Research), Vol. 94 No. A5 p. 5316 (1989) the neutral population had been treated as a uniform background insensitive to the perturbations in the plasma while in the present work the instability is allowed to perturb the neutrals as well as the plasma. The relevant dispersion relationships and instability conditions are presented. Supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy

  9. Calculation and measurement of space charge in MV-size xxtruded cables systems under load conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morshuis, P.H.F.; Bodega, R.; Fabiani, D.; Montanari, G.C.; Dissado, L.A; Smit, J.J.

    2007-01-01

    A load current in dc high voltage cables results in a temperature drop across the insulation and hence a radial distribution of the insulation conductivity is found. Direct consequence is an accumulation of space charge in the bulk of the nsulation, that may significantly affect its reliability. Thi

  10. Dependence of Lunar Surface Charging on Solar Wind Plasma Conditions and Solar Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, T. J.; Farrell, W. M.; Halekas, J. S.; Burchill, J. K.; Collier, M. R.; Zimmerman, M. I.; Vondrak, R. R.; Delory, G. T.; Pfaff, R. F.

    2014-01-01

    The surface of the Moon is electrically charged by exposure to solar radiation on its dayside, as well as by the continuous flux of charged particles from the various plasma environments that surround it. An electric potential develops between the lunar surface and ambient plasma, which manifests itself in a near-surface plasma sheath with a scale height of order the Debye length. This study investigates surface charging on the lunar dayside and near-terminator regions in the solar wind, for which the dominant current sources are usually from the pohotoemission of electrons, J(sub p), and the collection of plasma electrons J(sub e) and ions J(sub i). These currents are dependent on the following six parameters: plasma concentration n(sub 0), electron temperature T(sub e), ion temperature T(sub i), bulk flow velocity V, photoemission current at normal incidence J(sub P0), and photo electron temperature T(sub p). Using a numerical model, derived from a set of eleven basic assumptions, the influence of these six parameters on surface charging - characterized by the equilibrium surface potential, Debye length, and surface electric field - is investigated as a function of solar zenith angle. Overall, T(sub e) is the most important parameter, especially near the terminator, while J(sub P0) and T(sub p) dominate over most of the dayside.

  11. Charging studies of heat packs using parabolic dish solar energy concentrator for extreme conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rohitash; Vyas, Sumita; Kumar, Ravindra; Dixit, Ambesh

    2016-05-01

    Parabolic dish solar energy concentrator with aperture diameter 1.4 m and focal length 0.32 m is designed and fabricated to charge and store solar thermal energy in phase change material (PCM) based heat packs. Overall heat loss factor, heat duty, over all thermal efficiency, and optical efficiency factor are calculated using water sensible heating and cooling tests and values are 16.11 W m-2 K-1, 546.9 W, 49.2% and 0.62 respectively. The performance characteristic curve is generated using these parameters to understand its performance at different ambient temperatures and solar insolation. The fabricated concentrator has been used to charge 16 PCM heat packs with 150 g PCM in each heat pack, which took about 35 minutes for complete charging of PCM heat packs at average ambient temperature 39 °C and solar radiation flux density 715 W m-2 K-1. The charged heat packs are subjected to discharge studies at average ambient temperature about - 7 °C and observed heat release in the temperature range of 48 to 40 °C for 50 minutes, suggesting its applications for comfort and therapeutic applications in high altitude areas.

  12. Probing the electronic structures and properties of neutral and charged arsenic sulfides (AsnS(⁻¹,⁰,⁺¹), n =1-7) using Gaussian-3 theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jucai; Kang, Yali; Wang, Xi; Bai, Xue

    2013-12-01

    The structures and energies of neutral and charged arsenic sulfides As(n)S(⁻¹,⁰,⁺¹) (n =1-7) were systematically investigated using the G3 method. The bonding properties and the stabilities of As(n)S and their ions were discussed. The adiabatic electron affinities (AEAs) and adiabatic ionization potentials (AIPs) were presented. The ground-state structures of As(n)S can be considered as the lowest-energy structure of neutral As(n+1) by replacing an As atom with a S atom, that is, "substitutional structure", in which the feature of sulfur bonding is edge-bridging. The ground-state structures of As(n)S⁺ tend to be derived from the lowest-energy structure of cation As(n)⁺ by attaching to a S atom, that is, "attaching structure", in which the sulfur can be three-fold coordinated. There is no rule to be found for the ground-state structure of anion As(n)S⁻, in which the sulfur can be a terminal atom. There are odd-even alternations in both AEAs and AIPs as a function of size of As(n)S. The dissociation energies of S, S⁻, and/or S⁺ from neutral As(n)S and their ions were calculated to examine their stabilities.

  13. Exposure to negatively charged-particle dominant air-conditions on human lymphocytes in vitro activates immunological responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Yasumitsu; Takahashi, Kazuaki; Mase, Akinori; Kotani, Muneo; Ami, Kazuhisa; Maeda, Megumi; Shirahama, Takashi; Lee, Suni; Matsuzaki, Hidenori; Kumagai-Takei, Naoko; Yoshitome, Kei; Otsuki, Takemi

    2015-12-01

    Indoor air-conditions may play an important role in human health. Investigation of house conditions that promote health revealed that negatively charged-particle dominant indoor air-conditions (NAC) induced immune stimulation. NAC was established using fine charcoal powder on walls and ceilings and utilizing forced negatively charged particles (approximate diameter: 20 nm) dominant in indoor air-conditions created by applying an electric voltage (72 V) between the backside of the walls and the ground. We reported previously that these conditions induced a slight and significant increase of interleukin-2 during 2.5 h stay, and an increase of natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity, when examining human subjects after a two-week night stay under these conditions. In the present study, we investigated whether exposure to NAC in vitro affects immune conditions. Although the concentrations of particles were different, an incubator for cell culture with NAC was set and cellular compositions and functions of various freshly isolated human lymphocytes derived from healthy donors were assayed in the NAC incubator and compared with those of cultures in a standard (STD) incubator. Results showed that NAC cultivation caused an increase of CD25 and PD-1 expressing cells in the CD4 positive fraction, enhancement of NK cell cytotoxicity, production of interferon-y (IFNγ), and slight enhancement of regulatory T cell function. In addition, the formula designated as the "immune-index" clearly differed between STD and NAC culture conditions. Thus, NAC conditions may promote human health through slight activation of the immune system against cancer cells and virus infection as shown by this in vitro study and our previously reported human studies.

  14. The energy balance of the biomass generation of Chlamydomonas acidophila under acidic and neutral conditions and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii; Die Energiebilanz der Biomasseneubildung von Chlamydomonas acidophila unter sauren und neutralen Bedingungen und von Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langner, Uwe

    2009-01-16

    the positive cell surface charge and does facilitate the uptake of negative charged ions such as chloride and sulfate. Up to now from the unicellular green alga C. acidophila the pH-dependent growth (Cassin 1974, Gerloff-Elias et al. 2005), nutrient uptake (C, P) (Cuaresma et al. 2006, Nishikawa et al. 2006, Spijkerman 2007, 2008, Balkos and Colman 2007), heavy metal tolerance (Nishikawa et al. 2006, Spijkerman et al. 2007) and the adaptive mechanisms at pH < 3 (Messerli et al. 2005) have been analyzed. The present results expand the knowledge of the adaptation capacity of microalgae in extreme acidic water bodies. Nevertheless, which energetic and metabolic fluxes enable C. acidophila to achieve the growth rates like other Chlamydomonads under neutral conditions remains unclear. (orig.)

  15. Boundary-layer flow and power output in large wind farms during transition from neutral to stable conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaerts, Dries; Meyers, Johan

    2016-11-01

    In wind farms, power deficits are directly related to ambient turbulence levels. Power deficits will therefore increase during the transition from a daytime, conventionally neutral boundary layer (CNBL) to the stable boundary layer (SBL) at night. Besides turbulent decay, a multitude of effects occurs during this transition. For instance, low-level jets may cause strong winds at high elevations, while the velocity near the surface generally decreases. Consequently, Coriolis forces induce a change in wind direction, which alters the apparent wind-farm layout in streamwise direction. In this study, we perform LES of a large onshore wind farm in the late-afternoon transition from an equilibrium CNBL to a surface-cooled SBL. The results of two different cooling rates are compared with the wind-farm performance in the CNBL. The power output decrease during the transition, with faster decrease for stronger surface cooling. However, the initial decrease is dominated by the reduction in wind speed, and the relative power deficits do not increase. Further, considerable wake deflection occurs, and a spatially heterogeneous distribution of temperature and heat flux is observed. The authors acknowledge support from the European Research Council (FP7-Ideas, Grant No. 306471).

  16. New Insight into the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction under Buffered Near-Neutral pH Conditions: Enthalpy and Entropy of Activation

    KAUST Repository

    Shinagawa, Tatsuya

    2016-10-06

    Electrochemical conversion of thermodynamically stable chemicals of water and carbon dioxide is regarded as a core technology for achieving sustainability in our society. In both cases, the electrochemical hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is a key reaction, particularly at near-neutral pH. This study addresses the kinetic aspects of the HER in buffered near-neutral pH conditions using a variety of electrode materials (W, Ni, Pt, Au, and Cu) over a wide temperature range (299–346 K). When the overall performance was summarized with respect to the binding energy of the reaction intermediate species, a classic volcano-shaped relationship was obtained. Interestingly, the temperature sensitivity analysis disclosed that smaller activation energies did not always lead to higher performance in 1.5 mol L–1 K-phosphate solution (pH 5.8). Detailed analysis of the temperature- and potential-dependent parameters revealed that smaller activation energies coincided with smaller values of the pre-exponential factor in the Arrhenius’ equation (associated with the entropy of activation). Due to the trade-off relationship of enthalpy–entropy compensation in the current system, the conventional approach of mixing elements of lower and higher binding energies to the intermediate species failed: even though Ni–Cu showed lower apparent activation energy, its activity toward the HER was between that of Ni and Cu due to the lowered entropy of activation. This study demonstrates the unrevealed fundamental aspects of the HER in buffered near-neutral condition, which contributes to the rational development of efficient energy and material conversion systems.

  17. Non-ideal operating conditions of the ion source prototype for the ITER neutral beam injector due to thermal deformation of the support structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, E; Pavei, M; Marcuzzi, D; Zaccaria, P

    2014-02-01

    The beam formation and acceleration of the ITER neutral beam injector will be studied in the full-scale ion source, Source for Production of Ions of Deuterium Extracted from a RF plasma (SPIDER). It will be able to sustain 40 A deuterium ion beam during 1-h pulses. The operating conditions of its multi-aperture electrodes will diverge from ideality, as a consequence of inhomogeneous heating and thermally induced deformations in the support structure of the extraction and acceleration grids, which operate at different temperatures. Meeting the requirements on the aperture alignment and distance between the grids with such a large number of apertures (1280) and the huge support structures constitute a challenge. Examination of the structure thermal deformation in transient and steady conditions has been carried out, evaluating their effect on the beam performance: the paper describes the analyses and the solutions proposed to mitigate detrimental effects.

  18. Non-ideal operating conditions of the ion source prototype for the ITER neutral beam injector due to thermal deformation of the support structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, E.; Pavei, M.; Marcuzzi, D.; Zaccaria, P.

    2014-02-01

    The beam formation and acceleration of the ITER neutral beam injector will be studied in the full-scale ion source, Source for Production of Ions of Deuterium Extracted from a RF plasma (SPIDER). It will be able to sustain 40 A deuterium ion beam during 1-h pulses. The operating conditions of its multi-aperture electrodes will diverge from ideality, as a consequence of inhomogeneous heating and thermally induced deformations in the support structure of the extraction and acceleration grids, which operate at different temperatures. Meeting the requirements on the aperture alignment and distance between the grids with such a large number of apertures (1280) and the huge support structures constitute a challenge. Examination of the structure thermal deformation in transient and steady conditions has been carried out, evaluating their effect on the beam performance: the paper describes the analyses and the solutions proposed to mitigate detrimental effects.

  19. Non-ideal operating conditions of the ion source prototype for the ITER neutral beam injector due to thermal deformation of the support structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sartori, E., E-mail: emanuele.sartori@igi.cnr.it; Pavei, M.; Marcuzzi, D.; Zaccaria, P. [Consorzio RFX, Euratom-ENEA Association, Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy)

    2014-02-15

    The beam formation and acceleration of the ITER neutral beam injector will be studied in the full-scale ion source, Source for Production of Ions of Deuterium Extracted from a RF plasma (SPIDER). It will be able to sustain 40 A deuterium ion beam during 1-h pulses. The operating conditions of its multi-aperture electrodes will diverge from ideality, as a consequence of inhomogeneous heating and thermally induced deformations in the support structure of the extraction and acceleration grids, which operate at different temperatures. Meeting the requirements on the aperture alignment and distance between the grids with such a large number of apertures (1280) and the huge support structures constitute a challenge. Examination of the structure thermal deformation in transient and steady conditions has been carried out, evaluating their effect on the beam performance: the paper describes the analyses and the solutions proposed to mitigate detrimental effects.

  20. Neutralizing positive charges at the surface of a protein lowers its rate of amide hydrogen exchange without altering its structure or increasing its thermostability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Bryan F; Arthanari, Haribabu; Narovlyansky, Max; Durazo, Armando; Frueh, Dominique P; Pollastri, Michael P; Lee, Andrew; Bilgicer, Basar; Gygi, Steven P; Wagner, Gerhard; Whitesides, George M

    2010-12-15

    This paper combines two techniques--mass spectrometry and protein charge ladders--to examine the relationship between the surface charge and hydrophobicity of a representative globular protein (bovine carbonic anhydrase II; BCA II) and its rate of amide hydrogen-deuterium (H/D) exchange. Mass spectrometric analysis indicated that the sequential acetylation of surface lysine-ε-NH3(+) groups--a type of modification that increases the net negative charge and hydrophobicity of the surface of BCA II without affecting its secondary or tertiary structure--resulted in a linear decrease in the aggregate rate of amide H/D exchange at pD 7.4, 15 °C. According to analysis with MS, the acetylation of each additional lysine generated between 1.4 and 0.9 additional hydrogens that are protected from H/D exchange during the 2 h exchange experiment at 15 °C, pD 7.4. NMR spectroscopy demonstrated that none of the hydrogen atoms which became protected upon acetylation were located on the side chain of the acetylated lysine residues (i.e., lys-ε-NHCOCH3) but were instead located on amide NHCO moieties in the backbone. The decrease in rate of exchange associated with acetylation paralleled a decrease in thermostability: the most slowly exchanging rungs of the charge ladder were the least thermostable (as measured by differential scanning calorimetry). This observation--that faster rates of exchange are associated with slower rates of denaturation--is contrary to the usual assumptions in protein chemistry. The fact that the rates of H/D exchange were similar for perbutyrated BCA II (e.g., [lys-ε-NHCO(CH2)2CH3]18) and peracetylated BCA II (e.g., [lys-ε-NHCOCH3]18) suggests that the electrostatic charge is more important than the hydrophobicity of surface groups in determining the rate of H/D exchange. These electrostatic effects on the kinetics of H/D exchange could complicate (or aid) the interpretation of experiments in which H/D exchange methods are used to probe the structural

  1. Local charge transport properties of hydrazine reduced monolayer graphene oxide sheets prepared under pressure condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryuzaki, Sou; Meyer, Jakob Abild Stengaard; Petersen, Søren Vermehren

    2014-01-01

    Charge transport properties of chemically reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets prepared by treatment with hydrazine were examined using conductive atomic force microscopy. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of monolayer RGO sheets prepared under atmospheric pressure followed an exponentially...... increase due to 2D variable-range hopping conduction through small graphene domains in an RGO sheet containing defect regions of residual sp3carbon clusters bonded to oxygen groups, whereas RGO sheets prepared in a closed container under moderate pressure showed linear I-V characteristics...... with a conductivity of 267.2-537.5S/m. It was found that the chemical reduction under pressure results in larger graphene domains (sp2networks) in the RGO sheets when compared to that prepared under atmospheric pressure, indicating that the present reduction of GO sheets under the pressure is one of the effective...

  2. Probing freeze-out conditions in heavy ion collisions with moments of charge fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Karsch, Frithjof

    2011-01-01

    We calculate the first four moments of baryon number, electric charge and strangeness fluctuations within the hadron resonance gas model. Different moments and their ratios as well as skewness and kurtosis are evaluated on the phenomenologically determined freeze-out curve in the temperature, baryon chemical potential plane. The model results and its predictions as well as relations between different moments are compared with the first data on net proton fluctuations in Au-Au collisions obtained at RHIC by the STAR Collaboration. We find good agreement between the model calculations and experimental results. We also point out that higher order moments should be more sensitive to critical behavior and will also distinguish hadron resonance gas model calculations from results obtained from lattice QCD.

  3. Constraints on rapidity-dependent initial conditions from charged particle pseudorapidity densities and two-particle correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Ke, Weiyao; Bernhard, Jonah E; Bass, Steffen A

    2016-01-01

    We study the initial three-dimensional spatial configuration of the quark-gluon plasma produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions using centrality and rapidity-dependent measurements of charged particle pseudorapidity densities and two-particle correlations. A cumulant-generating function is used to parametrize the rapidity dependence of local entropy deposition and extend arbitrary boost-invariant initial conditions to nonzero beam rapidities. The model is compared to p+Pb and Pb+Pb single-particle distributions and systematically optimized using Bayesian parameter estimation to extract high-probability initial condition parameters. The optimized initial conditions are then compared to a number of experimental observables including two-particle rapidity correlations, the rapidity dependence of anisotropic flow, and event-plane decorrelations.

  4. Neutral B meson flavor tagging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robert J.

    2001-07-01

    We present an investigation of the use of net charge and kaon identification to tag the flavor of neutral B mesons. The net charge of the neutral B meson decay products is zero if all charged particles are used and slightly non-zero if only undiscriminated hadronic final states are used. The net charge of the kaons alone correctly tags the identity of the neutral meson in at least a third of all decays. We have parametrized the particle identification capability of several techniques, such as dE/dx in time projection chambers, LEP/SLC ring-imaging chambers and an enhanced BaBar DIRC. Using these parametrisations we compare the relative tagging power of each technique to that of an ideal detector.

  5. Neutral B meson flavor tagging

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, R J

    2001-01-01

    We present an investigation of the use of net charge and kaon identification to tag the flavor of neutral B mesons. The net charge of the neutral B meson decay products is zero if all charged particles are used and slightly non-zero if only undiscriminated hadronic final states are used. The net charge of the kaons alone correctly tags the identity of the neutral meson in at least a third of all decays. We have parametrized the particle identification capability of several techniques, such as dE/dx in time projection chambers, LEP/SLC ring-imaging chambers and an enhanced BaBar DIRC. Using these parametrisations we compare the relative tagging power of each technique to that of an ideal detector. (8 refs).

  6. Effects of Exhaust Gas Recirculation on the Homogeneous Charge Combustion Process of n-Heptane at Different Load Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Dexin; FENG Hongqing; ZHENG Jincai; MILLER David L; CERNANSKY Nicholas P

    2005-01-01

    Effects of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) on homogeneous charge combustion of n-heptane was studied through simulation and experiment. Experiments were carried out in a single cylinder, four-stroke, air cooled engine and a single cylinder, two-stroke, water cooled engine. In the four-stroke engine, experiments of the effects of EGR were examined using heated N2 addition as a surrogate for external EGR and modifying engine to increase internal EGR. The ignition timing was sensitive to EGR due to thermal and chemical effects. EGR or extra air is a key factor in eliminating knock during mid-load conditions. For higher load operation the only way to avoid knock is to control reaction timing through the use of spark ignition. Experimental and modeling results from the two-stroke engine show that auto-ignition can be avoided by increasing the engine speed. The two-stroke engine experiments indicate that high levels of internal EGR can enable spark ignition at lean conditions. At higher load conditions, increasing the engine speed is an effective method to control transition from homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) operation to non-HCCI operation and successful spark ignition of a highly dilute mixture can avoid serious knock.

  7. The Influence of Electrodes and Conditioning on Space Charge Accumulation in XLPE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleming, R. J.; Henriksen, Mogens; Holbøll, Joachim

    2000-01-01

    . They also developed homocharge close to the electrodes. The choice of electrode material had little effect on the heterocharge profile in unconditioned samples. Conditioning by holding at 80°C for four days, at rotary pump pressure or at atmospheric pressure, suppressed the accumulation of heterocharge....... Homocharge accumulation close to the electrodes in samples with semicon electrodes was affected little by this conditioning, but was reduced considerably in samples with gold electrodes. Conditioning by holding at room temperature for seven days at rotary pump pressure had little effect. The heterocharge...

  8. Gargamelle: neutral current event

    CERN Multimedia

    1973-01-01

    This event shows real tracks of particles from the 1200 litre Gargamelle bubble chamber that ran on the PS from 1970 to 1976 and on the SPS from 1976 to 1979. In this image a neutrino passes close to a nucleon and reemerges as a neutrino. Such events are called neutral curent, as they are mediated by the Z0 boson which has no electric charge.

  9. Organic carbon and reducing conditions lead to cadmium immobilization by secondary Fe mineral formation in a pH-neutral soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehe, E Marie; Adaktylou, Irini J; Obst, Martin; Zeitvogel, Fabian; Behrens, Sebastian; Planer-Friedrich, Britta; Kraemer, Ute; Kappler, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is of environmental relevance as it enters soils via Cd-containing phosphate fertilizers and endangers human health when taken up by crops. Cd is known to associate with Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides in pH-neutral to slightly acidic soils, though it is not well understood how the interrelation of Fe and Cd changes under Fe(III)-reducing conditions. Therefore, we investigated how the mobility of Cd changes when a Cd-bearing soil is faced with organic carbon input and reducing conditions. Using fatty acid profiles and quantitative PCR, we found that both fermenting and Fe(III)-reducing bacteria were stimulated by organic carbon-rich conditions, leading to significant Fe(III) reduction. The reduction of Fe(III) minerals was accompanied by increasing soil pH, increasing dissolved inorganic carbon, and decreasing Cd mobility. SEM-EDX mapping of soil particles showed that a minor fraction of Cd was transferred to Ca- and S-bearing minerals, probably carbonates and sulfides. Most of the Cd, however, correlated with a secondary iron mineral phase that was formed during microbial Fe(III) mineral reduction and contained mostly Fe, suggesting an iron oxide mineral such as magnetite (Fe3O4). Our data thus provide evidence that secondary Fe(II) and Fe(II)/Fe(III) mixed minerals could be a sink for Cd in soils under reducing conditions, thus decreasing the mobility of Cd in the soil.

  10. Measurements of CP Violation and Neutral Kaon Charge Radius using K(L) → π+π-e+e- Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golossanov, Alexander [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2005-05-01

    CP violation and K{sup 0} charge radius were measured using KL → π+π-e+e- decays. Specifically, a unique CP-violating decay-plane asymmetry was measured along with the parameters of individual contributions to the decay invariant amplitude: (1) CP-conserving magnetic dipole direct emission form factor, (2) CP-conserving K0 charge radius transition amplitude and (3) an upper limit for the CP-violating electric dipole direct emission amplitude. The measurements were obtained from the data sample accumulated by KTeV experiment at Fermilab. KTeV had two major goals: the measurement of direct CP violation parameter Re(ϵ'/ϵ) and the study of rare kaon decays. The state of the art detector was constructed, commissioned, operated and maintained by an international collaboration of scientists from fourteen institutions. The KL → π+π-e+e-L decays took place in the KTeV fiducial decay region.

  11. A Fast 3D Poisson Solver with Longitudinal Periodic and Transverse Open Boundary Conditions for Space-Charge Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Qiang, Ji

    2016-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) Poisson solver with longitudinal periodic and transverse open boundary conditions can have important applications in beam physics of particle accelerators. In this paper, we present a fast efficient method to solve the Poisson equation using a spectral finite-difference method. This method uses a computational domain that contains the charged particle beam only and has a computational complexity of $O(N_u(logN_{mode}))$, where $N_u$ is the total number of unknowns and $N_{mode}$ is the maximum number of longitudinal or azimuthal modes. This saves both the computational time and the memory usage by using an artificial boundary condition in a large extended computational domain.

  12. Quantifying the performance of charge-coupled devices in ambient conditions - Oral presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dungee, Ryan [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-22

    Telescope surveys have given us a great deal of information about our universe, but the images they capture carry with them an inherent limitation. The question then is how do we take this information to the next level? The answer: the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI). DESI is an instrument that will measure the distance to tens of millions of galaxies in our night sky. This information can be combined with already existing images to construct a three dimensional map of our universe providing a great deal of new opportunities for cosmological research. The DESI guidance system consists of 10 detectors called charge-coupled devices (CCDs). Each CCD is made of silicon atoms that emit electrons when struck with light, the electrons are counted and then used to reconstruct an image. But, CCDs suffer from an issue known as ‘dark current’ which are false counts that come from thermal motions of the silicon atoms. This is particularly problematic since they contribute to the uncertainty of a measurement without contributing to our signal. This causes a drop in the signal to noise ratio, a value that needs to be maximized in order to meet DESI’s high precision requirements. This summer was spent ensuring the DESI guidance system would meet its specifications. Data was collected using a CCD of the same type that would be used on DESI and the effectiveness of dark current removal was tested. Exposures were taken for a wide range of temperatures and exposure lengths and a number of dark current removal methods were implemented. While further testing is required, the initial results are quite promising and the DESI guidance system is on track to meet its specifications

  13. Two-stage crystallization of charged colloids under low supersaturation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratzer, Kai; Arnold, Axel

    2015-03-21

    We report simulations on the homogeneous liquid-fcc nucleation of charged colloids for both low and high contact energy values. As a precursor for crystal formation, we observe increased local order at the position where the crystal will form, but no correlations with the local density. Thus, the nucleation is driven by order fluctuations rather than density fluctuations. Our results also show that the transition involves two stages in both cases, first a transition of liquid → bcc, followed by a bcc → hcp/fcc transition. Both transitions have to overcome free energy barriers, so that a spherical bcc-like cluster is formed first, in which the final fcc structure is nucleated mainly at the surface of the crystallite. This means that the second stage bcc-fcc phase transition is a heterogeneous nucleation in the partially grown solid phase, even though we start from a homogeneous bulk liquid. The height of the bcc → hcp/fcc free energy barrier strongly depends on the contact energies of the colloids. For low contact energy this barrier is low, so that the bcc → hcp/fcc transition occurs spontaneously. For the higher contact energy, the second barrier is too high to be crossed spontaneously by the colloidal system. However, it was possible to ratchet the system over the second barrier and to transform the bcc nuclei into the stable hcp/fcc phase. The transitions are dominated by the first liquid-bcc transition and can be described by classical nucleation theory using an effective surface tension.

