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Sample records for charcot-marie-tooth disease type

  1. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease complicating type 2 diabetes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Win, Htet Htet Ne

    2012-02-01

    Although both conditions are relatively common, there are very few descriptions of type 2 diabetes mellitus coexisting with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). This case report and literature review describes a 53-year-old Irish man who presented with type 2 diabetes and significant neuropathy, and who was subsequently diagnosed with CMT type 1A. This case report will also discuss how to differentiate diabetic neuropathy from a progressive hereditary neuropathy and how coexistence aggravates the progression of neuropathy thus necessitating early diagnosis.

  2. Charcot-marie-tooth disease complicating type 2 diabetes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Win, Htet Htet Ne

    2011-07-01

    Although both conditions are relatively common, there are very few descriptions of type 2 diabetes mellitus coexisting with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). This case report and literature review describes a 53-year-old Irish man who presented with type 2 diabetes and significant neuropathy, and who was subsequently diagnosed with CMT type 1A. This case report will also discuss how to differentiate diabetic neuropathy from a progressive hereditary neuropathy and how coexistence aggravates the progression of neuropathy thus necessitating early diagnosis.

  3. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Jens Michael; Børglum, A D; Brandt, C A; Flint, T; Bisgaard, C

    1994-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) is an autosomal dominant peripheral neuropathy associated with a DNA duplication on chromosome 17p11.2-p12 in the majority of cases. Most of the sporadic cases are due to a de novo duplication. We have screened for this duplication in 11 Danish patients...... with CMT type 1, using four different techniques, and identified a de novo duplication in a sporadic case. Analysis of the fully informative pVAW409R3a alleles in this family showed the duplication to be of paternal origin....

  4. Neuromuscular Hip Dysplasia in Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease Type 1A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamford, Nigel S.; White, Klane K.; Robinett, Stephanie A.; Otto, Randolph K.; Gospe, Sidney M., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is one of the most common inherited neurological disorders, affecting 36 in 100,000 people. CMT type 1A (hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy) is the most frequent form of this disease, affecting 60 to 80% of the CMT population, but its diagnosis may be delayed because of inconsistent clinical signs and…

  5. Auditory processing in patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neijenhuis, C.A.M.; Beynon, A.J.; Snik, A.F.M.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Broek, P. van den

    2003-01-01

    HYPOTHESIS: It is unclear whether Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, type 1A, causes auditory processing disorders. Therefore, auditory processing abilities were investigated in five CMT1A patients with normal hearing. BACKGROUND: Previous studies have failed to separate peripheral from central audi

  6. Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a group of genetic nerve disorders. It is named after the three doctors who first identified it. ... a nerve biopsy. There is no cure. The disease can be so mild you don't realize ...

  7. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Reilly, Mary M

    2011-03-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the commonest inherited neuromuscular disorder affecting at least 1 in 2,500. Over the last two decades, there have been rapid advances in understanding the molecular basis for many forms of CMT with more than 30 causative genes now described. This has made obtaining an accurate genetic diagnosis possible but at times challenging for clinicians. This review aims to provide a simple, pragmatic approach to diagnosing CMT from a clinician\\'s perspective.

  8. Disability and quality of life in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1

    OpenAIRE

    PFEIFFER, G; Wicklein, E; Ratusinski, T; Schmitt, L; Kunze, K

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type I (CMT1) is a hereditary sensorimotor neuropathy causing variable degrees of handicap. The risk for relevant disability in respect to genetic counselling is unknown. An attempt was made to define it.
METHODS—Disability and ambulation of 50 patients with CMT1 were scored by the Hauser ambulation index score and the Rankin scale. Rankin score 2 was subdivided into 2a (independent without relevant slowness) and 2b (independent, ...

  9. Behavioural profiling of a murine Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norreel, J C; Jamon, M; Riviere, G; Passage, E; Fontes, M; Clarac, F

    2001-04-01

    Different features of motor behaviour were studied on a transgenic mouse model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth's disease (CMT). Mutants with 4 or 7 copies of the human PMP22 gene leading to a phenotype significantly close to CMT's disease type 1A were compared with control animals. The aim of the study was to validate this transgenic model and to characterise the impairments occurring in the various lines. Three main types of analysis were performed in 2-month-old mice without any peculiar visible deficit: (i) a study of standardised clinical tests (SHIRPA protocol) demonstrated that only a few motor deficits were expressed; (ii) a measurement of general spontaneous activity by means of a commercial video-tracking system was performed and revealed that the main spontaneous activities were identical in the three lines with, however, some slight localised modifications; and, (iii) by contrast, the three lines respond very differently to the footprints, grip strength, splay test and rotarod test. Even in lines with a significantly limited copy number of the transgene, we observed and quantified impairments. In conclusion, mutants of CMT1A seem to be a very pertinent model of this human pathology and will certainly be useful for therapeutic procedures and for theoretical studies on this disease. PMID:11328356

  10. Vestibular impairment in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Garrigues, Herminio; Sivera, Rafael; Vílchez, Juan Jesús; Espinós, Carmen; Palau, Francesc; Sevilla, Teresa

    2014-07-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4C (CMT4C) is a hereditary neuropathy with prominent unsteadiness. The objective of the current study is to determine whether the imbalance in CMT4C is caused only by reduced proprioceptive input or if vestibular nerve involvement is an additional factor. We selected 10 CMT4C patients and 10 age-matched and sex-matched controls. We performed a comprehensive evaluation of the vestibular system, including video Head Impulse Test, bithermal caloric test, galvanic stimulation test and skull vibration-induced nystagmus test. None of the patients experienced dizziness, spontaneous or gaze-evoked nystagmus, but all had significant vestibular impairment when tested when compared to controls. Seven had completely unexcitable vestibular systems and abnormal vestibuloocular reflex. There was no correlation between the degree of vestibulopathy and age or clinical severity. Significant vestibular impairment is a consistent finding in CMT4C and is present early in disease evolution. The profound imbalance that is so disabling in these patients may result from a combination of proprioceptive loss and vestibular neuropathy, and this would modify the recommended rehabilitation strategies. PMID:24614092

  11. Rapid genetic screening of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaobo Li; Kun Xia; Beisha Tang; Ruxu Zhang; Xiaohong Zi; Lin Li; Yajing Zhan; Shunxiang Huang; Jin Li; Xuning Li; Xigui Li; Zhengmao Hu

    2012-01-01

    We used the allele-specific PCR-double digestion method on peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) to determine duplication and deletion mutations in the proband and family members of one family with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 and one family with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies. The proband and one subclinical family member from the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 family had a PMP22 gene duplication; one patient from the hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies family had a PMP22 gene deletion. Electron microscopic analysis of ultrathin sections of the superficial peroneal nerve from the two probands demonstrated demyelination and myelin sheath hyperplasia, as well as an ‘onion-like’ structure in the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A patient. We observed an irregular thickened myelin sheath and ‘mouse-nibbled’-like changes in the patient with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies. In the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A patient, nerve electrophysiological examination revealed moderate-to-severe reductions in the motor and sensory conduction velocities of the bilateral median nerve, ulnar nerve, tibial nerve, and sural nerve. Moreover, the compound muscle action potential amplitude was decreased. In the patient with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies, the nerve conduction velocity of the bilateral tibial nerve and sural nerve was moderately reduced, and the nerve conduction velocity of the median nerve and ulnar nerve of both upper extremities was slightly reduced.

  12. A novel mitofusin 2 gene mutation causing Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2A disease in a Chinese family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEING Chor Kwan; LAU Kwok Kwong; YU Kwok Wai; CHAN Yan Wo Albert; MAK Miu Chloe

    2010-01-01

    @@ Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), also known as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies, comprises a genetically heterogeneous group of inherited peripheral neuropathies. Clinically it is characterized by progressive distal weakness, muscle atrophy, distal sensory loss and loss of deep tendon reflexes. Following electrophysiological criteria, CMT is divided into two main forms: the primarily demyelinating neuropathy CMT1 with severely decreased nerve conduction velocity (NCV) (38 m/s) but decreased amplitudes.1 CMT2A, an autosomal dominant disease caused by mitofusin 2 gene (MFN2) mutations, is the most common type of CMT2, accounting for up to 33% of familial CMT2 cases.2 We reported a patient with clinical diagnosis of CMT2 caused by a novel MFN2 mutation. To our knowledge, this is a relatively early report of genetically confirmed CMT2A in Chinese.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease Charcot- ...

  14. [Rehabilitation of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Fumihiro; Nakamura, Takeshi; Nishimura, Yukihide; Arakawa, Hideki; Kawasaki, Takashi; Ogawa, Takahiro; Nishiyama, Kazunari

    2016-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is one of the most commonly inherited neuromuscular diseases causing progressive muscle weakness; contracture; deformity in the feet, legs, and hands; and impairments of ambulation and handgrip. Reduced physical ability can be attributed not only to the disease but also to physical deconditioning. Previously, most physicians in the field of rehabilitation were anxious about the hypothesis of overwork weakness in CMT, and did not conduct intensive exercise programs for patients with CMT. However, recent studies have reported that progressive resistance strengthening programs for lower extremities are feasible, safe, beneficial, and improve exercise intolerance and undue fatigue in patients with CMT. Although the improvement in exercise tolerance may be partly due to the reversal of deconditioning effect of related sedentary lifestyle, progressive resistance training and physical fitness can improve walking function, activities of daily living, and subjective perception of pain and fatigue in patients with CMT. To increase the daily physical function, some studies described the potential benefits of ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs); however, no control study supported it. So far, the training programs on CMT have been dependent on the exercise programs for able-bodied individuals. To increase the effects of rehabilitation, optimal programs that combine the training protocol and AFO strategies will have to be designed for patients with CMT. PMID:26764300

  15. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: genetic and rehabilitation aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana CEVEI

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Charcot-Marie-Tooth hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy refers to a group of disorders characterized by a chronic motor and sensory polyneuropathy. Typical cases have distal muscle weakness and peroneal atrophy often associated with mild to moderate sensory loss, depressed tendon reflexes, and pes cavus. Hereditary neuropathies are categorized by mode of inheritance and chromosomal locus. The diagnosis is based on family history, characteristic findings on physical examination, EMG, nerve conduction velocity testing, and occasionally on nerve biopsy. The disorder shows allelic and non-allelic genetic heterogeneity, thus mutations of different genes leading to the same clinical features. Also, different mutations of the same gene may lead to different phenotypes. Molecular genetic testing is available in clinical laboratories for diagnosis of 7 subtypes of the disease. Genetic counseling and risk assessment depend on the inheritance. We present two cases with Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1 and type 2 respectively. There is no cure for the disorder, although physical therapy and moderate activity are often recommended to maintain muscle strength and endurance.

  16. Occurrence of Optic Neuritis and Cervical Cord Schwannoma with Charcot-Marie-Tooth Type 4B1 Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Patrick; Bruwer, Zandre; Al-Kharusi, Khalsa; Meftah, Douja; Al-Murshedi, Fathiya

    2016-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 4B1 (CMT4B1) disease is a rare subtype of CMT4 with reported association of facial weakness, vocal cord paresis, chest deformities, and claw hands. We report the unusual occurrence of optic neuritis and cervical cord schwannoma in a male individual with confirmed CMT4B1 disease. Sequencing of the MTMR2 gene revealed a novel nonsense homozygous mutation c.1768C>T (p.Gln590*). The mutation was identified in affected relatives of the proband and a second, apparently unrelated, family. The rare association of optic neuritis or schwannoma with genetically confirmed CMT1A has been individually observed, but never with recessive CMT. To the best of our knowledge, the occurrence of optic neuritis and cervical cord schwannoma in the same patient has never been reported with any form of CMT including CMT4B1. In similar cases, we recommend immediate medical attention to rule out the possibility of schwannomas in patients with all demyelinating CMT subtypes in case of the development of focal neurological signs or acute worsening of clinical status. PMID:27162595

  17. Occurrence of Optic Neuritis and Cervical Cord Schwannoma with Charcot-Marie-Tooth Type 4B1 Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Patrick; Bruwer, Zandre; Al-Kharusi, Khalsa; Meftah, Douja; Al-Murshedi, Fathiya

    2016-05-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 4B1 (CMT4B1) disease is a rare subtype of CMT4 with reported association of facial weakness, vocal cord paresis, chest deformities, and claw hands. We report the unusual occurrence of optic neuritis and cervical cord schwannoma in a male individual with confirmed CMT4B1 disease. Sequencing of the MTMR2 gene revealed a novel nonsense homozygous mutation c.1768C>T (p.Gln590*). The mutation was identified in affected relatives of the proband and a second, apparently unrelated, family. The rare association of optic neuritis or schwannoma with genetically confirmed CMT1A has been individually observed, but never with recessive CMT. To the best of our knowledge, the occurrence of optic neuritis and cervical cord schwannoma in the same patient has never been reported with any form of CMT including CMT4B1. In similar cases, we recommend immediate medical attention to rule out the possibility of schwannomas in patients with all demyelinating CMT subtypes in case of the development of focal neurological signs or acute worsening of clinical status. PMID:27162595

  18. Molecular Diagnosis of Charcot-Marie Tooth Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gordon Millichap

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of mutations in certain genes in 153 unrelated patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT was determined by DNA sequencing before clinical testing at the Departments of Molecular and Human Genetics and Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, and other centers.

  19. Vestibular impairment in patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    OpenAIRE

    Poretti, A.; Palla, A; Tarnutzer, A A; Petersen, J A; Weber, K P; Straumann, D; Jung, H H

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This case-control study aimed to determine whether the imbalance in Charcot-Marie-tooth (CMT) disease is caused only by reduced proprioceptive input or whether the involvement of the vestibular nerve is an additional factor. METHODS: Fifteen patients with CMT disease (aged 48 ± 17 years; 8 women) underwent cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials, which reflect otolith-spinal reflex function, and quantitative horizontal search-coil head-impulse testing, which assesses the hi...

  20. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: insights from skin biopsy

    OpenAIRE

    Pisciotta, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Inherited neuropathies, collectively known as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), are a group of genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous peripheral neuropathies associated with mutations or copy number variations in over 80 distinct genes. The advent of genetic testing has made sural nerve biopsy unnecessary for diagnosing most cases of CMT, particularly because the technique is somewhat invasive. Unfortunately, this has led to an inability to evaluate morphological effects by the various...

  1. Quality-of-Life in Charcot Marie Tooth Disease: The Patient's Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Nicholas E.; Heatwole, Chad R; Dilek, Nuran; Sowden, Janet; Kirk, Callyn A; Shereff, Denise; Shy, Michael E; Herrmann, David N.

    2014-01-01

    This study determines the impact of symptoms associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease on quality-of-life. Charcot-Marie-Tooth patients in the Inherited Neuropathies Consortium Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network Contact Registry were surveyed. The survey inquired about 214 symptoms and 20 themes previously identified as important to Charcot-Marie-Tooth patients through patient interviews. Symptom population impact was calculated as the prevalence multiplied by the relative importance o...

  2. [An autopsy case of neuronal type Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (HMSN type II) with nerve deafness and psychiatric symptoms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, I; Yoshimura, N; Hanazono, T; Usutani, S; Muramoto, Y; Fukushima, Y

    1992-06-01

    The clinical and pathological findings of a 41-year-old male patient with atypical Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease were reported. There were 3 cases of subarachnoid haemorrhage, 2 nerve deafness and 2 hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) in his family. He had suffered from progressive nerve deafness since 5 years old and gait disturbance since 37 years old. He had been admitted to the psychiatric hospital 3 times because of hallucinatory-delusional state and behavior abnormalities. Neurological examinations at 39 years old revealed that he had mental deterioration (IQ 66), nerve deafness, diffuse muscle atrophy, most marked distally, sensory disturbance, areflexia, positive Romberg's sign, orthostatic hypotension, dysphagia and slurred speech. MCV of median nerve was 27.8 m/sec, and SCV was not evoked. EEG revealed nonspecific dysfunction of the brain. He died of ileus-like condition at 41 years old. General autopsy showed haemorrhagic infarction of the jejunum and ileum due to compression of the superior mesenteric artery and vein by an adhesion band of connective tissue formed after previous appendectomy. Neuropathological examinations revealed axonal degeneration and loss of myelinated fibers with schwannosis of anterior and posterior spinal nerve roots as well as peripheral nerves. The posterior roots were more severely affected than the anterior ones. Ganglion cells of the posterior root ganglia showed remarkable degeneration and loss. There was severe degeneration of the posterior columns, especially in the gracilis, of the spinal cord. Nerve cells in the anterior horns and Clarke's columns also displayed conspicuous atrophy or central chromatolysis followed by gliosis. There was slight degeneration of the posterior spinocerebellar tracts.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1389565

  3. ALS5/SPG11/KIAA1840 mutations cause autosomal recessive axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montecchiani, Celeste; Pedace, Lucia; Lo Giudice, Temistocle; Casella, Antonella; Mearini, Marzia; Gaudiello, Fabrizio; Pedroso, José L; Terracciano, Chiara; Caltagirone, Carlo; Massa, Roberto; St George-Hyslop, Peter H; Barsottini, Orlando G P; Kawarai, Toshitaka; Orlacchio, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is a group of hereditary peripheral neuropathies that share clinical characteristics of progressive distal muscle weakness and atrophy, foot deformities, distal sensory loss, as well as diminished tendon reflexes. Hundreds of causative DNA changes have been found, but much of the genetic basis of the disease is still unexplained. Mutations in the ALS5/SPG11/KIAA1840 gene are a frequent cause of autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum and peripheral axonal neuropathy, and account for ∼ 40% of autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The overlap of axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with both diseases, as well as the common autosomal recessive inheritance pattern of thin corpus callosum and axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease in three related patients, prompted us to analyse the ALS5/SPG11/KIAA1840 gene in affected individuals with autosomal recessive axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. We investigated 28 unrelated families with autosomal recessive axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease defined by clinical, electrophysiological, as well as pathological evaluation. Besides, we screened for all the known genes related to axonal autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT2A2/HMSN2A2/MFN2, CMT2B1/LMNA, CMT2B2/MED25, CMT2B5/NEFL, ARCMT2F/dHMN2B/HSPB1, CMT2K/GDAP1, CMT2P/LRSAM1, CMT2R/TRIM2, CMT2S/IGHMBP2, CMT2T/HSJ1, CMTRID/COX6A1, ARAN-NM/HINT and GAN/GAN), for the genes related to autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum and axonal peripheral neuropathy (SPG7/PGN, SPG15/ZFYVE26, SPG21/ACP33, SPG35/FA2H, SPG46/GBA2, SPG55/C12orf65 and SPG56/CYP2U1), as well as for the causative gene of peripheral neuropathy with or without agenesis of the corpus callosum (SLC12A6). Mitochondrial disorders related to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 were also excluded by sequencing POLG and TYMP genes. An additional locus for autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth

  4. Learning about Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and/or hearing loss, and, in some individuals, scoliosis (curvature of the spine). People with CMT disease ... MBBS, Associate Professor, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Loma Linda University Medical Center, about Charcot-Marie- ...

  5. Charcot-Marie-Tooth and Related Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... does, and it isn’t contagious. It’s hereditary, meaning that it can be passed down through a ... easy to recognize in the family tree. In contrast, X-linked or autosomal recessive types of CMT ...

  6. Noncompaction Cardiomyopathy with Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherif Ali Eltawansy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 53-year-old female presenting with a new-onset heart failure that was contributed secondary to noncompaction cardiomyopathy. The diagnosis was made by echocardiogram and confirmed by cardiac MRI. Noncompaction cardiomyopathy (also known as ventricular hypertrabeculation is a newly discovered disease. It is considered to be congenital (genetic cardiomyopathy. It is usually associated with genetic disorders and that could explain the genetic pathogenesis of the non-compaction cardiomyopathy. Our case had a history of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. There is a high incidence of arrhythmia and embolic complications. The treatment usually consists of the medical management, defibrillator placement, and lifelong anticoagulation. Heart transplantation will be the last resort.

  7. Rehabilitation issues in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenis-Coskun, Ozge; Matthews, Dennis J

    2016-02-27

    Charcot Marie Tooth (CMT) disease is the most common hereditary sensorimotor neuropathy that has a slow onset. It presents usually in childhood, starting distally and from the lower limbs progressing to more proximal muscles. Due to the lack of curative medical treatments and the problematic outcomes of surgical intervention, rehabilitation continues to play a major role in treatment. This paper aims to summarize the rehabilitation approaches like aerobic, stretching and strengthening exercises. Orthotics is another important part of treatment that complete rehabilitative approaches. Orthotic devices that are currently being used and investigated in patients with CMT are also reviewed. The evidence shows that exercise is effective in improving strength and general fitness. Stretching is somewhat effective in maintaining range of motion. Orthotic devices are the mainstay of maintaining mobility and ambulation and upper extremity function. PMID:26966798

  8. Hand weakness in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease 1X.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Arthur-Farraj, P J

    2012-07-01

    There have been suggestions from previous studies that patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) have weaker dominant hand muscles. Since all studies to date have included a heterogeneous group of CMT patients we decided to analyse hand strength in 43 patients with CMT1X. We recorded handedness and the MRC scores for the first dorsal interosseous and abductor pollicis brevis muscles, median and ulnar nerve compound motor action potentials and conduction velocities in dominant and non-dominant hands. Twenty-two CMT1X patients (51%) had a weaker dominant hand; none had a stronger dominant hand. Mean MRC scores were significantly higher for first dorsal interosseous and abductor pollicis brevis in non-dominant hands compared to dominant hands. Median nerve compound motor action potentials were significantly reduced in dominant compared to non-dominant hands. We conclude that the dominant hand is weaker than the non-dominant hand in patients with CMT1X.

  9. MRI findings, patterns of disease distribution, and muscle fat fraction calculation in five patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2 F disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaeta, Michele; Mileto, Achille; Minutoli, Fabio; Settineri, Nicola; Donato, Rocco; Ascenti, Giorgio; Blandino, Alfredo [Policlinico ' ' G. Martino' ' , Dipartimento di Scienze Radiologiche, Messina (Italy); Mazzeo, Anna; Di Leo, Rita [Policlinico ' ' G. Martino' ' , Dipartimento di Neuroscienze, Scienze Psichiatriche ed Anestesiologiche, Messina (Italy)

    2012-05-15

    To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pattern of muscle involvement and disease progression in five patients with late-onset Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease type 2 F, due to a previously unknown mutation. Five patients (three males, two females) underwent MRI of the lower limbs to define the pattern of muscle involvement and evaluate the muscle fat fraction (MFF) of residual thigh muscle with gradient-echo (GRE) dual-echo dual-flip angle technique. Evaluation of fatty infiltration both by visual inspection and MFF calculation was performed. A proximal-to-distal gradient of muscle involvement was depicted in male patients with extensive muscle wasting of lower legs, less severe impairment of distal thigh muscles, and sparing of proximal thigh muscles. A peculiar phenotype finding was that no or only slight muscle abnormalities could be found in the two female patients. We described the pattern of muscle involvement and disease progression in a family with CMT disease type 2 F. GRE dual-echo dual-flip angle MRI technique is a valuable technique to obtain a rapid quantification of MFF. (orig.)

  10. Age-related changes in motor unit number estimates in adult patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. van Dijk; C. Verhamme; I.N. van Schaik; H.J. Schelhaas; E. Mans; L.J. Bour; D.F. Stegeman; M.J. Zwarts

    2010-01-01

    Background: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) is known as a demyelinating hereditary neuropathy. Secondary axonal dysfunction is the most important determinant of disease severity. In adult patients, clinical progression may be because of further axonal deterioration as was shown with comp

  11. Age-related changes in motor unit number estimates in adult patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, J.P. van; Verhamme, C.; Schaik, I.N. van; Schelhaas, H.J.; Mans, E.; Bour, L.J.; Stegeman, D.F.; Zwarts, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) is known as a demyelinating hereditary neuropathy. Secondary axonal dysfunction is the most important determinant of disease severity. In adult patients, clinical progression may be because of further axonal deterioration as was shown with comp

  12. The stretcher spontaneous neurodegenerative mutation models Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4D [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/8c

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Chandler

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Mice affected by a spontaneous mutation which arose within our colony exhibited a neuromuscular phenotype involving tremor and characteristic stretching of the rear limbs. The mutant, named stretcher, was used to breed a backcross cohort for genetic mapping studies. The gene responsible for the mutant phenotype was mapped to a small region on mouse chromosome 15, with a LOD score above 20. Candidate genes within the region included the Ndrg1 gene. Examination of this gene in the mutant mouse strain revealed that exons 10 to 14 had been deleted. Mutations in the human orthologue are known to result in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4D (CMT4D a severe early-onset disorder involving Schwann cell dysfunction and extensive demyelination. The stretcher mutant mouse is more severely affected than mice in which the Ndrg1 gene had been knocked out by homologous recombination. Our results demonstrate that the Ndrg1str mutation provides a new model for CMT4D, and demonstrate that exons 10 to 14 of Ndrg1 encode amino acids crucial to the appropriate function of Ndrg1 in the central nervous system.

  13. Localization of a gene (CMT2A) for autosomal dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 to chromosome 1p and evidence of genetic heterogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Othmane, K.B.; Loprest, L.J.; Wilkinson, K.M. (Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)); Middleton, L.T. (Cyprus Institute of Neurology and Genetics, Nicosia (Cyprus)) (and others)

    1993-08-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease type 2 (CMT2) is an inherited peripheral neuropathy characterized by variable age of onset and normal or slightly diminished nerve conduction velocity. CMT2 is pathologically and genetically distinct from CMT type 1 (CMT1). While CMT1 has been shown to be genetically heterogeneous, no chromosomal localization has been established for CMT2. The authors have performed pedigree linkage analysis in six large autosomal dominant CMT2 families and have demonstrated linkage and heterogeneity to a series of microsatellites (D1S160, D1S170, D1S244, D1S228 and D1S199) in the distal region of the short arm of chromosome 1. Significant evidence for heterogeneity was found using admixture analyses and the two-point lod scores. Admixture analyses using the multipoint results for the markers D1S244, D1S228, and D1S199 supported the two-point findings. Three families, DUK662, DUK1241, and 1523 gave posterior probabilities of 1.0, 0.98, and 0.88 of being of the linked type. Multipoint analysis examining the [open quotes]linked[close quotes] families showed that the most favored location for the CMT2A gene is within the interval flanked by D1S244 and D1S228 (odds approximately 70:1 of lying within versus outside that interval). These findings suggest that the CMT2 phenotype is secondary to at least two different genes and demonstrate further heterogeneity in the CMT phenotype.

  14. Electrophysiological Evaluation of Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth Type 1: Dispersion and Correlation Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Ji Hyuk; Kim, Hye Jeong; Lee, Eun Ryeong

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to analyze and compare electrophysiological characteristics observed in nerve conduction studies (NCS) of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 (CMT 1). [Subjects] A differential diagnosis of acquired and congenital demyelinating neuropathies was based on a study of 35 patients with NCS-confirmed CIDP and 30 patients with CMT 1 genetically proven by peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP-22) gene anal...

  15. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: frequency of genetic subtypes and guidelines for genetic testing.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Sinead M

    2012-07-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of diseases with approximately 45 different causative genes described. The aims of this study were to determine the frequency of different genes in a large cohort of patients with CMT and devise guidelines for genetic testing in practice.

  16. Molecular analyses of unrelated Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease patients suggest a high frequency of the CMTIA duplication.

    OpenAIRE

    Wise, C A; GARCIA, C. A.; Davis, S.N.; Heju, Z; Pentao, L; Patel, P.I.; Lupski, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most common inherited peripheral neuropathy. One form of CMT, CMT type 1A, is characterized by uniformly decreased nerve conduction velocities, usually shows autosomal dominant inheritance, and is associated with a large submicroscopic duplication of the p11.2-p12 region of chromosome 17. A cohort of 75 unrelated patients diagnosed clinically with CMT and evaluated by electrophysiological methods were analyzed molecularly for the presence of the CMT1A ...

  17. Motor axon loss is associated with hand dysfunction in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease 1a.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Videler, A.J.; Dijk, J.P. van; Beelen, A.; Visser, M. de; Nollet, F.; Schaik, I.N. van

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Charcot Marie Tooth type 1a (CMT1a) is a primarily demyelinating neuropathy, characterized by slowly progressive muscle weakness, atrophy, and sensory loss, and is most pronounced in both feet and hands. There is increasing evidence that muscle weakness is determined by motor axonal dysf

  18. A novel synonymous mutation in the MPZ gene causing an aberrant splicing pattern and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrado, L; Magri, S; Bagarotti, A; Carecchio, M; Piscosquito, G; Pareyson, D; Varrasi, C; Vecchio, D; Zonta, A; Cantello, R; Taroni, F; D'Alfonso, S

    2016-08-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is an inherited peripheral neuropathy with a heterogeneous genetic background. Here, we describe two CMT1B families with a mild sensory-motor neuropathy and a novel synonymous variant (c.309G > T, p.G103G) in exon 3 of the MPZ gene. Next generation sequencing analysis on a 94 CMT gene panel showed no mutations in other disease genes. In vitro splicing assay and mRNA expression analysis indicated that the c.309T variant enhances a cryptic donor splice site at position c.304 resulting in the markedly increased expression of the r.304_448del alternative transcript in patients' cells. This transcript is predicted to encode a truncated P0 protein (p.V102Cfs11*) lacking the transmembrane domain, thus suggesting a possible haploinsufficiency mechanism for this mutation. This is the third reported synonymous MPZ variant associated with CMT1 and affecting splicing. These data confirm the functional impact of synonymous variants on MPZ splicing and their possible role as disease-causing mutations rather than silent polymorphisms. PMID:27344971

  19. Selected items from the Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) Neuropathy Score and secondary clinical outcome measures serve as sensitive clinical markers of disease severity in CMT1A patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Mannil, M.; Solari, A.; Leha, A.; Pelayo-Negro, A. L.; Berciano, J; Schlotter-Weigel, B.; Walter, M.C.; Rautenstrauss, B.; Schnizer, T. J.; Schenone, A.; Seeman, P; Kadian, C.; Schreiber, O.; Angarita, N. G.; Fabrizi, G.M.

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates primary and secondary clinical outcome measures in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) with regard to their contribution towards discrimination of disease severity. The nine components of the composite Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease Neuropathy Score and six additional secondary clinical outcome measures were assessed in 479 adult patients with genetically proven CMT1A and 126 healthy controls. Using hierarchical clustering, we identified four significant clusters of ...

  20. SMN gene analysis of the spinal form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Hanash, A.; LeGuern, E.; Birouk, N; Clermont, O; Pouget, J; Bouche, P; Munnich, A; Brice, A; Melki, J

    1997-01-01

    The spinal form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (spinal CMT) is a rare genetic disorder of the peripheral nervous system, the genetic basis of which remains unknown. To test the hypothesis that a defect of survival motor neuron (SMN), the determining gene for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), would result in spinal CMT, 18 unrelated spinal CMT patients were studied. Nine of them were sporadic cases and the other nine belonged to unrelated autosomal dominant pedigrees. None of the 18 patients show...

  1. Outcome measures for Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: clinical and neurofunctional assessment in children

    OpenAIRE

    Pagliano, Emanuela; Moroni, Isabella; Baranello, Giovanni; Magro, Anita; Marchi, Alessia; Bulgheroni, Sara; Ferrarin, Maurizio; Pareyson, Davide

    2011-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the most common inherited neuromuscular disorder, presenting with symptoms often occurring since childhood, and showing a progressive course. At present, there are no valid and reliable measures for evaluation of impairment and disability in the pediatric population. The aim of this study was to determine the usefulness of outcome measures, commonly used in adult patients, in CMT children. We report the results of a comprehensive evaluation of 21 children ...

  2. Copy number variations are a rare cause of non-CMT1A Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Jia; Wu, Xingyao; Montenegro, Gladys; Price, Justin; Wang, GaoFeng; Vance, Jeffery M.; Shy, Michael E.; Züchner, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary peripheral neuropathies present a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous entities. All known forms, including the various forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) are characterized as Mendelian traits and over 35 genes have been identified thus far. The mutational mechanism of the most common CMT type, CMT1A, is a 1.5 Mb chromosomal duplication at 17p12 that contains the gene PMP22. Only recently it has been realized that such copy number variants (CNV) are a widesprea...

  3. Oral Health, Temporomandibular Disorder, and Masticatory Performance in Patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth Type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rejane L. S. Rezende

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this study was to evaluate the oral health status of temporomandibular disorders (TMD and bruxism, as well as to measure masticatory performance of subjects with Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2 (CMT2. Methods and Results. The average number of decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT for both groups, control (CG and CMT2, was considered low (CG = 2.46; CMT2 = 1.85, P=0.227. The OHIP-14 score was considered low (CG = 2.86, CMT2 = 5.83, P=0.899. The prevalence of self-reported TMD was 33.3% and 38.9% (P=0.718 in CG and CMT2 respectively and for self-reported bruxism was 4.8% (CG and 22.2% (CMT2, without significant difference between groups (P=0.162. The most common clinical sign of TMD was masseter (CG = 38.1%; CMT2 = 66.7% and temporalis (CG = 19.0%; GCMT2 = 33.3% muscle pain. The geometric mean diameter (GMD was not significantly different between groups (CG = 4369; CMT2 = 4627, P=0.157. Conclusion. We conclude that the CMT2 disease did not negatively have influence either on oral health status in the presence and severity of TMD and bruxism or on masticatory performance.

  4. Sport activity in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: A case study of a Paralympic swimmer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vita, Giuseppe; La Foresta, Stefania; Russo, Massimo; Vita, Gian Luca; Messina, Sonia; Lunetta, Christian; Mazzeo, Anna

    2016-09-01

    This study reports the positive physical, emotional and psychosocial changes induced by sport activity in a Paralympic swimmer with Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) type 4A. When we compared evaluations before initiating sport activity with those after five years of competitive activity, we found: i) increased proximal muscles strength of upper limbs; ii) augmented ability to propel wheelchair independently; iii) improved quality of life; iv) reduced trait anxiety and striking improvement of depression; v) enhanced self-esteem. Longitudinal studies in large cohorts to evaluate the positive effects of sport activity are needed to support provision of evidence-based advice to patients and families. PMID:27460291

  5. Reliability of the CMT neuropathy score (second version) in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Sinéad M

    2011-09-01

    The Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy score (CMTNS) is a reliable and valid composite score comprising symptoms, signs, and neurophysiological tests, which has been used in natural history studies of CMT1A and CMT1X and as an outcome measure in treatment trials of CMT1A. Following an international workshop on outcome measures in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), the CMTNS was modified to attempt to reduce floor and ceiling effects and to standardize patient assessment, aiming to improve its sensitivity for detecting change over time and the effect of an intervention. After agreeing on the modifications made to the CMTNS (CMTNS2), three examiners evaluated 16 patients to determine inter-rater reliability; one examiner evaluated 18 patients twice within 8 weeks to determine intra-rater reliability. Three examiners evaluated 63 patients using the CMTNS and the CMTNS2 to determine how the modifications altered scoring. For inter- and intra-rater reliability, intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) were ≥0.96 for the CMT symptom score and the CMT examination score. There were small but significant differences in some of the individual components of the CMTNS compared with the CMTNS2, mainly in the components that had been modified the most. A longitudinal study is in progress to determine whether the CMTNS2 is more sensitive than the CMTNS for detecting change over time.

  6. Coexistent Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A and type 2 diabetes mellitus neuropathies in a Chinese family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A-ping Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A is caused by duplication of the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22 gene on chromosome 17. It is the most common inherited demyelinating neuropathy. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a common metabolic disorder that frequently causes predominantly sensory neuropathy. In this study, we report the occurrence of CMT1A in a Chinese family affected by type 2 diabetes mellitus. In this family, seven individuals had duplication of the PMP22 gene, although only four had clinical features of polyneuropathy. All CMT1A patients with a clinical phenotype also presented with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The other three individuals had no signs of CMT1A or type 2 diabetes mellitus. We believe that there may be a genetic link between these two diseases.

  7. Exclusive expression of the Rab11 effector SH3TC2 in Schwann cells links integrin-α6 and myelin maintenance to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijay, Sauparnika; Chiu, Meagan; Dacks, Joel B; Roberts, Rhys C

    2016-07-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4C (CMT4C) is one of the commonest autosomal recessive inherited peripheral neuropathies and is associated with mutations in the Rab11 effector, SH3TC2. Disruption of the SH3TC2-Rab11 interaction is the molecular abnormality underlying this disease. However, why SH3TC2 mutations cause an isolated demyelinating neuropathy remains unanswered. Here we show that SH3TC2 is an exclusive Schwann cell protein expressed late in myelination and is downregulated following denervation suggesting a functional role in myelin sheath maintenance. We support our data with an evolutionary cell biological analysis showing that the SH3TC2 gene, and its paralogue SH3TC1, are derived from an ancestral homologue, the duplication of which occurred in the common ancestor of jawed vertebrates, coincident with the appearance of Schwann cells and peripheral axon myelination. Furthermore, we report that SH3TC2 associates with integrin-α6, suggesting that aberrant Rab11-dependent endocytic trafficking of this critical laminin receptor in myelinated Schwann cells is connected to the demyelination seen in affected nerves. Our study therefore highlights the inherent evolutionary link between SH3TC2 and peripheral nerve myelination, pointing also towards a molecular mechanism underlying the specific demyelinating neuropathy that characterizes CMT4C. PMID:27068304

  8. Causes of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... does, and it isn’t contagious. It’s hereditary, meaning that it can be passed down through a ... easy to recognize in the family tree. In contrast, X-linked or autosomal recessive types of CMT ...

  9. Anesthetic Management of a Patient With Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshita, Naohiro; Oka, Saeko; Tsuji, Kaname; Yoshida, Hiroaki; Morita, Shosuke; Momota, Yoshihiro; Tsutsumi, Yasuo M

    2016-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTD) is a hereditary peripheral neuropathy and is characterized by progressive muscle atrophy and motor-sensory disorders in all 4 limbs. Most reports have indicated that major challenges with general anesthetic administration in CMTD patients are the appropriate use of nondepolarizing muscle relaxants and preparation for malignant hyperthermia in neuromuscular disease. Moderate sedation may be associated with the same complications as those of general anesthesia, as well as dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system, reduced perioperative respiratory function, difficulty in positioning, and sensitivity to intravenous anesthetic agents. We decided to use intravenous sedation in a CMTD patient and administered midazolam initially and propofol continuously, with total doses of 1.5 mg and 300 mg, respectively. Anesthesia was completed in 3 hours and 30 minutes without adverse events. We suggest that dental anesthetic treatment with propofol and midazolam may be effective for patients with CMTD. PMID:27269665

  10. Genetic dysfunction of MT-ATP6 causes axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pitceathly, Robert D S

    2012-09-11

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the most common inherited neuromuscular disorder, affecting 1 in 2,500 individuals. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are not generally considered within the differential diagnosis of patients with uncomplicated inherited neuropathy, despite the essential requirement of ATP for axonal function. We identified the mtDNA mutation m.9185T>C in MT-ATP6, encoding the ATP6 subunit of the mitochondrial ATP synthase (OXPHOS complex V), at homoplasmic levels in a family with mitochondrial disease in whom a severe motor axonal neuropathy was a striking feature. This led us to hypothesize that mutations in the 2 mtDNA complex V subunit encoding genes, MT-ATP6 and MT-ATP8, might be an unrecognized cause of isolated axonal CMT and distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN).

  11. Next-generation sequencing and genetic diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Verma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Over 70 different Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT–associated genes have now been discovered and their number is growing. Conventional genetic testing for all CMT genes is cumbersome, expensive, and impractical in an individual patient. Next-generation sequencing (NGS technology allows cost-effective sequencing of large scale DNA, even entire exome (coding sequences or whole genome and thus, NGS platform can be employed to effectively target a large number or all CMT-related genes for accurate diagnosis. This overview discusses how NGS can be strategically used for genetic diagnosis in patients with CMT or unexplained neuropathy. A comment is made to combine simple clinical and electrophysiological algorithm to assign patients to major CMT subtypes and then employ NGS to screen for all known mutations in the subtype-specific CMT gene panel.

  12. Pé cavo adquirido na doença de Charcot-Marie-Tooth Acquired pes cavus in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Augusto Carvalho Maranho

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available As neuropatias sensitivomotoras hereditárias, principalmente a doença de Charcot-Marie-Tooth, manifestam-se frequentemente com o aparecimento de pé cavovaro, deformidade caracterizada pela acentuação fixa do arco plantar e inversão do retropé. O diagnóstico da doença de base e a cuidadosa avaliação do paciente fornecem os elementos-chave para decisão do tratamento. O cavo pode situar-se no antepé, retropé ou ser o resultado da associação das duas localizações. Deformidades combinadas, principalmente varismo e garras dos artelhos, devem ser bem avaliadas; as características clínicas como grau das alterações, acometimento da força muscular, flexibilidade e idade são fatores importantes para a decisão da conduta. O tratamento conservador do pé cavovaro por meio de fisioterapia, palmilhas e adaptação nos calçados é reservado ao paciente mais jovem ou casos levemente acometidos. Entretanto, há tendência de agravamento das deformidades devido à característica progressiva da doença neurológica de base. Assim, o tratamento cirúrgico pelas técnicas clássicas é indicado precocemente, sendo importante identificar as alterações primárias, diferenciá-las das secundárias e corrigi-las, se possível. As transferências musculares são usadas no sentido de minimizar o desequilíbrio, estruturas retraídas são seccionadas ou alongadas e osteotomias localizadas devem ser preferíveis às artrodeses, que são reservadas para pés rígidos e muito deformados de pacientes adultos.Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies, especially Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, are frequently expressed with an acquired cavusvarus foot which is characterized by a fixed increase of the plantar arch and hindfoot inversion. Diagnosis of the underlying condition achieved through careful patient assessment and local evaluations is the keystone for decision-making about the adequate treatment. The cavus may present as an isolated deformity of

  13. Flexor digitorum superficialis opposition tendon transfer improves hand function in children with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: Case series

    OpenAIRE

    Estilow, T.; Kozin, S.H.; Glanzman, A. M.; Burns, J; Finkel, R.S.

    2012-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease limits hand function. Tendon transfer has not been reported in pediatric CMT. We report two severely affected children following long finger flexor digitorum superficialis opposition tendon transfer. Improvement was noted in palmar abduction, (30°/40°), opposition, (thumb to all digits), and acquisition of pincer, palmar, and lateral pinch with measureable force (1 lb). Dexterity testing improved on the 9 Hole Peg Test (1.03 s/77 s, 22 s) and Functional Dexterity T...

  14. X inactivation in females with X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Sinéad M

    2012-07-01

    X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT1X) is the second most common inherited neuropathy, caused by mutations in gap junction beta-1 (GJB1). Males have a uniformly moderately severe phenotype while females have a variable phenotype, suggested to be due to X inactivation. We aimed to assess X inactivation pattern in females with CMT1X and correlate this with phenotype using the CMT examination score to determine whether the X inactivation pattern accounted for the variable phenotype in females with CMT1X. We determined X inactivation pattern in 67 females with CMT1X and 24 controls using the androgen receptor assay. We were able to determine which X chromosome carried the GJB1 mutation in 30 females. There was no difference in X inactivation pattern between patients and controls. In addition, there was no correlation between X inactivation pattern in blood and phenotype. A possible explanation for these findings is that the X inactivation pattern in Schwann cells rather than in blood may explain the variable phenotype in females with CMT1X.

