WorldWideScience

Sample records for charge distributions reviews

  1. TOPICAL REVIEW: Detection of charge distributions in insulator surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, C. A.; Gouveia, R. F.; da Silva, M. A.; Galembeck, F.

    2009-07-01

    Charge distribution in insulators has received considerable attention but still poses great scientific challenges, largely due to a current lack of firm knowledge about the nature and speciation of charges. Recent studies using analytical microscopies have shown that insulators contain domains with excess fixed ions forming various kinds of potential distribution patterns, which are also imaged by potential mapping using scanning electric probe microscopy. Results from the authors' laboratory show that solid insulators are seldom electroneutral, as opposed to a widespread current assumption. Excess charges can derive from a host of charging mechanisms: excess local ion concentration, radiochemical and tribochemical reactions added to the partition of hydroxonium and hydronium ions derived from atmospheric water. The last factor has been largely overlooked in the literature, but recent experimental evidence suggests that it plays a decisive role in insulator charging. Progress along this line is expected to help solve problems related to unwanted electrostatic discharges, while creating new possibilities for energy storage and handling as well as new electrostatic devices.

  2. Critical review of electrical conductivity measurements and charge distribution analysis of magnesium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Friedemann; Freund, Minoru M.; Batllo, Francois

    1993-01-01

    The electrical conductivity sigma of MgO single crystals shows a sharp increase at 500-800 C, in particular of sigma surface, generally attributed to surface contamination. Charge Distribution Analysis (CDA), a new technique providing information on fundamental properties that was previously unavailable, allows for the determination of surface charges, their sign and associated internal electric field. Data on 99.99% purity, arc-fusion grown MgO crystals show that mobile charge carriers start to appear in the bulk of the MgO crystals between 200 and 400 C when sigma (measured by conventional techniques) is in t he 10(exp -14) to 10(exp -16) /omega/cm range. Above 500 C, as sigma increases to 10(exp -6) to 10(exp -7)/omega/cm, more charges appear giving rise to a strong positive surface charge supported by a strong internal field. This indicates that charges are generated in the bulk and diffuse to the surface by an internally controlled process. On the basis of their positive sign they are identified as holes (defect electrons). Because of the low cation content of these very pure MgO crystals, theses holes cannnot be associated with transition metal impurties. Instead, they are associated with the O(2-) sublattice, e.g. consist of O(-) states or positive holes. This conclusion is supported by magnetic susceptibility data showing the appearance of 1000 +/- 500 ppm paramagnetic species between 200-500 C. The magnetic data are consistent with strongly coupled, diamagnetic O(-) pairs below 200-500 C, chemically equivalent to peroxy anions, O2(2-), and probably associated with cation vacancies in the MgO matrix. The formation of O2(2-) in arc-fusion grown MgO crystals is very unexpected because of the highly reducing growth conditions. Their presence implies an internal redox reaction involving dissolved 'water' by which OH(-) pairs convert to O2(2-) plus H2 molecules. This redox conversion is supported by mass spectroscopic measurements of the H2 release from highly

  3. Distributed charging of electrical assets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumyadip; Phan, Dung; Sharma, Mayank; Wu, Chai Wah; Xiong, Jinjun

    2016-02-16

    The present disclosure relates generally to the field of distributed charging of electrical assets. In various examples, distributed charging of electrical assets may be implemented in the form of systems, methods and/or algorithms.

  4. Charged current review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental measurements of the τ lifetime and leptonic branching ratios are combined to give updated world averages for these quantities. The results are then used to test the universality of the electroweak charged current couplings to the three lepton species and are found to be consistent with Standard Model predictions at the level of 0.2%, permitting limits to be derived on non-Standard Model physics such as the mass of the τ neutrino

  5. On stable nuclei mass charge distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The charge distribution of mass averaged stable nuclei about trajectory that cross the points with proton and neutron numbers nearly magic is investigated. It is shown that the charge distribution of ΔM have a symmetric property on nucleus charge z=45 and mass number A=103. The distribution of ΔM is compared with charge distribution of product of 206Th fission in framework of statistic model. 4 refs.; 1 fig. (author)

  6. Numerical calculation of impurity charge state distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crume, E. C.; Arnurius, D. E.

    1977-09-01

    The numerical calculation of impurity charge state distributions using the computer program IMPDYN is discussed. The time-dependent corona atomic physics model used in the calculations is reviewed, and general and specific treatments of electron impact ionization and recombination are referenced. The complete program and two examples relating to tokamak plasmas are given on a microfiche so that a user may verify that his version of the program is working properly. In the discussion of the examples, the corona steady-state approximation is shown to have significant defects when the plasma environment, particularly the electron temperature, is changing rapidly.

  7. New approach to $^4{He}$ charge distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Wilets, L; Pepin, S; Stancu, F; Carlson, J; Koepf, W; Stancu, Fl.

    1996-01-01

    We present a study of the $^4$He charge distribution based on realistic nucleonic wave functions and incorporation of the nucleon's quark substructure. The central depression of the proton point density seen in modern four-body calculations is too small by itself to lead to a correct description of the charge distribution. We utilize six-quark structures calculated in the Chromodielectric Model for N-N interactions, and we find a swelling of the proton charge distribution as the internucleon distance decreases. These charge distributions are combined with the $^4$He wave function using the Independent Pair Approximation and two-body distributions generated from Green's Function Monte Carlo calculations. We obtain a reasonably good fit to the experimental charge distribution without including meson exchange currents.

  8. Central depression of nuclear charge density distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The center-depressed nuclear charge distributions are investigated with the parametrized distribution and the relativistic mean-field theory, and their corresponding charge form factors are worked out with the phase shift analysis method. The central depression of nuclear charge distribution of 46Ar and 44S is supported by the relativistic mean-field calculation. According to the calculation, the valence protons in 46Ar and 44S prefer to occupy the 1d3/2 state rather than the 2s1/2 state, which is different from that in the less neutron-rich argon and sulfur isotopes. As a result, the central proton densities of 46Ar and 44S are highly depressed, and so are their central charge densities. The charge form factors of some argon and sulfur isotopes are presented, and the minima of the charge form factors shift upward and inward when the central nuclear charge distributions are more depressed. Besides, the effect of the central depression on the charge form factors is studied with a parametrized distribution, when the root-mean-square charge radii remain constant.

  9. Spherical charged fluid distributions in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formal features of Einstein--Maxwell equations for spherically symmetric distributions of a charged perfect fluid in equilibrium are discussed. An exact solution of the system of equations for a specified choice of matter density and fluid pressure, representing a charged perfect gas is presented

  10. On equilibrium charge distribution above dielectric surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.V. Slyusarenko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of the equilibrium state of the charged many-particle system above dielectric surface is formulated. We consider the case of the presence of the external attractive pressing field and the case of its absence. The equilibrium distributions of charges and the electric field, which is generated by these charges in the system in the case of ideally plane dielectric surface, are obtained. The solution of electrostatic equations of the system under consideration in case of small spatial heterogeneities caused by the dielectric surface, is also obtained. These spatial inhomogeneities can be caused both by the inhomogeneities of the surface and by the inhomogeneous charge distribution upon it. In particular, the case of the "wavy" spatially periodic surface is considered taking into account the possible presence of the surface charges.

  11. Review on Electric Vehicle, Battery Charger, Charging Station and Standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afida Ayob

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Electric vehicles are a new and upcoming technology in the transportation and power sector that have many benefits in terms of economic and environmental. This study presents a comprehensive review and evaluation of various types of electric vehicles and its associated equipment in particular battery charger and charging station. A comparison is made on the commercial and prototype electric vehicles in terms of electric range, battery size, charger power and charging time. The various types of charging stations and standards used for charging electric vehicles have been outlined and the impact of electric vehicle charging on utility distribution system is also discussed.

  12. Charge distributions and coagulation of radioactive aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The self-charging of radioactive aerosols will be reduced by background ions, such as those produced by radioactive gases. The sources of these background ions and their production rates are specified for a reactor containment atmosphere during a possible nuclear accident. Previous theory is extended to calculate the charging of a polydisperse radioactive aerosol. Gaussian approximations to charge distributions on an aerosol of a given size, and are shown to give a good representation of the exact numerical charge distributions of a Cs aerosol at normal temperatures, and also for highly radioactive aerosol containing 131I in a containment atmosphere. Extensive calculations are performed for charged-induced modifications to Brownian coagulation rates between steady-state size distribution of these radioactive aerosols, and also between small-sized radioactive aerosol and larger (non-radioactive) aerosol. The results show considerable enhancements of the coagulation rates between large and small-sized aerosol, but also a strong suppression of coagulation between large particles. Rate modifications calculated using the Gaussian approximations are generally close to the exact values. Time-dependent calculations for a monodisperse α-decaying aerosol reveal enhancements in coagulation rates even when the average charge on the aerosol is positive. Our results are relevant to behaviour in a dusty plasma. (author)

  13. A distribution network review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbairn, R.J.; Maunder, D.; Kenyon, P.

    1999-07-01

    This report summarises the findings of a study reviewing the distribution network in England, Scotland and Wales to evaluate its ability to accommodate more embedded generation from both fossil fuel and renewable energy sources. The background to the study is traced, and descriptions of the existing electricity supply system, the licence conditions relating to embedded generation, and the effects of the Review of Electricity Trading Arrangements are given. The ability of the UK distribution networks to accept embedded generation is examined, and technical benefits/drawbacks arising from embedded generation, and the potential for uptake of embedded generation technologies are considered. The distribution network capacity and the potential uptake of embedded generation are compared, and possible solutions to overcome obstacles are suggested. (UK)

  14. Complexation behavior of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes: Effect of charge distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Mingtian; Li, Baohui, E-mail: dliang@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: baohui@nankai.edu.cn [School of Physics and Key Laboratory of Functional Polymer Materials of Ministry of Education, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Zhou, Jihan; Su, Cuicui; Niu, Lin; Liang, Dehai, E-mail: dliang@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: baohui@nankai.edu.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences and the Key Laboratory of Polymer Chemistry and Physics of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-05-28

    Complexation behavior of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes in a solution is investigated using a combination of computer simulations and experiments, focusing on the influence of polyelectrolyte charge distributions along the chains on the structure of the polyelectrolyte complexes. The simulations are performed using Monte Carlo with the replica-exchange algorithm for three model systems where each system is composed of a mixture of two types of oppositely charged model polyelectrolyte chains (EGEG){sub 5}/(KGKG){sub 5}, (EEGG){sub 5}/(KKGG){sub 5}, and (EEGG){sub 5}/(KGKG){sub 5}, in a solution including explicit solvent molecules. Among the three model systems, only the charge distributions along the chains are not identical. Thermodynamic quantities are calculated as a function of temperature (or ionic strength), and the microscopic structures of complexes are examined. It is found that the three systems have different transition temperatures, and form complexes with different sizes, structures, and densities at a given temperature. Complex microscopic structures with an alternating arrangement of one monolayer of E/K monomers and one monolayer of G monomers, with one bilayer of E and K monomers and one bilayer of G monomers, and with a mixture of monolayer and bilayer of E/K monomers in a box shape and a trilayer of G monomers inside the box are obtained for the three mixture systems, respectively. The experiments are carried out for three systems where each is composed of a mixture of two types of oppositely charged peptide chains. Each peptide chain is composed of Lysine (K) and glycine (G) or glutamate (E) and G, in solution, and the chain length and amino acid sequences, and hence the charge distribution, are precisely controlled, and all of them are identical with those for the corresponding model chain. The complexation behavior and complex structures are characterized through laser light scattering and atomic force microscopy measurements. The order

  15. Complexation behavior of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes: Effect of charge distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complexation behavior of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes in a solution is investigated using a combination of computer simulations and experiments, focusing on the influence of polyelectrolyte charge distributions along the chains on the structure of the polyelectrolyte complexes. The simulations are performed using Monte Carlo with the replica-exchange algorithm for three model systems where each system is composed of a mixture of two types of oppositely charged model polyelectrolyte chains (EGEG)5/(KGKG)5, (EEGG)5/(KKGG)5, and (EEGG)5/(KGKG)5, in a solution including explicit solvent molecules. Among the three model systems, only the charge distributions along the chains are not identical. Thermodynamic quantities are calculated as a function of temperature (or ionic strength), and the microscopic structures of complexes are examined. It is found that the three systems have different transition temperatures, and form complexes with different sizes, structures, and densities at a given temperature. Complex microscopic structures with an alternating arrangement of one monolayer of E/K monomers and one monolayer of G monomers, with one bilayer of E and K monomers and one bilayer of G monomers, and with a mixture of monolayer and bilayer of E/K monomers in a box shape and a trilayer of G monomers inside the box are obtained for the three mixture systems, respectively. The experiments are carried out for three systems where each is composed of a mixture of two types of oppositely charged peptide chains. Each peptide chain is composed of Lysine (K) and glycine (G) or glutamate (E) and G, in solution, and the chain length and amino acid sequences, and hence the charge distribution, are precisely controlled, and all of them are identical with those for the corresponding model chain. The complexation behavior and complex structures are characterized through laser light scattering and atomic force microscopy measurements. The order of the apparent weight-averaged molar

  16. Complexation behavior of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes: Effect of charge distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mingtian; Zhou, Jihan; Su, Cuicui; Niu, Lin; Liang, Dehai; Li, Baohui

    2015-05-01

    Complexation behavior of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes in a solution is investigated using a combination of computer simulations and experiments, focusing on the influence of polyelectrolyte charge distributions along the chains on the structure of the polyelectrolyte complexes. The simulations are performed using Monte Carlo with the replica-exchange algorithm for three model systems where each system is composed of a mixture of two types of oppositely charged model polyelectrolyte chains (EGEG)5/(KGKG)5, (EEGG)5/(KKGG)5, and (EEGG)5/(KGKG)5, in a solution including explicit solvent molecules. Among the three model systems, only the charge distributions along the chains are not identical. Thermodynamic quantities are calculated as a function of temperature (or ionic strength), and the microscopic structures of complexes are examined. It is found that the three systems have different transition temperatures, and form complexes with different sizes, structures, and densities at a given temperature. Complex microscopic structures with an alternating arrangement of one monolayer of E/K monomers and one monolayer of G monomers, with one bilayer of E and K monomers and one bilayer of G monomers, and with a mixture of monolayer and bilayer of E/K monomers in a box shape and a trilayer of G monomers inside the box are obtained for the three mixture systems, respectively. The experiments are carried out for three systems where each is composed of a mixture of two types of oppositely charged peptide chains. Each peptide chain is composed of Lysine (K) and glycine (G) or glutamate (E) and G, in solution, and the chain length and amino acid sequences, and hence the charge distribution, are precisely controlled, and all of them are identical with those for the corresponding model chain. The complexation behavior and complex structures are characterized through laser light scattering and atomic force microscopy measurements. The order of the apparent weight-averaged molar

  17. Review of Variable Generation Integration Charges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, K.; Fink, S.; Buckley, M.; Rogers, J.; Hodge, B. M.

    2013-03-01

    The growth of wind and solar generation in the United States, and the expectation of continued growth of these technologies, dictates that the future power system will be operated in a somewhat different manner because of increased variability and uncertainty. A small number of balancing authorities have attempted to determine an 'integration cost' to account for these changes to their current operating practices. Some balancing authorities directly charge wind and solar generators for integration charges, whereas others add integration charges to projected costs of wind and solar in integrated resource plans or in competitive solicitations for generation. This report reviews the balancing authorities that have calculated variable generation integration charges and broadly compares and contrasts the methodologies they used to determine their specific integration charges. The report also profiles each balancing authority and how they derived wind and solar integration charges.

  18. Central depression of the nuclear charge distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a systematic feature of all measured charge distributions we find a shift in the form-factor zeroes as compared to a simple folding model. To first order, this shift can be interpreted as resulting from the central depression w, caused by the Coulomb repulsion. Accounting for it leads to an increase in the surface width of nuclear charge distributions by 0.105 fm. This interpretation of the experimental findings is compared with the droplet model, which relates w with the compression modulus K and the asymmetry energy J. Accounting for w leads to an increase in the extrapolated nuclear matter density by 7.5%. However, this macroscopic model is not able to describe the experimental results in detail since w is also influenced by shell effects. HF+BCS calculations with effective Skyrme-type interactions reproduce part of the data, revealing the influence of shells on w. Here, too, there remain discrepancies in details. A level of accuracy is reached at which most probably also the skewness of the charge distribution must be taken into account. (orig.)

  19. Device for measuring charge density distribution in charged particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A device to measure charge density distribution in charged particle beams has been described. The device contains a set of hollow interinsulated current-receiving electrodes, recording system, and cooling system. The invention is aimed at the increase of admissible capacity of the beams measured at the expense of cooling efficiency increase. The aim is achieved by the fact, that in the device a dynamic evaporating-condensational cooling of electrodes is realized by means of cooling agent supply in perpendicular to their planes through the tubes introduced inside special cups. Spreading in radial direction over electrode surface the cooling agent gradually and intensively washes the side surface of the cup, after that, it enters the cooling cavity in the form of vapour-liquid mixture. In the cavity the cooling agent, supplied using dispensina and receiving collectors in which vapoUr is condensed, circulates. In the device suggested the surface of electrode cooling is decreased significantly at the expense of side surface of the cups which receives the electrode heat

  20. Josephson charge qubits:a brief review

    OpenAIRE

    Pashkin, Yuri; Astafiev, O.; Yamamoto, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Tsai, J. S.

    2009-01-01

    The field of solid-state quantum computation is expanding rapidly initiated by our original charge qubit demonstrations. Various types of solid-state qubits are being studied, and their coherent properties are improving. The goal of this review is to summarize achievements on Josephson charge qubits. We cover the results obtained in our joint group of NEC Nano Electronics Research Laboratories and RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, also referring to the works done by other groups. Starting fro...

  1. The effect of single-particle charge limits on charge distributions in dusty plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analytical expression for the stationary particle charge distribution in dusty plasmas is derived that accounts for the existence of single-particle charge limits. This expression is validated by comparison with the results of Monte Carlo charging simulations. The relative importance of the existence of charge limits for various values of the ratio of electron-to-ion density and ion mass is examined, and the effect of charge limits on the transient behavior of the charge distribution is considered. It is found that the time required to reach a steady-state charge distribution strongly decreases as the charge limit decreases, and that the existence of charge limits causes high-frequency charge fluctuations to become relatively more important than in the case without charge limits. (paper)

  2. Electric Vehicle (EV) Charging Management with Dynamic Distribution System Tariff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Connell, Niamh; Wu, Qiuwei; Østergaard, Jacob;

    2011-01-01

    congestions in local distribution systems from the day-ahead planning perspective. Locational marginal pricing method was used to determine the dynamic distribution system tariff based on predicted day-ahead spot prices and predicted charging behaviors. Distribution grids of the Bornholm power system were......An electric vehicle (EV) charging schedule algorithm was proposed in this paper in order to charge EVs to meet EV users’ driving needs with the minimum EV charging cost and respect the local distribution system constraints. A day-ahead dynamic distribution system tariff scheme was proposed to avoid...

  3. Charge Distribution Dependency on Gap Thickness of CMS Endcap RPC

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Sung K; Lee, Kyongsei

    2016-01-01

    We report a systematic study of charge distribution dependency of CMS Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) on gap thickness. Prototypes of double-gap RPCs with six different gap thickness ranging from from 1.0 to 2.0 mm in 0.2-mm steps have been built with 2-mm-thick phenolic high-pressure-laminated plates. The efficiencies of the six gaps are measured as a function of the effective high voltages. We report that the strength of the electric fields of the gap is decreased as the gap thickness is increased. The distributions of charges in six gaps are measured. The space charge effect is seen in the charge distribution at the higher voltages. The logistic function is used to fit the charge distribution data. Smaller charges can be produced within smaller gas gap. But the digitization threshold should be also lowered to utilize these smaller charges.

  4. Charge-State Distributions of Accelerated ^{48}Ca Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Skobelev, N K; Astabatyan, R A; Vincour, J; Kulko, A A; Lobastov, S P; Lukyanov, S M; Markaryan, E R; Maslov, V A; Penionzhkevich, Yu E; Sobolev, Yu G; Ugryumov, V Yu

    2003-01-01

    A stepped pole broad-range magnetic analyzer has been used to measure the charge-state distributions of accelerated ^{48}Ca ions at the two incident energies 242.8 and 264.5 MeV after passing through thin carbon or gold target foils. The measured charge-state distributions and the mean equilibrium charge of the ^{48}Ca ions are compared with various calculations. It has been shown that the calculations can be used only for evaluation purposes.

  5. Precipitation particle charge distribution and evolution of East Asian rainbands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tsutomu

    2012-11-01

    Numerous videosondes, balloon-borne surveyors of precipitation particle morphology and charge, have been launched into cloud systems in many, disparate locations in East Asia. Reported here are videosonde-based observations of early summer, Baiu rainbands at Tanegashima in southern Japan and of summer rainbands at Chiang Rai in northern Thailand. Precipitation particles are mapped by type and charge over the course of cloud development, allowing particle and charge evolution to be derived. The basic charge distribution as observed in Hokuriku winter thunderclouds at different cloud life stages was seen at different locations characterized by vertical velocity profiles in the cloud. The charge structure of the rainbands in both locations was a basic tripole. The major charge carriers were graupel and ice crystals. As graupel and ice crystal concentrations increased, not only did space charge increase, but per-particle charge also increased. Increased lightning activity was associated with higher particle space charge and lower cloud-top temperature. The particle charge evolution of these systems includes several fundamental features: a. active negative charging of graupel in an intense updraft, b. descent of negative graupel along the edge of an updraft column, c. merging of negative graupel with positively charged raindrops falling in the central cloud, and d. extended distribution of positive ice crystals in the stratiform cloud. The observations suggest that riming electrification was the main charge separation mechanism.

  6. Charge distribution over dust particles configured with size distribution in a complex plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Shikha; Mishra, Sanjay K.

    2016-02-01

    A theoretical kinetic model describing the distribution of charge on the dust particles configured with generalized Kappa size distribution in a complex plasma has been developed. The formulation is based on the manifestation of uniform potential theory with an analytical solution of the master differential equation for the probability density function of dust charge; the number and energy balance of the plasma constituents are utilized in writing the kinetic equations. A parametric study to determine the steady state plasma parameters and the charge distribution corresponding to a size distribution of dust grains in the complex plasma has been made; the numerical results are presented graphically. The charge distribution is seen sensitive to the population of small grains in the particle size distribution and thus in contrast to symmetrical distribution of charge around a mean value for uniform sized grains, the charge distribution in the present case peaks around lower charge.

  7. Measurement of the equilibrium charge state distributions of Ni, Co, and Cu beams in Mo at 2 MeV/u: Review and evaluation of the relevant semi-empirical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastis, P.; Perdikakis, G.; Robertson, D.; Almus, R.; Anderson, T.; Bauder, W.; Collon, P.; Lu, W.; Ostdiek, K.; Skulski, M.

    2016-04-01

    Equilibrium charge state distributions of stable 60Ni, 59Co, and 63Cu beams passing through a 1 μm thick Mo foil were measured at beam energies of 1.84 MeV/u, 2.09 MeV/u, and 2.11 MeV/u respectively. A 1-D position sensitive Parallel Grid Avalanche Counter detector (PGAC) was used at the exit of a spectrograph magnet, enabling us to measure the intensity of several charge states simultaneously. The number of charge states measured for each beam constituted more than 99% of the total equilibrium charge state distribution for that element. Currently, little experimental data exists for equilibrium charge state distributions for heavy ions with 19 ≲Zp,Zt ≲ 54 (Zp and Zt, are the projectile's and target's atomic numbers respectively). Hence the success of the semi-empirical models in predicting typical characteristics of equilibrium CSDs (mean charge states and distribution widths), has not been thoroughly tested at the energy region of interest. A number of semi-empirical models from the literature were evaluated in this study, regarding their ability to reproduce the characteristics of the measured charge state distributions. The evaluated models were selected from the literature based on whether they are suitable for the given range of atomic numbers and on their frequent use by the nuclear physics community. Finally, an attempt was made to combine model predictions for the mean charge state, the distribution width and the distribution shape, to come up with a more reliable model. We discuss this new "combinatorial" prescription and compare its results with our experimental data and with calculations using the other semi-empirical models studied in this work.

  8. Nuclear charge distribution in the spontaneous fission of 252Cf

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Taofeng; Zhu, Liping; WANG, LIMING; Men, Qinghua; Han, Hongyin; Xia, Haihong

    2015-01-01

    The measurement for charge distributions of fragments in 252Cf has been performed by using a unique style of detector setup consisting of a typical grid ionization chamber and a dE-E particle telescope. We found that the fragment mass dependency of the average width of the charge distribution shows a systematic decreased trend with the obvious odd-even effect. The variation of widths of charge distribution with kinetic energies shows an approximate V-shape curve due to the large number of neu...

  9. Mass and Charge Distribution in Low-Energy Fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mass and charge distributions for thermal-neutron fission of U235 are discussed in considerable detail and compared with the corresponding distributions in other low-energy fission processes. Points discussed in connection with the mass distributions for binary fission include the positions of the peaks, valley and fine structure in a mass yield curve with respect to filled nuclear shells and the changes in the positions that occur with changing fissioning nucleus and excitation energy. The mass distribution from ternary fission is discussed also. For both binary and ternary fission comments are made concerning the mass distributions of primary fragments (before neutron evaporation) and of fission products (after neutron evaporation). Charge distribution is discussed in terms of charge dispersion among fission products with the same mass number and the variation with mass number of Zp, the ''most probable charge'' (non-integral) for a given mass number. Although direct information about charge distribution is limited to fission products, estimates are presented of charge distribution for primary fission fragments. Knowledge and estimates of mass and charge distribution for a fission process allow estimation of primary yields of all fission products or fragments. Although many estimated primary yields are quite uncertain mainly because of lack of knowledge of charge distribution, especially for fission products formed in low yield; some estimates of primary yields are presented to illustrate the need for and possible practicality of further experimentation. Fission processes other than thermal-neutron fission of U235 that are discussed include thermal-neutron fission of U233 and Pu239, spontaneous fission of Pu240 and Cf252, 14-MeV neutron fission of U235 and U238, 11-MeV proton fission of Ra226 and 22-MeV deuteron fission of Bi209. (author)

  10. Charged fluid distribution in higher dimensional spheroidal space-time

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G P Singh; S Kotambkar

    2005-07-01

    A general solution of Einstein field equations corresponding to a charged fluid distribution on the background of higher dimensional spheroidal space-time is obtained. The solution generates several known solutions for superdense star having spheroidal space-time geometry.

  11. The Calculation of the Electrostatic Potential of Infinite Charge Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redzic, Dragan V.

    2012-01-01

    We discuss some interesting aspects in the calculation of the electrostatic potential of charge distributions extending to infinity. The presentation is suitable for the advanced undergraduate level. (Contains 3 footnotes.)

  12. Experimental Tests of Charge Symmetry Violation in Parton Distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.T. Londergan; D.P. Murdock; A.W. Thomas

    2005-07-01

    Recently, a global phenomenological fit to high energy data has included charge symmetry breaking terms, leading to limits on the allowed magnitude of such effects. We discuss two possible experiments that could search for isospin violation in valence parton distributions. We show that, given the magnitude of charge symmetry violation consistent with existing global data, such experiments might expect to see effects at a level of several percent. Alternatively, such experiments could significantly decrease the upper limits on isospin violation in parton distributions.

  13. Charge and longitudinal momentum distributions in transverse coordinate space

    CERN Document Server

    Mondal, Chandan; Dahiya, Harleen; Chakrabarti, Dipankar

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the charge distributions for the $u$ and $d$ quarks in transverse coordinate space in a light-front quark-diquark model for the nucleons using the overlaps of the wave functions constructed from the soft-wall AdS/QCD prediction. We have also obtained the charge distributions for proton and neutron in transverse coordinate space and compared it with the distributions obtained in impact-parameter space. Further, we study the longitudinal momentum distributions using the wave functions in the transverse coordinate space. We have also shown the explicit fermionic and bosonic contributions for different struck $u$ and $d$ quarks.

  14. Mass and charge distribution in heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A statistical model based on the independent particle picture is used to calculate mass and charge distributions in deep inelastic heavy-ion collisions. Different assumptions on volume and charge equilibrations are compared with measured variances of charge distributions. One combination of assumptions is clearly favoured by experiment, and gives a reasonable description of the variance versus energy loss curves up to energy losses of about 200 MeV in the heavy systems Kr+Ho and Xe+Bi, and up to about 60 MeV for the light system Ar+Ca

  15. Multiplicity distributions and charged-neutral fluctuations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tapan K Nayak; M M Aggarwal; A Agnihotri; Z Ahammed; A L S Angelis; V Antonenko; V Arefiev; V Astakhov; V Avdeitchikov; T C Awes; P V K S Baba; S K Badyal; A Baldine; L Barabach; C Barlag; S Bathe; B Tatiounia; T Bernier; K B Bhalla; V S Bhatia; C Blume; R Bock; E-M Bohne; D Bucher; A Buijs; E-J Buis; H Büsching; L Carlen; V Chalyshev; S Chattopadhyay; K E Chenawi; R Cherbatchev; T Chujo; A Claussen; A C Das; M P Decowski; V Djordjadze; P Donni; I Doubovik; A K Dubey; M R Dutta Majumdar; S Eliseev; K Enosawa; H Feldmann; P Foka; S Fokin; V Frolov; M S Ganti; S Garpman; O Gavrishchuk; F J M Geurts; T K Ghosh; R Glasow; S K Gupta; B Guskov; H A Gustafsson; H H Gutbrod; R Higuchi; I Hrivnacova; M Ippolitov; H Kalechofsky; R Kamermans; K-H Kampert; K Karadjev; K Karpio; S Kato; S Kees; H Kim; B W Kolb; I Kosarev; I Koutcheryaev; A Kugler; P Kulinich; V Kumar; M Kurata; K Kurita; K Kuzmin; I Langbein; A Lebedev; Y Y Lee; H Löhner; D P Mahapatra; V Manko; M Martin; A Maximov; R Mehdiyev; G Mgebrichvili; Y Miake; D Mikhalev; G C Mishra; Y Miyamoto; B Mohanty; D Morrison; D S Mukhopadhyay; V Myalkovski; H Naef; B K Nandi; S K Nayak; T K Nayak; S Neumaier; A Nianine; V Nikitine; S Nikolaev; S Nishimura; P Nomokov; J Nystrand; F E Obenshain; A Oskarsson; I Otterlund; M Pachr; A Parfenov; S Pavliouk; T Peitzmann; V Petracek; F Plasil; M L Purschke; B Raeven; J Rak; R Raniwala; S Raniwala; V S Ramamurthy; N K Rao; F Retiere; K Reygers; G Roland; L Rosselet; I Roufanov; J M Rubio; S S Sambyal; R Santo; S Sato; H Schlagheck; H-R Schmidt; G Shabratova; I Sibiriak; T Siemiarczuk; B C Sinha; N Slavine; K Söderström; N Solomey; G Sood; S P Sørensen; P Stankus; G Stefanek; P Steinberg; E Stenlund; D Stüken; M Sumbera; T Svensson; M D Trivedi; A Tsvetkov; C Twenhöfel; L Tykarski; J Urbahn; N V Eijndhoven; W H V Heeringen; G J V Nieuwenhuizen; A Vinogradov; Y P Viyogi; A Vodopianov; S Vörös; M A Vos; B Wyslouch; K Yogi; Y Yokota; G R Young

    2001-08-01

    Results from the multiplicity distributions of inclusive photons and charged particles, scaling of particle multiplicities, event-by-event multiplicity fluctuations, and charged-neutral fluctuations in 158 GeV Pb+Pb collisions are presented and discussed. A scaling of charged particle multiplicity as $N^{1.07± 0:05}_{\\text{part}}$ and photons as $N^{1.12± 0:03}_{\\text{part}}$ have been observed, indicating violation of naive wounded nucleon model. The analysis of localized charged-neutral fluctuation indicates a model-independent demonstration of non-statistical fluctuations in both charged particles and photons in limited azimuthal regions. However, no correlated charged-neutral fluctuations are observed.

  16. Langevin description of fission fragment charge distribution from excited nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Karpov, A V

    2002-01-01

    A stochastic approach to fission dynamics based on a set of three-dimensional Langevin equations was applied to calculate fission-fragment charge distribution of compound nucleus sup 2 sup 3 sup 6 U. The following collective coordinates have been chosen - elongation coordinate, neck-thickness coordinate, and charge-asymmetry coordinate. The friction coefficient of charge mode has been calculated in the framework of one-body and two-body dissipation mechanisms. Analysis of the results has shown that Langevin approach is appropriate for investigation of isobaric distribution. Moreover, the dependences of the variance of the charge distribution on excitation energy and on the two-body viscosity coefficient has been studied

  17. Charge state distribution studies of the metal vapor vacuum arc ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied the charge state distribution of the ion beam produced by the MEVVA (metal vapor vacuum arc) high current metal ion source. Beams produced from a wide range of cathode materials have been examined and the charge state distributions have been measured as a function of many operational parameters. In this paper we review the charge state data we have accumulated, with particular emphasis on the time history of the distribution throughout the arc current pulse duration. We find that in general the spectra remain quite constant throughout most of the beam pulse, so long as the arc current is constant. There is an interesting early-time transient behavior when the arc is first initiated and the arc current is still rising, during which time the ion charge states produced are observed to be significantly higher than during the steady current region that follows. 12 refs., 5 figs

  18. Measurement of the electrostatic charge in airborne particles: II - particle charge distribution of different aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Rodrigues

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available This work gives sequence to the study on the measurement of the electrostatic charges in aerosols. The particle charge classifier developed for this purpose and presented in the previous paper (Marra and Coury, 2000 has been used here to measure the particle charge distribution of a number of different aerosols. The charges acquired by the particles were naturally derived from the aerosol generation procedure itself. Two types of aerosol generators were used: the vibrating orifice generator and turntable Venturi plate generator. In the vibrating orifice generator, mono-dispersed particles were generated by a solution of water/ethanol/methylene blue, while in the rotating plate generator, six different materials were utilized. The results showed no clear dependence between electric charge and particle diameter for the mono-dispersed aerosol. However, for the poly-dispersed aerosols, a linear dependence between particle size and charge could be noticed.

  19. Nuclear charge distribution in the spontaneous fission of 252Cf

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Taofeng; Wang, Liming; Men, Qinghua; Han, Hongyin; Xia, Haihong

    2015-01-01

    The measurement for charge distributions of fragments in 252Cf has been performed by using a unique style of detector setup consisting of a typical grid ionization chamber and a dE-E particle telescope. We found that the fragment mass dependency of the average width of the charge distribution shows a systematic decreased trend with the obvious odd-even effect. The variation of widths of charge distribution with kinetic energies shows an approximate V-shape curve due to the large number of neutron emission for the high excitation energies and cold fragmentation with low excitation energies. As for the behavior of the average nuclear charge with respect to its deviation {\\Delta}Z from the unchanged charge distribution (UCD) as a function of the mass number of primary fragments A*, for asymmetric fission products {\\Delta}Z is negative value, while upon approaching mass symmetry {\\Delta}Z turns positive. Concerning the energy dependence of the most probable charge for given primary mass number A*, the obvious inc...

  20. Charge collection and space charge distribution in neutron-irradiated epitaxial silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poehlsen, Thomas

    2010-04-15

    In this work epitaxial n-type silicon diodes with a thickness of 100 {mu}m and 150 {mu}m are investigated. After neutron irradiation with fluences between 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} and 4 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} annealing studies were performed. CV-IV curves were taken and the depletion voltage was determined for different annealing times. All investigated diodes with neutron fluences greater than 2 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} showed type inversion due to irradiation. Measurements with the transient current technique (TCT) using a pulsed laser were performed to investigate charge collection effects for temperatures of -40 C, -10 C and 20 C. The charge correction method was used to determine the effective trapping time {tau}{sub eff}. Inconsistencies of the results could be explained by assuming field dependent trapping times. A simulation of charge collection could be used to determine the field dependent trapping time {tau}{sub eff}(E) and the space charge distribution in the detector bulk. Assuming a linear field dependence of the trapping times and a linear space charge distribution the data could be described. Indications of charge multiplication were seen in the irradiated 100 {mu}m thick diodes for all investigated fluences at voltages above 800 V. The space charge distribution extracted from TCT measurements was compared to the results of the CV measurements and showed good agreement. (orig.)

  1. Charge collection and space charge distribution in neutron-irradiated epitaxial silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work epitaxial n-type silicon diodes with a thickness of 100 μm and 150 μm are investigated. After neutron irradiation with fluences between 1014 cm-2 and 4 x 1015 cm-2 annealing studies were performed. CV-IV curves were taken and the depletion voltage was determined for different annealing times. All investigated diodes with neutron fluences greater than 2 x 1014 cm-2 showed type inversion due to irradiation. Measurements with the transient current technique (TCT) using a pulsed laser were performed to investigate charge collection effects for temperatures of -40 C, -10 C and 20 C. The charge correction method was used to determine the effective trapping time τeff. Inconsistencies of the results could be explained by assuming field dependent trapping times. A simulation of charge collection could be used to determine the field dependent trapping time τeff(E) and the space charge distribution in the detector bulk. Assuming a linear field dependence of the trapping times and a linear space charge distribution the data could be described. Indications of charge multiplication were seen in the irradiated 100 μm thick diodes for all investigated fluences at voltages above 800 V. The space charge distribution extracted from TCT measurements was compared to the results of the CV measurements and showed good agreement. (orig.)

  2. Flat Bunches with a Hollow Distribution for Space Charge Mitigation

    CERN Document Server

    Oeftiger, Adrian; Findlay, Alan James; Hancock, Steven; Rumolo, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Longitudinally hollow bunches provide one means to mitigate the impact of transverse space charge. The hollow distributions are created via dipolar parametric excitation during acceleration in CERN's Proton Synchrotron Booster. We present simulation work and beam measurements. Particular emphasis is given to the alleviation of space charge effects on the long injection plateau of the downstream Proton Synchrotron machine, which is the main goal of this study.

  3. Probing the electron charge distribution via Kapitza-Dirac diffraction

    OpenAIRE

    Sancho, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the diffraction of elementary systems as the electron by light gratings when they are described by charge distributions instead of the usual point-like form. The treatment of the problem is based on the introduction, in analogy with atomic polarizability, of state-dependent non-permanent multi-pole moments for the charge. The diffraction patterns can provide bounds on these moments. With this approach we can experimentally explore some aspects of the interpretation of the wave pict...

  4. Charged-particle inclusive distributions from hadronic Z0 decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have measured inclusive distributions for charged particles in hadronic decays of the Z boson. The variables chosen for study were the mean charged-particle multiplicity (left-angle nch right-angle), scaled momentum (x), and momenta transverse to the sphericity axes (p perpendicular in and p perpendicular out). The distributions have been corrected for detector effects and are compared with data from e+e- annihilation at lower energies and with the predictions of several QCD-based models. The data are in reasonable agreement with expectations. 12 refs., 2 figs

  5. Argon-ion charge distributions following near-threshold ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When an atom is photoionized in an inner shell, there are two mechanisms by which the remaining electron cortege relaxes to fill the vacancy: x-ray emission and radiationless Auger and Coster-Kronig transitions. In the former, the inner-shell hole moves to a less tightly bound orbital without increasing the number of atomic vacancies. In Auger processes, however, the energy liberated by transfer of a less-tightly-bound electron to the inner-shell vacancy is transferred to another electron which is ejected into the continuum. In this case, the charge on the residual ion increases by one. Through a series of radiative and non-radiative processes, the initial vacancy bubbles up until all vacancies arrive at the outermost shell. Due to the many possible routes by which this may occur, there can be a broad distribution of residual ion charge states characteristic of the decay of a single inner-shell vacancy. Because so many processes can contribute to each charge state, it is difficult to determine the effect of each by examining the total ion charge distribution; the total-ion charge distribution represents an average over many effects. To overcome this limitation, the author has recently measured argon-ion production as a function of both photon energy and Auger decay channel following photoionization of K-shell electrons with highly monochromatic synchrotron radiation. When measured differential in decay channel, the ion charge distributions are greatly simplified. Analysis, in progress, of these simplified distributions will permit extraction of information about relative decay rates and shakeoff effects that is obscured in the single spectra

  6. Radiobiology with heavy charged particles: a historical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skarsgard, L.D. [Dept. of Medical Biophysics, B.C. Cancer Research Centre and TRIUMF, Vancouver (Canada)

    1997-09-01

    The presentation will attempt to briefly review some of radiobiological data on the effects of heavy charged particles and to discuss the influence of those studies on the clinical application which followed. (orig./MG)

  7. Charge distribution in neptunium compounds calculated from moessbauer spectroscopy data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculations of the 5f-orbitals population density in the neptunium compounds are carried out on the basis of experimental data, obtained by the Moessbauer spectroscopy method. Charge distribution in compounds Np(3), Np(4), Np(5), Np(6) and Np(7) is presented. Approach to studying the correlation between the δ indices and orbital population densities is proposed

  8. Charging Schedule for Electric Vehicles in Danish Residential Distribution Grids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pillai, Jayakrishnan Radhakrishna; Huang, Shaojun; Bak-Jensen, Birgitte;

    2015-01-01

    vehicle owner, vehicle fleet operator and other parties involved in the process could economically benefit from the process. This paper investigates an optimal EV charging plan in Danish residential distribution grids in view of supporting high volumes of wind power in electricity grids. The results of...

  9. Ion distribution function in ion space-charge region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental results for the ion distribution functions measured into an ion space-charge region near the negatively biased grid of a multipolar confinement plasma system are presented. The ion space charge is produced in argon plasma at a pressure of about 10-4 mbar. Plasma parameters in source chamber were electron density in the range 108 to 1010 cm-3 and electron temperature in the range 0.5 to 6.0 eV. The ion distribution functions were measured using a small electrostatic analyser with two grids of about 8 mm effective diameter and 48% optical transparency. The are two regimes for ion space-charge formation: one regime is stable and another is unstable. The latter consists of large current fluctuations in external electrical circuits. The ion distribution functions for both regimes are measured and the differences between them are pointed out. In the nonstationary regime the ion distribution functions are broader than in the stationary one. This effect is more important if the distance between the grid and the electrostatic analyser is greater than the ion space-charge position. (authors)

  10. Connection between elastic relativistic form factors and charge distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A scheme by means of which one can establish the connection between form factors and charge distribution (for particles of any spin) in proposed. Except for the nonrelativistic domain our results differ from previous ones. Consequences of our relations (some of them in agreement with experimental and previous theoretical results) are briefly discussed

  11. Response of electrostatic probes to eccentric charge distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Torben; McAllister, Iain Wilson

    2001-01-01

    The response of an electrostatic probe mounted in an electrode is examined with reference to eccentric charge distributions. The study involves using the probe λ function to derive a characteristic parameter. This parameter enables the response of the probe to different degrees of eccentricity to...

  12. Charge density distributions derived from smoothed electrostatic potential functions: design of protein reduced point charge models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leherte, Laurence; Vercauteren, Daniel P

    2011-10-01

    To generate reduced point charge models of proteins, we developed an original approach to hierarchically locate extrema in charge density distribution functions built from the Poisson equation applied to smoothed molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) functions. A charge fitting program was used to assign charge values to the so-obtained reduced representations. In continuation to a previous work, the Amber99 force field was selected. To easily generate reduced point charge models for protein structures, a library of amino acid templates was designed. Applications to four small peptides, a set of 53 protein structures, and four KcsA ion channel models, are presented. Electrostatic potential and solvation free energy values generated by the reduced models are compared with the corresponding values obtained using the original set of atomic charges. Results are in closer agreement with the original all-atom electrostatic properties than those obtained with a previous reduced model that was directly built from the smoothed MEP functions [Leherte and Vercauteren in J Chem Theory Comput 5:3279-3298, 2009]. PMID:21915750

  13. Effects of Solvent on the Maximum Charge State and Charge State Distribution of Protein Ions Produced by Electrospray Ionization

    OpenAIRE

    Iavarone, Anthony T.; Jurchen, John C.; Williams, Evan R.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of solvent composition on both the maximum charge states and charge state distributions of analyte ions formed by electrospray ionization were investigated using a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The charge state distributions of cytochrome c and myoglobin, formed from 47%/50%/3% water/solvent/acetic acid solutions, shift to lower charge (higher m/z) when the 50% solvent fraction is changed from water to methanol, to acetonitrile, to isopropanol. This is also the order of increasing...

  14. Charge, quantum state, and energy distributions of impurities released in plasma-wall interaction processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional wisdom has it that total sputtering yields correlate with high Z-impurity levels found in fusion plasmas. The charge, quantum states and energy distributions of sputtered atoms have been virtually ignored in these considerations. Impurity transport from the wall or limiter to the plasma is, however, strongly influenced by these factors which may play a crucial role in determining impurity levels in the deeper plasma regions. Preliminary calculations have shown that positively charged impurities would most likely be redeposited on their surfaces of origin. The conditions leading to charged or excited state atoms emission and the energy distributions of such species are reviewed. Techniques for measuring these quantities are discussed and the need for a wider data base in this field is pointed out

  15. Probing charge-symmetry-violating quark distributions in semi-inclusive leptoproduction of hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    Londergan, J T; Thomas, A W; Pang, Alex

    1996-01-01

    Recent experiments by the HERMES group at HERA are measuring semi-inclusive electroproduction of pions from deuterium. We point out that by comparing the production of \\pi^+ and \\pi^- from an isoscalar target, it is possible, in principle, to measure charge symmetry violation in the valence quark distributions of the nucleons. It is also possible in the same experiments to obtain an independent measurement of the quark fragmentation functions. We review the information which can be deduced from such experiments and show the ``signature'' for charge symmetry violation in such experiments. Finally, we predict the magnitude of the charge symmetry violation, from both the valence quark distributions and the pion fragmentation function, which might be expected in these experiments.

  16. Review and Progress on Distributed Fibre Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Thévenaz, Luc

    2006-01-01

    Optical fibers have crucially contributed to promote the concept of distributed sensing with a large impact. The different types of fiber optics distributed sensing techniques are reviewed and their performances and limits are presented.

  17. Ionic strength independence of charge distributions in solvation of biomolecules

    OpenAIRE

    Virtanen, J. J.; Sosnick, T. R.; Freed, K. F.

    2014-01-01

    Electrostatic forces enormously impact the structure, interactions, and function of biomolecules. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations for 5 proteins and 5 RNAs to determine the dependence on ionic strength of the ion and water charge distributions surrounding the biomolecules, as well as the contributions of ions to the electrostatic free energy of interaction between the biomolecule and the surrounding salt solution (for a total of 40 different biomolecule/solvent combinations...

  18. Ionic strength independence of charge distributions in solvation of biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, J J; Sosnick, T R; Freed, K F

    2014-12-14

    Electrostatic forces enormously impact the structure, interactions, and function of biomolecules. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations for 5 proteins and 5 RNAs to determine the dependence on ionic strength of the ion and water charge distributions surrounding the biomolecules, as well as the contributions of ions to the electrostatic free energy of interaction between the biomolecule and the surrounding salt solution (for a total of 40 different biomolecule/solvent combinations). Although water provides the dominant contribution to the charge density distribution and to the electrostatic potential even in 1M NaCl solutions, the contributions of water molecules and of ions to the total electrostatic interaction free energy with the solvated biomolecule are comparable. The electrostatic biomolecule/solvent interaction energies and the total charge distribution exhibit a remarkable insensitivity to salt concentrations over a huge range of salt concentrations (20 mM to 1M NaCl). The electrostatic potentials near the biomolecule's surface obtained from the MD simulations differ markedly, as expected, from the potentials predicted by continuum dielectric models, even though the total electrostatic interaction free energies are within 11% of each other. PMID:25494774

  19. Comparison of the charge distributions of the titanium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements have been made of the elastic electron scattering from the three even isotopes of titanium, Ti46, Ti48, and Ti50, with the objective of determining the differences in their ground state charge distributions. The experiment measures the ratios of the elastic cross sections of the three isotopes, thereby eliminating many of the uncertainties peculiar to an absolute cross section measurement. The experiment was done at the NBS Linac in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Theoretical calculations using a partial wave elastic scattering program, showed that the ratios of cross sections arising from scattering from two slightly different Fermi type 2 parameter charge distributions, depended strongly on the differences in the parameter describing the charge distribution, but only weakly on the actual values of these parameters. These ratio curves, considered as a function of momentum transfer, achieved their extreme values at momenta transfer near 1.0 F-1, which is near the point where the Born approximation form factor goes to zero. Therefore, ratios of cross sections were measured at momenta transfer ranging from .55 to 1.1 F-1; by holding the scattering angle fixed at 127.50 and varying the incident beam energy from 60 to 123 MeV. 43 refs., 45 figs., 9 tabs

  20. Predicted angular distribution of fast charged particles with ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moliere theory of angular distribution for fast charged particles is improved to take into account ionization loss, by using Kamata-Nishimura formulation of the theory. Decrease of the particle energy along the passage hence increase of the screening angle brings a slight different results from those derived by Moliere-Bethe formulation for fixed energies. The present results are reduced to the same Moliere distribution with modified values of the expansion parameter and the unit of Moliere angle. Properties of the new distribution and differences from the traditional one are discussed. Angular distributions of particles penetrating through the mixed or compound substances are also investigated both under the relativistic and the nonrelativistic conditions, together with the Kamata-Nishimura constants characterizing their formulation. (author)

  1. Electromagnetic contribution to charge symmetry violation in parton distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X.G. Wang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We report a calculation of the combined effect of photon radiation and quark mass differences on charge symmetry violation (CSV in the parton distribution functions of the nucleon. Following a recent suggestion of Martin and Ryskin, the initial photon distribution is calculated in terms of coherent radiation from the proton as a whole, while the effect of the quark mass difference is based on a recent lattice QCD simulation. The distributions are then evolved to a scale at which they can be compared with experiment by including both QCD and QED radiation. Overall, at a scale of 5 GeV2, the total CSV effect on the phenomenologically important difference between the d and u-quark distributions is some 20% larger than the value based on quark mass differences alone. In total these sources of CSV account for approximately 40% of the NuTeV anomaly.

  2. Review on Electric Vehicle, Battery Charger, Charging Station and Standards

    OpenAIRE

    Afida Ayob; Wan Mohd Faizal Wan Mahmood; Azah Mohamed Mohd Zamri Che Wanik; MohdFadzil Mohd Siam; Saharuddin Sulaiman; Abu Hanifah Azit; Mohamed Azrin Mohamed Ali

    2014-01-01

    Electric vehicles are a new and upcoming technology in the transportation and power sector that have many benefits in terms of economic and environmental. This study presents a comprehensive review and evaluation of various types of electric vehicles and its associated equipment in particular battery charger and charging station. A comparison is made on the commercial and prototype electric vehicles in terms of electric range, battery size, charger power and charging time. The various types o...

  3. Distribution of charge and matter in nuclei: Charge density difference of 206Pb and 205Tl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We contrast two calculations of the charge density difference of 206Pb and 205Tl. In the simplest model this difference in charge density is due to the occupation of an additional 3s/sub 1/2/ orbital in 206Pb. A standard mean-field calculation of the charge difference does not yield a satisfactory result. One may modify this result by assigning the 3s/sub 1/2/ orbital an occupation probability of seventy percent, with a corresponding increase to thirty percent of the occupation probability of a 2d/sub 3/2/ orbital. However, this modification of the mean-field analysis, while solving one problem, is seen to create a new problem in the fit to the data. In this work we present an alternative analysis: We maintain unit occupation probability for the 3s/sub 1/2/ orbital but use the medium-modified proton electromagnetic form factor we have calculated previously. Our model is able to give a better fit to the data without the introduction of free parameters into the analysis. Medium-modified form factors have recently been shown to be effective in explaining the charge distribution of 208Pb and their application to the interpretation of the 206Pb-205Tl charge density difference yields a result which is consistent with the experimental data and superior to that obtained in the adjusted mean-field analysis described above

  4. Distribution of Electric Charge in a System of Charged Conductors of Finite Dimensions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doležel, Ivo; Dvořák, P.; Šolín, Pavel; Ulrych, B.

    Ostrava : VŠB Technická univerzita Ostrava, 2003, s. -. ISBN 80-248-0225-2. [International Scientific Conference /5./. Beskydy - Visalaje (CZ), 28.01.2003-29.01.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/00/0933 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2057903 Keywords : distribution of electric charge * finite dimensions Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  5. Solute location in a nanoconfined liquid depends on charge distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, Jacob A.; Thompson, Ward H., E-mail: wthompson@ku.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas 66045 (United States)

    2015-07-28

    Nanostructured materials that can confine liquids have attracted increasing attention for their diverse properties and potential applications. Yet, significant gaps remain in our fundamental understanding of such nanoconfined liquids. Using replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations of a nanoscale, hydroxyl-terminated silica pore system, we determine how the locations explored by a coumarin 153 (C153) solute in ethanol depend on its charge distribution, which can be changed through a charge transfer electronic excitation. The solute position change is driven by the internal energy, which favors C153 at the pore surface compared to the pore interior, but less so for the more polar, excited-state molecule. This is attributed to more favorable non-specific solvation of the large dipole moment excited-state C153 by ethanol at the expense of hydrogen-bonding with the pore. It is shown that a change in molecule location resulting from shifts in the charge distribution is a general result, though how the solute position changes will depend upon the specific system. This has important implications for interpreting measurements and designing applications of mesoporous materials.

  6. Charge distribution and radii in clusters from nuclear pasta models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the consistency of the description of charge distributions and radii of nuclear clusters obtained with semiclassical nuclear pasta models. These nuclei are expected to exist in the low density outer crust of neutron stars. Properties of the arising clusterized nucleon matter can be compared to realistic nuclear properties as experimentally extracted on earth. We focus on non iso-symmetric light clusters with nucleon number 8 ≤ A ≤ 30 and use Monte Carlo many-body techniques. We simulate isotopic chains for a set of selected nuclei using a model Hamiltonian consisting of the usual kinetic term, hadronic nucleon nucleon (NN), Coulomb and an effective density dependent Pauli potential. It is shown that for neutron rich (deficient) clusters neutron (proton) skins develop. Different (matter, neutron, proton, electric charge) radii are computed for this set of non iso-symmetric nuclei. Nuclear binding energies are also analyzed in the isotopic chains. (author)

  7. Charge distribution dependency on gap thickness of CMS endcap RPC

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Sung Keun

    2016-01-01

    We present a systematic study of charge distribution dependency of CMS Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) on gap thickness.Prototypes of double-gap with five different gap thickness from 1.8mm to 1.0mm in 0.2mm steps have been built with 2mm thick phenolic high-pressure-laminated (HPL) plates. The charges of cosmic-muon signals induced on the detector strips are measured as a function of time using two four-channel 400-MHz fresh ADCs. In addition, the arrival time of the muons and the strip cluster sizes are measured by digitizing the signal using a 32-channel voltage-mode front-end-electronics and a 400-MHz 64-channel multi-hit TDC. The gain and the input impedance of the front-end-electronics were 200mV/mV and 20 Ohm, respectively.

  8. A distributed charge storage with GeO2 nanodots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, a distributed charge storage with GeO2 nanodots is demonstrated. The mean size and aerial density of the nanodots embedded in SiO2 are estimated to be about 5.5 nm and 4.3x1011 cm-2, respectively. The composition of the dots is also confirmed to be GeO2 by x-ray absorption near-edge structure analyses. A significant memory effect is observed through the electrical measurements. Under the low voltage operation of 5 V, the memory window is estimated to ∼0.45 V. Also, a physical model is proposed to demonstrate the charge storage effect through the interfacial traps of GeO2 nanodots

  9. Impact of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle on Power Distribution System Considering Vehicle to Grid Technology: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    A. Aljanad; Azah Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a comprehensive review of the potential technical impacts of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles on power distribution and transmission systems. This review also presents various power quality impacts on the power system in several aspects. This review conveys a detailed analysis of electric vehicle charging strategies on electrical distribution networks. The two charging aspects (coordinated/uncoordinated) and intelligent scheduling of charging are discussed in terms of thei...

  10. Modifications of the Weibull distribution: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well known that the Weibull distribution is the most popular and the most widely used distribution in reliability and in analysis of lifetime data. Unfortunately, its hazard function cannot exhibit non-monotonic shapes like the bathtub shape or the unimodal shape. Since 1958, the Weibull distribution has been modified by many researchers to allow for non-monotonic hazard functions. This paper gives an extensive review of some discrete and continuous versions of the modifications of the Weibull distribution. - Highlights: • A comprehensive review of known discrete modifications and generalizations of the Weibull distribution. • A comprehensive review of known continuous modifications and generalizations of the Weibull distribution. • Over 110 references on modifications/generalizations of the Weibull distribution. • More than 55% of the cited references appeared in the last 5 years

  11. Charge Distributions in Transverse Coordinate Space and in Impact Parameter Space

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Dae Sung; Kim, Dong Soo; Kim, Jonghyun

    2008-01-01

    We study the charge distributions of the valence quarks inside nucleon in the transverse coordinate space, which is conjugate to the transverse momentum space. We compare the results with the charge distributions in the impact parameter space.

  12. Revealing dressed quarks via the proton's charge distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloët, Ian C; Roberts, Craig D; Thomas, Anthony W

    2013-09-01

    The proton is arguably the most fundamental of nature's readily detectable building blocks. It is at the heart of every nucleus and has never been observed to decay. It is nevertheless a composite object, defined by its valence-quark content: u+u+d--i.e., two up (u) quarks and one down (d) quark; and the manner by which they influence, inter alia, the distribution of charge and magnetization within this bound state. Much of novelty has recently been learned about these distributions; and it now appears possible that the proton's momentum-space charge distribution possesses a zero. Experiments in the coming decade should answer critical questions posed by this and related advances; we explain how such new information may assist in charting the origin and impact of key emergent phenomena within the strong interaction. Specifically, we show that the possible existence and location of a zero in the proton's electric form factor are a measure of nonperturbative features of the quark-quark interaction in the standard model, with particular sensitivity to the running of the dressed-quark mass. PMID:25166653

  13. A review of factors affecting electrostatic charging of pharmaceuticals and adhesive mixtures for inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaialy, Waseem

    2016-04-30

    Pharmaceutical powders are typically insulators consisting of relatively small particles and thus they usually exhibit significant electrostatic charging behaviours. In the inhalation field, the measurement of electrostatic charge is an imperative stage during pharmaceutical formulation development. The electrostatic charge is affected by the interplay of many factors. This article reviews the factors affecting the electrostatic charging of pharmaceutical powders with a focus on dry powder inhalations. The influences of particle resistivity, size distribution, shape distribution, surface roughness, polymorphic form and hygroscopicity, as well as the effects of moisture uptake, environmental conditions, pharmaceutical processing (i.e., milling, sieving, spray drying and blending), and storage on the electrostatic charge behaviours of pharmaceuticals, with focus on inhalation powders, were reviewed. The influence of electrostatic charge on the performance of dry powder inhaler formulations in terms of drug content homogeneity, the passage of drug through the inhaler device, drug-carrier adhesion/detachment, and drug deposition on the respiratory airways were discussed. The understanding gained is crucial to improving the safety, quality, and efficiency of the pharmaceutical inhalation products. PMID:26836710

  14. TOPICAL REVIEW: Charged-particle multiplicity in proton-proton collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiete Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan; Reygers, Klaus

    2010-08-01

    This review summarizes and critically reviews measurements of charged-particle multiplicity distributions and pseudorapidity densities in p+p(\\bar{p}) collisions between \\sqrt{s} = 23.6 {\\;GeV} and \\sqrt{s} = 1.8\\;TeV. Related theoretical concepts are briefly introduced. Moments of multiplicity distributions are presented as a function of \\sqrt{s}. Feynman scaling, KNO scaling as well as the description of multiplicity distributions with a single negative binomial distribution and with combinations of two or more negative binomial distributions is discussed. Moreover, similarities between the energy dependence of charged-particle multiplicities in p+p(\\bar{p}) and e+e- collisions are studied. Finally, various predictions for pseudorapidity densities, average multiplicities in full phase space and multiplicity distributions of charged particles in p+p(\\bar{p}) collisions at the LHC energies of \\sqrt{s} = 7\\;TeV, 10\\;TeV and 14 TeV are summarized and compared.

