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Sample records for charge collection profiles

  1. Measurements of charge collection profiles in virgin and strongly irradiated silicon diodes by means of the micro-IBICC technique

    CERN Document Server

    Vittone, E; Galassini, S; Jaksic, M; Lo Giudice, A; Lorenzi, A; Manfredotti, C

    2002-01-01

    Ion beam-induced charge collection (IBICC) method is a very sensitive technique to investigate the electronic features of semiconductor materials and devices. This technique consists in measuring the charge induced at the electrode by the motion of free carriers generated by a spatially scanned focused energetic ion beam. The measurement of the charge collection efficiency as a function of the ion impact position allows the electronic features of semiconductor materials and devices to be mapped. We used the micro-beam facility of the Ruder Boskovic Institute in Zagreb (HR) to perform lateral IBICC measurements of virgin, Au doped and strongly irradiated (frontal irradiation with 6.5 MeV He sup 2 sup + ions for a total dose of 2E12 ions/cm sup 2) p sup + /n/n sup + silicon diodes in order to evaluate charge collection profiles (CCPs) under different applied bias conditions. Basic transport parameters (minority carrier diffusion length, depletion region width) have been extracted from the experimental profiles ...

  2. Charge collection in an external proton beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wookey, C.W.; Somswasdi, B.; Rouse, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    Results from the measurement of the stability of charge collected from the target and exit foil, or as alternatives, the γ-ray or backscattered proton counts from the exit foil and the Ar X-ray counts from the air path in an external proton beam are presented. These results show that comparative analysis of material mounted in air is reliable, using either the collected charge or the γ-ray counts as the normalizing factor, if there are no earthed objects in close geometry. The backscattered proton counts can also be used, but not the Ar X-ray counts, unless the current is stabilized. The electrical or thermal conductivity of the target and the target to exit foil separation do not affect the proportionality of the collected charge and the γ-ray counts to the charge incident on the target

  3. The Charge Collection Properties of CVD Diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Behnke, T; Oh, A; Steuerer, J; Wagner, A; Zeuner, W; Behnke, Ties; Hüntemeyer, Petra; Oh, Alexander; Steuerer, Johannes; Wagner, Albrecht; Zeuner, Wolfram

    1998-01-01

    The charge collection properties of CVD diamond have been investigated with ionising radiation. In this study two CVD diamond samples, prepared with electrical contacts have been used as solid state ionisation chambers. The diamonds have been studied with beta particles and 10 keV photons, providing a homogeneous ionisation density and with protons and alpha particles which are absorbed in a thin surface layer. For the latter case a strong decrease of the signal as function of time is observed, which is attributed to polarisation effects inside the diamond. Spatially resolved measurements with protons show a large variation of the charge collection efficiency, whereas for photons and minimum ionising particles the response is much more uniform and in the order of 18%. These results indicate that the applicability of CVD diamond as a position sensitive particle detector depends on the ionisation type and appears to be promising for homogeneous ionisation densities as provided by relativistic charged particles.

  4. Charge Storage, Conductivity and Charge Profiles of Insulators as Related to Spacecraft Charging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, J. R.; Swaminathan, Prasanna; Frederickson, A. R.

    2004-01-01

    Dissipation of charges built up near the surface of insulators due to space environment interaction is central to understanding spacecraft charging. Conductivity of insulating materials is key to determine how accumulated charge will distribute across the spacecraft and how rapidly charge imbalance will dissipate. To understand these processes requires knowledge of how charge is deposited within the insulator, the mechanisms for charge trapping and charge transport within the insulator, and how the profile of trapped charge affects the transport and emission of charges from insulators. One must consider generation of mobile electrons and holes, their trapping, thermal de-trapping, mobility and recombination. Conductivity is more appropriately measured for spacecraft charging applications as the "decay" of charge deposited on the surface of an insulator, rather than by flow of current across two electrodes around the sample. We have found that conductivity determined from charge storage decay methods is 102 to 104 smaller than values obtained from classical ASTM and IEC methods for a variety of thin film insulating samples. For typical spacecraft charging conditions, classical conductivity predicts decay times on the order of minutes to hours (less than typical orbit periods); however, the higher charge storage conductivities predict decay times on the order of weeks to months leading to accumulation of charge with subsequent orbits. We found experimental evidence that penetration profiles of radiation and light are exceedingly important, and that internal electric fields due to charge profiles and high-field conduction by trapped electrons must be considered for space applications. We have also studied whether the decay constants depend on incident voltage and flux or on internal charge distributions and electric fields; light-activated discharge of surface charge to distinguish among differing charge trapping centers; and radiation-induced conductivity. Our

  5. Time resolved ion beam induced charge collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sexton W, Frederick; Walsh S, David; Doyle L, Barney; Dodd E, Paul

    2000-01-01

    Under this effort, a new method for studying the single event upset (SEU) in microelectronics has been developed and demonstrated. Called TRIBICC, for Time Resolved Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection, this technique measures the transient charge-collection waveform from a single heavy-ion strike with a -.03db bandwidth of 5 GHz. Bandwidth can be expanded up to 15 GHz (with 5 ps sampling windows) by using an FFT-based off-line waveform renormalization technique developed at Sandia. The theoretical time resolution of the digitized waveform is 24 ps with data re-normalization and 70 ps without re-normalization. To preserve the high bandwidth from IC to the digitizing oscilloscope, individual test structures are assembled in custom high-frequency fixtures. A leading-edge digitized waveform is stored with the corresponding ion beam position at each point in a two-dimensional raster scan. The resulting data cube contains a spatial charge distribution map of up to 4,096 traces of charge (Q) collected as a function of time. These two dimensional traces of Q(t) can cover a period as short as 5 ns with up to 1,024 points per trace. This tool overcomes limitations observed in previous multi-shot techniques due to the displacement damage effects of multiple ion strikes that changed the signal of interest during its measurement. This system is the first demonstration of a single-ion transient measurement capability coupled with spatial mapping of fast transients

  6. The charge collection in silicon strip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehringer, T.; Hubbeling, L.; Weilhammer, P.; Kemmer, J.; Koetz, U.; Riebesell, M.; Belau, E.; Klanner, R.; Lutz, G.; Neugebauer, E.; Seebrunner, H.J.; Wylie, A.

    1983-02-01

    The charge collection in silicon detectors has been studied, by measuring the response to high-energy particles of a 20μm pitch strip detector as a function of applied voltage and magnetic field. The results are well described by a simple model. The model is used to predict the spatial resolution of silicon strip detectors and to propose a detector with optimized spatial resolution. (orig.)

  7. 32 CFR 728.46 - Charges and collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Charges and collection. 728.46 Section 728.46... Their Dependents § 728.46 Charges and collection. (a) Policy. Pub. L. 99-591, section 9029, contains... . . . shall be credited to the appropriations against which charges have been made for providing such care...

  8. Racial Profiling as Collective Definition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor G. Gardner

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Economists and other interested academics have committed significant time and effort to developing a set of circumstances under which an intelligent and circumspect form of racial profiling can serve as an effective tool in crime finding–the specific objective of finding criminal activity afoot. In turn, anti-profiling advocates tend to focus on the immediate efficacy of the practice, the morality of the practice, and/or the legality of the practice. However, the tenor of this opposition invites racial profiling proponents to develop more surgical profiling techniques to employ in crime finding. In the article, I review the literature on group distinction to discern its relevance to the practice and study of racial profiling. I argue that the costs of racial profiling extend beyond inefficient policing and the humiliation of law-abiding minority pedestrians and drivers. Racial profiling is simultaneously a process of perception and articulation of relative human characteristics (both positive and negative; it binds and reifies the concepts of race and criminality, fixing them into the subconscious of the profiled, the profiler, and society at large.

  9. Racial Profiling as Collective Definition

    OpenAIRE

    Trevor G. Gardner

    2014-01-01

    Economists and other interested academics have committed significant time and effort to developing a set of circumstances under which an intelligent and circumspect form of racial profiling can serve as an effective tool in crime finding-the specific objective of finding criminal activity afoot. In turn, anti-profiling advocates tend to focus on the immediate efficacy of the practice, the morality of the practice, and/or the legality of the practice. However, the tenor of this opposition invi...

  10. Charge Storage, Conductivity and Charge Profiles of Insulators As Related to Spacecraft Charging

    OpenAIRE

    Dennison, JR; Frederickson, A. R.; Swaminathan, Prasanna

    2003-01-01

    Dissipation of charges built up near the surface of insulators due to space environment interaction is central to understanding spacecraft charging. Conductivity of insulating materials is key to determine how accumulated charge will distribute across the spacecraft and how rapidly charge imbalance will dissipate. To understand these processes requires knowledge of how charge is deposited within the insulator, the mechanisms for charge trapping and charge transport within the insulator, and h...

  11. Physics of new methods of charged particle acceleration collective effects in dense charged particle ensembles

    CERN Document Server

    Bonch-Osmolovsky, A G

    1994-01-01

    This volume discusses the theory of new methods of charged particle acceleration and its physical and mathematical descriptions. It examines some collective effects in dense charged particle ensembles, and traces the history of the development of the field of accelerator physics.

  12. Charge collection and space charge distribution in neutron-irradiated epitaxial silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poehlsen, Thomas

    2010-04-15

    In this work epitaxial n-type silicon diodes with a thickness of 100 {mu}m and 150 {mu}m are investigated. After neutron irradiation with fluences between 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} and 4 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} annealing studies were performed. CV-IV curves were taken and the depletion voltage was determined for different annealing times. All investigated diodes with neutron fluences greater than 2 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} showed type inversion due to irradiation. Measurements with the transient current technique (TCT) using a pulsed laser were performed to investigate charge collection effects for temperatures of -40 C, -10 C and 20 C. The charge correction method was used to determine the effective trapping time {tau}{sub eff}. Inconsistencies of the results could be explained by assuming field dependent trapping times. A simulation of charge collection could be used to determine the field dependent trapping time {tau}{sub eff}(E) and the space charge distribution in the detector bulk. Assuming a linear field dependence of the trapping times and a linear space charge distribution the data could be described. Indications of charge multiplication were seen in the irradiated 100 {mu}m thick diodes for all investigated fluences at voltages above 800 V. The space charge distribution extracted from TCT measurements was compared to the results of the CV measurements and showed good agreement. (orig.)

  13. Charge collection and space charge distribution in neutron-irradiated epitaxial silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poehlsen, Thomas

    2010-04-01

    In this work epitaxial n-type silicon diodes with a thickness of 100 μm and 150 μm are investigated. After neutron irradiation with fluences between 10 14 cm -2 and 4 x 10 15 cm -2 annealing studies were performed. CV-IV curves were taken and the depletion voltage was determined for different annealing times. All investigated diodes with neutron fluences greater than 2 x 10 14 cm -2 showed type inversion due to irradiation. Measurements with the transient current technique (TCT) using a pulsed laser were performed to investigate charge collection effects for temperatures of -40 C, -10 C and 20 C. The charge correction method was used to determine the effective trapping time τ eff . Inconsistencies of the results could be explained by assuming field dependent trapping times. A simulation of charge collection could be used to determine the field dependent trapping time τ eff (E) and the space charge distribution in the detector bulk. Assuming a linear field dependence of the trapping times and a linear space charge distribution the data could be described. Indications of charge multiplication were seen in the irradiated 100 μm thick diodes for all investigated fluences at voltages above 800 V. The space charge distribution extracted from TCT measurements was compared to the results of the CV measurements and showed good agreement. (orig.)

  14. Charge Collection and Propagation in Diamond X-Ray Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keister, J.W.; Smedley, J.; Dimitrov, D.; Busby, R.

    2009-01-01

    Diamond is a unique material for x-ray energy conversion. Its high thermal conductivity and low coefficient of thermal expansion make it ideal for high heat load environments. However, its large bandgap, while offering insensitivity to visible light, makes charge trapping more likely (thermal detrapping less likely) than in silicon; energy conversion efficiency is also 3-4 times less even under the best conditions. High material strength and x-ray transmission also are potentially useful features for certain applications in x-ray science. Limitations to charge collection efficiency such as recombination and charge trapping have been investigated quantitatively using quasi-continuous tunable synchrotron radiation under flexible biasing schemes as well using detailed Monte Carlo Simulations. In the case of charge collection efficiency, the magnitude of the applied field, initial particle energy, and probe depth are adjusted. The diffusion and drift of photo-generated charge clouds are explicitly considered for the specific energy loss behavior of diamond. While recombination loss at the entrance window of diamond diodes is qualitatively similar to a treatment for an additional 'dead' carbon window layer, the observed field and photon energy dependence implies that the more sophisticated model is more correct quantitatively. In addition, charge propagation in diamond is unique in that photoconductive gain is possible. Effectively, charge trapping of one carrier leads to screening of the applied field. In order to avoid photoconductive gain, either blocking contacts or explicit detrapping is required. Quantitative analysis of photoconductive gain as a function of applied field, x-ray power, waveform and photon energy offers insight into the fundamental limitations of state of the art single crystal diamond. Simple models are proposed to assist in extrapolating the observed behavior towards useful detector devices.

  15. Charge collection and charge pulse formation in highly irradiated silicon planar detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dezillie, B.; Li, Z.; Eremin, V.

    1998-06-01

    The interpretation of experimental data and predictions for future experiments for high-energy physics have been based on conventional methods like capacitance versus voltage (C-V) measurements. Experiments carried out on highly irradiated detectors show that the kinetics of the charge collection and the dependence of the charge pulse amplitude on the applied bias are deviated too far from those predicted by the conventional methods. The described results show that in highly irradiated detectors, at a bias lower than the real full depletion voltage (V fd ), the kinetics of the charge collection (Q) contains a fast and a slow component. At V = V fd *, which is the full depletion voltage traditionally determined by the extrapolation of the fast component amplitude of q versus bias to the maximum value or from the standard C-V measurements, the pulse has a slow component with significant amplitude. This slow component can only be eliminated by applying additional bias that amounts to the real full depletion voltage (V fd ) or more. The above mentioned regularities are explained in this paper in terms of a model of an irradiated detector with multiple regions. This model allows one to use C-V, in a modified way, as well as TChT (transient charge technique) measurements to determine the V fd for highly irradiated detectors

  16. Collective Space-Charge Phenomena in the Source Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haber, I.; Bernal, S.; Celata, C.M.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Kishek,R.A.; Quinn, B.; O' Shea, P.G.; Reiser, M.; Vay, J.-L.

    2004-09-18

    For many devices space-charge-dominated behavior, including the excitation of space-charge collective modes, can occur in the source region, even when the downstream characteristics are not space-charge-dominated. Furthermore, these modes can remain undamped for many focusing periods. Traditional studies of the source region in particle beam systems have emphasized the behavior of averaged beam characteristics, such as total current, rms beam size, or emittance, rather than the details of the full beam distribution function that are necessary to predict the excitation of collective modes. A primary tool for understanding the detailed evolution of a space-charge dominated beam in the source region has been the use of simulation in concert with detailed experimental measurement. However, ''first-principle'' simulations beginning from the emitter surface have often displayed substantial differences from what is measured. This is believed to result from sensitivities in the beam dynamics to small changes in the mechanical characteristics of the gun structure, as well as to similar sensitivities in the numerical methods. Simulations of the beam in the source region using the particle-in-cell WARP code and comparisons to experimental measurements at the University of Maryland are presented to illustrate the complexity in beam characteristics that can occur in the source region. In addition, direct measurement of the beam characteristics can be limited by lack of access to the source region or by difficulties in obtaining enough data to completely characterize the distribution function. Methods are therefore discussed for using simulation to infer characteristics of the beam distribution from the data that can be obtained.

  17. Improved charge collection of the buried p-i-n a-Si:H radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujieda, I.; Cho, G.; Conti, M.; Drewery, J.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Qureshi, S.; Street, R.A.

    1989-09-01

    Charge collection in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) radiation detectors is improved for high LET particle detection by adding thin intrinsic layers to the usual p-i-n structure. This buried p-i-n structure enables us to apply higher bias and the electric field is enhanced. When irradiated by 5.8 MeV α particles, the 5.7 μm thick buried p-i-n detector with bias 300V gives a signal size of 60,000 electrons, compared to about 20,000 electrons with the simple p-i-n detectors. The improved charge collection in the new structure is discussed. The capability of tailoring the field profile by doping a-Si:H opens a way to some interesting device structures. 17 refs., 7 figs

  18. SEE rate estimation based on diffusion approximation of charge collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogoyan, Armen V.; Chumakov, Alexander I.; Smolin, Anatoly A.

    2018-03-01

    The integral rectangular parallelepiped (IRPP) method remains the main approach to single event rate (SER) prediction for aerospace systems, despite the growing number of issues impairing method's validity when applied to scaled technology nodes. One of such issues is uncertainty in parameters extraction in the IRPP method, which can lead to a spread of several orders of magnitude in the subsequently calculated SER. The paper presents an alternative approach to SER estimation based on diffusion approximation of the charge collection by an IC element and geometrical interpretation of SEE cross-section. In contrast to the IRPP method, the proposed model includes only two parameters which are uniquely determined from the experimental data for normal incidence irradiation at an ion accelerator. This approach eliminates the necessity of arbitrary decisions during parameter extraction and, thus, greatly simplifies calculation procedure and increases the robustness of the forecast.

  19. Charge collection efficiency of GaAs detectors studied with low-energy heavy charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, R.; Dolezal, Z.; Linhart, V.; O'Shea, V.; Pospisil, S.; Raine, C.; Smith, K.; Sinor, M.; Wilhelm, I.

    1999-01-01

    Epitaxially grown GaAs layers have recently been produced with sufficient thickness and low enough free carrier concentration to permit their use as radiation detectors. Initial tests have shown that the epi-material behaves as a classical semiconductor as the depletion behaviour follows the square root dependency on the applied bias. This article presents the results of measurements of the growth of the active depletion depth with increasing bias using low-energy protons and alpha particles as probes for various depths and their comparison to values extrapolated from capacitance measurements. From the proton and alpha particle spectroscopic measurements, an active depth of detector material that collects 100% of the charge generated inside it was determined. The consistency of these results with independent capacitance measurements supports the idea that the GaAs epi-material behaves as a classical semiconductor. (author)

  20. Charge collection measurements with p-type Magnetic Czochralski silicon single pad detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosi, C.; Bruzzi, M.; Macchiolo, A.; Scaringella, M.; Petterson, M.K.; Sadrozinski, H.F.-W.; Betancourt, C.; Manna, N.; Creanza, D.; Boscardin, M.; Piemonte, C.; Zorzi, N.; Borrello, L.; Messineo, A.

    2007-01-01

    The charge collected from beta source particles in single pad detectors produced on p-type Magnetic Czochralski (MCz) silicon wafers has been measured before and after irradiation with 26 MeV protons. After a 1 MeV neutron equivalent fluence of 1x10 15 cm -2 the collected charge is reduced to 77% at bias voltages below 900 V. This result is compared with previous results from charge collection measurements

  1. Experimental characterization of the dominant multiple nodes charge collection mechanism in metal oxide-semiconductor transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ruiqiang; Chen, Shuming; Chi, Yaqing; Wu, Zhenyu; Liang, Bin; Chen, Jianjun; Xu, Jingyan; Hao, Peipei; Yu, Junting

    2017-06-01

    We propose an experimental method to investigate the dominant multiple node charge collection mechanism. A transistor array-based test structure is used to distinguish charge collection owing to the drift-diffusion and parasitic bipolar amplification effect. Heavy ion experimental results confirm that drift-diffusion dominates multiple node charge collection at low linear energy transfer (LET). However, the parasitic bipolar amplification effect dominates it at high LET. We also propose simple equations to determine the critical LET which may change the dominant multiple node charge collection mechanism. The calculated LET value is consistent with the heavy ion experimental results.

  2. Search for multiply charged Heavy Stable Charged Particles in data collected with the CMS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2013-10-30

    Several models of new physics yield particles that are massive, long-lived, and have an electric charge, Q, greater than that of the electron, e. A search for evidence of such particles was performed using 5.0 fb-1 and 18.8 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data collected at √s = 7 TeV and √s = 8 TeV, respectively, with the Compact Muon Solenoid detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The distinctive detector signatures of these particles are that they are slow-moving and highly ionizing. Ionization energy loss and time-of- flight measurements were made using the inner tracker and the muon system, respectively. The search is sensitive to 1e ≤ |Q| ≤ 8e. Data were found to be consistent with standard model expectations and upper limits on the production cross section of these particles were computed using a Drell-Yan-like production model. Masses below 517, 687, 752, 791, 798, 778, 753, and 724 GeV are excluded for |Q| = 1e, 2e, 3e, 4e, 5e, 6e, 7e, and 8e, respectively.

  3. Search for multiply charged Heavy Stable Charged Particles in data collected with the CMS detector.

    CERN Document Server

    Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh

    Several models of new physics yield particles that are massive, long-lived, and have an electric charge, $Q$, greater than that of the electron, $e$. A search for evidence of such particles was performed using 5.0~fb$^{-1}$ and 18.8~fb$^{-1}$ of proton-proton collision data collected at $\\sqrt{s}=7~$TeV and $\\sqrt{s}=8~$TeV, respectively, with the Compact Muon Solenoid detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The distinctive detector signatures of these particles are that they are slow-moving and highly ionizing. Ionization energy loss and time-of-flight measurements were made using the inner tracker and the muon system, respectively. The search is sensitive to $1e \\leq |Q| \\leq 8e$. Data were found to be consistent with standard model expectations and upper limits on the production cross section of these particles were computed using a Drell-Yan-like production model. Masses below 517, 687, 752, 791, 798, 778, 753, and 724~GeV are excluded for $|Q|=1e$, $2e$, $3e$, $4e$, $5e$, $6e$, $7e$, and $8e$, respectivel...

  4. The charge collection in single side silicon microstrip detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Eremin, V V; Roe, S; Ruggiero, G; Weilhammer, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The transient current technique has been used to investigate signal formation in unirradiated silicon microstrip detectors, which are similar in geometry to those developed for the ATLAS experiment at LHC. Nanosecond pulsed infrared and red lasers were used to induce the signals under study. Two peculiarities in the detector performance were observed: an unexpectedly slow rise to the signal induced in a given strip when signals are injected opposite to the strip, and a long duration of the induced signal in comparison with the calculated drift time of charge carriers through the detector thickness - with a significant fraction of the charge being induced after charge carrier arrival. These major effects and details of the detector response for different positions of charge injection are discussed in the context of Ramo's theorem and compared with predictions arising from the more commonly studied phenomenon of signal formation in planar pad detectors.

  5. Charge collection efficiency degradation induced by MeV ions in semiconductor devices: Model and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vittone, E., E-mail: ettore.vittone@unito.it [Department of Physics, NIS Research Centre and CNISM, University of Torino, via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Pastuovic, Z. [Centre for Accelerator Science (ANSTO), Locked bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2234 (Australia); Breese, M.B.H. [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Garcia Lopez, J. [Centro Nacional de Aceleradores (CNA), Sevilla University, J. Andalucia, CSIC, Av. Thomas A. Edison 7, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Jaksic, M. [Department for Experimental Physics, Ruder Boškovic Institute (RBI), P.O. Box 180, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Raisanen, J. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, Helsinki 00014 (Finland); Siegele, R. [Centre for Accelerator Science (ANSTO), Locked bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2234 (Australia); Simon, A. [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna International Centre, P.O. Box 100, 1400 Vienna (Austria); Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Vizkelethy, G. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), PO Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Highlights: • We study the electronic degradation of semiconductors induced by ion irradiation. • The experimental protocol is based on MeV ion microbeam irradiation. • The radiation induced damage is measured by IBIC. • The general model fits the experimental data in the low level damage regime. • Key parameters relevant to the intrinsic radiation hardness are extracted. - Abstract: This paper investigates both theoretically and experimentally the charge collection efficiency (CCE) degradation in silicon diodes induced by energetic ions. Ion Beam Induced Charge (IBIC) measurements carried out on n- and p-type silicon diodes which were previously irradiated with MeV He ions show evidence that the CCE degradation does not only depend on the mass, energy and fluence of the damaging ion, but also depends on the ion probe species and on the polarization state of the device. A general one-dimensional model is derived, which accounts for the ion-induced defect distribution, the ionization profile of the probing ion and the charge induction mechanism. Using the ionizing and non-ionizing energy loss profiles resulting from simulations based on the binary collision approximation and on the electrostatic/transport parameters of the diode under study as input, the model is able to accurately reproduce the experimental CCE degradation curves without introducing any phenomenological additional term or formula. Although limited to low level of damage, the model is quite general, including the displacement damage approach as a special case and can be applied to any semiconductor device. It provides a method to measure the capture coefficients of the radiation induced recombination centres. They can be considered indexes, which can contribute to assessing the relative radiation hardness of semiconductor materials.

  6. Heavy ion microbeam studies of diffusion time resolved charge collection from p-n junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, B.N.; El Bouanani, M.; Duggan, J.L.; McDaniel, F.D.; Renfrow, S.N.; Walsh, D.S.; Doyle, B.L.

    2001-01-01

    The knowledge of (diffusion, drift, and funneling assisted) charge collection within electronic devices is essential to design radiation hardened Integrated Circuits (ICs). In the present work, diffusion time resolved charge collection studies were performed on stripe-like junctions using 12 MeV carbon and 28 MeV silicon microbeams and MEDICI simulation calculations. The relative average arrival time of the diffused charge on the junctions was measured along with the amount of charge collection by the junctions. The average arrival time of the diffused charge is related to the first moment (or the average time) of the arrival carrier density on the junction. The experimental results and MEDICI (a 2D-device simulator) calculations support this interpretation. These results show the importance of the diffusive charge collection by junctions, which is especially significant in accounting for Single Event Upsets (SEUs) and Multiple Bit Upset (MBUs) in digital devices

  7. Methodology for extraction of space charge density profiles at nanoscale from Kelvin probe force microscopy measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villeneuve-Faure, C; Boudou, L; Makasheva, K; Teyssedre, G

    2017-12-15

    To understand the physical phenomena occurring at metal/dielectric interfaces, determination of the charge density profile at nanoscale is crucial. To deal with this issue, charges were injected applying a DC voltage on lateral Al-electrodes embedded in a SiN x thin dielectric layer. The surface potential induced by the injected charges was probed by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). It was found that the KPFM frequency mode is a better adapted method to probe accurately the charge profile. To extract the charge density profile from the surface potential two numerical approaches based on the solution to Poisson's equation for electrostatics were investigated: the second derivative model method, already reported in the literature, and a new 2D method based on the finite element method (FEM). Results highlight that the FEM is more robust to noise or artifacts in the case of a non-flat initial surface potential. Moreover, according to theoretical study the FEM appears to be a good candidate for determining charge density in dielectric films with thicknesses in the range from 10 nm to 10 μm. By applying this method, the charge density profile was determined at nanoscale, highlighting that the charge cloud remains close to the interface.

  8. Methodology for extraction of space charge density profiles at nanoscale from Kelvin probe force microscopy measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villeneuve-Faure, C.; Boudou, L.; Makasheva, K.; Teyssedre, G.

    2017-12-01

    To understand the physical phenomena occurring at metal/dielectric interfaces, determination of the charge density profile at nanoscale is crucial. To deal with this issue, charges were injected applying a DC voltage on lateral Al-electrodes embedded in a SiN x thin dielectric layer. The surface potential induced by the injected charges was probed by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). It was found that the KPFM frequency mode is a better adapted method to probe accurately the charge profile. To extract the charge density profile from the surface potential two numerical approaches based on the solution to Poisson’s equation for electrostatics were investigated: the second derivative model method, already reported in the literature, and a new 2D method based on the finite element method (FEM). Results highlight that the FEM is more robust to noise or artifacts in the case of a non-flat initial surface potential. Moreover, according to theoretical study the FEM appears to be a good candidate for determining charge density in dielectric films with thicknesses in the range from 10 nm to 10 μm. By applying this method, the charge density profile was determined at nanoscale, highlighting that the charge cloud remains close to the interface.

  9. Charge collection measurements in single-type column 3D sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaringella, M.; Polyakov, A.; Sadrozinski, H.F.-W.; Bruzzi, M.; Tosi, C.; Boscardin, M.; Piemonte, C.; Pozza, A.; Ronchin, S.; Zorzi, N.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.

    2007-01-01

    We report on charge collection studies on 3D silicon detectors of single-type column n-diffusions in p-substrate, configured either as strip or as pad detectors. The charge is generated by penetrating beta particles from a 90 Sr source which, together with a scintillation counter, serves as an electron telescope. The charge collection as a function of bias voltage is compared with the depletion thickness derived from the measured C-V characteristics

  10. Charge collection characteristics of Frisch collar CdZnTe gamma-ray spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, Mark J.; Kargar, Alireza; McGregor, Douglas S.

    2007-01-01

    A collimated 198 Au source was used to determine the charge collection efficiency (CCE) at several locations along the length of a 3.4x3.4x5.5 mm 3 CdZnTe bar detector, both in planar configuration and with Frisch collars of varying length. For each configuration, a 0.50-mm-long region spanning the width of the device was irradiated with 411-keV gamma rays produced by a neutron-activated gold foil. Irradiation began at the cathode and stepped in 0.50-mm steps toward the anode, with a spectrum being collected at each location. By observing the channel location of the full-energy peak in each collected spectrum, an average CCE was determined for each irradiated region. The CCE was found to vary nearly linearly along the length of the device in the planar configuration, starting at a peak value of 89% and dropping to a minimum measured value of 26% near the anode. The addition of a Frisch collar covering the entire length of the crystal greatly altered the CCE profile, which remained near 87% for approximately two-thirds of the length, then sharply dropped near the anode. Results were confirmed by theoretical models. Further CCE mapping was also completed for devices with Frisch collars of various lengths. Those results are reported as well

  11. A Pattern Analysis of Daily Electric Vehicle Charging Profiles: Operational Efficiency and Environmental Impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjit R. Desai

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEVs are considered one solution to reducing GHG emissions from private transport. Additionally, PEV adopters often have free access to public charging facilities. Through a pattern analysis, this study identifies five distinct clusters of daily PEV charging profiles observed at the public charging stations. Empirically observed patterns indicate a significant amount of operational inefficiency, where 54% of the total parking duration PEVs do not consume electricity, preventing other users from charging. This study identifies the opportunity cost in terms of GHG emissions savings if gasoline vehicles are replaced with potential PEV adopters. The time spent in parking without charging by current PEV users can be used by these potential PEV users to charge their PEVs and replace the use of gasoline. The results suggest that reducing inefficient station use leads to significant reductions in emissions. Overall, there is significant variability in outcomes depending on the specific cluster membership.

  12. Charge collection mechanisms in MOS/SOI transistors irradiated by energetic heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musseau, O.; Leray, J.L.; Ferlet, V.; Umbert, A.; Coic, Y.M.; Hesto, P.

    1991-01-01

    We have investigated with both experimental and numerical methods (Monte Carlo and drift-diffusion models) various charge collection mechanisms in NMOS/SOI transistors irradiated by single energetic heavy ions. Our physical interpretations of data emphasize the influence of various parasitic structures of the device. Two charge collection mechanisms are detailed: substrate funneling in buried MOS capacitor and latching of the parasitic bipolar transistor. Based on carrier transport and charge collection, the sensitivity of future scaled down CMOS/SOI technologies is finally discussed

  13. Investigation of the charge collection for strongly irradiated silicon strip detectors of the CMS ECAL Preshower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloch, Ph.; Peisert, A.; Chang, Y.H.; Chen, A.E.; Hou, S.; Lin, W.T.; Cheremukhin, A.E.; Golutvin, I.A.; Urkinbaev, A.R.; Zamyatin, N.I.; Loukas, D.

    2001-01-01

    Strongly irradiated (2.3·10 14 n/cm 2 ) silicon strip detectors of different size, thickness and different design options were tested in a muon beam at CERN in 1999. A charge collection efficiency in excess of 85% and a signal-to-noise ratio of about 6 are obtained in all cases at high enough bias voltage. Details of the charge collection in the interstrip and the guard ring region and cross-talk between strips were also studied. We find that the charge collection efficiency and the cross-talk between strips depend on the interstrip distance

  14. Analyzing heavy-ion-induced charge collection in Si devices by three-dimensional simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, P.E.

    1994-01-01

    Properties of charge collection in Si devices in response to single-ion bombardment have been studied using transient three-dimensional drift-diffusion simulation. In unloaded Si diodes, the funnel effect is particularly strong in lightly-doped materials for high-density strikes such as 100 MeV Fe, and essentially all charge collection is by funnel-assisted drift. This drift collection may occur at time scales as late as several nanoseconds, much later than is traditionally associated with drift. For more heavily-doped materials or lower-density strikes, such as 5-MeV α-particles, drift and diffusion play more equal roles. In epitaxial structures the funnel is truncated by the heavily-doped substrate, collapses quickly, and a great deal of charge is collected at late times by diffusion. Charge collection in Si circuitry is influenced by the circuit external to the struck device. Loading effects on charge collection were studied using passive external circuit elements as well as by mixed-mode simulation, which allows modeling of active external circuitry. Simulations indicate that the funnel can be significantly affected by the inclusion of passive loads, while active loads may prevent any direct charge collection by funneling. Finally, the use of three-dimensional device simulators is presented as a method of analyzing results obtained from focused ion microbeam experiments

  15. Method of measuring a profile of the density of charged particles in a particle beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyman, L.G.; Jankowski, D.J.

    1975-01-01

    A profile of the relative density of charged particles in a beam is obtained by disposing a number of rods parallel to each other in a plane perpendicular to the beam and shadowing the beam. A second number of rods is disposed perpendicular to the first rods in a plane perpendicular to the beam and also shadowing the beam. Irradiation of the rods by the beam of charged particles creates radioactive isotopes in a quantity proportional to the number of charged particles incident upon the rods. Measurement of the radioactivity of each of the rods provides a measure of the quantity of radioactive material generated thereby and, together with the location of the rods, provides information sufficient to identify a profile of the density of charged particles in the beam

  16. Method of improving heterogeneous oil reservoir polymer flooding effect by positively-charged gel profile control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ling; Xia, Huifen

    2018-01-01

    The project of polymer flooding has achieved great success in Daqing oilfield, and the main oil reservoir recovery can be improved by more than 15%. But, for some strong oil reservoir heterogeneity carrying out polymer flooding, polymer solution will be inefficient and invalid loop problem in the high permeability layer, then cause the larger polymer volume, and a significant reduction in the polymer flooding efficiency. Aiming at this problem, it is studied the method that improves heterogeneous oil reservoir polymer flooding effect by positively-charged gel profile control. The research results show that the polymer physical and chemical reaction of positively-charged gel with the residual polymer in high permeability layer can generate three-dimensional network of polymer, plugging high permeable layer, and increase injection pressure gradient, then improve the effect of polymer flooding development. Under the condition of the same dosage, positively-charged gel profile control can improve the polymer flooding recovery factor by 2.3∼3.8 percentage points. Under the condition of the same polymer flooding recovery factor increase value, after positively-charged gel profile control, it can reduce the polymer volume by 50 %. Applying mechanism of positively-charged gel profile control technology is feasible, cost savings, simple construction, and no environmental pollution, therefore has good application prospect.