  15. [Treatment for Patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease: Orthopaedic Aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kota

    2016-01-01

    The orthopedic manifestations in patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease include deformity and dysfunction of the extremities and spine. Conservative treatment is the first choice. Orthosis and rehabilitation can improve function, and are important for the prevention of joint contractures. Foot problems are most commonly observed and require surgical treatment. Foot deformities include pes cavus, cavovarus, claw toes, or drop foot. Single or combined surgeries selected for soft tissues are plantar release, tendon transfer, or Achilles tendon lengthening, and those for bones are osteotomies and joint fusions. The upper limb initially demonstrates loss of power of the intrinsic hand muscles followed by symmetrical atrophy of the forearm muscle groups. The typical hand deformity is claw hand. Tendon transfer, joint fusion, soft tissue release, or nerve decompression procedures are performed for correction of hand deformities. Acetabular dysplasia in the hip joints is sometimes observed and osteotomy is selected as surgical treatment in such cases. The associated spinal deformity is scoliosis with or without kyphosis. Similar to treatment of idiopathic scoliosis, posterior spinal fusion is performed in patients with progressive spinal deformities. PMID:26764299

  16. Doença de Charcot-Marie-Tooth: estudos eletromiográficos em 45 pacientes Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: electromyographic studies in 45 cases

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos R. G. de freitas; Nascimento, Osvaldo J.M.; Maria T. Nevares; Tânia M. Escada

    1995-01-01

    Foi realizada eletroneuromiografia em 45 pacientes com doença de Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT). A classificação em tipo I e tipo II da doença de CMT foi feita com base na neurocondução motora do mediano e do ulnar. Assim 11 pacientes eram do tipo I e 34 eram do tipo II. No tipo I não houve relação entre a queda da VCN motora do ulnar e mediano com o quadro clínico da doença. Devido a ausência do potencial de ação sensitivo (PAS) do nervo sural em muitos casos, achamos impossível a classificação d...

  17. A locus-specific database for mutations in GDAP1 allows analysis of genotype-phenotype correlations in Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases type 4A and 2K

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassereau Julien

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein 1 gene (GDAP1, which is involved in the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT, the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy, encodes a protein anchored to the mitochondrial outer membrane. The phenotypic presentations of patients carrying GDAP1 mutations are heterogeneous, making it difficult to determine genotype-phenotype correlations, since the majority of the mutations have been found in only a few unrelated patients. Locus-specific databases (LSDB established in the framework of the Human Variome Project provide powerful tools for the investigation of such rare diseases. Methods and Results We report the development of a publicly accessible LSDB for the GDAP1 gene. The GDAP1 LSDB has adopted the Leiden Open-source Variation Database (LOVD software platform. This database, which now contains 57 unique variants reported in 179 cases of CMT, offers a detailed description of the molecular, clinical and electrophysiological data of the patients. The usefulness of the GDAP1 database is illustrated by the finding that GDAP1 mutations lead to primary axonal damage in CMT, with secondary demyelination in the more severe cases of the disease. Conclusion Findings of this nature should lead to a better understanding of the pathophysiology of CMT. Finally, the GDAP1 LSDB, which is part of the mitodyn.org portal of databases of genes incriminated in disorders involving mitochondrial dynamics and bioenergetics, should yield new insights into mitochondrial diseases.

  18. Genetics of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT Disease within the Frame of the Human Genome Project Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Timmerman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT neuropathies comprise a group of monogenic disorders affecting the peripheral nervous system. CMT is characterized by a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neuropathies, involving all types of Mendelian inheritance patterns. Over 1,000 different mutations have been discovered in 80 disease-associated genes. Genetic research of CMT has pioneered the discovery of genomic disorders and aided in understanding the effects of copy number variation and the mechanisms of genomic rearrangements. CMT genetic study also unraveled common pathomechanisms for peripheral nerve degeneration, elucidated gene networks, and initiated the development of therapeutic approaches. The reference genome, which became available thanks to the Human Genome Project, and the development of next generation sequencing tools, considerably accelerated gene and mutation discoveries. In fact, the first clinical whole genome sequence was reported in a patient with CMT. Here we review the history of CMT gene discoveries, starting with technologies from the early days in human genetics through the high-throughput application of modern DNA analyses. We highlight the most relevant examples of CMT genes and mutation mechanisms, some of which provide promising treatment strategies. Finally, we propose future initiatives to accelerate diagnosis of CMT patients through new ways of sharing large datasets and genetic variants, and at ever diminishing costs.

  19. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease and dilated cardiomyopathy. A rare combination. Enfermedad de Charcot-Marie-Tooth y miocardiopatía dilatada. Una rara asociación.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Pila Pérez

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available

    Se presenta el caso de un paciente de 50 años de edad, con 14 años de evolución de manifestaciones clínicas, destacándose las alteraciones musculoesqueléticas de los cuatro miembros con atrofia de las prominencias tenar e hipotenar y de la musculatura de ambas piernas. Se destacó la presencia de alteraciones sensitivas en miembros inferiores con distribución en calcetín, atrofia, atonía, arreflexia y marcha equina. Desde el punto de vista cardiaco, el paciente presentaba un fibriloaleteo. La radiografía de tórax mostró un aumento marcado del área cardiaca y la ecocardiografía puso de manifiesto una miocardiopatía dilatada. El estudio histopatológico confirmó la presencia de la enfermedad de Charcot-Marie-Tooth asociada a miocardiopatía dilatada. El diagnóstico se basó en las características clínicas, la velocidad de conducción motora, y el estudio histopatológico, que demostró desmielinización con lesiones en “cebolla”, si bien faltaron los estudios genéticos. La enfermedad de Charcot-Marie-Tooth es una enfermedad rara; aproximadamente un 60 % de los pacientes que la padecen, son portadores de una duplicación del cromosoma 17. Por ello, se consideró oportuno transmitir la experiencia de este caso.

    The case of a 50 years old male patient is presented. Along 14 years of clinical evolution, four limbs musculoskeletal disorders with atrophy of the thenar and hypothenar prominences and muscles of both legs had been emphasized. The presence of sensory impairment in lower limbs with stocking distribution, atrophy, weakness, areflexia and equine gait were very peculiar in this case. From the cardiac point of view, the patient presented a fibrillation/flutter. Chest radiography showed a marked increase in the cardiac area and echocardiography revealed dilated cardiomyopathy. Histopathological examination confirmed the presence of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease associated with dilated cardiomyopathy. While genetic

  20. Neurophysiological performance of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type 1)%脱髓鞘型腓骨肌萎缩症的神经电生理表现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王娆; 诸寅; 杨卓; 王丽华; 杨昀; 张珍珍

    2013-01-01

    Objective To find out the neurophysiological performance of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) type 1,and provide examination basis for clinical diagnosis and Ureatment of the disease.Methods Sixty-two patients with CMT of HMSN type 1,admitted to our hospital from January 2011 to December 2012 were chosen in our study; the nerve conduction velocity,including motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) and sensory nerve conduction velocity (SNCV),and electromyogram (EMG) of these patients were examined.All the test results were analyzed statistically.Results MNCV in different nerves could not be detected in 35 patients,counting for 56.5%; removing the cases that MNCV not being elicited,average test results of tibial nerve,common peroneal nerve and median nerve MNCV were (23.48±9.60) m/s,(26.35±9.14) m/s and (30.07±12.19) m/s.SNCV in different nerves could not be detected in 50 patients,counting for 80.6%; removing the cases that SNCV not being elicited,average test results of common peroneal nerve and median nerve MNCV were (28.06±10.32) m/s and (31.20±12.05) m/s.Totally,175 muscles were inspected by EMG; among them,109 neurogenic muscles were determined,counting for 62.3%; 14 muscles were diagnosed as having suspect neurogenic damage,counting for 8.0%; 52 normal muscles were noted,counting for 29.7 %.There were 53 of neurogenic damages in 62 cases,counting for 85.5%; among them,the distal neurogenic muscles damages were in 47 cases; while proximal neurogenic muscle damages were in 11 cases.Conclusion The neurophysiological manifestations of CMT patients of HMSN type 1 are different and changes following the patient's age,duration and examination site.%目的 分析脱髓鞘型(HMSN 1型)腓骨肌萎缩症的神经电生理表现,为该疾病的临床诊断治疗提供检查依据.方法 选取自2011年1月至2012年12月北京积水潭医院收治的62例HMSN 1型腓骨肌萎缩症患者,行神经传导

  1. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease and dilated cardiomyopathy. A rare combination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Pila Pérez

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta el caso de un paciente de 50 años de edad, con 14 años de evolución de manifestaciones clínicas, destacándose las alteraciones musculoesqueléticas de los cuatro miembros con atrofia de las prominencias tenar e hipotenar y de la musculatura de ambas piernas. Se destacó la presencia de alteraciones sensitivas en miembros inferiores con distribución en calcetín, atrofia, atonía, arreflexia y marcha equina. Desde el punto de vista cardiaco, el paciente presentaba un fibriloaleteo. La radiografía de tórax mostró un aumento marcado del área cardiaca y la ecocardiografía puso de manifiesto una miocardiopatía dilatada. El estudio histopatológico confirmó la presencia de la enfermedad de Charcot-Marie-Tooth asociada a miocardiopatía dilatada. El diagnóstico se basó en las características clínicas, la velocidad de conducción motora, y el estudio histopatológico, que demostró desmielinización con lesiones en “cebolla”, si bien faltaron los estudios genéticos. La enfermedad de Charcot-Marie-Tooth es una enfermedad rara; aproximadamente un 60 % de los pacientes que la padecen, son portadores de una duplicación del cromosoma 17. Por ello, se consideró oportuno transmitir la experiencia de este caso.

  2. Distribución Espacial de la Enfermedad Charcot- Marie-Tooth en Costa Rica, 1990-2003 Spatial Distribution of the Charcot-Marie- Tooth Disease in Costa Rica,1990-2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger E Bonilla

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Evaluar la distribución espacial como indicador de la incidencia de la enfermedad de Charcot-Marie-Tooth por los egresos hospitalarios reportados en Costa Rica entre el período 1990-2003. Métodos: Se aplicó un rastreo estadístico espacial de la incidencia de la enfermedad y se evaluó la significancia estadística de los conglomerados con excesos de casos. Resultados: El exceso de casos observados de la enfermedad en la zona de Naranjo fue estadísticamente significativo (56 versus 26.3 p Objective: To evaluate the spatial distribution of Charcot- Marie-Tooth disease as indicator of incidence in Costa Rica between 1990-2003. Methods: A spatial statistical scan was performed for the CMT incidence. We evaluated the statistical significance of high rate clusters. Results: The excess of observed cases of the disease in the area of Naranjo was statistically significant (56 vs. 26.3 p <0.05. Other regions showing significant excess of cases of CMT are: Tibás (33 vs. 13.5, Alajuela Centro (20 vs. 6, Turrialba Centro (16 vs. 4.5, Golfito (18 vs. 5.6 and Puntarenas Centro (9 vs. 1.5. Discussion: Spatial statistical scan is proposed as a tool in the decision making process in order to reduce the incidence of the disease and respond appropriately to those affected by CMT and their families. The method identifies clusters where it is necessary to focus efforts in evaluating the incidence of the disease.

  3. Diagnostic laboratory testing for Charcot Marie Tooth disease (CMT): the spectrum of gene defects in Norwegian patients with CMT and its implications for future genetic test strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Østern, Rune André Helland; Fagerheim, Toril; Hjellnes, Helene; Nygård, Bjørn; Mellgren, Svein Ivar; Nilssen, Øivind

    2013-01-01

    Background Current genetic test algorithms for Charcot Marie Tooth (CMT) disease are based on family details and comprehensive clinical and neurophysiological data gathered under ideal conditions for clinical assessment. However, in a diagnostic laboratory setting relying on external test requisitions and patient samples, such conditions are not always met. Our objective was therefore to perform a retrospective evaluation of the data given in laboratory request forms and to assess their quali...

  4. Hereditaer motorisk sensorisk neuropati (Charcot-Marie-Tooths sygdom). Molekyloergenetiske aspekter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, M J; Børglum, Anders; Brandt, C A; Bisgård, C

    1995-01-01

    Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) comprises a heterogenous group of peripheral neuropathies which are classified on the basis of symptoms, mode of inheritance and electrophysiological and neuropathological investigations. HMSN type I, or Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) type 1, is a...

  5. DGAT2 Mutation in a Family with Autosomal-Dominant Early-Onset Axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Young Bin; Kang, Junghee; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jinho; Kwak, Geon; Hyun, Young Se; Nam, Soo Hyun; Hong, Hyun Dae; Choi, Yu-Ri; Jung, Sung-Chul; Koo, Heasoo; Lee, Ji Eun; Choi, Byung-Ok; Chung, Ki Wha

    2016-05-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most common inherited peripheral neuropathy and is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous disorder. We examined a Korean family in which two individuals had an autosomal-dominant axonal CMT with early-onset, sensory ataxia, tremor, and slow disease progression. Pedigree analysis and exome sequencing identified a de novo missense mutation (p.Y223H) in the diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 2 (DGAT2) gene. DGAT2 encodes an endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrial-associated membrane protein, acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase, which catalyzes the final step of the triglyceride (TG) biosynthesis pathway. The patient showed consistently decreased serum TG levels, and overexpression of the mutant DGAT2 significantly inhibited the proliferation of mouse motor neuron cells. Moreover, the variant form of human DGAT2 inhibited the axonal branching in the peripheral nervous system of zebrafish. We suggest that mutation of DGAT2 is the novel underlying cause of an autosomal-dominant axonal CMT2 neuropathy. This study will help provide a better understanding of the pathophysiology of axonal CMT and contribute to the molecular diagnostics of peripheral neuropathies. PMID:26786738

  6. PLEKHG5 deficiency leads to an intermediate form of autosomal-recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzedine, Hamid; Zavadakova, Petra; Planté-Bordeneuve, Violaine; Vaz Pato, Maria; Pinto, Nuno; Bartesaghi, Luca; Zenker, Jennifer; Poirot, Olivier; Bernard-Marissal, Nathalie; Arnaud Gouttenoire, Estelle; Cartoni, Romain; Title, Alexandra; Venturini, Giulia; Médard, Jean-Jacques; Makowski, Edward; Schöls, Ludger; Claeys, Kristl G; Stendel, Claudia; Roos, Andreas; Weis, Joachim; Dubourg, Odile; Leal Loureiro, José; Stevanin, Giovanni; Said, Gérard; Amato, Anthony; Baraban, Jay; LeGuern, Eric; Senderek, Jan; Rivolta, Carlo; Chrast, Roman

    2013-10-15

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) comprises a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of peripheral neuropathies characterized by progressive distal muscle weakness and atrophy, foot deformities and distal sensory loss. Following the analysis of two consanguineous families affected by a medium to late-onset recessive form of intermediate CMT, we identified overlapping regions of homozygosity on chromosome 1p36 with a combined maximum LOD score of 5.4. Molecular investigation of the genes from this region allowed identification of two homozygous mutations in PLEKHG5 that produce premature stop codons and are predicted to result in functional null alleles. Analysis of Plekhg5 in the mouse revealed that this gene is expressed in neurons and glial cells of the peripheral nervous system, and that knockout mice display reduced nerve conduction velocities that are comparable with those of affected individuals from both families. Interestingly, a homozygous PLEKHG5 missense mutation was previously reported in a recessive form of severe childhood onset lower motor neuron disease (LMND) leading to loss of the ability to walk and need for respiratory assistance. Together, these observations indicate that different mutations in PLEKHG5 lead to clinically diverse outcomes (intermediate CMT or LMND) affecting the function of neurons and glial cells. PMID:23777631

  7. A Novel Mutation of GDAP1 Associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease in An Iranian Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmaeel MOHAMMADI PARGOO

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available As a result of higher distributed consanguinity in the Mediterranean region and the Middle East, autosomal-recessive forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (ARCMT are more common in these areas. CMT disease caused by mutations in the ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein 1 (GDAP1 gene is a severe autosomal recessive neuropathy resulting in either demyelinating CMT4A neuropathy or axonal neuropathy with vocal cord paresis. The patient was an 8-year-old boy with AR inheritance that showed some delayed achievement of motor milestones, including walking, also bilateral foot drop, wasting of distal muscles in the legs, pes cavus and marked weakness of the foot dorsiflexors. He had no hoarseness or vocal cord paralysis. Total genomic DNA was extracted from whole peripheral blood of the patient and his family by using standard procedures. PCR- sequencing method were used to analysis the whole coding regions of the GDAP1 gene. A novel homozygote insertion of T nucleotide in codon 34 was detected (c.100_101insT that probably led to an early stop codon. This mutation may be associated with a common haplotype, suggesting a common ancestor that needs further investigation in the Iranian population.

  8. Thr(118Met amino acid substitution in the peripheral myelin protein 22 does not influence the clinical phenotype of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A due to the 17p11.2-p12 duplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Marques Jr.

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The Thr(118Met substitution in the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22 gene has been detected in a number of families with demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT1 neuropathy or with the hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy, but in none of them has it consistently segregated with the peripheral neuropathy. We describe here a CMT1 family (a 63-year-old man, his brother and his niece in which two mutations on different chromosomes were found in the PMP22 gene, the 17p duplication, detected by fluorescent semiquantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR of microsatellite markers localized within the duplicated region on chromosome 17p11.2-p12, and the Thr(118Met substitution, detected by direct sequencing the four coding exons of the PMP22 gene. A genotype/phenotype correlation study showed that the neuropathy segregates with the duplication and that the amino acid substitution does not seem to modify the clinical characteristics or the severity of the peripheral neuropathy. We did not find any evidence to characterize this substitution as a polymorphism in the population studied and we propose that the high frequency reported for this point mutation in the literature suggests that the Thr(118Met substitution may be a hotspot for mutations in the PMP22 gene.

  9. Efficacy of focal mechanic vibration treatment on balance in Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A disease: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazzaglia, Costanza; Camerota, F; Germanotta, M; Di Sipio, E; Celletti, C; Padua, L

    2016-07-01

    Patients affected by Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease experience an impaired balance. Although the causes of the postural instability are not fully understood, somatosensory system seems to play a key role. Mechanical vibration seems to act on the somatosensory system and to improve its function. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of focal mechanical vibration (fMV) on the balance of CMT 1A patients. We enrolled 14 genetically confirmed CMT 1A patients (8 female and 6 male, mean age 492 years, range 32-74, mean duration of disease: 13 years, range 1-30). Patients underwent a 3-day fMV treatment on quadriceps and triceps surae and were evaluated before the treatment as well as 1 week and 1 month after the end of the treatment. The primary outcome measure was the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and the secondary were the Dynamic Gait Index (DGI), the 6 Min Walking Test (6MWT), the muscular strength of lower limbs, the Quality of Life (QoL) questionnaire and the stabilometric variables. The statistical analysis showed a significant modification of the BBS due to the effect of treatment (p CMT 1A patients determined an improvement of balance as detected by the BBS. The concurrent improvement of stabilometric variables in the eyes closed condition only suggests that fMV acts mostly on somatosensory afferences. Further studies are needed to confirm these data on a larger sample of CMT patients. PMID:27177999

  10. Efeitos do uso de órteses na Doença de Charcot-Marie-Tooth: atualização da literatura Orthoses effects in Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease: update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouse Barbosa Pereira

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A Doença de Charcot-Marie-Tooth (DCMT é a neuropatia periférica hereditária mais comum em seres humanos, apresentando incidência de 1:2.500 pessoas. A fraqueza distal crural na DCMT provoca inúmeras alterações na marcha, como, por exemplo, na velocidade, no comprimento, na largura e cadência dos passos. Vários recursos em reabilitação têm sido propostos para gerenciar os problemas de deambulação, dentre eles, destaca-se a utilização de órteses. O objetivo deste estudo é apresentar e discutir os resultados de estudos sobre os efeitos da utilização de órteses nos padrões de marcha na DCMT. Neste estudo foi utilizada atualização da literatura através das principais bases de dados nacionais/internacionais (SciELO, LILACS e MEDLINE, publicados entre os anos de 2006-2012. O tratamento da DCMT consiste em fisioterapia e utilização de equipamentos de assistência, visto que ainda não há fármacos ou terapia gênica capaz de atenuar os danos clínicos e funcionais. Tal associação busca maximizar a função e melhorar a qualidade de vida desses pacientes, na tentativa de evitar agravos adicionais relativos à incapacidade física. A partir de atualização de literatura é possível concluir que existe consenso sobre a utilização de órteses nos membros inferiores para promover a estabilização das articulações do tornozelo e um padrão de deambulação mais funcional, evitando sinergias inadequadas de movimento e atenuando o risco de quedas.Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT disease is the most common hereditary peripheral neuropathy in humans, presenting incidence of 1:2.500 people. The distal crural weakness of the CMT causes numerous gait impairment changes, for example, velocity, length, width and cadence of the steps. Several rehabilitation resources have been proposed to manage the walking problems, among them, the use of orthoses is highlighted. The objective of this study was to present and discuss the results of

  11. Conduction block and tonic pupils in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease caused by a myelin protein zero p.Ile112Thr mutation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Sinéad M

    2011-03-01

    We report a patient with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) due to the p.Ile112Thr mutation in myelin protein zero (MPZ) who presented with a patchy neuropathy with conduction block and tonic pupils. Conduction block is unusual in inherited neuropathies, while pupil abnormalities are recognised to occur in CMT especially due to MPZ mutations. This case highlights that patchy demyelinating neuropathy with conduction block may occur in p.Ile112Thr MPZ mutations. Involvement of the pupils, as in this case, may be a pointer towards a genetic rather than inflammatory cause of neuropathy.

  12. Mutation Analysis of Gap Junction Protein Beta 1 and Genotype-Phenotype Correlation in X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease in Chinese Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Sun; Zhao-Hui Chen; Li Ling; Yi-Fan Li; Li-Zhi Liu; Fei Yang; Xu-Sheng Huang

    2016-01-01

    Background:Among patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT),the X-linked variant (CMTX) caused by gap junction protein beta 1 (GJB1) gene mutation is the second most frequent type,accounting for approximately 90% of all CMTX.More than 400 mutations have been identified in the GJB1 gene that encodes connexin 32 (CX32).CX32 is thought to form gap junctions that promote the diffusion pathway between cells.GJB1 mutations interfere with the formation of the functional channel and impair the maintenance of peripheral myelin,and novel mutations are continually discovered.Methods:We included 79 unrelated patients clinically diagnosed with CMT at the Department of Neurology of the Chinese People's Liberation Army General Hospital from December 20,2012,to December 31,2015.Clinical examination,nerve conduction studies,and molecular and bioinformatics analyses were performed to identify patients with CMTX 1.Results:Nine GJB1 mutations (c.283G>A,c.77C>T,c.643C>T,c.515C>T,c.191G>A,c.610C>T,c.490C>T,c.491G>A,and c.44G>A) were discovered in nine patients.Median motor nerve conduction velocities of all nine patients were < 38 m/s,resembling CMT Type 1.Three novel mutations,c.643C>T,c.191G>A,and c.610C>T,were revealed and bioinformatics analyses indicated high pathogenicity.Conclusions:The three novel missense mutations within the GJB1 gene broaden the mutational diversity of CMT 1 X.Molecular analysis of family members and bioinformatics analyses of the afflicted patients confirmed the pathogenicity of these mutations.

  13. Association of the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease gene ARHGEF10 with paclitaxel induced peripheral neuropathy in NCCTG N08CA (Alliance).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boora, Ganesh K; Kulkarni, Amit A; Kanwar, Rahul; Beyerlein, Peter; Qin, Rui; Banck, Michaela S; Ruddy, Kathryn J; Pleticha, Josef; Lynch, Cynthia A; Behrens, Robert J; Züchner, Stephan; Loprinzi, Charles L; Beutler, Andreas S

    2015-10-15

    The predisposition of patients to develop polyneuropathy in response to toxic exposure may have a genetic basis. The previous study Alliance N08C1 found an association of the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) gene ARHGEF10 with paclitaxel chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) related to the three non-synonymous, recurrent single nucleotide variants (SNV), whereby rs9657362 had the strongest effect, and rs2294039 and rs17683288 contributed only weakly. In the present report, Alliance N08CA was chosen to attempt to replicate the above finding. N08CA was chosen because it is the methodologically most similar study (to N08C1) performed in the CIPN field to date. N08CA enrolled patients receiving the neurotoxic chemotherapy agent paclitaxel. Polyneuropathy was assessed by serial repeat administration of the previously validated patient reported outcome instrument CIPN20. A study-wide, Rasch type model was used to perform extreme phenotyping in n=138 eligible patients from which "cases" and "controls" were selected for genetic analysis of SNV performed by TaqMan PCR. A significant association of ARHGEF10 with CIPN was found under the pre-specified primary endpoint, with a significance level of p=0.024. As in the original study, the strongest association of a single SNV was seen for rs9657362 (odds ratio=3.56, p=0.018). To further compare results across the new and the previous study, a statistical "classifier" was tested, which achieved a ROC area under the curve of 0.60 for N08CA and 0.66 for N08C1, demonstrating good agreement. Retesting of the primary endpoint of N08C1 in the replication study N08CA validated the association of ARHGEF10 with CIPN. PMID:26143528

  14. Selected items from the Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) Neuropathy Score and secondary clinical outcome measures serve as sensitive clinical markers of disease severity in CMT1A patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannil, Manoj; Solari, Alessandra; Leha, Andreas; Pelayo-Negro, Ana L; Berciano, José; Schlotter-Weigel, Beate; Walter, Maggie C; Rautenstrauss, Bernd; Schnizer, Tuuli J; Schenone, Angelo; Seeman, Pavel; Kadian, Chandini; Schreiber, Olivia; Angarita, Natalia G; Fabrizi, Gian Maria; Gemignani, Franco; Padua, Luca; Santoro, Lucio; Quattrone, Aldo; Vita, Giuseppe; Calabrese, Daniela; Young, Peter; Laurà, Matilde; Haberlová, Jana; Mazanec, Radim; Paulus, Walter; Beissbarth, Tim; Shy, Michael E; Reilly, Mary M; Pareyson, Davide; Sereda, Michael W

    2014-11-01

    This study evaluates primary and secondary clinical outcome measures in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) with regard to their contribution towards discrimination of disease severity. The nine components of the composite Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease Neuropathy Score and six additional secondary clinical outcome measures were assessed in 479 adult patients with genetically proven CMT1A and 126 healthy controls. Using hierarchical clustering, we identified four significant clusters of patients according to clinical severity. We then tested the impact of each of the CMTNS components and of the secondary clinical parameters with regard to their power to differentiate these four clusters. The CMTNS components ulnar sensory nerve action potential (SNAP), pin sensibility, vibration and strength of arms did not increase the discriminant value of the remaining five CMTNS components (Ulnar compound motor action potential [CMAP], leg motor symptoms, arm motor symptoms, leg strength and sensory symptoms). However, three of the six additional clinical outcome measures - the 10m-timed walking test (T10MW), 9 hole-peg test (9HPT), and foot dorsal flexion dynamometry - further improved discrimination between severely and mildly affected patients. From these findings, we identified three different composite measures as score hypotheses and compared their discriminant power with that of the CMTNS. A composite of eight components CMAP, Motor symptoms legs, Motor symptoms arms, Strength of Legs, Sensory symptoms), displayed the strongest power to discriminate between the clusters. As a conclusion, five items from the CMTNS and three secondary clinical outcome measures improve the clinical assessment of patients with CMT1A significantly and are beneficial for upcoming clinical and therapeutic trials. PMID:25085517

  15. Systemic inflammation disrupts oligodendrocyte gap junctions and induces ER stress in a model of CNS manifestations of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olympiou, Margarita; Sargiannidou, Irene; Markoullis, Kyriaki; Karaiskos, Christos; Kagiava, Alexia; Kyriakoudi, Styliana; Abrams, Charles K; Kleopa, Kleopas A

    2016-01-01

    X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT1X) is a common form of inherited neuropathy resulting from different mutations affecting the gap junction (GJ) protein connexin32 (Cx32). A subset of CMT1X patients may additionally present with acute fulminant CNS dysfunction, typically triggered by conditions of systemic inflammation and metabolic stress. To clarify the underlying mechanisms of CNS phenotypes in CMT1X we studied a mouse model of systemic inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection to compare wild type (WT), connexin32 (Cx32) knockout (KO), and KO T55I mice expressing the T55I Cx32 mutation associated with CNS phenotypes. Following a single intraperitoneal LPS or saline (controls) injection at the age of 40-60 days systemic inflammatory response was documented by elevated TNF-α and IL-6 levels in peripheral blood and mice were evaluated 1 week after injection. Behavioral analysis showed graded impairment of motor performance in LPS treated mice, worse in KO T55I than in Cx32 KO and in Cx32 KO worse than WT. Iba1 immunostaining revealed widespread inflammation in LPS treated mice with diffusely activated microglia throughout the CNS. Immunostaining for the remaining major oligodendrocyte connexin Cx47 and for its astrocytic partner Cx43 revealed widely reduced expression of Cx43 and loss of Cx47 GJs in oligodendrocytes. Real-time PCR and immunoblot analysis indicated primarily a down regulation of Cx43 expression with secondary loss of Cx47 membrane localization. Inflammatory changes and connexin alterations were most severe in the KO T55I group. To examine why the presence of the T55I mutant exacerbates pathology even more than in Cx32 KO mice, we analyzed the expression of ER-stress markers BiP, Fas and CHOP by immunostaining, immunoblot and Real-time PCR. All markers were increased in LPS treated KO T55I mice more than in other genotypes. In conclusion, LPS induced neuroinflammation causes disruption of the main astrocyte

  16. 腓骨肌萎缩症(CMT)1型的临床、神经电生理及CMT1A型基因诊断方法的研究%Study on the clinic, neuro-electrophysiology of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 and the gene diagnosis methods of CMT1 A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史磊; 曹秉振

    2013-01-01

    目的 观察腓骨肌萎缩症(CMT)1型患者的临床表现及神经电生理特点,同时利用两种不同方法检测CMT1A型相关基因是否存在突变,并分析两种方法的临床应用价值以进一步确定CMT1A型的诊断.方法 对临床确诊为CMT1型的5例患者进行详细的临床及神经电生理检查,同时对所有患者利用等位基因特异性PCR及MLPA两种方法进行PMP22基因重复突变检测.结果 4例患者20岁前发病,其中2例有家族史,1例患者30岁左右发病.临床特点为进行性四肢远端无力伴肌萎缩,四肢远端感觉减退,腱反射均减弱或消失,2例患者出现弓型足.神经电生理检查示神经传导速度减慢,波幅轻度降低.两种基因检测均发现1例患者存在PMP22基因重复突变.结论 CMT1型发病年龄较早,主要表现为进行性四肢无力伴肌萎缩,神经电生理可见神经传导速度明显降低,波幅略有降低.等位基因特异性PCR和MLPA两种方法检测基因突变结果一致.%Objective To study the clinical and neuro-electrophysiological features of Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1. Two methods were combined to detect mutations in CMT 1A - related genes and comparison of the two methods was performed to determine the clinical value for further diagnosis of CMT1 A. Methods 5 cases of patients with CMT1 underwent detailed clinical and neuro-electrophysiology examinations. Allele-specific PCR and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification type CMT1 ( MLPA-CMT1) were respectively used to detect PMP22 gene duplication mutation in 5 cases. Results Two cases has a family history. age at onset was in the first or second decade except one patient. The clinical features were slowly progressive distalmuscle weakness , atrophy and end - brush form sensory decrement, diminshed or absent tendon reflexes. There are foot deformity in 2 patients. EMG showed conduction velocities highly decreased and volatility decreased slightly. One patient was detected

  17. Clinical and electrophysiological characteristics of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A patients with PMP22 duplication mutation%周围髓鞘蛋白22基因重复突变致夏科-马里-图斯病1A亚型的临床和神经电生理特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪仁斌; 严莉; 段晓慧; 毛坤; 孙少杰; 董明睿; 焦劲松; 王国相

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨周围髓鞘蛋白22(PMP22)基因重复突变阳性的夏科-马里-图斯病(CMT) 1A亚型患者临床和神经电生理改变特点.方法 总结21例PMP22基因重复突变阳性的CMT1A患者的临床特点,并分析其神经电生理特征.结果 21例患者中,10例临床特征符合四肢远端萎缩无力的典型CMT1型表现,另外11例呈不典型性,如仅有头晕、合并听力障碍、上肢姿势性震颤、反复发作性肢体无力、伴有小脑性共济失调及癫(痢)等.10例患者肌电图出现纤颤电位和(或)正锐波,15例患者运动单位电位时限延长.神经传导存在广泛异常,所有患者被检的运动或感觉神经传导速度存在不同程度的减慢或消失.结论 PMP22重复突变阳性的CMT1A患者具有较高的临床异质性,其电生理特点为肌电图呈神经源性损害,感觉神经病变重于运动神经,下肢受累程度重于上肢,神经电生理检查对CMT1A的诊断很重要.%Objective To investigate the clinical and electrophysiological characteristics in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease(CMT ) type 1A patients with (peripheral myetin protein22,PMP22) duplication mutation. Methods Twenty one patients with CMT 1A were retrospectively studied. Routine electromyography ( EMG) and nerve conduction had been performed in all patients. Hie clinical and electrophysiological features were analyzed. Results 10 of 21 patients showed typical presentations including weakness and atrophy in the distal parts of limbs, and 11 atypical cases with special phenotypes including mild dizziness, hearing loss, postural tremor in the upper limbs, recurrent limbs weakness , cerebellar ataxia and epilepsy. EMG detected fibrillation potentials and positive sharp waves in 10 patients and prolonged duration of motor unit potentials in 15 patients respectively. Nerve conduction studies revealed decreased nerve conductive velocity or unelicited potentials in all detected nerves in the patients. Conclusion The CMT 1

  18. A novel mutation in the nerve-specific 5'UTR of the GJB1 gene causes X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Sinéad M

    2011-03-01

    X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT1X) is the second most common cause of CMT, and is usually caused by mutations in the gap junction protein beta 1 (GJB1) gene which codes for connexin 32 (CX32). CX32 has three tissue-specific promoters, P1 which is specific for liver and pancreas, P1a specific for liver, oocytes and embryonic stem cells, and P2 which is nerve-specific. Over 300 mutations have been described in GJB1, spread throughout the coding region. We describe two families with X-linked inheritance and a phenotype consistent with CMT1X who did not have mutations in the GJB1 coding region. The non-coding region of GJB1 was sequenced and an upstream exon-splicing variant found at approximately - 373G>A which segregated with the disease in both families and was not present in controls. This substitution is located at the last base of the nerve-specific 5\\'UTR and thus may disrupt splicing of the nerve-specific transcript. Online consensus splice-site programs predict a reduced score for the mutant sequence vs. the normal sequence. It is likely that other mutations within the GJB1 non-coding regions account for the CMT1X families who do not have coding region mutations.

  19. Examining hand dominance using dynamometric grip strength testing as evidence for overwork weakness in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts-Clarke, Daniel; Fornusek, Che; Fiatarone Singh, Maria A; Burns, Joshua; Hackett, Daniel A

    2016-09-01

    This systematic review with a meta-analysis of studies was carried out to evaluate the potential of overwork weakness on the basis of grip strength of dominant and nondominant hands in individuals with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). Numerous electronic databases were searched from the earliest records to February 2016. Studies of any design including participants older than 18 years of age with a confirmed diagnosis of CMT that measured grip strength of both hands using dynamometric testing were eligible for inclusion. Of 12 593 articles identified following removal of duplicates, five articles fulfilled the criteria. A total of 166 participants, mostly with CMT1 or CMT2, were described from the studies included. Hand and finger pinch grip strength for the dominant compared with the nondominant hand was not statistically different. There is no definitive evidence that preferential use of the dominant hand in CMT impairs function relative to the nondominant hand. Thus, robust exercise trials of progressive resistance training are needed to understand the extent of adaptations possible and provide evidence of the safety of such regimens. PMID:27177353

  20. Loss of the E3 ubiquitin ligase LRSAM1 sensitizes peripheral axons to degeneration in a mouse model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent P. Bogdanik

    2013-05-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous condition characterized by peripheral axon degeneration with subsequent motor and sensory deficits. Several CMT gene products function in endosomal sorting and trafficking to the lysosome, suggesting that defects in this cellular pathway might present a common pathogenic mechanism for these conditions. LRSAM1 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that is implicated in this process, and mutations in LRSAM1 have recently been shown to cause CMT. We have generated mouse mutations in Lrsam1 to create an animal model of this form of CMT (CMT2P. Mouse Lrsam1 is abundantly expressed in the motor and sensory neurons of the peripheral nervous system. Both homozygous and heterozygous mice have largely normal neuromuscular performance and only a very mild neuropathy phenotype with age. However, Lrsam1 mutant mice are more sensitive to challenge with acrylamide, a neurotoxic agent that causes axon degeneration, indicating that the axons in the mutant mice are indeed compromised. In transfected cells, LRSAM1 primarily localizes in a perinuclear compartment immediately beyond the Golgi and shows little colocalization with components of the endosome to lysosome trafficking pathway, suggesting that other cellular mechanisms also merit consideration.

  1. Tolerability and efficacy study of P2X7 inhibition in experimental Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A (CMT1A) neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sociali, Giovanna; Visigalli, Davide; Prukop, Thomas; Cervellini, Ilaria; Mannino, Elena; Venturi, Consuelo; Bruzzone, Santina; Sereda, Michael W; Schenone, Angelo

    2016-11-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A (CMT1A) is a demyelinating hereditary neuropathy for which pharmacological treatments are not yet available. An abnormally high intracellular Ca(2+) concentration was observed in Schwann cells (SC) from CMT1A rats, caused by the PMP22-mediated overexpression of the P2X7 purinoceptor. The purpose of this study was to investigate the tolerability and therapeutic potential of a pharmacological antagonist of the P2X7 receptor (A438079) in CMT1A. A438079 ameliorated in vitro myelination of organotypic DRG cultures from CMT1A rats. Furthermore, we performed an experimental therapeutic trial in PMP22 transgenic and in wild-type rats. A preliminary dose-escalation trial showed that 3mg/kg A438079 administered via intraperitoneal injection every 24h for four weeks was well tolerated by wild type and CMT1A rats. Affected rats treated with 3mg/kg A438079 revealed a significant improvement of the muscle strength, when compared to placebo controls. Importantly, histologic analysis revealed a significant increase of the total number of myelinated axons in tibial nerves. Moreover, a significant decrease of the hypermyelination of small caliber axons and a significant increase of the frequency and diameter of large caliber myelinated axons was highlighted. An improved distal motor latencies was recorded, whereas compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) remained unaltered. A438079 reduced the SC differentiation defect in CMT1A rats. These results show that pharmacological inhibition of the P2X7 receptor is well tolerated in CMT1A rats and represents a proof-of-principle that antagonizing this pathway may correct the molecular derangements and improve the clinical phenotype in the CMT1A neuropathy. PMID:27431093

  2. NEFL N98S mutation: another cause of dominant intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with heterogeneous early-onset phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berciano, José; Peeters, Kristien; García, Antonio; López-Alburquerque, Tomás; Gallardo, Elena; Hernández-Fabián, Arantxa; Pelayo-Negro, Ana L; De Vriendt, Els; Infante, Jon; Jordanova, Albena

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a pedigree with NEFL N98S mutation associated with a dominant intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (DI-CMT) and heterogeneous early-onset phenotype. The pedigree comprised two patients, the proband and her son, aged 38 and 5 years. The proband, evaluated at age 31, showed delayed motor milestones that, as of the second decade, evolved into severe phenotype consisting of sensorimotor neuropathy, pes cavus, clawing hands, gait and kinetic cerebellar ataxia, nystagmus and dysarthria, she being wheelchair bound. By then, a working diagnosis of sporadic early onset cerebellar ataxia with peripheral neuropathy was established. Screening of mutations associated with SCA and autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias was negative. Her son showed a mild phenotype characterized by delayed motor milestones, and lower-limb hypotonia and areflexia. Electrophysiology in both patients showed nerve conduction slowing in the intermediate range, both in proximal and distal nerve segments, but where compound muscle action potentials exhibited severe attenuation there was conduction slowing down to the demyelinating range. In the proband, cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed cerebellar atrophy, electromyography disclosed active denervation in tibialis anterior, and MRI of lower-limb musculature demonstrated widespread and distally accentuated muscle fatty atrophy; furthermore, on water sensitive MRI sequences there was edema of calf muscles. We conclude that the NEFL N98S mutation is associated with a DI-CMT phenotype characterized by early-onset sensorimotor neuropathy delaying motor milestones, which may evolve into a severe and complex clinical picture including cerebellar ataxia. PMID:26645395

  3. Progression of motor axon dysfunction and ectopic Nav1.8 expression in a mouse model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease 1B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosberg, Mette R; Alvarez, Susana; Klein, Dennis; Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Martini, Rudolf; Levinson, S Rock; Krarup, Christian; Moldovan, Mihai

    2016-09-01

    Mice heterozygously deficient for the myelin protein P0 gene (P0+/-) develop a slowly progressing neuropathy modeling demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT1B). The aim of the study was to investigate the long-term progression of motor dysfunction in P0+/- mice at 3, 7, 12 and 20months. By comparison with WT littermates, P0+/- showed a decreasing motor performance with age. This was associated with a progressive reduction in amplitude and increase in latency of the plantar compound muscle action potential (CMAP) evoked by stimulation of the tibial nerve at ankle. This progressive functional impairment was in contrast to the mild demyelinating neuropathy of the tibial nerve revealed by histology. "Threshold-tracking" studies showed impaired motor axon excitability in P0+/- from 3months. With time, there was a progressive reduction in threshold deviations during both depolarizing and hyperpolarizing threshold electrotonus associated with increasing resting I/V slope and increasing strength-duration time constant. These depolarizing features in excitability in P0+/- as well as the reduced CMAP amplitude were absent in P0+/- NaV1.8 knockouts, and could be acutely reversed by selective pharmacologic block of NaV1.8 in P0+/-. Mathematical modeling indicated an association of altered passive cable properties with a depolarizing shift in resting membrane potential and increase in the persistent Na(+) current in P0+/-. Our data suggest that ectopic NaV1.8 expression precipitates depolarizing conduction failure in CMT1B, and that motor axon dysfunction in demyelinating neuropathy is pharmacologically reversible. PMID:27215377

  4. Clinical classification and gene mutation of Chinese probands with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease Analysis of 57 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruxu Zhang; Xiaobo Li; Xiaohong Zi; Shunxiang Huang; Fufeng Zhang; Kun Xia; Qian Pan; Beisha Tang

    2011-01-01

    Charcot-Mafie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the most common inherited peripheral neuropathic disorder.CMT is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. To date, 27 genes associated with the disease have been cloned. The present study carried out clinical classification according to clinical,electrophysiological and pathological features, conducted inheritance classification according to inheritance patterns, and performed mutation analysis of 13 CMT disease genes (PMP22, CX32,HSPB1, MNF2, MPZ, HSPB8, GDAP1, NFL, EGR2, SIMPLE, RAB7, LMNA, MTMR2) in 57 Chinese probands with CMT. Five cases of AD-CMT1 and 13 cases of sporadic CMT1 were diagnosed as CMT1A; five cases of X-CMT1, one case of X-CMT2 and one case of sporadic CMT1 were diagnosed as CMTX1; four cases of AD-CMT2 were diagnosed as CMT2F; one case of AD-CMT2 and one case of sporadic CMT2 were diagnosed as CMT2A2; one case of AD-CMT2 was diagnosed as CMT2L; one case of AD-CMT2 was diagnosed as CMT2J; one case of AR-CMT1 was diagnosed as CMT4A. Among the 57 CMT probands, seven genotypes were determined among 34 patients, with a detection rate of 59.6%. The results indicated that the clinical classification and inheritance classification are indispensable for selecting potential disease genes for mutation detection, and for efficient molecular diagnosis.

  5. Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CMT1 typically show signs of abnormal myelination. Specifically, "onion bulb" formations may be seen which represent axons ... research involves gene therapy experiments. Research with cell cultures and animal models has shown that it is ...