  14. Development of a highly sensitive chemiluminescent assay for hydrogen peroxide under neutral conditions using acridinium ester and its application to an enzyme immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Hidetoshi; Tsuruoka, Keiko; Ohno, Ken-ichi; Tajima, Noriko; Nagano, Hiromi

    2014-06-01

    We developed a highly sensitive chemiluminescent (CL) assay for hydrogen peroxide using 10-methyl-9-(phenoxycarbonyl) acridinium fluorosulfonate (PMAC) that produced chemiluminescence under neutral conditions and applied it to an enzyme immunoassay (EIA). One picomole of hydrogen peroxide could be detected using the optimized PMAC-CL method and 6.2 × 10(-20) mol β-D-galactosidase (β-gal) could be detected by combining an indoxyl derivative substrate and the proposed PMAC-CL method. This highly sensitive CL β-gal assay was applied to an EIA for thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) using β-gal as a label enzyme; 0.02-100.0 μU/mL TSH in human serum could be assayed directly and with high reproducibility.

  15. Divertor plasma conditions and neutral dynamics in horizontal and vertical divertor configurations in JET-ILW low confinement mode plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groth, M., E-mail: mathias.groth@aalto.fi [Aalto University, Association EURATOM-Tekes, Otakaari 4, Espoo (Finland); Brezinsek, S. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, IEK4 – Plasma Physik, Jülich (Germany); Belo, P. [Institute of Plasmas and Nuclear Fusion, Association EURATOM/IST, Lisbon (Portugal); Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Association EURATOM-CCFE, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Brix, M. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Association EURATOM-CCFE, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Calabro, G. [Association EURATOM-ENEA, Frascati (Italy); Chankin, A. [Max-Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM Association, Garching (Germany); Clever, M.; Coenen, J.W. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, IEK4 – Plasma Physik, Jülich (Germany); Corrigan, G. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Association EURATOM-CCFE, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Drewelow, P. [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM Association, Greifswald (Germany); Guillemaut, C. [Association EURATOM CEA, CEA/DSM/IRFM, Cadarache (France); Harting, D. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Association EURATOM-CCFE, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Huber, A. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, IEK4 – Plasma Physik, Jülich (Germany); Jachmich, S. [Association ‘Euratom-Belgian state’, Ecole Royale Militaire, Brussels (Belgium); Järvinen, A. [Aalto University, Association EURATOM-Tekes, Otakaari 4, Espoo (Finland); Kruezi, U.; Lawson, K.D. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Association EURATOM-CCFE, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Lehnen, M. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, IEK4 – Plasma Physik, Jülich (Germany); ITER Organisation, 13115 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); and others

    2015-08-15

    Measurements of the plasma conditions at the low field side target plate in JET ITER-like wall ohmic and low confinement mode plasmas show minor differences in divertor plasma configurations with horizontally and vertically inclined targets. Both the reduction of the electron temperature in the vicinity of the strike points and the rollover of the ion current to the plates follow the same functional dependence on the density at the low field side midplane. Configurations with vertically inclined target plates, however, produce twice as high sub-divertor pressures for the same upstream density. Simulations with the EDGE2D-EIRENE code package predict significantly lower plasma temperatures at the low field side target in vertical than in horizontal target configurations. Including cross-field drifts and imposing a pumping by-pass leak at the low-field side plate can still not recover the experimental observations.

  16. Experimental and numerical studies of neutral gas depletion in an inductively coupled plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Masashi

    The central theme of this dissertation is to explore the impact of neutral depletion and coupling between plasma and neutral gas in weakly ionized unmagnetized plasma. Since there have been few systematic studies of the mechanism which leads to non-uniform neutral distribution in processing plasmas, this work investigated the spatial profiles of neutral temperature and pressure experimentally, and the mechanism of resulting neutral depletion by simulation. The experimental work is comprised of neutral temperature measurements using high resolution atomic spectroscopy and molecular spectroscopy, and neutral pressure measurements considering thermal transpiration. When thermal transpiration effects are used to correct the gas pressure measurements, the total pressure remains constant regardless of the plasma condition. Since the neutral gas follows the ideal gas law, the neutral gas density profile is also obtained from the measured neutral gas temperature and the corrected pressure measurements. The results show that neutral gas temperature rises close to ˜ 900 [K], and the neutral gas density at the center of plasma chamber has a significant (factor of 2-4x) decrease in the presence of a plasma discharge. In numerical work, neutral and ion transport phenomena were simulated by a hybrid-type direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method of one dimensional (1D) electrostatic plasma to identify the mechanism of the neutral gas density depletion in Ar/N2 mixtures. The simulation reveals that the neutral depletion is the result of the interplay between plasma and neutral gas, and a parametric study indicates that neutral depletion occurs mainly due to gas heating and pressure balance for the typical condition of plasma processing. In high density plasma sources (Te ≈ 2-5 eV, ne ≈ 1011-1012 cm-3) where the plasma pressure becomes comparable to neutral pressure, total pressure (neutral pressure and plasma pressure) is conserved before and after the discharge. Therefore

  17. Gold nanostars coated with neutral and charged polyethylene glycols: A comparative study of in-vitro biocompatibility and of their interaction with SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallavicini, Piersandro; Cabrini, Elisa; Cavallaro, Gennara; Chirico, Giuseppe; Collini, Maddalena; D'Alfonso, Laura; Dacarro, Giacomo; Donà, Alice; Marchesi, Nicoletta; Milanese, Chiara; Pascale, Alessia; Sironi, Laura; Taglietti, Angelo

    2015-10-01

    Gold nanostars (GNS) have been coated with four different polyethylene glycols (PEGs) equipped with a -SH function for grafting on the gold surface. These PEGs have different chain lengths with average MW=2000, 3000, 5000 and average number of -O-CH2-CH2 - units 44, 66, and 111, respectively. Two are neutral and two are terminated with -COOH and -NH2 functions, thus bearing negative and positive charges at physiological pH, thanks to the formation of carboxylate and ammonium groups. The negative charge of the GNS coated with PEG carboxylate has also been exploited to further coat the GNS with the PAH (polyallylamine hydrochloride) cationic polymer. Vitality tests have been carried out on SH-SY5Y cells treated with the five differently coated GNS for 4, 24, and 48 h, at Au concentrations ranging from 1.25 to 100 μg/mL. The same tests have been repeated with the pure PEGs and PAH. Excellent biocompatibility was found for all PEGs, independently on charge and chain length, both for coated GNS and for the pure polymers. On the contrary, poor biocompatibility was found for PAH overcoated GNS and for pure PAH, although the latter only at high concentrations. Exploiting the two-photon luminescence of GNS, we have found by confocal laser scanning microscopy that when GNS are coated with PEGs they do not enter SH-SY5Y cells, while when overcoated with PAH they massively penetrate into the cytoplasm. This causes cell death by dramatically changing cell morphology, as demonstrated also by atomic force microscopy.

  18. Improved Measurements of Neutral B Decay Branching Fractions to K0s pi+ pi- and the Charge Asymmetry of B0 -> K*+ pi-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.

    2005-08-26

    The authors analyze the decay B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} using a sample of 232 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory. A maximum likelihood fit finds the following branching fractions: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = (43.0 {+-} 2.3 {+-} 2.3) x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} f{sub 0}({yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})K{sup 0}) = (5.5 {+-} 0.7 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -6} and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = (11.0 {+-} 1.5 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 0.5) x 10{sup -6}. For these results, the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third (if present) is due to the effect of interference from other resonances. They also measure the CP-violating charge asymmetry in the decay B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {Alpha}{sub K*{pi}} = -0.11 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.05.

  19. Measurements of Neutral B Decay Branching Fractions to K0S pi+ pi- Final States and the Charge Asymmetry of B0 --> K*+ pi-

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Jayatilleke, S M; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De, R; Sangro; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Vazquez, W P; Charles, M J; Mader, W F; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Green, M G; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Edgar, C L; Hodgkinson, M C; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pacetti, S; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, Roy; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P F; Graziani, G; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Van Bakel, N; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmüller, O L; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bóna, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martínez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, S; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R V; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihályi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-01-01

    We analyze the decay B0 -> K0s pi+ pi- using a sample of 232 million Upsilon(4S) -> BB decays collected with the BaBar detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory. A maximum likelihood fit finds the following branching fractions: BF(B0 -> K0 pi+ pi-) = (43.0 +/- 2.3 +/- 2.3) x 10^{-6}, BF(B0 -> f0 (-> pi+ pi-) K0) = (5.5 +/- 0.7 +/- 0.5 +/- 0.3) x 10^{-6} and BF(B0 -> K*+ pi-) = (11.0 +/- 1.5 +/- 0.5 +/- 0.5) x 10^{-6}. For these results, the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third (if present) is due to the effect of interference from other resonances. We also measure the CP-violating charge asymmetry in the decay B0 -> K*+ pi-, A(B0 -> K*+ pi-) = -0.11 +/- 0.14 +/- 0.05.

  20. Numerical simulation of the effect of wind removing the corona space charge over grounded structures under thunderstorm conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Stephan; Lopez, Javier; Holbøll, Joachim;

    2015-01-01

    that the effectof the removal of the corona space charge by the wind leadsto a higher field strength at the grounded object and, therefore,it becomes easier for it to initiate an upward connecting leadercompared to a situation where the space charge is present. Inthis work, a simplified space charge drift model...

  1. Precision measurement of the cross section of charged-current and neutral current processes at large Q{sup 2} at HERA with the polarized-electron beam; Mesures de precision de la section efficace des processus courant charge et courant neutre a grand Q{sup 2} a HERA avec le faisceau d'electrons polarises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, Trong Hieu

    2011-04-15

    The inclusive cross sections for both charged and neutral current processes have been measured in interactions of longitudinally polarized electrons (positrons) with unpolarized protons using the full data samples collected by H1 at HERA-II. The data taken at a center-of-mass energy of 319 GeV correspond to an integrated luminosity of 149.1 pb{sup -1} and 180.0 pb{sup -1} for e{sup -}p and e{sup +}p collisions, representing an increase in statistics of a factor of 10 and 2, respectively, over the data from HERA-I. The measured double differential cross sections d{sup 2}{sigma}/dxdQ{sup 2} cover more than two orders of magnitude in both Q{sup 2}, the negative four-momentum transfer squared, up to 30000 GeV{sup 2}, and Bjorken x, down to 0.003. The cross section data are compared to predictions of the Standard Model which is able to provide a good description of the data. The polarization asymmetry as a function of Q{sup 2} is measured with improved precision, confirming the previous observation of P violation effect in neutral current ep scattering at distances down to 10{sup -18} m. The total cross sections of the charged current process, for Q{sup 2} > 400 GeV{sup 2} and inelasticity y < 0.9 are measured for 4 independent data samples with e{sup {+-}} beams and different polarization values. Together with the corresponding cross section obtained from the previously published unpolarized data, the polarization dependence of the charged current cross section is measured and found to be in agreement with the Standard Model prediction with the absence of right-handed charged current. The cross sections are combined with previously published data from H1 to obtain the most precise unpolarized measurements. These are used to extract the structure function xF{sub 3}{sup {gamma}}{sup Z} which is sensitive to the valence quark distributions down to low x values. The new cross sections have also been used in a combined electroweak and QCD fit to significantly improve the

  2. Propagation of dust-acoustic waves in weakly ionized plasmas with dust-charge fluctuation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K K Mondal

    2004-11-01

    For an unmagnetized partially ionized dusty plasma containing electrons, singly charged positive ions, micron-sized massive negatively charged dust grains and a fraction of neutral atoms, dispersion relations for both the dust-ion-acoustic and the dust-acoustic waves have been derived, incorporating dust charge fluctuation. The dispersion relations, under various conditions, have been exhaustively analysed. The explicit expressions for the growth rates have also been derived.

  3. Martian Atmospheric Pressure Static Charge Elimination Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    A Martian pressure static charge elimination tool is currently in development in the Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory (ESPL) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. In standard Earth atmosphere conditions, static charge can be neutralized from an insulating surface using air ionizers. These air ionizers generate ions through corona breakdown. The Martian atmosphere is 7 Torr of mostly carbon dioxide, which makes it inherently difficult to use similar methods as those used for standard atmosphere static elimination tools. An initial prototype has been developed to show feasibility of static charge elimination at low pressure, using corona discharge. A needle point and thin wire loop are used as the corona generating electrodes. A photo of the test apparatus is shown below. Positive and negative high voltage pulses are sent to the needle point. This creates positive and negative ions that can be used for static charge neutralization. In a preliminary test, a floating metal plate was charged to approximately 600 volts under Martian atmospheric conditions. The static elimination tool was enabled and the voltage on the metal plate dropped rapidly to -100 volts. This test data is displayed below. Optimization is necessary to improve the electrostatic balance of the static elimination tool.

  4. Shock acceleration in partially neutral plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Morlino, G; Blasi, P; Caprioli, D

    2010-01-01

    We present the non-linear theory of shock acceleration applied to SNRs expanding into partially neutral plasma. Using this theory we show how the Balmer lines detected from young SNRs can be used to test the efficiency of shocks in the production of cosmic rays. In particular we investigate the effect of charge-exchange between protons and neutral hydrogen occurring in the precursor formed ahead of the shock. In this precursor the CR pressure accelerate the ionized component of the plasma and a relative velocity between protons and neutral hydrogen is established. On the other hand the charge-exchange process tends to equilibrate ions and neutrals resulting in the heating of both components. We show that even when the shock converts only a few per cent of the total bulk kinetic energy into CRs, the heating is efficient enough to produce a detectable broadening of the narrow Balmer lines emitted by the neutral hydrogen.

  5. Charged gravastars in higher dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ghosh

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We explore possibility to find out a new model of gravastars in the extended D-dimensional Einstein–Maxwell space–time. The class of solutions as obtained by Mazur and Mottola of a neutral gravastar [1,2] have been observed as a competent alternative to D-dimensional versions of the Schwarzschild–Tangherlini black hole. The outer region of the charged gravastar model therefore corresponds to a higher dimensional Reissner–Nordström black hole. In connection to this junction conditions, therefore we have formulated mass and the related Equation of State of the gravastar. It has been shown that the model satisfies all the requirements of the physical features. However, overall observational survey of the results also provide probable indication of non-applicability of higher dimensional approach for construction of a gravastar with or without charge from an ordinary 4-dimensional seed as far as physical ground is concerned.

  6. QCD and electroweak analysis and first measurement of neutral and charged current cross section with the polarised positron beam at HERA 2; Premiere mesure des sections efficaces de courant charge et neutre avec le faisceau de positrons polarise a HERA 2 et analyses QCD-electrofaibles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portheault, B

    2005-03-15

    In 2003-2004 the HERA collider delivered e{sup +}p collisions with a longitudinally polarised positron beam. We prescribe the measurement of inclusive Neutral and Charged Current DIS (deep inelastic scattering) cross section using the H1 detector. The total Charged Current cross section for Q{sup 2} > 400 GeV{sup 2}, y < 0,9 is measured with a Right-handed (P = 0,33) sample of 15,3 pb{sup -1} and a Left-handed (P = -0,40) sample of 21,7 pb{sup -1} yielding {sigma}cc (P = +0,33) = 34,67 pb {+-} 1,94 pb (stat) {+-} 1,66 pb (sys) C.20) {sigma}cc(P = -0,40) = 13,80 pb {+-} 1,04 pb (stat) {+-} 0,94 pb (sys). C.21) This result is consistent with the proportionality of the cross section with respect to the polarisation, in good agreement with the Standard Model expectations. The second part of this work is devoted to QCD analysis of the proton structure. The H1 data alone are used to extract flavor separated parton densities. This analysis is further used as a basis to extract various electroweak parameters, such as the W boson mass and the quarks couplings to the Z. Then a global QCD analysis of DIS and Drell Yan data is realized, focusing on the strange sea asymmetry which is found to be small: {integral}{sub 0}{sup 1} x(s - s-bar)dx = (1,8 {+-} 3,8) x 10{sup -4}. The impact of new E866 data on high x partons densities is discussed and the extraction of the strong coupling is realized {alpha}s = 0,1197 {+-} (+0,0005 - 0,0007)(mod) {+-}0,006 (th). (author)

  7. A Study on the Dissolution Kinetics of Basalt—Water Interaction under Different pH Conditions I:Release of Elements and pH Neutralization Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    党志; 侯英

    1993-01-01

    Experimental research on the chemical weathering of alkaline-olivine basalt from Huangyi Mountain,Kuandain County,Liaoning.Province and olivine basalt from Dayangke,Mingxi County,Fujian Province has shown that the acidity of the solution tends to become neutral regardless of what the acidity of the starting solution would be during basalt0-water interaction.We call this phenome-non“pH neutralized Effect”.The dissolved species in the solution were determined and unreacted and reacted sample-surface chemical components involved or uninvolved in reaction were analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy(XPS).The results revealed two different mechanisms of dissolution of basalt in acidic and basic solutions.

  8. A Measurement of Coherent Neutral Pion Production in Neutrino Neutral Current Interactions in NOMAD experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Kullenberg, C T

    2009-01-01

    We present a study of exclusive neutral pion production in neutrino-nucleus Neutral Current interactions using data from the NOMAD experiment at the CERN SPS. The data correspond to $1.44 \\times 10^6$ muon-neutrino Charged Current interactions in the energy range $2.5 \\leq E_{\

  9. Optimal Conditions for Fast Charging and Long Cycling Stability of Silicon Microwire Anodes for Lithium Ion Batteries, and Comparison with the Performance of Other Si Anode Concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Quiroga-González

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cycling tests under various conditions have been performed for lithium ion battery anodes made from free-standing silicon microwires embedded at one end in a copper current collector. Optimum charging/discharging conditions have been found for which the anode shows negligible fading (< 0.001% over 80 cycles; an outstanding result for this kind of anodes. Several performance parameters of the anode have been compared to the ones of other Si anode concepts, showing that especially the capacity as well as the rates of charge flow per nominal area of anode are the highest for the present anode. With regard to applications, the specific parameters per area are more important than the specific gravimetric parameters like the gravimetric capacity, which is good for comparing the capacity between materials but not enough for comparing between anodes.

  10. Laboratory Studies of Thermal Energy Charge Transfer of Multiply Charged Ions in Astrophysical Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Victor H. S.

    2003-01-01

    The laser ablation/ion storage facility at the UNLV Physics Department has been dedicated to the study of atomic and molecular processes in low temperature plasmas. Our program focuses on the charge transfer (electron capture) of multiply charged ions and neutrals important in astrophysics. The electron transfer reactions with atoms and molecules is crucial to the ionization condition of neutral rich photoionized plasmas. With the successful deployment of the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) and the Chandra X-ray Observatory by NASA high resolution VUV and X-ray emission spectra fiom various astrophysical objects have been collected. These spectra will be analyzed to determine the source of the emission and the chemical and physical environment of the source. The proper interpretation of these spectra will require complete knowledge of all the atomic processes in these plasmas. In a neutral rich environment, charge transfer can be the dominant process. The rate coefficients need to be known accurately. We have also extended our charge transfer measurements to KeV region with a pulsed ion beam. The inclusion of this facility into our current program provides flexibility in extending the measurement to higher energies (KeV) if needed. This flexibility enables us to address issues of immediate interest to the astrophysical community as new observations are made by high resolution space based observatories.

  11. VARIABLE CHARGE SOILS: MINERALOGY AND CHEMISTRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Ranst, Eric; Qafoku, Nikolla; Noble, Andrew; Xu, Ren-Kou

    2016-09-19

    Soils rich in particles with amphoteric surface properties in the Oxisols, Ultisols, Alfisols, Spodosols and Andisols orders (1) are considered to be variable charge soils (2) (Table 1). The term “variable charge” is used to describe organic and inorganic soil constituents with reactive surface groups whose charge varies with pH and ionic concentration and composition of the soil solution. Such groups are the surface carboxyl, phenolic and amino functional groups of organic materials in soils, and surface hydroxyl groups of Fe and Al oxides, allophane and imogolite. The hydroxyl surface groups are also present on edges of some phyllosilicate minerals such as kaolinite, mica, and hydroxyl-interlayered vermiculite. The variable charge is developed on the surface groups as a result of adsorption or desorption of ions that are constituents of the solid phase, i.e., H+, and the adsorption or desorption of solid-unlike ions that are not constituents of the solid phase. Highly weathered soils and subsoils (e.g., Oxisols and some Ultisols, Alfisols and Andisols) may undergo isoelectric weathering and reach a “zero net charge” stage during their development. They usually have a slightly acidic to acidic soil solution pH, which is close to either the point of zero net charge (PZNC) (3) or the point of zero salt effect (PZSE) (3). They are characterized by high abundances of minerals with a point of zero net proton charge (PZNPC) (3) at neutral and slightly basic pHs; the most important being Fe and Al oxides and allophane. Under acidic conditions, the surfaces of these minerals are net positively charged. In contrast, the surfaces of permanent charge phyllosilicates are negatively charged regardless of ambient conditions. Variable charge soils therefore, are heterogeneous charge systems.

  12. Ultracold neutral plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, M.; Rolston, S. L.

    2017-01-01

    By photoionizing samples of laser-cooled atoms with laser light tuned just above the ionization limit, plasmas can be created with electron and ion temperatures below 10 K. These ultracold neutral plasmas have extended the temperature bounds of plasma physics by two orders of magnitude. Table-top experiments, using many of the tools from atomic physics, allow for the study of plasma phenomena in this new regime with independent control over the density and temperature of the plasma through the excitation process. Characteristic of these systems is an inhomogeneous density profile, inherited from the density distribution of the laser-cooled neutral atom sample. Most work has dealt with unconfined plasmas in vacuum, which expand outward at velocities of order 100 m/s, governed by electron pressure, and with lifetimes of order 100 μs, limited by stray electric fields. Using detection of charged particles and optical detection techniques, a wide variety of properties and phenomena have been observed, including expansion dynamics, collective excitations in both the electrons and ions, and collisional properties. Through three-body recombination collisions, the plasmas rapidly form Rydberg atoms, and clouds of cold Rydberg atoms have been observed to spontaneously avalanche ionize to form plasmas. Of particular interest is the possibility of the formation of strongly coupled plasmas, where Coulomb forces dominate thermal motion and correlations become important. The strongest impediment to strong coupling is disorder-induced heating, a process in which Coulomb energy from an initially disordered sample is converted into thermal energy. This restricts electrons to a weakly coupled regime and leaves the ions barely within the strongly coupled regime. This review will give an overview of the field of ultracold neutral plasmas, from its inception in 1999 to current work, including efforts to increase strong coupling and effects on plasma properties due to strong coupling.

  13. Measurement of neutral current coherent neutral pion production on carbon in a few-GeV neutrino beam

    CERN Document Server

    Kurimoto, Y; Brice, S J; Bugel, L; Catala-Perez, J; Cheng, G; Conrad, J M; Djurcic, Z; Dore, U; Finley, D A; Franke, A J; Giganti, C; Gomez-Cadenas, J J; Guzowski, P; Hanson, A; Hayato, Y; Hiraide, K; Jover-Manas, G; Karagiorgi, G; Katori, T; Kobayashi, Y K; Kobilarcik, T; Kubo, H; Louis, W C; Loverre, P F; Ludovici, L; Mahn, K B M; Mariani, C; Masuike, S; Matsuoka, K; McGary, V T; Metcalf, W; Mills, G B; Mitsuka, G; Miyachi, Y; Mizugashira, S; Moore, C D; Nakajima, Y; Nakaya, T; Napora, R; Nienaber, P; Orme, D; Otani, M; Russell, A D; Sanchez, F; Shaevitz, M H; Shibata, T -A; Sorel, M; Stefanski, R J; Takei, H; Tanaka, H -K; Tanaka, M; Tayloe, R; Taylor, I J; Tesarek, R J; Uchida, Y; Van de Water, R; Walding, J J; Wascko, M O; White, H B; Wilking, M J; Yokoyama, M; Zeller, G P; Zimmerman, E D

    2010-01-01

    The SciBooNE Collaboration reports a measurement of neutral current coherent neutral pion production on carbon by a muon neutrino beam with average energy 0.8 GeV. The separation of coherent from inclusive neutral pion production has been improved by detecting recoil protons from resonant neutral pion production. We measure the ratio of the neutral current coherent neutral pion production to total charged current cross sections to be (1.16 +/- 0.24) x 10-2. The ratio of charged current coherent pion to neutral current coherent pion production is calculated to be 0.14+0.30 -0.28, using our published charged current coherent pion measurement.

  14. Charged Dust Aggregate Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2015-11-01

    A proper understanding of the behavior of dust particle aggregates immersed in a complex plasma first requires a knowledge of the basic properties of the system. Among the most important of these are the net electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments on the dust aggregate as well as the manner in which the aggregate interacts with the local electrostatic fields. The formation of elongated, fractal-like aggregates levitating in the sheath electric field of a weakly ionized RF generated plasma discharge has recently been observed experimentally. The resulting data has shown that as aggregates approach one another, they can both accelerate and rotate. At equilibrium, aggregates are observed to levitate with regular spacing, rotating about their long axis aligned parallel to the sheath electric field. Since gas drag tends to slow any such rotation, energy must be constantly fed into the system in order to sustain it. A numerical model designed to analyze this motion provides both the electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments of the aggregate while including the forces due to thermophoresis, neutral gas drag, and the ion wakefield. This model will be used to investigate the ambient conditions leading to the observed interactions. This research is funded by NSF Grant 1414523.

  15. Modelling the neutralisation process in neutral beam injectors

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzgerald, Niall J.