  15. The self-energy of a charged particle in the presence of a topological defect distribution

    CERN Document Server

    De Carvalho, A M M; Furtado, C; Moraes, Fernando; Furtado, Claudio

    2004-01-01

    In this work we study a charged particle in the presence of both a continuous distribution of disclinations and a continuous distribution of edge dislocations in the framework of the geometrical theory of defects. We obtain the self-energy for a single charge both in the internal and external regions of either distribution. For both distributions the result outside the defect distribution is the self-energy that a single charge experiments in the presence of a single defect.

  16. Application of carbon stripping foil to HIRFL-CSR and measurement of charge state distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charged ions may be injected into the CSRm by means of the charge stripping injection or the multiple multi-turn injection. The charge state distribution of the ions passing through the carbon foil has great influence on the performance of the accelerator and thus plays a key role in the charge stripping injection. It's found that the charge state distribution is dependent on the thicknesses of the carbon foil and the energy of the ions. In present work, the carbon stripper was applied to HIRFL-CSR and the best optional charge state distribution was measured. (authors)

  17. Influence of Multiple Ionization on Charge State Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Michael; Savin, Daniel Wolf

    2015-08-01

    The spectrum emitted by a plasma depends on the charge state distribution (CSD) of the gas. For collisionally ionized plasmas, the CSD is is determined by the corresponding rates for electron-impact ionization and recombination. In astrophysics, such plasmas are formed in stars, supernova remnants, galaxies, and galaxy clusters. Current CSD calculations generally do not account for electron-impact multiple ionization (EIMI), a process in which multiple electrons are ejected by a single electron-ion collision. We have estimated the EIMI cross sections for all charge states of iron using a combination of the available experimental data and semi-empirical formulae. We then modeled the CSD and observed the influence of EIMI compared to only including single ionization. One case of interest for astrophysics is nanoflare heating, which is a leading theory to explain the heating of the solar corona. In order to determine whether this theory can indeed explain coronal heating, spectroscopic measurements are being compared to model nanoflare spectra. Such models have attempted to predict the spectra of impulsively heated plasmas in which the CSD is time dependent. These nonequilbirium ionization calculations have so far ignored EIMI, but our findings suggest that EIMI can have a significant effect on the CSD of a nanoflare-heated plasma, changing the ion abundances by up to about 50%.

  18. Distribution of counterions and interaction between two similarly charged dielectric slabs: Roles of charge discreteness and dielectric inhomogeneity

    CERN Document Server

    Pezeshkian, Weria; Norouzi, Davood; Mohammad-Rafiee, Farshid; Fazli, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    The distribution of counterions and the electrostatic interaction between two similarly charged dielectric slabs is studied in the strong coupling limit. Dielectric inhomogeneities and discreteness of charge on the slabs have been taken into account. It is found that the amount of dielectric constant difference between the slabs and the environment, and the discreteness of charge on the slabs have opposing effects on the equilibrium distribution of the counterions. At small inter-slab separations, increasing the amount of dielectric constant difference increases the tendency of the counterions toward the middle of the intersurface space between the slabs and the discreteness of charge pushes them to the surfaces of the slabs. In the limit of point charges, independent of the strength of dielectric inhomogeneity, counterions distribute near the surfaces of the slabs. The interaction between the slabs is attractive at low temperatures and its strength increases with the dielectric constant difference. At room t...

  19. Review on Islanding Operation of Distribution System with Distributed Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahat, Pukar; Chen, Zhe; Bak-Jensen, Birgitte

    2011-01-01

    The growing environmental concern and various benefits of distributed generation (DG) have resulted in significant penetration of DG in many distribution systems worldwide. One of the major expected benefits of DG is the improvement in the reliability of power supply by supplying load during power...... outage by operating in an island mode. However, there are many challenges to overcome before islanding operation of a distribution system with DG can become a viable solution in future. This paper reviews some of the major challenges with islanding operation and explores some possible solutions to...

  20. Time-dependent charge distributions in polymer films under electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The time-dependent charge distribution in polymer film under electron beam irradiation is studied by both experiment and numerical simulation. In the experiment, the distribution is measured with the piezoinduced pressure wave propagation method. In the simulation, the initial charge distribution is obtained by the Monte Carlo method of electron scattering, and the charge drift in the specimen is simulated by taking into account the Poisson equation, the charge continuity equation, Ohm's law, and the radiation-induced conductivity. The results obtained show that the negative charge deposited in the polymer film, whose top and bottom surfaces are grounded, drifts toward both grounded electrodes and that twin peaks appear in the charge distribution. The radiation-induced conductivity plays an important role in determining the charge distribution in the polymer films under electron beam irradiation

  1. Theoretical study of the central depression of nuclear charge density distribution by electron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The charge form factors of elastic electron scattering for isotones with N=20 and N=28 are calculated using the phase-shift analysis method, with corresponding charge density distributions from relativistic mean-field theory. The results show that there are sharp variations at the inner parts of charge distributions with the proton number decreasing. The corresponding charge form factors are divided into two groups because of the unique properties of the s-states wave functions, though the proton numbers change uniformly in two isotonic chains. Meanwhile, the shift regularities of the minima are also discussed, and we give a clear relation between the minima of the charge form factors and the corresponding charge radii. This relation is caused by the diffraction effect of the electron. Under this conclusion, we calculate the charge density distributions and the charge form factors of the A=44 nuclei chain. The results are also useful for studying the central depression in light exotic nuclei. (authors)

  2. A review of four distribution infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, J.; Edwards, N.; Cole, R.

    1994-06-01

    The paper describes experiences in designing and implementing a groupware application (a shared whiteboard) on four different distribution infrastructures. We describe the application and how its design was influenced by reliability requirements. We review the four platforms and discuss the useful, and not so useful, features of each platform.

  3. Influence of charge changing collisions on charge state distributions (CSD) in non-equilibrium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For an optimal design of ion sources and for some aspects of plasma diagnostics it is important to study the influence of all processes and parameters that are essential for the production and loss of multiply charged ions. Till now all existing calculations of CSD neglected charge transfer because of missing data. Now many of the very big charge transfer cross sections are measured and so we are able to include them into our calculations. (orig.)

  4. Dielectric sample with two-layer charge distribution for space charge calibration purposes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbøll, Joachim; Henriksen, Mogens; Rasmussen, C.

    2002-01-01

    In the present paper is described a dielectric test sample with two very narrow concentrations of bulk charges, achieved by two internal electrodes not affecting the acoustical properties of the sample, a fact important for optimal application of most space charge measuring systems. Space charge...... formation was investigated under different electrical conditions by means of the laser induced pressure pulse (LIPP) method and the pulsed electro-acoustic method (PEA)....

  5. The effect of polymer charge density and charge distribution on the formation of multilayers

    CERN Document Server

    Voigt, U; Tauer, K; Hahn, M; Jäger, W; Klitzing, K V

    2003-01-01

    Polyelectrolyte multilayers which are built up by alternating adsorption of polyanions and polycations from aqueous solutions at a solid interface are investigated by reflectometry and ellipsometry. Below a degree of charge of about 70% the adsorption stops after a certain number of dipping cycles and no multilayer formation occurs. This indicates an electrostatically driven adsorption process. Below a charge density of 70% an adsorption can take place if the charged segments are combined as a block of the polymer.

  6. A Fully Distributed Approach for Plug-in Electric Vehicle Charging

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadi, Javad; Vaya, Marina Gonzalez; Kar, Soummya; Hug, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) are considered as flexible loads since their charging schedules can be shifted over the course of a day without impacting drivers mobility. This property can be exploited to reduce charging costs and adverse network impacts. The increasing number of PEVs makes the use of distributed charging coordinating strategies preferable to centralized ones. In this paper, we propose an agent-based method which enables a fully distributed solution of the PEVs Coordinated ...

  7. Fractal dimension of the topological charge density distribution in SU(2) lattice gluodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buividovich, P.V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics ITEP, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kalaydzhyan, T. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics ITEP, Moscow (Russian Federation); Polikarpov, M.I. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics ITEP, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-11-15

    We study the effect of cooling on the spatial distribution of the topological charge density in quenched SU(2) lattice gauge theory with overlap fermions. We show that as the gauge field configurations are cooled, the Hausdorff dimension of regions where the topological charge is localized gradually changes from d=2/3 towards the total space dimension. Hence the cooling procedure destroys some of the essential properties of the topological charge distribution. (orig.)

  8. A numerical method for calculation of electrostatic charge distribution induced on conducting surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Saeed Hatamzadeh-Varmazyar; Zahra Masouri

    2014-01-01

    The focus of this article is on calculation of electrostatic charge distribution induced on conducting surfaces. For this purpose, the integral equation concept is used for mathematical modeling of the problem. A special set of exponential basis functions is introduced and defined to be used in formulation of a numerical method for solving the integral equation to obtain the charge distribution. The method is numerically evaluated via calculation of charge density for some structures by which...

  9. Equilibrium charge state distributions of high energy heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Equilibrium charge state fractions have been measured for N, O, Ne, S, Ar and Kr ions at 1.04 MeV/nucleon after passing through various stripping materials. Further data were obtained at higher energy for S ions (4.12 MeV/nucleon) and Ar ions (4.12 and 9.6 MeV/nucleon). The mean charge fractions can be fitted to universal curves for both solid and gaseous strippers. Measurements of the equilibrium fraction of krypton ions at 1.04 MeV/nucleon passing through heavy vapours have shown that a higher average charge state is obtained than for lighter gaseous strippers. (Auth.)

  10. Charge distribution and Fermi level in bimetallic nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Holmberg, Nico; Laasonen, Kari; Peljo, Pekka Eero

    2016-01-01

    Upon metal-metal contact, a transfer of electrons will occur between the metals until the Fermi levels in both phases are equal, resulting in a net charge difference across the metal-metal interface. Here, we have examined this contact electrification in bimetallic model systems composed of mixed Au-Ag nanoparticles containing ca. 600 atoms using density functional theory calculations. We present a new model to explain this charge transfer by considering the bimetallic system as a nanocapacit...

  11. REVIEW OF CHECKPOINTING ALGORITHMS IN DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Gahlan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Checkpointing is the process of saving the status information. Checkpoint is defined as a designated place in a program at which normal processing is interrupted specifically to preserve the status information necessary to allow resumption of processing at a later time. Mobile computing raises many new issues such as lack of stablestorage, low bandwidth of wireless channel, high mobility, and limited battery life. Coordinated checkpointing is an attractive approach for transparently adding fault tolerance to distributed applications since it avoids domino effects and minimizes the stable storage requirement. This paper presents the review of the algorithms,which have been reported in the literature for checkpointing. This paper also covers backward error recovery techniques for distributed systems specially the distributed mobile systems.

  12. Proximity effects in cold gases of multiply charged atoms (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikina, I.; Shikin, V.

    2016-07-01

    Possible proximity effects in gases of cold, multiply charged atoms are discussed. Here we deal with rarefied gases with densities nd of multiply charged (Z ≫ 1) atoms at low temperatures in the well-known Thomas-Fermi (TF) approximation, which can be used to evaluate the statistical properties of single atoms. In order to retain the advantages of the TF formalism, which is successful for symmetric problems, the external boundary conditions accounting for the finiteness of the density of atoms (donors), nd ≠ 0, are also symmetrized (using a spherical Wigner-Seitz cell) and formulated in a standard way that conserves the total charge within the cell. The model shows that at zero temperature in a rarefied gas of multiply charged atoms there is an effective long-range interaction Eproxi(nd), the sign of which depends on the properties of the outer shells of individual atoms. The long-range character of the interaction Eproxi is evaluated by comparing it with the properties of the well-known London dispersive attraction ELond(nd) 0 and for the alkali and alkaline-earth elements Eproxi thermal decay are interesting in themselves as they determine the important phenomenon of dissociation of neutral complexes into charged fragments. This phenomenon appears consistently in the TF theory through the temperature dependence of the different versions of Eproxi. The anomaly in the thermal proximity effect shows up in the following way: for T ≠ 0 there is no equilibrium solution of TS statistics for single multiply charged atoms in a vacuum when the effect is present. Instability is suppressed in a Wigner-Seitz model under the assumption that there are no electron fluxes through the outer boundary R3 ∝ n-1d of a Wigner-Seitz cell. Eproxi corresponds to the definition of the correlation energy in a gas of interacting particles. This review is written so as to enable comparison of the results of the TF formalism with the standard assumptions of the correlation theory for

  13. A thundercloud electric field sounding - Charge distribution and lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, M. E.; Few, A. A.; Stewart, M. F.; Christian, H. J.

    1982-01-01

    An instrumented free balloon measured electric fields and field changes as it rose through a thundercloud above Langmuir Laboratory, New Mexico. The variation of the electric field with altitude implied that the cloud contained negative space charge of density -0.6 to -4 nC/cu m between 5.5 and 8.0 km MSL. The environmental temperature at these levels ranged from -5 to -20 C. The measurements imply that the areal extent of this negative charge center was significantly greater than that of the cloud's intense precipitation shafts. At altitudes greater than 8 km, the instrument ascended past net positive charge. In addition, positive space charge adjacent to the earth's surface (concentration 0.6 nC/cu m and in the lowest portion of the cloud (1.0 nC/cu m) is inferred from the measurements. Electric field changes from intracloud lightning were interpreted by using a simple model for the developing streamer of the initial phase. Thunder source reconstructions provided estimates for the orientation of lightning channels. Seven 'streamers' so analyzed propagated on the average, at 50,000 m/s and carried a current of 390 A. The mean charge dissipated during a flash was 30 C.

  14. Charge distribution and Fermi level in bimetallic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, Nico; Laasonen, Kari; Peljo, Pekka

    2016-01-28

    Upon metal-metal contact, a transfer of electrons will occur between the metals until the Fermi levels in both phases are equal, resulting in a net charge difference across the metal-metal interface. Here, we have examined this contact electrification in bimetallic model systems composed of mixed Au-Ag nanoparticles containing ca. 600 atoms using density functional theory calculations. We present a new model to explain this charge transfer by considering the bimetallic system as a nanocapacitor with a potential difference equal to the work function difference, and with most of the transferred charge located directly at the contact interface. Identical results were obtained by considering surface contacts as well as by employing a continuum model, confirming that this model is general and can be applied to any multimetallic structure regardless of geometry or size (going from nano- to macroscale). Furthermore, the equilibrium Fermi level was found to be strongly dependent on the surface coverage of different metals, enabling the construction of scaling relations. We believe that the charge transfer due to Fermi level equilibration has a profound effect on the catalytic, electrocatalytic and other properties of bimetallic particles. Additionally, bimetallic nanoparticles are expected to have very interesting self-assembly for large superstructures due to the surface charge anisotropy between the two metals. PMID:26788999

  15. Impact of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle on Power Distribution System Considering Vehicle to Grid Technology: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Aljanad

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a comprehensive review of the potential technical impacts of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles on power distribution and transmission systems. This review also presents various power quality impacts on the power system in several aspects. This review conveys a detailed analysis of electric vehicle charging strategies on electrical distribution networks. The two charging aspects (coordinated/uncoordinated and intelligent scheduling of charging are discussed in terms of their impacts on power systems. Vehicle to grid technology are investigated, elaborated and evaluated based on technical, suitability and configuration aspects.

  16. Coupling of mass and charge distributions for low excited nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The simple model for calculation of charge distributions of fission fragments for low exited nuclear fission from experimental mass distributions is offered. The model contains two parameters, determining amplitude of even-odd effect of charge distributions and its dependence on excitation energy. Results for reactions 233U(nth,f), 235U(nth,f), 229Th(nth,f), 249Cf(nth,f) are spent

  17. Equilibrium charge-state distributions of highly stripped ions in carbon foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asymmetric equilibrium charge-state distributions observed for heavy ions (Z approx. >= 7) in carbon foils at high velocities (v > 3.6 x 108 Z0sup(.)45 cm s-1) are closely approximated by a simple statistical distribution: the reduced chi-squared model. The dependences of the mean charge and of the standard deviation of the charge on the projectile velocity are obtained by a previously-known and a newly-proposed relation, respectively. Finally charge-state fractions may be easily predicted using a simple formula depending only on the atomic number and on the velocity of the projectile. (orig.)

  18. Review of theories of charge transfer processes involving highly stripped heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is made of various theoretical models to study charge transfer processes involving highly stripped heavy ions Asup(z+) + B → Asup((z-1)+) + B+. The limitations of applicability of these models are critically discussed. Detailed comparison is made between theories for examples of C6+ + H → C5+ + H+ and Fe26+ + H → Fe25+ + H+. Scaling rules of the charge transfer cross section with respect to Z and theoretical predictions of the distribution over the fimal states of the highly stripped heavy ion are summarized, which are important for application to nuclear fusion and to X-ray laser. The theoretical results are compared with the experimental data available at present. (author)

  19. Distributed Solar Photovoltaics for Electric Vehicle Charging: Regulatory and Policy Considerations (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-09-01

    Increasing demand for electric vehicle (EV) charging provides an opportunity for market expansion of distributed solar technology. A major barrier to the current deployment of solar technology for EV charging is a lack of clear information for policy makers, utilities and potential adopters. This paper introduces the pros and cons of EV charging during the day versus at night, summarizes the benefits and grid implications of combining solar and EV charging technologies, and offers some regulatory and policy options available to policy makers and regulators wanting to incentivize solar EV charging.

  20. Proximity effects in cold gases of multiply charged atoms (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikina, I.; Shikin, V.

    2016-07-01

    Possible proximity effects in gases of cold, multiply charged atoms are discussed. Here we deal with rarefied gases with densities nd of multiply charged (Z ≫ 1) atoms at low temperatures in the well-known Thomas-Fermi (TF) approximation, which can be used to evaluate the statistical properties of single atoms. In order to retain the advantages of the TF formalism, which is successful for symmetric problems, the external boundary conditions accounting for the finiteness of the density of atoms (donors), nd ≠ 0, are also symmetrized (using a spherical Wigner-Seitz cell) and formulated in a standard way that conserves the total charge within the cell. The model shows that at zero temperature in a rarefied gas of multiply charged atoms there is an effective long-range interaction Eproxi(nd), the sign of which depends on the properties of the outer shells of individual atoms. The long-range character of the interaction Eproxi is evaluated by comparing it with the properties of the well-known London dispersive attraction ELond(nd) 0 and for the alkali and alkaline-earth elements Eproxi theory through the temperature dependence of the different versions of Eproxi. The anomaly in the thermal proximity effect shows up in the following way: for T ≠ 0 there is no equilibrium solution of TS statistics for single multiply charged atoms in a vacuum when the effect is present. Instability is suppressed in a Wigner-Seitz model under the assumption that there are no electron fluxes through the outer boundary R3 ∝ n-1d of a Wigner-Seitz cell. Eproxi corresponds to the definition of the correlation energy in a gas of interacting particles. This review is written so as to enable comparison of the results of the TF formalism with the standard assumptions of the correlation theory for classical plasmas. The classic example from work on weak solutions (including charged solutions)—the use of semi-impermeable membranes for studies of osmotic pressure—is highly appropriate for

  1. Distribution of Electrical Charge in a System of Finite Conductors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doležel, Ivo; Kloucek, P.; Šolín, Pavel; Ulrych, B.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 1 (2003), s. 1-13. ISSN 0001-7043 Grant ostatní: GA €R(CZ) GP102/01/D114; NSF(US) DMS -0107539 Institutional research plan: CEZ:MSM 212300016 Keywords : electrical charge * numerical modelling * integral equations Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  2. Evolution of the trapped charge distribution due to trap emptying processes in a natural aluminosilicate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of the thermoluminescence glow curve of a natural Ca-Be rich aluminosilicate after annealing treatments at different temperatures has been studied in order to evaluate the changes in the trapped charge distribution. The glow curve consists of a single broad peak that continuously shifts toward higher temperatures when the sample is preheated up to increasing temperatures, thus indicating the presence of a continuous trap distribution. The glow curve fitting assuming different distribution functions shows how a gaussian distribution becomes a nearly exponential distribution owing to the thermal leakage of charge carriers from trapping centres. (authors)

  3. Universities Review Overhead Charges; Some Alter Policies on President's Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, Colleen

    1991-01-01

    Congressional investigations into university overhead charges, especially those at Stanford University (California), for federally sponsored research are leading universities to reexamine and change some policies, including charging some housing costs for university officers to government contracts. (DB)

  4. Improving and Handling Electric Vehicle Penetration Level by Different Smart Charging Algorithms in Distribution Grids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kordheili, Reza Ahmadi; Bak-Jensen, Birgitte; Pillai, Jayakrishnan Radhakrishna;

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes different smart charging algorithms for electric vehicles (EVs) to find out the maximum grid capability in dealing with these new devices. The main objective is to obtain maximum EV penetration in the distribution grid without reinforcing the grid in order to avoid any cost for...... distribution system operators (DSOs). Two smart charging algorithms are proposed in this study. The proposed algorithms are applied to a part of the Danish distribution grid as a case study. As a comparison, a dumb charging scenario, i.e. charging EVs without any specific order or algorithm, is also simulated....... Simulation results demonstrate the capability of the smart charging methods to increase the penetration of EVs up to three times, compared to the base case....

  5. Distribution Locational Marginal Pricing for Optimal Electric Vehicle Charging Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ruoyang; Wu, Qiuwei; Oren, Shmuel S.

    2013-01-01

    prices (DLMPs) by solving the social welfare optimization of the Electric distribution system which considers EV aggregators as Price takers in the local DSO market and demand price elasticity. Nonlinear optimization has been used to solve the social welfare optimization problem in order to obtain the......This paper presents an integrated distribution locational marginal pricing (DLMP) method designed to alleviate congestion induced by electric vehicle (EV) loads in future power systems. In the proposed approach, the distribution system operator (DSO) determines distribution locational marginal...

  6. Space charge distribution measurement methods and particle loaded insulating materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hole, S [Laboratoire des Instruments et Systemes d' Ile de France, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris6, 10 rue Vauquelin, 75005 Paris (France); Sylvestre, A [Laboratoire d' Electrostatique et des Materiaux Dielectriques, CNRS UMR5517, 25 avenue des Martyrs, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Lavallee, O Gallot [Laboratoire d' Etude Aerodynamiques, CNRS UMR6609, boulevard Marie et Pierre Curie, Teleport 2, BP 30179, 86962 Futuroscope, Chasseneuil (France); Guillermin, C [Schneider Electric Industries SAS, 22 rue Henry Tarze, 38000 Grenoble (France); Rain, P [Laboratoire d' Electrostatique et des Materiaux Dielectriques, CNRS UMR5517, 25 avenue des Martyrs, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Rowe, S [Schneider Electric Industries SAS, 22 rue Henry Tarze, 38000 Grenoble (France)

    2006-03-07

    In this paper the authors discuss the effects of particles (fillers) mixed in a composite polymer on the space charge measurement techniques. The origin of particle-induced spurious signals is determined and silica filled epoxy resin is analysed using the laser-induced-pressure-pulse (LIPP) method, the pulsed-electro-acoustic (PEA) method and the laser-induced-thermal-pulse (LITP) method. A spurious signal identified as the consequence of a piezoelectric effect of some silica particles is visible for all the method. Moreover, space charges are clearly detected at the epoxy/silica interface after a 10 kV mm{sup -1} poling at room temperature for 2 h.

  7. Equilibrium charge state distributions of 14N and 20Ne ions emerging from solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new technique of backscattering has been developed for the measurement of equilibrium charge state distributions of ions emerging from a solid medium. By this method, equilibrium charge fractions for nitrogen in the energy range from 0.8 to 1.7 MeV and for neon from 1.5 to 4.4 MeV have been measured. The influence of inner shell vacancies produced by violent collisions on the charge state equilibrium is discussed. (Auth.)

  8. Laser induced pressure pulse probe of charge distribution in thermally poled glass: Evidence of dipole polarisation?

    OpenAIRE

    Kazansky, P G; Smith, A. R.; Russell, P. St. J.; Yang, G.M.; Sessler, G.M.

    1995-01-01

    For the first time charge distributions in thermally poled silica glass are mapped by using laser induced pressure pulse technique. The experimental results may be explained through postulating the formation of both real space charge layers and inside the the depletion region

  9. The influence of spherical cavity surface charge distribution on the sequence of partial discharge events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, a model representing partial discharge (PD) behaviour of a spherical cavity within a homogeneous dielectric material has been developed to study the influence of cavity surface charge distribution on the electric field distribution in both the cavity and the material itself. The charge accumulation on the cavity surface after a PD event and charge movement along the cavity wall under the influence of electric field magnitude and direction has been found to affect the electric field distribution in the whole cavity and in the material. This in turn affects the likelihood of any subsequent PD activity in the cavity and the whole sequence of PD events. The model parameters influencing cavity surface charge distribution can be readily identified; they are the cavity surface conductivity, the inception field and the extinction field. Comparison of measurement and simulation results has been undertaken to validate the model.

  10. Conformally flat spherically symmetric charged perfect fluid distribution in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A solution of Einstein's field equations representing spherically symmetric charged perfect fluid distribution, which are conformally flat, is obtained. Various physical properties of the model are also discussed. (author)

  11. Measurements of Aerosol Charge and Size Distribution for Graphite, Gold, Palladium, and Silver Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of charge on aerosol evolution and hence the nuclear source term has been an issue of interest, and there is a need for both experimental techniques and modeling for quantifying this role. Our focus here is on further exploration of a tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) technique to simultaneously measure both the size and charge (positive, negative and neutral) dependent aerosol distributions. We have generated graphite, gold, silver, and palladium nanoparticles (aerosol) using a spark generator. We measure the electrical mobility-size distributions for these aerosols using a TDMA, and from these data we deduce the full charge-size distributions. We observe asymmetry in the particle size distributions for negative and positive charges. This asymmetry could have a bearing on the dynamics of charged aerosols, indicating that the assumption of symmetry for size distributions of negatively and positively charged particles in source term simulations may not be always appropriate. Also, the experimental technique should find applications in measurements of aerosol rate processes that are affected by both particle charge and size (e.g. coagulation, deposition, resuspension), and hence in modeling and simulation of the nuclear source term.

  12. Probabilistic Method to Assess the Impact of Charging of Electric Vehicles on Distribution Grids

    OpenAIRE

    David Martínez-Vicente; Andreas Sumper; Roberto Villafafila-Robles; Eduardo Valsera-Naranjo

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a grid impact analysis of charging electric vehicles (EV) using charging curves with detailed battery modelling. A probabilistic method using Monte Carlo was applied to a typical Spanish distribution grid, also using mobility patterns of Barcelona. To carry out this analysis, firstly, an IEEE test system was adapted to a typical distribution grid configuration; secondly, the EV and its battery types were modeled taking into account the current vehicle market and the batte...

  13. Measurements of charged-particle inclusive distributions in hadronic decays of the Z boson

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have measured inclusive distributions for charged particles in hadronic decays of the Z boson. The variables chosen for study were charged-particle multiplicity, scaled momentum, and momenta transverse to the sphericity axes. The distributions have been corrected for detector effects and are compared with data from e+e- annihilation at lower energies and with the predictions of several QCD-based models. The data are in reasonable agreement with expectations

  14. Tensor Metrics and Charged Containers for 3D Q-space Sample Distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Knutsson, Hans; Westin, Carl-Fredrik

    2013-01-01

    This paper extends Jones’ popular electrostatic repulsion based algorithm for distribution of single-shell Q-space samples in two fundamental ways. The first alleviates the single-shell requirement enabling full Q-space sampling. Such an extension is not immediately obvious since it requires distributing samples evenly in 3 dimensions. The extension is as elegant as it is simple: Add a container volume of the desired shape having a constant charge density and a total charge equal to the negat...

  15. Correlations between molecular structure and charge distribution in organometallic complexes of lanthanoids and actinoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The correlation between molecular structure and charge distribution was investigated in organometallic compounds of the lanthanoid (4f-) and actinoid (5f-) elements. These compounds are suitable models for two reasons: a) they are soluble in nonpolar solvents and b) in both series, there is a possibility for continuous variation of the ionic size of the central ion. Detailed investigation of several compound-classes with different molecular symmetry, has given important information concerning the influence of the molecular structure on the macroscopic charge distribution in the molecule. The anisotropy of the charge distribution in the molecule increases with decreasing of the molecular symmetry. Contrary to predictions previously discussed in the literature, it has been shown, that the molecular symmetry primarily does not depend on sterical interactions, but on the Coulomb-interaction between the central ion and the ligand. Using different models which take into account the molecular geometry and the charge distribution, it was possible to calculate the partial electrical moments between ligand and central ion for several coordinating atoms of the used ligands. The contribution of the f-electrons to the total charge distribution around the central ion can be quantitatively calculated from the molecular polarizability and the total charge distribution of the investigated molecule. (orig./RB)

  16. Determination of the charge state distribution of a highly ionized coronal Au plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the first definitive measurement of the charge state distribution of a highly ionized gold plasma in coronal equilibrium. The experiment utilized the Livermore electron beam ion trap EBIT-II in a novel configuration to create a plasma with a Maxwellian temperature of 2.5 keV. The charge balance in the plasma was inferred from spectral line emission measurements which accounted for charge exchange effects. The measured average ionization state was 46.8±0.75. This differs from the predictions of two modeling codes by up to four charge states

  17. An axisymmetric charged dust distribution with NUT rotation in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Rodriguez, H.; Gonzalez-Silva, R. A.; Lopez Benitez, L. I.

    2010-07-01

    An exact solution of the Einstein-Maxwell's field equations is presented. This solution describes an axisymmetric charged dust distribution, with NUT rotation, in the presence of an electromagnetic field of the pure magnetic type. In the comoving reference frame, there is magnetic field only, the dust's electric charges do not interact with themselves, this is due to the vanishing of the Lorentz force. A naked singularity with magnetic charge is present. The solution is of the Petrov type D and possesses four Killing vectors. This is a generalization of the Lukács solution to the case when dust is charged.

  18. Planning Future Electric Vehicle Central Charging Stations Connected to Low-Voltage Distribution Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marra, Francesco; Træholt, Chresten; Larsen, Esben

    2012-01-01

    A great interest is recently paid to Electric Vehicles (EV) and their integration into electricity grids. EV can potentially play an important role in power system operation, however, the EV charging infrastructures have been only partly defined, considering them as limited to individual charging...... points, randomly distributed into the networks. This paper addresses the planning of public central charging stations (CCS) that can be integrated in low-voltage (LV) networks for EV parallel charging. The concepts of AC and DC architectures of CCS are proposed and a comparison is given on their...

  19. Calculating method for confinement time and charge distribution of ions in electron cyclotron resonance sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dougar-Jabon, V.D. [Escuela de Fisica, Universidad Industrial de Santander, A.A. 678, Bucaramanga (Colombia); Umnov, A.M. [Russian Friendship University, 117198 Moscow (Russia); Kutner, V.B. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russia)

    1996-03-01

    It is common knowledge that the electrostatic pit in a core plasma of electron cyclotron resonance sources exerts strict control over generation of ions in high charge states. This work is aimed at finding a dependence of the lifetime of ions on their charge states in the core region and to elaborate a numerical model of ion charge dispersion not only for the core plasmas but for extracted beams as well. The calculated data are in good agreement with the experimental results on charge distributions and magnitudes for currents of beams extracted from the 14 GHz DECRIS source. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Multipole correction of atomic monopole models of molecular charge distribution. I. Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokalski, W. A.; Keller, D. A.; Ornstein, R. L.; Rein, R.

    1993-01-01

    The defects in atomic monopole models of molecular charge distribution have been analyzed for several model-blocked peptides and compared with accurate quantum chemical values. The results indicate that the angular characteristics of the molecular electrostatic potential around functional groups capable of forming hydrogen bonds can be considerably distorted within various models relying upon isotropic atomic charges only. It is shown that these defects can be corrected by augmenting the atomic point charge models by cumulative atomic multipole moments (CAMMs). Alternatively, sets of off-center atomic point charges could be automatically derived from respective multipoles, providing approximately equivalent corrections. For the first time, correlated atomic multipoles have been calculated for N-acetyl, N'-methylamide-blocked derivatives of glycine, alanine, cysteine, threonine, leucine, lysine, and serine using the MP2 method. The role of the correlation effects in the peptide molecular charge distribution are discussed.

  1. Two rods confined by positive plates: effective forces and charge distribution profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of confinement on the interaction force between two negatively charged rods is studied through Monte Carlo simulations. Confinement is produced by two parallel, charged or uncharged plates. The system is immersed in a 0.1 M 1-1 restricted primitive model electrolyte. The effect on the rod-rod effective force by the plate charge distribution is analysed. A strong modification of the rod-rod effective force due to confinement is found, as compared to the bulk case. In particular, rod-rod attraction was found for plates having a charge equal to that of fully charged bilipid bilayers. In spite of the simplicity of the model, these results agree with some DNA-phospholipid experimental observations. On the other hand, for a model having the plate charges fixed on a grid, very long range, oscillatory rod-rod effective forces were obtained

  2. Spatial distribution of ion charges in fast, partially stripped clusters traversing solid targets

    CERN Document Server

    Miskovic, Z L; Goodman, F O; Wang, Y N

    2002-01-01

    Joint statistical description of the distribution of ion charge states and the spatial structure of a cluster, made of heavy ions, allows a self-consistent generalization of the Brandt-Kitagawa variational theory, including dynamically-screened inter-ionic interactions, in a form of a non-linear integral equation. Solution of such an equation for fast clusters passing very thin foils shows the familiar reduction of charge per ion, compared to the charge on an isotactic ion, which is rather non-homogeneously distributed throughout the volume of the cluster. As a consequence, the distribution of individual ion charges in the cluster exhibits large dispersion around an average value, which drops with the increasing cluster size.

  3. Spatial distribution of ion charges in fast, partially stripped clusters traversing solid targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joint statistical description of the distribution of ion charge states and the spatial structure of a cluster, made of heavy ions, allows a self-consistent generalization of the Brandt-Kitagawa variational theory, including dynamically-screened inter-ionic interactions, in a form of a non-linear integral equation. Solution of such an equation for fast clusters passing very thin foils shows the familiar reduction of charge per ion, compared to the charge on an isotactic ion, which is rather non-homogeneously distributed throughout the volume of the cluster. As a consequence, the distribution of individual ion charges in the cluster exhibits large dispersion around an average value, which drops with the increasing cluster size

  4. Upper-division student understanding of Coulomb's law: Difficulties with continuous charge distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Bethany R.; Caballero, Marcos D.; Pepper, Rachel E.; Pollock, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Utilizing the integral expression of Coulomb's Law to determine the electric potential from a continuous charge distribution is a canonical exercise in Electricity and Magnetism (E&M). In this study, we use both think-aloud interviews and responses to traditional exam questions to investigate student difficulties with this topic at the upper-division level. Leveraging a theoretical framework for the use of mathematics in physics, we discuss how students activate, construct, execute and reflect on the integral form of Coulomb's Law when solving problems with continuous charge distributions. We present evidence that junior-level E&M students have difficulty mapping physical systems onto the mathematical expression for the Coulomb potential. Common challenges include difficulty expressing the difference vector in appropriate coordinates as well as determining expressions for the differential charge element and limits of integration for a specific charge distribution. We discuss possible implications of these findings for future research directions and instructional strategies.

  5. Upper-division Student Understanding of Coulomb's Law: Difficulties with Continuous Charge Distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Wilcox, Bethany R; Pepper, Rachel E; Pollock, Steven J

    2012-01-01

    Utilizing the integral expression of Coulomb's Law to determine the electric potential from a continuous charge distribution is a canonical exercise in Electricity and Magnetism (E&M). In this study, we use both think-aloud interviews and responses to traditional exam questions to investigate student difficulties with this topic at the upper-division level. Leveraging a theoretical framework for the use of mathematics in physics, we discuss how students activate, construct, execute and reflect on the integral form of Coulomb's Law when solving problems with continuous charge distributions. We present evidence that junior-level E&M students have difficulty mapping physical systems onto the mathematical expression for the Coulomb potential. Common challenges include difficulty expressing the difference vector in appropriate coordinates as well as determining expressions for the differential charge element and limits of integration for a specific charge distribution. We discuss possible implications of t...

  6. Electronic structure, charge distribution and X-ray emission spectra of V3Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cluster calculations of the electronic structure and charge distribution in V3Si have been performed using two different molecular orbital methods: a semiempirical LCAO and the MS Xα model. The results are compared with X-ray emission spectra and band structure calculations. An analysis of the calculated electronic distribution reveals a charge transfer from Si-atoms to V-atoms, the additional charge on a V-atom being 0.6e (LCAO) and 0.4e (MS Xα method). The results are in good agreement with experiment, which indicates that the cluster approach is adequate for the description of charge distributions and spectra characteristics of the A-15 compounds. (author)

  7. Distribution Locational Marginal Pricing for Optimal Electric Vehicle Charging through Chance Constrained Mixed-Integer Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhaoxi; Wu, Qiuwei; Oren, Shmuel S.;

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a distribution locational marginal pricing (DLMP) method through chance constrained mixed-integer programming designed to alleviate the possible congestion in the future distribution network with high penetration of electric vehicles (EVs). In order to represent the stochastic...... characteristics of the EV driving patterns, a chance constrained optimization of the EV charging is proposed and formulated through mixed-integer programming (MIP). With the chance constraints in the optimization formulations, it guarantees that the failure probability of the EV charging plan fulfilling...... constrained MIP can successfully alleviate the congestion in the distribution network due to the EV charging while keeping the failure probability of EV charging not meeting driving needs below the predefined confidence....

  8. On the Electromagnetic Momentum of Static Charge and Steady Current Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gsponer, Andre

    2007-01-01

    Faraday's and Furry's formulae for the electromagnetic momentum of static charge distributions combined with steady electric current distributions are generalized in order to obtain full agreement with Poynting's formula in the case where all fields are of class C[superscript 1], i.e., continuous and continuously differentiable, and the…

  9. Effect of Moliere theory on path length distribution of fast charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The path length distribution due to multiple Coulomb scattering, considering single scattering and more accurate screening potential than gaussian approximation, is discussed after Moliere theory. Solutions for restricted conditions are indicated, from which we discuss effects of Moliere cross section on the path length distribution of charged particles and the time structure of electromagnetic cascade showers. (author)

  10. A slanted etching method to analyze the trapped charge distribution in the insulators of MIS structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are problems concerned with reliability of integrated circuits due to charge trapping in the oxide such as hot carrier injection, ionizing radiation, etc. Trapped charges in the insulators change the threshold voltage of MOSFET and increase the leakage currents in IC. Generally, the density of oxide charge has been calculated by assuming that it is located near the Si-SiO2 interface. This assumption is a good approximation in many cases. However, it would introduce serious errors in cases where the oxide charge has a spatial distribution, in particular where both positive and negative charges are present. In this paper, the authors propose a method for measuring the charge distribution in the oxide layer. They will explain about the slanted etching method that they proposed and describe the results of applying this method to silicon dioxide with and without ammonia anneal and silicon dioxide-nitride films. They will investigate the charge distributions both in the oxide layer of MOS structure with and without ammonia annealing and in the insulators of MOS and MNOS structures before and after irradiation

  11. Heavy ion charge-state distribution effects on energy loss in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriga-Carrasco, Manuel D.

    2013-10-01

    According to dielectric formalism, the energy loss of the heavy ion depends on its velocity and its charge density. Also, it depends on the target through its dielectric function; here the random phase approximation is used because it correctly describes fully ionized plasmas at any degeneracy. On the other hand, the Brandt-Kitagawa (BK) model is employed to depict the projectile charge space distribution, and the stripping criterion of Kreussler is used to determine its mean charge state . This latter criterion implies that the mean charge state depends on the electron density and temperature of the plasma. Also, the initial charge state of the heavy ion is crucial for calculating inside the plasma. Comparing our models and estimations with experimental data, a very good agreement is found. It is noticed that the energy loss in plasmas is higher than that in the same cold gas cases, confirming the well-known enhanced plasma stopping (EPS). In this case, EPS is only due to the increase in projectile effective charge Qeff, which is obtained as the ratio between the energy loss of each heavy ion and that of the proton in the same plasma conditions. The ratio between the effective charges in plasmas and in cold gases is higher than 1, but it is not as high as thought in the past. Finally, another significant issue is that the calculated effective charge in plasmas Qeff is greater than the mean charge state , which is due to the incorporation of the BK charge distribution. When estimations are performed without this distribution, they do not fit well with experimental data.

  12. Analysis of the charged-particle multiplicity distribution using the ratio of cumulant to factorial moments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ratio of the cumulant to factorial moments of the charged-particle multiplicity distribution is known to show a quasi-oscillatory behavior when plotted versus the order of the moments. This peculiar behavior is also predicted b;y the NNLLA of perturbative QCD assuming the validity of the LPHD hypothesis. Using the subjet multiplicity distribution obtained from both Durham and Cambridge jet algorithms, instead of the charged-particle multiplicity distribution, in order to vary the dependence on the LPHD hypothesis, it was found that the oscillations appear only for non-perturbative energy scales. (author)

  13. Analysis of the charged particle multiplicity distribution using the ratio of cumulant factorial to factorial moments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ratio of the cumulant factorial to factorial moments of the charged particle multiplicity distribution is known to show a quasi-oscillatory behaviour when plotted versus the order of the moments. This peculiar behaviour is also predicted by the NNLLA of perturbative QCD assuming the validity of the LPHD hypothesis. Using the subjet multiplicity distribution obtained from both Durham and Cambridge jet algorithms, instead of the charged particle multiplicity distribution, in order to vary the dependence on the LPHD hypothesis; it is shown that the oscillations appear only for non-perturbative energy scales. (author)

  14. Flavor and Charge Symmetry in the Parton Distributions of the Nucleon

    CERN Document Server

    Benesh, C J

    1998-01-01

    Recent calculations of charge symmetry violation(CSV) in the valence quark distributions of the nucleon have revealed that the dominant symmetry breaking contribution comes from the mass associated with the spectator quark system.Assuming that the change in the spectator mass can be treated perturbatively, we derive a model independent expression for the shift in the parton distributions of the nucleon. This result is used to derive a relation between the charge and flavor asymmetric contributions to the valence quark distributions in the proton, and to calculate CSV contributions to the nucleon sea. The CSV contribution to the Gottfried sum rule is also estimated, and found to be small.

  15. Measurements of charge distributions of the fragments in the low energy fission reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement for charge distributions of fragments in spontaneous fission 252Cf has been performed by using a unique style of detector setup consisting of a typical grid ionization chamber and a ΔΕ−Ε particle telescope, in which a thin grid ionization chamber served as the ΔΕ-section and the E-section was an Au–Si surface barrier detector. The typical physical quantities of fragments, such as mass number and kinetic energies as well as the deposition in the gas ΔΕ detector and E detector were derived from the coincident measurement data. The charge distributions of the light fragments for the fixed mass number A2⁎ and total kinetic energy (TKE) were obtained by the least-squares fits for the response functions of the ΔΕ detector with multi-Gaussian functions representing the different elements. The results of the charge distributions for some typical fragments are shown in this article which indicates that this detection setup has the charge distribution capability of Ζ:ΔΖ>40:1. The experimental method developed in this work for determining the charge distributions of fragments is expected to be employed in the neutron induced fissions of 232Th and 238U or other low energy fission reactions.

  16. Highly transverse velocity distribution of convoy electrons emitted by highly charged ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seliger, M.; Tőkési, K.; Reinhold, C. O.; Burgdörfer, J.

    2003-05-01

    We present a theoretical study of convoy electron emission resulting from highly charged ion (HCI) transport through carbon foils. Employing a classical transport theory we analyze the angular and energy distribution formed by multiple scattering of electrons in the solid. We find that the convoy electron distribution becomes highly transverse at intermediate foil thicknesses representing an oblate spheroidal distribution due to the stepwise excitation of the HCI. The calculated convoy electron spectra are found to be in good agreement with recent measurements.

  17. Effect of surface charge distribution on the adsorption orientation of proteins to lipid monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiemeyer, Sebastian; Paulus, Michael; Tolan, Metin

    2010-09-01

    The adsorption orientation of the proteins lysozyme and ribonuclease A (RNase A) to a neutral 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and a negatively charged stearic acid lipid film was investigated by means of X-ray reflectivity. Both proteins adsorbed to the negatively charged lipid monolayer, whereas at the neutral monolayer, no adsorption was observed. For acquiring comprehensive information on the proteins' adsorption, X-ray reflectivity data were combined with electron densities obtained from crystallographic data. With this method, it is possible to determine the orientation of adsorbed proteins in solution underneath lipid monolayers. While RNase A specifically coupled with its positively charged active site to the negatively charged lipid monolayer, lysozyme prefers an orientation with its long axis parallel to the Langmuir film. In comparison to the electrostatic maps of the proteins, our results can be explained by the discriminative surface charge distribution of lysozyme and RNase A. PMID:20707324

  18. Charge density distribution of transparent p-type semiconductor (LaO)CuS

    OpenAIRE

    Takase, Kouichi; Sato,Ken; Shoji, Osamu; Takahashi, Yumiko; Takano, Yoshiki; Sekizawa, Kazuko; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro; GOTO, MANABU

    2007-01-01

    The charge density distributions of layered oxysulfide (LaO)CuS, known as a p-type transparent semiconductor, have been investigated by analyzing the synchrotron radiation powder diffraction profile with the maximum entropy method/Rietveld method. The bonding character of the Cu–S bond is revealed to be covalent. Meanwhile, the O–La bonding has both ionic and covalent characters. The number of electrons estimated by integrating the charge density around each atom gave direct evidence that eac...

  19. A parametrisation of the energy loss distributions of charged particles and its applications for silicon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Sikler, Ferenc

    2012-01-01

    The energy loss distribution of charged particles in silicon is approximated by a simple analytical parametrization. Its use is demonstrated through several examples. With the help of energy deposits in sensing elements of the detector, the position of track segments and the corresponding deposited energy are estimated with improved accuracy and less bias. The parametrization is successfully used to estimate the energy loss rate of charged particles, and it is applied to detector gain calibration tasks.

  20. Recoil ion charge state distribution following the beta(sup +) decay of {sup 21}Na

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scielzo, Nicholas D.; Freedman, Stuart J.; Fujikawa, Brian K.; Vetter, Paul A.

    2003-01-03

    The charge state distribution following the positron decay of 21Na has been measured, with a larger than expected fraction of the daughter 21Ne in positive charge states. No dependence on either the positron or recoil nucleus energy is observed. The data is compared to a simple model based on the sudden approximation. Calculations suggest a small but important contribution from recoil ionization has important consequences for precision beta decay correlation experiments detecting recoil ions.

  1. Recoil ion charge state distribution following the beta(sup +) decay of 21Na

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The charge state distribution following the positron decay of 21Na has been measured, with a larger than expected fraction of the daughter 21Ne in positive charge states. No dependence on either the positron or recoil nucleus energy is observed. The data is compared to a simple model based on the sudden approximation. Calculations suggest a small but important contribution from recoil ionization has important consequences for precision beta decay correlation experiments detecting recoil ions

  2. The Impact of Charging Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on a Residential Distribution Grid

    OpenAIRE

    Clement-Nyns, Kristien; Haesen, Edwin; Driesen, Johan

    2010-01-01

    Alternative vehicles, such as plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, are becoming more popular. The batteries of these plug-in hybrid electric vehicles are to be charged at home from a standard outlet or on a corporate car park. These extra electrical loads have an impact on the distribution grid which is analyzed in terms of power losses and voltage deviations. Without coordination of the charging, the vehicles are charged instantaneously when they are plugged in or after a fixed start delay. Thi...

  3. Effects of charge distribution on water filling process in carbon nanotube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG LingYi; LI QiKai; SHUAI ZhiGang

    2009-01-01

    Using umbrella sampling technique with molecular dynamics simulation, we investigated the nanoflu-idic transport of water in carbon nanotube (CNT). The simulations showed that a positive charge modi-fication to the carbon nanotube can slow down the water column growth process, while the negative charge modification to the carbon nanotube will, on the other hand, quicken the water column growth process. The free energy curves were obtained through the statistical process of water column growth under different charge distributions, and the results indicated that these free energy curves can be employed to explain the dynamical process of water column growth in the nanosized channels.

  4. Effects of charge distribution on water filling process in carbon nanotube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Using umbrella sampling technique with molecular dynamics simulation,we investigated the nanoflu-idic transport of water in carbon nanotube(CNT).The simulations showed that a positive charge modi-fication to the carbon nanotube can slow down the water column growth process,while the negative charge modification to the carbon nanotube will,on the other hand,quicken the water column growth process.The free energy curves were obtained through the statistical process of water column growth under different charge distributions,and the results indicated that these free energy curves can be employed to explain the dynamical process of water column growth in the nanosized channels.

  5. Role of Molecular Weight Distribution on Charge Transport in Semiconducting Polymers

    KAUST Repository

    Himmelberger, Scott

    2014-10-28

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. Model semiconducting polymer blends of well-controlled molecular weight distributions are fabricated and demonstrated to be a simple method to control intermolecular disorder without affecting intramolecular order or degree of aggregation. Mobility measurements exhibit that even small amounts of low molecular weight material are detrimental to charge transport. Trends in charge carrier mobility can be reproduced by a simple analytical model which indicates that carriers have no preference for high or low molecular weight chains and that charge transport is limited by interchain hopping. These results quantify the role of long polymer tie-chains and demonstrate the need for controlled polydispersity for achieving high carrier mobilities.

  6. Hierarchical charge distribution controls self-assembly process of silk in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Cencen; Liu, Lijie; Kaplan, David L.; Zhu, Hesun; Lu, Qiang

    2015-12-01

    Silk materials with different nanostructures have been developed without the understanding of the inherent transformation mechanism. Here we attempt to reveal the conversion road of the various nanostructures and determine the critical regulating factors. The regulating conversion processes influenced by a hierarchical charge distribution were investigated, showing different transformations between molecules, nanoparticles and nanofibers. Various repulsion and compressive forces existed among silk fibroin molecules and aggregates due to the exterior and interior distribution of charge, which further controlled their aggregating and deaggregating behaviors and finally formed nanofibers with different sizes. Synergistic action derived from molecular mobility and concentrations could also tune the assembly process and final nanostructures. It is suggested that the complicated silk fibroin assembly processes comply a same rule based on charge distribution, offering a promising way to develop silk-based materials with designed nanostructures.

  7. An APL program for the distribution of energy deposition by charged particles passing through thin absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    An APL program which numerically evaluates the probability density function (PDF) for the energy deposited in a thin absorber by a charged particle is proposed, with application to the construction, pointing, and control of spacecraft. With this program, the PDF of the restricted energy loss distribution of Watts (1973) is derived, and Vavilov's (1957) distribution is obtained by proper parameter selection. The method is demonstrated with the example of the effect of charged particle induced radiation on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) pointing accuracy. A Monte Carlo study simulates the photon noise caused by charged particles passing through the photomultiplier tube window, and the stochastic variation of energy loss is introduced into the simulation by generating random energy losses from a power law distribution. The program eliminates annoying loop procedures, and model parameter sensitivity can be studied using the graphical output.

  8. Ion distributions at charged aqueous surfaces: Synchrotron X-ray scattering studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface sensitive synchrotron X-ray scattering studies were performed to obtain the distribution of monovalent ions next to a highly charged interface at room temperature. To control surface charge density, lipids, dihexadecyl hydrogen-phosphate (DHDP) and dimysteroyl phosphatidic acid (DMPA), were spread as monolayer materials at the air/water interface, containing CsI at various concentrations. Five decades in bulk concentrations (CsI) are investigated, demonstrating that the interfacial distribution is strongly dependent on bulk concentration. We show that this is due to the strong binding constant of hydronium H3O+ to the phosphate group, leading to proton-transfer back to the phosphate group and to a reduced surface charge. Using anomalous reflectivity off and at the L3 Cs+ resonance, we provide spatial counterion (Cs+) distributions next to the negatively charged interfaces. The experimental ion distributions are in excellent agreement with a renormalized surface charge Poisson-Boltzmann theory for monovalent ions without fitting parameters or additional assumptions. Energy Scans at four fixed momentum transfers under specular reflectivity conditions near the Cs+ L3 resonance were conducted on 10-3 M CsI with DHDP monolayer materials on the surface. The energy scans exhibit a periodic dependence on photon momentum transfer. The ion distributions obtained from the analysis are in excellent agreement with those obtained from anomalous reflectivity measurements, providing further confirmation to the validity of the renormalized surface charge Poisson-Boltzmann theory for monovalent ions. Moreover, the dispersion corrections f0 and f00 for Cs+ around L3 resonance, revealing the local environment of a Cs+ ion in the solution at the interface, were extracted simultaneously with output of ion distributions.

  9. Ion distributions at charged aqueous surfaces: Synchrotron X-ray scattering studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bu, Wei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Surface sensitive synchrotron X-ray scattering studies were performed to obtain the distribution of monovalent ions next to a highly charged interface at room temperature. To control surface charge density, lipids, dihexadecyl hydrogen-phosphate (DHDP) and dimysteroyl phosphatidic acid (DMPA), were spread as monolayer materials at the air/water interface, containing CsI at various concentrations. Five decades in bulk concentrations (CsI) are investigated, demonstrating that the interfacial distribution is strongly dependent on bulk concentration. We show that this is due to the strong binding constant of hydronium H3O+ to the phosphate group, leading to proton-transfer back to the phosphate group and to a reduced surface charge. Using anomalous reflectivity off and at the L3 Cs+ resonance, we provide spatial counterion (Cs+) distributions next to the negatively charged interfaces. The experimental ion distributions are in excellent agreement with a renormalized surface charge Poisson-Boltzmann theory for monovalent ions without fitting parameters or additional assumptions. Energy Scans at four fixed momentum transfers under specular reflectivity conditions near the Cs+ L3 resonance were conducted on 10-3 M CsI with DHDP monolayer materials on the surface. The energy scans exhibit a periodic dependence on photon momentum transfer. The ion distributions obtained from the analysis are in excellent agreement with those obtained from anomalous reflectivity measurements, providing further confirmation to the validity of the renormalized surface charge Poisson-Boltzmann theory for monovalent ions. Moreover, the dispersion corrections f0 and f00 for Cs+ around L3 resonance, revealing the local environment of a Cs+ ion in the solution at the interface, were extracted simultaneously with output of ion distributions.

  10. A 128-channel picoammeter system and its application on charged particle beam current distribution measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 128-channel picoammeter system is constructed based on instrumentation amplifiers. Taking advantage of a high electric potential and narrow bandwidth in DC energetic charged beam measurements, a current resolution better than 5 fA can be achieved. Two sets of 128-channel strip electrodes are implemented on printed circuit boards and are employed for ion and electron beam current distribution measurements. Tests with 60 keV O3+ ions and 2 keV electrons show that it can provide exact boundaries when a positive charged particle beam current distribution is measured

  11. A 128-channel picoammeter system and its application on charged particle beam current distribution measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Deyang; Liu, Junliang; Xue, Yingli; Zhang, Mingwu; Cai, Xiaohong; Hu, Jianjun; Dong, Jinmei; Li, Xin

    2015-11-01

    A 128-channel picoammeter system is constructed based on instrumentation amplifiers. Taking advantage of a high electric potential and narrow bandwidth in DC energetic charged beam measurements, a current resolution better than 5 fA can be achieved. Two sets of 128-channel strip electrodes are implemented on printed circuit boards and are employed for ion and electron beam current distribution measurements. Tests with 60 keV O3+ ions and 2 keV electrons show that it can provide exact boundaries when a positive charged particle beam current distribution is measured.

  12. Isovector coupling channel and central properties of the charge density distribution in heavy spherical nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Haddad

    2010-09-01

    The influence of the isovector coupling channel on the central depression parameter and the central value of the charge density distribution in heavy spherical nuclei was studied. The isovector coupling channel leads to about 50% increase of the central depression parameter, and weakens the dependency of both central depression parameter and central density on the asymmetry, impressively contributing to the semibubble form of the charge density distribution in heavy nuclei, and increasing the probability of larger nuclei with higher proton numbers and higher neutron-to-proton ratios stable.

  13. Microscopic modeling of mass and charge distributions in the spontaneous fission of 240Pu

    CERN Document Server

    Sadhukhan, Jhilam; Schunck, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    In this letter, we outline a methodology to calculate microscopically mass and charge distributions of spontaneous fission yields. We combine the multi-dimensional minimization of collective action for fission with stochastic Langevin dynamics to track the relevant fission paths from the ground-state configuration up to scission. The nuclear potential energy and collective inertia governing the tunneling motion are obtained with nuclear density functional theory in the collective space of shape deformations and pairing. We obtain a quantitative agreement with experimental data and find that both the charge and mass distributions in the spontaneous fission of 240Pu are sensitive both to the dissipation in collective motion and to adiabatic characteristics.

  14. Microscopic modeling of mass and charge distributions in the spontaneous fission of 240Pu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhukhan, Jhilam; Nazarewicz, Witold; Schunck, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    We propose a methodology to calculate microscopically the mass and charge distributions of spontaneous fission yields. We combine the multidimensional minimization of collective action for fission with stochastic Langevin dynamics to track the relevant fission paths from the ground-state configuration up to scission. The nuclear potential energy and collective inertia governing the tunneling motion are obtained with nuclear density functional theory in the collective space of shape deformations and pairing. We obtain a quantitative agreement with experimental data and find that both the charge and mass distributions in the spontaneous fission of 240Pu are sensitive both to the dissipation in collective motion and to adiabatic fission characteristics.

  15. Isovector coupling channel and central properties of the charge density distribution in heavy spherical nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of the isovector coupling channel on the central depression parameter and the central value of the charge density distribution in heavy spherical nuclei was studied. The isovector coupling channel leads to about 50% increase of the central depression parameter, and weakens the dependency of both central depression parameter and the central density on the asymmetry, impressively contributing to the semibubble form of the charge density distribution in heavy nuclei, and increasing the probability of larger nuclei with higher proton numbers and higher neutron-to-proton ratios stable. (author)

  16. A 128-channel picoammeter system and its application on charged particle beam current distribution measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Deyang; Xue, Yingli; Zhang, Mingwu; Cai, Xiaohong; Hu, Jianjun; Dong, Jinmei; Li, Xin

    2015-01-01

    A 128-channel picoammeter system is constructed based on instrumentation amplifiers. Taking the advantages of high electric potential and narrow bandwidth in DC energetic charged beam measurements, current resolution better than 5 fA can be achieved. Two 128-channel Faraday cup arrays are built, and are employed for ion and electron beam current distribution measurements. Tests with 60 keV O3+ ions and 2 keV electrons show that it can provide exact boundaries when a positive charged particle beam current distribution is measured.