  6. Hip Subluxation, first clinical manifestation in a boy with illness of Charcot Marie Tooth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is a motor and sensitive neuropathy characterized by limb atrophy and weakness, cavus feet and in some cases acetabular dysplasia. We present a case of bilateral hip subluxation caused by this disease, which needed surgical correction

  7. Irradiação contralateral de força para a ativação do músculo tibial anterior em portadores da doença de Charcot-Marie-Tooth: efeitos de um programa de intervenção por FNP Contralateral force irradiation for the activation of tibialis anterior muscle in carriers of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: effect of PNF intervention program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula C. Meningroni

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a resposta do músculo tibial anterior (TA após um protocolo de cinco semanas com irradiação contralateral de força através de diagonais de facilitação neuromuscular proprioceptiva (FNP em pacientes com polineuropatia desmielinizante associada à doença de Charcot-Marie-Tooth do tipo 1A (CMT-1A. MÉTODOS: Participaram deste estudo 12 pacientes, de ambos os sexos. Eles foram tratados em uma frequência de duas vezes por semana, durante cinco semanas. Em cada sessão, foram utilizadas as diagonais de Chopping, extensão-adução com rotação interna (EARI e flexão-abdução com rotação interna (FARI. As diagonais foram repetidas quatro vezes, em ambos os membros superiores e inferiores; cada diagonal tinha duração média de 6 segundos. Durante as execuções, a resposta muscular do TA foi registrada por um eletromiógrafo de superfície, desprezando-se os 2 segundos iniciais e finais de cada diagonal. A média dos valores de Root Mean Square (RMS das quatro repetições foi normalizada em porcentagem. Os dados iniciais e finais foram submetidos ao teste em t para amostras pareadas com valores de p significativos OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the response of the tibialis anterior (TA muscle following a five-week protocol with contralateral irradiation force through Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation (PNF diagonals in patients with demyelinating polyneuropathy associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT-1A. METHODS: The study included 12 patients of both sexes. They were treated twice-weekly for 5 weeks. At each session, they performed the following diagonal patterns: chopping, extension-adduction with internal rotation (EAIR and flexion-abduction with internal rotation (FAIR. The diagonals were repeated four times, in both upper and lower limbs, with each repetition lasting six seconds on average. During execution, the response of the TA muscle was recorded by a surface electromyograph disregarding the

  8. Denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography of the myotubularin-related 2 gene (MTMR2) in unrelated patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease suggests a low frequency of mutation in inherited neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolino, A; Lonie, L J; Zimmer, M; Boerkoel, C F; Takashima, H; Monaco, A P; Lupski, J R

    2001-03-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 4B (CMT4B), an autosomal recessive demyelinating neuropathy characterized by focally folded myelin sheaths in the peripheral nerve, has been associated with mutations in the gene encoding myotubularin-related protein 2, MTMR2, on chromosome 11q22. To investigate whether mutations in MTMR2 may also cause different forms of CMT, we screened 183 unrelated patients with a broad spectrum of CMT and related neuropathies using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography. We identified four frequent and three rare exonic variants; two of the rare variants were identified in two unrelated patients with congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy and not in the normal controls. Our results suggest that loss-of-function mutations in MTMR2 are preferentially associated with the CMT4B phenotype. PMID:11354824

  9. An Algorithm for Genetic Testing of Serbian Patients with Demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth

    OpenAIRE

    Keckarevic Markovic, Milica P.; Dackovic, Jelena; Mladenovic, Jelena; Milic-Rasic, Vedrana; Kecmanovic, Miljana; Keckarevic, Dusan; Romac, Stanka

    2013-01-01

    Charcot-Marie Tooth (CMT) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of diseases with rough genotype–phenotype correlation, so the final diagnosis requires extensive clinical and electrophysiological examination, family data, and gene mutation analysis. Although there is a common pattern of genetic basis of CMT, there could be some population differences that should be taken into account to facilitate analyses. Here we present the algorithm for genetic testing in Serbian patients wit...

  10. Heterogeneity in the properties of NEFL mutants causing Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease results in differential effects on neurofilament assembly and susceptibility to intervention by the chaperone-inducer, celastrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentil, Benoit J; Mushynski, Walter E; Durham, Heather D

    2013-07-01

    Aberrant aggregation of neurofilament proteins is a common feature of neurodegenerative diseases. For example, neurofilament light protein (NEFL) mutants causing Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease induce misassembly of neurofilaments. This study demonstrated that mutations in different functional domains of NEFL have different effects on filament assembly and susceptibility to interventions to restore function. The mouse NEFL mutants, NEFL(Q333P) and NEFL(P8R), exhibited different assembly properties in SW13-cells, cells lacking endogenous intermediate filaments, indicating different consequences of these mutations on the biochemical properties of NEFL. The p.Q333P mutation caused reversible misfolding of the protein. NEFL(Q333P) could be refolded and form coil-coiled dimers, in vitro using chaotropic agent, and in cultured cells by induction of HSPA1 and HSPB1. Celastrol, an inducer of chaperone proteins, induced HSPA1 expression in motor neurons and prevented the formation of neurofilament inclusions and mitochondrial shortening induced by expression of NEFL(Q333P), but not in sensory neurons. Conversely, celastrol had a protective effect against the toxicity of NEFL(P8R), a mutant which is sensitive to HSBP1 but not HSPA1 chaperoning, only in large-sized sensory neurons, not in motor neurons. Importantly, sensory and motor neurons do not respond identically to celastrol and different chaperones are upregulated by the same treatment. Thus, effective therapy of CMT not only depends on the identity of the mutated gene, but the consequences of the specific mutation on the properties of the protein and the neuronal population targeted. PMID:23618875

  11. 腓骨肌萎缩症1型患者肌电图及PMP22基因特点分析%Electromyography and PMP22 gene analysis in patients with type 1 Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘晓丽; 潘志宏; 张楠楠; 高红

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨和研究腓骨肌萎缩症1型(Charcot‐Marie‐Tooth disease 1,CMT1)患者肌电图和 PMP22基因改变特点。方法对43例CM T1患者进行常规神经传导速度和肌电图检查,应用PCR双酶切方法对其中33例CM T1患者及15名健康志愿者(对照组)检测17p11.2‐12 PM P22基因重复序列(即1760 bp片段)。33例CM T1患者依有无17p11.2‐12 PM P22基因特异性片段分为 PM P22基因特异性片段阳性组与阴性组,比较两组患者神经传导改变有无差异。结果43例患者均行肌电图检测,均表现为运动或感觉神经传导速度存在明显减慢(100%),感觉神经病变重于运动神经,下肢受累程度重于上肢;所检129块肌肉中,88块(68.2%)呈神经源性损害。经 PM P22基因学检测的33例中20例(60.6%)检测出1760 bp片断,对照组均未检测到此片段。PM P22基因特异性片段阳性组感觉神经传导速度、运动神经传导速度及远端潜伏期与阴性组比较差异均无统计学意义(P>0.05)。结论 CMT1患者肌电图改变具有其特异性,结合PCR‐双酶切法检测 PMP22特异性基因重复序列可提高诊断CM T1的准确性及敏感性。%Objective To study the electromyography and PM P22 gene features in patients with type 1 Charcot‐Marie‐Tooth (CMT ) disease . Methods Routine electromyography and nerve conduction were performed in 43 patients with CMT 1 .Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) combined with restriction enzyme digestion was used to detect PMP22 gene duplication on chromosome 17p11.2‐12 (1760 bp) in 33 CMT 1 patients and 15 healthy volunteers (the control group) .According to the presence or absence of 17 p11.2‐12 PMP22 gene segments ,33 CMT 1 patients were divided into the positive group and the negative group . Parameters of nerve conduction were compared between two groups .Results All of the patients had the nerve conduction velocities slower or disappeared

  12. Early-onset osteoarthritis, Charcot-Marie-Tooth like neuropathy, autoimmune features, multiple arterial aneurysms and dissections: an unrecognized and life threatening condition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mélodie Aubart

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Severe osteoarthritis and thoracic aortic aneurysms have recently been associated with mutations in the SMAD3 gene, but the full clinical spectrum is incompletely defined. METHODS: All SMAD3 gene mutation carriers coming to our centre and their families were investigated prospectively with a structured panel including standardized clinical workup, blood tests, total body computed tomography, joint X-rays. Electroneuromyography was performed in selected cases. RESULTS: Thirty-four SMAD3 gene mutation carriers coming to our centre were identified and 16 relatives were considered affected because of aortic surgery or sudden death (total 50 subjects. Aortic disease was present in 72%, complicated with aortic dissection, surgery or sudden death in 56% at a mean age of 45 years. Aneurysm or tortuosity of the neck arteries was present in 78%, other arteries were affected in 44%, including dissection of coronary artery. Overall, 95% of mutation carriers displayed either aortic or extra-aortic arterial disease. Acrocyanosis was also present in the majority of patients. Osteoarticular manifestations were recorded in all patients. Joint involvement could be severe requiring surgery in young patients, of unusual localization such as tarsus or shoulder, or mimicking crystalline arthropathy with fibrocartilage calcifications. Sixty eight percent of patients displayed neurological symptoms, and 9 suffered peripheral neuropathy. Electroneuromyography revealed an axonal motor and sensory neuropathy in 3 different families, very evocative of type II Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT2 disease, although none had mutations in the known CMT2 genes. Autoimmune features including Sjogren's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, Hashimoto's disease, or isolated autoantibodies- were found in 36% of patients. INTERPRETATION: SMAD3 gene mutations are associated with aortic dilatation and osteoarthritis, but also autoimmunity and peripheral neuropathy which mimics type II

  13. PMP22 messenger RNA levels in skin biopsies: testing the effectiveness of a Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A biomarker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobbio, Lucilla; Visigalli, Davide; Radice, Davide; Fiorina, Elisabetta; Solari, Alessandra; Lauria, Giuseppe; Reilly, Mary M; Santoro, Lucio; Schenone, Angelo; Pareyson, Davide

    2014-06-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) is associated with increased gene dosage for PMP22. Therapeutic approaches are currently aiming at correcting PMP22 over-expression. It is unknown whether PMP22 can be used as a biological marker of disease progression and therapy efficacy. We performed quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction on skin biopsies of 45 patients with CMT1A, obtained at study entry and after 24-months of treatment either with ascorbic acid or placebo. Data of a subgroup of patients were also compared with matched healthy subjects. Finally, we analysed PMP22 messenger RNA levels in sural nerve biopsies. We did not find significant differences in the levels of any known PMP22 transcripts in treated or untreated patients with CMT1A, thus confirming that ascorbic acid does not impact on the molecular features of CMT1A. Most importantly, we did not observe any correlation between PMP22 messenger RNA levels and the different clinical and electrophysiological outcome measures, underscoring the weakness of PMP22 to mirror the phenotypic variability of patients with CMT1A. We did not find increased PMP22 messenger RNA levels in skin and sural nerve biopsies of patients with CMT1A compared with relative controls. In conclusion, this study shows that ascorbic acid does not impact on PMP22 transcriptional regulation and PMP22 is not a suitable biomarker for CMT1A. PMID:24812204

  14. 腓骨肌萎缩症X型伴有可逆性中枢神统系统受累%Charcot Marie Tooth type X with reversible central nerve system disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张洁; 孔双艳; 杨琼; 邢岩

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨的腓骨肌萎缩症X型的临床特点和引起中枢神经系统受累可能的发病机制。方法报道1例国内未报道过的CMTX可引起中枢神经系统受累Cx32基因突变,分析该例患者的临床、电生理及病理改变特点。结果该患者为基因检查确诊Arg424Trp( R142W)突变的CMTX。临床存在可逆性眼震,电生理提示感觉运动神经受累均受累,轴索髓鞘均损害。肌肉活检提示慢性神经源性病理改变。周围神经活检示周围神经髓鞘损害为主。 BAEP提示可逆性中枢性损害。结论 R142W突变的CMTX可以在应激条件下出现可逆性中枢神经系统损害。%Objective To investigate the clinical features of Charcot Marie Tooth X ( CMTX) and possible pathogenesis of central nervous system involved.Methods Cx32 gene mutations in 1 cases of with central nervous system disorded were reported, and the clinical, electrophysiological and pathological characteristics of the patient was analyzed retrospectively.Results The Arg424Trp(R142W) mutation of the CMTX gene was confirmed.The clinical presence of reversible nystagmus, electrophysiological prompt sensory and motor nerve were involed with axonal myelin damage.Muscle biopsy indicated that the chronic axonal peripheral nerve pathological changes.BAEP indicated that the reversibility of the central nervous system damage.Conclusion The R142W mutation of CMTX can appear to be reversible central nervous system damage under the stress conditions.

  15. Rehabilitation Management of the Charcot-Marie-Tooth Syndrome: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrado, Bruno; Ciardi, Gianluca; Bargigli, Chiara

    2016-04-01

    The Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) causes significant muscular deficits in the affected patients, restricts daily activities (ADL), and involves a severe disability. Although the conservative intervention is the only treatment for the disease, there is no scientific evidence so far on rehabilitation treatment. Objectives of the review are: research the best literary evidence so far on the rehabilitation treatment of CMT; critically analyze the outcome, to build an evidence-based work protocol.A systematic review of the rehabilitation of a patient with CMT, including the results from the following databases: Pubmed, Medline, Embase, Pedro, Cinahl, Ebsco discovery. Criteria for inclusion: randomized/controlled studies, analytic studies, transversal studies on a cohort of at least 10 individuals; medium/long-term report of the results.Eleven studies in total have been admitted to the final review phase; trials about physiotherapy CMT treatment (5), about orthosis treatment (6). Despite the wide range of outcomes and proposed interventions, the data points to the following: strength or endurance trainings improve functionality and ADLs of affected patients, while orthotic role is, at the moment, not completely clear.Physiotherapy treatment is a useful tool to manage CMT; more studies on a larger number of cases are needed to define orthosis utility and to establish the gold standard of the treatment. PMID:27124017

  16. [Phenotypes of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Syndrome and Differential Diagnosis Focused in Inflammatory Neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), the most frequent form of inherited neuropathy, is a genetically heterogeneous syndrome of the peripheral nervous system with a rather homologous clinical phenotype (slowly progressive distal weakness and muscle atrophy, skeletal deformities, and areflexia in each limb). CMT1 is the autosomal-dominant demyelinating form, and CMT1A (mostly PMP22 duplication) is the most frequent subtype, followed by CMTX1, HNPP (hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies), CMT1B, or CMT2. As CMT is characterized by slowly progressive motor and sensory disturbances in each limb, it could be misdiagnosed as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) occasionally. Some points can distinguish demyelinating CMT from CIDP. CMT1 patients do not show the conduction block that is frequent in CIDP. In addition, ultrasonographic findings are useful because CMT1 suggests diffuse enlargement of peripheral nerves, whereas CIDP is characterized by asymmetrical or focal enlargement of peripheral nerves. Some CMT1 cases show favorable responses to immunomodulating therapeutics such as corticosteroids, IVIg, and plasma exchange. Such CIDP-like CMT1 (especially CMT1B or CMT2A) shows moderate to high levels of cerebrospinal fluid protein and infiltrated inflammatory macrophages. PMID:26764297

  17. A new mutation in the GJB1 gene of a Chinese family with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease associated with vocal cord paresis%伴声带麻痹的X连锁腓骨肌萎缩症GJB1基因新突变

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李清华; 蒋静子; 刘开祥; 俸军林; 曾爱源; 李浩; 吴岚; 唐永刚; 陈梅玲; 林小慧

    2010-01-01

    Objective To report an X-linked dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX) Chinese family with vocal cord paresis and to identify the mutation of gap junction protein beta 1 gene (GJB1). Methods Part of the family members with dysphagia, dysphonia and lethal respiratory failure were studied through flexible laryngoscope, clinical, brain MRI and electrophysiological examinations. After excluding large fragment tandem duplication containing peripheral myelin protein 22 gene (PMP22), direct sequencing was performed to analyze the mutation of the GJB1 gene in 5 patients including the proband, 5 unaffected family members and 50 unrelated healthy individuals. Results Eight members spanning 3 generations in this family were affected with CMTX characterized by progressive atrophy and weakness of the anterior tibial and peroneal muscles, especially in the proband. Vocal cord paresis was observed through flexible laryngoscope in total of 4 affected members with dysarthria and dysphagia, 2 of them died of severe respiratory failure due to complete bilateral vocal cord involvement. Normal brain MRI was observed in the proband. The electrophysiological data showed predominant demyelization involving the motor and sensory nerves in the proband. DNA sequencing revealed a de novo c. 186 C>G missense mutation in exon 2 of the GJB1 gene, the mutation cosegregated with phenotype. Conclusion Respiratory failure associated with vocal cord involvement may be a rare and severe symptom in CMTX. The present report provides further evidence for clinical and genetic heterogeneity in the X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.%目的 报告1个临床可疑的伴声带麻痹的X连锁显性遗传腓骨肌萎缩症(X-1inked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease,CMTX)家系,并探讨与连接蛋白(gap jurction protein beta 1,GJB1)基因突变的关系.方法 对1个具有声音嘶哑、吞咽困难、致死性呼吸衰竭的临床可疑的CMTX家系进行临床、纤维喉镜、头部MRI及电生理检

  18. Whole Genome Sequencing Identifies a 78 kb Insertion from Chromosome 8 as the Cause of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Neuropathy CMTX3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Megan H.; Chaudhry, Rabia; Qi, Jessica; Kidambi, Aditi; Drew, Alexander P.; Ryan, Monique M.; Subramanian, Gopinath M.; Young, Helen K.; Zuchner, Stephan; Reddel, Stephen W.; Nicholson, Garth A.; Kennerson, Marina L.

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of whole exome sequencing, cases where no pathogenic coding mutations can be found are increasingly being observed in many diseases. In two large, distantly-related families that mapped to the Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy CMTX3 locus at chromosome Xq26.3-q27.3, all coding mutations were excluded. Using whole genome sequencing we found a large DNA interchromosomal insertion within the CMTX3 locus. The 78 kb insertion originates from chromosome 8q24.3, segregates fully with the disease in the two families, and is absent from the general population as well as 627 neurologically normal chromosomes from in-house controls. Large insertions into chromosome Xq27.1 are known to cause a range of diseases and this is the first neuropathy phenotype caused by an interchromosomal insertion at this locus. The CMTX3 insertion represents an understudied pathogenic structural variation mechanism for inherited peripheral neuropathies. Our finding highlights the importance of considering all structural variation types when studying unsolved inherited peripheral neuropathy cases with no pathogenic coding mutations. PMID:27438001

  19. Mitofusin 2 expression dominates over mitofusin 1 exclusively in mouse dorsal root ganglia - a possible explanation for peripheral nervous system involvement in Charcot-Marie-Tooth 2A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawalec, Maria; Zabłocka, Barbara; Kabzińska, Dagmara; Neska, Jacek; Beręsewicz, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2), a protein of the mitochondrial outer membrane, is essential for mitochondrial fusion and contributes to the maintenance and operation of the mitochondrial network. Mutations in the mitofusin 2 gene cause axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2A (CMT2A), an inherited disease affecting peripheral nerve axons. The precise mechanism by which mutations in MFN2 selectively cause the degeneration of long peripheral axons is not known. There is a hypothesis suggesting the involvement of reduced expression of a homologous protein, mitofusin 1 (Mfn1), in the peripheral nervous system, and less effective compensation of defective mitofusin 2 by mitofusin 1. We therefore aimed to perform an analysis of the mitofusin 1 and mitofusin 2 mRNA and protein expression profiles in different mouse tissues, with special attention paid to dorsal root ganglia (DRGs), as parts of the peripheral nervous system. Quantitative measurement relating to mRNA revealed that expression of the Mfn2 gene dominates over Mfn1 mainly in mouse DRG, as opposed to other nervous system samples and other tissues studied. This result was further supported by Western blot evaluation. Both these sets of data confirm the hypothesis that the cellular consequences of mutations in the mitofusin 2 gene can mostly be manifested in the peripheral nervous system. PMID:25574749

  20. Diagnóstico clínico de la enfermedad Charcot-Marie-Tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuselis Pérez Cid

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available La enfermedad de Charcot-Marie-Tooth es un trastorno polineuropático genéticamente heterogéneo, en la que se han identificado más de 30 genes responsables; sin embargo, el diagnóstico es posible establecerlo sobre las bases de los estudios clínicos y electrofisiológicos. Constituye un reto en la práctica médica de los países del tercer mundo contar con la realización sistemática de estudios genéticos moleculares de las neuropatías hereditarias, por lo que en este trabajo se enfatiza en los estudios clínico-electrofisiológicos para la clasificación de la CMT

  1. Assessment of upper motor neuron dysfunction by triple stimulation technique in patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease%三重刺激技术对腓骨肌萎缩症上运动神经元损害的评估

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐迎胜; 张朔; 刘小璇; 孙阿萍; 樊东升

    2016-01-01

    目的 对腓骨肌萎缩症(CMT)患者进行三重刺激技术(TST)检测,探索其上运动神经元(UMN)损害的亚临床证据,以期为致病基因的筛选提供依据.方法 分析2013年8月至2015年8月于北京大学第三医院神经内科就诊的经基因检测确诊的CMT患者65例.对其进行临床查体、神经电生理检测,主要观察锥体束征和TST检测(包括经颅磁刺激、外周神经刺激、对冲技术等)结果,计算TST test/TST control波幅比,判断其上运动神经元功能状况.结果 临床查体发现7例患者下肢腱反射亢进,Babinski征阳性,肌张力增高,其中2例合并上肢腱反射亢进,Hoffmann征阳性.10例患者TST test/TST control波幅比下降(其中5例下肢腱反射亢进,Babinski征阳性,2例合并上肢腱反射亢进,Hoffmann征阳性).对应的致病基因:MFN2基因突变5例,BSCL2基因突变1例,3例GJB1基因突变,GDAP基因突变1例.根据临床查体和TST结果,18.5%(12例)的患者存在上运动神经元损害.结论 CMT患者可存在上运动神经元损害,据此可进行相关致病基因检测.%Objective To investigate the presence of upper motor neuron dysfunction in patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) by triple stimulation technique (TST) to provide evidence for gene diagnosis.Methods A total of 65 CMT patients confirmed by genetic testing from Peking University Third Hospital between August 2013 and August 2015,underwent physical examination and routine electrophysiological tests and triple stimulation technique.The TST combined transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the motor cortex with peripheral collision studies.The results were expressed by the TST amplitude ratio (TST test/TST control).Based on the result of physical examination and the ratio of TST,the function of upper motor neuron was assessed.Results All of the CMT patients had typical presentations and were confirmed genetically.Hyperreflexia,Babinski sign and muscular hypertonia were

  2. 神经超声在Chacot-Marie-Tooth1型和慢性炎性脱髓鞘性多发性神经根神经病鉴别诊断中的价值%The utility of peripheral nerve ultrasound in differentiating Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1 from chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘明生; 牛婧雯; 李亦; 吴双; 管宇宙; 崔丽英

    2016-01-01

    CharcotMarie-Tooth type 1 (CMT1) from chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP).Methods Eighteen patients with CIDP,13 patients with CMT1 and 16 healthy controls were recruited prospectively from Peking Union Medical College Hospital between January 2014 and July 2015 for this study.Ultrasonographic tests were performed via nerve tracing from wrist to axilla on median and ulnar nerve with a 10 MHz linear array probe.The cross sectional areas (CSAs) were measured at 10 defined sites of the nerves,respectively.Results CSAs (mm2) at all sites of median nerve were significantly increased in CMT1 than in CIDP (10.5 ±5.3 vs7.8 ±2.4,10.9 ±3.6 vs 6.8 ±1.9,11.5 ±5.0 vs7.3 ±1.8,13.5 ± 4.4vs7.2±2.5,16.0±4.5vs7.2±2.1,17.1±5.1vs7.0±2.8,21.0±4.5vs9.5±4.8,24.3±6.9 vs 9.5 ±4.3,23.9 ±6.0 vs 10.2 ±4.3,22.4 ±6.7 vs 9.8 ±2.1;t=2.141,4.766,2.935,4.858,6.715,6.602,7.148,7.100,8.078,6.498,respectively,all P < 0.05).CSAs (mm2) at all sites of ulnar nerve were significantly increased in CMT1 than in CIDP (7.9 ± 1.8 vs 4.0 ± 1.3,8.9 ± 2.0 vs 4.9 ± 1.3,13.5±1.9 vs6.5±2.4,15.0±4.3 vs 6.5 ±1.5,15.8 ±4.4 vs 6.8 ±3.3,11.6±2.3 vs6.9± 3.1,10.2±3.2vs7.6±2.8,14.0±3.0vs6.6±2.1,19.2±3.7vs7.6±4.4,18.1±3.6vs6.3± 2.5;t =7.652,7.414,9.194,6.893,6.443,4.766,2.561,7.897,8.113,11.554,respectively,all P < 0.05).CSAs at 8 sites of median nerve and 8 sites of ulnar nerve were significantly increased in CIDP than in healthy controls.Receiver operation characteristic curve analysis revealed that CSA was suited for differentiating CMT1 from CIDP,and the area under curve in 8 sites of median nerve and 9 sites in ulnar nerve was more than 0.9.Conclusions CSAs measured at different sites by peripheral nerve ultrasound in CMT1 were significantly increased than in CIDP.Measurement of CSAs by peripheral nerve ultrasound can be used for differentiating CMTI from CIDP.

  3. Innovative quantitative testing of hand function in Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, Maria A; Mori, Laura; Francini, Luca; Poggi, Ilaria; Monti Bragadin, Margherita; Bellone, Emilia; Grandis, Marina; Maggi, Giovanni; Reni, Lizia; Sormani, Maria P; Tacchino, Andrea; Padua, Luca; Prada, Valeria; Bove, Marco; Schenone, Angelo

    2015-12-01

    To describe a new test to quantitatively evaluate hand function in patients affected by Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (CMT). The sensor-engineered glove test (SEGT) was applied to CMT patients (N: 26) and compared with a cohort of healthy controls (HC, N: 26). CMT patients were further divided into subjects with clinically normal (group 1) or impaired hand (group 2) function. The SEGT parameters evaluated were touch duration, inter-tapping interval, and movement rate parameters of two different sequences: finger tapping (FT) and index-medium-ring-little (IMRL) performed at self-paced mode (SPM) and maximum velocity (MV). Hand function and strength were assessed by the 9-hole peg test (9HPT) and dynamometry. Disability of patients was measured by the CMT neuropathy score. CMT patients had significantly worst performances at SEGT than controls regarding the rate of execution of both FT (at MV) and IMRL sequences (at SPM and MV). The rate parameter at MV in IMRL sequence showed a significant trend of decreasing in its average between HC (n: 26, rate = 3.08 ± 0.52 Hz), group 1 (n: 9, rate = 2.64 ± 0.66 Hz) and group 2 (n: 17, rate = 2.19 ± 0.45 Hz) (p for trend CMT neuropathy score. The SEGT test is sensitive to show hand dysfunction in CMT patients, with and without clinically impaired hands. PMID:26456943

  4. Genética de la enfermedad de Charcot-Marie-Tooth autosómica recesiva

    OpenAIRE

    Claramunt Alonso, Reyes

    2008-01-01

    RESUMEN El objetivo de esta tesis doctoral es profundizar en el conocimiento de las bases genéticas y moleculares de la enfermedad de Charcot-Marie-Tooth, especialmente de las formas con herencia autosómica recesiva. En este sentido, se incluyen los resultados obtenidos del análisis genético y molecular del gen GDAP1 en una serie de 118 familias de origen español, cuyas mutaciones son las causantes de la forma autosómica recesiva axonal tipo 4A (CMT4A), así como también, el estudio genétic...

  5. Clinical and Electrophysiological Studies of a Family with Probable X-linked Dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth Neuropathy and Ptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Wu

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The X-linked dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (CMTX is ahereditary motor and sensory neuropathy linked to a variety of mutations inthe connexin32 (Cx32 gene. Clinical and genetic features of CMTX havenot previously been reported in Taiwanese.Methods: Clinical evaluations and electrophysiological studies were carried out on 25family members of a Taiwanese family group. Molecular genetic analysis ofthe Cx32 gene was performed. A sural nerve biopsy was obtained from 1patient.Results: Nine patients had clinical features of X-linked dominant inheritance and amoderate Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT neuropathy phenotype. Moleculargenetic analysis showed no mutation of the Cx32 coding region, but revealeda G-to-A transition at position -215 of the nerve-specific promoter P2 of theCx32 gene. Ptosis is 1 clinical manifestation of neuropathy in this probableCMTX family. Familial hyperthyroidism is an additional independent featureof the family. Electrophysiological and histological studies showed featuresof axonal neuropathy. Multimodality evoked potential studies revealed normalcentral motor and sensory conduction velocities.Conclusions: The presence of ptosis in this family illustrates the existence of clinical heterogeneityamong related family members with CMTX similar to that inCMT of autosomal inheritance. Electrophysiological and histological findingsrevealed normal central conduction and axonal neuropathy.

  6. A brief review of recent Charcot-Marie-Tooth research and priorities [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/53g

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Ekins

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This brief review of current research progress on Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT disease is a summary of discussions initiated at the Hereditary Neuropathy Foundation (HNF scientific advisory board meeting on November 7, 2014. It covers recent published and unpublished in vitro and in vivo research. We discuss recent promising preclinical work for CMT1A, the development of new biomarkers, the characterization of different animal models, and the analysis of the frequency of gene mutations in patients with CMT. We also describe how progress in related fields may benefit CMT therapeutic development, including the potential of gene therapy and stem cell research. We also discuss the potential to assess and improve the quality of life of CMT patients. This summary of CMT research identifies some of the gaps which may have an impact on upcoming clinical trials. We provide some priorities for CMT research and areas which HNF can support. The goal of this review is to inform the scientific community about ongoing research and to avoid unnecessary overlap, while also highlighting areas ripe for further investigation. The general collaborative approach we have taken may be useful for other rare neurological diseases.

  7. Disease: H00264 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ease (hereditary motor sensory neuropathies) and hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies. Neurologist...pheral neuropathies characterized by progressive distal wasting and loss of reflexes in the muscles of the legs. Neurodegenerati...y of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Neurogenetics 4:1-15 (2002) PMID:17595294 Nangle LA,...Peroneal muscular atrophy Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is a genetically heterogeneous group of inherited peri...an V Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: a clinico-genetic confrontation. Ann Hum Genet 72:416-41 (2008) PMID:16775

  8. Enfermedad de Charcot Marie Tooth (CMT4A por mutacion en el gen GDAP1: reporte de una familia colombiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Milena Martin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Antecedentes:Las mutaciones del gen GDAP1 son causantes de la enfermedad de Charcot Marie Tooth tanto autosómica dominante como recesiva, y se han reportado más de 40 mutaciones distintas. La mutación recesiva Q163X ha sido descrita en pacientes de ascendencia española y se ha demostrado una mutación fundadora originaria de España en pacientes de origen suramericano. Describimos las características físicas e histológicas y el impacto molecular de la mutación Q163X en una familia colombiana.Objetivo:Se describe el impacto de la mutación Q163X en las características físicas, histológicas y moleculares en una familia colombiana.Métodos:Se describe dos pacientes de sexo femenino, hijas de padres consanguíneos, quienes presentaron inicio de síntomas en los dos primeros años de vida, mostrando deterioro funcional severo, sin evidencia de dismorfía, disfonía o parálisis diafragmática. Los estudios de electrofisiología mostraron una neuropatía sensitiva y motora con patrón axonal. Se solicitó la secuenciación del gen GDAP1, y el estudio identificó una mutación homocigota puntual (c. 487 C>T en el exón 4, causando un codón de parada prematuro (p. Q163X. Este resultado confirma el diagnóstico de Enfermedad de Charcot Marie Tooth, tipo 4A (recesiva, tipo axonal.Resultados:Las pacientes fueron remitidas al servicio de Fisiatría para evaluación de métodos de asistencia para deambulación. Ellas reciben seguimiento por el servicio de Neumología, quienes vigilan la función pulmonar y el desarrollo de parálisis diafragmática. Se brindó asesoramiento genético. La genealogía del paciente, las características fenotípicas y los hallazgos en los estudios electrofisiológicos son herramientas valiosas en el enfoque clínico del paciente con CMT, de forma que se pueda plantear una posible mutación causal. Se debe considerar la presencia de mutaciones en el gen GDAP1 en pacientes de origen suramericano, en especial la

  9. Genetics of Pediatric-Onset Motor Neuron and Neuromuscular Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-24

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy; Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease; Muscular Dystrophy; Spinal Muscular Atrophy With Respiratory Distress 1; Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis; Motor Neuron Disease; Neuromuscular Disease; Peroneal Muscular Atrophy; Fragile X Syndrome

  10. Fisiopatología celular del déficit de GDAP1, relacionado con la enfermedad de Charcot-Marie-Tooth

    OpenAIRE

    Pla Martín, David

    2012-01-01

    La enfermedad de Charcot-Marie-Tooth es uno de los trastornos neurológicos hereditarios más comunes que afecta aproximadamente a uno de casa 2.500 – 5.000 habitantes. La enfermedad CMT se clasifica en neuropatías desmielinizantes (CMT1) y neuropatías axonales (CMT2). Para ambas entidades se han descrito diversos patrones de herencia. Actualmente se conocen más de 40 genes implicados en la enfermedad siendo GDAP1 uno de los más variables en cuanto al fenotipo. Mutaciones en el gen GDAP1 se han...

  11. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: The development of a diagnostic platform using next generation sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Rikke; Væth, Signe; Thorsen, Kasper;

    sequenced on a Hiseq2000. Data analysis was performed using CLC Genomics Workbench v7.0.3. Results and Conclusion: Preliminary results indicate an increased diagnostic yield when analyzing 63 CMT associated genes compared to previous Sanger sequencing of 4 genes. The introduction of NGS in CMT diagnostics...

  12. GDAP1-related autosomal dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease : phenotypical and MRI features

    OpenAIRE

    Sivera Mascaró, Rafael; Álvarez Sabin, Jose; Sevilla Mantecón, Maria Teresa

    2012-01-01

    El present estudi es basa en la descripció de quatre famílies portadores d'una mateixa mutació puntual (p.R120W) en el gen GDAP1 que segreguen d'una manera autosòmica dominant. Les trobades més rellevants foren: - Els individus afectats varen tindre un començament més tardà i un fenotipus més lleu que les mutacions recessives del gen GDAP-1, però amb una gran variabilitat clínica. - La Resonància Magnètica Muscular va demostrar una afectació selectiva de la musculatura intrínseca del peu i la...

  13. Recommendations to enable drug development for inherited neuropathies: Charcot-Marie-Tooth and Giant Axonal Neuropathy [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/3am

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori Sames

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 1 in 2500 Americans suffer from Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT disease. The underlying disease mechanisms are unique in most forms of CMT, with many point mutations on various genes causing a toxic accumulation of misfolded proteins. Symptoms of the disease often present within the first two decades of life, with CMT1A patients having reduced compound muscle and sensory action potentials, slow nerve conduction velocities, sensory loss, progressive distal weakness, foot and hand deformities, decreased reflexes, bilateral foot drop and about 5% become wheelchair bound. In contrast, the ultra-rare disease Giant Axonal Neuropathy (GAN is frequently described as a recessively inherited condition that results in progressive nerve death. GAN usually appears in early childhood and progresses slowly as neuronal injury becomes more severe and leads to death in the second or third decade. There are currently no treatments for any of the forms of CMTs or GAN. We suggest that further clinical studies should analyse electrical impedance myography as an outcome measure for CMT. Further, additional quality of life (QoL assessments for these CMTs are required, and we need to identify GAN biomarkers as well as develop new genetic testing panels for both diseases. We propose that using the Global Registry of Inherited Neuropathy (GRIN could be useful for many of these studies. Patient advocacy groups and professional organizations (such as the Hereditary Neuropathy Foundation (HNF, Hannah's Hope Fund (HHF, The Neuropathy Association (TNA and the American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AANEM can play a central role in educating clinicians and patients. Undertaking these studies will assist in the correct diagnosis of disease recruiting patients for clinical studies, and will ultimately improve the endpoints for clinical trials. By addressing obstacles that prevent industry investment in various forms of inherited neuropathies

  14. Recommendations to enable drug development for inherited neuropathies: Charcot-Marie-Tooth and Giant Axonal Neuropathy [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/33n

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori Sames

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 1 in 2500 Americans suffer from Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT disease. The underlying disease mechanisms are unique in most forms of CMT, with many point mutations on various genes causing a toxic accumulation of misfolded proteins. Symptoms of the disease often present within the first two decades of life, with CMT1A patients having reduced compound muscle and sensory action potentials, slow nerve conduction velocities, sensory loss, progressive distal weakness, foot and hand deformities, decreased reflexes, bilateral foot drop and about 5% become wheelchair bound. In contrast, the ultra-rare disease Giant Axonal Neuropathy (GAN is frequently described as a recessively inherited condition that results in progressive nerve death. GAN usually appears in early childhood and progresses slowly as neuronal injury becomes more severe and leads to death in the second or third decade. There are currently no treatments for any of the forms of CMTs or GAN. We suggest that further clinical studies should analyse electrical impedance myography as an outcome measure for CMT. Further, additional quality of life (QoL assessments for these CMTs are required, and we need to identify GAN biomarkers as well as develop new genetic testing panels for both diseases. We propose that using the Global Registry of Inherited Neuropathy (GRIN could be useful for many of these studies. Patient advocacy groups and professional organizations (such as the Hereditary Neuropathy Foundation (HNF, Hannah's Hope Fund (HHF, The Neuropathy Association (TNA and the American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AANEM can play a central role in educating clinicians and patients. Undertaking these studies will assist in the correct diagnosis of disease recruiting patients for clinical studies, and will ultimately improve the endpoints for clinical trials. By addressing obstacles that prevent industry investment in various forms of inherited neuropathies

  15. Molecular genetics of neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roses, A D

    1993-02-01

    Recent progress in human neurogenetics has led to the discovery of new modes of inheritance and disease expression, including 1) stably inherited duplications in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1a, 2) dynamic mutations in fragile X syndrome and myotonic dystrophy, and 3) identical mutations with different phenotypes in fatal familial insomnia and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The mechanisms by which known mutations of the amyloid precursor protein lead to early-onset Alzheimer's disease remain unexplained, despite hundreds of recent studies of beta-amyloid. PMID:8428064

  16. INF2 mutations associated with dominant inherited intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in two Chinese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Suqin; Wang, Wei; Wang, Renbin; Lv, He; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Zhaoxia; Jiao, Jinsong; Yuan, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Recently, mutations in the inverted formin 2 (INF2) gene have been indentified in patients with dominant inherited intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (DI-CMT) with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). We report clinical and nerve pathological changes in two Chinese patients. Case 1 is 27 years old and presented with distal muscle weakness and atrophy of legs at the age of 13 and renal failure at the age of 26. Three of his family members died due to pure renal failure. Case 2 is 22 years old and presented with distal muscle weakness and atrophy of the legs with transient attacks of difficulty in speaking at age 17. Proteinuria was found by routine urine test at the same time. Sural nerve biopsy revealed moderate-to-severe loss of myelinated fibers with union bulbs and regeneration clusters in both patients. Ultrastructurally, numerous elongated extensions of Schwann cells of unmyelinated fibers could be seen in both patients. INF2 gene mutation screening revealed c.451 T>C in case 1 and c.341 G>A in case 2. This is the first report of Chinese patients with INF2-related DI-CMT. The c.451 T>C mutant was responsible for both isolated FSGS and a dual phenotype of FSGS and neuropathy within one family. Intrafamilial variability can be found with the same INF2 mutation. The CNS manifestations further broadened the clinical spectrum of INF2- associated disorders. PMID:25943269

  17. The regulation of fine movements in patients with Charcot Marie Tooth, type Ia : Some ideas about continuous adaptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, T.; Den Otter, R.; van Engelen, B.

    2001-01-01

    The flexibility of the human motor system is remarkable. Even when parts of the system are damaged, the output often remains optimal or near-optimal. The neuromotor system is designed to keep the output optimal by shifting between input sources. This capability is termed the principle of continuous

  18.  Hypertelorism in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease 1A from the common PMP22 duplication: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Finsterer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available  The 1.4Mb tandem-duplication in the PMP22 gene at 17p11.2 usually manifests as hereditary sensorimotor polyneuropathy with foot deformity, sensorineural hearing-loss, moderate developmental delay, and gait disturbance. Hypertelorism and marked phenotypic variability within a single family has not been reported. In a single family, the PMP22 tandem-duplication manifested as short stature, sensorimotor polyneuropathy, tremor, ataxia, sensorineural hearing-loss, and hypothyroidism in the 27 years-old index case, as mild facial dysmorphism, muscle cramps, tinnitus, intention tremor, bradydiadochokinesia, and sensorimotor polyneuropathy in the 31 year-old half-brother of the index-patient, and as sensorimotor polyneuropathy and foot deformityin the father of the two. The half-brother additionally presented with hypertelorism, not previously reported in PMP22tandem-duplication carriers. The presented cases show that the tandem-duplication 17p11.2 may present with marked intra-familialphenotype variability and that mild facial dysmorphism with stuck-out ears and hypertelorism may be a rare phenotypic feature of this mutation. The causal relation between facial dysmorphism and the PMP22 tandem-duplication, however, remains speculative.

  19. Is the extracellular ATP a key in X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease and in inherited non-syndromic deafness?

    OpenAIRE

    Mas del Molino, Ezequiel

    2011-01-01

    [spa] El ATP es una molécula ampliamente conocida por su papel en muchas funciones como la homeostasis celular, el mantenimiento de gradientes iónicos, el mantenimiento del pH en gránulos secretores, el almacenamiento energético, regulador de la interacción actina-miosina, etc. Además, el ATP puede actuar como molécula señalizadora a través de los receptores purinérgicos P2. De receptores P2 hay de dos tipos, los P2X, que son ionotrópicos, y los P2Y que son metabotrópicos. Los primeros son un...

  20. 'Laminopathies': A wide spectrum of human diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutations in genes encoding the intermediate filament nuclear lamins and associated proteins cause a wide spectrum of diseases sometimes called 'laminopathies.' Diseases caused by mutations in LMNA encoding A-type lamins include autosomal dominant Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy and related myopathies, Dunnigan-type familial partial lipodystrophy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2B1 and developmental and accelerated aging disorders. Duplication in LMNB1 encoding lamin B1 causes autosomal dominant leukodystrophy and mutations in LMNB2 encoding lamin B2 are associated with acquired partial lipodystrophy. Disorders caused by mutations in genes encoding lamin-associated integral inner nuclear membrane proteins include X-linked Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy, sclerosing bone dysplasias, HEM/Greenberg skeletal dysplasia and Pelger-Huet anomaly. While mutations and clinical phenotypes of 'laminopathies' have been carefully described, data explaining pathogenic mechanisms are only emerging. Future investigations will likely identify new 'laminopathies' and a combination of basic and clinical research will lead to a better understanding of pathophysiology and the development of therapies

  1. Mitochondrial Fusion Proteins and Human Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Ranieri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are highly dynamic, complex organelles that continuously alter their shape, ranging between two opposite processes, fission and fusion, in response to several stimuli and the metabolic demands of the cell. Alterations in mitochondrial dynamics due to mutations in proteins involved in the fusion-fission machinery represent an important pathogenic mechanism of human diseases. The most relevant proteins involved in the mitochondrial fusion process are three GTPase dynamin-like proteins: mitofusin 1 (MFN1 and 2 (MFN2, located in the outer mitochondrial membrane, and optic atrophy protein 1 (OPA1, in the inner membrane. An expanding number of degenerative disorders are associated with mutations in the genes encoding MFN2 and OPA1, including Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2A and autosomal dominant optic atrophy. While these disorders can still be considered rare, defective mitochondrial dynamics seem to play a significant role in the molecular and cellular pathogenesis of more common neurodegenerative diseases, for example, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. This review provides an overview of the basic molecular mechanisms involved in mitochondrial fusion and focuses on the alteration in mitochondrial DNA amount resulting from impairment of mitochondrial dynamics. We also review the literature describing the main disorders associated with the disruption of mitochondrial fusion.

  2. Lamin A/C truncation in dilated cardiomyopathy with conduction disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huber Jill M

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the gene encoding the nuclear membrane protein lamin A/C have been associated with at least 7 distinct diseases including autosomal dominant dilated cardiomyopathy with conduction system disease, autosomal dominant and recessive Emery Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy, limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 1B, autosomal recessive type 2 Charcot Marie Tooth, mandibuloacral dysplasia, familial partial lipodystrophy and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria. Methods We used mutation detection to evaluate the lamin A/C gene in a 45 year-old woman with familial dilated cardiomyopathy and conduction system disease whose family has been well characterized for this phenotype 1. Results DNA from the proband was analyzed, and a novel 2 base-pair deletion c.908_909delCT in LMNA was identified. Conclusions Mutations in the gene encoding lamin A/C can lead to significant cardiac conduction system disease that can be successfully treated with pacemakers and/or defibrillators. Genetic screening can help assess risk for arrhythmia and need for device implantation.