  17. Anomalous effect of trench-oxide depth on alpha-particle-induced charge collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, H.; Kim, N.M.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of trench-oxide depth on the alpha-particle-induced charge collection is analyzed for the first time. From the simulation results, it was found that the depth of trench oxide has a considerable influence on the amount of collected charge. The confining of generated charge by the trench oxide was identified as a cause of this anomalous effect. Therefore, the tradeoff between soft error rate and cell to cell isolation characteristics should be considered in optimizing the depth of trench oxide

  18. Optoelectronic properties and depth profile of charge transport in nanocrystal films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aigner, Willi; Bienek, Oliver; Desta, Derese; Wiggers, Hartmut; Stutzmann, Martin; Pereira, Rui N.

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the charge transport in nanocrystal (NC) films using field effect transistors (FETs) of silicon NCs. By studying films with various thicknesses in the dark and under illumination with photons with different penetration depths (UV and red light), we are able to predictably change the spatial distribution of charge carriers across the films' profile. The experimental data are compared with photoinduced charge carrier generation rates computed using finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations complemented with optical measurements. This enables us to understand the optoelectronic properties of NC films and the depth profile dependence of the charge transport properties. From electrical measurements, we extract the total (bulk) photoinduced charge carrier densities (nphoto) and the photoinduced charge carrier densities in the FETs channel (nphoto*). We observe that the values of nphoto and their dependence on film thickness are similar for UV and red light illumination, whereas a significant difference is observed for the values of nphoto*. The dependencies of nphoto and nphoto* on film thickness and illumination wavelength are compared with data from FDTD simulations. Combining experimental data and simulation results, we find that charge carriers in the top rough surface of the films cannot contribute to the macroscopic charge transport. Moreover, we conclude that below the top rough surface of NC films, the efficiency of charge transport, including the charge carrier mobility, is homogeneous across the film thickness. Our work shows that the use of NC films as photoactive layers in applications requiring harvesting of strongly absorbed photons such as photodetectors and photovoltaics demands a very rigorous control over the films' roughness.

  19. Critical Points of the Electric Field from a Collection of Point Charges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Max, N; Weinkauf, T

    2007-02-16

    The electric field around a molecule is generated by the charge distribution of its constituents: positively charged atomic nuclei, which are well approximated by point charges, and negatively charged electrons, whose probability density distribution can be computed from quantum mechanics. For the purposes of molecular mechanics or dynamics, the charge distribution is often approximated by a collection of point charges, with either a single partial charge at each atomic nucleus position, representing both the nucleus and the electrons near it, or as several different point charges per atom. The critical points in the electric field are useful in visualizing its geometrical and topological structure, and can help in understanding the forces and motion it induces on a charged ion or neutral dipole. Most visualization tools for vector fields use only samples of the field on the vertices of a regular grid, and some sort of interpolation, for example, trilinear, on the grid cells. There is less risk of missing or misinterpreting topological features if they can be derived directly from the analytic formula for the field, rather than from its samples. This work presents a method which is guaranteed to find all the critical points of the electric field from a finite set of point charges. To visualize the field topology, we have modified the saddle connector method to use the analytic formula for the field.

  20. How to pay for waste collection? Taxes, charges, user fees or market prices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ascari, S.; Universita Commerciale Luigi Bocconi, Milan

    1995-01-01

    Increased environmental awareness leads to the reexamination of the waste collection charging problem, where the public nature of the service is challenged by their private utility, while economic instruments should also be aimed at pursuing environmental goals. Hence the case for applying the benefit principle of taxation is discussed. The choice of payment vehicle for waste collection services is analysed first as an environmental instrument, where unit pricing is compared with recycling subsidies and landfill levies; and as a local public finance tool, aimed at triggering utility efficiency, budget transparency, and equity. Alternative solutions like lump sum and parametric charges (in particular, the opportunity of charging waste collection by local property taxes) are also seen from these perspectives. Finally, price structure and the case for fees raised directly by the franchise instead of local public charges are discussed as a means of improving productive efficiency and combating tax evasion

  1. Test system for charge collection efficiency measurement (SYCOC) for neutron irradiated silicon sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, L. S.; Pin, A.; Militaru, O.; Cortina, E.; De Callatay, B.; Cabrera, J.; Michotte, D. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2011-07-01

    One of the constraints in using standard Float Zone silicon layer as base material for tracking in particle physics is its radiation hardness. The detection efficiency is degraded by the introduction of defects in the silicon crystal and charge trapping becomes the main problem. The Charge Collection Efficiency (CCE) is a relevant parameter in order to determine the detection performance of such devices. A state-of-the-art test system named 'Systeme de mesure de collection de charge' (SYCOC) has been developed for the characterization of diode and microstrip silicon sensors before and after irradiation. The system is designed to perform Charge Collection Efficiency (CCE) and Transient Current Technique (TCT) measurements with laser and radioactive sources in a controlled environment. Initial measurements on diodes are presented. (authors)

  2. Charge collection in the Silicon Drift Detectors of the ALICE experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Alessandro, B; Batigne, G; Beolé, S; Biolcati, E; Cerello, P; Coli, S; Corrales Morales, Y; Crescio, E; De Remigis, P; Falchieri, D; Giraudo, G; Giubellino, P; Lea, R; Marzari Chiesa, A; Masera, M; Mazza, G; Ortona, G; Prino, F; Ramello, L; Rashevsky, A; Riccati, L; Rivetti, A; Senyukov, S; Siciliano, M; Sitta, M; Subieta, M; Toscano, L; Tosello, F

    2010-01-01

    A detailed study of charge collection efficiency has been performed on the Silicon Drift Detectors (SDD) of the ALICE experiment. Three different methods to study the collected charge as a function of the drift time have been implemented. The first approach consists in measuring the charge at different injection distances moving an infrared laser by means of micrometric step motors. The second method is based on the measurement of the charge injected by the laser at fixed drift distance and varying the drift field, thus changing the drift time. In the last method, the measurement of the charge deposited by atmospheric muons is used to study the charge collection efficiency as a function of the drift time. The three methods gave consistent results and indicated that no charge loss during the drift is observed for the sensor types used in 99% of the SDD modules mounted on the ALICE Inner Tracking System. The atmospheric muons have also been used to test the effect of the zero-suppression applied to reduce the d...

  3. PROFIL KEPRIBADIAN BIG FIVE DAN COLLECTING BEHAVIOUR KOLEKTOR PIRINGAN HITAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    eni nuraeni nugrahawati

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A collector has peculiarities in their behavior, they have an emotional bond with his collection, persistent in hunting collection and preserved in caring, worried about the loss and damage of his/her collections. This study focused on how the collector’s personality profile and behavior on collecting records by using the theory of the Big Five Personality Profile from McIntosh & Schmeichel. The subjects of research were collector of records aged 30 to 39 years old with the  level of social status was medium. By factors analysis through International Item Pool Representation (IPIP-NEO questionnaire from Goldberg, this research found that  type personality mostly  were the openess to experience was high, Counscientiousness was high, Extraversion was high, Agreeableness was high, and Neuroticsm was low (O↑C↑E↑A↑N↓. Additionally the Collecting Behaviour type were the Passionate was high, the Inquisitive was low, the Hobby was high and the Expressive was high (P↑I↓H↑E↑.

  4. Charge collection efficiency and space charge formation in CdTe gamma and X-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matz, R.; Weidner, M.

    1998-01-01

    A new extended model for the charge collection efficiency in CdTe gamma and X ray detectors is presented which allows to derive from apparent experimental gamma spectra of a quasi-monochromatic source, an 241 Am source in the present case, not only the μτ products of electrons and holes individually but also the sign, spatial distribution, and temporal evolution of the net space charge accumulated in the detector. Resistive CdTe and CdZnTe as well as CdTe Schottky detectors are studied. While the resistive type is stable in time and exhibits higher μτ products, the Schottky type shows space charge accumulation which approaches saturation after about 1 h at several 10 11 cm -3 . This is attributed to efficient majority carrier depletion, Fermi level shift, and trap filling. Resistive detectors thus appear optimized to the needs of gamma spectroscopy even at low bias voltage, while Schottky types need higher bias to overcome the space charge. They are suited to both, gamma spectroscopy and X-ray detection in analog current mode, where they operate more stably due to the higher bias. From the point of view of materials characterization, gamma spectroscopy with Schottky detectors probes and reveals the trap density near the Fermi level (several 10 12 cm -3 eV -1 ). We find a basically homogeneous spatial distribution suggesting the trap origin being in crystal growth rather than surface processing. Capture of photogenerated charges in traps is detrimental for current-mode operation under high X-ray flux because delayed emission from traps limits the detector''s ability to respond to fast signal changes. (orig.)

  5. The measurement and modeling of alpha-particle-induced charge collection in dynamic memories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oldiges, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    This thesis addresses the problem of α-particle-induced charge collection in high-density dynamic random access memories. A novel technique for the measurement of charge collection in high-density memory cells and bit lines due to α-particle strikes was developed. The technique involves D.C. tests on simple test structures with an α-particle source on the device package as a lid. The advantages of this new measurement technique are: the method allows for in-situ measurements of charge collection on both MOS capacitors and bit lines found in present-day memories; the on-chip measurement technique minimizes errors due to external probes loading the device under test; the measurements can be controlled by a personal computer, with the data being able to be reduced on the same machine. Results obtained using this new measurement technique show that the charge collection is found to depend upon test-structure size and the configuration of its neighbors. Results of two-dimensional simulations of charge flow along the surface of an MOS capacitor from current injection due to an α-particle strike indicate that a spatial potential variation of 0.5V may occur between the point of current injection and capacitor edge for a 1M dRAM capacitor

  6. Investigation on the charge collection properties of a 4H-SiC Schottky diode detector

    CERN Document Server

    Verzellesi, G; Nava, F; Canali, C

    2002-01-01

    We present experimental and theoretical data on the charge collection properties of a 4H-SiC epitaxial Schottky diode exposed to 5.48- and 2.00-MeV alpha particles. Hundred percent Charge Collection Efficiency (CCE) is, in particular, demonstrated for the 2.00-MeV alpha particles at reverse voltages higher than 40 V. By comparing measured CCE values with the outcomes of drift-diffusion simulations, a value of 500 ns is inferred for the hole lifetime within the lowly doped, active layer of virgin samples. The contributions of diffusion and funneling-assisted drift to CCE at low reverse voltages are pointed out.

  7. Gallium arsenide particle detectors: a study of the active region and charge-collection efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berluti, L.; D'Auria, S.; Mattei, G.; Proia, M.; Rinaldi, P.; Zichichi, A.

    1995-01-01

    Gallium arsenide particle detectors made by Alenia SpA have been tested within the context of the RD-8 project and found to have a high charge-collection efficiency (75%). We have analysed the data and found the overall behaviour of these detectors to be coherent and understandable in terms of one function: the local charge-collection efficiency. Two ways have been used to measure the width of the active region and the increase of such a width as a function of bias is found not to be consistent with a simple square-root law. ((orig.))

  8. Charge collection control using retrograde well tested by proton microprobe irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayama, Hirokazu; Takai, Mikio; Kimura, Hiroshi; Ohno, Yoshikazu; Satoh, Shinichi; Sonoda, Kenichirou; Katani, Norihiko.

    1993-01-01

    Soft error reduction by high-energy ion-implanted layers has been investigated by novel evaluation techniques using high-energy proton microprobes. A retrograde well formed by 160 and 700 keV boron ion implantation could completely suppress soft errors induced by the proton microprobes at 400 keV. The proton-induced current revealed the charge collection efficiency for the retrograde well structure. The collected charge for the retrograde well in the soft-error mapping was proved to be lower than the critical charge of the measured DRAMs(dynamic random-access memories). Complementary use of soft-error mapping and ion-induced-current measurement could clarify well structures immune against soft errors. (author)

  9. Charges collection induced in APS by heavy particles: influence of design parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belredon, Xavier

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the design parameters influence on heavy ions-induced charge collection physics in APS. The goal is to determine the key parameters for an optimised space environment 'particle detector' APS design. It appears that diffusion is the dominant charge collection mechanism in all the studied technology types, with a smaller magnitude in case of epitaxial technologies. Following proton irradiation, a delayed charge collection and loss of collected charges have been observed. These phenomena are explained by the combination of carriers diffusion and action of the traps generated in the device. Even if they cannot be avoid in space applications, these effects are reduced in case of epitaxial technologies. This work led to the design parameters definition of an optimized APS 'particle detector' and to its fabrication. The results obtained on this APS confirm the previous conclusions and let us define the detection range of such detectors from 0.03 to 50 MeV.cm 2 .mg -1 . (author) [fr

  10. Experimental study of charge collection in PN, NP diodes and MOS capacitor struck by heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patin, Y.; Lochard, J.P.; Gosselin, G.

    1991-01-01

    Charge collection in PN and silicon diodes and MOS capacitor struck by heavy ions, has been experimentally studied. We have analysed a large set of data obtained at GANIL, Saclay and Bruyeres-le-Chatel accelerators. General laws have been deduced to describe the FUNNELING phenomena as function of circuit polarisation and ion penetration

  11. 47 CFR 36.381 - Carrier access charge billing and collecting expense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carrier access charge billing and collecting expense. 36.381 Section 36.381 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES JURISDICTIONAL SEPARATIONS PROCEDURES; STANDARD PROCEDURES FOR SEPARATING...

  12. Production, collection, and utilization of very-long-lived heavy charged leptons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goity, J. L.; Kossler, W. J.; Sher, Marc

    1993-12-01

    If a fourth generation of leptons exists, both the neutrino and its charged partner must be heavier than 45 GeV. We suppose that the neutrino is the heavier of the two, and that a global or discrete symmetry prohibits intergenerational mixing. In that case, nonrenormalizable Planck scale interactions will induce a very small mixing; dimension-five interactions will lead to a lifetime for the heavy charged lepton ~(1-100) yr. Production of such particles is discussed, and it is shown that a few thousand can be produced and collected at a linear collider. The possible uses of these heavy leptons are also briefly discussed.

  13. Profile distortion by beam space-charge in Ionization Profile Monitors

    CERN Document Server

    Vilsmeier, D; Wettig, T

    Measuring the transverse beam size in the Large Hadron Collider by using Ionization Profile Monitors is a difficult task for energies above injection during the energy ramp from 450 GeV to 6.5TeV. The beam size decreases from around 1mm to 200um and the brightness of the beam is high enough to destroy the structure of any form of interacting matter. While the electron trajectories are confined by an external electro-magnetic field which forces the electrons accordingly on helix paths with certain gyroradii, this gyration is heavily increased under the influence of the electric field of the beam. Smaller beam sizes, which go hand in hand with increased bunch electric fields, lead to larger gyroradii of the ionized electrons, which results in strongly distorted profiles. In addition, this distortion becomes more visible for smaller beam sizes as the extent of gyration grows compared to the actual beam size. Depending on the initial momentum distribution of the electrons, emerging from the ionization process wit...

  14. Funneling effect of alpha particles on the charge collection efficiency in N type silicon surface barrier detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boorboor, S.; Feghhi, S.A.H.; Jafari, H.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Field funneling due to SEE in microelectronic device affects the charge collection efficiency. • Charge collection efficiency from alpha particles in a N type SSB device was calculated. • GEANT4, a Monte Carlo code and ATLAS, a numerical code have been used. • The simulation results have been validated through comparison with the experimental results. - Abstract: There are three different mechanisms of charge collection in a semiconductor charge particle detector, such as the drift of carriers in depletion zone, the drift of carriers in an extended electrical field along the ion track or funneling effect and the diffusion of carriers. In this work, the funneling effect on charge collection efficiency due to alpha particle track in a N type silicon surface barrier detector has been investigated. GEANT4, as Monte Carlo code, has been used for estimation of the deposit energy distribution in the component. In addition, the semiconductor device simulator, ATLAS, has been used in calculation of charge collection efficiency. The simulation results have been validated through comparison with the available experimental results. The calculated charge collection efficiency has good agreement with experiment. Without considering the funneling effect and diffusion, the calculation results underestimate the charge collection efficiency within 60%. Our overall results were indicative of the fact that considering funneling effect, considerably improves the accuracy of the charge collection efficiency estimation

  15. Coupled spin and charge collective excitations in a spin polarized electron gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinescu, D.C.; Quinn, J.J.; Yi, K.S.

    1997-01-01

    The charge and longitudinal spin responses induced in a spin polarized quantum well by a weak electromagnetic field are investigated within the framework of the linear response theory. The authors evaluate the excitation frequencies for the intra- and inter-subband transitions of the collective charge and longitudinal spin density oscillations including many-body corrections beyond the random phase approximation through the spin dependent local field factors, G σ ± (q,ω). An equation-of-motion method was used to obtain these corrections in the limit of long wavelengths, and the results are given in terms of the equilibrium pair correlation function. The finite degree of spin polarization is shown to introduce coupling between the charge and spin density modes, in contrast with the result for an unpolarized system

  16. Large-scale charge transport and collective streamer dynamics within a developing sprite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, A.; Ebert, U.; Gordillo-Vázquez, F.

    2013-12-01

    Sprite discharges, ocurring above active electrical thunderstorms, often appear as huge trees containing hundreds of propagating streamer filaments. Some features in these "carrot sprites", such as the reconnection of neighbouring streamers and the emergence of upward-propagating tendrils, reveal the complex collective dynamics of the propagating branches and the large-scale charge transport within the developing sprite. We here present a model of growing streamer trees that takes into account the finite channel conductivity and treats the electric field self-consistently [1]. Our simulations show the structure of an overall ``streamer of streamers'' that we name collective streamer front. We discuss the charge distribution inside the discharge tree, which provides a natural explanation for the observed reconnections of streamers in sprites and for the emergence from existing channels of upward-propagating, negative streamers. [1] arXiv:1307.2378 [physics.plasm-ph

  17. High-Power Collective Charging of a Solid-State Quantum Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Dario; Campisi, Michele; Andolina, Gian Marcello; Pellegrini, Vittorio; Polini, Marco

    2018-03-01

    Quantum information theorems state that it is possible to exploit collective quantum resources to greatly enhance the charging power of quantum batteries (QBs) made of many identical elementary units. We here present and solve a model of a QB that can be engineered in solid-state architectures. It consists of N two-level systems coupled to a single photonic mode in a cavity. We contrast this collective model ("Dicke QB"), whereby entanglement is genuinely created by the common photonic mode, to the one in which each two-level system is coupled to its own separate cavity mode ("Rabi QB"). By employing exact diagonalization, we demonstrate the emergence of a quantum advantage in the charging power of Dicke QBs, which scales like √{N } for N ≫1 .

  18. Profil épidémiologique et prise en charge des exacerbations d ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: l'exacerbation d'asthme est un phénomène paroxystique qui peut mettre en jeu le pronostic vital. Le but de l'étude est d'évaluer le profil épidémiologique et les modalités de prise en charge de l'exacerbation d'asthme chez les enfants âgés de 2 à 15 ans dans l'unité de pneumoallergologie pédiatrique de ...

  19. Geant4-based simulations of charge collection in CMOS Active Pixel Sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, M.; Allinson, N.M.; Price, T.; Anaxagoras, T.

    2017-01-01

    Geant4 is an object-oriented toolkit for the simulation of the interaction of particles and radiation with matter. It provides a snapshot of the state of a simulated particle in time, as it travels through a specified geometry. One important area of application is the modelling of radiation detector systems. Here, we extend the abilities of such modelling to include charge transport and sharing in pixelated CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APSs); though similar effects occur in other pixel detectors. The CMOS APSs discussed were developed in the framework of the PRaVDA consortium to assist the design of custom sensors to be used in an energy-range detector for proton Computed Tomography (pCT). The development of ad-hoc classes, providing a charge transport model for a CMOS APS and its integration into the standard Geant4 toolkit, is described. The proposed charge transport model includes, charge generation, diffusion, collection, and sharing across adjacent pixels, as well as the full electronic chain for a CMOS APS. The proposed model is validated against experimental data acquired with protons in an energy range relevant for pCT.

  20. Depth profiling of oxide-trapped charges in 6H-SiC MOS structures by slant etching method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitoh, Kazunari; Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Ohnishi, Kazunori [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Coll. of Science and Technology; Yoshikawa, Masahito; Ohshima, Takeshi; Itoh, Hisayoshi; Nashiyama, Isamu

    1997-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to evaluate the depth profile of trapped charges in an oxide layer on SiC. Using this method, 6H-SiC MOS structures with different oxide thickness were fabricated on the same substrate under the same oxidation condition, and the depth profile of oxide-trapped charges before and after {sup 60}Co-gamma ray irradiation were obtained. It is found, from the depth profiling, that the trapping mechanism of electrons and holes in the oxide strongly depends on the bias polarity during irradiation, and these charges are trapped near 6H-SiC/SiO{sub 2} interface. We believe that this method is very useful for estimation of the oxide-trapped charges in 6H-SiC MOS structures. (author)

  1. Estimation of optimum time interval for neutron- γ discrimination by simplified digital charge collection method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Harleen; Singh, Sarabjeet

    2014-01-01

    The discrimination of mixed radiation field is of prime importance due to its application in neutron detection which leads to radiation safety, nuclear material detection etc. The liquid scintillators are one of the most important radiation detectors because the relative decay rate of neutron pulse is slower as compared to gamma radiation in these detectors. There are techniques like zero crossing and charge comparison which are very popular and implemented using analogue electronics. In the recent years due to availability of fast ADC and FPGA, digital methods for discrimination of mixed field radiations have been investigated. Some of the digital time domain techniques developed are pulse gradient analysis (PGA), simplified digital charge collection method (SDCC), digital zero crossing method. The performance of these methods depends on the appropriate selection of gate time for which the pulse is processed. In this paper, the SDCC method is investigated for a neutron-gamma mixed field. The main focus of the study is to get the knowledge of optimum gate time which is very important in neutron gamma discrimination analysis in a mixed radiation field. The comparison with charge collection (CC) method is also investigated

  2. Evidence for plasma effect on charge collection efficiency in proton irradiated GaAs detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Nava, F; Canali, C; Vittone, E; Polesello, P; Biggeri, U; Leroy, C

    1999-01-01

    The radiation damage in 100 mu m thick Schottky diodes made on semi-insulating undoped GaAs materials, were studied using alpha-, beta-, proton- and gamma-spectroscopy as well as I-V measurements. The results have been analysed within the framework of the Hecht model to investigate the influence of the plasma produced by short-range strongly ionising particles on the detector performance after 24 GeV proton irradiation. It has been found that with the mean free drift lengths for electrons and holes determined from alpha-spectra in overdepleted detectors, the charge collection efficiency for beta-particles, cce subbeta, is well predicted in the unirradiated detectors, while in the most irradiated ones, the cce subbeta is underestimated by more than 40%. The observed disagreement can be explained by assuming that the charge carrier recombination in the plasma region of such detectors, becomes significant.

  3. Effect produced by the charge collection time upon the time and energy resolution of semiconductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, V.A.; Stegailov, V.I.; Zinov, V.G.; Yashin, S.N.

    1986-01-01

    The effect produced by the charge collection time upon the time and energy resolution of semiconductor detectors has been studied. It is shown that sampling of pulse rise times permits one to identify in coaxial detectors a group of pulses corresponding to the detection of radiation in surface layers of the detector. Choosing pulses with the maximum rise time rate allows one to improve the time resolution of the coincidence sepectrometer and achieve 2tau=1.65 ns, instead of the 2tau=5.50 ns for coincidences of the 1332 keV gamma line and β - particles from 60 Co. (orig.)

  4. Chaos and collective relaxation in galaxies and charged-particle beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohn, Courtlandt; /Fermilab /Northern Illinois U.; Kandrup, Henry E.; /Florida U.; Kishek, Rami A.; O' Shea, Patrick G.; Reiser, Martin; /Maryland U.; Sideris, Ioannis V.; /Florida U. /Northern Illinois U.

    2003-01-01

    Both galaxies and charged particle beams can exhibit collective relaxation on surprisingly short time scales. This can be attributed to the effects of chaos, often triggered by resonances caused by time-dependences in the bulk potential, which act almost identically for attractive gravitational and repulsive electrostatic forces. These similarities suggest that many physical processes at work in galaxies, albeit not subject to direct controlled experiments, can be tested indirectly using facilities such as the University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER) currently nearing completion.

  5. EX1206 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1206: Northeast and Mid-Atlantic Canyons...

  6. EX1305 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1305: Summer Ecosystem Monitoring Survey...

  7. EX0903 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX0903: Mapping Field Trial I Mendocino...

  8. EX0905 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX0905: Mapping Field Trials II Mendocino...

  9. EX1104 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1104: Mid-Cayman Rise Exploration...

  10. EX1704 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1704: American Samoa and Cook Islands...

  11. EX1601 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1601: Transit and Mission Patch Test...

  12. EX1302 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1302: Ship Shakedown, Patch Test and...

  13. EX1705 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1705: American Samoa, Kingman/Palmyra,...

  14. EX1701 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1701: Kingman/Palmyra, Jarvis (Mapping)...

  15. EX1403 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1403: East Coast Mapping and Exploration...

  16. EX0907 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX0907: Mapping Field Trial IV Habitat...

  17. EX1105 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1105: Field Trials of EM302 Multibeam...

  18. EX1608 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1608: FY17 Ship and ROV Shakedown on...

  19. EX0802 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX0802: Operation Halloween Shakedown...

  20. EX1602 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1602: Mission System Shakedown/CAPSTONE...

  1. EX1201 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1201: Ship Shakedown and Patch Tests...

  2. EX0904 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX0904: Water Column Exploration Field...

  3. EX0901 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX0901: Mapping Shakedown Cruise between...

  4. EX1607 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1607: CAPSTONE Wake Island PRI MNM...

  5. EX1303 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1303: New England Seamount Chain...

  6. EX0801 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX0801: Mapping Operations Shakedown...

  7. EX1702 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1702: American Samoa Expedition:...

  8. EX1301 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1301: Ship Shakedown and Patch Test...

  9. EX1505 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1505: October 2015 Transit: Honolulu, HI...

  10. EX1005 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1005: Guam to Honolulu, HI Transit...

  11. EX1203 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1203: Florida Escarpment and Straits...

  12. EX1101 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1101: Ship Shakedown and Patch Tests...

  13. EX1604 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1604: CAPSTONE Wake Island PRIMNM...

  14. Temperature profile data collected from 03 May 1962 to 15 September 1990 (NODC Accession 0000049)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bottle casts in a world wide distribution from 03 May 1962 to 15 September 1990. Data were collected and submitted by...

  15. 40 CFR 141.533 - What data must my system collect to calculate a disinfection profile?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... calculate a disinfection profile? 141.533 Section 141.533 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Disinfection Profile § 141.533 What data must my system collect to calculate a disinfection profile? Your system must monitor the following...

  16. 78 FR 39832 - Price for the 2013 5-Star Generals Profile Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY United States Mint Price for the 2013 5-Star Generals Profile Collection AGENCY: United States Mint, Department of the Treasury. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The United States Mint is announcing a price of $74.95 for the 2013 5-Star Generals Profile Collection. FOR FURTHER...

  17. Photo-excited charge collection spectroscopy probing the traps in field-effect transistors

    CERN Document Server

    Im, Seongil; Kim, Jae Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Solid state field-effect devices such as organic and inorganic-channel thin-film transistors (TFTs) have been expected to promote advances in display and sensor electronics. The operational stabilities of such TFTs are thus important, strongly depending on the nature and density of charge traps present at the channel/dielectric interface or in the thin-film channel itself. This book contains how to characterize these traps, starting from the device physics of field-effect transistor (FET). Unlike conventional analysis techniques which are away from well-resolving spectral results, newly-introduced photo-excited charge-collection spectroscopy (PECCS) utilizes the photo-induced threshold voltage response from any type of working transistor devices with organic-, inorganic-, and even nano-channels, directly probing on the traps. So, our technique PECCS has been discussed through more than ten refereed-journal papers in the fields of device electronics, applied physics, applied chemistry, nano-devices and materia...

  18. Electric field distribution and the charge collection process in not-ideally compensated coaxial Ge(Li) detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szymczyk, W.M.; Moszynski, M.

    1978-01-01

    The not-ideally compensated space charge of donors and acceptors in lithium-drifted coaxial Ge(Li) detectors can modify the electric field distribution in the detector depleted volume, and influence in this way the charge collection process. Observations of the capacity, the time of charge collection (transit time), and the relative efficiency characteristics vs. detector bias voltage, showed that in conventional pin + coaaxial structures an undercompensation near the inner p-type core was typical. It was found that such an undercompensation had negligible consequences from the charge collection point of view. However, one case was observed where the modification near the outer electrode was present. In that case the charge pulses with remarkably increased rise-times were observed, as compared to the predictions based on the assumption of the classical, E proportional to 1/r, electric field distribution. The pulses expected from not-ideally compensated detectors were calculated using the Variable Velocity Approximation. The pulses expected from and much better agreement with the observed pulses was obtained. The calculated and observed dependencies of the charge transit times vs. reciprocal of the detector bias voltage exhibited, in the absence of the outer-electrode modification, linear parts. Measurement of their slopes permitted to find experimentally the depletion layer width provided the charge carriers mobility value was known, or vice versa. (Auth.)

  19. Load demand profile for a large charging station of a fleet of all-electric plug-in buses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario A. Rios

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes a general procedure to compute the load demand profile from a parking lot where a fleet of buses with electric propulsion mechanisms are charged. Such procedure is divided in three different stages, the first one models the daily energy utilisation of the batteries based on Monte Carlo simulations and route characteristics. The second one models the process in the charging station based on discrete event simulation of queues of buses served by a lot of available chargers. The third step computes the final demand profile in the parking lot because of the charging process based on the power consumption of batteries’ chargers and the utilisation of the available charges. The proposed procedure allows the computation of the number of required batteries’ chargers to be installed in a charging station placed at a parking lot in order to satisfy and ensure the operation of the fleet, the computation of the power demand profile and the peak load and the computation of the general characteristics of electrical infrastructure to supply the power to the station.

  20. Correction of incomplete charge collection in CdTe detectors using the correlation with the rise time distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horovitz, Yossi.

    1994-01-01

    Experimentally and theoretically it was found that there is a correlation between tile pulse rise time and the amount of charge that is collected in the detector contacts. As the rise time becomes longer less charge is collected. In this thesis it has been proven that one can find from this correlation, with the aid of a mathematical function, the theoretical amount of charge that has to be collected in the contacts if no trapping took place. This mathematical function called the correction function, f(t), is dependent on the rise time and the material quality (the trap concentration). In order to find the correction function, a computer, simulation was written. This computer program simulates, based on a phenomenological theoretical model, the charge collection in the detector. This model depends on three parameters (for the holes and for the electrons) that characterized the charge collection quality of the detector. The parameters are: the mean free time to be trapped, the detrapping time and the transit time that depends on the electric field. By a comparison between the simulation output and experimental data, these parameters were found. The correction function was found to be linear with rise time. This conclusion is confirmed experimentally. In this work experiments have been carried out that measured the correlation between two parameters. These experiments measured, for each photon that interacts with the detector, the pulse rise time and the pulse amplitude. A computer program accepts these spectra and substitute each element in the correction function and corrects for the incomplete charge collection. It was found that the correction function does not depend on the energy of the radiation source and source-detector geometry but depends on the material quality. The application of the correction function to the two dimensional spectra gives a correction of tens of percents in charge collection and provides an improvement in the resolution and the peak

  1. Charge and current density profiles of a degenerate magnetized free-electron gas near a hard wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kettenis, M.M.; Suttorp, L.G.

    1998-01-01

    The charge and current densities of a completely degenerate free-electron gas in a uniform magnetic field are found to have a damped oscillatory spatial dependence near a wall that is parallel to the magnetic field. For large distances from the wall the behaviour of the associated profile functions

  2. Effect of body biasing on single-event induced charge collection in deep N-well technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Yi; Hu Jian-Guo; Tan Hong-Zhou; Qin Jun-Rui

    2015-01-01

    As the device size decreases, the soft error induced by space ions is becoming a great concern for the reliability of integrated circuits (ICs). At present, the body biasing technique is widely used in highly scaled technologies. In the paper, using the three-dimensional technology computer-aided design (TCAD) simulation, we analyze the effect of the body biasing on the single-event charge collection in deep N-well technology. Our simulation results show that the body biasing mainly affects the behavior of the source, and the effect of body biasing on the charge collection for the nMOSFET and pMOSFET is quite different. For the nMOSFET, the RBB will increase the charge collection, while the FBB will reduce the charge collection. For the pMOSFET, the effect of RBB on the SET pulse width is small, while the FBB has an adverse effect. Moreover, the differenceof the effect of body biasing on the charge collection is compared in deep N-well and twin well. (paper)

  3. Charge collection mapping of a novel ultra-thin silicon strip detector for hadrontherapy beam monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouterfa, Mohamed, E-mail: mohamed.bouterfa@uclouvain.be [ICTEAM Institute, Universite catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Alexandre, Geoffrey; Cortina Gil, Eduardo [IRPM Institute, Universite catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Flandre, Denis [ICTEAM Institute, Universite catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2013-12-21

    In precise hadrontherapy treatments, the particle beam must be monitored in real time without being degraded. Silicon strip detectors have been fabricated over an area as large as 4.5×4.5 cm{sup 2} with ultra low thickness of 20μm. These offer the following considerable advantages: significantly reduced beam scattering, higher radiation hardness which leads to improved detector lifetime, and much better collection efficiency. In a previous work, the novel sensor has been described and a global macroscopic dosimetry characterization has been proposed. This provides practical information for the detector daily use but not about the local microscopic knowledge of the sensor. This work therefore presents a micrometric-accuracy charge-collection characterization of this new generation of ultra-thin silicon strip detectors. This goal is reached thanks to a 1060 nm-wavelength micrometric-sized laser that can be positioned relatively to the sensor with a submicron precision for the three different axes. This study gives a much better knowledge of the inefficient areas of the sensor and allows therefore optimization for future designs.

  4. 77 FR 69440 - Information Collection; Limitations on Pass-Through Charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-19

    ...; Limitations on Pass-Through Charges AGENCY: Department of Defense (DOD), General Services Administration (GSA... regarding Limitations on Pass- Through Charges. Public comments are particularly invited on: Whether this... 9000- 0173, Limitations on Pass-Through Charges by any of the following methods: Regulations.gov : http...

  5. Transverse energy per charged particle in heavy-ion collisions: Role of collective flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar Tiwari, Swatantra; Sahoo, Raghunath

    2018-03-01

    The ratio of (pseudo)rapidity density of transverse energy and the (pseudo)rapidity density of charged particles, which is a measure of the mean transverse energy per particle, is an important observable in high energy heavy-ion collisions. This ratio reveals information about the mechanism of particle production and the freeze-out criteria. Its collision energy and centrality dependence is almost similar to the chemical freeze-out temperature until top Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) energy. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) measurement at √{s_{NN}} = 2.76 TeV brings up new challenges towards understanding the phenomena like gluon saturation and role of collective flow, etc. being prevalent at high energies, which could contribute to the above observable. Statistical Hadron Gas Model (SHGM) with a static fireball approximation has been successful in describing both the centrality and energy dependence until top RHIC energies. However, the SHGM predictions for higher energies lie well below the LHC data. In order to understand this, we have incorporated collective flow in an excluded-volume SHGM (EV-SHGM). Our studies suggest that the collective flow plays an important role in describing E T/ N ch and it could be one of the possible parameters to explain the rise observed in E T/ N ch from RHIC to LHC energies. Predictions are made for E T/ N ch , participant pair normalized-transverse energy per unit rapidity and the Bjorken energy density for Pb+Pb collisions at √{s_{NN}} = 5.02 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider.