  17. Charged weak currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this review of charged weak currents we shall concentrate on inclusive high energy neutrino physics. The plan of this review is the following: general structure of charged current; new results on total cross-section; Callan-Gross relation; antiquark distribution; scaling violations and tests of QCD. At the end we will give a very short summary on multilepton physics

  18. Ion temperature effects on ion charge-state distributions of an electron cyclotron resonant ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is described for determining ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) heating effects on multiply charged-ion energy distributions using a Monte Carlo fit to experimental time-of-flight spectrometer data. The method is general but is used here specifically to separate the effects of plasma ambipolar potential spread and ion temperature in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heated magnetic mirror ion source (MIMI) [Phys. Fluids 28, 3116 (1985)]. A steady-state equilibrium model is also developed that models the relevant atomic processes occurring in MIMI plasmas. This model and the Monte Carlo analysis are used to relate the effect of midplane ICR heating on end loss ion charge state distributions to its effect on the confined ion distributions. The model allows for collisional, moderately collisional, and collisionless confinement, specific to each charge state in the distribution. Both experiment and modeling show that increased ion temperature causes a shift to lower-Z ion populations in both the confined and end loss charge-state distributions

  19. Review of household solid waste charges for developing countries--A focus on quantity-based charge methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welivita, Indunee; Wattage, Premachandra; Gunawardena, Prasanthi

    2015-12-01

    Solid waste management has become a major issue in almost all municipalities especially in developing countries across the world. As more waste needs to be collected and disposed of in urban areas, the increased cost cannot be covered by the available funds in developing countries. Managing the Household Solid Waste (HSW) sector is very important as it is the main contributor of the waste that needs to be collected in residential areas. The reduction of the amount of HSW to be disposed of can be achieved by households themselves practising the "4R" activities: reducing, reusing, recycling and recovering. As a policy instrument, the Waste Management Charge (WMC) for HSW has shown much success in encouraging such activities all over the world. Given the already difficult context in which developing countries operate, it is important to careful consider what kind of charging system is implemented. Using available literature, this paper reviews the applicability of available charging methods, from a flat rate method, through to volume-based (bags, cans or tag/sticker) and weight-based charging methods. These charging methods were evaluated on the basis of overall cost, technology need possible other issues. By considering the conditions in developing countries, a 'pre-paid bag based charging method' could be suggested as the most suitable charging method for a WMC in Sri Lanka or other developing countries. The potential applicability of this method was also examined in the context of social, economic and political characteristics. Whilst the use of economic instruments, including WMC, was widely discussed in the literature, the selection of a charging method in the context of developing countries is rarely discussed. Having said that, this paper gives an insight to the policy makers in developing countries upon using pre-paid bag based charging method for HSW sector. It also provides recommendations regarding possible issues in implementing for developing countries

  20. Distributed Agile Software Development: A Review

    CERN Document Server

    Shrivastava, Suprika Vasudeva

    2010-01-01

    Distribution of software development is becoming more and more common in order to save the production cost and reduce the time to market. Large geographical distance, different time zones and cultural differences in distributed software development (DSD) leads to weak communication which adversely affects the project. Using agile practices for distributed development is also gaining momentum in various organizations to increase the quality and performance of the project. This paper explores the intersection of these two significant trends for software development i.e. DSD and agile. We discuss the challenges faced by geographically distributed agile teams and proven practices to address these issues, which will help in building a successful distributed team.

  1. Fragment charge and energy distributions in the 1.8-4.8 GeV {sup 3}He + {sup nat}Ag, {sup 197}Au reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracken, D.S.; Foxford, E.R.; Kwiatkowski, K. [and others

    1995-10-01

    Moving source fits have been performed for IMFs as a function of observables related to collision violence in the 1.8-4.8 GeV {sup 3}He +{sup nat}Ag, {sup l97}Au reactions. The systematic behavior of the source properties and fragment charge distributions will be reviewed. The evolution of the spectral Coulomb parameters provides evidence for nuclear expansion prior to multifragmentation, suggesting a breakup density of p/p{sub o} {approximately} 1/3. The charge distributions will be examined in terms of power-law fits and moment analyses.

  2. Fragment charge and energy distributions in the 1.8-4.8 GeV 3He + natAg, 197Au reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moving source fits have been performed for IMFs as a function of observables related to collision violence in the 1.8-4.8 GeV 3He +natAg, l97Au reactions. The systematic behavior of the source properties and fragment charge distributions will be reviewed. The evolution of the spectral Coulomb parameters provides evidence for nuclear expansion prior to multifragmentation, suggesting a breakup density of p/po ∼ 1/3. The charge distributions will be examined in terms of power-law fits and moment analyses

  3. Dust charging processes with a Cairns-Tsallis distribution function with negative ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dust grain charging processes are presented in a non-Maxwellian dusty plasma following the Cairns-Tsallis (q, α)–distribution, whose constituents are the electrons, as well as the positive/negative ions and negatively charged dust grains. For this purpose, we have solved the current balance equation for a negatively charged dust grain to achieve an equilibrium state value (viz., qd = constant) in the presence of Cairns-Tsallis (q, α)–distribution. In fact, the current balance equation becomes modified due to the Boltzmannian/streaming distributed negative ions. It is numerically found that the relevant plasma parameters, such as the spectral indexes q and α, the positive ion-to-electron temperature ratio, and the negative ion streaming speed (U0) significantly affect the dust grain surface potential. It is also shown that in the limit q → 1 the Cairns-Tsallis reduces to the Cairns distribution; for α = 0 the Cairns-Tsallis distribution reduces to pure Tsallis distribution and the latter reduces to Maxwellian distribution for q → 1 and α = 0

  4. Dust charging processes with a Cairns-Tsallis distribution function with negative ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abid, A. A., E-mail: abidaliabid1@hotmail.com [Applied Physics Department, Federal Urdu University of Arts, Science and Technology, Islamabad Campus, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Khan, M. Z., E-mail: mzk-qau@yahoo.com [Applied Physics Department, Federal Urdu University of Arts, Science and Technology, Islamabad Campus, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Plasma Technology Research Center, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Yap, S. L. [Plasma Technology Research Center, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Terças, H., E-mail: hugo.tercas@tecnico.ul.pt [Physics of Information Group, Instituto de Telecomunicações, Av. Rovisco Pais, Lisbon 1049-001 (Portugal); Mahmood, S. [Science Place, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N5A2 (Canada)

    2016-01-15

    Dust grain charging processes are presented in a non-Maxwellian dusty plasma following the Cairns-Tsallis (q, α)–distribution, whose constituents are the electrons, as well as the positive/negative ions and negatively charged dust grains. For this purpose, we have solved the current balance equation for a negatively charged dust grain to achieve an equilibrium state value (viz., q{sub d} = constant) in the presence of Cairns-Tsallis (q, α)–distribution. In fact, the current balance equation becomes modified due to the Boltzmannian/streaming distributed negative ions. It is numerically found that the relevant plasma parameters, such as the spectral indexes q and α, the positive ion-to-electron temperature ratio, and the negative ion streaming speed (U{sub 0}) significantly affect the dust grain surface potential. It is also shown that in the limit q → 1 the Cairns-Tsallis reduces to the Cairns distribution; for α = 0 the Cairns-Tsallis distribution reduces to pure Tsallis distribution and the latter reduces to Maxwellian distribution for q → 1 and α = 0.

  5. Effects of charging and doping on orbital hybridizations and distributions in TiO2 clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hong Min; Wu, Miao Miao; Wang, Qian; Jena, Puru

    2011-11-01

    Charging and doping are two important strategies used in TiO2 quantum dots for photocatalysis and photovoltaics. Using small clusters as the prototypes for quantum dots, we have carried out density functional calculations to study the size-specific effects of charging and doping on geometry, electronic structure, frontier orbital distribution, and orbital hybridization. We find that in neutral (TiO2)n clusters the charge transfer from Ti to O is almost size independent, while for the anionic (TiO2)n clusters the corresponding charge transfer is reduced but it increases with size. When one O atom is substituted with N, the charge transfer is also reduced due to the smaller electron affinity of N. As the cluster size increases, the populations of 3d and 4s orbitals of Ti decrease with size, while the populations of the 4p orbital increase, suggesting size dependence of spd hybridizations. The present study clearly shows that charging and doping are effective ways for tailoring the energy gap, orbital distributions, and hybridizations.

  6. Measurements of the charged particle multiplicity distribution in restricted rapidity intervals

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; De Bonis, I; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Ariztizabal, F; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Gaitan, V; Garrido, L; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Padilla, C; Palla, Fabrizio; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Farilla, A; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Romano, F; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Bonvicini, G; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Engelhardt, A; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Jacobsen, R; Janot, P; Jost, B; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Markou, C; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Meinhard, H; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Oest, T; Palazzi, P; Pater, J R; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wiedenmann, W; Wildish, T; Witzeling, W; Wotschack, J; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Bardadin-Otwinowska, Maria; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rossignol, J M; Saadi, F; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Kyriakis, A; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Passalacqua, L; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Tanaka, R; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Delfino, M C; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; ten Have, I; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; Morton, W T; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Smith, M G; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Braun, O; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Colling, D J; Dornan, Peter J; Konstantinidis, N P; Moneta, L; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; San Martin, G; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bowdery, C K; Brodbeck, T J; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Raab, J; Renk, B; Sander, H G; Wanke, R; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Thulasidas, M; Nicod, D; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Abt, I; Assmann, R W; Bauer, C; Blum, Walter; Brown, D; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Jakobs, K; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Stierlin, U; Saint-Denis, R; Wolf, G; Alemany, R; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Courault, F; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Musolino, G; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Park, I C; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Abbaneo, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Triggiani, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Betteridge, A P; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Johnson, D L; Medcalf, T; Mir, M; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Bertin, V; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Edwards, M; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Duarte, H; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Rosowsky, A; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Si Mohand, D; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Beddall, A; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Dawson, I; Köksal, A; Letho, M; Newton, W M; Rankin, C; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Feigl, E; Grupen, Claus; Lutters, G; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Ragusa, F; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Harton, J L; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Schmitt, M; Scott, I J; Sharma, V; Turk, J; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1995-01-01

    Charged particle multiplicity distributions have been measured with the ALEPH detector in restricted rapidity intervals |Y| \\leq 0.5,1.0, 1.5,2.0\\/ along the thrust axis and also without restriction on rapidity. The distribution for the full range can be parametrized by a log-normal distribution. For smaller windows one finds a more complicated structure, which is understood to arise from perturbative effects. The negative-binomial distribution fails to describe the data both with and without the restriction on rapidity. The JETSET model is found to describe all aspects of the data while the width predicted by HERWIG is in significant disagreement.

  7. Ion charge state distributions of pulsed vacuum arc plasmas in strong magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacuum arc plasmas with discharge currents of 300 A and duration 250 μs have been produced in strong magnetic fields up to 4 T. Ion charge state distributions have been measured for C, Al, Ag, Ta, Pt, Ho, and Er with a time-of-flight charge-mass spectrometer. Our previous measurements have been confirmed which show that ion charge states can be considerably enhanced when increasing the magnetic field up to about 1 T. The new measurements address the question of whether or not the additional increase continues at even higher magnetic field strength. It has been found that the increase becomes insignificant for field strengths greater than 1 T. Ion charge state distributions are almost constant for magnetic field strengths between 2 and 4 T. The results are explained by comparing the free expansion length with the freezing length. The most significant changes of charge state distributions are observed when these lengths are similar. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  8. Ion charge state distributions of pulsed vacuum arc plasmas in strong magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacuum arc plasmas with discharge currents of 300 A and duration 250 μs have been produced in strong magnetic fields up to 4 T. Ion charge state distributions have been measured for C, Al, Ag, Ta, Pt, Ho, and Er with a time-of-flight charge-mass-spectrometer. Our previous measurements have been confirmed which show that ion charge states can be considerably enhanced when increasing the magnetic field up to about 1 T. The new measurements address the question of whether or not the additional increase continues at even higher magnetic field strength. It has been found that the increase becomes insignificant for field strengths greater than 1 T. Ion charge state distributions are almost constant for magnetic field strengths between 2 and 4 T. The results are explained by comparing the free expansion length with the freezing length. The most significant changes of charge state distributions are observed when these lengths are similar. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  9. Investigation of the W and Q 2 dependence of charged pion distributions in μ p scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneodo, M.; Arvidson, A.; Aubert, J. J.; Badelek, B.; Beaufays, J.; Bee, C. P.; Benchouk, C.; Berghoff, G.; Bird, I.; Blum, D.; Böhm, E.; de Bouard, X.; Brasse, F. W.; Braun, H.; Broll, C.; Brown, S.; Brück, H.; Calen, H.; Chima, J. S.; Ciborowski, J.; Clifft, R.; Coignet, G.; Combley, F.; Coughlan, J.; D'Agostini, G.; Dahlgren, S.; Dengler, F.; Derado, I.; Dreyer, T.; Drees, J.; Düren, M.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, A.; Ernst, T.; Eszes, G.; Favier, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Flauger, W.; Foster, J.; Gabathuler, E.; Gajewski, J.; Gamet, R.; Gayler, J.; Geddes, N.; Giubellino, P.; Grafström, P.; Grard, F.; Haas, J.; Hagberg, E.; Hasert, F. J.; Hayman, P.; Heusse, P.; Hoppe, C.; Jaffré, M.; Jacholkowska, A.; Janata, F.; Jancso, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Kabuss, E. M.; Kellner, G.; Korbel, V.; Krüger, J.; Kullander, S.; Landgraf, U.; Lanske, D.; Loken, J.; Long, K.; Maire, M.; Malecki, P.; Manz, A.; Maselli, S.; Mohr, W.; Montanet, F.; Montgomery, H. E.; Nagy, E.; Nassalski, J.; Norton, P. R.; Oakham, F. G.; Osborne, A. M.; Pascaud, C.; Pawlik, B.; Payre, P.; Peroni, C.; Pessard, H.; Pettingale, J.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pönsgen, B.; Pötsch, M.; Renton, P.; Ribarics, P.; Rith, K.; Rondio, E.; Scheer, M.; Schlagböhmer, A.; Schiemann, H.; Schmitz, N.; Schneegans, M.; Scholz, M.; Schröder, T.; Schouten, M.; Schultze, K.; Sloan, T.; Stier, H. E.; Studt, M.; Taylor, G. N.; Thénard, J. M.; Thompson, J. C.; de La Torre, A.; Toth, J.; Urban, L.; Wallucks, W.; Whalley, M.; Wheeler, S.; Williams, W. S. C.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Windmolders, R.; Wolf, G.

    1986-03-01

    The W and Q 2 dependence of the fragmentation functions and of the average multiplicity of charged pions is investigated, using data from the NA9 experiment at the CERN SPS on muon-proton scattering at 280 GeV. A significant increase of pion production with increasing W is observed at fixed Q 2, leading to a rise of the average charged pion multiplicity, linear in ln W 2, and of the pion fragmentation function in the central region, i.e. at small | x F |. This increase can be understood from the kinematic widening of the cms rapidity range proportional to ln W 2 and the observed W independent height of the rapidity distribution. At fixed W, a rise of the average charged pion multiplicity with Q 2 is observed. This rise appears to be weaker than that observed for all charged hadrons implying a stronger rise with Q 2 for kaons and protons.

  10. Electron Charge Density Distribution from X-Ray Diffraction Study of the 4-Methoxybenzenecarbothioamide Compound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokhtaria Drissi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular electron charge density distribution of the title compound is described accurately using the multipolar model of Hansen and Coppens. The net atomic charge and the in-crystal molecular dipole moment have been determined in order to understand the nature of inter- and intramolecular charge transfer. The study reveals the nature of intermolecular interactions including charge transfer and hydrogen bonds in the title compound. In this crystal, the molecules form dimers via N–HS intermolecular hydrogen bonds. The dimers are further linked by C–HO hydrogen bonds into chains along the c crystallographic axis. This study has also allowed us to determine the electrostatic potential and therefore locate the electropositive part and the electronegative part in molecular scale of the title compound.

  11. Charge symmetry breaking from a chiral extrapolation of moments of quark distribution functions

    OpenAIRE

    Shanahan, P. E.; Thomas, A. W.; Young, R.D.(ARC Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Terascale and CSSM, School of Chemistry and Physics, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia)

    2013-01-01

    We present a determination, from lattice QCD, of charge symmetry violation in the spin- independent and spin-dependent parton distribution functions of the nucleon. This is done by chirally extrapolating recent QCDSF/UKQCD Collaboration lattice simulations of the first several Mellin moments of the parton distribution functions of octet baryons to the physical point. We find small chiral corrections for the polarized moments, while the corrections are quantitatively significant in the unpolar...

  12. Scaled momentum distributions of charged particles in dijet photoproduction at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Lab., Argonne, IL (US)] (and others)

    2009-04-15

    The scaled momentum distributions of charged particles in jets have been measured for dijet photoproduction with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 359 pb{sup -1}. The distributions are compared to predictions based on perturbative QCD carried out in the framework of the modified leading-logarithmic approximation (MLLA) and assuming local parton-hadron duality (LPHD). The universal MLLA scale, {lambda}{sub eff}, and the LPHD parameter, {kappa}{sup ch}, are extracted. (orig.)

  13. Charged particle density distributions in Au + Au collisions at relativistic heavy-ion collider energies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fauad Rami

    2003-05-01

    Charged particle pseudorapidity distributions have been measured in Au + Au collisions using the BRAHMS detector at RHIC. The results are presented as a function of the collision centrality and the center of mass energy. They are compared to the predictions of different parton scattering models and the important role of hard scattering processes at RHIC energies is discussed.

  14. Market-based coordinated charging of electric vehicles on the low-voltage distribution grid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Ghijsen; R D'hulst

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a market based coordination mechanism for charging electric vehicles. In market based coordination, a virtual market is used to match supply and demand of a commodity. The goal is to limit the impact of the electric vehicles on the low voltage distribution grid. First it is shown

  15. Polarized parton distributions from charged-current deep-inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the capabilities of a neutrino factory in the determination of polarized parton distributions from charged-current deep-inelastic scattering experiments, with special attention to the accuracy of this kind of measurements. We show that a neutrino factory would allow to distinguish between different theoretical scenarios for the proton spin structure

  16. Surface valence charge distributions and scanning tunneling microscopy of WTe 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, S. L.; Kasowski, R. V.; Suna, A.; Parkinson, B. A.

    1990-11-01

    We have studied the surface electronic structures of the van der Waals surfaces of tungsten ditelluride (WTe 2) with first principles calculations of the spatial distribution of the surface valence charge densities and compared the results to images obtained with the scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The energy- and z(distance from the surface)-dependent calculations show that the valence charge density distribution above the Te surface could be derived from the surface Te layer, as we previously calculated, but the charge density distribution close to but below the Fermi energy has a distortion that coincidentally makes it appear to have a symmetry close to the paired, zig-zag and buckled rows of the W layer. These results dramatically illustrate that in highly covalent compounds, the surface valence charge density distribution does not necessarily follow the surface atomic positions even on ideal, unreconstructed surfaces. An alternative interpretation of the STM images of this surface is proposed in light of this new surface electronic structure. Our calculated and experimental results are also discussed with reference to recent STM results on other transition metal dichalcogenides.

  17. Distribution of charged particles near the plasma boundary in the presence of external electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of the proposed numerical procedure the solution of the nonlinear Boltzmann-Poisson equation for bounded plasma in the presence of strong external electric field is obtained. The numerical analysis of the electric field, potential, and equilibrium profiles of charged particles distributions in the plasma half-space is performed in detail. 6 refs.; 8 figs. (author)

  18. Distributed Information System Development: Review of Some Management Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Deepti; Mishra, Alok

    Due to the proliferation of the Internet and globalization, distributed information system development is becoming popular. In this paper we have reviewed some significant management issues like process management, project management, requirements management and knowledge management issues which have received much attention in distributed development perspective. In this literature review we found that areas like quality and risk management issues could get only scant attention in distributed information system development.

  19. X-Ray Spectroscopy: An Experimental Technique to Measure Charge State Distribution Right at the Ion-Solid Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Prashant

    2015-01-01

    Charge state distributions of $^{56}$Fe and $^{58}$Ni projectile ions passing through thin carbon foils have been studied in the energy range of 1.44 - 2.69 MeV/u using a novel method from the x-ray spectroscopy technique. Interestingly the charge state distribution in the bulk show Lorentzian behavior instead of usual Gaussian distribution. Further, different parameters of charge state distribution like mean charge state, distribution width and asymmetric parameter are determined and compared with the empirical calculations and ETACHA predictions. It is found that the x-ray measurement technique is appropriate to determine the mean charge state right at the interaction zone or in the bulk. Interestingly, empirical formalism predicts much lower projectile mean charge states compare to x-ray measurements which clearly indicate multi-electron capture from the target surface. The ETACHA predictions and experimental results are found to be comparable for energies $\\geq$ 2 MeV/u.

  20. Charge particle accelerator - a brief review, future challenges and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charged particle accelerators are important tools to investigate hitherto inaccessible problems in various fields of science. The interaction of charged particles with materials reveals structural information at very small scale (-16 cm). Accelerator based equipments viz. scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and focused ion beam (FIB) machines are extensively being used to explore new possibilities in nanotechnology. Many experiments in nuclear and particle physics examine the fundamental laws of physics by colliding a high-energy beam of particles, such as electrons or protons, with a fixed target or with another beam of particles. Modern light sources, which are capable of producing high-energy photons such as X-rays, operate by 'bending' the path of electrons in an accelerator with magnets to generate radiation. State-of-the-art cancer treatment facilities utilize high-energy proton and heavier ion beams to treat inoperable tumors. The man made sun, International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), will utilize 1 MeV, 40 A neutral proton beams for additional heating of the plasma. A roadmap for developing accelerator driven systems (ADS) in India was prepared in 2001 and involves development of a 1 GeV, 30 mA proton linear accelerator. Due to potential applications, developing high energy accelerators worldwide is a challenge for the community. New acceleration schemes to make accelerator size compact have been realized. In the present talk, various types of accelerators, accelerator based programs worldwide and new acceleration scheme of charge particles will be discussed. The low energy ion beam facility (LEIBF) at IUAC and a few experimental results arising from this facility will be presented. Finally, I will touch some applications, particularly in nanotechnology, where accelerators are making a big impact. (author)

  1. Characterization of the surface charge distribution on kaolinite particles using high resolution atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Naveen; Zhao, Cunlu; Klaassen, Aram; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder; Siretanu, Igor

    2016-02-01

    Most solid surfaces, in particular clay minerals and rock surfaces, acquire a surface charge upon exposure to an aqueous environment due to adsorption and/or desorption of ionic species. Macroscopic techniques such as titration and electrokinetic measurements are commonly used to determine the surface charge and ζ -potential of these surfaces. However, because of the macroscopic averaging character these techniques cannot do justice to the role of local heterogeneities on the surfaces. In this work, we use dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) to determine the distribution of surface charge on the two (gibbsite-like and silica-like) basal planes of kaolinite nanoparticles immersed in aqueous electrolyte with a lateral resolution of approximately 30 nm. The surface charge density is extracted from force-distance curves using DLVO theory in combination with surface complexation modeling. While the gibbsite-like and the silica-like facet display on average positive and negative surface charge values as expected, our measurements reveal lateral variations of more than a factor of two on seemingly atomically smooth terraces, even if high resolution AFM images clearly reveal the atomic lattice on the surface. These results suggest that simple surface complexation models of clays that attribute a unique surface chemistry and hence homogeneous surface charge densities to basal planes may miss important aspects of real clay surfaces.

  2. A flexible distributed framework for realising electric and plug-in hybrid vehicle charging policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stüdli, S.; Crisostomi, E.; Middleton, R.; Shorten, R.

    2012-08-01

    Motivated by the problems of charging a number of electric vehicles via limited capacity infrastructure, this article considers the problem of individual load adjustment under a total capacity constraint. For reasons of scalability and simplified communications, distributed solutions to this problem are sought. Borrowing from communication networks (AIMD algorithms) and distributed convex optimisation, we describe a number of distributed algorithms for achieving relative average fairness whilst maximising utilisation. We present analysis and simulation results to show the performance of these algorithms. In the scenarios examined, the algorithm's performance is typically within 5% of that achievable in the ideal centralised case, but with greatly enhanced scalability and reduced communication requirements.

  3. Statistical interpretation of joint multiplicity distributions of neutrons and charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental joint multiplicity distributions of neutrons and charged particles provide a striking signal of the characteristic decay processes of nuclear systems following energetic nuclear reactions. They present, therefore, a valuable tool for testing theoretical models for such decay processes. The power of this experimental tool is demonstrated by a comparison of an experimental joint multiplicity distribution to the predictions of different theoretical models of statistical decay of excited nuclear systems. It is shown that, while generally phase-space based models offer a quantitative description of the observed correlation pattern of such an experimental multiplicity distribution, some models of nuclear multifragmentation fail to account for salient features of the observed correlation

  4. Charge state distributions and charge-changing cross sections of heavy ions in the energy range up to 10 MeV/u

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charge state distributions and charge-changing cross sections have been measured for heavy ions with atomic numbers between 18 and 92, in charge states from +9 to +68, and at energies in the range from 0.2 to 10 MeV/u using various gaseous and solid target materials. The experimental cross sections are compared with the theory of Bohr and Lindhard. The accuracy of predictions by means of known empirical formulae for average equilibrium charge states is briefly discussed. (author)

  5. Potential energy, force distribution and oscillatory motion of chloride ion inside electrically charged carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, F.; Ansari, R.; Darvizeh, M.

    2016-06-01

    In this research, a continuum-based model is presented to explore potential energy, force distribution and oscillatory motion of ions, and in particular chloride ion, inside carbon nanotubes (CNTs) decorated by functional groups at two ends. To perform this, van der Waals (vdW) interactions between ion and nanotube are modeled by the 6-12 Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential, whereas the electrostatic interactions between ion and functional groups are modeled by the Coulomb potential and the total interactions are analytically derived by summing the vdW and electrostatic interactions. Making the assumption that carbon atoms and charge of functional groups are all uniformly distributed over the nanotube surface and the two ends of nanotube, respectively, a continuum approach is utilized to evaluate the related interactions. Based on the actual force distribution, the equation of motion is also solved numerically to arrive at the time history of displacement and velocity of inner core. With respect to the proposed formulations, comprehensive studies on the variations of potential energy and force distribution are carried out by varying functional group charge and nanotube length. Moreover, the effects of these parameters together with initial conditions on the oscillatory behavior of system are studied and discussed in detail. It is found out that chloride ion escapes more easily from negatively charged CNTs which is followed by uncharged and positively charged ones. It is further shown that the presence of functional groups leads to enhancing the operating frequency of such oscillatory systems especially when the electric charges of ion and functional groups have different signs.

  6. A Statistical Study of the Average Iron Charge Distributions inside Magnetic Clouds for Solar Cycle 23

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Hongqiang; Chen, Yao; Zhang, Jie; Cheng, Xin; Zhao, Liang; Hu, Qiang; Li, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic clouds (MCs) are the interplanetary counterpart of coronal magnetic flux ropes. They can provide valuable information to reveal the flux rope characteristics at their eruption stage in the corona, which are unable to be explored in situ at present. In this paper, we make a comprehensive survey of the average iron charge state (Fe) distributions inside 96 MCs for solar cycle 23 using ACE (Advanced Composition Explorer) data. As the Fe in the solar wind are typically around 9+ to 11+, the Fe charge state is defined as high when the Fe is larger than 12+, which implies the existence of a considerable amount of Fe ions with high charge states (e.g., \\geq 16+). The statistical results show that the Fe distributions of 92 (~ 96%) MCs can be classified into four groups with different characteristics. In group A (11 MCs), the Fe shows a bimodal distribution with both peaks higher than 12+. Group B (4 MCs) presents a unimodal distribution of Fe with its peak higher than 12+. In groups C (29 MCs) and D (48 MCs...

  7. Charge states distribution of 3350 keV He ions channeled in silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Bentini, G G; Bianconi, M; Lotti, R; Lulli, G

    2002-01-01

    When an ion beam is aligned along a major crystalline axis the dominant interaction is with valence electrons. In this condition the charge exchange processes mostly concern the interaction between the incident ion and a quasi-free electron gas and a strong reduction of the charge-changing probabilities is expected. In this work, 3350 keV He sup + and He sup 2 sup + ions were aligned at small tilt angles about the axis of a 4650 A silicon crystalline membrane. The charge state distribution (CSD) of the transmitted ions was detected by an electro-magnetic analyzer having a very small acceptance angle. In these conditions the equilibration of the CSD was not yet reached and this allowed, making use of simple approximations, for the measurement of the valence electron loss cross-section.

  8. Ionic charge state distribution of helium, carbon, oxygen, and iron in an energetic storm particle enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovestadt, D.; Klecker, B.; Hoefner, H.; Scholer, M.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.

    1982-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the ionic charge state distribution of He, C, O and Fe in the energetic storm particle event of September 28-29, 1978. Data were obtained with the ULEZEQ electrostatic analyzer-proportional counter on board the ISEE 3 spacecraft. The He(+)/He(++) ratio between 0.4 and 1 MeV/n is shown to be significantly lower during the energetic storm particle event than during the preceding period of solar flare particle enhancement, with a temporal evolution similar to that of the Fe/He ratio as reported by Klecker et al. (1981). Increases in the mean charge state for oxygen by about 3% and for iron by about 16% are also noted. The temporal variations in charge states are accounted for in terms of first-order Fermi acceleration of the pre-existing solar flare particles by a propagating interplanetary shock wave.

  9. Charge state distribution analysis of Al and Pb ions from the laser ion source at IMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prototype laser ion source that could demonstrate the possibility of producing intense pulsed high charge state ion beams has been established with a commercial Nd:YAG laser (Emax=3 J, 1064 nm, 8-10 ns) to produce laser plasma for the research of Laser Ion Source (LIS). At the laser ion source test bench, high purity (99.998%) aluminum and lead targets have been tested for laser plasma experiment. An Electrostatic Ion Analyzer (EIA) and Electron Multiply Tube (EMT) detector were used to analyze the charge state and energy distribution of the ions produced by the laser ion source. The maximum charge states of Al12+ and Pb7+ were achieved. The results will be presented and discussed in this paper. (authors)

  10. Charge state distribution analysis of Al and Pb ions from the laser ion source at IMP

    CERN Document Server

    Shan, Sha; Zhang-Min, Li; Xiao-Hong, Guo; Lun-Cai, Zhou; Guo-Zhu, Cai; Liang-ting, Sun; Xue-Zhen, Zhang; Huan-Yu, Zhao; Xi-Meng, Chen; Hong-Wei, Zhao

    2013-01-01

    A prototype laser ion source that could demonstrate the possibility of producing intense pulsed high charge state ion beams has been established with a commercial Nd:YAG laser (E max = 3 J, 1064 nm, 8-10 ns) to produce laser plasma for the research of Laser Ion Source (LIS). At the laser ion source test bench, high purity (99.998 %) aluminum and lead targets have been tested for laser plasma experiment. An Electrostatic Ion Analyzer (EIA) and Electron Multiply Tube (EMT) detector were used to analyze the charge state and energy distribution of the ions produced by the laser ion source. The maximum charge states of Al12+ and Pb7+ were achieved. The results will be presented and discussed in this paper.

  11. X-ray diffraction studies of charge density waves in cuprate superconductors: A brief review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High temperature superconductivity in the cuprates has fascinated scientists for more than 25 years, but there is still no consensus on the pairing mechanism. Soon after the discovery of high temperature superconductivity, it was suggested that the cuprates have an incipient tendency towards spatial electronic order – spin and charge order. In this paper, I will review X-ray diffraction studies of charge density waves in the cuprates. These results, by a number of different groups, indicate that short-range charge correlations exist across the cuprate family, and in many cases are clearly competing with the superconductivity

  12. Charged patchy particle models in explicit salt: Ion distributions, electrostatic potentials, and effective interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We introduce a set of charged patchy particle models (CPPMs) in order to systematically study the influence of electrostatic charge patchiness and multipolarity on macromolecular interactions by means of implicit-solvent, explicit-ion Langevin dynamics simulations employing the Gromacs software. We consider well-defined zero-, one-, and two-patched spherical globules each of the same net charge and (nanometer) size which are composed of discrete atoms. The studied mono- and multipole moments of the CPPMs are comparable to those of globular proteins with similar size. We first characterize ion distributions and electrostatic potentials around a single CPPM. Although angle-resolved radial distribution functions reveal the expected local accumulation and depletion of counter- and co-ions around the patches, respectively, the orientation-averaged electrostatic potential shows only a small variation among the various CPPMs due to space charge cancellations. Furthermore, we study the orientation-averaged potential of mean force (PMF), the number of accumulated ions on the patches, as well as the CPPM orientations along the center-to-center distance of a pair of CPPMs. We compare the PMFs to the classical Derjaguin-Verwey-Landau-Overbeek theory and previously introduced orientation-averaged Debye-Hückel pair potentials including dipolar interactions. Our simulations confirm the adequacy of the theories in their respective regimes of validity, while low salt concentrations and large multipolar interactions remain a challenge for tractable theoretical descriptions

  13. Charged patchy particle models in explicit salt: Ion distributions, electrostatic potentials, and effective interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yigit, Cemil; Dzubiella, Joachim, E-mail: joachim.dzubiella@helmholtz-berlin.de [Soft Matter and Functional Materials, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Helmholtz Virtual Institute “Multifunctional Biomaterials for Medicine,” 14513 Teltow (Germany); Institut für Physik, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Heyda, Jan [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Chemistry and Technology, Prague, 166 28 Praha 6 (Czech Republic)

    2015-08-14

    We introduce a set of charged patchy particle models (CPPMs) in order to systematically study the influence of electrostatic charge patchiness and multipolarity on macromolecular interactions by means of implicit-solvent, explicit-ion Langevin dynamics simulations employing the Gromacs software. We consider well-defined zero-, one-, and two-patched spherical globules each of the same net charge and (nanometer) size which are composed of discrete atoms. The studied mono- and multipole moments of the CPPMs are comparable to those of globular proteins with similar size. We first characterize ion distributions and electrostatic potentials around a single CPPM. Although angle-resolved radial distribution functions reveal the expected local accumulation and depletion of counter- and co-ions around the patches, respectively, the orientation-averaged electrostatic potential shows only a small variation among the various CPPMs due to space charge cancellations. Furthermore, we study the orientation-averaged potential of mean force (PMF), the number of accumulated ions on the patches, as well as the CPPM orientations along the center-to-center distance of a pair of CPPMs. We compare the PMFs to the classical Derjaguin-Verwey-Landau-Overbeek theory and previously introduced orientation-averaged Debye-Hückel pair potentials including dipolar interactions. Our simulations confirm the adequacy of the theories in their respective regimes of validity, while low salt concentrations and large multipolar interactions remain a challenge for tractable theoretical descriptions.

  14. Audio and ultrasonic responses of laminated fluoroethylenepropylene and porous polytetrafluoroethylene films with different charge distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoqing; Sessler, Gerhard M.; Xue, Yuan; Ma, Xingchen

    2016-05-01

    Laminated fluoropolymer films with a regular microstructure were made from compact fluoroethylenepropylene (FEP) and porous polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) using a process consisting of patterning and fusion bonding steps. The fabricated films were rendered piezoelectric via the contact charging or corona charging methods. The piezoelectric responses of such piezoelectret films were measured in the frequency range 100 Hz–100 kHz. The results show that the acoustic impedance of the FEP/PTFE films is around 0.014–0.030 MRayl. Dynamic piezoelectric d 33 coefficients of up to 500 pC N‑1 were achieved at 100 Hz for these films. Microphones built with such films exhibit flat response curves in a broad frequency range if the diffraction effects are eliminated. Bonded films with all positive charges deposited in the porous PTFE layers show the best thermal stability: after annealing for 1100 min at 125 °C, the remaining d 33 at 1020 Hz is about 30% of the initial value, corresponding to 105 pC N‑1, and it remains relatively stable at this temperature. This remarkable thermal stability has to be attributed to the fact that positive charges are more permanent in porous PTFE than in FEP. The entire charge distribution exhibits much better thermal stability than is achievable for customary polypropylene piezoelectrets.

  15. Calculation of Coulomb energies for uniform charge distributions of arbitrary shape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three distinct surface-integral formulas are derived for calculating the Coulomb energies of uniform charge distributions of arbitrary shape. Of particular interest is an equation obtained by applying Gauss' divergence theorem twice. It is shown that this equation can be simply transformed to another expression which has been widely used for calculating Coulomb energies, with this derivation implying a third formula. The three formulas are also expressed in cylindrical coordinates for charge distributions possessing axial symmetry. For such shapes, numerical studies are presented showing the computational times and errors involved in calculating the Coulomb energies and generalized forces using Gaussian-Legendre quadrature formulas. It is shown that the double-divergence-derived formula is faster and more accurate than the other two surface-integral formulas and other formulas used in the literature

  16. Electronic States and Spatial Charge Distribution of Single Mn Impurity in Diluted Magnetic Semiconductors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei-Hua; ZOU Liang-Jian

    2006-01-01

    The electronic and magnetic properties as well as the spatial charge distribution of single Mn impurity in Ⅲ-V diluted magnetic semiconductors are obtained when the degeneracy of the p orbits contributed from the four nearest-neighbouring As(N) atoms is taken into account. We show that in the ground state, the Mn spin is strongly antiferromagnetically coupled to the surrounding As(N) atoms when the p - d hybridization Vpd is large and both the hole level Ev and the impurity level Ed are close to the Fermi energy. The spatial charge distribution of the Mn acceptor in the (110) plane is non-spherically symmetric, in good agreement with the recent STM images.

  17. Charge state distribution of light ions at glancing collision with solid surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many experimental results have suggested that the charge state distribution of ions have penetrated through solid is different from that inside the solid. It is important to clarify the physical process taking place at solid surface in order to know the states of ions inside the solid from those observed outside the solid. In the present paper, we report our measurement of charge state distributions of He+ and H2+ ions having been scattered in small angles (less than 40) at surfaces of Au, Ag and C. One of the advantages of the use of the glancing collision of ions at solid surface for the study of ion-surface interaction is that the dwell time of ion near solid surface can be made more than 100 times longer than that in normal transmission experiments. The longer dwell times may alter any contribution of solid surface to electron capture and loss of ions

  18. Comparison study of the charge density distribution induced by heavy ions and pulsed lasers in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Kai; Cao, Zhou; Xue, Yu-Xiong; Yang, Shi-Yu

    2010-01-01

    Heavy ions and pulsed lasers are important means to simulate the ionization damage effects on semiconductor materials. The analytic solution of high-energy heavy ion energy loss in silicon has been obtained using the Bethe-Bloch formula and the Kobetich-Katz theory, and some ionization damage parameters of Fe ions in silicon, such as the track structure and ionized charge density distribution, have been calculated and analyzed according to the theoretical calculation results. Using the Gaussian function and Beer's law, the parameters of the track structure and charge density distribution induced by a pulsed laser in silicon have also been calculated and compared with those of Fe ions in silicon, which provides a theoretical basis for ionization damage effect modeling.

  19. An Independent Review Of The Fee-Charging Debt Management Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Collard, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    A debt management plan (DMP) provides a means for people to repay their consumer credit debts in full. An affordable payment is calculated, based on an assessment of an individual's inclome and expenditure. The person in debt makes one monthly payment to a debt management provider, which is then distributed between their creditors on a pro rata basis, either electronically or by cheque. DMPs are provided by fee-charging debt management companies, which generally charge their customers a set-u...

  20. Charge transfer and structured vibrational distributions in H++CH4 low-energy collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inelastic and charge transfer collisions of protons with methane molecules have been investigated in a perpendicular-plane crossed beam experiment via the detection of the scattered protons and H atoms, respectively. Time-of-flight analysis of the protons and H atoms at scattering angles 00≤θ≤100 and collision energies 10≤E≤30 eV provided information on internal energy distributions of the CH4 and CH+4 products. Excitation of the n(ν1 ,ν3) +m (ν2 ,ν4) type vibrations, with n,m = 0, 1, 2,xxxwas found to be the most probable assignment of the observed structured energy distributions of CH4 (1 A1 ) at θ≤40. At θ>40, the energy transfer increases steeply up to the dissociation limit while the vibrational structure was no longer resolved. In the case of charge transfer, the observed narrow internal energy distributions corresponding to a most probable average internal energy of CH+4 of about 0.95 eV was centered at the recombination energy of the proton indicative of quasiresonant charge transfer. In addition, fragmentation of CH+4 formed in charge transfer collisions of H+ with CH4 was investigated in an independent experiment using mass spectrometric analysis to identify the individual fragment species. The relative intensities of the parent and fragment ions (i.e., of CH+4, CH+3, and CH+2) were found to be in good agreement with the known values of the appearance potentials of the fragment ions and the distribution of the CH+4 internal energy as obtained from the differential cross sections

  1. Charged-particle pseudorapidity distributions in Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zeng-Wei; JIANG Zhi-Jin

    2009-01-01

    Using the Glauber model, we present the formulas for calculating the numbers of participants,spectators and binary nucleon-nucleon collisions. Based on this work, we get the pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles as the function of the impact parameter in nucleus-nucleus collisions. The theoretical results agree well with the experimental observations made by the BRAHMS Collaboration in Au+Au collisions at √SNN=200 GeV in different centrality bins over the whole pseudorapidity range.

  2. A mathematically defined motif for the radial distribution of charged residues on apolipoprotein amphipathic alpha helixes.

    OpenAIRE

    Hazelrig, J B; Jones, M. K.; Segrest, J P

    1993-01-01

    Multiple amphipathic alpha-helical candidate domains have been identified in exchangeable apolipoproteins by sequence analysis and indirect experimental evidence. The distribution of charged residues can differ within and between these apolipoproteins. Segrest et al. (Segrest, J. P., H. DeLoof, J. G. Dohlman, C. G. Brouillette, and G. M. Anantharamaiah. 1990. Proteins. 8:103-117.) argued that these differences are correlated with lipid affinity. A mathematically defined motif for the particul...

  3. Changes of the Nuclear Charge Distribution of Nd from Optical Isotope Shifts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马洪良; 李茂生; 杨福家

    2001-01-01

    The isotope shifts and hyperfine structures of seven optical transitions for all seven stable isotopes of Nd Ⅱ were measured by using collinear fast-ion-beam laser spectroscopy. The nuclear parameter λ was obtained from the measured optical isotope shifts for alI seven stable isotopes with improved accuracy. The λ values were analysed by using the Fermi distribution for the nuclear charge density. The values of δ, δ and δ were determined.

  4. PEA System Modeling and Signal Processing for Measurements of Volume Charge Distributions in Thin Dielectric Films

    OpenAIRE

    Pearson, Lee H.; Dennison, JR; Griffiths, Erick W.; Pearson, A. C.

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses an effort to develop advanced pulsed electroacoustic (PEA) measurement system capabilities that incorporate state-of-the-art hardware and improved signal processing and modeling to characterize embedded charge distributions in thin dielectric films. Objectives in developing this system include: (1) improved spatial resolution, while maintaining reasonable temporal resolution; (2) improved signal processing tools for increased signal/noise ratios; (3) integrated PEA modeli...

  5. Distributed Item Review: Administrator User Guide. Technical Report #1603

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvin, P. Shawn

    2016-01-01

    The Distributed Item Review (DIR) is a secure and flexible, web-based system designed to present test items to expert reviewers across a broad geographic area for evaluation of important dimensions of quality (e.g., alignment with standards, bias, sensitivity, and student accessibility). The DIR is comprised of essential features that allow system…

  6. Energy loss and charge state distribution of calcium ions in dense moderately coupled carbon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis the interaction of swift calcium ions (Energy: 3.5 MeV/u) with a dense and moderately coupled carbon plasma (Coupling parameter: Γ=0.1-0.5) is investigated. The plasma state is generated by heating a thin carbon foil volumetrically by thermal X-ray radiation. The thermal X-ray radiation itself is generated by the conversion of a high energy laser beam in a hohlraum cavity. Compared to earlier ion stopping experiments the electron density and the plasma coupling parameter could be increased by an order of magnitude. This work provides the first time experimental energy loss and charge state distribution data in this moderately coupled interaction regime. The thesis consists of a theoretical part where the ion beam plasma interaction is studied for a broad range of plasma parameters and an experimental part where the ion beam interaction with the hohlraum plasma target is measured. All the described experiments were carried out at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt. This facility offers the unique possibility to combine a heavy ion beam from an accelerator with a high energy laser beam in one interaction chamber. An intense laser pulse (150 J of laser energy in 1 ns at λL=527 nm) is focused inside a 600 μm diameter spherical cavity and generates a hot gold plasma that emits X-rays. The absorbed and reemitted radiation establishes a spatially uniform temperature distribution in the cavity and serves as an intense, isotropic X-ray source with a quasi-thermal spectral distribution. These thermal X-rays with a radiation temperature of Tr=98±6 eV then propagate into a secondary cylindrical hohlraum (diameter: 1000 μm, length: 950 μm) where they volumetrically heat two thin carbon foils to the plasma state. The radiation temperature in the secondary hohlraum is Tr=33±5 eV. This indirect laser heating scheme has the advantage that the whole sample volume is instantaneously heated and that the plasma is inertially and

  7. Coordinated Charging of Electric Vehicles for Congestion Prevention in the Distribution Grid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Junjie; You, Shi; Lind, Morten;

    2014-01-01

    insufficient capacity in peak hours. This paper aims to coordinate the valuable services and operation constraints of three actors: the EV owner, the Fleet operator (FO) and the Distribution system operator (DSO), considering the individual EV owner’s driving requirement, the charging cost of EV and thermal...... limits of cables and transformers in a distribution grid capacity market framework. Firstly, a theoretical market framework is described. Within this framework, FOs who represent their customer’s (EV owners) interests will centrally guarantee the EV owners’ driving requirements and procure the energy for...

  8. Unfolding of event-by-event net-charge distributions in heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Garg, P; Netrakanti, P K; Mohanty, A K; Mohanty, B

    2013-01-01

    An unfolding method, based on Bayes theorem is presented to obtain true event-by-event net-charge multiplicity distribution from a corresponding measured distribution, which is subjected to detector artifacts. The unfolding is demonstrated to work for widely varying particle production mechanism, beam energy and collision centrality. Further the necessity of taking into account the detector effects is emphasized before comparing the experimental measurements to the theoretical calculations, particularly in case of higher moments. The advantage of this approach being that one need not construct new observable to cancel out detector effects which loose their ability to be connected to physical quantities calculable in standard theories.

  9. Electronic structure and partial charge distribution of doxorubicin under different molecular environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudel, Lokendra

    Doxorubicin (trade name Adriamycin, abbreviated DOX) is a well-known an- thracyclic chemotherapeutic used in treating a variety of cancers including acute leukemia, lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and a range of stomach, lung, bladder, bone, breast, and ovarian cancers. The purpose of the present work is to study electronic structure, partial charge distribution and interaction energy of DOX under different environments. It provides a framework for better understanding of bioactivity of DOX with DNA. While in this work, we focus on DOX -- DNA interactions; the obtained knowledge could be translated to other drug -- target interactions or biomolecular interactions. The electronic structure and partial charge distribution of DOX in three dierent molecular environments: isolated, solvated, and intercalated into a DNA complex,were studied by rst principles density functional methods. It is shown that the addition of solvating water molecules to DOX and the proximity and interaction with DNA has a signicant impact on the electronic structure as well as the partial charge distribution. The calculated total partial charges for DOX in the three models are 0.0, +0.123 and -0.06 electrons for the isolated, solvated, and intercalated state, respectively. Furthermore, by using the more accurate ab initio partial charge values on every atom in the models, signicant improvement in estimating the DOX-DNA interaction energy is obtained in conjunction with the NAnoscale Molecular Dynamics (NAMD) code. The electronic structure of the DOX-DNA is further elucidated by resolving the total density of states (TDOS) into dierent functional groups of DOX, DNA, water, co-crystallized Spermine molecule, and Na ions. The surface partial charge distribution in the DOX-DNA is calculated and displayed graphically. We conclude that the presence of the solvent as well as the details of the interaction geometry matter greatly in the determination of the stability of the DOX complexion. Ab initio

  10. Review of Congestion Management Methods for Distribution Networks with High Penetration of Distributed Energy Resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Shaojun; Wu, Qiuwei; Liu, Zhaoxi;

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the existing congestion management methods for distribution networks with high penetration of DERs documented in the recent research literatures. The congestion management methods for distribution networks reviewed can be grouped into two categories – market methods and direct...... control methods. The market methods consist of dynamic tariff, distribution capacity market, shadow price and flexible service market. The direct control methods are comprised of network reconfiguration, reactive power control and active power control. Based on the review of the existing methods, the...... authors suggest a priority list of the existing methods....

  11. Multi-Agent-Based Distributed State of Charge Balancing Control for Distributed Energy Storage Units in AC Microgrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Chendan; Dragicevic, Tomislav; Vasquez, Juan Carlos;

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a multiagent based distributed control algorithm has been proposed to achieve state of charge (SoC) balance of distributed energy storage (DES) units in an AC microgrid. The proposal uses frequency scheduling instead of adaptive droop gain. Each DES unit is taken as an agent...... and they schedule their own frequency reference given of the real power droop controller according to the SoC values of the other DES units. Further, to obtain the average SoC value of DES, dynamic average consensus algorithm is adapted by each agent. A smallsignal model of the system is developed in order...... to verify the stability of the control system and control parameters design. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the control strategy and also show the robustness against communication topology changes....

  12. Beam energy dependence of pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sumit; Nayak, Tapan K.; Datta, Kaustuv

    2016-06-01

    Heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Large Hadron Collider at CERN probe matter at extreme conditions of temperature and energy density. Most of the global properties of the collisions can be extracted from the measurements of charged-particle multiplicity and pseudorapidity (η ) distributions. We have shown that the available experimental data on beam energy and centrality dependence of η distributions in heavy-ion (Au +Au or Pb +Pb ) collisions from √{sNN}=7.7 GeV to 2.76 TeV are reasonably well described by the AMPT model, which is used for further exploration. The nature of the η distributions has been described by a double Gaussian function using a set of fit parameters, which exhibit a regular pattern as a function of beam energy. By extrapolating the parameters to a higher energy of √{sNN}=5.02 TeV, we have obtained the charged-particle multiplicity densities, η distributions, and energy densities for various centralities. Incidentally, these results match well with some of the recently published data by the ALICE Collaboration.

  13. Calculation of ion charge-state distribution in ECR ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starting with the pioneering efforts of Y. Yongen (Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium) a code has been developed to calculate the equilibrium ion charge-state distribution for electron-cyclotron resonance source (ECR) ion sources. Production of ions is caused by the impact ionization of the charge gas from ECR-heated electrons of a few keV. Loss of an ion of a given charge state is from charge exchange and radiative recombination. Ultimately, the ion flows out of the minimum-B containment region. The ion confinement times are calculated using an ion-trap-potential model which is based upon modeling calculations done at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for the Tandem Mirror Machine. Using this model requires the self-consistent determination of the trap potential and thermal electron density in the plasma. Code inputs are gas natural density, hot-electron temperature and density, ion temperature, cold-electron temperature, mirror ratio, physical dimensions, and atomic-physics data. Other than that there are no adjustable parameters. Results of comparison of calculations with the limited available data are reasonable

  14. Probabilistic Method to Assess the Impact of Charging of Electric Vehicles on Distribution Grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Martínez-Vicente

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a grid impact analysis of charging electric vehicles (EV using charging curves with detailed battery modelling. A probabilistic method using Monte Carlo was applied to a typical Spanish distribution grid, also using mobility patterns of Barcelona. To carry out this analysis, firstly, an IEEE test system was adapted to a typical distribution grid configuration; secondly, the EV and its battery types were modeled taking into account the current vehicle market and the battery characteristics; and, finally, the recharge control strategies were taken into account. Once these main features were established, a statistical probabilistic model for the household electrical demand and for the EV charging parameters was determined. Finally, with these probabilistic models, the Monte Carlo analysis was performed within the established scenario in order to study the lines’ and the transformers’ loading levels. The results show that an accurate model for the battery gives a more precise estimation about the impact on the grid. Additionally, mobility patterns have been proved to be some of the most important key aspects for these type of studies.

  15. Ion charge state distributions of vacuum arc plasmas: The origin of species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacuum arc plasmas are produced at micrometer-size, nonstationary cathode spots. Ion charge state distributions (CSD close-quote s) are experimentally known for 50 elements, but the theoretical understanding is unsatisfactory. In this paper, CSD close-quote s of vacuum arc plasmas are calculated under the assumption that the spot plasma experiences an instantaneous transition from equilibrium to nonequilibrium while expanding. Observable charge state distributions are the result of a freezing process at this transition. open-quotes Frozenclose quotes CSD close-quote s have been calculated using Saha equations in the Debye-Hueckel approximation of the nonideal plasma for all metals of the Periodic Table and for boron, carbon, silicon, and germanium. The results are presented in a open-quotes periodic table of CSD.close quotes The table contains also the mean ion charge state, the neutral vapor fraction, and the effective plasma temperature and density at the freezing point for each element. The validity of the concepts of open-quotes instantaneous freezingclose quotes and open-quotes effective temperature and densityclose quotes is discussed for low and high currents and for the presence of a magnetic field. Temperature fluctuations have been identified to cause broadening of CSD close-quote s. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  16. The transverse space-charge force in tri-gaussian distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-12-01

    In tracking, the transverse space-charge force can be represented by changes in the horizontal and vertical divergences, {Delta}x{prime} and {Delta}y{prime} at many locations around the accelerator ring. In this note, they are going to list some formulas for {Delta}x{prime} and {delta}y{prime} arising from space-charge kicks when the beam is tri-Gaussian distributed. They will discuss separately a flat beam and a round beam. they are not interested in the situation when the emittance growth arising from space charge becomes too large and the shape of the beam becomes weird. For this reason, they can assume the bunch still retains its tri-Gaussian distribution, with its rms sizes {sigma}{sub x}, {sigma}{sub y}, and {sigma}{sub z} increasing by certain factors. Thus after each turn, {sigma}{sub x}, {sigma}{sub y}, and {sigma}{sub z} can be re-calculated.

  17. Direct observation of charge re-distribution in a MgB2 superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sheng Yun; Shih, Po-Hsun; Ji, Jhong-Yi; Chan, Ting-Shan; Yang, Chun Chuen

    2016-04-01

    To study the origin of negative thermal expansion effects near the superconducting transition temperature TC in MgB2, low-temperature high-energy synchrotron radiation x-ray diffraction was used to probe the charge redistribution near the boron atoms. Our results reveal that the in-plane hole-distribution of B- hops through the direct orbital overlap of Mg2+ along the c-axis at 50 K and is re-distributed out-of-plane. This study shows that the out-of-plane π-hole distribution plays a dominant role in the possible origin of superconductivity and negative thermal effects in MgB2.

  18. Effects of target size on the comparison of photon and charged particle dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work presented here is part of an ongoing project to quantify and evaluate the differences in the use of different radiation types and irradiation geometries in radiosurgery. We are examining dose distributions for photons using the ''Gamma Knife'' and the linear accelerator arc methods, as well as different species of charged particles from protons to neon ions. A number of different factors need to be studied to accurately compare the different modalities such as target size, shape and location, the irradiation geometry, and biological response. This presentation focuses on target size, which has a large effect on the dose distributions in normal tissue surrounding the lesion. This work concentrates on dose distributions found in radiosurgery, as opposed to those usually found in radiotherapy. 5 refs., 2 figs

  19. Measurement of charged-particle multiplicity distributions and their $H_q$ moments in hadronic Z decays at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; de la Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; van Dalen, J A; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Debreczeni, J; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Ewers, A; Extermann, Pierre; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisher, W; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Hu, Y; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Käfer, D; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M H; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Krüger, A; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Likhoded, S A; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofiev, D O; Prokofev, D; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rosenbleck, C; Roux, B; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S V; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Van de Valle, R T; De Walle, M; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Wienemann, P; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yeh, S C; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zilizi, G; Zimmermann, B; Zöller, M

    2003-01-01

    The charged-particle multiplicity distribution and the inclusive momentum distribution, in terms of the variable $\\xi$, are measured for all hadronic events as well as for light-quark and b-quark events in $\\mathrm{e}^{+}\\mathrm{e}^{-}$ collisions at the Z pole. Moments of the charged-particle multiplicity distributions are calculated, and the peak positions of the $\\xi$ distributions determined. The multiplicity distributions are studied in terms of their $H_q$ moments. Their quasi-oscillations when plotted versus the rank of the moment are compared with different theoretical approaches.

  20. Axial ion charge state distribution in the vacuum arc plasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on our experimental studies of the ion charge state distribution (CSD) of vacuum arc plasmas using a time-of-flight diagnostic method. The dependence of the CSD on the axial distance from the plasma source region was measured for a titanium vacuum arc. It was found that the axial CSD profile is nonuniform. Generally, the mean charge state increases approximately linearly with axial distance from about 1.7 at 12 cm up to 1.9 at 25 cm from the plasma source. A model for ion transport in the free boundary plasma jet is proposed which is based on the existence of an electric field in the quasineutral plasma. This model qualitatively explains the experimental results. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  1. Interaction of current filaments in dielectric barrier discharges with relation to surface charge distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stollenwerk, L [Institut fuer Plasmaforschung, Pfaffenwaldring 31, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)], E-mail: stollenwerk@ipf.uni-stuttgart.de

    2009-10-15

    In a planar, laterally extended dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) system operated in glow mode, a filamentary discharge is observed. The filaments tend to move laterally and hence tend to cause collisions. Thereby, usually one collision partner becomes destroyed. In this paper, the collision process and especially the preceding time period is investigated. Beside the luminescence density of the filaments, the surface charge density accumulated between the single breakdowns of the DBD is observed via an optical measurement technique based on the linear electro-optical effect (pockels effect). A ring-like substructure of the surface charge distribution of a single filament is found, which correlates to the filament interaction behaviour. Furthermore, a preferred filament distance is found, suggesting the formation of a filamentary quasi-molecule.

  2. Space distribution and energy straggling of charged particles via Fokker-Planck equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fokker-Planck equation describing a beam of charged particles entering a homogeneous medium is solved here for a stationary case. Interactions are taken into account through Coulomb cross-section. Starting from the charged-particle distribution as a function of velocity and penetration depth, some important kinetic quantities are calculated, like mean velocity, range and the loss of energy per unit space. In such quantities the energy straggling is taken into account. This phenomenon is not considered in the continuous slowing-down approximation that is commonly used to obtain the range and the stopping power. Finally the well-know Bohr of Bethe formula is found as a first-order approximation of the Fokker-Planck equation

  3. Conformations of intrinsically disordered proteins are influenced by linear sequence distributions of oppositely charged residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Rahul K; Pappu, Rohit V

    2013-08-13

    The functions of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are governed by relationships between information encoded in their amino acid sequences and the ensembles of conformations that they sample as autonomous units. Most IDPs are polyampholytes, with sequences that include both positively and negatively charged residues. Accordingly, we focus here on the sequence-ensemble relationships of polyampholytic IDPs. The fraction of charged residues discriminates between weak and strong polyampholytes. Using atomistic simulations, we show that weak polyampholytes form globules, whereas the conformational preferences of strong polyampholytes are determined by a combination of fraction of charged residues values and the linear sequence distributions of oppositely charged residues. We quantify the latter using a patterning parameter κ that lies between zero and one. The value of κ is low for well-mixed sequences, and in these sequences, intrachain electrostatic repulsions and attractions are counterbalanced, leading to the unmasking of preferences for conformations that resemble either self-avoiding random walks or generic Flory random coils. Segregation of oppositely charged residues within linear sequences leads to high κ-values and preferences for hairpin-like conformations caused by long-range electrostatic attractions induced by conformational fluctuations. We propose a scaling theory to explain the sequence-encoded conformational properties of strong polyampholytes. We show that naturally occurring strong polyampholytes have low κ-values, and this feature implies a selection for random coil ensembles. The design of sequences with different κ-values demonstrably alters the conformational preferences of polyampholytic IDPs, and this ability could become a useful tool for enabling direct inquiries into connections between sequence-ensemble relationships and functions of IDPs. PMID:23901099

  4. Spectral and angular distributions of charged particles outside biological shielding of the 70 GeV Serpukhov accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Space, angular and energy distributions of the charged particle of radiation field outside the Serpukhov accelerator shielding at different protons beam energies obtained with the ΔE-E spectrometer are presented. The influence of the accelerating complex operation on the charged particles field shaping outside the concrete and heterogeneous steel-concrete shieldings has been analyzed. The ratios between neutrons and charged particles of the radiation field outside the 70 GeV accelerator shielding have been estimated

  5. Dynamics of spherical distributions of charge with small internal dipolar motion

    CERN Document Server

    Flammer, P D

    2016-01-01

    This paper extends the Lorentz-Abraham model of an electron (i.e. the equations of motion for a small spherical shell of charge, which is rigid in its proper frame) to treat a small spherically symmetric charge distribution, allowing for small internal dipolar motion. This is done by dividing the distribution into thin spherical shells (in the continuum limit), and tracking the interactions between shells. Dipolar motion of each constituent spherical shell is allowed along the net dipole moment, but higher order multipole-moments are ignored. The amplitude of dipolar motion of each spherical shell is assumed to be linearly proportional to the net dipole moment. Under these assumptions, low velocity equations of motion are determined for both the center-of-mass motion and net dipolar motion of the distribution. This is then generalized to arbitrary (relativistic) center-of-mass velocity and acceleration, assuming the motion of individual shells is completely in phase or out of phase with the net dipole moment.