  3. Musculoskeletal complications of neuromuscular disease in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Sherilyn W; Skinner, Joline

    2008-02-01

    A wide variety of neuromuscular diseases affect children, including central nervous system disorders such as cerebral palsy and spinal cord injury; motor neuron disorders such as spinal muscular atrophy; peripheral nerve disorders such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease; neuromuscular junction disorders such as congenital myasthenia gravis; and muscle fiber disorders such as Duchenne's muscular dystrophy. Although the origins and clinical syndromes vary significantly, outcomes related to musculoskeletal complications are often shared. The most frequently encountered musculoskeletal complications of neuromuscular disorders in children are scoliosis, bony rotational deformities, and hip dysplasia. Management is often challenging to those who work with children who have neuromuscular disorders. PMID:18194756

  4. ENU Mutagenesis Screen to Establish Motor Phenotypes in Wild-Type Mice and Modifiers of a Pre-Existing Motor Phenotype in Tau Mutant Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Liu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Modifier screening is a powerful genetic tool. While not widely used in the vertebrate system, we applied these tools to transgenic mouse strains that recapitulate key aspects of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, such as tau-expressing mice. These are characterized by a robust pathology including both motor and memory impairment. The phenotype can be modulated by ENU mutagenesis, which results in novel mutant mouse strains and allows identifying the underlying gene/mutation. Here we discuss this strategy in detail. We firstly obtained pedigrees that modify the tau-related motor phenotype, with mapping ongoing. We further obtained transgene-independent motor pedigrees: (i hyperactive, circling ENU 37 mice with a causal mutation in the Tbx1 gene—the complete knock-out of Tbx1 models DiGeorge Syndrome; (ii ENU12/301 mice that show sudden jerky movements and tremor constantly; they have a causal mutation in the Kcnq1 gene, modelling aspects of the Romano-Ward and Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndromes; and (iii ENU16/069 mice with tremor and hypermetric gait that have a causal mutation in the Mpz (Myelin Protein Zero gene, modelling Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 (CMT1B. Together, we provide evidence for a real potential of an ENU mutagenesis to dissect motor functions in wild-type and tau mutant mice.

  5. Decreased Variability of the 6-Minute Walk Test by Heart Rate Correction in Patients with Neuromuscular Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prahm, Kira Philipsen; Witting, Nanna; Vissing, John

    2014-01-01

    by heart rate correction. METHODS: Sixteen patients with neuromuscular diseases, including Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy, Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, Charcot-Marie-Tooths, Dystrophia Myotonica and Congenital Myopathy and 12 healthy subjects were studied. Patients were excluded if they...... had cardiac arrhythmias, if they received drug treatment for hypertension or any other medical conditions that could interfere with the interpretation of the heart rate and walking capability. All completed three 6-minute walk tests on three different test-days. Heart rate was measured continuously...... treatment trials....

  6. Defective membrane remodeling in neuromuscular diseases: insights from animal models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda S Cowling

    Full Text Available Proteins involved in membrane remodeling play an essential role in a plethora of cell functions including endocytosis and intracellular transport. Defects in several of them lead to human diseases. Myotubularins, amphiphysins, and dynamins are all proteins implicated in membrane trafficking and/or remodeling. Mutations in myotubularin, amphiphysin 2 (BIN1, and dynamin 2 lead to different forms of centronuclear myopathy, while mutations in myotubularin-related proteins cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies. In addition to centronuclear myopathy, dynamin 2 is also mutated in a dominant form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy. While several proteins from these different families are implicated in similar diseases, mutations in close homologues or in the same protein in the case of dynamin 2 lead to diseases affecting different tissues. This suggests (1 a common molecular pathway underlying these different neuromuscular diseases, and (2 tissue-specific regulation of these proteins. This review discusses the pathophysiology of the related neuromuscular diseases on the basis of animal models developed for proteins of the myotubularin, amphiphysin, and dynamin families. A better understanding of the common mechanisms between these neuromuscular disorders will lead to more specific health care and therapeutic approaches.

  7. Genotype-phenotype characteristics and baseline natural history of heritable neuropathies caused by mutations in the MPZ gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanmaneechai, Oranee; Feely, Shawna; Scherer, Steven S; Herrmann, David N; Burns, Joshua; Muntoni, Francesco; Li, Jun; Siskind, Carly E; Day, John W; Laura, Matilde; Sumner, Charlotte J; Lloyd, Thomas E; Ramchandren, Sindhu; Shy, Rosemary R; Grider, Tiffany; Bacon, Chelsea; Finkel, Richard S; Yum, Sabrina W; Moroni, Isabella; Piscosquito, Giuseppe; Pareyson, Davide; Reilly, Mary M; Shy, Michael E

    2015-11-01

    We aimed to characterize genotype-phenotype correlations and establish baseline clinical data for peripheral neuropathies caused by mutations in the myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene. MPZ mutations are the second leading cause of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1. Recent research makes clinical trials for patients with MPZ mutations a realistic possibility. However, the clinical severity varies with different mutations and natural history data on progression is sparse. We present cross-sectional data to begin to define the phenotypic spectrum and clinical baseline of patients with these mutations. A cohort of patients with MPZ gene mutations was identified in 13 centres of the Inherited Neuropathies Consortium - Rare Disease Clinical Research Consortium (INC-RDCRC) between 2009 and 2012 and at Wayne State University between 1996 and 2009. Patient phenotypes were quantified by the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease neuropathy score version 1 or 2 and the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease paediatric scale outcome instruments. Genetic testing was performed in all patients and/or in first- or second-degree relatives to document mutation in MPZ gene indicating diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B. There were 103 patients from 71 families with 47 different MPZ mutations with a mean age of 40 years (range 3-84 years). Patients and mutations were separated into infantile, childhood and adult-onset groups. The infantile onset group had higher Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease neuropathy score version 1 or 2 and slower nerve conductions than the other groups, and severity increased with age. Twenty-three patients had no family history of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Sixty-one patients wore foot/ankle orthoses, 19 required walking assistance or support, and 10 required wheelchairs. There was hearing loss in 21 and scoliosis in 17. Forty-two patients did not begin walking until after 15 months of age. Half of the infantile onset patients then required ambulation aids or wheelchairs for

  8. Organization experience of diagnostic and medicosocial services for patients with Charcot—Marie—Tooth disease in Krasnoyarsk region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Glushchenko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary neuropathy Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT is the most common form of hereditary polyneuropathies. Goal of the study was the development of evidence-based diagnostic and treatment algorithms using patients with CMT (for example, in Krasnoyarsk Territory.Materials and methods: A total of 324 people. (probands and their relatives 1 and 2 lines of kinship. We analyzed 125 (38,5 % clinical cases of CMT, 64/125 (51,2 % clinical cases were include to statistical analysis (probands and their family trees, past the full range of clinical and laboratory findings according to the protocol this study. Age ranged from 6 to 81 years, median age — 30,5 years, including women 24 (37,5 %, median age — 33,5 years; males 40 (62,5 %, median age — 28,5 years. Methods of diagnosis: clinical, genetic, neurophysiological, molecular genetic, assessment of quality of life assessment of anxiety and depression.Results: The family history of CMT noted in 53/57 (93,0 % cases, with a predominance of autosomal dominant type of inheritance —52 (91,2 % cases. As a result of DNA testing duplication of peripheral myelin protein gene (RMR22 on chromosome 17, held 34 survey, this mutation was found in 17 (50,0 % patients. Modified method of computer esthesiometry for CMT diagnosis using domestic diagnostic equipment “Vibrotester-MBN” BT-02-1 has a high sensitivity in the early stages of the disease and can be recommended for more widespread adoption of on par with other subjects of the Russian Federation.

  9. Disease: H00929 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H00929 Congenital vertical talus Congenital vertical talus is a primary dislocation... Gurnett CA, Connolly AM, Pestronk A, Dobbs MB Skeletal muscle abnormalities and genetic factors related to vertical...on, gene) Levinsohn EM, Shrimpton AE, Cady RB, Packard DS, Hootnick DR Congenital vertical talus in four gen...otnick DR A HOX gene mutation in a family with isolated congenital vertical talus and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Am J Hum Genet 75:92-6 (2004) PMID:16450407 (description, gene) Dobbs MB, Gurnett CA, Pierce B, Exner GU, Robarge J, Morcuende JA, Cole WG, Templeton PA, Foster B, Bowcock AM HOXD10 M319K mutation in a family with isolated congenital vertical talus. J Orthop Res 24:448-53 (2006) ...

  10. The impact of autophagy on peripheral synapses in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolf, Rudiger; Khan, Muzamil Majid; Wild, Franziska; Hashemolhosseini, Said

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of autophagy have been linked to several peripheral nervous system diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Modulation of autophagy by metabolic or pharmacological interventions has been increasingly recognized as a strategy to fight many of these disorders. Cellular processes that are aberrant in case of impaired autophagy and that might lead to these diseases belong to three different categories: (1) clearing of protein aggregates, (2) regulation of vesicle and cargo turnover, and (3) disposal of damaged mitochondria. This review summarizes the present literature that addresses both, the impact and mechanisms of autophagy on the health of the peripheral nervous system and treatment proposals for human disorders associated with impaired autophagy. PMID:27100517

  11. Novel C12orf65 mutations in patients with axonal neuropathy and optic atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Tucci,A; Liu, Y. T.; Preza, E; Pitceathly, R. D.; Chalasani, A.; Plagnol, V.; Land, J. M.; Trabzuni, D.; Ryten, M.; Jaunmuktane, Z.; Reilly, M.M.; Brandner, S; Hargreaves, I.; Hardy, J.; Singleton, A B

    2013-01-01

    Objective Charcot-Marie Tooth disease (CMT) forms a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders. Although a number of disease genes have been identified for CMT, the gene discovery for some complex form of CMT has lagged behind. The association of neuropathy and optic atrophy (also known as CMT type 6) has been described with autosomaldominant, recessive and X-linked modes of inheritance. Mutations in Mitofusin 2 have been found to cause dominant forms of CMT6. Phosphoribosylp...

  12. Mechanisms for Nonrecurrent Genomic Rearrangements Associated with CMT1A or HNPP: Rare CNVs as a Cause for Missing Heritability

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Feng; Seeman, Pavel; Liu, Pengfei; Weterman, Marian A.J.; Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Towne, Charles F.; Batish, Sat Dev; De Vriendt, Els; De Jonghe, Peter; Rautenstrauss, Bernd; Krause, Klaus-Henning; Khajavi, Mehrdad; Posadka, Jan; Vandenberghe, Antoon; Palau, Francesc

    2010-01-01

    Genomic rearrangements involving the peripheral myelin protein gene (PMP22) in human chromosome 17p12 are associated with neuropathy: duplications cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A), whereas deletions lead to hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). Our previous studies showed that >99% of these rearrangements are recurrent and mediated by nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR). Rare copy number variations (CNVs) generated by nonrecurrent rearrangeme...

  13. The instability of the BTB-KELCH protein Gigaxonin causes Giant Axonal Neuropathy and constitutes a new penetrant and specific diagnostic test

    OpenAIRE

    Boizot, Alexia; Talmat-Amar, Yasmina; Morrogh, Deborah; Kuntz, Nancy; Halbert, Cecile; Chabrol, Brigitte; Houlden, Henry; Stojkovic, Tanya; Schulman, Brenda; Rautenstrauss, Bernd; Bomont, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    International audience BACKGROUND: The BTB-KELCH protein Gigaxonin plays key roles in sustaining neuron survival and cytoskeleton architecture. Indeed, recessive mutations in the Gigaxonin-encoding gene cause Giant Axonal Neuropathy (GAN), a severe neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a wide disorganization of the Intermediate Filament network. Growing evidences suggest that GAN is a continuum with the peripheral neuropathy Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases type 2 (CMT2). Sharing similar...

  14. A Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease resembling to chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: a report of two cases%慢性炎性脱髓鞘性周围神经病样表现的腓骨肌萎缩症二例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王毅; 乔凯; 吕传真

    2005-01-01

    目的观察亚急性病程的慢性炎性脱髓鞘性周围神经病(CIDP)样表现的腓骨肌萎缩症(CMT)的临床、病理和电生理特点.方法报道2例亚急性的CIDP样表现的CMT患者的临床、神经电生理及周围神经活检的病理特点.结果 2例证实为17p12重复突变的CMT1A患者,慢性病程中亚急性加重,临床表现类似于CIDP.肌电图示运动神经传导速度(MNCV)减慢、阻滞;神经活检见洋葱头样改变,髓鞘脱失,有炎性细胞的浸润,证明有炎性脱髓鞘的CMT1A存在,且免疫治疗有效.结论慢性病程的CMT1A可有类似于CIDP的病程和临床表现,免疫治疗可改善症状.

  15. Polymyositis: Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT) Congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) ... examination. This may be followed by some lab tests, perhaps of the electrical activity inside the muscles ...

  16. Inclusion-Body Myositis: Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT) Congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) ... examination. This may be followed by some lab tests, perhaps of the electrical activity inside the muscles. ...

  17. Dermatomyositis: Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT) Congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) ... examination. This may be followed by some lab tests, perhaps of the electrical activity inside the muscles, ...

  18. Non-radioactive detection of 17p11.2 duplication in CMT1A: a study of 78 patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Schiavon, F; Mostacciuolo, M. L.; Saad, F.; Merlini, L.; Siciliano, G; Angelini, C.; Danieli, G A

    1994-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 (CMT1) is a peripheral neuropathy characterised by progressive distal muscular atrophy and sensory loss with markedly decreased nerve conduction velocity, mostly inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. The most common form, type 1A, is associated with a 1.5Mb DNA duplication in region p11.2-p12 of chromosome 17 in many patients. In this study a non-radioactive test for detection of the CMT1A duplication based on an RM11-GT microsatellite polymorphism is pr...

  19. A Clinical Analysis of 36 Nervous System Disease Patients Acompanying Auditory Neuropathy%伴发神经系统疾病的听神经病36例临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王锦玲; 王剑; 石力; 薛飞; 吴保仁; 高磊; 谢娟; 韩丽萍

    2011-01-01

    neuropathy (AN) and the relations between them. Methods The clinical data of 36 syndromic AN patients were retrospectively examined and ten typical patients were described in this study. Results Thirty-six nervous system disease patients consisted of Friedreich ataxia (5 patients), Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (4 patients), Refsum disease (1 patient), optic atrophy (9 patients), pelvic limb peripheral neuropathy (9 patients), multiple sclerosis (2 patients), chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP, 1 patient), subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord (2 patients), motor neuron disease (1 patient), hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (1 patient), and erythromelalgia (1 patient). Twenty-three out of 36 patients developed more than one type of nervous system diseases. Twenty-two (61.11 %) patients appeared to have hearing loss and poor speech recognition abilities as the first symptoms while the other patients (39%) showed the features of peripheral neuropathy firstly, including the numbness of lower limb, difficulty or weakness in walking, and visual impairment. Seven patients had family hereditary history. According to etiological factors,neurological examinations showed various findings as presented in this paper.Fourteen out of 26 patients who received vestibular caloric tests showed canal paresis, and vestibular evoked myogenic potentials(VEMP) wave could not be observed in 9 out of 13 patients. All the audiological diagnostic results were within the AN diagnostic criteria. Conclusion AN may be accompanied with nervous system diseases in that most are peripheral and hereditary neuropathy. Most patients appeared to have hearing loss, difficulty in walking or visual impairment. The audiological tests showed that they all had the characteristics of auditory neuropathy. The hearing disorder may be before or late during the course of nervous system disease. AN symptoms may indicate that the primary neurological disorders have affected the auditory nerve.

  20. Pathological relationships involving iron and myelin may constitute a shared mechanism linking various rare and common brain diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Moones; Gerami, Sam H.; Bassett, Brianna; Graham, Ross M.; Chua, Anita C.G.; Aryal, Ritambhara; House, Michael J.; Collingwood, Joanna F.; Bettencourt, Conceição; Houlden, Henry; Ryten, Mina; Olynyk, John K.; Trinder, Debbie; Johnstone, Daniel M.; Milward, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We previously demonstrated elevated brain iron levels in myelinated structures and associated cells in a hemochromatosis Hfe−/−xTfr2mut mouse model. This was accompanied by altered expression of a group of myelin-related genes, including a suite of genes causatively linked to the rare disease family ‘neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation’ (NBIA). Expanded data mining and ontological analyses have now identified additional myelin-related transcriptome changes in response to brain iron loading. Concordance between the mouse transcriptome changes and human myelin-related gene expression networks in normal and NBIA basal ganglia testifies to potential clinical relevance. These analyses implicate, among others, genes linked to various rare central hypomyelinating leukodystrophies and peripheral neuropathies including Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease as well as genes linked to other rare neurological diseases such as Niemann-Pick disease. The findings may help understand interrelationships of iron and myelin in more common conditions such as hemochromatosis, multiple sclerosis and various psychiatric disorders. PMID:27500074

  1. Additive reductions in zebrafish PRPS1 activity result in a spectrum of deficiencies modeling several human PRPS1-associated diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Wuhong; Xu, Lisha; Varshney, Gaurav K.; Carrington, Blake; Bishop, Kevin; Jones, MaryPat; Huang, Sunny C.; Idol, Jennifer; Pretorius, Pamela R.; Beirl, Alisha; Schimmenti, Lisa A.; Kindt, Katie S.; Sood, Raman; Burgess, Shawn M.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase-1 (PRPS1) is a key enzyme in nucleotide biosynthesis, and mutations in PRPS1 are found in several human diseases including nonsyndromic sensorineural deafness, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease-5, and Arts Syndrome. We utilized zebrafish as a model to confirm that mutations in PRPS1 result in phenotypic deficiencies in zebrafish similar to those in the associated human diseases. We found two paralogs in zebrafish, prps1a and prps1b and characterized each paralogous mutant individually as well as the double mutant fish. Zebrafish prps1a mutants and prps1a;prps1b double mutants showed similar morphological phenotypes with increasingly severe phenotypes as the number of mutant alleles increased. Phenotypes included smaller eyes and reduced hair cell numbers, consistent with the optic atrophy and hearing impairment observed in human patients. The double mutant also showed abnormal development of primary motor neurons, hair cell innervation, and reduced leukocytes, consistent with the neuropathy and recurrent infection of the human patients possessing the most severe reductions of PRPS1 activity. Further analyses indicated the phenotypes were associated with a prolonged cell cycle likely resulting from reduced nucleotide synthesis and energy production in the mutant embryos. We further demonstrated the phenotypes were caused by delays in the tissues most highly expressing the prps1 genes. PMID:27425195

  2. A duplicated PLP gene causing Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease detected by comparative multiplex PCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, K.; Sugiyama, N.; Kawanishi, C. [Yokohama City Univ., Yokohama (Japan)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) is an X-linked dysmyelinating disorder caused by abnormalities in the proteolipid protein (PLP) gene, which is essential for oligodendrocyte differentiation and CNS myelin formation. Although linkage analysis has shown the homogeneity at the PLP locus in patients with PMD, exonic mutations in the PLP gene have been identified in only 10% - 25% of all cases, which suggests the presence of other genetic aberrations, including gene duplication. In this study, we examined five families with PMD not carrying exonic mutations in PLP gene, using comparative multiplex PCR (CM-PCR) as a semiquantitative assay of gene dosage. PLP gene duplications were identified in four families by CM-PCR and confirmed in three families by densitometric RFLP analysis. Because a homologous myelin protein gene, PMP22, is duplicated in the majority of patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A, PLP gene overdosage may be an important genetic abnormality in PMD and affect myelin formation. 38 ref., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Abnormal interaction of motor neuropathy-associated mutant HspB8 (Hsp22) forms with the RNA helicase Ddx20 (gemin3)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Xiankui; Fontaine, Jean-Marc; Hoppe, Adam D.; Carra, Serena; DeGuzman, Cheryl; Martin, Jody L.; Simon, Stephanie; Vicart, Patrick; Welsh, Michael J.; Landry, Jacques; Benndorf, Rainer

    2010-01-01

    A number of missense mutations in the two related small heat shock proteins HspB8 (Hsp22) and HspB1 (Hsp27) have been associated with the inherited motor neuron diseases (MND) distal hereditary motor neuropathy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. HspB8 and HspB1 interact with each other, suggesting tha

  4. Comparison of CMT1A and CMT2: similarities and differences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.M.E. Bienfait; C. Verhamme; I.N. van Schaik; J.H.T.M. Koelman; B.W.O. de Visser; R.J. de Haan; F. Baas; B.G.M. van Engelen; M. de Visser

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical and electrophysiological similarities and differences between two large groups of patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, i.e. CMT1A and CMT2, we performed a post hoc comparison of clinical and electrophysiological data. Most CMT1A and CMT2 patients had the classical CMT

  5. Comparison of CMT1A and CMT2: similarities and differences.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bienfait, H.M.; Verhamme, C.; Schaik, I.N. van; Koelman, J.H.; Visser, B.W. de; Haan, R.J. de; Baas, F.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Visser, M. de

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical and electrophysiological similarities and differences between two large groups of patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, i.e. CMT1A and CMT2, we performed a post hoc comparison of clinical and electrophysiological data.Most CMT1A and CMT2 patients had the classical CMT p

  6. Studies of cellular radiosensitivity in hereditary disorders of nervous system and muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan, S.; Lewis, P.D. (Royal Postgraduate Medical School, London (UK))

    1983-12-01

    Skin fibroblasts from patients with familial dysautonomia, Duchenne muscular dystrophy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease show normal sensitivity to ionising radiation, as measured by post-irradiation clonal growth. Previous reports of cellular hypersensitivity to ionising radiation and other DNA-damaging agents in familial dysautonomia and Duchenne muscular dystrophy have not been confirmed.

  7. Studies of cellular radiosensitivity in hereditary disorders of nervous system and muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skin fibroblasts from patients with familial dysautonomia, Duchenne muscular dystrophy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease show normal sensitivity to ionising radiation, as measured by post-irradiation clonal growth. Previous reports of cellular hypersensitivity to ionising radiation and other DNA-damaging agents in familial dysautonomia and Duchenne muscular dystrophy have not been confirmed. (author)

  8. Studies of cellular radiosensitivity in hereditary disorders of nervous system and muscle.

    OpenAIRE

    Brennan, S; Lewis, P.D.

    1983-01-01

    Skin fibroblasts from patients with familial dysautonomia, Duchenne muscular dystrophy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease show normal sensitivity to ionising radiation, as measured by post-irradiation clonal growth. Previous reports of cellular hypersensitivity to ionising radiation and other DNA-damaging agents in familial dysautonomia and Duchenne muscular dystrophy have not been confirmed.

  9. The proteolipid protein gene: Double, double, . . . and trouble

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodes, M.E.; Dlouhy, S.R. [Indiana Univ. School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    1996-07-01

    That more of a good thing may be too much has been apparent at least since the discovery that Down syndrome is caused by three copies of chromosome 21 instead of the normal two. Duplications of myelin genes also lead to trouble. An extra dose of PMP22, the gene for a protein of peripheral nervous system myelin, causes Charcot-Marie Tooth type 1A disease (CMT1A). Increased dosage of the proteolipid protein gene, PLP, which encodes the chief protein of CNS myelin, can cause Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD). The work of Inoue et al. is of particular importance because they found the duplication in four of five families with {open_quotes}classical{close_quotes} PMD, whereas other changes in PLP, such as missense mutations, are found in no more than one in four or five patients with the disease. 27 refs.

  10. Exome sequencing resolves apparent incidental findings and reveals further complexity of SH3TC2 variant alleles causing Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Lupski, James R.; Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Yang, Yaping; Bainbridge, Matthew N.; Jhangiani, Shalini; Buhay, Christian J.; Christie L Kovar; Wang, Min; Hawes, Alicia C.; Reid, Jeffrey G; Eng, Christine; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Background The debate regarding the relative merits of whole genome sequencing (WGS) versus exome sequencing (ES) centers around comparative cost, average depth of coverage for each interrogated base, and their relative efficiency in the identification of medically actionable variants from the myriad of variants identified by each approach. Nevertheless, few genomes have been subjected to both WGS and ES, using multiple next generation sequencing platforms. In addition, no personal genome has...

  11. Implications of mitochondrial dynamics on neurodegeneration and on hypothalamic dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio eZorzano

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dynamics is a term that encompasses the movement of mitochondria along the cytoskeleton, regulation of their architecture, and connectivity mediated by tethering and fusion/fission. The importance of these events in cell physiology and pathology has been partially unraveled with the identification of the genes responsible for the catalysis of mitochondrial fusion and fission. Mutations in two mitochondrial fusion genes (MFN2 and OPA1 cause neurodegenerative diseases, namely Charcot-Marie Tooth type 2A and autosomal dominant optic atrophy. Alterations in mitochondrial dynamics may be involved in the pathophysiology of prevalent neurodegenerative conditions. Moreover, impairment of the activity of mitochondrial fusion proteins dysregulates the function of hypothalamic neurons, leading to alterations in food intake and in energy homeostasis. Here we review selected findings in the field of mitochondrial dynamics and their relevance for neurodegeneration and hypothalamic dysfunction.

  12. Na(v)1.8 channelopathy in mutant mice deficient for myelin protein zero is detrimental to motor axons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvarez Herrero, Susana; Pinchenko, Volodymyr; Klein, Dennis;

    2011-01-01

    Myelin protein zero mutations were found to produce Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease phenotypes with various degrees of myelin impairment and axonal loss, ranging from the mild 'demyelinating' adult form to severe and early onset forms. Protein zero deficient homozygous mice ( ) show a severe and...... conventional nerve conduction studies, behavioural studies using rotor-rod measurements, and histological measures to assess membrane dysfunction and its progression in protein zero deficient homozygous mutants as compared with age-matched wild-type controls. The involvement of Na(V)1.8 was investigated by...... pharmacologic block using the subtype-selective Na(V)1.8 blocker A-803467 and chronically in Na(V)1.8 knock-outs. We found that in the context of dysmyelination, abnormal potassium ion currents and membrane depolarization, the ectopic Na(V)1.8 channels further impair the motor axon excitability in protein zero...

  13. Generation and characterization of transgenic mice expressing mitochondrial targeted red fluorescent protein selectively in neurons: modeling mitochondriopathy in excitotoxicity and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Yi; Pan Yan; Price Ann; Martin Lee J

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Mitochondria have roles or appear to have roles in the pathogenesis of several chronic age-related and acute neurological disorders, including Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and cerebral ischemia, and could be critical targets for development of rational mechanism-based, disease-modifying therapeutics for treating these disorders effectively. A deeper understanding of neural tissue mitochondria pathobiologies as definitive ...

  14. A deletion in the N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) gene in Greyhounds with polyneuropathy.

    OpenAIRE

    Cord Drögemüller; Doreen Becker; Barbara Kessler; Elisabeth Kemter; Jens Tetens; Konrad Jurina; Karin Hultin Jäderlund; Annette Flagstad; Michele Perloski; Kerstin Lindblad-Toh; Kaspar Matiasek

    2010-01-01

    The polyneuropathy of juvenile Greyhound show dogs shows clinical similarities to the genetically heterogeneous Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease in humans. The pedigrees containing affected dogs suggest monogenic autosomal recessive inheritance and all affected dogs trace back to a single male. Here, we studied the neuropathology of this disease and identified a candidate causative mutation. Peripheral nerve biopsies from affected dogs were examined using semi-thin histology, nerve fibre tea...

  15. Neuropathic Pain Model of Peripheral Neuropathies Mediated by Mutations of Glycyl-tRNA Synthetase

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Seo Jin; Seo, Ah Jung; Park, Byung Sun; Jo, Hyun Woo; Huh, Youngbuhm

    2014-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most common inherited motor and sensory neuropathy. Previous studies have found that, according to CMT patients, neuropathic pain is an occasional symptom of CMT. However, neuropathic pain is not considered to be a significant symptom associated with CMT and, as a result, no studies have investigated the pathophysiology underlying neuropathic pain in this disorder. Thus, the first animal model of neuropathic pain was developed by our laboratory using a...

  16. Mutation screen reveals novel variants and expands the phenotypes associated with DYNC1H1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Alleene V; Schabhüttl, Maria; Offenbacher, Hans; Synofzik, Matthis; Hauser, Natalie S; Brunner-Krainz, Michaela; Gruber-Sedlmayr, Ursula; Moore, Steven A; Windhager, Reinhard; Bender, Benjamin; Harms, Matthew; Klebe, Stephan; Young, Peter; Kennerson, Marina; Garcia, Avencia Sanchez Mejias; Gonzalez, Michael A; Züchner, Stephan; Schule, Rebecca; Shy, Michael E; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2015-09-01

    Dynein, cytoplasmic 1, heavy chain 1 (DYNC1H1) encodes a necessary subunit of the cytoplasmic dynein complex, which traffics cargo along microtubules. Dominant DYNC1H1 mutations are implicated in neural diseases, including spinal muscular atrophy with lower extremity dominance (SMA-LED), intellectual disability with neuronal migration defects, malformations of cortical development, and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, type 2O. We hypothesized that additional variants could be found in these and novel motoneuron and related diseases. Therefore, we analyzed our database of 1024 whole exome sequencing samples of motoneuron and related diseases for novel single nucleotide variations. We filtered these results for significant variants, which were further screened using segregation analysis in available family members. Analysis revealed six novel, rare, and highly conserved variants. Three of these are likely pathogenic and encompass a broad phenotypic spectrum with distinct disease clusters. Our findings suggest that DYNC1H1 variants can cause not only lower, but also upper motor neuron disease. It thus adds DYNC1H1 to the growing list of spastic paraplegia related genes in microtubule-dependent motor protein pathways. PMID:26100331

  17. Function Over Form: Modeling Groups of Inherited Neurological Conditions in Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozol, Robert A; Abrams, Alexander J; James, David M; Buglo, Elena; Yan, Qing; Dallman, Julia E

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish are a unique cell to behavior model for studying the basic biology of human inherited neurological conditions. Conserved vertebrate genetics and optical transparency provide in vivo access to the developing nervous system as well as high-throughput approaches for drug screens. Here we review zebrafish modeling for two broad groups of inherited conditions that each share genetic and molecular pathways and overlap phenotypically: neurodevelopmental disorders such as Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), Intellectual Disability (ID) and Schizophrenia (SCZ), and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Cerebellar Ataxia (CATX), Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia (HSP) and Charcot-Marie Tooth Disease (CMT). We also conduct a small meta-analysis of zebrafish orthologs of high confidence neurodevelopmental disorder and neurodegenerative disease genes by looking at duplication rates and relative protein sizes. In the past zebrafish genetic models of these neurodevelopmental disorders and neurodegenerative diseases have provided insight into cellular, circuit and behavioral level mechanisms contributing to these conditions. Moving forward, advances in genetic manipulation, live imaging of neuronal activity and automated high-throughput molecular screening promise to help delineate the mechanistic relationships between different types of neurological conditions and accelerate discovery of therapeutic strategies. PMID:27458342

  18. In vivo intracellular recordings from spinal lumbar motoneurones in P0-deficient mice indicate an activity-dependent axonal conduction failure in otherwise functional motoneurones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehnhoff, Janna; Moldovan, Mihai; Hedegaard, Anne;

    2014-01-01

    Mice deficient for the peripheral myelin binding protein zero (P0-/-) show a progressive dysmyelinating neuropathy phenotypically resembling severe forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease. Traditionally, the progression of the disease was attributed to axonal loss, but the effect of chronic...... dysmyelination remains poorly understood. In this study, in vivo electrophysiological recordings were used to assess the function of both central and axonal components of spinal lumbar motoneurones in adult P0-/- mice.Three month old P0-/- mice (n=7) and wild type (WT) littermate controls (n=5) were...... anaesthetized with Hypnorm (0.315 mg/mL fentanyl-citrate + 10 mg/mL fluanisone), Midazolam (5 mg/mL), and sterile water, mixed in the ratio 1:1:2 (induction: 0.15mL/25g, maintenance: 0.05 mL/20 minutes, S.C.). Anaesthesia during surgery was assessed by the lack of reflexes to a short noxious pinch on the hind...

  19. Phenotype expression in women with CMT1X.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Siskind, Carly E

    2011-06-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1X (CMT1X) is the second most common inherited peripheral neuropathy. Women with CMT1X typically have a less severe phenotype than men, perhaps because of X-inactivation patterns. Our objective was to determine the phenotype of women with CMT1X and whether X-inactivation patterns in white blood cells (WBCs) differ between females with CMT1X and controls. Thirty-one women with CMT1X were evaluated using the CMT neuropathy score (CMTNS) and the CMT symptom score in cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses. Lower scores correspond to less disability. WBCs were analyzed for X-inactivation pattern by androgen receptor X-inactivation assay in 14 patients and 23 controls. The 31 women\\'s mean CMTNS was 8.35. Two-thirds of the cohort had a mild CMTNS (mean 4.85) and one-third had a moderate CMTNS (mean 14.73). Three patients had a CMTNS of 0. The pattern of X-inactivation did not differ between the affected and control groups. Women with CMT1X presented with variable impairment independent of age, type of mutation, or location of mutation. No evidence supported the presence of a gap junction beta-1 (GJB1) mutation affecting the pattern of X-inactivation in blood. Further studies are planned to determine whether X-inactivation is the mechanism for CMT1X females\\' variable phenotypes.

  20. New mutations in CMT 1 and HNPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandenberghe, A.; Boucherat, M. [Faculty of Pharmacy, Lyon (France); Bonnebouche, C. [Hopital de l`Antiquaille, Lyon (France)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The majority of mutations in CMT 1 (Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1) are due to a duplication of a 1.5 Mb fragment from chromosome 17 containing the PMP22 myelin gene. In addition, micromutations are found in the genes for PMP22 and myelin Po. We collected data from over one hundred families with a duplication in 17p11.2. In about 10% of these families, a de novo mutation was observed. All parents were clinically examined as normal and correct paternity was confirmed. Some families were informative for polymorphic probes located in the duplicated region, and we could deduce a majority of new mutations to be from paternal origin. HNPP (hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies) is believed to be the reciprocal product of an unequal crossing over underlying the CMT 1 mutation and is due to a deletion of the 1.5 Mb fragment. One new HNPP mutation was found among 7 deleted HNPP families. This mutation is of paternal origin. Clinically assigned CMT 1 patients without a duplication are screened for micromutations applying the SSCP technique. In one family, a de novo mutation was found in the gene for Po.

  1. 节段性运动神经传导测定在慢性炎性脱髓鞘性多发性神经根神经病和腓骨肌萎缩症1型之间的差异%Difference of segmental motor nerve conduction study between chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy and Clarcot-Marie-Tooth type 1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘明生; 崔丽英; 冯新红; 管宇宙; 李本红; 杜华

    2010-01-01

    目的 探讨节段性运动神经传导测定在慢性炎性脱髓鞘性多发性神经根神经病(chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy,CIDP)和腓骨肌萎缩症1型(Charcot-MarieTooth type1,CMT1)鉴别诊断中的价值.方法 收集16例CIDP和13例CMT1患者,进行节段性运动神经传导测定,比较两组远端运动潜伏期、运动神经传导速度,以及近端和远端比较复合肌肉动作电位波幅、面积和时限变化的差异.结果 CIDP和CMT1患者远端运动潜伏期分别为(5.6±3.4)、(9.3±2.1)ms(t=5.347,P=0.000),运动传导速度分别为(31.1±14.3)、(22.2±5.8)m/s(t=6.369,P=0.000),近端和远端比较波幅下降百分比M5o分别为29.7%和4.9%(Z=7.141,P=0.000).在CIDP患者,所有测定神经中40.3%(25/62)远端潜伏期正常,18.1%(26/144)的神经节段传导速度正常,而在CMT1中所有测定神经的远端潜伏期均延长,所有测定节段的传导速度均减慢.在CIDP患者29.2%的神经节段可见传导阻滞或异常波形离散,而在CMT1仅有3.0%的节段可见传导阻滞(x2=20.829,P=0.000).结论 当针对CIDP和CMT1进行鉴别时,如果节段性运动神经传导测定发现传导阻滞和异常波形离散、不同神经节段传导速度下降程度差别较大,可以支持 CIDP的诊断.%Objective to assess the utility of segmental motor nerve conduction study in differential diagnosis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy(CIDP)and Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1(CMT1).Methods A segmental motor nerve conduction study was performed on 16 patients with CIDP and 13 patients with CMT1.Distal motor latency,motor nerve conduction velocity,the changes of amplitude,area and duration of compound motor action potential over conventional segment were compared between the groups.Results Distal motor latency was (5.6±3.4) ms in CIDP and (9.3±2.1) ms in CMT1(t=5.347 P=0.000),motor nerve conduction velocity was (31.1±14.3) m/s in CIDP and(22.2±5.8)m/s(t=6.369,P=0

  2. Sciatic nerve tumor and tumor-like lesions - uncommon pathologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sciatic nerve mass-like enlargement caused by peripheral nerve sheath tumors or neurocutaneous syndromes such as neurofibromatosis or schwannomatosis has been widely reported. Other causes of enlargement, such as from perineuroma, fibromatosis, neurolymphoma, amyloidosis, endometriosis, intraneural ganglion cyst, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy are relatively rare. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an excellent non-invasive tool for the evaluation of such lesions. In this article, the authors discuss normal anatomy of the sciatic nerve and MRI findings of the above-mentioned lesions. (orig.)

  3. Sciatic nerve tumor and tumor-like lesions - uncommon pathologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wadhwa, Vibhor; Thakkar, Rashmi S.; Carrino, John A.; Chhabra, Avneesh [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Maragakis, Nicholas; Hoeke, Ahmet; Sumner, Charlotte J.; Lloyd, Thomas E. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Belzberg, Allan J. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Sciatic nerve mass-like enlargement caused by peripheral nerve sheath tumors or neurocutaneous syndromes such as neurofibromatosis or schwannomatosis has been widely reported. Other causes of enlargement, such as from perineuroma, fibromatosis, neurolymphoma, amyloidosis, endometriosis, intraneural ganglion cyst, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy are relatively rare. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an excellent non-invasive tool for the evaluation of such lesions. In this article, the authors discuss normal anatomy of the sciatic nerve and MRI findings of the above-mentioned lesions. (orig.)

  4. Clinical and Genetic Characteristics Analysis of Auditory Neuropathy Acompanying Peripheral Nervous System Disease%以听神经病为首发病伴周围神经病家系的听力学及遗传学特征分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐悦; 兰兰; 史伟; 张秋静; 纵亮; 李娜; 王大勇; 李倩; 王秋菊

    2012-01-01

    目的 分析以听神经病为首发病伴周围神经病家系的临床听力学及遗传学特征.方法 对3个以听神经病为首发病伴周围神经病的家系进行病史采集、专科体检、听力学检查及相关的神经系统检查,从患者的临床表型、听力学检测、家系谱图及家系遗传学特征进行分析.结果 3个家系中的患者均以听神经病为首发病,其中,2个家系中的患者伴发Charcot-Marie-Tooth(CMT)综合征、1个家系中的患者伴发运动神经元病.3个家系中患者的表型特点均为青少年期发病的低频下降为主的双侧感音神经性聋,多伴局部感觉及运动障碍.家系谱分析显示两个伴发CMT综合征家系分别具有常染色体隐性及X连锁隐性遗传特征,而伴发运动神经元病家系则表现出常染色体隐性遗传特征.结论 部分听神经病可表现为周围神经病的首发病,青少年期发病,双耳低频下降型感音神经性聋;具有为常染色体隐性或X连锁隐性遗传特征.%Objective To analysis the clinical and genetic characteristics of three Chinese families with auditory neuropathy and peripheral nervous system disease. Methods The three Chinese families with auditory neuropathy and peripheral nervous system disease were investigated by history collectioning, physical examinationing, audiologi-cal examinationing and drawing the family trees. The systematic examination of audiology including audiological examination, such as pure tone testing, OAE, ABR,and neurologic examination. Results The three families had been diagnosed with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss mainly at low frequency. The hearing loss ranged from mild to serves. Patients all had tinnitus, sensory and movement disorders, partly had ataxia, optic atrophy and other symptoms. Among them, seven of the eight patients accepted systematic examination of audiology. All the audiological diagnostic results showed typical characters of auditory neuropathy

  5. Functional and comparative genomics analyses of pmp22 in medaka fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawarabayasi Yutaka

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pmp22, a member of the junction protein family Claudin/EMP/PMP22, plays an important role in myelin formation. Increase of pmp22 transcription causes peripheral neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type1A (CMT1A. The pathophysiological phenotype of CMT1A is aberrant axonal myelination which induces a reduction in nerve conduction velocity (NCV. Several CMT1A model rodents have been established by overexpressing pmp22. Thus, it is thought that pmp22 expression must be tightly regulated for correct myelin formation in mammals. Interestingly, the myelin sheath is also present in other jawed vertebrates. The purpose of this study is to analyze the evolutionary conservation of the association between pmp22 transcription level and vertebrate myelin formation, and to find the conserved non-coding sequences for pmp22 regulation by comparative genomics analyses between jawed fishes and mammals. Results A transgenic pmp22 over-expression medaka fish line was established. The transgenic fish had approximately one fifth the peripheral NCV values of controls, and aberrant myelination of transgenic fish in the peripheral nerve system (PNS was observed. We successfully confirmed that medaka fish pmp22 has the same exon-intron structure as mammals, and identified some known conserved regulatory motifs. Furthermore, we found novel conserved sequences in the first intron and 3'UTR. Conclusion Medaka fish undergo abnormalities in the PNS when pmp22 transcription increases. This result indicates that an adequate pmp22 transcription level is necessary for correct myelination of jawed vertebrates. Comparison of pmp22 orthologs between distantly related species identifies evolutionary conserved sequences that contribute to precise regulation of pmp22 expression.

  6. Splicing mutation in Sbf1 causes nonsyndromic male infertility in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liška, František; Chylíková, Blanka; Janků, Michaela; Šeda, Ondřej; Vernerová, Zdeňka; Pravenec, Michal; Křen, Vladimír

    2016-09-01

    In the inbred SHR/OlaIpcv rat colony, we identified males with small testicles and inability to reproduce. By selectively breeding their parents, we revealed the infertility to segregate as an autosomal recessive Mendelian character. No other phenotype was observed in males, and females were completely normal. By linkage using a backcross with Brown Norway strain, we mapped the locus to a 1.2Mbp segment on chromosome 7, harboring 35 genes. Sequencing of candidate genes revealed a G to A substitution in a canonical 'AG' splice site of intron 37 in Sbf1 (SET binding factor 1, alias myotubularin-related protein 5). This leads to either skipping exon 38 or shifting splicing one base downstream, invariantly resulting in frameshift, premature stop codon and truncation of the protein. Western blotting using two anti-Sbf1 antibodies revealed absence of the full-length protein in the mutant testis. Testicles of the mutant males were significantly smaller compared with SHR from 4weeks, peaked at 84% wild-type weight at 6weeks and declined afterward to 28%, reflecting massive germ cell loss. Histological examination revealed lower germ cell number; latest observed germ cell stage were round spermatids, resulting in the absence of sperm in the epididymis (azoospermia). SBF1 is a member of a phosphatase family lacking the catalytical activity. It probably modulates the activity of a phosphoinositol phosphatase MTMR2. Human homozygotes or compound heterozygotes for missense SBF1 mutations exhibit Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (manifested mainly as progressive neuropathy), while a single mouse knockout reported in the literature identified male infertility as the only phenotype manifestation. PMID:27335132

  7. [Autoimmune diseases in type 1 diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechleitner, Monika; Hoppichler, Friedrich; Kaser, Susanne

    2016-04-01

    According to literature about 30 % of the patients with type 1 diabetes develop further autoimmune diseases. Thyroid dysfunction represents with 15‒30 % the most common disorder, followed by gastritis with 5‒10 %, celiac disease with 4‒9 % and vitiligo with 2‒10 %. Addison's disease seems to be less prevalent. Diagnostic procedures in the course of the comprehensive care for diabetic patients should therefore include screening for further autoimmune diseases. PMID:27052247

  8. Connexin: a potential novel target for protecting the central nervous system?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-yan Xie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Connexin subunits are proteins that form gap junction channels, and play an important role in communication between adjacent cells. This review article discusses the function of connexins/hemichannels/gap junctions under physiological conditions, and summarizes the findings regarding the role of connexins/hemichannels/gap junctions in the physiological and pathological mechanisms underlying central nervous system diseases such as brain ischemia, traumatic brain and spinal cord injury, epilepsy, brain and spinal cord tumor, migraine, neuroautoimmune disease, Alzheimer′s disease, Parkinson′s disease, X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease, spastic paraplegia and maxillofacial dysplasia. Connexins are considered to be a potential novel target for protecting the central nervous system.