  6. 75 FR 20811 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Produce Processor Profiles of Fish Processing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-21

    ... processing seasons. However, very limited information is available in a consolidated location or format about... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Produce Processor Profiles of Fish Processing Plants in Alaska AGENCY: National...

  7. Analytical solution for charged fluid pressure profiles - circulation in combined electromagnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovář, Jiří; Slaný, Petr; Stuchlík, Zdeněk; Karas, Vladimír; Trova, Audrey

    2017-12-01

    We introduce a general transformation leading to an integral form of pressure equations characterizing equilibrium configurations of charged perfect fluid circling in strong gravitational and combined electromagnetic fields. The transformation generalizes our recent analytical treatment applicable to electric or magnetic fields treated separately along with the gravitational one. As an example, we present a particular solution for a fluid circling close to a charged rotating black hole immersed in an asymptotically uniform magnetic field.

  8. Charge collection in X-ray pixel detectors based on semi-insulating GaAs doped with Cr

    CERN Document Server

    Ayzenshtat, G I; Tolbanov, O P; Vorobev, A P

    2002-01-01

    An analysis of the performance of X-ray pixel detectors based on semi-insulating GaAs doped with Cr has been carried out. An analytic form for electron and hole currents has been obtained. The detector based on our material has high charge collection efficiency only when positive potential is applied to pixels, in contrast to semi-insulating materials (LEC SI-GaAs). A mean charge of a pixel contact is calculated for photon energy of 30 and 60 keV. The maximum mean charge is 3000e for the detector thickness of 300 mu m and photon energy of 30 keV and 2300e for the detector thickness of 600-800 mu m and photon energy of 60 keV.

  9. Characterization of charge carrier collection in a CdZnTe Frisch collar detector with a highly collimated 137Cs source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kargar, Alireza; Harrison, Mark J.; Brooks, Adam C.; McGregor, Douglas S.

    2010-01-01

    A 4.7 x4.7x9.5 mm 3 CdZnTe Frisch collar device was characterized through probing the device with a highly collimated 137 Cs 662 keV gamma ray source. In a systematic series of experiments, the detector was probed along the length and width with a 137 Cs gamma ray source using a 43.0 mm long Pb-collimator with a 0.6 mm circular hole. The detector was probed along the central line under different operating voltages of 1200, 1000, 800, 600 and 400 V. The experimental results correlated well to charge collection calculations for a modeled device with the same size and operating conditions. It was proved that, unlike the planar configuration, the charge collection efficiency profile along the length of Frisch collar device is considerably improved. The CdZnTe raw materials for this study were acquired from Redlen Technologies, and the Frisch collar device was fabricated and characterized at S.M.A.R.T. Laboratory at Kansas State University.

  10. Space charge profiles in low density polyethylene samples containing a permittivity/conductivity gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bambery, K.R.; Fleming, R.J.; Holbøll, Joachim

    2001-01-01

    Laser induced pressure pulse space charge measurements were made on 1.5 mm thick plaques of high purity low density polyethylene equipped with vacuum-evaporated aluminium electrodes. Temperature differences up to 20 °C were maintained across the samples, which were subjected to dc fields up to 1.......5×107 V m-1. Current density was also measured as a function of temperature and field. Space charge due exclusively to the temperature gradient was detected, with density of order 0.01 C m-3. The activation energy associated with the transport of electrons through the bulk was calculated as 0.09 e...... were inferred by combining the space charge and current density measurements...

  11. Multilayer Coating of Tetrandrine-loaded PLGA nanoparticles: Effect of surface charges on cellular uptake rate and drug release profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Rui; Li, Ke; Chen, Zhe; Shi, Chen

    2016-02-01

    The effect of surface charges on the cellular uptake rate and drug release profile of tetrandrine-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (TPNs) was studied. Stabilizer-free nanoprecipitation method was used in this study for the synthesis of TPNs. A typical layer-by-layer approach was applied for multi-coating particles' surface with use of poly(styrene sulfonate) sodium salt (PSS) as anionic layer and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) as cationic layer. The modified TPNs were characterized by different physicochemical techniques such as Zeta sizer, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The drug loading efficiency, release profile and cellular uptake rate were evaluated by high performance liquid chromatography and confocal laser scanning microscopy, respectively. The resultant PSS/PAH/PSS/PAH/TPNs (4 layers) exhibited spherical-shaped morphology with the average size of 160.3±5.165 nm and zeta potential of-57.8 mV. The encapsulation efficiency and drug loading efficiency were 57.88% and 1.73%, respectively. Multi-layer coating of polymeric materials with different charges on particles' surface could dramatically influence the drug release profile of TPNs (4 layers vs. 3 layers). In addition, variable layers of surface coating could also greatly affect the cellular uptake rate of TPNs in A549 cells within 8 h. Overall, by coating particles' surface with those different charged polymers, precise control of drug release as well as cellular uptake rate can be achieved simultaneously. Thus, this approach provides a new strategy for controllable drug delivery.

  12. Exploring charge density analysis in crystals at high pressure: data collection, data analysis and advanced modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casati, Nicola; Genoni, Alessandro; Meyer, Benjamin; Krawczuk, Anna; Macchi, Piero

    2017-08-01

    The possibility to determine electron-density distribution in crystals has been an enormous breakthrough, stimulated by a favourable combination of equipment for X-ray and neutron diffraction at low temperature, by the development of simplified, though accurate, electron-density models refined from the experimental data and by the progress in charge density analysis often in combination with theoretical work. Many years after the first successful charge density determination and analysis, scientists face new challenges, for example: (i) determination of the finer details of the electron-density distribution in the atomic cores, (ii) simultaneous refinement of electron charge and spin density or (iii) measuring crystals under perturbation. In this context, the possibility of obtaining experimental charge density at high pressure has recently been demonstrated [Casati et al. (2016). Nat. Commun. 7, 10901]. This paper reports on the necessities and pitfalls of this new challenge, focusing on the species syn-1,6:8,13-biscarbonyl[14]annulene. The experimental requirements, the expected data quality and data corrections are discussed in detail, including warnings about possible shortcomings. At the same time, new modelling techniques are proposed, which could enable specific information to be extracted, from the limited and less accurate observations, like the degree of localization of double bonds, which is fundamental to the scientific case under examination.

  13. Towards a wave theory of charged beam transport: A collection of thoughts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dattoli, G.; Mari, C.; Torre, A.

    1992-01-01

    We formulate in a rigorous way a wave theory of charged beam linear transport. The Wigner distribution function is introduced and provides the link with classical mechanics. Finally, the von Neumann equation is shown to coincide with the Liouville equation for the nonlinear transport

  14. Adsorption of humic acid on goethite: Isotherms, charge adjustments and potential profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saito, T.; Koopal, L.K.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.; Nagasaki, S.; Tanaka, S.

    2004-01-01

    The adsorption of natural organic matter (NOM) on mineral (hydr)oxide plays an important role in the evaluation of the speciation of toxic metal ions in the environment. Because both NOM and mineral oxide have variable charges that adjust upon adsorption, a good understanding of proton binding is

  15. Demand Profile Study of Battery Electric Vehicle under Different Charging Options

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marra, Francesco; Yang, Guang Ya; Træholt, Chresten

    2012-01-01

    An increased research on electric vehicles (EV) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) deals with their flexible use in electric power grids. Several research projects on smart grids and electric mobility are now looking into realistic models representing the behavior of an EV during charging...

  16. Effect of age and blood collection site on the metabolic profile of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Different collection site did not affect the examined parameters, but some statistically significant differences were observed between the age groups. However, all the parameters agreed with the data reported in the literature and contribute to our knowledge of the metabolic profile of ostriches. South African Journal of Animal ...

  17. Financial analysis of an inner-city helicopter service: charges versus collections for patients transferred from another acute care facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, J R; Saywell, R M; Rodman, G H; Nyhuis, A W; Pientka, N D; Steiner, C J; Phillips, J D; Bock, H C

    1989-11-01

    Emergency helicopter services provided by trauma centers are now being perceived as contributing to the financial burden of the hospital because of recent changes in trauma reimbursement under the Medicare Prospective Payment System (PPS) and because of the general perception that collection rates are lower among trauma patients. The use of helicopters to transfer patients from one acute care facility to another may also be concentrating the patients with low collection rates at the receiving hospital. We examined retrospectively the demographic and clinical factors associated with the collection experience in a series of 288 trauma patients transferred by helicopter from another acute care facility to an inner-city hospital. Factors affecting payment at 180 and 360 days included patient age, insurance class, discharge status, and size of the hospital charge. As long as reimbursement continues to be cost-based for nonMedicare patients, collection rates remain an important consideration in determining the financial viability of using helicopters to transfer patients.

  18. Classical gluon fields and collective dynamics of color-charge systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voronyuk, V.; Goloviznin, V. V.; Zinovjev, G. M.; Cassing, W.; Molodtsov, S. V.; Snigirev, A. M.; Toneev, V. D.

    2015-01-01

    An investigation of color fields that arise in collisions of relativistic heavy ions reveals that, in the non-Abelian case, a change in the color charge leads to the appearance of an extra term that generates a sizable contribution of color-charge glow in chromoelectric and chromomagnetic fields. The possibility of the appearance of a color echo in the scattering of composite color particles belonging to the dipole type is discussed. Arguments are adduced in support of the statement that such effects are of importance in simulating the first stage of ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions,where the initial parton state is determined by a high nonequilibrium parton density and by strong local color fluctuations

  19. Charge-collection efficiency of single-crystal CVD diamond detector for low-energy charged particles with energies ranging from 100 keV to 2 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Yuki, E-mail: sato.yuki@jaea.go.jp [Collaborative Laboratories for Advanced Decommissioning Science (CLADS), Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2–4 Shirane Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Murakami, Hiroyuki [RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, 2–1Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Shimaoka, Takehiro; Tsubota, Masakatsu; Kaneko, Junichi H. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N13, W8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

    2016-10-21

    The performance of a diamond detector created from a single-crystal diamond grown by chemical vapor deposition was studied for application in detecting charged particles having energies ranging from 100 keV to 2 MeV. Energy peaks of different low-energy ions were clearly observed. However, we observed that the pulse height for individual incident ions decreases with increasing atomic number of the ions. We estimated the charge collection efficiency of the generated charge carriers by the incident charged particles. The charge collection efficiencies are 97.0 ± 0.7% for 2 MeV helium-ions (He{sup +}). On the other hand, compared with that of He{sup +}, silicon-ions (Si{sup +}) and gold-ions (Au{sup 3+}) show low charge collection efficiency: 70.6 ± 2.2% and 29.5 ± 4.2% for 2 MeV-Si{sup +} and 2 MeV-Au{sup 3+}, respectively. We also found that the charge collection efficiency decreases as the generated charge density inside the diamond crystal increases.

  20. Thermal generation and mobility of charge carriers in collective proton transport in hydrogen-bonded chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyrard, M.; Boesch, R.; Kourakis, I. (Dijon Univ., 21 (France). Faculte des Sciences)

    1991-01-01

    The transport of protons in hydrogen-bonded systems is a long standing problem which has not yet obtained a satisfactorily theoretical description. Although this problem was examined first for ice, it is relevant in many systems and in particular in biology for the transport along proteins or for proton conductance across membranes, an essential process in cell life. The broad relevance makes the study of proton conduction very appealing. Since the original work of Bernal and Fowler on ice, the idea that the transport occurs through chains of hydrogen bonds has been well accepted. Such proton wires'' were invoked by Nagle and Morowitz for proton transport across membranes proteins and more recently across lipid bilayers. In this report, we assume the existence of such an hydrogen-bonded chain and discuss its consequences on the dynamics of the charge carriers. We show that this assumption leads naturally to the idea of soliton transport and we put a special emphasis on the role of the coupling between the protons and heavy ions motions. The model is presented. We show how the coupling affects strongly the dynamics of the charge carriers and we discuss the role it plays in the thermal generation of carriers. The work presented has been performed in 1986 and 87 with St. Pnevmatikos and N. Flyzanis and was then completed in collaboration with D. Hochstrasser and H. Buettner. Therefore the results presented in this part are not new but we think that they are appropriate in the context of this multidisciplinary workshop because they provide a rather complete example of the soliton picture for proton conduction. This paper discusses the thermal generation of the charge carriers when the coupling between the protons and heavy ions dynamics is taken into account. The results presented in this part are very recent and will deserve further analysis but they already show that the coupling can assist for the formation of the charge carriers.

  1. Influence of doping on charge carrier collection in normal and inverted geometry polymer:fullerene solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibb, George F. A.; Muth, Mathis-Andreas; Kirchartz, Thomas; Engmann, Sebastian; Hoppe, Harald; Gobsch, Gerhard; Thelakkat, Mukundan; Blouin, Nicolas; Tierney, Steve; Carrasco-Orozco, Miguel; Durrant, James R.; Nelson, Jenny

    2013-11-01

    While organic semiconductors used in polymer:fullerene photovoltaics are generally not intentionally doped, significant levels of unintentional doping have previously been reported in the literature. Here, we explain the differences in photocurrent collection between standard (transparent anode) and inverted (transparent cathode) low band-gap polymer:fullerene solar cells in terms of unintentional p-type doping. Using capacitance/voltage measurements, we find that the devices exhibit doping levels of order 1016 cm-3, resulting in space-charge regions ~100 nm thick at short circuit. As a result, low field regions form in devices thicker than 100 nm. Because more of the light is absorbed in the low field region in standard than in inverted architectures, the losses due to inefficient charge collection are greater in standard architectures. Using optical modelling, we show that the observed trends in photocurrent with device architecture and thickness can be explained if only charge carriers photogenerated in the depletion region contribute to the photocurrent.

  2. Two Years of Ozone Vertical Profiles Collected from Aircraft over California and the Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austerberry, D.; Yates, E. L.; Roby, M.; Chatfield, R. B.; Iraci, L. T.; Pierce, B.; Fairlie, T. D.; Johnson, B. J.; Ives, M.

    2012-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone transported across the Pacific Ocean has been strongly suggested to contribute substantially to surface ozone levels at several sites within Northern California's Sacramento Valley. Because this contribution can affect a city's ability to meet regulatory ozone limits, the influence of Pacific ozone transport has implications for air quality control strategies in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV). The Alpha Jet Atmospheric Experiment is designed to collect a multi-year data set of tropospheric ozone vertical profiles. Forty-four flights with ozone profiles were conducted between February 2nd, 2011 and August 9th, 2012, and approximately ten more flights are expected in the remainder of 2012. Twenty marine air profiles have been collected at sites including Trinidad Head and two locations tens of kilometers offshore at 37° N latitude. Good agreement is seen with ozonesondes launched from Trinidad Head. Additional profiles over Merced, California were obtained on many of these flight days. These in-situ measurements were conducted during spiral descents of H211's Alpha Jet at mid-day local times using a 2B Technologies Dual Beam Ozone Monitor. Hourly surface ambient ozone data were obtained from the California Air Resources Board's SJV monitoring sites. For each site, the Pearson linear correlation coefficient was calculated between ozone in a 300m vertical layer of an offshore profile and the surface site at varying time offsets from the time of the profile. Each site's local and regional ozone production component was estimated and removed. The resulting correlations suggest instances of Pacific ozone transport following some of the offshore observations. Real-Time Air Quality Modeling System (RAQMS) products constrained by assimilated satellite data model the transport of ozone enhancements and guide flight planning. RAQMS hindcasts also suggest that ozone transport to the surface of the SJV basin occurred following some of these offshore profiles

  3. Deconvolution of charged particle spectra from neutron depth profiling using Simplex method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hnatowicz, Vladimír; Vacík, Jiří; Fink, Dietmar

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 7 (2010), 073906/1-073906/7 ISSN 0034-6748 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06041 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : neutron depth profiling * Simplex method * NDP Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.598, year: 2010

  4. Tree resin composition, collection behavior and selective filters shape chemical profiles of tropical bees (Apidae: Meliponini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Sara D; Schmitt, Thomas; Blüthgen, Nico

    2011-01-01

    The diversity of species is striking, but can be far exceeded by the chemical diversity of compounds collected, produced or used by them. Here, we relate the specificity of plant-consumer interactions to chemical diversity applying a comparative network analysis to both levels. Chemical diversity was explored for interactions between tropical stingless bees and plant resins, which bees collect for nest construction and to deter predators and microbes. Resins also function as an environmental source for terpenes that serve as appeasement allomones and protection against predators when accumulated on the bees' body surfaces. To unravel the origin of the bees' complex chemical profiles, we investigated resin collection and the processing of resin-derived terpenes. We therefore analyzed chemical networks of tree resins, foraging networks of resin collecting bees, and their acquired chemical networks. We revealed that 113 terpenes in nests of six bee species and 83 on their body surfaces comprised a subset of the 1,117 compounds found in resins from seven tree species. Sesquiterpenes were the most variable class of terpenes. Albeit widely present in tree resins, they were only found on the body surface of some species, but entirely lacking in others. Moreover, whereas the nest profile of Tetragonula melanocephala contained sesquiterpenes, its surface profile did not. Stingless bees showed a generalized collecting behavior among resin sources, and only a hitherto undescribed species-specific "filtering" of resin-derived terpenes can explain the variation in chemical profiles of nests and body surfaces from different species. The tight relationship between bees and tree resins of a large variety of species elucidates why the bees' surfaces contain a much higher chemodiversity than other hymenopterans.

  5. Tree Resin Composition, Collection Behavior and Selective Filters Shape Chemical Profiles of Tropical Bees (Apidae: Meliponini)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Sara D.; Schmitt, Thomas; Blüthgen, Nico

    2011-01-01

    The diversity of species is striking, but can be far exceeded by the chemical diversity of compounds collected, produced or used by them. Here, we relate the specificity of plant-consumer interactions to chemical diversity applying a comparative network analysis to both levels. Chemical diversity was explored for interactions between tropical stingless bees and plant resins, which bees collect for nest construction and to deter predators and microbes. Resins also function as an environmental source for terpenes that serve as appeasement allomones and protection against predators when accumulated on the bees' body surfaces. To unravel the origin of the bees' complex chemical profiles, we investigated resin collection and the processing of resin-derived terpenes. We therefore analyzed chemical networks of tree resins, foraging networks of resin collecting bees, and their acquired chemical networks. We revealed that 113 terpenes in nests of six bee species and 83 on their body surfaces comprised a subset of the 1,117 compounds found in resins from seven tree species. Sesquiterpenes were the most variable class of terpenes. Albeit widely present in tree resins, they were only found on the body surface of some species, but entirely lacking in others. Moreover, whereas the nest profile of Tetragonula melanocephala contained sesquiterpenes, its surface profile did not. Stingless bees showed a generalized collecting behavior among resin sources, and only a hitherto undescribed species-specific “filtering” of resin-derived terpenes can explain the variation in chemical profiles of nests and body surfaces from different species. The tight relationship between bees and tree resins of a large variety of species elucidates why the bees' surfaces contain a much higher chemodiversity than other hymenopterans. PMID:21858119

  6. Diffusion-time-resolved ion-beam-induced charge collection from stripe-like test junctions induced by heavy-ion microbeams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, B.N.; El Bouanani, M.; Renfrow, S.N.; Nigam, M.; Walsh, D.S.; Doyle, B.L.; Duggan, J.L.; McDaniel, F.D.

    2001-01-01

    To design more radiation-tolerant integrated circuits (ICs), it is necessary to design and test accurate models of ionizing-radiation-induced charge collection dynamics. A new technique, diffusion-time-resolved ion-beam-induced charge collection (DTRIBICC), is used to measure the average arrival time of the diffused charge, which is related to the average time of the arrival carrier density at the junction. Specially designed stripe-like test junctions are studied using a 12 MeV carbon microbeam with a spot size of ∼1 μm. The relative arrival time of ion-generated charge and the collected charge are measured using a multiple parameter data acquisition system. A 2-D device simulation code, MEDICI, is used to calculate the charge collection dynamics on the stripe-like test junctions. The simulations compare well with experimental microbeam measurements. The results show the importance of the diffused charge collection by junctions, which is especially significant for single-event upsets (SEUs) and multiple-event upsets (MEUs) in electronic devices. The charge sharing results also indicate that stripe-like junctions may be used as position-sensitive detectors with a resolution of ∼0.1 μm

  7. Financial analysis of an inner-city helicopter service: charges versus collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saywell, R M; Woods, J R; Rodman, G H; Nyhuis, A W; Bender, L B; Phillips, J D; Bock, H C

    1989-01-01

    Trauma centers are now being perceived as financial burdens because of recent changes in trauma reimbursement for the Medicare Prospective Payment System population and the perception that collection rates are lower among trauma patients. We examined the demographic and clinical factors associated with the collection experience in a series of 114 trauma patients transferred by helicopter from the accident site to an inner-city trauma center. Factors affecting payment at 30, 60, 90, and 180 days included patient age, insurance class, and discharge status. While not as high as the collection rate for the facility as a whole, we found an average 71.2% collection rate for trauma patients at 180 days. As long as trauma reimbursement continues to be cost based for nonMedicare patients, collection rates remain an important consideration in determining the financial viability of trauma centers.

  8. Enhanced Charge Collection in MOF‐525–PEDOT Nanotube Composites Enable Highly Sensitive Biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tzu‐Yen; Kung, Chung‐Wei; Liao, Yu‐Te; Kao, Sheng‐Yuan; Cheng, Mingshan; Chang, Ting‐Hsiang; Henzie, Joel; Alamri, Hatem R.; Alothman, Zeid A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract With the aim of a reliable biosensing exhibiting enhanced sensitivity and selectivity, this study demonstrates a dopamine (DA) sensor composed of conductive poly(3,4‐ethylenedioxythiophene) nanotubes (PEDOT NTs) conformally coated with porphyrin‐based metal–organic framework nanocrystals (MOF‐525). The MOF‐525 serves as an electrocatalytic surface, while the PEDOT NTs act as a charge collector to rapidly transport the electron from MOF nanocrystals. Bundles of these particles form a conductive interpenetrating network film that together: (i) improves charge transport pathways between the MOF‐525 regions and (ii) increases the electrochemical active sites of the film. The electrocatalytic response is measured by cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry techniques, where the linear concentration range of DA detection is estimated to be 2 × 10−6–270 × 10−6 m and the detection limit is estimated to be 0.04 × 10−6 m with high selectivity toward DA. Additionally, a real‐time determination of DA released from living rat pheochromocytoma cells is realized. The combination of MOF5‐25 and PEDOT NTs creates a new generation of porous electrodes for highly efficient electrochemical biosensing. PMID:29201623

  9. Impact of the collective diffusion of charged nanoparticles in the convective/capillary deposition directed by receding contact lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguera-Marín, Diego; Moraila-Martínez, Carmen Lucía; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, Miguel; Rodríguez-Valverde, Miguel Angel

    2016-02-01

    The motion of electrically charged particles under crowding conditions and subjected to evaporation-driven capillary flow might be ruled by collective diffusion. The concentration gradient developed inside an evaporating drop of colloidal suspension may reduce by diffusion the number of particles transported toward the contact line by convection. Unlike self-diffusion coefficient, the cooperative diffusion coefficient of interacting particles becomes more pronounced in crowded environments. In this work, we examined experimentally the role of the collective diffusion of charge-stabilized nanoparticles in colloidal patterning. To decouple the sustained evaporation from the contact line motion, we conducted evaporating menisci experiments with driven receding contact lines at low capillary number. This allowed us to explore convective assembly at fixed and low bulk concentration, which enabled to develop high concentration gradients. At fixed velocity of receding contact line, we explored a variety of substrate-particle systems where the particle-particle electrostatic interaction was changed (via p H) as well as the substrate receding contact angle and the relative humidity. We found that the particle deposition directed by receding contact lines may be controlled by the interplay between evaporative convection and collective diffusion, particularly at low particle concentration.

  10. Influence of the nuclear symmetry energy on the collective flows of charged pions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuan; Yong, Gao-Chan; Zhang, Lei; Zuo, Wei

    2018-01-01

    Based on the isospin-dependent Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (IBUU) transport model, we studied charged pion transverse and elliptic flows in semicentral 197Au+197Au collisions at 600 MeV/nucleon. It is found that π+-π- differential transverse flow and the difference of π+ and π- transverse flows almost show no effects of the symmetry energy. Their corresponding elliptic flows are largely affected by the symmetry energy, especially at high transverse momenta. The isospin-dependent pion elliptic flow at high transverse momenta thus provides a promising way to probe the high-density behavior of the symmetry energy in heavy-ion collisions at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI, Darmstadt or at the Cooling Storage Ring (CSR) at HIRFL, Lanzhou.

  11. First results on the charge collection properties of segmented detectors made with p-type bulk silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casse, G.; Allport, P.P.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Greenall, A.; Hanlon, M.; Jackson, J.N.

    2002-01-01

    Radiation damage of n-type bulk detectors introduces stable defects acting as effective p-type doping and leads to the change of the conductivity type of the silicon substrate (type inversion) after a fluence of a few times 10 13 protons cm -2 . The diode junction after inversion migrates from the original side to the back plane of the detector. The migration of the junction can be prevented using silicon detectors with p-type substrates. Furthermore, the use of n-side readout gives higher charge collection efficiency for segmented devices operated below the full depletion voltage. Large area (∼6.4x6.4 cm 2 ) capacitively coupled 80 μm pitch detectors using polysilicon bias resistors have been fabricated on p-type substrates (n-in-p diode structure). These detectors have been irradiated with 24 GeV/c protons to an integrated fluence of 3x10 14 cm -2 and kept for 7 days at 25 deg. C to reach the broad minimum of the annealing curve. Results are presented on the comparison of their charge collection properties with detectors using p-strip read-out after corresponding dose and annealing

  12. Chirp subbottom profile data collected in 2015 from the northern Chandeleur Islands, Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forde, Arnell S.; DeWitt, Nancy T.; Fredericks, Jake J.; Miselis, Jennifer L.

    2018-01-30

    As part of the Barrier Island Evolution Research project, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center conducted a nearshore geophysical survey around the northern Chandeleur Islands, Louisiana, in September 2015. The objective of the project is to improve the understanding of barrier island geomorphic evolution, particularly storm-related depositional and erosional processes that shape the islands over annual to interannual time scales (1–5 years). Collecting geophysical data can help researchers identify relations between the geologic history of the islands and their present day morphology and sediment distribution. High-resolution geophysical data collected along this rapidly changing barrier island system can provide a unique time-series dataset to further the analyses and geomorphological interpretations of this and other coastal systems, improving our understanding of coastal response and evolution over medium-term time scales (months to years). Subbottom profile data were collected in September 2015 offshore of the northern Chandeleur Islands, during USGS Field Activity Number 2015-331-FA. Data products, including raw digital chirp subbottom data, processed subbottom profile images, survey trackline map, navigation files, geographic information system data files and formal Federal Geographic Data Committee metadata, and Field Activity Collection System and operation logs are available for download.

  13. Chemical profile of size-fractionated soils collected in a semiarid industrial area of Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Del Mastro, Anabella; Pereyra, Marcelo; Londonio, Agustín; Pereyra, Victoria; Rebagliati, Raúl Jiménez; Dawidowski, Laura; Gómez, Darío; Smichowski, Patricia

    2014-12-01

    A study was undertaken to assess the chemical profile of soil collected in Bahía Blanca (Argentina). In this industrial city, semiarid soils are affected by different industrial and agricultural activities, the presence of a saltpeter extraction facility, traffic and increasing urbanization. Sixteen soil samples (superficial and sub-superficial) were collected. Samples were sieved in two fractions (A Na+ ≅ SO42- > K+ > NO3-. Three indicators, namely, (i) coefficient of variation, (ii) coefficient of divergence and (iii) ratio of elemental concentration with respect to Ca were used to assess chemical, spatial and inter-profile variability. Chloride > Ca > Na+ > Mo > SO42-, dominated the variability indicating that these are key chemical markers for future assessment of crustal contribution to airborne particles in the area. The ratios Xi/Ca allowed discriminating the soil of the semi-arid region surrounding Bahía Blanca. The chemical profiles obtained in this study, particularly those of topsoil, will be a key input to characterize soil resuspension and its contribution to airborne particulate matter in a forthcoming receptor model analysis.

  14. Radiation Quality Effects on Transcriptome Profiles in 3-D Cultures After Charged Particle Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Zarana S.; Kidane, Yared H.; Huff, Janice L.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we evaluated the differential effects of low- and high-LET radiation on 3-D organotypic cultures in order to investigate radiation quality impacts on gene expression and cellular responses. Current risk models for assessment of space radiation-induced cancer have large uncertainties because the models for adverse health effects following radiation exposure are founded on epidemiological analyses of human populations exposed to low-LET radiation. Reducing these uncertainties requires new knowledge on the fundamental differences in biological responses (the so-called radiation quality effects) triggered by heavy ion particle radiation versus low-LET radiation associated with Earth-based exposures. In order to better quantify these radiation quality effects in biological systems, we are utilizing novel 3-D organotypic human tissue models for space radiation research. These models hold promise for risk assessment as they provide a format for study of human cells within a realistic tissue framework, thereby bridging the gap between 2-D monolayer culture and animal models for risk extrapolation to humans. To identify biological pathway signatures unique to heavy ion particle exposure, functional gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) was used with whole transcriptome profiling. GSEA has been used extensively as a method to garner biological information in a variety of model systems but has not been commonly used to analyze radiation effects. It is a powerful approach for assessing the functional significance of radiation quality-dependent changes from datasets where the changes are subtle but broad, and where single gene based analysis using rankings of fold-change may not reveal important biological information.

  15. Effect of collective response on electron capture and excitation in collisions of highly charged ions with fullerenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadhane, U; Misra, D; Singh, Y P; Tribedi, Lokesh C

    2003-03-07

    Projectile deexcitation Lyman x-ray emission following electron capture and K excitation has been studied in collisions of bare and Li-like sulphur ions (of energy 110 MeV) with fullerenes (C(60)/C(70)) and different gaseous targets. The intensity ratios of different Lyman x-ray lines in collisions with fullerenes are found to be substantially lower than those for the gas targets, both for capture and excitation. This has been explained in terms of a model based on "solidlike" effect, namely, wakefield induced stark mixing of the excited states populated via electron capture or K excitation: a collective phenomenon of plasmon excitation in the fullerenes under the influence of heavy, highly charged ions.

  16. Charge collection efficiency characterization of a HgI2 Frisch collar spectrometer with collimated high energy gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kargar, A.; Ariesanti, E.; James, S.; McGregor, D.S.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a 2.1x2.1x4.1 mm 3 HgI 2 Frisch collar device was characterized through probing the device with a highly collimated 662 keV gamma rays ( 137 Cs check source) along the length and width of the device. In a systematic series of experiments, the detector was probed along its central line under different operating voltages of 1600, 1300, 1000, 800, 600 and 500 V. The experimental results were confirmed through a simulation of the charge collection for a device with the same size and operating conditions. It is shown that the HgI 2 Frisch collar device has a uniform response to gamma rays over two-thirds of the detector volume. The HgI 2 crystals and the Frisch collar detectors were grown and fabricated within the S.M.A.R.T Laboratory at Kansas State University.

  17. Evaluation of Co and Cr mobility in soil profiles collected in a scrapyard of impounded vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, Camila N.; Figueiredo, Ana Maria G.; Enzweiler, Jacinta

    2015-01-01

    The number of motor vehicles in urban environments has increased dramatically in the past years. As a result, so has the number of impounded and end-of-life vehicles. Car wastes can have a very high metal content, which can cause important environmental impacts to the soil where these vehicles are kept. Most Brazilian vehicle impound scrapyards are currently operating at their maximum capacity and soils may have become contaminated by past or current vehicle handling practices. Most of these areas do not present an impermeable surface. The level of soil contamination with heavy metals depends on the type of soil, climate and management practices. Metals, such as Co and Cr, that are present in many auto-parts, may be considered potentially toxic elements in these areas. The aim of this study was to evaluate Co and Cr levels and behavior in soil profiles located in a scrapyard of impounded vehicles of Ribeirao Pires-SP city. For this purpose, samples from distinct horizons of three soil profiles were collected. Element concentrations were determined by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA). Soil parameters such as pH, organic matter content and clay, silt and sand percentage were also determined. The obtained data were statistically analyzed in order to establish correlations between elemental concentrations and the impounded vehicles scrapyard soil. Soil acidity showed to be the most remarkable property for Cr and Co mobility through soil profile. (author)

  18. Profile of osteopathic practice in Spain: results from a standardized data collection study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez Bustins, Gerard; López Plaza, Pedro-Victor; Carvajal, Sonia Roura

    2018-04-11

    There is limited research regarding patients' profiles and consumer attitudes and habits of osteopathy in Spain. The purpose of this study was to profile patients who regularly receive osteopathic care in Spain using an internationally developed standardized data collection tool. During the period between April 2014 and December 2015, a UK-developed standardized data collection tool was distributed to Spanish osteopaths who voluntarily agreed to participate in this cross-sectional study. Thirty-six osteopaths participated in this study and returned a total of 314 completed datasets. Of 314 patients, 61% were women and 39% were men, with a mean age of 40 years (SD 17.02 years, range 0 to 83 years). Forty-four percent were full-time salaried workers, and in 78% of cases, receiving osteopathic treatment was the patient's own choice. Chronic spinal pain presentations were the most frequent reasons for consultation. Seventy-five percent of patients presented with a coexisting condition, mainly gastrointestinal disorders and headaches. The main treatment approach consisted of mobilization techniques, followed by soft tissue, cranial and high velocity thrust techniques. Improvement or resolution of the complaint was experienced by 93% of patients after a small number of sessions. Adverse events were minor and occurred in 7% of all cases. This is the first study carried out in Spain analyzing the profile of patients who receive osteopathic care. The typical patient who receives osteopathic care in Spain is middle-aged, presents mainly with chronic spinal pain, and voluntarily seeks osteopathic treatment. Osteopathic treatment produces a significant improvement in the majority of cases with a low rate of minor adverse events reported.

  19. Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity and other measurements collected using bottle in the Arctic in 1934 (NODC Accession 0001244)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and meteorological data were collected using bottle casts in the Barents Sea, Kara Sea, Laptev Sea, White Sea, and Arctic Ocean. Data were...

  20. Cell design and image analysis for in situ Raman mapping of inhomogeneous state-of-charge profiles in lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Shuyu; Yan, Min; Hamers, Robert J.