    2009-01-01

    High power neutral beams currently play an important role in heating, fuelling and diagnosing magnetically confined thermonuclear fusion plasmas. At the Joint European Torus (JET) in Oxfordshire, England, the formation of such a beam involves passing a positive ion beam through a neutral gas target wherein beam electron-capture collisions result in a neutral beam component. The subsequent beam injection into the fusion plasma requires the sole use of this neutral component, since the charged ...

  16. From dimer to condensed phases at extreme conditions: accurate predictions of the properties of water by a Gaussian charge polarizable model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paricaud, Patrice; Predota, Milan; Chialvo, Ariel A; Cummings, Peter T

    2005-06-22

    Water exhibits many unusual properties that are essential for the existence of life. Water completely changes its character from ambient to supercritical conditions in a way that makes it possible to sustain life at extreme conditions, leading to conjectures that life may have originated in deep-sea vents. Molecular simulation can be very useful in exploring biological and chemical systems, particularly at extreme conditions for which experiments are either difficult or impossible; however this scenario entails an accurate molecular model for water applicable over a wide range of state conditions. Here, we present a Gaussian charge polarizable model (GCPM) based on the model developed earlier by Chialvo and Cummings [Fluid Phase Equilib. 150, 73 (1998)] which is, to our knowledge, the first that satisfies the water monomer and dimer properties, and simultaneously yields very accurate predictions of dielectric, structural, vapor-liquid equilibria, and transport properties, over the entire fluid range. This model would be appropriate for simulating biological and chemical systems at both ambient and extreme conditions. The particularity of the GCPM model is the use of Gaussian distributions instead of points to represent the partial charges on the water molecules. These charge distributions combined with a dipole polarizability and a Buckingham exp-6 potential are found to play a crucial role for the successful and simultaneous predictions of a variety of water properties. This work not only aims at presenting an accurate model for water, but also at proposing strategies to develop classical accurate models for the predictions of structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic properties.

  17. Space-charge compensation measurements in electron cyclotron resonance ion source low energy beam transport lines with a retarding field analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winklehner, D.; Leitner, D., E-mail: leitnerd@nscl.msu.edu; Cole, D.; Machicoane, G.; Tobos, L. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    In this paper we describe the first systematic measurement of beam neutralization (space charge compensation) in the ECR low energy transport line with a retarding field analyzer, which can be used to measure the potential of the beam. Expected trends for the space charge compensation levels such as increase with residual gas pressure, beam current, and beam density could be observed. However, the overall levels of neutralization are consistently low (<60%). The results and the processes involved for neutralizing ion beams are discussed for conditions typical for ECR injector beam lines. The results are compared to a simple theoretical beam plasma model as well as simulations.

  18. Trace Element Partitioning under Crustal and Uppermost Mantle Conditions: The Influences of Ionic Radius, Cation Charge, Pressure, and Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, B. J.; Blundy, J. D.

    2003-12-01

    The controls on partitioning of trace elements between crystals and silicate melts were initially the subject of crystal-chemical, rather than petrogenetic interest. Goldschmidt (1937) systematized his observations of elemental concentrations in minerals as a means of understanding and predicting element behavior during crystallization from liquids or gases. Thus, he proposed his three "rules" of element partitioning, which may be summarized as follows: (i) Any two ions of the same charge and very similar ionic radius have essentially the same crystal-liquid partition coefficient (D=[i]xtl/[i]liq, where [i] refers to the concentration of element i). (ii) If there is a small difference of ionic radius, the smaller ion enters the crystal preferentially, e.g., DMg2+>DFe2+, DK+>DRb+>DCs+. (iii) For ions of similar radius but different charges, the ion with the higher charge enters the crystal preferentially, i.e., DSc3+>DMg2+>DLi+, DCa2+>DNa+, and DBa2+>DK+. These principles were taught to generations of students and, as we will show below, under certain circumstances, retain a degree of validity. They are neither, however, universally correct nor do they have any quantitative applicability. The aim of this chapter is to summarize the ways in which Goldschmidt's work has been amplified through a combination of theory and experimental measurement in order to quantify crystal-liquid partitioning behavior.Since the development of accurate methods of determining element concentration at the ppm level, the trace-element contents of igneous rocks have frequently been used to model their chemical evolution. These studies use estimated crystal-liquid partition coefficients together with solutions for the differential equations describing, e.g., fractional crystallization or fractional melting (Schilling and Winchester, 1967; Gast, 1968; Shaw, 1970) to model evolution of the melt during precipitation or dissolution of the crystalline phases. Generally, because of lack of data

  19. Can IBEX Identify Variations in the Galactic Environment of the Sun using Energetic Neutral Atom (ENAs)?

    CERN Document Server

    Frisch, P C; Pogorelov, N V; DeMajistre, B; Crew, G B; Funsten, H O; Janzen, P; McComas, D J; Moebius, E; Mueller, H -R; Reisenfeld, D B; Schwadron, N A; Slavin, J D; Zank, G P

    2010-01-01

    The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) spacecraft is providing the first all-sky maps of the energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) produced by charge-exchange between interstellar neutral \\HI\\ atoms and heliospheric solar wind and pickup ions in the heliosphere boundary regions. The 'edge' of the interstellar cloud presently surrounding the heliosphere extends less than 0.1 pc in the upwind direction, terminating at an unknown distance, indicating that the outer boundary conditions of the heliosphere could change during the lifetime of the IBEX satellite. Using reasonable values for future outer heliosphere boundary conditions, ENA fluxes are predicted for one possible source of ENAs coming from outside of the heliopause. The ENA production simulations use three-dimensional MHD plasma models of the heliosphere that include a kinetic description of neutrals and a Lorentzian distribution for ions. Based on this ENA production model, it is then shown that the sensitivities of the IBEX 1.1 keV skymaps are sufficient ...

  20. Alkaline solution neutralization capacity of soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Hiroshi; Sakanakura, Hirofumi; Matsuto, Toshihiko

    2010-10-01

    Alkaline eluate from municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration residue deposited in landfill alkalizes waste and soil layers. From the viewpoint of accelerating stability and preventing heavy metal elution, pH of the landfill layer (waste and daily cover soil) should be controlled. On the other hand, pH of leachate from existing MSW landfill sites is usually approximately neutral. One of the reasons is that daily cover soil can neutralize alkaline solution containing Ca(2+) as cation. However, in landfill layer where various types of wastes and reactions should be taken into consideration, the ability to neutralize alkaline solutions other than Ca(OH)(2) by soil should be evaluated. In this study, the neutralization capacities of various types of soils were measured using Ca(OH)(2) and NaOH solutions. Each soil used in this study showed approximately the same capacity to neutralize both alkaline solutions of Ca(OH)(2) and NaOH. The cation exchange capacity was less than 30% of the maximum alkali neutralization capacity obtained by the titration test. The mechanism of neutralization by the pH-dependent charge can explain the same neutralization capacities of the soils. Although further investigation on the neutralization capacity of the soils for alkaline substances other than NaOH is required, daily cover soil could serve as a buffer zone for alkaline leachates containing Ca(OH)(2) or other alkaline substances.

  1. Measurement of Inclusive Neutral Current Neutral Pion Production on Carbon in a Few-GeV Neutrino Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Kurimoto, Y

    2009-01-01

    The SciBooNE Collaboration reports inclusive neutral current neutral pion production by a muon neutrino beam on a polystyrene target (C8H8). We obtain (7.7 \\pm 0.5(stat.) \\pm 0.5 (sys.)) x 10^(-2) as the ratio of the neutral current neutral pion production to total charged current cross section; the mean energy of neutrinos producing detected neutral pions is 1.1 GeV. The result agrees with the Rein-Sehgal model implemented in our neutrino interaction simulation program with nuclear effects. The spectrum shape of the neutral pion momentum and angle agree with the model. We also measure the ratio of the neutral current coherent pion production to total charged current cross section to be (0.9 \\pm 0.5) x 10^(-2).

  2. Large-Eddy Simulation Comparison of Neutral Flow Over a Canopy: Sensitivities to Physical and Numerical Conditions, and Similarity to Other Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouwersloot, H. G.; Moene, A. F.; Attema, J. J.; de Arellano, J. Vilà-Guerau

    2017-01-01

    The representation of a neutral atmospheric flow over roughness elements simulating a vegetation canopy is compared between two large-eddy simulation models, wind-tunnel data and recently updated empirical flux-gradient relationships. Special attention is devoted to the dynamics in the roughness sublayer above the canopy layer, where turbulence is most intense. By demonstrating that the flow properties are consistent across these different approaches, confidence in the individual independent representations is bolstered. Systematic sensitivity analyses with the Dutch Atmospheric Large-Eddy Simulation model show that the transition in the one-sided plant-area density from the canopy layer to unobstructed air potentially alters the flow in the canopy and roughness sublayer. Anomalously induced fluctuations can be fully suppressed by spreading the transition over four steps. Finer vertical resolutions only serve to reduce the magnitude of these fluctuations, but do not prevent them. To capture the general dynamics of the flow, a resolution of 10 % of the canopy height is found to suffice, while a finer resolution still improves the representation of the turbulent kinetic energy. Finally, quadrant analyses indicate that momentum transport is dominated by the mean velocity components within each quadrant. Consequently, a mass-flux approach can be applied to represent the momentum flux.

  3. Surface charge effects in protein adsorption on nanodiamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramesh, M; Shimoni, O; Ostrikov, K; Prawer, S; Cervenka, J

    2015-03-19

    Understanding the interaction of proteins with charged diamond nanoparticles is of fundamental importance for diverse biomedical applications. Here we present a thorough study of protein binding, adsorption kinetics and structure on strongly positively (hydrogen-terminated) and negatively (oxygen-terminated) charged nanodiamond particles using a quartz crystal microbalance by dissipation and infrared spectroscopy. By using two model proteins (bovine serum albumin and lysozyme) of different properties (charge, molecular weight and rigidity), the main driving mechanism responsible for the protein binding to the charged nanoparticles was identified. Electrostatic interactions were found to dominate the protein adsorption dynamics, attachment and conformation. We developed a simple electrostatic model that can qualitatively explain the observed adsorption behaviour based on charge-induced pH modifications near the charged nanoparticle surfaces. Under neutral conditions, the local pH around the positively and negatively charged nanodiamonds becomes very high (11-12) and low (1-3) respectively, which has a profound impact on the protein charge, hydration and affinity to the nanodiamonds. Small proteins (lysozyme) were found to form multilayers with significant conformational changes to screen the surface charge, while larger proteins (albumin) formed monolayers with minor conformational changes. The findings of this study provide a step forward toward understanding and eventually predicting nanoparticle interactions with biofluids.

  4. A Study of the Internal Boundary Layer due to a Roughness Change in Neutral Conditions Observed During the LINEX Field Campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegede, O. O.; Foken, T.

    As an aspect of the LINEX field studies (1996-1997 Lindenberg near Beeskow, Germany), the characteristics of the internal boundary layer (IBL) that is associated with a step change of the surface roughnesses in neutral constant stress layers was investigated and is reported in this paper. Both smooth to rough (in 1996) and rough to smooth (in 1997) types of flow, have been studied based upon the profiles of mean wind and temperature realised from a 10-m mast and eddy correlation measurements taken at two levels (2m and 5m). Depending upon wind direction, the fetch at the site varied between 140m and 315m within the wind sector (200° to 340°) used for the field investigations. The height of the IBL, δ, had been determined from the intersect of the logarithmic wind-profiles below (6) the interface. Values of δ obtained at the experimental site compared fairly well to the existing theoretical/empirical fetch-height relationships of the form: δ=aċxb, where a, b, are empirical constants. The ratio for the friction velocities below and above the IBL as measured directly by the eddy correlation techniques showed that for fetches less than 250m there was an increase (decrease) of about 20% of the momentum flux arising from the smooth to rough (rough to smooth) transitions. Influences of distant obstructions (e.g., bushes, pockets of trees) on the surface flow were markedly important on the examined wind profiles and such can be indicative as multiple IBLs.

  5. Numerical study of effects of the intermediates and initial conditions on flame propagation in a real homogeneous charge compression ignition engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Meng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The premixed flame speed under a small four stock homogeneous charge compression ignition engine, fueled with dimethyl ether, was investigated. The effects of intermediate species, initial temperature, initial pressure, exhaust gas recirculation, and equivalence ratio were studied and compared to the baseline condition. Results show that, under all conditions, the flame speeds calculated without intermediates are higher than those which took the intermediates in consideration. Flame speeds increase with the increase of crank angle. The increase rate is divided into three regions and the increase rate is obviously high in the event of low temperature heat release. Initial temperature and pressure only affect the crank angle of flame speed, but have little influence on its value. Equivalence ratio and exhaust gas recirculation ratio do not only distinctly decrease the flame speed, but also advance the crank angle of flame speed.

  6. Amine reactivity with charged sulfuric acid clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Bzdek, B. R.; D. P. Ridge; Johnston, M. V.

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of charged species produced by electrospray of an ammonium sulfate solution in both positive and negative polarities is examined using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). Positively-charged ammonium bisulfate cluster composition differs significantly from negatively-charged cluster composition. For positively-charged clusters all sulfuric acid is neutralized to bisulfate, whereas for negatively-charged clusters the degree of sulfuric acid n...

  7. Surface charges effects on the 2D conformation of supercoiled DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Schmatko, Tatiana; Maaloum, Mounir

    2012-01-01

    We have adsorbed plasmid PuC19 DNA on a supported bilayer. The mobility of the lipids within the bilayer ensured a 2D equilibrium of the DNA molecule. By varying the fraction of cationic lipids in the membrane, we have tuned the surface charge. Plasmids conformations were imaged by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM).We performed two sets of experiments: deposition from salt free solution on charged bilayers and deposition from salty solutions on neutral bilayers. Plasmids can be seen as rings, completely opened structures, or tightly supercoiled plectonemes, depending on the experimental conditions. The plectonemic conformation is observed either on charged surfaces (in the absence of salt) or at 30 mM salt concentration on a neutral bilayer. We demonstrate the equivalence of surface screening by mobile interfacial charges and bulk screening from salt ions.

  8. Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) is an astronaut training facility and neutral buoyancy pool operated by NASA and located at the Sonny Carter Training Facility,...

  9. Neutral particle kinetics in fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tendler, M.; Heifetz, D.

    1986-05-01

    The theory of neutral particle kinetics treats the transport of mass, momentum, and energy in a plasma due to neutral particles which themselves are unaffected by magnetic fields. This transport affects the global power and particle balances in fusion devices, as well as profile control and plasma confinement quality, particle and energy fluxes onto device components, performance of pumping systems, and the design of diagnostics and the interpretation of their measurements. This paper reviews the development of analytic, numerical, and Monte Carlo methods of solving the time-independent Boltzmann equation describing neutral kinetics. These models for neutral particle behavior typically use adaptations of techniques developed originally for computing neutron transport, due to the analogy between the two phenomena, where charge-exchange corresponds to scattering and ionization to absorption. Progress in the field depends on developing multidimensional analytic methods, and obtaining experimental data for the physical processes of wall reflection, the neutral/plasma interaction, and for processes in fusion devices which are directly related to neutral transport, such as H/sub ..cap alpha../ emission rates, plenum pressures, and charge-exchange emission spectra.

  10. Edge rotation from momentum transport by neutrals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omotani, JT; Newton, SL; Pusztai, I.; Fülöp, T.

    2016-11-01

    Due to their high cross field mobility, neutral atoms can have a strong effect on transport even at the low relative densities found inside the separatrix. We use a charge-exchange dominated model for the neutrals, coupled to neoclassical ions, to calculate momentum transport when it is dominated by the neutrals. We can then calculate self-consistently the radial electric field and predict the intrinsic rotation in an otherwise torque-free plasma. Using a numerical solver for the ion distribution to allow arbitrary collisionality, we investigate the effects of inverse aspect ratio and elongation on plasma rotation. We also calculate the rotation of a trace carbon impurity, to facilitate future comparison to experiments using charge exchange recombination spectroscopy diagnostics.

  11. Spectroscopic determination of the composition of a 50 kV hydrogen diagnostic neutral beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, X.; Nornberg, M. D.; Craig, D.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Oliva, S. P.

    2016-11-01

    A grating spectrometer with an electron multiplying charge-coupled device camera is used to diagnose a 50 kV, 5 A, 20 ms hydrogen diagnostic neutral beam. The ion source density is determined from Stark broadened Hβ emission and the spectrum of Doppler-shifted Hα emission is used to quantify the fraction of ions at full, half, and one-third beam energy under a variety of operating conditions including fueling gas pressure and arc discharge current. Beam current is optimized at low-density conditions in the ion source while the energy fractions are found to be steady over most operating conditions.

  12. Influence of electrostatic interactions on the release of charged molecules from lipid cubic phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrini, Renata; Sánchez-Ferrer, Antoni; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2014-04-22

    The release of positive, negative, and neutral hydrophilic drugs from pH responsive bicontinuous cubic phases was investigated under varying conditions of electrostatic interactions. A weak acid, linoleic acid (LA), or a weak base, pyridinylmethyl linoleate (PML), were added to the neutral monolinolein (ML) in order to form lyotropic liquid-crystalline (LLC) phases, which are negatively charged at neutral pH and positively charged at acidic pH. Release studies at low ionic strength (I = 20 mM) and at different pH values (3 and 7) revealed that electrostatic attraction between a positive drug, proflavine (PF), and the negatively charged LLC at pH = 7 or between a negative drug, antraquinone 2-sulfonic acid sodium salt (AQ2S), and the positively charged LLC at pH = 3 did delay the release behavior, while electrostatic repulsion affects the transport properties only to some extent. Release profiles of a neutral drug, caffeine, were not affected by the surface charge type and density in the cubic LLCs. Moreover, the influence of ionic strength was also considered up to 150 mM, corresponding to a Debye length smaller than the LLC water channels radius, which showed that efficient screening of electrostatic attractions occurring within the LLC water domains results in an increased release rate. Four transport models were applied to fit the release data, providing an exhaustive, quantitative insight on the role of electrostatic interactions in transport properties from pH responsive bicontinuous cubic phases.

  13. Study on the production of charged and neutral kaons in Au+Au at 1.23A GeV with HADES; Untersuchung zur Produktion von geladenen und neutralen Kaonen in Au+Au bei 1.23A GeV mit HADES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, Katharina

    2013-06-06

    In April and May 2012, 7.3 . 10{sup 9} Au+Au collisions at a kinetic beam energy of E{sub kin}=1.23 GeV per nucleon have been recorded by the HADES detector, installed at the Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) at Darmstadt, Germany. Based on this experiment, this thesis focuses on the reconstruction of lightest strangeness containing mesons, such as K{sup +}, K{sup -} and K{sup 0}. Due to their production far below the threshold energy in nucleon-nucleon collisions, particles carrying strangeness have turned out to be very valuable messengers for the state of nuclear matter under extreme conditions. The K{sup 0}/K{sup +} production ratio in isospin asymmetric relativistic heavy-ion collisions has been suggested as a promising observable for the symmetry energy term of the nuclear equation of state. However, the high density behavior of the symmetry energy is at present largely unconstrained. Measurements of the K{sup 0}/K{sup +} ratio in the high density region are now possible with the HADES detector. In addition, the production rates of the different kaons provide information about their production mechanism and propagation in the baryon dominated matter. The results, presented in this thesis, are derived from an analysis of the total statistics of the April and May 2012 measuring campaign. The charged kaons are identified via cuts on their quality of the track reconstruction, their energy loss in multi-wire drift chambers distribution and their reconstructed momentum. In the analysis of the statistics a total of 3.6.10{sup 6} positively charged kaons and 1.1.10{sup 4} negatively charged kaons were reconstructed. For small polar angles of the detector (18 {sup circle} -45 {sup circle}, Resistive Plate Chamber wall), the signal of K{sup +} has been found to be at a mass of M=(488.8±0.7) MeV/c{sup 2} with a width of σ=(17.4±2.2) MeV/c{sup 2}. At large polar angles (44 {sup circle} -85 {sup circle}, Time of Flight wall) a mass of M=(501.6±0.5) Me

  14. Improving the cycle life of lead-acid batteries using three-dimensional reduced graphene oxide under the high-rate partial-state-of-charge condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Qunying; Ma, Guozheng; Xu, Qiqin; Ma, Cheng; Nan, Junmin; Li, Aiju; Chen, Hongyu

    2017-03-01

    A three-dimensional reduced graphene oxide (3D-RGO) material has been successfully prepared by a facile hydrothermal method and is employed as the negative additive to curb the sulfation of lead-acid battery. When added with 1.0 wt% 3D-RGO, the initial discharge capacity (0.05 C, 185.36 mAh g-1) delivered by the battery is 14.46% higher than that of the control cell (161.94 mAh g-1); and the cycle life under the high-rate partial-state-of-charge (HRPSoC) condition is significantly improved by more than 224% from 8142 to 26,425 cycles. In comparison to the conventional carbon additions like the activated carbon and acetylene black, the 3D-RGO also exhibits the highest initial discharge capacity, the best rate capabilities and the longest HRPSoC cycling life. Finally, we propose a possible mechanism for 3D-RGO to suppress lead-acid battery sulfation, where the abundant pore structure and excellent conductivity of 3D-RGO may have a synergistic effect on facilitating the charge and discharge process of negative plate.

  15. Conditions for minimization of halo particle production during transverse compression of intense ion charge bunches in the Paul Trap Simulator Experiment (PTSX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilson, Erik P. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)]. E-mail: egilson@pppl.gov; Chung, Moses [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Davidson, Ronald C. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Dorf, Mikhail [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Efthimion, Philip C. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Grote, David P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Majeski, Richard [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Startsev, Edward A. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)

    2007-07-01

    The Paul Trap Simulator Experiment (PTSX) is a compact laboratory Paul trap that simulates propagation of a long, thin charged-particle bunch coasting through a multi-kilometer-long magnetic alternating-gradient (AG) transport system by putting the physicist in the frame-of-reference of the beam. The transverse dynamics of particles in both systems are described by the same sets of equations-including all nonlinear space-charge effects. The time-dependent quadrupolar voltages applied to the PTSX confinement electrodes correspond to the axially dependent magnetic fields applied in the AG system. This paper presents the results of experiments in which the amplitude of the applied confining voltage is changed over the course of the experiment in order to transversely compress a beam with an initial depressed tune {nu}/{nu} {sub 0}{approx}0.9. Both instantaneous and smooth changes are considered. Particular emphasis is placed on determining the conditions that minimize the emittance growth and, generally, the number of particles that are found at large radius (so-called halo particles) after the beam compression. The experimental data are also compared with the results of particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations performed with the WARP code.

  16. Charge transport studies in donor-acceptor block copolymer PDPP-TNT and PC71BM based inverted organic photovoltaic devices processed in room conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Shashi B.; Singh, Samarendra P., E-mail: samarendra.singh@snu.edu.in [Department of Physics, Shiv Nadar University, Gautam Buddha Nagar, Uttar Pradesh, India-201307 (India); Sonar, Prashant [School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia-4001 (Australia)

    2015-07-15

    Diketopyrrolopyrole-naphthalene polymer (PDPP-TNT), a donor-acceptor co-polymer, has shown versatile behavior demonstrating high performances in organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) and organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices. In this paper we report investigation of charge carrier dynamics in PDPP-TNT, and [6,6]-phenyl C{sub 71} butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) bulk-heterojunction based inverted OPV devices using current density-voltage (J-V) characteristics, space charge limited current (SCLC) measurements, capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics, and impedance spectroscopy (IS). OPV devices in inverted architecture, ITO/ZnO/PDPP-TNT:PC71BM/MoO{sub 3}/Ag, are processed and characterized at room conditions. The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of these devices are measured ∼3.8%, with reasonably good fill-factor 54.6%. The analysis of impedance spectra exhibits electron’s mobility ∼2 × 10{sup −3} cm{sup 2}V{sup −1}s{sup −1}, and lifetime in the range of 0.03-0.23 ms. SCLC measurements give hole mobility of 1.12 × 10{sup −5} cm{sup 2}V{sup −1}s{sup −1}, and electron mobility of 8.7 × 10{sup −4} cm{sup 2}V{sup −1}s{sup −1}.

  17. Influence of fuel moisture, charge size, feeding rate and air ventilation conditions on the emissions of PM, OC, EC, parent PAHs, and their derivatives from residential wood combustion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guofeng Shen; Miao Xue; Siye Wei; Yuanchen Chen; Qiuyue Zhao; Bing Li; Haisuo Wu

    2013-01-01

    Controlled combustion experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of fuel charge size,moisture,air ventilation and feeding rate on the emission factors (EFs) of carbonaceous particulate matter,parent polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (pPAHs) and their derivatives from residential wood combustion in a typical brick cooking stove.Measured EFs were found to be independent of fuel charge size,but increased with increasing fuel moisture.Pollution emissions from the normal burning under an adequate air supply condition were the lowest for most pollutants,while more pollutants were emitted when an oxygen deficient atmosphere was formed in the stove chamber during fast burning.The impacts of these factors on the size distribution of emitted particles was also studied.Modified combustion efficiency and the four investigated factors explained 68%,72%,and 64% of total variations in EFs of PM,organic carbon,and oxygenated PAHs,respectively,but only 36%,38% and 42% of the total variations in EFs of elemental carbon,pPAHs and nitro-PAHs,respectively.

  18. Dynamics in the Charged Time Conformal Schwarzschild Black Hole

    CERN Document Server

    Jawad, Abdul; Shahzad, M Umair; Abbas, G

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present the new technique for discussing the dynamical motion of neutral as well as charged particles in the absence/presence of magnetic field around the time conformal Schwarzschild black hole. Initially, we find the numerical solutions of geodesics of Schwarzschild black hole and the time conformal Schwarzschild black hole. We observe that the Schwarzschild spacetime admits the time conformal factor $e^{\\epsilon f(t)}$, where $f(t)$ is an arbitrary function and $\\epsilon$ is very small which causes the perturbation in the spacetimes. This technique also re-scale the energy content of spacetime. We also investigate the thermal stability, horizons and energy conditions corresponding time conformal Schwarzschild spacetime. Also, we examine the dynamics of neutral and charged particle around time conformal Schwarzschild black hole. We investigate the circumstances under which the particle can escape from vicinity of black hole after collision with another particle. We analyze the effective pot...