  9. Connexin:a potential novel target for protecting the central nervous system?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-yan Xie; Yu Cui; Fang Deng; Jia-chun Feng

    2015-01-01

    Connexin subunits are proteins that form gap junction channels, and play an important role in communication between adjacent cells. This review article discusses the function of connexins/hemichannels/gap junctions under physiological conditions, and summarizes the findings re-garding the role of connexins/hemichannels/gap junctions in the physiological and pathological mechanisms underlying central nervous system diseases such as brain ischemia, traumatic brain and spinal cord injury, epilepsy, brain and spinal cord tumor, migraine, neuroautoimmune disease, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Peli-zaeus-Merzbacher-like disease, spastic paraplegia and maxillofacial dysplasia. Connexins are considered to be a potential novel target for protecting the central nervous system.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: glycogen storage disease type V

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... storage disease type V glycogen storage disease type V Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Glycogen storage disease type V (also known as GSDV or McArdle disease) is ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: glycogen storage disease type I

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... storage disease type I glycogen storage disease type I Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Glycogen storage disease type I (also known as GSDI or von Gierke disease) ...

  12. The cytoskeleton as a novel therapeutic target for old neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eira, Jessica; Silva, Catarina Santos; Sousa, Mónica Mendes; Liz, Márcia Almeida

    2016-06-01

    Cytoskeleton defects, including alterations in microtubule stability, in axonal transport as well as in actin dynamics, have been characterized in several unrelated neurodegenerative conditions. These observations suggest that defects of cytoskeleton organization may be a common feature contributing to neurodegeneration. In line with this hypothesis, drugs targeting the cytoskeleton are currently being tested in animal models and in human clinical trials, showing promising effects. Drugs that modulate microtubule stability, inhibitors of posttranslational modifications of cytoskeletal components, specifically compounds affecting the levels of tubulin acetylation, and compounds targeting signaling molecules which regulate cytoskeleton dynamics, constitute the mostly addressed therapeutic interventions aiming at preventing cytoskeleton damage in neurodegenerative disorders. In this review, we will discuss in a critical perspective the current knowledge on cytoskeleton damage pathways as well as therapeutic strategies designed to revert cytoskeleton-related defects mainly focusing on the following neurodegenerative disorders: Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease, Huntington's Disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease. PMID:27095262

  13. Exome Sequence Analysis Suggests that Genetic Burden Contributes to Phenotypic Variability and Complex Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Gonzaga-Jauregui

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT disease is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous distal symmetric polyneuropathy. Whole-exome sequencing (WES of 40 individuals from 37 unrelated families with CMT-like peripheral neuropathy refractory to molecular diagnosis identified apparent causal mutations in ∼45% (17/37 of families. Three candidate disease genes are proposed, supported by a combination of genetic and in vivo studies. Aggregate analysis of mutation data revealed a significantly increased number of rare variants across 58 neuropathy-associated genes in subjects versus controls, confirmed in a second ethnically discrete neuropathy cohort, suggesting that mutation burden potentially contributes to phenotypic variability. Neuropathy genes shown to have highly penetrant Mendelizing variants (HPMVs and implicated by burden in families were shown to interact genetically in a zebrafish assay exacerbating the phenotype established by the suppression of single genes. Our findings suggest that the combinatorial effect of rare variants contributes to disease burden and variable expressivity.

  14. Genetic disorders producing compressive radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, Joseph M

    2006-11-01

    Back pain is a frequent complaint seen in neurological practice. In evaluating back pain, neurologists are asked to evaluate patients for radiculopathy, determine whether they may benefit from surgery, and help guide management. Although disc herniation is the most common etiology of compressive radiculopathy, there are many other causes, including genetic disorders. This article is a discussion of genetic disorders that cause or contribute to radiculopathies. These genetic disorders include neurofibromatosis, Paget's disease of bone, and ankylosing spondylitis. Numerous genetic disorders can also lead to deformities of the spine, including spinal muscular atrophy, Friedreich's ataxia, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, familial dysautonomia, idiopathic torsional dystonia, Marfan's syndrome, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. However, the extent of radiculopathy caused by spine deformities is essentially absent from the literature. Finally, recent investigation into the heritability of disc degeneration and lumbar disc herniation suggests a significant genetic component in the etiology of lumbar disc disease. PMID:17048153

  15. Intracellular transport proteins: classification, structure and function of kinesins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Chudy

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Correct cell functioning, division and morphogenesis rely on efficient intracellular transport. Apart from dyneins and myosins, kinesins are the main proteins responsible for intracellular movement. Kinesins are a large, diverse group of motor proteins, which based on phylogenetic similarity were classified into fourteen families. Among these families, due to the location of their motor domains, three groups have been characterized: N-, C- and M-kinesin. As molecular motors, kinesins transport various molecules and vesicles mainly towards the microtubule plus end (from the cell body participating in anterograde transport, although there are also kinesins involved in retrograde transport (C-kinesins. Kinesins are also involved in spindle formation, chromosome segregation, and spermatogenesis. Because of their great importance for the correct functioning of cells, mutations in kinesin coding genes may lead to such neurodegenerative diseases as dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia or Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

  16. Adiposity, type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Luchsinger, José A.; Gustafson, Deborah R

    2009-01-01

    This manuscript provides a comprehensive review of the epidemiologic evidence linking the continuum of adiposity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The mechanisms relating adiposity and T2D to AD may include hyperinsulinemia, advanced products of glycosilation, cerebrovascular disease, and products of adipose tissue metabolism. Elevated adiposity in middle age is related to a higher risk of AD but the data on this association in old age is conflicting. Several studies ha...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: glycogen storage disease type VII

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... storage disease type VII glycogen storage disease type VII Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Glycogen storage disease type VII (GSDVII) is an inherited disorder caused by an ...

  18. Type 2 Gaucher Disease (Acute Infantile Gaucher Disease or Neuropathic Type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdi TAGHDIRI

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite this Article: Taghdiri MM. Type 2 Gaucher Disease (Acute Infantile Gaucher Disease or Neuropathic Type. Iran J Child Neurol Autumn 2012; 6:4 (suppl. 1:12. Pls see PDF. 

  19. Neurofilament light mutation causes hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with pyramidal signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashiguchi, Akihiro; Higuchi, Yujiro; Nomura, Miwa; Nakamura, Tomonori; Arata, Hitoshi; Yuan, Junhui; Yoshimura, Akiko; Okamoto, Yuji; Matsuura, Eiji; Takashima, Hiroshi

    2014-12-01

    To identify novel mutations causing hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) with pyramidal signs, a variant of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), we screened 28 CMT and related genes in four members of an affected Japanese family. Clinical features included weakness of distal lower limb muscles, foot deformity, and mild sensory loss, then late onset of progressive spasticity. Electrophysiological studies revealed widespread neuropathy. Electron microscopic analysis showed abnormal mitochondria and mitochondrial accumulation in the neurons and Schwann cells. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed an abnormally thin corpus callosum. In all four, microarrays detected a novel heterozygous missense mutation c.1166A>G (p.Y389C) in the gene encoding the light-chain neurofilament protein (NEFL), indicating that NEFL mutations can result in a HMSN with pyramidal signs phenotype. PMID:25583183

  20. Niemann-Pick disease type C or Gaucher’s disease type 3? A clinical conundrum

    OpenAIRE

    Pandi, Suresh; Chandran, Vijay; Deshpande, Anirudda; Kurien, Annamma

    2014-01-01

    We describe a patient who presented with a neurovisceral syndrome characterised by ataxia, bulbar dysfunction, supranuclear gaze palsy, splenomegaly and foamy histiocytes in the bone marrow. This presentation was suggestive of a lysosomal storage disorder such as Niemann-Pick disease type C or Gaucher's disease type 3. We review the presentation of these disorders, with a focus on the neurological features. In addition, we briefly discuss the disease-modifying therapeutic options which have r...

  1. Type I Gaucher disease: extraosseous extension of skeletal disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective. To investigate the frequency and morphology of extraosseous extension in patients with Gaucher disease type I.Design and patients. MRI examinations of the lower extremities were analyzed in 70 patients with Gaucher disease type I. Additionally, the thoracic spine and the midface were investigated on MRI in two patients.Results. Four cases are presented in which patients with Gaucher disease type I and severe skeletal involvement developed destruction or protrusion of the cortex with extraosseous extension into soft tissues. In one patient, Gaucher cell deposits destroyed the cortex of the mandible and extended into the masseter muscle. In the second patient, multiple paravertebral masses with localized destruction of the cortex were apparent in the thoracic spine. In the third and fourth patient, cortical destruction with extraosseous tissue extending into soft tissues was seen in the lower limbs.Conclusions. Extraosseous extension is a rare manifestation of Gaucher bone disease. While an increased risk of cancer, especially hematopoietic in origin, is known in patients with Gaucher disease, these extraosseous benign manifestations that may mimic malignant processes should be considered in the differential diagnosis of extraosseous extension into soft tissues. A narrow neck of tissue was apparent in all cases connecting bone and extraosseous extensions. (orig.)

  2. Lack of on-going adaptations in the soleus muscle activity during walking in patients affected by large-fiber neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nazarena, Mazzaro; Grey, Michael James; Sinkjær, Thomas;

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of feedback from large-diameter sensory fibers to the adaptation of soleus muscle activity after small ankle trajectory modifications during human walking. Small-amplitude and slow-velocity ankle dorsiflexion enhancements and reductions were...... applied during the stance phase of the gait cycle to mimic the normal variability of the ankle trajectory during walking. Patients with demyelination of large sensory fibers (Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A and antibodies to myelin-associated glycoprotein neuropathy) and age-matched controls participated in...... this study. The patients had absent light-touch sense in the toes and feet and absent quadriceps and Achilles tendon reflexes, indicating functional loss of large sensory fibers. Moreover, their soleus stretch reflex response consisted of a single electromyographic (EMG) burst with delayed onset and...

  3. Clinical Manifestations of Type 1 Gaucher Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadab SALEHPOUR

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available  How to Cite this Article: Salehpour Sh. Clinical Manifestations of Type 1 Gaucher Disease. Iran J Child Neurol Autumn 2012; 6:4 (suppl. 1:13-14.pls see PDF.References 1. Beutler E, Grabowski GA. Gaucher disease. In: Metabolic and molecular bases of inherited disease, Scriver CR, Beaudet AL, Sly WS, Valle D (Eds, McGraw-Hill, New York 2001: 3635. 2. Cox TM, Schofield JP.   Gaucher’s disease: clinical features  and   natural   history.   Baillieres   Clin Haematol. 1997 Dec;10(4:657-89.   

  4. Type 1 diabetes: A predictable disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kimber M Simmons; Aaron W Michels

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease characterizedby loss of insulin producing beta cells andreliance on exogenous insulin for survival. T1D is one ofthe most common chronic diseases in childhood and theincidence is increasing, especially in children less than 5years of age. In individuals with a genetic predisposition,an unidentified trigger initiates an abnormal immuneresponse and the development of islet autoantibodiesdirected against proteins in insulin producing beta cells.There are currently four biochemical islet autoantibodiesmeasured in the serum directed against insulin, glutamicdecarboxylase, islet antigen 2, and zinc transporter 8.Development of islet autoantibodies occurs before clinicaldiagnosis of T1D, making T1D a predictable disease in anindividual with 2 or more autoantibodies. Screening forislet autoantibodies is still predominantly done throughresearch studies, but efforts are underway to screenthe general population. The benefits of screening forislet autoantibodies include decreasing the incidenceof diabetic ketoacidosis that can be life threatening,initiating insulin therapy sooner in the disease process,and evaluating safe and specific therapies in largerandomized clinical intervention trials to delay or preventprogression to diabetes onset.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: medullary cystic kidney disease type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions medullary cystic kidney disease type 1 medullary cystic kidney disease type 1 Enable Javascript to ... and How They Work Educational Resources (4 links) Disease InfoSearch: Medullary cystic kidney disease 1 Merck Manual Consumer Version: ...

  6. Types of Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or postinfectious disease ( bronchiolitis obliterans) Eosinophilic pneumonia Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis Pulmonary infiltrates with eosinophilia Pulmonary lymphatic disorders (lymphangiomatosis, ...

  7. Pompe's disease or type IIa glycogenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob José Luiz Balthazar

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This is the report of a five-month-old child presenting clinical evidence of Pompe's disease: severe hypotonicity, hyporeflexia and congestive heart failure. The ECG showed a short PR interval, the chest radiography disclosed marked cardiomegaly, and the echocardiogram revealed marked left ventricular hypertrophy - the most typical finding of this disease. A skeletal muscle biopsy led to final diagnosis, because in the histopathologic study marked increased glycogen accumulation was evident. Death occurred two months after symptom onset.

  8. Surgical treatment of unicentric plasma cell histological type Castleman's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Marić Nebojša; Stanić Vojkan; Cvijanović Vlado; Ristanović Aleksandar; Kovačević Snežana; Krivokapić Žarko; Tasić-Radić Olga

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Castleman’s disease or angiofollicular lymph hyperplasia is a rare disease with two identified clinical forms. Unicentric or localized form is characterized by isolated growth of lymph nodes, most often in mediastinum, and multicentric form is expressed as systemic disease with spread lymphadenopathy, organomegaly and presence of general symptoms of the disease. Histological types are hyalovascular, plasma-cell and transitive (mixed) cell. Case report. This case report sho...

  9. Postprandial dysmetabolism and cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Tushuizen, M.E.; Diamant, M.; Heine, R. J.

    2005-01-01

    The worldwide prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus has reached epidemic proportions. The so-called traditional risk factors cannot fully explain the excessive cardiovascular disease risk of type 2 diabetic patients. Numerous studies indicate that postprandial metabolic derangements, most notably hyperglycaemia and hypertriglyceridaemia, which are exaggerated and prolonged in type 2 diabetes, are important cardiovascular disease risk factors since they induce oxidative stress and endothelial...

  10. Type I Gaucher disease with exophthalmos and pulmonary arteriovenous malformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Wei-Min

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gaucher disease type I, the non-neuropathic type, usually presents in adulthood with hepatosplenomegaly. We report here an adult with type I Gaucher disease presented with unusual and severe clinical manifestations. Case presentation Hepatosplenomegaly, bone crisis and fractures occurred at early childhood, and splenectomy was performed at the age of 5. Exophthalmos with increase in retrobulbar space was noted when the patient was 30. Cerezyme infusion started at the age of 32; but unfortunately, pulmonary arteriovenous malformation with dyspnea and hypoxemia was found two years later. Gene analysis revealed V375L/L444P mutations in the β-glucocerebrosidase gene. Conclusion Although both eye and lung diseases have been associated with Gaucher disease, this is the first reported demonstration of exophthalmos and pulmonary arteriovenous malformation in the same patient. This case may therefore present an extremely severe and unusual form of type I Gaucher disease.

  11. Surgical treatment of unicentric plasma cell histological type Castleman's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marić Nebojša

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Castleman’s disease or angiofollicular lymph hyperplasia is a rare disease with two identified clinical forms. Unicentric or localized form is characterized by isolated growth of lymph nodes, most often in mediastinum, and multicentric form is expressed as systemic disease with spread lymphadenopathy, organomegaly and presence of general symptoms of the disease. Histological types are hyalovascular, plasma-cell and transitive (mixed cell. Case report. This case report shows a woman, 59 years old, with unicentric form of plasma-cell type of Castleman’s disease. Unicentric form is usually shown as hyalovascular histological type, extremely rare as plasma-cell type, and transitive (mixed cell type was never described in literature as localized clinical form. The disease was manifested with chest pain, loss of body weight, exhaustion and weakness of legs. Further diagnostic procedures found the presence of enlarged lymph nodes paratracheally right, in a close contact with vena cava superior. The disease was confirmed by histopathological analysis of bioptated mediastinal lymph node after mediastinoscopy. Surgical treatment included extirpation of enlarged lymph nodes. After the regular postoperative condition, a full therapy effect was confirmed. Conclusion. Unicentric form of Castleman’s disease is expressed with enlarged lymph nodes on predilected places, usually in mediastinum. Surgical treatment is best method for the management of the disease and brings a full recovery of patient.

  12. Transitional type of Castleman's disease manifested as the POEMS syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomić Ilija

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Castleman’s disease is an atypical lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by angiofollicular hyperplasia of lymph nodes. Histologically it can be classified into a hyaline-vascular type, plasma-cell type, and transitional (mixed-cell type, while clinically localized type has been classified as unicentric, or generalized (multicentric form of the disease. Case report. This paper presents a 21 years old male patient with multicentric Castleman’s disease, a transitional (mixed-cell type. The disease was manifested by fever, generalized enlargement of peripherial lymph nodes, breast glands enlargement, hyperemia of the face, and weakness of the lower extremities. We found mediastinal lymphadenopathy, pleural and pericardial effusions, sensorimotor peripherial neuropathy and polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia. The simultaneous presence of these manifestations of the disease (sensomotor peripheral neuropathy, lymphadenopathy, effusions endocrinopathy, polyclonal gammaglobulinemia and skin changes is indentified as POEMS syndrome. The diagnosis of Castleman’s disease was based on the results of histopathologic analysis of mediastinal lymph node biopsies after thoracotomy. The patient was treated with corticosteroids (prednisone 80 mg daily for 2 weeks followed by 60 mg daily. A partial response was achieved after 4 months of treatment. Conclusion. A transitional type of multicentric Castleman’s disease may be present itself as POEMS syndrome. The effect of corticosteroid therapy in this form of the disease is unpredictable.

  13. Periodontal disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the periodontal status in well controlled and poorly controlled type 2 diabetic patients compared with normal healthy individuals. Methodology: Forty well controlled and forty poorly controlled type 2 diabetic subjects having good oral hygiene (scored according to simplified oral hygiene index) were compared with a control group of forty normal healthy individuals. Probing depth (PD), gingival recession (GR), and attachment loss (AL) were recorded to obtain the periodontal status of each tooth, using a Michigan probe '0' with Williams marking. Glycemic control was evaluated by glycated Hb value. Using ANOVA and independent sample t-test, mean probing depth and attachment loss in each tooth type (incisors, canines, premolars and molars) were compared. Results: Mean age of diabetic subjects was 58.86 +- 6.21 years and that of control group was 56.92 +- 6.91 years; 60% were females. Probing depth was greater in patients with poorly controlled diabetes compared to well controlled diabetic patients and non-diabetic controls (4.21 mm vs. 3.72 mm and 2.93 mm respectively, p 0.05). Number of sites and mean percentage of sites with attachment loss of greater or equal to 4 and greater or equal to 6 mm was also significantly higher in poorly controlled diabetes compared to the control group (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001 respectively). Conclusion: Periodontal status as estimated by probing depth and degree of attachment loss deteriorates significantly with poor glycemic control in diabetes. (author)

  14. Niemann-Pick disease type C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanier Marie T

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Niemann-Pick C disease (NP-C is a neurovisceral atypical lysosomal lipid storage disorder with an estimated minimal incidence of 1/120 000 live births. The broad clinical spectrum ranges from a neonatal rapidly fatal disorder to an adult-onset chronic neurodegenerative disease. The neurological involvement defines the disease severity in most patients but is typically preceded by systemic signs (cholestatic jaundice in the neonatal period or isolated spleno- or hepatosplenomegaly in infancy or childhood. The first neurological symptoms vary with age of onset: delay in developmental motor milestones (early infantile period, gait problems, falls, clumsiness, cataplexy, school problems (late infantile and juvenile period, and ataxia not unfrequently following initial psychiatric disturbances (adult form. The most characteristic sign is vertical supranuclear gaze palsy. The neurological disorder consists mainly of cerebellar ataxia, dysarthria, dysphagia, and progressive dementia. Cataplexy, seizures and dystonia are other common features. NP-C is transmitted in an autosomal recessive manner and is caused by mutations of either the NPC1 (95% of families or the NPC2 genes. The exact functions of the NPC1 and NPC2 proteins are still unclear. NP-C is currently described as a cellular cholesterol trafficking defect but in the brain, the prominently stored lipids are gangliosides. Clinical examination should include comprehensive neurological and ophthalmological evaluations. The primary laboratory diagnosis requires living skin fibroblasts to demonstrate accumulation of unesterified cholesterol in perinuclear vesicles (lysosomes after staining with filipin. Pronounced abnormalities are observed in about 80% of the cases, mild to moderate alterations in the remainder ("variant" biochemical phenotype. Genotyping of patients is useful to confirm the diagnosis in the latter patients and essential for future prenatal diagnosis. The differential

  15. Infantile Onset Glycogen Storage Disease Type 2: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan Bilge Koca

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Glycogen storage disease type 2 (Pompe’s disease is an autosomal recessive, fatal glycogen storage disease presenting with hypotonia and muscle weakness. It is known that deficiency of lysosomal acid alpha-glucosidase (acid maltase leads to progressive generalised myopathy, cardiomyopathy and death in early infancy because of respiratory muscle weakness. Excessive undegradable intracellular glycogen deposition plays a role in the pathogenesis of the disease. Here we report a 3.5 month-old girl presenting with respiratory failure due to pneumonia and hypotonia, who was later diagnosed as Pompe disease.

  16. Treatment of Lung Carcinoid by Type and Extent of Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Get Involved Find Local ACS Learn About Cancer » Lung Carcinoid Tumor » Detailed Guide » Treatment of lung carcinoid, by type and extent of disease Share this Page Close Push escape to close share window. Print ...

  17. An autosomal locus causing autoimmune disease: Autoimmune polyglandular disease type I assigned to chromosome 21

    OpenAIRE

    Aaltonen, Johanna; Björses, Petra; Sandkuijl, Lodewijk; Perheentupa, Jaakko; Peltonen, Leena Johanna

    1994-01-01

    textabstractAutoimmune polyglandular disease type I (APECED) is an autosomal recessive autoimmune disease characterized by a variable combination of the failure of the endocrine glands. The pathogenesis of this unique autoimmune disease is unknown; unlike many other autoimmune diseases, APECED does not show association to specific HLA haplotypes. Unravelling the APECED locus will identify a novel gene outside the HLA loci influencing the outcome of autoimmune diseases. We have assigned the di...

  18. Multiple Gastric Carcinomas Associated with Potter Type III Cystic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Mimatsu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of multiple gastric carcinomas associated with Potter type III cystic disease of the liver, mesenterium and kidney. A 65-year-old man with chronic renal failure due to polycystic kidneys and under hemodialysis treatment 3 times a week for 2 years was admitted to our hospital because of anemia. He stated that his sister had suffered from polycystic kidney disease. Gastrointestinal fiberscopy showed two lesions in the lesser curvature in the lower portion of the stomach, and histopathological analysis of the gastric tumor biopsies revealed that one of the tumors was a papillary adenocarcinoma and the other a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. Helicobacter pylori infection was not detected in the stomach mucosa. Abdominal computed tomography scan revealed polycystic lesions in the liver, mesenterium and both kidneys. These imaging findings and family history suggested that the patient suffered from multiple gastric carcinomas associated with Potter type III cystic disease of the liver, mesenterium and kidney. Reports on the association of malignant neoplasm with Potter type III cystic disease are extremely rare. Especially, no case of the association of gastric carcinoma with Potter type III cystic disease of the liver and kidney has been described previously. This is a first report of the association of gastric carcinoma with Potter type III cystic disease. We also review reports of other malignant neoplasms associated with polycystic disease.

  19. Immune dysfunction in Niemann‐Pick disease type C

    OpenAIRE

    Platt, Nick; Speak, Annelise O.; Colaco, Alexandria; Gray, James(Arnold-Sommerfeld-Center for Theoretical Physics, Department für Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Theresienstraße 37, 80333, München, Germany); Smith, David A; Williams, Ian M; Wallom, Kerri‐Lee; Platt, Frances M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Lysosomal storage diseases are inherited monogenic disorders in which lysosome function is compromised. Although individually very rare, they occur at a collective frequency of approximately one in five thousand live births and usually have catastrophic consequences for health. The lysosomal storage diseases Niemann‐Pick disease type C (NPC) is caused by mutations predominantly in the lysosomal integral membrane protein NPC1 and clinically presents as a progressive neurodegenerative ...

  20. Cardiovascular disease in Navajo Indians with type 2 diabetes.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoy, W; Light, A; Megill, D

    1995-01-01

    Rates of both type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease have risen sharply in recent years among Navajo Indians, the largest reservation-based American Indian tribe, but the association between the two conditions is not entirely clear. Rates of cardiovascular disease and some possible associations in several hundred diabetic and non-diabetic Navajos were estimated. Nearly one-third (30.9 percent) of those with diabetes had formal diagnoses of cardiovascular disease--25.3 percent had heart di...

  1. Interferon Type I Driven Immune Activation in Generalized Autoimmune Diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z. Brkić (Zana)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis describes research performed on several generalized autoimmune diseases with the main focus on primary Sjögren’s syndrome. Interferon type I has been implicated in the pathogenesis of these diseases and will be introduced in this chapter together with other important immune f

  2. One risk assessment tool for cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Alssema (Marjan); R.S. Newson (Rachel); S.J.L. Bakker (Stephan); C.D. Stehouwer (Coen); M.W. Heymans (Martijn); M.G.A.A.M. Nijpels (Giel); H.L. Hillege (Hans); A. Hofman (Albert); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); R.T. Gansevoort; J.M. Dekker (Jacqueline)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE - Individuals at high risk for chronic cardiometabolic disease (cardiovascular disease [CVD], type 2 diabetes, and chronic kidney disease [CKD]) share many risk factors and would benefit from early intervention. We developed a nonlaboratory-based risk-assessment tool for identi

  3. One Risk Assessment Tool for Cardiovascular Disease, Type 2 Diabetes, and Chronic Kidney Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alssema, Marjan; Newson, Rachel S.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Stehouwer, Coen D. A.; Heymans, Martijn W.; Nijpels, Giel; Hillege, Hans L.; Hofman, Albert; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Dekker, Jacqueline M.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE-Individuals at high risk for chronic cardiometabolic disease (cardiovascular disease [CVD], type 2 diabetes, and chronic kidney disease [CKDD]) share many risk factors and would benefit from early intervention. We developed a nonlaboratory-based risk-assessment tool for identification of p

  4. Types A and B Niemann-Pick Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuchman, Edward H; Wasserstein, Melissa P

    2016-06-01

    Two distinct metabolic abnormalities are included under the eponym Niemann-Pick disease (NPD). The first is due to the deficient activity of the enzyme acid sphingomyelinase (ASM). Patients with ASM deficiency are classified as having types A and B Niemann-Pick disease (NPD). Type A NPD patients exhibit hepatosplenomegaly, frequent pulmonary infections, and profound central nervous system involvement in infancy. They rarely survive beyond two years of age. Type B patients also have hepatosplenomegaly and progressive alterations of their lungs, but there are usually no central nervous system signs. The age of onset and rate of disease progression varies greatly among type B patients, and they frequently live into adulthood. Recently, patients with phenotypes intermediate between types A and B NPD also have been identified. These individuals represent the expected continuum caused by inheriting different mutations in the ASM gene (SMPD1). Patients in the second category are designated as having type C NPD. Impaired intracellular trafficking of cholesterol causes type C NPD, and two distinct gene defects have been found. In this chapter only types A and B NPD will be discussed. PMID:27491215

  5. A case of Niemann – Pick disease type C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei Anatolyevich Klyushnikov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a clinical case of a 27-year-old female patient with Niemann – Pick disease type C (NPC, a rare inherited orphan disease, belonging to a group of lipid storage diseases. It gives an update on the etiology and pathogenesis of this type of glycosphingolipidosis and on established gene mutations. The clinical polymorphism of NPC and the trends in the development of somatic, mental, and neurological disorders are highlighted in relation to the onset age of the disease. The problem of differential diagnosis is discussed. The diagnostic NPC probability index in scores and the latest methods for laboratory diagnostic verification, including molecular genetic testing, are presented.Information is given on specific substrate reduction therapy with miglustat for NPC.

  6. Basal Cell Carcinoma in Type 2 Segmental Darier's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynne Robertson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Darier's disease (DD, also known as Keratosis Follicularis or Darier-White disease, is a rare disorder of keratinization. DD can present as a generalized autosomal dominant condition as well as a localized or segmental postzygotic condition (Vázquez et al., 2002. Clinical features of DD include greasy, warty papules and plaques on seborrheic areas, dystrophic nails, palmo-plantar pits, and papules on the dorsum of the hands and feet. Objective. We report a case of basal cell carcinoma developing in a patient with type 2 segmental DD. Conclusion. According to the current literature, Type 2 segmental disease is a rare presentation of Darier's disease with only 8 previous cases reported to date. In addition, nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC arising from DD is rarely reported; however, there may be an association between DD and risk of carcinogenesis.

  7. Type A Behaviours and Heart Disease: Epidemiological and Experimental Foundations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Bennett

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper critically examines three strands of evidence that concern the relationship between type A behaviours and coronary heart disease; prospective epidemiological studies of healthy populations, studies of those at high risk for coronary heart disease, and angiographic studies of atherosclerosis. The first of these would seem to provide the strongest test. Methodological and conceptual issues mean that the results of studies using the other methods should be interpreted with care. It is concluded that there is relatively strong evidence of an association between Type A behaviour as measured by Structured Interview and coronary heart disease. Hostility and anger appear to be the most powerful determinants of CHD. However, it is likely that they interact with other type A behaviours and related environmental factors in determining risk.

  8. Neutropenia, neutrophil dysfunction, and inflammatory bowel disease in glycogen storage disease type Ib : Results of the European Study on Glycogen Storage Disease Type I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, G; Rake, JP; Fernandes, J; Labrune, P; Leonard, JV; Moses, S; Ullrich, K; Smit, GPA

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the incidence, the severity, and the course of neutropenia, neutrophil dysfunction, and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in glycogen storage disease (GSD) type Ib. Method: As part of a collaborative European Study on GSD type I, a retrospective registry was established in 1

  9. Sanfilippo disease (mucopolysaccharidosis type III): Early diagnosis and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Wijburg, F.A.; Ruijter, de, J.

    2013-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) are severe, inherited metabolic disorders caused by defective lysosomal degradation glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). The subsequent progressive accumulation of GAGs in cells and tissues in MPS patients results in extensive, severe and progressive disease, generally limiting quality of life and life expectancy. Sanfilippo disease (mucopolysaccharidosis type III, MPS III) is one of the 7 MPSs and is characterized by storage of the GAG heparan sulfate (HS), primarily leadin...

  10. Multiple Gastric Carcinomas Associated with Potter Type III Cystic Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Mimatsu, Kenji; Oida, Takatsugu; Kawasaki, Atsushi; Kano, Hisao; Kida, Kazutoshi; Fukino, Nobutada; Kuboi, Youichi; Amano, Sadao

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of multiple gastric carcinomas associated with Potter type III cystic disease of the liver, mesenterium and kidney. A 65-year-old man with chronic renal failure due to polycystic kidneys and under hemodialysis treatment 3 times a week for 2 years was admitted to our hospital because of anemia. He stated that his sister had suffered from polycystic kidney disease. Gastrointestinal fiberscopy showed two lesions in the lesser curvature in the lower portion of the stomach, and hi...

  11. Gallstone disease and type-2 diabetes mellitus-the link

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the factors predisposing patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus to gallstone disease. One hundred type 2 diabetic patients and 100 age and gender-matched controls underwent real time ultrasonography to study factors predisposing patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus to gallstone disease. The age, gender, body mass index (BMI), duration of diabetes mellitus and serum lipids were determined in the individuals enrolled for the study. Fifteen percent of the diabetic patients had ultrasound evidence of gallstone disease as compared to 7% in non-diabetic controls. There was a steady increase in the incidence of gallstone disease in diabetic patients with age with a peak incidence in the seventh decade i.e. 60-69 years, and a decline in the eighth decade i.e. 70 - 79 years. The average age of the diabetic patients with gallstone disease - 59.1+ 9.5 years was significantly higher than in those without gallstone disease - 51.8 + 10.5 years (p 0.014). The mean duration of disease in the diabetic patients with gallstone disease was 5.0 + 4.9 years compared with 4.5 + 3.8 years in the diabetic patients without gallstone disease (p=0.772). The mean serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels - 4.3 + 1.3 mmol/L and 1.5 + 0.8 mmol/L respectively in the diabetic patients with gallstone disease was higher than in those without gallstone disease - 3.4 + 0.5 mmol/L (p=0.0941) and 1.4 + 0.7 mmol/L (p=0.712) respectively. The mean body mass index for the diabetic patients with gallstone disease was 26.2 + 5.5 kg /m 2 compared with 25.7 + 6.7 kg/m2 in those without gallstone disease (p=0.755) . Increasing age is a risk factor for gallstone disease in diabetic patients. Hyperlipidaemia, female gender, heavier weight and a longer duration of diabetes mellitus appear to be associated risk factors. (author)

  12. Beyond PrPres type 1/Type 2 dichotomy in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uro-Coste, E.; Cassard, H.; Simon, S.; Lugan, S.; Bilheude, J.M.; Perret-Liaudet, A.; Ironside, J.E.; Haik, S.; Basset-Leobon, C.; Lacroux, C.; Peoch, K.; Streichenberger, N.; Langeveld, J.P.M.; Head, M.W.; Grassi, J.; Hauw, J.J.; Schelcher, F.; Delisle, M.B.; Andreoletti, O.

    2008-01-01

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) cases are currently subclassified according to the methionine/valine polymorphism at codon 129 of the PRNP gene and the proteinase K (PK) digested abnormal prion protein (PrPres) identified on Western blotting (type 1 or type 2). These biochemically distinct

  13. Beyond PrP9res) type 1/type 2 dichotomy in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Uro-coste, Emmanuelle; Cassard, Hervé; Simon, Stéphanie; Lugan, Séverine; Bilheude, Jean-Marc; Perret-Liaudet, Armand; Ironside, James,; Haik, Stéphane; Basset-Leobon, Christelle; Lacroux, Caroline; Peoch, Katell; Streichenberger, Nathalie; Langeveld, Jan; Head, Mark,; Grassi, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    International audience Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) cases are currently subclassified according to the methionine/valine polymorphism at codon 129 of the PRNP gene and the proteinase K (PK) digested abnormal prion protein (PrP(res)) identified on Western blotting (type 1 or type 2). These biochemically distinct PrP(res) types have been considered to represent potential distinct prion strains. However, since cases of CJD show co-occurrence of type 1 and type 2 PrP(res) in the b...

  14. Beyond PrPres type 1/Type 2 dichotomy in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    OpenAIRE

    Uro-Coste, E.; Cassard, H.; SIMON S.; Lugan, S.; Bilheude, J.M.; Perret-Liaudet, A.; Ironside, J.E.; Haik, S; Basset-Leobon, C.; Lacroux, C.; Peoch, K.; Streichenberger, N.; Langeveld, J. P. M.; Head, M. W.; Grassi, J.

    2008-01-01

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) cases are currently subclassified according to the methionine/valine polymorphism at codon 129 of the PRNP gene and the proteinase K (PK) digested abnormal prion protein (PrPres) identified on Western blotting (type 1 or type 2). These biochemically distinct PrPres types have been considered to represent potential distinct prion strains. However, since cases of CJD show co-occurrence of type 1 and type 2 PrPres in the brain, the basis of this classifi...

  15. Beyond PrPres type 1/type 2 dichotomy in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    OpenAIRE

    Uro-coste, Emmanuelle; Cassard, Hervé; Simon, Stéphanie; Lugan, Séverine; Bilheude, Jean-Marc; Perret-Liaudet, Armand; Ironside, James,; Haik, Stéphane; Basset-Leobon, Christelle; Lacroux, Caroline; Peoch, Katell; Streichenberger, Nathalie; Langeveld, Jan; Head, Mark,; Grassi, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) cases are currently subclassified according to the methionine/valine polymorphism at codon 129 of the PRNP gene and the proteinase K (PK) digested abnormal prion protein (PrP(res)) identified on Western blotting (type 1 or type 2). These biochemically distinct PrP(res) types have been considered to represent potential distinct prion strains. However, since cases of CJD show co-occurrence of type 1 and type 2 PrP(res) in the brain, the basis of this cl...

  16. Beyond PrPres Type 1/Type 2 Dichotomy in Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Uro-coste, Emmanuelle; Cassard, Hervé; Simon, Stéphanie; Lugan, Séverine; Bilheude, Jean-Marc; Perret-Liaudet, Armand; Ironside, James W.; Haik, Stéphane; Basset-Leobon, Christelle; Lacroux, Caroline; Peoch, Katell; Streichenberger, Nathalie; Langeveld, Jan; Mark W Head; Grassi, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) cases are currently subclassified according to the methionine/valine polymorphism at codon 129 of the PRNP gene and the proteinase K (PK) digested abnormal prion protein (PrPres) identified on Western blotting (type 1 or type 2). These biochemically distinct PrPres types have been considered to represent potential distinct prion strains. However, since cases of CJD show co-occurrence of type 1 and type 2 PrPres in the brain, the basis of this classifi...

  17. Beyond PrP res type 1/type 2 dichotomy in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    OpenAIRE

    Uro-coste, Emmanuelle; Cassard, Hervé; Simon, Stéphanie; Lugan, Séverine; Bilheude, Jean-Marc; Perret-Liaudet, Armand; Ironside, James W.; Haik, Stéphane; Basset-Leobon, Christelle; Lacroux, Caroline; Peoch, Katell; Streichenberger, Nathalie; Langeveld, Jan; Mark W Head; Grassi, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) cases are currently subclassified according to the methionine/valine polymorphism at codon 129 of the PRNP gene and the proteinase K (PK) digested abnormal prion protein (PrPres)identified on Western blotting (type 1 or type 2). These biochemically distinct PrPres types have been considered to represent potential distinct prion strains. However, since cases of CJD show co-occurrence of type 1 and type 2 PrPres in the brain, the basis of this classific...

  18. Beyond PrP9res) type 1/type 2 dichotomy in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Emmanuelle Uro-Coste; Hervé Cassard; Stéphanie Simon; Séverine Lugan; Jean-Marc Bilheude; Armand Perret-Liaudet; Ironside, James W.; Stéphane Haik; Christelle Basset-Leobon; Caroline Lacroux; Katell Peoch'; Nathalie Streichenberger; Jan Langeveld; Mark W Head; Jacques Grassi

    2008-01-01

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) cases are currently subclassified according to the methionine/valine polymorphism at codon 129 of the PRNP gene and the proteinase K (PK) digested abnormal prion protein (PrP(res)) identified on Western blotting (type 1 or type 2). These biochemically distinct PrP(res) types have been considered to represent potential distinct prion strains. However, since cases of CJD show co-occurrence of type 1 and type 2 PrP(res) in the brain, the basis of this cl...

  19. Acute type II cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis mimicking atherosclerotic peripheral vascular disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Saeed, A

    2012-01-31

    Atherosclerotic peripheral vascular disease is a common presenting cause for digital ischaemia in life long smokers. Acute severe Type II Cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis is a rare yet important cause, which may present with similar clinical features and which if undiagnosed may be rapidly fatal. Following the instigation of therapy with intravenous methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide this patient made an excellent recovery.

  20. RENAL COMPLICATIONS IN GLYCOGEN-STORAGE-DISEASE TYPE-I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    REITSMABIERENS, WCC

    1993-01-01

    Deficiency of the enzyme glucose-6-phosphatase is the biochemical defect in glycogen storage disease type I (GSD I). Normally this enzyme is present in the liver, intestine and kidneys. The lack of the enzyme in the kidney makes it obvious that glycogen storage will not be restricted to the liver bu

  1. Relationship between Genomic Types of Escherichia coli and Clinical Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meiying YI; Ruen LIU; Hanju HUANG

    2008-01-01

    In this study, by analysis of genome structures of E. coli, the relationships Between the genomic types of E. coli and the associated diseases were investigated. Samples of sputum, urine and other excretions from patients with different infective diseases were collected. And 62 E. coli strains were isolated from these samples. Intact bacterial genomic DNA was cleaved with I-CeuI, separated by pulsed field gel electrophoresis and then typed on the basis of cleavage map. The results showed that 7 I-CeuI sites were found in all the genome structures of the 62 E. coli, indicating that there were 7 rrn operons in the genomes. The size of genome ranged from 4500 kb to 5000 kb. According to thegenome structures, 62 E. coli strains were divided into 30 genome types. It was concluded that genome structures of E. coli isolated from the patients with different infective diseases varied to some extent, suggesting that some genome types of E. coli were closely related to some infective diseases.

  2. [Niemann-Pick type C disease: pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Kousaku

    2016-03-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder which is caused in 95% by a mutation in the NPC1 gene on chromosome 18 or by NPC2 mutation, encoding for 2 different lysosomal lipid transport proteins. The impaired protein function leads to systemic intralysosomal accumulation of free cholesterol and shingolipids particularly in the CNS. In Japan, currently 34 living NPC patients are known as of December 2015. Considering the prevalence of the disease in the Western countries, the real number of NPC patients is most likely to be five-folds higher. For NPC, treatment methods are established and an approved disease-specific medications are available. It is important that patients early in their disease are referred to expert centers, in order to ensure timely initiation of treatment and to delay the progression of neurological symptoms as a goal. PMID:27149732

  3. Asymptomatic coronary artery disease in Type-2 diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To select a subgroup of type-2 diabetics with two additional pre specified risk factors to see that whether there is any benefit of screening such patients. Methodology: Five hundred twenty six patients were sent for treadmill stress test or thallium scan. Those who had abnormal results were advised coronary angiography. The angiographically proven CAD was correlated with various risk factors to find the relationship between the disease and variables. Results: Two hundred thirty five (48%) patients had abnormal results and among them 158 (67%)underwent coronary angiography. Among these 21% had evidence of CAD. Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) was performed in 35(33%) patients, catheter based intervention (PCI) in 44(40%) patients and 30(27%) patients were not suitable for intervention. Duration of diabetes, smoking, diabetic retinopathy, albuminuria, and peripheral vascular disease were significant predictor of asymptomatic CAD. Conclusion: This study has demonstrated strong relationship between risk factors and asymptomatic CAD in type 2 diabetics. (author)

  4. Alzheimer's disease and Type 2 diabetes mellitus: the cholinesterase connection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siva Prasad Akula

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus tend to occur together. We sought to identify protein(s common to both conditions that could suggest a possible unifying pathogenic role. Using human neuronal butyrylcholinesterase (AAH08396.1 as the reference protein we used BLAST Tool for protein to protein comparison in humans. We found three groups of sequences among a series of 12, with an E-value between 0–12, common to both Alzheimer's disease and diabetes: butyrylcholinesterase precursor K allele (NP_000046.1, acetylcholinesterase isoform E4-E6 precursor (NP_000656.1, and apoptosis-related acetylcholinesterase (1B41|A. Butyrylcholinesterase and acetylcholinesterase related proteins were found common to both Alzheimer's disease and diabetes; they may play an etiological role via influencing insulin resistance and lipid metabolism.

  5. Glycogen storage disease type III: modified Atkins diet improves myopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Mayorandan, Sebene; Meyer, Uta; Hartmann, Hans; Das, Anibh Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background Frequent feeds with carbohydrate-rich meals or continuous enteral feeding has been the therapy of choice in glycogen storage disease (Glycogenosis) type III. Recent guidelines on diagnosis and management recommend frequent feedings with high complex carbohydrates or cornstarch avoiding fasting in children, while in adults a low-carb-high-protein-diet is recommended. While this regimen can prevent hypoglycaemia in children it does not improve skeletal and heart muscle function, whic...