    2017-06-01

    The study of inhomogeneous battery failure processes requires proper tools with high spatial resolving power. Here we describe a simple way to adapt industry-standard coin cells to enable in situ Raman mapping of lithium-ion battery materials. We describe the important cell design parameters and validate that the design achieves a uniform potential distribution within the region probed by Raman. We further validate that the cell yields electrical performance characteristics equivalent to a standard, non-modified coin cell. Using this cell, we probe the local charging profiles of LiNi0.5Mn0.3Co0.2O2 ("NMC") particles during cycling and demonstrate the ability to achieve spatial maps of the Raman spectra. In order to reduce the effects of local topography, we further analyze these data by numerically extracting the local frequency of the A1g vibrational mode, which is sensitive to the local extent of lithiation, and producing spatial maps of the local frequency of the A1g mode. This work demonstrates a way to collect and analyze high quality in situ spectra with an easy-to-implement cell design that can be applied to a wide range of electrode materials.

  1. Hydrogen in oxygen-free, phosphorus-doped copper - Charging techniques, hydrogen contents and modelling of hydrogen diffusion and depth profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinsson, Aasa [Swerea KIMAB, Kista (Sweden); Sandstroem, Rolf [Swerea KIMAB, Kista (Sweden); Div. of Materials Science and Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Lilja, Christina [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-01-15

    In Sweden spent nuclear fuel is planned to be disposed of by encapsulating in cast iron inserts protected by a copper shell. The copper can be exposed to hydrogen released during corrosion processes in the inserts. If the hydrogen is taken up by the copper, it could lead to hydrogen embrittlement. Specimens from oxygen-free copper have been hydrogen charged using two different methods. The purpose was to investigate how hydrogen could be introduced into copper in a controlled way. The thermal charging method resulted in a reduction of the initial hydrogen content. After electrochemical charging of cylindrical specimens, the measured hydrogen content was 2.6 wt. ppm which should compared with 0.6 wt. ppm before charging. The retained hydrogen after two weeks was reduced by nearly 40%. Recently the paper 'Hydrogen depth profile in phosphorus-doped, oxygen-free copper after cathodic charging' (Martinsson and Sandstrom, 2012) has been published. The paper describes experimental results for bulk specimens as well as presenting a model. Almost all the hydrogen is found to be located less than 100 {mu}m from the surface. This model is used to interpret the experimental results on foils in the present report. Since the model is fully based on fundamental equations, it can be used to analyse what happens in new situations. In this report the effect of the charging intensity, the grain size, the critical nucleus size for hydrogen bubble formation as well as the charging time are analysed.

  2. Genome profiling (GP) as an effective tool for monitoring culture collections: a case study with Trichosporon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamano, Keiichi; Ueno-Tsuji, Sachika; Tanaka, Reiko; Suzuki, Motofumi; Nishimura, Kazuko; Nishigaki, Koichi

    2012-05-01

    Species identification and classification of a large number of microbes are essential and heavy workloads in culture collections and relevant laboratories. The identification of species usually requires different methods depending on species. Therefore, the development of a method which is simple and applicable to any organisms will lessen the burdens, increase the reliability of databases and thus enhance the science on microbes. The genome profiling (GP) method, developed previously, was found effective in monitoring authenticities of all strains/species tested in culture collections and expectedly various species, which was shown by applying the GP and the conventional sequencing methods to identifying and classifying species/strains belonging to the genus Trichosporon (38 strains; 16 species). Small differences between strains (11 strains of Trichosporon asahii and 4 strains of Trichosporon coremiiforme) can be reliably discriminated by GP, which was unsuccessful in the conventional sequencing approach. Importantly, seven possible false-assignments contained in the database were all pointed out by the GP method with near-perfect correctness, showing the power of the GP method.GP was shown to be a potent tool for rapidly and correctly monitoring species and strains of fungi in culture collections owing to its simple and informative natures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Magnetic field effects and self-assembled n-type nanostructures to increase charge collection in organic photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Austin Roberts

    Photovoltaics, the direct conversion of light energy to electrical energy, offers access to perhaps the best source of clean renewable energy: the sun. The cost to produce electrical energy using photovoltaics could be dramatically reduced by fabricating photovoltaic devices (solar cells) out of carbon-based (organic) semiconducting materials. This dissertation describes two new approaches for increasing the efficiency in organic photovoltaic systems. The first approach uses magnetic fields to inhibit the recombination of electrons and holes and increase charge collection. Many magnetic field effects in room-temperature organic semiconductor devices can be understood by the magnetoeffects by the interconversion of singlets and triplets (MIST) model. According to the MIST model, magnetic fields split the degeneracy of triplet electron-hole spin states via the Zeeman effect. This splitting alters inter-system crossing between loosely bound singlets and triplets, which can change the overall recombination rate of electron-hole pairs. The organic magnetoresistance in polymer-based organic photovoltaic devices was measured to be positive and on the order of a few percent. In addition, the magnitude of the organic magnetoresistance decreased with increasing bias and with increasing concentration of electron-accepting fullerenes. This behavior is consistent with the MIST model. The MIST model was then extended to describe magnetic field effects in photocurrents produced by organic photovoltaic devices. Single-layer polymer devices showed an increase in photocurrent of ˜6--9% with the application of relatively weak magnetic fields (˜30 mT) due to a reduction in the recombination rate of non-geminate electron-hole pairs. However, in bulk-heterojunction devices the magnetic field effect on photocurrent was significantly diminished with just a few percent by weight of fullerenes. These results are shown to be consistent with the robust MIST model: electron

  4. Impact of blood collection and processing on peripheral blood gene expression profiling in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Linda; Fuhlbrigge, Rebecca; Atkinson, Mark A; Fathman, C Garrison

    2017-08-18

    The natural history of type 1 diabetes (T1D) is challenging to investigate, especially as pre-diabetic individuals are difficult to identify. Numerous T1D consortia have been established to collect whole blood for gene expression analysis from individuals with or at risk to develop T1D. However, with no universally accepted protocol for their collection, differences in sample processing may lead to variances in the results. Here, we examined whether the choice of blood collection tube and RNA extraction kit leads to differences in the expression of genes that are changed during the progression of T1D, and if these differences could be minimized by measuring gene expression directly from the lysate of whole blood. Microarray analysis showed that the expression of 901 genes is highly influenced by sample processing using the PAXgene versus the Tempus system. These included a significant number of lymphocyte-specific genes and genes whose expression has been reported to differ in the peripheral blood of at-risk and T1D patients compared to controls. We showed that artificial changes in gene expression occur when control and T1D samples were processed differently. The sample processing-dependent differences in gene expression were largely due to loss of transcripts during the RNA extraction step using the PAXgene system. The majority of differences were not observed when gene expression was measured in whole blood lysates prepared from blood collected in PAXgene and Tempus tubes. We showed that the gene expression profile of samples processed using the Tempus system is more accurate than that of samples processed using the PAXgene system. Variation in sample processing can result in misleading changes in gene expression. However, these differences can be minimized by measuring gene expression directly in whole blood lysates.

  5. Reduced graphene oxide wrapped hierarchical TiO2 nanorod composites for improved charge collection efficiency and carrier lifetime in dye sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Mohan Raj; Kumaresan, Duraisamy; Jothi, Sathiskumar; McGettrick, James D.; Watson, Trystan M.

    2018-01-01

    Three dimensional hierarchical TiO2 nanorods-reduced graphene oxide (HTNs-rGO) composites with different rGO wt% were directly grown on conducting glass substrate by an in situ hydrothermal process for improved charge separation and collection in dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The crystal structure and chemical composition of as grown composites were confirmed by X-ray diffraction and optical studies. Electron microscopic studies on the composites surface morphologies revealed the formation of rGO wrapped or intertwined HTNs architectures onto the FTO substrates with thicknesses ranging from 14.33 to 15.70 μm. 2 wt% rGO loaded HTNs composite photoanode showed a superior power conversion efficiency of 4.54% as compared to the other wt% rGO loaded HTNs composite and bare HTNs photoanodes in DSSCs. This is due to optimal loading of rGO facilitating formation of a better charge transport channel within HTNs matrix and reducing charge transport resistance (Rtr), which resulted in a higher charge collection of HTNs-rGO composite. Besides, the solar cell current-voltage (J-V) and electrochemical impedance characterizations confirmed the superior light scattering and dye loading capabilities of HTNs, together with a low charge transport resistance and improved charge carrier lifetime in HTNs-rGO composites contributed to the photovoltaic performance enhancement of their DSSCs.

  6. Roughening Conjugated Polymer Surface for Enhancing the Charge Collection Efficiency of Sequentially Deposited Polymer/Fullerene Photovoltaics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoonhee Jang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A method that enables the formation of a rough nano-scale surface for conjugated polymers is developed through the utilization of a polymer chain ordering agent (OA. 1-Chloronaphthalene (1-CN is used as the OA for the poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl (P3HT layer. The addition of 1-CN to the P3HT solution improves the chain ordering of the P3HT during the film formation process and increases the surface roughness of the P3HT film compared to the film prepared without 1-CN. The roughened surface of the P3HT film is utilized to construct a P3HT/fullerene bilayer organic photovoltaic (OPV by sequential solution deposition (SqSD without thermal annealing process. The power conversion efficiency (PCE of the SqSD-processed OPV utilizing roughened P3HT layer is 25% higher than that utilizing a plain P3HT layer. It is revealed that the roughened surface of the P3HT increases the heterojunction area at the P3HT/fullerene interface and this resulted in improved internal charge collection efficiency, as well as light absorption efficiency. This method proposes a novel way to improve the PCE of the SqSD-processed OPV, which can be applied for OPV utilizing low band gap polymers. In addition, this method allows for the reassessment of polymers, which have shown insufficient performance in the BSD process.

  7. Measurement of charge collection in irradiated miniature sensors for the upgrade of ATLAS Phase-II Strip tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Cindro, Vladimir; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Miniature sensors with outer dimension of 10 mm x 10 mm were produced together with full size sensors for the innermost ring (R0) of the end-cap part in the upgraded ATLAS inner tracker (ITk). AC and DC coupled n-type strips with three different pitches (wide, default and narrow) were processed on high resistivity p-type FZ silicon substrates by Hamamatsu Photonics. Miniature sensors were irradiated with 70 MeV protons at CYRIC at Tohoku University (Japan) and reactor neutrons at Jožef Stefan Institute (Slovenia) to three different 1 MeV neutron equivalent fluences: 0.5, 1 and 2 x 1015 neqcm-2. The upper fluence range exceeds the highest anticipated in the inner-most part of the ATLAS ITk-Strips over the HL-LHC lifetime (~1.25 x 1015 neqcm2). Charge collection in test sensors has been evaluated systematically using 90Sr β- source and Alibava analogue readout system at reverse bias voltages up to 1000 V.

  8. Inversion of collective matter flow in nucleus-nucleus collisions, measured with a 4π charged particle array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peter, J.; Cussol, D.; Brou, R.; Louvel, M.; Patry, J.P.; Regimbart, R.; Steckmeyer, J.C.; Tamain, B.; Motobayashi, T.; Doubre, H.; Peghaire, A.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Crema, E.; MacGrath, R.; Jeong, S.C.; Lee, S.M.; Nagashima, Y.; Nakagawa, T.; Ogihara, M.; Kasagi, J.

    1991-01-01

    The multidetector array Mur + Tonneau has been used to perform a 4π detection of charged particles and fragments emitted in reactions between 40 Ar, at energies ranging from 25 to 85 MeV/u, and 27 Al or 58 Ni target. The events have been sorted as a function of the impact parameter value, using a new global variable, the average parallel velocity. The collective transverse momentum in the reaction plane (sidewards flow parameter) is observed to strongly vary as a function of impact parameter and incident energy. The measured values have to be corrected for the effects due to reaction plane indetermination and to the detector limitations. In order to disentangle these two effects, a simulation calculation has been made first by assuming perfect detection of all products. Then, the limitations of Mur + Tonneau have been included. Those limitations caused by the method itself are more important than those caused by the detector. The measured value of the flow can be severely reduced, especially when the flow approaches zero. At low energies, the flow is attributed to scattering to negative angles. When the energy increases, compression gradually opposes this negative scattering, until the flow falls to zero. This is obtained at beam energies in the range 70-1000 MeV/u depending on the for impact parameter value such studies should allow information both on the nucleon-nucleoncross section in medium and the EOS of nuclear matter to be obtained

  9. Measurement of charge collection in irradiated miniature sensors for the upgrade of ATLAS Phase-II Strip tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Cindro, Vladimir; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Miniature sensors with outer dimension of 10 mm x 10 mm have been produced together with full size sensors for the innermost ring (R0) of the end-cap part in the upgraded ATLAS inner tracker (ITk). AC and DC coupled n-type strips with three different pitches (wide, default and narrow) were processed on high resistivity p-type FZ silicon substrates by Hamamatsu Photonics. Miniature sensors were irradiated with 70 MeV protons at CYRIC at Tohoku University (Japan) and reactor neutrons at Jožef Stefan Institute (Slovenia) to three different 1 MeV neutron equivalent fluences: 0.5, 1 and 2 x 1015 neqcm-2. The upper fluence range exceeds the highest anticipated in the inner-most part of the ATLAS ITk-Strips over the HL-LHC lifetime (~1.5 x 1015 neqcm2). Charge collection in test sensors has been evaluated systematically using 90Sr β-source and Alibava analogue readout system at reverse bias voltages up to 1000 V.

  10. arXiv Charge collection properties in an irradiated pixel sensor built in a thick-film HV-SOI process

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00541780; Cindro, V.; Gorišek, A.; Hemperek, T.; Kishishita, T.; Kramberger, G.; Krüger, H.; Mandić, I.; Mikuž, M.; Wermes, N.; Zavrtanik, M.

    2017-10-25

    Investigation of HV-CMOS sensors for use as a tracking detector in the ATLAS experiment at the upgraded LHC (HL-LHC) has recently been an active field of research. A potential candidate for a pixel detector built in Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) technology has already been characterized in terms of radiation hardness to TID (Total Ionizing Dose) and charge collection after a moderate neutron irradiation. In this article we present results of an extensive irradiation hardness study with neutrons up to a fluence of 1x10e16 neq/cm2. Charge collection in a passive pixelated structure was measured by Edge Transient Current Technique (E-TCT). The evolution of the effective space charge concentration was found to be compliant with the acceptor removal model, with the minimum of the space charge concentration being reached after 5x10e14 neq/cm2. An investigation of the in-pixel uniformity of the detector response revealed parasitic charge collection by the epitaxial silicon layer characteristic for the SOI design. The r...

  11. Terahertz spectra revealing the collective excitation mode in charge-density-wave single crystal LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiumei; Jin, Zuanming; Lin, Xian; Ma, Guohong [Department of Physics, Shanghai University (China); Cheng, Zhenxiang [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, NSW (Australia); Balakrishnan, Geetha [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom)

    2017-09-15

    A low-energy collective excitation mode in charge-ordered multiferroic LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} is reported via terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. Upon cooling from 300 to 40 K, the central resonance frequency showed a pronounced hardening from 0.85 to 1.15 THz. In analogy to the well-known low-energy optical properties of LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, this emerging resonance was attributed to the charge-density-wave (CDW) collective excitations. By using the Drude-Lorentz model fitting, the CDW collective mode becomes increasingly damped with the increasing temperature. Furthermore, the kinks of the CDW collective mode at the magnetic transition temperature are analyzed, which indicate the coupling of spin order with electric polarization. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Charge collection microscopy of in-situ switchable PRAM line cells in a scanning electron microscope : Technique development and unique observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosthoek, J. L. M.; Schuitema, R. W.; ten Brink, G. H.; Gravesteijn, D. J.; Kooi, B. J.

    An imaging method has been developed based on charge collection in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) that allows discrimination between the amorphous and crystalline states of Phase-change Random Access Memory (PRAM) line cells. During imaging, the cells are electrically connected and can be

  13. Mean carrier transport properties and charge collection dynamics of single-crystal, natural type IIa diamonds from ion-induced conductivity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sung Su [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-09-01

    Ion-induced conductivity has been used to investigate the detector characteristics of diamond detectors. Both integrated-charge, and time-resolved current measurements were performed to examine the mean carrier transport properties of diamond and the dynamics of charge collection under highly-localized and high-density excitation conditions. The integrated-charge measurements were conducted with a standard pulse-counting system with 241Am radioactivity as the excitation source for the detectors. The time-resolved current measurements were performed using a 70 GHz random sampling oscilloscope with the detectors incorporated into high-speed microstrip transmission lines and the excitation source for these measurements was an ion beam of either 5-MeV He+ or 10-MeV Si3+. The detectors used in both experiments can be described as metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) devices where a volume of the detector material is sandwiched between two metal plates. A charge collection model was developed to interpret the integrated-charge measurements which enabled estimation of the energy required to produce an electron-hole pair (ϵdi) and the mean carrier transport properties in diamond, such as carrier mobility and lifetime, and the behavior of the electrical contacts to diamond.

  14. Density profiles and collective excitations of a trapped two-component Fermi vapour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amoruso, M.; Meccoli, I.; Minguzzi, A.; Tosi, M.P.

    1999-08-01

    We discuss the ground state and the small-amplitude excitations of a degenerate vapour of fermionic atoms placed in two hyperfine states inside a spherical harmonic trap. An equations-of-motion approach is set up to discuss the hydrodynamic dissipation processes from the interactions between the two components of the fluid beyond mean-field theory and to emphasize analogies with spin dynamics and spin diffusion in a homogeneous Fermi liquid. The conditions for the establishment of a collisional regime via scattering against cold-atom impurities are analyzed. The equilibrium density profiles are then calculated for a two-component vapour of 40 K atoms: they are little modified by the interactions for presently relevant values of the system parameters, but spatial separation of the two components will spontaneously arise as the number of atoms in the trap is increased. The eigenmodes of collective oscillation in both the total particle number density and the concentration density are evaluated analytically in the special case of a symmetric two-component vapour in the collisional regime. The dispersion relation of the surface modes for the total particle density reduces in this case to that of a one-component Fermi vapour, whereas the frequencies of all other modes are shifted by the interactions. (author)

  15. Esterase profile of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus populations collected from Northern India exhibiting varied susceptibility to deltamethrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Swaid; Yadav, C L; Vatsya, Stuti

    2012-11-01

    Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus is an economically important ectoparasite of cattle. Chemical acaricides remain the most practical method for control of these pests. During past two decades there have been increasing reports of resistance development against synthetic pyrethroids in tick populations of this species throughout the world. A study was conducted to determine the level of susceptibility of R. (B.) microplus to deltamethrin collected from different geographical locations of northern India. LPT bioassay results revealed LC(50) values of deltamethrin ranging from 0.035 to 0.00037 % A.I. Esterase profile of the tick larval extracts using native PAGE, revealed 5 bands of esterase activity designated EST-5 to EST-1A. Inhibitory tests recognized EST-1, EST-2 and EST-3 as Acetylcholinesterases (AchEs), EST-4 and EST-5 as Carboxylesterases (CaEs). The band intensity varied between tick populations of various locations, being more intense in case of the resistant populations. An extra band of esterase activity (EST-1A) was obtained in larval extracts of ticks from 3 locations. This increased esterase activity may be involved in the resistance development in these tick populations. Acaricide resistance is a multi-factorial phenomenon, thus other causes of increased resistance like sodium channel mutation and reduced drug penetration (e.g. cuticle thickening) and behavioural changes (e.g. avoiding the pesticides) are to be tested in future in order to confirm the basic cause of the resistance development in these acaricide resistant tick populations.

  16. Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity collected using bottle in the Barents, Kara, Laptev, White, Norwegian Seas from 1977-1998 (NODC Accession 0002294)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity collected using bottle in the Barents, Kara, Laptev, White, Norwegian Seas from 1977-1998. Profile data received at NODC...

  17. Adjustment of Cell-Type Composition Minimizes Systematic Bias in Blood DNA Methylation Profiles Derived by DNA Collection Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiwa, Yuh; Hachiya, Tsuyoshi; Furukawa, Ryohei; Ohmomo, Hideki; Ono, Kanako; Kudo, Hisaaki; Hata, Jun; Hozawa, Atsushi; Iwasaki, Motoki; Matsuda, Koichi; Minegishi, Naoko; Satoh, Mamoru; Tanno, Kozo; Yamaji, Taiki; Wakai, Kenji; Hitomi, Jiro; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Kubo, Michiaki; Tanaka, Hideo; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Sobue, Kenji; Shimizu, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Differences in DNA collection protocols may be a potential confounder in epigenome-wide association studies (EWAS) using a large number of blood specimens from multiple biobanks and/or cohorts. Here we show that pre-analytical procedures involved in DNA collection can induce systematic bias in the DNA methylation profiles of blood cells that can be adjusted by cell-type composition variables. In Experiment 1, whole blood from 16 volunteers was collected to examine the effect of a 24 h storage period at 4°C on DNA methylation profiles as measured using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array. Our statistical analysis showed that the P-value distribution of more than 450,000 CpG sites was similar to the theoretical distribution (in quantile-quantile plot, λ = 1.03) when comparing two control replicates, which was remarkably deviated from the theoretical distribution (λ = 1.50) when comparing control and storage conditions. We then considered cell-type composition as a possible cause of the observed bias in DNA methylation profiles and found that the bias associated with the cold storage condition was largely decreased (λ adjusted = 1.14) by taking into account a cell-type composition variable. As such, we compared four respective sample collection protocols used in large-scale Japanese biobanks or cohorts as well as two control replicates. Systematic biases in DNA methylation profiles were observed between control and three of four protocols without adjustment of cell-type composition (λ = 1.12-1.45) and no remarkable biases were seen after adjusting for cell-type composition in all four protocols (λ adjusted = 1.00-1.17). These results revealed important implications for comparing DNA methylation profiles between blood specimens from different sources and may lead to discovery of disease-associated DNA methylation markers and the development of DNA methylation profile-based predictive risk models.

  18. Adjustment of Cell-Type Composition Minimizes Systematic Bias in Blood DNA Methylation Profiles Derived by DNA Collection Protocols.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuh Shiwa

    Full Text Available Differences in DNA collection protocols may be a potential confounder in epigenome-wide association studies (EWAS using a large number of blood specimens from multiple biobanks and/or cohorts. Here we show that pre-analytical procedures involved in DNA collection can induce systematic bias in the DNA methylation profiles of blood cells that can be adjusted by cell-type composition variables. In Experiment 1, whole blood from 16 volunteers was collected to examine the effect of a 24 h storage period at 4°C on DNA methylation profiles as measured using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array. Our statistical analysis showed that the P-value distribution of more than 450,000 CpG sites was similar to the theoretical distribution (in quantile-quantile plot, λ = 1.03 when comparing two control replicates, which was remarkably deviated from the theoretical distribution (λ = 1.50 when comparing control and storage conditions. We then considered cell-type composition as a possible cause of the observed bias in DNA methylation profiles and found that the bias associated with the cold storage condition was largely decreased (λ adjusted = 1.14 by taking into account a cell-type composition variable. As such, we compared four respective sample collection protocols used in large-scale Japanese biobanks or cohorts as well as two control replicates. Systematic biases in DNA methylation profiles were observed between control and three of four protocols without adjustment of cell-type composition (λ = 1.12-1.45 and no remarkable biases were seen after adjusting for cell-type composition in all four protocols (λ adjusted = 1.00-1.17. These results revealed important implications for comparing DNA methylation profiles between blood specimens from different sources and may lead to discovery of disease-associated DNA methylation markers and the development of DNA methylation profile-based predictive risk models.

  19. Collective Dynamics and Strong Pinning near the Onset of Charge Order in La1.48Nd0.4Sr0.12CuO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baity, P. G.; Sasagawa, T.; Popović, Dragana

    2018-04-01

    The dynamics of charge-ordered states is one of the key issues in underdoped cuprate high-temperature superconductors, but static short-range charge-order (CO) domains have been detected in almost all cuprates. We probe the dynamics across the CO (and structural) transition in La1.48Nd0.4Sr0.12CuO4 by measuring nonequilibrium charge transport, or resistance R as the system responds to a change in temperature and to an applied magnetic field. We find evidence for metastable states, collective behavior, and criticality. The collective dynamics in the critical regime indicates strong pinning by disorder. Surprisingly, nonequilibrium effects, such as avalanches in R , are revealed only when the critical region is approached from the charge-ordered phase. Our results on La1.48Nd0.4Sr0.12CuO4 provide the long-sought evidence for the fluctuating order across the CO transition, and also set important constraints on theories of dynamic stripes.

  20. Degradation of the charge collection efficiency of an n-type Fz silicon diode subjected to MeV proton irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbero, Nicolò; Forneris, Jacopo [Physics Department, NIS Research Centre and CNISM, University of Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, 10250 Torino (Italy); Grilj, Veljko; Jakšić, Milko [Department for Experimental Physics, Ruđer Bošković Institute, P.O. Box 180, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Räisänen, Jyrki [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, 00014 Helsinki (Finland); Simon, Aliz [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna International Centre, P.O. Box 100, 1400 Vienna (Austria); Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Skukan, Natko [Department for Experimental Physics, Ruđer Bošković Institute, P.O. Box 180, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Vittone, Ettore, E-mail: ettore.vittone@unito.it [Physics Department, NIS Research Centre and CNISM, University of Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, 10250 Torino (Italy)

    2015-04-01

    Highlights: •Study of charge collection efficiency degradation (CCE) in Si diode due to MeV H irradiation. •CCE evaluated by micro-IBIC using 4.5 MeV Li ions to probe the damaged region. •Generation of H-donors, which perturb the electrostatic properties of the diode. -- Abstract: We present the analysis of the charge collection efficiency (CCE) degradation of float zone grown n-type silicon detectors irradiated with 1.3, 2.0 and 3.0 MeV protons. The analysis was carried out by irradiating small regions (50 × 50 μm{sup 2}) with a proton microbeam at fluences ranging from 10{sup 11} to 4·10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2} and probing the effect of irradiation by measuring the 4.5 MeV Li ion induced charge in full depletion conditions. The CCE degradation as function of the proton fluence shows an unexpected deviation from the linear behavior predicted by the Shockley–Read–Hall model of carrier recombination. The build-up of excess hydrogen related donors due to proton irradiations is suggested to be the cause of a significant perturbation of the electrostatic properties of the diode, which drastically change the electron trajectories and hence the induced charge mechanism.

  1. Measuring the Thickness and Potential Profiles of the Space-Charge Layer at Organic/Organic Interfaces under Illumination and in the Dark by Scanning Kelvin Probe Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Geoffrey A; Wu, Yanfei; Haugstad, Greg; Frisbie, C Daniel

    2016-03-09

    Scanning Kelvin probe microscopy was used to measure band-bending at the model donor/acceptor heterojunction poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT)/fullerene (C60). Specifically, we measured the variation in the surface potential of C60 films with increasing thicknesses grown on P3HT to produce a surface potential profile normal to the substrate both in the dark and under illumination. The results confirm a space-charge carrier region with a thickness of 10 nm, consistent with previous observations. We discuss the possibility that the domain size in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells, which is comparable to the space-charge layer thickness, is actually partly responsible for less than expected electron/hole recombination rates.

  2. Charge collection efficiency in SI GaAs grown from melts with variable composition as a material for solar neutrino detection

    CERN Document Server

    Verbitskaya, E; Ivanov, A; Strokan, N; Vasilev, V; Markov, A; Polyakov, A; Gavrin, V; Kozlova, Y; Veretenkin, E; Bowles, T J

    2000-01-01

    The results on electrical characteristics and charge collection efficiency in the detectors from bulk SI GaAs developed as a material for solar neutrino spectroscopy are presented. SI GaAs crystals were grown by the Czochralski method. The changes in the stoichiometric components are permanently controlled. It is shown that the performance of GaAs p sup + -i-n sup + structures provided the range of operational reverse voltage up to 1 kV. Measurement of deep level spectra and their analysis reveal the dominant deep levels - hole traps E sub v +0.51 and +0.075 eV in GaAs grown from stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric melts, respectively. Investigation of carrier transport properties and bulk homogeneity evinced in charge collection efficiency has shown advantageous results for SI GaAs grown from stoichiometric melt. The reduction of carrier transport parameters and charge collection efficiency in GaAs grown from nonstoichiometric melt is analyzed taking into consideration formation of the hole trap E sub v +0....

  3. Charge collection efficiency in SI GaAs grown from melts with variable composition as a material for solar neutrino detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verbitskaya, E. E-mail: elver@detsi.ioffe.rssi.ru; Eremin, V.; Ivanov, A.; Strokan, N.; Vasilev, V.; Markov, A.; Polyakov, A.; Gavrin, V.; Kozlova, Yu.; Veretenkin, E.; Bowles, T.J

    2000-01-11

    The results on electrical characteristics and charge collection efficiency in the detectors from bulk SI GaAs developed as a material for solar neutrino spectroscopy are presented. SI GaAs crystals were grown by the Czochralski method. The changes in the stoichiometric components are permanently controlled. It is shown that the performance of GaAs p{sup +}-i-n{sup +} structures provided the range of operational reverse voltage up to 1 kV. Measurement of deep level spectra and their analysis reveal the dominant deep levels - hole traps E{sub v}+0.51 and +0.075 eV in GaAs grown from stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric melts, respectively. Investigation of carrier transport properties and bulk homogeneity evinced in charge collection efficiency has shown advantageous results for SI GaAs grown from stoichiometric melt. The reduction of carrier transport parameters and charge collection efficiency in GaAs grown from nonstoichiometric melt is analyzed taking into consideration formation of the hole trap E{sub v}+0.075 eV, presumably assigned to Ga antisite and its influence on the concentration of the ionized deep donor level EL2{sup +}.

  4. Profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Profiles is a synthetic overview of more than 100 national energy markets in the world, providing insightful facts and key energy statistics. A Profile is structured around 6 main items and completed by key statistics: Ministries, public agencies, energy policy are concerned; main companies in the oil, gas, electricity and coal sectors, status, shareholders; reserve, production, imports and exports, electricity and refining capacities; deregulation of prices, subsidies, taxes; consumption trends by sector, energy market shares; main energy projects, production and consumption prospects. Statistical Profiles are present in about 3 pages the main data and indicators on oil, gas, coal and electricity. (A.L.B.)

  5. EX1502L1 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1502L1: Caribbean Exploration (Mapping)...

  6. EX1103L2 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1103L2: Exploration and Mapping,...

  7. EX1404L3 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1404L3: Northeast Seamounts and Canyons...

  8. EX1504L1 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L1: CAPSTONE NWHI & Johnston...

  9. EX1402L2 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1402L2: Gulf of Mexico Mapping and...

  10. EX1502L3 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1502L3: Caribbean Exploration (ROV)...

  11. EX1103L1 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1103: Exploration and Mapping, Galapagos...

  12. EX1504L2 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L2: Campaign to Address Pacific...

  13. EX0909L4 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX0909L4: Mapping Field Trials -...

  14. EX1304L1 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1304L1: Northeast U.S. Canyons...

  15. EX1004L3 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1004L3: Exploration Indonesia - Bitung...

  16. EX1004L2 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1004L2: Exploration Indonesia - Bitung...

  17. EX1004L1 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1004L1: Exploration Indonesia - Guam to...

  18. EX0909L1 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX0909L1: Mapping Field Trials - Necker...

  19. EX1202L1 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1202L1: Gulf of Mexico Exploration...

  20. EX1202L3 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1202L3: Gulf of Mexico Exploration...

  1. EX1202L2 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1202: Gulf of Mexico Exploration between...

  2. EX0909L3 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX0909L3: Mapping Field Trials - Hawaiian...

  3. EX1402L1 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1402L1: Gulf of Mexico Mapping and...

  4. EX1504L3 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L3: CAPSTONE Leg III: Main Hawaiian...

  5. EX1504L4 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L4: Campaign to Address Pacific...

  6. EX1402L3 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1402L3: Gulf of Mexico Mapping and ROV...

  7. EX1503L1 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1503L1: Tropical Exploration (Mapping I)...

  8. EX1205L1 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1205L1: Exploration, Blake Plateau...

  9. EX1605L3 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1605L3: CAPSTONE CNMI & Mariana...

  10. EX1205L2 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1205L2: Northeast Canyons and...

  11. EX0909L2 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX0909L2: Mapping Field Trials - Necker...

  12. EX1605L1 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1605L1: CAPSTONE CNMI & Mariana...

  13. Temperature, salinity, nutrient, and ammonia profiles collected by bottle in the Black Sea from 5/5/1955 - 4/16/1989 (NODC Accession 0000131)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Nutrients and temperature profile data were collected using bottle casts from the FIOLENT and other platforms in the Black Sea. Data were collected from 05 May 1955...

  14. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from FARRAGUT in the Mediterranean Sea from 20 May 1986 to 30 June 1986 (NODC Accession 8700046)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT from the FARRAGUT in the Mediterranean Sea. Data were collected from 20 May 1986 to 30 June...

  15. Temperature profile data collected using CTD casts from the JAMES CLARK ROSS in the South Atlantic Ocean from 15 November 1994 to 21 November 1994 (NODC Accession 0000873)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using CTD casts in the South Atlantic Ocean from JAMES CLARK ROSS. Data were collected from 15 November 1994 to 21 November...

  16. Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity and other measurements collected using bottle from the SNP-1 in the Coastal South Pacific and South Pacific in 1976 (NODC Accession 0001483)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile, nutrients, and meteorological data were collected using bottle casts from the SNP-1 in the South Pacific Ocean. Data were collected from 24...

  17. Temperature profile data collected in a world wide distribution using XBT casts from 01 January 1994 to 25 May 1994 (NODC Accession 9600159)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using XBT casts from the ANGO and other platforms in a world wide distribution. Data were collected from 01 January 1994 to...

  18. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from HARRIOT LANE in the NW Atlantic (limit-40 W) from 29 December 1986 to 31 December 1986 (NODC Accession 8700074)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XTB casts in the NW Atlantic Ocean from the HARRIOT LANE. Data were collected from 29 December...

  19. Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity, oxygen and other measurement collected from various platforms in the South Pacific and South Atlantic Oceans from 1961-1964 (NODC Accession 0001903)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and nutrients data were collected using bottle casts from the ARGUS in the South Atlantic Ocean and South Pacific Ocean. Data were collected from...

  20. Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity, oxygen and other measurements collected using bottle from multiple platforms in the Atlantic, Pacific, Arctic, Indian Oceans from 1873 to 2005 (NODC Accession 0002738)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data in this collection are part of the historical profile data collection acquired by the Department of Fisheries and Oceans Marine Environmental Data Service,...

  1. Temperature profile and other data collected from bottle casts by MONOWAI in South Pacific Ocean from 16 November 1992 to 03 December 1992 (NODC Accession 9400103)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and other data were collected using bottle casts in the South Pacific Ocean by MONOWAI. Data were collected from 16 November 1992 to 03 December...

  2. Oceanographic profile temperature and salinity measurements collected using bottle from the POLYARNIK (UGPR) in the Arctic in 1960 (NODC Accession 0001126)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and meteorological data were collected using bottle casts from the POLYARNIK in the Barents Sea. Data were collected from 15 November 1960 to 06...

  3. Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity, and oxygen measurements collected from BLUE FIN in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1988 to 1993 (NODC Accession 0002230)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and other data were collected using CTD casts from the BLUE FIN in the North Atlantic Ocean. Data were collected from 26 September 1988 to 18...