  6. Anorexia Nervosa and Body Fat Distribution: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Marwan El Ghoch; Simona Calugi; Silvia Lamburghini; Riccardo Dalle Grave

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to conduct a systematic review of body fat distribution before and after partial and complete weight restoration in individuals with anorexia nervosa. Literature searches, study selection, method development and quality appraisal were performed independently by two authors, and data was synthesized using a narrative approach. Twenty studies met the inclusion criteria and were consequently analyzed. The review had five main findings. First, during anorexia nervosa ado...

  7. Simulations of Ion Velocity Distribution Functions Taken into Account Both Elastic and Charge Exchange Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Huihui; Kaganovich, Igor D; Mustafaev, Alexander S

    2016-01-01

    Based on accurate representation of the He+-He differential angular scattering cross sections consisting of both elastic and charge exchange collisions, we performed detailed numerical simulations of the ion velocity distribution functions (IVDF) by Monte Carlo collision method (MCC). The results of simulations are validated by comparison with the experimental data of the mobility and the transverse diffusion. The IVDF simulation study shows that due to significant effect of scattering in elastic collisions IVDF cannot be separated into product of two independent IVDFs in the transverse and parallel to the electric field directions.

  8. A direct and at nanometer scale study of electrical charge distribution on membranes of alive cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlière Christian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper is presented an innovative method to map in-vivo and at nanometer scale the electrical charge distribution on membranes of alive cells. It relies on a new atomic force microscopy (AFM mode based on an electro-mechanical coupling effect. Furthermore, an additional electrical signal detected by both the deflection of the AFM cantilever and simultaneous direct current measurements was detected at low scanning rates. It was attributed to the detection of the current stemming from ionic channels. It opens a new way to directly investigate in situ biological electrical surface processes involved in bacterial adhesion, biofilm formation, microbial fuel cells, etc.

  9. Average Distribution of Ionic Charges and Ionizability for the Au Plasma System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨天丽; 蒋刚; 朱正和

    2002-01-01

    Using relativistic multi-configuration Dirac-Fock theory, we calculate the transition data of 3dj - n fj, (n =5, 6, 7) for the M-shell from an Ni-like Au ion to an As-like Auion using the GRASP programme with the core-polarization, quantum electrodynamical effect and Breit correction. Based on the present calculation results andthe experiment of the Xingguang-Ⅱ laser facilities, the average distribution of ionic charge and the ionizabilityhave been derived. The average ionization degree of Au plasma Z* is 49.06 ± 0.5, which is comparable with theresult of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  10. Shaping of proton distribution for raising the space-charge of the CERN PS Booster

    CERN Document Server

    Delahaye, J P; Magnani, L; Nassibian, G; Pedersen, F; Reich, K H; Schindl, Karlheinz; Schönauer, H O

    1980-01-01

    The intensity of the PS Booster is limited by space-charge defocusing forces which create a spread in the betatron tunes of up to Delta G approximately=0.5. Shaping of the transverse and longitudinal distributions was used for accommodating more particles in a given working area and enabled the Booster to accelerate 2*10/sup 13/ protons per pulse, twice the design intensity. Modifying the RF potential well by an experimental second harmonic cavity yields beam intensities and densities well beyond the present performance. The corresponding PSB experiments and improvements are described and an outlook on future developments is given. (14 refs).

  11. Shaping of proton distribution for raising the space-charge of the CERN PS booster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intensity of the PS booster is limited by space-charge defocusing forces which create a spread in the betatron tunes of up to ΔQ approximately equal to 0.5. Shaping of the transverse and longitudinal distributions was used for accommodating more particles in a given working area and enabled the Booster to accelerate 2 x 1013 protons per pulse, twice the design intensity. Modifying the RF potential well by an experimental second-harmonic cavity yields beam intensities well beyond the present performance. The corresponding PSB experiments and improvements are described and an outlook on future developments is given. (Auth.)

  12. Pseudorapidity Distribution of Charged Particles in d+Au Collisions at √(sNN)=200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Becker, B.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Harrington, A. S.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Khan, N.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lee, J. W.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sedykh, I.; Skulski, W.; Smith, C. E.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wolfs, F. L.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wysłouch, B.; Zhang, J.

    2004-08-01

    The measured pseudorapidity distribution of primary charged particles in minimum-bias d+Au collisions at √(sNN)=200 GeV is presented for the first time. This distribution falls off less rapidly in the gold direction as compared to the deuteron direction. The average value of the charged particle pseudorapidity density at midrapidity is ∣η∣≤0.6=9.4±0.7(syst) and the integrated primary charged particle multiplicity in the measured region is 82±6(syst). Estimates of the total charged particle production, based on extrapolations outside the measured pseudorapidity region, are also presented. The pseudorapidity distribution, normalized to the number of participants in d+Au collisions, is compared to those of Au+Au and p+p¯ systems at the same energy. The d+Au distribution is also compared to the predictions of the parton saturation model, as well as microscopic models.

  13. The Size Distribution of Bovine Casein Micelles: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Holt, C.

    1985-01-01

    This review considers the average size and size distribution of bovine casein micelles as measured by electron microscopy, light scattering and controlled pore glass chromatography, and the origin and biological function of the size distribution. Recent work by electron microscopy has given average sizes in reasonable agreement with measurements on the same milk sample by light scattering . It is suggested that natural variations in averaqe micelle size and overestimation of micelle radii ...

  14. An Experimental Review of Charged Lepton Flavor Violation in Muon Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ootani, Wataru

    2016-09-01

    The flavor violating transition between generations of charged leptons is highly suppressed in the Standard Model of the elementary particle physics, whereas many of the promising new physics beyond the Standard Model predict sizable rates of the flavor violating processes within a reach of the ongoing or proposed experiments. The status and the perspectives of the experimental quests for the charged lepton flavor violation in muon channel are reviewed focusing on the three major processes, μ - N to e - N, μ + to e + γ , and μ + to e + e - e + .

  15. The effect of realistic nuclear charge distributions on isotope shifts and towards the extraction of higher order nuclear radial moments

    OpenAIRE

    Papoulia, A.; Carlsson, B. G.; Ekman, J

    2016-01-01

    Background: Atomic spectral lines from different isotopes display a small shift in energy, commonly referred to as the line isotope shift. One of the components of the isotope shift is the field shift, which depends on the extent and the shape of the nuclear charge density distribution. Purpose: To investigate how sensitive field shifts are with respect to variations in the nuclear size and shape and what information of nuclear charge distributions that can be extracted from measured field sh...

  16. A stepped leader model for lightning including charge distribution in branched channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stepped leader process in negative cloud-to-ground lightning plays a vital role in lightning protection analysis. As lightning discharge usually presents significant branched or tortuous channels, the charge distribution along the branched channels and the stochastic feature of stepped leader propagation were investigated in this paper. The charge density along the leader channel and the charge in the leader tip for each lightning branch were approximated by introducing branch correlation coefficients. In combination with geometric characteristics of natural lightning discharge, a stochastic stepped leader propagation model was presented based on the fractal theory. By comparing simulation results with the statistics of natural lightning discharges, it was found that the fractal dimension of lightning trajectory in simulation was in the range of that observed in nature and the calculation results of electric field at ground level were in good agreement with the measurements of a negative flash, which shows the validity of this proposed model. Furthermore, a new equation to estimate the lightning striking distance to flat ground was suggested based on the present model. The striking distance obtained by this new equation is smaller than the value estimated by previous equations, which indicates that the traditional equations may somewhat overestimate the attractive effect of the ground.

  17. Repair activities on the LHC cryogenic distribution line in charge of TS/MME

    CERN Document Server

    Atieh, S; CERN. Geneva. TS Department

    2005-01-01

    The Cryogenic Distribution Line (QRL), running inside the machine tunnel parallel to the regular lattice of superconducting quadrupole and dipole magnets of LHC, transports the refrigeration power produced by the refrigerators over long distances. With a total length of about 25.8 km, QRL consists of a modular set-up of pipe and Service Modules (SM), Vacuum Barriers (VB), Fixed Points (FP), steps and elbows. TS department was charged to replace non-conform sliding tables included in the Cryogenic Distribution Line QRL. For this repair work, based on technologically advanced methods, TS/MME imposed a high level of quality assurance and follow-up for mechanical repair works as well as for the metrological measurements carried out which an innovative polyarticulated arm, a portable measuring device, and leak testing by argon.

  18. Charge and mass distribution in 7Li induced fission of 232Th

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formation cross sections of about forty fission products have been determined using recoil catcher technique followed by off line gamma-ray spectrometry in 7Li induced fission of 232Th at Elab=41.9, 36.6 and 31.4 MeV. The measured data have been used to deduce charge and mass distributions. Mass distribution is found to be asymmetric at all the three energies. Cross sections of evaporation residues formed in both transfer reactions (232,233,234Pa) as well as in complete fusion (234Np), have also been measured. The measured evaporation residue cross sections and the decay probabilities of target like nuclei (233,234,235Pa) formed in the various transfer reactions, as calculated by PACE2, have been used to estimate the transfer induced fission cross sections. The data indicated that the magnitude of transfer induced fission is very small

  19. Temporal evolution of ion energy distribution functions and ion charge states of Cr and Cr-Al pulsed arc plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the temporal evolution of ion energy distribution functions, charge-state-resolved ion energy distribution functions of pulsed arc plasmas from Cr and Cr-Al cathodes were recorded with high time resolution by using direct data acquisition from a combined energy and mass analyzer. The authors find increases in intensities of singly charged ions, which is evidence that charge exchange reactions took place in both Cr and Cr-Al systems. In Cr-Al plasmas, the distributions of high-charge-state ions exhibit high energy tails 50 μs after discharge ignition, but no such tails were observed at 500 μs. The energy ratios of ions of different charge states at the beginning of the pulse, when less neutral atoms were in the space in front of the cathode, suggest that ions are accelerated by an electric field. The situation is not so clear after 50 μs due to particle collisions. The initial mean ion charge state of Cr was about the same in Cr and in Cr-Al plasmas, but it decreased more rapidly in Cr-Al plasmas compared to the decay in Cr plasma. The faster decay of the mean ion charge state and ion energy caused by the addition of Al into a pure Cr cathode suggests that the mean ion charge state is determined not only by ionization processes at the cathode spot but also by inelastic collision between different elements

  20. Temporal evolution of ion energy distribution functions and ion charge states of Cr and Cr-Al pulsed arc plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Koichi, E-mail: tanak@mmc.co.jp [Central Research Institute, Mitsubishi Materials Corporation, 1002-14 Mukohyama, Naka-shi, Ibaraki 311-0102 (Japan); Anders, André [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 53, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    To study the temporal evolution of ion energy distribution functions, charge-state-resolved ion energy distribution functions of pulsed arc plasmas from Cr and Cr-Al cathodes were recorded with high time resolution by using direct data acquisition from a combined energy and mass analyzer. The authors find increases in intensities of singly charged ions, which is evidence that charge exchange reactions took place in both Cr and Cr-Al systems. In Cr-Al plasmas, the distributions of high-charge-state ions exhibit high energy tails 50 μs after discharge ignition, but no such tails were observed at 500 μs. The energy ratios of ions of different charge states at the beginning of the pulse, when less neutral atoms were in the space in front of the cathode, suggest that ions are accelerated by an electric field. The situation is not so clear after 50 μs due to particle collisions. The initial mean ion charge state of Cr was about the same in Cr and in Cr-Al plasmas, but it decreased more rapidly in Cr-Al plasmas compared to the decay in Cr plasma. The faster decay of the mean ion charge state and ion energy caused by the addition of Al into a pure Cr cathode suggests that the mean ion charge state is determined not only by ionization processes at the cathode spot but also by inelastic collision between different elements.

  1. Review of highly charged heavy ion production with electron cyclotron resonance ion source (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, T

    2014-02-01

    The electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) plays an important role in the advancement of heavy ion accelerators and other ion beam applications worldwide, thanks to its remarkable ability to produce a great variety of intense highly charged heavy ion beams. Great efforts over the past decade have led to significant ECRIS performance improvements in both the beam intensity and quality. A number of high-performance ECRISs have been built and are in daily operation or are under construction to meet the continuously increasing demand. In addition, comprehension of the detailed and complex physical processes in high-charge-state ECR plasmas has been enhanced experimentally and theoretically. This review covers and discusses the key components, leading-edge developments, and enhanced ECRIS performance in the production of highly charged heavy ion beams. PMID:24593514

  2. Review of highly charged heavy ion production with electron cyclotron resonance ion source (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, T.

    2014-02-01

    The electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) plays an important role in the advancement of heavy ion accelerators and other ion beam applications worldwide, thanks to its remarkable ability to produce a great variety of intense highly charged heavy ion beams. Great efforts over the past decade have led to significant ECRIS performance improvements in both the beam intensity and quality. A number of high-performance ECRISs have been built and are in daily operation or are under construction to meet the continuously increasing demand. In addition, comprehension of the detailed and complex physical processes in high-charge-state ECR plasmas has been enhanced experimentally and theoretically. This review covers and discusses the key components, leading-edge developments, and enhanced ECRIS performance in the production of highly charged heavy ion beams.

  3. Review of highly charged heavy ion production with electron cyclotron resonance ion source (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) plays an important role in the advancement of heavy ion accelerators and other ion beam applications worldwide, thanks to its remarkable ability to produce a great variety of intense highly charged heavy ion beams. Great efforts over the past decade have led to significant ECRIS performance improvements in both the beam intensity and quality. A number of high-performance ECRISs have been built and are in daily operation or are under construction to meet the continuously increasing demand. In addition, comprehension of the detailed and complex physical processes in high-charge-state ECR plasmas has been enhanced experimentally and theoretically. This review covers and discusses the key components, leading-edge developments, and enhanced ECRIS performance in the production of highly charged heavy ion beams

  4. Transverse energy distribution, charged particle multiplicities and spectra in 16O-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The HELIOS (High Energy Lepton and Ion Spectrometer) experiment, installed at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron, proposes to examine in details the physical properties of a state of high energy created in nuclei by ultra-relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. It is generally believed that, at high densities or temperatures, a phase transition to a plasma of quark and gluons will occur. The dynamic of the expansion of such a plasma and its subsequent condensation into a hadron gas should markedly affect the composition and momentum distribution of the emerging particles and photons. The HELIOS experimental setup therefore combines 4π calorimetric coverage with measurements of inclusive particle spectra, two particle correlations, low and high mass lepton pairs and photons. The emphasis is placed on transverse energy flow (E/sub T/) measurements with good energy resolution, and the ability to trigger the acquisition of data in a variety of E/sub T/ ranges, thereby selecting the impact parameter or the violence of the collisions. This short note presents HELIOS results, for the most part still preliminary, on 16O-nucleus collisions at the incident energies of 60 and 200 GeV per nucleon. The E/sub T/ distributions from Al, Ag and W targets are discussed and compared to the associated charged particle multiplicities from W. Charged particle and (converted) photon spectra measured with the external magnetic spectrometer are compared for 16O + W and p + W collisions at 200 GeV per nucleon. 5 refs., 7 figs

  5. Effect of Fe3O4 nanoparticles on space charge distribution in propylene carbonate under impulse voltage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addition of nanoparticles of the ferromagnetic material Fe3O4 can increase the positive impulse breakdown voltage of propylene carbonate by 11.65%. To further investigate the effect of ferromagnetic nanoparticles on the space charge distribution in the discharge process, the present work set up a Kerr electro-optic field mapping measurement system using an array photodetector to carry out time-continuous measurement of the electric field and space charge distribution in propylene carbonate before and after modification. Test results show that fast electrons can be captured by Fe3O4 nanoparticles and converted into relatively slow, negatively charged particles, inhibiting the generation and transportation of the space charge, especially the negative space charge

  6. Tomographic measurement of the phase space distribution of a space-charge-dominated beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratakis, Diktys

    Many applications of accelerators, such as free electron lasers, pulsed neutron sources, and heavy ion fusion, require a good quality beam with high intensity. In practice, the achievable intensity is often limited by the dynamics at the low-energy, space-charge dominated end of the machine. Because low-energy beams can have complex distribution functions, a good understanding of their detailed evolution is needed. To address this issue, we have developed a simple and accurate tomographic method to map the beam phase using quadrupole magnets, which includes the effects from space charge. We extend this technique to use also solenoidal magnets which are commonly used at low energies, especially in photoinjectors, thus making the diagnostic applicable to most machines. We simulate our technique using a particle in cell code (PIC), to ascertain accuracy of the reconstruction. Using this diagnostic we report a number of experiments to study and optimize injection, transport and acceleration of intense space charge dominated beams. We examine phase mixing, by studying the phase-space evolution of an intense beam with a transversely nonuniform initial density distribution. Experimental measurements, theoretical predictions and PIC simulations are in good agreement each other. Finally, we generate a parabolic beam pulse to model those beams from photoinjectors, and combine tomography with fast imaging techniques to investigate the time-sliced parameters of beam current, size, energy spread and transverse emittance. We found significant differences between the slice emittance profiles and slice orientation as the beam propagates downstream. The combined effect of longitudinal nonuniform profiles and fast imaging of the transverse phase space provided us with information about correlations between longitudinal and transverse dynamics that we report within this dissertation.

  7. Measurement and modeling of electric field and space-charge distributions in obstructed helium discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axial and radial variations of electric field have been measured in dielectric shielded 0.025 m diameter parallel plate electrode with 0.0065 m gap for 1.6 mA, 2260 V helium dc discharge at 1.75 Torr. The axial and radial electric field profiles have been measured from the Stark splitting of 21S→11 1P transition through collision induced fluorescence from 43D→23P. The electric field values showed a strong radial variation peaking to 500 kV/m near the cathode radial boundary, and decreasing to about 100 kV/m near the anode edge, suggesting the formation of an obstructed discharge for this low nd condition, where n is the gas density and d is the gap distance. The off-axis Stark spectra showed that the electric field vector deviates from normal to the cathode surface which permits longer path electron trajectories in the inter-electrode gap. Also, the on-axis electric field gradient was very small and off-axis electric field gradient was large indicating a radially non-uniform current density. In order to obtain information about the space charge distribution in this obstructed discharge, it was modeled using the 2-d axisymmetric Poisson solver with the COMSOL finite element modeling program. The best fit to the measured electric field distribution was obtained with a space charge variation of ρ(r) = ρ0(r/r0)3, where ρ(r) is the local space charge density, ρ0 = 6 × 10−3 Coulomb/m3, r is the local radial value, and r0 is the radius of the electrode

  8. Anorexia nervosa and body fat distribution: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ghoch, Marwan; Calugi, Simona; Lamburghini, Silvia; Dalle Grave, Riccardo

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this paper was to conduct a systematic review of body fat distribution before and after partial and complete weight restoration in individuals with anorexia nervosa. Literature searches, study selection, method development and quality appraisal were performed independently by two authors, and data was synthesized using a narrative approach. Twenty studies met the inclusion criteria and were consequently analyzed. The review had five main findings. First, during anorexia nervosa adolescent females lose more central body fat, while adult females more peripheral fat. Second, partial weight restoration leads to greater fat mass deposition in the trunk region than other body regions in adolescent females. Third, after short-term weight restoration, whether partial or complete, adults show a central adiposity phenotype with respect to healthy age-matched controls. Fourth, central fat distribution is associated with increased insulin resistance, but does not adversely affect eating disorder psychopathology or cause psychological distress in female adults. Fifth, the abnormal central fat distribution seems to normalize after long-term maintenance of complete weight restoration, indicating that preferential central distribution of body fat is a transitory phenomenon. However, a discrepancy in the findings has been noted, especially between adolescents and adults; besides age and gender, these appear to be related to differences in the methodology and time of body composition assessments. The PROSPERO Registry-Anorexia Nervosa and Body Fat Distribution: A Systematic Review (CRD42014008738). PMID:25251296

  9. Anorexia Nervosa and Body Fat Distribution: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwan El Ghoch

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to conduct a systematic review of body fat distribution before and after partial and complete weight restoration in individuals with anorexia nervosa. Literature searches, study selection, method development and quality appraisal were performed independently by two authors, and data was synthesized using a narrative approach. Twenty studies met the inclusion criteria and were consequently analyzed. The review had five main findings. First, during anorexia nervosa adolescent females lose more central body fat, while adult females more peripheral fat. Second, partial weight restoration leads to greater fat mass deposition in the trunk region than other body regions in adolescent females. Third, after short-term weight restoration, whether partial or complete, adults show a central adiposity phenotype with respect to healthy age-matched controls. Fourth, central fat distribution is associated with increased insulin resistance, but does not adversely affect eating disorder psychopathology or cause psychological distress in female adults. Fifth, the abnormal central fat distribution seems to normalize after long-term maintenance of complete weight restoration, indicating that preferential central distribution of body fat is a transitory phenomenon. However, a discrepancy in the findings has been noted, especially between adolescents and adults; besides age and gender, these appear to be related to differences in the methodology and time of body composition assessments. The PROSPERO Registry—Anorexia Nervosa and Body Fat Distribution: A Systematic Review (CRD42014008738.

  10. The evolution of ion charge states in cathodic vacuum arc plasmas: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre

    2011-12-18

    Cathodic vacuum arc plasmas are known to contain multiply charged ions. 20 years after “Pressure Ionization: its role in metal vapour vacuum arc plasmas and ion sources” appeared in vol. 1 of Plasma Sources Science and Technology, it is a great opportunity to re-visit the issue of pressure ionization, a non-ideal plasma effect, and put it in perspective to the many other factors that influence observable charge state distributions, such as the role of the cathode material, the path in the density-temperature phase diagram, the “noise” in vacuum arc plasma as described by a fractal model approach, the effects of external magnetic fields and charge exchange collisions with neutrals. A much more complex image of the vacuum arc plasma emerges putting decades of experimentation and modeling in perspective.

  11. Charge symmetry at the partonic level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Londergan, J. T.; Peng, J. C.; Thomas, A. W.

    2010-07-01

    This review article discusses the experimental and theoretical status of partonic charge symmetry. It is shown how the partonic content of various structure functions gets redefined when the assumption of charge symmetry is relaxed. We review various theoretical and phenomenological models for charge symmetry violation in parton distribution functions. We summarize the current experimental upper limits on charge symmetry violation in parton distributions. A series of experiments are presented, which might reveal partonic charge symmetry violation, or alternatively might lower the current upper limits on parton charge symmetry violation.

  12. Charged particle transport and energization by magnetic field fluctuations with Gaussian/non-Gaussian distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we investigate charged particle transport and acceleration in a two-dimensional system with an uniform electric field and stationary magnetic field fluctuations. The main idea of this study is to consider dependencies of transport and acceleration rates on properties of distributions of magnetic field fluctuations. We develop a simplified model of magnetic fluctuations with a regulated distribution and apply the test particle approach. System parameters are chosen to simulate conditions typical for ion dynamics in the deep Earth magnetotail. We show that for a fixed power density of magnetic field fluctuations the particle acceleration is more effective in the system where particles interact with small-amplitude (but frequent) fluctuations. In systems with large-amplitude rare fluctuations the particle scattering is less effective and the particle acceleration is weaker. - Highlights: • Ion transport/acceleration by magnetic fluctuations with different distributions. • The most effective acceleration is for non-Gaussian magnetic field fluctuations • Both Gaussian/non-Gaussian distributions give similar energy spectrum shape

  13. First study of the negative binomial distribution applied to higher moments of net-charge and net-proton multiplicity distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnowsky, Terence J.; Westfall, Gary D.

    2013-07-01

    A study of the first four moments (mean, variance, skewness, and kurtosis) and their products (κσ2 and Sσ) of the net-charge and net-proton distributions in Au + Au collisions at √{sNN} = 7.7- 200 GeV from HIJING simulations has been carried out. The skewness and kurtosis and the collision volume independent products κσ2 and Sσ have been proposed as sensitive probes for identifying the presence of a QCD critical point. A discrete probability distribution that effectively describes the separate positively and negatively charged particle (or proton and anti-proton) multiplicity distributions is the negative binomial (or binomial) distribution (NBD/BD). The NBD/BD has been used to characterize particle production in high-energy particle and nuclear physics. Their application to the higher moments of the net-charge and net-proton distributions is examined. Differences between κσ2 and a statistical Poisson assumption of a factor of four (for net-charge) and 40% (for net-protons) can be accounted for by the NBD/BD. This is the first application of the properties of the NBD/BD to describe the behavior of the higher moments of net-charge and net-proton distributions in nucleus-nucleus collisions.

  14. Examination of the charge state distribution of ions in the ECR ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. The Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) Ion Source of ATOMKI offers the possibility for up-to-date experiments in the field of atomic and plasma physics and for practical applications. Also the methods of the production of highly charged ions are objects of active research. As in the ion source the particles are confined in small volume magnetic traps, the examination without disturbing the plasma is mainly focused on the radiation emitted by them. In the course of our experiments we examine the spectral distribution of x-rays emitted by the plasma of the ECR Ion Source. For the measurements we use a solid state x-ray detector of PIN diode type. With the knowledge of the response function and the efficiency of the detector the recorded spectra can be analyzed and important plasma parameters can be determined from them. During the measurements the detector was situated outside the vacuum chamber so in the course of the analysis also the x-ray transmission of different materials (a 100 μm kapton foil; 25 cm air; 25 μm Be window) had to be taken into account. We recorded x-ray spectra by different settings of the ECRIS and we studied the effects of the tuning parameters on the spectra. In our measurements Ar and Kr gases were used and we analyzed the position of the Kα peak of the working gas incorporating the above detector functions. The shift of the above mentioned peak gives us information on the change of the average ion charge of the plasma. Figure 1 shows a typical x-ray spectrum. We can observe three components in the spectrum: the bremsstrahlung of the electrons, the characteristic lines of the working gas and the characteristic lines of the excited wall materials. X-ray spectrum of Kr ECR plasma and the Change of the energy position of the Kr Kα peak as a function of the power of the microwave field. We plan to continue these measurement using a higher resolution x-ray detector and we will plan to compare the measured

  15. Technical challenges for electric power industries due to grid-integrated electric vehicles in low voltage distributions: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Grid-Integrated Vehicles (GIVs) as mobile storage systems are briefly discussed. • Comparative analysis on electric vehicles (EVs) and charging systems are provided. • It is necessary to coordinate the GIVs to minimize its impacts on power grid. • A proper load model of EVs that predicts the realistic system behavior is required. • Offering a dual tariff by grid utilities is needed as a way to reduce peak load. - Abstract: Grid-Integrated Vehicles (GIVs) are promising technologies for future Smart Grid (SG) and offer the potential to reduce the environmental impact of vehicles. The large scale deployment of GIVs without proper control of the time to charge the vehicles can result in unexpected challenges. This can lead to a disruptive impact on the current power distribution systems and in particular its substantial impacts in building power energy systems. Therefore, a proper model that predicts the realistic system behavior is required to analysis the true effects of introducing GIVs in the power grid. This paper presents a review of existing studies on GIV systems, their modeling techniques and their effects on power grids. Following a brief overview of the common types of electric vehicles (EVs) with their charging systems, a review of their impact on the low voltage distribution systems will be analyzed. The comprehensive review presented in this paper reveals that the impact of GIVs on power distribution systems can be quantified using the aspects of EVs, such as vehicle penetration, charging time, charging characteristics, driving patterns, transportation network. GIV studies are expected to be more popular in future years with the development of EV technologies and the government support to electricity utilities. Thereby, these factors will reduce the cost of energy to charge EV and enhance the practical implications of GIVs

  16. Simulation of the current distribution in lead-acid batteries to investigate the dynamic charge acceptance in flooded SLI batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowal, Julia; Schulte, Dominik; Sauer, Dirk Uwe [Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage Systems Group, Institute for Power Electronics and Electrical Drives (ISEA), RWTH Aachen University, 52066 Aachen (Germany); Karden, Eckhard [Ford Research and Advanced Engineering Europe, Aachen (Germany)

    2009-06-01

    Measurements show that the dynamic charge acceptance (DCA) of flooded SLI lead-acid batteries during micro-cycling in conventional and micro-hybrid vehicles is strongly dependent on the short-term history, such as previous charge or discharge, current rate, lowest state of charge in the last 24 h and more. Factors of 10 have been reported. Inhomogeneous current distribution, especially as a result of acid stratification, has been suggested to explain the DCA variability. This hypothesis was investigated by simulation of a two-dimensional macrohomogeneous model. It provides a spatial resolution of three elements in horizontal direction in each electrode and three elements in vertical direction. For an existing set of parameters, different current profiles were analyzed with regard to the current distribution during charging and discharging. In these simulations, a strong impact of the short-term history on current, charge and acid density distribution was found as well as a strong influence of micro-cycles on both charge distribution and acid stratification. (author)

  17. Integral cross section measurements and product recoil velocity distributions of Xe2+ + N2 hyperthermal charge-transfer collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hause, Michael L.; Prince, Benjamin D.; Bemish, Raymond J.

    2016-07-01

    Charge exchange from doubly charged rare gas cations to simple diatomics proceeds with a large cross section and results in populations of many vibrational and electronic product states. The charge exchange between Xe2+ and N2, in particular, is known to create N2 + in both the A and B electronic states. In this work, we present integral charge exchange cross section measurements of the Xe2+ + N2 reaction as well as axial recoil velocity distributions of the Xe+ and N2 + product ions for collision energies between 0.3 and 100 eV in the center-of-mass (COM) frame. Total charge-exchange cross sections decrease from 70 Å2 to about 40 Å2 with increasing collision energy through this range. Analysis of the axial velocity distributions indicates that a Xe2+ - N2 complex exists at low collision energies but is absent by 17.6 eV COM. Analysis of the axial velocity distributions reveals evidence for complexes with lifetimes comparable to the rotational period at low collision energies. The velocity distributions are consistent with quasi-resonant single charge transfer at high collision energies.

  18. Integral cross section measurements and product recoil velocity distributions of Xe(2+) + N2 hyperthermal charge-transfer collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hause, Michael L; Prince, Benjamin D; Bemish, Raymond J

    2016-07-28

    Charge exchange from doubly charged rare gas cations to simple diatomics proceeds with a large cross section and results in populations of many vibrational and electronic product states. The charge exchange between Xe(2+) and N2, in particular, is known to create N2 (+) in both the A and B electronic states. In this work, we present integral charge exchange cross section measurements of the Xe(2+) + N2 reaction as well as axial recoil velocity distributions of the Xe(+) and N2 (+) product ions for collision energies between 0.3 and 100 eV in the center-of-mass (COM) frame. Total charge-exchange cross sections decrease from 70 Å(2) to about 40 Å(2) with increasing collision energy through this range. Analysis of the axial velocity distributions indicates that a Xe(2+) - N2 complex exists at low collision energies but is absent by 17.6 eV COM. Analysis of the axial velocity distributions reveals evidence for complexes with lifetimes comparable to the rotational period at low collision energies. The velocity distributions are consistent with quasi-resonant single charge transfer at high collision energies. PMID:27475363

  19. Future prospects for ECR plasma generators with improved charge state distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growing number and variety of fundamental, applied, and industrial uses for high intensity, high charge state ion beams continues to be the driving force behind efforts to develop Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion sources with superior performance characteristics. Incumbent with the advent of sub-micron electronic devices and their fabrication has been the demand for improved process control and optimization. These demands have led to the development of methods for cleaning, chemical etching, and deposition of thin films based on the use of plasma devices including ECR sources. Despite the steady advance in the technology, ECR plasma heating has not yet reached its full potential in terms of charge state and intensity within a particular charge state, in part, because of the narrow band width, single-frequency microwave radiation commonly used to heat the plasma electrons. This heating technique, coupled with conventional minimum-B configuration magnetic fields used for confining the electrons, resulting in the formation of the thin, ECR surfaces within the plasma volumes of these sources. This report identifies fundamentally important methods for enhancing the performances of ECR plasma generators by transforming the ECR zones from surfaces to volumes. Two methods are readily available for increasing the sizes of these zones. These techniques include: (1) a tailored magnetic field configuration in combination with single-frequency microwave radiation to create a large uniformly distributed ECR volume and; (2) the use of broadband-frequency domain techniques derived from standard TWT technology, to transform the resonant plasma surfaces of traditional ECR ion sources into resonant plasma volumes

  20. Momentum distribution of charged particles in jets in dijet events and comparison to perturbative QCD predictions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M E ZOMORRODIAN; M HASHEMINIA; S M ZABIHINPOUR; A MIRJALILI

    2016-08-01

    Inclusive momentum distributions of charged particles are measured in dijet events. Events were produced at the AMY detector with a centre of mass energy of 60 ${\\rm GeV}$. Our results were compared, on the one hand to those obtained from other $e^+ e^-$, $ep$ as well as CDF data, and on the other hand to the perturbative QCD calculations carried out in the framework of the modified leading log approximation (MLLA) and assuming local parton--hadron duality (LPHD). A fit of the shape of the distributions yields $\\scr Q_{eff} = 263 \\pm 13 {\\rm MeV}$ for the AMY data. In addition, a fit to the evolution of the peak position with dijet mass using all data from different experiments gives $\\scr Q_{eff} = 226 \\pm 18 {\\rm MeV}$. Next, αs was extracted using the shape of the distribution at the Z0 scale, with a value of 0.118 \\pm 0.013. This is consistent, within the statistical errors, with many accurate measurements. We conclude that it is the success of LPHD + MLLA that the extracted value of $\\alpha_{s}$ is correct. Possible explanations for all these features will be presented in this paper.

  1. Spectroscopic techniques for measuring ion diode space-charge distributions and ion source properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are using time- and space-resolved visible spectroscopy to measure applied-B ion diode dynamics on the 20 TW Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II. Doppler broadening of fast Li atoms, as viewed parallel to the anode, is used in a charge-exchange model to obtain the Li+ ion divergence within 100 μm of the anode surface. The characteristic Stark/Zeeman shifts in spectra of alkali neutrals or singly-ionized alkaline-earths are used to measure the strong electric (109 V/m) and magnetic (∼6 T) fields in the diode gap. Large Stark shifts within 0.5 mm of the anode indicate the LiF emits with a finite field threshold rather than with Child- Langmuir-type emission, and the small slope in the electric field indicates an unexpected build-up of electrons near the anode. In the diode gap, we aim to unfold fields to quantify the time-dependent ion and electron space-charge distributions that determine the ion beam properties. Observed electric field non-uniformities give local beam deflections that can be comparable to the total beam microdivergence. We are implementing active laser absorption and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy on low-density Na atoms injected into the diode gap prior to the power pulse. The small Doppler broadening in the Na spectra should allow simultaneous electric and magnetic field mapping with improved spatial resolution

  2. A review of technical options for solar charging stations in Asia and Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. Almeida

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Charging stations are an attractive solution to provide access to electricity to low income populations with low energy consumption in remote and off-grid areas. This paper reviews the state of the art of charging stations, with special focus on the technical options. Forty-five different actors in this field were analysed, based on academic publications, reports, online search and surveys. Results show that most stations are run in Sub Saharan Africa and South Asia, are powered by solar energy and although there are many different energy services targeted, the most popular services are charging batteries, mobile phones and lamps. The first charging station was installed in 1992 but most activities happen after 2005. This recent growth has been enabled by the falling cost of photovoltaic modules, learning effect, economies of scale, financial innovation, private sector involvement and worldwide dissemination of mobile phones. While in the first system the only purpose was to charge solar photovoltaic lanterns, the first multi-purpose station appeared in 2008. As expected, the technical challenges are mostly related to the use of batteries not only because they represent the component with shortest lifetime but also because if the battery is not for individual use, social questions arise due to poor definition of rights and duties of the customers. Furthermore, the development of a sustainable business model is also a challenge since this requires technical skills and system monitoring that are not usually available locally. Finally, it is also suggested that the minimum technical quality standards for charging stations should be defined and implemented.

  3. Model Simulations of Charged Particles Multiplicity Distributions in the Forward Region for ALICE at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, M A; Kondratev, V P; Vechernin, V V

    1999-01-01

    We present results of Monte Carlo simulations of charged particles multiplicity distributions and ALICE background conditions in forward region for PbPb collisions at LHC.HIJING event generator [1] results are compared with predictions of Coloured String Fusion Model [2,3].Requirements to the Forward Multiplicity Detector for ALICE arising from these simulations are discussed (multiplicity range, resolution in multiplicity, granularity, timing resolution).References: [1] N.van Eijndhoven et al., ALICE/CERN 95-32, Internal Note 1996[2] M.Braun and C.Pajares, PHys. Rev. D47 (1993) 114-122[2] M.Braun and C.Pajares, PHys. Rev. C51 (1995) 879-889

  4. Charged hadron transverse momentum distributions in Au+Au collisions at S=200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, Christof; PHOBOS Collaboration; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Ballintijn, M.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michałowski, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2003-03-01

    We present transverse momentum distributions of charged hadrons produced in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV. The evolution of the spectra for transverse momenta p_T from 0.25 to 5GeV/c is studied as a function of collision centrality over a range from 65 to 344 participating nucleons. We find a significant change of the spectral shape between proton-antiproton and peripheral Au+Au collisions. Comparing peripheral to central Au+Au collisions, we find that the yields at the highest p_T exhibit approximate scaling with the number of participating nucleons, rather than scaling with the number of binary collisions.

  5. Charged Particle Radiation Therapy for Uveal Melanoma: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhen, E-mail: Wang.Zhen@mayo.edu [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Nabhan, Mohammed [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Schild, Steven E. [Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); Stafford, Scott L.; Petersen, Ivy A.; Foote, Robert L.; Murad, M. Hassan [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Charged particle therapy (CPT) delivered with either protons, helium ions, or carbon ions, has been used to treat uveal melanoma. The present analysis was performed to systematically evaluate the efficacy and adverse effects of CPT for uveal melanoma. We searched EMBASE, MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and SciVerse Scopus and cross-referenced recent systematic reviews through January 2012. Two independent reviewers identified clinical trials and observational studies of CPT (protons, helium ions, and carbon ions). These reviewers extracted data and assessed study quality. Twenty-seven studies enrolling 8809 uveal melanoma patients met inclusion criteria. The rate of local recurrence was significantly less with CPT than with brachytherapy (odds ratio [OR] = 0.22, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.21-0.23). There were no significant differences in mortality or enucleation rates. Results were robust in multiple sensitivity analyses. CPT was also associated with lower retinopathy and cataract formation rates. Data suggest better outcomes may be possible with charged particle therapy with respect to local recurrence, retinopathy, and cataract formation rates. The overall quality of the evidence is low, and higher quality comparative effectiveness studies are needed to provide better evidence.

  6. Charged Particle Radiation Therapy for Uveal Melanoma: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charged particle therapy (CPT) delivered with either protons, helium ions, or carbon ions, has been used to treat uveal melanoma. The present analysis was performed to systematically evaluate the efficacy and adverse effects of CPT for uveal melanoma. We searched EMBASE, MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and SciVerse Scopus and cross-referenced recent systematic reviews through January 2012. Two independent reviewers identified clinical trials and observational studies of CPT (protons, helium ions, and carbon ions). These reviewers extracted data and assessed study quality. Twenty-seven studies enrolling 8809 uveal melanoma patients met inclusion criteria. The rate of local recurrence was significantly less with CPT than with brachytherapy (odds ratio [OR] = 0.22, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.21-0.23). There were no significant differences in mortality or enucleation rates. Results were robust in multiple sensitivity analyses. CPT was also associated with lower retinopathy and cataract formation rates. Data suggest better outcomes may be possible with charged particle therapy with respect to local recurrence, retinopathy, and cataract formation rates. The overall quality of the evidence is low, and higher quality comparative effectiveness studies are needed to provide better evidence

  7. Accelerating QM/MM free energy calculations: representing the surroundings by an updated mean charge distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosta, Edina; Haranczyk, Maciej; Chu, Zhen T; Warshel, Arieh

    2008-05-01

    Reliable studies of enzymatic reactions by combined quantum mechanical/molecular mechanics (QM(ai)/MM) approaches with an ab initio description of the quantum region presents a major challenge to computational chemists. The main problem is the need for very large computer time to evaluate the QM energy, which in turn makes it extremely challenging to perform proper configurational sampling. One of the most obvious options for accelerating QM/MM simulations is the use of an average solvent potential. In fact, the idea of using an average solvent potential is rather obvious and has implicitly been used in Langevin dipole/QM calculations. However, in the case of explicit solvent models the practical implementations are more challenging, and the accuracy of the averaging approach has not been validated. The present study introduces the average effect of the fluctuating solvent charges by using equivalent charge distributions, which are updated every m steps. Several models are evaluated in terms of the resulting accuracy and efficiency. The most effective model divides the system into an inner region with N explicit solvent atoms and an external region with two effective charges. Different models are considered in terms of the division of the solvent system and the update frequency. Another key element of our approach is the use of the free energy perturbation (FEP) and/or linear response approximation treatments that guarantees the evaluation of the rigorous solvation free energy. Special attention is paid to the convergence of the calculated solvation free energies and the corresponding solute polarization. The performance of the method is examined by evaluating the solvation of a water molecule and a formate ion in water and also the dipole moment of water in water solution. Remarkably, it is found that different averaging procedures eventually converge to the same value but some protocols provide optimal ways of obtaining the final QM(ai)/MM converged results. The

  8. Charge transfer efficiency improvement of a 4-T pixel by the optimization of electrical potential distribution under the transfer gate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The charge transfer efficiency improvement method is introduced by optimizing the electrical potential distribution under the transfer gate along the charge transfer path. A non-uniform doped transfer transistor channel is introduced to provide an ascending electrical potential gradient in the transfer transistor channel. With the adjustments to the overlap length between the R1 region and the transfer gate, the doping dose of the R1 region, and the overlap length between the anti-punch-through (APT) implantations and transfer gate, the potential barrier and potential pocket in the connecting region of transfer transistor channel and the pinned photodiode (PPD) are reduced to improve the electrical potential connection. The simulation results show that the percentage of residual charges to total charges drops from 1/104 to 1/107, and the transfer time is reduced from 500 to 110 ns. This means the charge transfer efficiency is improved. (semiconductor devices)

  9. Review of events in the electricity distribution sector in 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chief Executive of Southern Electric plc, one of the thirteen recently privatised Regional Electricity Companies, reviews the performance of the United Kingdom electricity distribution sector for 1992, and considers the effects of competition in the Electricity Supply Industry. Three areas of progress are discussed. These include benefits to shareholders (in terms of profits) and to customers, who enjoyed lower prices, better service and more choice. A review of transmission prices was undertaken by the Director General and led to regulations on the effective operation of the pool, improved service standards and power generation competition. Finally, the Coal Review had ramifications for the industry by broadening the debate on competitively priced energy generation and the electricity market since privatization. (UK)

  10. Polarization-Induced Charge Distribution at Homogeneous Zincblende/Wurtzite Heterostructural Junctions in ZnSe Nanobelts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, L.; Jin, L.; Wang, J.; Smith, D. J.; Yin, W. J.; Yan, Y.; Sang, H.; Choy, W. C. H.; McCartney, M. R.

    2012-03-08

    Homogeneous heterostructural wurtzite (WZ)/zincblende (ZB) junctions are successfully fabricated in ZnSe nanobelts. Polarity continuity across the ZB/WZ interface is demonstrated. The saw-tooth-like potential profile induced by spontaneous polarization across the WZ/ZB/WZ interfaces is identified directly at the nanoscale. The polarization-induced charge distribution across the homogeneous heterostructural interfaces is proposed as a viable alternative approach towards charge tailoring in semiconductor nanostructures.

  11. Influence of argon and oxygen on charge-state-resolved ion energy distributions of filtered aluminum arcs

    OpenAIRE

    Rosen, Johanna; Anders, Andre; Mraz, Stanislav; Atiser, Adil; Schneider, Jochen M.

    2006-01-01

    The charge-state-resolved ion energy distributions (IEDs) in filtered aluminum vacuum arc plasmas were measured and analyzed at different oxygen and argon pressures in the range 0.5 8.0 mTorr. A significant reduction of the ion energy was detected as the pressure was increased, most pronounced in an argon environment and for the higher charge states. The corresponding average charge state decreased from 1.87 to 1.0 with increasing pressure. The IEDs of all metal ions in oxygen were fitte...

  12. Distributed Temperature Sensing: Review of Technology and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ukil, A; Krippner, P

    2015-01-01

    Distributed temperature sensors (DTS) measure temperatures by means of optical fibers. Those optoelectronic devices provide a continuous profile of the temperature distribution along the cable. Initiated in the 1980s, DTS systems have undergone significant improvements in the technology and the application scenario over the last decades. The main measuring principles are based on detecting the back-scattering of light, e.g., detecting via Rayleigh, Raman, Brillouin principles. The application domains span from traditional applications in the distributed temperature or strain sensing in the cables, to the latest smart grid initiative in the power systems, etc. In this paper, we present comparative reviews of the different DTS technologies, different applications, standard and upcoming, different manufacturers.

  13. The effect of realistic nuclear charge distributions on isotope shifts and towards the extraction of higher order nuclear radial moments

    CERN Document Server

    Papoulia, A; Ekman, J

    2016-01-01

    Background: Atomic spectral lines from different isotopes display a small shift in energy, commonly referred to as the line isotope shift. One of the components of the isotope shift is the field shift, which depends on the extent and the shape of the nuclear charge density distribution. Purpose: To investigate how sensitive field shifts are with respect to variations in the nuclear size and shape and what information of nuclear charge distributions that can be extracted from measured field shifts. Methods: Nuclear properties are obtained from nuclear density functional theory calculations based on the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approach. These results are combined with multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock methods to obtain realistic field shifts. Results: Phenomena such as nuclear deformation and variations in the diffuseness of nuclear charge distributions give measurable contributions to the field shifts. Using a novel approach, we demonstrate the possibility to extract new information concerning the n...

  14. A new class of solutions of anisotropic charged distributions on pseudo-spheroidal spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratanpal, B. S.; Thomas, V. O.; Pandya, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    In the present article a new class of exact solutions of Einstein's field equations for charged anisotropic distribution is obtained on the background of pseudo-spheroidal spacetime characterized by the metric potential g_{rr}=1+K {r2/R2}/{1+r2/R2}, where K and R are geometric parameters of the spacetime. The radial pressure pr and electric field intensity E are taken in the form 8π pr=K-1/R2 (1-{r2/R2)}/{ (1+Kr2/R2 )2} and E2=α(K-1){r2/R2}/{R2 (1+Kr2/R2 )2}. The bounds of geometric parameter K and the parameter α appearing in the expression of E2 are obtained by imposing the requirements for a physically acceptable model. It is found that the model is in good agreement with the observational data of number of compact stars like 4U 1820-30, PSR J1903+327, 4U 1608-52, Vela X-1, PSR J1614-2230, Cen X-3 given by Gangopadhyay et al. (Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 431:3216, 2013). When α= 0, the model reduces to the uncharged anisotropic distribution given by Ratanpal et al. (arXiv:1506.08512 [gr-qc], 2015).

  15. Learning overcomplete representations from distributed data: a brief review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Haroon; Bajwa, Waheed U.

    2016-05-01

    Most of the research on dictionary learning has focused on developing algorithms under the assumption that data is available at a centralized location. But often the data is not available at a centralized location due to practical constraints like data aggregation costs, privacy concerns, etc. Using centralized dictionary learning algorithms may not be the optimal choice in such settings. This motivates the design of dictionary learning algorithms that consider distributed nature of data as one of the problem variables. Just like centralized settings, distributed dictionary learning problem can be posed in more than one way depending on the problem setup. Most notable distinguishing features are the online versus batch nature of data and the representative versus discriminative nature of the dictionaries. In this paper, several distributed dictionary learning algorithms that are designed to tackle different problem setups are reviewed. One of these algorithms is cloud K-SVD, which solves the dictionary learning problem for batch data in distributed settings. One distinguishing feature of cloud K-SVD is that it has been shown to converge to its centralized counterpart, namely, the K-SVD solution. On the other hand, no such guarantees are provided for other distributed dictionary learning algorithms. Convergence of cloud K-SVD to the centralized K-SVD solution means problems that are solvable by K-SVD in centralized settings can now be solved in distributed settings with similar performance. Finally, cloud K-SVD is used as an example to show the advantages that are attainable by deploying distributed dictionary algorithms for real world distributed datasets.

  16. Analysis of Charge State Distribution by Non-Local Thermodynamic-Equilibrium Spin-Orbit-Split-Array Collisional Radiative Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张红; 张继彦; 杨向东; 杨国洪; 郑志坚

    2003-01-01

    A collisional radiative model based on the spin-orbit-split-arrays is used to determine the charge state distribution of gold plasmas. The ab initio atomic structure code of Cowan and the spin-orbit-split-array model were used to calculate all the emission spectra of the different gold species, and a non-local thermodynamic-equilibrium model was coupled to calculate the ion populations at a given plasma density and electron temperature. The charge state distribution and other plasma parameters were determined by comparing the experimental spectra with the theoretical simulated spectra of gold plasmas.

  17. Charged-particle multiplicity distributions in oxygen-nucleus collisions at 60 and 200 GeV per nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multiplicity distributions of charged particles produced in the pseudorapidity range 0.9lab<5.5 were measured in oxygen-nucleus collisions for Al, Ag, and W target nuclei at incident energies of 60 and 200 GeV per nucleon. The multiplicity differential cross sections and the pseudorapidity distributions as a function of transverse energy are presented for the various target nuclei. The correlation between charged multiplicity and transverse energy is studied as a function of transverse energy. Data are compared with predictions of the IRIS and FRITIOF generators. (orig.)

  18. Energy dependence of mass, charge, isotopic, and energy distributions in neutron-induced fission of 235U and 239Pu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasca, H.; Andreev, A. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Kim, Y.

    2016-05-01

    The mass, charge, isotopic, and kinetic-energy distributions of fission fragments are studied within an improved scission-point statistical model in the reactions 235U+n and 239Pu+n at different energies of the incident neutron. The charge and mass distributions of the electromagnetic- and neutron-induced fission of 214,218Ra, 230,232,238U are also shown. The available experimental data are well reproduced and the energy-dependencies of the observable characteristics of fission are predicted for future experiments.

  19. Contributed Review: Distributed optical fibre dynamic strain sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoudi, Ali; Newson, Trevor P.

    2016-01-01

    Extensive research on Brillouin- and Raman-based distributed optical fibre sensors over the past two decades has resulted in the commercialization of distributed sensors capable of measuring static and quasi-static phenomena such as temperature and strain. Recently, the focus has been shifted towards developing distributed sensors for measurement of dynamic phenomena such as dynamic strain and sound waves. This article reviews the current state of the art distributed optical fibre sensors capable of quantifying dynamic vibrations. The most important aspect of Rayleigh and Brillouin scattering processes which have been used for distributed dynamic measurement are studied. The principle of the sensing techniques used to measure dynamic perturbations are analyzed followed by a case study of the most recent advances in this field. It is shown that the Rayleigh-based sensors have longer sensing range and higher frequency range, but their spatial resolution is limited to 1 m. On the other hand, the Brillouin-based sensors have shown a higher spatial resolution, but relatively lower frequency and sensing ranges.

  20. Contributed Review: Distributed optical fibre dynamic strain sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoudi, Ali; Newson, Trevor P

    2016-01-01

    Extensive research on Brillouin- and Raman-based distributed optical fibre sensors over the past two decades has resulted in the commercialization of distributed sensors capable of measuring static and quasi-static phenomena such as temperature and strain. Recently, the focus has been shifted towards developing distributed sensors for measurement of dynamic phenomena such as dynamic strain and sound waves. This article reviews the current state of the art distributed optical fibre sensors capable of quantifying dynamic vibrations. The most important aspect of Rayleigh and Brillouin scattering processes which have been used for distributed dynamic measurement are studied. The principle of the sensing techniques used to measure dynamic perturbations are analyzed followed by a case study of the most recent advances in this field. It is shown that the Rayleigh-based sensors have longer sensing range and higher frequency range, but their spatial resolution is limited to 1 m. On the other hand, the Brillouin-based sensors have shown a higher spatial resolution, but relatively lower frequency and sensing ranges. PMID:26827302

  1. Charge distribution on plutonium-containing aerosols produced in mixed-oxide reactor fuel fabrication and the laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inhalation toxicity of potentially toxic aerosols may be affected by the electrostatic charge on the particles. Charge may influence the deposition site during inhalation and therefore its subsequent clearance and dose patterns. The electrostatic charge distributions on plutonium-containing aerosols were measured with a miniature, parallel plate, aerosol electrical mobility spectrometer. Two aerosols were studied: a laboratory-produced 238PuO2 aerosol (15.8 Ci/g) and a plutonium mixed-oxide aerosol (PU-MOX, natural UO2 plus PuO2, 0.02 Ci/g) formed during industrial centerless grinding of mixed-oxide reactor fuel pellets. Plutonium-238 dioxide particles produced in the laboratory exhibited a small net positive charge within a few minutes after passing through a 85Kr discharger due to alpha particle emission removal of valence electrons. PU-MOX aerosols produced during centerless grinding showed a charge distribution essentially in Boltzmann equilibrium. The gross alpha aerosol concentrations (960-1200 nCi/l) within the glove box were sufficient to provide high ion concentrations capable of discharging the charge induced by mechanical and/or nuclear decay processes

  2. First Study of the Negative Binomial Distribution Applied to Higher Moments of Net-charge and Net-proton Multiplicity Distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Tarnowsky, Terence J

    2013-01-01

    A study of the first four moments (mean, variance, skewness, and kurtosis) and their products ($\\kappa\\sigma^{2}$ and $S\\sigma$) of the net-charge and net-proton distributions in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{\\rm s_{NN}}$ = 7.7-200 GeV from HIJING simulations has been carried out. It is seen that a Poisson does not effectively describe the actual distributions of positive and negative particles (or protons and anti-protons). A discrete probability distribution that effectively describes the raw distributions is the negative binomial (or binomial) distribution (NBD/BD). The NBD/BD have been used to characterize particle production in high-energy particle and nuclear physics. Differences between $\\kappa\\sigma^{2}$ and the Poisson assumption of a factor of four (for net-charge) and 40% (for net-protons) can be accounted for by the NBD/BD. This is the first application of the NBD/BD to describe the behavior of the higher moments of net-charge and net-proton distributions in nucleus-nucleus collisions.

  3. Measurements of charged-particle distributions at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ and $13$ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00332935; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Inclusive charged-particle measurements at hadron colliders probe the low-energy non-perturbative region of QCD. The ATLAS collaboration has measured the primary-charged-particle multiplicity and its dependence on transverse momentum and pseudorapidity in special data sets with low LHC proton--proton beam currents, recorded at centre-of-mass energies of 8~TeV and 13~TeV. The new precise measurements at 8~TeV cover a wide spectrum of distributions using charged-particle selections with minimum transverse momentum of both 100~MeV and 500~MeV and in various phase-space regions of low and high charged-particle multiplicities. Two measurements at 13~TeV present the first detailed studies with a minimum transverse momentum of 500~MeV and 100~MeV. The measurements are compared with predictions of various MC generators and are found to provide strong constraints on these.

  4. Forward-backward correlations and charged-particle azimuthal distributions in pp interactions using the ATLAS detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Akiyama, A.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amorós, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M.-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barashkou, A.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beale, S.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ben Ami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Benchouk, C.; Bendel, M.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Kuutmann, E. Bergeaas; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertella, C.; Bertin, A.; Bertinelli, F.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blazek, T.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. B.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bona, M.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Bondioli, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, C. N.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Botterill, D.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozhko, N. I.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G. W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brodet, E.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Brown, H.; Bruckman, de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.

    2012-07-01

    Using inelastic proton-proton interactions at sqrt {s} = 900 GeV and 7 TeV, recorded by the ATLAS detector at the LHC, measurements have been made of the correlations between forward and backward charged-particle multiplicities and, for the first time, between forward and backward charged-particle summed transverse momentum. In addition, jet-like structure in the events is studied by means of azimuthal distributions of charged particles relative to the charged particle with highest transverse momentum in a selected kinematic region of the event. The results are compared with predictions from tunes of the pythia and herwig++ Monte Carlo generators, which in most cases are found to provide a reasonable description of the data.

  5. Investigation of the W and Q2 dependence of charged pion distributions in μp scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The W and Q2 dependence of the fragmentation functions and of the average multiplicity of charged pions is investigated, using data from the NA9 experiment at the CERN SPS on muon-proton scattering at 280 GeV. A significant increase of pion production with increasing W is observed at fixed Q2, leading to a rise of the average charged pion multiplicity, linear in ln W2, and of the pion fragmentation function in the central region, i.e. at small vertical strokeXsub(F)vertical stroke. This increase can be understood from the kinematic widening of the cms rapidity range proportional to ln W2 and the observed W independent height of the rapidity distribution. At fixed W, a rise of the average charged pion multiplicity with Q2 is observed. This rise appears to be weaker than that observed for all charged hadrons implying a stronger rise with Q2 for kaons and protons. (orig.)

  6. Forward-backward correlations and charged-particle azimuthal distributions in $pp$ interactions using the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdesselam, Abdelouahab; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acerbi, Emilio; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Aderholz, Michael; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Akiyama, Kunihiro; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Aliyev, Magsud; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral, Pedro; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amorim, Antonio; Amorós, Gabriel; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Andrieux, Marie-Laure; Anduaga, Xabier; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Astvatsatourov, Anatoli; Aubert, Bernard; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Ay, Cano; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahinipati, Seema; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Mark; Baker, Sarah; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barashkou, Andrei; Barbaro Galtieri, Angela; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Valeria; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beale, Steven; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Behera, Prafulla; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellina, Francesco; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Ben Ami, Sagi; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Benchouk, Chafik; Bendel, Markus; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertella, Claudia; Bertin, Antonio; Bertinelli, Francesco; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bitenc, Urban; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Using inelastic proton-proton interactions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 900 GeV and 7 TeV, recorded by the ATLAS detector at the LHC, measurements have been made of the correlations between forward and backward charged-particle multiplicities and, for the first time, between forward and backward charged-particle summed transverse momentum. In addition, jet-like structure in the events is studied by means of azimuthal distributions of charged particles relative to the charged particle with highest transverse momentum in a selected kinematic region of the event. The results are compared with predictions from tunes of the PYTHIA and HERWIG++ Monte Carlo generators, which in most cases are found to provide a reasonable description of the data.

  7. Spatial distribution of average charge state and deposition rate in high power impulse magnetron sputtering of copper

    OpenAIRE

    Horwat, David

    2008-01-01

    The spatial distribution of copper ions and atoms in high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) discharges was determined by (i) measuring the ion current to electrostatic probes and (ii) measuring the film thickness by profilometry. A set of electrostatic and collection probes were placed at different angular positions and distances from the target surface. The angular distribution of the deposition rate and the average charge state of the copper species (including ions and neutrals)...

  8. Calculation of photon angular distribution and polarization for radiative recombination for high-charged hydrogen-like ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen Tian-Ming; Chen Chong-Yang; Wang Yan-Sen

    2007-01-01

    In this paper a systematic study is carried out on the angular distribution and polarization of photons emitted following radiative recombination of H-like ions by a non-relativistic dipole approximation. In order to incorporate the screening effect due to inner-shell electrons, a distorted wave approach is used. The dependences of the calculated angular distribution and polarization on the reduced energy and nuclear charge are fitted by the corresponding empirical formulas respectively.

  9. Study of charged multiplicity distributions in pn interactions at 555, 93 and 146 GeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Fridman, A; Gerber, J P; Hunt, W; Juillot, P; Koller, E L; Malko, J A; Michalon, A; Michalon-Mentzer, M E; Plano, R J; Raths, O; Robinson, D K; Sheng, A P; Stamer, P E; Taylor, S; Voltolini, C

    1975-01-01

    Uses Argonne, CERN and Brookhaven data to determine pn topological cross sections at incident momenta of 5.55, 9.3 and 14.6 GeV/c. Studies the momentum dependence of the multiplicity distributions. Discusses the properties of the data, which show both a broadening of the multiplicity distribution an increase in the average charged multiplicity (n) as the incident momentum increases. (17 refs).