  6. Ferroportin Disease (Haemochromatosis-type IV): a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Novo, Elena; Faria, Ricardo; Faustino, Paula; Fleming, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Introdution: Haemochromatosis-type IV, the ferroportin disease, is characterized by an autosomal-dominant transmission and early iron accumulation in macrophages. It is caused by mutations in the transmembrane iron exporter protein ferroportin1 (SLC40A1 gene). In form A (classic), ferroportin loss of function mutants are unable to export iron from cells leading to cellular iron accumulation with decreased availability of iron for serum transferrin (TS). We present a Portuguese rare clinical c...

  7. Role of HLA typing on Crohn's disease pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi, Batool Mutar

    2015-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is the main type of chronic inflammatory bowel disease of unknown etiology. Evidence from family and twin studies suggests that genetics plays a significant role in predisposing an individual to develop Crohn's disease. A susceptibility locus for Crohn's disease has been mapped 3 to chromosome 16: a frameshift variant and two missense variants of NOD2, encoding a member of the Apaf-1/Ced-4 superfamily of apoptosis regulators which is expressed in hematopoietic compartment cells and intestinal epithelial cells as well as in paneth cells, where NOD2 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of Crohn disease in the gastrointestinal system. This leads to alteration the structure of either the leucine-rich repeat domain of the protein or the adjacent region. NOD2 activates nuclear factor NF-kB; this activating function is regulated by the carboxy-terminal leucine-rich repeat domain, which has two functions, first an inhibitory role and also acts as an intracellular receptor for components of microbial pathogens. Thus, NOD2 gene product confers susceptibility to Crohn's disease by altering the recognition of these components and/or by over-activating NF-kB in intestinal epithelial cells as well as in paneth cells. Further confirmation of a genetic predisposition comes from studies of the association between the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system and CD. The immunogenetic predisposition may be considered an important requirement for the development of CD, as several alleles of human major histocompatibility complex had an association with CD. Although it is difficult to estimate the importance of this region in determining overall genetic susceptibility in a population, studies of HLA allele sharing within families suggest that this region contributes between 10% and 33% of the total genetic risk of Crohn's disease. PMID:26288728

  8. Comorbidity between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meteran, Howraman; Backer, Vibeke; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Skytthe, Axel; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2015-01-01

    the relationship between type 2 diabetes and chronic bronchitis and COPD in adult twins, and to examine to what extent comorbidity between these diseases is explained by shared genetic or environmental factors. METHODS: Questionnaire data on chronic bronchitis and hospital discharge data on diagnosed...... COPD in 13,649 twins, aged 50-71 years, from the Danish Twin Registry were cross-linked with hospital discharge diagnosis data on type 2 diabetes from the Danish National Patient Registry. RESULTS: The risk of type 2 diabetes was higher in persons with symptoms of chronic bronchitis than in those...... on chronic bronchitis and type 2 diabetes, and between genetic effects on diagnosed COPD and type 2 diabetes, respectively, were 0.33 (0.00-0.79), p = 0.103, and 0.43 (0.00-0.98), p = 0.154. Non-shared environmental correlations between chronic bronchitis and type 2 diabetes were -0.13 (-0.43 to 0...

  9. Imaging features of type-B Niemann-Pick disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muntaner, L. [Dept. of Radiology, Son Dureta University Hospital, Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Galmes, A. [Dept. of Hematology, Son Dureta University Hospital, Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Chabas, A. [Instituto de Bioquimica Clinica Corporacio Sanitaria, Barcelona (Spain); Herrera, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Son Dureta University Hospital, Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    1997-04-01

    We report two cases of a mild form of type-B Niemann-Pick disease manifesting as an adult-onset chronic non-neuropathic clinical picture. Femoral T1- and T2-weighted low-intensity non-enhancing coarse bone marrow pattern was evident on femoral MR associated with splenic hypodense nodule(s) on abdominal CT. The role of imaging is discussed in relation to current techniques of confirmation of this entity based on demonstration of lipid-laden cells within marrow aspirates (which are often sea-blue histiocytes) and sphingomyelinase assay of cultured skin fibroblasts. (orig.). With 2 figs.

  10. Imaging features of type-B Niemann-Pick disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report two cases of a mild form of type-B Niemann-Pick disease manifesting as an adult-onset chronic non-neuropathic clinical picture. Femoral T1- and T2-weighted low-intensity non-enhancing coarse bone marrow pattern was evident on femoral MR associated with splenic hypodense nodule(s) on abdominal CT. The role of imaging is discussed in relation to current techniques of confirmation of this entity based on demonstration of lipid-laden cells within marrow aspirates (which are often sea-blue histiocytes) and sphingomyelinase assay of cultured skin fibroblasts. (orig.). With 2 figs

  11. Is type 1 diabetes a food-induced disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landin-Olsson, Mona; Hillman, Magnus; Erlanson-Albertsson, Charlotte

    2013-08-01

    The incidence of type 1 diabetes among children has almost doubled during the last decades in Sweden. Type 1 diabetes is considered as an autoimmune disease with unknown aetiology. Here we propose that the immune reaction may be initiated by food-derived mechanisms. The incidence of diabetes parallels an increased consumption of pasta, white bread, meat, cheese, low-fat milk, exotic fruits, soda, and snacks. Simultaneously, the consumption of potatoes, butter, high-fat milk, and domestic fruit has decreased. Three categories of food related reaction mechanisms are discussed against the following items (1) proteins from wheat, meat, and milk, (2) fat from processed food, and (3) exotic fruits. The current food consumption is suggested to initiate a pro-inflammatory reaction in the intestine and thereby reduce the intestinal barrier function. This may influence tolerance development and thus pave the way for an autoimmune attack on pancreatic beta cells. PMID:23688738

  12. Identification of mutations in Type IV glycogen storage disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Y.; Kishnani, P.; Chen, Y.T. [Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Type IV glycogen storage disease (GSD IV, Andersen disease) is caused by a deficiency of glycogen branching enzyme (GBE) activity, which results in the accumulation of glycogen with unbranched, long, outer chains in the tissues. The molecular basis of the disease is not known. We studied four patients with the disease; three with typical presentation of progressive liver cirrhosis and failure, and one with severe and fatal neonatal hypotonia and cardiomyopathy. Southern blot analysis with EcoRI or MspI did not detect gross DNA rearrangement, deletion or duplication in patients` glycogen branching enzyme genes. Northern analysis with total cellular RNAs isolated from skin fibroblast MI strains of three patients with typical clinical presentation showed a normal level and size (2.95 kb) of GBE mRNA hybridization band in two and absent mRNA hybridization band in the remaining one. The patient with atypical severe neonatal hypotonia demonstrated a less intense and smaller size (2.75 kb) of mRNA hybridization band. A 210 hp deletion from nucleotide sequence 873 to 1082 which causes 70 amino acids missing from amino acid sequence 262 to 331 was detected in all 17 clones sequenced from the fatal hypotonia patient. This deletion is located in the region which is highly conserved between prokaryotic, yeast and human GBE polypeptide sequences, and also includes the first of the four regions which constitute the catalytic active sites of most of amylolytic enzymes. A point mutation C-T (1633) which changes the amino acid from Arginine to Cystine was found in 19 of 20 cDNA clones from a patient with classical clinical presentation. This point mutation was unique to this patient and was not observed in three other patients or normal controls. This is the first report on the molecular basis of GSD IV and our data indicated the presence of extensive genetic heterogeneity in the disease.

  13. The Role of Rab Proteins in Neuronal Cells and in the Trafficking of Neurotrophin Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Bucci

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Neurotrophins are a family of proteins that are important for neuronal development, neuronal survival and neuronal functions. Neurotrophins exert their role by binding to their receptors, the Trk family of receptor tyrosine kinases (TrkA, TrkB, and TrkC and p75NTR, a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF receptor superfamily. Binding of neurotrophins to receptors triggers a complex series of signal transduction events, which are able to induce neuronal differentiation but are also responsible for neuronal maintenance and neuronal functions. Rab proteins are small GTPases localized to the cytosolic surface of specific intracellular compartments and are involved in controlling vesicular transport. Rab proteins, acting as master regulators of the membrane trafficking network, play a central role in both trafficking and signaling pathways of neurotrophin receptors. Axonal transport represents the Achilles' heel of neurons, due to the long-range distance that molecules, organelles and, in particular, neurotrophin-receptor complexes have to cover. Indeed, alterations of axonal transport and, specifically, of axonal trafficking of neurotrophin receptors are responsible for several human neurodegenerative diseases, such as Huntington’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and some forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. In this review, we will discuss the link between Rab proteins and neurotrophin receptor trafficking and their influence on downstream signaling pathways.

  14. Beyond PrP9res type 1/type 2 dichotomy in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Uro-Coste

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD cases are currently subclassified according to the methionine/valine polymorphism at codon 129 of the PRNP gene and the proteinase K (PK digested abnormal prion protein (PrP(res identified on Western blotting (type 1 or type 2. These biochemically distinct PrP(res types have been considered to represent potential distinct prion strains. However, since cases of CJD show co-occurrence of type 1 and type 2 PrP(res in the brain, the basis of this classification system and its relationship to agent strain are under discussion. Different brain areas from 41 sCJD and 12 iatrogenic CJD (iCJD cases were investigated, using Western blotting for PrP(res and two other biochemical assays reflecting the behaviour of the disease-associated form of the prion protein (PrP(Sc under variable PK digestion conditions. In 30% of cases, both type 1 and type 2 PrP(res were identified. Despite this, the other two biochemical assays found that PrP(Sc from an individual patient demonstrated uniform biochemical properties. Moreover, in sCJD, four distinct biochemical PrP(Sc subgroups were identified that correlated with the current sCJD clinico-pathological classification. In iCJD, four similar biochemical clusters were observed, but these did not correlate to any particular PRNP 129 polymorphism or western blot PrP(res pattern. The identification of four different PrP(Sc biochemical subgroups in sCJD and iCJD, irrespective of the PRNP polymorphism at codon 129 and the PrP(res isoform provides an alternative biochemical definition of PrP(Sc diversity and new insight in the perception of Human TSE agents variability.

  15. Glycogen storage disease type I: clinical and laboratory profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berenice L. Santos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To characterize the clinical, laboratory, and anthropometric profile of a sample of Brazilian patients with glycogen storage disease type I managed at an outpatient referral clinic for inborn errors of metabolism. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional outpatient study based on a convenience sampling strategy. Data on diagnosis, management, anthropometric parameters, and follow-up were assessed. RESULTS: Twenty-one patients were included (median age 10 years, range 1-25 years, all using uncooked cornstarch therapy. Median age at diagnosis was 7 months (range, 1-132 months, and 19 patients underwent liver biopsy for diagnostic confirmation. Overweight, short stature, hepatomegaly, and liver nodules were present in 16 of 21, four of 21, nine of 14, and three of 14 patients, respectively. A correlation was found between height-for-age and BMI-for-age Z-scores (r = 0.561; p = 0.008. CONCLUSIONS: Diagnosis of glycogen storage disease type I is delayed in Brazil. Most patients undergo liver biopsy for diagnostic confirmation, even though the combination of a characteristic clinical presentation and molecular methods can provide a definitive diagnosis in a less invasive manner. Obesity is a side effect of cornstarch therapy, and appears to be associated with growth in these patients.

  16. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and Alzheimer’s disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mario; Barbagallo; Ligia; J; Dominguez

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological and biological evidences support a link between type 2 diabetes mellitus(DM2) and Alzheimer’s disease(AD). Persons with diabetes have a higher incidence of cognitive decline and an increased risk of developing all types of dementia. Cognitive deficits in persons with diabetes mainly affect the areas of psychomotor efficiency, attention, learning and memory, mental flexibility and speed, and executive function. The strong epidemiological association has suggested the existence of a physiopathological link. The determinants of the accelerated cognitive decline in DM2, however, are less clear. Increased cortical and subcortical atrophy have been evidenced after controlling for diabetic vascular disease and inadequate cerebral circulation. Most recent studies have focused on the role of insulin and insulin resistance as possible links between diabetes and AD. Disturbances in brain insulin signaling mechanisms may contribute to the molecular, biochemical, and histopathological lesions in AD. Hyperglycemia itself is a risk factor for cognitive dysfunction and dementia. Hypoglycemia may also have deleterious effects on cognitive function. Recurrent symptomatic and asymptomatic hypoglycemic episodes have been suggested to cause sub-clinical brain damage, and permanent cognitive impairment. Futuretrials are required to clarify the mechanistic link, to address the question whether cognitive decline may be prevented by an adequate metabolic control, and to elucidate the role of drugs that may cause hypoglycemic episodes.

  17. Genetic homogeneity of autoimmune polyglandular disease type I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjoerses, P.; Aaltonen, J.; Vikman, A. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular disease type I (APECED) is an autosomal recessive autoimmune disease (MIM 240300) characterized by hypoparathyroidism, primary adrenocortical failure, and chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis. The disease is highly prevalent in two isolated populations, the Finnish population and the Iranian Jewish one. Sporadic cases have been identified in many other countries, including almost all European countries. The APECED locus has previously been assigned to chromosome 21q22.3 by linkage analyses in 14 Finnish families. Locus heterogeneity is a highly relevant question in this disease affecting multiple tissues and with great phenotypic diversity. To solve this matter, we performed linkage and haplotype analyses on APECED families rising from different populations. Six microsatellite markers on the critical chromosomal region of 2.6 cM on 21q22.3 were analyzed. Pair-wise linkage analyses revealed significant LOD scores for all these markers, maximum LOD score being 10.23. The obtained haplotype data and the geographic distribution of the great-grandparents of the Finnish APECED patients suggest the presence of one major, relatively old mutation responsible for {approximately}90% of the Finnish cases. Similar evidence for one founder mutation was also found in analyses of Iranian Jewish APECED haplotypes. These haplotypes, however, differed totally from the Finnish ones. The linkage analyses in 21 non-Finnish APECED families originating from several European countries provided independent evidence for linkage to the same chromosomal region on 21q22.3 and revealed no evidence for locus heterogeneity. The haplotype analyses of APECED chromosomes suggest that in different populations APECED is due to a spectrum of mutations in a still unknown gene on chromosome 21. 21 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Charcot-Marine-Tooth CMT-2 Polyneuropathy Syndrome A Case Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arbind Kumar Choudhary

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease CMT refers to the inherited peripheral neuropathies affect approximately one in 2500 people they are among the most common inherited neurological disorders. The majority of CMT patients have autosomal dominant inheritance although X-linked dominant and autosomal recessive forms also exist. The majority of cases are demyelinating although up to one third appear to be primary axonal or neuronal disorders. A patient of 9-year-old girl visited our hospital because of began to suffer from an insidious onset of progressive distal weakness and numbness and muscle twitching in both in her upper and lower limbs. Nerve conduction studies showed sensory nerve conduction SNCV of bilateral median and ulnar nerve was reduced in upper limb and bilateral sural nerve was reduced in lower limb While in case of motor nerve conduction MNCV bilateral median and ulnar nerve was reduced in upper limb and common peroneal nerve CPN as well as posterior tibial nerve was decreased leg. F response latencies were markedly prolonged in patient. Family history along with electrophysiological studied showed It was typical case of autosomal dominant CMT 2 axonal neuropathy. CMT is currently an untreatable disorder and at the moment the treatment of CMT is only supportive as there are no drugs available that would halt the disease symptoms. The care of a CMT patient is challenging for the health care team.

  19. Intrathecal gene therapy rescues a model of demyelinating peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagiava, Alexia; Sargiannidou, Irene; Theophilidis, George; Karaiskos, Christos; Richter, Jan; Bashiardes, Stavros; Schiza, Natasa; Nearchou, Marianna; Christodoulou, Christina; Scherer, Steven S; Kleopa, Kleopas A

    2016-04-26

    Inherited demyelinating peripheral neuropathies are progressive incurable diseases without effective treatment. To develop a gene therapy approach targeting myelinating Schwann cells that can be translatable, we delivered a lentiviral vector using a single lumbar intrathecal injection and a myelin-specific promoter. The human gene of interest, GJB1, which is mutated in X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT1X), was delivered intrathecally into adult Gjb1-null mice, a genetically authentic model of CMT1X that develops a demyelinating peripheral neuropathy. We obtained widespread, stable, and cell-specific expression of connexin32 in up to 50% of Schwann cells in multiple lumbar spinal roots and peripheral nerves. Behavioral and electrophysiological analysis revealed significantly improved motor performance, quadriceps muscle contractility, and sciatic nerve conduction velocities. Furthermore, treated mice exhibited reduced numbers of demyelinated and remyelinated fibers and fewer inflammatory cells in lumbar motor roots, as well as in the femoral motor and sciatic nerves. This study demonstrates that a single intrathecal lentiviral gene delivery can lead to Schwann cell-specific expression in spinal roots extending to multiple peripheral nerves. This clinically relevant approach improves the phenotype of an inherited neuropathy mouse model and provides proof of principle for treating inherited demyelinating neuropathies. PMID:27035961

  20. Inherited peripheral neuropathies due to mitochondrial disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassereau, J; Codron, P; Funalot, B

    2014-05-01

    Mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) are frequently responsible for neuropathies with variable severity. Mitochondrial diseases causing peripheral neuropathies (PNP) may be due to mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), as is the case in MERRF and MELAS syndromes, or to mutations of nuclear genes. Secondary abnormalities of mtDNA (such as multiple deletions of muscle mtDNA) may result from mitochondrial disorders due to mutations in nuclear genes involved in mtDNA maintenance. This is the case in several syndromes caused by impaired mtDNA maintenance, such as Sensory Ataxic Neuropathy, Dysarthria and Ophthalmoplegia (SANDO) due to recessive mutations in the POLG gene, which encodes the catalytic subunit of mtDNA polymerase (DNA polymerase gamma), or Mitochondrial Neuro-Gastro-Intestinal Encephalomyopathy (MNGIE), due to recessive mutations in the TYMP gene, which encodes thymidine phosphorylase. The last years have seen a growing list of evidence demonstrating that mitochondrial bioenergetics and dynamics might be dysfunctional in axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT2), and these mechanisms might present a common link between dissimilar CMT2-causing genes. PMID:24768438

  1. Glycogen Storage Disease Type Ia in Canines: A Model for Human Metabolic and Genetic Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Specht; Laurie Fiske; Kirsten Erger; Travis Cossette; John Verstegen; Martha Campbell-Thompson; Struck, Maggie B.; Young Mok Lee; Chou, Janice Y.; Byrne, Barry J; Correia, Catherine E.; Mah, Cathryn S.; Weinstein, David A.; Conlon, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    A canine model of Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSDIa) is described. Affected dogs are homozygous for a previously described M121I mutation resulting in a deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase-α. Metabolic, clinicopathologic, pathologic, and clinical manifestations of GSDIa observed in this model are described and compared to those observed in humans. The canine model shows more complete recapitulation of the clinical manifestations seen in humans including “lactic acidosis”, larger size,...

  2. TYPE II DIABETES MELLITUS: MEDICAL OR SURGICAL DISEASE ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Silecchia

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM is increasing in all the world. In this way the comorbidities and complications of the T2DM as well as death related T2DM are also increasing. It was demonstrated by many studies that T2DM is a medically incurable disease, chronic and progressive, and despite all the medical therapy and life style changing, more than 20% from the patients have a poor glycemic control. On the other hand, some surgical procedures, initially performed for morbid obesity (bariatric surgery revealed good results to control the diabetes and even the metabolic syndrome. This paper presents the advantages and disadvantages of three main surgical procedures: gastric by-pass, sleeve gastrectomy and gastric banding. All of these procedures are very effectiveness to control the diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Further studies are necessary to establish the guidelines for the treatment (and even prophylaxis of T2DM.

  3. Exercise intolerance in Glycogen Storage Disease Type III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, Nicolai; Pradel, Agnès; Husu, Edith;

    2013-01-01

    Myopathic symptoms in Glycogen Storage Disease Type IIIa (GSD IIIa) are generally ascribed to the muscle wasting that these patients suffer in adult life, but an inability to debranch glycogen likely also has an impact on muscle energy metabolism. We hypothesized that patients with GSD IIIa can...... experience exercise intolerance due to insufficient carbohydrate oxidation in skeletal muscle. Six patients aged 17-36-years were studied. We determined VO 2peak (peak oxygen consumption), the response to forearm exercise, and the metabolic and cardiovascular responses to cycle exercise at 70% of VO 2peak...... capacity was significantly reduced, and our results indicate that this was due to a block in muscle glycogenolytic capacity. Our findings suggest that the general classification of GSD III as a glycogenosis characterized by fixed symptoms related to muscle wasting should be modified to include dynamic...

  4. Peripheral Arterial Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Youl Rhee

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral arterial disease (PAD in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM exhibits broad clinical characteristics and various consequences and is known as one of the major macrovascular complications of T2DM. Atherosclerosis is recognized as the most direct and important cause of PAD, but acute or chronic limb ischemia may be the result of various risk factors. In light of the increasing number of patients who undergo peripheral vascular procedures, the number of subjects who are exposed to the risks for PAD and related complications is increasing. In this review, we will discuss the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of PAD, as well as the clinical significance of PAD in T2DM subjects.

  5. Myocardial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofstad, Anne Pernille

    2016-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is strongly associated with increased risk of myocardial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease (CVD), two separate conditions which often co-exist and influence each other's course. The prevalence of myocardial dysfunction may be as high as 75% in T2DM populations but is often overlooked due to the initial asymptomatic nature of the disease, complicating co-morbidities such as coronary artery disease (CAD) and obesity, and the lack of consensus on diagnostic criteria. More sensitive echocardiographic applications are furthermore needed to improve detection of early subclinical changes in myocardial function which do not affect conventional echocardiographic parameters. The pathophysiology of the diabetic myocardial dysfunction is not fully elucidated, but involves hyperglycemia and high levels of free fatty acids. It evolves over several years and increases the risk of developing overt HF, and is suggested to at least in part account for the worse outcome seen in T2DM individuals after cardiac events. CAD and stroke are the most frequent CV manifestations among T2DM patients and relate to a large degree to the accelerated atherosclerosis driven by inflammation. Diagnosing CAD is challenging due to the lower sensitivity inherent in the diagnostic tests and there is thus a need for new biomarkers to improve prediction and detection of CAD. It seems that a multi-factorial approach (i.e. targeting several CV risk factors simultaneously) is superior to a strict glucose lowering strategy in reducing risk for macrovascular events, and recent research may even support an effect also on HF outcomes. PMID:27071642

  6. Describing the hexapeptide identity platform between the influenza A H5N1 and Homo sapiens proteomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanduc, Darja

    2010-01-01

    We searched the primary sequence of influenza A H5N1 polyprotein for hexamer amino acid sequences shared with human proteins using the Protein International Resource database and the exact peptide matching analysis program. We find that the viral polyprotein shares numerous hexapeptides with the human proteome. The human proteins involved in the viral overlap are represented by antigens associated with basic cell functions such as proliferation, development, and differentiation. Of special importance, many human proteins that share peptide sequences with influenza A polyprotein are antigens such as reelin, neurexin I-α, myosin-IXa, Bardet-Biedl syndrome 10 protein, Williams syndrome transcription factor, disrupted in schizophrenia 1 protein, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 2 chromosomal region candidate gene 17 protein, fragile X mental retardation 2 protein, and jouberin. That is, the viral-vs-human overlap involves human proteins that, when altered, have been reported to be potentially associated with multiple neurological disorders that can include autism, epilepsy, obesity, dystonia, ataxia-telangiectasia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, sensorineural deafness, sudden infant death syndrome, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, and myelination. The present data are discussed as a possible molecular basis for understanding influenza A viral escape from immunosurveillance and for defining anti-influenza immune-therapeutic approaches devoid of collateral adverse events. PMID:20859452

  7. Describing the hexapeptide identity platform between the influenza A H5N1 and Homo sapiens proteomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darja Kanduc

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Darja KanducDepartment of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Bari, ItalyAbstract: We searched the primary sequence of influenza A H5N1 polyprotein for hexamer amino acid sequences shared with human proteins using the Protein International Resource database and the exact peptide matching analysis program. We find that the viral polyprotein shares numerous hexapeptides with the human proteome. The human proteins involved in the viral overlap are represented by antigens associated with basic cell functions such as proliferation, development, and differentiation. Of special importance, many human proteins that share peptide sequences with influenza A polyprotein are antigens such as reelin, neurexin I-a, myosin-IXa, Bardet–Biedl syndrome 10 protein, Williams syndrome transcription factor, disrupted in schizophrenia 1 protein, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 2 chromosomal region candidate gene 17 protein, fragile X mental retardation 2 protein, and jouberin. That is, the viral-vs-human overlap involves human proteins that, when altered, have been reported to be potentially associated with multiple neurological disorders that can include autism, epilepsy, obesity, dystonia, ataxia–telangiectasia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, sensorineural deafness, sudden infant death syndrome, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, and myelination. The present data are discussed as a possible molecular basis for understanding influenza A viral escape from immunosurveillance and for defining anti-influenza immune-therapeutic approaches devoid of collateral adverse events.Keywords: peptide sharing, neurological disorders, host-pathogen relationships, viral escape from immunosurveillance

  8. Secondary structural analysis of the carboxyl-terminal domain from different connexin isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnol, Gaëlle; Al-Mugotir, Mona; Kopanic, Jennifer L; Zach, Sydney; Li, Hanjun; Trease, Andrew J; Stauch, Kelly L; Grosely, Rosslyn; Cervantes, Matthew; Sorgen, Paul L

    2016-03-01

    The connexin carboxyl-terminal (CxCT) domain plays a role in the trafficking, localization, and turnover of gap junction channels, as well as the level of gap junction intercellular communication via numerous post-translational modifications and protein-protein interactions. As a key player in the regulation of gap junctions, the CT presents itself as a target for manipulation intended to modify function. Specific to intrinsically disordered proteins, identifying residues whose secondary structure can be manipulated will be critical toward unlocking the therapeutic potential of the CxCT domain. To accomplish this goal, we used biophysical methods to characterize CxCT domains attached to their fourth transmembrane domain (TM4). Circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance were complementary in demonstrating the connexin isoforms that form the greatest amount of α-helical structure in their CT domain (Cx45 > Cx43 > Cx32 > Cx50 > Cx37 ≈ Cx40 ≈ Cx26). Studies compared the influence of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol, pH, phosphorylation, and mutations (Cx32, X-linked Charcot-Marie Tooth disease; Cx26, hearing loss) on the TM4-CxCT structure. While pH modestly influences the CT structure, a major structural change was associated with phosphomimetic substitutions. Since most connexin CT domains are phosphorylated throughout their life cycle, studies of phospho-TM4-CxCT isoforms will be critical toward understanding the role that structure plays in regulating gap junction function. PMID:26542351

  9. Homozygous mutations in MFN2 cause multiple symmetric lipomatosis associated with neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Sarah L; Cheuk-Him Ng, Andy; Innes, A Micheil; Wagner, Justin D; Dyment, David A; Tetreault, Martine; Majewski, Jacek; Boycott, Kym M; Screaton, Robert A; Nicholson, Garth

    2015-09-15

    Multiple symmetric lipomatosis (MSL) is a mitochondrial disorder with impaired brown fat metabolism that has been associated with MERRF mutations in some, but not all, patients. We studied a sibling pair and an unrelated indiviadual who presented with MSL and neuropathy to determine the genetic etiology of this disorder in patients who did not carry the MSL-associated MERRF mutation. Whole-exome sequencing was performed on the siblings, and a rare, shared homozygous mutation in MFN2 (c.2119C>T: p.R707W) was identified. The mutation was not present in their healthy siblings. In silico programs predict it to be pathogenic, and heterozygous carriers of the MFN2 p.R707W substitution are known to have Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease. A third, unrelated patient with multiple symmetrical lipomatosis and neuropathy also harbored the same homozygous mutation and had been previously diagnosed with CMT. Functional studies in patient fibroblasts demonstrate that the p.R707W substitution impairs homotypic (MFN2-MFN2) protein interactions required for normal activity and renders mitochondria prone to perinuclear aggregation. These findings show that homozygous mutations at p.R707W in MFN2 are a novel cause of multiple symmetrical lipomatosis. PMID:26085578

  10. Identification of Genetic Causes of Inherited Peripheral Neuropathies by Targeted Gene Panel Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Soo Hyun; Hong, Young Bin; Hyun, Young Se; Nam, Da Eun; Kwak, Geon; Hwang, Sun Hee; Choi, Byung-Ok; Chung, Ki Wha

    2016-05-31

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies (IPN), which are a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous peripheral nerve disorders including Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), exhibit progressive degeneration of muscles in the extremities and loss of sensory function. Over 70 genes have been reported as genetic causatives and the number is still growing. We prepared a targeted gene panel for IPN diagnosis based on next generation sequencing (NGS). The gene panel was designed to detect mutations in 73 genes reported to be genetic causes of IPN or related peripheral neuropathies, and to detect duplication of the chromosome 17p12 region, the major genetic cause of CMT1A. We applied the gene panel to 115 samples from 63 non-CMT1A families, and isolated 15 pathogenic or likely-pathogenic mutations in eight genes from 25 patients (17 families). Of them, eight mutations were unreported variants. Of particular interest, this study revealed several very rare mutations in the SPTLC2, DCTN1, and MARS genes. In addition, the effectiveness of the detection of CMT1A was confirmed by comparing five 17p12-nonduplicated controls and 15 CMT1A cases. In conclusion, we developed a gene panel for one step genetic diagnosis of IPN. It seems that its time- and cost-effectiveness are superior to previous tiered-genetic diagnosis algorithms, and it could be applied as a genetic diagnostic system for inherited peripheral neuropathies. PMID:27025386

  11. Unusual presentation of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andary Michael T

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP is an autosomal-dominant painless peripheral neuropathy characterized by episodes of repeated focal pressure neuropathies at sites of entrapment/compression, with a considerable variability in the clinical course. Electrodiagnostic and genetic testing are important in the diagnostic evaluation of these patients. Case presentation We report an unusual HNPP phenotype, five compression neuropathies in four nerves in a patient with bilateral hand numbness. A 42-year-old female, presented with acute bilateral paresthesias and weakness in her hands after starting yoga exercises requiring hyperextension of her hands at the wrists. Her presentation was complicated by: a a remote history of acute onset foot drop and subsequent improvement, b previous diagnoses of demyelinating peripheral neuropathy, possibly Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, and c exposure to leprosy. Electrodiagnostic testing showed 5 separate compression neuropathies in 4 nerves including: severe left and right ulnar neuropathies at the wrist, left and right median neuropathies at the wrist and left ulnar neuropathy at the elbow. There was a mild generalized, primarily demyelinating, peripheral polyneuropathy. Based on the clinical suspicion and electrodiagnostic findings, consistent with profound demyelination in areas of compression, genetic analysis was done which identified a deletion of the PMP-22 gene consistent with HNPP. Conclusion HNPP can present with unusual phenotypes, such as 5 separate mononeuropathies, bilateral ulnar and median neuropathies at the wrists and ulnar neuropathy at the elbow with mild peripheral demyelinating polyneuropathy associated with the PMP-22 gene deletion.

  12. Identification of Genetic Causes of Inherited Peripheral Neuropathies by Targeted Gene Panel Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Soo Hyun; Hong, Young Bin; Hyun, Young Se; Nam, Da Eun; Kwak, Geon; Hwang, Sun Hee; Choi, Byung-Ok; Chung, Ki Wha

    2016-01-01

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies (IPN), which are a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous peripheral nerve disorders including Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), exhibit progressive degeneration of muscles in the extremities and loss of sensory function. Over 70 genes have been reported as genetic causatives and the number is still growing. We prepared a targeted gene panel for IPN diagnosis based on next generation sequencing (NGS). The gene panel was designed to detect mutations in 73 genes reported to be genetic causes of IPN or related peripheral neuropathies, and to detect duplication of the chromosome 17p12 region, the major genetic cause of CMT1A. We applied the gene panel to 115 samples from 63 non-CMT1A families, and isolated 15 pathogenic or likely-pathogenic mutations in eight genes from 25 patients (17 families). Of them, eight mutations were unreported variants. Of particular interest, this study revealed several very rare mutations in the SPTLC2, DCTN1, and MARS genes. In addition, the effectiveness of the detection of CMT1A was confirmed by comparing five 17p12-nonduplicated controls and 15 CMT1A cases. In conclusion, we developed a gene panel for one step genetic diagnosis of IPN. It seems that its time- and cost-effectiveness are superior to previous tiered-genetic diagnosis algorithms, and it could be applied as a genetic diagnostic system for inherited peripheral neuropathies. PMID:27025386

  13. Effect of Electroacupuncture on the Expression of Glycyl-tRNA Synthetase and Ultrastructure Changes in Atrophied Rat Peroneus Longus Muscle Induced by Sciatic Nerve Injection Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GlyRS is one of the key enzymes involved in protein synthesis. Its mutations have been reported to cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease which demonstrates muscular atrophy in distal extremities, particularly manifested in peroneus muscles. In this situation, the dysfunctions of mitochondria and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR affect energy supply and excitation-contraction coupling of muscle fibers, therefore resulting in muscular atrophy. Although the treatment of muscular atrophy is a global urgent problem, it can be improved by electroacupuncture (EA treatment. To investigate the mechanism underlying EA treatment improving muscular atrophy, we focused on the perspective of protein synthesis by establishing a penicillin injection-induced sciatic nerve injury model. In our model, injured rats without treatment showed decreased sciatic functional index (SFI, decreased peroneus longus muscle weight and muscle fiber cross-sectional area, aggregated mitochondria with vacuoles appearing, swollen SR, and downregulated mRNA and protein expression levels of GlyRS and myosin heavy chain IIb (MHC-IIb. The injured rats with EA treatment showed significant recovery. These results indicated that EA stimulation can alleviate peroneus longus muscular atrophy induced by iatrogenic sciatic nerve injury through promoting the recovery of GlyRS and muscle ultrastructure and increasing muscle protein synthesis.

  14. Glutamate signals through mGluR2 to control Schwann cell differentiation and proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, Fuminori; Wakatsuki, Shuji; Tokunaga, Shinji; Fujieda, Hiroki; Araki, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Rapid saltatory nerve conduction is facilitated by myelin structure, which is produced by Schwann cells (SC) in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Proper development and degeneration/regeneration after injury requires regulated phenotypic changes of SC. We have previously shown that glutamate can induce SC proliferation in culture. Here we show that glutamate signals through metabotropic glutamate receptor 2 (mGluR2) to induce Erk phosphorylation in SC. mGluR2-elicited Erk phosphorylation requires ErbB2/3 receptor tyrosine kinase phosphorylation to limit the signaling cascade that promotes phosphorylation of Erk, but not Akt. We found that Gβγ and Src are involved in subcellular signaling downstream of mGluR2. We also found that glutamate can transform myelinating SC to proliferating SC, while inhibition of mGluR2 signaling can inhibit demyelination of injured nerves in vivo. These data suggest pathophysiological significance of mGluR2 signaling in PNS and its possible therapeutic importance to combat demyelinating disorders including Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. PMID:27432639

  15. Supramaximal Stimulus Intensity as a Diagnostic Tool in Chronic Demyelinating Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivien Parker

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The ability to correctly identify chronic demyelinating neuropathy can have important therapeutic and prognostic significance. The stimulus intensity value required to obtain a supramaximal compound muscle action potential amplitude is a commonly acquired data point that has not been formally assessed as a diagnostic tool in routine nerve conduction studies to identify chronic neuropathies. We postulated that this value was significantly elevated in chronic demyelinating neuropathy. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed electrophysiology laboratory records to compare the stimulus intensity values recorded during median and ulnar motor nerve conduction studies. The groups studied included normal controls (n=42 and the following diagnostic categories: chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy (CIDP (n=20, acquired inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy (AIDP (n=13, Charcot Marie Tooth (CMT type 1 or 4C (n=15, carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS (n=11, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS (n=18. Results. Supramaximal intensities were significantly higher in patients with CMT (median nerve: 43.4 mA and CIDP (median nerve: 38.9 mA, whereas values similar to normal controls (median nerve: 25.3 mA were obtained in ALS, CTS, and AIDP. Conclusions. Supramaximal stimulus intensity may be used as an additional criterion to identify the pathophysiology of neuropathy. We postulate that endoneurial hypertrophic changes may increase electrical impedance and thus the threshold of excitation at nodes of Ranvier.

  16. Supramaximal Stimulus Intensity as a Diagnostic Tool in Chronic Demyelinating Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Vivien; Warman Chardon, Jodi; Mills, Julie; Goldsmith, Claire; Bourque, Pierre R

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The ability to correctly identify chronic demyelinating neuropathy can have important therapeutic and prognostic significance. The stimulus intensity value required to obtain a supramaximal compound muscle action potential amplitude is a commonly acquired data point that has not been formally assessed as a diagnostic tool in routine nerve conduction studies to identify chronic neuropathies. We postulated that this value was significantly elevated in chronic demyelinating neuropathy. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed electrophysiology laboratory records to compare the stimulus intensity values recorded during median and ulnar motor nerve conduction studies. The groups studied included normal controls (n = 42) and the following diagnostic categories: chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy (CIDP) (n = 20), acquired inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy (AIDP) (n = 13), Charcot Marie Tooth (CMT) type 1 or 4C (n = 15), carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) (n = 11), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) (n = 18). Results. Supramaximal intensities were significantly higher in patients with CMT (median nerve: 43.4 mA) and CIDP (median nerve: 38.9 mA), whereas values similar to normal controls (median nerve: 25.3 mA) were obtained in ALS, CTS, and AIDP. Conclusions. Supramaximal stimulus intensity may be used as an additional criterion to identify the pathophysiology of neuropathy. We postulate that endoneurial hypertrophic changes may increase electrical impedance and thus the threshold of excitation at nodes of Ranvier. PMID:27413732

  17. Supramaximal Stimulus Intensity as a Diagnostic Tool in Chronic Demyelinating Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Vivien; Warman Chardon, Jodi; Mills, Julie; Goldsmith, Claire; Bourque, Pierre R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The ability to correctly identify chronic demyelinating neuropathy can have important therapeutic and prognostic significance. The stimulus intensity value required to obtain a supramaximal compound muscle action potential amplitude is a commonly acquired data point that has not been formally assessed as a diagnostic tool in routine nerve conduction studies to identify chronic neuropathies. We postulated that this value was significantly elevated in chronic demyelinating neuropathy. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed electrophysiology laboratory records to compare the stimulus intensity values recorded during median and ulnar motor nerve conduction studies. The groups studied included normal controls (n = 42) and the following diagnostic categories: chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy (CIDP) (n = 20), acquired inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy (AIDP) (n = 13), Charcot Marie Tooth (CMT) type 1 or 4C (n = 15), carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) (n = 11), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) (n = 18). Results. Supramaximal intensities were significantly higher in patients with CMT (median nerve: 43.4 mA) and CIDP (median nerve: 38.9 mA), whereas values similar to normal controls (median nerve: 25.3 mA) were obtained in ALS, CTS, and AIDP. Conclusions. Supramaximal stimulus intensity may be used as an additional criterion to identify the pathophysiology of neuropathy. We postulate that endoneurial hypertrophic changes may increase electrical impedance and thus the threshold of excitation at nodes of Ranvier.

  18. Glycogen Storage Disease Type Ia in Canines: A Model for Human Metabolic and Genetic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Specht

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A canine model of Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSDIa is described. Affected dogs are homozygous for a previously described M121I mutation resulting in a deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase-α. Metabolic, clinicopathologic, pathologic, and clinical manifestations of GSDIa observed in this model are described and compared to those observed in humans. The canine model shows more complete recapitulation of the clinical manifestations seen in humans including “lactic acidosis”, larger size, and longer lifespan compared to other animal models. Use of this model in preclinical trials of gene therapy is described and briefly compared to the murine model. Although the canine model offers a number of advantages for evaluating potential therapies for GSDIa, there are also some significant challenges involved in its use. Despite these challenges, the canine model of GSDIa should continue to provide valuable information about the potential for generating curative therapies for GSDIa as well as other genetic hepatic diseases.

  19. Niemann-Pick Disease Type C: Implications for Sedation and Anesthesia for Diagnostic Procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Miao, Ning; Lu, Xiaowei; O’Grady, Naomi P.; Yanjanin, Nicole; Porter, Forbes D.; Quezado, Zenaide M N

    2012-01-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C, an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder, can present with severe visceral and neurologic involvement and is associated with a significant decrease in life expectancy. As little is known about anesthetic considerations of this disease, we examined the perianesthetic course of patients with Niemann-Pick disease type C. Thirty-two patients with Niemann-Pick disease type C, median age 6.9 years (1.8–33 years), underwent 64 general anesthetics for diagnostic ...

  20. TYPES OF TREMOR IN PATIENTS WITH CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASES AND CARDIOVASCULAR EVENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Petrov Igor; Mulic Mersudin; Antonio Georgiev

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Tremor can occur as a part of the clinical feature of cerebrovascular diseases. Many patients with cerebral stroke have cardiovascular diseases as a comorbidity or complication of stroke; sometimes cardiovascular events can lead to embolic stroke. Aim: To present types of tremor in patients with cerebrovascular diseases and cardiovascular events and diabetes mellitus type 2, clinical characteristics of tremor and investigations used. Materia...

  1. Validating the Type D personality construct in Chinese patients with coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Doris S F; Thompson, David R; Yu, Cheuk Man;

    2010-01-01

    Type D personality predicts poor prognosis in coronary heart disease (CHD) but little is known about Type D in non-Western cultures. We examined the (a) validity of the Type D construct and its assessment with the DS14 scale in the Chinese culture, (b) prevalence of Type D, and (c) gender vs. Type...

  2. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in glycogen storage disease type 1b. Results of the European Study on Glycogen Storage Disease Type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, G.; Rake, J.P.; Labrune, P.; Leonard, J.V.; Moses, S.; Ullrich, K.; Wendel, U.; Groenier, K.H.; Smit, G.P.

    2002-01-01

    Patients with glycogen storage disease type 1b (GSD-1b) have neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction that predispose to frequent infections and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), for which granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF) is given. To investigate the use and the value of GCSF treatment in

  3. Shared Genetic Factors Involved in Celiac Disease, Type 2 Diabetes and Anorexia Nervosa Suggest Common Molecular Pathways for Chronic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostowy, Joanna; Montén, Caroline; Gudjonsdottir, Audur H.; Arnell, Henrik; Browaldh, Lars; Nilsson, Staffan; Agardh, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several genetic regions involved in immune-regulatory mechanisms to be associated with celiac disease. Previous GWAS also revealed an over-representation of genes involved in type 2 diabetes and anorexia nervosa associated with celiac disease, suggesting involvement of common metabolic pathways for development of these chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to extend these previous analyses to study the gene expression in the gut from children with active celiac disease. Material and Methods Thirty six target genes involved in type 2 diabetes and four genes associated with anorexia nervosa were investigated for gene expression in small intestinal biopsies from 144 children with celiac disease at median (range) age of 7.4 years (1.6–17.8) and from 154 disease controls at a median (range) age 11.4.years (1.4–18.3). Results A total of eleven of genes were differently expressed in celiac patients compared with disease controls of which CD36, CD38, FOXP1, SELL, PPARA, PPARG, AGT previously associated with type 2 diabetes and AKAP6, NTNG1 with anorexia nervosa remained significant after correction for multiple testing. Conclusion Shared genetic factors involved in celiac disease, type 2 diabetes and anorexia nervosa suggest common underlying molecular pathways for these diseases. PMID:27483138

  4. All about Your Risk for Prediabetes, Type 2 Diabetes, and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... being more active. Astudy of people at high risk for type 2 diabetes found that people could lower their ... inactive If you develop prediabetes, you’re at risk for type 2 diabetes and heart disease. But you can ...