  4. Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity, oxygen, and nutrients measurements collected using bottle and MBT from the A.I. VOEIKOV in the Pacific Ocean (NODC Accession 0002214)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile, nutrients, and meteorological data were collected using bottle and MBT casts from the A.I. VOEIKOV in the Pacific Ocean. Data were collected...

  5. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from HARKNESS in the Indian Ocean from 15 December 1986 to 14 January 1987 (NODC Accession 8700087)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the HARKNESS in the Indian Ocean and TOGA Area - India Ocean. Data were collected...

  6. 47 CFR 64.1510 - Billing and collection of pay-per-call and similar service charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Pay-Per-Call and Other Information Services § 64.1510 Billing and collection of pay-per-call and... pay-per-call services and offering billing and collection services to such provider shall: (1) Ensure... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Billing and collection of pay-per-call and...

  7. Characteristic Profiles of an Original Drink Sap from Male and Female Deglet Nour Palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) during Collection Period

    OpenAIRE

    Ines Makhlouf-Gafsi; Abir Mokni-Ghribi; Hamadi Attia; Christophe Blecker; Souhail Besbes

    2016-01-01

    This work aimed to evaluate the nutritional quality of a typical natural drink from male and female Deglet Nour (DN) date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) during the collection period. Dry matter, protein, amino acids, and sugar profiles were determined using AFNOR norm, Kjeldahl method, HPLC, and HPAEC-PAD, respectively. The male sap dry matter content was higher than that of the female. It decreased significantly through the tapping period. During the harvest, the male sap protein content decr...

  8. Charge heterogeneity profiling of monoclonal antibodies using low ionic strength ion-exchange chromatography and well-controlled pH gradients on monolithic columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebi, Mohammad; Nordborg, Anna; Gaspar, Andras; Lacher, Nathan A; Wang, Qian; He, Xiaoping Z; Haddad, Paul R; Hilder, Emily F

    2013-11-22

    In this work, the suitability of employing shallow pH gradients generated using single component buffer systems as eluents through cation-exchange (CEX) monolithic columns is demonstrated for the high-resolution separation of monoclonal antibody (mAb) charge variants in three different biopharmaceuticals. A useful selection of small molecule buffer species is described that can be used within very narrow pH ranges (typically 1 pH unit) defined by their buffer capacity for producing controlled and smooth pH profiles when used together with porous polymer monoliths. Using very low ionic strength eluents also enabled direct coupling with electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry. The results obtained by the developed pH gradient approach for the separation of closely related antibody species appear to be consistent with those obtained by imaged capillary isoelectric focusing (iCE) in terms of both resolution and separation profile. Both determinants of resolution, i.e., peak compression and peak separation contribute to the gains in resolution, evidently through the Donnan potential effect, which is increased by decreasing the eluent concentration, and also through the way electrostatic charges are distributed on the protein surface. Retention mechanisms based on the trends observed in retention of proteins at pH values higher than the electrophoretic pI are also discussed using applicable theories. Employing monolithic ion-exchangers is shown to enable fast method development, short analysis time, and high sample throughput owing to the accelerated mass transport of the monolithic media. The possibility of short analysis time, typically less than 15 min, and high sample throughput is extremely useful in the assessment of charge-based changes to the mAb products, such as during manufacturing or storage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Linear shaped charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, David; Stofleth, Jerome H.; Saul, Venner W.

    2017-07-11

    Linear shaped charges are described herein. In a general embodiment, the linear shaped charge has an explosive with an elongated arrowhead-shaped profile. The linear shaped charge also has and an elongated v-shaped liner that is inset into a recess of the explosive. Another linear shaped charge includes an explosive that is shaped as a star-shaped prism. Liners are inset into crevices of the explosive, where the explosive acts as a tamper.

  10. Prospects of real-time ion temperature and rotation profiles based on neural-network charge exchange analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, R.W.T.; Von Hellermann, M. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Svensson, J. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1994-07-01

    A back-propagation neural network technique is used at JET to extract plasma parameters like ion temperature, rotation velocities or spectral line intensities from charge exchange (CX) spectra. It is shown that in the case of the C VI CX spectra, neural networks can give a good estimation (better than +-20% accuracy) for the main plasma parameters (Ti, V{sub rot}). Since the neural network approach involves no iterations or initial guesses the speed with which a spectrum is processed is so high (0.2 ms/spectrum) that real time analysis will be achieved in the near future. 4 refs., 8 figs.

  11. PROFILE SURVEY OF WASTE PICKERS IN BRAZIL: REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF A COLLECTION VEHICLE AND OPTIMIZED ROUTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naiara F. Ramos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents information collected from waste pickers in the southern, south-eastern and north-eastern regions of Brazil to guide th e development of a collection vehicle and a support system fo r the definition of collecting routes. The study had three objectives: to speci fy the profile of waste pickers of recyclable materials in the three surv eyed regions; to diagnose the working conditions of individuals linked to a ssociations and cooperatives of waste pickers and to identify the physical and operational struct ure of the waste picker organizations. To reach these objectives questionnaires were issued to waste pickers linked to associations and coope ratives that collect recyclables using human- or animal-powered vehicles a nd to the waste picker organizations themselves. Based on the results of this study, we are able to provide the requirements for the development of the co llection vehicle, to draw a profile of the waste pickers in the th ree study regions and have be tter understanding of the working and physical conditions and th e organizational structure of waste picker entities. It can be concluded th at waste pickers suffer several forms of deprivation, resulting in the marginal ization, prejudice and exclusion of individuals who conduct this work, making it essential to prom ote actions that contribute to the social in clusion of waste pickers in their productive segment.

  12. Collecting optical coherence elastography depth profiles with a micromachined cantilever probe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chavan, D.C.; Mo, J.; de Groot, M.; Meijering, A.E.C.; de Boer, J.F.; Iannuzzi, D.

    2013-01-01

    We present an experimental setup that combines optical coherence elastography depth sensing with atomic force microscope indentation. The instrument relies on a miniaturized cantilever probe that compresses a sample with a small footprint force and simultaneously collects an optical coherence

  13. 75 FR 44053 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request: CDFI/CDE Project Profiles Web Form

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-27

    ... provide loans, investments, financial services and technical assistance to underserved populations and... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Community Development Financial Institutions Fund Proposed Collection.... 3506(c)(2)(A). Currently, the Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFI) Fund, Department of...

  14. A novel position and time sensing active pixel sensor with field-assisted electron collection for charged particle tracking and electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Geronimo, G. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Instrumentation Division, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Deptuch, G. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Instrumentation Division, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Dragone, A. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Instrumentation Division, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Radeka, V. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Instrumentation Division, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Rehak, P. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Instrumentation Division, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States)]. E-mail: rehak@bnl.gov; Castoldi, A. [Politecnico di Milano, Dip. Ingegneria Nucleare, 20133 Milan (Italy); INFN Sez. Milano, 20133 Milan (Italy); Fazzi, A. [Politecnico di Milano, Dip. Ingegneria Nucleare, 20133 Milan (Italy); INFN Sez. Milano, 20133 Milan (Italy); Gatti, E. [Politecnico di Milano, Dip. Elettronica e Informazione, 20133 Milan (Italy); INFN Sez. Milano, 20133 Milan (Italy); Guazzoni, C. [Politecnico di Milano, Dip. Elettronica e Informazione, 20133 Milan (Italy); INFN Sez. Milano, 20133 Milan (Italy); Rijssenbeek, M. [Physics Department of State University of New York at Stony Brook, NY 11790 (United States); Dulinski, W. [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, 23 rue du Loess BP 28, 67037 Strasbourg cedex (France); Besson, A. [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, 23 rue du Loess BP 28, 67037 Strasbourg cedex (France); Deveaux, M. [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, 23 rue du Loess BP 28, 67037 Strasbourg cedex (France); Winter, M. [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, 23 rue du Loess BP 28, 67037 Strasbourg cedex (France)

    2006-11-30

    A new type of active pixel sensors (APSs) to track charged particles for particle physics experiments or to count number of electrons that cross any pixel at the focal plane of electron microscopes is described. The electric field of desirable shape is created inside the active volume of the pixel introducing the drift component in the movement of the signal electrons towards charge collecting electrodes. The electric field results from the flow of {approx}100 mA/cm{sup 2} hole currents within individual pixels of the sensor. The proposed sensor is produced using a standard industrially available complementary metal oxide silicon (CMOS) process. There are two main advantages of the proposed detectors when compared to the present (February 2005) state-of-the-art, i.e. field-free APS sensors. The first advantage of a field-assisted transport mechanism is the reduction of the charge collection time and of the sharing of the signal electrons between adjacent pixels by diffusion. The second advantage is the freedom to use both kinds of MOS transistors within each pixel of the sensor. Thus, the full functional power of CMOS circuits can be embedded in situ. As an example, 16-bit scalers will be implemented in each pixel of the sensor for electron microscopy. The reduced collection time combined with the state-of-the-art electronics within each pixel provides the most complete information about the position and the timing of incident charged particles for particle physics experiments. Position resolution of new sensors was computationally simulated to be a few microns, that is, the same as the resolution of standard APSs. Moreover, the active depth of the sensor and the associate electronics is less than about 20 {mu}m and a thinned down sensor together with its beryllium backing can have a total thickness of less than 0.1% of one radiation length. The reduction of the thickness of the detector reduces the amount of multiple scattering within the detector. The

  15. A novel position and time sensing active pixel sensor with field-assisted electron collection for charged particle tracking and electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Geronimo, G.; Deptuch, G.; Dragone, A.; Radeka, V.; Rehak, P.; Castoldi, A.; Fazzi, A.; Gatti, E.; Guazzoni, C.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Dulinski, W.; Besson, A.; Deveaux, M.; Winter, M.

    2006-11-01

    A new type of active pixel sensors (APSs) to track charged particles for particle physics experiments or to count number of electrons that cross any pixel at the focal plane of electron microscopes is described. The electric field of desirable shape is created inside the active volume of the pixel introducing the drift component in the movement of the signal electrons towards charge collecting electrodes. The electric field results from the flow of ˜100 mA/cm 2 hole currents within individual pixels of the sensor. The proposed sensor is produced using a standard industrially available complementary metal oxide silicon (CMOS) process. There are two main advantages of the proposed detectors when compared to the present (February 2005) state-of-the-art, i.e. field-free APS sensors. The first advantage of a field-assisted transport mechanism is the reduction of the charge collection time and of the sharing of the signal electrons between adjacent pixels by diffusion. The second advantage is the freedom to use both kinds of MOS transistors within each pixel of the sensor. Thus, the full functional power of CMOS circuits can be embedded in situ. As an example, 16-bit scalers will be implemented in each pixel of the sensor for electron microscopy. The reduced collection time combined with the state-of-the-art electronics within each pixel provides the most complete information about the position and the timing of incident charged particles for particle physics experiments. Position resolution of new sensors was computationally simulated to be a few microns, that is, the same as the resolution of standard APSs. Moreover, the active depth of the sensor and the associate electronics is less than about 20 μm and a thinned down sensor together with its beryllium backing can have a total thickness of less than 0.1% of one radiation length. The reduction of the thickness of the detector reduces the amount of multiple scattering within the detector. The determination of the

  16. Calcium carbonate electronic-insulating layers improve the charge collection efficiency of tin oxide photoelectrodes in dye-sensitized solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikh, Shoyebmohamad F.; Mane, Rajaram S.; Hwang, Yun Jeong; Joo, Oh-Shim

    2015-01-01

    In dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), a surface passivation layer has been employed on the tin oxide (SnO 2 ) photoanodes to enhance the charge collection efficiency, and thus the power conversion efficiency. Herein, we demonstrate that the electronic-insulating layering of calcium carbonate (CaCO 3 ) can improve the charge collection efficiency in dye-sensitized solar cells designed with photoanodes. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of CaCO 3 layering, both layered and pristine SnO 2 photoanodes are characterized with regard to their structures, morphologies, and photo-electrochemical measurements. The SnO 2 -6L CaCO 3 photoanode has demonstrated as high as 3.5% power conversion efficiency; 3.5-fold greater than that of the pristine SnO 2 photoanode. The enhancement in the power conversion efficiency is corroborated with the number of the dye molecules, the passivation of surface states, a negative shift in the conduction band position, and the reduced electron recombination rate of photoelectrons following the coating of the CaCO 3 surface layer

  17. 77 FR 68104 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Socio-Economic Profile of Small-Scale...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-15

    ... channels, capital investment, attitudes and perceptions about the performance management actions and the... Flexibility Act, the Endangered Species Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act, and other pertinent... included in the request for OMB approval of this information collection; they also will become a matter of...

  18. Characterisation of charging kinetics of dielectrics under continuous electron irradiation through real time electron emission collecting method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerch, Kévin, E-mail: kevin.guerch@onera.fr [ONERA, 2 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31055 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); CIRIMAT – Institut Carnot (CNRS) Université Paul Sabatier, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 09 (France); Paulmier, Thierry [ONERA, 2 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31055 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Guillemet-Fritsch, Sophie; Lenormand, Pascal [CIRIMAT – Institut Carnot (CNRS) Université Paul Sabatier, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 09 (France)

    2015-04-15

    Dielectric materials used for spacecraft applications are often characterised under electron irradiation in order to study their physical and electrical mechanisms. For surface potential measurement, a small removable flat device based on the secondary electron spectrometer method has been developed and installed in the CEDRE irradiation test facility at ONERA (Toulouse, France). This technique was developed to get rid off specific issues inherent to the Kelvin Probe technique. This experimental device named REPA (Repulsive Electron Potential Analyser) allows in situ and real time assessment of the surface potential built up on dielectric materials under continuous electron irradiation. A calibration has been performed in order to validate this experimental setup. Furthermore, to optimise its efficiency, the physical behaviour of this device has been modelled and numerically simulated using Particle In Cell (PIC) model and a dedicated numerical code called SPIS (Spacecraft Plasma Interactions System). In a final step, electrical characterisations of a charged dielectric have been carried out under continuous electron irradiation with this new method. These results have been compared with measurements performed in same experimental conditions with conventional Kelvin Probe method. The experimental results have been discussed in this paper. To conclude, advantages of this experimental setup in regard of this application will be emphasised.

  19. Evaluations of dielectric property and drug release profile of 5-FU patches based on plasma charged electrets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, YUAN; Hejuan, LIANG; Ping, HUANG; Xiaoqiang, AN; Jian, JIANG; Lili, CUI

    2018-05-01

    In the present study, the electret 5-fluorouracil patch was developed, the effective surface potential, piezoelectric coefficient d 33, open-circuit thermally stimulated discharge (TSD) current spectra and shear adhesion of the patch were measured. The drug release profile of the patch was determined by using high performance liquid chromatography method. A stable potential difference which was positively dependent on the surface potential of the electret was generated on two sides of the patch. The measurements of d 33 coefficient, TSD current spectra and adhesion performance showed that the electrostatic field of the electret could cause polarization and cohesive strength decreasing of the matrix molecules, change the distribution and interaction of the drug molecules in patch, therefore to increase the release of drug from the transdermal patch.

  20. A comparative study of three model-based algorithms for estimating state-of-charge of lithium-ion batteries under a new combined dynamic loading profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Fangfang; Xing, Yinjiao; Wang, Dong; Tsui, Kwok-Leung

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Three different model-based filtering algorithms for SOC estimation are compared. • A combined dynamic loading profile is proposed to evaluate the three algorithms. • Robustness against uncertainty of initial states of SOC estimators are investigated. • Battery capacity degradation is considered in SOC estimation. - Abstract: Accurate state-of-charge (SOC) estimation is critical for the safety and reliability of battery management systems in electric vehicles. Because SOC cannot be directly measured and SOC estimation is affected by many factors, such as ambient temperature, battery aging, and current rate, a robust SOC estimation approach is necessary to be developed so as to deal with time-varying and nonlinear battery systems. In this paper, three popular model-based filtering algorithms, including extended Kalman filter, unscented Kalman filter, and particle filter, are respectively used to estimate SOC and their performances regarding to tracking accuracy, computation time, robustness against uncertainty of initial values of SOC, and battery degradation, are compared. To evaluate the performances of these algorithms, a new combined dynamic loading profile composed of the dynamic stress test, the federal urban driving schedule and the US06 is proposed. The comparison results showed that the unscented Kalman filter is the most robust to different initial values of SOC, while the particle filter owns the fastest convergence ability when an initial guess of SOC is far from a true initial SOC.

  1. Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity, oxygen measurements collected using bottle from multiple platforms in the Azov, Black Seas from 1924-1990 (NODC Accession 0002717)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity, oxygen measurements collected using bottle from multiple platforms in the Azov, Black Seas from 1924-1990

  2. Temperature profile data collected from the ALE ANDRO DE HUMBOLDT from 19 September 1971 to 26 September 1971 (NODC Accession 7500942)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bottle casts from the ALE ANDRO DE HUMBOLDT in the coastal waters of California from 19 September 1971 to 26 September...

  3. Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity, oxygen and other measurement collected using bottle in the Barents, Kara, Laptev, White, Norwegian Seas from 1900 - 1940 (NODC Accession 0002118)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and other measurements were collected using bottle casts from the SOTRA in the Barents Sea and other locations from 16 May 1900 to 20 October...

  4. Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity, oxygen and other measurements collected using bottle in the Barents, Kara, Laptev, White, and Norwegian Seas from 1970 through 1975 (NODC Accession 0002125)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity, oxygen and other measurements collected using bottle in the Barents, Kara, Laptev, White, and Norwegian Seas from 1970...

  5. Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity, oxygen and other measurements collected using bottle in the Barents, Kara, Laptev, White, Norwegian Seas from 1965 - 1969 (NODC Accession 0002124)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity, oxygen and other measurements collected using bottle in the Barents, Kara, Laptev, White, and Norwegian Seas from 1965...

  6. Temperature profile and other data collected using bottle casts in Barents, Kara and other Seas from 03 January 1961 to 30 June 1963 (NODC Accession 0002122)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and other data were collected using bottle casts from the AISBERG and POLYARNIK in the Kara, Barents, White, Laptev, and Norwegian Sea. Data were...

  7. Temperature profile and other data collected using bottle casts in Barents, Kara and other Seas from 01 January 1963 to 26 December 1964 (NODC Accession 0002123)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and other data were collected using bottle casts from the AISBERG and other platforms in the Kara, Barents, White, Laptev, and Norwegian Sea....

  8. Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity, oxygen and other measurement collected using bottle in the Barents, Kara, Laptev, White, Norwegian Seas from 1943 - 1950 (NODC Accession 0002119)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and other measurements were collected using bottle casts in the Barents Sea and other locations from 02 June 1943 to 16 June 1950. Data were...

  9. Hull-Mounted Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Data (SADCP) collected aboard the NOAA Ship NANCY FOSTER during cruise NF-10-01 and NF-10-02

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Upper ocean current velocity measurements collected with NOAA Ship NANCY FOSTER's Teledyne RD Instruments 150 kHz hull-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler...

  10. Sound velocity profiles collected by NOAA's Navigation Response Team No. 4 in the Great Lakes, July 5 - September 25, 2007 (NODC Accession 0020370)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical oceanographic data were collected from NOAA Navigation Response Team-4 in the Great Lakes from 05 July 2007 to 25 September 2007. Sound velocity profiles...

  11. Oceanographic profile data collected aboard multiple platforms worldwide from 1959-05-26 to 2012-06-03 (NCEI Accession 0098794)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0098794 contains physical and chemical oceanographic profile data collected aboard multiple ships worldwide from 1959-05-26 to 2012-06-03. These data...

  12. Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity and other measurements collected using bottle and high resolution CTD from the POLARSTERN in the Antarctic and South Atlantic in 1992 (NODC Accession 0000463)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile, nutrients, and other data were collected using plankton net, bottle, and CTD casts from the POLARSTERN in the Southern Oceans. Data were...

  13. One sound velocity profile collected aboard the NAVIGATION RESPONSE TEAM 1 in Berwick Bay near Morgan City, Louisiana on October 4, 2006 (NODC Accession 0013777)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A sound velocity profile was collected using a sound velocimeter cast in Berwick Bay near Morgan City, Louisiana on 04 October 2006 as part of project number...

  14. Temperature and salinity profile data collected by NOAA's Navigation Response Team 5 during operations along the northeast US coast, March 2005 - March 2006 (NODC Accession 0002674)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using CTD casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean and the Northeast US Coast from the NAVIGATION RESPONSE TEAM 5 from 03 March...

  15. Oceanographic profile temperature, oxygen, nitrate+nitrite and other measurements collected using bottle from various platforms in the North Atlantic ocean from 1988 to 2001 (NODC Accession 0000990)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Profile data collected as part of the Bermuda-Atlantic Time Series Study (BATS) from Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences (BIOS; formerly BBSR)

  16. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from HARRIOT LANE in the NW Atlantic (limit-40 W) from 20 February 1987 to 22 February 1987 (NODC Accession 8700096)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT from the HARRIOT LANE in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean and TOGA Area - Atlantic Ocean. Data...

  17. Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity, oxygen, and nutrients measurements collected using bottle from the Staffetta in the Mediterranean Sea (NODC Accession 0002243)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity, oxygen and other profile data collected in the Mediterranean Sea received at NODC on 07/11/04 by Sydney Levitus from Trieste Institute of...

  18. Temperature profile data collected using CTD casts in the Indian Ocean from 30 January 1972 to 18 August 1981 (NODC Accession 0000278)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using CTD casts in the Indian Ocean from 30 January 1972 to 18 August 1981. The data were submitted by Vladimirov, V L. of...

  19. Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity, oxygen and other measurement collected using bottle in the Barents, Kara, Laptev, White, and Norwegian Seas from 1976 through 1982 (NODC Accession 0002126)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity, oxygen and other measurement collected using bottle in the Barents, Kara, Laptev, White, and Norwegian Seas from 1976...

  20. Temperature profile and oxygen data collected from multiple ships using CTD casts in a world wide distribution from 04 September 1979 to 15 April 1998 (NODC Accession 0002716)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and oxygen data were collected using CTD casts in a world wide distribution from multiple platforms from 04 September 1979 to 15 April 1998. Data...

  1. Physical profile data collected during the calendar year 2003 for the Tropical Atmosphere Ocean Project by NOAA's Pacific Marine Environment Lab (NODC Accession 0001364)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical profile data were collected using meteorological sensors and CTD casts in the Northeast Pacific Ocean from NOAA Ship KA'IMIMOANA and NOAA Ship RONALD H....

  2. Mineral profiling of ostrich (Struthio camelus) seminal plasma and its relationship with semen traits and collection day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A M J; Bonato, M; Dzama, K; Malecki, I A; Cloete, S W P

    2018-04-06

    Successful assisted reproduction techniques, with specific focus on in vitro semen storage for artificial insemination, are dependent on certain key elements which includes the biochemical profiling of semen. The objective of this study was to complete an ostrich seminal plasma (SP) evaluation by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) among seven males at different daily intervals (day 1, 3, 7, 11, 15, 19, 21, 23, 25, 26, 27, 28) for a period of 28 days during spring (August to September) for mineral profiling. The effect of collection day and male on sperm concentration, semen volume and seminal plasma volume, was explored as well as the relationships amongst these specific sperm traits and SP minerals. Variation amongst SP mineral concentrations, accounted for by the fixed effects of sperm concentration, semen volume, seminal plasma volume, collection day and male, ranged from 18% to 77%. Male had the largest effect on variation in SP minerals, namely: phosphorus (P), potassium (K), calcium (Ca), sodium (Na), boron (B), iron (Fe), cobalt (Co), nickel (Ni), copper (Cu), molybdenum (Mo), barium (Ba), arsenic (As) and selenium (Se). Sperm concentration instigated fluctuations of P, magnesium (Mg), B, zinc (Zn), Fe, aluminium (Al), Se, manganese (Mn) and lead (Pb). Semen volume had an effect on Na, K, B, Pb and Ba while seminal plasma volume only influenced variation in Na. There were fluctuations among collection days of specific micro minerals, Ni and Mo, with initial Ni concentrations being relatively greater and Mo at lesser concentrations. Semen volume, seminal plasma volume and sperm concentration varied amongst males. Sperm concentrations during the initial collection days, 1 and 3, were less than that for days 7 to 28. Significant variation of SP minerals and sperm characteristics among ejaculates and males suggest an association of these specific elements with sperm function and are, therefore, considered to be of potential importance to

  3. Fungal Profiles Isolated from Open and Used Cosmetic Products Collected from Different Localities in Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasser, Laila A

    2008-01-01

    A total of seventy five samples of cosmetic products open and used for varying periods of time were collected from different localities in Saudi Arabia. These samples were analyzed for the presence of mesophilic and thermophilic fungi. Six genera and 13 species were isolated at 28 degree C. Eleven genera, 24 species as well as two species varieties were encountered at 45 degree C (thermophilic fungi). Aspergillus was the most common genus while A. terreus was the most common species at 28 degree C and 45 degree C. The highest total count of fungi was obtained from samples of lip cosmetic products, while the lowest total counts were detected in eye cosmetic products. The antifungal activity was studied for seven randomly selected commercial drugs against five species of isolated saprophytic fungi. Results indicated that Dermocart skin cream was largely effective against all tested fungal isolates. (author)

  4. Non-destructive depth profiling of solid samples by atomic and nuclear interactions induced by charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demortier, Guy

    2003-01-01

    The study of complex materials (non-homogeneous matrices containing medium and/or heavy atoms as major elements) by Particle Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE) requires the tailoring of the experimental set up to take into account the high X-ray intensity produced by these main elements present at the surface, as well as the expected low intensity from other elements 'buried' in the substrate. The determination of traces is therefore limited and the minimum detection limit is generally higher by at least two orders of magnitude in comparison with those achievable for low Z matrices (Z≤20). Additionally, those high Z matrices, having a high absorption capability, are not always homogeneous. The non-homogeneity may be, on the one hand, a layered structure (which is uneasy to profile by Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS) if the material contains elements of neighbouring atomic masses or if the layered structure extends on several microns). PIXE measurements at various incident energies (and with various projectiles (p, d, He 3 , He 4 )) are an alternative method to overcome those difficulties. The use of special filters to selectively decrease the intensity of the most intense X-ray lines, the accurate calculation of the characteristic X-ray intensity ratios (Kα/Kβ, Lα/Lβ) of individual elements, the computation of the secondary X-ray fluorescence induced in thick targets are amongst the most important parameters to be investigated in order to solve these analytical problems. Examples of Al, Si, Cu, Ag, Au based alloys as encountered in industrial and archaeological metallurgy are discussed. The non-destructive aspect of the ion beam techniques is proved by applying the method in vivo for the study of fluorine migration in tooth enamel. Preliminary results on the composition of the blocks of the pyramid of Cheops are presented in the scope of a complete revision of the procedure of its construction

  5. Measurement of the charge asymmetry in highly boosted top-quark pair production in s=8 TeV pp collision data collected by the ATLAS experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Aad

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the pp→tt¯ process the angular distributions of top and anti-top quarks are expected to present a subtle difference, which could be enhanced by processes not included in the Standard Model. This Letter presents a measurement of the charge asymmetry in events where the top-quark pair is produced with a large invariant mass. The analysis is performed on 20.3 fb−1 of pp collision data at s=8TeV collected by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, using reconstruction techniques specifically designed for the decay topology of highly boosted top quarks. The charge asymmetry in a fiducial region with large invariant mass of the top-quark pair (mtt¯>0.75 TeV and an absolute rapidity difference of the top and anti-top quark candidates within −2<|yt|−|yt¯|<2 is measured to be 4.2±3.2%, in agreement with the Standard Model prediction at next-to-leading order. A differential measurement in three tt¯ mass bins is also presented.

  6. Enhanced charge collection with ultrathin AlOx electron blocking layer for hole-transporting material-free perovskite solar cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Huiyun; Shi, Jiangjian; Xu, Xin; Xiao, Junyan; Luo, Jianheng; Dong, Juan; Lv, Songtao; Zhu, Lifeng; Wu, Huijue; Li, Dongmei; Luo, Yanhong; Meng, Qingbo; Chen, Qiang

    2015-02-21

    An ultrathin AlOx layer has been deposited onto a CH3NH3PbI3 film using atomic layer deposition technology, to construct a metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) back contact for the hole-transporting material-free perovskite solar cell. By optimization of the ALD deposition cycles, the average power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the cell has been enhanced from 8.61% to 10.07% with a highest PCE of 11.10%. It is revealed that the improvement in cell performance with this MIS back contact is mainly attributed to the enhancement in charge collection resulting from the electron blocking effect of the AlOx layer.

  7. Evolution of coherent collective modes through consecutive charge-density-wave transitions in the (PO2)4(WO3)12 monophosphate tungsten bronze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojchevska, L.; Borovšak, M.; Foury-Leylekian, P.; Pouget, J.-P.; Mertelj, T.; Mihailovic, D.

    2017-07-01

    All-optical femtosecond relaxation dynamics in a single crystal of monophosphate tungsten bronze (PO2)4(WO3)2m with alternate stacking m =6 of WO3 layers was studied through the three consequent charge-density-wave (CDW) transitions. Several transient coherent collective modes associated with the different CDW transitions were observed and analyzed in the framework of the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau theory. Remarkably, the interference of the modes leads to an apparent rectification effect in the transient reflectivity response. A saturation of the coherent-mode amplitudes with increasing pump fluence well below the CDWs destruction threshold fluence indicates a decoupling of the electronic and lattice parts of the order parameter on the femtosecond timescale.

  8. Collection efficiency of charges in ionization chambers in presence of constant or variable radiation intensity; Efficacite de la collection des charges dans les chambres d'ionisation en presence d'une intensite de rayonnement ionisant constante ou variable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decuyper, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1970-07-01

    The theoretical and experimental study of the collection of carriers built up by ionization in standard chambers, is made by varying the value of different acting parameters. In the presence of constant ionization intensity and under a D.C. and A.C. voltage, the effect of geometry, recombination, diffusion and attachment is analyzed. The compensation of thermal neutron D.C. chambers is equally considered. Under a time dependent ionization intensity and D.C. voltage, is then studied the effect of recombination on current response, and on the collection efficiency of all formed charges. (author) [French] L'etude theorique et experimentale de la collection des porteurs crees par ionisation dans les chambres couramment utilisees est entreprise en fonction de la valeur des differents parametres agissants. En presence d'une ionisation constante et sous une tension d'alimentation d'abord continue puis alternative, on analyse l'influence de la geometrie, de la recombinaison, de la diffusion et de l'attachement. La compensation des chambres a courant continu de mesure neutronique est egalement examinee. Ensuite, sous une intensite d'ionisation variable dans le temps et en alimentation continue, on etudie l'effet de la recombinaison sur la reponse en courant et sur l'efficacite de la collection de la charge totale liberee. (auteur)

  9. Genetic dissection of the (poly)phenol profile of diploid strawberry (Fragaria vesca) fruits using a NIL collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia, Maria; Schwab, Wilfried; Hoffmann, Thomas; Monfort, Amparo

    2016-01-01

    Over the last few years, diploid strawberry (Fragaria vesca) has been recognized as a model species for applied research of cultivated strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) that is one of the most economically important crops. Berries, particularly strawberries, are known for their high antioxidant capacity due to a high concentration of (poly) phenolic compounds. Studies have already characterized the phenolic composition of fruits from sets of cultivated strawberries but the quantification of phenolics in a Fragaria mapping population has not been reported, yet. The metabolite profiling of a F. vesca near isogenic line (NIL) collection by LC-MS allowed the unambiguous identification of 22 (poly)-phenols, including anthocyanins, flavonols, flavan-3-ols, flavanones, hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives, and ellagic acid in the diploid strawberry fruit. The variability in the collection revealed that the genetic factor was more decisive than the environmental factor for the accumulation of 18 of the 24 compounds. Genotyping the NIL collection with the Axiom® IStraw90® SNPs array, we were able to map 76 stable QTLs controlling accumulation of the (poly)-phenolic compounds. They provide a powerful new tool to characterise candidate genes to increase the antioxidant capacity of fruits and produce healthier strawberries for consumers. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Assessing the pharmacodynamic profile of intravenous antibiotics against prevalent Gram-negative organisms collected in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Virginia Villegas

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to simulate standard and optimized dosing regimens for intravenous antibiotics against contemporary populations of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa using MIC distribution data to determine which of the tested carbapenem regimens provided the greatest opportunity for obtaining maximal pharmacodynamic (PD activity. METHODS: The isolates studied were obtained from the COMPACT-COLOMBIA surveillance program conducted between February and November 2009. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was conducted by broth microdilution method according to the CLSI guidelines. Doripenem, imipenem-cilastatin, and meropenem, were the modeled antibiotics. A 5,000 patient Monte Carlo simulation was performed for each regimen and PD targets were defined as free drug concentrations above the MIC for at least 40% of the dosing interval. RESULTS: All carbapenem regimens obtained optimal exposures against E. coli, unlike the other Enterobacteriaceae tested. Against P. aeruginosa, only a prolonged infusion of doripenem exceeded the 90% cumulative fraction of response (CFR threshold. Worrisomely, no regimens for any of the drugs tested obtained optimal CFR against A. baumannii. For P. aeruginosa intensive care unit (ICU isolates, CFR was approximately 20% lower for isolates collected in the respiratory tract compared with bloodstream or intra-abdominal for imipenem and meropenem. Noteworthy, all doripenem and meropenem regimens achieved greater than 90% CFR against bloodstream and respiratory isolates of K. pneumoniae. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggests that higher dosing and prolonged infusion of doripenem or meropenem may be suitable for empirically treating ICU P. aeruginosa, while none of the carbapenems achieved optimal cumulative fraction of response against A. baumannii. Standard dosing regimens of all the carbapenems tested achieved optimal CFR against E. coli isolates, but

  11. Measurement of radial profiles of density ratio of helium to hydrogen ion using charge exchange spectroscopy with two-wavelength spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, K; Yoshinuma, M; Wieland, B; Goto, M; Nakamura, Y; Kobayashi, M; Murakami, I; Moon, C

    2015-12-01

    Radial profiles of density ratio of helium to hydrogen ions are measured using the charge exchange spectroscopy technique with the two-wavelength spectrometer system in the large helical device. The two-wavelength spectrometer system consists of a dichroic mirror box, a spectrometer with two grating and two camera lenses, and one CCD detector. The dichroic mirror box is used to divide the light of one fiber from the plasma to two fibers, one for HeII (λ = 468.6 nm) and the other for H(α) (λ = 656.3 nm), that are connected to the entrance slit of the spectrometer to eliminate the interference between the HeII and the H(α) spectra on the CCD. This system provides a simultaneous measurement of helium and hydrogen ion density ratio at 8 exact same locations (8 spatial channels) with a time resolution of >40 ms in the wide range of the density ratio of 0.05-5.