  10. Lateral charged particle distribution of extensive air showers - source of information about energy and nature of the primary cosmic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CORSIKA simulated showers for H, C and Fe cosmic primaries in 8 energy intervals from 1016 eV to 1018 eV, taking into account the response of KASCADE-Grande detectors, have been used to reconstruct the charged particle density for KASCADE-Grande observations, based on the Linsley lateral distribution function (LDF). Extensive studies have been done to investigate features for energy estimation and mass discrimination of cosmic primaries around 1017 eV. It has been found that the charged particle density distribution of EAS exhibits interesting information for both aspects: at larger distances from shower core, around 500 m - 600 m the charge particle density could be used as energy identifier, and at shorter distances from shower core, around, 100 m - 200 m, it signals the mass of the EAS primary. (author)

  11. Charge state distributions of oxygen and carbon in the energy range 1 to 300 keV/e observed with AMPTE/CCE in the magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Observations of charge state distributions of oxygen and carbon are presented that were obtained with the charge-energy-mass spectrometer (CHEM) onboard the AMPTE/CCE space-craft. Data were selected for two different local time sectors (apogee at 1300 LT and 0300 LT, respectively), three L-ranges (48), and quiet to moderately disturbed days (Kp< or =4). The charge state distributions reveal the existence of all charge states of oxygen and carbon in the magnetosphere. The relative importance of the different charge states strongly depends on L and much less on local time. The observations confirm that the solar wind and the ionosphere contribute to the oxygen population, whereas carbon only originates from the solar wind. The L-dependence of the charge state distributions can be interpreted in terms of these different ion sources and of charge exchange and diffusion processes that largely influence the distribution of oxygen and carbon in the magnetosphere

  12. Effect of fractal silver electrodes on charge collection and light distribution in semiconducting organic polymer films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamousis, RL; Chang, LL; Watterson, WJ; Montgomery, RD; Taylor, RP; Moule, AJ; Shaheen, SE; Ilan, B; van de Lagemaat, J; Osterloh, FE

    2014-08-21

    Living organisms use fractal structures to optimize material and energy transport across regions of differing size scales. Here we test the effect of fractal silver electrodes on light distribution and charge collection in organic semiconducting polymer films made of P3HT and PCBM. The semiconducting polymers were deposited onto electrochemically grown fractal silver structures (5000 nm x 500 nm; fractal dimension of 1.71) with PEDOT:PSS as hole-selective interlayer. The fractal silver electrodes appear black due to increased horizontal light scattering, which is shown to improve light absorption in the polymer. According to surface photovoltage spectroscopy, fractal silver electrodes outperform the flat electrodes when the BHJ film thickness is large (>400 nm, 0.4 V photovoltage). Photocurrents of up to 200 microamperes cm(-2) are generated from the bulk heterojunction (BHJ) photoelectrodes under 435 nm LED (10-20 mW cm(-2)) illumination in acetonitrile solution containing 0.005 M ferrocenium hexafluorophosphate as the electron acceptor. The low IPCE values (0.3-0.7%) are due to slow electron transfer to ferrocenium ion and due to shunting along the large metal-polymer interface. Overall, this work provides an initial assessment of the potential of fractal electrodes for organic photovoltaic cells.

  13. Unsteady electroosmosis in a microchannel with Poisson-Boltzmann charge distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chien C; Kuo, Chih-Yu; Wang, Chang-Yi

    2011-11-01

    The present study is concerned with unsteady electroosmotic flow (EOF) in a microchannel with the electric charge distribution described by the Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation. The nonlinear PB equation is solved by a systematic perturbation with respect to the parameter λ which measures the strength of the wall zeta potential relative to the thermal potential. In the small λ limits (λlinearized PB equation - the Debye-Hückel approximation. The solutions obtained by using only three terms in the perturbation series are shown to be accurate with errors equation is then used to solve the electrokinetic fluid transport equation for two types of unsteady flow: transient flow driven by a suddenly applied voltage and oscillatory flow driven by a time-harmonic voltage. The solution for the transient flow has important implications on EOF as an effective means for transporting electrolytes in microchannels with various electrokinetic widths. On the other hand, the solution for the oscillatory flow is shown to have important physical implications on EOF in mixing electrolytes in terms of the amplitude and phase of the resulting time-harmonic EOF rate, which depends on the applied frequency and the electrokinetic width of the microchannel as well as on the parameter λ. PMID:22072500

  14. Charged-particle (pseudo)rapidity distributions in e+e-, pp, and AA collisions at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A unified formula which describes the (pseudo)rapidity distributions of charged particles produced in high energy collisions is presented. The calculated results are compared and found to be in agreement with the experimental data of e+e-, pp, and AA collisions at high energies

  15. Momentum distributions and interferometry analysis of negatively charged hadrons from 200 A GeV S + Au reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two particle correlations and single particle PT distributions have been measured for negatively charged hadrons from 200 A GeV S+Au reactions. The large acceptance of the WA93 dipole spectrometer enables the study of transverse momentum dependence of the multi-dimensional correlation function. A longitudinal radius decreasing with increasing transverse momentum is observed. (orig.)

  16. Momentum distributions and interferometry analysis of negatively charged hadrons from 200 A GeV S + Au reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slegt, S. [Rijksuniversiteit Groningen (Netherlands). Kernfysisch Versneller Inst.; Angelis, A.L.S. [Geneva Univ. (Switzerland); Doenni, P. [Geneva Univ. (Switzerland); Durieux, E. [Geneva Univ. (Switzerland); Garpman, S. [Lund Univ. (Sweden); Gustafsson, H.AA. [Lund Univ. (Sweden); Izycki, M. [Geneva Univ. (Switzerland); Loehner, H. [Rijksuniversiteit Groningen (Netherlands). Kernfysisch Versneller Inst.; Martin, M. [Geneva Univ. (Switzerland); Naef, H. [Geneva Univ. (Switzerland); Nystrand, J. [Lund Univ. (Sweden); Oskarsson, A. [Lund Univ. (Sweden); Otterlund, I. [Lund Univ. (Sweden); Rosselet, L. [Geneva Univ. (Switzerland); Rubio, J.M. [Geneva Univ. (Switzerland); Siemssen, R.H. [Rijksuniversiteit Groningen (Netherlands). Kernfysisch Versneller Inst.; Soederstrom, K. [Lund Univ. (Sweden); Solomey, N. [Geneva Univ. (Switzerland); Stenlund, E. [Lund Univ. (Sweden); Ster, A. [Geneva Univ. (Switzerland); WA93 Collaboration

    1995-07-24

    Two particle correlations and single particle P{sub T} distributions have been measured for negatively charged hadrons from 200 A GeV S+Au reactions. The large acceptance of the WA93 dipole spectrometer enables the study of transverse momentum dependence of the multi-dimensional correlation function. A longitudinal radius decreasing with increasing transverse momentum is observed. (orig.).

  17. Charging of a dust particle in a plasma with a nonextensive ion distribution function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dust charge neutralization in a plasma with nonextensive ions is considered. The condition that the total current to a grain be zero is expressed in terms of the Lambert function. The fall-off of the net negative dust charge is then considered and a parameter study conducted, assuming hydrogen as well as argon plasma. Owing to ion nonextensivity, the dust charge reduction becomes much faster. Moreover, stronger is the ions correlation, more important is the involved electron depletion for a complete dust “decharging”. -- Highlights: ► Dust charge neutralization in nonextensive plasma is analyzed. ► Fall-off of dust charge is considered. ► Dust charge neutralization becomes less faster.

  18. Potential distribution around a test charge in a positive dust-electron plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, S.

    2016-06-01

    The electrostatic potential caused by a test-charge particle in a positive dust-electron plasma is studied, accounting for the dust-charge fluctuations associated with ultraviolet photoelectron and thermionic emissions. For this purpose, the set of Vlasov-Poisson equations coupled with the dust charging equation is solved by using the space-time Fourier transform technique. As a consequence, a modified dielectric response function is obtained for dust-acoustic waves in a positive dust-electron plasma. By imposing certain conditions on the velocity of the test charge, the electrostatic potential is decomposed into the Debye-H¨uckel (DH), wake-field (WF), and far-field (FF) potentials that are significantly modified in the limit of a large dust-charge relaxation rate both analytically and numerically. The results can be helpful for understanding dust crystallization/coagulation in twocomponent plasmas, where positively charged dust grains are present.

  19. Transverse Momentum Distributions of Charged Particles in Nuclear Collisions at RHIC Energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper reports on measurements of the transverse momentum distributions of produced particles from nuclear collisions at the highest center-of-mass energies provided by the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The transverse momentum spectra of charged hadrons produced in d + Au and Au + Au collisions at the top RHIC energy of 200 GeV in the nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass system are presented. For the Au + Au system, the measurements at the lower energy of 62.4 GeV are also reported. The analyzed data were collected by the PHOBOS experiment during several RHIC data-taking runs from 2001 to 2004. The main emphasis of this paper is the measurement of particle production at very low transverse momenta, a possibility uniquely available to the PHOBOS detector. A new non-standard method was developed to extract yields of (π+ + π-), (K+ + K-) and (p + p(bar)) at the lowest transverse momentum values accessible at RHIC. The results do not confirm the prediction of a significant enhancement in particle production at very low pT . The flattening of proton and antiproton pT spectra, consistent with the expectations of transverse expansion of the system, is clearly observed down to very low pT . In contrast to Au + Au collisions, such a flattening is not observed in yields of d + Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV. The scaling properties of mT spectra in Au + Au and d + Au collisions, as well as particle ratios, are discussed. Results obtained from the analysis of the transverse momentum distributions clearly show that the matter produced in nuclear collisions at RHIC energies is strongly coupled and undergoes a rapid transverse expansion. Comparison to the predictions of different models aiming to describe particle production in ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions is discussed. The characteristics of the system derived from this study of the transverse momentum distributions has provided a significant contribution to the RHIC discovery of a new state of matter, a

  20. Stability analysis for dusty plasma under grain charge fluctuations due to non-Maxwellian electron distributions

    OpenAIRE

    Donoso Vargas, Jose Manuel; Sánchez Torres, Antonio; Conde López, Luis

    2010-01-01

    The most relevant characteristic of a complex plasma is the dust charge as well as the dust charging process itself which controls different collective and individual behaviors of the plasma. The dust charging has been exhaustively studied providing several theoretical approaches that have improved the early Orbital Motion Limited (OML) description [1, 2]. The OML is considered as a suitable model and, at least, it provides a certain perspective of the main plasma parameters involved in the c...

  1. Charged-particle distributions in √{ s} = 13 TeVpp interactions measured with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brunt, BH; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burka, K.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Calvet, T. P.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Camincher, C.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. W.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavallaro, E.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerda Alberich, L.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chan, S. K.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chatterjee, A.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Che, S.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, H. J.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chomont, A. R.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, M. R.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crawley, S. J.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Dann, N. S.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Denysiuk, D.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Dette, K.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Clemente, W. K.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Du, Y.; Duarte-Campderros, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dutta, B.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellajosyula, V.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Ennis, J. S.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, F.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farina, C.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fawcett, W. J.; Fayard, L.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Flaschel, N.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Forcolin, G. T.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Foster, A. G.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Frate, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; Fressard-Batraneanu, S. M.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fusayasu, T.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gach, G. P.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, L. G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Geisler, M. P.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Geng, C.; Gentile, S.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghasemi, S.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghneimat, M.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giannetti, P.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gignac, M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giromini, P.; Giugni, D.; Giuli, F.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gkougkousis, E. L.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Godlewski, J.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; Gongadze, A.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Goudet, C. R.; Goujdami, D.; Goussiou, A. G.; Govender, N.; Gozani, E.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Gradin, P. O. J.; Grafström, P.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Grefe, C.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Grevtsov, K.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Groh, S.; Grohs, J. P.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Grout, Z. J.; Guan, L.; Guan, W.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gustavino, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Hadef, A.; Haefner, P.; Hageböck, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Haley, J.; Hall, D.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamilton, A.; Hamity, G. N.; Hamnett, P. G.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Haney, B.; Hanke, P.; Hanna, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, M. C.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Hariri, F.; Harkusha, S.; Harrington, R. D.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartjes, F.; Hasegawa, M.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasib, A.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauser, R.; Hauswald, L.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, A. D.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hays, J. M.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heim, T.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, J. J.; Heinrich, L.; Heinz, C.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Hellman, S.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Heng, Y.; Henkelmann, S.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Herbert, G. H.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hetherly, J. W.; Hickling, R.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hinman, R. R.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoenig, F.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hohn, D.; Holmes, T. R.; Homann, M.; Hong, T. M.; Hooberman, B. H.; Hopkins, W. H.; Horii, Y.; Horton, A. J.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howard, J.; Howarth, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn'ova, T.; Hrynevich, A.; Hsu, C.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hu, D.; Hu, Q.; Huang, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Hülsing, T. A.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Ideal, E.; Idrissi, Z.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Iizawa, T.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikeno, M.; Ilchenko, Y.; Iliadis, D.; Ilic, N.; Ince, T.; Introzzi, G.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Iordanidou, K.; Ippolito, V.; Irles Quiles, A.; Isaksson, C.; Ishino, M.; Ishitsuka, M.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Ito, F.; Iturbe Ponce, J. M.; Iuppa, R.; Ivarsson, J.; Iwanski, W.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jabbar, S.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, M.; Jackson, P.; Jain, V.; Jakobi, K. B.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakoubek, T.; Jamin, D. O.; Jana, D. K.; Jansen, E.; Jansky, R.; Janssen, J.; Janus, M.; Jarlskog, G.; Javadov, N.; Javůrek, T.; Jeanneau, F.; Jeanty, L.; Jejelava, J.; Jeng, G.-Y.; Jennens, D.; Jenni, P.; Jentzsch, J.; Jeske, C.; Jézéquel, S.; Ji, H.; Jia, J.; Jiang, H.; Jiang, Y.; Jiggins, S.; Jimenez Pena, J.; Jin, S.; Jinaru, A.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johansson, P.; Johns, K. A.; Johnson, W. J.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jones, S.; Jones, T. J.; Jongmanns, J.; Jorge, P. M.; Jovicevic, J.; Ju, X.; Juste Rozas, A.; Köhler, M. K.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kahn, S. J.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kalderon, C. W.; Kaluza, A.; Kama, S.; Kamenshchikov, A.; Kanaya, N.; Kaneti, S.; Kanjir, L.; Kantserov, V. A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kaplan, L. S.; Kapliy, A.; Kar, D.; Karakostas, K.; Karamaoun, A.; Karastathis, N.; Kareem, M. J.; Karentzos, E.; Karnevskiy, M.; Karpov, S. N.; Karpova, Z. M.; Karthik, K.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A. N.; Kasahara, K.; Kashif, L.; Kass, R. D.; Kastanas, A.; Kataoka, Y.; Kato, C.; Katre, A.; Katzy, J.; Kawade, K.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kawamura, G.; Kazama, S.; Kazanin, V. F.; Keeler, R.; Kehoe, R.; Keller, J. S.; Kempster, J. J.; Keoshkerian, H.; Kepka, O.; Kerševan, B. P.; Kersten, S.; Keyes, R. A.; Khalil-zada, F.; Khandanyan, H.; Khanov, A.; Kharlamov, A. G.; Khoo, T. J.; Khovanskiy, V.; Khramov, E.; Khubua, J.; Kido, S.; Kim, H. Y.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kind, O. M.; King, B. T.; King, M.; King, S. B.; Kirk, J.; Kiryunin, A. E.; Kishimoto, T.; Kisielewska, D.; Kiss, F.; Kiuchi, K.; Kivernyk, O.; Kladiva, E.; Klein, M. H.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinknecht, K.; Klimek, P.; Klimentov, A.; Klingenberg, R.; Klinger, J. A.; Klioutchnikova, T.; Kluge, E.-E.; Kluit, P.; Kluth, S.; Knapik, J.; Kneringer, E.; Knoops, E. B. F. G.; Knue, A.; Kobayashi, A.; Kobayashi, D.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kocian, M.; Kodys, P.; Koffas, T.; Koffeman, E.; Kogan, L. A.; Kohriki, T.; Koi, T.; Kolanoski, H.; Kolb, M.; Koletsou, I.; Komar, A. A.; Komori, Y.; Kondo, T.; Kondrashova, N.; Köneke, K.; König, A. C.; Kono, T.; Konoplich, R.; Konstantinidis, N.; Kopeliansky, R.; Koperny, S.; Köpke, L.; Kopp, A. K.; Korcyl, K.; Kordas, K.; Korn, A.; Korol, A. A.; Korolkov, I.; Korolkova, E. V.; Kortner, O.; Kortner, S.; Kosek, T.; Kostyukhin, V. V.; Kotov, V. M.; Kotwal, A.; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, A.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouskoura, V.; Koutsman, A.; Kowalewska, A. B.; Kowalewski, R.; Kowalski, T. Z.; Kozanecki, W.; Kozhin, A. S.; Kramarenko, V. A.; Kramberger, G.; Krasnopevtsev, D.; Krasny, M. W.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kraus, J. K.; Kravchenko, A.; Kretz, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kreutzfeldt, K.; Krieger, P.; Krizka, K.; Kroeninger, K.; Kroha, H.; Kroll, J.; Kroseberg, J.; Krstic, J.; Kruchonak, U.; Krüger, H.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, A.; Kruse, M. C.; Kruskal, M.; Kubota, T.; Kucuk, H.; Kuday, S.; Kuechler, J. T.; Kuehn, S.; Kugel, A.; Kuger, F.; Kuhl, A.; Kuhl, T.; Kukhtin, V.; Kukla, R.; Kulchitsky, Y.; Kuleshov, S.; Kuna, M.; Kunigo, T.; Kupco, A.; Kurashige, H.; Kurochkin, Y. A.; Kus, V.; Kuwertz, E. S.; Kuze, M.; Kvita, J.; Kwan, T.; Kyriazopoulos, D.; La Rosa, A.; La Rosa Navarro, J. L.; La Rotonda, L.; Lacasta, C.; Lacava, F.; Lacey, J.; Lacker, H.; Lacour, D.; Lacuesta, V. R.; Ladygin, E.; Lafaye, R.; Laforge, B.; Lagouri, T.; Lai, S.; Lammers, S.; Lampl, W.; Lançon, E.; Landgraf, U.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lang, V. S.; Lange, J. C.; Lankford, A. J.; Lanni, F.; Lantzsch, K.; Lanza, A.; Laplace, S.; Lapoire, C.; Laporte, J. F.; Lari, T.; Lasagni Manghi, F.; Lassnig, M.; Laurelli, P.; Lavrijsen, W.; Law, A. T.; Laycock, P.; Lazovich, T.; Lazzaroni, M.; Le Dortz, O.; Le Guirriec, E.; Le Menedeu, E.; Le Quilleuc, E. P.; LeBlanc, M.; LeCompte, T.; Ledroit-Guillon, F.; Lee, C. A.; Lee, S. C.; Lee, L.; Lefebvre, G.; Lefebvre, M.; Legger, F.; Leggett, C.; Lehan, A.; Lehmann Miotto, G.; Lei, X.; Leight, W. A.; Leisos, A.; Leister, A. G.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, R.; Lellouch, D.; Lemmer, B.; Leney, K. J. C.; Lenz, T.; Lenzi, B.; Leone, R.; Leone, S.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Leontsinis, S.; Lerner, G.; Leroy, C.; Lesage, A. A. J.; Lester, C. G.; Levchenko, M.; Levêque, J.; Levin, D.; Levinson, L. J.; Levy, M.; Leyko, A. M.; Leyton, M.; Li, B.; Li, H.; Li, H. L.; Li, L.; Li, L.; Li, Q.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Liang, Z.; Liao, H.; Liberti, B.; Liblong, A.; Lichard, P.; Lie, K.; Liebal, J.; Liebig, W.; Limbach, C.; Limosani, A.; Lin, S. C.; Lin, T. H.; Lindquist, B. E.; Lipeles, E.; Lipniacka, A.; Lisovyi, M.; Liss, T. M.; Lissauer, D.; Lister, A.; Litke, A. M.; Liu, B.; Liu, D.; Liu, H.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, K.; Liu, L.; Liu, M.; Liu, M.; Liu, Y. L.; Liu, Y.; Livan, M.; Lleres, A.; Llorente Merino, J.; Lloyd, S. L.; Lo Sterzo, F.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loch, P.; Lockman, W. S.; Loebinger, F. K.; Loevschall-Jensen, A. E.; Loew, K. M.; Loginov, A.; Lohse, T.; Lohwasser, K.; Lokajicek, M.; Long, B. A.; Long, J. D.; Long, R. E.; Longo, L.; Looper, K. A.; Lopes, L.; Lopez Mateos, D.; Lopez Paredes, B.; Lopez Paz, I.; Lopez Solis, A.; Lorenz, J.; Lorenzo Martinez, N.; Losada, M.; Lösel, P. J.; Lou, X.; Lounis, A.; Love, J.; Love, P. A.; Lu, H.; Lu, N.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luci, C.; Lucotte, A.; Luedtke, C.; Luehring, F.; Lukas, W.; Luminari, L.; Lundberg, O.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Lynn, D.; Lysak, R.; Lytken, E.; Lyubushkin, V.; Ma, H.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, Y.; Maccarrone, G.; Macchiolo, A.; Macdonald, C. M.; Maček, B.; Machado Miguens, J.; Madaffari, D.; Madar, R.; Maddocks, H. J.; Mader, W. F.; Madsen, A.; Maeda, J.; Maeland, S.; Maeno, T.; Maevskiy, A.; Magradze, E.; Mahlstedt, J.; Maiani, C.; Maidantchik, C.; Maier, A. A.; Maier, T.; Maio, A.; Majewski, S.; Makida, Y.; Makovec, N.; Malaescu, B.; Malecki, Pa.; Maleev, V. P.; Malek, F.; Mallik, U.; Malon, D.; Malone, C.; Maltezos, S.; Malyshev, V. M.; Malyukov, S.; Mamuzic, J.; Mancini, G.; Mandelli, B.; Mandelli, L.; Mandić, I.; Maneira, J.; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, L.; Manjarres Ramos, J.; Mann, A.; Mansoulie, B.; Mantifel, R.; Mantoani, M.; Manzoni, S.; Mapelli, L.; Marceca, G.; March, L.; Marchiori, G.; Marcisovsky, M.; Marjanovic, M.; Marley, D. E.; Marroquim, F.; Marsden, S. P.; Marshall, Z.; Marti, L. F.; Marti-Garcia, S.; Martin, B.; Martin, T. A.; Martin, V. J.; Martin dit Latour, B.; Martinez, M.; Martin-Haugh, S.; Martoiu, V. S.; Martyniuk, A. C.; Marx, M.; Marzano, F.; Marzin, A.; Masetti, L.; Mashimo, T.; Mashinistov, R.; Masik, J.; Maslennikov, A. L.; Massa, I.; Massa, L.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mastroberardino, A.; Masubuchi, T.; Mättig, P.; Mattmann, J.; Maurer, J.; Maxfield, S. J.; Maximov, D. A.; Mazini, R.; Mazza, S. M.; Mc Fadden, N. C.; Mc Goldrick, G.; Mc Kee, S. P.; McCarn, A.; McCarthy, R. L.; McCarthy, T. G.; McClymont, L. I.; McFarlane, K. W.; Mcfayden, J. A.; Mchedlidze, G.; McMahon, S. J.; McPherson, R. A.; Medinnis, M.; Meehan, S.; Mehlhase, S.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meineck, C.; Meirose, B.; Mellado Garcia, B. R.; Meloni, F.; Mengarelli, A.; Menke, S.; Meoni, E.; Mercurio, K. M.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Mermod, P.; Merola, L.; Meroni, C.; Merritt, F. S.; Messina, A.; Metcalfe, J.; Mete, A. S.; Meyer, C.; Meyer, C.; Meyer, J.-P.; Meyer, J.; Meyer Zu Theenhausen, H.; Middleton, R. P.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mijović, L.; Mikenberg, G.; Mikestikova, M.; Mikuž, M.; Milesi, M.; Milic, A.; Miller, D. W.; Mills, C.; Milov, A.; Milstead, D. A.; Minaenko, A. A.; Minami, Y.; Minashvili, I. A.; Mincer, A. I.; Mindur, B.; Mineev, M.; Ming, Y.; Mir, L. M.; Mistry, K. P.; Mitani, T.; Mitrevski, J.; Mitsou, V. A.; Miucci, A.; Miyagawa, P. S.; Mjörnmark, J. U.; Moa, T.; Mochizuki, K.; Mohapatra, S.; Mohr, W.; Molander, S.; Moles-Valls, R.; Monden, R.; Mondragon, M. C.; Mönig, K.; Monk, J.; Monnier, E.; Montalbano, A.; Montejo Berlingen, J.; Monticelli, F.; Monzani, S.; Moore, R. W.; Morange, N.; Moreno, D.; Moreno Llácer, M.; Morettini, P.; Mori, D.; Mori, T.; Morii, M.; Morinaga, M.; Morisbak, V.; Moritz, S.; Morley, A. K.; Mornacchi, G.; Morris, J. D.; Mortensen, S. S.; Morvaj, L.; Mosidze, M.; Moss, J.; Motohashi, K.; Mount, R.; Mountricha, E.; Mouraviev, S. V.; Moyse, E. J. W.; Muanza, S.; Mudd, R. D.; Mueller, F.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, R. S. P.; Mueller, T.; Muenstermann, D.; Mullen, P.; Mullier, G. A.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Murillo Quijada, J. A.; Murray, W. J.; Musheghyan, H.; Muskinja, M.; Myagkov, A. G.; Myska, M.; Nachman, B. P.; Nackenhorst, O.; Nadal, J.; Nagai, K.; Nagai, R.; Nagano, K.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nagata, K.; Nagel, M.; Nagy, E.; Nairz, A. M.; Nakahama, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, I.; Namasivayam, H.; Naranjo Garcia, R. F.; Narayan, R.; Narrias Villar, D. I.; Naryshkin, I.; Naumann, T.; Navarro, G.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Nechaeva, P. Yu.; Nechansky, F.; Neep, T. J.; Nef, P. D.; Negri, A.; Negrini, M.; Nektarijevic, S.; Nellist, C.; Nelson, A.; Nemecek, S.; Nemethy, P.; Nepomuceno, A. A.; Nessi, M.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neumann, M.; Neves, R. M.; Nevski, P.; Newman, P. R.; Nguyen, D. H.; Nickerson, R. B.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nicquevert, B.; Nielsen, J.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikolaenko, V.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Nilsen, J. K.; Nilsson, P.; Ninomiya, Y.; Nisati, A.; Nisius, R.; Nobe, T.; Nodulman, L.; Nomachi, M.; Nomidis, I.; Nooney, T.; Norberg, S.; Nordberg, M.; Norjoharuddeen, N.; Novgorodova, O.; Nowak, S.; Nozaki, M.; Nozka, L.; Ntekas, K.; Nurse, E.; Nuti, F.; O'grady, F.; O'Neil, D. C.; O'Rourke, A. A.; O'Shea, V.; Oakham, F. G.; Oberlack, H.; Obermann, T.; Ocariz, J.; Ochi, A.; Ochoa, I.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Oda, S.; Odaka, S.; Ogren, H.; Oh, A.; Oh, S. H.; Ohm, C. C.; Ohman, H.; Oide, H.; Okawa, H.; Okumura, Y.; Okuyama, T.; Olariu, A.; Oleiro Seabra, L. F.; Olivares Pino, S. A.; Oliveira Damazio, D.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Onofre, A.; Onogi, K.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Oram, C. J.; Oreglia, M. J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlando, N.; Orr, R. S.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Otero y Garzon, G.; Otono, H.; Ouchrif, M.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Oussoren, K. P.; Ouyang, Q.; Owen, M.; Owen, R. E.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozturk, N.; Pachal, K.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Pagáčová, M.; Pagan Griso, S.; Paige, F.; Pais, P.; Pajchel, K.; Palacino, G.; Palestini, S.; Palka, M.; Pallin, D.; Palma, A.; Panagiotopoulou, E. St.; Pandini, C. E.; Panduro Vazquez, J. G.; Pani, P.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Paolozzi, L.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Paramonov, A.; Paredes Hernandez, D.; Parker, A. J.; Parker, M. A.; Parker, K. A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pascuzzi, V.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Patel, N. D.; Pater, J. R.; Pauly, T.; Pearce, J.; Pearson, B.; Pedersen, L. E.; Pedersen, M.; Pedraza Lopez, S.; Pedro, R.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Pelikan, D.; Penc, O.; Peng, C.; Peng, H.; Penwell, J.; Peralva, B. S.; Perego, M. M.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perez Codina, E.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrella, S.; Peschke, R.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petroff, P.; Petrolo, E.; Petrov, M.; Petrucci, F.; Pettersson, N. E.; Peyaud, A.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Pickering, M. A.; Piegaia, R.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pin, A. W. J.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pires, S.; Pirumov, H.; Pitt, M.; Plazak, L.; Pleier, M.-A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Pluth, D.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Polesello, G.; Poley, A.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Pozo Astigarraga, M. E.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Primavera, M.; Prince, S.; Proissl, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Puddu, D.; Puldon, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Quayle, W. B.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Raddum, S.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Raine, J. A.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Ratti, M. G.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, S.; Ravenscroft, T.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reichert, J.; Reisin, H.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter, S.; Richter-Was, E.; Ricken, O.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Riegel, C. J.; Rieger, J.; Rifki, O.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Ristić, B.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Rizzi, C.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Roda, C.; Rodina, Y.; Rodriguez Perez, A.; Rodriguez Rodriguez, D.; Roe, S.; Rogan, C. S.; Røhne, O.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romano Saez, S. M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, P.; Rosenthal, O.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, J. H. N.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rubinskiy, I.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryu, S.; Ryzhov, A.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Saha, P.; Sahinsoy, M.; Saimpert, M.; Saito, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Salazar Loyola, J. E.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sammel, D.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shaikh, N. W.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simon, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Slovak, R.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans Sanchez, C. A.; Solar, M.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Son, H.; Song, H. Y.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stabile, A.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, G. H.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, A. C.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, B.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Trofymov, A.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turgeman, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tyndel, M.; Ucchielli, G.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valdes Santurio, E.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasquez, J. G.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigani, L.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vittori, C.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilk, F.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-07-01

    Charged-particle distributions are measured in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV, using a data sample of nearly 9 million events, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 170 μb-1, recorded by the ATLAS detector during a special Large Hadron Collider fill. The charged-particle multiplicity, its dependence on transverse momentum and pseudorapidity and the dependence of the mean transverse momentum on the charged-particle multiplicity are presented. The measurements are performed with charged particles with transverse momentum greater than 500 MeV and absolute pseudorapidity less than 2.5, in events with at least one charged particle satisfying these kinematic requirements. Additional measurements in a reduced phase space with absolute pseudorapidity less than 0.8 are also presented, in order to compare with other experiments. The results are corrected for detector effects, presented as particle-level distributions and are compared to the predictions of various Monte Carlo event generators.

  2. Equilibrium charge state distributions of Ni, Co, and Cu beams in molybdenum foil at 2 MeV/u

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastis, Panagiotis; Perdikakis, George; Robertson, Daniel; Bauder, Will; Skulski, Michael; Collon, Phillipe; Anderson, Tyler; Ostdiek, Karen; Aprahamian, Ani; Lu, Wenting; Almus, Robert

    2015-10-01

    The charge states of heavy-ions are important for the study of nuclear reactions in inverse kinematics when electromagnetic recoil mass spectrometers are used. The passage of recoil products through a material, like the windows of gas cells or charge state boosters, results a charge state distribution (CSD) in the exit. This distribution must be known for the extraction of any cross section since only few charge-state can be transmitted through a magnetic separator separator for a given setting. The calculation of CSDs for heavy ions is challenging. Currently we rely on semi-empirical models with unknown accuracy for ion/target combinations in the Z > 20 region. In the present study were measured the CSDs of the stable 60Ni, 59Co, and 63Cu beams while passing through a 1 μm molybdenum foil. The beam energies were 1.84 MeV/u, 2.09 MeV/u, and 2.11 MeV/u for the 60Ni, 59Co, and 63Cu respectively. The results of this study mainly check the accuracy of the semi-empirical models used by the program LISE++, on calculating CSDs for ion/target combinations of Z > 20. In addition, other empirical models on calculating mean charge states were compared and checked.

  3. Analyzing charge distribution in the termination area of 4H-SiC diodes by measuring depletion-layer capacitance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Hiroyuki; Okino, Hiroyuki; Mochizuki, Kazuhiro; Yamada, Renichi

    2016-04-01

    The distribution of positive-charge density at the SiO2/SiC interface of the termination area (Q TM) was analyzed by measuring the depletion-layer capacitance of 4H-SiC PN diodes with different termination structures. A change in Q TM induced by reverse-bias stressing (ΔQ TM) caused a change in the breakdown voltage of the diodes. By comparing the measured depletion-layer capacitance to the simulated value, the initial Q TM (Q\\text{TM}\\text{o}) and the distribution of ΔQ TM were clarified. It is concluded from these results that the distribution of ΔQ TM was not uniform but that positive charges mostly accumulated in the termination area under a high applied electric field.

  4. Fission fragment charge and mass distributions in 239Pu(n,f) in the adiabatic nuclear energy density functional theory

    CERN Document Server

    Regnier, D; Schunck, N; Verriere, M

    2016-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of fission fragment yields is an essential ingredient of numerous applications ranging from the formation of elements in the r-process to fuel cycle optimization for nuclear energy. The need for a predictive theory applicable where no data is available is an incentive to develop a fully microscopic approach to fission dynamics. In this work, we calculate the pre-neutron emission charge and mass distributions of the fission fragments formed in the neutron-induced fission of 239Pu using a microscopic method based on nuclear energy density functional (EDF) method, where large amplitude collective motion is treated adiabatically using the time dependent generator coordinate method (TDGCM) under the Gaussian overlap approximation (GOA). Fission fragment distributions are extracted from the flux of the collective wave packet through the scission line. We find that the main characteristics of the fission charge and mass distributions can be well reproduced by existing energy functionals even in tw...

  5. Electric field and space-charge distribution in SI GaAs: effect of high-energy proton irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Castaldini, A; Polenta, L; Canali, C; Nava, F

    1999-01-01

    The effect of irradiation on semi-insulating gallium arsenide Schottky diodes has been investigated by means of surface potential measurements and spectroscopic techniques. Before and after irradiation the electric field exhibits a Mott barrier-like distribution, and the box-shaped space charge modifies its distribution with irradiation. The increase in density or the generation of some traps changes the compensation ratio producing a deeper active region and a more homogeneous distribution of the electric field. The latter phenomenon is also observed by EBIC images of edge-mounted diodes.

  6. Evidence of self-affne multiplicity scaling of charged-particle multiplicity distribution in hadron–nucleus interaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dipak Ghosh; Argha Deb; Sitaram Pal; Swarnapratim Bhattacharyya

    2007-05-01

    A self-affne analysis of charged-particle multiplicity distribution (protons + pions) in − –AgBr interaction at 350 GeV/c is performed according to the two-dimensional factorial moment methodology using the concept of Hurst exponent in $X_{\\cos\\theta^{-}}$ phase space. Comparing with the results obtained from self-similar analysis, the self affine analysis shows a better power-law behaviour. Corresponding results are compared with shower multiplicity distribution (pions). Multifractal behaviour is observed for both types of distributions.

  7. Computational Intelligence based techniques for islanding detection of distributed generation in distribution network: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Unintentional and intentional islanding, their causes, and solutions are presented. • Remote, passive, active and hybrid islanding detection techniques are discussed. • The limitation of these techniques in accurately detect islanding are discussed. • Computational intelligence techniques ability in detecting islanding is discussed. • Review of ANN, fuzzy logic control, ANFIS, Decision tree techniques is provided. - Abstract: Accurate and fast islanding detection of distributed generation is highly important for its successful operation in distribution networks. Up to now, various islanding detection technique based on communication, passive, active and hybrid methods have been proposed. However, each technique suffers from certain demerits that cause inaccuracies in islanding detection. Computational intelligence based techniques, due to their robustness and flexibility in dealing with complex nonlinear systems, is an option that might solve this problem. This paper aims to provide a comprehensive review of computational intelligence based techniques applied for islanding detection of distributed generation. Moreover, the paper compares the accuracies of computational intelligence based techniques over existing techniques to provide a handful of information for industries and utility researchers to determine the best method for their respective system

  8. Forward charge distributions associated with hadronically produced J/psi particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have measured the forward charge as a function of x/sub F/ of the psi for events produced by 225 Gev/c π-Be interactions. The forward charge is the average difference between the number of positive hadrons and negative hadrons produced in the forward hemisphere. The standard Drell-Yan model predicts that the forward charge should become less negative as the x/sub F/ of the J/psi increases. The measured forward charge becomes more negative as the x/sub F/ of the J/psi increases although it is consistent with being flat as a function of x/sub F/. Hence the data is not consistent with any Drell-Yan type model which assumes the forward charge is not strongly dependent on the hadronic energy left over after the J/psi is formed. 45 references

  9. Pseudorapidity distribution of charged hadrons in proton-proton collisions at √{ s} = 13 TeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; de Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; El Sawy, M.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Kamel, M.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Mohammed, Y.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Toriashvili, T.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Verlage, T.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Connor, P.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Grados Luyando, J. M.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Trippkewitz, K. D.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Gonzalez, D.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Ott, J.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schwandt, J.; Seidel, M.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Akbiyik, M.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; de Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Fink, S.; Frensch, F.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Maier, B.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Roscher, F.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Tziaferi, E.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Strologas, J.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hazi, A.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Bartók, M.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Mal, P.; Mandal, K.; Sahoo, D. K.; Sahoo, N.; Swain, S. K.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Chawla, R.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mehta, A.; Mittal, M.; Singh, J. B.; Walia, G.; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Garg, R. B.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Nishu, N.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, R.; Sharma, V.; Bhardwaj, R.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dey, S.; Dutta, S.; Jain, Sa.; Majumdar, N.; Modak, A.; Mondal, K.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Roy, A.; Roy, D.; Roy Chowdhury, S.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Chudasama, R.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Mahakud, B.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mitra, S.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sarkar, T.; Sur, N.; Sutar, B.; Wickramage, N.; Chauhan, S.; Dube, S.; Sharma, S.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Caputo, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; de Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Miniello, G.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Ranieri, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Battilana, C.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chhibra, S. S.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gonzi, S.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Viliani, L.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Calvelli, V.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Brianza, L.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Gerosa, R.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; di Guida, S.; Esposito, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lanza, G.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Benato, L.; Bisello, D.; Boletti, A.; Branca, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gonella, F.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Zanetti, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D'Imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Gelli, S.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Preiato, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Kiani, B.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Monteil, E.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Ravera, F.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Tamponi, U.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Schizzi, A.; Zanetti, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Kong, D. J.; Lee, S.; Oh, Y. D.; Sakharov, A.; Son, D. C.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Kim, H.; Kim, T. J.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Go, Y.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Yoo, H. D.; Choi, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. H.; Lee, J. S. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Ryu, M. S.; Choi, Y.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Kwon, E.; Lee, J.; Yu, I.; Juodagalvis, A.; Vaitkus, J.; Ahmed, I.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Md Ali, M. A. B.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Yusli, M. N.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; de La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Byszuk, A.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Walczak, M.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão da Cruz E Silva, C.; di Francesco, A.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Leonardo, N.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nguyen, F.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Seixas, J.; Toldaiev, O.; Vadruccio, D.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Afanasiev, S.; Bunin, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Konoplyanikov, V.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Shmatov, S.; Shulha, S.; Skatchkov, N.; Smirnov, V.; Zarubin, A.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Kuznetsova, E.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Karneyeu, A.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Pozdnyakov, I.; Safronov, G.; Spiridonov, A.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Bylinkin, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Baskakov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Khein, L.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Lukina, O.; Myagkov, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; de La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro de Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Santaolalla, J.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Palencia Cortezon, E.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Castiñeiras de Saa, J. R.; de Castro Manzano, P.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Fernandez, M.; Garcia-Ferrero, J.; Gomez, G.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benaglia, A.; Bendavid, J.; Benhabib, L.; Benitez, J. F.; Berruti, G. M.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Castello, R.; Cerminara, G.; D'Alfonso, M.; D'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; Daponte, V.; David, A.; de Gruttola, M.; de Guio, F.; de Roeck, A.; de Visscher, S.; di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dordevic, M.; Dorney, B.; Du Pree, T.; Dünser, M.; Dupont, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Franzoni, G.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Guida, R.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Hammer, J.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kirschenmann, H.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Kousouris, K.; Krajczar, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Lucchini, M. T.; Magini, N.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Martelli, A.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Nemallapudi, M. V.; Neugebauer, H.; Orfanelli, S.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Peruzzi, M.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Piparo, D.; Racz, A.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Ruan, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Sharma, A.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Steggemann, J.; Stieger, B.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Treille, D.; Triossi, A.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Zagozdzinska, A.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Heidegger, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz Del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meister, D.; Micheli, F.; Musella, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pata, J.; Pauss, F.; Perrozzi, L.; Quittnat, M.; Rossini, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Tavolaro, V. R.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Aarrestad, T. K.; Amsler, C.; Caminada, L.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; de Cosa, A.; Galloni, C.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Salerno, D.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Doan, T. H.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Konyushikhin, M.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Yu, S. S.; Kumar, Arun; Bartek, R.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Fiori, F.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Miñano Moya, M.; Petrakou, E.; Tsai, J. F.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Cerci, S.; Demiroglu, Z. S.; Dozen, C.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, M.; Zorbilmez, C.; Akin, I. V.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Albayrak, E. A.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Yetkin, T.; Cankocak, K.; Sen, S.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Grynyov, B.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Aggleton, R.; Ball, F.; Beck, L.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Sakuma, T.; Seif El Nasr-Storey, S.; Senkin, S.; Smith, D.; Smith, V. J.; Barducci, D.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Cieri, D.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Williams, T.; Womersley, W. J.; Worm, S. D.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Bundock, A.; Burton, D.; Casasso, S.; Citron, M.; Colling, D.; Corpe, L.; Cripps, N.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; de Wit, A.; Della Negra, M.; Dunne, P.; Elwood, A.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Kenzie, M.; Lane, R.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Raymond, D. M.; Richards, A.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Tapper, A.; Uchida, K.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Borzou, A.; Call, K.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Kasmi, A.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Gastler, D.; Lawson, P.; Rankin, D.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Zou, D.; Alimena, J.; Berry, E.; Bhattacharya, S.; Cutts, D.; Dhingra, N.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Hakala, J.; Heintz, U.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Mao, Z.; Narain, M.; Piperov, S.; Sagir, S.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Syarif, R.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon de La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Saltzberg, D.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova Paneva, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Shrinivas, A.; Wei, H.; Wimpenny, S.; Yates, B. R.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; MacNeill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Barge, D.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Gran, J.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; McColl, N.; Mullin, S. D.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; To, W.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Pierini, M.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Mulholland, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Sun, W.; Tan, S. M.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Wittich, P.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Jung, A. W.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Kwan, S.; Lammel, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lopes de Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. I.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Yang, F.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; di Giovanni, G. P.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Hugon, J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Low, J. F.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Rank, D.; Rossin, R.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Terentyev, N.; Thomas, L.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, J. R.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Khatiwada, A.; Prosper, H.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Osherson, M.; Roskes, J.; Sady, A.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; You, C.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Kenny, R. P., III; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Marini, A. C.; McGinn, C.; Mironov, C.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Evans, A.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Ratnikov, F.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira de Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Petrillo, G.; Verzetti, M.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Dalchenko, M.; de Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Mueller, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.

    2015-12-01

    The pseudorapidity distribution of charged hadrons in pp collisions at √{ s} = 13 TeV is measured using a data sample obtained with the CMS detector, operated at zero magnetic field, at the CERN LHC. The yield of primary charged long-lived hadrons produced in inelastic pp collisions is determined in the central region of the CMS pixel detector (| η | < 2) using both hit pairs and reconstructed tracks. For central pseudorapidities (| η | < 0.5), the charged-hadron multiplicity density is dNch / dη | | η | < 0.5 = 5.49 ± 0.01(stat) ± 0.17(syst), a value obtained by combining the two methods. The result is compared to predictions from Monte Carlo event generators and to similar measurements made at lower collision energies.

  10. Pseudorapidity distribution of charged hadrons in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 13 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aşılar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Knünz, Valentin; König, Axel; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Matsushita, Takashi; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Lauwers, Jasper; Luyckx, Sten; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; De Bruyn, Isabelle; Deroover, Kevin; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Moreels, Lieselotte; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Van Parijs, Isis; Barria, Patrizia; Brun, Hugues; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lenzi, Thomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Maerschalk, Thierry; Marinov, Andrey; Perniè, Luca; Randle-conde, Aidan; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Crucy, Shannon; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Gul, Muhammad; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Poyraz, Deniz; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Tytgat, Michael; Van Driessche, Ward; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Mertens, Alexandre; Nuttens, Claude; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Beliy, Nikita; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Hamer, Matthias; Hensel, Carsten; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Da Costa, Eliza Melo; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Souza Santos, Angelo; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Moon, Chang-Seong; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Huaqiao; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Micanovic, Sasa; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; El Sawy, Mai; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Kamel, Mohamed; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Mohammed, Yasser; Calpas, Betty; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Pekkanen, Juska; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Machet, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Zghiche, Amina; Antropov, Iurii; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Cadamuro, Luca; Chapon, Emilien; Charlot, Claude; Dahms, Torsten; Davignon, Olivier; Filipovic, Nicolas; Florent, Alice; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Lisniak, Stanislav; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Miné, Philippe; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Pigard, Philipp; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Strebler, Thomas; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Buttignol, Michael; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Coubez, Xavier; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Merlin, Jeremie Alexandre; Skovpen, Kirill; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Courbon, Benoit; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Lagarde, Francois; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sabes, David; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Toriashvili, Tengizi; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heister, Arno; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Preuten, Marius; Raupach, Frank; Schael, Stefan; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Verlage, Tobias; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Knutzen, Simon; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Bell, Alan James; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Choudhury, Somnath; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Flucke, Gero; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Gunnellini, Paolo; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Karacheban, Olena; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nayak, Aruna; Ntomari, Eleni; Perrey, Hanno; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Roland, Benoit; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Saxena, Pooja; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schröder, Matthias; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Trippkewitz, Karim Damun; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Gonzalez, Daniel; Görner, Martin; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Junkes, Alexandra; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Meyer, Mareike; Nowatschin, Dominik; Ott, Jochen; Pantaleo, Felice; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Pietsch, Niklas; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Schwandt, Joern; Seidel, Markus; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Vormwald, Benedikt; Akbiyik, Melike; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Fink, Simon; Frensch, Felix; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Hartmann, Frank; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Maier, Benedikt; Mildner, Hannes; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Röcker, Steffen; Roscher, Frank; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weber, Marc; Weiler, Thomas; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Psallidas, Andreas; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Agapitos, Antonis; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Tziaferi, Eirini; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Loukas, Nikitas; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hazi, Andras; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Makovec, Alajos; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chawla, Ridhi; Gupta, Ruchi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Mehta, Ankita; Mittal, Monika; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Nishu, Nishu; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Sharma, Varun; Bhardwaj, Rishika; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dey, Sourav; Dutta, Suchandra; Jain, Sandhya; Majumdar, Nayana; Modak, Atanu; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukherjee, Swagata; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Roy, Ashim; Roy, Debarati; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sarkar, Tanmay; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Chauhan, Shubhanshu; Dube, Sourabh; Sharma, Seema; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Goldouzian, Reza; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Caputo, Claudio; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Travaglini, Riccardo; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gonzi, Sandro; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Monge, Maria Roberta; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Brianza, Luca; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Gerosa, Raffaele; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Esposito, Marco; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lanza, Giuseppe; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Benato, Lisa; Bisello, Dario; Boletti, Alessio; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gonella, Franco; Gozzelino, Andrea; Kanishchev, Konstantin; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Braghieri, Alessandro; Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiezia, Aniello; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fedi, Giacomo; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Traczyk, Piotr; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Kiani, Bilal; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Ravera, Fabio; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Tamponi, Umberto; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Schizzi, Andrea; Zanetti, Anna; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Oh, Young Do; Sakharov, Alexandre; Son, Dong-Chul; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Tae Jeong; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Ryu, Min Sang; Choi, Young-Il; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Bylinkin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Khein, Lev; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Lukina, Olga; Myagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Santaolalla, Javier; Soares, Mara Senghi; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Castiñeiras De Saa, Juan Ramon; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Garcia-Ferrero, Juan; Gomez, Gervasio; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benaglia, Andrea; Bendavid, Joshua; Benhabib, Lamia; Benitez, Jose F; Berruti, Gaia Maria; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Castello, Roberto; Cerminara, Gianluca; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Gruttola, Michele; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; De Visscher, Simon; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dordevic, Milos; Dorney, Brian; Du Pree, Tristan; Dünser, Marc; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Franzoni, Giovanni; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Guida, Roberto; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kirschenmann, Henning; Kortelainen, Matti J; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Magini, Nicolo; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Martelli, Arabella; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Neugebauer, Hannes; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Peruzzi, Marco; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Piparo, Danilo; Racz, Attila; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Ruan, Manqi; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Sharma, Archana; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Steggemann, Jan; Stieger, Benjamin; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Treille, Daniel; Triossi, Andrea; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Zagoździńska, Agnieszka; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Eller, Philipp; Grab, Christoph; Heidegger, Constantin; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Kasieczka, Gregor; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marionneau, Matthieu; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Masciovecchio, Mario; Meister, Daniel; Micheli, Francesco; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pata, Joosep; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrozzi, Luca; Quittnat, Milena; Rossini, Marco; Starodumov, Andrei; Takahashi, Maiko; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Aarrestad, Thea Klaeboe; Amsler, Claude; Caminada, Lea; Canelli, Maria Florencia; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Cosa, Annapaola; Galloni, Camilla; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Lange, Clemens; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Pinna, Deborah; Robmann, Peter; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Salerno, Daniel; Yang, Yong; Cardaci, Marco; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Doan, Thi Hien; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Konyushikhin, Maxim; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Yu, Shin-Shan; Kumar, Arun; Bartek, Rachel; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Fiori, Francesco; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Petrakou, Eleni; Tsai, Jui-fa; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Asavapibhop, Burin; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Cerci, Salim; Demiroglu, Zuhal Seyma; Dozen, Candan; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Mehmet; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Isildak, Bora; Karapinar, Guler; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Yetkin, Elif Asli; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Yetkin, Taylan; Cankocak, Kerem; Sen, Sercan; Vardarlı, Fuat Ilkehan; Grynyov, Boris; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Aggleton, Robin; Ball, Fionn; Beck, Lana; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Meng, Zhaoxia; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Dominic; Smith, Vincent J; Barducci, Daniele; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cieri, Davide; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Womersley, William John; Worm, Steven; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Bundock, Aaron; Burton, Darren; Casasso, Stefano; Citron, Matthew; Colling, David; Corpe, Louie; Cripps, Nicholas; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; De Wit, Adinda; Della Negra, Michel; Dunne, Patrick; Elwood, Adam; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; Kenzie, Matthew; Lane, Rebecca; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Raymond, David Mark; Richards, Alexander; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Tapper, Alexander; Uchida, Kirika; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Borzou, Ahmad; Call, Kenneth; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Kasmi, Azeddine; Liu, Hongxuan; Pastika, Nathaniel; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Gastler, Daniel; Lawson, Philip; Rankin, Dylan; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; St John, Jason; Sulak, Lawrence; Zou, David; Alimena, Juliette; Berry, Edmund; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Cutts, David; Dhingra, Nitish; Ferapontov, Alexey; Garabedian, Alex; Hakala, John; Heintz, Ulrich; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Piperov, Stefan; Sagir, Sinan; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Syarif, Rizki; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Cousins, Robert; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Saltzberg, David; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Ivova PANEVA, Mirena; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Malberti, Martina; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Wei, Hua; Wimpenny, Stephen; Yates, Brent; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Klein, Daniel; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Welke, Charles; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Barge, Derek; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Gran, Jason; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Mccoll, Nickolas; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; Suarez, Indara; To, Wing; West, Christopher; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Duarte, Javier; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Pierini, Maurizio; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Andrews, Michael Benjamin; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carlson, Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Sun, Menglei; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Jensen, Frank; Johnson, Andrew; Krohn, Michael; Mulholland, Troy; Nauenberg, Uriel; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Eggert, Nicholas; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Ryd, Anders; Skinnari, Louise; Soffi, Livia; Sun, Werner; Tan, Shao Min; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Weng, Yao; Wittich, Peter; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hirschauer, James; Hu, Zhen; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Jung, Andreas Werner; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Kwan, Simon; Lammel, Stephan; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena Ingrid; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Pedro, Kevin; Prokofyev, Oleg; Rakness, Gregory; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Verzocchi, Marco; Vidal, Richard; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Whitbeck, Andrew; Yang, Fan; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Carnes, Andrew; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Field, Richard D; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Hugon, Justin; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Low, Jia Fu; Ma, Peisen; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Rank, Douglas; Rossin, Roberto; Shchutska, Lesya; Snowball, Matthew; Sperka, David; Terentyev, Nikolay; Thomas, Laurent; Wang, Jian; Wang, Sean-Jiun; Yelton, John; Hewamanage, Samantha; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Jordon Rowe; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Diamond, Brendan; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Khatiwada, Ajeeta; Prosper, Harrison; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Noonan, Daniel; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Kurt, Pelin; O'Brien, Christine; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Silkworth, Christopher; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Wu, Zhenbin; Zakaria, Mohammed; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tan, Ping; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Anderson, Ian; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Eminizer, Nicholas; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Martin, Christopher; Osherson, Marc; Roskes, Jeffrey; Sady, Alice; Sarica, Ulascan; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; Xin, Yongjie; You, Can; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Bruner, Christopher; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Majumder, Devdatta; Malek, Magdalena; Murray, Michael; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Wang, Quan; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Toda, Sachiko; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Anelli, Christopher; Baden, Drew; Baron, Owen; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Ferraioli, Charles; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Kunkle, Joshua; Lu, Ying; Mignerey, Alice; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Baty, Austin; Bierwagen, Katharina; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Demiragli, Zeynep; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Gulhan, Doga; Iiyama, Yutaro; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Klute, Markus; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Mcginn, Christopher; Mironov, Camelia; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Stephans, George; Sumorok, Konstanty; Varma, Mukund; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zhukova, Victoria; Dahmes, Bryan; Evans, Andrew; Finkel, Alexey; Gude, Alexander; Hansen, Peter; Kalafut, Sean; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Lesko, Zachary; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rusack, Roger; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Fangmeier, Caleb; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Keller, Jason; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Meier, Frank; Monroy, Jose; Ratnikov, Fedor; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Alyari, Maral; Dolen, James; George, Jimin; Godshalk, Andrew; Harrington, Charles; Iashvili, Ia; Kaisen, Josh; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael; Stoynev, Stoyan; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Dev, Nabarun; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Pearson, Tessa; Planer, Michael; Reinsvold, Allison; Ruchti, Randy; Smith, Geoffrey; Taroni, Silvia; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Antonelli, Louis; Brinson, Jessica; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Ji, Weifeng; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Liu, Bingxuan; Luo, Wuming; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Winer, Brian L; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Koay, Sue Ann; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Palmer, Christopher; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zuranski, Andrzej; Malik, Sudhir; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bortoletto, Daniela; Gutay, Laszlo; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Kurt; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shi, Xin; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Sun, Jian; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Chen, Zhenyu; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Guilbaud, Maxime; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Northup, Michael; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Rorie, Jamal; Tu, Zhoudunming; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Petrillo, Gianluca; Verzetti, Mauro; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Lath, Amitabh; Nash, Kevin; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Foerster, Mark; Riley, Grant; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; York, Andrew; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Mueller, Ryan; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kunori, Shuichi; Lamichhane, Kamal; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Undleeb, Sonaina; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Janjam, Ravi; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Mao, Yaxian; Melo, Andrew; Ni, Hong; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Xu, Qiao; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Sun, Xin; Wang, Yanchu; Wolfe, Evan; Wood, John; Xia, Fan; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Friis, Evan; Gomber, Bhawna; Grothe, Monika; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Levine, Aaron; Long, Kenneth; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ruggles, Tyler; Sarangi, Tapas; Savin, Alexander; Sharma, Archana; Smith, Nicholas; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Woods, Nathaniel

    2015-01-01

    The pseudorapidity distribution of charged hadrons in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 13 TeV is measured using a data sample obtained with the CMS detector, operated at zero magnetic field, at the CERN LHC. The yield of primary charged long-lived hadrons produced in inelastic pp collisions is determined in the central region of the CMS pixel detector ($|\\eta|$ < 2) using both hit pairs and reconstructed tracks. For central pseudo-rapidities ($|\\eta|$ < 0.5), the charged-hadron multiplicity density ${\\rm d}N_{\\rm ch}/{\\rm d}\\eta | _{|\\eta| {\\rm\\ < 0.5}}$ = $5.49 \\pm 0.01 {\\rm\\ (stat)} \\pm 0.17 {\\rm\\ (syst)}$ , a value obtained by combining the two methods. The result is compared to predictions from Monte Carlo event generators and to similar measurements made at lower collision energie.

  11. Estimation of the spatial distribution of traps using space-charge-limited current measurements in an organic single crystal

    KAUST Repository

    Dacuña, Javier

    2012-09-06

    We used a mobility edge transport model and solved the drift-diffusion equation to characterize the space-charge-limited current of a rubrene single-crystal hole-only diode. The current-voltage characteristics suggest that current is injection-limited at high voltage when holes are injected from the bottom contact (reverse bias). In contrast, the low-voltage regime shows that the current is higher when holes are injected from the bottom contact as compared to hole injection from the top contact (forward bias), which does not exhibit injection-limited current in the measured voltage range. This behavior is attributed to an asymmetric distribution of trap states in the semiconductor, specifically, a distribution of traps located near the top contact. Accounting for a localized trap distribution near the contact allows us to reproduce the temperature-dependent current-voltage characteristics in forward and reverse bias simultaneously, i.e., with a single set of model parameters. We estimated that the local trap distribution contains 1.19×1011 cm -2 states and decays as exp(-x/32.3nm) away from the semiconductor-contact interface. The local trap distribution near one contact mainly affects injection from the same contact, hence breaking the symmetry in the charge transport. The model also provides information of the band mobility, energy barrier at the contacts, and bulk trap distribution with their corresponding confidence intervals. © 2012 American Physical Society.

  12. Non-adiabatic quantized charge pumping with tunable-barrier quantum dots: a review of current progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaestner, Bernd; Kashcheyevs, Vyacheslavs

    2015-10-01

    Precise manipulation of individual charge carriers in nanoelectronic circuits underpins practical applications of their most basic quantum property—the universality and invariance of the elementary charge. A charge pump generates a net current from periodic external modulation of parameters controlling a nanostructure connected to source and drain leads; in the regime of quantized pumping the current varies in steps of {{q}\\text{e}} f as function of control parameters, where {{q}\\text{e}} is the electron charge and f is the frequency of modulation. In recent years, robust and accurate quantized charge pumps have been developed based on semiconductor quantum dots with tunable tunnel barriers. These devices allow modulation of charge exchange rates between the dot and the leads over many orders of magnitude and enable trapping of a precise number of electrons far away from equilibrium with the leads. The corresponding non-adiabatic pumping protocols focus on understanding of separate parts of the pumping cycle associated with charge loading, capture and release. In this report we review realizations, models and metrology applications of quantized charge pumps based on tunable-barrier quantum dots.