  5. Clinical features of adult patients with Eisenmenger syndrome associated with different types of congenital heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈果

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical features and hemodynamics of adult patients with Eisenmenger syndrome in different types of congenital heart diseases (CHD) .Methods Patients with Eisenmenger syndrome with different types of CHD diagnosed by right heart

  6. Characterization of foot-and-mouth disease virus types Ο and Asia 1 RNA

    OpenAIRE

    S. Vasantha; LAL, SM; Antony, A

    1988-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease is an acute and highly contagious febrile disease affecting cloven-footed animals. Identification of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), the causative agent of the disease, posed problems because of the occurrence of many types and subtypes of the virus. A molecular approach based on oligonucleotide mapping of FMDV RNA has been used for the identification and characterization of virus isolates obtained in a disease outbreak (King et al., 1981). One-dimensiona...

  7. Application of KDIGO classifcation of chronic kidney disease for analyzing the prevalence of kidney disease and other vascular diseases in 1645 type 2 diabetic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李明

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the prevalence,risk factors of kidney disease in type 2 diabetic patients with KDIGO classification of chronic kidney disease,and to study cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases and death in these patients,so as to investigate the significance of the KDIGO classification system.Methods One thousand six hundred and forty-five type 2 diabetic patients who were in

  8. Linkage of Niemann-Pick disease type D to the same region of human chromosome 18 as Niemann-Pick disease type C.

    OpenAIRE

    Greer, W. L.; Riddell, D. C.; Byers, D M; Welch, J. P.; Girouard, G S; Sparrow, S M; Gillan, T L; Neumann, P. E.

    1997-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type II disease is a severe disorder characterized by accumulation of tissue cholesterol and sphingomyelin and by progressive degeneration of the nervous system. This disease has two clinically similar subtypes, type C (NPC) and type D (NPD). NPC is clinically variable and has been identified in many ethnic groups. NPD, on the other hand, has been reported only in descendants of an Acadian couple who lived in Nova Scotia in the early 18th century and has a more homogeneous expres...

  9. Crystal structure of the extracellular domain of human myelin protein zero

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Yong; Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Sohi, Jasloveleen; Kamholz, John; Kovari, Ladislau C. (WSU-MED); (NWU)

    2012-03-27

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), a hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy, is the most common genetic neuropathy with an incidence of 1 in 2600. Several forms of CMT have been identified arising from different genomic abnormalities such as CMT1 including CMT1A, CMT1B, and CMTX. CMT1 with associated peripheral nervous system (PNS) demyelination, the most frequent diagnosis, demonstrates slowed nerve conduction velocities and segmental demyelination upon nerve biopsy. One of its subtypes, CMT1A, presents a 1.5-Mb duplication in the p11-p12 region of the human chromosome 17 which encodes peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22). CMT1B, a less common form, arises from the mutations in the myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene on chromosome 1, region q22-q23, which encodes the major structural component of the peripheral myelin. A rare type of CMT1 has been found recently and is caused by point mutations in early growth response gene 2 (EGR2), encoding a zinc finger transcription factor in Schwann cells. In addition, CMTX, an X-linked form of CMT, arises from a mutation in the connexin-32 gene. Myelin protein zero, associated with CMT1B, is a transmembrane protein of 219 amino acid residues. Human MPZ consists of three domains: 125 residues constitute the glycosylated immunoglobulin-like extracellular domain; 27 residues span the membrane; and 67 residues comprise the highly basic intracellular domain. MPZ makes up approximately 50% of the protein content of myelin, and is expressed predominantly in Schwann cells, the myelinating cell of the PNS. Myelin protein zero, a homophilic adhesion molecule, is a member of the immunoglobulin super-family and is essential for normal myelin structure and function. In addition, MPZ knockout mice displayed abnormal myelin that severely affects the myelination pathway, and overexpression of MPZ causes congenital hypomyelination of peripheral nerves. Myelin protein zero mutations account for {approx}5% of patients with CMT. To date, over 125

  10. VASCULAR DEMENTIA TYPE BINSWANGER'S DISEASE IN PATIENTS WITH ACTIVE NEUROCYSTICERCOSIS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foyaca Sibat H, MD.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We report seven patients who presented with clinical manifestations of ischemic cerebrovascular disease (CVD, dementia, and on CT Scan radiological signs of active neurocysticercosis and Binswanger’s Disease (BD were found. Two patients died due to bilateral pulmonary thromboembolism secondary to deep venous thrombosis on lower limbs and the others remain alive. In almost all of them after one day of treatment with praziquantel(PZQ some aggravation of the clinical manifestations of BD were observed. We have hypothesized about the Taenia solium-microglial activation-coagulation disorder and glial disorders-Blood-Brain-Barrier disturbances-Binswanger’s disease. We considered that anti-parasitic therapy for active NCC in patients with an associated BD should be prescribed for some isolated cases when it’s extremely necessary.

  11. The association of type D personality with quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubayova, Tatiana; Nagyova, Iveta; Havlikova, Eva; Rosenberger, Jaroslav; Gdovinova, Zuzana; Middel, Berrie; van Dijk, Jitse P.; Groothoff, Johan W.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Personality traits appear as determinants of quality of life (QoL) in most chronic diseases. Type D personality is characterized by ineffective coping strategies that reduce QoL in patients with coronary heart disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether Type D personality also

  12. An Acoustic Study of the Relationships among Neurologic Disease, Dysarthria Type, and Severity of Dysarthria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yunjung; Kent, Raymond D.; Weismer, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined acoustic predictors of speech intelligibility in speakers with several types of dysarthria secondary to different diseases and conducted classification analysis solely by acoustic measures according to 3 variables (disease, speech severity, and dysarthria type). Method: Speech recordings from 107 speakers with…

  13. Clinical potential of eliglustat tartrate in the treatment of type 1 Gaucher disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kaplan P

    2014-01-01

    Paige KaplanLysosomal Disorders Center, Section of Metabolic Diseases, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Nonneuropathic type 1 Gaucher disease is an autosomal recessive inherited disease caused by the deficiency or absence of beta glucocerebrosidase (beta glucosidase). The highest prevalence of type 1 is in Ashkenazi Jews, but it affects all ethnic groups. It manifests at any age but is seen predominantly in the first two decades. The phenotype is charact...

  14. Clinical potential of eliglustat tartrate in the treatment of type 1 Gaucher disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kaplan, Paige

    2014-01-01

    Paige KaplanLysosomal Disorders Center, Section of Metabolic Diseases, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Nonneuropathic type 1 Gaucher disease is an autosomal recessive inherited disease caused by the deficiency or absence of beta glucocerebrosidase (beta glucosidase). The highest prevalence of type 1 is in Ashkenazi Jews, but it affects all ethnic groups. It manifests at any age but is seen predominantly in the first two decades. The phenotype is cha...

  15. Ischemia-modified albumin in type 2 diabetic patients with and without peripheral arterial disease

    OpenAIRE

    Shao-Gang Ma; Chun-Ling Wei; Bing Hong; Wei-Nan Yu

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether there is an association between serum ischemia-modified albumin and the risk factor profile in type 2 diabetic patients with peripheral arterial disease and to identify the risk markers for peripheral arterial disease. METHODS: Participants included 290 patients (35.2% women) with type 2 diabetes. The ankle-brachial pressure index was measured using a standard protocol, and peripheral arterial disease was defined as an ankle-brachial index 1.3. The basal ischem...

  16. Recovery from liver disease in a Niemann-Pick type C mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    Sayre, Naomi L.; Rimkunas, Victoria M.; Graham, Mark J.; Crooke, Rosanne M.; Liscum, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Loss of function of Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) leads to lysosomal free cholesterol storage, resulting in the neurodegenerative disease Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC). Significant numbers of patients with NPC also suffer from liver disease. Currently, no treatments exist that alter patient outcome, and it is unknown if recovery from tissue damage can occur even if a treatment were found. Our laboratory developed a strategy to test whether mice can recover from NPC liver disease. We used antisen...

  17. Prospective Cohort Study of Type 2 Diabetes and the Risk of Parkinson's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Ashley; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Driver, Jane A.; Buring, Julie Elizabeth; Gaziano, John Michael; Kurth, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To evaluate the association between type 2 diabetes and newly reported Parkinson's disease. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Our study included 21,841 participants in the Physicians’ Health Study, a cohort of U.S. male physicians. Diabetes and Parkinson's disease were self-reported via questionnaire. We used time-varying Cox regression to calculate adjusted relative risk (RR) for Parkinson's disease. RESULTS—Over 23 years, 556 individuals with Parkinson's disease were identified. Subject...

  18. Type D personality and health status in cardiovascular disease populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Versteeg, Henneke; Spek, Viola; Pedersen, Susanne S.;

    2012-01-01

    in patient-reported physical and mental health status among cardiovascular patients. Methods: A computerized search of the literature through PUBMED and PsychINFO (from 1995 to May 2011) was performed and prospective studies were selected that analysed the association between Type D personality and...... health status in cardiovascular patients. Two separate meta-analyses were performed for the association of Type D personality with physical and mental health status, respectively. Results: Of all identified studies, ten studies met the selection criteria. The meta-analyses showed that Type D was...... associated with a two-fold increased odds for impaired physical health status (3035 patients, OR 1.94, 95% CI 1.49-2.52) and a 2.5-fold increased odds for impaired mental health status (2213 patients, OR 2.55, 95% CI 1.57-4.16). There was no significant heterogeneity between the studies on physical health...

  19. Extraosseous manifestation of Gaucher's disease type I: MR and histological appearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaucher's disease type I is the most prevalent lysosomal storage disorder caused by an autosomal-recessive inherited deficiency of glucocerebrosidase activity with secondary accumulation of glucocerebrosides within the lysosomes of macrophages. The storage disorder produces a multisystem disease characterized by progressive visceral enlargement and gradual replacement of bone marrow with lipid-laden macrophages. Skeletal disease is a major source of disability in Gaucher's disease. Extraosseous extension of Gaucher cells is an extremely rare manifestation of skeletal Gaucher's disease. This is a report on the MRI and histopathological findings of an extraosseous Gaucher-cell extension into the midface in a patient with Gaucher's disease. (orig.)

  20. Type 1 diabetes mellitus, coeliac disease, and lymphoma: a report of four cases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, T M

    2012-02-03

    INTRODUCTION: Patients with Type 1 diabetes mellitus have a high prevalence of coeliac disease, symptoms of which are often mild, atypical, or absent. Untreated coeliac disease is associated with an increased risk of malignancy, particularly of lymphoma. We describe four patients with Type 1 diabetes mellitus and coeliac disease who developed lymphoma. CASE REPORTS: Two patients were male and two female. In three patients, coeliac disease and lymphoma were diagnosed simultaneously. Enteropathy-associated T cell lymphoma occurred in two patients, Hodgkin\\'s disease in one, and B cell lymphoma in one. Response to treatment was in general poor, and three patients died soon after the diagnosis of lymphoma was made. CONCLUSION: As the relative risk of lymphoma is reduced by a gluten-free diet, a high index of suspicion for coeliac disease should exist in all Type 1 diabetic patients with unexplained constitutional or gastrointestinal symptoms.

  1. Glomerular Basement Membrane Type IV Collagen in Health and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Fish, Alfred J.; Kashtan, Clifford E.; Matsukura, Hiro; Butkowski, Ralph J.

    1991-01-01

    Glomerular basement membrane is the major supporting structural element of the glomerular capillary wall. This is a highly complex locus which functionally serves as a filtration barrier, and has been the subject of detailed investigation. The composition of whole glomerular basement membrane suggests that collagen is a major component. Isolation and characterization of the collagenous domains has revealed that glomerular basement membrane is chiefly composed of type IV collagen. This molecul...

  2. Dermoscopy: a useful auxiliary tool in the diagnosis of type 1 segmental Darier's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errichetti, Enzo; Maione, Vincenzo; Pegolo, Enrico; Stinco, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Type 1 segmental Darier's disease is a blaschkolinear variant of Darier's disease resulting from a postzygotic mosaicism. Since it usually lacks diagnostic clues typical of the generalized form, including positive family history of the disease, nail and mucosal abnormalities, and/or acral involvement, its distinction from other acquired inflammatory blaschkolinear dermatoses may often be quite challenging, thus requiring histopathological examination to reach a definitive diagnosis. We report a case of type 1 segmental Darier's disease with its dermoscopic findings in order to show the usefulness of dermoscopy in assisting the noninvasive identification of this condition. PMID:27222773

  3. Association of Chronic Kidney Disease and Cerebral Small Vessel Disease with Cognitive Impairment in Elderly Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Umemura, Toshitaka; Kawamura, Takahiko; Umegaki, Hiroyuki; Kawano, Naoko; Mashita, Shinichi; Sakakibara, Toshimasa; Hotta, Nigishi; Sobue, Gen

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims In recent years, the relationship between chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cognitive impairment has been attracting attention. Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is also associated with an increased risk of cognitive impairment. However, it is still unknown whether CKD markers are associated with cognitive impairment independently of SVD in elderly diabetic patients. Methods Seventy-nine type 2 diabetic patients (mean age, 76.0 years) were enrolled in the present study. CKD w...

  4. Type-1 interferons contribute to the neuroinflammatory response and disease progression of the MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, Bevan S; Zhang, Moses; Brody, Kate M; Ayton, Scott; Frugier, Tony; Steer, David; Finkelstein, David; Crack, Peter J; Taylor, Juliet M

    2016-09-01

    Type-1 interferons (IFNs) are pleiotropic cytokines with a critical role in the initiation and regulation of the pro-inflammatory response. However, the contribution of the type-1 IFNs to CNS disorders, specifically chronic neuropathologies such as Parkinson's disease is still unknown. Here, we report increased type-1 IFN signaling in both post mortem human Parkinson's disease samples and in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model. In response to MPTP, mice lacking the type-1 IFN receptor (IFNAR1(-/-) ) displayed decreased type-1 IFN signaling, an attenuated pro-inflammatory response and reduced loss of dopaminergic neurons. The neuroprotective potential of targeting the type-1 IFN pathway was confirmed by reduced neuroinflammation and DA cell death in mice treated with a blocking monoclonal IFNAR1 (MAR-1) antibody. The MPTP/MAR-1 treated mice also displayed increased striatal dopamine levels and improved behavioural outcomes compared to their MPTP/IgG controls. These data, implicate for the first time, a deleterious role for the type-1 IFNs as key modulators of the early neuroinflammatory response and therefore the neuronal cell death in Parkinson's disease. GLIA 2016;64:1590-1604. PMID:27404846

  5. Prevalence of celiac disease in adult type 1 patients with diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Burcu; Oner, Can; Bayramicli, Oya Uygur; Yorulmaz, Elif; Feyizoglu, Guneş; Oguz, Aytekin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Celiac disease, an autoimmune disease, is related to immune mediated intolerance to gluten. Some studies suggest that Celiac Disease was 20 times more frequent in type 1 patients with diabetes. The objective of our study was to evaluate the prevalence of celiac disease in hospital based type 1 diabetic adults. Methods: Our study was carried out retrospectively in Medeniyet University Goztepe Training and Educational Hospital in Istanbul between 2012–2013. The cohort comprised 482 type 1 patients with diabetes attending the diabetes outpatient clinic. The data were analyzed by SPSS 10.5 package program. Student’s t tests is used for comparative analyses. A p-value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The cohort included 482 type 1 patients with diabetes. Fifty seven of them were not evaluated for Endomysium antibody positivity. Fifteen of the remaining 425 patients were positive for anti endomysial antibody (3.5%). The prevalence of biopsy proven celiac disease was 2.3% (10/425). There was no significant difference between Endomysial antibody positive and negative groups in regard of age, sex, or duration of the disease. Conclusion: This study confirms that the celiac disease is common in type 1 diabetic patients. Since a small proportion of celiac patients are symptomatic this disorder should be screened in all adult type 1 patients with diabetes by antiendomysium antibody. PMID:26430419

  6. Evaluation of Cladribine treatment in refractory celiac disease type

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Greetje J Tack; Wieke HM Verbeek; Abdul Al-Toma; Dirk J Kuik; Marco WJ Schreurs; Otto Visser; Chris JJ Mulder

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate cladribine [2-chlorodeoxyadenosine (2-CdA)] therapy in refractory celiac disease (RCD) Ⅱ. METHODS: An open-label cohort-study of RCD Ⅱ patients treated with 2-CdA was performed between 2000 and 2010. Survival rate, enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL) occurrence, clinical course, and histological and immunological response rates were evaluated. RESULTS: Overall, 32 patients were included with a median follow-up of 31 mo. Eighteen patients responded well to 2-CdA. Patients responsive to 2-CdA had a statistically significant increased survival compared to those who were unresponsive. The overall 3- and 5-year survival was 83% in the responder and 63% and 22% in the non-responder group, respectively. The overall 2-year clinical, histological and immunological response rates were 81%, 47% and 41%, respectively. Progression into EATL was reported in 16%, all of these patients died. CONCLUSION: Treatment of RCD Ⅱ with 2-CdA holds promise, showing excellent clinical and histological response rates, and probably less frequent transition into EATL.

  7. Treatment of Niemann-Pick disease type B by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    OpenAIRE

    Vellodi, A.; Hobbs, J. R.; O'Donnell, N M; Coulter, B S; Hugh-Jones, K.

    1987-01-01

    Allogenic bone marrow transplantation was carried out on a 3 year old girl with Niemann-Pick disease type B. Successful engraftment was achieved, and nine months after the procedure there was definite clearing of the sphingomyelin from the liver and pronounced clearing from the bone marrow. Any patient with Niemann-Pick disease type B complicated by early or severe hepatic impairment should be considered for bone marrow transplantation.

  8. Pseudo (Platelet-type) von Willebrand disease in pregnancy: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Grover Neetu; Boama Vincent; Chou Munazzah Rifat

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Pseudo (platelet-type)-von Willebrand disease is a rare autosomal dominant bleeding disorder caused by an abnormal function of the glycoprotein lb protein; the receptor for von Willebrand factor. This leads to an increased removal of VWF multimers from the circulation as well as platelets and this results in a bleeding diathesis. Worldwide, less than 50 patients are reported with platelet type von Willebrand disease (PT-VWD). Case presentation We describe the management of...

  9. Progression of kidney disease in type 2 diabetes – beyond blood pressure control: an observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Chatha Maninder P; Daoud Tarek M; Kramer Holly J; Leehey David J; Isreb Majd A

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background The risk factors for progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) have not been fully elucidated. Although uncontrolled blood pressure (BP) is known to be deleterious, other factors may become more important once BP is treated. Methods All patients seen in the outpatient clinics of our hospital between January 1993 and September 2002 with type 2 DM and clinical evidence of CKD were evaluated. Progression of kidney disease was evaluated by ra...

  10. Progress in Enzyme Replacement Therapy in Glycogen Storage Disease Type II

    OpenAIRE

    Angelini, Corrado; SEMPLICINI, CLAUDIO; Tonin, Paola; Filosto, Massimiliano; Pegoraro, Elena; Sorarù, Gianni; Fanin, Marina

    2009-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (GSDII) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding alpha-glucosidase (GAA). The disease can be clinically classified into three types: a severe infantile form, a juvenile and an adultonset form. Cases with juvenile or adult onset GSDII mimic limb-girdle muscular dystrophy or polymyositis and are often characterized by respiratory involvement. GSDII patients are diagnosed by biochemical assay and by m...

  11. Management of von Willebrand disease type 3 during pregnancy - 2 cases reports.

    OpenAIRE

    Inocêncio, G.; Braga, A; Azevedo, S.; Buchner, C

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: von Willebrand disease type 3, is an extremely rare condition. It can be severe and potentially life-threatening, particularly in pregnant women during labor and subsequently during early puerperium. Due to its rarity, there is no optimal treatment/management during pregnancy. CASE: We describe two cases of pregnant women with von Willebrand disease type 3, and its successful surveillance and treatment with Haemate P FVIII (human plasma-derived von Willebrand Factor-risto...

  12. Effect of disease duration on personality type in multiple sclerosis patients and healthy individual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesal, Sahar; Dehghani, Leila; Etemadifar, Masoud; Poorazizi, Elahe; Akhavan, Sima; Mazrouei, Samaneh; Mehdizadeh, Nasim; Saraf, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis may have profound emotional consequences. The relation between psychological and physical factors could lead patients toward unforeseen disease. This study focuses on multiple sclerosis (MS) disease duration on personality type A and B in relation to individuals’ behaviors. Materials and Methods: This descriptive-analytical study was conducted in Isfahan Alzahra hospital in 2013. Three hundred MS patients and 100 healthy individuals were determined. The distributed questionnaires related to MS patients and considering the descriptive statistics such as demographic variables. Data were analyzed by SPSS software (version 18) based on Chi-square test and independent T-test. Results: Disease duration varied between 1 to 38 years: 30% (1-4 years), 38% (5-10 years), 20% (10-20 years), and 12% (more than 20 years). Significant relationship was observed between disease duration and tendency to type A (higher stress). This relation was positive and significant in Relapsing Remitting MS patients; but negative correlation was seen in Secondary Progressive MS patients. These patients tended to type B (lower stress) when disease duration increased. Conclusions: Individuals with disease duration of one year and less than one year tend to type A personality, while patients with increment of disease duration have tendency to type B. PMID:27099848

  13. Signs of inflammation in different types of heart valve disease : The VOCIN study

    OpenAIRE

    Wallby, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Heart valve dysfunction is a relatively common condition in the population, whereas significant heart valve disease is more unusual. The cause of different types of heart valve disease depends on which valve is concerned. Rheumatic heart valve disease, has for a long time been considered to constitute a post-inflammatory condition. During the 1990s it was also shown that the so-called non-rheumatic or degenerative tricuspid aortic stenosis, comprised signs of inflammation. In this study, 118 ...

  14. Dermoscopy: a useful auxiliary tool in the diagnosis of type 1 segmental Darier’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Errichetti, Enzo; Maione, Vincenzo; Pegolo, Enrico; Stinco, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 segmental Darier’s disease is a blaschkolinear variant of Darier’s disease resulting from a postzygotic mosaicism. Since it usually lacks diagnostic clues typical of the generalized form, including positive family history of the disease, nail and mucosal abnormalities, and/or acral involvement, its distinction from other acquired inflammatory blaschkolinear dermatoses may often be quite challenging, thus requiring histopathological examination to reach a definitive diagnosis. We report...

  15. Tight Junctions, Intestinal Permeability, and Autoimmunity Celiac Disease and Type 1 Diabetes Paradigms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Jeroen; Rozing, Jan; Sapone, Anna; Lammers, Karen; Fasano, Alessio; Fromm, M; Schulzke, JD

    2009-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by tissue damage and loss of function due to an immune response that is directed against specific organs. This review is focused on celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune enteropathy, and type I diabetes (TID), a hyperglycosaemia caused by a destructive autoimmune p

  16. Investigation of the type, frequency, and sex distribution of fistulas in Crohn's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various types of fistula development are described in a population of 206 patients with a pravious diagnosis of Crohn's disease. In addition, the frequency of occurence of Crohn's disease in a population and the frequency of Crohn's reoccurrence for a given patient is reported. Furthermore a subdivision of patients with respect to sex is possible. (orig.)

  17. A patient with common glycogen storage disease type Ib mutations without neutropenia or neutrophil dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, DHJ; Kuijpers, TW; Maianski, NA; Rake, JP; Smit, GPA; Visser, G

    2006-01-01

    We describe a 16-year old boy with glycogen storage disease type Ib, homozygous for the common 1211-1212delCT mutation, who never experienced neutropenia, and did not suffer from frequent infections or inflammatory bowel disease. In addition, neutrophil function tests showed no abnormalities.

  18. Recommendations on the diagnosis and management of Niemann-Pick disease type C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.E. Wraith; M.R. Baumgartner; B. Bembi; A. Covanis; T. Levade; E. Mengel; M. Pineda; F. Sedel; M. Topçu; M.T. Vanier; H. Widner; F.A. Wijburg; M.C. Patterson

    2009-01-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NP-C) is a lysosomal storage disease in which impaired intracellular lipid trafficking leads to excess storage of cholesterol and glycosphingolipids in the brain and other tissues. it is characterized clinically by a variety of progressive, disabling neurological symptom

  19. Shared and Distinct Genetic Variants in Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smyth, Deborah J.; Plagnol, Vincent; Walker, Neil M.; Cooper, Jason D.; Downes, Kate; Yang, Jennie H. M.; Howson, Joanna M. M.; Stevens, Helen; McManus, Ross; Wijmenga, Cisca; Heap, Graham A.; Dubois, Patrick C.; Clayton, David G.; Hunt, Karen A.; van Heel, David A.; Todd, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Two inflammatory disorders, type 1 diabetes and celiac disease, cosegregate in populations, suggesting a common genetic origin. Since both diseases are associated with the HLA class II genes on chromosome 6p21, we tested whether non-HLA loci are shared. Methods: We evaluated the associat

  20. Increased expression of vascular endothelin type B and angiotensin type 1 receptors in patients with ischemic heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malmsjö Malin

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endothelin-1 and angiotensin II are strong vasoconstrictors. Patients with ischemic heart disease have elevated plasma levels of endothelin-1 and angiotensin II and show increased vascular tone. The aim of the present study was to examine the endothelin and angiotensin II receptor expression in subcutaneous arteries from patients with different degrees of ischemic heart disease. Methods Subcutaneous arteries were obtained, by biopsy from the abdomen, from patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG surgery because of ischemic heart disease (n = 15, patients with angina pectoris without established myocardial infarction (n = 15 and matched cardiovascular healthy controls (n = 15. Endothelin type A (ETA and type B (ETB, and angiotensin type 1 (AT1 and type 2 (AT2 receptors expression and function were examined using immunohistochemistry, Western blot and in vitro pharmacology. Results ETA and, to a lesser extent, ETB receptor staining was observed in the healthy vascular smooth muscle cells. The level of ETB receptor expression was higher in patients undergoing CABG surgery (250% ± 23%; P B receptor agonist sarafotoxin S6c, compared to healthy controls (P A receptors. AT1 and, to a lesser extent, AT2 receptor immunostaining was seen in the vascular smooth muscle cells. The level of AT1 receptor expression was higher in both the angina pectoris (128% ± 25%; P 1 receptor expression was confirmed by Western blotting. Myograph experiment did however not show any change in vasoconstriction to angiotensin II in CABG patients compared to healthy controls (P = n.s. Conclusion The results demonstrate, for the first time, upregulation of ETB and AT1 receptors in vascular smooth muscle cells in ischemic heart disease. These receptors may play a role in the pathophysiology of ischemic heart disease and could provide important targets for pharmaceutical interventions.

  1. Predicting cell types and genetic variations contributing to disease by combining GWAS and epigenetic data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Gerasimova

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWASs identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that are enriched in individuals suffering from a given disease. Most disease-associated SNPs fall into non-coding regions, so that it is not straightforward to infer phenotype or function; moreover, many SNPs are in tight genetic linkage, so that a SNP identified as associated with a particular disease may not itself be causal, but rather signify the presence of a linked SNP that is functionally relevant to disease pathogenesis. Here, we present an analysis method that takes advantage of the recent rapid accumulation of epigenomics data to address these problems for some SNPs. Using asthma as a prototypic example; we show that non-coding disease-associated SNPs are enriched in genomic regions that function as regulators of transcription, such as enhancers and promoters. Identifying enhancers based on the presence of the histone modification marks such as H3K4me1 in different cell types, we show that the location of enhancers is highly cell-type specific. We use these findings to predict which SNPs are likely to be directly contributing to disease based on their presence in regulatory regions, and in which cell types their effect is expected to be detectable. Moreover, we can also predict which cell types contribute to a disease based on overlap of the disease-associated SNPs with the locations of enhancers present in a given cell type. Finally, we suggest that it will be possible to re-analyze GWAS studies with much higher power by limiting the SNPs considered to those in coding or regulatory regions of cell types relevant to a given disease.

  2. Multifactorial intervention and cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaede, Peter; Vedel, Pernille; Larsen, Nicolai; Jensen, Gunnar V H; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Pedersen, Oluf

    2003-01-01

    Cardiovascular morbidity is a major burden in patients with type 2 diabetes. In the Steno-2 Study, we compared the effect of a targeted, intensified, multifactorial intervention with that of conventional treatment on modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabe...

  3. Type 3 Diabetes: Cross Talk between Differentially Regulated Proteins of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Khyati; Mani, Ruchi Jakhmola; Katare, Deepshikha Pande

    2016-01-01

    Type 3 Diabetes (T3D) is a neuroendocrine disorder that represents the progression of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) to Alzheimer's disease (AD). T3D contributes in the increase of the total load of Alzheimer's patients worldwide. The protein network based strategies were used for the analysis of protein interactions and hypothesis was derived describing the possible routes of communications among proteins. The hypothesis provides the insight on the probable mechanism of the disease progression for T3D. The current study also suggests that insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) could be the major player which holds the capacity to shift T2DM to T3D by altering metabolic pathways like regulation of beta-cell development, negative regulation of PI3K/AKT pathways and amyloid beta degradation. PMID:27151376

  4. C-type natriuretic-derived peptides as biomarkers in human disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, Solvej Kølvraa; Goetze, Jens Peter

    2010-01-01

    and extracellular fluid volume. Atrial natriuretic peptide and B-type natriuretic peptide have gained considerable diagnostic interest as biomarkers in cardiovascular disease. By contrast, C-type natriuretic peptide has not yet been ascribed a role in human diagnostics. This perspective aims at......The natriuretic peptide system comprises three structurally related peptides: atrial natriuretic peptide, B-type natriuretic peptide and C-type natriuretic peptide. In circulation, they play an important endocrine role in the regulation of cardiovascular homeostasis by maintaining blood pressure...... recapitulating the present biochemical and clinical issues concerning C-type natriuretic peptide measurement in plasma as a potential biomarker....

  5. Effects of Probiotic Yogurt Consumption on Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    F. Mohammadi; M Veissi; Haidari, F; Shahbazian, H.; M mohammad shahi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Cardiovascular disease is more prevalent in patients with type 2 diabetes. Regarding the role of probiotics in control of inflammation and modulating the lipid profile, this study assess the effect of probiotic and conventional yogurt on inflammatory markers and lipid profile in type 2 diabetic patients. Methods: Forty- four subjects with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to two intervention and control groups. The intervention group consumed 300 g/d probiotic yogurt (e...

  6. Adult onset glycogen storage disease type II (adult onset Pompe disease): report and magnetic resonance images of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Gaizo, Andrew [Emory University School of Medicine, Radiology Resident, Atlanta, GA (United States); Banerjee, Sima [Emory University School of Medicine, Musculoskeletal Radiology Department, Atlanta, GA (United States); Terk, Michael [Emory University School of Medicine, Radiology, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Glycogen storage disease type II (GSDII), also referred to as Pompe disease or acid maltase deficiency, is a rare inherited condition caused by a deficiency in acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA) enzyme activity. The condition is often classified by age of presentation, with infantile and late onset variants (Laforet et al. J Neurology 55:1122-8, 2000). Late onset tends to present with progressive proximal muscle weakness and respiratory insufficiency (Winkel et al. J Neurology 252:875-84, 2005). We report two cases of biopsy confirmed adult onset GSDII, along with key Magnetic Resonance (MR) images. (orig.)

  7. Extraosseous manifestation of Gaucher's disease type I: MR and histological appearance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poll, L.W.; Koch, J.A.; Moedder, U. [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie; Dahl, S. vom; Haeussinger, D. [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Medizinische Fakultaet; Loxtermann, E. [Heinrich Heine Univ., Duesseldorf (Germany). Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery; Sarbia, M. [Heinrich Heine Univ., Duesseldorf (Germany). Dept. of Pathology; Niederau, C. [Department of Internal Medicine, St. Josef Hospital, Muelheimerstrasse 83, D-46045 Oberhausen (Germany)

    2000-10-01

    Gaucher's disease type I is the most prevalent lysosomal storage disorder caused by an autosomal-recessive inherited deficiency of glucocerebrosidase activity with secondary accumulation of glucocerebrosides within the lysosomes of macrophages. The storage disorder produces a multisystem disease characterized by progressive visceral enlargement and gradual replacement of bone marrow with lipid-laden macrophages. Skeletal disease is a major source of disability in Gaucher's disease. Extraosseous extension of Gaucher cells is an extremely rare manifestation of skeletal Gaucher's disease. This is a report on the MRI and histopathological findings of an extraosseous Gaucher-cell extension into the midface in a patient with Gaucher's disease. (orig.)

  8. Toward molecular pathogenesis of an autoimmune disease: Refined genetic mapping of autoimmune polyglandular disease type I (APECED)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, J.; Bjoerses, P.; Peltonen, L. [National Public Health Institute, Helsinki (Finland)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Autoimmune reactions encoupled to many human diseases are still only partially understood. Unravelling the molecular pathogenesis of inherited diseases with a strong autoimmune component in their clinical expression could help to dissect individual components in the molecular background of abnormal immune response. One such genetic disorder is autosomal recessive autoimmune polyglandular disease type I (PGD I), also known as autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED, MIM 240300). The disease is especially enriched in the genetically isolated population of Finland and we have assigned the APECED locus to human chromosome 21q22.3 in 14 Finnish families by linkage analyses. The best positional lod score of 6.49 was observed with marker D21S49. Based on the history of the Finns, the gene pool of this population clearly demonstrates the consequences of a founder effect and consequent isolation. In the Finnish population, we can take advantage of linkage disequilibrium and allelic association studies to more precisely define the critical DNA region for our disease gene of interest than would be possible by linkage analyses alone. We are now able to define the chromosomal region of interest between two flanking markers locating 1 cM apart. Linkage disequilibrium is observed with three of the markers used in the analyses and this suggests a distance of less than 500 kb to the disease locus, well approachable with molecular cloning techniques. Overlapping YAC and cosmid clones spanning our region of interest will facilitate the cloning of APECED gene in the near future.

  9. What patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 know on their disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belkis Mercedes Vicente Sánchez

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: education on diabetes is one of the key objectives of general care for people with diabetes mellitus and should be effectively implemented in order to provide patients with more information about their disease. Objective: to determine how much patients with type 2 diabetes know about the disease. Methods: descriptive study of a case series conducted between January and June 2008. The universe consisted on 120 patients from the "Area V" Polyclinic of Cienfuegos who were diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, type 2. In order to determine how much patients know about the disease a pre-test designed by the working group of the Center for Diabetes Care and Education was applied to all patients admitted in the institution. Results: females predominated over males. The largest number of patients was between 5 and 10 years and more than 10 years of disease progression (40% in both groups. In the first group 21, 7% of patients have an inadequate knowledge standard on the disease and in the second one, the same situation occurs in 25% of them. Hypertension and ischemic heart disease were the chronic diseases associated with more patients and polyneuropathy and neuropathy were the most common chronic complications. Conclusions: patients with diabetes need a steady educational work to acquire more knowledge on their disease and to live better with it.

  10. Prediction of First Cardiovascular Disease Event in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vistisen, Dorte; Andersen, Gregers Stig; Hansen, Christian Stevns;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), but they are currently undertreated. There are no risk scores used on a regular basis in clinical practice for assessing the risk of CVD in type 1 diabetes mellitus. METHODS...... AND RESULTS: From 4306 clinically diagnosed adult patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, we developed a prediction model for estimating the risk of first fatal or nonfatal CVD event (ischemic heart disease, ischemic stroke, heart failure, and peripheral artery disease). Detailed clinical data including...... lifestyle factors were linked to event data from validated national registers. The risk prediction model was developed by using a 2-stage approach. First, a nonparametric, data-driven approach was used to identify potentially informative risk factors and interactions (random forest and survival tree...

  11. Complex Type 2 Reactions in Three Patients with Hansen's Disease from a Southern United States Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Kristoffer E; Salinas, Jorge L; McDonald, Robert W; Sheth, Anandi N; Fairley, Jessica K

    2015-11-01

    In non-endemic countries, leprosy, or Hansen's disease (HD), remains rare and is often underrecognized. Consequently, the literature is currently lacking in clinical descriptions of leprosy complications in the United States. Immune-mediated inflammatory states known as reactions are common complications of HD. Type 1 reactions are typical of borderline cases and occur in 30% of patients and present as swelling and inflammation of existing skin lesions, neuritis, and nerve dysfunction. Type 2 reactions are systemic events that occur at the lepromatous end of the disease spectrum, and typical symptoms include fever, arthralgias, neuritis, and classic painful erythematous skin nodules known as erythema nodosum leprosum. We report three patients with lepromatous leprosy seen at a U.S. HD clinic with complicated type 2 reactions. The differences in presentations and clinical courses highlight the complexity of the disease and the need for increased awareness of unique manifestations of lepromatous leprosy in non-endemic areas. PMID:26304919

  12. Niemann-Pick Disease Type B in a 21 Year Old Male.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, M A; Miah, M Z

    2016-04-01

    Niemann-pick disease is a group of autosomal recessive disorder of lipid storage with progressive accumulation of sphingomyelin and other lipids in the lysosomes of various tissues. We are reporting a 21 year old male who had hepatosplenomegaly, cherry red macula and normal cognitive function. Bone marrow biopsy showed plenty of foam cells and sphingomyelinase level was low, thus conforming our diagnosis. Survival into adulthood and absence of gross neurological involvement suggests Niemann-Pick disease type B. PMID:27277377

  13. The Role of Gluten in Celiac Disease and Type 1 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Gloria Serena; Stephanie Camhi; Craig Sturgeon; Shu Yan; Alessio Fasano

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) and type 1 diabetes (T1D) are autoimmune conditions in which dietary gluten has been proven or suggested to play a pathogenic role. In CD; gluten is established as the instigator of autoimmunity; the autoimmune process is halted by removing gluten from the diet; which allows for resolution of celiac autoimmune enteropathy and subsequent normalization of serological markers of the disease. However; an analogous causative agent has not yet been identified for T1D. Neverthele...

  14. Lessons from type 1 diabetes for understanding natural history and prevention of autoimmune disease

    OpenAIRE

    Simmons, Kimber; Michels, Aaron W

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disorder resulting from immune mediated destruction of insulin producing beta cells within the pancreatic islets. The natural history of T1D is well defined with distinct stages in disease development. Genetics and environmental factors contribute to disease susceptibility, followed by autoimmune targeting of proteins within beta cells. Preclinical T1D is marked by the presence of islet autoantibodies and normal blood glucose levels. Prediction of...

  15. Intragenic Deletion as a Novel Type of Mutation in Wolman Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Teresa M.; Welsh, Mariko; Benhamed, Sonia; Chung, Wendy K.

    2011-01-01

    Two clinically distinct disorders, Wolman disease (WD) and cholesteryl ester storage disease (CESD), are allelic autosomal recessive disorders caused by different mutations in lysosomal acid lipase (LIPA) which encodes for an essential enzyme involved in the hydrolysis of intracellular cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. We describe a case of lysosomal acid lipase deficiency in an infant with WD and report on a novel mutation type, intragenic deletion.

  16. Impaired Autophagy in the Lipid-Storage Disorder Niemann-Pick Type C1 Disease

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy dysfunction has been implicated in misfolded protein accumulation and cellular toxicity in several diseases. Whether alterations in autophagy also contribute to the pathology of lipid-storage disorders is not clear. Here, we show defective autophagy in Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1) disease associated with cholesterol accumulation, where the maturation of autophagosomes is impaired because of defective amphisome formation caused by failure in SNARE machinery, whereas the lysosomal prot...

  17. The aurora sign in a patient with type B Niemann-Pick disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aurora sign, a sonographic sign found on the sagittal and transverse view, refers to multiple bands of ring-down artifacts posterior to the right hemidiaphragm. Parenchymal lung disease should be suspected when this is present. We report a case of type B Niemann-Pick disease with pulmonary involvement and the aurora sign on abdominal sonography. High-resolution CT of the chest showed corresponding thickened interlobular septa. (orig.)

  18. New therapies in the management of Niemann-Pick type C disease: clinical utility of miglustat

    OpenAIRE

    Wraith, Ed

    2009-01-01

    James E Wraith, Jackie ImrieWillink Biochemical Genetics Unit, Royal Manchester Children’s Hospital, Manchester, UKAbstract: Niemann-Pick disease type C (NP-C) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by progressive neurological deterioration leading to premature death. The disease is caused by mutations in one of two genes, NPC1 or NPC2, leading to impaired intracellular lipid transport and build-up of lipids in various tissues, particularly the brain. Miglustat (Z...

  19. Lysosomal-specific Cholesterol Reduction by Biocleavable Polyrotaxanes for Ameliorating Niemann-Pick Type C Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Atsushi Tamura; Nobuhiko Yui

    2014-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is an autosomal recessive lysosomal trafficking disorder, in which the cholesterols are abnormally accumulated in lysosomes. Recently, the β-cyclodextrin (CD) derivatives are revealed to show therapeutic effect for NPC disease through the removal of accumulated cholesterols in lysosomes. Herein, to enhance the therapeutic effect and reduce the toxicity of β-CD derivatives, biocleavable Pluronic/β-CD-based polyrotaxanes (PRXs) bearing terminal disulfide linkag...

  20. Oxidative Stress: A Pathogenic Mechanism for Niemann-Pick Type C Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Mary Carmen Vázquez; Elisa Balboa; Alvarez, Alejandra R.; Silvana Zanlungo

    2012-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is a neurovisceral atypical lipid storage disorder involving the accumulation of cholesterol and other lipids in the late endocytic pathway. The pathogenic mechanism that links the accumulation of intracellular cholesterol with cell death in NPC disease in both the CNS and the liver is currently unknown. Oxidative stress has been observed in the livers and brains of NPC mice and in different NPC cellular models. Moreover, there is evidence of an elevation of ...

  1. The aurora sign in a patient with type B Niemann-Pick disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa e. Silva, Eduardo J. da [Instituto Materno Infantil Professor Fernando Figueira, Departamento de Radiologia, Recife, Pernambuco (Brazil); IMIP, Departamento de Radiologia-Rua dos Coelhos, Recife, PE (Brazil); Cavalcanti de Albuquerque, Silvio; Queiroz Praxedes, Eduardo L. de; Amaral, Fernando J. do [Instituto Materno Infantil Professor Fernando Figueira, Departamento de Radiologia, Recife, Pernambuco (Brazil)

    2007-01-15

    The aurora sign, a sonographic sign found on the sagittal and transverse view, refers to multiple bands of ring-down artifacts posterior to the right hemidiaphragm. Parenchymal lung disease should be suspected when this is present. We report a case of type B Niemann-Pick disease with pulmonary involvement and the aurora sign on abdominal sonography. High-resolution CT of the chest showed corresponding thickened interlobular septa. (orig.)

  2. Global stability and persistence in LG–Holling type II diseased predator ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Sarwardi, Sahabuddin; Haque, Mainul; Venturino, Ezio

    2011-01-01

    A Leslie–Gower–Holling type II model is modified to introduce a contagious disease in the predator population, assuming that disease cannot propagate to the prey. All the system’s equilibria are determined and the behaviour of the system near them is investigated. The main mathematical issues are global stability and bifurcations for some of the equilibria, together with sufficient conditions for persistence of the ecosystem. Counterintuitive results on the role played by intraspecific compet...

  3. Cell type-selective disease-association of genes under high regulatory load

    OpenAIRE

    Galhardo, Mafalda Sofia; Berninger, Philipp; Nguyen, Thanh Phuong; Sauter, Thomas; Sinkkonen, Lasse

    2015-01-01

    We previously showed that disease-linked metabolic genes are often under combinatorial regulation. Using the genome-wide ChIP-Seq binding profiles for 93 transcription factors in nine different cell lines, we show that genes under high regulatory load are significantly enriched for disease-association across cell types. We find that transcription factor load correlates with the enhancer load of the genes and thereby allows the identification of genes under high regulatory load by epigenomic m...

  4. Characterization of a canine model of glycogen storage disease type IIIa

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Haiqing; Thurberg, Beth L.; Curtis, Sarah; Austin, Stephanie; Fyfe, John; Koeberl, Dwight D.; Kishnani, Priya S.; Sun, Baodong

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Glycogen storage disease type IIIa (GSD IIIa) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by deficiency of glycogen debranching enzyme (GDE) in liver and muscle. The disorder is clinically heterogeneous and progressive, and there is no effective treatment. Previously, a naturally occurring dog model for this condition was identified in curly-coated retrievers (CCR). The affected dogs carry a frame-shift mutation in the GDE gene and have no detectable GDE activity in liver and muscle. We ...