  12. Characteristic Profiles of an Original Drink Sap from Male and Female Deglet Nour Palm (Phoenix dactylifera L. during Collection Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Makhlouf-Gafsi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to evaluate the nutritional quality of a typical natural drink from male and female Deglet Nour (DN date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L. during the collection period. Dry matter, protein, amino acids, and sugar profiles were determined using AFNOR norm, Kjeldahl method, HPLC, and HPAEC-PAD, respectively. The male sap dry matter content was higher than that of the female. It decreased significantly through the tapping period. During the harvest, the male sap protein content decreased but increased significantly in the female sap. Finally, sugar fraction, for both male and female DN sap, was dominated by sucrose, glucose, fructose, and a small amount of myo-inositol. During the collection time, sugar content is affected by the sex especially for myo-inositol content that increased significantly in the female date sap, unlike that of the male one. This may be related to the fact that the male palm is more resistant to physiological stress, inducing myo-inositol formation during tapping.

  13. Archive of digital chirp subbottom profile data collected during USGS cruise 10BIM04 offshore Cat Island, Mississippi, September 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forde, Arnell S.; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Kindinger, Jack G.; Miselis, Jennifer L.; Wiese, Dana S.; Buster, Noreen A.

    2012-01-01

    In September of 2010, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), conducted a geophysical survey to investigate the geologic controls on barrier island framework of Cat Island, Miss., as part of a broader USGS study on Barrier Island Mapping (BIM). These surveys were funded through the Mississippi Coastal Improvements Program (MsCIP) and the Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) Ecosystem Change and Hazard Susceptibility Project as part of the Holocene Coastal Evolution of the Mississippi-Alabama Region Subtask. This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital chirp subbottom data, trackline maps, navigation files, GIS files, Field Activity Collection System (FACS) logs, and formal FGDC metadata. Gained (showing a relative increase in signal amplitude) digital images of the seismic profiles are also provided. Refer to the Acronyms page for expansions of acronyms and abbreviations used in this report. The USGS Saint Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center (SPCMSC) assigns a unique identifier to each cruise or field activity. For example, 10BIM04 tells us the data were collected in 2010 during the fourth field activity for that project in that calendar year. Refer to http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/infobank/programs/html/definition/activity.html for a detailed description of the method used to assign the field activity identification (ID). All chirp systems use a signal of continuously varying frequency; the EdgeTech SB-512i system used during this survey produces high-resolution, shallow-penetration (typically less than 50 milliseconds (ms)) profile images of sub-seafloor stratigraphy. The towfish contains a transducer that transmits and receives acoustic energy; it was housed within a float system (built at the SPCMSC), which allows the towfish to be towed at a constant depth of 1.07 meters (m) below the sea surface. As transmitted acoustic energy intersects density boundaries, such as the seafloor or sub

  14. An analytical X-ray CdTe detector response matrix for incomplete charge collection correction for photon energies up to 300 keV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurková, Dana; Judas, Libor

    2018-05-01

    Gamma and X-ray energy spectra measured with semiconductor detectors suffer from various distortions, one of them being so-called "tailing" caused by an incomplete charge collection. Using the Hecht equation, a response matrix of size 321 × 321 was constructed which was used to correct the effect of incomplete charge collection. The correction matrix was constructed analytically for an arbitrary energy bin and the size of the energy bin thus defines the width of the spectral window. The correction matrix can be applied separately from other possible spectral corrections or it can be incorporated into an already existing response matrix of the detector. The correction was tested and its adjustable parameters were optimized on the line spectra of 57Co measured with a cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector in a spectral range from 0 up to 160 keV. The best results were obtained when the values of the free path of holes were spread over a range from 0.4 to 1.0 cm and weighted by a Gauss function. The model with the optimized parameter values was then used to correct the line spectra of 152Eu in a spectral range from 0 up to 530 keV. An improvement in the energy resolution at full width at half maximum from 2.40 % ± 0.28 % to 0.96 % ± 0.28 % was achieved at 344.27 keV. Spectra of "narrow spectrum series" beams, N120, N150, N200, N250 and N300, generated with tube voltages of 120 kV, 150 kV, 200 kV, 250 kV and 300 kV respectively, and measured with the CdTe detector, were corrected in the spectral range from 0 to 160 keV (N120 and N150) and from 0 to 530 keV (N200, N250, N300). All the measured spectra correspond both qualitatively and quantitatively to the available reference data after the correction. To obtain better correspondence between N150, N200, N250 and N300 spectra and the reference data, lower values of the free paths of holes (range from 0.16 to 0.65 cm) were used for X-ray spectra correction, which suggests energy dependence of the phenomenon.

  15. Culture of the entrepreneur: collective entrepreneurial action and profile of the entrepreneur Cultura empreendedora: empreendedorismo coletivo e perfil empreendedor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Maria Schmidt

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The culture of the entrepreneur is fundamental because it represents the essence of entrepreneurial action which may be exemplified in many ways. An analysis was made of the contribution of this culture to the formation of a local productive arrangement for sustainable tourism in Nova Russia, Blumenau, S.C.. Data were obtained from the ten owner managers involved by means of a participative survey as well as meetings, visits, presentations and structured interviews. An entrepreneurial culture was identified; however it is still weak, in spite of collective entrepreneurial actions undertaken. The entrepreneurial profiles of those investigated were in an incipient stage hindering the arrangement at this time. More extensive development of the profiles would encourage progress of the arrangement and stimulate collective and timely innovations in view of continuing market developments.A cultura empreendedora é fundamental, pois representa a essência do empreendedorismo, e pode manifestar-se de várias formas. Dessa forma, o objetivo geral desta pesquisa foi analisar a contribuição dessa cultura para a formação do Arranjo Produtivo Local (APL de turismo sustentável na Nova Rússia em Blumenau - SC. O estudo foi realizado mediante pesquisa participante com os dez proprietários-dirigentes do aglomerado turístico da Nova Rússia. Os dados foram obtidos de reuniões, visitas, palestras e entrevistas estruturadas. Como principal resultado, identificou-se que existe cultura empreendedora na região, porém bem fragilizada, pois, apesar de existirem ações de empreendedorismo coletivo na Nova Rússia, o perfil empreendedor dos investigados ainda apresenta um nível bastante baixo de desenvolvimento, o que compromete o início do APL neste momento. Caso a cultura empreendedora estivesse mais caracterizada, teria influência muita positiva sobre a formação do APL, pois os empreendedores se tornariam inovadores diante das constantes evoluções do

  16. Charge collection and non-ionizing radiation tolerance of CMOS pixel sensors using a 0.18 μm CMOS process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhang, Liang; Fu, Min

    2016-09-01

    The proposed Circular Electron Positron Collider (CEPC) will be primarily aimed for precision measurements of the discovered Higgs boson. Its innermost vertex detector, which will play a critical role in heavy-flavor tagging, must be constructed with fine-pitched silicon pixel sensors with low power consumption and fast readout. CMOS pixel sensor (CPS), as one of the most promising candidate technologies, has already demonstrated its excellent performance in several high energy physics experiments. Therefore it has been considered for R&D for the CEPC vertex detector. In this paper, we present the preliminary studies to improve the collected signal charge over the equivalent input capacitance ratio (Q / C), which will be crucial to reduce the analog power consumption. We have performed detailed 3D device simulation and evaluated potential impacts from diode geometry, epitaxial layer properties and non-ionizing radiation damage. We have proposed a new approach to improve the treatment of the boundary conditions in simulation. Along with the TCAD simulation, we have designed the exploratory prototype utilizing the TowerJazz 0.18 μm CMOS imaging sensor process and we will verify the simulation results with future measurements.

  17. Measurements of charge and CP asymmetries in $b$-hadron decays using top-quark events collected by the ATLAS detector in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV

    CERN Document Server

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Haug, Sigve; Hauser, Reiner; Hauswald, Lorenz; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hayakawa, Daiki; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Jochen Jens; Heinrich, Lukas; Heinz, Christian; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Hellman, Sten; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Henkelmann, Steffen; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Herde, Hannah; Herget, Verena; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hladik, Ondrej; Hoad, Xanthe; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohn, David; Holmes, Tova Ray; Homann, Michael; Honda, Shunsuke; Honda, Takuya; Hong, Tae Min; Hooberman, Benjamin Henry; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howarth, James; Hoya, Joaquin; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Qipeng; Hu, Shuyang; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Huo, Peng; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Yuriy; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Introzzi, Gianluca; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Ishijima, Naoki; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ito, Fumiaki; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Paul; Jain, Vivek; Jakobi, Katharina Bianca; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Janus, Piotr Andrzej; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanneau, Fabien; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jenni, Peter; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Hai; Jiang, Yi; Jiang, Zihao; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Jivan, Harshna; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Johnson, Christian; Johnson, William Joseph; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Sarah; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Köhler, Markus Konrad; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; Kaji, Toshiaki; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kaluza, Adam; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneti, Steven; Kanjir, Luka; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karamaoun, Andrew; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karentzos, Efstathios; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kasahara, Kota; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Kato, Chikuma; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kawade, Kentaro; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazanin, Vassili; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Keyes, Robert; Khader, Mazin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; 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Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Koulouris, Aimilianos; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Kowalewska, Anna Bozena; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozakai, Chihiro; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kravchenko, Anton; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuechler, Jan Thomas; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kukla, Romain; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kuprash, Oleg; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurchaninov, Leonid; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kurth, Matthew Glenn; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwan, Tony; Kyriazopoulos, Dimitrios; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rosa Navarro, Jose Luis; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Lammers, Sabine; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lanfermann, Marie Christine; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, J örn Christian; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Lapertosa, Alessandro; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Lazovich, Tomo; Lazzaroni, Massimo; Le, Brian; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Quilleuc, Eloi; LeBlanc, Matthew Edgar; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Benoit; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Lerner, Giuseppe; Leroy, Claude; Lesage, Arthur; Lester, Christopher; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Dave; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Changqiao; Li, Haifeng; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Qi; Li, Shu; Li, Xingguo; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liberti, Barbara; Liblong, Aaron; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Lionti, Anthony Eric; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Hongbin; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanlin; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina Maria; Loch, Peter; Loebinger, Fred; Loew, Kevin Michael; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan David; Long, Robin Eamonn; Longo, Luigi; Looper, Kristina Anne; Lopez Lopez, Jorge Andres; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lopez Solis, Alvaro; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Lösel, Philipp Jonathan; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Haonan; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luedtke, Christian; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Luzi, Pierre Marc; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Lyubushkin, Vladimir; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Ma, Yanhui; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macdonald, Calum Michael; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeda, Junpei; Maeland, Steffen; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magradze, Erekle; Mahlstedt, Joern; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maier, Thomas; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Claire; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mancini, Giada; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Maneira, José; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany; Mann, Alexander; Manousos, Athanasios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mansour, Jason Dhia; Mantifel, Rodger; Mantoani, Matteo; Manzoni, Stefano; Mapelli, Livio; Marceca, Gino; March, Luis; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marjanovic, Marija; Marley, Daniel; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Martyniuk, Alex; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Maznas, Ioannis; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mc Fadden, Neil Christopher; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McClymont, Laurie; McDonald, Emily; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Melini, Davide; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Melo, Matej; Meloni, Federico; Menary, Stephen Burns; Meng, Lingxin; Meng, Xiangting; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer Zu Theenhausen, Hanno; Miano, Fabrizio; Middleton, Robin; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milesi, Marco; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Minegishi, Yuji; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mistry, Khilesh; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mizukami, Atsushi; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Mlynarikova, Michaela; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mogg, Philipp; Mohapatra, Soumya; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Monden, Ryutaro; Mondragon, Matthew Craig; Mönig, Klaus; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montalbano, Alyssa; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Stefanie; Mori, Daniel; Mori, Tatsuya; Morii, Masahiro; Morinaga, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Mortensen, Simon Stark; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moschovakos, Paris; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Harry James; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Ralph Soeren Peter; Mueller, Thibaut; Muenstermann, Daniel; Mullen, Paul; Mullier, Geoffrey; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Muškinja, Miha; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nachman, Benjamin Philip; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nagy, Elemer; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Narrias Villar, Daniel Isaac; Naryshkin, Iouri; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Negri, Andrea; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen Manh, Tuan; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nielsen, Jason; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Jon Kerr; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nooney, Tamsin; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Norjoharuddeen, Nurfikri; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Rourke, Abigail Alexandra; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Oide, Hideyuki; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onogi, Kouta; Onyisi, Peter; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Owen, Mark; Owen, Rhys Edward; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Pacheco Rodriguez, Laura; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganini, Michela; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palazzo, Serena; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panagoulias, Ilias; Pandini, Carlo Enrico; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Adam Jackson; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parker, Kerry Ann; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pascuzzi, Vincent; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Pater, Joleen; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pearson, Benjamin; Pedersen, Lars Egholm; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Penc, Ondrej; Peng, Cong; Peng, Haiping; Penwell, John; Peralva, Bernardo; Perego, Marta Maria; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petroff, Pierre; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrov, Mariyan; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Peyaud, Alan; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickering, Mark Andrew; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pin, Arnaud Willy J; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pires, Sylvestre; Pirumov, Hayk; Pitt, Michael; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Pluth, Daniel; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Polesello, Giacomo; Poley, Anne-luise; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Poppleton, Alan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pozo Astigarraga, Mikel Eukeni; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Primavera, Margherita; Prince, Sebastien; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Puddu, Daniele; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Raddum, Silje; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Raine, John Andrew; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Ratti, Maria Giulia; Rauch, Daniel; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Stefan; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Ravinovich, Ilia; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Reale, Marilea; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reed, Robert; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reichert, Joseph; Reiss, Andreas; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resseguie, Elodie Deborah; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter, Stefan; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ricken, Oliver; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Riegel, Christian Johann; Rieger, Julia; Rifki, Othmane; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rimoldi, Marco; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ristić, Branislav; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Rizzi, Chiara; Roberts, Rhys Thomas; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Rodina, Yulia; Rodriguez Perez, Andrea; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Daniel; Roe, Shaun; Rogan, Christopher Sean; Røhne, Ole; Roloff, Jennifer; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romano Saez, Silvestre Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Peyton; Rosien, Nils-Arne; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Jonatan; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Russell, Heather; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryu, Soo; Ryzhov, Andrey; Rzehorz, Gerhard Ferdinand; Saavedra, Aldo; Sabato, Gabriele; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Saha, Puja; Sahinsoy, Merve; Saimpert, Matthias; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Salazar Loyola, Javier Esteban; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sammel, Dirk; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sanchez Pineda, Arturo; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Carlos; Sankey, Dave; Sannino, Mario; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sasaki, Osamu; Sato, Koji; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savage, Graham; Savard, Pierre; Savic, Natascha; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schachtner, Balthasar Maria; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Leigh; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaeffer, Jan; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Schiavi, Carlo; Schier, Sheena; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, Korbinian Ralf; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Stefan; Schmitz, Simon; Schneider, Basil; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schopf, Elisabeth; Schott, Matthias; Schouwenberg, Jeroen; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schuh, Natascha; Schulte, Alexandra; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwarz, Thomas Andrew; Schweiger, Hansdieter; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Seema, Pienpen; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekhon, Karishma; Sekula, Stephen; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Sessa, Marco; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shaikh, Nabila Wahab; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shaw, Savanna Marie; Shcherbakova, Anna; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shirabe, Shohei; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shoaleh Saadi, Diane; Shochet, Mel; Shojaii, Seyed Ruhollah; Shope, David Richard; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sickles, Anne Marie; Sidebo, Per Edvin; Sideras Haddad, Elias; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simon, Dorian; Simon, Manuel; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sioli, Maximiliano; Siragusa, Giovanni; Siral, Ismet; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Skinner, Malcolm Bruce; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Slawinska, Magdalena; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Slovak, Radim; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smiesko, Juraj; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Joshua Wyatt; Smith, Matthew; Smith, Russell; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snyder, Ian Michael; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Sokhrannyi, Grygorii; Solans Sanchez, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Son, Hyungsuk; Song, Hong Ye; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosa, David; Sotiropoulou, Calliope Louisa; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Sowden, Benjamin; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spalla, Margherita; Spangenberg, Martin; Spanò, Francesco; Sperlich, Dennis; Spettel, Fabian; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stabile, Alberto; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Giordon; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Stärz, Steffen; Staszewski, Rafal; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strubig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Suchek, Stanislav; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Suster, Carl; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Shota; Svatos, Michal; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Swift, Stewart Patrick; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Masahiro; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanioka, Ryo; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tapia Araya, Sebastian; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Aaron; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Pierre Thor Elliot; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Temple, Darren; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Tepel, Fabian-Phillipp; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Tibbetts, Mark James; Ticse Torres, Royer Edson; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todome, Kazuki; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tolley, Emma; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tong, Baojia(Tony); Tornambe, Peter; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Trofymov, Artur; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; Truong, Loan; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsui, Ka Ming; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tu, Yanjun; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tulbure, Traian Tiberiu; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turgeman, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Ucchielli, Giulia; Ueda, Ikuo; Ughetto, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Unverdorben, Christopher; Urban, Jozef; Urquijo, Phillip; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Usui, Junya; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valderanis, Chrysostomos; Valdes Santurio, Eduardo; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Graaf, Harry; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vasquez, Jared Gregory; Vasquez, Gerardo; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Veloce, Laurelle Maria; Veloso, Filipe; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigani, Luigi; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; 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Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Liqing; Zhang, Matt; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Xiandong; Zhao, Yongke; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Chen; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Maosen; Zhou, Mingliang; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zinser, Markus; Ziolkowski, Michael; Živković, Lidija; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2017-02-07

    Same- and opposite-sign charge asymmetries are measured in lepton+jets $t\\bar{t}$ events in which a $b$-hadron decays semileptonically to a soft muon, using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 $fb^{-1}$ from proton--proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. The charge asymmetries are based on the charge of the lepton from the top-quark decay and the charge of the soft muon from the semileptonic decay of a $b$-hadron and are measured in a fiducial region corresponding to the experimental acceptance. Four CP asymmetries (one mixing and three direct) are measured and are found to be compatible with zero and consistent with the Standard Model.

  18. Measurements of charge and $CP$ asymmetries in $b$-hadron decays using top-quark events collected by the ATLAS detector in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00371337

    Same- and opposite-sign charge asymmetries are measured in lepton+jets $t\\bar{t}$ events in which a $b$-hadron decays semileptonically to a soft muon, using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ from proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. The charge asymmetries are based on the charge of the lepton from the top-quark decay and the charge of the soft muon from the semileptonic decay of a $b$-hadron and are measured in a fiducial region corresponding to the experimental acceptance. Four $CP$ asymmetries (one mixing and three direct) are measured and are found to be compatible with zero and consistent with the Standard Model.

  19. Measurements of charge and CP asymmetries in b-hadron decays using top-quark events collected by the ATLAS detector in pp collisions at √s=8 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaboud, M. [Faculté des Sciences, Université Mohamed Premier and LPTPM, Oujda (Morocco); Aad, G. [CPPM, Aix-Marseille Université and CNRS/IN2P3, Marseille (France); Abbott, B. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman OK (United States); Abdallah, J. [Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington TX (United States); Collaboration: The ATLAS collaboration; and others

    2017-02-14

    Same- and opposite-sign charge asymmetries are measured in lepton+jets tt̄ events in which a b-hadron decays semileptonically to a soft muon, using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb{sup −1} from proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of √s=8 TeV collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. The charge asymmetries are based on the charge of the lepton from the top-quark decay and the charge of the soft muon from the semileptonic decay of a b-hadron and are measured in a fiducial region corresponding to the experimental acceptance. Four CP asymmetries (one mixing and three direct) are measured and are found to be compatible with zero and consistent with the Standard Model.

  20. Gene expression profiling and pathway analysis of human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to airborne particulate matter collected from Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Hong; Shamy, Magdy; Kluz, Thomas; Muñoz, Alexandra B.; Zhong, Mianhua; Laulicht, Freda; Alghamdi, Mansour A.; Khoder, Mamdouh I.; Chen, Lung-Chi; Costa, Max

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have established a positive correlation between human mortality and increased concentration of airborne particulate matters (PM). However, the mechanisms underlying PM related human diseases, as well as the molecules and pathways mediating the cellular response to PM, are not fully understood. This study aims to investigate the global gene expression changes in human cells exposed to PM 10 and to identify genes and pathways that may contribute to PM related adverse health effects. Human bronchial epithelial cells were exposed to PM 10 collected from Saudi Arabia for 1 or 4 days, and whole transcript expression was profiled using the GeneChip human gene 1.0 ST array. A total of 140 and 230 genes were identified that significantly changed more than 1.5 fold after PM 10 exposure for 1 or 4 days, respectively. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed that different exposure durations triggered distinct pathways. Genes involved in NRF2-mediated response to oxidative stress were up-regulated after 1 day exposure. In contrast, cells exposed for 4 days exhibited significant changes in genes related to cholesterol and lipid synthesis pathways. These observed changes in cellular oxidative stress and lipid synthesis might contribute to PM related respiratory and cardiovascular disease. -- Highlights: ► PM exposure modulated gene expression and associated pathways in BEAS-2B cells. ► One-day exposure to PM induced genes involved in responding to oxidative stress. ► 4-day exposure to PM changed genes associated to cholesterol and lipid synthesis.

  1. Metagenomic profiling of the viromes of plasma collected from blood donors with elevated serum alanine aminotransferase levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Rika A; Sakamoto, Hirotaka; Kuroishi, Ayumu; Yasiui, Kazuta; Matsukura, Harumichi; Hirayama, Fumiya

    2015-08-01

    In Japanese Red Cross (JRC) blood centers, blood collected from donors with serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels of more than 60 U/L are disqualified even if serologically negative for transfusion-transmitted infections (TTIs). To assess potential risks of TTIs in plasma with elevated serum ALT levels in the current donor screening program of the JRC, we conducted a metagenomic analysis (MGA) of virome profiles in the plasma of blood donors with or without elevated serum ALT levels. Based on serum ALT levels, donors were classified into three groups: "high," more than 79 U/L; "middle," 61 to 79 U/L; and "low," less than 61 U/L. We individually analyzed 100 plasma samples from each group by MGA, employing shotgun sequencing. Viral sequences detected using MGA were partly confirmed using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Donors with high and middle ALT levels were significantly younger than those with low ALT levels, and more than 90% were males. Herpesviridae, Anelloviridae, Picornaviridae, and Flaviviridae sequences were identified in plasma samples, and their distribution and frequency were not significantly different among the three groups. The serum ALT test may be unsuitable for monitoring for additional risks of TTIs in blood donors who were negative for typical TTIs using serologic and nucleic acid tests. Although MGA is less sensitive than PCR, it remains the best technology to detect known viruses in these donors. © 2015 AABB.

  2. Potential use of fatty acid profiles of the adductor muscle of cockles (Cerastoderma edule) for traceability of collection site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricardo, Fernando; Pimentel, Tânia; Moreira, Ana S P; Rey, Felisa; Coimbra, Manuel A; Rosário Domingues, M; Domingues, Pedro; Costa Leal, Miguel; Calado, Ricardo

    2015-06-18

    Geographic traceability of seafood is key for controlling its quality and safeguarding consumers' interest. The present study assessed if the fatty acid (FA) profile of the adductor muscle (AM) of fresh cockles (Cerastoderma edule) can be used to discriminate the origin of specimens collected in different bivalve capture/production areas legally defined within a coastal lagoon. Results suggest that this biochemical approach holds the potential to trace sampling locations with a spatial resolution <10 Km, even for areas with identical classification for bivalve production. Cockles further away from the inlet, i.e. in areas exposed to a higher saline variation, exhibited lower levels of saturated fatty acids, which are key for stabilizing the bilayer structure of cell membranes, and a higher percentage of polyunsaturated fatty acids, which enhance bilayer fluidity. Results suggest that the structural nature of the lipids present in the AM provides a stable fatty acid signature and holds potential for tracing the origin of bivalves to their capture/production areas.

  3. A prototype ionization profile monitor for RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connolly, R.; Cameron, P.; Ryan, W.

    1997-01-01

    Transverse beam profiles in the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) will be measured with ionization profile monitors (IPM's). Each IPM collects and measures the distribution of electrons in the beamline resulting from residual gas ionization during bunch passage. The electrons are swept transversely from the beamline and collected on strip anodes oriented parallel to the beam axis. At each bunch passage the charge pulses are amplified, integrated, and digitized for display as a profile histogram. A prototype detector was tested in the injection line during the RHIC Sextant Test. This paper describes the detector and gives results from the beam tests

  4. A prototype ionization profile monitor for RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connolly, R.; Cameron, P.; Ryan, W. [and others

    1997-07-01

    Transverse beam profiles in the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) will be measured with ionization profile monitors (IPM`s). Each IPM collects and measures the distribution of electrons in the beamline resulting from residual gas ionization during bunch passage. The electrons are swept transversely from the beamline and collected on strip anodes oriented parallel to the beam axis. At each bunch passage the charge pulses are amplified, integrated, and digitized for display as a profile histogram. A prototype detector was tested in the injection line during the RHIC Sextant Test. This paper describes the detector and gives results from the beam tests.

  5. An Improved Wireless Battery Charging System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo-Seok Lee

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a direct wireless battery charging system. The output current of the series-series compensated wireless power transfer (SS-WPT system is used as a current source, and the output voltage of AC-DC converter controls the current source. Therefore, the proposed wireless battery charging system needs no battery charging circuit to carry out charging profiles, and can solve space constraints and thermal problems in many battery applications. In addition, the proposed wireless battery charging system can implement easily most other charging profiles. In this paper, the proposed wireless battery charging system is implemented and the feasibility is verified experimentally according to constant-current constant-voltage charging profile or multi-step current charging profile.

  6. Charge collection enhancement by incorporation of gold-silica core-shell nanoparticles into P3HT:PCBM/ZnO nanorod array hybrid solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting-Chung; Su, Yen-Hsun; Hung, Yun-Kai; Yeh, Chen-Sheng; Huang, Li-Wen; Gomulya, Widianta; Lai, Lai-Hung; Loi, Maria A; Yang, Jih-Sheng; Wu, Jih-Jen

    2015-08-14

    In this work, gold-silica core-shell (Au@silica) nanoparticles (NPs) with various silica-shell thicknesses are incorporated into P3HT:PCBM/ZnO nanorod (NR) hybrid solar cells. Enhancement in the short-circuit current density and the efficiency of the hybrid solar cells is attained with the appropriate addition of Au@silica NPs regardless of the silica-shell thickness. Compared to the P3HT:PCBM/ZnO NR hybrid solar cell, a 63% enhancement in the efficiency is achieved by the P3HT:PCBM/Au@silica NP/ZnO NR hybrid solar cell. The finite difference time domain simulations indicate that the strength of the Fano resonance, i.e., the electric field of the quasi-static asymmetric quadrupole, on the surface of Au@silica NPs in the P3HT:PCBM/ZnO NR hybrid significantly decreases with increasing thickness of the silica shell. Raman characterization reveals that the degree of P3HT order increases when Au@silica NPs are incorporated into the P3HT:PCBM/ZnO NR hybrid. The charge separation at the interface between P3HT and PCBM as well as the electron transport in the active layer are retarded by the electric field of the Fano resonance. Nevertheless, the prolongation of the electron lifetime and the reduction of the electron transit time in the P3HT:PCBM/ZnO NR hybrid solar cells, which result in an enhancement of electron collection, are achieved by the addition of Au@silica NPs. This may be attributed to the improvement in the degree of P3HT order and connectivity of PCBM when Au@silica NPs are incorporated into the P3HT:PCBM active layer.

  7. Molecular identification and antifungal susceptibility profiles of Candida parapsilosis complex species isolated from culture collection of clinical samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Silvestre Ataides

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractINTRODUCTION:Candida parapsilosis is a common yeast species found in cases of onychomycosis and candidemia associated with infected intravascular devices. In this study, we differentiated Candida parapsilosis sensu stricto, Candida orthopsilosis , and Candida metapsilosis from a culture collection containing blood and subungual scraping samples. Furthermore, we assessed the in vitro antifungal susceptibility of these species to fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, posaconazole, amphotericin B, and caspofungin.METHODS:Differentiation of C. parapsilosis complex species was performed by amplification of the secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (SADH gene and digestion by the restriction enzyme Ban I. All isolates were evaluated for the determination of minimal inhibitory concentrations using Etest, a method for antifungal susceptibility testing.RESULTS:Among the 87 isolates, 78 (89.7% were identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto , five (5.7% were identified as C. orthopsilosis , and four (4.6% were identified as C. metapsilosis . Analysis of antifungal susceptibility showed that C. parapsilosis sensu strictoisolates were less susceptible to amphotericin B and itraconazole. One C. parapsilosis sensu stricto isolate was resistant to amphotericin B and itraconazole. Moreover, 10.2% of C. parapsilosis sensu stricto isolates were resistant to caspofungin. Two C. parapsilosis sensu strictoisolates and one C. metapsilosis isolate were susceptible to fluconazole in a dose-dependent manner.CONCLUSIONS:We reported the first molecular identification of C. parapsilosiscomplex species in State of Goiás, Brazil. Additionally, we showed that although the three species exhibited differences in antifungal susceptibility profiles, the primary susceptibility of this species was to caspofungin.

  8. Gene expression profiling and pathway analysis of human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to airborne particulate matter collected from Saudi Arabia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Hong [Department of Environmental Medicine, NYU School of Medicine, Tuxedo, NY (United States); Shamy, Magdy [Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Meteorology, Environment and Arid Land Agriculture, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Kluz, Thomas; Muñoz, Alexandra B.; Zhong, Mianhua; Laulicht, Freda [Department of Environmental Medicine, NYU School of Medicine, Tuxedo, NY (United States); Alghamdi, Mansour A.; Khoder, Mamdouh I. [Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Meteorology, Environment and Arid Land Agriculture, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Chen, Lung-Chi [Department of Environmental Medicine, NYU School of Medicine, Tuxedo, NY (United States); Costa, Max, E-mail: Max.Costa@nyumc.org [Department of Environmental Medicine, NYU School of Medicine, Tuxedo, NY (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Epidemiological studies have established a positive correlation between human mortality and increased concentration of airborne particulate matters (PM). However, the mechanisms underlying PM related human diseases, as well as the molecules and pathways mediating the cellular response to PM, are not fully understood. This study aims to investigate the global gene expression changes in human cells exposed to PM{sub 10} and to identify genes and pathways that may contribute to PM related adverse health effects. Human bronchial epithelial cells were exposed to PM{sub 10} collected from Saudi Arabia for 1 or 4 days, and whole transcript expression was profiled using the GeneChip human gene 1.0 ST array. A total of 140 and 230 genes were identified that significantly changed more than 1.5 fold after PM{sub 10} exposure for 1 or 4 days, respectively. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed that different exposure durations triggered distinct pathways. Genes involved in NRF2-mediated response to oxidative stress were up-regulated after 1 day exposure. In contrast, cells exposed for 4 days exhibited significant changes in genes related to cholesterol and lipid synthesis pathways. These observed changes in cellular oxidative stress and lipid synthesis might contribute to PM related respiratory and cardiovascular disease. -- Highlights: ► PM exposure modulated gene expression and associated pathways in BEAS-2B cells. ► One-day exposure to PM induced genes involved in responding to oxidative stress. ► 4-day exposure to PM changed genes associated to cholesterol and lipid synthesis.

  9. Oceanographic profile temperature and salinity measurements collected using bottle from the LITKE in the Arctic in 1948 (NODC Accession 0001088)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity and other profile data digitized at NODC on 05/02/03, received by Igor Smolyar from Matishov, G., A. Zuyev, V. Golubev, N. Adrov, S. Timofeev,...

  10. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample, profile and time series profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from LA CURIEUSE in the Indian Ocean from 1990-01-27 to 1995-01-08 (NODC Accession 0112882)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0112882 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical, profile and time series profile data collected from LA CURIEUSE in the Indian Ocean...

  11. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample, profile and time series profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from ARNI FRIDRIKSSON and BJARNI SAEMUNDSSON in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1991-08-08 to 2006-02-02 (NODC Accession 0100114)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0100114 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical, profile and time series profile data collected from ARNI FRIDRIKSSON and BJARNI SAEMUNDSSON in...

  12. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample, profile and time series profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from ARNI FRIDRIKSSON and BJARNI SAEMUNDSSON in the North Greenland Sea from 1991-08-15 to 2006-10-02 (NODC Accession 0100063)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0100063 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical, profile and time series profile data collected from ARNI FRIDRIKSSON and BJARNI SAEMUNDSSON in...

  13. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample, profile and time series profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from POLARFRONT in the Norwegian Sea from 2001-10-31 to 2007-11-29 (NODC Accession 0112884)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0112884 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical, profile and time series profile data collected from POLARFRONT in the Norwegian Sea from...

  14. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample, profile and time series profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from HERMANO GINES in the Caribbean Sea from 1995-11-08 to 2015-07-29 (NODC Accession 0112926)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0112926 includes discrete sample, profile and time series profile data collected from HERMANO GINES in the Caribbean Sea from 1995-11-08 to...

  15. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USCGC GLACIER using BT and XBT casts in the NW / SW Pacific Ocean from 25 October 1986 to 31 January 1987 (NODC Accession 8700140)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts in the NW / SW Pacific Ocean from USCGC GLACIER. Data were collected from 25 October...

  16. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USGC FORWARD using BT and XBT casts in the Gulf of Mexico from 11 March 1992 to 01 April 1992 (NODC Accession 9200086)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USCGC FORWARD in the Gulf of Mexico. Data were collected from 11 March 1992...

  17. Pressure and temperature profile data collected by the NOAA vessel Bay Hydrographer during survey operations along the NE US coast, 03 February 2005 to 21 November 2005 (NODC Accession 0002670)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Pressure and temperature profile data were collected using CTD casts from the NOAA Survey Vessel BAY HYDROGRAPHER. Data were collected in the Chesapeake Bay from...

  18. Delayed XBT data collected by Royal Australian Navy and submitted to NODC for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP), dates range from August 31 2009 - April 14 2010 (NODC Accession 0073675)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts in the Indian Ocean. Data were collected from 31 August 2009 to 14 April 2010 by the Royal Australian Navy. Data...

  19. Delayed XBT data collected by Defense Oceanographic Data Center (DODC) and submitted to NODC for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) from 2006-10-28 to 2008-12-08 (NODC Accession 0056138)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts in the Indian and Pacific Oceans. Data were collected from 28 October 2006 to 08 December 2008 by the Royal...

  20. Oceanographic profile, temperature, salinity and other measurements collected using bottle from NOAA Ship ALBATROSS IV 2/27/63-PRESENT, OCEANUS and other platforms in the Coastal N Atlantic and North Atlantic from 1997 to 1999 (NODC Accession 0000522)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and nutrients data were collected using bottle casts from the OCEANUS and NOAA Ship ALBATROSS IV in the Georges Bank. Data were collected from 14...

  1. Temperature profile and nutrients data collected using bottle casts from the POLAR DUKE in the Ross Sea and Southern Oceans from 08 October 1996 to 06 November 1996 (NODC Accession 0000894)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and nutrients data were collected using bottle casts in the Ross Sea and Southern Oceans from POLAR DUKE. Data were collected from 08 October...

  2. Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity and other measurements collected using bottle from the BURTON ISLAND, CANCOLIM II and other platforms in the Arctic from 1950 to 1983 (NODC Accession 9700307)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and other data were collected using bottle casts from the CANCOLIM II and other platforms in the Beaufort Sea. Data were collected from 14...