  13. Non-adiabatic quantized charge pumping with tunable-barrier quantum dots: a review of current progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaestner, Bernd; Kashcheyevs, Vyacheslavs

    2015-10-01

    Precise manipulation of individual charge carriers in nanoelectronic circuits underpins practical applications of their most basic quantum property--the universality and invariance of the elementary charge. A charge pump generates a net current from periodic external modulation of parameters controlling a nanostructure connected to source and drain leads; in the regime of quantized pumping the current varies in steps of [Formula: see text] as function of control parameters, where [Formula: see text] is the electron charge and f is the frequency of modulation. In recent years, robust and accurate quantized charge pumps have been developed based on semiconductor quantum dots with tunable tunnel barriers. These devices allow modulation of charge exchange rates between the dot and the leads over many orders of magnitude and enable trapping of a precise number of electrons far away from equilibrium with the leads. The corresponding non-adiabatic pumping protocols focus on understanding of separate parts of the pumping cycle associated with charge loading, capture and release. In this report we review realizations, models and metrology applications of quantized charge pumps based on tunable-barrier quantum dots. PMID:26394066

  14. Two-Stage Electric Vehicle Charging Coordination in Low Voltage Distribution Grids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhattarai, Bishnu Prasad; Bak-Jensen, Birgitte; Pillai, Jayakrishnan Radhakrishna;

    2014-01-01

    Increased environmental awareness in the recent years has encouraged rapid growth of renewable energy sources (RESs); especially solar PV and wind. One of the effective solutions to compensate intermittencies in generation from the RESs is to enable consumer participation in demand response (DR......). Being a sizable rated element, electric vehicles (EVs) can offer a great deal of demand flexibility in future intelligent grids. This paper first investigates and analyzes driving pattern and charging requirements of EVs. Secondly, a two-stage charging algorithm, namely local adaptive control...... encompassed by a central coordinative control, is proposed to realize the flexibility offered by EV. The local control enables adaptive charging; whereas the central coordinative control prepares optimized charging schedules. Results from various scenarios show that the proposed algorithm enables significant...

  15. Measurements of the Charged­ Particle distributions with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Cairo, Valentina; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Inclusive charged ­particle measurements at hadron colliders probe the low­ energy non­perturbative region of QCD. The ATLAS collaboration has measured the charged­ particle multiplicity and its dependence on transverse momentum and pseudorapidity in special data sets with low LHC beam currents, recorded at center­-of­-mass energies of 8 TeV and 13 TeV. The new precise measurements at 8 TeV cover a wide spectrum using charged­ particle selections with minimum transverse momentum of both 100 MeV and 500 MeV and in various phase space regions of low and high charged particle multiplicities. The measurements at 13 TeV present the first detailed studies with a minimum transverse momentum of both 100 MeV and 500 MeV. The measurements are compared with predictions of various MC generators and are found to provide strong constraints on these.

  16. Conformations of intrinsically disordered proteins are influenced by linear sequence distributions of oppositely charged residues

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Rahul K.; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2013-01-01

    The functions of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are governed by relationships between information encoded in their amino acid sequences and the ensembles of conformations that they sample as autonomous units. Most IDPs are polyampholytes, with sequences that include both positively and negatively charged residues. Accordingly, we focus here on the sequence–ensemble relationships of polyampholytic IDPs. The fraction of charged residues discriminates between weak and strong polyamphol...

  17. Determination of Nuclear Charge Distributions of Fission Fragments from ^{235} U (n_th , f) with Calorimetric Low Temperature Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabitz, P.; Andrianov, V.; Bishop, S.; Blanc, A.; Dubey, S.; Echler, A.; Egelhof, P.; Faust, H.; Gönnenwein, F.; Gomez-Guzman, J. M.; Köster, U.; Kraft-Bermuth, S.; Mutterer, M.; Scholz, P.; Stolte, S.

    2016-03-01

    Calorimetric low temperature detectors (CLTD's) for heavy-ion detection have been combined with the LOHENGRIN recoil separator at the ILL Grenoble for the determination of nuclear charge distributions of fission fragments produced by thermal neutron-induced fission of ^{235} U. The LOHENGRIN spectrometer separates fission fragments according to their mass-to-ionic-charge ratio and their kinetic energy, but has no selectivity with respect to nuclear charges Z. For the separation of the nuclear charges, one can exploit the nuclear charge-dependent energy loss of the fragments passing through an energy degrader foil (absorber method). This separation requires detector systems with high energy resolution and negligible pulse height defect, as well as degrader foils which are optimized with respect to thickness, homogeneity, and energy loss straggling. In the present, contribution results of test measurements at the Maier Leibnitz tandem accelerator facility in Munich with ^{109} Ag and ^{127} I beams with the aim to determine the most suitable degrader material, as well as measurements at the Institut Laue-Langevin will be presented. These include a systematic study of the quality of Z-separation of fission fragments in the mass range 82≤ A ≤ 132 and a systematic measurement of ^{92} Rb fission yields, as well as investigations of fission yields toward the symmetry region.

  18. Determination of Nuclear Charge Distributions of Fission Fragments from ^{235}U (n_th, f) with Calorimetric Low Temperature Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabitz, P.; Andrianov, V.; Bishop, S.; Blanc, A.; Dubey, S.; Echler, A.; Egelhof, P.; Faust, H.; Gönnenwein, F.; Gomez-Guzman, J. M.; Köster, U.; Kraft-Bermuth, S.; Mutterer, M.; Scholz, P.; Stolte, S.

    2016-08-01

    Calorimetric low temperature detectors (CLTD's) for heavy-ion detection have been combined with the LOHENGRIN recoil separator at the ILL Grenoble for the determination of nuclear charge distributions of fission fragments produced by thermal neutron-induced fission of ^{235}U. The LOHENGRIN spectrometer separates fission fragments according to their mass-to-ionic-charge ratio and their kinetic energy, but has no selectivity with respect to nuclear charges Z. For the separation of the nuclear charges, one can exploit the nuclear charge-dependent energy loss of the fragments passing through an energy degrader foil (absorber method). This separation requires detector systems with high energy resolution and negligible pulse height defect, as well as degrader foils which are optimized with respect to thickness, homogeneity, and energy loss straggling. In the present, contribution results of test measurements at the Maier Leibnitz tandem accelerator facility in Munich with ^{109}Ag and ^{127}I beams with the aim to determine the most suitable degrader material, as well as measurements at the Institut Laue-Langevin will be presented. These include a systematic study of the quality of Z-separation of fission fragments in the mass range 82le A le 132 and a systematic measurement of ^{92}Rb fission yields, as well as investigations of fission yields toward the symmetry region.

  19. Transverse-momentum and pseudorapidity distributions of charged hadrons in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Sirunyan, Albert M.; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Er, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; /Yerevan Phys. Inst. /Vienna, OAW /CERN /Minsk, High Energy Phys. Ctr. /Antwerp U., WISINF /Vrije U., Brussels /Brussels U. /Gent U. /Louvain U. /UMH, Mons /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /CERN /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Piemonte Orientale U., Novara /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /CHEP, Taegu /Chonnam Natl. U. /Korea U. /UCLA /CERN /UC, Riverside /Budapest, RMKI /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /Caltech /Carnegie Mellon U. /Colorado U. /Cornell U. /Fairfield U.

    2010-05-01

    Charged-hadron transverse-momentum and pseudorapidity distributions in proton-proton collisions at {radical}s = 7 TeV are measured with the inner tracking system of the CMS detector at the LHC. The charged-hadron yield is obtained by counting the number of reconstructed hits, hit-pairs, and fully reconstructed charged-particle tracks. The combination of the three methods gives a charged-particle multiplicity per unit of pseudorapidity dN{sub ch}/d{eta}|{eta}|<0.5 = 5.78 {+-} 0.01 (stat.) {+-} 0.23 (syst.) for non-single-diffractive events, higher than predicted by commonly used models. The relative increase in charged-particle multiplicity from {radical}s = 0.9 to 7 TeV is 66.1% {+-} 1.0% (stat.) {+-} 4.2% (syst.). The mean transverse momentum is measured to be 0.545 {+-} 0.005 (stat.) {+-} 0.015 (syst.) GeV/c. The results are compared with similar measurements at lower energies.

  20. Transverse-momentum and pseudorapidity distributions of charged hadrons in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hammer, Josef; Haensel, Stephan; Hoch, Michael; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Krammer, Manfred; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Pernicka, Manfred; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Teischinger, Florian; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Walzel, Gerhard; Widl, Edmund; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Benucci, Leonardo; Ceard, Ludivine; De Wolf, Eddi A.; Hashemi, Majid; Janssen, Xavier; Maes, Thomas; Mucibello, Luca; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Selvaggi, Michele; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Adler, Volker; Beauceron, Stephanie; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Devroede, Olivier; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Maes, Joris; Maes, Michael; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Villella, Ilaria; Chabert, Eric Christian; Charaf, Otman; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dero, Vincent; Gay, Arnaud; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wickens, John; Costantini, Silvia; Grunewald, Martin; Klein, Benjamin; Marinov, Andrey; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Vanelderen, Lukas; Verwilligen, Piet; Walsh, Sinead; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Bruno, Giacomo; Caudron, Julien; De Favereau De Jeneret, Jerome; Delaere, Christophe; Demin, Pavel; Favart, Denis; Giammanco, Andrea; Grégoire, Ghislain; Hollar, Jonathan; Lemaitre, Vincent; Militaru, Otilia; Ovyn, Severine; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Quertenmont, Loic; Schul, Nicolas; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Alves, Gilvan; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Carvalho, Wagner; Da Costa, Eliza Melo; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Mundim, Luiz; Oguri, Vitor; Santoro, Alberto; Silva Do Amaral, Sheila Mara; Sznajder, Andre; Torres Da Silva De Araujo, Felipe; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Ferreira Dias, Marco Andre; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Novaes, Sergio F.; Padula, Sandra; Darmenov, Nikolay; Dimitrov, Lubomir; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Trayanov, Rumen; Vankov, Ivan; Dyulendarova, Milena; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Marinova, Evelina; Mateev, Matey; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Wang, Jian; Wang, Jian; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Yang, Min; Zang, Jingjing; Zhang, Zhen; Ban, Yong; Guo, Shuang; Hu, Zhen; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Teng, Haiyun; Zhu, Bo; Cabrera, Andrés; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Osorio Oliveros, Andres Felipe; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Lelas, Karlo; Plestina, Roko; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Dzelalija, Mile; Brigljevic, Vuko; Duric, Senka; Kadija, Kreso; Morovic, Srecko; Attikis, Alexandros; Fereos, Reginos; Galanti, Mario; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Papadakis, Antonakis; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A.; Rykaczewski, Hans; Tsiakkouri, Demetra; Zinonos, Zinonas; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Hektor, Andi; Kadastik, Mario; Kannike, Kristjan; Müntel, Mait; Raidal, Martti; Rebane, Liis; Azzolini, Virginia; Eerola, Paula; Czellar, Sandor; Härkönen, Jaakko; Heikkinen, Mika Aatos; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Klem, Jukka; Kortelainen, Matti J.; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Ungaro, Donatella; Wendland, Lauri; Banzuzi, Kukka; Korpela, Arja; Tuuva, Tuure; Sillou, Daniel; Besancon, Marc; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Descamps, Julien; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Gentit, François-Xavier; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Marionneau, Matthieu; Millischer, Laurent; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Rousseau, Delphine; Titov, Maksym; Verrecchia, Patrice; Baffioni, Stephanie; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Bluj, Michal; Broutin, Clementine; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Elgammal, Sherif; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Haguenauer, Maurice; Kalinowski, Artur; Miné, Philippe; Paganini, Pascal; Sabes, David; Sirois, Yves; Thiebaux, Christophe; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Besson, Auguste; Bloch, Daniel; Bodin, David; Brom, Jean-Marie; Cardaci, Marco; Conte, Eric; Drouhin, Frédéric; Ferro, Cristina; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Greder, Sebastien; Juillot, Pierre; Karim, Mehdi; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Mikami, Yoshinari; Speck, Joaquim; Van Hove, Pierre; Fassi, Farida; Mercier, Damien; Baty, Clement; Beaupere, Nicolas; Bedjidian, Marc; Bondu, Olivier; Boudoul, Gaelle; Boumediene, Djamel; Brun, Hugues; Chanon, Nicolas; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Le Grand, Thomas; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Tosi, Silvano; Tschudi, Yohann; Verdier, Patrice; Xiao, Hong; Roinishvili, Vladimir; Anagnostou, Georgios; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heracleous, Natalie; Hindrichs, Otto; Jussen, Ruediger; Klein, Katja; Merz, Jennifer; Mohr, Niklas; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Perieanu, Adrian; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Sprenger, Daniel; Weber, Hendrik; Weber, Martin; Wittmer, Bruno; Actis, Oxana; Ata, Metin; Bender, Walter; Biallass, Philipp; Erdmann, Martin; Frangenheim, Jens; Hebbeker, Thomas; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Hof, Carsten; Kirsch, Matthias; Klimkovich, Tatsiana; Kreuzer, Peter; Lanske, Dankfried; Magass, Carsten; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Papacz, Paul; Pieta, Holger; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Sowa, Michael; Steggemann, Jan; Teyssier, Daniel; Zeidler, Clemens; Bontenackels, Michael; Davids, Martina; Duda, Markus; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Giffels, Manuel; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Heydhausen, Dirk; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Linn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Perchalla, Lars; Pooth, Oliver; Sauerland, Philip; Stahl, Achim; Thomas, Maarten; Tornier, Daiske; Zoeller, Marc Henning; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bergholz, Matthias; Borras, Kerstin; Campbell, Alan; Castro, Elena; Dammann, Dirk; Eckerlin, Guenter; Flossdorf, Alexander; Flucke, Gero; Geiser, Achim; Hauk, Johannes; Jung, Hannes; Kasemann, Matthias; Katkov, Igor; Kleinwort, Claus; Kluge, Hannelies; Knutsson, Albert; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lange, Wolfgang; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Marienfeld, Markus; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Olzem, Jan; Parenti, Andrea; Raspereza, Alexei; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Sen, Niladri; Stein, Matthias; Tomaszewska, Justyna; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Wissing, Christoph; Autermann, Christian; Draeger, Jula; Eckstein, Doris; Enderle, Holger; Gebbert, Ulla; Kaschube, Kolja; Kaussen, Gordon; Klanner, Robert; Mura, Benedikt; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nowak, Friederike; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schröder, Matthias; Schum, Torben; Schwandt, Joern; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Thomsen, Jan; Wolf, Roger; Bauer, Julia; Buege, Volker; Cakir, Altan; Chwalek, Thorsten; Daeuwel, Daniel; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; Dirkes, Guido; Feindt, Michael; Gruschke, Jasmin; Hackstein, Christoph; Hartmann, Frank; Heinrich, Michael; Held, Hauke; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz; Honc, Simon; Kuhr, Thomas; Martschei, Daniel; Mueller, Steffen; Müller, Thomas; Niegel, Martin; Oberst, Oliver; Oehler, Andreas; Ott, Jochen; Peiffer, Thomas; Piparo, Danilo; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Ratnikov, Fedor; Renz, Manuel; Sabellek, Andreas; Saout, Christophe; Scheurer, Armin; Schieferdecker, Philipp; Schilling, Frank-Peter; Schott, Gregory; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Troendle, Daniel; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Zeise, Manuel; Zhukov, Valery; Ziebarth, Eva Barbara; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Manolakos, Ioannis; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Mavrommatis, Charalampos; Petrakou, Eleni; Gouskos, Loukas; Katsas, Panagiotis; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Evangelou, Ioannis; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Patras, Vaios; Triantis, Frixos A.; Aranyi, Attila; Bencze, Gyorgy; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Debreczeni, Gergely; Hajdu, Csaba; Horvath, Dezso; Kapusi, Anita; Krajczar, Krisztian; Laszlo, Andras; Sikler, Ferenc; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Beni, Noemi; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Veszpremi, Viktor; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Jindal, Monika; Kaur, Manjit; Kohli, Jatinder Mohan; Mehta, Manuk Zubin; Nishu, Nishu; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Sharma, Archana; Sharma, Richa; Singh, Anil; Singh, Jas Bir; Singh, Supreet Pal; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chauhan, Sushil; Choudhary, Brajesh C.; Gupta, Pooja; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Kumar, Ashok; Ranjan, Kirti; Shivpuri, Ram Krishen; Choudhury, Rajani Kant; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kataria, Sushil Kumar; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Suggisetti, Praveenkumar; Aziz, Tariq; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Devdatta; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Saha, Anirban; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Dugad, Shashikant; Mondal, Naba Kumar; Arfaei, Hessamaddin; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Fahim, Ali; Jafari, Abideh; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Abbrescia, Marcello; Barbone, Lucia; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Dimitrov, Anton; Fedele, Francesca; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Lusito, Letizia; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Manna, Norman; Marangelli, Bartolomeo; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Romano, Francesco; Roselli, Giuseppe; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Trentadue, Raffaello; Tupputi, Salvatore; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Giunta, Marina; Grandi, Claudio; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Odorici, Fabrizio; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gianni; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Frosali, Simone; Gallo, Elisabetta; Genta, Chiara; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Fabbricatore, Pasquale; Musenich, Riccardo; Benaglia, Andrea; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; De Guio, Federico; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malberti, Martina; Malvezzi, Sandra; Martelli, Arabella; Massironi, Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Miccio, Vincenzo; Moroni, Luigi; Negri, Pietro; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Sala, Silvano; Salerno, Roberto; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Tancini, Valentina; Taroni, Silvia; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cimmino, Anna; De Cosa, Annapaola; De Gruttola, Michele; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Noli, Pasquale; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bellan, Paolo; Bellato, Marco; Biasotto, Massimo; Bisello, Dario; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; De Mattia, Marco; Dorigo, Tommaso; Fanzago, Federica; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Giubilato, Piero; Gresele, Ambra; Lacaprara, Stefano; Lazzizzera, Ignazio; Margoni, Martino; Maron, Gaetano; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Nespolo, Massimo; Perrozzi, Luca; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Triossi, Andrea; Vanini, Sara; Zumerle, Gianni; Baesso, Paolo; Berzano, Umberto; Riccardi, Cristina; Torre, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Viviani, Claudio; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Caponeri, Benedetta; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Lucaroni, Andrea; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Nappi, Aniello; Santocchia, Attilio; Servoli, Leonello; Valdata, Marisa; Volpe, Roberta; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Castaldi, Rino; Dagnolo, Raffaele Tito; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Kraan, Aafke; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Palmonari, Francesco; Segneri, Gabriele; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Del Re, Daniele; Di Marco, Emanuele; Diemoz, Marcella; Franci, Daniele; Grassi, Marco; Longo, Egidio; Organtini, Giovanni; Palma, Alessandro; Pandolfi, Francesco; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Biino, Cristina; Botta, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Castello, Roberto; Costa, Marco; Demaria, Natale; Graziano, Alberto; Mariotti, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Mila, Giorgia; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Trocino, Daniele; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ambroglini, Filippo; Belforte, Stefano; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; Montanino, Damiana; Penzo, Aldo; Chang, Sunghyun; Chung, Jin Hyuk; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Ji Eun; Kong, Dae Jung; Park, Hyangkyu; Son, Dong-Chul; Kim, Jaeho; Kim, Jae Yool; Song, Sanghyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Ji Hyun; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lee, Kyong Sei; Moon, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Keun; Rhee, Han-Bum; Sim, Kwang Souk; Choi, Minkyoo; Kang, Seokon; Kim, Hyunyong; Park, Chawon; Park, Inkyu; Park, Sangnam; Choi, Suyong; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Lee, Jongseok; Lee, Sungeun; Seo, Hyunkwan; Yu, Intae; Janulis, Mindaugas; Martisiute, Dalia; Petrov, Pavel; Sabonis, Tomas; Castilla Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz Burelo, Eduard; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Villaseñor-Cendejas, Luis Manuel; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Reyes-Santos, Marco A.; Allfrey, Philip; Krofcheck, David; Tam, Jason; Aumeyr, Thomas; Butler, Philip H.; Signal, Tony; Williams, Jennifer C.; Ahmad, Muhammad; Ahmed, Ijaz; Asghar, Muhammad Irfan; Hoorani, Hafeez R.; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Qazi, Shamona; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Frueboes, Tomasz; Gokieli, Ryszard; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Szleper, Michal; Wrochna, Grzegorz; Zalewski, Piotr; Almeida, Nuno; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Mini, Giuliano; Musella, Pasquale; Nayak, Aruna; Raposo, Luis; Ribeiro, Pedro Quinaz; Seixas, Joao; Silva, Pedro; Soares, David; Varela, Joao; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Altsybeev, Igor; Belotelov, Ivan; Bunin, Pavel; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr., Michael; Golutvin, Igor; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Kozlov, Guennady; Lanev, Alexander; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Smirnov, Vitaly; Volodko, Anton; Zarubin, Anatoli; Bondar, Nikolai; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Matveev, Viktor; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Toropin, Alexander; Troitsky, Sergey; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Ilina, Natalia; Kaftanov, Vitali; Kossov, Mikhail; Krokhotin, Andrey; Kuleshov, Sergey; Oulianov, Alexei; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Shreyber, Irina; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Sarycheva, Ludmila; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Rusakov, Sergey V.; Vinogradov, Alexey; Azhgirey, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Datsko, Kirill; Grishin, Viatcheslav; Kachanov, Vassili; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Slabospitsky, Sergey; Sobol, Andrei; Sytine, Alexandre; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Djordjevic, Milos; Krpic, Dragomir; Maletic, Dimitrije; Milosevic, Jovan; Puzovic, Jovan; Aguilar-Benitez, Manuel; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Arce, Pedro; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cepeda, Maria; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Ferrando, Antonio; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M.; Josa, Maria Isabel; Merino, Gonzalo; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Santaolalla, Javier; Willmott, Carlos; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chuang, Shan-Huei; Diaz Merino, Irma; Diez Gonzalez, Carlos; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Gonzalez Sanchez, Javier; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Jorda, Clara; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Matorras, Francisco; Rodrigo, Teresa; Ruiz Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Sobron Sanudo, Mar; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Beaudette, Florian; Bell, Alan James; Bellan, Riccardo; Benedetti, Daniele; Bernet, Colin; Bialas, Wojciech; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bolognesi, Sara; Breuker, Horst; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cano, Eric; Cattai, Ariella; Cerminara, Gianluca; Christiansen, Tim; Coarasa Perez, Jose Antonio; Covarelli, Roberto; Curé, Benoît; Dahms, Torsten; De Roeck, Albert; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Funk, Wolfgang; Gaddi, Andrea; Gennai, Simone; Gerwig, Hubert; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Glege, Frank; Gomez-Reino Garrido, Robert; Gowdy, Stephen; Guiducci, Luigi; Hansen, Magnus; Hartl, Christian; Harvey, John; Hegner, Benedikt; Henderson, Conor; Hoffmann, Hans Falk; Honma, Alan; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Lecoq, Paul; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Lourenco, Carlos; Macpherson, Alick; Maki, Tuula; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Masetti, Lorenzo; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moser, Roland; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mulders, Martijn; Nesvold, Erik; Orsini, Luciano; Perez, Emmanuelle; Petrilli, Achille; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Pimiä, Martti; Racz, Attila; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovelli, Chiara; Rovere, Marco; Ryjov, Vladimir; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Segoni, Ilaria; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Spiropulu, Maria; Stöckli, Fabian; Traczyk, Piotr; Tropea, Paola; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Vichoudis, Paschalis; Voutilainen, Mikko; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Gabathuler, Kurt; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; König, Stefan; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Meier, Frank; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Sibille, Jennifer; Starodumov, Andrei; Caminada, Lea; Chen, Zhiling; Cittolin, Sergio; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Eugster, Jürg; Freudenreich, Klaus; Grab, Christoph; Hervé, Alain; Hintz, Wieland; Lecomte, Pierre; Lustermann, Werner; Marchica, Carmelo; Meridiani, Paolo; Milenovic, Predrag; Moortgat, Filip; Nardulli, Alessandro; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pape, Luc; Pauss, Felicitas; Punz, Thomas; Rizzi, Andrea; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Sala, Leonardo; Sanchez, Ann - Karin; Sawley, Marie-Christine; Schinzel, Dietrich; Sordini, Viola; Stieger, Benjamin; Tauscher, Ludwig; Thea, Alessandro; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Treille, Daniel; Weber, Matthias; Wehrli, Lukas; Weng, Joanna; Amsler, Claude; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Visscher, Simon; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Millan Mejias, Barbara; Regenfus, Christian; Robmann, Peter; Rommerskirchen, Tanja; Schmidt, Alexander; Tsirigkas, Dimitrios; Wilke, Lotte; Chang, Yuan-Hann; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Chen, Wan-Ting; Go, Apollo; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Li, Syue-Wei; Lin, Willis; Liu, Ming-Hsiung; Lu, Yun-Ju; Wu, Jing-Han; Yu, Shin-Shan; Bartalini, Paolo; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Kao, Kai-Yi; Lei, Yeong-Jyi; Lin, Sheng-Wen; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Ueno, Koji; Wang, Chin-chi; Wang, Minzu; Wei, Jui-Te; Adiguzel, Aytul; Ayhan, Aydin; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Demir, Zahide; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gökbulut, Gül; Güler, Yalcin; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Karaman, Turker; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Nart, Alisah; Önengüt, Gülsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatöz, Ayse; Sahin, Ozge; Sengul, Ozden; Sogut, Kenan; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Uzun, Dilber; Vergili, Latife Nukhet; Vergili, Mehmet; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Aliev, Takhmasib; Bilmis, Selcuk; Deniz, Muhammed; Gamsizkan, Halil; Guler, Ali Murat; Ocalan, Kadir; Ozpineci, Altug; Serin, Meltem; Sever, Ramazan; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Deliomeroglu, Mehmet; Demir, Durmus; Gülmez, Erhan; Halu, Arda; Isildak, Bora; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Özbek, Melih; Ozkorucuklu, Suat; Sonmez, Nasuf; Levchuk, Leonid; Bell, Peter; Bostock, Francis; Brooke, James John; Cheng, Teh Lee; Cussans, David; Frazier, Robert; Goldstein, Joel; Hansen, Maria; Heath, Greg P.; Heath, Helen F.; Hill, Christopher; Huckvale, Benedickt; Jackson, James; Kreczko, Lukasz; Mackay, Catherine Kirsty; Metson, Simon; Newbold, Dave M.; Nirunpong, Kachanon; Smith, Vincent J.; Ward, Simon; Basso, Lorenzo; Bell, Ken W.; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M.; Camanzi, Barbara; Cockerill, David J.A.; Coughlan, John A.; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Kennedy, Bruce W.; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Tomalin, Ian R.; Womersley, William John; Worm, Steven; Bainbridge, Robert; Ball, Gordon; Ballin, Jamie; Beuselinck, Raymond; Buchmuller, Oliver; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Cutajar, Michael; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Foudas, Costas; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Guneratne Bryer, Arlo; Hall, Geoffrey; Hatherell, Zoe; Hays, Jonathan; Iles, Gregory; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Marrouche, Jad; Nandi, Robin; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Papageorgiou, Anastasios; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Pioppi, Michele; Raymond, David Mark; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Rose, Andrew; Ryan, Matthew John; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Sparrow, Alex; Stoye, Markus; Tapper, Alexander; Tourneur, Stephane; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Wakefield, Stuart; Wardrope, David; Whyntie, Tom; Barrett, Matthew; Chadwick, Matthew; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R.; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leslie, Dawn; Reid, Ivan; Teodorescu, Liliana; Bose, Tulika; Clough, Andrew; Heister, Arno; St. John, Jason; Lawson, Philip; Lazic, Dragoslav; Rohlf, James; Sulak, Lawrence; Andrea, Jeremy; Avetisyan, Aram; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Chou, John Paul; Cutts, David; Esen, Selda; Heintz, Ulrich; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kukartsev, Gennadiy; Landsberg, Greg; Narain, Meenakshi; Nguyen, Duong; Speer, Thomas; Tsang, Ka Vang; Borgia, Maria Assunta; Breedon, Richard; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Cebra, Daniel; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Cox, Peter Timothy; Dolen, James; Erbacher, Robin; Friis, Evan; Ko, Winston; Kopecky, Alexandra; Lander, Richard; Liu, Haidong; Maruyama, Sho; Miceli, Tia; Nikolic, Milan; Pellett, Dave; Robles, Jorge; Schwarz, Thomas; Searle, Matthew; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Tripathi, Mani; Vasquez Sierra, Ricardo; Veelken, Christian; Andreev, Valeri; Arisaka, Katsushi; Cline, David; Cousins, Robert; Deisher, Amanda; Erhan, Samim; Farrell, Chris; Felcini, Marta; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Jarvis, Chad; Plager, Charles; Rakness, Gregory; Schlein, Peter; Tucker, Jordan; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Wallny, Rainer; Babb, John; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Jeng, Geng-Yuan; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Liu, Feng; Liu, Hongliang; Luthra, Arun; Nguyen, Harold; Pasztor, Gabriella; Satpathy, Asish; Shen, Benjamin C.; Stringer, Robert; Sturdy, Jared; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wilken, Rachel; Wimpenny, Stephen; Andrews, Warren; Branson, James G.; Dusinberre, Elizabeth; Evans, David; Golf, Frank; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Lebourgeois, Matthew; Letts, James; Mangano, Boris; Muelmenstaedt, Johannes; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pi, Haifeng; Pieri, Marco; Ranieri, Riccardo; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Barge, Derek; Blume, Michael; Campagnari, Claudio; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; Danielson, Thomas; Garberson, Jeffrey; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Kalavase, Puneeth; Koay, Sue Ann; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Lamb, James; Lowette, Steven; Pavlunin, Viktor; Rebassoo, Finn; Ribnik, Jacob; Richman, Jeffrey; Rossin, Roberto; Stuart, David; To, Wing; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Witherell, Michael; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Gataullin, Marat; Kcira, Dorian; Litvine, Vladimir; Ma, Yousi; Newman, Harvey B.; Rogan, Christopher; Shin, Kyoungha; Timciuc, Vladlen; Veverka, Jan; Wilkinson, Richard; Yang, Yong; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Akgun, Bora; Carroll, Ryan; Ferguson, Thomas; Jang, Dong Wook; Jun, Soon Yung; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Terentyev, Nikolay; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Drell, Brian Robert; Ford, William T.; Heyburn, Bernadette; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Nauenberg, Uriel; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Zang, Shi-Lei; Agostino, Lorenzo; Alexander, James; Blekman, Freya; Chatterjee, Avishek; Das, Souvik; Eggert, Nicholas; Fields, Laura Johanna; Gibbons, Lawrence Kent; Heltsley, Brian; Hopkins, Walter; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Kreis, Benjamin; Kuznetsov, Valentin; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Puigh, Darren; Riley, Daniel; Ryd, Anders; Shi, Xin; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Vaughan, Jennifer; Weng, Yao; Wittich, Peter; Biselli, Angela; Cirino, Guy; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Atac, Muzaffer; Bakken, Jon Alan; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bauerdick, Lothar A.T.; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C.; Bloch, Ingo; Borcherding, Frederick; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Chetluru, Vasundhara; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Demarteau, Marcel; Eartly, David P.; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gao, Yanyan; Gottschalk, Erik; Green, Dan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hahn, Alan; Hanlon, Jim; Harris, Robert M.; James, Eric; Jensen, Hans; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Khatiwada, Rakshya; Kilminster, Benjamin; Klima, Boaz; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Kunori, Shuichi; Kwan, Simon; Limon, Peter; Lipton, Ron; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; McCauley, Thomas; Miao, Ting; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Musienko, Yuri; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Popescu, Sorina; Pordes, Ruth; Prokofyev, Oleg; Saoulidou, Niki; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Sharma, Seema; Smith, Richard P.; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J.; Spiegel, Leonard; Tan, Ping; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vidal, Richard; Whitmore, Juliana; Wu, Weimin; Yumiceva, Francisco; Yun, Jae Chul; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Chen, Mingshui; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Dobur, Didar; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Field, Richard D.; Fu, Yu; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Gartner, Joseph; Kim, Bockjoo; Klimenko, Sergey; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kotov, Khristian; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Kypreos, Theodore; Matchev, Konstantin; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Prescott, Craig; Remington, Ronald; Schmitt, Michael; Scurlock, Bobby; Sellers, Paul; Wang, Dayong; Yelton, John; Zakaria, Mohammed; Ceron, Cristobal; Gaultney, Vanessa; Kramer, Laird; Lebolo, Luis Miguel; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Mesa, Dalgis; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Chen, Jie; Diamond, Brendan; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Jenkins, Merrill; Johnson, Kurtis F.; Prosper, Harrison; Sekmen, Sezen; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Baarmand, Marc M.; Guragain, Samir; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Ralich, Robert; Vodopiyanov, Igor; Adams, Mark Raymond; Anghel, Ioana Maria; Apanasevich, Leonard; Bazterra, Victor Eduardo; Betts, Russell Richard; Callner, Jeremy; Cavanaugh, Richard; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo Javier; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Khalatian, Samvel; Lacroix, Florent; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Smoron, Agata; Strom, Derek; Varelas, Nikos; Akgun, Ugur; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Bilki, Burak; Cankocak, Kerem; Clarida, Warren; Duru, Firdevs; Lae, Chung Khim; McCliment, Edward; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Newsom, Charles Ray; Norbeck, Edwin; Olson, Jonathan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Sen, Sercan; Wetzel, James; Yetkin, Taylan; Yi, Kai; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bonato, Alessio; Eskew, Christopher; Fehling, David; Giurgiu, Gavril; Gritsan, Andrei; Guo, Zijin; Hu, Guofan; Maksimovic, Petar; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Swartz, Morris; Tran, Nhan Viet; Whitbeck, Andrew; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Grachov, Oleg; Murray, Michael; Radicci, Valeria; Sanders, Stephen; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Zhukova, Victoria; Bandurin, Dmitry; Bolton, Tim; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Maravin, Yurii; Shrestha, Shruti; Svintradze, Irakli; Wan, Zongru; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Boutemeur, Madjid; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Ferencek, Dinko; Hadley, Nicholas John; Kellogg, Richard G.; Kirn, Malina; Mignerey, Alice; Rossato, Kenneth; Rumerio, Paolo; Santanastasio, Francesco; Skuja, Andris; Temple, Jeffrey; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C.; Twedt, Elizabeth; Alver, Burak; Bauer, Gerry; Bendavid, Joshua; Busza, Wit; Butz, Erik; Cali, Ivan Amos; Chan, Matthew; D'Enterria, David; Everaerts, Pieter; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Harris, Philip; Kim, Yongsun; Klute, Markus; Lee, Yen-Jie; Li, Wei; Loizides, Constantinos; Luckey, Paul David; Ma, Teng; Nahn, Steve; Paus, Christoph; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Rudolph, Matthew; Stephans, George; Sumorok, Konstanty; Sung, Kevin; Wenger, Edward Allen; Wyslouch, Bolek; Xie, Si; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Yoon, Sungho; Zanetti, Marco; Cole, Perrie; Cooper, Seth; Cushman, Priscilla; Dahmes, Bryan; De Benedetti, Abraham; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Franzoni, Giovanni; Haupt, Jason; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Petyt, David; Rekovic, Vladimir; Rusack, Roger; Sasseville, Michael; Singovsky, Alexander; Cremaldi, Lucien Marcus; Godang, Romulus; Kroeger, Rob; Perera, Lalith; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sanders, David A; Sonnek, Peter; Summers, Don; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Butt, Jamila; Claes, Daniel R.; Dominguez, Aaron; Eads, Michael; Keller, Jason; Kelly, Tony; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Lundstedt, Carl; Malbouisson, Helena; Malik, Sudhir; Snow, Gregory R.; Baur, Ulrich; Iashvili, Ia; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Smith, Kenneth; Strang, Michael; Zennamo, Joseph; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Boeriu, Oana; Reucroft, Steve; Swain, John; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Anastassov, Anton; Kubik, Andrew; Ofierzynski, Radoslaw Adrian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael; Stoynev, Stoyan; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Antonelli, Louis; Berry, Douglas; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kolb, Jeff; Kolberg, Ted; Lannon, Kevin; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Morse, David Michael; Ruchti, Randy; Slaunwhite, Jason; Valls, Nil; Warchol, Jadwiga; Wayne, Mitchell; Ziegler, Jill; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Gu, Jianhui; Killewald, Phillip; Ling, Ta-Yung; Williams, Grayson; Adam, Nadia; Berry, Edmund; Elmer, Peter; Gerbaudo, Davide; Halyo, Valerie; Hunt, Adam; Jones, John; Laird, Edward; Lopes Pegna, David; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Piroué, Pierre; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zuranski, Andrzej; Acosta, Jhon Gabriel; Huang, Xing Tao; Lopez, Angel; Mendez, Hector; Oliveros, Sandra; Ramirez Vargas, Juan Eduardo; Zatzerklyaniy, Andriy; Alagoz, Enver; Barnes, Virgil E.; Bolla, Gino; Borrello, Laura; Bortoletto, Daniela; Everett, Adam; Garfinkel, Arthur F.; Gecse, Zoltan; Gutay, Laszlo; Jones, Matthew; Koybasi, Ozhan; Laasanen, Alvin T.; Leonardo, Nuno; Liu, Chang; Maroussov, Vassili; Merkel, Petra; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Potamianos, Karolos; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Zablocki, Jakub; Zheng, Yu; Jindal, Pratima; Parashar, Neeti; Cuplov, Vesna; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank J.M.; Liu, Jinghua H.; Morales, Jafet; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; Chung, Yeon Sei; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Flacher, Henning; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Gotra, Yury; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Miner, Daniel Carl; Orbaker, Douglas; Petrillo, Gianluca; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Zielinski, Marek; Bhatti, Anwar; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Lungu, Gheorghe; Mesropian, Christina; Yan, Ming; Atramentov, Oleksiy; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Hits, Dmitry; Lath, Amitabh; Rose, Keith; Schnetzer, Steve; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Cerizza, Giordano; Hollingsworth, Matthew; Spanier, Stefan; Yang, Zong-Chang; York, Andrew; Asaadi, Jonathan; Eusebi, Ricardo; Gilmore, Jason; Gurrola, Alfredo; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Montalvo, Roy; Nguyen, Chi Nhan; Pivarski, James; Safonov, Alexei; Sengupta, Sinjini; Toback, David; Weinberger, Michael; Akchurin, Nural; Bardak, Cemile; Damgov, Jordan; Jeong, Chiyoung; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Lee, Sung Won; Mane, Poonam; Roh, Youn; Sill, Alan; Volobouev, Igor; Wigmans, Richard; Yazgan, Efe; Appelt, Eric; Brownson, Eric; Engh, Daniel; Florez, Carlos; Gabella, William; Johns, Willard; Kurt, Pelin; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Sheldon, Paul; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Balazs, Michael; Buehler, Marc; Conetti, Sergio; Cox, Bradley; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Neu, Christopher; Yohay, Rachel; Gollapinni, Sowjanya; Gunthoti, Kranti; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Mattson, Mark; Milstène, Caroline; Sakharov, Alexandre; Anderson, Michael; Bachtis, Michail; Bellinger, James Nugent; Carlsmith, Duncan; Dasu, Sridhara; Dutta, Suchandra; Efron, Jonathan; Gray, Lindsey; Grogg, Kira Suzanne; Grothe, Monika; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Klabbers, Pamela; Klukas, Jeffrey; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Leonard, Jessica; Lomidze, David; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Polese, Giovanni; Reeder, Don; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H.; Swanson, Joshua; Weinberg, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Charged-hadron transverse-momentum and pseudorapidity distributions in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$~TeV are measured with the inner tracking system of the CMS detector at the LHC. The charged-hadron yield is obtained by counting the number of reconstructed hits, hit-pairs, and fully reconstructed charged-particle tracks. The combination of the three methods gives a charged-particle multiplicity per unit of pseudorapidity \\dnchdeta$|_{|\\eta| < 0.5} = 5.78\\pm 0.01\\stat\\pm 0.23\\syst$ for non-single-diffractive events, higher than predicted by commonly used models. The relative increase in charged-particle multiplicity from $\\sqrt{s} = 0.9$ to 7~TeV is $66.1\\%\\pm 1.0\\%\\stat\\pm 4.2\\%\\syst$. The mean transverse momentum is measured to be $0.545\\pm 0.005\\stat\\pm 0.015\\syst\\GeVc$. The results are compared with similar measurements at lower energies.

  1. Effect of the electrode material on the breakdown voltage and space charge distribution of propylene carbonate under impulse voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qing; Jin, Yang; Sima, Wenxia; Liu, Mengna

    2016-04-01

    This paper reports three types of electrode materials (copper, aluminum, and stainless steel) that are used to measure the impulse breakdown voltage of propylene carbonate. The breakdown voltage of propylene carbonate with these electrode materials is different and is in decreasing order of stainless steel, copper, and aluminum. To explore how the electrode material affects the insulating properties of the liquid dielectric, the electric field distribution and space charge distribution of propylene carbonate under impulse voltage with the three electrode materials are measured on the basis of a Kerr electro-optic test. The space charge injection ability is highest for aluminum, followed by copper, and then the stainless steel electrodes. Furthermore, the electric field distortion rate decreased in the order of the aluminum, copper, and then the stainless steel electrode. This paper explains that the difference in the electric field distortion rate between the three electrode materials led to the difference in the impulse breakdown voltage of propylene carbonate.

  2. Beam energy dependence of moments of the net-charge multiplicity distributions in Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2014-01-01

    We report the first measurements of the moments -mean ($M$), variance ($\\sigma^{2}$), skewness ($S$) and kurtosis ($\\kappa$) -of the net-charge multiplicity distributions at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at seven energies, ranging from $\\sqrt {{s_{\\rm NN}}}$=7.7 to 200 GeV, as a part of the Beam Energy Scan program at RHIC. The moments are related to the thermodynamic susceptibilities of net-charge, which are expected to diverge at the QCD critical point. We compare the products of the moments, $\\sigma^{2}/M$, $S\\sigma$ and $\\kappa\\sigma^{2}$ with the expectations from Poisson and negative binomial distributions (NBD). The $S\\sigma$ values deviate from Poisson and are close to NBD baseline, while the $\\kappa\\sigma^{2}$ values tend to lie between the two. Within the present uncertainties, our data do not show clear evidence of non-monotonic behavior as a function of collision energy.

  3. Effect of the electrode material on the breakdown voltage and space charge distribution of propylene carbonate under impulse voltage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Yang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports three types of electrode materials (copper, aluminum, and stainless steel that are used to measure the impulse breakdown voltage of propylene carbonate. The breakdown voltage of propylene carbonate with these electrode materials is different and is in decreasing order of stainless steel, copper, and aluminum. To explore how the electrode material affects the insulating properties of the liquid dielectric, the electric field distribution and space charge distribution of propylene carbonate under impulse voltage with the three electrode materials are measured on the basis of a Kerr electro-optic test. The space charge injection ability is highest for aluminum, followed by copper, and then the stainless steel electrodes. Furthermore, the electric field distortion rate decreased in the order of the aluminum, copper, and then the stainless steel electrode. This paper explains that the difference in the electric field distortion rate between the three electrode materials led to the difference in the impulse breakdown voltage of propylene carbonate.

  4. Surface speciation of yttrium and neodymium sorbed on rutile: Interpretations using the charge distribution model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridley, Moira K.; Hiemstra, Tjisse; Machesky, Michael L.; Wesolowski, David J.; van Riemsdijk, Willem H.

    2012-10-01

    The adsorption of Y3+ and Nd3+ onto rutile has been evaluated over a wide range of pH (3-11) and surface loading conditions, as well as at two ionic strengths (0.03 and 0.3 m), and temperatures (25 and 50 °C). The experimental results reveal the same adsorption behavior for the two trivalent ions onto the rutile surface, with Nd3+ first adsorbing at slightly lower pH values. The adsorption of both Y3+ and Nd3+ commences at pH values below the pHznpc of rutile. The experimental results were evaluated using a charge distribution (CD) and multisite complexation (MUSIC) model, and Basic Stern layer description of the electric double layer (EDL). The coordination geometry of possible surface complexes were constrained by molecular-level information obtained from X-ray standing wave measurements and molecular dynamic (MD) simulation studies. X-ray standing wave measurements showed an inner-sphere tetradentate complex for Y3+ adsorption onto the (1 1 0) rutile surface (Zhang et al., 2004b). The MD simulation studies suggest additional bidentate complexes may form. The CD values for all surface species were calculated based on a bond valence interpretation of the surface complexes identified by X-ray and MD. The calculated CD values were corrected for the effect of dipole orientation of interfacial water. At low pH, the tetradentate complex provided excellent fits to the Y3+ and Nd3+ experimental data. The experimental and surface complexation modeling results show a strong pH dependence, and suggest that the tetradentate surface species hydrolyze with increasing pH. Furthermore, with increased surface loading of Y3+ on rutile the tetradentate binding mode was augmented by a hydrolyzed-bidentate Y3+ surface complex. Collectively, the experimental and surface complexation modeling results demonstrate that solution chemistry and surface loading impacts Y3+ surface speciation. The approach taken of incorporating molecular-scale information into surface complexation models

  5. High resolution technique for measuring charge and polarization distributions in dielectrics by piezoelectrically induced pressure step waves (PPS)

    OpenAIRE

    Haardt, Martin; Eisenmenger, Wolfgang

    1982-01-01

    Our step wave technique, so far, has been discussed with respect to the investigation of already prepared samples. In some situations it is of interest to study the buildup of charge and polarization distributions during the poling procedure. This can be accomplished by inserting an additional insulating film, e.g. mylar between the conducting rubber electrode and the sample film. The insulating film acts as a series capacitor reducing the signal amplitude with no influence on the signal shap...

  6. Predicting and rationalizing the effect of surface charge distribution and orientation on nano-wire based FET bio-sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Vico, L.; Iversen, L.; Sørensen, Martin Hedegård;

    2011-01-01

    changes (e.g. a positive signal change due to a net positive protein binding to a p-type conductor) can occur for certain combinations of charge distributions and Debye lengths. The new method is applied to interpret published experimental data on Streptavidin (Ishikawa et al., ACS Nano, 2009, 3, 3969......-3976) and Nucleocapsid protein (Ishikawa et al., ACS Nano, 2009, 3, 1219-1224)....

  7. Fission fragment charge and mass distributions in 239Pu(n,f) in the adiabatic nuclear energy density functional theory

    OpenAIRE

    Regnier, D.; Dubray, N.; Schunck, N.; Verriere, M.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of fission fragment yields is an essential ingredient of numerous applications ranging from the formation of elements in the r-process to fuel cycle optimization for nuclear energy. The need for a predictive theory applicable where no data is available is an incentive to develop a fully microscopic approach to fission dynamics. In this work, we calculate the pre-neutron emission charge and mass distributions of the fission fragments formed in the neutron-induced fission of ...

  8. Charged-particle distributions in 16O induced nuclear reactions at 60 and 200 A GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results from 16O induced nuclear interactions with C, Cu, Ag and Au targets at 60 and 200 A GeV are presented. Multiplicity and pseudorapidity-density distributions of charged particles and their dependence on the target mass number are reported. The increase in the particle density with increasing centrality, characterized by the energy flux at zero degrees, is investigated. Comparisons with the Fritiof model reveal systematic differences. (orig.)

  9. 42 CFR 423.2262 - Review and distribution of marketing materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Marketing Requirements § 423.2262 Review and distribution of marketing materials. (a) CMS review of marketing materials. (1) Except as provided in paragraph (a)(2) of this section, a Part D plan may not... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Review and distribution of marketing materials....

  10. Spatially resolved charge-state and current-density distributions at the extraction of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we present our measurements of charge-state and current-density distributions performed in very close vicinity (15 mm) of the extraction of our hexapole geometry electron cyclotron resonance ion source. We achieved a relatively high spatial resolution reducing the aperture of our 3D-movable extraction (puller) electrode to a diameter of only 0.5 mm. Thus, we are able to limit the source of the extracted ion beam to a very small region of the plasma electrode's hole (O = 4 mm) and therefore to a very small region of the neutral plasma sheath. The information about the charge-state distribution and the current density in the plane of the plasma electrode at each particular position is conserved in the ion beam. We determined the total current density distribution at a fixed coaxial distance of only 15 mm to the plasma electrode by remotely moving the small-aperture puller electrode which contained a dedicated Faraday cup (FC) across the aperture of the plasma electrode. In a second measurement we removed the FC and recorded m/q-spectra for the different positions using a sector magnet. From our results we can deduce that different ion charge-states can be grouped into bloated triangles of different sizes and same orientation at the extraction with the current density peaking at centre. This confirms observations from other groups based on simulations and emittance measurements. We present our measurements in detail and discuss possible systematic errors.

  11. Higher order QCD corrections to charged-lepton deep-inelastic scattering and global fits of parton distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekhin, S. [Institut Fiziki Vysokikh Ehnergij, Protvino (Russian Federation); Moch, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2008-11-15

    We study the perturbative QCD corrections to structure functions of charged-lepton deep-inelastic scattering and their impact on global fits of parton distributions. We include the logarithmically enhanced terms near threshold due to soft gluon resummation in the QCD corrections at next-to-next-to-leading order. We demonstrate that this approximation is sufficient to describe the available HERA data in most parts of the kinematic region. The threshold-enhanced next-to-next-to-leading order corrections improve the agreement between predictions based on global fits of the parton distribution functions and the HERA collider data even in the small-x region. (orig.)

  12. Multiplicity and Pseudorapidity Distributions of Charged Particles and Photons at Forward Pseudorapidity in Au + Au Collisions at sqrt{s_NN} = 62.4 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, J; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bharadwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Blyth, S L; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bravar, A; Bystersky, M; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca-Sanchez, M; Castillo, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, Y; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, H A; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Daugherity, M; De Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; De Phillips, M; Derevshchikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dogra, S M; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta-Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Yu; Fornazier, K S F; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Gans, J; Ganti, M S; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; González, J E; Gorbunov, Y G; Gos, H; Grachov, O; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D P; Guertin, S M; Guo, Y; Sen-Gupta, A; Gupta, N; Gutíerrez, T D; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Hepplemann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horner, M J; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jiang, H; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kim, B C; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kowalik, K L; Krämer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krüger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kutuev, R K; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C H; Lehocka, S; Le Vine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Liu, Q J; Liu, Z; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; López-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J N; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnik, Yu M; Meschanin, A; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnár, L; Moore, C F; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, Grazyna Janina; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Yu A; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevozchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M V; Potrebenikova, E V; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C A; Putschke, J; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D M; Reid, J G; Reinnarth, J; Renault, G; Retière, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Savin, I; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Shao, W; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shestermanov, K E; Shimansky, S S; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sørensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M N; Stringfellow, B C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E R; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Swanger, M; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T J; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; Van der Kolk, N; Van Leeuwen, M; Van der Molen, A M; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasilev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, E; Yepes, P; Yoo, I K; Yurevich, V I; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhong, C; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N; Zuo, J X

    2006-01-01

    We present the centrality dependent measurement of multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles and photons in Au + Au collisions at sqrt{s_NN} = 62.4 GeV. The charged particles and photons are measured in the pseudorapidity region 2.9 < eta < 3.9 and 2.3 < eta < 3.7, respectively. We have studied the scaling of particle production with the number of participating nucleons and the number of binary collisions. The photon and charged particle production in the measured pseudorapidity range has been shown to be consistent with energy independent limiting fragmentation behavior. The photons are observed to follow a centrality independent limiting fragmentation behavior while for the charged particles it is centrality dependent. We have carried out a comparative study of the pseudorapidity distributions of positively charged hadrons, negatively charged hadrons, photons, pions, net protons in nucleus--nucleus collisions and pseudorapidity distributions from p+p collisions. From the...

  13. The Charge and Matter radial distributions of Heavy-Light mesons calculated on a lattice with dynamical fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Green, A M; Pennanen, P; Michael, C

    2003-01-01

    A knowledge of the radial distributions of quarks inside hadrons could lead to a better understanding of the QCD description of these hadrons and possibly suggest forms for phenomenological models. As a step in this direction, in an earlier work, the charge (vector) and matter (scalar) radial distributions of heavy-light mesons were measured in the quenched approximation on a 16^3x24 lattice with a lattice spacing of 'a' approx. 0.17 fm, and a hopping parameter corresponding to a light quark mass about that of the strange quark. Here several improvements are now made: 1) The configurations are generated using dynamical fermions with a approx 0.14 fm; 2) Many more gauge configurations areincluded; 3) The distributions at many off-axis, in addition to on-axis, points are measured; 4) The data analysis is much more complete. In particular, distributions involving excited states are extracted. The exponential decay of the charge and matter distributions can be described by mesons of mass 0.9 +- 0.1 and 1.5 +- 0.1...

  14. Study of quark fragmentation in e+e- annihilation at 29 GeV: charged particle multiplicity distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the charged particle multiplicity distributions for e+e- annihilation at √s = 29 GeV measured in the High Resolution Spectrometer. The data, which correspond to an integrated luminosity of 185 pb-1, were obtained at the e+e- storage ring PEP. The techniques used to obtain the original distributions from the observed prong numbers are discussed. The multiplicity distribution of the charged particles with a two jet selection has a mean value = 13.02 +- 0.03 +- 0.5; and a dispersion D = 3.84 +- 0.02 +- 0.1. The mean multiplicity increases with the event sphericity. No correlation is observed between the multiplicities in the two jets that characterize most of the events. For the single jets a value of D = 2.71 +- 0.02 +- 0.06 is measured which gives further support the idea of independent jet fragmentation. When compared with e+e- data at other energies, the multiplicity distributions exhibit the scaling behavior in the mean first suggested by Koba, Nielsen and Olsen (KNO). The KNO distribution in the central rapidity interval is broader than that for the whole rapidity span and agrees well with the generalized Bose-Einstein formula for three independent sources. 17 refs., 14 figs

  15. Space charge distributions in insulating polymers: A new non-contacting way of measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marty-Dessus, D., E-mail: marty@laplace.univ-tlse.fr; Ziani, A. C.; Berquez, L. [Université de Toulouse, UPS, LAPLACE, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse (France); CNRS, LAPLACE, F-31062 Toulouse (France); Petre, A. [Université de Pau et des Pays de l’Adour, SIAME, IPRA, 2 avenue du Président Pierre Angot, F-64053 Pau (France)

    2015-04-15

    A new technique for the determination of space charge profiles in insulating polymers is proposed. Based on the evolution of an existing thermal wave technique called Focused Laser Intensity Modulation Method ((F)LIMM), it allows non-contact measurements on thin films exhibiting an internal charge to be studied. An electrostatic model taking into account the new sample-cell geometry proposed was first developed. It has been shown, in particular, that it was theoretically possible to calculate the internal charge from experimental measurements while allowing an evaluation of the air layer appearing between the sample and the electrode when non-contact measurements are performed. These predictions were confirmed by an experimental implementation for two thin polymer samples (25 μm-polyvinylidenefluoride and 50 μm-polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)) used as tests. In these cases, minimum air-layer thickness was determined with an accuracy of 3% and 20%, respectively, depending on the signal-to-noise ratio during the experimental procedure. In order to illustrate the reachable possibilities of this technique, 2D and 3D cartographies of a negative space charge implanted by electron beam within the PTFE test sample were depicted: like in conventional (F)LIMM, a multidimensional representation of a selectively implanted charge remains possible at a few microns depth, but using a non-contacting way of measurement.

  16. Space charge distributions in insulating polymers: A new non-contacting way of measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty-Dessus, D.; Ziani, A. C.; Petre, A.; Berquez, L.

    2015-04-01

    A new technique for the determination of space charge profiles in insulating polymers is proposed. Based on the evolution of an existing thermal wave technique called Focused Laser Intensity Modulation Method ((F)LIMM), it allows non-contact measurements on thin films exhibiting an internal charge to be studied. An electrostatic model taking into account the new sample-cell geometry proposed was first developed. It has been shown, in particular, that it was theoretically possible to calculate the internal charge from experimental measurements while allowing an evaluation of the air layer appearing between the sample and the electrode when non-contact measurements are performed. These predictions were confirmed by an experimental implementation for two thin polymer samples (25 μm-polyvinylidenefluoride and 50 μm-polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)) used as tests. In these cases, minimum air-layer thickness was determined with an accuracy of 3% and 20%, respectively, depending on the signal-to-noise ratio during the experimental procedure. In order to illustrate the reachable possibilities of this technique, 2D and 3D cartographies of a negative space charge implanted by electron beam within the PTFE test sample were depicted: like in conventional (F)LIMM, a multidimensional representation of a selectively implanted charge remains possible at a few microns depth, but using a non-contacting way of measurement.

  17. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium charge-state distributions of 2.0 MeV/u carbon ions passing through carbon foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both equilibrium and non-equilibrium charge-state distributions were studied experimentally for 2.0 MeV/u carbon ions after passing through carbon foils. Measured charge-state distribution established the equilibrium at a target thickness of 10 μg/cm2 and this remained unchanged until a maximum target thickness of 98 μg/cm2. The equilibrium charge-state distribution, the equilibrium mean charge-state, and the width and skewness of the equilibrium distribution were compared with predictions using existing semi-empirical formulae as well as simulation results, including the ETACHA code. It was found that charge-state distributions, mean charge states, and distribution widths for C2+, C3+, and C4+ incident ions merged into quasi-equilibrium values at a target thickness of 5.7 μg/cm2 in the pre-equilibrium region and evolved simultaneously to the ‘real equilibrium’ values for all of the initial charge states, including C5+ and C6+ ions, as previously demonstrated for sulfur projectile ions at the same velocity (Imai et al., 2009). Two kinds of simulation, ETACHA and solution of rate equations taking only single electron transfers into account, were used, and both of them reproduced the measured charge evolution qualitatively. The quasi-equilibrium behavior could be reproduced with the ETACHA code, but not with solution of elementary rate equations

  18. Influence of the vacuum interface on the charge distribution in V 2 O 3 thin films

    KAUST Repository

    Schwingenschlögl, Udo

    2009-09-22

    The electronic structure of V2O3 thin films is studied by means of the augmented spherical wave method as based on density functional theory and the local density approximation. We establish that the effects of charge redistribution, induced by the vacuum interface, in such films are restricted to a very narrow surface layer of ≈15 Å thickness. As a consequence, charge redistribution can be ruled out as a source of the extraordinary thickness dependence of the metal–insulator transition observed in V2O3 thin films of ~100–1000 Å thickness.

  19. Influence of the vacuum interface on the charge distribution in V2O3 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwingenschlögl, U.; Frésard, R.; Eyert, V.

    2009-09-01

    The electronic structure of V2O3 thin films is studied by means of the augmented spherical wave method as based on density functional theory and the local density approximation. We establish that the effects of charge redistribution, induced by the vacuum interface, in such films are restricted to a very narrow surface layer of ≈15 Å thickness. As a consequence, charge redistribution can be ruled out as a source of the extraordinary thickness dependence of the metal-insulator transition observed in V2O3 thin films of ~100-1000 Å thickness.

  20. Heterotrophic bacteria in drinking water distribution system: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Shakhawat

    2012-10-01

    The microbiological quality of drinking water in municipal water distribution systems (WDS) depends on several factors. Free residual chlorine and/or chloramines are typically used to minimize bacterial recontamination and/or regrowth in WDS. Despite such preventive measures, regrowth of heterotrophic (HPC) and opportunistic bacteria in bulk water and biofilms has yet to be controlled completely. No approach has shown complete success in eliminating biofilms or HPC bacteria from bulk water and pipe surfaces. Biofilms can provide shelter for pathogenic bacteria and protect these bacteria from disinfectants. Some HPC bacteria may be associated with aesthetic and non-life threatening diseases. Research to date has achieved important success in understanding occurrence and regrowth of bacteria in bulk water and biofilms in WDS. To achieve comprehensive understanding and to provide efficient control against bacteria regrowth, future research on bacteria regrowth dynamics and their implications is warranted. In this study, a review was performed on the literature published in this area. The findings and limitations of these papers are summarized. Occurrences of bacteria in WDS, factors affecting bacteria regrowth in bulk water and biofilms, bacteria control strategies, sources of nutrients, human health risks from bacterial exposure, modelling of bacteria regrowth and methods of bacteria sampling and detection and quantification are investigated. Advances to date are noted, and future research needs are identified. Finally, research directions are proposed to effectively control HPC and opportunistic bacteria in bulk water and biofilms in WDS. PMID:22076103

  1. Effects of non-Maxwellian electron distributions on charge-state populations in laser-produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of a non-Maxwellian electron distribution on the charge-state populations in a plasma with the distribution characterized by the function f(v)=Fm exp[-(v/vm)m] with 2≤m≤5 are investigated. In the underdense region of a laser produced plasma, the parameter m would depend on the electron temperature, electron density, and the average ionization state of the plasma in addition to the optical laser intensity and wavelength. The ion populations are obtained by solving the rate equations in which the coefficients are evaluated by integrating the cross sections over the non-Maxwellian electron distributions. The scaling of m with column density and optical laser intensity in laser exploding foils is obtained. The effects of a non-Maxwellian electron distribution on the charge-state populations in both selenium and molybdenum foils, similar to those used to model recent x-ray laser experiments, are calculated. The effects on the dominant populations are found to be small, less than a dozen of percents

  2. Beam energy dependence of pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles produced in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC energies

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, Sumit; Datta, Kaustuv

    2016-01-01

    Heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Large Hadron Collider at CERN probe matter at extreme conditions of temperature and energy density. Most of the global properties of the collisions can be extracted from the measurements of charged particle multiplicity and pseudorapidity ($\\eta$) distributions. We have shown that the available experimental data on beam energy and centrality dependence of \\Eta-distributions in heavy-ion (Au+Au or Pb+Pb) collisions from \\sNN=7.7 GeV to 2.76 TeV are reasonably well described by the AMPT model, which is used for further exploration. The nature of the \\Eta-distributions has been described by a double Gaussian function using a set of fit parameters, which exhibit a regular pattern as a function of beam energy. By extrapolating the parameters to a higher energy of \\sNN~=~5.02 TeV, we have obtained the charged particle multiplicity densities, \\Eta-distributions and energy densities for various centralities. Incident...