  19. Asymptotical Properties for Parabolic Systems of Neutral Type

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Bao-tong; HAN Mao-an

    2005-01-01

    Asymptotical properties for the solutions of neutral parabolic systems with Robin boundary conditions were analyzed by using the inequality analysis. The oscillations problems for the neutral parabolic systems were considered and some oscillation criteria for the systems were established.

  20. Charged Local Defects in Extended Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, Peter A.

    1999-05-25

    The conventional approach to treating charged defects in extended systems in first principles calculations is via the supercell approximation using a neutralizing jellium background charge. I explicitly demonstrate shortcomings of this standard approach and discuss the consequences. Errors in the electrostatic potential surface over the volume of a supercell are shown to be comparable to a band gap energy in semiconductor materials, for cell sizes typically used in first principles simulations. I present an alternate method for eliminating the divergence of the Coulomb potential in supercell calculations of charged defects in extended systems that embodies a correct treatment of the electrostatic potential in the local viciniq of the a charged defect, via a mixed boundary condition approach. I present results of first principles calculations of charged vacancies in NaCl that illustrate the importance of polarization effects once an accurate representation of the local potential is obtained. These polarization effects, poorly captured in small supercells, also impact the energetic on the scale of typical band gap energies.

  1. A General Nonlinear Fluid Model for Reacting Plasma-Neutral Mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, E T; Shumlak, U

    2012-04-06

    A generalized, computationally tractable fluid model for capturing the effects of neutral particles in plasmas is derived. The model derivation begins with Boltzmann equations for singly charged ions, electrons, and a single neutral species. Electron-impact ionization, radiative recombination, and resonant charge exchange reactions are included. Moments of the reaction collision terms are detailed. Moments of the Boltzmann equations for electron, ion, and neutral species are combined to yield a two-component plasma-neutral fluid model. Separate density, momentum, and energy equations, each including reaction transfer terms, are produced for the plasma and neutral equations. The required closures for the plasma-neutral model are discussed.

  2. Charging and coagulation of radioactive and nonradioactive particles in the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-H. Kim

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Charging and coagulation influence one another and impact the particle charge and size distributions in the atmosphere. However, few investigations to date have focused on the coagulation kinetics of atmospheric particles accumulating charge. This study presents three approaches to include mutual effects of charging and coagulation on the microphysical evolution of atmospheric particles such as radioactive particles. The first approach employs ion balance, charge balance, and a bivariate population balance model (PBM to comprehensively calculate both charge accumulation and coagulation rates of particles. The second approach involves a much simpler description of charging, and uses a monovariate PBM and subsequent effects of charge on particle coagulation. The third approach is further simplified assuming that particles instantaneously reach their steady-state charge distributions. It is found that compared to the other two approaches, the first approach can accurately predict time-dependent changes in the size and charge distributions of particles over a wide size range covering from the free molecule to continuum regimes. The other two approaches can reliably predict both charge accumulation and coagulation rates for particles larger than about 40 nm and atmospherically relevant conditions. These approaches are applied to investigate coagulation kinetics of particles accumulating charge in a radioactive neutralizer, the urban atmosphere, and a radioactive plume. Limitations of the approaches are discussed.

  3. Drift compression of an intense neutralized ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, P.K.; Yu, S.S.; Henestroza, E.; Anders, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Coleman, J.; Eylon, S.; Greenway, W.G.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; Waldron, W.L.; Welch, D.R.; Thoma, C.; Sefkow, A.B.; Gilson, E.P.; Efthimion, P.C.; Davidson, R.C.

    2004-10-25

    Longitudinal compression of a tailored-velocity, intense neutralized ion beam has been demonstrated. The compression takes place in a 1-2 m drift section filled with plasma to provide space-charge neutralization. An induction cell produces a head-to-tail velocity ramp that longitudinally compresses the neutralized beam, enhancing the beam peak current by a factor of 50 and producing a pulse duration of about 3 ns. this measurement has been confirmed independently with two different diagnostic systems.

  4. Influence of temperature conditions in outer space on the macrokinetic characteristics of ignition and combustion of the solid-fuel charge of the microthruster of a microelectromechanical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futko, S. I.; Bondarenko, V. P.; Dolgii, L. N.

    2012-03-01

    On the basis of macrokinetic calculations, the influence of the initial temperature on the impulse responses of the processes of ignition and combustion of the solid-fuel charge of the microelectromechanical system (MEMS) microthruster burning the solid fuel glycidyl azide polymer (GAP)/RDX has been investigated. It has been established that fuel heating/cooling in a wide range of temperature values from 150 to 450 K characteristic of the conditions of a satellite in orbital flight markedly affects both the thrust and the total impulse of the MEMS microthruster. In so doing, an increase in the initial temperature leads to a marked decrease in the induction period and an increase in the critical flux of fuel ignition. The influence of the change in the initial temperature on the self-ignition temperature of GAP can be neglected. To obtain stable characteristics of the microthruster, it seems expedient to use a thermostating system.

  5. One-component plasma of point charges and of charged rods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatlo, Marius M; Karatrantos, Argyrios; Lue, Leo

    2009-12-01

    An approximate theory is developed to describe the properties of mobile particles with extended charge distributions in the presence of a neutralizing fixed background charge. Long-wavelength fluctuations of the electric potential are handled within a variational perturbation approximation, and the short-wavelength fluctuations are handled within a cumulant (fugacity) expansion. The distinct treatment of these two contributions to the free energy enables the theory to provide quantitative predictions for the properties of these systems from the weak- to the strong-coupling regimes. With this theory, we study three different variations in the classical one-component plasma model: a plasma of point charges, a plasma of particles consisting of 8 linearly bonded point charges (8-mer), and a plasma of line charges. The theory was found to agree well with the available computer simulation data for the electrostatic interaction energy of these systems for all values of the plasma coupling parameter examined ( Gamma=0 to 400). In addition, we find that both the 8-mer rod and the line charge systems form a strongly ordered nematic phase, which is entirely driven by electrostatic interactions. The nematic phase only exists within a finite range of lengths of the charged particles. If the particles are too short or too long, the nematic phase does not appear. Finally, we find that the nematic phase is stable over a broader range of conditions for the line charge system than for the 8-mer rod system; consequently, the phase behavior of the one-component plasma is sensitive to the manner in which the charge is distributed on the particles.

  6. Variable Charge Soils: Mineralogy and Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qafoku, Nik; Van Ranst, Eric; Noble, Andrew; Baert, Geert

    2003-11-01

    Soils rich in particles with amphoteric surface properties in the Oxisols, Ultisols, Alfisols, Spodosols and Andisols orders (1) are considered variable charge soils (2). The term “variable charge” is used to describe organic and inorganic soil constituents with reactive surface groups whose charge varies with pH, ionic concentration and composition of the soil solution. Such groups are the surface carboxyl, phenolic and amino functional groups of organic materials in soils, and surface hydroxyl groups of Fe and Al oxides, allophane and imogolite. The hydroxyl surface groups are also present on edges of some phyllosilicate minerals such as kaolinite, mica, and hydroxyl-interlayered vermiculite. The variable charge is developed on the surface groups as a result of adsorption or desorption of ions that are constituents of the solid phase, i.e., H+, and the adsorption or desorption of solid-unlike ions that are not constituents of the solid. Highly weathered soils usually undergo isoeletric weathering and reach a “zero net charge” stage during their development. They have a slightly acidic to acidic soil solution pH, which is close to either point of zero net charge (PZNC) (3) or point of zero salt effect (PZSE) (3). They are characterized by high abundances of minerals with a point of zero net proton charge (PZNPC) (3) at neutral and slightly basic pHs; the most important being Fe and Al oxides and allophane. Under acidic conditions, the surfaces of these minerals are net positively charged. In contrast, the surfaces of permanent charge phyllosilicates are negatively charged regardless of ambient conditions. Variable charge soils therefore, are heterogeneous charge systems. The coexistence and interactions of oppositely charged surfaces or particles confers a different pattern of physical and chemical behavior on the soil, relatively to a homogeneously charged system of temperate regions. In some variable charge soils (Oxisols and some Ultisols developed on

  7. Absolute Stability Limit for Relativistic Charged Spheres

    CERN Document Server

    Giuliani, Alessandro

    2007-01-01

    We find an exact solution for the stability limit of relativistic charged spheres for the case of constant gravitational mass density and constant charge density. We argue that this provides an absolute stability limit for any relativistic charged sphere in which the gravitational mass density decreases with radius and the charge density increases with radius. We then provide a cruder absolute stability limit that applies to any charged sphere with a spherically symmetric mass and charge distribution. We give numerical results for all cases. In addition, we discuss the example of a neutral sphere surrounded by a thin, charged shell.

  8. Neutral Naturalness with Bifundamental Gluinos

    CERN Document Server

    Gherghetta, Tony; Thomas, Zachary

    2016-01-01

    We study constraints on one-loop neutral naturalness at the LHC by considering gluon partners which are required to ameliorate the tuning in the Higgs mass-squared arising at two loops. This is done with a simple orbifold model of folded supersymmetry which not only contains color-neutral stops but also bifundamental gluinos that are charged under the Standard Model color group $SU(3)_C$ and a separate $SU(3)_C'$ group. The bifundamental gluinos reduce the Higgs mass tuning at two loops and maintain naturalness provided the gluinos are lighter than approximately 1.9 TeV for a 5 TeV cutoff scale. Limits from the LHC already forbid bifundamental gluinos below 1.4 TeV, and other non-colored states such as electroweakinos, $Z'$ bosons and dark sector bound states may be probed at future colliders. The search for bifundamental gluinos therefore provides a direct probe of one-loop neutral naturalness that can be fully explored at the LHC.

  9. Neutral naturalness with bifundamental gluinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherghetta, Tony; Nguyen, Minh; Thomas, Zachary

    2016-12-01

    We study constraints on one-loop neutral naturalness at the LHC by considering gluon partners which are required to ameliorate the tuning in the Higgs mass-squared arising at two loops. This is done with a simple orbifold model of folded supersymmetry which not only contains color-neutral stops but also bifundamental gluinos that are charged under the Standard Model color group S U (3 )C and a separate S U (3 )C' group. The bifundamental gluinos reduce the Higgs mass tuning at two loops and maintain naturalness provided the gluinos are lighter than approximately 1.9 TeV for a 5 TeV cutoff scale. Limits from the LHC already forbid bifundamental gluinos below 1.4 TeV, and other noncolored states such as electroweakinos, Z' bosons and dark sector bound states may be probed at future colliders. The search for bifundamental gluinos therefore provides a direct probe of one-loop neutral naturalness that can be fully explored at the LHC.

  10. A neutralization-reionization and reactivity mass spectrometry study of the generation of neutral hydroxymethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yawei; Crestoni, Maria Elisa; Fornarini, Simonetta; Mayer, Paul M

    2011-06-01

    Neutral hydroxymethylene HCOH is an important intermediate in several chemical reactions; however, it is difficult to observe due to its high reactivity. In this work, neutral hydroxymethylene and formaldehyde were generated by charge exchange neutralization of their respective ionic counterparts and then were reionized and detected as positive-ion recovery signals in neutralization-reionization mass spectrometry in a magnetic sector instrument of BEE geometry. The reionized species were characterized by their subsequent collision-induced dissociation mass spectra. The transient hydroxymethylene neutral was observed to isomerize to formaldehyde with an experimental time span exceeding 13.9 µs. The vertical neutralization energy of the HCOH(+•) ion has also been assayed using charge transfer reactions between the fast ions and stationary target gases of differing ionization energy. The measured values match the result of ab initio calculations at the QCISD/6-311 + G(d,p) and CCSD(T)/6-311 + + G(3df,2p) levels of theory. Neutral hydroxymethylene was also produced by proton transfer from CH(2) OH(+) to a strong base such as pyridine, confirmed by appropriate isotopic labeling. There is a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) for H(+) versus D(+) transfer from the C atom of the hydroxymethyl cation of ∼3, consistent with a primary KIE of a nearly thermoneutral reaction.

  11. The Optimization of the Time-Cost Tradeoff Problem in Projects with Conditional Activities Using of the Multi-Objective Charged System Search Algorithm (SMOCSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Sharbatdar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The appropriate planning and scheduling for reaching the project goals in the most economical way is the very basic issue of the project management. As in each project, the project manager must determine the required activities for the implementation of the project and select the best option in the implementation of each of the activities, in a way that the least final cost and time of the project is achieved. Considering the number of activities and selecting options for each of the activities, usually the selection has not one unique solution, but it consists of a set of solutions that are not preferred to each other and are known as Pareto solutions. On the other hand, in some actual projects, there are activities that their implementation options depend on the implementation of the prerequisite activity and are not applicable using all the implementation options, and even in some cases the implementation or the non-implementation of some activities are also dependent on the prerequisite activity implementation. These projects can be introduced as conditional projects. Much researchs have been conducted for acquiring Pareto solution set, using different methods and algorithms, but in all the done tasks the time-cost optimization of conditional projects is not considered. Thus, in the present study the concept of conditional network is defined along with some practical examples, then an appropriate way to illustrate these networks and suitable time-cost formulation of these are presented. Finally, for some instances of conditional activity networks, conditional project time-cost optimization conducted multi-objectively using known meta-heuristic algorithms such as multi-objective genetic algorithm, multi-objective particle swarm algorithm and multi-objective charged system search algorithm.

  12. Measurement of lifetimes of charged and neutral beauty hadrons from the channel B{yields}J/{psi}X and J/{psi}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} in the DELPHI experience (LEP); Mesure des durees de vie des hadrons beaux neutres et charges avec le canal B{yields}J/{psi}X et J/{psi}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} dans l`experience DELPHI (LEP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupont, F.

    1994-05-01

    In order to measure the separate lifetimes of neutral and charged B hadrons, the data recorded in 1991 and 1992 by the LEP DELPHI experiment has been analyzed. B hadrons are identified using their decay into J/{psi}, followed by the decay of the latter into a muon pair. The performances of the detector allow to measure with a high precision the length of flight of the B in the R{phi} plane, as well as it momentum using a technique of jet-particle clustering, in which the J/{psi} is the nucleus. So the proper time is determined on an event by event basis. The estimation of the charge of the B hadrons is based on a discrimination method between the particles coming from their decay and those coming from the fragmentation process. After selection, 80 events allow to measure: {tau}{sub B}{sup 0} = 1.18{+-}0.38{+-}0.08 ps {tau}{sub B}{sup {+-}} 1.77{+-}0.37{+-}0.14 ps. (author). 92 refs., 75 figs., 24 tabs.

  13. Charged Lifshitz Black Holes

    OpenAIRE

    Dehghani, M. H.; Pourhasan, R.; Mann, R. B.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate modifications of the Lifshitz black hole solutions due to the presence of Maxwell charge in higher dimensions for arbitrary $z$ and any topology. We find that the behaviour of large black holes is insensitive to the topology of the solutions, whereas for small black holes significant differences emerge. We generalize a relation previously obtained for neutral Lifshitz black branes, and study more generally the thermodynamic relationship between energy, entropy, and chemical pot...

  14. conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Venkatesulu

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Solutions of initial value problems associated with a pair of ordinary differential systems (L1,L2 defined on two adjacent intervals I1 and I2 and satisfying certain interface-spatial conditions at the common end (interface point are studied.

  15. Optimization on the fermentation conditions of proteinase neutral produced by bacillus subtilis%枯草芽孢杆菌产中性蛋白酶的发酵条件优化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄璠; 蔡俊

    2012-01-01

    This paper focused on the optimization of fermentation conditions of proteinase neutral produced by bacillus subtilis.Mono-factor experiment and orthogonal tests were undertaken to obtain the suitable fermentation conditions as follows: liquid level 60 ml/250 ml, shaker revolution 200 r/min, initial pH 6.9, fermentation period 60 h, inoculation size 4%, culture temperature 37 ℃.Under the optimized conditions, the maximum enzyme activity increased by 311.7%.%文章对一株枯草芽孢杆菌产中性蛋白酶的发酵条件进行了优化,采用单因素试验和正交试验确定了最优发酵条件为装液量60 ml/250 ml,转速200 r/min,初始pH值6.9,发酵周期60 h,接种量4%,发酵温度37℃.通过发酵条件的优化,酶活提高了311.7%.

  16. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Matthew; Lazerson, Samuel A.

    2014-09-01

    With the advent of applied 3D fields in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous slowing down, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database. Elementary benchmark calculations are presented to verify the collisionless particle orbits, NBI model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields. Notice: this manuscript has been authored by Princeton University under Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466 with the US Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes.

  17. Amine reactivity with charged sulfuric acid clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Bzdek, B. R.; D. P. Ridge; Johnston, M. V.

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of ionic species produced by electrospray of an ammonium sulfate solution in both positive and negative polarities is examined using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). Positively-charged ammonium bisulfate cluster composition differs significantly from negatively-charged cluster composition. For positively-charged clusters all sulfuric acid is neutralized to bisulfate, whereas for negatively-charged clusters the degree of sulfuric acid neu...

  18. Neutralization of English Consonants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庞彬彬

    2011-01-01

    This paper gives a brief account of English consonant cluster's structure and phonetic features from the perspective of the definition and cause of neutralization of English consonants as well as their distinctive features and oppositions.It comes up with the final conclusion that neutralization exists in only thirteen English consonant clusters,among a large number of consonant clusters.

  19. Chemical bath deposition of ZnO nanowires at near-neutral pH conditions without hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA): understanding the role of HMTA in ZnO nanowire growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPeak, Kevin M; Le, Thinh P; Britton, Nathan G; Nickolov, Zhorro S; Elabd, Yossef A; Baxter, Jason B

    2011-04-05

    Chemical bath deposition (CBD) is an inexpensive and reproducible method for depositing ZnO nanowire arrays over large areas. The aqueous Zn(NO(3))(2)-hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) chemistry is one of the most common CBD chemistries for ZnO nanowire synthesis, but some details of the reaction mechanism are still not well-understood. Here, we report the use of in situ attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy to study HMTA adsorption from aqueous solutions onto ZnO nanoparticle films and show that HMTA does not adsorb on ZnO. This result refutes earlier claims that the anisotropic morphology arises from HMTA adsorbing onto and capping the ZnO {10 1 0} faces. We conclude that the role of HMTA in the CBD of ZnO nanowires is only to control the saturation index of ZnO. Furthermore, we demonstrate the first deposition of ZnO nanowire arrays at 90 °C and near-neutral pH conditions without HMTA. Nanowires were grown using the pH buffer 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES) and continuous titratation with KOH to maintain the same pH conditions where growth with HMTA occurs. This semi-batch synthetic method opens many new opportunities to tailor the ZnO morphology and properties by independently controlling temperature and pH.

  20. Neutralization principles for the Extraction and Transport of Ion Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Riege, H

    2000-01-01

    The strict application of conventional extraction techniques of ion beams from a plasma source is characterized by a natural intensity limit determined by space charge.The extracted current may be enhanced far beyond this limit by neutralizing the space charge of the extracted ions in the first extraction gap of the source with electrons injected from the opposite side. The transverse and longitudinal emittances of a neutralized ion beam, hence its brightness, are preserved. Results of beam compensation experiments, which have been carried out with a laser ion source, are resumed for proposing a general scheme of neutralizing ion sources and their adjacent low-energy beam transport channels with electron beams. Many technical applications of high-mass ion beam neutralization technology may be identified: the enhancement of ion source output for injection into high-intensity, low-and high-energy accelerators, or ion thrusters in space technology, for the neutral beams needed for plasma heating of magnetic conf...

  1. Electron emission yield and charging process of alkali-silicate glass submitted to an electron beam under the varying temperature condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belhaj, M., E-mail: Mohamed.Belhaj@onera.fr [ONERA - French Aerospace Lab, F-31055 Toulouse (France); Tondu, T.; Inguimbert, V. [ONERA - French Aerospace Lab, F-31055 Toulouse (France); Elsafi, B.; Fakhfakh, S. [LaMaCop, Faculte des Sciences de SFAX, Route Soukra Km 3, BP 1171, C.P 3000 Sfax (Tunisia); Jbara, O., E-mail: omar.jbara@univ-reims.fr [GRESPI/Materiaux Fonctionnels, UFR Sciences, BP 1039, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France)

    2012-01-01

    The electron emission due to electron impact of alkali-silicate glasses is measured with a technique based on the use of a Kelvin probe (KP method) and a pulsed electron beam. The KP method, allows a clear discrimination between the external and internal effects of charging process. The effect of the incident charge fluence, incident charge fluency and the temperature on the yield curve is investigated. It was found that, at room temperature as well as at 80 Degree-Sign C, electron emission varies with charge fluence. The effects of the temperature on charging mechanisms and charge transport characteristics of alkali-silicate glasses where also studied using the measurement of displacement and leakage currents under continuous electron irradiation in scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results clearly establish a correlation between charge carriers mobility and secondary electron emission yield. The enhancement of charge carrier mobility with increasing the temperature prevents the formation of a positive space charge (i.e. creation of positive ions and/or holes) that internally reduces the secondary electron (SE) emission. The higher is the temperature and the higher is the electron emission yield (EEY).

  2. Charge-driven and reversible assembly of ultra-dense polymer brushers: Formation and antifouling properties of a zipper brush

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, de W.M.; Meijer, G.; Keizer, de A.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Kleijn, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated a new type of polymer brushes: the zipper brush. By adsorbing a diblock-copolymer with one charged block and one neutral block to an oppositely charged polyelectrolyte brush, a neutral polymer brush is formed on top of an almost neutral complex layer of polyelectrolytes. This neutral

  3. Investigation of accelerated neutral atom beams created from gas cluster ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkpatrick, A., E-mail: akirkpatrick@exogenesis.us [Exogenesis Corporation, 20 Fortune Drive, Billerica, MA 01821 (United States); Kirkpatrick, S.; Walsh, M.; Chau, S.; Mack, M.; Harrison, S.; Svrluga, R.; Khoury, J. [Exogenesis Corporation, 20 Fortune Drive, Billerica, MA 01821 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    A new concept for ultra-shallow processing of surfaces known as accelerated neutral atom beam (ANAB) technique employs conversion of energetic gas cluster ions produced by the gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) method into intense collimated beams of coincident neutral gas atoms having controllable average energies from less than 10 eV per atom to beyond 100 eV per atom. A beam of accelerated gas cluster ions is first produced as is usual in GCIB, but conditions within the source ionizer and extraction regions are adjusted such that immediately after ionization and acceleration the clusters undergo collisions with non-ionized gas atoms. Energy transfer during these collisions causes the energetic cluster ions to release many of their constituent atoms. An electrostatic deflector is then used to eliminate charged species, leaving the released neutral atoms to still travel collectively at the same velocities they had as bonded components of their parent clusters. Upon target impact, the accelerated neutral atom beams produce effects similar to those normally associated with GCIB, but to shallower depths, with less surface damage and with superior subsurface interfaces. The paper discusses generation and characterization of the accelerated neutral atom beams, describes interactions of the beams with target surfaces, and presents examples of ongoing work on applications for biomedical devices.

  4. Measurement of neutral current neutral pion production on Carbon in a Few-GeV Neutrino Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Kurimoto, Y

    2009-01-01

    The SciBooNE Collaboration has measured neutral current neutral pion production by the muon neutrino beam at a polystyrene target (C8H8). We obtained (7.7+- 0.5(stat.)+0.4-0.5 (sys.)) x 10^-2 as cross section ratio of the neutral current neutral pion production to total charged current cross section at the mean neutrino energy of 1.16 GeV. This result is consistent with the Monte Carlo prediction based on the Rein-Sehgal model

  5. Detection and analysis of neutral and charged particles. Application to the study of hot plasmas; Detection et analyse des particules chargees et neutres appliquees a l'etude des plasmas chauds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renaud, C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires. Groupe de recherches de l' association EURATOM-CEA sur la fusion controlee

    1966-12-01

    To measure the energy spectrum of ions in a plasma, one must extract the ions without altering the spectrum. For a dense plasma this presents difficulties, one method is the measurement of the energy spectrum of atoms produced by charge-exchange reactions of ions with residual gas. The measurements of both the energy spectrum and the flux of atoms leaving the magnetic configuration of the device DECA II (Dispositif d'Etude de Compression Adiabatique) are made by: an ion detector which permits the measurement of ion currents {>=} 10{sup -16} A, an electrostatic analyser of energy range 10 eV - 10 keV, a magnetic analyser for ion momentum {<=} 10{sup 5} gauss-cm, and a gas cell to convert fast atoms into ions. (author) [French] Pour mesurer le spectre en energie des ions dans un plasma on doit extraire des ions sans en modifier l'energie. Dans le cas de plasmas denses cela presente certaines difficultes. Une mesure du spectre en energie des ions est alors possible a partir du spectre en energie des atomes produits par collision d'echange de charge entre les ions du plasma et le gaz residuel. Pour effectuer la mesure du spectre en energie et du flux d'atomes s'echappant de la configuration magnetique du Dispositif d'Etude de Compression Adiabatique (DECA II) nous avons mis au point: un detecteur d'ions permettant la mesure de courant {>=} 10{sup -16} A, d'un analyseur electrostatique dont la gamme d'analyse en energie est comprise entre 10 eV et 10 keV, d'un analyseur magnetique capable d'analyser des ions d'une quantite de mouvement {<=} 10{sup 5} gauss cm, ainsi qu'une cellule a gaz permettant l'ionisation des atomes rapides. (auteur)

  6. Molecular Spectroscopic Study on the Interaction between Heparin and Neutral Red

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li ZHANG; Na LI; Feng Lin ZHAO; Ke An LI

    2004-01-01

    The interaction between heparin and neutral red was investigated by molecular spectroscopic methods. The change of all spectra suggested that positively charged neutral red had interacted with negatively charged heparin. The study of influence factors indicated that electrostatic force and hydrophobic bond might be involved in the interaction. The total binding number per disaccharide unit and intrinsic binding constant were obtained using Scatchard model.

  7. Surface effects on nitrogen vacancy centers neutralization in diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Arthur N.; Dowdell, Dontray A.; Santamore, D. H.