  3. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from AMERICAN VIKING using BT and XBT casts in the Northeast Pacific Ocean from 23 September 1986 to 17 September 1987 (NODC Accession 8800048)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the AMERICAN VIKING in the Northeast Pacific Ocean. Data were collected from 23...

  4. Temperature profile and water depth collected from XIANG YANG HONG 05 in the South China Sea using BT and XBT casts from 16 November 1986 to 03 December 1986 (NODC Accession 8700009)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth were collected using BT and XBT casts from the XIANG YANG HONG 05 in the South China Sea. Data were collected from 16 November...

  5. Temperature profile, oxygen, phosphate and other data collected using bottle from multiple platforms in a World-wide distribution from 24 June 1934 to 24 August 1984 (NODC Accession 0002144)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and other data were collected using bottle casts from multiple platforms in a world wide distribution. Data were collected from 24 June 1934 to...

  6. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USCGC HARRIOT LANE using BT and XBT casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean from 01 December 1987 to 05 January 1988 (NODC Accession 8800015)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USCGC HARRIOT LANE in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean. Data were collected from...

  7. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USCGC HARRIET LANE using BT and XBT casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean from 21 July 1988 to 18 August 1988 (NODC Accession 8800256)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USCGC HARRIET LANE in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean. Data were collected from...

  8. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USCGC HARRIOT LANE using BT and XBT casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean from 09 March 1988 to 10 March 1988 (NODC Accession 8800094)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USCGC Harriot Lane in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean. Data were collected from...

  9. Temperature profile and nutrients data collected using bottle and CTD casts from the HESPERIDES in the South Atlantic Ocean from 15 February 1996 to 21 February 1996 (NODC Accession 0000871)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and nutrients data were collected using bottle and CTD casts in the South Atlantic Ocean from HESPERIDES. Data were collected from 15 February...

  10. Temperature profile and nutrients data collected using bottle and CTD casts from the HESPERIDES in the South Atlantic Ocean from 11 February 1995 to 20 February 1995 (NODC Accession 0000870)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and nutrients data were collected using bottle and CTD casts in the South Atlantic Ocean from HESPERIDES. Data were collected from 11 February...

  11. Temperature profile and other data collected from XBT casts in South Pacific Ocean from BOTANY BAY and other platforms from 24 January 1991 to 20 November 1991 (NODC Accession 9400208)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and other data were collected using XBT casts from BOTANY BAY and other platforms in South Pacific Ocean. Data were collected from 24 January...

  12. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USS GALLERY using BT and XBT casts in the N/S Pacific Ocean from 25 June 1979 to 29 April 1986 (NODC Accession 8800225)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USS GALLERY in the North / South Pacific Ocean. Data were collected from 25...

  13. Temperature profile and nutrients data collected using bottle casts from the NATHANIEL B. PALMER in the Ross Sea and Southern Oceans from 09 November 1994 to 08 December 1994 (NODC Accession 0000899)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and nutrients data were collected using bottle casts in the Ross Sea and Southern Oceans from the NATHANIEL B. PALMER. Data were collected from...

  14. Temperature profile and nutrients data collected using bottle casts from the NATHANIEL B. PALMER in the Ross Sea and Southern Oceans from 16 December 1995 to 13 January 1996 (NODC Accession 0000889)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and nutrients data were collected using bottle casts in the Ross Sea and Southern Oceans from the NATHANIEL B. PALMER. Data were collected from...

  15. Temperature profile and nutrients data collected using bottle casts from the POLAR DUKE in the Ross Sea and Southern Oceans from 05 February 1992 to 28 February 1992 (NODC Accession 0000888)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and nutrients data were collected using bottle casts in the Ross Sea and Southern Oceans from the POLAR DUKE. Data were collected from 05...

  16. Temperature profile and nutrients data collected using bottle casts from the POLAR DUKE in the Ross Sea and Southern Oceans from 13 November 1996 to 26 November 1996 (NODC Accession 0000895)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and nutrients data were collected using bottle casts in the Ross Sea and Southern Oceans from the POLAR DUKE. Data were collected from 13...

  17. Temperature profile and nutrients data collected using bottle casts from the POLAR DUKE in the Ross Sea and Southern Oceans from 06 September 1996 to 12 September 1996 (NODC Accession 0000890)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and nutrients data were collected using bottle casts in the Ross Sea and Southern Oceans from POLAR DUKE. Data were collected from 06 September...

  18. XBT data collected by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology (ABOM), and submitted to the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP), dates range from January 04, 2011 to December 29, 2011 (NODC Accession 0087991)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical data were collected using XBT profiles in the Indian Ocean from January 04, 2011 to December 29, 2011. Data were collected and submitted by the Australian...

  19. XBT data collected by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology (ABOM), and submitted to the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP), dates range from January 05, 2010 to January 04, 2011 (NODC Accession 0072587)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical data were collected using XBT profiles in the Indian Ocean from January 05, 2010 to January 04, 2011. Data were collected and submitted by the Australian...

  20. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from SAXON STAR and other platforms in a World wide distribution from 09 March 1983 to 12 November 1986 (NODC Accession 8700035)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT from the SAXON STAR and other platforms in a World wide distribution. Data were collected...

  1. Physical, chemical, and temperature profile data were collected using bottle casts and other instruments from GASCOYNE and other platforms in the Pacific Ocean and Mediterranean Sea from 07 November 1959 to 01 July 1972 (NODC Accession 0000095)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, chemical, and temperature profile data were collected using bottle casts, plankton net, fluorometer, and meteorological sensors. Data were collected from...

  2. Charged Particle Optics Theory

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hawkes, P. W.; Lencová, Bohumila

    -, č. 6 (2006), s. 6-8 Grant - others:EC 5RP(XE) G5RD-CT-2000-00344 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : optics of charged particles * design of ion lithography system * spot profile * the finite element method Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering www.phantomsnet.net

  3. Profil épidémiologique et prise en charge de l’éclampsie au Sénégal: à propos de 62 cas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diouf, Abdoul Aziz; Diallo, Moussa; Mbaye, Magatte; Sarr, Sokhna Diarra; Faye-Diémé, Marie Edouard; Moreau, Jean Charles; Diouf, Alassane

    2013-01-01

    Introduction L'objectif de cette étude etait d'apprécier les caractéristiques épidémiologiques et cliniques de l’éclampsie et d’évaluer la prise en charge et le pronostic maternel et périnatal. Méthodes Étude descriptive rétrospective sur 3 années (2007-2010) dans un service de Gynécologie Obstétrique de Dakar (Sénégal). Le critère d'inclusion était toute crise convulsive en période gravido-puerpérale dans un contexte de prééclampsie. Résultats Sur un total de 4587 accouchements, 62 cas d’éclampsie étaient enregistrés représentant une incidence de 1,35%. Le profil retrouvé était celui d'une jeune femme (24 ans), primipare (58.1%), habitant la banlieue dakaroise (83.8%), porteuse d'une grossesse à terme (56.5%), mal suivie (82.3%) et référée par un poste de santé environnant (82.3%). La crise était survenue en antépartum et en post-partum dans 72.5 et 27,5% respectivement. Toutes les patientes présentaient une HTA ; l’‘dème et la protéinurie étaient retrouvés dans 72.5 et 84% respectivement. La majorité des patientes (88%) avait présenté plus de deux crises et l’état de mal éclamptique concernait 14.5% des cas. Le sulfate de magnésium était utilisé chez toutes les patientes. La césarienne était le mode d'accouchement largement adopté (75.5%) pour les patientes reçues en antépartum. Le pronostic maternel était marqué par un cas de décès. La mortalité périnatale était de 130%. Conclusion L’éclampsie est un problème de santé publique dans les pays en développement. Les principaux facteurs de risque sont la primiparité et l’âge jeûne. L'administration du sulfate de magnésium et la césarienne permettent d'améliorer le pronostic maternel et foetal. La prévention passe nécessairement par un suivi prénatal de qualité. PMID:24711873

  4. Carrier transport and collection in fully depleted semiconductors by a combined action of the space charge field and the field due to electrode voltages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehak, P.; Gatti, E.

    1984-02-24

    A semiconductor charge transport device and method for making same, characterized by providing a thin semiconductor wafer having rectifying functions on its opposing major surfaces and including a small capacitance ohmic contact, in combination with bias voltage means and associated circuit means for applying a predetermined voltage to effectively deplete the wafer in regions thereof between the rectifying junctions and the ohmic contact. A charge transport device of the invention is usable as a drift chamber, a low capacitance detector, or a charge coupled device each constructed according to the methods of the invention for making such devices. Detectors constructed according to the principles of the invention are characterized by having significantly higher particle position indicating resolution than is attainable with prior art detectors, while at the same time requiring substantially fewer readout channels to realize such high resolution.

  5. Single and multiple ionization of C60 fullerenes and collective effects in collisions with highly charged C, F, and Si ions with energy 3 MeV/u

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelkar, A. H.; Kadhane, U.; Misra, D.; Gulyas, L.; Tribedi, L. C.

    2010-10-01

    We have measured absolute cross sections for single, double, triple, and quadruple ionization of C60 in collisions with 3 MeV/u C, F, and Si projectile ions at various projectile charge states. The experiment was performed using the recoil-ion time-of-flight technique. Projectile charge state dependence of the ionization yields was compared mainly with a model based on the giant dipole plasmon resonance (GDPR). In some cases, the continuum-distorted-wave-eikonal-initial-state (CDW-EIS) model which is normally applied for ion-atom collisions was also used as a reference. An excellent qualitative agreement between the experimental data for single and double ionization and the GDPR model predictions was found for all projectile charge states.

  6. Single and multiple ionization of C60 fullerenes and collective effects in collisions with highly charged C, F, and Si ions with energy 3 MeV/u

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelkar, A. H.; Kadhane, U.; Misra, D.; Tribedi, L. C.; Gulyas, L.

    2010-01-01

    We have measured absolute cross sections for single, double, triple, and quadruple ionization of C 60 in collisions with 3 MeV/u C, F, and Si projectile ions at various projectile charge states. The experiment was performed using the recoil-ion time-of-flight technique. Projectile charge state dependence of the ionization yields was compared mainly with a model based on the giant dipole plasmon resonance (GDPR). In some cases, the continuum-distorted-wave-eikonal-initial-state (CDW-EIS) model which is normally applied for ion-atom collisions was also used as a reference. An excellent qualitative agreement between the experimental data for single and double ionization and the GDPR model predictions was found for all projectile charge states.

  7. Fractional charges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saminadayar, L.

    2001-01-01

    20 years ago fractional charges were imagined to explain values of conductivity in some materials. Recent experiments have proved the existence of charges whose value is the third of the electron charge. This article presents the experimental facts that have led theorists to predict the existence of fractional charges from the motion of quasi-particles in a linear chain of poly-acetylene to the quantum Hall effect. According to the latest theories, fractional charges are neither bosons nor fermions but anyons, they are submitted to an exclusive principle that is less stringent than that for fermions. (A.C.)

  8. Application of profile fitting method to neutron time-of-flight protein single crystal diffraction data collected at the iBIX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Naomine; Yamada, Taro; Hosoya, Takaaki; Ohhara, Takashi; Tanaka, Ichiro; Kusaka, Katsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    We developed and employed a profile fitting method for the peak integration of neutron time-of-flight diffraction data collected by the IBARAKI Biological Crystal Diffractometer (iBIX) at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) for protein ribonuclease A and α-thrombin single crystals. In order to determine proper fitting functions, four asymmetric functions were evaluated using strong intensity peaks. A Gaussian convolved with two back-to-back exponentials was selected as the most suitable fitting function, and a profile fitting algorithm for the integration method was developed. The intensity and structure refinement data statistics of the profile fitting method were compared to those of the summation integration method. It was clearly demonstrated that the profile fitting method provides more accurate integrated intensities and model structures than the summation integration method at higher resolution shells. The integration component with the profile fitting method has already been implemented in the iBIX data processing software STARGazer and its user manual has been prepared. PMID:27905404

  9. CHARGE Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semanti Chakraborty

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present here a case of 17-year-old boy from Kolkata presenting with obesity, bilateral gynecomastia, mental retardation, and hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. The patient weighed 70 kg and was of 153 cm height. Facial asymmetry (unilateral facial palsy, gynecomastia, decreased pubic and axillary hair, small penis, decreased right testicular volume, non-palpable left testis, and right-sided congenital inguinal hernia was present. The patient also had disc coloboma, convergent squint, microcornea, microphthalmia, pseudohypertelorism, low set ears, short neck, and choanalatresia. He had h/o VSD repaired with patch. Laboratory examination revealed haemoglobin 9.9 mg/dl, urea 24 mg/dl, creatinine 0.68 mg/dl. IGF1 77.80 ng/ml (decreased for age, GH <0.05 ng/ml, testosterone 0.25 ng/ml, FSH-0.95 ΅IU/ml, LH 0.60 ΅IU/ml. ACTH, 8:00 A.M cortisol, FT3, FT4, TSH, estradiol, DHEA-S, lipid profile, and LFT was within normal limits. Prolactin was elevated at 38.50 ng/ml. The patient′s karyotype was 46XY. Echocardiography revealed ventricularseptal defect closed with patch, grade 1 aortic regurgitation, and ejection fraction 67%. Ultrasound testis showed small right testis within scrotal sac and undescended left testis within left inguinal canal. CT scan paranasal sinuses revealed choanalatresia and deviation of nasal septum to the right. Sonomammography revealed bilateral proliferation of fibroglandular elements predominantly in subareoalar region of breasts. MRI of brain and pituitary region revealed markedly atrophic pituitary gland parenchyma with preserved infundibulum and hypothalamus and widened suprasellar cistern. The CHARGE association is an increasingly recognized non-random pattern of congenital anomalies comprising of coloboma, heart defect, choanal atresia, retarded growth and development, genital hypoplasia, ear abnormalities, and/or deafness. [1] These anomalies have a higher probability of occurring together. In this report, we have

  10. Field profile tailoring in a-Si:H radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujieda, I.; Cho, G.; Conti, M.; Drewery, J.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Quershi, S.; Wildermuth, D.; Street, R.A.

    1990-03-01

    The capability of tailoring the field profile in reverse-biased a-Si:H diodes by doping and/or manipulating electrode shapes opens a way to many interesting device structures. Charge collection in a-Si:H radiation detectors is improved for high LET particle detection by inserting thin doped layers into the i-layer of the usual p-i-n diode. This buried p-i-n structure enables us to apply higher reverse-bias and the electric field is enhanced in the mid i-layer. Field profiles of the new structures are calculated and the improved charge collection process is discussed. Also discussed is the possibility of field profile tailoring by utilizing the fixed space charges in i-layers and/or manipulating electrode shapes of the reverse-biased p-i-n diodes. 10 refs., 7 figs

  11. Profiling an electrospray plume by laser-induced fluorescence and Fraunhofer diffraction combined to mass spectrometry: influence of size and composition of droplets on charge-state distributions of electrosprayed proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girod, Marion; Dagany, Xavier; Boutou, Véronique; Broyer, Michel; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe; Mordehai, Alex; Love, Craig; Werlich, Mark; Fjeldsted, John; Stafford, George

    2012-07-14

    We investigated how physico-chemical properties of charged droplets are affected by the electrospray process, using simultaneous in situ measurements by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), Fraunhofer diffraction and mass spectrometry. For this purpose, we implemented a laser-induced-fluorescence profiling setup in conjunction with a fast, high-resolution particle sizing scheme on a modified Agilent Jet Stream electrospray source coupled to a single quadrupole mass analyser. The optical setup permits us to profile the solvent fractionation and the size of the droplets as they evaporate in an electrospray plume by measuring both the angular scattering pattern and emission spectra of a solvatochromic fluorescent dye. Mass spectra are recorded simultaneously. These mass spectrometry and optical spectroscopy investigations allow us to study the relation between the observed charge-state distributions of protein anions and physico-chemical properties of evaporating droplets in the spray plume. By mixing water with methanol, a refolding of cytochrome C is observed as the water percentage increases in the plume due to the preponderant evaporation of volatile methanol.

  12. SINGLE CHANNEL SEISMIC APPLICATION FOR GAS CHARGED SEDIMENT RECONNAISSANCE IN GEOHAZARD STUDY OF PORT CONSTRUCTION AT WETLAND AREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taufan Wiguna

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Gas charged sediment as a one of parameter for geohazard study in infrastructure especially in swamp area. Instability of sediment layer for exampel subsidence and landslide result in geohazard potention that caused by gas charged sediment. Seismic single channel can be used to identufy gas charged sediment location. Seabed morphology is collected from bathymetry and tidal survey. From seismic profile interpretation shows gas charged sediment indication in Line A and Line B. That indication emerged by presence of acoustic turbid zone and acoustic blanking. Line A and Line B location will be spotlight in next geotechnic port construction study.

  13. Charge preamplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaminade, R.; Passerieux, J.P.

    1961-01-01

    We describe a charge preamplifier having the following properties: - large open loop gain giving both stable gain and large input charge transfer; - stable input grid current with aging and without any adjustment; - fairly fast rise; - nearly optimum noise performance; - industrial material. (authors)

  14. Charging machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medlin, J.B.

    1976-01-01

    A charging machine for loading fuel slugs into the process tubes of a nuclear reactor includes a tubular housing connected to the process tube, a charging trough connected to the other end of the tubular housing, a device for loading the charging trough with a group of fuel slugs, means for equalizing the coolant pressure in the charging trough with the pressure in the process tubes, means for pushing the group of fuel slugs into the process tube and a latch and a seal engaging the last object in the group of fuel slugs to prevent the fuel slugs from being ejected from the process tube when the pusher is removed and to prevent pressure liquid from entering the charging machine. 3 claims, 11 drawing figures

  15. 50 CFR 600.1015 - Late charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Late charges. 600.1015 Section 600.1015... charges. The late charge to fish buyers for fee payment, collection, deposit, and/or disbursement shall be..., deposited, and/or disbursed. The full late charge shall apply to the fee for each month or portion of a...

  16. Calculation of bulk charge and electric field profiles in one-open-face coaxial γ-detectors using experimental C-U characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirnas, I.G.; Litovchenko, P.G.; Petrosyan, E.E.; Pashchuk, N.N.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental C-U characteristics of one-open-face coaxial detectors are employed in deriving an analytic expression that describes the distributions of ionized impurity bulk charge e(N a - N d ) and electric field E(r) for arbitrary variations of N a - N d in the detector volume. As an example, e(N a - N d ) = f(r) and E(r) are calculated for a Ge(Li)-detector whose experimental C-U characteristics is approximated by a power law with exponent two. (author)

  17. Profiles in Successful Group Piano for Children: A Collective Case Study of Children's Group-Piano Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Pamela D.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this collective case study was to explore the best practices in beginning group-piano instruction. Four beginning and intermediate groups of piano students (N =20) were observed. Data were triangulated through in-class observation of students and teachers, teacher interviews and student questionnaires. The master teachers…

  18. Archive of digital boomer subbottom profile data collected in the Atlantic Ocean offshore northeast Florida during USGS cruises 03FGS01 and 03FGS02 in September and October of 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, Karynna; Forde, Arnell S.; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Wiese, Dana S.; Phelps, Daniel C.

    2012-01-01

    In September and October of 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Florida Geological Survey, conducted geophysical surveys of the Atlantic Ocean offshore northeast Florida from St. Augustine, Florida, to the Florida-Georgia border. This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital boomer subbottom profile data, trackline maps, navigation files, Geographic Information System (GIS) files, Field Activity Collection System (FACS) logs, and formal Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata. Filtered and gained (a relative increase in signal amplitude) digital images of the seismic profiles are also provided. Refer to the Acronyms page for expansions of all acronyms and abbreviations used in this report. The USGS St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center (SPCMSC) assigns a unique identifier to each cruise or field activity. For example, 03FGS01 tells us the data were collected in 2003 as part of cooperative work with the Florida Geological Survey (FGS) and that the data were collected during the first field activity for that project in that calendar year. Refer to http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/infobank/programs/html/definition/activity.html for a detailed description of the method used to assign the field activity identification (ID). The naming convention used for each seismic line is as follows: yye##a, where 'yy' are the last two digits of the year in which the data were collected, 'e' is a 1-letter abbreviation for the equipment type (for example, b for boomer), '##' is a 2-digit number representing a specific track, and 'a' is a letter representing the section of a line if recording was prematurely terminated or rerun for quality or acquisition problems. The boomer plate is an acoustic energy source that consists of capacitors charged to a high voltage and discharged through a transducer in the water. The transducer is towed on a sled floating on the water surface and when discharged emits a short acoustic pulse, or shot

  19. CHARGE syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Chitra

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract CHARGE syndrome was initially defined as a non-random association of anomalies (Coloboma, Heart defect, Atresia choanae, Retarded growth and development, Genital hypoplasia, Ear anomalies/deafness. In 1998, an expert group defined the major (the classical 4C's: Choanal atresia, Coloboma, Characteristic ears and Cranial nerve anomalies and minor criteria of CHARGE syndrome. Individuals with all four major characteristics or three major and three minor characteristics are highly likely to have CHARGE syndrome. However, there have been individuals genetically identified with CHARGE syndrome without the classical choanal atresia and coloboma. The reported incidence of CHARGE syndrome ranges from 0.1–1.2/10,000 and depends on professional recognition. Coloboma mainly affects the retina. Major and minor congenital heart defects (the commonest cyanotic heart defect is tetralogy of Fallot occur in 75–80% of patients. Choanal atresia may be membranous or bony; bilateral or unilateral. Mental retardation is variable with intelligence quotients (IQ ranging from normal to profound retardation. Under-development of the external genitalia is a common finding in males but it is less apparent in females. Ear abnormalities include a classical finding of unusually shaped ears and hearing loss (conductive and/or nerve deafness that ranges from mild to severe deafness. Multiple cranial nerve dysfunctions are common. A behavioral phenotype for CHARGE syndrome is emerging. Mutations in the CHD7 gene (member of the chromodomain helicase DNA protein family are detected in over 75% of patients with CHARGE syndrome. Children with CHARGE syndrome require intensive medical management as well as numerous surgical interventions. They also need multidisciplinary follow up. Some of the hidden issues of CHARGE syndrome are often forgotten, one being the feeding adaptation of these children, which needs an early aggressive approach from a feeding team. As the child

  20. Improved charge neutralization method for depth profiling of bulk insulators using O2+ primary beam on a magnetic sector SIMS instrument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pivovarov, A.L.; Stevie, F.A.; Griffis, D.P.

    2004-01-01

    Use of electrons for charge neutralization during positive secondary ion SIMS analysis of insulators has typically been achieved using coincident primary ion and electron beams. The normal incidence electron gun on CAMECA magnetic sector SIMS instruments can effectively eliminate sample charging during analysis of thin insulating films if the electron energy is sufficient to penetrate the film. However, positive secondary ion SIMS bulk insulator analysis using this instrument can be difficult, especially if high sputtering rates are required. A neutralization method has been developed utilizing electron beam impact of a region adjacent to the sputtered area. Prior to analysis, the surface of the sample is coated with gold which provides a conductive surface layer and which has a high secondary and backscattered electron yield. Results have been obtained showing excellent neutralization for a variety of bulk insulators including glass, silica, alumina, and lithium niobate. Sputtering rates exceeding 2 nm/s have been achieved in bulk silica. The technique should be applicable to minerals and possibly for other materials in cases where the analyzed area cannot be directly irradiated with an electron beam

  1. Antimicrobial susceptibility and antibiotic resistance profiles of cultivable lactic acid bacteria from intestinal tract of domestic chickens collected in Adjara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia L. Amiranashvili

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Elaboration and introduction of safe, effective probiotic preparations as alternatives to antibiotics are being actively conducted throughout the world. 66 LAB isolates were isolated from ileal, cecal and rectal samples collected from domestic chickens collected in different districts of Adjara, Georgia. Their resistance to 17 antibiotics and antibacterial activity were studied using the agar diffusion method. Among the isolates, widespread resistance was found to metronidazole and nystatin, sensitivity – to ampicillin, tylosin, rifampicin and bacitracin. Most of isolates have intermediate susceptibility to the majority of the antibiotics. 3 LAB isolates were selected by antibacterial action against the several bacterial indicator strains that makes them effective remedy to control antibiotic-independent pathogen through competitive exclusion and promotion of good protective microbiota and perspective probiotic additives for chicken food. Future investigations, proving the safety of the strains and their antimicrobial compounds will enable to apply in vivo probiotic properties on poultry production.

  2. 5 CFR 835.607 - Administrative charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Administrative charges. 835.607 Section... (CONTINUED) DEBT COLLECTION Collection of Debts by Federal Tax Refund Offset § 835.607 Administrative charges. All administrative charges incurred in connection with the referral of the debts to the IRS will be...

  3. Particle deposition in a realistic geometry of the human conducting airways: Effects of inlet velocity profile, inhalation flowrate and electrostatic charge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koullapis, P. G.; Kassinos, S. C.; Bivolarova, Mariya Petrova

    2016-01-01

    . Nevertheless, flow field differences due to the inlet conditions are largely smoothed out just a short distance downstream of the mouth inlet as a result of the complex geometry. Increasing the inhalation flowrate from sedentary to activity conditions left the mean flowfield structures largely unaffected......Understanding the multitude of factors that control pulmonary deposition is important in assessing the therapeutic or toxic effects of inhaled particles. The use of increasingly sophisticated in silico models has improved our overall understanding, but model realism remains elusive. In this work...... between particle size, electrostatic charge, and flowrate. Our results suggest that in silico models should be customized for specific applications, ensuring all relevant physical effects are accounted for in a self-consistent fashion....

  4. Profil épidémiologique et prise en charge de l’éclampsie au Sénégal: à propos de 62 cas

    OpenAIRE

    Diouf, Abdoul Aziz; Diallo, Moussa; Mbaye, Magatte; Sarr, Sokhna Diarra; Faye-Diémé, Marie Edouard; Moreau, Jean Charles; Diouf, Alassane

    2013-01-01

    Introduction L'objectif de cette étude etait d'apprécier les caractéristiques épidémiologiques et cliniques de l’éclampsie et d’évaluer la prise en charge et le pronostic maternel et périnatal. Méthodes Étude descriptive rétrospective sur 3 années (2007-2010) dans un service de Gynécologie Obstétrique de Dakar (Sénégal). Le critère d'inclusion était toute crise convulsive en période gravido-puerpérale dans un contexte de prééclampsie. Résultats Sur un total de 4587 accouchements, 62 cas d’écl...

  5. Charged particle beams

    CERN Document Server

    Humphries, Stanley

    2013-01-01

    Detailed enough for a text and sufficiently comprehensive for a reference, this volume addresses topics vital to understanding high-power accelerators and high-brightness-charged particle beams. Subjects include stochastic cooling, high-brightness injectors, and the free electron laser. Humphries provides students with the critical skills necessary for the problem-solving insights unique to collective physics problems. 1990 edition.

  6. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from AMERICAN RESERVIST using BT and XBT casts in the North Pacific Ocean from 20 January 1974 to 29 September 1977 (NODC Accession 8900287)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the AMERICAN RESERVIST in the North Pacific Ocean and TOGA Area - Pacific Ocean....

  7. Temperature profile data collected using BT and XBT from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER and other platforms in the Philippine Sea from 1971-10-06 to 1979-09-21 (NODC Accession 8000151)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using XBT and BT casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER and other platforms in Philippine Sea from 06 October 1971 to 21 September...

  8. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the POLARSTERN in the South Atlantic Ocean from 1989-09-06 to 1989-10-30 (NODC Accession 0116645)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0116645 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from POLARSTERN in the South Atlantic Ocean from 1989-09-06 to...

  9. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from DISCOVERY in the South Atlantic Ocean from 1992-12-22 to 1993-02-01 (NCEI Accession 0144287)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0144287 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from DISCOVERY in the South Atlantic Ocean from 1992-12-22 to 1993-02-01. These data...

  10. Temperature profile data collected using CTD casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER in the TOGA Area of Atlantic Ocean from 1987-03-12 to 1987-09-25 (NODC Accession 8900017)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and other data were collected using CTD casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER in the TOGA Area of Atlantic Ocean from 12 March 1987 to 25 September...

  11. Temperature profile data collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts in part of the International Decade of Ocean Exploration / North Pacific Experiment (IDOE/NORPAX) project from 01 November 1977 to 28 February 1978 (NODC Accession 8100400)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from the KANA KEOKI from November 1, 1977 to February 28, 1978. Data were submitted by...

  12. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the ASIA MARU from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1977-01-08 to 1977-01-17 (NODC Accession 8100280)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from ASIA MARU in the Pacific Ocean from January 8, 1977 to January 17, 1977. Data were...

  13. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USCGC GLACIER in the NW/SE Pacific Ocean and other seas from 31 January 1987 to 08 April 1987 (NODC Accession 8700183)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USCGC GLACIER in the Northwest/Southeast Pacific Ocean and other seas. Data...

  14. PH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from DISCOVERY in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1998-04-23 to 1998-06-01 (NODC Accession 0113536)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0113536 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from DISCOVERY in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1998-04-23...

  15. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from USCGC POLAR STAR in the Arctic Ocean from 2002-08-19 to 2002-09-23 (NODC Accession 0115588)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0115588 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from USCGC POLAR STAR in the Arctic Ocean from 2002-08-19 to 2002-09-23. These data...

  16. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USS JOHN RODGERS using BT and XBT casts in the NE/NW Atlantic Ocean and other seas from 03 August 1988 to 03 October 1988 (NODC Accession 8900041)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USS JOHN RODGERS in the Northeast / Northwest Atlantic Ocean, Ionian Sea,...

  17. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from ATLANTIS in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2006-01-18 to 2006-01-31 (NCEI Accession 0157469)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157469 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from ATLANTIS in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2006-01-18 to...

  18. Chemical, physical, profile and other oceanographic data collected aboard the GYRE in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-09-19 to 2010-09-28 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0074904)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile, imagery, laboratory analysis and sediment analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the GYRE in the Gulf of Mexico from...

  19. Chemical, physical, profile and other oceanographic data collected aboard the OCEAN VERITAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-09-22 to 2010-10-24 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069615)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile, imagery, laboratory analysis and sediment analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the OCEAN VERITAS in the Gulf of Mexico from...

  20. Chemical, physical, profile and other oceanographic data collected aboard the GYRE in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-10-01 to 2010-10-03 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0074906)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile, imagery, laboratory analysis and sediment analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the GYRE in the Gulf of Mexico from...

  1. Chemical, physical, profile and other oceanographic data collected aboard the GYRE in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-09-25 to 2010-09-28 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0074905)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile, imagery, laboratory analysis and sediment analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the GYRE in the Gulf of Mexico from...

  2. Chemical, physical, profile and other oceanographic data collected aboard the GYRE in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-10-07 to 2010-10-20 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069127)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile, imagery, laboratory analysis and sediment analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the GYRE in the Gulf of Mexico from...

  3. Temperature profile and pressure data collected from bottle casts in Banda Sea and other areas from BARUNA JAYA I from 08 August 1993 to 25 February 1994 (NODC Accession 0000436)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and pressure data were collected using bottle casts in the Banda Sea, Celebes Sea, Ceram Sea, and Java Sea from BARUNA JAYA I. Data were...

  4. Chemical, physical, profile and other oceanographic data collected aboard the RYAN CHOUEST in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-10-07 to 2010-10-17 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069356)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile, imagery, laboratory analysis and sediment analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the RYAN CHOUEST in the Gulf of Mexico from...

  5. Temperature profile collected using XBT casts in the North/South Atlantic Ocean from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER from 1977-11-05 to 1979-02-13 (NODC Accession 7900324)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile were collected using BT and XBT casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER in North/South Atlantic Ocean from 05 November 1977 to 13 February 1979. Data...

  6. Chemical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the Ferrel in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-03 to 2010-07-07 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0074854)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the Ferrel in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-03 to 2010-07-07 in response to the...

  7. Chemical, physical and profile oceanographic data collected aboard the RYAN CHOUEST in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-09-09 to 2010-09-15 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069126)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected aboard the RYAN CHOUEST in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-09-09 to 2010-09-15 in response to the...

  8. Chemical, physical and profile oceanographic data collected aboard the CAPE HATTERAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-21 to 2010-09-02 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069058)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected aboard the CAPE HATTERAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-21 to 2010-09-02 in response to the...

  9. Chemical, physical and profile oceanographic data collected aboard NOAA Ship Pisces in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-18 to 2010-09-02 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069112)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected aboard NOAA Ship Pisces in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-18 to 2010-09-02 in response to the...

  10. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the RYAN CHOUEST in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-09-15 to 2010-09-22 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069079)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the RYAN CHOUEST in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-09-15 to 2010-09-22 in...

  11. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the RYAN CHOUEST in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-09-23 to 2010-09-28 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069080)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the RYAN CHOUEST in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-09-23 to 2010-09-28 in...

  12. Chemical, physical and profile oceanographic data collected aboard the RYAN CHOUEST in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-11 to 2010-07-13 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0084582)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected aboard the RYAN CHOUEST in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-11 to 2010-07-13 in response to the...

  13. Chemical, physical and profile oceanographic data collected aboard NOAA Ship PISCES in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-05 to 2010-08-14 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069111)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected aboard NOAA Ship PISCES in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-05 to 2010-08-14 in response to the...

  14. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USS BARBEY using BT and XBT casts in the Indian ocean and other seas from 07 January 1989 to 31 January 1989 (NODC Accession 8900034)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USS BARBEY in the Indian Ocean, South China Sea, Burma Sea, and Malacca of...

  15. Chemical, physical, profile and underway oceanographic data collected aboard NOAA Ship GORDON GUNTER in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-05-27 to 2010-06-04 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069067)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and underway oceanographic data were collected aboard NOAA Ship GORDON GUNTER in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-05-27 to 2010-06-04 in...

  16. Temperature profile and other data collected using CTD casts in the TOGA Area - Atlantic Ocean from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER from 1985-04-18 to 1986-11-20 (NODC Accession 8700149)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and other data were collected using CTD casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER in the TOGA Area - Atlantic Ocean from 18 April 1985 to 20 November 1986....

  17. Temperature profile and nutrients data collected using bottle casts from the POLAR DUKE and NATHANIEL B. PALMER in the Ross Sea and Southern Oceans from 10 November 1997 to 12 December 1997 (NODC Accession 0000898)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and nutrients data were collected using bottle casts in the Ross Sea and Southern Oceans from the POLAR DUKE and NATHANIEL B. PALMER. Data were...

  18. Chemical, physical and profile oceanographic data collected aboard the CAPE HATTERAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-09-04 to 2010-09-15 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069059)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected aboard the CAPE HATTERAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-09-04 to 2010-09-15 in response to the...

  19. Carbon dioxide, temperature, salinity and other variables collected via time series profile monitoring from Kairei, MIRAI and NATSUSHIMA in the North Pacific Ocean from 1999-05-28 to 2008-10-26 (NODC Accession 0100115)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0100115 includes chemical, discrete bottle, physical and time series profile data collected from Kairei, MIRAI and NATSUSHIMA in the North Pacific...