  3. Charge distribution in scattering off nuclei: A test of the production mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the dual parton model, the absolute value of the charge in the forward hemisphere in collisions of negative particles with nucleons increases with energy. This effect is strongly amplified in collisions with nuclei when the number of struck nucleons increases. It can provide a crucial test of the particle production mechanism. (orig.)

  4. Measurements of the charged-particle distributions with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Lukas, Wolfgang; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Inclusive charged-particle measurements at hadron colliders probe the low-energy non-perturbative region of QCD. The ATLAS collaboration has measured the charged-particle multiplicity and its dependence on transverse momentum and pseudorapidity in special data sets with low LHC beam currents, recorded at center-of-mass energies of 8 TeV and 13 TeV. The new precise measurements at 8 TeV cover a wide spectrum using charged-particle selections with minimum transverse momentum of both 100 MeV and 500 MeV and in various phase space regions of low and high charged particle multiplicities. The measurements at 13 TeV present the first detailed studies with a minimum transverse momentum of 500 MeV and, if available, will be extended to a lower threshold of 100 MeV. The measurements are compared with predictions of various MC generators and are found to provide strong constraints on these.

  5. Testing the Leutwyler-Smilga prediction regarding the global topological charge distribution on the lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I give a sketch of my recent attempt to test the prediction by Leutwyler and Smilga according to which, for QCD in a finite box with Nf ≥ 2, the combination x = VΣm indicates whether the net topological charge of the gauge background proves relevant (x > 1) for physical observables

  6. Distributed Bus Signaling Control for a DC Charging Station with Multi Paralleled Flywheel Energy Storage System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Bo; Dragicevic, Tomislav; Vasquez, Juan Carlos; Guerrero, Josep M.; Savaghebi, Mehdi

    Fast charging stations (FCS) will become an essential part of future transportation systems with an increasing number of electrical vehicles. However, since these FCS plugs have power ratings of up to 100 kW, serious stress caused by large number of FCS could threaten the stability of the main...

  7. Moments of net-charge multiplicity distribution in Au+Au collisions measured by the PHENIX experiment at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Garg, P

    2013-01-01

    Beam Energy Scan (BES) program at RHIC is important to search for the existence of the critical point in the QCD phase diagram. Lattice QCD have shown that the predictions of the susceptibility of the medium formed in heavy-ion collisions can be sensitive to the various moments (mean ($\\mu$) =${}$, variance ($\\sigma^2$) = ${}$, skewness (S) = $\\frac{}{\\sigma^3}$ and kurtosis ($\\kappa$) =$\\frac{}{\\sigma^4} -3$) of conserved quantities like net-baryon number ($\\Delta$B), net-electric charge ($\\Delta$Q) and net-strangeness ($\\Delta$S). Any non-monotonic behavior of the higher moments would confirm the existence of the QCD critical point. The recent results of the higher moments of net-charge multiplicity distributions for Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s}_{NN}$ varying from 7.7 GeV to 200 GeV from the PHENIX experiment at RHIC are presented. The energy and centrality dependence of the higher moments and their products (S$\\sigma$ and $\\kappa\\sigma^{2}$) are shown for the net-charge multiplicity distributions. Further...

  8. Pseudo-rapidity distributions of charged hadrons in pp and pA collisions at the LHC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hong-Min; LIU Jia-Fu; HOU Zhao-Yu; SUN Xian-Jing

    2013-01-01

    In the framework of the Color Glass Condensate,the pseudo-rapidity distributions of charged hadrons in pp and pA collisions at the LHC are studied with the UGD function from the GBW model.With a x2 analysis of the CMS data in pp collisions at √s=0.9,2.36,7 TeV,the normalization factor is obtained and the theoretical results are in good agreement with the experimental data.Then,considering the influence of nucleon hard partons transverse distribution on the number of participants in pA collisions by using a Glauber Monte Carlo method,we also give the predictive results for the multiplicity distributions in pPb collisions at √s=4.4 TeV.

  9. Capacitive RF MEMS switch dielectric charging and reliability: a critical review with recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a comprehensive review of the reliability issues hampering capacitive RF MEMS switches in their development toward commercialization. Dielectric charging and its effects on device behavior are extensively addressed, as well as the application of different dielectric materials, improvements in the mechanical design and the use of advanced actuation waveforms. It is concluded that viable capacitive RF MEMS switches with a great chance of market acceptance preferably have no actuation voltage across a dielectric at all, contrary to the ‘standard’ geometry. This is substantiated by the reliability data of a number of dielectric-less MEMS switch designs. However, a dielectric can be used for the signal itself, resulting in a higher Con/Coff ratio than that one would be able to achieve in a switch without any dielectric. The other reliability issues of these devices are also covered, such as creep, RF-power-related failures and packaging reliability. This paper concludes with a recipe for a conceptual ‘ideal’ switch from a reliability point of view, based on the lessons learned. (paper)

  10. Calculation of Ion Charge State Distributions After Inner-Shell Ionization in Xe Atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vacancy cascades following initial inner-shell vacancies in single and multi-ionized atoms often lead to highly charged residual ions. The inner-shell vacancy produced by ionization processes may decay by either a radiative or non-radiative transition. In addition to the vacancy filling processes, there is an electron shake off process due to the change of core potential of the atom. In the calculation of vacancy cascades, the radiative (x-ray) and non-radiative (Auger and Coster-Kronig) branching ratios give valuable information on the de-excitation dynamics of an atom with inner-shell vacancy. The production of multi-charged ions yield by the Auger cascades following inner shell ionization of an atom has been studied both experimentally and theoretically. Multi-charged Xe ions following de-excitation of K-, L1-, L2,3-, M1-, M2,3- and M4,5 subshell vacancies are calculated using Monte-Carlo algorithm to simulate the vacancy cascade development. Fluorescence yield (radiative) and Auger, Coster- Kronig yield (non- radiative) are evaluated. The decay of K hole state through radiative transitions is found to be more probable than non-radiative transitions in the first step of de-excitation. On the other hand, the decay of L, M vacancies through non-radiative transitions are more probable. The K shell ionization in Xe atom mainly yields Xe7+, Xe8+, Xe9+ and Xe10+ ions, and the charged X8+ ions are the highest. The main product from the L1- shell ionization is found to be Xe8+, Xe9+ ions, while the charged Xe8+ ions predominate at L2,3 hole states. The charged Xe6+, Xe7+ and Xe8+ ions mainly yield from 3s1/2 and 3p1/2,3/2 ionization, while Xe in 3d3/2,5/2 hole states mainly turns into Xe4+ and Xe5+ ions. The present results are found to agree well with the experimental data.

  11. Calculation of Ion Charge State Distributions After Inner-Shell Ionization in Xe Atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vacancy cascades following initial inner-shell vacancies in single and multi-ionized atoms often lead to highly charged residual ions. The inner-shell vacancy produced by ionization processes may decay by either a radiative or non-radiative transition. In addition to the vacancy filling processes, there is an electron shake off process due to the change of core potential of the atom. In the calculation of vacancy cascades, the radiative (x-ray) and non-radiative (Auger and Coster-Kronig) branching ratios give valuable information on the de-excitation dynamics of an atom with inner-shell vacancy. The production of multi-charged ions yield by the Auger cascades following inner shell ionization of an atom has been studied both experimentally and theoretically. Multi-charged Xe ions following de-excitation of K, L1, L2,3, M1, M2,3 and M4,5 subshell vacancies are calculated using Monte-Carlo algorithm to simulate the vacancy cascade development. Fluorescence yield (radiative) and Auger, Coster- Kronig yield (non- radiative) are evaluated. The decay of K hole state through radiative transitions is found to be more probable than non-radiative transitions in the first step of de-excitation. On the other hand, the decay of L, M vacancies through non-radiative transitions are more probable. The K shell ionization in Xe atom mainly yields Xe7+, Xe8+, Xe9+ and Xe10+ ions, and the charged X8+ ions are the highest. The main product from the L1 shell ionization is found to be Xe8+, Xe9+ ions, while the charged Xe8+ ions predominate at L2,3 hole states. The charged Xe6+, Xe7+ and Xe8+ ions mainly yield from 3s1/2 and 3p1/2,3/2 ionization, while Xe in 3d3/2,5/2 hole states mainly turns into Xe4+ and Xe5+ ions. The present results are found to agree well with the experimental data. (author)

  12. Voltage Scheduling Droop Control for State-of-Charge Balance of Distributed Energy Storage in DC Microgrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Chendan; Dragicevic, Tomislav; Aldana, Nelson Leonardo Diaz;

    2014-01-01

    State-of-Charge balance. In this paper, a new droop method based on voltage scheduling for State-of-Charge balance is proposed to keep the SoC balance for the energy storage units. The proposed method has the advantage of avoiding the stability problem existed in traditional methods based on droop gain...... scheduling. Simulation experiment is taken in Matlab on a DC microgrid with two distributed energy storage units. The simulation results show that the proposed method has successfully achieved SoC balance during the load changes while maintaining the DC bus voltage within the allowable range.......Due to higher power quality, lower conversion loss, and more DC loads, there has been an increasing awareness on DC microgrid. Previous emphasis has been on equal power sharing among different units in the DC microgrid, while overlooking the coordination of the energy storage units to maintain the...

  13. Contribution of material’s surface layer on charge state distribution in laser ablation plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To generate laser ablation plasma, a pulse laser is focused onto a solid target making a crater on the surface. However, not all the evaporated material is efficiently converted to hot plasma. Some portion of the evaporated material could be turned to low temperature plasma or just vapor. To investigate the mechanism, we prepared an aluminum target coated by thin carbon layers. Then, we measured the ablation plasma properties with different carbon thicknesses on the aluminum plate. The results showed that C6+ ions were generated only from the surface layer. The deep layers (over 250 nm from the surface) did not provide high charge state ions. On the other hand, low charge state ions were mainly produced by the deeper layers of the target. Atoms deeper than 1000 nm did not contribute to the ablation plasma formation

  14. On the Field of a Spherical Charged Pulsating Distribution of Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavroulakis N.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In the theory of the gravitational field generated by an isotropic spherical mass, the spheres centered at the origin of $R^3$ are non-Euclidean objects, so that each of them possesses a curvature radius distinct from its Euclidean radius. The classical theory suppresses this distinction and consequently leads to inadmissible errors. Specifically, it leads to the false idea that the field of a pulsating source is static. In a number of our previous publications (see references, we have exposed the inevitable role that the curvature radius plays and demonstrated that the field generated by a pulsating not charged spherical course is dynamical. In the present paper we prove that the curvature radius plays also the main role in the description of the gravitational field generated by a charged pulsating source.

  15. Contribution of material’s surface layer on charge state distribution in laser ablation plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumaki, Masafumi, E-mail: rogus@asagi.waseda.jp [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Steski, Dannie; Kanesue, Takeshi [Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Ikeda, Shunsuke [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Kanagawa 226-8503 (Japan); Okamura, Masahiro [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Washio, Masakazu [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    To generate laser ablation plasma, a pulse laser is focused onto a solid target making a crater on the surface. However, not all the evaporated material is efficiently converted to hot plasma. Some portion of the evaporated material could be turned to low temperature plasma or just vapor. To investigate the mechanism, we prepared an aluminum target coated by thin carbon layers. Then, we measured the ablation plasma properties with different carbon thicknesses on the aluminum plate. The results showed that C{sup 6+} ions were generated only from the surface layer. The deep layers (over 250 nm from the surface) did not provide high charge state ions. On the other hand, low charge state ions were mainly produced by the deeper layers of the target. Atoms deeper than 1000 nm did not contribute to the ablation plasma formation.

  16. Landau Level Splittings, Phase Transitions, and Nonuniform Charge Distribution in Trilayer Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Leonardo C.; Taychatanapat, Thiti; Serbyn, Maksym; Surakitbovorn, Kawin; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Abanin, Dmitry A.; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo

    2016-08-01

    We report on magnetotransport studies of dual-gated, Bernal-stacked trilayer graphene (TLG) encapsulated in boron nitride crystals. We observe a quantum Hall effect staircase which indicates a complete lifting of the 12-fold degeneracy of the zeroth Landau level. As a function of perpendicular electric field, our data exhibit a sequence of phase transitions between all integer quantum Hall states in the filling factor interval -8 graphene, the observed Landau level splittings and quantum Hall phase transitions can be understood within a single-particle picture, but imply the presence of a charge density imbalance between the inner and outer layers of TLG, even at charge neutrality and zero transverse electric field. Our results indicate the importance of a previously unaccounted band structure parameter which, together with a more accurate estimate of the other tight-binding parameters, results in a significantly improved determination of the electronic and Landau level structure of TLG.

  17. Charge state distribution of 16O from the 4He(12C,16O)γ reaction of astrophysical interest studied both experimentally and theoretically

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In astrophysics, 4He(12C,16O)γ reaction places an important role. At Kyushu University Tandem accelerator Laboratory (KUTL), the measurement of 4He(12C,16O)γ cross section is in progress in the energy range of astrophysical nuclear reaction. Since the charge state of product 16O ions after passing through the gas target is spread and only one charge state can be measured at terminal detector, it is necessary to know the charge state distribution of 16O ions passing through the He gas target precisely. Here, we report the charge state distribution of the 16O recoils both experimentally and theoretically. Experimentally, we measured the equilibrium charge state distribution of 16O ions in the windowless helium gas target with the beam energy of primary 16O ions at 7.2, 4.5, and 3.45 MeV at KUTL. The measured results showed a Gaussian distribution for the charge state fraction. Theoretically, we proposed a framework for the charge state distribution study. Charge state distribution was computed by solving a set of differential equations including a series of charge exchange cross sections. For the ionization cross section, plane-wave Born approximation was applied and modified by taking target atomic screening as a function of momentum transfer into account. For the capture cross section, continuum distorted wave approximation was applied and the influence of the gas target density was taken into account in the process of electron capture. Using above charge exchange cross sections, the charge state evolution was simulated. According to the equilibrium distribution, we compared the theoretical calculation to the experimental data. After taking into account the density effects in the charge exchange process, the theoretical charge state distributions shows a good agreement with the experimental data. Both experimental and theoretical results are useful to understand the charge fraction of recoil oxygen created via 4He(12C,16O)γ reaction, especially in the energy

  18. DC electric field distribution in planar dielectric in the presence of space charge

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Z; Choo, W.; Chen, G.

    2007-01-01

    Electric field in a dielectric material under dc conditions is determined by conductivity of the material. It is well known that the dc conductivity is a function of both temperature and electric field. This is generally not serious issue for a thinner planar sample as the temperature gradient is not great and the applied field is uniform across the sample. However, in the presence of space charge, electric field will be modified. As a result, the conductivity varies with the position, leadin...

  19. An algorithm for three-dimensional Monte-Carlo simulation of charge distribution at biofunctionalized surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Bulyha, Alena

    2011-01-01

    In this work, a Monte-Carlo algorithm in the constant-voltage ensemble for the calculation of 3d charge concentrations at charged surfaces functionalized with biomolecules is presented. The motivation for this work is the theoretical understanding of biofunctionalized surfaces in nanowire field-effect biosensors (BioFETs). This work provides the simulation capability for the boundary layer that is crucial in the detection mechanism of these sensors; slight changes in the charge concentration in the boundary layer upon binding of analyte molecules modulate the conductance of nanowire transducers. The simulation of biofunctionalized surfaces poses special requirements on the Monte-Carlo simulations and these are addressed by the algorithm. The constant-voltage ensemble enables us to include the right boundary conditions; the dna strands can be rotated with respect to the surface; and several molecules can be placed in a single simulation box to achieve good statistics in the case of low ionic concentrations relevant in experiments. Simulation results are presented for the leading example of surfaces functionalized with pna and with single- and double-stranded dna in a sodium-chloride electrolyte. These quantitative results make it possible to quantify the screening of the biomolecule charge due to the counter-ions around the biomolecules and the electrical double layer. The resulting concentration profiles show a three-layer structure and non-trivial interactions between the electric double layer and the counter-ions. The numerical results are also important as a reference for the development of simpler screening models. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  20. Chiral symmetry and the charge asymmetry of the s bar s distribution in a proton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on a simple K-cloud model, as well as the Gross-Neveu and the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, it is predicted that the s bar s sea in a proton is not charge symmetric at large Bjorken-x. The s quarks are shifted to larger values of xbj than the bar s quarks. Furthermore these large xbj s quarks carry a negative polarization. 9 refs., 2 figs

  1. Chiral symmetry and the charge asymmetry of the s s distribution in a proton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkardt, M.

    1991-05-01

    Based on a simple K-cloud model, as well as the Gross-Neveu and the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, it is predicted that the s{bar s} sea in a proton is not charge symmetric at large Bjorken-x. The s quarks are shifted to larger values of x{sub bj} than the {bar s} quarks. Furthermore these large x{sub bj} s quarks carry a negative polarization. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Spatial distribution of charged particles along the ion-optical axis in electron cyclotron resonance ion sources. Experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental determination of the spatial distribution of charged particles along the ion-optical axis in electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRIS) defines the focus of this thesis. The spatial distributions of different ion species were obtained in the object plane of the bending magnet (∼45 cm downstream from the plasma electrode) and in the plane of the plasma electrode itself, both in high spatial resolution. The results show that each of the different ion species forms a bloated, triangular structure in the aperture of the plasma electrode. The geometry and the orientation of these structures are defined by the superposition of the radial and axial magnetic fields. The radial extent of each structure is defined by the charge of the ion. Higher charge states occupy smaller, more concentrated structures. The total current density increases towards the center of the plasma electrode. The circular and star-like structures that can be observed in the beam profiles of strongly focused, extracted ion beams are each dominated by ions of a single charge state. In addition, the spatially resolved current density distribution of charged particles in the plasma chamber that impinge on the plasma electrode was determined, differentiating between ions and electrons. The experimental results of this work show that the electrons of the plasma are strongly connected to the magnetic field lines in the source and thus spatially well confined in a triangular-like structure. The intensity of the electrons increases towards the center of the plasma electrode and the plasma chamber, as well. These electrons are surrounded by a spatially far less confined and less intense ion population. All the findings mentioned above were already predicted in parts by simulations of different groups. However, the results presented within this thesis represent the first (and by now only) direct experimental verification of those predictions and are qualitatively transferable to other

  3. Spatial distribution of charged particles along the ion-optical axis in electron cyclotron resonance ion sources. Experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panitzsch, Lauri

    2013-02-08

    The experimental determination of the spatial distribution of charged particles along the ion-optical axis in electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRIS) defines the focus of this thesis. The spatial distributions of different ion species were obtained in the object plane of the bending magnet ({approx}45 cm downstream from the plasma electrode) and in the plane of the plasma electrode itself, both in high spatial resolution. The results show that each of the different ion species forms a bloated, triangular structure in the aperture of the plasma electrode. The geometry and the orientation of these structures are defined by the superposition of the radial and axial magnetic fields. The radial extent of each structure is defined by the charge of the ion. Higher charge states occupy smaller, more concentrated structures. The total current density increases towards the center of the plasma electrode. The circular and star-like structures that can be observed in the beam profiles of strongly focused, extracted ion beams are each dominated by ions of a single charge state. In addition, the spatially resolved current density distribution of charged particles in the plasma chamber that impinge on the plasma electrode was determined, differentiating between ions and electrons. The experimental results of this work show that the electrons of the plasma are strongly connected to the magnetic field lines in the source and thus spatially well confined in a triangular-like structure. The intensity of the electrons increases towards the center of the plasma electrode and the plasma chamber, as well. These electrons are surrounded by a spatially far less confined and less intense ion population. All the findings mentioned above were already predicted in parts by simulations of different groups. However, the results presented within this thesis represent the first (and by now only) direct experimental verification of those predictions and are qualitatively transferable to

  4. Charged-particle pseudorapidity distributions in Au+Au collisions at sNN=62.4 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Hauer, M.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Khan, N.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Reed, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Sagerer, J.; Seals, H.; Sedykh, I.; Smith, C. E.; Stankiewicz, M. A.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; Nieuwenhuizen, G. J. Van; Vaurynovich, S. S.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wenger, E.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wysłouch, B.

    2006-08-01

    The charged-particle pseudorapidity density for Au+Au collisions at sNN=62.4 GeV has been measured over a wide range of impact parameters and compared to results obtained at other energies. As a function of collision energy, the pseudorapidity distribution grows systematically both in height and width. The midrapidity density is found to grow approximately logarithmically between BNL Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) energies and the top BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) energy. There is also an approximate factorization of the centrality and energy dependence of the midrapidity yields. The new results at sNN=62.4 GeV confirm the previously observed phenomenon of “extended longitudinal scaling” in the pseudorapidity distributions when viewed in the rest frame of one of the colliding nuclei. It is also found that the evolution of the shape of the distribution with centrality is energy independent, when viewed in this reference frame. As a function of centrality, the total charged particle multiplicity scales linearly with the number of participant pairs as it was observed at other energies.

  5. Implementation of Data Integration using Distributed Systems: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Rakesh Jaitly

    2011-01-01

    Data integration in the distributed data system is introduced to solve the problem that data model has. The data integration in the distributional systems can be supported effectively. Data conversion is still a challenge in distributed system integration.Community based system is used for distributed data integration. It comprises of three elements: community, data model and communication protocol. The integration system solves the data heterogeneous problem in production management, making ...

  6. The reaction current distribution in battery electrode materials revealed by XPS-based state-of-charge mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearse, Alexander J; Gillette, Eleanor; Lee, Sang Bok; Rubloff, Gary W

    2016-07-28

    Morphologically complex electrochemical systems such as composite or nanostructured lithium ion battery electrodes exhibit spatially inhomogeneous internal current distributions, particularly when driven at high total currents, due to resistances in the electrodes and electrolyte, distributions of diffusion path lengths, and nonlinear current-voltage characteristics. Measuring and controlling these distributions is interesting from both an engineering standpoint, as nonhomogenous currents lead to lower utilization of electrode material, as well as from a fundamental standpoint, as comparisons between theory and experiment are relatively scarce. Here we describe a new approach using a deliberately simple model battery electrode to examine the current distribution in a electrode material limited by poor electronic conductivity. We utilize quantitative spatially resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to measure the spatial distribution of the state-of-charge of a V2O5 model electrode as a proxy measure for the current distribution on electrodes discharged at varying current densities. We show that the current at the electrode-electrolyte interface falls off with distance from the current collector, and that the current distribution is a strong function of total current. We compare the observed distributions with a simple analytical model which reproduces the dependence of the distribution on total current, but fails to predict the correct length scale. A more complete numerical simulation suggests that dynamic changes in the electronic conductivity of the V2O5 concurrent with lithium insertion may contribute to the differences between theory and experiment. Our observations should help inform design criteria for future electrode architectures. PMID:27357533

  7. Application of signal processing techniques for islanding detection of distributed generation in distribution network: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Pros & cons of conventional islanding detection techniques (IDTs) are discussed. • Signal processing techniques (SPTs) ability in detecting islanding is discussed. • SPTs ability in improving performance of passive techniques are discussed. • Fourier, s-transform, wavelet, HHT & tt-transform based IDTs are reviewed. • Intelligent classifiers (ANN, ANFIS, Fuzzy, SVM) application in SPT are discussed. - Abstract: High penetration of distributed generation resources (DGR) in distribution network provides many benefits in terms of high power quality, efficiency, and low carbon emissions in power system. However, efficient islanding detection and immediate disconnection of DGR is critical in order to avoid equipment damage, grid protection interference, and personnel safety hazards. Islanding detection techniques are mainly classified into remote, passive, active, and hybrid techniques. From these, passive techniques are more advantageous due to lower power quality degradation, lower cost, and widespread usage by power utilities. However, the main limitations of these techniques are that they possess a large non detection zones and require threshold setting. Various signal processing techniques and intelligent classifiers have been used to overcome the limitations of passive islanding. Signal processing techniques, in particular, are adopted due to their versatility, stability, cost effectiveness, and ease of modification. This paper presents a comprehensive overview of signal processing techniques used to improve common passive islanding detection techniques. A performance comparison between the signal processing based islanding detection techniques with existing techniques are also provided. Finally, this paper outlines the relative advantages and limitations of the signal processing techniques in order to provide basic guidelines for researchers and field engineers in determining the best method for their system

  8. Multiagent Based Distributed Control for State-of-Charge Balance of Distributed Energy Storage in DC microgrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Chendan; Dragicevic, Tomislav; Garcia Plaza, Manuel;

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a distributed multiagent based algorithm is proposed to achieve SoC balance for DES in the DC microgrid by means of voltage scheduling. Reference voltage given is adjusted instead of droop gain. Dynamic average consensus algorithm is explored in each agent to get the required...... information for scheduling voltage autonomously. State-space analysis on a single energy storage unit and simulation verification shows that the proposed method has two advantages. Firstly, modifying the reference voltage given has less impact on system stability compared to gain scheduling. Secondly, by...

  9. Recent progress on the $h^{q,\\bar q}_1(x,Q^2)$ Distributions and the Nucleon Tensor Charges

    OpenAIRE

    Soffer, J.

    1997-01-01

    We recall the definitions and the basic properties of the transversity distributions $h^{q,\\bar q}_1(x,Q^2)$ and the corresponding nucleon tensor charges $\\delta q(Q^2)$. We briefly comment on different estimates from several phenomenological models and on the future possible measurements with the polarized $pp$ collider at RHIC-BNL. Recent works on the $Q^2$-evolution of $h^{q,\\bar q}_1(x,Q^2)$ are also discussed and their implications on a very useful positivity bound.

  10. Azimuthal distributions of charged hadrons, pions, and kaons produced in deep-inelastic scattering off unpolarized protons and deuterons

    CERN Document Server

    Airapetian, A; Akopov, Z; Aschenauer, E C; Augustyniak, W; Avakian, R; Avetissian, A; Avetisyan, E; Belostotski, S; Blok, H P; Borissov, A; Bowles, J; Bryzgalov, V; Burns, J; Capiluppi, M; Capitani, G P; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, P F; Deconinck, W; De Leo, R; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; Diefenthaler, M; Di Nezza, P; Düren, M; Elbakian, G; Ellinghaus, F; Fantoni, A; Felawka, L; Frullani, S; Gapienko, G; Gapienko, V; Garibaldi, F; Gavrilov, G; Gharibyan, V; Giordano, F; Gliske, S; Golembiovskaya, M; Hadjidakis, C; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Hillenbrand, A; Hoek, M; Holler, Y; Hristova, I; Imazu, Y; Ivanilov, A; Jackson, H E; Jo, H S; Joosten, S; Kaiser, R; Karyan, G; Keri, T; Kinney, E; Kisselev, A; Korotkov, V; Kozlov, V; Kravchenko, P; Krivokhijine, V G; Lagamba, L; Lapikás, L; Lehmann, I; Lenisa, P; Ruiz, A López; Lorenzon, W; Ma, B -Q; Mahon, D; Makins, N C R; Manaenkov, S I; Manfré, L; Mao, Y; Marianski, B; de la Ossa, A Martinez; Marukyan, H; Miller, C A; Miyachi, Y; Movsisyan, A; Murray, M; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Y; Nass, A; Negodaev, M; Nowak, W -D; Pappalardo, L L; Perez-Benito, R; Petrosyan, A; Raithel, M; Reimer, P E; Reolon, A R; Riedl, C; Rith, K; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, A; Rubin, J; Ryckbosch, D; Salomatin, Y; Sanftl, F; Schäfer, A; Schnell, G; Schüler, K P; Seitz, B; Shibata, T -A; Stancari, M; Statera, M; Steijger, J J M; Stewart, J; Stinzing, F; Terkulov, A; Truty, R; Trzcinski, A; Tytgat, M; Vandenbroucke, A; Van Haarlem, Y; Van Hulse, C; Veretennikov, D; Vikhrov, V; Vilardi, I; Wang, S; Yaschenko, S; Ye, Z; Yen, S; Yu, W; Zagrebelnyy, V; Zeiler, D; Zihlmann, B; Zupranski, P

    2012-01-01

    The azimuthal cos{\\phi} and cos2{\\phi} modulations of the distribution of hadrons produced in unpolarized semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of electrons and positrons off hydrogen and deuterium targets have been measured in the HERMES experiment. For the first time these modulations were determined in a four-dimensional kinematic space for positively and negatively charged pions and kaons separately, as well as for unidentified hadrons. These azimuthal dependences are sensitive to the transverse motion and polarization of the quarks within the nucleon via, e.g., the Cahn, Boer-Mulders and Collins effects.

  11. Azimuthal distributions of charged hadrons, pions, and kaons produced in deep-inelastic scattering off unpolarized protons and deuterons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetian, A. [Giessen Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Randall Laboratory of Physics; Akopov, N. [Yerevan Physics Institute (Armenia); Akopov, Z. [DESY Hamburg (DE)] (and others)

    2012-04-15

    The azimuthal cos {phi} and cos 2{phi} modulations of the distribution of hadrons produced in unpolarized semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of electrons and positrons off hydrogen and deuterium targets have been measured in the Hermes experiment. For the first time these modulations were determined in a four-dimensional kinematic space for positively and negatively charged pions and kaons separately, as well as for unidentified hadrons. These azimuthal dependences are sensitive to the transverse motion and polarization of the quarks within the nucleon via, e.g., the Cahn, Boer-Mulders and Collins effects.

  12. Systematics of radii and nuclear charge distributions deduced from elastic electron scattering, muonic X-ray and optical isotope shift measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Emrich, H J; Höhn, M; Kaser, K; Mallot, M; Miska, H; Robert-Tissot, B; Rychel, D; Schaller, L; Schellenberg, L; Schneuwly, H; Shera, B; Sieberling, H G; Steffen, R; Wohlfahrt, H D; Yamazaki, Y

    1981-01-01

    The nuclear charge distribution and nuclear charge distribution differences have been investigated by 350 MeV elastic electron scattering at the Institut fur Kernphysik, Universitat Mainz. Muonic X-ray measurements yield complementary information to electron scattering results. Both experimental data are analysed in an almost model independent way. Muonic X-ray measurements have been performed for the region /sup 40/Ca up to /sup 100/Mo. (18 refs).

  13. Genaralised Study of the Formfunction on a Modified Multi-Tubular Charge with Holes Symmetrically Distributed in A 2-Dimensional Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girraj Prasad

    1969-10-01

    Full Text Available The formfunction of a modified multi-tubular charge with holes symmetrically distributed in a 2-dimensional space has been studied. A general expression for the formfunction and the ratio S/So has been obtainedfrom which formfunction for distributions of holes about 3-fold, 4-fold and 6-fold axes have been derived. The charge has been so modified that the burning is complete at the end of the first phase of combustion.

  14. Charge recombination in distributed heterostructures of semiconductor discotic and polymeric materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jenny; Archer, Robert; Redding, Tim; Foden, Clare; Tant, Julien; Geerts, Yves; Friend, Richard H.; Silva, Carlos

    2008-06-01

    Control of microstructure and energetics at heterojunctions in organic semiconductors is central to achieve high light-emitting or photovoltaic device efficiency. We report the observation of an emissive exciplex formed between an electron-accepting discotic material (hexaazatrinaphthylene or HATNA-SC12) and a hole accepting conjugated polymer {poly[9,9- dioctylfluorene-co-N-(4-butylphenyl)diphenylamine] or TFB}. In contrast to polymer-polymer systems, we find here that the exciplex is strongly localized at the interface, acting as an energy bottleneck with inefficient transfer to bulk exciton states and with low yield of charge separation.

  15. Energy dependence of the transverse momentum distributions of charged particles in pp collisions measured by ALICE

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, Dagmar; Bielčíková, Jana; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kushpil, Vasilij; Mareš, Jiří A.; Šumbera, Michal; Vajzer, Michal; Závada, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 12 (2013), s. 1-12. ISSN 1434-6044 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG13031 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : energy dependence * transverse momentum * momentum spectrum * charged particle * p p * scattering Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics; BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders (UJF-V) Impact factor: 5.436, year: 2013 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1140%2Fepjc%2Fs10052-013-2662-9

  16. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions by inducing energy conservation and distributed generation from elimination of electric utility customer charges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper quantifies the increased greenhouse gas emissions and negative effect on energy conservation (or 'efficiency penalty') due to electric rate structures that employ an unavoidable customer charge. First, the extent of customer charges was determined from a nationwide survey of US electric tariffs. To eliminate the customer charge nationally while maintaining a fixed sum for electric companies for a given amount of electricity, an increase of 7.12% in the residential electrical rate was found to be necessary. If enacted, this increase in the electric rate would result in a 6.4% reduction in overall electricity consumption, conserving 73 billion kW h, eliminating 44.3 million metric tons of carbon dioxide, and saving the entire US residential sector over $8 billion per year. As shown here, these reductions would come from increased avoidable costs, thus leveraging an increased rate of return on investments in energy efficiency, energy conservation behavior, distributed energy generation, and fuel choices. Finally, limitations of this study and analysis are discussed and conclusions are drawn for proposed energy policy changes

  17. Fragment distribution of thermal decomposition for lignin monomer by QMD calculations using the excited and charged model molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, Kazunaka [Department of Chemistry (Faculty of Science), Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kakumamachi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan)], E-mail: endo@wriron1.s.kanazawa-u.ac.jp; Matsumoto, Daisuke; Kato, Kenichi; Takagi, Yusuke; Ida, Tomonori; Mizuno, Motohiro [Department of Chemistry (Faculty of Science), Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kakumamachi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Saito, Kaori; Fukushima, Kazuhiko [Graduate School of Bioagricultural Sciences and Technical Center, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Kato, Nobuhiko [Applied Physics, Seikei University, Musashino-city, Tokyo 180-8633 (Japan)

    2008-12-15

    Simulations with a quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) method (MD with MO) were demonstrated on the thermal decomposition of lignin monomer at the ground state including excited and positive charged states. Geometry and energy optimized results of the lignin monomer at the singlet and triplet states in single excitation, and at (+2) positive charged state by semi-empirical AM1 MO calculations were used as the initial MD step of QMD calculations. In the QMD calculations, we controlled the total energy of the system using Nose-Hoover thermostats in the total energy range of 0.69-0.95 eV, and the sampling position data with a time step of 0.5 fs were carried out up to 5000 steps at 50 different initial conditions. The calculated neutral, positive and negative charged fragment distributions of the monomer model with 0.82 eV energy control were obtained as 90.6, 3.5, and 5.9% to the total fragments, respectively. The ratios seem to correspond well with to the values observed experimentally in SIMS.

  18. Reinvestigation of the charge density distribution in arc discharge fusion system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Lin Horng; Yee, Lee Kim; Nan, Phua Yeong; Thung, Yong Yun; Khok, Yong Thian; Rahman, Faidz Abd [Centre of Photonics and Advance Material, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-04-24

    A continual arc discharge system has been setup and the light intensity of arc discharge has been profiled. The mathematical model of local energy density distribution in arc discharge fusion has been simulated which is in good qualitative agreement with light intensity profile of arc discharge in the experiments. Eventually, the local energy density distribution of arc discharge system is able to be precisely manipulated to act as heat source in the fabrication of fused fiber devices.

  19. Discolouration in potable water distribution systems: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vreeburg, J H G; Boxall, J B

    2007-02-01

    A large proportion of the customer contacts that drinking water supply companies receive stem from the occurrence of discoloured water. Currently, such complaints are dealt with in a reactive manner. However, water companies are being driven to implement planned activities to control discolouration prior to contacts occurring. Hence improved understanding of the dominant processes and predictive and management tools are needed. The material responsible for discolouration has a variety of origins and a range of processes and mechanisms may be associated with its accumulation within distribution systems. Irrespective of material origins, accumulation processes and mechanisms, discolouration events occur as a result of systems changes leading to mobilisation of the accumulations from within the network. Despite this conceptual understanding, there are very few published practicable tools and techniques available to aid water companies in the planned management and control of discolouration problems. Two recently developed and published, but different approaches to address this are reviewed here: the PODDS model which was developed to predict levels of turbidity as a result of change in hydraulic conditions, but which is semi-empirical and requires calibration; and the resuspension potential method which was developed to directly measure discolouration resulting from a controlled change in hydraulic conditions, providing a direct assessment of discolouration risk, although intrinsically requiring the limited generation of discoloured water within a live network. Both these methods support decision making on the need for maintenance operations. While risk evaluation and implementation of appropriate maintenance can be implemented to control discolouration risk, new material will continue to accumulate and hence an ongoing programme of maintenance is required. One sustainable measure to prevent such re-accumulation of material is the adoption of a self-cleaning threshold

  20. Review of modular power converters solutions for smart transformer in distribution system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alzola, Rafael Pena; Gohil, Ghanshyamsinh Vijaysinh; Mathe, Laszlo; Liserre, Marco; Blaabjerg, Frede

    While the use of power electronics based Smart Transformer (ST) is becoming a reality in traction applications, and it has been considered as an interesting option for interfacing different transmission systems, the possibility to use it in distribution systems is still considered futuristic....... Replacing primary distribution transformers with ST can lead to more flexible handling of the distribution feeders, while replacing secondary distribution transformers can allow decoupling of distribution network. This paper reviews different power converter solutions for the ST focusing on modularity...

  1. Effect of the partial charge distributions in the ZIF-8 framework on the adsorption of CO2 as assessed by Gibbs Ensemble Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puphasuk, P.; Remsungnen, T.

    2016-03-01

    The effect of the partial charge distributions on the adsorption of CO2 molecules in ZIF-8 framework has been obtained using GEMC simulations. The charge models are derived from the ab initio electrostatic potential surfaces of framework fragments. The signs of the atomic charges obtained with the MK model are more consistent with respect to the basis set than those obtained from the other models. The charges on the H1 and H2 atoms are found to have a notable effect on the amount of absorbed CO2, in agreement with a previous mention that these hydrogen sites are the favored absorption sites.

  2. State-of-Charge Balance Using Adaptive Droop Control for Distributed Energy Storage Systems in DC MicroGrid Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Xiaonan; Sun, Kai; Guerrero, Josep M.; Vasquez, Juan Carlos; Huang, Lipei

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the coordinated control of distributed energy storage systems (DESSs) in DC micro-grids. In order to balance the state-of-charge (SoC) of each energy storage unit (ESU), an SoC-based adaptive droop control method is proposed. In this decentralized control method, the droop...... between each ESU gradually becomes smaller and finally the load power is equally shared between the distributed ESUs. Meanwhile, the load sharing speed can be adjusted by changing the exponent of SoC in the adaptive droop control. The model of SoC-based adaptive droop control system is established and the...... system stability is thereby analyzed by using this model. Simulation and experimental results from a 2×2.2 kW parallel converter system are presented in order to validate the proposed approach....

  3. Pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles in Pb–Pb collisions at super proton synchrotron energies from the NA50 experiment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Marek Idzik; M C Abreu; B Alessandro; C Alexa; R Arnaldi; M Atayan; C Baglin; A Baldit; M Bedjidian; S Beolè; V Boldea; P Bordalo; G Borges; A Bussière; L Capelli; C Castanier; J Castor; B Chaurand; I Chevrot; B Cheynis; E Chiavassa; C Cicalò; T Claudino; M P Comets; N Constans; S Constantinescu; P Cortese; A De Falco; N De Marco; G Dellacasa; A Devaux; S Dita; O Drapier; L Ducroux; B Espagnon; J Fargeix; P Force; M Gallio; Y K Gavrilov; C Gerschel; P Giubellino; M B Golubeva; M Gonin; A A Grigorian; S Grigorian; J Y Grossiord; F F Guber; A Guichard; H Gulkanyan; R Hakobyan; R Haroutunian; M Idzik; D Jouan; T L Karavitcheva; L Kluberg; A B Kurepin; Y Le Bornee; C Lourenço; P Macciotta; M Mac Cormick; A Marzari-Chiesa; M Masera; A Masoni; M Monteno; A Musso; P Petiau; A Piccotti; J R Pizzi; W L Prado da Silva; F Prino; G Puddu; C Quintans; L Ramello; S Ramos; P Rato Mendes; L Riccati; A Romana; H Santos; P Saturnini; E Scalas; E Scomparin; S Serci; R Shahoyan; F Sigaudo; S Silva; M Sitta; P Sonderegger; X Tarrago; N S Topilskaya; G L Usai; E Vercellin; L Villatte; N Willis; NA50 Collaboration

    2003-05-01

    We present the measurements of charged particle pseudorapidity distributions dch/d performed by the NA50 experiment in Pb–Pb collisions at the CERN SPS. Measurements were done at incident energies of 40 GeV ($\\sqrt{s}=8.77$ GeV) and 158 GeV ($\\sqrt{s}=17.3$ GeV) per nucleon over a broad impact parameter range. The multiplicity distributions are studied as a function of centrality using the number of participating nucleons (part), or the number of binary nucleon–nucleon collisions (coll). Their values at midrapidity exhibit a linear scaling with part at both energies. Particle yield increases approximately by a factor of 2 between $\\sqrt{s}=8.77$ GeV and $\\sqrt{s}=17.3$ GeV.

  4. Hydrodynamic description for the pseudorapidity distributions of the charged particles produced in nucleus + nucleus collisions at high energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By using the revised Landau hydrodynamic model and taking into account the effect of leading particles, we discuss the pseudorapidity distributions of the charged particles produced in high energy heavy-ion collisions. The leading particles are assumed to have the rapidity distributions with Gaussian forms with the normalization constant being equal to the number of participants, which can be figured out in theory. The results from the revised Landau hydrodynamic model, together with the contributions from leading particles, were found to be consistent with the experimental data obtained by the PHOBOS Collaboration on RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) at BNL (Brookhaven National Laboratory) in different centrality Cu + Cu and Au + Au collisions at high energies.

  5. Transverse momentum and transverse mass distributions of charged hadrons produced in Au-Au collisions at high energies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Fu-Hu

    2008-01-01

    The transverse momentum distribution and the transverse mass distribution of charged hadrons produced in nucleus-nucleus collisions at high energies are described by using a two-cylinder model. The results calculated by the model are compared and found to be in agreement with the experimental data of the STAR and E895 Collaborations, measured in Au-Au collisions at the relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and alternating-gradient synchrotron (AGS) energies, respectively. In the energy range concerned, the excitation degree of emission source close to the central axis of cylinders increases obviously with the collision centrality and incident energy increasing, but it does not show any obvious change with the increase of the (pseudo) rapidity in central collisions. The excitation degree of emission source close to the side-surface of cylinders does not show any obvious change with the collision centrality, the (pseudo) rapidity, and the incident energy increasing.

  6. Molecular dynamics studies on the NMR structures of rabbit prion protein wild-type and mutants: surface electrostatic charge distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jiapu

    2014-01-01

    Prion is a misfolded protein found in mammals that causes infectious diseases of the nervous system in humans and animals. Prion diseases are invariably fatal and highly infectious neurodegenerative diseases that affect a wide variety of mammalian species such as sheep and goats, cattle, deer, elk and humans etc. Recent studies have shown that rabbits have a low susceptibility to be infected by prion diseases with respect to other animals including humans. The present study employs molecular dynamics (MD) means to unravel the mechanism of rabbit prion proteins (RaPrPC) based on the recently available rabbit NMR structures (of the wild-type and its two mutants of two surface residues). The electrostatic charge distributions on the protein surface are the focus when analysing the MD trajectories. It is found that we can conclude that surface electrostatic charge distributions indeed contribute to the structural stability of wild-type RaPrPC; this may be useful for the medicinal treatment of prion diseases.

  7. Beam Energy Dependence of Moments of the Net-Charge Multiplicity Distributions in Au +Au Collisions at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Banerjee, A.; Barnovska, Z.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Grosnick, D.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hajkova, O.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lima, L. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Oliveira, R. A. N.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandacz, A.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; deSouza, U. G.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2014-08-01

    We report the first measurements of the moments—mean (M), variance (σ2), skewness (S), and kurtosis (κ)—of the net-charge multiplicity distributions at midrapidity in Au +Au collisions at seven energies, ranging from √sNN =7.7 to 200 GeV, as a part of the Beam Energy Scan program at RHIC. The moments are related to the thermodynamic susceptibilities of net charge, and are sensitive to the location of the QCD critical point. We compare the products of the moments, σ2/M, Sσ, and κσ2, with the expectations from Poisson and negative binomial distributions (NBDs). The Sσ values deviate from the Poisson baseline and are close to the NBD baseline, while the κσ2 values tend to lie between the two. Within the present uncertainties, our data do not show nonmonotonic behavior as a function of collision energy. These measurements provide a valuable tool to extract the freeze-out parameters in heavy-ion collisions by comparing with theoretical models.

  8. Book Review: Screen Distribution and the New King Kongs of the Online World

    OpenAIRE

    Bradley Decker

    2014-01-01

    A short review of the 2013 book, Screen Distribution and the New King Kongs of the Online World, a succinct publication which explores the impact of new methods of media distribution, from their inception in the 1990’s, to the current climate of both legitimate and illegitimate streaming sources, and offers a framework within which to research future developments in the industry of online distribution. The review concludes with a brief critique and recommendations for those who may intend to ...

  9. Isotopic and velocity distributions of 83Bi produced in charge-pickup reactions of 20882PB at 1 A GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotopically resolved cross sections and velocity distributions have been measured in charge-pickup reactions of 1 A GeV 208Pb with proton, deuterium and titanium target. The total and partial charge-pickup cross sections in the reactions 208Pb + 1H and 208Pb + 2H are measured to be the same in the limits of the error bars. A weak increase in the total charge-pickup cross section is seen in the reaction of 208Pb with the titanium target. The measured velocity distributions show different contributions - quasi-elastic scattering and Δ-resonance excitation - to the charge-pickup production. Data on total and partial charge-pickup cross sections from these three reactions are compared with other existing data and also with model calculations based on the coupling of different intra-nuclear cascade codes and an evaporation code. (orig.)

  10. Effect of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles on space charge distribution in propylene carbonate under impulse voltage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sima, Wenxia, E-mail: cqsmwx@cqu.edu.cn; Song, He; Yang, Qing; Guo, Hongda; Chen, Qiulin [State Key Laboratory of Power Transmission Equipment and System Security and New Technology, Chongqing University, Shapingba, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Addition of nanoparticles of the ferromagnetic material Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} can increase the positive impulse breakdown voltage of propylene carbonate by 11.65%. To further investigate the effect of ferromagnetic nanoparticles on the space charge distribution in the discharge process, the present work set up a Kerr electro-optic field mapping measurement system using an array photodetector to carry out time-continuous measurement of the electric field and space charge distribution in propylene carbonate before and after modification. Test results show that fast electrons can be captured by Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles and converted into relatively slow, negatively charged particles, inhibiting the generation and transportation of the space charge, especially the negative space charge.

  11. Invited Review Article: Contemporary instrumentation and application of charge exchange neutral particle diagnostics in magnetic fusion energy experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview of the developments postcirca 1980s in the instrumentation and application of charge exchange neutral particle diagnostics on magnetic fusion energy experiments is presented. First, spectrometers that employ only electric fields and hence provide ion energy resolution but not mass resolution are discussed. Next, spectrometers that use various geometrical combinations of both electric and magnetic fields to provide both energy and mass resolutions are reviewed. Finally, neutral particle diagnostics based on utilization of time-of-flight techniques are presented

  12. Charge state distributions of oxygen and carbon in the energy range 1 to 300 keV/e observed with AMPTE/CCE in the magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremser, G.; Stuedemann, W.; Wilken, B.; Gloeckler, G.; Hamilton, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    Observations of charge state distributions of oxygen and carbon are presented that were obtained with the charge-energy-mass spectrometer onboard the AMPTE/CCE spacecraft. Data were selected for two different local time sectors (apogee at 1300 LT and 0300 LT, respectively), three L-ranges (4-6, 6-8, and greater than 8), and quiet to moderately disturbed days (Kp less than or equal to 4). The charge state distributions reveal the existence of all charge states of oxygen and carbon in the magnetosphere. The relative importance of the different charge states strongly depends on L and much less on local time. The observations confirm that the solar wind and the ionosphere contribute to the oxygen population, whereas carbon only originates from the solar wind. The L-dependence of the charge state distributions can be interpreted in terms of these different ion sources and of charge exchange and diffusion processes that largely influence the distribution of oxygen and carbon in the magnetosphere.

  13. Flywheel-Based Distributed Bus Signalling Strategy for the Public Fast Charging Station

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragicevic, Tomislav; Sucic, Stepjan; Vasquez, Juan Carlos;

    2014-01-01

    Fast charging stations (FCS) are able to recharge plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (pHEVs) in less than half an hour, thus representing an appealing concept to vehicle owners since the off-road time is similar as for refuelling at conventional public gas stations. However, since these FCS plugs...... have power ratings of up to 100 kW, they may expose the utility mains to intolerable stresses in the near future scenario where there will be a large number of public FCS spread across the network. This paper proposes an internal power balancing strategy for FCS based on flywheel energy storage system...... layer affect the stability features of the system, a reduced order small-signal model has been assembled and parameters have been selected accordingly. Finally, real-time simulation results performed on a full scale model have been reported in order to verify the validity of proposed approach....

  14. Dose distribution of secondary charged particles in multilayer samples irradiated by gamma quanta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The calculations of the absorbed dose from secondary electrons and positrons are performed for the fiber light pipe irradiated by gamma-quanta in the energy range 0.2-10 MeV. The light pipe comprises the cylindrical quartz glass layer surrounded by the light-reflective silicone coating. The transmission of gamma-quanta through the light pipe is considered for the cases of two protective shells and without ones. The calculations of the absorbed dose in the light pipe is carried out by means of the FORTRAN program based on the Monte Carlo method. It is shown that the dose of secondary charged particles (mainly electrons) in the light pipe depends significantly on the energy of primary gamma-quanta and increases considerably with protective polymeric shells

  15. Energy Dependence of the Transverse Momentum Distributions of Charged Particles in pp Collisions Measured by ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Abelev, Betty Bezverkhny; Adamova, Dagmar; Adare, Andrew Marshall; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agocs, Andras Gabor; Agostinelli, Andrea; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Nazeer; Ahmad, Arshad; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ahn, Sul-Ah; Ahn, Sang Un; Aimo, Ilaria; Aiola, Salvatore; Ajaz, Muhammad; Akindinov, Alexander; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alexandre, Didier; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altini, Valerio; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anielski, Jonas; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arbor, Nicolas; Arcelli, Silvia; Armesto Perez, Nestor; Arnaldi, Roberta; Aronsson, Tomas; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Awes, Terry; Aysto, Juha Heikki Eskeli; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Bach, Matthias Jakob; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Ban, Jaroslav; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Baumann, Christoph Heinrich; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont Moreno, Ernesto; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bergognon, Anais Annick Erica; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blanco, Fernando; Blanco, Francesco; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Bock, Friederike; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Bogolyubskiy, Mikhail; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian Heinz; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Bornschein, Joerg; Botje, Michiel; Botta, Elena; Boettger, Stefan; Braidot, Ermes; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Broker, Theo Alexander; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brun, Rene; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Caliva, Alberto; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Canoa Roman, Veronica; Cara Romeo, Giovanni; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carminati, Federico; Casanova Diaz, Amaya Ofelia; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Catanescu, Vasile Ioan; Cavicchioli, Costanza; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan Valeriev; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Dobrigkeit Chinellato, David; Chochula, Peter; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Colamaria, Fabio Filippo; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Colocci, Manuel; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa Del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contin, Giacomo; Contreras Nuno, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortese, Pietro; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Albino, Rigoberto; Cuautle Flores, Eleazar; Cunqueiro Mendez, Leticia; Dainese, Andrea; Dang, Ruina; Danu, Andrea; Das, Kushal; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; Delagrange, Hugues; Deloff, Andrzej; Denes, Ervin Sandor; Deppman, Airton; Oliveira Valeriano De Barros, Gabriel; De Caro, Annalisa; De Cataldo, Giacinto; De Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; De Rooij, Raoul Stefan; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Divia, Roberto; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Giglio, Carmelo; Di Liberto, Sergio; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Dobrowolski, Tadeusz Antoni; Doenigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Dutt Mazumder, Abhee Kanti; D'Erasmo, Ginevra; Elia, Domenico; Emschermann, David Philip; Engel, Heiko; Erazmus, Barbara Ewa; Erdal, Hege Austrheim; Eschweiler, Dominic; Espagnon, Bruno; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Evans, David; Evdokimov, Sergey; Eyyubova, Gyulnara; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Falchieri, Davide; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Fehlker, Dominik; Feldkamp, Linus; Felea, Daniel; Feliciello, Alessandro; Feofilov, Grigory; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Figiel, Jan; Araujo Silva Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Floratos, Emmanouil; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoeje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago Medina, Alberto Martin; Gallio, Mauro; Gangadharan, Dhevan Raja; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Garabatos Cuadrado, Jose; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo Javier; Gargiulo, Corrado; Garishvili, Irakli; Gerhard, Jochen; Germain, Marie; Gheata, Andrei George; Gheata, Mihaela; Ghidini, Bruno; Ghosh, Premomoy; Gianotti, Paola; Giubellino, Paolo; Gladysz-Dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gorlich, Lidia Maria; Gomez Jimenez, Ramon; Gonzalez Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Gotovac, Sven; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Grajcarek, Robert; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoras, Alina Gabriela; Grigoryev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grynyov, Borys; Grion, Nevio; Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grossiord, Jean-Yves; Grosso, Raffaele; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerzoni, Barbara; Guilbaud, Maxime Rene Joseph; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gulkanyan, Hrant; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Khan, Kamal; Haake, Rudiger; Haaland, Oystein Senneset; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Haiduc, Maria; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Hanratty, Luke David; Hansen, Alexander; Harris, John William; Harton, Austin Vincent; Hatzifotiadou, Despina; Hayashi, Shinichi; Hayrapetyan, Arsen; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Heide, Markus Ansgar; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Herrmann, Norbert; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hicks, Bernard Richard; Hippolyte, Boris; Hori, Yasuto; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Hrivnacova, Ivana; Huang, Meidana; Humanic, Thomas; Hutter, Dirk; Hwang, Dae Sung; Ichou, Raphaelle; Ilkaev, Radiy; Ilkiv, Iryna; Inaba, Motoi; Incani, Elisa; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Ionita, Costin; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Ivanov, Vladimir; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanytskyi, Oleksii; Jacholkowski, Adam Wlodzimierz; Jahnke, Cristiane; Jang, Haeng Jin; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Pahula Hewage, Sandun; Jena, Satyajit; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jones, Peter Graham; Jung, Hyungtaik; Jusko, Anton; Kalcher, Sebastian; Kalinak, Peter; Kalliokoski, Tuomo Esa Aukusti; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Kar, Somnath; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kazantsev, Andrey; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Ketzer, Bernhard Franz; Khan, Palash; Khan, Mohammed Mohisin; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Beomkyu; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Jinsook; Kim, Mimae; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Kiss, Gabor; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Jochen; Klein-Boesing, Christian; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kohler, Markus Konrad; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kolozhvari, Anatoly; Kondratyev, Valery; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Konevskikh, Artem; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Kox, Serge; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kral, Jiri; Kralik, Ivan; Kramer, Frederick; Kravcakova, Adela; Krelina, Michal; Kretz, Matthias; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Krus, Miroslav; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kucera, Vit; Kucheryaev, Yury; Kugathasan, Thanushan; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paulus Gerardus; Kulakov, Igor; Kumar, Jitendra; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, Alexey; Kurepin, Alexander; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kushpil, Vasilij; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; Ladron De Guevara, Pedro; Lagana Fernandes, Caio; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; Lara Martinez, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; La Rocca, Paola; Lea, Ramona; Lechman, Mateusz Arkadiusz; Lee, Sung Chul; Lee, Graham Richard; Legrand, Iosif; Lehnert, Joerg Walter; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Lenhardt, Matthieu Laurent; Lenti, Vito; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Levai, Peter; Li, Shuang; Lien, Jorgen Andre; Lietava, Roman; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Ljunggren, Hans Martin; Lodato, Davide Francesco; Lonne, Per-Ivar; Loggins, Vera Renee; Loginov, Vitaly; Lohner, Daniel; Loizides, Constantinos; Loo, Kai Krister; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lovhoiden, Gunnar; Lu, Xianguo; Luettig, Philipp Johannes; Lunardon, Marcello; Luo, Jiebin; Luparello, Grazia; Luzzi, Cinzia; Jacobs, Peter Martin; Ma, Rongrong; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahapatra, Durga Prasad; Maire, Antonin; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Liudmila; Mal'Kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manceau, Loic Henri Antoine; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martashvili, Irakli; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martinengo, Paolo; Martinez Hernandez, Mario Ivan; Martinez-Garcia, Gines; Martin Blanco, Javier; Martynov, Yevgen; Mas, Alexis Jean-Michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mazer, Joel Anthony; Mazumder, Rakesh; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Meddi, Franco; Menchaca-Rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Mercado-Perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Miake, Yasuo; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz Czeslaw; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mlynarz, Jocelyn; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Molnar, Levente; Montano Zetina, Luis Manuel; Monteno, Marco; Montes Prado, Esther; Moon, Taebong; Morando, Maurizio; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Muller, Hans; Gameiro Munhoz, Marcelo; Murray, Sean; Musa, Luciano; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Nattrass, Christine; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nedosekin, Alexander; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Nilsen, Bjorn Steven; Nilsson, Mads Stormo; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Nyanin, Alexander; Nyatha, Anitha; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Sun Kun; Oh, Saehanseul; Olah, Laszlo; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Onderwaater, Jacobus; Oppedisano, Chiara; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pachr, Milos; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Painke, Florian; Pajares Vales, Carlos; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Palaha, Arvinder Singh; Palmeri, Armando; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Park, Woojin; Passfeld, Annika; Patalakha, Dmitry; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Paul, Biswarup; Pawlak, Tomasz Jan; Peitzmann, Thomas; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, Elienos; Peresunko, Dmitry Yurevich; Perez Lara, Carlos Eugenio; Perrino, Davide; Peryt, Wiktor Stanislaw; Pesci, Alessandro; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petran, Michal; Petris, Mariana; Petrov, Plamen Rumenov; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Piano, Stefano; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Pitz, Nora; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Planinic, Mirko; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Pohjoisaho, Esko Heikki Oskari; Polishchuk, Boris; Poljak, Nikola; Pop, Amalia; Porteboeuf, Sarah Julie; Pospisil, Vladimir; Potukuchi, Baba; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puddu, Giovanna; Punin, Valery; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Qvigstad, Henrik; Rachevski, Alexandre; Rademakers, Alphonse; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Raniwala, Sudhir; Raniwala, Rashmi; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Rauch, Wolfgang Hans; Rauf, Aamer Wali; Razazi, Vahedeh; Read, Kenneth Francis; Real, Jean-Sebastien; Redlich, Krzysztof; Reed, Rosi Jan; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick Simon; Reicher, Martijn; Reidt, Felix; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Rettig, Felix Vincenz; Revol, Jean-Pierre; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riccati, Lodovico; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva Ora Herenui; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Rivetti, Angelo; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Rodriguez Manso, Alis; Roeed, Ketil; Rogochaya, Elena; Sharma, Rohni; Rohr, David Michael; Roehrich, Dieter; Romita, Rosa; Ronchetti, Federico; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossegger, Stefan; Rossi, Andrea; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Rui, Rinaldo; Russo, Riccardo; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Rybicki, Andrzej; Sadovskiy, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakaguchi, Hiroaki; Sakai, Shingo; Sakata, Dosatsu; Salgado Lopez, Carlos Alberto; Salzwedel, Jai Samuel Nielsen; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sanchez Castro, Xitzel; Sandor, Ladislav; Sandoval, Andres; Sano, Masato; Santagati, Gianluca; Santoro, Romualdo; Sarkar, Debojit; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Scharenberg, Rolf Paul; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schuchmann, Simone; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schulc, Martin; Schuster, Tim Robin; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Scott, Rebecca Michelle; Scott, Patrick Aaron; Segato, Gianfranco; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya; Seo, Jeewon; Serci, Sergio; Serradilla Rodriguez, Eulogio; Sevcenco, Adrian; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shabratova, Galina; Shahoyan, Ruben; Sharma, Satish; Sharma, Natasha; Shigaki, Kenta; Shtejer Diaz, Katherin; Sibiryak, Yury; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Silvestre, Catherine Micaela; Simatovic, Goran; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singha, Subhash; Singhal, Vikas; Sinha, Bikash; Sarkar - Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Skjerdal, Kyrre; Smakal, Radek; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Soegaard, Carsten; Soltz, Ron Ariel; Song, Myunggeun; Song, Jihye; Soos, Csaba; Soramel, Francesca; Spacek, Michal; Sputowska, Iwona Anna; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, Martha; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stefanek, Grzegorz; Steinpreis, Matthew Donald; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Steyn, Gideon Francois; Stiller, Johannes Hendrik; Stocco, Diego; Stolpovskiy, Mikhail; Strmen, Peter; Alarcon Do Passo Suaide, Alexandre; Subieta Vasquez, Martin Alfonso; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Suleymanov, Mais Kazim Oglu; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Susa, Tatjana; Symons, Timothy; Szanto De Toledo, Alejandro; Szarka, Imrich; Szczepankiewicz, Adam; Szymanski, Maciej Pawel; Takahashi, Jun; Tangaro, Marco-Antonio; Tapia Takaki, Daniel Jesus; Tarantola Peloni, Attilio; Tarazona Martinez, Alfonso; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Terrevoli, Cristina; Ter-Minasyan, Astkhik; Thaeder, Jochen Mathias; Thomas, Deepa; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Timmins, Anthony Robert; Toia, Alberica; Torii, Hisayuki; Trubnikov, Victor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ulery, Jason Glyndwr; Ullaland, Kjetil; Ulrich, Jochen; Uras, Antonio; Urciuoli, Guido Maria; Usai, Gianluca; Vajzer, Michal; Vala, Martin; Valencia Palomo, Lizardo; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Vannucci, Luigi; Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Van Leeuwen, Marco; Vargas Trevino, Aurora Diozcora; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veldhoen, Misha; Venaruzzo, Massimo; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara Limon, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Verweij, Marta; Vickovic, Linda; Viesti, Giuseppe; Viinikainen, Jussi Samuli; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Vinogradov, Yury; Virgili, Tiziano; Viyogi, Yogendra; Vodopyanov, Alexander; Volkl, Martin Andreas; Voloshin, Sergey; Voloshin, Kirill; Volpe, Giacomo; Von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Vulpescu, Bogdan; Vyushin, Alexey; Wagner, Boris; Wagner, Vladimir; Wagner, Jan; Wang, Yifei; Wang, Yaping; Wang, Mengliang; Watanabe, Daisuke; Watanabe, Kengo; Weber, Michael; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Westerhoff, Uwe; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilde, Martin Rudolf; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilkinson, Jeremy John; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Winn, Michael Andreas; Xiang, Changzhou; Yaldo, Chris G; Yamaguchi, Yorito; Yang, Hongyan; Yang, Ping; Yang, Shiming; Yano, Satoshi; Yasnopolskiy, Stanislav; Yi, Jungyu; Yin, Zhongbao; Yoo, In-Kwon; Yushmanov, Igor; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zach, Cenek; Zampolli, Chiara; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zavyalov, Nikolay; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zelnicek, Pierre; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Yonghong; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, You; Zhou, Fengchu; Zhu, Xiangrong; Zhu, Jianlin; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Markus Bernhard; Zimmermann, Alice; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zoccarato, Yannick Denis; Zynovyev, Mykhaylo; Zyzak, Maksym

    2013-01-01

    Differential cross sections of charged particles in inelastic pp collisions as a function of $p_T$ have been measured at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 0.9, 2.76 and 7 TeV at the LHC. The $p_T$ spectra are compared to NLO-pQCD calculations. Though the differential cross section for an individual $\\sqrt{s}$ cannot be described by NLO-pQCD, the relative increase of cross section with $\\sqrt{s}$ is in agreement with NLO-pQCD. Based on these measurements and observations, procedures are discussed to construct pp reference spectra at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 2.76 and 5.02 TeV up to $p_T$ = 50 GeV/c as required for the calculation of the nuclear modification factor in nucleus-nucleus and proton-nucleus collisions.