    2016-11-01

    The performance of nitrogen vacancy (NV-) based magnetic sensors strongly depends on the stability of nitrogen vacancy centers near the diamond surface. The sensitivity of magnetic field detection is diminished as the NV- turns into the neutralized charge state NV0. We investigate the neutralization of NV- and calculate the ratio of NV0 to total NV (NV-+NV0) caused by a hydrogen terminated diamond with a surface water layer. We find that NV- neutralization exhibits two distinct regions: near the surface, where the NV- is completely neutralized, and in the bulk, where the neutralization ratio is inversely proportional to depth following the electrostatic force law. In addition, small changes in concentration can lead to large differences in neutralization behavior. This phenomenon allows one to carefully control the concentration to decrease the NV- neutralization. The presence of nitrogen dopant greatly reduces NV- neutralization as the nitrogen ionizes in preference to NV- neutralization at the same depth. The water layer pH also affects neutralization. If the pH is very low due to cleaning agent residue, then we see a change in the band bending and the reduction of the two-dimensional hole gas region. Finally, we find that dissolved carbon dioxide resulting from direct contact with the atmosphere at room temperature hardly affects the NV- neutralization.

  8. Phospholipid and Hydrocarbon Interactions with a Charged Electrode Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Zachary A; DeNardis, Nadica Ivošević; Vernier, P Thomas

    2016-03-22

    Using a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and experiments we examined the interactions of alkanes and phospholipids at charged interfaces in order to understand how interfacial charge densities affect the association of these two representative molecules with electrodes. Consistent with theory and experiment, these model systems reveal interfacial associations mediated through a combination of Coulombic and van der Waals forces. van der Waals forces, in particular, mediate rapid binding of decane to neutral electrodes. No decane binding was observed at high surface charge densities because of interfacial water polarization, which screens hydrophobic attractions. The positively charged choline moiety of the phospholipid palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC) is primarily responsible for POPC attraction by a moderately negatively charged electrode. The hydrocarbon tails of POPC interact with the hydrophobic electrode interface similarly to decane. Previously reported electrochemical results confirm these findings by demonstrating bipolar displacement currents from PC vesicles adhering to moderately negatively charged interfaces, originating from the choline interactions observed in simulations. At more negatively charged interfaces, choline-to-surface binding was stronger. In both simulations and experiments the maximal interaction of anionic PS occurs with a positively charged interface, provided that the electrostatic forces outweigh local Lennard-Jones interactions. Direct comparisons between the binding affinities measured in experiments and those obtained in simulations reveal previously unobserved atomic interactions that facilitate lipid vesicle adhesion to charged interfaces. Moreover, the implementation of a charged interface in molecular dynamics simulations provides an alternative method for the generation of large electric fields across phospholipid bilayers, especially for systems with periodic boundary conditions, and may be useful for

  9. Effect of Neutral Aroma Components in Stalk Positions Under Different Fertility Conditions for Flue-cured Tobacco%土壤肥力对烤烟不同部位中性香气成分含量的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张国显; 邸慧慧; 王廷晓; 张大纯; 马永建; 史宏志; 王维超; 曹晓涛; 刘国顺

    2011-01-01

    以烤烟(Nicotiana tabacum L.)品种中烟100为材料,通过田间试验研究了土壤肥力对烤烟不同部位中性香气成分含量的影响,并对不同肥力条件下烤烟各部位烟叶进行单料烟感官评吸鉴定.结果表明,类胡萝卜素类降解产物总量在中部叶(腰叶、上二棚)及顶叶以高肥力条件下较高;茄酮含量在除顶叶外均以低肥力条件下较高,顶叶以高肥力条件下含量较高;非酶棕色化反应产物总量在烟株的大部分位置高、中肥力处理间没有显著差异;芳香族氨基酸类降解产物总量在除底脚叶外的其他部位均以高肥力处理最高,中肥力处理次之,低肥力处理最低:新植二烯含量在下部叶以中肥力条件下最高,其他部位以高肥力条件下最高;在烟株的中部高、中肥条件下烟叶的除新植二烯外香气物质总量无显著差异,在顶叶高肥力条件下香气物质总量显著高于中肥力.评吸结果以中肥力条件下腰叶得分最高.综合认为,中肥力土壤有利于生产出优质烟叶.%Field experiment was carried out in Xiangcheng to study the effect of neutral aroma components in stalk positions under different fertility conditions for flue-cured tobacco leaves and the differences in the sensory evaluation on aroma quality of a tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L)cultivar Zhongyanl00.The results showed that tobacco leaves from higher fertility conditions had high levels of carotenoid catabolite in the middle and upper positions.The content of solanone from lower fertility condition had high levels in all stalk positions except upper leaves, in which position the content of solanone from higher fertility condition had high levels.The content of maillard reaction in tobacco leaves from higher and lower fertility conditions had no significant differences in most positions.The content of phenylalanine cracking from higher fertility conditions had the highest levels, followed by middle and lower fertility

  10. Flavour-changing neutral currents in models with extra ' boson

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Sahoo; L Maharana

    2004-09-01

    New neutral gauge bosons ' are the features of many models addressing the physics beyond the standard model. Together with the existence of new neutral gauge bosons, models based on extended gauge groups (rank > 4) often predict new charged fermions also. A mixing of the known fermions with new states, with exotic weak-isospin assignments (left-handed singlets and right-handed doublets) will induce tree-level flavour-changing neutral interactions mediated by exchange, while if the mixing is only with new states with ordinary weak-isospin assignments, the flavour-changing neutral currents are mainly due to the exchange of the new neutral gauge boson '. We review flavour-changing neutral currents in models with extra ' boson. Then we discuss some flavour-changing processes forbidden in the standard model and new contributions to standard model processes.

  11. Efficacy of Neutral pH Electrolyzed Water in Reducing Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium DT 104 on Fresh Produce Items using an Automated Washer at Simulated Food Service Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afari, George K; Hung, Yen-Con; King, Christopher H

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of neutral pH electrolyzed (NEO) water (155 mg/L free chlorine, pH 7.5) in reducing Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium DT 104 on romaine lettuce, iceberg lettuce, and tomatoes washed in an automated produce washer for different times and washing speeds. Tomatoes and lettuce leaves were spot inoculated with 100 μL of a 5 strain cocktail mixture of either pathogen and washed with 10 or 8 L of NEO water, respectively. Washing lettuce for 30 min at 65 rpm led to the greatest reductions, with 4.2 and 5.9 log CFU/g reductions achieved for E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium respectively on romaine, whereas iceberg lettuce reductions were 3.2 and 4.6 log CFU/g for E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium respectively. Washing tomatoes for 10 min at 65 rpm achieved reductions greater than 8 and 6 log CFU/tomato on S. Typhimurium and E. coli O157:H7 respectively. All pathogens were completely inactivated in NEO water wash solutions. No detrimental effects on the visual quality of the produce studied were observed under all treatment conditions. Results show the adoption of this washing procedure in food service operations could be useful in ensuring produce safety.

  12. Spatial calibration of a tokamak neutral beam diagnostic using in situ neutral beam emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrystal, C. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Burrell, K. H.; Pace, D. C. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Grierson, B. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Neutral beam injection is used in tokamaks to heat, apply torque, drive non-inductive current, and diagnose plasmas. Neutral beam diagnostics need accurate spatial calibrations to benefit from the measurement localization provided by the neutral beam. A new technique has been developed that uses in situ measurements of neutral beam emission to determine the spatial location of the beam and the associated diagnostic views. This technique was developed to improve the charge exchange recombination (CER) diagnostic at the DIII-D tokamak and uses measurements of the Doppler shift and Stark splitting of neutral beam emission made by that diagnostic. These measurements contain information about the geometric relation between the diagnostic views and the neutral beams when they are injecting power. This information is combined with standard spatial calibration measurements to create an integrated spatial calibration that provides a more complete description of the neutral beam-CER system. The integrated spatial calibration results are very similar to the standard calibration results and derived quantities from CER measurements are unchanged within their measurement errors. The methods developed to perform the integrated spatial calibration could be useful for tokamaks with limited physical access.

  13. Surface charge effects in protein adsorption on nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramesh, M.; Shimoni, O.; Ostrikov, K.; Prawer, S.; Cervenka, J.

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the interaction of proteins with charged diamond nanoparticles is of fundamental importance for diverse biomedical applications. Here we present a thorough study of protein binding, adsorption kinetics and structure on strongly positively (hydrogen-terminated) and negatively (oxygen-terminated) charged nanodiamond particles using a quartz crystal microbalance by dissipation and infrared spectroscopy. By using two model proteins (bovine serum albumin and lysozyme) of different properties (charge, molecular weight and rigidity), the main driving mechanism responsible for the protein binding to the charged nanoparticles was identified. Electrostatic interactions were found to dominate the protein adsorption dynamics, attachment and conformation. We developed a simple electrostatic model that can qualitatively explain the observed adsorption behaviour based on charge-induced pH modifications near the charged nanoparticle surfaces. Under neutral conditions, the local pH around the positively and negatively charged nanodiamonds becomes very high (11-12) and low (1-3) respectively, which has a profound impact on the protein charge, hydration and affinity to the nanodiamonds. Small proteins (lysozyme) were found to form multilayers with significant conformational changes to screen the surface charge, while larger proteins (albumin) formed monolayers with minor conformational changes. The findings of this study provide a step forward toward understanding and eventually predicting nanoparticle interactions with biofluids.Understanding the interaction of proteins with charged diamond nanoparticles is of fundamental importance for diverse biomedical applications. Here we present a thorough study of protein binding, adsorption kinetics and structure on strongly positively (hydrogen-terminated) and negatively (oxygen-terminated) charged nanodiamond particles using a quartz crystal microbalance by dissipation and infrared spectroscopy. By using two model proteins

  14. Neutrality and the social contract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian J. Carroll

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Given the fact of moral disagreement, theories of state neutrality which rely on moral premises will have limited application, in that they will fail to motivate anyone who rejects the moral premises on which they are based. By contrast, contractarian theories can be consistent with moral scepticism, and can therefore avoid this limitation. In this paper, I construct a contractarian model which I claim is sceptically consistent and includes a principle of state neutrality as a necessary condition. The principle of neutrality which I derive incorporates two conceptions of neutrality (consequential neutrality and justificatory neutrality which have usually been thought of as distinct and incompatible. I argue that contractarianism gives us a unified account of these conceptions. Ultimately, the conclusion that neutrality can be derived without violating the constraint established by moral scepticism turns out to rely on an assumption of equal precontractual bargaining power. I do not attempt to defend this assumption here. If the assumption cannot be defended in a sceptically consistent fashion, then the argument for neutrality given here is claimed to be morally minimal, rather than fully consistent with moral scepticism. L’existence d’un désaccord sur les questions morales fait en sorte que les constructions théoriques de la neutralité de l’État se fondant sur des prémisses morales ne peuvent avoir qu’une application limitée, car elles échouent à motiver quiconque rejette ces prémisses fondatrices. Par opposition, les théories contractualistes peuvent s’accommoder d’un scepticisme moral et peuvent donc éviter cette limitation. Cet article développe un modèle contractualiste compatible avec le scepticisme et qui inclut comme condition nécessaire la neutralité de l’État. Le principe de neutralité que je dérive à partir de ce modèle incorpore deux conceptions de la neutralité, soit la neutralité des cons

  15. Grain charging in protoplanetary discs

    CERN Document Server

    Ilgner, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Recent work identified a growth barrier for dust coagulation that originates in the electric repulsion between colliding particles. Depending on its charge state, dust material may have the potential to control key processes towards planet formation such as MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) turbulence and grain growth which are coupled in a two-way process. We quantify the grain charging at different stages of disc evolution and differentiate between two very extreme cases: compact spherical grains and aggregates with fractal dimension D_f = 2. Applying a simple chemical network that accounts for collisional charging of grains, we provide a semi-analytical solution. This allowed us to calculate the equilibrium population of grain charges and the ionisation fraction efficiently. The grain charging was evaluated for different dynamical environments ranging from static to non-stationary disc configurations. The results show that the adsorption/desorption of neutral gas-phase heavy metals, such as magnesium, effects the ...

  16. Stability of a Neutral Stochastic Functional Differential Equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bi-wen

    2005-01-01

    Sufficient condition for stochastic unifrom stability of a neutral stochastic functional differential equation is given, especially, new techniques are developed to cope with the neutral delay case, we obtained the sufficient condition for asymptotic stabillty of neutral stochastic differential delay equations. Due to the new techniques developed in this paper, the results obtained are very general and useful. The theory developed here gives a unified treatment for various asymptotic estimates e.g. exponential and polynomial bounds.

  17. Charged Frenkel biexcitons in organic molecular crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Agranovich, V M; Kamchatnov, A M

    2001-01-01

    It is known that the energy of the lowest electronic transition in neutral molecules of anthracene, tetracene and other polyacenes is blue shifted in comparison with the corresponding transition energy in mono-valent molecular ions. This effect in molecular crystal may be responsible for the attraction between molecular (Frenkel) exciton and charge carrier. Due to this attraction the bound state of Frenkel exciton and free charge (charged Frenkel exciton) may be formed. The same mechanism can be responsible for formation of charged biexcitons (bound state of two Frenkel excitons and a charge carrier). Calculations are performed for molecular crystals like tetracene by means of one-dimensional lattice model

  18. Electrostatic attraction between overall neutral surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adar, Ram M; Andelman, David; Diamant, Haim

    2016-08-01

    Two overall neutral surfaces with positively and negatively charged domains ("patches") have been shown in recent experiments to exhibit long-range attraction when immersed in an ionic solution. Motivated by the experiments, we calculate analytically the osmotic pressure between such surfaces within the Poisson-Boltzmann framework, using a variational principle for the surface-averaged free energy. The electrostatic potential, calculated beyond the linear Debye-Hückel theory, yields an overall attraction at large intersurface separations, over a wide range of the system's controlled length scales. In particular, the attraction is stronger and occurs at smaller separations for surface patches of larger size and charge density. In this large patch limit, we find that the attraction-repulsion crossover separation is inversely proportional to the square of the patch-charge density and to the Debye screening length.

  19. First-principles Study on Neutral Nitrogen Impurities in Zinc Oxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Li; Sheng-hua Deng; Yi-bao Li; Li Zhang; Guo-hong Liu; Jing Huang

    2012-01-01

    The atomic geometries,electronic structures,and formation energies of neutral nitrogen impurities in ZnO have been investigated by first-principles calculations.The nitrogen impurities are always deep acceptors,thus having no contributions to p-type conductivity.Among all the neutral nitrogen impurities,nitrogen substituting on an oxygen site has the lowest formation energy and the shallowest acceptor level,while nitrogen substituting on a zinc site has the second-lowest formation energy in oxygen-rich conditions.Nitrogen interstitials are unstable at the tetrahedral site and spontaneously relax into a kick-out configuration.Though nitrogen may occupy the octahedral site,the concentrations will be low for the high formation energy.The charge density distributions in various doping cases are discussed,and self-consistent results are obtained.

  20. Impurity induced neutralization of MeV energy protons in JET plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gondhalekar, A. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Korotkov, A.A. [AF Ioffe Institute, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1994-07-01

    A model elucidating the role of carbon and beryllium, the main impurities in JET plasmas, in neutralizing MeV energy protons, which arise during ICRF heating of deuterium plasmas in the hydrogen minority heating mode D(H), and from D-D fusion reactions, is presented. The model establishes charge transfer from hydrogen-like impurity ions to protons as the main process for neutralization. Calculations for deducing the proton energy distribution function from measured hydrogen flux are described. The validity of the model is tested by using it to described the measured flux in different conditions of plasma heating and fueling. Further, it is used to deduce the background thermal deuterium atom density at the plasma center. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Surface effects on nitrogen vacancy centers neutralization in diamond

    OpenAIRE

    Newell, Arthur N.; Dowdell, Dontray A.; Santamore, D. H.

    2016-01-01

    The performance of nitrogen vacancy (NV$^{-}$) based magnetic sensors strongly depends on the stability of nitrogen vacancy centers near the diamond surface. The sensitivity of magnetic field detection is diminished as the NV$^{-}$ turns into the neutralized charge state NV$^{0}$. We investigate the neutralization of NV$^{-}$ and calculate the ratio of NV$^{0}$ to total NV (NV$^{-}$+NV$^{0}$) caused by a hydrogen terminated diamond with a surface water layer. We find that NV$^{-}$ neutralizat...

  2. Mapping the QCD Phase Diagram with Susceptibilities of Conserved Charges within Nambu-Jonna-Lasinio Model

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Wenkai; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2016-01-01

    Under the chemical equilibrium and electric charge neutrality conditions, we evaluate the $2$nd to $4$th order baryon, charge and strangeness susceptibilities near a chiral critical point using the Nambu--Jona--Lasinio model. Because of the considerati on of electron chemical potential, up and down quarks are no longer degenerate, but have a chemical potential difference. This isospin chemical potential does not bring new qualitative features in the QCD phase diagram. Furthermore, baryon number susce ptibilities are found to be of the greatest magnitude, offering the strongest signal. Whereas the strangeness susceptibilities have the smallest divergence dominating area, owing to the large strange quark mass.

  3. Neutral particle behaviour and particle confinement studies in Heliotron E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muraoka, K.; Uchino, K.; Kajiwara, T.; Matsuo, K.; Akazaki, M.; Maeda, M.; Sudo, S.; Kondo, K.; Motojima, O.; Sano, F.

    1989-04-01

    Measurements of neutral-hydrogen density by laser fluorescence spectroscopy on Heliotron E revealed the anisotropy of its distribution in the poloidal cross section and the dependence of the anisotropy on the average electron density for the first time. This indicates the relative importance of the recycling of charged particles localized at divertor traces and that of charge-exchanged neutrals distributed over a surface. These results are used to calculate the global particle confinement time, which is to be correlated with the measurements of H/sub /alpha// emission intensity and the electron density fluctuations, the initial results of which are also shown. (orig.).

  4. CO2-Neutral Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goede, Adelbert; van de Sanden, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Mimicking the biogeochemical cycle of System Earth, synthetic hydrocarbon fuels are produced from recycled CO2 and H2O powered by renewable energy. Recapturing CO2 after use closes the carbon cycle, rendering the fuel cycle CO2 neutral. Non-equilibrium molecular CO2 vibrations are key to high energy efficiency.

  5. CO2-Neutral Fuels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goede, A.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Mimicking the biogeochemical cycle of System Earth, synthetic hydrocarbon fuels are produced from recycled CO2 and H2O powered by renewable energy. Recapturing CO2 after use closes the carbon cycle, rendering the fuel cycle CO2 neutral. Non-equilibrium molecular CO2 vibrations are key to high energy

  6. Mod en neutral seksualitet!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leer, Jonatan

    2013-01-01

    Towards a Neutral Sexuality! or Roland Barthes as a Queer Thinker? This article argues that the work of Roland Barthes has interesting perspectives in common with the queer theory. This argument will be put forward by using his concept of ‘the neutral’ that Barthes defines as “that which outplays...

  7. Bleach Neutralizes Mold Allergens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Researchers at National Jewish Medical and Research Center have demonstrated that dilute bleach not only kills common household mold, but may also neutralize the mold allergens that cause most mold-related health complaints. The study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, is the first to test the effect on allergic…

  8. OSCILLATION CRITERIA OF NEUTRAL TYPE IMPULSIVE HYPERBOLIC EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马晴霞; 刘安平

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, oscillatory properties of all solutions for neutral type impulsive hyperbolic equations with several delays under the Robin boundary condition are investigated and several new sufficient conditions for oscillation are presented.

  9. Photoinduced Transformation between Charge Carrier and Spin Carrier in Polymers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MEI Yuan; ZHAO Chang; SUN Xin

    2006-01-01

    By dynamical simulations, we show a transforming process between neutral soliton (spin carrier) and charged soliton (charge carrier) in polymers via photo-excitation, taking a polaron as the transitional bridge. It is photoinduced transformation between spin carrier and charge carrier. In this way, we demonstrate an access for polymers to be applied to spintronics.

  10. CHARGE syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Chitra

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract CHARGE syndrome was initially defined as a non-random association of anomalies (Coloboma, Heart defect, Atresia choanae, Retarded growth and development, Genital hypoplasia, Ear anomalies/deafness. In 1998, an expert group defined the major (the classical 4C's: Choanal atresia, Coloboma, Characteristic ears and Cranial nerve anomalies and minor criteria of CHARGE syndrome. Individuals with all four major characteristics or three major and three minor characteristics are highly likely to have CHARGE syndrome. However, there have been individuals genetically identified with CHARGE syndrome without the classical choanal atresia and coloboma. The reported incidence of CHARGE syndrome ranges from 0.1–1.2/10,000 and depends on professional recognition. Coloboma mainly affects the retina. Major and minor congenital heart defects (the commonest cyanotic heart defect is tetralogy of Fallot occur in 75–80% of patients. Choanal atresia may be membranous or bony; bilateral or unilateral. Mental retardation is variable with intelligence quotients (IQ ranging from normal to profound retardation. Under-development of the external genitalia is a common finding in males but it is less apparent in females. Ear abnormalities include a classical finding of unusually shaped ears and hearing loss (conductive and/or nerve deafness that ranges from mild to severe deafness. Multiple cranial nerve dysfunctions are common. A behavioral phenotype for CHARGE syndrome is emerging. Mutations in the CHD7 gene (member of the chromodomain helicase DNA protein family are detected in over 75% of patients with CHARGE syndrome. Children with CHARGE syndrome require intensive medical management as well as numerous surgical interventions. They also need multidisciplinary follow up. Some of the hidden issues of CHARGE syndrome are often forgotten, one being the feeding adaptation of these children, which needs an early aggressive approach from a feeding team. As the child

  11. Experimental evidence of energetic neutrals production in an ion diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pushkarev, A.I., E-mail: aipush@mail.ru; Isakova, Y.I.; Khaylov, I.P.

    2015-01-15

    The paper presents several experimental proofs of the formation of energetic charge-exchange neutrals in a self-magnetically insulated ion diode with a graphite cathode. The energetic neutrals are thought to be produced as a result of charge exchange process between accelerated ions and stationary neutral molecules. The experiments have been carried out using both a diode with externally applied magnetic insulation (single-pulse mode: 100 ns, 250–300 kV) and a diode with self-magnetic insulation (double-pulse mode: 300–500 ns, 100–150 kV (negative pulse); 120 ns, 250–300 kV (positive pulse)). The motivation for looking at the neutral component of the ion beam came when we compared two independent methods to measure the energy density of the beam. A quantitative comparison of infrared measurements with signals from Faraday cups and diode voltage was made to assess the presence of neutral atoms in the ion beam. As another proof of charge-exchange effects in ion diode we present the results of statistical analysis of diode performance. It was found that the shot-to shot variation of the energy density in a set of 50–100 shots does not exceed 11%, whilst the same variation for ion current density was 20–30%; suggesting the presence of neutrals in the beam. Moreover, the pressure in the zone of ion beam energy dissipation exceeds the results stated in cited references. The difference between our experimental data and results stated by other authors we attribute to the presence of a low-energy charge-exchange neutral component in the ion beam.

  12. Neutral particle Mass Spectrometry with Nanomechanical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Sage, Eric; Alava, Thomas; Morel, Robert; Dupré, Cécilia; Hanay, Mehmet Selim; Duraffourg, Laurent; Masselon, Christophe; Hentz, Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    Current approaches to Mass Spectrometry (MS) necessarily rely on the ionization of the analytes of interest and subsequent spectrum interpretation is based on the mass-to-charge ratios of the ions. The resulting charge state distribution can be very complex for high-mass species which may hinder correct interpretation. A new form of MS analysis based on Nano-Electro-Mechanical Systems (NEMS) was recently demonstrated with high-mass ions. Thanks to a dedicated setup comprising both conventional time-of-flight MS (TOF-MS) and NEMS-MS in-situ, we show here for the first time that NEMS-MS analysis is insensitive to charge state: it provides one single peak regardless of the species charge state, highlighting effective clarification over existing MS analysis. All charged particles were thereafter removed from the beam electrostatically, and unlike TOF-MS, NEMS-MS retained its ability to perform mass measurements. This constitutes the first unequivocal measurement of mass spectra of neutral particles. This ability ...

  13. Neutral Heavy Leptons and Electroweak Baryogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Hernández, Pilar

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the possibility that baryogenesis occurs during the weak phase transition in a minimal extension of the Standard Model which contains extra neutral leptons and conserves total lepton number. The necessary CP-violating phases appear in the leptonic Yukawa couplings. We compute the CP-asymmetries in both the neutral and the charged lepton fluxes reflected on the bubble wall. Using present experimental bounds on the mixing angles and Standard Model estimates for the parameters related to the scalar potential, we conclude that it seems unlikely to produce the observed baryon to entropy ratio within this type of models. We comment on the possibility that the constraints on the mixings might be naturally relaxed due to small finite temperature effects.

  14. The impact of exospheric neutral dynamics on ring current decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilie, R.; Liemohn, M. W.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.; Gruntman, M.; Bailey, J. J.; Toth, G.

    2015-12-01

    The geocorona plays an important role in the energy budget of the Earth's inner magnetosphere since charge exchange of energetic ions with exospheric neutrals makes the exosphere act as an energy sink for ring current particles. Long-term ring current decay following a magnetic storm is mainly due to these electron transfer reactions, leading to the formation energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) that leave the ring current system on ballistic trajectories. The number of ENAs emitted from a given region of space depends on several factors, such as the energy and species of the energetic ion population in that region and the density of the neutral gas with which the ions undergo charge exchange. However, the density and structure of the exosphere are strongly dependent on changes in atmospheric temperature and density as well as charge exchange with the ions of plasmaspheric origin, which depletes the geocorona (by having a neutral removed from the system). Moreover, the radiation pressure exerted by solar far-ultraviolet photons pushes the geocoronal hydrogen away from the Earth in an anti-sunward direction to form a tail of neutral hydrogen. TWINS ENA images provide a direct measurement of these ENA losses and therefore insight into the dynamics of the ring current decay through interactions with the geocorona. We assess the influence of geocoronal neutrals on ring current formation and decay by analysis of the predicted ENA emissions using 6 different geocoronal models and simulations from the HEIDI ring current model during storm time. Comparison with TWINS ENA images shows that the location of the peak ENA enhancements is highly dependent on the distribution of geocoronal hydrogen density. We show that the neutral dynamics has a strong influence on the time evolution of the ring current populations as well as on the formation of energetic neutral atoms.