  20. Temperature profile data collected using BT and XBT casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1985-04-18 to 1985-05-16 (NODC Accession 8600230)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using XBT and BT casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER in the North Atlantic Ocean from 18 April 1985 to 16 May 1985. Data were...

  1. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the PACIFIC ARROW from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1977-05-13 to 1977-05-20 (NODC Accession 8100340)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from PACIFIC ARROW in the Pacific Ocean from May 13, 1977 to May 20, 1977. Data were...

  2. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the KASHU MARU from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1976-11-06 to 1976-11-22 (NODC Accession 8100139)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from KASHU MARU in the Pacific Ocean from November 16, 1976 to November 22, 1976. Data...

  3. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the PRESIDENT MCKINLEY from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1977-04-10 to 1977-04-14 (NODC Accession 8100321)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from PRESIDENT MCKINLEY in the Pacific Ocean from April 10, 1977 to April 14, 1977....

  4. Temperature profile and other data collected using BT, XBT, and other instruments from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER and other platforms in the Gulf of Mexico from 1982-08-18 to 1985-04-06 (NODC Accession 8900211)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and other data were collected using XBT, BT, and other instruments from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER and other platforms in the Gulf of Mexico from 18...

  5. Temperature profile and other data collected using CTD from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER and VIRGINIA KEY in the Gulf of Mexico from 1978-06-12 to 1978-12-19 (NODC Accession 7900250)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and other data were collected using CTD casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER and VIRGINIA KEY in the Gulf of Mexico from 12 June 1978 to 19 December...

  6. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the SHOYO in the North Pacific Ocean from 1993-10-14 to 1993-11-27 (NODC Accession 0115607)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115607 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from SHOYO in the North Pacific Ocean from 1993-10-14 to 1993-11-27...

  7. Temperature, salinity, biology (species, and subspecies) profiles collected by bottle and water pump in the Southern oceans, the Southwest Pacific, and the Indian Ocean from 1/4/1984 - 2/16/1984 (NODC Accession 0000118)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and species data were collected using bottle, water pump, and XBT casts in the Southern Oceans, Indian Ocean, and Pacific Ocean. Data were...

  8. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the TOKYO MARU and other platforms from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1989-08-28 to 1990-07-08 (NODC Accession 9000204)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from TOKYO MARU and other platforms in the Pacific Ocean from August 28, 1989 to July...

  9. Oceanographic water temperature and salinity profiles from CTD casts collected aboard the Navigation Response Team 6 in the Pacific Ocean from 2004-10-07 to 2005-07-19 (NODC Accession 0002666)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using CTD casts in the Northeast Pacific Ocean from the NAVIGATION RESPONSE TEAM 6 from 07 October 2004 to 19 July 2005. Data...

  10. Profile data collected to support the assessment of the physiological status of phytoplankton state: population and individual cell measurement cruise in the NW Atlantic, October 1 - 15, 2001 (NODC Accession 0002256)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and phytoplankton data were collected using XBT and CTD casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean from R/V ENDEAVOR from 01 October 2001 to 15...

  11. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from Kaiyo in the Philippine Sea from 1994-02-12 to 1994-02-16 (NCEI Accession 0143635)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0143635 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from Kaiyo in the Philippine Sea from 1994-02-12 to 1994-02-16. These data include DELTA...

  12. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the OCEAN VERITAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-06-25 to 2010-06-29 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069097)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the OCEAN VERITAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-06-25 to 2010-06-29 in...

  13. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the OCEAN VERITAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-06-19 to 2010-06-23 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069096)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the OCEAN VERITAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-06-19 to 2010-06-23 in...

  14. Chemical, physical, profile and other oceanographic data collected aboard NOAA Ship Pisces in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-09-25 to 2010-10-03 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NCEI Accession 0069114)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile, imagery, laboratory analysis, sediment analysis and underway oceanographic data were collected aboard NOAA Ship Pisces in the Gulf of...

  15. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the OCEAN VERITAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-31 to 2010-08-03 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069102)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the OCEAN VERITAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-31 to 2010-08-03 in...

  16. Temperature profile and other data collected using CTD casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER in the North American Coastline-South from 1982-06-09 to 1985-09-06 (NODC Accession 8600133)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and other data were collected using CTD casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER in the North American Coastline - South from 09 June 1982 to 06 September...

  17. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from RYOFU MARU in the Philippine Sea from 1992-02-10 to 1992-02-17 (NCEI Accession 0143943)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0143943 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from RYOFU MARU in the Philippine Sea from 1992-02-10 to 1992-02-17. These data include...

  18. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the RYOFU MARU in the Philippine Sea from 1995-11-15 to 1995-11-30 (NODC Accession 0117669)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0117669 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from RYOFU MARU in the Philippine Sea from 1995-11-15 to 1995-11-30...

  19. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from AUSTRALIA STAR and other platforms using XBT casts in the TOGA Area - Atlantic and Pacific Ocean from 05 October 1989 to 21 December 1992 (NODC Accession 9400035)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using XBT casts from the AUSTRALIA STAR and other platforms in the TOGA Area - Atlantic and Pacific Ocean,...

  20. Temperature profile data collected using CTD casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER in the TOGA area - Indian from 1979-04-15 to 1979-06-02 (NODC Accession 8200199)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and other data were collected using CTD casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER in the TOGA Area - Indian from 15 April 1979 to 02 June 1979. Data were...

  1. Temperature profile data collected using BT and XBT casts in a World-wide distribution from NOAA Ship MALCOLM BALDRIGE and other platforms from 1989-03-10 to 1990-08-01 (NODC Accession 9000239)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using XBT and BT casts from NOAA Ship MALCOLM BALDRDIGE and other platforms in a World-wide distribution from 10 March 1989...

  2. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean from 1991-09-25 to 1991-10-27 (NODC Accession 0116370)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0116370 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean from 1991-09-25 to...

  3. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the KNORR in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1986-04-24 to 1986-05-18 (NODC Accession 0117678)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0117678 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from KNORR in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1986-04-24 to 1986-05-18...

  4. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the Hakuho Maru in the North Pacific Ocean from 1993-05-13 to 1993-05-30 (NODC Accession 0115496)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115496 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from Hakuho Maru in the North Pacific Ocean from 1993-05-13 to...

  5. Physical, chemical and biological profile data collected aboard the vessel HERMANO GINES in support of the Carbon Retention in A Colored Ocean (CARIACO) project in the Caribbean Sea from October 9, 2001 to July 8, 2003 (NODC Accession 0001345)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, chemical and biological profile data collected using bottle and CTD casts aboard the vessel HERMANO GINES by the Fundacion La Salle (Venezuela) in support...

  6. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the OCEAN VERITAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-06-07 to 2010-06-11 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069094)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the OCEAN VERITAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-06-07 to 2010-06-11 in...

  7. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USCGC HARRIOT LANE using BT and XBT casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea from 30 April 1988 to 31 May 1988 (NODC Accession 8800173)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USCGC HARRIOT LANE in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea. Data...

  8. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USCGC HARRIOT LANE using BT and XBT casts in the NW Atlantic Ocean for 1987-05-31 (NODC Accession 8700225)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USCGC Harriot Lane in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean and TOGA Area - Atlantic...

  9. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the PRESIDENT VAN BUREN from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1977-03-08 to 1977-03-16 (NODC Accession 8100234)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from PRESIDENT VAN BUREN in the Pacific Ocean March 8, 1977 to March 16, 1977. Data...

  10. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the PRESIDENT VAN BUREN from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1977-02-24 to 1977-03-06 (NODC Accession 8100232)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from PRESIDENT VAN BUREN in the Pacific Ocean from February 24, 1977 to March 6, 1977....

  11. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the PRESIDENT VAN BUREN from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1977-03-11 to 1977-03-20 (NODC Accession 8100235)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from PRESIDENT VAN BUREN in the Pacific Ocean from March 11, 1977 to March 20, 1977....

  12. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the PRESIDENT VAN BUREN from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1977-01-08 to 1977-01-13 (NODC Accession 8100230)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from PRESIDENT VAN BUREN in the Pacific Ocean from January 8, 1977 to January 13, 1977....

  13. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the PRESIDENT VAN BUREN from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1977-05-20 to 1977-05-28 (NODC Accession 8100218)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from PRESIDENT VAN BUREN in the Pacific Ocean from May 20, 1977 to May 28, 1977. Data...

  14. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the PRESIDENT VAN BUREN from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1976-12-10 to 1976-12-19 (NODC Accession 8100231)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from PRESIDENT VAN BUREN in the Pacific Ocean from December 10, 1976 to December 19,...

  15. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the PRESIDENT VAN BUREN from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1977-01-27 to 1977-02-06 (NODC Accession 8100233)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from PRESIDENT VAN BUREN in the Pacific Ocean from January 27, 1977 to February 6,...

  16. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the PRESIDENT VAN BUREN from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1977-04-22 to 1977-04-29 (NODC Accession 8100217)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from PRESIDENT VAN BUREN in the Pacific Ocean from April 22, 1977 to April 29, 1977....

  17. Temperature profile and other data collected from XBT casts in Indian Ocean and N / S Pacific Ocean from ICEBIRD and other platforms from 02 January 1993 to 01 January 1994 (NODC Accession 9400207)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and other data were collected using XBT casts from ICEBIRD and other platforms in Indian Ocean and North / South Pacific Ocean. Data were...

  18. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the OCEAN VERITAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-06-13 to 2010-06-17 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069095)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the OCEAN VERITAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-06-13 to 2010-06-17 in...

  19. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from MELVILLE in the North Pacific Ocean from 1999-10-29 to 1999-11-22 (NCEI Accession 0157617)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157617 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from MELVILLE in the North Pacific Ocean from 1999-10-29 to...

  20. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the OCEAN VERITAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-06-23 to 2010-07-17 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069128)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the OCEAN VERITAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-06-23 to 2010-07-17 in...

  1. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the OCEAN VERITAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-09-07 to 2010-10-16 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069109)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the OCEAN VERITAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-09-07 to 2010-10-16 in...

  2. Oceanographic profile temperature and salinity collected using bottle from the T. WASHINGTON, VITYAZ (BEFORE 12/81), and other platforms in the Mediterranean, North Indian and other locations from 1881 to 1933 (NODC Accession 0000450)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile were collected using bottle casts from THOMAS WASHINGTON and other platforms in the North Pacific Ocean from 18 August 1881 to 29 December 1933....

  3. Oceanographic profile temperature measurements collected using bottle from the A.T. CAMERON, GADUS ATLANTICA, RYURIK, BLAGONAMERENNI, PREDPRIYATIE, and other platforms in the Antarctic, Equatorial Pacific, and other locations from 1772 to 1866 (NODC Accession 0000571)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bottle casts from the BEAGLE in the North / South Pacific Ocean, Indian Ocean, Southern Oceans, and Red Sea. Data were...

  4. Temperature profile and oxygen data collected from multiple ships using bottle casts in the South Pacific and Indian Ocean from 04 November 1956 to 02 January 1994 (NODC Accession 0002700)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and oxygen data were collected using bottle casts from multiple ships in the South Pacific and Indian Ocean from 04 November 1956 to 02 January...

  5. Temperature profile and other data collected by the R/V ALPHA HELIX using CTD casts, fluorometer, and transmissometer from 13 August 2000 to 11 October 2000 (NODC Accession 0000374)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile transmissivity, fluorescence and other data were collected from the R/V ALPHA HELIX from August 13, 2000 to October 11, 2000. Data were submitted...

  6. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the Ferrel in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-18 to 2010-08-23 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069065)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the Ferrel in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-18 to 2010-08-23 in...

  7. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the Ferrel in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-15 to 2010-07-23 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069060)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the Ferrel in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-15 to 2010-07-23 in...

  8. Delayed XBT data collected by Royal Australian Navy and submitted to NODC for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP), dates range from 2009-2011 (NODC Accession 0089585)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts in the Arafura Sea, Bass Strait, Coral Sea, Great Australian Bight, Indian Ocean, Molukka Sea, North Pacific...

  9. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USS MCCLUSKY using BT and XBT casts in the Northeast Pacific Ocean and other seas from 24 July 1992 to 10 December 1992 (NODC Accession 9300003)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USS MCCLUSKY in the Northeast Pacific Ocean, Philippine Sea, East / South...

  10. Temperature profile data collected using BT and XBT casts in a World-wide distribution from NOAA Ship MALCOLM BALDRIGE and other platforms from 1988-02-03 to 1990-03-31 (NODC Accession 9000094)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using XBT and BT casts from NOAA Ship MALCOLM BALDRIGE in a World-wide distribution from 03 February 1988 to 31 March 1990....

  11. Physical and profile oceanographic data collected aboard the ENDEAVOR in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-06-17 to 2010-06-30 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0084592)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and profile oceanographic data were collected aboard the ENDEAVOR in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-06-17 to 2010-06-30 in response to the Deepwater Horizon...

  12. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the OCEAN RESEARCHER I in the Philippine Sea from 1991-06-26 to 1991-07-04 (NODC Accession 0115598)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115598 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from OCEAN RESEARCHER I in the Philippine Sea from 1991-06-26 to...

  13. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the MEDELENA from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1976-08-12 to 1976-08-18 (NODC Accession 8100398)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from MEDELENA in the Pacific Ocean from August 12, 1976 to August 18, 1976. Data were...

  14. Temperature profiles collected by Commonwealth Scientific Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO) from Fish Tag data from the Coral Sea, Tasman Sea, and the Indian Oceans from 15 November 2008 to 26 July 2009 (NODC Accession 0067650)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from Fish Tag data from the biologging group at CSIRO, from the Coral Sea, Tasman Sea, and the Indian Oceans from 15 November...

  15. Chemical and physical oceanographic profile data collected from CTD casts aboard the American Diver in the Gulf of Mexico on 2010-08-04 in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill event (NODC Accession 0069088)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical and physical oceanographic profile data were collected aboard the American Diver in the Gulf of Mexico on 2010-08-04 in response to the Deepwater Horizon...

  16. Chemical, physical and profile oceanographic data collected aboard NOAA Ship GORDON GUNTER in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-25 to 2010-07-31 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0070332)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected aboard NOAA Ship GORDON GUNTER in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-25 to 2010-07-31 in response to...

  17. Temperature profile and water depth collected from ZAMBEZE and other platforms using BT and XBT casts in the Atlantic Ocean from 21 July 1981 to 02 December 1985 (NODC Accession 8600293)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the ZAMBEZE and other platforms in the Northeast / Southwest Atlantic Ocean. Data...

  18. Temperature profile and other data collected using CTD casts in the TOGA Area - Pacific Ocean from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER from 1984-04-09 to 1984-11-05 (NODC Accession 8800072)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and other data were collected using CTD casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER in the TOGA Area - Pacific Ocean from 09 April 1984 to 05 November 1984....

  19. Temperature profile and other data collected using CTD casts in the TOGA Area - Pacific Ocean from NOAA Ship MALCOLM BALDRIGE and NOAA Ship DISCOVERER from 1989-05-13 to 1989-12-08 (NODC Accession 9100142)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and other data were collected using CTD casts from NOAA Ship MALCOLM BALDRDIGE and NOAA Ship DISCOVERER in the TOGA Area - Pacific Ocean from 13...

  20. Chemical, physical and profile oceanographic data collected aboard NOAA Ship Pisces in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-09-09 to 2010-09-17 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069113)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected aboard NOAA Ship Pisces in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-09-09 to 2010-09-17 in response to the...

  1. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the Ferrel in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-25 to 2010-07-30 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069061)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the Ferrel in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-25 to 2010-07-30 in...

  2. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the Ferrel in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-03 to 2010-08-11 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069063)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the Ferrel in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-03 to 2010-08-11 in...

  3. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the Ferrel in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-07 to 2010-08-27 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069066)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the Ferrel in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-07 to 2010-08-27 in...

  4. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from HEALY in the Arctic Ocean and Beaufort Sea from 2003-09-11 to 2003-10-18 (NODC Accession 0115676)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0115676 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, optical, physical and profile data collected from HEALY in the Arctic Ocean and Beaufort Sea...

  5. Temperature and salinity profile data collected by bottle on multiple cruises in the Baltic Sea, Baffin Bay, Davis Strait, the North Atlantic Ocean, and the North Sea from 02 January 1985 to 13 November 1989 (NODC Accession 0000056)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and nutrients data were collected using bottle casts from DANA and other platforms in Baffin Sea, Baltic Sea, Davis Strait, North Sea, and North...

  6. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the AMERICA MARU from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1977-07-06 to 1977-07-14 (NODC Accession 8100352)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from AMERICA MARU in the Pacific Ocean from July 6, 1977 to July 14, 1977. Data were...

  7. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the Ferrel in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-30 to 2010-08-03 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069062)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the Ferrel in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-30 to 2010-08-03 in...

  8. Physical profiles collected by the R/V Laurence M. Gould in the Southern Oceans to support the Palmer Long Term Ecological Research for the purpose of ecosystem and physical oceanography research, January 7 - January 31, 2004 (NODC Accession 0039427)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Palmer Long Term Ecological Research (PAL-LTER) Temperature and Salinity profile data collected west of the Antarctic Peninsula. These data from January 2004 are...

  9. Physical profiles collected by the R/V Laurence M. Gould in the Southern Ocean to support the Palmer Long Term Ecological Research for the purpose of ecosystem and physical oceanography research, January 4 - January 31, 2005 (NODC Accession 0039426)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Palmer Long Term Ecological Research (PAL-LTER) Temperature and Salinity profile data collected west of the Antarctic Peninsula. These data from January 2005 are...

  10. Physical profiles collected by the R/V Laurence M. Gould in the Southern Oceans to support the Palmer Long Term Ecological Research for the purpose of ecosystem and physical oceanography research, January 7 - February 3, 2006 (NODC Accession 0039224)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Palmer Long Term Ecological Research (PAL-LTER) Temperature and Salinity profile data collected west of the Antarctic Peninsula. These data from January/February...

  11. Physical profiles collected by the R/V Laurence M. Gould in the Southern Oceans to support the Palmer Long Term Ecological Research for the purpose of ecosystem and physical oceanography research, January 6 - February 1, 2003 (NODC Accession 0039429)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Palmer Long Term Ecological Research (PAL-LTER) Temperature and Salinity profile data collected west of the Antarctic Peninsula. These data from January/February...

  12. Chemical, physical, profile and underway oceanographic data collected aboard NOAA Ship GORDON GUNTER in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-01 to 2010-07-06 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069068)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and underway oceanographic data were collected aboard NOAA Ship GORDON GUNTER in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-01 to 2010-07-06 in...

  13. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the OCEAN VERITAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-26 to 2010-07-29 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069101)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the OCEAN VERITAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-26 to 2010-07-29 in...

  14. Chemical, physical, profile and other oceanographic data collected aboard NOAA Ship GORDON GUNTER in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-02 to 2010-08-08 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0070333)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile, laboratory analysis and underway oceanographic data were collected aboard NOAA Ship GORDON GUNTER in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-02...

  15. Chemical, physical, profile and underway oceanographic data collected aboard NOAA Ship GORDON GUNTER in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-08 to 2010-07-16 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0070331)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and underway oceanographic data were collected aboard NOAA Ship GORDON GUNTER in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-08 to 2010-07-16 in...

  16. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the OCEAN VERITAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-09-03 to 2010-09-07 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069108)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the OCEAN VERITAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-09-03 to 2010-09-07 in...

  17. Chemical, physical, profile and underway oceanographic data collected aboard NOAA Ship GORDON GUNTER in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-06-15 to 2010-06-25 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0070330)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and underway oceanographic data were collected aboard NOAA Ship GORDON GUNTER in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-06-15 to 2010-06-25 in...

  18. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the OCEAN VERITAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-18 to 2010-08-22 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069105)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the OCEAN VERITAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-18 to 2010-08-22 in...

  19. Chemical, physical, profile and other oceanographic data collected aboard NOAA Ship THOMAS JEFFERSON in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-06-03 to 2010-07-18 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069082)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile, tows and underway oceanographic data were collected aboard NOAA Ship THOMAS JEFFERSON in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-06-03 to...

  20. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the OCEAN VERITAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-06 to 2010-08-10 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069103)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the OCEAN VERITAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-06 to 2010-08-10 in...

  1. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the OCEAN VERITAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-25 to 2010-08-29 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069106)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the OCEAN VERITAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-25 to 2010-08-29 in...

  2. Chemical, physical, profile and other oceanographic data collected aboard NOAA Ship GORDON GUNTER in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-24 to 2010-09-10 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0070532)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile, meteorological, navigational and underway oceanographic data were collected aboard NOAA Ship GORDON GUNTER in the Gulf of Mexico from...

  3. Physical and profile oceanographic data collected aboard the WEATHERBIRD II in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-05-22 to 2010-05-27 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0084597)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and profile oceanographic data were collected aboard the WEATHERBIRD II in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-05-22 to 2010-05-27 in response to the Deepwater...

  4. Chemical, physical and profile oceanographic data collected aboard the OCEAN VERITAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-05-26 to 2010-05-30 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069092)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected aboard the OCEAN VERITAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-05-26 to 2010-05-30 in response to the...

  5. Chemical, physical and profile oceanographic data collected aboard NOAA Ship THOMAS JEFFERSON in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-06-15 to 2010-06-28 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069083)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected aboard NOAA Ship THOMAS JEFFERSON in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-06-15 to 2010-06-28 in response to...

  6. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the OCEAN VERITAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-06-01 to 2010-06-05 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069093)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the OCEAN VERITAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-06-01 to 2010-06-05 in...

  7. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the OCEAN VERITAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-30 to 2010-09-03 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069107)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the OCEAN VERITAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-30 to 2010-09-03 in...

  8. Profile and underway oceanographic data collected aboard NOAA Ship GORDON GUNTER in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-21 to 2010-07-24 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0081186)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Profile and underway oceanographic data were collected aboard NOAA Ship GORDON GUNTER in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-21 to 2010-07-24 in response to the...

  9. Chemical, physical and profile oceanographic data collected aboard the PELICAN in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-05-10 to 2010-07-21 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069087)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected aboard the PELICAN in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-05-10 to 2010-07-21 in response to the Deepwater...

  10. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the South Pacific Ocean from 2013-10-25 to 2013-12-20 (NCEI Accession 0163186)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0163186 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the South Pacific Ocean from 2013-10-25 to...

  11. Chemical, physical and profile oceanographic data collected aboard the RYAN CHOUEST in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-09-04 to 2010-09-08 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069120)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected aboard the RYAN CHOUEST in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-09-04 to 2010-09-08 in response to the...

  12. Chemical and physical oceanographic profile data collected from CTD casts aboard the Arctic in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-09-09 to 2010-09-14 in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill event (NODC Accession 0068955)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical and physical oceanographic profile data were collected aboard the Arctic in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-09-09 to 2010-09-14 in response to the Deepwater...

  13. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the DISCOVERY in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1989-07-16 to 1989-08-10 (NODC Accession 0113532)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113532 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from DISCOVERY in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1989-07-16 to...

  14. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the DARVIN in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1991-07-12 to 1991-07-24 (NODC Accession 0113526)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113526 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from DARVIN in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1991-07-12 to 1991-07-24...

  15. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the Ferrel in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-13 to 2010-08-17 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069064)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the Ferrel in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-13 to 2010-08-17 in...

  16. Temperature profile and nutrients data collected using bottle casts from the POLAR DUKE AND NATHANIEL B. PALMER in the Ross Sea and Southern Oceans from 12 January 1997 to 09 February 1997 (NODC Accession 0000896)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and nutrients data were collected using bottle casts in the Ross Sea and Southern Oceans from the POLAR DUKE and NATHANIEL B. PALMER. Data were...

  17. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from HMAS DARWIN and other platforms using BT and XBT casts in the North / South Pacific Ocean and Indian Ocean from 29 April 1985 to 12 April 1988 (NODC Accession 8800166)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the HMAS DARWIN and other platforms in the North / South Pacific Ocean and Indian...

  18. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USS COCHRANE using BT and XBT casts in the Inland Sea and other seas from 30 October 1988 to 26 March 1989 (NODC Accession 8900122)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USS COCHRANE in the Inland Sea, Philippine Sea, South / East China Sea, and...

  19. Nutrients, transient tracers, and other variables collected from profile and discrete sampling observations using Niskin bottle, CTD and other instruments in the Arctic Ocean from 2005-05-02 to 2009-05-18 (NODC Accession 0117695)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0117695 includes discrete CTD profile data collected from aircraft lending expeditions in the Arctic Ocean from 2005-05-02 to 2009-05-18. All...

  20. Temperature profile data collected using XBT and BT casts in a World-wide distribution from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER and other platforms from 1970-09-30 to 1979-08-05 (NODC Accession 8300089)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using XBT and BT casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER and other platforms in a World-wide distribution from 30 September 1970 to...

  1. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the JAN MAYEN in the Norwegian Sea from 1993-04-01 to 1995-11-01 (NODC Accession 0115677)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115677 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from JAN MAYEN in the Norwegian Sea from 1993-04-01 to 1995-11-01 and...

  2. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the SVENJA and other platforms from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1989-04-24 to 1990-02-07 (NODC Accession 9000063)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from SVENJA and other platforms in the Pacific Ocean from April 24, 1989 to February 7,...

  3. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the OCEAN VERITAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-12 to 2010-08-16 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069104)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the OCEAN VERITAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-12 to 2010-08-16 in...

  4. Delayed XBT data collected by Royal Australian Navy and submitted to NODC for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP), dates range from January 18, 2011 to October 02, 2011 (NODC Accession 0086909)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts in the Arafura Sea, Bass Strait, Coral Sea, Great Australian Bight, Gulf of Thailand, Indian ocean, South China...

  5. Delayed XBT data collected by the Royal Australian Navy and submitted to NODC for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP), dates range from September 15 2009 to October 25 2010 (NODC Accession 0085726)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts in the Great Australian Bight, Gulf of Thailand, Indian ocean, South China Sea, and Tasman Sea. Data were...

  6. Temperature profile data collected using BT and XBT casts in a World-wide distribution from NOAA Ship MALCOLM BALDRIGE and other platforms from 1990-06-22 to 1991-08-29 (NODC Accession 9100184)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using XBT and BT casts from NOAA Ship MALCOLM BALDRIGE and other platforms in a World-wide distribution from 22 June 1990 to...

  7. Temperature profile data collected using CTD casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1981-11-21 to 1981-12-07 (NODC Accession 8200194)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and other data were collected using CTD casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER in the North Atlantic Ocean from 21 November 1981 to 07 December 1981....

  8. Temperature profile and other data collected using CTD casts in the North/South Pacific Ocean from NOAA Ship MALCOLM BALDRIGE and other platform from 16 February 1991 to 98 December 1991 (NODC Accession 9200156)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and other data were collected using CTD casts from NOAA Ship MALCOLM BALDRIGE and NOAA Ship DISCOVERER in the North/South Pacific Ocean from 16...

  9. Temperature profile and chemical data collected using BT and XBT casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER in the North/South Pacific Ocean and Caribbean Sea from 1987-04-07 to 1987-09-30 (NODC Accession 8700382)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and chemical data were collected using XBT and BT casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER in the North/South Pacific Ocean and Caribbean Sea from 07...

  10. Temperature profile data collected using BT and XBT casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER and other platforms in the Bering Sea and other Sea areas from 1987-02-25 to 1987-07-27 (NODC Accession 8700280)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using XBT and BT casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER and other platforms in the Bering Sea and other Sea areas from 25 February...

  11. Temperature profile and other data collected using CTD casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER and other platforms in the TOGA Area of Pacific Ocean from 1987-04-25 to 1988-12-03 (NODC Accession 8900298)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and other data were collected using CTD casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER, NOAA Ship MALCOLM BALDRIGE, and NOAA Ship OCEANOGRAPHER in the TOGA area...

  12. Temperature profile data collected using BT and XBT casts in the TOGA Area - Pacific Ocean from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER from 1984-06-09 to 1984-06-21 (NODC Accession 8700051)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using XBT and BT casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER in the TOGA Area - Pacific Ocean from 09 June 1984 to 21 June 1984. Data...

  13. Temperature profile data collected using BT and XBT casts in the Gulf of Mexico and TOGA Area - Pacific Ocean from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER from 1985-10-20 to 1985-12-14 (NODC Accession 8700105)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using XBT and BT casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER in the Gulf of Mexico and TOGA Area - Pacific Ocean from 30 October 1985 to...

  14. Temperature profile and other data collected using CTD casts in the TOGA Area - Pacific Ocean from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER and other platforms from 1984-11-13 to 1986-12-01 (NODC Accession 8700194)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and other data were collected using CTD casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER and other platforms in the TOGA Area - Pacific Ocean from 13 November...

  15. Temperature profile and other data collected using CTD casts in the SE Pacific Ocean from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER from 1984-06-12 to 1984-06-30 (NODC Accession 8500249)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and other data were collected using CTD casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER in the SE Pacific Ocean from 12 June 1984 to 30 June 1984. Data were...

  16. Temperature profile and other data collected using CTD casts in the North/South Pacific Ocean from NOAA Ship MALCOLM BALDRIGE and other platform from 1990-02-23 to 1990-12-06 (NODC Accession 9200013)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and other data were collected using CTD casts from NOAA Ship MALCOLM BALDRIGE and NOAA Ship DISCOVERER in the North/South Pacific Ocean from 23...

  17. Temperature profile data collected using BT and XBT casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER and NOAA Ship DISCOVERER in the TOGA Area - Pacific Ocean from 1984-10-10 to 1985-06-19 (NODC Accession 8800073)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using XBT and BT casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER in the TOGA Area - Pacific Ocean from 10 October 1984 to 19 June 1985. Data...

  18. Temperature profile data collected using XBT and BT casts in the TOGA Area of Pacific Ocean from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER and other platforms from 1979-02-28 to 1991-07-27 (NODC Accession 9300170)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using XBT and BT casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER and other platforms in the TOGA Area of Pacific Ocean from 28 February 1979...

  19. Temperature profile data collected using BT and XBT casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER in the TOGA Area- Pacific Ocean from 1984-04-11 to 1984-05-05 (NODC Accession 8800211)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using XBT and BT casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER in the TOGA Area - Pacific Ocean from 11 April 1984 to 05 May 1984. Data...

  20. Chemical, laboratory analyses, physical and profile oceanographic data collected aboard the JACK FITZ in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-18 to 2010-08-23 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069119)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, laboratory analyses, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected aboard the JACK FITZ in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-18 to 2010-08-23 in...

  1. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the OCEAN VERITAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-07 to 2010-07-11 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069099)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the OCEAN VERITAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-07 to 2010-07-11 in...

  2. Chemical, laboratory analyses, physical and profile oceanographic data collected aboard the BUNNY BORDELON in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-18 to 2010-08-23 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069118)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, laboratory analyses, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected aboard the BUNNY BORDELON in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-18 to 2010-08-23...

  3. Chemical, laboratory analyses, physical and profile oceanographic data collected aboard the JACK FITZ in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-06-12 to 2010-06-20 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069074)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, laboratory analyses, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected aboard the JACK FITZ in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-06-12 to 2010-06-20 in...

  4. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the ENDEAVOR in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1991-03-28 to 1991-04-21 (NODC Accession 0113988)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113988 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from ENDEAVOR in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1991-03-28 to...

  5. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the METEOR in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2001-06-20 to 2001-07-15 (NODC Accession 0115601)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115601 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from METEOR in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2001-06-20 to 2001-07-15...

  6. PH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from THALASSA in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2004-06-04 to 2004-07-06 (NODC Accession 0113918)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0113918 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from THALASSA in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2004-06-04 to...

  7. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the KNORR in the South Pacific Ocean from 2006-01-30 to 2006-03-14 (NODC Accession 0115593)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115593 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from KNORR in the South Pacific Ocean from 2006-01-30 to 2006-03-14...

  8. Temperature profile, sound velocity, and other data collected from the COLUMBUS ISELIN using inverted echo sounder and CTD casts in the TOGA Area - Atlantic Ocean from 24 January 1987 to 07 October 1991 (NODC Accession 9200059)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile, sound velocity, and other data were collected using Inverted Echo Sounder (IES) and CTD casts from the COLUMBUS ISELIN in the TOGA Area -...

  9. Pressure/temperature/salinity profiler measurements collected in the Sea of Japan, 2001-06 to July 2001, under the sponsorship of the Office of Naval Research (NODC Accession 0002416)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Pressure/temperature/salinty profiles collected in support of a study to investigate the shallow and deep current variability in the southwest Japan/East Sea....

  10. Temperature profile and chemical data collected using XBT and CTD casts from NOAA Ship MALCOLM BALDRIGE and other platforms in a World-wide distribution from 1991-09-17 to 1995-03-23 (NODC Accession 9500074)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and chemical data were collected using XBT and CTD casts in a World-wide distribution from NOAA Ship MALCOLM BALDRIGE and other platforms from 17...

  11. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the OCEAN VERITAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-09-11 to 2010-09-13 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069110)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the OCEAN VERITAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-09-11 to 2010-09-13 in...

  12. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the OCEAN VERITAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-19 to 2010-07-23 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069100)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the OCEAN VERITAS in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-19 to 2010-07-23 in...

  13. PH, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from SHUMPU MARU in the Philippine Sea from 1992-02-25 to 1992-02-29 (NODC Accession 0115709)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0115709 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from SHUMPU MARU in the Philippine Sea from 1992-02-25 to 1992-02-29....

  14. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from OCEAN RESEARCHER I in the Philippine Sea from 1990-10-11 to 1990-10-15 (NODC Accession 0115600)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0115600 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from OCEAN RESEARCHER I in the Philippine Sea from 1990-10-11 to...

  15. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from CHARLES DARWIN in the Indian Ocean from 1987-11-12 to 1987-12-17 (NCEI Accession 0157468)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157468 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from CHARLES DARWIN in the Indian Ocean from 1987-11-12 to 1987-12-17....

  16. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from FRANKLIN in the Indian Ocean from 1996-05-07 to 1996-05-31 (NCEI Accession 0143942)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0143942 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from FRANKLIN in the Indian Ocean from 1996-05-07 to 1996-05-31. These data include...

  17. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from FRANKLIN in the Indian Ocean from 1995-09-13 to 1995-10-14 (NCEI Accession 0143397)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0143397 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from FRANKLIN in the Indian Ocean from 1995-09-13 to 1995-10-14 and retrieved during...

  18. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from DISCOVERY in the Indian Ocean from 1995-01-06 to 1995-02-21 (NCEI Accession 0160543)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0160543 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from DISCOVERY in the Indian Ocean from 1995-01-06 to...

  19. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from PROFESSOR MULTANOVSKIY in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1993-09-11 to 1993-11-21 (NCEI Accession 0143931)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0143931 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from PROFESSOR MULTANOVSKIY in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1993-09-11 to 1993-11-21....

  20. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the North Pacific Ocean from 1985-08-04 to 1985-09-07 (NCEI Accession 0143394)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0143394 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the North Pacific Ocean from 1985-08-04 to 1985-09-07 and...