  16. U.S. Department of Energy's EV Everywhere Workplace Charging Challenge, Mid-Program Review: Employees Plug In

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-12-01

    This Program Review takes an unprecedented look at the state of workplace charging in the United States -- a report made possible by U.S. Department of Energy leadership and valuable support from our partners as they share their progress in developing robust workplace charging programs. Through the Workplace Charging Challenge, more than 250 participants are accelerating the development the nation's worksite PEV charging infrastructure and are supporting cleaner, more convenient transportation options within their communities. Challenge partners are currently providing access to PEV charging stations at more than 440 worksites across the country and are influencing countless other organizations to do the same.

  17. The charge state distributions of 0.5-2.9 MeV Be, Al, Cl, Ti and Ni ions measured after carbon foil stripping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Equilibrium charge state distributions have been measured for Be, Al, Cl, Ti and Ni ions stripped in the high-voltage terminal of an electrostatic tandem accelerator using a 2 μg/cm2 carbon foil. The series of measurements were made with a terminal voltage ranging from typically 1.5 to 2.9 MV. The charge state distributions were measured on the high-energy side of the accelerator, just in front of the analysing magnet, in order to take charge state-dependent transmission through the high-energy side of the accelerator into account. The obtained charge state distributions will be used for accelerator mass spectrometry measurements to find the optimum terminal voltage of the accelerator. (orig.)

  18. Developing guidelines for distributed teamwork: review of the literature and the HFI DTC’s distributed teamwork studies

    OpenAIRE

    Stanton, Neville A.; Salmon, Paul; Houghton, Robert; Rafferty, Laura; Walker, Guy; Jenkins, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Distributed teams are increasingly being employed within complex systems and rapid technological advances are affecting the ways in which they work and can potentially work. Despite this, guidance on how distributed teams should work, how they should be organised and trained, what communications technology they should use and how support systems should be designed is not readily available. This report presents, based on a review of the relevant literature and also a series of naturalistic cas...

  19. Controversy over Charges by Stanford Prompts Critical Review of Entire Indirect-Cost System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, Colleen

    1991-01-01

    As a result of investigations into overhead charges at Stanford University (California), lawmakers and federal agency officials are seeking ways to prevent universities from overcharging the government for indirect costs and ways to improve federal oversight of government payments. (DB)

  20. Doctors charged with manslaughter in the course of medical practice, 1795-2005: a literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Ferner, R E; McDowell, Sarah E

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: To quantify the number of doctors charged with manslaughter in the course of legitimate medical practice and to classify cases, as mistakes, slips (or lapses), and violations, using a recognized classification of human error system.

  1. Review: Ecological distribution of Dipterocarpaceae species in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PURWANINGSIH

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Dipterocarpaceae is one of the biggest family with >500 species in the world, and most of dipterocarps population are grown in Indonesia which have high economical value of wood. One of the most important value from dipterocarps species is high on endemicities; there are up to 128 species (53.78% from 238 dipterocarps species in Indonesia. Distribution of dipterocarps species would be affected by some factors especially edaphic, climate, and altitude. In Indonesia the dipterocarps species distribution could be shown from islands groups, number of species and forest types. Based on the observation of herbarium collection in Herbarium Bogoriense the distribution of the most dipterocarps species was in the altitude of 0-500 m and 500-1000 m on the dipterocarps forest type. Kalimantan and Sumatra were the two bigger islands with have the dipterocarps species distributed relatively high on population and species.

  2. Feasibility study of single-shot real-time non-distractive three-dimensional bunch charge distribution monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In linac-based high brightness light sources, it is necessary for high precision experiments to characterize the light emission bunch by bunch. It is essential for precise characterizations of X-ray FEL's beam to monitor ever-changing charge distribution of electron bunch by single-shot measurement with high resolutions. Therefore, a single-shot and non-destructive 3D bunch charge distribution (BCD) monitor was developed to characterize longitudinal and transverse BCDs simultaneously. It is based on Electro-Optical (EO) multiple sampling with a manner of spectral decoding. For the transverse detection, eight EO-crystals surround the beam axis azimuthally, and a linear-chirped probe laser pulse with a hollow shape and spirally temporal shift, passes through the EO-crystals. The polarization axis of the probe laser is radially distributed as well as the Coulomb field of the electron bunches. Since the signal intensity encoded at each crystal depends on the strength of the Coulomb field at each point, the longitudinal BCDs are encoded as independent intensity modulations at eight different wavelength regions. The encoded information of 3D BCDs is decoded by a multichannel spectrometer with an eight-branched fiber-optic input. We report the principle and the first experimental results of the novel 3D-BCD monitor with ZnTe EO-crystals. As future development directions, we are preparing a conerefringent probe laser with Kerr-EO amorphous for precise detections of transverse BCDs and a broadband laser prove pulse (> 400 nm (a) 800 nm) with an organic DAST EO-crystal to realize a temporal resolution of < 30 fs. (author)

  3. Review of the Risk Management at a Distribution System Operator

    OpenAIRE

    Wallnerström, Carl Johan; Hasselström, Jörgen; Bengtsson, Per; Bertling, Lina

    2008-01-01

    Sweden was re-regulated in 1996 followed by new laws and regulations. These new circumstances have become incentives to adopt more comprehensive and quantitative analysis methods applied on Electrical Distribution Systems (EDS). This paper provides a systematic presentation of the current risk management at a Distribution System Operator (DSO) as an integrated part of the net planning process. The description is complemented by an example and an evaluation including ideas of future developmen...

  4. Measurement of the angular distribution of dielectronic recombination into highly charged krypton ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angular distribution of x-rays emitted in the process of Dielectronic Recombination (DR) was studied at the Electron Beam Ion Trap. For this the photon emission spectra were observed along and perpendicular the electron beam propagation direction. X-ray line intensities differ drastically between the two acquired spectra. This indicates a strong alignment of the total angular momentum vector of the excited states populated by DR with respect to the electron beam propagation direction.

  5. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium charge-state distributions of 2 MeV/u sulfur ions passing through carbon foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both equilibrium and non-equilibrium charge-state distributions for 2.0 MeV/u sulfur ions after passing through carbon foils were studied experimentally. For the equilibrium charge-state distribution, incident ions of S7+, S12+, S14+ and S16+ were injected into carbon foils 54, 98, 150 and 200 μg/cm2 in thickness, whereas for the non-equilibrium distributions, new measurements for S15+ and S16+ incidences were made through carbon foils of 0.9-10 μg/cm2 to supplement our previous experiments regarding S6+-S14+ incidences [M. Imai, M. Sataka, K. Kawatsura, K. Takahiro, K. Komaki, H. Shibata, H. Sugai, K. Nishio, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 230 (2005) 63; M. Imai, M. Sataka, K. Kawatsura, K. Takahiro, K. Komaki, H. Shibata, H. Sugai, K. Nishio, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 256 (2007) 11]. Mean charge states for S6+-S14+ incidences as functions of the penetration thickness merged at 6.9 μg/cm2 and changed together until reaching equilibrium at around 100 μg/cm2, while those for S15+ and S16+ incidences took different paths to equilibrium, which was also the case for distribution widths for S6+-S14+, S15+ and S16+ incidences. An equilibrium mean charge state of 12.68 and distribution width of 1.11 were attained with equilibrium charge distributions between 6+ and 16+.

  6. Charge independence and charge symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, G A; Miller, Gerald A; van Oers, Willem T H

    1994-01-01

    Charge independence and charge symmetry are approximate symmetries of nature, violated by the perturbing effects of the mass difference between up and down quarks and by electromagnetic interactions. The observations of the symmetry breaking effects in nuclear and particle physics and the implications of those effects are reviewed.

  7. Charge independence and charge symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charge independence and charge symmetry are approximate symmetries of nature, violated by the perturbing effects of the mass difference between up and down quarks and by electromagnetic interactions. The observations of the symmetry breaking effects in nuclear and particle physics and the implications of those effects are reviewed. (author). 145 refs., 3 tabs., 11 figs

  8. Pharmaceutical Good Distribution Practices – A Review of Global Scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmal Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to manage medicine distribution in an appropriate manner, there is a necessity of deep understanding of its management. The challenges of the pharmaceutical products supply chain are its specified shelf life and specified storage conditions. Managing quality of medicines during distribution is a critical operation. There are various dosage forms of medicines eg tablets, syrups, injectables etc. Each of them are to be stored at different environmental conditions defined on the basis of stability of drug products. For cold chain products, more care is required because of the fear of failures during testing. The desired features have high requirements for supply chain management and planning to achieve the goal of ensuring availability in retail stores without increasing the quantity of wasted products in different supply chain phases. In UK, USA and Europe significant amount of control is exercised during medicine distribution as compared to Pacific region.

  9. Review of Axial Burnup Distribution Considerations for Burnup Credit Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report attempts to summarize and consolidate the existing knowledge on axial burnup distribution issues that are important to burnup credit criticality safety calculations. Recently released Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff guidance permits limited burnup credit, and thus, has prompted resolution of the axial burnup distribution issue. The reactivity difference between the neutron multiplication factor (keff) calculated with explicit representation of the axial burnup distribution and keff calculated assuming a uniform axial burnup is referred to as the ''end effect.'' This end effect is shown to be dependent on many factors, including the axial-burnup profile, total accumulated burnup, cooling time, initial enrichment, assembly design, and the isotopics considered (i.e., actinide-only or actinides plus fission products). Axial modeling studies, efforts related to the development of axial-profile databases, and the determination of bounding axial profiles are also discussed. Finally, areas that could benefit from further efforts are identified

  10. Review of Axial Burnup Distribution Considerations for Burnup Credit Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J.C.; DeHart, M.D.

    2000-03-01

    This report attempts to summarize and consolidate the existing knowledge on axial burnup distribution issues that are important to burnup credit criticality safety calculations. Recently released Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff guidance permits limited burnup credit, and thus, has prompted resolution of the axial burnup distribution issue. The reactivity difference between the neutron multiplication factor (keff) calculated with explicit representation of the axial burnup distribution and keff calculated assuming a uniform axial burnup is referred to as the ``end effect.'' This end effect is shown to be dependent on many factors, including the axial-burnup profile, total accumulated burnup, cooling time, initial enrichment, assembly design, and the isotopics considered (i.e., actinide-only or actinides plus fission products). Axial modeling studies, efforts related to the development of axial-profile databases, and the determination of bounding axial profiles are also discussed. Finally, areas that could benefit from further efforts are identified.

  11. Improved phenomenological description of equilibrium charge state distributions for Ni, Co, and Cu ions in Mo based on new experimental data at 2 MeV/u

    CERN Document Server

    Gastis, P; Robertson, D; Almus, R; Anderson, T; Bauder, W; Collon, P; Lu, W; Ostdiek, K; Skulski, M

    2015-01-01

    Equilibrium charge state distributions of stable 60Ni, 59Co, and 63Cu beams passing through a 1um thick Mo foil were measured at beam energies of 1.84 MeV/u, 2.09 MeV/u, and 2.11 MeV/u respectively. A 1-D position sensitive Parallel Grid Avalanche Counter detector (PGAC) was used at the exit of a spectrograph magnet, enabling us to measure the intensity of several charge states simultaneously. The number of charge states measured for each beam constituted more than 99% of the total equilibrium charge state distribution for that elements. Currently, little experimental data exists for equilibrium charge state distributions for heavy ions with 19charge states and distribution widths), has not been thoroughly tested at the energy region of interest. A number of semi-empirical models from the literature were evalu...

  12. CAT SWARM OPTIMIZATION FOR SINGLE STAGE SUPPLY CHAIN DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM WITH FIXED CHARGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Manimaran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, Cat Swarm Optimization (CSO Algorithm is proposed for single stage supply chain distribution system with a fixed cost. This paper considers two kinds of cost: a continuous cost, that linearly increases with the amount transported between a supplier and a customer and a fixed cost, which is incurred whenever a non-zero quantity is transported between a supplier and a customer and it is independent of the amount transported. The aim of this paper is to determine the quantities to be distributed to satisfy the customer demand with minimum cost. Since fixed costs results discontinuities in the objective function, solution procedures are become more difficult and are known to be non-deterministic polynomial (NP hard. In this paper Cat Swarm Optimization (CSO Algorithm is proposed for the optimization of single stage supply chain problem to provide optimal or near optimal solution. The results of the proposed model of this paper have been compared with a spanning tree-based Genetic Algorithm and binary coded Genetic Algorithm. Computational results show the superiority of CSO algorithm over other algorithms.

  13. Density functional studies on wurtzite piezotronic transistors: influence of different semiconductors and metals on piezoelectric charge distribution and Schottky barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Zhang, Aihua; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-05-01

    The mechanical–electrical coupling properties of piezoelectric semiconductors endow these materials with novel device applications in microelectromechanical systems, sensors, human–computer interfaces, etc. When an applied strain is exerted on a piezoelectric semiconductor, piezoelectric charges are generated at the surface or interface of the semiconductor, which can be utilized to control the electronic transport characteristics. This is the fundamental working mechanism of piezotronic devices, called the piezotronic effect. In the present report, a series of piezotronic transistors composed of different electrode metals and semiconductors is examined using density functional theory calculation. It is found that the influence of semiconductors on the piezotronic effect is larger than the impact of metals, and GaN and CdS are promising candidates for piezotronic and piezo-phototronic devices, respectively. The width of the piezoelectric charge distribution obtained in the present study can be used as a parameter in classical finite-element-method based simulations, which provide guidance on designing high-performance piezotronic devices.

  14. Density functional studies on wurtzite piezotronic transistors: influence of different semiconductors and metals on piezoelectric charge distribution and Schottky barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Zhang, Aihua; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-05-20

    The mechanical-electrical coupling properties of piezoelectric semiconductors endow these materials with novel device applications in microelectromechanical systems, sensors, human-computer interfaces, etc. When an applied strain is exerted on a piezoelectric semiconductor, piezoelectric charges are generated at the surface or interface of the semiconductor, which can be utilized to control the electronic transport characteristics. This is the fundamental working mechanism of piezotronic devices, called the piezotronic effect. In the present report, a series of piezotronic transistors composed of different electrode metals and semiconductors is examined using density functional theory calculation. It is found that the influence of semiconductors on the piezotronic effect is larger than the impact of metals, and GaN and CdS are promising candidates for piezotronic and piezo-phototronic devices, respectively. The width of the piezoelectric charge distribution obtained in the present study can be used as a parameter in classical finite-element-method based simulations, which provide guidance on designing high-performance piezotronic devices. PMID:27053577

  15. X-ray derived experimental charge density distribution in GaF3 and VF3 solid systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujatha, K.; Israel, S.; Anzline, C.; Niranjana Devi, R.; Sheeba, R. A. J. R.

    2016-09-01

    The electronic structure and bonding features of metal and transition metal fluorides in low oxidation states, GaF3 and VF3, have been studied from precise single crystal X-ray diffraction data using multipole and maximum entropy methods. The topology of the charge density is analyzed and the (3,-1) bond critical points are determined. Existences of ionic nature of bonding in low valent fluorine compounds are clearly evident. The spherical core of metal atom and aspherical or twisted core of transition metal atom reveal the fact that GaF3 is much more rigid than VF3. Aspherical cores of the polarized ligand atoms are also visible in the two-dimensional density distribution pictures. The true valence charge density surfaces with encapsulating the atomic basins maps are elucidated. An elongated saddle with mid-bond density of 0.6191 e/Å3, observed in the compound VF3, shows that its lattice is less rigid and has more ionic character than GaF3.

  16. Synthesis, crystal structure and charge distribution of Na7As11O31: An oxygen-deficient layered sodium arsenate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new sodium arsenate with layer structure has been synthesized and its crystal structure solved and refined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The crystal is trigonal, space group P3-bar m1, a=11.199(3)A, c=5.411(2)A, V=587.80(3)A3, Z=1; the refinement converged to R=0.0282 and wR=0.0751 for 590 reflections with (I)>2sigma(I). The structural model gives the formula Na7As11O32, which would be non-neutral; besides, the structural model is not validated by the charge distribution (CD) analysis, which gives an unsatisfactory agreement on the computed charges of the cations. The CD analysis suggest incomplete (5/6) occupation of the O5 site, which leads to the deficiency of an oxygen atom per unit cell and to formula Na7As11O31: this new structural model corresponds to a neutral compound, is validated by the CD analysis, and results in better displacement parameters for O5 than its non neutral counterpart. The (001) anionic layers are built up from corner and edge sharing of As1 and As2 distorted octahedra and As3 distorted tetrahedra, the sodium cations playing the role of interlayer cations. The effects of the oxygen deficiency on the crystal structure are discussed

  17. When the expansion of finite-size corrections to hydrogen Lamb shift in moments of charge distribution breaks down

    CERN Document Server

    Hagelstein, Franziska

    2015-01-01

    We point out a limitation of the standard way of accounting the finite-size effects, i.e., when the leading $[(Z\\alpha)^4]$ and subleading $[(Z\\alpha)^5]$ contributions to the Lamb shift are given by the mean-square radius and the third Zemach moment of the charge distribution. This limitation may have profound consequences for the interpretation of the "proton size puzzle". We find, for instance, that the de R\\'ujula toy model of the proton form factor does not resolve the puzzle as claimed, despite the large value of the third Zemach moment. Given the formula which does not rely on the radii expansion, we show how tiny (less than a hundredth of percent) changes in the proton electric form factor at a MeV scale would be able to explain the puzzle.

  18. Mass, velocity, angular and charge-state distributions from the fusion of /sup 32/S and /sup 112/Sn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolton, C.; Schier, W.A.; Tsoupas, N.; Enge, H.; Salomaa, M.; Sperduto, A.; Graue, A.

    1978-07-01

    Evaporation residues from the fusion of /sup 32/S and /sup 112/Sn at E/sub /sup 32/S/ = 160 meV were studied using an energy-mass spectrometer. The velocity selector of the energy-mass spectrometer was first utilized to measure summed fusion products as a function of velocity setting and reaction angle. In-flight mass separtion of the fusion products with the energy-mass spectrometer identified masses 141, 140, and 139 from the evaporation of three to five nucleons from the /sup 144/Dy compound nucleus. Absolute cross-section measurements are compared to theoretical predictions of the statistical evaporation model. Velocity, angular and charge state distributions of evaporation residues are also compared to calculated values.

  19. INFLUENCE OF ELECTRON-IMPACT MULTIPLE IONIZATION ON EQUILIBRIUM AND DYNAMIC CHARGE STATE DISTRIBUTIONS: A CASE STUDY USING IRON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, M.; Savin, D. W. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2015-02-10

    We describe the influence of electron-impact multiple ionization (EIMI) on the ionization balance of collisionally ionized plasmas. Previous ionization balance calculations have largely neglected EIMI. Here, EIMI cross-section data are incorporated into calculations of both equilibrium and non-equilibrium charge-state distributions (CSDs). For equilibrium CSDs, we find that EIMI has only a small effect and can usually be ignored. However, for non-equilibrium plasmas the influence of EIMI can be important. In particular, we find that for plasmas in which the temperature oscillates there are significant differences in the CSD when including versus neglecting EIMI. These results have implications for modeling and spectroscopy of impulsively heated plasmas, such as nanoflare heating of the solar corona.

  20. Influence of Electron-Impact Multiple Ionization on Equilibrium and Dynamic Charge State Distributions: A Case Study Using Iron

    CERN Document Server

    Hahn, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We describe the influence of electron-impact multiple ionization (EIMI) on the ionization balance of collisionally ionized plasmas. We are unaware of any previous ionization balance calculations that have included EIMI, which is usually assumed to be unimportant. Here, we incorporate EIMI cross-section data into calculations of both equilibrium and non-equilibrium charge-state distributions (CSDs). For equilibrium CSDs, we find that EIMI has only a small effect and can usually be ignored. However, for non-equilibrium plasmas the influence of EIMI can be important. In particular, we find that for plasmas in which the temperature oscillates there are significant differences in the CSD when including versus neglecting EIMI. These results have implications for modeling and spectroscopy of impulsively heated plasmas, such as nanoflare heating of the solar corona.

  1. Charged hadron transverse momentum distributions in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Ballintijn, M.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Lee, J. W.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2004-01-01

    We present transverse momentum distributions of charged hadrons produced in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV. The spectra were measured for transverse momenta pT from 0.25 to 4.5 GeV/c in a pseudorapidity range of 0.2<η<1.4. The evolution of the spectra is studied as a function of collision centrality, from 65 to 344 participating nucleons. The results are compared to data from proton-antiproton collisions and Au+Au collisions at lower RHIC energies. We find a significant change of the spectral shape between proton-antiproton and semi-peripheral Au+Au collisions. Comparing semi-peripheral to central Au+Au collisions, we find that the yields at high pT exhibit approximate scaling with the number of participating nucleons, rather than scaling with the number of binary collisions.

  2. User charges for health services in developing countries: a review of the economic literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPake, B

    1993-06-01

    Literature suggests that in theory, the efficiency of user charges for health services is related to the level of externality, the price elasticity of demand, the proportion of total costs which are private access costs, and the level of the government budget constraint. Theoretical models predict that price elasticity of demand for health services is likely to be higher for lower income groups and that user charges are therefore unlikely to promote equity, or reduce the discrepancies between the utilisation rates of the rich and poor, 'ceteris paribus'. Empirical evidence tends to confirm the latter prediction but to suggest that user charges in many countries provide the scope for welfare gains for the majority. Unfortunately, this scope is seldom exploited in practice. It is argued that many countries have little choice but to try to exploit the potential for majority gains, but that more emphasis should be placed on ensuring quality improvements than on superficial financial measures of success. PMID:8511628

  3. Surface phase, morphology, and charge distribution transitions on vacuum and ambient annealed SrTi O3 (100)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagdeviren, Omur E.; Simon, Georg H.; Zou, Ke; Walker, Fred J.; Ahn, Charles; Altman, Eric I.; Schwarz, Udo D.

    2016-05-01

    The surface structures of SrTi O3 (100) single crystals were examined as a function of annealing time and temperature in either oxygen atmosphere or ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) using noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and low-energy electron diffraction (LEED). Samples were subsequently analyzed for the effect the modulation of their charge distribution had on their surface potential. It was found that the evolution of the SrTi O3 surface roughness, stoichiometry, and reconstruction depends on the preparation scheme. LEED revealed phase transitions from a (1 ×1 ) termination to an intermediate c (4 ×2 ) reconstruction to ultimately a (√ 13 ×√ 13 ) -R 33 .7∘ surface phase when the surface was annealed in an oxygen flux, while the reverse transition from (√ 13 ×√ 13 ) -R 33 .7∘ to c (4 ×2 ) was observed when samples were annealed in UHV. When the surface reverted to c (4 ×2 ) , AES data indicated decreases in both the surface Ti and O concentrations. These findings were corroborated by NC-AFM imaging, where initially Ti O2 -terminated crystals developed half-unit cell high steps following UHV annealing, which is typically attributed to a mix of SrO and Ti O2 terminations. Surface roughness evolved nonmonotonically with UHV annealing temperature, which is explained by electrostatic modulations of the surface potential caused by increasing oxygen depletion. This was further corroborated by experiments in which the apparent roughness tracked in NC-AFM could be correlated with changes in the surface charge distribution that were controlled by applying a bias voltage to the sample. Based on these findings, it is suggested that careful selection of preparation procedures combined with application of an electric field may be used to tune the properties of thin films grown on SrTi O3 .

  4. The Grid-Dose-Spreading Algorithm for Dose Distribution Calculation in Heavy Charged Particle Radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki

    2007-01-01

    A simple and efficient variant of the pencil-beam algorithm for dose distribution calculation is proposed. Compared to the conventional pencil-beam algorithms, the new algorithm is intrinsically faster due to minimized computation within the convolution integral. Namely, computation for physical interaction is decoupled from the convolution integral and the convolution kernel is approximated by simple grid-to-grid correlation. Implementation to a treatment planning system for carbon-ion radiotherapy has enabled realistic beam blurring with marginal speed decrease from the broad-beam calculation. Evaluation of a modeled proton pencil beam exhibits inaccuracy within its spread at the Bragg peak when the beam incidence is angled to all the dose grid axes, which will be minimized in broad-beam formation and may be acceptable depending on its relative significance to the other sources of errors. The new algorithm will provide balanced accuracy and speed without technical difficulty for high-resolution dose distrib...

  5. Charge separation effects in solid targets and ion acceleration with a two-temperature electron distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrostatic field at the solid-vacuum interface generated by two electron populations with different thermal energies, each following a Boltzmann distribution, is analytically derived from the Poisson equation and studied in terms of plasma parameters. In particular, the effect of the pressure of each of the two populations on the amplitude of the electric field and on its spatial extension is described. In order to evaluate the cold electron temperature, an analytical model for the Ohmic heating of the background electron population by laser generated fast electrons is developed and the consequences on ion detachment, ionization, and acceleration processes in laser-solid experiments are discussed. The efficiency of ion acceleration is shown to be controlled by the heating rate of the background electrons

  6. Charged Hadron Distributions In 19.6-gev Gold+gold Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Picha, R

    2005-01-01

    Experimental results from a low-energy heavy ion run in year 2001 at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) using the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC (STAR) detector are presented. From the collisions of gold ions at sNN = 19.6 GeV, six species of particles (π±, K±, p, and p¯) are identified via energy loss mechanism and their transverse mass spectra are analyzed at midrapidity (|y| < 0.5) and m T − m0 < 1.0 GeV/c 2. Rapidity distributions, particle ratios, and hadronic freeze-out conditions are discussed. This study provides a low energy measurement at RHIC which is very close to that at the SPS for cross comparison between collider experiments and fixed target experiments. The analysis provides a good reference to study excitation functions of strangeness production, net baryon, and collective flow inside heavy ion collisions.

  7. A REVIEW ON DISTRIBUTED CONTROL OF COOPERATING MINI UAVS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qasim Ali

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Mini Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (MUAVs are becoming popular research platform and drawing considerable attention, particularly during the last decade due to their multi-dimensional applications in almost every walk of life. MUAVs range from simple toys found at electronic supermarkets for entertainment purpose to highly sophisticated commercial platforms performing novel assignments like offshore wind power station inspection and 3D modelling of buildings. This paper presents an overview of the main aspects in the domain of distributed control of cooperating MUAVs to facilitate the potential users in this fascinating field. Furthermore it gives an overview on state of the art in MUAV technologies e.g. Photonic Mixer Devices (PMD camera, distributed control methods and on-going work and challenges, which is the motivation for many researchers all over the world to work in this field.

  8. A Review on Distributed Control of Cooperating Mini UAVS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qasim Ali

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Mini Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (MUAVs are becoming popular research platform and drawing considerable attention, particularly during the las t decade due to their multi-dimensional application s in almost every walk of life. MUAVs range from simple toys found at electronic supermarkets for entertainment purpose to highly sophisticated comme rcial platforms performing novel assignments like offshore wind power station inspection and 3D model ling of buildings. This paper presents an overview of the main aspects in the domain of distributed contr ol of cooperating MUAVs to facilitate the potential users in this fascinating field. Furthermore it gives an overview on state of the art in MUAV technologies e .g. Photonic Mixer Devices (PMD camera, distributed co ntrol methods and on-going work and challenges, which is the motivation for many researchers all ov er the world to work in this field.

  9. DISTRIBUTION OF HEAVY METALS AMONG THE COMPONENTS OF FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEMS (REVIEW)

    OpenAIRE

    N. Kolesnyk

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To review scientific sources on the distribution of heavy metals among the components of freshwater ecosystems. Findings. The review of the works of many scientists showed that heavy metals are widespread in the biotic and abiotic components of freshwater ecosystems. The article highlights the distribution of heavy metals in water, bottom sediments, natural food base, fish organs and tissues. It has been shown that as a result of global pollution of the ecosystem, the majority of...

  10. A Review of Turkish Natural Gas Distribution Market

    OpenAIRE

    Erdogdu, Erkan

    2009-01-01

    In Turkey, natural gas consumption started at 0.5 bcm (billion cubic meters) in 1987 and reached approximately 35 bcm in 2007. Turkish natural gas usage is projected to further increase remarkably in coming years. In 2001, a reform process was started to create and strengthen a competitive natural gas market. However, the reform has not worked out as expected so far. The present article discusses the application of auctions in Turkish natural gas distribution zones. After presenting a short s...

  11. 锂电池充电技术综述%Review of lithium battery charging technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何秋生; 徐磊; 吴雪雪

    2013-01-01

    在二次锂电池问世以来,凭借其循环寿命长、比能量高等优良的性能被应用在生产生活的各个领域.充电作为锂电池使用过程中最重要的一环,直接影响着电池的寿命及循环性能.在锂电池最佳充电曲线的基础上,分析了锂电池的各种不同充电方法,比较各自的充电速度、应用范围、电池寿命和循环性能等特性,最后提出了今后研究的方向.%The rechargeable lithium battery with the advantages of long cycle life,high energy density and other excellent performance has been widely used since its development in 1970s.As one of the most important process,charging directly affects the battery life and cycling performance.On the basis of the best lithium battery charging curve,the performance of various lithium battery charging methods was analyzed.Finally,the future investigation on lithium battery charging technology was discussed.

  12. Multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles and photons at forward pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisons at VsNN=62.4 GeV

    OpenAIRE

    Y. Bai; Benedosso, F.; Botje, M.A.J.; Grebenyuk, O.; Mischke, A.; Peitzmann, T.(Institute for Subatomic Physics of Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands); Russcher, M. J.; Snellings, R. J M; van der Kolk, N.

    2006-01-01

    We present the centrality-dependent measurement of multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles and photons in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=62.4 GeV. The charged particles and photons are measured in the pseudorapidity region 2.9≤η≤3.9 and 2.3≤η≤3.7, respectively. We have studied the scaling of particle production with the number of participating nucleons and the number of binary collisions. The photon and charged particle production in the measured pseudorapidity range has ...

  13. Pseudorapidity and transverse-momentum distributions of charged particles in proton–proton collisions at s=13 TeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Adam

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The pseudorapidity (η and transverse-momentum (pT distributions of charged particles produced in proton–proton collisions are measured at the centre-of-mass energy s=13 TeV. The pseudorapidity distribution in |η|<1.8 is reported for inelastic events and for events with at least one charged particle in |η|<1. The pseudorapidity density of charged particles produced in the pseudorapidity region |η|<0.5 is 5.31±0.18 and 6.46±0.19 for the two event classes, respectively. The transverse-momentum distribution of charged particles is measured in the range 0.15charged particle in |η|<1. The evolution of the transverse momentum spectra of charged particles is also investigated as a function of event multiplicity. The results are compared with calculations from PYTHIA and EPOS Monte Carlo generators.

  14. Systematics of radii and nuclear charge distributions induced from elastic electron scattering, muonic x-ray, and optical isotope-shift measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear charge distribution and nuclear charge distribution differences have been investigated by 350 MeV elastic electron scattering at the Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Mainz. Muonix x-ray measurements yield complementary information to electron scattering results. Both experimental data are analyzed in an almost model independent way. Muonic x-ray measurements have been performed for the region 40Ca up to 100Mo. Muonic x-ray transition energies allow the determination of one radial parameter R/sub k/ - the Barrett radius - with high precision. This Barrett radius combined with the charge distribution from elastic electron scattering yields the following precise radial parameters 2>/sup 1/2/, 4>/sup 1/4/ and 6>/sup 1/6/. With the abolute values of these radial moments, it is possible to determine the two optical constants: the electron density at the nucleus and the specific mass shift

  15. Charged-particle distributions in $pp$ interactions at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV measured with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2069742; ATLAS Collaboration; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abeloos, Baptiste; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abraham, Nicola; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Agricola, Johannes; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allen, Benjamin William; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Armitage, Lewis James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Artz, Sebastian; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Augsten, Kamil; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Balunas, William Keaton; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barranco Navarro, Laura; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans~Peter; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bedognetti, Matteo; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Andrew Stuart; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Belyaev, Nikita; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez, Jose; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Berlendis, Simon; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertram, Iain Alexander; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Bielski, Rafal; Biesuz, Nicolo Vladi; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biondi, Silvia; Bjergaard, David Martin; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanco, Jacobo Ezequiel; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Blunier, Sylvain; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boehler, Michael; Boerner, Daniela; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogavac, Danijela; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortoletto, Daniela; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Bossio Sola, Jonathan David; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Boutle, Sarah Kate; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Breaden Madden, William Dmitri; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Lydia; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Britzger, Daniel; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Broughton, James; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Brunt, Benjamin; Bruschi, Marco; Bruscino, Nello; Bryant, Patrick; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bullock, Daniel; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgard, Carsten Daniel; Burghgrave, Blake; Burka, Klaudia; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Buzykaev, Aleksey; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cairo, Valentina; Cakir, Orhan; Calace, Noemi; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Calvet, Thomas Philippe; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Camincher, Clement; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Carbone, Ryne Michael; Cardarelli, Roberto; Cardillo, Fabio; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Casper, David William; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavallaro, Emanuele; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerda Alberich, Leonor; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerqueira, Augusto Santiago; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chan, Stephen Kam-wah; Chan, Yat Long; Chang, Philip; Chapman, John Derek; Charlton, Dave; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Che, Siinn; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Shion; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Huajie; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cheremushkina, Evgenia; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choi, Kyungeon; Chomont, Arthur Rene; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christodoulou, Valentinos; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chudoba, Jiri; Chuinard, Annabelle Julia; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Cioara, Irina Antonela; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirotto, Francesco; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Brian Lee; Clark, Michael; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Colasurdo, Luca; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crawley, Samuel Joseph; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cúth, Jakub; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dandoy, Jeffrey Rogers; Dang, Nguyen Phuong; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Dann, Nicholas Stuart; Danninger, Matthias; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Peter; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Benedetti, Abraham; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delgove, David; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; DeMarco, David; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Denysiuk, Denys; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Dette, Karola; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Clemente, William Kennedy; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaconu, Cristinel; Diamond, Miriam; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Djuvsland, Julia Isabell; do Vale, Maria Aline Barros; Dobos, Daniel; Dobre, Monica; Doglioni, Caterina; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Drechsler, Eric; Dris, Manolis; Du, Yanyan; Duarte-Campderros, Jorge; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Duschinger, Dirk; Dutta, Baishali; Dyndal, Mateusz; Eckardt, Christoph; Ecker, Katharina Maria; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Edson, William; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellajosyula, Venugopal; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Elliot, Alison; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Ennis, Joseph Stanford; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Federica; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farina, Christian; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Favareto, Andrea; Fawcett, William James; Fayard, Louis; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Feremenga, Last; Fernandez Martinez, Patricia; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Cora; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Flaschel, Nils; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Fletcher, Rob Roy MacGregor; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Forcolin, Giulio Tiziano; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Foster, Andrew Geoffrey; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Frate, Meghan; Fraternali, Marco; Freeborn, David; Fressard-Batraneanu, Silvia; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gach, Grzegorz; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Louis Guillaume; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yanyan; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gascon Bravo, Alberto; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudiello, Andrea; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Geisler, Manuel Patrice; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Geng, Cong; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghasemi, Sara; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghneimat, Mazuza; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giannetti, Paola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gignac, Matthew; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giromini, Paolo; Giugni, Danilo; Giuli, Francesco; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; Gongadze, Alexi; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Goudet, Christophe Raymond; Goujdami, Driss; Goussiou, Anna; Govender, Nicolin; Gozani, Eitan; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Gradin, Per Olov Joakim; Grafström, Per; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Grefe, Christian; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Grevtsov, Kirill; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Groh, Sabrina; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guan, Wen; Guenther, Jaroslav; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Guo, Jun; Guo, Yicheng; Gupta, Shaun; Gustavino, Giuliano; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Hadef, Asma; Haefner, Petra; Hageböck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Haney, Bijan; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Maike Christina; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harrington, Robert; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauser, Reiner; Hauswald, Lorenz; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Jochen Jens; Heinrich, Lukas; Heinz, Christian; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Hellman, Sten; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Henkelmann, Steffen; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hinman, Rachel Reisner; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohlfeld, Marc; Hohn, David; Holmes, Tova Ray; Homann, Michael; Hong, Tae Min; Hooberman, Benjamin Henry; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Qipeng; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Iurii; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Ince, Tayfun; Introzzi, Gianluca; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ito, Fumiaki; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Ivarsson, Jenny; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jain, Vivek; Jakobi, Katharina Bianca; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanneau, Fabien; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Hai; Jiang, Yi; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Johnson, William Joseph; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Sarah; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Köhler, Markus Konrad; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kaluza, Adam; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneti, Steven; Kanjir, Luka; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karamaoun, Andrew; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karentzos, Efstathios; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kasahara, Kota; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Kato, Chikuma; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kawade, Kentaro; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Keyes, Robert; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kido, Shogo; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Shinhong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver Maria; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kivernyk, Oleh; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Matthew Henry; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Knapik, Joanna; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Aine; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolb, Mathis; Koletsou, Iro; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewska, Anna Bozena; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuechler, Jan Thomas; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kukla, Romain; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwan, Tony; Kyriazopoulos, Dimitrios; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rosa Navarro, Jose Luis; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Lammers, Sabine; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, J örn Christian; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Lazovich, Tomo; Lazzaroni, Massimo; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; Le Quilleuc, Eloi; LeBlanc, Matthew Edgar; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Lerner, Giuseppe; Leroy, Claude; Lesage, Arthur; Lester, Christopher; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Qi; Li, Shu; Li, Xingguo; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Liblong, Aaron; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Hongbin; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanlin; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loew, Kevin Michael; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan David; Long, Robin Eamonn; Longo, Luigi; Looper, Kristina Anne; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lopez Solis, Alvaro; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Lösel, Philipp Jonathan; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Haonan; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luedtke, Christian; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Lyubushkin, Vladimir; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Ma, Yanhui; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macdonald, Calum Michael; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeda, Junpei; Maeland, Steffen; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magradze, Erekle; Mahlstedt, Joern; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maier, Thomas; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mancini, Giada; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Maneira, José; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany; Mann, Alexander; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mantoani, Matteo; Manzoni, Stefano; Mapelli, Livio; Marceca, Gino; March, Luis; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marjanovic, Marija; Marley, Daniel; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mc Fadden, Neil Christopher; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McClymont, Laurie; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Medici, Morten; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer Zu Theenhausen, Hanno; Middleton, Robin; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milesi, Marco; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mistry, Khilesh; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Monden, Ryutaro; Mondragon, Matthew Craig; Mönig, Klaus; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montalbano, Alyssa; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Mori, Daniel; Mori, Tatsuya; Morii, Masahiro; Morinaga, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Mortensen, Simon Stark; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Ralph Soeren Peter; Mueller, Thibaut; Muenstermann, Daniel; Mullen, Paul; Mullier, Geoffrey; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Muskinja, Miha; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nachman, Benjamin Philip; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nagy, Elemer; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Narrias Villar, Daniel Isaac; Naryshkin, Iouri; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Nef, Pascal Daniel; Negri, Andrea; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Jon Kerr; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nooney, Tamsin; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Norjoharuddeen, Nurfikri; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Rourke, Abigail Alexandra; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Oide, Hideyuki; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onogi, Kouta; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Owen, Mark; Owen, Rhys Edward; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Pandini, Carlo Enrico; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Adam Jackson; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parker, Kerry Ann; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pascuzzi, Vincent; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pearson, Benjamin; Pedersen, Lars Egholm; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Penc, Ondrej; Peng, Cong; Peng, Haiping; Penwell, John; Peralva, Bernardo; Perego, Marta Maria; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petroff, Pierre; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrov, Mariyan; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Peyaud, Alan; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickering, Mark Andrew; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pin, Arnaud Willy J; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pires, Sylvestre; Pirumov, Hayk; Pitt, Michael; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Pluth, Daniel; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Polesello, Giacomo; Poley, Anne-luise; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pozo Astigarraga, Mikel Eukeni; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Primavera, Margherita; Prince, Sebastien; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Puddu, Daniele; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Raddum, Silje; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Raine, John Andrew; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Ratti, Maria Giulia; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Stefan; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reichert, Joseph; Reisin, Hernan; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter, Stefan; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ricken, Oliver; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Riegel, Christian Johann; Rieger, Julia; Rifki, Othmane; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ristić, Branislav; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Rizzi, Chiara; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Rodina, Yulia; Rodriguez Perez, Andrea; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Daniel; Roe, Shaun; Rogan, Christopher Sean; Røhne, Ole; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romano Saez, Silvestre Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Peyton; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Jonatan; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Russell, Heather; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryu, Soo; Ryzhov, Andrey; Saavedra, Aldo; Sabato, Gabriele; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Saha, Puja; Sahinsoy, Merve; Saimpert, Matthias; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Salazar Loyola, Javier Esteban; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sammel, Dirk; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sannino, Mario; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sato, Koji; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savage, Graham; Savard, Pierre; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaeffer, Jan; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Schiavi, Carlo; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Stefan; Schmitz, Simon; Schneider, Basil; Schnellbach, Yan Jie; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schopf, Elisabeth; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schuh, Natascha; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwarz, Thomas Andrew; Schwegler, Philipp; Schweiger, Hansdieter; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Seema, Pienpen; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekhon, Karishma; Sekula, Stephen; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Sessa, Marco; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shaikh, Nabila Wahab; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shaw, Savanna Marie; Shcherbakova, Anna; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shoaleh Saadi, Diane; Shochet, Mel; Shojaii, Seyedruhollah; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sidebo, Per Edvin; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simon, Dorian; Simon, Manuel; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sioli, Maximiliano; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinner, Malcolm Bruce; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Slawinska, Magdalena; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Slovak, Radim; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Matthew; Smith, Russell; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snidero, Giacomo; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Sokhrannyi, Grygorii; Solans Sanchez, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Son, Hyungsuk; Song, Hong Ye; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosa, David; Sotiropoulou, Calliope Louisa; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Sowden, Benjamin; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spalla, Margherita; Spangenberg, Martin; Spanò, Francesco; Sperlich, Dennis; Spettel, Fabian; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stabile, Alberto; Staerz, Steffen; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Giordon; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strubig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Suchek, Stanislav; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Shota; Svatos, Michal; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Taccini, Cecilia; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tam, Jason; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Shuji; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tapia Araya, Sebastian; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Aaron; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Pierre Thor Elliot; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Temple, Darren; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Tepel, Fabian-Phillipp; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Ray; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Tibbetts, Mark James; Ticse Torres, Royer Edson; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todome, Kazuki; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tolley, Emma; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tong, Baojia(Tony); Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Trofymov, Artur; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; Truong, Loan; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsui, Ka Ming; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turgeman, Daniel; Turra, Ruggero; Turvey, Andrew John; Tuts, Michael; Tyndel, Mike; Ucchielli, Giulia; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ughetto, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Unverdorben, Christopher; Urban, Jozef; Urquijo, Phillip; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valderanis, Chrysostomos; Valdes Santurio, Eduardo; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vasquez, Jared Gregory; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veloce, Laurelle Maria; Veloso, Filipe; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigani, Luigi; Vigne, Ralph; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Vittori, Camilla; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wallangen, Veronica; Wang, Chao; Wang, Chao; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Tingting; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Washbrook, Andrew; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; Whallon, Nikola Lazar; Wharton, Andrew Mark; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; White, Sebastian; Whiteson, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wildauer, Andreas; Wilk, Fabian; Wilkens, Henric George; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winklmeier, Frank; Winston, Oliver James; Winter, Benedict Tobias; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wu, Mengqing; Wu, Miles; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yakabe, Ryota; Yamaguchi, Daiki; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zongchang; Yao, Weiming; Yap, Yee Chinn; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yuen, Stephanie P; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zakharchuk, Nataliia; Zalieckas, Justas; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zeng, Jian Cong; Zeng, Qi; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Guangyi; Zhang, Huijun; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Xiandong; Zhao, Yongke; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Chen; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Mingliang; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zinser, Markus; Ziolkowski, Michael; Živković, Lidija; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zurzolo, Giovanni; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents measurements of charged-particle distributions which are produced in proton--proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV and recorded by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. A special dataset recorded in 2012 with a small number of interactions per beam crossing (below 0.004) and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $160 \\mathrm{\\mu b^{-1}}$ was used. A minimum-bias trigger was utilised to select a data sample of more than 9 million collision events. The multiplicity, pseudorapidity, and transverse momentum distributions of charged particles are shown in different regions of kinematics and charged-particle multiplicity, including measurements of final states at high multiplicity. The results are presented as particle-level distributions to which predictions of various Monte Carlo event generator models are compared.

  16. Development of hydraulic power unit and accumulator charging circuit for electricity generation, storage and distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.N.Okoye; JIANG Ji-hai; LIU Hai-chang

    2008-01-01

    It is the purpose of the present paper to convert hydraulic energy to electric energy and saves both the pressure and electrical energy for re - use during the next system upstroke using two secondary units coupled to induction motor to drive cylinder loads. During upstroke operation, the variable pump/motor (P/M) driven by both electric motor and the second (P/M) works as hydraulic pump and output flow to the cylinders which drive the load. During load deceleration, the cylinders work as pump while the operation of the two secondary units are reversed, the variable (P/M) works as a motor generating a torque with the electric motor to drive the other(P/M) which transforms mechanical energy to hydraulic energy that is saved in the accumulator. When the en-ergy storage capacity of the accumulator is attained as the operation continues, energy storage to the accumulator is thermostatically stopped while the induction motor begins to work as a generator and generates electricity that is stored in the power distribution unit. Simulations were performed using a limited PT2 Block, I.e. 2nd-ordertransfer function with limitation of slope and signal output to determine suitable velocity of the cylinder which will match high performance and system stability. A mathematical model suited to the simulation of the hydrau-lic accumulator both in an open-or close-loop system is presented. The quest for improvement of lower energy capacity storage, saving and re-utilization of the conventional accumulator resulting in the short cycle time usage of hydraulic accumulators both in domestic and industrial purposes necessitates this research. The outcome of the research appears to be very efficient for generating fluctuation free electricity, power quality and reliability, energy saving/reutilization and system noise reduction.

  17. Review of Distribution Coefficients for Radionuclides in Carbonate Minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutton, M

    2009-08-14

    An understanding of the transport of radionuclides in carbonate minerals is necessary to be able to predict the fate of (and potentially remediate) radionuclides in the environment. In some environments, carbonate minerals such as calciate, aragonite, dolomite and limestone are present and an understanding of the sorption of radionuclides in these carbonate minerals is therefore advantageous. A list of the radionuclides of interest is given in Table 1. The distribution coefficient, K{sub d} is defined as the ratio of the contaminant concentration bound on the solid phase to the contaminant concentration remaining in the liquid phase at equilibrium. Some authors report distribution coefficients and other report partition coefficients, the data presented in this work assumes equality between these two terms, and data are presented and summarized in this work as logarithmic distribution coefficient (log K{sub D}). Published literature was searched using two methods. Firstly, the JNC Sorption Database, namely Shubutani et al (1999), and Suyama and Sasamoto (2004) was used to select elements of interest and a number of carbonate minerals. Secondly, on-line literature search tools were used to locate relevant published articles from 1900 to 2009. Over 300 data points covering 16 elements (hydrogen, carbon, calcium, nickel, strontium, technetium, palladium, iodine, cesium, samarium, europium, holmium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium and americium) were used to calculate an average and range of log K{sub d} values for each element. Unfortunately, no data could be found for chlorine, argon, krypton, zirconium, niobium, tin, thorium and curium. A description of the data is given below, together with the average, standard deviation, minimum, maximum and number of inputs for radionuclide K{sub d} values for calcite, aragonate, limestone, dolomite and unidentified carbonate rocks in Table 2. Finally, the data are condensed into one group (carbonate minerals) of data for each

  18. Review of Distribution Coefficients for Radionuclides in Carbonate Minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An understanding of the transport of radionuclides in carbonate minerals is necessary to be able to predict the fate of (and potentially remediate) radionuclides in the environment. In some environments, carbonate minerals such as calciate, aragonite, dolomite and limestone are present and an understanding of the sorption of radionuclides in these carbonate minerals is therefore advantageous. A list of the radionuclides of interest is given in Table 1. The distribution coefficient, Kd is defined as the ratio of the contaminant concentration bound on the solid phase to the contaminant concentration remaining in the liquid phase at equilibrium. Some authors report distribution coefficients and other report partition coefficients, the data presented in this work assumes equality between these two terms, and data are presented and summarized in this work as logarithmic distribution coefficient (log KD). Published literature was searched using two methods. Firstly, the JNC Sorption Database, namely Shubutani et al (1999), and Suyama and Sasamoto (2004) was used to select elements of interest and a number of carbonate minerals. Secondly, on-line literature search tools were used to locate relevant published articles from 1900 to 2009. Over 300 data points covering 16 elements (hydrogen, carbon, calcium, nickel, strontium, technetium, palladium, iodine, cesium, samarium, europium, holmium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium and americium) were used to calculate an average and range of log Kd values for each element. Unfortunately, no data could be found for chlorine, argon, krypton, zirconium, niobium, tin, thorium and curium. A description of the data is given below, together with the average, standard deviation, minimum, maximum and number of inputs for radionuclide Kd values for calcite, aragonate, limestone, dolomite and unidentified carbonate rocks in Table 2. Finally, the data are condensed into one group (carbonate minerals) of data for each element of interest in Table

  19. Telescope Time Without Tears: A Distributed Approach to Peer Review

    CERN Document Server

    Merrifield, Michael R

    2009-01-01

    The procedure that is currently employed to allocate time on telescopes is horribly onerous on those unfortunate astronomers who serve on the committees that administer the process, and is in danger of complete collapse as the number of applications steadily increases. Here, an alternative is presented, whereby the task is distributed around the astronomical community, with a suitable mechanism design established to steer the outcome toward awarding this precious resource to those projects where there is a consensus across the community that the science is most exciting and innovative.

  20. Asymmetric distribution of charged lipids between the leaflets of a vesicle bilayer induced by melittin and alamethicin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Shuo [ORNL; Heller, William T [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Cellular membranes are complex mixtures of lipids, proteins, and other small molecules that provide functional, dynamic barriers between the cell and its environment, as well as between environments within the cell. The lipid composition of the membrane is highly specific and controlled in terms of both content and lipid localization. The membrane structure results from the complex interplay between the wide varieties of molecules present. Here, small-angle neutron scattering and selective deuterium labeling were used to probe the impact of the membrane-active peptides melittin and alamethicin on the structure of lipid bilayers composed of a mixture of the lipids dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) and chain-perdeuterated dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC). We found that both peptides enriched the outer leaflet of the bilayer with the negatively charged DMPG, creating an asymmetric distribution of lipids. The level of enrichment is peptide concentration-dependent and is stronger for melittin than it is for alamethicin. The enrichment between the inner and outer bilayer leaflets occurs at very low peptide concentrations and increases with peptide concentration, including when the peptide adopts a membrane-spanning, pore-forming state. The results suggest that these membrane-active peptides may have a secondary stressful effect on target cells at low concentrations that results from a disruption of the lipid distribution between the inner and outer leaflets of the bilayer that is independent of the formation of transmembrane pores.

  1. Ion charge state distributions in ECR-plasmas determined from mass spectrometry and X-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of microwave power, magnetic field, neutral gas pressure and gas mixture on the ion charge state distribution (CSD) of an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma was investigated by q/A-analysis of an ion beam extracted from the plasma and by X-ray spectroscopy of this plasma. As the ion beam expands from a limited plasma edge and the extraction process alters the plasma properties in this region a small plasma cone including the discharge core is investigated by the X-ray method. For this reason the measured CSD are significantly different. Additionally, the transmission of the ions to the beam stop depends on the q/A ratio of the ion species and can falsify the true, primary CSD. In this way, the analysis of ECR plasma X-rays represents a more accurate method to measure the CSD of a discharge. In comparison to the q/A analysis it provides the true distribution and, moreover, different plasma regions can be examined

  2. A Review of Parallel Operation of Active Power Filters in the Distributed Generation System

    OpenAIRE

    Khadem, Shafiuzzaman Khan; Basu, Malabika; Conlon, Michael

    2011-01-01

    In this paper a technical review of parallel operation of Active Power Filter (APF) for harmonic power compensation in distributed generation (DG) network has been presented. Controlling methods and connection topologies with their pros and cons are described. Recent improvements in controlling and future trends for the application of APFs in distributed mode are also identified.

  3. Fission fragment charge and mass distributions in 239Pu(n ,f ) in the adiabatic nuclear energy density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnier, D.; Dubray, N.; Schunck, N.; Verrière, M.

    2016-05-01

    Background: Accurate knowledge of fission fragment yields is an essential ingredient of numerous applications ranging from the formation of elements in the r process to fuel cycle optimization for nuclear energy. The need for a predictive theory applicable where no data are available, together with the variety of potential applications, is an incentive to develop a fully microscopic approach to fission dynamics. Purpose: In this work, we calculate the pre-neutron emission charge and mass distributions of the fission fragments formed in the neutron-induced fission of 239Pu using a microscopic method based on nuclear density functional theory (DFT). Methods: Our theoretical framework is the nuclear energy density functional (EDF) method, where large-amplitude collective motion is treated adiabatically by using the time-dependent generator coordinate method (TDGCM) under the Gaussian overlap approximation (GOA). In practice, the TDGCM is implemented in two steps. First, a series of constrained EDF calculations map the configuration and potential-energy landscape of the fissioning system for a small set of collective variables (in this work, the axial quadrupole and octupole moments of the nucleus). Then, nuclear dynamics is modeled by propagating a collective wave packet on the potential-energy surface. Fission fragment distributions are extracted from the flux of the collective wave packet through the scission line. Results: We find that the main characteristics of the fission charge and mass distributions can be well reproduced by existing energy functionals even in two-dimensional collective spaces. Theory and experiment agree typically within two mass units for the position of the asymmetric peak. As expected, calculations are sensitive to the structure of the initial state and the prescription for the collective inertia. We emphasize that results are also sensitive to the continuity of the collective landscape near scission. Conclusions: Our analysis confirms

  4. Implications of current constraints on parton charge symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. T. Londergan; A. W. Thomas

    2005-11-01

    For the first time, charge symmetry breaking terms in parton distribution functions have been included in a global fit to high energy data. We review the results obtained for both valence and sea quark charge symmetry violation and compare these results with the most stringent experimental upper limits on charge symmetry violation for parton distribution functions, as well as with theoretical estimates of charge symmetry violation. The limits allowed in the global fit would tolerate a rather large violation of charge symmetry. We discuss the implications of this for various observables, including extraction of the Weinberg angle in neutrino DIS and the Gottfried and Adler sum rules.

  5. Constraints on Parton Charge Symmetry and Implications for Neutrino Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.T. Londergan; Anthony Thomas

    2004-07-01

    For the first time, charge symmetry breaking terms in parton distribution functions have been included in a global fit to high energy data. We review the results obtained for both valence and sea quark charge symmetry violation, and we compare these results with the most stringent experimental upper limits on charge symmetry violation for parton distribution functions, and with theoretical estimates of charge symmetry violation. The limits allowed in the global fit would tolerate a rather large violation of charge symmetry. We discuss the implications of this for the extraction of the Weinberg angle in neutrino DIS by the NuTeV collaboration.