  15. Electric charge quantization in SU(3)_c X SU(3)_L X U(1)_X model

    CERN Document Server

    Abdinov, O B; Rzaeva, S S

    2010-01-01

    Basing on the general photon eigenstate and anomaly cancellation, it is shown that the electric charge quantization in SU(3)_c X SU(3)_L X U(1)_X model with exotic particles can be obtained independently on parameters alpha and betta. The fixation of hypercharges of fermions fields by the Higgs fields and dependence of the electric charges quantization conditions from the hypercharges of Higgs fields leads to the fact that the electric charge in the considered model can be quantized and fixed only in the presence of Higgs fields. In addition, we have shown that in the considered model the classical constraints following from the Yukawa interactions are equivalent to the conditions following from the parity invariance of electromagnetic interaction. The most general expressions for the gauge bosons masses, eigenstates of neutral fields and the interactions of leptons and quarks with gauge bosons have been derived in the arbitrary case

  16. Between detection and neutralization.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snell, Mark Kamerer; Green, Mary Wilson; Adams, Douglas Glenn; Pritchard, Daniel Allison

    2005-08-01

    Security system analytical performance analysis is generally based on the probability of system effectiveness. The probability of effectiveness is a function of the probabilities of interruption and neutralization. Interruption occurs if the response forces are notified in sufficient time to engage the adversary. Neutralization occurs if the adversary attack is defeated after the security forces have actively engaged the adversary. Both depend upon communications of data. This paper explores details of embedded communications functions that are often assumed to be inconsequential. It is the intent of the authors to bring focus to an issue in security system modeling that, if not well understood, has the potential to be a deciding factor in the overall system failure or effectiveness.

  17. Ultracold Neutral Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Killian, T C; Gupta, P; Laha, S; Martinez, Y N; Mickelson, P G; Nagel, S B; Saenz, A D; Simien, C E; Killian, Thomas C.

    2005-01-01

    Ultracold neutral plasmas are formed by photoionizing laser-cooled atoms near the ionization threshold. Through the application of atomic physics techniques and diagnostics, these experiments stretch the boundaries of traditional neutral plasma physics. The electron temperature in these plasmas ranges from 1-1000 K and the ion temperature is around 1 K. The density can approach $10^{11}$ cm$^{-3}$. Fundamental interest stems from the possibility of creating strongly-coupled plasmas, but recombination, collective modes, and thermalization in these systems have also been studied. Optical absorption images of a strontium plasma, using the Sr$^+$ ${^2S_{1/2}} -> {^2P_{1/2}}$ transition at 422 nm, depict the density profile of the plasma, and probe kinetics on a 50 ns time-scale. The Doppler-broadened ion absorption spectrum measures the ion velocity distribution, which gives an accurate measure of the ion dynamics in the first microsecond after photoionization.

  18. Charge Qubit-Atom Hybrid

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Deshui; Hufnagel, C; Kwek, L C; Amico, Luigi; Dumke, R

    2016-01-01

    We investigate a novel hybrid system of a superconducting charge qubit interacting directly with a single neutral atom via electric dipole coupling. Interfacing of the macroscopic superconducting circuit with the microscopic atomic system is accomplished by varying the gate capacitance of the charge qubit. To achieve strong interaction, we employ two Rydberg states with an electric-dipole-allowed transition, which alters the polarizability of the dielectric medium of the gate capacitor. Sweeping the gate voltage with different rates leads to a precise control of hybrid quantum states. Furthermore, we show a possible implementation of a universal two-qubit gate.

  19. Search for neutral B meson decays to two charged leptons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acciarri, M.; Adriani, O.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Ahlen, S.; Alpat, B.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alverson, G.; Alviggi, M. G.; Ambrosi, G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, V. P.; Angelescu, T.; Anselmo, F.; Antreasyan, D.; Arefiev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Baksay, L.; Ball, R. C.; Banerjee, S.; Banicz, K.; Barillère, R.; Barone, L.; Bartalini, P.; Baschirotto, A.; Basile, M.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B. L.; Bhattacharya, S.; Biasini, M.; Biland, A.; Bilei, G. M.; Blaising, J. J.; Blyth, S. C.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bock, R.; Böhm, A.; Borgia, B.; Boucham, A.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Boutigny, D.; Branson, J. G.; Brigljevic, V.; Brock, I. C.; Buffini, A.; Buijs, A.; Burger, J. D.; Burger, W. J.; Busenitz, J.; Buytenjuijs, A.; Cai, X. D.; Campanelli, M.; Capell, M.; Romeo, G. Cara; Caria, M.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A. M.; Casaus, J.; Castellini, G.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Cesaroni, F.; Chamizo, M.; Chan, A.; Chang, Y. H.; Chaturvedi, U. K.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Chiefari, G.; Chien, C. Y.; Choi, M. T.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Civinini, C.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Cohn, H. O.; Coignet, G.; Colijn, A. P.; Colino, N.; Commichau, V.; Costantini, S.; Cotorobai, F.; de La Cruz, B.; Csilling, A.; Dai, T. S.; D'Alessandro, R.; de Asmundis, R.; de Boeck, H.; Degré, A.; Deiters, K.; Denes, P.; Denotaristefani, F.; Dibitonto, D.; Diemoz, M.; van Dierendonck, D.; di Lodovico, F.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Dominguez, A.; Doria, A.; Dorne, I.; Dova, M. T.; Drago, E.; Duchesneau, D.; Duinker, P.; Duran, I.; Dutta, S.; Easo, S.; Efremenko, Yu.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Erné, F. C.; Ernenwein, J. P.; Extermann, P.; Fabre, M.; Faccini, R.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Fenyi, B.; Ferguson, T.; Fernandez, D.; Ferroni, F.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J. H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P. H.; Forconi, G.; Fredj, L.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Yu.; Ganguli, S. N.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gau, S. S.; Gentile, S.; Gerald, J.; Gheordanescu, N.; Giagu, S.; Goldfarb, S.; Goldstein, J.; Gong, Z. F.; Gougas, A.; Gratta, G.; Gruenewald, M. V.; Gupta, V. K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L. J.; Hartmann, B.; Hasan, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Hervé, A.; van Hoek, W. C.; Hofer, H.; Hoorani, H.; Hou, S. R.; Hu, G.; Innocente, V.; Janssen, H.; Jenkes, K.; Jin, B. N.; Jones, L. W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Kasser, A.; Khan, R. A.; Kamrad, D.; Kamyshkov, Yu.; Kapustinsky, J. S.; Karyotakis, Y.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M. N.; Kim, D.; Kim, J. K.; Kim, S. C.; Kim, Y. G.; Kinnison, W. W.; Kirkby, A.; Kirkby, D.; Kirkby, J.; Kiss, D.; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; König, A. C.; Korolko, I.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraemer, R. W.; Krenz, W.; Kuijten, H.; Kunin, A.; de Guevara, P. Ladron; Landi, G.; Lapoint, C.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Laurikainen, P.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, K. Y.; Leggett, C.; Le Goff, J. M.; Leiste, R.; Leonardi, E.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Lieb, E.; Lin, W. T.; Linde, F. L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z. A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, W.; Lu, Y. S.; Lübelsmeyer, K.; Luci, C.; Luckey, D.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W. G.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Maña, C.; Mangla, S.; Marchesini, P.; Marin, A.; Martin, J. P.; Marzano, F.; Massaro, G. G. G.; McNally, D.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W. J.; von der Mey, M.; Mi, Y.; Mihul, A.; van Mil, A. J. W.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Molnar, P.; Monteleoni, B.; Moore, R.; Morganti, S.; Moulik, T.; Mount, R.; Müller, S.; Muheim, F.; Nagy, E.; Nahn, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Niessen, T.; Nippe, A.; Nisati, A.; Nowak, H.; Opitz, H.; Organtini, G.; Ostonen, R.; Pandoulas, D.; Paoletti, S.; Paolucci, P.; Park, H. K.; Pascale, G.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, T.; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Peach, D.; Pei, Y. J.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petrak, S.; Pevsner, A.; Piccolo, D.; Pieri, M.; Pinto, J. C.; Piroué, P. A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Postema, H.; Produit, N.; Prokofiev, D.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rattaggi, M.; Raven, G.; Razis, P.; Read, K.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; van Rhee, T.; Riemann, S.; Riemers, B. C.; Riles, K.; Rind, O.; Ro, S.; Robohm, A.; Rodin, J.; Rodriguez, F. J.; Roe, B. P.; Romero, L.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rosselet, Ph.; van Rossum, W.; Roth, S.; Rubio, J. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Santocchia, A.; Sarakinos, M. E.; Sarkar, S.; Sassowsky, M.; Sauvage, G.; Schäfer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schmidt-Kaerst, S.; Schmitz, D.; Schmitz, P.; Schneegans, M.; Scholz, N.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D. J.; Schwenke, J.; Schwering, G.; Sciacca, C.; Sciarrino, D.; Sens, J. C.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shukla, J.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Sopczak, A.; Soulimov, V.; Smith, B.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D. P.; Stone, H.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Strauch, K.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L. Z.; Susinno, G. F.; Suter, H.; Swain, J. D.; Tang, X. W.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tonutti, M.; Tonwar, S. C.; Tóth, J.; Tully, C.; Tuchscherer, H.; Tung, K. L.; Uchida, Y.; Ulbricht, J.; Uwer, U.; Valente, E.; van de Walle, R. T.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Viertel, G.; Vivargent, M.; Völkert, R.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Vorobyov, A. A.; Vorvolakos, A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wallraff, W.; Wang, J. C.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Z. M.; Weber, A.; Wittgenstein, F.; Wu, S. X.; Wynhoff, S.; Xu, J.; Xu, Z. Z.; Yang, B. Z.; Yang, C. G.; Yao, X. Y.; Ye, J. B.; Yeh, S. C.; You, J. M.; Zalite, An.; Zalite, Yu.; Zemp, P.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, G. Y.; Zhu, R. Y.; Zichichi, A.; Ziegler, F.

    1997-02-01

    The decays B0d, B0s -> e+e-, μ+μ-, e+/-μ+/- are searched for in 3.5 million hadronic Z events, which constitute the full LEP I data sample collected by the L3 detector. No signals are observed, therefore upper limits at the 90% (95%) confidence levels are set on the following branching fractions: Br(B0d -> e+e-) e+e-) μ+μ-) μ+μ-) e+/-μ+/-) e+/-μ+/-) e+e- and B0s -> e+/-μ+/- are the first limits set on these decay modes.

  20. Search for neutral B meson decays to two charged leptons

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alpat, B; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Antreasyan, D; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Ball, R C; Banerjee, S; Banicz, K; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Borgia, B; Boucham, A; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Boutigny, D; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Buytenhuijs, A O; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Caria, M; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chan, A; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, M; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Choi, M T; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; De Boeck, H; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dorne, I; Dova, M T; Drago, E; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Fernández, D; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gerald, J; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janssen, H; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kuijten, H; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee Jae Sik; Lee, K Y; Leggett, C; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lieb, E H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Nagy, E; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riemers, B C; Riles, K; Rind, O; Ro, S; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Rodríguez-Calonge, F J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Santocchia, A; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Sauvage, G; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Schneegans, M; Schöneich, B; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Sens, Johannes C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Soulimov, V; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhou, Y; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    The decays $\\mathrm{B_d^0,\\,B_s^0 \\rightarrow e^+e^-,\\,\\mu^+\\mu^-,\\, e^\\pm\\mu^\\mp}$ are searched for in 3.5 million hadronic ${\\mathrm{Z}}$ events, which constitute the full LEP I data sample collected by the L3 detector. No signals are observed, therefore upper limits at the 90\\%(95\\%) confidence levels are set on the following branching fractions: % \\begin{center}% {\\setlength{\\tabcolsep}{2pt} \\begin{tabular}{lccccclcccc}% % Br$({\\mathrm{B_d^0 \\rightarrow {\\mathrm{e^+e^-}}}})$ & $<$ & $1.4(1.8)$ & $\\times$ & $ 10^{-5}$; & \\hspace*{5mm} & Br$({\\mathrm{B_s^0 \\rightarrow {\\mathrm{e^+e^-}}}})$ & $<$ & $5.4(7.0)$ & $\\times$ & $ 10^{-5}$; \\\\% Br$({\\mathrm{B_d^0 \\rightarrow \\mu^+\\mu^-}})$ & $<$ & $1.0(1.4)$ & $\\times$ & $ 10^{-5}$; & \\hspace*{5mm} & Br$({\\mathrm{B_s^0 \\rightarrow \\mu^+\\mu^-}})$ & $<$ & $3.8(5.1)$ & $\\times$ & $ 10^{-5}$; \\\\% Br$({\\mathrm{B_d^0 \\rightarrow {\\mathrm{e^\\pm\\mu^\\mp}}}})$ & $<$ & $1.6(...

  1. Potential energy curves for neutral and multiply charged carbon monoxide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pradeep Kumar; N Sathyamurthy

    2010-01-01

    Potential energy curves of various electronic states of CO+ (0 ≤ ≤ 6) are generated at MRCI/CASSCF level using cc-pvQZ basis set and the results are compared with available experimental and theoretical data.

  2. Charged Leptons

    CERN Document Server

    Albrecht, J; Babu, K; Bernstein, R H; Blum, T; Brown, D N; Casey, B C K; Cheng, C -h; Cirigliano, V; Cohen, A; Deshpande, A; Dukes, E C; Echenard, B; Gaponenko, A; Glenzinski, D; Gonzalez-Alonso, M; Grancagnolo, F; Grossman, Y; Harnik, R; Hitlin, D G; Kiburg, B; Knoepfe, K; Kumar, K; Lim, G; Lu, Z -T; McKeen, D; Miller, J P; Ramsey-Musolf, M; Ray, R; Roberts, B L; Rominsky, M; Semertzidis, Y; Stoeckinger, D; Talman, R; Van De Water, R; Winter, P

    2013-01-01

    This is the report of the Intensity Frontier Charged Lepton Working Group of the 2013 Community Summer Study "Snowmass on the Mississippi", summarizing the current status and future experimental opportunities in muon and tau lepton studies and their sensitivity to new physics. These include searches for charged lepton flavor violation, measurements of magnetic and electric dipole moments, and precision measurements of the decay spectrum and parity-violating asymmetries.

  3. Neutral gas density depletion due to neutral gas heating and pressure balance in an inductively coupled plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Masashi; Tynan, George R.; Cattolica, Robert

    2007-02-01

    The spatial distribution of neutral gas temperature and total pressure have been measured for pure N2, He/5%N2 and Ar/5%N2 in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactor, and a significant rise in the neutral gas temperature has been observed. When thermal transpiration is used to correct total pressure measurements, the total pressure remains constant regardless of the plasma condition. Neutral pressure is depleted due to the pressure balance when the plasma pressure (mainly electron pressure) becomes comparable to the neutral pressure in high density plasma. Since the neutral gas follows the ideal gas law, the neutral gas density profile was obtained from the neutral gas temperature and the corrected neutral pressure measurements. The results show that the neutral gas density at the centre of the plasma chamber (factor of 2-4 ×) decreases significantly in the presence of a plasma discharge. Significant spatial variation in neutral gas uniformity occurs in such plasmas due to neutral gas heating and pressure balance.

  4. Implementation of a plasma-neutral model in NIMROD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, S.; Shumlak, U.; King, J. R.

    2016-10-01

    Interaction between plasma fluid and neutral species is of great importance in the edge region of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. The presence of neutrals can have beneficial effects such as fueling burning plasmas and quenching the disruptions in tokamaks, as well as deleterious effects like depositing high energy particles on the vessel wall. The behavior of edge plasmas in magnetically confined systems has been investigated using computational approaches that utilize the fluid description for the plasma and Monte Carlo transport for neutrals. In this research a reacting plasma-neutral model is implemented in NIMROD to study the interaction between plasma and neutral fluids. This model, developed by E. T. Meier and U. Shumlak, combines a single-fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) plasma model with a gas dynamic neutral fluid model which accounts for electron-impact ionization, radiative recombination, and resonant charge exchange. Incorporating this model into NIMROD allows the study of the interaction between neutrals and plasma in a variety of plasma science problems. An accelerated plasma moving through a neutral gas background in a coaxial electrode configuration is modeled, and the results are compared with previous calculations from the HiFi code.

  5. Threshold Neutral Pion Photoproduction on the Proton

    CERN Document Server

    Blin, Astrid Hiller; Ledwig, Tim

    2015-01-01

    The neutral pion photoproduction on the proton near threshold has a very small scattering cross section when compared to the charged channels, which in ChPT is explained by strong cancellations between the lowest order pieces. Therefore it is very sensitive to higher-order corrections of chiral perturbation theory. We perform a fully covariant calculation up to chiral order p^3 and we investigate the effect of the inclusion of the Delta(1232) resonance as an explicit degree of freedom. We show that the convergence improves, leading to a much better agreement with data at a wide range of energies.

  6. Screening in quantum charged systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ph. A.; Gruber, Ch.

    1984-07-01

    For stationary states of quantum charged systems in ν dimensions, ν>=2, it is proven that the reduced-density matrices satisfy a set of sum rules whenever the clustering is faster than |x|-(ν+l). These sum rules, describing the screening properties, are analogous to those previously derived for classical systems. For neutral quantum fluids, it is shown that the clustering cannot be faster than the decay of the force.

  7. Major contribution of neutral clusters to new particle formation in the free troposphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Rose

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The formation of new aerosol particles in the atmosphere is a key process influencing the aerosol number concentration as well as the climate, in particular in the free troposphere (FT where the newly formed particles directly influence cloud formation. However, free tropospheric new particle formation (NPF is poorly documented due to logistic limitations and complex atmospheric dynamics around high altitude stations that make the observation of this day-time process challenging. Recent improvements in measurement techniques make now possible the detection of neutral clusters down to ~ 1 nm sizes, which opens new horizons in our understanding of the nucleation process. Indeed, only the charged fraction of clusters has been reported in the upper troposphere up to now. Here we report observations of charged and neutral clusters (1 to 2.5 nm mobility diameter during day-time free tropospheric conditions at the altitude site of Puy de Dôme (1465 m a.s.l., central France, between 10 and 29 February 2012. Our findings demonstrate that in the free troposphere, the formation of 1.5 nm neutral clusters is about 40 times higher than the one of ionic clusters during NPF events, indicating that they dominate in the nucleation process. We also observe that the total cluster concentration increases by a factor of 5.5 during NPF events compared to the other days, which was not clearly observed for the charged cluster population in the past. In the FT, the nucleation process does not seem to be sulphuric acid-limited, as previously suggested, and could be promoted by the transport of pollutants to the upper troposphere.

  8. Lipopolysaccharide Neutralization by Cationic-Amphiphilic Polymers through Pseudoaggregate Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppu, Divakara S S M; Haldar, Jayanta

    2016-03-14

    Synthetic polymers incorporating the cationic charge and hydrophobicity to mimic the function of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been developed. These cationic-amphiphilic polymers bind to bacterial membranes that generally contain negatively charged phospholipids and cause membrane disintegration resulting in cell death; however, cationic-amphiphilic antibacterial polymers with endotoxin neutralization properties, to the best of our knowledge, have not been reported. Bacterial endotoxins such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) cause sepsis that is responsible for a great amount of mortality worldwide. These cationic-amphiphilic polymers can also bind to negatively charged and hydrophobic LPS and cause detoxification. Hence, we envisaged that cationic-amphiphilic polymers can have both antibacterial as well as LPS binding properties. Here we report synthetic amphiphilic polymers with both antibacterial as well as endotoxin neutralizing properties. Levels of proinflammatory cytokines in human monocytes caused by LPS stimulation were inhibited by >80% when coincubated with these polymers. These reductions were found to be dependent on concentration and, more importantly, on the side-chain chemical structure due to variations in the hydrophobicity profiles of these polymers. These cationic-amphiphilic polymers bind and cause LPS neutralization and detoxification. Investigations of polymer interaction with LPS using fluorescence spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS) showed that these polymers bind but neither dissociate nor promote LPS aggregation. We show that polymer binding to LPS leads to sort of a pseudoaggregate formation resulting in LPS neutralization/detoxification. These findings provide an unusual mechanism of LPS neutralization using novel synthetic cationic-amphiphilic polymers.

  9. Drag Forces, Neutral Wind and Electric Conductivity Changes in the Ionospheric E Region

    CERN Document Server

    Nenovski, Petko

    2014-01-01

    The neutrals in the Earth environment are in fact free and subjected to drag forces (by ions). In this study we show that drag or friction forces in the ionosphere-thermosphere system initiate changes in the plasma flow, neutral wind, and the conductivity, as well. Ions and electrons embedded in neutral wind field of velocity u acquire drifts perpendicular both to the initial neutral wind velocity and to the ambient magnetic field producing a perpendicular electric current. This perpendicular electric current is defined by a conductivity derived previously and the polarization electric field u x B. Self-consistently, the free neutrals acquires an additional neutral velocity component perpendicular to the initial neutral wind velocity u. The Pedersen and Hall currents wane within a specific time inversely proportional to neutral-ion collision frequency. These findings are relevant to a better understanding of electric current generation, distribution and closure in weakly ionized plasmas where charged particle...

  10. A Quirky Probe of Neutral Naturalness

    CERN Document Server

    Chacko, Zackaria; Verhaaren, Christopher B

    2015-01-01

    We consider the signals arising from top partner pair production at the LHC as a probe of theories of Neutral Naturalness. We focus on scenarios in which the top partners carry electroweak charges, such as Folded SUSY or the Quirky Little Higgs. In this class of theories the top partners are charged under a mirror color group whose lightest states are hidden glueballs. The top partners, once produced, form a quirky bound state that de-excites promptly and annihilates into hidden glueballs. These glueballs can decay through mixing with the Higgs, giving rise to striking displaced signatures at the LHC. We show that the displaced signals arising from top partner pair production constitute the primary discovery channel for this class of theories in most regions of parameter space.

  11. Effect of gamma irradiation at various temperatures and packaging conditions on chicken tissues. 1. Fatty acid profiles of neutral and polar lipids separated from muscle irradiated at -20/sup 0/C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rady, A.H.; Maxwell, R.J.; Wierbicki, E.; Phillips, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    A lipid composition study on irradiated chicken muscle is reported. All muscle samples, packed either under air or vacuum, were gamma irradiated (-20/sup 0/C) at 0, 1, 3, 6 and 10 kGy using /sup 137/Cs (dose rate 0.1 kGymin). Lipids were isolated from the muscle using a dry column extraction method with concomitant isolation of separated neutral and polar fractions. Lipid isolates were converted to their methyl esters and analyzed by capillary column gas chromatography with computer assisted data storage, followed by data consolidation and statistical computer analysis. Separated fatty acid profiles for neutral and polar lipids were obtained as normalized reports (each fatty acid as percentage of total fatty acids) and as gravimetric reports (mg of each fatty acid100 g tissue). Normalized reports showed only negligible occurrence of significant changes in fatty acid profiles of neutral muscle lipid fractions regardless of irradiation doses (0 to 10 kGy) in either air and vacuum packaging. These differences were not apparent when the data were compiled as gravimetric reports. The polar lipid fractions containing the nutritionally significant ..omega..3 and ..omega..6 fatty acids showed only slight changes in normalized and gravimetric reports and were similarly unaffected with increasing levels of irradiation. Additionally, no new fatty acids or other artifacts due to gamma-irradiation were observed in detectable amounts by gas chromatography in any lipid fractions

  12. Mild Solutions of Neutral Stochastic Partial Functional Differential Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. E. Govindan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the existence and uniqueness of a mild solution for a neutral stochastic partial functional differential equation using a local Lipschitz condition. When the neutral term is zero and even in the deterministic special case, the result obtained here appears to be new. An example is included to illustrate the theory.

  13. Genetic mapping of day-neutrality in cultivated strawberry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day-neutrality is a highly desirable trait in strawberry (Fragaria L.) breeding programs worldwide due to its importance in extending the harvest season in commercial production. Day-neutral genotypes are photoperiod insensitive and will initiate flowers under any photoperiod conditions as long as t...

  14. Late-Time Evolution of Charged Gravitational Collapse and Decay of Charged Scalar Hair, 2

    CERN Document Server

    Hod, S; Hod, Shahar; Piran, Tsvi

    1998-01-01

    We study analytically the initial value problem for a charged massless scalar-field on a Reissner-Nordström spacetime. Using the technique of spectral decomposition we extend recent results on this problem. Following the no-hair theorem we reveal the dynamical physical mechanism by which the charged hair is radiated away. We show that the charged perturbations decay according to an inverse power-law behaviour at future timelike infinity and along future null infinity. Along the future outer horizon we find an oscillatory inverse power-law relaxation of the charged fields. We find that a charged black hole becomes ``bald'' slower than a neutral one, due to the existence of charged perturbations. Our results are also important to the study of mass-inflation and the stability of Cauchy horizons during a dynamical gravitational collapse of charged matter in which a charged black-hole is formed.

  15. Retentivity, selectivity and thermodynamic behavior of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on charge-transfer and hypercrosslinked stationary phases under conditions of normal phase high performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ping; Lucy, Charles A

    2016-03-11

    Charge-transfer and hypercrosslinked polystyrene phases offer retention and separation for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and thus have potential for petroleum analysis. The size, shape and planarity selectivity for PAH standards on charge-transfer (DNAP column) and hypercrosslinked polystyrene (HC-Tol and 5HGN columns) phases are different under normal phase liquid chromatography (NPLC). The HC-Tol column behaves like a conventional NPLC column with low retention of PAHs. Retention of PAHs on the DNAP and 5HGN are strong and increases with the number of aromatic rings. The main retention mechanism is through π-π interactions and dipole-induced dipole interaction. Thermodynamics indicates that the retention mechanism of PAHs remains unchanged over the temperature range 20-60°C. In addition, on either DNAP or 5HGN column, both linear and bent PAHs are retained through the same mechanism. But DNAP possesses smaller π-π interaction and higher planarity selectivity than 5HGN for PAHs. This is suggestive that DNAP interacts with PAHs through a disordered phase arrangement, while 5HGN behaves as an ordered adsorption phase.

  16. The Weak Neutral Current

    CERN Document Server

    Erler, Jens

    2013-01-01

    This is a review of electroweak precision physics with particular emphasis on low-energy precision measurements in the neutral current sector of the electroweak theory and includes future experimental prospects and the theoretical challenges one faces to interpret these observables. Within the minimal Standard Model they serve as determinations of the weak mixing angle which are competitive with and complementary to those obtained near the Z-resonance. In the context of new physics beyond the Standard Model these measurements are crucial to discriminate between models and to reduce the allowed parameter space within a given model. We illustrate this for the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model with or without R-parity.

  17. Improving Charging-Breeding Simulations with Space-Charge Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilek, Ryan; Kwiatkowski, Ania; Steinbrügge, René

    2016-09-01

    Rare-isotope-beam facilities use Highly Charged Ions (HCI) for accelerators accelerating heavy ions and to improve measurement precision and resolving power of certain experiments. An Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) is able to create HCI through successive electron impact, charge breeding trapped ions into higher charge states. CBSIM was created to calculate successive charge breeding with an EBIT. It was augmented by transferring it into an object-oriented programming language, including additional elements, improving ion-ion collision factors, and exploring the overlap of the electron beam with the ions. The calculation is enhanced with the effects of residual background gas by computing the space charge due to charge breeding. The program assimilates background species, ionizes and charge breeds them alongside the element being studied, and allows them to interact with the desired species through charge exchange, giving fairer overview of realistic charge breeding. Calculations of charge breeding will be shown for realistic experimental conditions. We reexamined the implementation of ionization energies, cross sections, and ion-ion interactions when charge breeding.

  18. Use of calorimetry for end of charge determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Chris J.

    1994-01-01

    To perform heat flow measurements on batteries, it is necessary to consider the following requirements: establish thermal neutral potential; identify inefficient charging; understand self discharge mechanisms; and provide accurate voltage/temperature data. A discussion is provided in viewgraph format.

  19. 拉伸状态下LDPE/SiO2改性材料的空间电荷特性研究%Study on Space Charge Behavior in LDPE/SiO2 Nanocomposites Under Tensile Condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王灿; 王有元; 凡朋; 廖瑞金

    2016-01-01

    为深入研究低密度聚乙烯(low-density polyethylene, LDPE)/SiO2改性材料内部空间电荷的运动特性,利用纳米粒径分别为15和50 nm的SiO2纳米粒子制备了质量分数5%的LDPE/SiO2改性材料,同时制备了拉伸率为10%的样品,利用电声脉冲(pulsed electroacoustic apparatus,PEA)法装置测量了每种样品的空间电荷分布.结果表明:添加SiO2纳米粒子后,材料中靠近电极处的空间电荷累积由异极性电荷转变为同极性电荷;拉伸后,所有材料内部的空间电荷累积量均出现了增加,并且当拉伸率为10%,质量分数为5%时,LDPE/SiO2改性材料内部出现了空间电荷大量累积的现象,在材料中心位置处形成了两个不同极性的空间电荷包, 15nm粒径改性材料的空间电荷包远小于50nm粒径的改性材料.文中从弧波理论、电荷在改性材料中的受力以及具有不同介电常数材料表面电荷的累积等方面对 LDPE/SiO2改性材料内部的空间电荷包现象进行了详细解释,为深入理解空间电荷在改性材料中的运动特性和分布特性提供参考.%In order to research space charge behavior in low-density polyethylene (LDPE)/SiO2 nanocomposites, this paper prepared LDPE/SiO2 nanocomposites with particle size of 15nm and 50nm, mass fraction of 5% and elongation of 10%. Space charge behavior of each sample was tested by pulsed electroacoustic apparatus (PEA) method. The results show that homocharge accumulation changes to hetercharge accumulation near electrodes in LDPE/SiO2 nanocomposites when nanoparticles were added. The amount of space charge increases under tensile condition. There is a large amount of space charge in nanocomposites with elongation of 10% and nanoparticles'' mass fraction of 5%. At the same time, there are two different polarity packet-like space charges in the center of nanocomposites and the packet-like space charge in nanocomposites with particle size of 50nm is more obvious than that in

  20. An Effective Method of Producing Small Neutral Carbon Clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Zhu-Hong; CHEN Cheng-Chu; HSU Yen-Chu

    2007-01-01

    An effective method of producing small neutral carbon clusters Cn (n = 1-6) is described. The small carbon clusters (positive or negative charge or neutral) are formed by plasma which are produced by a high power 532nm pulse laser ablating the surface of the metal Mn rod to react with small hydrocarbons supplied by a pulse valve, then the neutral carbon clusters are extracted and photo-ionized by another laser (266nm or 355nm) in the ionization region of a linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The distributions of the initial neutral carbon clusters are analysed with the ionic species appeared in mass spectra. It is observed that the yield of small carbon clusters with the present method is about 10 times than that of the traditional widely used technology of laser vaporization of graphite.

  1. On exponential stabilizability of linear neutral systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusser Xavier

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we deal with linear neutral functional differential systems. Using an extended state space and an extended control operator, we transform the initial neutral system in an infinite dimensional linear system. We give a sufficient condition for admissibility of the control operator B , conditions under which operator B can be acceptable in order to work with controllability and stabilizability. Necessary and sufficient conditions for exact controllability are provided; in terms of a gramian of controllability N ( μ . Assuming admissibility and exact controllability, a feedback control law is defined from the inverse of the operator N ( μ in order to stabilize exponentially the closed loop system. In this case, the semigroup generated by the closed loop system has an arbitrary decay rate.

  2. A quirky probe of neutral naturalness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacko, Zackaria; Curtin, David; Verhaaren, Christopher B.

    2016-07-01

    We consider the signals arising from top partner pair production at the LHC as a probe of theories of neutral naturalness. We focus on scenarios in which top partners carry electroweak charges, such as folded supersymmetry or the quirky little Higgs. In this class of theories the top partners are pair produced as quirky bound states, since they are charged under a mirror color group whose lightest states are hidden glueballs. The quirks promptly de-excite and annihilate into glueballs, which decay back to Standard Model fermions via Higgs mixing. This can give rise to spectacular signatures at the LHC, such displaced decays, or high-multiplicity prompt production of many hard b ¯b or τ+τ- pairs. We show that signals arising from top partner pair production constitute the primary discovery channel for this class of theories in most regions of parameter space, and might provide the only experimental probe of scenarios with sub-cm glueball decay lengths. The measurement of top partner masses and couplings, which could be used to test the neutral naturalness mechanism directly, is also a tantalizing possibility.

  3. Neutral Color Semitransparent Microstructured Perovskite Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Eperon, Giles E.

    2014-01-28

    Neutral-colored semitransparent solar cells are commercially desired to integrate solar cells into the windows and cladding of buildings and automotive applications. Here, we report the use of morphological control of perovskite thin films to form semitransparent planar heterojunction solar cells with neutral color and comparatively high efficiencies. We take advantage of spontaneous dewetting to create microstructured arrays of perovskite "islands", on a length-scale small enough to appear continuous to the eye yet large enough to enable unattenuated transmission of light between the islands. The islands are thick enough to absorb most visible light, and the combination of completely absorbing and completely transparent regions results in neutral transmission of light. Using these films, we fabricate thin-film solar cells with respectable power conversion efficiencies. Remarkably, we find that such discontinuous films still have good rectification behavior and relatively high open-circuit voltages due to the inherent rectification between the n- and p-type charge collection layers. Furthermore, we demonstrate the ease of "color-tinting" such microstructured perovksite solar cells with no reduction in performance, by incorporation of a dye within the hole transport medium. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  4. Neutralization of H- at Nanostructured Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obreshkov, Boyan; Thumm, Uwe

    2006-05-01

    The charge transfer rates and the neutralization probabilities for hydrogen anions colliding with nanostructured (vicinal) surfaces are obtained by direct numerical integration of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation for the motion of the active electron in the field of the projectile-surface compound. The electronic structure of the surface is calculated from a Thomas-Fermi - von Weizsaecker statistical model with local density approximation for the exchange-correlation energy. In fixed-ion approximation, the decay rate of the electronic state of the anion in front of the surface is obtained by projecting the density of states of the collision system onto the unperturbed projectile level. The ion neutralization probability is calculated from this static width within a rate equation approach for a set of broken-straight-line collision trajectories for kinetic energies of 1 keV. The dependence of decay rates and neutralization probabilities on the surface morphology and the scattering trajectories, and a comparison of our numerical results with the experiments will be discussed.

  5. Organic neutralization agents for neutralization-reionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M Y; McLafferty, F W

    1992-02-01

    Porter has shown that excited neutrals of specified internal energies can be prepared by neutralization of an ion beam with metal vapors of low ionization potential (IP). For specific problems in neutralization-reionization mass spectrometry, a metal with the desired IP value may not be available, or it may present experimental problems such as a high vaporization temperature, instrument contamination, or detector instability. The use of organic neutralization agents such as tetra-p-anisylethylene (IP = 6.0 eV) can minimize these problems (although cross sections for neutralization with these are a factor of 5 lower than those with metals), and can provide a much wider range of IP values. Their utility is demonstrated in the neutralization of C4H4 (+•) and CH8 (+•) ions to produce C4H4 and C4H8 of selected internal energies. However, for CH4 (+•) neutralization, the CH4 neutrals formed have a much lower internal energy than predicted, indicating that electron transfer from the neutralization agent predominantly produces its ions in excited states.

  6. Electroelasticity of Charged Black Branes

    CERN Document Server

    Armas, Jay; Obers, Niels A

    2013-01-01

    We present the first order corrected dynamics of fluid branes carrying higher-form charge by obtaining the general form of their equations of motion to pole-dipole order. Assuming linear response theory, we characterize the corresponding effective theory of stationary bent charged (an)isotropic fluid branes in terms of two sets of response coefficients, the Young modulus and the piezoelectric moduli. We subsequently find large classes of examples in gravity of this effective theory, by constructing stationary strained charged black brane solutions to first order in a derivative expansion. Using solution generating techniques and bent neutral black branes as a seed solution, we obtain a class of charged black brane geometries carrying smeared Maxwell charge in Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton gravity. In the specific case of ten-dimensional space-time we furthermore use T-duality to generate bent black branes with higher-form charge, including smeared D-branes of type II string theory. By subsequently measuring the be...

  7. Spectroscopy of neutral radium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mol, Aran; De, Subhadeep; Jungmann, Klaus; Wilschut, Hans; Willmann, Lorenz [KVI, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2008-07-01

    The heavy alkaline earth atoms radium is uniquely sensitive towards parity and time reversal symmetry violations due to a large enhancement of an intrinsic permanent electric dipole moment of the nucleous or the electron. Furthermore, radium is sensitive to atomic parity violation and the nuclear anapole moment. To prepare such experiments spectroscopy of relevant atomic states need to be done. At a later stage we will build a neutral atom trap for radium. We have built an atomic beam of the short lived isotope {sup 225}Ra with a flux of several 10{sup 4} atoms/sec. We are preparing the laser spectroscopy using this beam setup. In the preparation for efficient laser cooling and trapping we have successfully trapped barium, which is similar in it's requirements for laser cooling. The techniques which we have developed with barium can be used to trap rare radium isotopes. We report on the progress of the experiments.

  8. Comparison theorems for neutral stochastic functional differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xiaoming; Jiang, Jifa

    2016-05-01

    The comparison theorems under Wu and Freedman's order are proved for neutral stochastic functional differential equations with finite or infinite delay whose drift terms satisfy the quasimonotone condition and diffusion term is the same.

  9. Strange neutral currents in nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Ressell, M T; Aufderheide, M B; Bloom, S D; Resler, D A

    1995-01-01

    We examine the effects on the nuclear neutral current Gamow-Teller (GT) strength of a finite contribution from a polarized strange quark sea. We perform nuclear shell model calculations of the neutral current GT strength for a number of nuclei likely to be present during stellar core collapse. We compare the GT strength when a finite strange quark contribution is included to the strength without such a contribution. As an example, the process of neutral current nuclear de-excitation via \

  10. Oscillating supertubes and neutral rotating black hole microstates

    CERN Document Server

    Mathur, Samir D

    2014-01-01

    The construction of neutral black hole microstates is an important problem, with implications for the information paradox. In this paper we conjecture a construction of non-supersymmetric supergravity solutions describing D-brane configurations which carry mass and angular momentum, but no other conserved charges. We first study a classical string solution which locally carries dipole winding and momentum charges in two compact directions, but globally carries no net winding or momentum charge. We investigate its backreaction in the D1-D5 duality frame, where this object becomes a supertube which locally carries oscillating dipole D1-D5 and NS1-NS5 charges, and again carries no net charge. In the limit of an infinite straight supertube, we find an exact supergravity solution describing this object. We conjecture that a similar construction may be carried out based on a class of two-charge non-supersymmetric D1-D5 solutions. These results are a step towards demonstrating how neutral black hole microstates may ...

  11. Oscillating supertubes and neutral rotating black hole microstates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathur, Samir D.; Turton, David [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University,191 W Woodruff Ave, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2014-04-10

    The construction of neutral black hole microstates is an important problem, with implications for the information paradox. In this paper we conjecture a construction of non-supersymmetric supergravity solutions describing D-brane configurations which carry mass and angular momentum, but no other conserved charges. We first study a classical string solution which locally carries dipole winding and momentum charges in two compact directions, but globally carries no net winding or momentum charge. We investigate its backreaction in the D1-D5 duality frame, where this object becomes a supertube which locally carries oscillating dipole D1-D5 and NS1-NS5 charges, and again carries no net charge. In the limit of an infinite straight supertube, we find an exact supergravity solution describing this object. We conjecture that a similar construction may be carried out based on a class of two-charge non-supersymmetric D1-D5 solutions. These results are a step towards demonstrating how neutral black hole microstates may be constructed in string theory.

  12. Discrete electrostatic charge transfer by the electrophoresis of a charged droplet in a dielectric liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Do Jin; Ahn, Myung Mo; Yoo, Byeong Sun; Moon, Dustin; Lee, Dong Woog; Kang, In Seok

    2012-08-14

    We have experimentally investigated the electrostatic charging of a water droplet on an electrified electrode surface to explain the detailed inductive charging processes and use them for the detection of droplet position in a lab-on-a-chip system. The periodic bouncing motion of a droplet between two planar electrodes has been examined by using a high-resolution electrometer and an image analysis method. We have found that this charging process consists of three steps. The first step is inductive charge accumulation on the opposite electrode by the charge of a droplet. This induction process occurs while the droplet approaches the electrode, and it produces an induction current signal at the electrometer. The second step is the discharging of the droplet by the accumulated induced charge at the moment of contact. For this second step, there is no charge-transfer detection at the electrometer. The third step is the charging of the neutralized droplet to a certain charged state while the droplet is in contact with the electrode. The charge transfer of the third step is detected as the pulse-type signal of an electrometer. The second and third steps occur simultaneously and rapidly. We have found that the induction current by the movement of a charged droplet can be accurately used to measure the charge of the droplet and can also be used to monitor the position of a droplet under actuation. The implications of the current findings for understanding and measuring the charging process are discussed.

  13. Amine reactivity with charged sulfuric acid clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bzdek, B. R.; Ridge, D. P.; Johnston, M. V.

    2011-08-01

    The distribution of charged species produced by electrospray of an ammonium sulfate solution in both positive and negative polarities is examined using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). Positively-charged ammonium bisulfate cluster composition differs significantly from negatively-charged cluster composition. For positively-charged clusters all sulfuric acid is neutralized to bisulfate, whereas for negatively-charged clusters the degree of sulfuric acid neutralization is cluster size-dependent. With increasing cluster size (and, therefore, a decreasing role of charge), both positively- and negatively-charged cluster compositions converge toward ammonium bisulfate. The reactivity of negatively-charged sulfuric acid-ammonia clusters with dimethylamine and ammonia is also investigated by FTICR-MS. Two series of negatively-charged clusters are investigated: [(HSO4)(H2SO4)x]- and [(NH4)x(HSO4)x+1(H2SO4)3]-. Dimethylamine substitution for ammonia in [(NH4) x(HSO4) x+1(H2SO4)3]- clusters is nearly collision-limited, and subsequent addition of dimethylamine to neutralize H2SO4 to bisulfate is within one order of magnitude of the substitution rate. Dimethylamine addition to [(HSO4) (H2SO4) x]- clusters is either not observed or very slow. The results of this study indicate that amine chemistry will be evident and important only in large ambient negative ions (>m/z 400), whereas amine chemistry may be evident in small ambient positive ions. Addition of ammonia to unneutralized clusters occurs at a rate that is ~2-3 orders of magnitude slower than incorporation of dimethylamine either by substitution or addition. Therefore, in locations where amine levels are within a few orders of magnitude of ammonia levels, amine chemistry may compete favorably with ammonia chemistry.

  14. Solid charged-core model of ball lightning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. Muldrew

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, ball lightning (BL is assumed to have a solid, positively-charged core. According to this underlying assumption, the core is surrounded by a thin electron layer with a charge nearly equal in magnitude to that of the core. A vacuum exists between the core and the electron layer containing an intense electromagnetic (EM field which is reflected and guided by the electron layer. The microwave EM field applies a ponderomotive force (radiation pressure to the electrons preventing them from falling into the core. The energetic electrons ionize the air next to the electron layer forming a neutral plasma layer. The electric-field distributions and their associated frequencies in the ball are determined by applying boundary conditions to a differential equation given by Stratton (1941. It is then shown that the electron and plasma layers are sufficiently thick and dense to completely trap and guide the EM field. This model of BL is exceptional in that it can explain all or nearly all of the peculiar characteristics of BL. The ES energy associated with the core charge can be extremely large which can explain the observations that occasionally BL contains enormous energy. The mass of the core prevents the BL from rising like a helium-filled balloon – a problem with most plasma and burning-gas models. The positively charged core keeps the negatively charged electron layer from diffusing away, i.e. it holds the ball together; other models do not have a mechanism to do this. The high electrical charges on the core and in the electron layer explains why some people have been electrocuted by BL. Experiments indicate that BL radiates microwaves upon exploding and this is consistent with the model. The fact that this novel model of BL can explain these and other observations is strong evidence that the model should be taken seriously.

  15. Determining Acceptable Explosive Charge Mass Under Different Geological Conditions / Problematyka Wyznaczania Dopuszczalnych Ładunków Mw W Zróżnicowanych Warunkach Geologicznych

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyra, Józef; Sołtys, Anna; Winzer, Jan; Dworzak, Michał; Biessikirski, Andrzej

    2015-09-01

    This article presents a procedure for determining the safety of explosive charges for their surrounding environment, using a limestone mine as a case study. Varied geological structures, as well as other constructions in the surrounding area of a mine, sometimes necessitate the use of two or more ground vibration propagation equations, and thus a variety of explosive charges, depending on the area of rock blasting. This is a crucial issue for the contractor, as it is important to blast the rock as few times as possible, while using the maximum amount of explosive charge for each blast. Wykonywanie robót strzałowych w górnictwie polega na odpalaniu mas materiału wybuchowego (MW) celem uzyskania dużej ilości odpowiednio rozdrobnionego urobku. W momencie zwiększonego popytu na surowce skalne zakłady górnicze zmuszone są do zwielokrotnienia wykonywania prac strzałowych aby zapewnić regularne dostawy produktu. Konsekwencją takich działań jest ponoszenie dodatkowych kosztów operacyjnych. Celem ich minimalizacji oraz uzyskania jak największej efektywności prowadzonych robót strzałowych jest wydłużanie serii, a więc stosowanie coraz to większych mas ładunków materiałów wybuchowych. Efektem takiego postępowanie jest możliwość wystąpienia w otoczeniu oddziaływania o potencjalnie szkodliwym charakterze m. in. drgania parasejsmiczne. Aby wyeliminować powyższy problem oraz zapewnić niezbędny komfort mieszkańcom, Prawo geologiczne i górnicze, Prawo ochrony środowiska i rozporządzenia wykonawcze nakładają na podmiot wykonujący roboty strzałowe obowiązek ochrony otoczenia, poprzez prowadzenie działalności profilaktycznej w zakresie kontroli, monitorowania oraz wyznaczania dopuszczalnych mas ładunków MW. W momencie gdy nie ma możliwości ograniczenia niepożądanych wpływów dynamicznych po przez zmianę parametrów siatki strzałowej czy modyfikację struktury czasowo-częstotliwościowej drgań, jedyną możliwością staje si

  16. CO2-neutral fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goede A. P. H.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for storage of renewable energy (RE generated by photovoltaic, concentrated solar and wind arises from the fact that supply and demand are ill-matched both geographically and temporarily. This already causes problems of overcapacity and grid congestion in countries where the fraction of RE exceeds the 20% level. A system approach is needed, which focusses not only on the energy source, but includes conversion, storage, transport, distribution, use and, last but not least, the recycling of waste. Furthermore, there is a need for more flexibility in the energy system, rather than relying on electrification, integration with other energy systems, for example the gas network, would yield a system less vulnerable to failure and better adapted to requirements. For example, long-term large-scale storage of electrical energy is limited by capacity, yet needed to cover weekly to seasonal demand. This limitation can be overcome by coupling the electricity net to the gas system, considering the fact that the Dutch gas network alone has a storage capacity of 552 TWh, sufficient to cover the entire EU energy demand for over a month. This lecture explores energy storage in chemicals bonds. The focus is on chemicals other than hydrogen, taking advantage of the higher volumetric energy density of hydrocarbons, in this case methane, which has an approximate 3.5 times higher volumetric energy density. More importantly, it allows the ready use of existing gas infrastructure for energy storage, transport and distribution. Intermittent wind electricity generated is converted into synthetic methane, the Power to Gas (P2G scheme, by splitting feedstock CO2 and H2O into synthesis gas, a mixture of CO and H2. Syngas plays a central role in the synthesis of a range of hydrocarbon products, including methane, diesel and dimethyl ether. The splitting is accomplished by innovative means; plasmolysis and high-temperature solid oxygen electrolysis. A CO2-neutral fuel

  17. CO2-neutral fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goede, A. P. H.

    2015-08-01

    The need for storage of renewable energy (RE) generated by photovoltaic, concentrated solar and wind arises from the fact that supply and demand are ill-matched both geographically and temporarily. This already causes problems of overcapacity and grid congestion in countries where the fraction of RE exceeds the 20% level. A system approach is needed, which focusses not only on the energy source, but includes conversion, storage, transport, distribution, use and, last but not least, the recycling of waste. Furthermore, there is a need for more flexibility in the energy system, rather than relying on electrification, integration with other energy systems, for example the gas network, would yield a system less vulnerable to failure and better adapted to requirements. For example, long-term large-scale storage of electrical energy is limited by capacity, yet needed to cover weekly to seasonal demand. This limitation can be overcome by coupling the electricity net to the gas system, considering the fact that the Dutch gas network alone has a storage capacity of 552 TWh, sufficient to cover the entire EU energy demand for over a month. This lecture explores energy storage in chemicals bonds. The focus is on chemicals other than hydrogen, taking advantage of the higher volumetric energy density of hydrocarbons, in this case methane, which has an approximate 3.5 times higher volumetric energy density. More importantly, it allows the ready use of existing gas infrastructure for energy storage, transport and distribution. Intermittent wind electricity generated is converted into synthetic methane, the Power to Gas (P2G) scheme, by splitting feedstock CO2 and H2O into synthesis gas, a mixture of CO and H2. Syngas plays a central role in the synthesis of a range of hydrocarbon products, including methane, diesel and dimethyl ether. The splitting is accomplished by innovative means; plasmolysis and high-temperature solid oxygen electrolysis. A CO2-neutral fuel cycle is

  18. Comparison of experimental data and 3D simulations of ion beam neutralization from the neutralized transport experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thoma, C.; Welch, D.R.; Yu, S.S.; Henestroza, E.; Roy, P.K.; Eylon, S.; Gilson, E.P.

    2004-09-22

    The Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been designed to study the final focus and neutralization of high perveance ion beams for applications in heavy ion fusion (HIF) and high energy density physics (HEDP) experiments. Pre-formed plasmas in the last meter before the target of the scaled experiment provide a source of electrons which neutralize the ion current and prevent the space-charge induced spreading of the beam spot. NTX physics issues are discussed and experimental data is analyzed and compared with 3D particle-in-cell simulations. Along with detailed target images, 4D phase-space data of the NTX at the entrance of the neutralization region has been acquired. This data is used to provide a more accurate beam distribution with which to initialize the simulation. Previous treatments have used various idealized beam distributions which lack the detailed features of the experimental ion beam images. Simulation results are compared with NTX experimental measurements for 250 keV K{sup +} ion beams with dimensionless perveance of 1-7 x 10{sup -4}. In both simulation and experiment, the deduced beam charge neutralization is close to the predicted maximum value.

  19. Artificial electromagnetism for neutral atoms: Escher staircase and Laughlin liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Erich J.

    2004-10-01

    We present a method for creating fields that couple to neutral atoms in the same way that electromagnetic fields couple to charged particles. We show that this technique opens the door for a range of neutral atom experiments, including probing the interplay between periodic potentials and quantum Hall effects. Furthermore, we propose, and analyze, seemingly paradoxical geometries which can be engineered through these techniques. For example, we show how to create a ring of sites where an atom continuously reduces its potential energy by moving in a clockwise direction.

  20. Evidence for the Production of Neutral Mesons by Photons

    CERN Document Server

    Steinberger, J; Panofsky, Wolfgang Kurt Hermann

    1950-01-01

    In the bombardment of nuclei by 330-Mev x-rays, multiple gamma-rays are emitted. From their angular correlation it is deduced that they are emitted in pairs in the disintegration of neutral particles moving with relativistic velocities and therefore of intermediate mass. The neutral mesons are produced with cross sections similar to those for the charged mesons and with an angular distribution peaked more in the forward direction. The production cross section in hydrogen and the production cross section per nucleon in C and Be are comparable.

  1. Neutral pion form factor measurement at NA62

    CERN Document Server

    Goudzovski, Evgueni

    2016-01-01

    The NA62 experiment at CERN collected a large sample of charged kaon decays with a highly efficient trigger for decays into electrons in 2007. The kaon beam represents a source of tagged neutral pion decays in vacuum. A measurement of the electromagnetic transition form factor slope of the neutral pion in the time-like region from $1.05\\times10^6$ fully reconstructed $\\pi^0$ Dalitz decay is presented. The limits on dark photon production in $\\pi^0$ decays from the earlier kaon experiment at CERN, NA48/2, are also reported.

  2. Neutralization distances of Ar^Z+ Rydberg ions interacting with solid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majkic, M. D.; Nedeljkovic, N. N.; Galijas, S. M. D.

    2008-07-01

    We apply the recently developed time-symmetrized, two-state vector model to investigate the intermediate stages of the electron capture into the Rydberg states of multiply charged Ar^Z+ ions (core charge Z >> 1, principal quantum number n_A >> 1) escaping Al-solid surface at low velocity. The simple analytical formulae derived for the corresponding neutralization rates enable us to analyze the neutralization distances for the low-l Rydberg states (n_A,l_A,m_A), for different charge states Z of the ion. It is found that the inclusion of core polarization significantly reduces the neutralization distances. The neutralization distances for the highest Rydberg levels that can be populated in the vicinity of solid surface are in agreement with the data deduced from experiments in which the kinetic energy gain due to the image acceleration of the ions is measured.

  3. Neutral evolution of mutational robustness.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nimwegen, E. van; Crutchfield, J.P.; Huynen, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    We introduce and analyze a general model of a population evolving over a network of selectively neutral genotypes. We show that the population's limit distribution on the neutral network is solely determined by the network topology and given by the principal eigenvector of the network's adjacency ma

  4. The merits of neutral theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonso, David; Etienne, Rampal S.; McKane, Alan J.

    2006-01-01

    Hubbell's neutral theory of biodiversity has challenged the classic niche-based view of ecological community structure. Although there have been many attempts to falsify Hubbell's theory, we argue that falsification should not lead to rejection, because there is more to the theory than neutrality al

  5. Photons shedding light on electron capture by highly charged ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Romke Anne

    1990-01-01

    In this thesis charge transfer is studied in collisions of highly charged ions (Aq+) with neutral particles (B). Because the electron is captured resonantly (i.e. without its binding energy) by the ion, a limited number of highly excited states (characterized by the quantum numbers nlm) is preferent

  6. Interaction of a neutral cloud moving through a magnetized plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goertz, C. K.; Lu, G.

    1990-01-01

    Current collection by outgassing probes in motion relative to a magnetized plasma may be significantly affected by plasma processes that cause electron heating and cross field transport. Simulations of a neutral gas cloud moving across a static magnetic field are discussed. The authors treat a low-Beta plasma and use a 2-1/2 D electrostatic code linked with the authors' Plasma and Neutral Interaction Code (PANIC). This study emphasizes the understanding of the interface between the neutral gas cloud and the surrounding plasma where electrons are heated and can diffuse across field lines. When ionization or charge exchange collisions occur a sheath-like structure is formed at the surface of the neutral gas. In that region the crossfield component of the electric field causes the electron to E times B drift with a velocity of the order of the neutral gas velocity times the square root of the ion to electron mass ratio. In addition a diamagnetic drift of the electron occurs due to the number density and temperature inhomogeneity in the front. These drift currents excite the lower-hybrid waves with the wave k-vectors almost perpendicular to the neutral flow and magnetic field again resulting in electron heating. The thermal electron current is significantly enhanced due to this heating.

  7. Stability of the extremal Reissner-Nordstrom black hole to charged scalar perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Hod, Shahar

    2013-01-01

    The stability of Reissner-Nordstrom black holes to neutral (gravitational and electromagnetic) perturbations was established almost four decades ago. However, the stability of these charged black holes under charged perturbations has remained an open question due to the well-known phenomena of superradiant scattering: A charged scalar field impinging on a charged Reissner-Nordstrom black hole can be amplified as it scatters off the hole. If the incident field has a non-zero rest mass, then the mass term effectively works as a mirror, preventing the energy extracted from the hole from escaping to infinity. One may suspect that such superradiant amplification of charged fields in Reissner-Nordstrom spacetimes may lead to an instability of these charged black holes (in as much the same way that rotating Kerr black holes are unstable under rotating scalar perturbations). However, we show here that, for extremal Reissner-Nordstrom black holes, the two conditions which are required in order to trigger a possible su...

  8. Comparison of Fenton, UV-Fenton and nano-Fe3O4 catalyzed UV-Fenton in degradation of phloroglucinol under neutral and alkaline conditions: Role of complexation of Fe3+ with hydroxyl group in phloroglucinol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yong; Lin, Xihuang; Shao, Zongze

    2017-01-01

    Phloroglucinol degradation at initial pH from 7.0 to 9.0 has been investigated in Fenton, UV-Fenton and nano-Fe3O4 catalyzed UV-Fenton (Hetero-Fenton). Within the reaction time given in this study (not more than 4 h), 150 mg·L−1 phloroglucinol was completely removed, while there was some...... difference in TOC removal efficiency: about 90% for UV-Fenton, nearly 60% for Fenton and Hetero-Fenton. Increasing initial pH from 7.0 to 9.0, there was an obvious decline in the degradation rate. The average values of H2O2 utilization efficiency were 0.65 ± 0.01 for Fenton, 0.66 ± 0.09 for UV...... important roles in Fenton degradation under neutral and alkaline pH. The result of effect of pollutant content showed phloroglucinol at lower concentrations of 20 and 50 mg·L−1 could still be completely removed by all Fenton-based systems at pH 7.0, however, in Fenton with 20 mg·L−1 phloroglucinol...

  9. Numerical study for production of space charge within the stratiform cloud

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Srivastava; S N Tripathi

    2010-10-01

    One dimensional numerical model has been developed to predict the production of space charge and variations in other electrical parameters within the low level stratiform type of cloud having very weak vertical motion.Non-linear coupled differential equations which govern ion concentrations,charged and neutral droplet concentrations and electric field were used.Symmetry has been observed in all the electrical parameters within the cloud.The magnitude of average positive ion concentrations was observed to be high as compared to the negative ion concentrations,which is due to low scavenging rate of positive ions than the negative ions,highly attributed to their mobilities.The rate of scavenging of ions affects the concentration of charged droplets,which eventually influence the electric field and thus the space charge density within the cloud.Maximum electric field (max) was observed at middle of the cloud whereas minimum was observed at both the edges of the cloud.Minimum electric field (min) was found to be equal and constant (∼27Vm−1)for any drop concentration.Net positive and negative space charges were observed at the top and bottom of the cloud,respectively.The simulated results show some discrepancies to the natural condition, which are due to simulations made under some basic assumptions and limitations and that will be incorporated in the future studies for natural cloud condition.

  10. Three-dimensional modeling of the neutral gas depletion effect in a helicon discharge plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollasch, Jeffrey; Schmitz, Oliver; Norval, Ryan; Reiter, Detlev; Sovinec, Carl

    2016-10-01

    Helicon discharges provide an attractive radio-frequency driven regime for plasma, but neutral-particle dynamics present a challenge to extending performance. A neutral gas depletion effect occurs when neutrals in the plasma core are not replenished at a sufficient rate to sustain a higher plasma density. The Monte Carlo neutral particle tracking code EIRENE was setup for the MARIA helicon experiment at UW Madison to study its neutral particle dynamics. Prescribed plasma temperature and density profiles similar to those in the MARIA device are used in EIRENE to investigate the main causes of the neutral gas depletion effect. The most dominant plasma-neutral interactions are included so far, namely electron impact ionization of neutrals, charge exchange interactions of neutrals with plasma ions, and recycling at the wall. Parameter scans show how the neutral depletion effect depends on parameters such as Knudsen number, plasma density and temperature, and gas-surface interaction accommodation coefficients. Results are compared to similar analytic studies in the low Knudsen number limit. Plans to incorporate a similar Monte Carlo neutral model into a larger helicon modeling framework are discussed. This work is funded by the NSF CAREER Award PHY-1455210.

  11. Neutral Beams from Blazar Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atoyan, Armen M.; Dermer, Charles D.

    2003-03-01

    We treat the production of neutrons, photons, and neutrinos through photomeson interactions of relativistic protons with ambient photons in the compact inner jets of blazars. Internal synchrotron and external isotropic radiation due to scattered optical/UV accretion-disk radiation are considered as target photon fields. Protons are assumed to be accelerated to a maximum energy limited by the size scale and magnetic field of the jet, and by competing energy losses. We characterize the conditions when the photomeson interactions of ultrarelativistic protons become effective, and show that the presence of the external radiation field makes possible strong energy losses for protons with energies Ep>~1015 eV. Without this component, effective energy losses of protons begin at Ep>~1018 eV, and would rapidly disappear with expansion of the blob. We develop a model describing the production and escape of neutrons from a comoving spherical blob, which continue to interact with the ambient external radiation field on the parsec-scale broad-line region (BLR). Neutrons may carry ~10% of the overall energy of the accelerated protons with Ep>~1015 eV outside the BLR. Ultra-high-energy gamma rays produced by photomeson interaction of neutrons outside the blob can also escape the BLR. The escaping neutrons, gamma rays, and neutrinos form a collimated neutral beam with a characteristic opening angle θ~1/Γ, where Γ is the bulk Lorentz factor of the inner jet. Energy and momentum is deposited in the extended jet from the decay of neutrons at distances ld(En)~(En/1017eV) kpc, and through pair-production attenuation of gamma rays with energies Eγ>~1015 eV which propagate to ~10-100 kpc distances. In this scenario, neutral beams of ultra-high-energy gamma rays and neutrons can be the reason for straight extended jets, such as in Pictor A. Fluxes of neutrinos detectable with kilometer-scale neutrino telescopes are predicted from flat-spectrum radio quasars such as 3C 279.

  12. Neutralization process of Xeq+ ion grazing on Al(111) surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A code has been developed to simulate the neutralization and grazing process of slow highly charged ion Xeq+ on Al(111) surface under the classical-over-the-barrier model. The image energy gain of Xeq+ ions are calculated and compared with experiment data. The simulation results of image energy gain are in good agreement with the experiment data. Meanwhile, in the present work, the reflection coefficient of incident Xeq+ on Al(111) surface as a function of the incidence angle, energy and charge state is also studied.

  13. Molecular modeling of the surface charging of hematite. I. The calculation of proton affinities and acidities on a surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Evgeny; Rustad, James R.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    1999-03-01

    Calculation of the energy of a charged defect on a surface in supercell geometry is discussed. An important example of such a calculation is evaluation of surface proton affinities and acidities, as adding or removing a proton creates a charged unit cell. Systems with periodic boundary conditions in three spatial directions and a vacuum gap between slabs are demonstrated to be inadequate for unit cells having non-zero ionic charge and uniform neutralizing background. In such a system the calculated energy diverges linearly with the thickness of the vacuum gap. A system periodic in two directions and finite in the direction perpendicular to the surface (2-D PBC) with the neutralizing background distributed as the surface charge density is free from this problem. Furthermore, the correction for the interaction of the charged defect with its own translational images is needed to speed up the convergence to the infinite dilution limit. The expression for the asymptotic correction for the energy of interaction of a charged defect with its translational images in 2-D PBC geometry has been developed in this study. The asymptotic correction is evaluated as the interaction energy of a 2-D translationally periodic array of point charges located above and below the plate of non-uniform dielectric. This is a generalization of the method of M. Leslie and M.J. Gillan [J. Phys. C, 18 (1985) 973] for the calculation of the energy of a charged defect in bulk crystals. The usefulness of this correction was demonstrated on two test cases involving the calculation of proton affinity and acidity at the (012) surface of hematite. The proposed method is likely to be important in ab initio calculations of the energy effect of the surface protonation reactions, where computational limitations dictate a small size for the unit cell.

  14. The Aharonov-Bohm effect in neutral liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonin, E B, E-mail: sonin@cc.huji.ac.i [Racah Institute of Physics Hebrew University of Jerusalem Givat Ram, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2010-09-03

    The Aharonov-Bohm effect was discovered as a quantum-mechanical effect for charged particles, but it has its counterpart in classical wave mechanics. The Aharonov-Bohm interference arises at the scattering of a sound wave by a vortex in classical and quantum hydrodynamics. This interference leads to a transverse force between quasiparticles and vortices in superfluids and superconductors. The Aharonov-Bohm effect was also generalized to neutral particles with magnetic or electric dipole momenta. The Aharonov-Bohm effect for charge particles and its modification for magnetic momenta (the Aharonov-Casher effect) have already been experimentally observed, and the efforts to detect the Aharonov-Bohm effect for electrically polarized neutral particles are on the way. A possible system for this detection is a Bose-condensate of excitons in a double quantum well. Observation of the Aharonov-Bohm effect in this system would provide direct evidence of Bose-Einstein condensation.

  15. The Aharonov-Bohm effect in neutral liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonin, E. B.

    2010-09-01

    The Aharonov-Bohm effect was discovered as a quantum-mechanical effect for charged particles, but it has its counterpart in classical wave mechanics. The Aharonov-Bohm interference arises at the scattering of a sound wave by a vortex in classical and quantum hydrodynamics. This interference leads to a transverse force between quasiparticles and vortices in superfluids and superconductors. The Aharonov-Bohm effect was also generalized to neutral particles with magnetic or electric dipole momenta. The Aharonov-Bohm effect for charge particles and its modification for magnetic momenta (the Aharonov-Casher effect) have already been experimentally observed, and the efforts to detect the Aharonov-Bohm effect for electrically polarized neutral particles are on the way. A possible system for this detection is a Bose-condensate of excitons in a double quantum well. Observation of the Aharonov-Bohm effect in this system would provide direct evidence of Bose-Einstein condensation.

  16. Charge diffusion and the butterfly effect in striped holographic matter

    CERN Document Server

    Lucas, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Recently, it has been proposed that the butterfly velocity - a speed at which quantum information propagates - may provide a fundamental bound on diffusion constants in dirty incoherent metals. We analytically compute the charge diffusion constant and the butterfly velocity in charge-neutral holographic matter with long wavelength "hydrodynamic" disorder in a single spatial direction. In this limit, we find that the butterfly velocity does not set a sharp lower bound for the charge diffusion constant.

  17. The Antiparticles of Neutral Bosons

    CERN Document Server

    Perkins, Walton A

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of the ability to create and study antihydrogen, we think it is appropriate to consider the possibility that antiphotons might not be identical to photons. First of all, we will look at the experimental evidence concerning multiple neutral pions and multiple photons. Because of its internal structure, the neutral kaon is not identical to its antiparticle. We will consider internal structures for the neutral pion and photon for which the antiparticle differs from the particle. Interestingly, the antiphoton thus created from neutrinos does not interact with electrons because its neutrinos have the wrong helicity.

  18. Positional nystagmus showing neutral points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiruma, Kiyoshi; Numata, Tsutomu

    2004-01-01

    We encountered patients who had their static direction-changing positional nystagmus canceled at about 20-30 degrees yaw head rotation from the supine position. This nystagmus was also canceled when the head was rotated 180 degrees from this position. We call these head positions neutral points. At the neutral points, the cupula of the horizontal semicircular canal of the affected ear is positioned vertical to the gravitational plane and no deflection of the cupula occurs. The positional nystagmus observed (except the neutral points) was thought to occur due to a "heavy cupula" or "light cupula", which may be determined by the specific gravity of its endolymph.

  19. Application Neutrality and a Paradox of Side Payments

    CERN Document Server

    Altman, Eitan; Kesidis, George

    2010-01-01

    The ongoing debate over "net neutrality" covers a broad set of issues related to the regulation of public networks. This paper contains two separate contributions: (a) an extension of the quadratic-utility framework we proposed in a previous paper to study the impact of side payments in a system involving pluralities of access and content providers; and (b) a variation of this model to deal with the question of application neutrality. Our analysis of the generalized framework (a) reveals an interesting "paradox" that did not occur with monopolistic players: side payments handicap the providers who perceive them. Application neutrality (b) refers to price discrimination: ISPs charging consumers different fees depending on their use of the network (web surfing, VoIP, file sharing, etc.). We analyze the consequences of such discrimination for a simple two-application setting.

  20. Spontaneous CP violation in the 2HDM: physical conditions and the alignment limit

    CERN Document Server

    Grzadkowski, B; Osland, P

    2016-01-01

    For the general Two-Higgs-Doublet model, we present conditions for having spontaneous CP violation, in terms of physical masses and couplings. These relations involve the charged-Higgs mass, its cubic couplings with neutral scalars and quartic coupling, and become particularly simple in the alignment limit. In the simplified model with softly broken $Z_2$ symmetry, some deviation from alignment is required for spontaneous CP violation to be present.

  1. Controllability of Impulsive Neutral Functional Differential Inclusions in Banach Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. J. Wan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the controllability of impulsive neutral functional differential inclusions in Banach spaces. Our main aim is to find an effective method to solve the controllability problem of impulsive neutral functional differential inclusions with multivalued jump sizes in Banach spaces. Based on a fixed point theorem with regard to condensing map, sufficient conditions for the controllability of the impulsive neutral functional differential inclusions in Banach spaces are derived. Moreover, a remark is given to explain less conservative criteria for special cases, and work is improved in the previous literature.

  2. Anomalous screening of quantum impurities by a neutral environment

    OpenAIRE

    Yakaboylu, Enderalp; Lemeshko, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    It is a common knowledge that an effective interaction of a quantum impurity with an electromagnetic field can be screened by surrounding charge carriers, whether mobile or static. Here we demonstrate that very strong, `anomalous' screening can take place in the presence of a neutral, weakly-polarizable environment, due to an exchange of orbital angular momentum between the impurity and the bath. Furthermore, we show that it is possible to generalize all phenomena related to isolated impuriti...

  3. $\\mu^+e^- <---> \\mu^- e^+$ Transitions via Neutral Scalar Bosons

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, Wei-Shu; Wong, Gwo-Guang

    1995-01-01

    With $\\mu\\to e\\gamma$ decay forbidden by multiplicative lepton number conservation, we study muonium--antimuonium transitions induced by neutral scalar bosons. Pseudoscalars do not induce conversion for triplet muonium, while for singlet muonium, pseudoscalar and scalar contributions add constructively. This is in contrast to the usual case of doubly charged scalar exchange, where the conversion rate is the same for both singlet and triplet muonium. Complementary to muonium conversion studies...

  4. Limits on Neutral D Mixing in Semileptonic Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Cawlfield, C; Gollin, G D; Karliner, I; Kim, D; Lowrey, N; Naik, P; Sedlack, C; Selen, M; Williams, J; Wiss, J; Edwards, K W; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Gong, D T; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Li, S Z; Poling, R A; Scott, A W; Smith, A; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z V; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A G; Zweber, P; Ernst, J; Mahmood, A H; Arms, K; Gan, K K; Severini, H; Asner, D M; Dytman, S A; Love, W; Mehrabyan, S S; Müller, J A; Savinov, V; Li, Z; López, A; Méndez, H; Ramírez, J; Huang, G S; Miller, D H; Pavlunin, V; Sanghi, B; Shibata, E I; Shipsey, I P J; Adams, G S; Chasse, M; Cravey, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Napolitano, J; He, Q; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Park, W; Thorndike, E H; Coan, T E; Gao, Y S; Liu, F; Stroynowski, R; Artuso, M; Boulahouache, C; Blusk, S; Butt, J; Dambasuren, E; Dorjkhaidav, O; Li, J; Menaa, N; Mountain, R; Nandakumar, R; Redjimi, R; Sia, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, K; Csorna, S E; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; McGee, S; Bornheim, A; Pappas, S P; Weinstein, A J; Nelson, H N; Briere, R A; Chen, G P; Chen, J; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G T; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Rosner, J L; Adam, N E; Alexander, J P; Berkelman, K; Cassel, D G; Credé, V; Duboscq, J E; Ecklund, K M; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Gibbons, L; Gittelman, B; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Hsu, L; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Meyer, T O; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Pivarski, J; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Schwarthoff, H; Shepherd, M R; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Urner, D; Wilksen, T; Weinberger, M; Athar, S B; Avery, P; Breva-Newell, L; Patel, R; Potlia, V; Stöck, H; Yelton, J; Rubin, P

    2005-01-01

    Using the CLEO II.V detector observing e+e- collisions at around 10.6 GeV we search for neutral D mixing in semileptonic D0 decays tagged in charged D* decays. Combining the results from the Kenu and K*enu channels we find that the rate for D mixing is less than 0.0078 at 90% C.L.

  5. Modeling of Neutral Entrainment in an FRC Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    nonequilibirum; ion, electron, and neutral temperatures strongly differ, and the electron distribution function is non - Maxwellian . This indicates that a...as keii = ∫ gσeii(g) fe(g)dg, (1) where g is the relative collision velocity and fe is the Maxwellian distribution function. For the charge exchange...plasma temperature and concentration of reacting species, non -equlibrium of their velocity distributions, and the relashionship between different reaction

  6. Modeling the Martian neutral particle radiation - predictions for ExoMars/IRAS and implications for Martian habitability during the Noachian

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehresmann, Bent; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert; Burmeister, Soenke; Koehler, Jan; Kulkarni, Shri [Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Kiel (Germany); Reitz, Guenther [Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The exciting results of recent Mars exploration missions indicate that water existed on the Martian surface, which provides a possibility for life on Mars. Thus, there is an enhanced interest in analyzing the conditions for habitability on Mars, especially in the Noachian epoch. An important aspect of habitability is the radiation level of charged and neutral particles in possible habitats. Using Planetocosmics, we calculate particle radiation in the Martian atmosphere and at ground level for present-day conditions. These calculations allow us to make predictions for the measurements of the Ionizing Radiation Sensor (IRAS) on ExoMars. By changing atmosphere conditions and varying the water-content of the Martian soil, we can derive radiation levels expected during the Noachian period. We will discuss the implications of these model results in terms of Noachian habitability.

  7. Neutrality Versus Materiality: A Thermodynamic Theory of Neutral Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rémi Tailleux

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a theory for constructing quasi-neutral density variables γ directly in thermodynamic space is formulated, which is based on minimising the absolute value of a purely thermodynamic quantity J n . Physically, J n has a dual dynamic/thermodynamic interpretation as the quantity controlling the energy cost of adiabatic and isohaline parcel exchanges on material surfaces, as well as the dependence of in-situ density on spiciness, in a description of water masses based on γ, spiciness and pressure. Mathematically, minimising | J n | in thermodynamic space is showed to be equivalent to maximising neutrality in physical space. The physics of epineutral dispersion is also reviewed and discussed. It is argued, in particular, that epineutral dispersion is best understood as the aggregate effect of many individual non-neutral stirring events (being understood here as adiabatic and isohaline events with non-zero buoyancy, so that it is only the net displacement aggregated over many events that is approximately neutral. This new view resolves an apparent paradox between the focus in neutral density theory on zero-buoyancy motions and the overwhelming evidence that lateral dispersion in the ocean is primarily caused by non-zero buoyancy processes such as tides, residual currents and sheared internal waves. The efficiency by which a physical process contributes to lateral dispersion can be characterised by its energy signature, with those processes releasing available potential energy (negative energy cost being more efficient than purely neutral processes with zero energy cost. The latter mechanism occurs in the wedge of instability, and its source of energy is the coupling between baroclinicity, thermobaricity, and density compensated temperature/salinity anomalies. Such a mechanism, which can only exist in a salty ocean, is speculated to be important for dissipating spiciness anomalies and neutral helicity. The paper also discusses potential

  8. Measurement of Neutral Current Neutral Pion Production on Carbon in a Few-GeV Neutrino Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurimoto, Yoshinori [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    2010-01-01

    Understanding of the π0 production via neutrino-nucleus neutral current interaction in the neutrino energy region of a few GeV is essential for the neutrino oscillation experiments. In this thesis, we present a study of neutral current π0 production from muon neutrinos scattering on a polystyrene (C8H8) target in the SciBooNE experiment. All neutrino beam data corresponding to 0.99 × 1020 protons on target have been analyzed. We have measured the cross section ratio of the neutral current π0 production to the total charge current interaction and the π0 kinematic distribution such as momentum and direction. We obtain [7.7 ± 0.5(stat.) ± 0.5(sys.)] × 10-2 as the ratio of the neutral current neutral pion production to total charged current cross section; the mean energy of neutrinos producing detected neutral pions is 1.1 GeV. The result agrees with the Rein- Sehgal model, which is generally used for the Monte Carlo simulation by many neutrino oscillation experiments. We achieve less than 10 % uncertainty which is required for the next generation search for νµ → νe oscillation. The spectrum shape of the π0 momentum and the distribution of the π0 emitted angle agree with the prediction, which means that not only the Rein-Sehgal model but also the intra-nuclear interaction models describe our data well. We also measure the ratio of the neutral current coherent pion production to total charged current cross section to be (1.17 ± 0.23 ) × 10-2 based on the Rein and Sehgal model. The result gives the evidence for non-zero coherent pion production via neutral current interaction at the mean neutrino energy of 1.0 GeV.

  9. Neutral recirculation—the key to control of divertor operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukushkin, A. S.; Pacher, H. D.

    2016-12-01

    Interaction of the plasma with neutral gas in the divertor affects virtually all aspects of divertor functionality (power loading of the targets, pumping and fuelling, sustaining the operational conditions of the core plasma). In the course of ITER design development, this interaction has been the subject of intense modelling analysis, supported by experiments on various tokamaks. Neutral gas puffing is found to be the most effective means of divertor control. The results of those studies are summarized and assessed in the paper.

  10. Insertion of an electron beam ionizer in a quadrupole spectrometer for secondary neutral mass analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Ameziane, O; Serrano, J; Guzman, B; Aguilar, M A

    2003-01-01

    An insertable electron beam ionizer into a quadrupole-based secondary ion mass spectrometer instrument has been designed and installed to analyze sputtered neutrals. The optimum design conditions of the ionizer have been obtained by modeling various configurations of the system using a simulation program developed by us. The program has allowed us to compute the potentials and ion trajectories inside the system to test the performance of the ion optics design. We have investigated the advantages of using a large ionization volume with low electron current to minimize the space charge effect in the ionizer, as this is the major problem in this type of instrument. In addition, we have used the simulations to obtain' all electrodes voltages which provide an efficient suppression of residual gas and secondary ions. A good useful yield was obtained, even with low electron densities, thanks to the high geometrical acceptance of the ionizer and its large active volume. This configuration implies less thermal radiati...

  11. The question of charge and of mass

    CERN Document Server

    Dolocan, Voicu

    2