  5. Emerging links between type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sridhar, Gumpeny R; Lakshmi, Gumpeny; Nagamani, Gumpeny

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus and Alzheimer’s disease are both associated with increasing age, and each increases the risk of development of the other. Epidemiological, clinical, biochemical and imaging studies have shown that elevated glucose levels and diabetes are associated with cognitive dysfunction, the most prevalent cause of which is Alzheimer’s disease. Cross sectional studies have clearly shown such an association, whereas longitudinal studies are equivocal, reflecting the many complex w...

  6. Defective Cytochrome P450-Catalysed Drug Metabolism in Niemann-Pick Type C Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Elena-Raluca Nicoli; Nada Al Eisa; Celine V M Cluzeau; Wassif, Christopher A.; James Gray; Burkert, Kathryn R.; Smith, David A.; Lauren Morris; Cologna, Stephanie M.; Peer, Cody J.; Sissung, Tristan M.; Constantin-Daniel Uscatu; William D Figg; Pavan, William J.; Vite, Charles H.

    2016-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is a neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in either the NPC1 or NPC2 gene. NPC is characterised by storage of multiple lipids in the late endosomal/lysosomal compartment, resulting in cellular and organ system dysfunction. The underlying molecular mechanisms that lead to the range of clinical presentations in NPC are not fully understood. While evaluating potential small molecule therapies in Npc1 -/- mice, we observed a consistent ...

  7. Forgiveness and Personality Type among Men and Women Suffering from Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Foroozandeh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Role of personality and some components of behaviors, traits and emotions as effective factors on coronary heart diseases (CHD were presented nearly 50 years ago with the concept of “type A” behavior, a compound of hostility, impatience, competitiveness and dominance. Later studies showed crucial role of other traits and behaviors like anger, introversion, depression and forgiveness. Objective: The aim of this study was to compare personality type and forgiveness in the patients suffering from cardiovascular diseases based on gender. Materials and method: The cross sectional study was designed and sample was collected from men and women referred to cardiologists (within the age range of 23-75 years old from the patients of Shahid Rajaee Heart Hospital of Tehran, Iran from December 2010 to March 2011. Total 87 subjects were selected using random method. The study subjects were given two questionnaires: personality type A (with two factors: TA1, pathologic behaviors of type A personality and TA2, non pathologic behaviors of type A personality and Interpersonal Forgiveness Inventory (IFI, with three subscales namely reestablishment of relationship, control of revenge and realistic perception. Data were analyzed using SPSS software. Results: Mean(±SD age of men was 50.5±11.6 years (n=33 and 55.7±14.4 years in women (n=54. Mean duration of suffering from cardiovascular diseases in men was 7.8 years and in women was 9.10 years. The study found high mean scores of type A pathologic but not non pathologic type A among women compared to men (p<0.038 and no statistically significant differences in forgiveness subscales. Conclusion: The study revealed significant difference between women and men suffering from cardiovascular disease in pathologic type A (TA1 and negative relationship between pathologic type A and forgiveness.

  8. Peripheral arterial disease, type 2 diabetes and postprandial lipidaemia: Is there a link?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pedro; Valdivielso; José; Ramírez-Bollero; Carmen; Pérez-López

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease, manifested as intermittent claudication or critical ischaemia, or identified by an ankle/brachial index < 0.9, is present in at least one in every four patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.Several reasons exist for peripheral arterial disease indiabetes. In addition to hyperglycaemia, smoking and hypertension, the dyslipidaemia that accompanies type2 diabetes and is characterised by increased triglyceride levels and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations also seems to contribute to this association. Recent years have witnessed an increased interest in postprandial lipidaemia, as a result of various prospective studies showing that non-fasting triglycerides predict the onset of arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease better than fasting measurements do. Additionally,the use of certain specific postprandial particle markers,such as apolipoprotein B-48, makes it easier and more simple to approach the postprandial phenomenon. Despite this, only a few studies have evaluated the role of postprandial triglycerides in the development of peripheral arterial disease and type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this review is to examine the epidemiology and risk factors of peripheral arterial disease in type 2 diabetes, focusing on the role of postprandial triglycerides and particles.

  9. Generation and characterization of transgenic mice expressing mitochondrial targeted red fluorescent protein selectively in neurons: modeling mitochondriopathy in excitotoxicity and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondria have roles or appear to have roles in the pathogenesis of several chronic age-related and acute neurological disorders, including Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and cerebral ischemia, and could be critical targets for development of rational mechanism-based, disease-modifying therapeutics for treating these disorders effectively. A deeper understanding of neural tissue mitochondria pathobiologies as definitive mediators of neural injury, disease, and cell death merits further study, and the development of additional tools to study neural mitochondria will help achieve this unmet need. Results We created transgenic mice that express the coral (Discosoma sp. red fluorescent protein DsRed2 specifically in mitochondria of neurons using a construct engineered with a Thy1 promoter, specific for neuron expression, to drive expression of a fusion protein of DsRed2 with a mitochondrial targeting sequence. The biochemical and histological characterization of these mice shows the expression of mitochondrial-targeted DsRed2 to be specific for mitochondria and concentrated in distinct CNS regions, including cerebral cortex, hippocampus, thalamus, brainstem, and spinal cord. Red fluorescent mitochondria were visualized in cerebral cortical and hippocampal pyramidal neurons, ventrobasal thalamic neurons, subthalamic neurons, and spinal motor neurons. For the purpose of proof of principle application, these mice were used in excitotoxicity paradigms and double transgenic mice were generated by crossing Thy1-mitoDsRed2 mice with transgenic mice expressing enhanced-GFP (eGFP under the control of the Hlxb9 promoter that drives eGFP expression specifically in motor neurons and by crossing Thy1-mitoDsRed2 mice to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS mice expressing human mutant superoxide dismutase-1. Conclusions These novel transgenic mice will be a useful tool for better understanding

  10. Absence of a sphenoid wing in neurofibromatosis type 1 disease: imaging with multidetector computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 disease if characterized by pigmented cutaneous lesions and generalized tumors of a neural crest origin and it may affect all the systems of the human body. Sphenoid dysplasia is one of the characteristics of this syndrome and it occurs in 5-10% of the cases; further, abnormalities of the sphenoid wings are often considered pathognomonic. However, complete agenesis of a sphenoid wing is very rare. We report here on an unusual case of neurofibromatosis type 1 disease with the associated absence of a sphenoid wing that was diagnosed by using multidetector computed tomography

  11. Absence of a sphenoid wing in neurofibromatosis type 1 disease: imaging with multidetector computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onbas, Omer; Aliagaoglu, Cihangir; Calikoglu, Cagatay; Kantarci, Mecit; Atasoy, Mustafa; Alper, Fatih [Ataturk University, Erzurum (Turkmenistan)

    2006-03-15

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 disease if characterized by pigmented cutaneous lesions and generalized tumors of a neural crest origin and it may affect all the systems of the human body. Sphenoid dysplasia is one of the characteristics of this syndrome and it occurs in 5-10% of the cases; further, abnormalities of the sphenoid wings are often considered pathognomonic. However, complete agenesis of a sphenoid wing is very rare. We report here on an unusual case of neurofibromatosis type 1 disease with the associated absence of a sphenoid wing that was diagnosed by using multidetector computed tomography.

  12. Kidney Disease and Youth Onset Type 2 Diabetes: Considerations for the General Practitioner

    OpenAIRE

    Dart, Allison B.; Sellers, Elizabeth A.; Heather J. Dean

    2012-01-01

    Youth onset type 2 diabetes (T2DM) continues to increase worldwide, concomitant with the rising obesity epidemic. There is evidence to suggest that youth with T2DM are affected by the same comorbidities and complications as adults diagnosed with T2DM. This review highlights specifically the kidney disease associated with youth onset T2DM, which is highly prevalent and associated with a high risk of end-stage kidney disease in early adulthood. A general understanding of this complex disease by...

  13. Diabetes mellitus Type II and cognitive capacity in healthy aging, mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degen, Christina; Toro, Pablo; Schönknecht, Peter; Sattler, Christine; Schröder, Johannes

    2016-06-30

    While diabetes mellitus (DM) Type II has repeatedly been linked to Alzheimer´s disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI), longitudinal research is scarce and disease duration has not always been taken into account. In a birth cohort born between 1930 and 1932 we investigated the influence of DM Type II and disease duration on neuropsychological functioning (memory/learning, attention, verbal fluency, visuospatial thinking and abstract thinking) across 14 years. Subjects who developed MCI or AD performed significantly poorer on all neuropsychological tests applied. While significant main effects DM Type II did not arise, its presence led to a significant deterioration of performance in the digit symbol test and visuospatial thinking over time. Additionally, in visuospatial thinking this change was more pronounced for individuals suffering from MCI/AD. We found that, as a concomitant disease DM Type II does not affect memory functioning, which is typically compromised in MCI and early AD. Rather, it may lead to deficits in cognitive flexibility and visuospatial thinking. DM Type II can be considered a frequent comorbid condition which can aggravate the course of MCI and AD. In this respect it may serve as a model for other comorbid conditions in AD. PMID:27082868

  14. Relationship of adiponectin level with lipid profile in type-2 diabetic men with coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerebro-vascular disease is a commonest long term complication of type-2 diabetes mellitus. The study was done to determine concentration of serum adiponectin and lipid profile in type-2 diabetic men with coronary heart disease (CHD) in the region of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KPK), and to find possible relationship between them. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study comprising of randomly selected thirty six healthy adult males and thirty six type-2 diabetic males with coronary heart disease. Their fasting blood samples were analysed for serum adiponectin, fasting blood glucose, glycosylated haemoglobin and lipid profile which included total cholesterol (T-C), triglycerides (TG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). The relationship of adiponectin with other variables in type-2 diabetic men with coronary heart disease was determined with Pearson correlations coefficient (r). Results: Type-2 diabetic males with coronary heart disease when compared to healthy males showed significantly low levels of serum adiponectin (p=<0.001) and HDL-C (p=<0.001) and significantly high level of FBG (p=<0.001), HbA1c (p=<0.001), TC (p=<0.05), TG (p=<0.05) and LDL-C (p=<0.05). Serum adiponectin level showed a significant negative correlation with FBG (r = -0.332; p= 0.04), HbA1c (r = -0.818; p=<0.01) and TG (r = -0.640; p=<0.01) in type-2 diabetic men with coronary heart disease. Adiponectin showed a significant positive association with HDL-C in controls (r = 0.948; p=<0.01) and patients of type-2 diabetes with CHD (r = 0.650; p=<0.01). Conclusion: Serum adiponectin concentration is markedly decreased in patients of type-2 diabetes with coronary heart disease. Hypoadiponectinemia is related with deranged lipid profile, i.e., high TG and low HDL-C levels in type-2 diabetic men with CHD. Moreover, adiponectin is associated positively with HDL-C and negatively with HbA1c and TG levels in the studied population. (author)

  15. IgE-Mediated Hypersensitivity and Desensitisation with Recombinant Enzymes in Pompe Disease and Type I and Type VI Mucopolysaccharidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capanoglu, Murat; Dibek Misirlioglu, Emine; Azkur, Dilek; Vezir, Emine; Guvenir, Hakan; Gunduz, Mehmet; Toyran, Muge; Civelek, Ersoy; Kocabas, Can Naci

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is important for the treatment of lysosomal storage disorders. Hypersensitivity reactions with ERT have been reported, and in these cases, desensitisation with the enzyme is necessary. Here we report the cases of 3 patients with lysosomal storage disorders, including Pompe disease and mucopolysaccharidosis type I and VI, who had IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions and positive skin tests. Successful desensitisation protocols with the culprit enzyme solution were used for these patients. All 3 patients were able to safely receive ERT with the desensitisation protocol. PMID:27144408

  16. Prenatal diagnosis of morquio disease type A using a simple fluorometric enzyme assay

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Hui; Diggelen, Otto; Thoomes, R.; Huijmans, Jan; Young, E.; Mazurczak, T; Kleijer, Wim

    1990-01-01

    textabstractA new fluorogenic substrate, 4 methylumbelliferyl B-D-6-sulphogalactoside, was used for the assay of galactose-6-sulphate sulphatase activity in chorionic villi, cultured villus cells, and amniocytes. The fluorometric assay is much more convenient than the conventional assay using radiolabelled, sulphated oligosaccharides. Both types of substrate were used in the prenatal diagnosis of three pregnancies at risk for Morquio type A disease using amniocytes. These enzyme tests, as wel...

  17. A deletion in the N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1 gene in Greyhounds with polyneuropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cord Drögemüller

    Full Text Available The polyneuropathy of juvenile Greyhound show dogs shows clinical similarities to the genetically heterogeneous Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT disease in humans. The pedigrees containing affected dogs suggest monogenic autosomal recessive inheritance and all affected dogs trace back to a single male. Here, we studied the neuropathology of this disease and identified a candidate causative mutation. Peripheral nerve biopsies from affected dogs were examined using semi-thin histology, nerve fibre teasing and electron microscopy. A severe chronic progressive mixed polyneuropathy was observed. Seven affected and 17 related control dogs were genotyped on the 50k canine SNP chip. This allowed us to localize the causative mutation to a 19.5 Mb interval on chromosome 13 by homozygosity mapping. The NDRG1 gene is located within this interval and NDRG1 mutations have been shown to cause hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy-Lom in humans (CMT4D. Therefore, we considered NDRG1 a positional and functional candidate gene and performed mutation analysis in affected and control Greyhounds. A 10 bp deletion in canine NDRG1 exon 15 (c.1080_1089delTCGCCTGGAC was perfectly associated with the polyneuropathy phenotype of Greyhound show dogs. The deletion causes a frame shift (p.Arg361SerfsX60 which alters several amino acids before a stop codon is encountered. A reduced level of NDRG1 transcript could be detected by RT-PCR. Western blot analysis demonstrated an absence of NDRG1 protein in peripheral nerve biopsy of an affected Greyhound. We thus have identified a candidate causative mutation for polyneuropathy in Greyhounds and identified the first genetically characterized canine CMT model which offers an opportunity to gain further insights into the pathobiology and therapy of human NDRG1 associated CMT disease. Selection against this mutation can now be used to eliminate polyneuropathy from Greyhound show dogs.

  18. Winter circulation weather types and hospital admissions for respiratory diseases in Galicia, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royé, D.; Taboada, J. J.; Martí, A.; Lorenzo, M. N.

    2016-04-01

    The link between various pathologies and atmospheric conditions has been a constant topic of study over recent decades in many places across the world; knowing more about it enables us to pre-empt the worsening of certain diseases, thereby optimizing medical resources. This study looked specifically at the connections in winter between respiratory diseases and types of atmospheric weather conditions (Circulation Weather Types, CWT) in Galicia, a region in the north-western corner of the Iberian Peninsula. To do this, the study used hospital admission data associated with these pathologies as well as an automatic classification of weather types. The main result obtained was that weather types giving rise to an increase in admissions due to these diseases are those associated with cold, dry weather, such as those in the east and south-east, or anticyclonic types. A second peak was associated with humid, hotter weather, generally linked to south-west weather types. In the future, this result may help to forecast the increase in respiratory pathologies in the region some days in advance.

  19. HLA Typing and Histopathologic Features of Patients with Celiac Disease-A Retrospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulay Ceylan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Celiac disease is the most common defect of nutrition intolerance. There is an increased sensitivity to the glutene. It is inherited multifactorial, because of this, genetic and enviromental factors are important in the evaluation. The existence of specific human leukocyte antigen alleles coding especially DQ2 and DQ8 are important at the diagnosis of celiac disease. In this study, it is aimed to determine human leukocyte antigens allel distribution for celiac disease in patients with chronic diarrhea, abdominal pain and similar symptomes. Material and Method: The prevalance of human leukocyte antigens of 40 patients applied to our laboratory were searched using polimerase chain reaction-sequence specific primer method. Marsh classification of the patients were also performed by a pathologist. Results: We determined human leukocyte antigens in 95% of the patients. The most common antigens were DQA1*0501 and DQB1*0201. The combination of DQA1*0501 and DRB1*04 was the least. According to Marsh classification, Grade 2 Marsh Type 4 hypoplastic was the most common type. Discussion: The human leukocyte antigen typing is helpful for the clinicians at the progression of the celiac disease and at the prediction of the tendency to the disease.

  20. Cerebrospinal Fluid Calbindin D Concentration as a Biomarker of Cerebellar Disease Progression in Niemann-Pick Type C1 Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagel, Jessica; Sampson, Maureen; Farhat, Nicole; Ding, Wenge; Swain, Gary; Prociuk, Maria; O’Donnell, Patricia; Drobatz, Kenneth; Gurda, Brittney; Wassif, Christopher; Remaley, Alan; Porter, Forbes; Vite, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) 1 disease is a rare, inherited, neurodegenerative disease. Clear evidence of the therapeutic efficacy of 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) in animal models resulted in the initiation of a phase I/IIa clinical trial in 2013 and a phase IIb/III trial in 2015. With clinical trials ongoing, validation of a biomarker to track disease progression and serve as a supporting outcome measure of therapeutic efficacy has become compulsory. In this study, we evaluated calcium-binding protein calbindin D-28K (calbindin) concentrations in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as a biomarker of NPC1 disease. In the naturally occurring feline model, CSF calbindin was significantly elevated at 3 weeks of age, prior to the onset of cerebellar dysfunction, and steadily increased to >10-fold over normal at end-stage disease. Biweekly intrathecal administration of HPβCD initiated prior to the onset of neurologic dysfunction completely normalized CSF calbindin in NPC1 cats at all time points analyzed when followed up to 78 weeks of age. Initiation of HPβCD after the onset of clinical signs (16 weeks of age) resulted in a delayed reduction of calbindin levels in the CSF. Evaluation of CSF from patients with NPC1 revealed that calbindin concentrations were significantly elevated compared with CSF samples collected from unaffected patients. Off-label treatment of patients with NPC1 with miglustat, an inhibitor of glycosphingolipid biosynthesis, significantly decreased CSF calbindin compared with pretreatment concentrations. These data suggest that the CSF calbindin concentration is a sensitive biomarker of NPC1 disease that could be instrumental as an outcome measure of therapeutic efficacy in ongoing clinical trials. PMID:27307499

  1. Metabolic Risk: Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease and Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Patient’s Guide The number of people at risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) ... lifestyle therapies because studies suggest it will reduce cardiovascular risk. Medications to lower LDL cholesterol may be added ...

  2. A Trial of Darbepoetin Alfa in Type 2 Diabetes and Chronic Kidney Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfeffer, Marc A.; Burdmann, Emmanuel A.; Chen, Chao-Yin; Cooper, Mark E.; de Zeeuw, Dick; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Feyzi, Jan M.; Ivanovich, Peter; Kewalramani, Reshma; Levey, Andrew S.; Lewis, Eldrin F.; McGill, Janet B.; McMurray, John J. V.; Parfrey, Patrick; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Singh, Ajay K.; Solomon, Scott D.; Toto, Robert

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Anemia is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular and renal events among patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease. Although darbepoetin alfa can effectively increase hemoglobin levels, its effect on clinical outcomes in these patients has not been adequately te

  3. RENAL-FUNCTION AND KIDNEY SIZE IN GLYCOGEN-STORAGE-DISEASE TYPE-I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    REITSMABIERENS, WCC; SMIT, GPA; TROELSTRA, JA

    1992-01-01

    Renal failure has been reported recently as a late complication of glycogen storage disease type I (GSD I). We studied the renal function of 23 patients, mean age 10.9 years (range 2.2-21.6 years). The mean glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) were 188 +/- 50 and 9

  4. Fetal ascites: an unusual presentation of Niemann-Pick disease type C.

    OpenAIRE

    Maconochie, I K; Chong, S; Mieli-Vergani, G; Lake, B D; Mowat, A P

    1989-01-01

    Two infants were seen with severe ascites detected before birth, a previously unreported presentation of Niemann-Pick disease type C. In the second infant no diagnostic storage cells were present in bone marrow. Confirmatory investigations were prompted by experience of the first case.

  5. Molecular Characterization of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Type C of Indian Origin

    OpenAIRE

    Nagendrakumar, Singanallur Balasubramanian; Reddy, Guddeti Srinivas; Chandran, Dev; Thiagarajan, Dorairajan; Rangarajan, Pundi Narasimha; Srinivasan, Villuppanoor Alwar

    2005-01-01

    Comparison of nucleotide sequences of the partial 1D region of foot-and-mouth disease type C viruses of Indian origin with those of European, South American, and Southeast Asian viruses revealed that the Indian viruses form a distinct genotype. The vaccine strain C IND/51/79 belongs to this genotype and may be a prototype strain of this genotype.

  6. [Porcine circovirus type 2 and PCV2-systemic disease--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jinyan; Xing, Gang; Lei, Jing; Liu, Fei; Zhou, Jiyong

    2015-06-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) can cause immunosuppression on herds. PCV2, as an essential pathogen of PCV2-systemic disease (PCV2-SD), has caused considerable economic losses in pig industry worldwide. Here we review and address the evolution, viral protein and immunolesion of PCV2 and preventive techniques of PCV2-SD. PMID:26672364

  7. Type 3 von Willebrand’s disease in a Shetland sheepdog

    OpenAIRE

    Pathak, Elizabeth J.

    2004-01-01

    A 3.75-year-old, spayed female, Shetland sheepdog was presented with excessive bleeding from a gingival surface. The dog’s condition deteriorated over 24 h and whole fresh blood was transfused. Type 3 von Willebrand’s disease was diagnosed. Coagulation was achieved and the dog was released with recommendations for a sedentary lifestyle and careful monitoring.

  8. Oral hypoglycaemic agents, insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmingsen, Bianca; Lund, Søren S; Wetterslev, Jørn; Vaag, Allan

    2009-01-01

    This article is a narrative review of the current evidence of the effects on cardiovascular disease (CVD) of oral hypoglycaemic agents that increase insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). In overweight T2D patients, metformin has been demonstrated to reduce CVD risk, and this...

  9. Aspirin in the prevention of cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hovens, Marcel Maria Christiaan

    2010-01-01

    In the first of this thesis, results are summarized of a randomised crossover trial on the effects of aspirin on markers of inflammation, coagulation and number of endothelial progenitor cells in type 2 diabetic patients without cardiovascular disease. In the second part, results of two systematic r

  10. Type III interferon protects swine against foot-and-mouth disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    In recent years we have developed novel strategies to control foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) including the use of biotherapeutics such as interferons (IFN) delivered by a replication-defective human adenovirus type 5 (Ad5). Swine can be sterilely protected after vaccination with an Ad5 that encodes po...

  11. Automatic classification of long-term ambulatory ECG records according to type of ischemic heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smrdel Aleš

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated transient ischemic ST segment episodes in the ambulatory electrocardiographic (AECG records appear generally in patients with transmural ischemia (e. g. Prinzmetal's angina while depressed ischemic episodes appear in patients with subendocardial ischemia (e. g. unstable or stable angina. Huge amount of AECG data necessitates automatic methods for analysis. We present an algorithm which determines type of transient ischemic episodes in the leads of records (elevations/depressions and classifies AECG records according to type of ischemic heart disease (Prinzmetal's angina; coronary artery diseases excluding patients with Prinzmetal's angina; other heart diseases. Methods The algorithm was developed using 24-hour AECG records of the Long Term ST Database (LTST DB. The algorithm robustly generates ST segment level function in each AECG lead of the records, and tracks time varying non-ischemic ST segment changes such as slow drifts and axis shifts to construct the ST segment reference function. The ST segment reference function is then subtracted from the ST segment level function to obtain the ST segment deviation function. Using the third statistical moment of the histogram of the ST segment deviation function, the algorithm determines deflections of leads according to type of ischemic episodes present (elevations, depressions, and then classifies records according to type of ischemic heart disease. Results Using 74 records of the LTST DB (containing elevated or depressed ischemic episodes, mixed ischemic episodes, or no episodes, the algorithm correctly determined deflections of the majority of the leads of the records and correctly classified majority of the records with Prinzmetal's angina into the Prinzmetal's angina category (7 out of 8; majority of the records with other coronary artery diseases into the coronary artery diseases excluding patients with Prinzmetal's angina category (47 out of 55; and correctly

  12. 核纤层蛋白病--一个基因,多种疾病%Laminopathies -one gene, multiple diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋书娟; 章远志; Nanbert ZHONG

    2005-01-01

    @@ 核纤层蛋白病(laminopathies)是指由LMNA基因及其编码蛋白lamin A/C异常引起的一组人类遗传病[1].根据临床特征不同,至今被认识的核纤层蛋白病已有10种,除一种由影响成熟lamin A形成的FACE-1基因突变引起外[2],其余9种均由LMNA基因突变引起,其中包括2种既可以常染色体显性又可以常染色体隐性遗传的遗传病:Emery-Dreifuss 肌营养不良(Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy, EDMD,常显EDMD2,常隐EDMD3)[3,4] 和腓骨肌萎缩症2型(Charcot-Marie-Tooth2,常显AD-CMT2,常隐AR-CMT2)[5,6];6种常染色体显性遗传病:肢带型肌营养不良1B(limb girdle muscular dystrophy1B,LGMD1B)[7],扩张性心肌病伴心脏传导阻滞1A(dilated cardiomyopathy and cardiac conduction defects1A, CMD1A)[8],家族部分性脂肪营养不良(familial partial lipodystrophy, FPLD)[9],脂肪营养不良、胰岛素抵抗型糖尿病、弥漫性白黑皮病样丘疹、肝脂肪变性和心肌病综合征(lipoatrophy & insulin-resistant diabetes & disseminated leukomelanodermic papules & liver steatosis and cardiomyopathy,LDHPC)[10],Werner综合征(Werner syndrome, WRN)[11]和早老症(Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome,HGPS)[12];1种常染色体隐性遗传病: Mandibuloacral dysplasia(MAD)[13].

  13. Prognostic clinical and molecular biomarkers of renal disease in type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena, Michelle J; de Zeeuw, Dick; Mischak, Harald;

    2015-01-01

    biomarker panels are thus required. There is also a paucity of studies that assess the effect of treatments on novel biomarker panels and determine whether initial treatment-induced changes in novel biomarkers predict changes in long-term renal outcomes. Such studies can not only improve our healthcare but......Diabetic kidney disease occurs in ∼ 25-40% of patients with type 2 diabetes. Given the high risk of progressive renal function loss and end-stage renal disease, early identification of patients with a renal risk is important. Novel biomarkers may aid in improving renal risk stratification. In this...... metabolomics biomarkers. We focus on multiple biomarker panels since the molecular processes of renal disease progression in type 2 diabetes are heterogeneous, rendering it unlikely that a single biomarker significantly adds to clinical risk prediction. A limited number of prospective studies of multiple...

  14. Severe heart disease in an unusual case of familial amyloid polyneuropathy type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira Santos, Miguel; Brito, Dulce

    2013-09-01

    Familial amyloid polyneuropathy type I (FAP type I) is a rare hereditary systemic amyloidosis caused by the Val30Met mutation in the transthyretin (TTR) gene. The clinical onset and spectrum are variable and depend on phenotypic heterogeneity. Cardiac complications (dysrhythmias and conduction disturbances, cardiomyopathy and dysautonomia) indicate a poor prognosis, even after liver transplantation. We report an atypical case of FAP type I, highlighting the severe cardiac involvement and its complications. Early diagnosis of amyloid heart disease is increasingly important in the context of several clinical trials of promising new and experimental drugs. PMID:23993291

  15. Saccadic eye movement characteristics in adult Niemann-Pick Type C disease: relationships with disease severity and brain structural measures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry A Abel

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick Type C disease (NPC is a rare genetic disorder of lipid metabolism. A parameter related to horizontal saccadic peak velocity was one of the primary outcome measures in the clinical trial assessing miglustat as a treatment for NPC. Neuropathology is widespread in NPC, however, and could be expected to affect other saccadic parameters. We compared horizontal saccadic velocity, latency, gain, antisaccade error percentage and self-paced saccade generation in 9 adult NPC patients to data from 10 age-matched controls. These saccadic measures were correlated with appropriate MRI-derived brain structural measures (e.g., dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, frontal eye fields, supplemental eye fields, parietal eye fields, pons, midbrain and cerebellar vermis and with measures of disease severity and duration. The best discriminators between groups were reflexive saccade gain and the two volitional saccade measures. Gain was also the strongest correlate with disease severity and duration. Most of the saccadic measures showed strongly significant correlations with neurophysiologically appropriate brain regions. While our patient sample is small, the apparent specificity of these relationships suggests that as new diagnostic methods and treatments become available for NPC, a broader range of saccadic measures may be useful tools for the assessment of disease progression and treatment efficacy.

  16. Expression of myotubularins in blood platelets: Characterization and potential diagnostic of X-linked myotubular myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Rana; Severin, Sonia; Xuereb, Jean-Marie; Gratacap, Marie-Pierre; Laporte, Jocelyn; Buj-Bello, Ana; Tronchère, Hélène; Payrastre, Bernard

    2016-07-29

    Phosphoinositides play a key role in the spatiotemporal control of central intracellular processes and several specific kinases and phosphatases regulating the level of these lipids are implicated in human diseases. Myotubularins are a family of 3-phosphatases acting specifically on phosphatidylinositol 3-monophosphate and phosphatidylinositol 3,5 bisphosphate. Members of this family are mutated in genetic diseases including myotubularin 1 (MTM1) and myotubularin-related protein 2 (MTMR2) which mutations are responsible of X-linked centronuclear myopathy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy, respectively. Here we show that MTM1 is expressed in blood platelets and that hundred microliters of blood is sufficient to detect the protein by western blotting. Since the most severe cases of pathogenic mutations of MTM1 lead to loss of expression of the protein, we propose that a minimal amount of blood can allow a rapid diagnostic test of X-linked myotubular myopathy, which is currently based on histopathology of muscle biopsy and molecular genetic testing. In platelets, MTM1 is a highly active 3-phosphatase mainly associated to membranes and found on the dense granules and to a lesser extent on alpha-granules. However, deletion of MTM1 in mouse had no significant effect on platelet count and on platelet secretion and aggregation induced by thrombin or collagen stimulation. Potential compensation by other members of the myotubularin family is conceivable since MTMR2 was easily detectable by western blotting and the mRNA of several members of the family increased during in vitro differentiation of human megakaryocytes and MEG-01 cells. In conclusion, we show the presence of several myotubularins in platelets and propose that minimal amounts of blood can be used to develop a rapid diagnostic test for genetic pathologies linked to loss of expression of these phosphatases. PMID:27155155

  17. Targeting the Immunogenetic Diseases with the Appropriate HLA Molecular Typing: Critical Appraisal on 2666 Patients Typed in One Single Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Guarene

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We compared the immunogenetic data from 2666 patients affected by HLA-related autoimmune diseases with those from 4389 ethnically matched controls (3157 cord blood donors CBD, 1232 adult bone marrow donors BMD, to verify the appropriateness of HLA typing requests received in the past decade. The frequency of HLA-B*27 phenotype was 10.50% in 724 ankylosing spondylitis, 16.80% in 125 uveitis (3.41% BMD, 4.24% CBD, P<0.0001; HLA-B*51 allele was 15.57% in 212 Behçet’s disease (12.91% BMD, 9.88% CBD, P<0.0001; the HLA-DRB1-rheumatoid arthritis (RA shared epitope was 13.72% in 554 RA (10.85% BMD, 13.48% CBD, P=0.016; the carriers of almost one of HLA-DQB1 susceptibility alleles were 84.91% in 795 celiac disease (CD and 59.37% in 256 insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM (46.06% in 875 CBD, 42.75% in 662 BMD P<0.0001. Overall, our results show that the HLA marker frequencies were higher in patients than controls, but lower than expected from the literature data (excluding CD and IDDM and demonstrate that, in complex immunogenetic conditions, a substantial number of genetic analyses are redundant and inappropriate, burdening to the public health costs. For this reason, we suggest the Italian Scientific Society of Immunogenetics to establish guidelines to improve the appropriateness of typing requests.

  18. TYPES OF TREMOR IN PATIENTS WITH CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASES AND CARDIOVASCULAR EVENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrov Igor

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tremor can occur as a part of the clinical feature of cerebrovascular diseases. Many patients with cerebral stroke have cardiovascular diseases as a comorbidity or complication of stroke; sometimes cardiovascular events can lead to embolic stroke. Aim: To present types of tremor in patients with cerebrovascular diseases and cardiovascular events and diabetes mellitus type 2, clinical characteristics of tremor and investigations used. Material and methods: In our study we included 36 patients, 24 men and 12 women, that were examined and followed for 3 years, from 2012-2015. All patients were subjected to the following investigations: neurological examination, laboratory analysis, computerized tomography of brain, magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography. In cardiovascular patients we also performed Doppler sonography of carotid arteries, electrocardiography, cardiac ultrasound. The patients were examined and treated by cardiologists. Results: Of all patients 22% had cerebral infarction, 41% atherosclerosis, 36% multiple lacunar infarctions and 28% diabetes mellitus type 2. Three patients with cerebral infarction had chorea, hemiballismus, dystonia and dystonic tremor, three had postural tremor and two cerebellar intention tremor. Atherosclerotic patients had atherosclerotic action tremor, while diabetic patients predominantly presented with action-type tremor. Electroencephalography showed irritative basic brain activity with slow waves, while carotid arteries stenosis was diagnosed by Doppler sonography. Computerized tomography of the brain and magnetic resonance imaging revealed cerebrovascular diseases in certain areas. Patients with cardiomyopathy, rhythm disorders, high blood pressure, hyperlipidemia was investigated and medically treated by a cardiologist. Conclusion: In cerebrovascular diseases different types of tremor can occur as the result of the damage of the extrapyramidal system.

  19. Chronic Kidney Disease and Associated Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Chinese with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Lin Lou

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundTo determine the frequency of chronic kidney disease (CKD and its associated risk factors in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients, we conducted a cross-sectional study in Nanjing, China, in the period between January 2008 and December 2009.MethodsPatients with type 2 diabetes under the care by Jiangsu Province Official Hospital, Nanjing, China were invited for assessment. CKD was defined as the presence of albuminuria or estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min/1.73 m2. Albuminuria was defined as urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio ≥30 mg/g.ResultsWe recruited 1,521 urban Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes (mean age, 63.9±12.0 years. The frequency of CKD and albuminuria was 31.0% and 28.9%, respectively. After adjusted by age and sex, hypertension, anemia and duration of diabetes were significantly associated with CKD with odds ratio (95% confidence interval being 1.93 (1.28 to 2.93, 1.70 (1.09 to 2.64, and 1.03 (1.00 to 1.06, respectively.ConclusionIn conclusion, CKD was common in the urban Nanjing Chinese with type 2 diabetes. Strategies to prevent or delay progression of kidney disease in diabetes should be carried out at the early disease course of type 2 diabetes.

  20. Clinical use of creatine in neuromuscular and neurometabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnopolsky, Mark A

    2007-01-01

    Many of the neuromuscular (e.g., muscular dystrophy) and neurometabolic (e.g., mitochondrial cytopathies) disorders share similar final common pathways of cellular dysfunction that may be favorably influenced by creatine monohydrate (CrM) supplementation. Studies using the mdx model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy have found evidence of enhanced mitochondrial function, reduced intra-cellular calcium and improved performance with CrM supplementation. Clinical trials in patients with Duchenne and Becker's muscular dystrophy have shown improved function, fat-free mass, and some evidence of improved bone health with CrM supplementation. In contrast, the improvements in function in myotonic dystrophy and inherited neuropathies (e.g., Charcot-Marie-Tooth) have not been significant. Some studies in patients with mitochondrial cytopathies have shown improved muscle endurance and body composition, yet other studies did not find significant improvements in patients with mitochondrial cytopathy. Lower-dose CrM supplementation in patients with McArdle's disease (myophosphorylase deficiency) improved exercise capacity, yet higher doses actually showed some indication of worsened function. Based upon known cellular pathologies, there are potential benefits from CrM supplementation in patients with steroid myopathy, inflammatory myopathy, myoadenylate deaminase deficiency, and fatty acid oxidation defects. Larger randomized control trials (RCT) using homogeneous patient groups and objective and clinically relevant outcome variables are needed to determine whether creatine supplementation will be of therapeutic benefit to patients with neuromuscular or neurometabolic disorders. Given the relatively low prevalence of some of the neuromuscular and neurometabolic disorders, it will be necessary to use surrogate markers of potential clinical efficacy including markers of oxidative stress, cellular energy charge, and gene expression patterns. PMID:18652078

  1. Behavioral and molecular exploration of the AR-CMT2A mouse model Lmna (R298C/R298C).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poitelon, Yannick; Kozlov, Serguei; Devaux, Jerôme; Vallat, Jean-Michel; Jamon, Marc; Roubertoux, Pierre; Rabarimeriarijaona, Sitraka; Baudot, Cécile; Hamadouche, Tarik; Stewart, Colin L; Levy, Nicolas; Delague, Valérie

    2012-03-01

    In 2002, we identified LMNA as the first gene responsible for an autosomal recessive axonal form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, AR-CMT2A. All patients were found to be homozygous for the same mutation in the LMNA gene, p.Arg298Cys. In order to investigate the physiopathological mechanisms underlying AR-CMT2A, we have generated a knock-in mouse model for the Lmna p.Arg298Cys mutation. We have explored these mice through an exhaustive series of behavioral tests and histopathological analyses, but were not able to find any peripheral nerve phenotype, even at 18 months of age. Interestingly at the molecular level, however, we detect a downregulation of the Lmna gene in all tissues tested from the homozygous knock-in mouse Lmna (R298C/R298C) (skeletal muscle, heart, peripheral nerve, spinal cord and cerebral trunk). Importantly, we further reveal a significant upregulation of Pmp22, specifically in the sciatic nerves of Lmna (R298C/R298C) mice. These results indicate that, despite the absence of a perceptible phenotype, abnormalities exist in the peripheral nerves of Lmna (R298C/R298C) mice that are absent from other tissues. Although the mechanisms leading to deregulation of Pmp22 in Lmna (R298C/R298C) mice are still unclear, our results support a relation between Lmna and Pmp22 and constitute a first step toward understanding AR-CMT2A physiopathology. PMID:22331516

  2. Mutant glycyl-tRNA synthetase (Gars ameliorates SOD1(G93A motor neuron degeneration phenotype but has little affect on Loa dynein heavy chain mutant mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth T Banks

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In humans, mutations in the enzyme glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS cause motor and sensory axon loss in the peripheral nervous system, and clinical phenotypes ranging from Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy to a severe infantile form of spinal muscular atrophy. GARS is ubiquitously expressed and may have functions in addition to its canonical role in protein synthesis through catalyzing the addition of glycine to cognate tRNAs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have recently described a new mouse model with a point mutation in the Gars gene resulting in a cysteine to arginine change at residue 201. Heterozygous Gars(C201R/+ mice have locomotor and sensory deficits. In an investigation of genetic mutations that lead to death of motor and sensory neurons, we have crossed the Gars(C201R/+ mice to two other mutants: the TgSOD1(G93A model of human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and the Legs at odd angles mouse (Dync1h1(Loa which has a defect in the heavy chain of the dynein complex. We found the Dync1h1(Loa/+;Gars(C201R/+ double heterozygous mice are more impaired than either parent, and this is may be an additive effect of both mutations. Surprisingly, the Gars(C201R mutation significantly delayed disease onset in the SOD1(G93A;Gars(C201R/+ double heterozygous mutant mice and increased lifespan by 29% on the genetic background investigated. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings raise intriguing possibilities for the study of pathogenetic mechanisms in all three mouse mutant strains.

  3. An ARHGEF10 deletion is highly associated with a juvenile-onset inherited polyneuropathy in Leonberger and Saint Bernard dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari J Ekenstedt

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available An inherited polyneuropathy (PN observed in Leonberger dogs has clinical similarities to a genetically heterogeneous group of peripheral neuropathies termed Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT disease in humans. The Leonberger disorder is a severe, juvenile-onset, chronic, progressive, and mixed PN, characterized by exercise intolerance, gait abnormalities and muscle atrophy of the pelvic limbs, as well as inspiratory stridor and dyspnea. We mapped a PN locus in Leonbergers to a 250 kb region on canine chromosome 16 (Praw = 1.16×10-10, Pgenome, corrected = 0.006 utilizing a high-density SNP array. Within this interval is the ARHGEF10 gene, a member of the rho family of GTPases known to be involved in neuronal growth and axonal migration, and implicated in human hypomyelination. ARHGEF10 sequencing identified a 10 bp deletion in affected dogs that removes four nucleotides from the 3'-end of exon 17 and six nucleotides from the 5'-end of intron 17 (c.1955_1958+6delCACGGTGAGC. This eliminates the 3'-splice junction of exon 17, creates an alternate splice site immediately downstream in which the processed mRNA contains a frame shift, and generates a premature stop codon predicted to truncate approximately 50% of the protein. Homozygosity for the deletion was highly associated with the severe juvenile-onset PN phenotype in both Leonberger and Saint Bernard dogs. The overall clinical picture of PN in these breeds, and the effects of sex and heterozygosity of the ARHGEF10 deletion, are less clear due to the likely presence of other forms of PN with variable ages of onset and severity of clinical signs. This is the first documented severe polyneuropathy associated with a mutation in ARHGEF10 in any species.

  4. Joint preserving surgery versus arthrodesis in operative treatment of patients with neuromuscular polyneuropathy: questionnaire assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napiontek, Marek; Pietrzak, Krzysztof

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of the paper was to present the results of surgical treatment of foot deformities in peripheral neuropathies using bone procedures: both joint preserving and with joint arthrodesis. The study included 26 patients, 14 males and 12 females (43 feet). The age of the patients at surgery ranged from 5 to 55 years (average 23 years). The follow-up ranged from 0.5 to 15 years (average 4.3 years). Seventeen patients presented Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, three Friedreich's ataxia and six peripheral motor and sensory neuropathies of undetermined nature. Sixteen patients had bilateral procedures. Four patients had to be re-operated during the follow-up. The patients were divided into four groups depending on the age and the surgical technique applied. The groups I and II (9 children, 17 feet) included patients with growth plate still present in the foot just before surgery. In the groups III and IV (17 adults, 26 feet), bone growth was completed. The assessment of all patients based on a modified AOFAS scale ranged from 44 to 105 points (mean 83.7; SD 17.5). The assessment on the subjective scale ranged from 3 to 10 points (mean 7.4; SD 2.1). The assessment of quality of life on the WOMAC scale ranged from 0 to 41 points (mean 15.7; SD 13.2). All patients stated that they would decide to undergo the treatment again. For groups I and II, joint preserving surgeries gave better results; however, the results could not be statistically confirmed. The results for the groups III and IV were inconclusive as to which surgical techniques should be preferred, arthrodesis or joint preserving. The results show that none of the surgical techniques used for correction of foot deformities in motor-sensory polyneuropathies seems to be preferable. PMID:24968792

  5. Periodontal disease and type I diabetes mellitus: Associations with glycemic control and complications

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    Ajita Meenawat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate periodontal health status in patients diagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1 and to establish a correlation between metabolic control and periodontal health status. Materials and Methods: Periodontal health parameters namely plaque index (PI, gingival index (GI, probing pocket depth (PPD and clinical attachment loss (CAL were recorded in 28 patients diagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1 and 20 healthy controls. Diabetes history was recorded based on the information provided by the physician and it included date of diagnosis, duration, age of diagnosis, latest values of glycosylated haemoglobin and existing diabetic complications. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the relationship between periodontal parameters and degree of metabolic control, the duration of the disease and the appearance of complications. Results: The periodontal health in the diabetic group was compromised and they had greater bleeding index (P < 0.001, probing pocket depth (P < 0.001 and clinical attachment level (P = 0.001. Patients diagnosed for diabetes for shorter duration of time (4-7 years showed bleeding index-disease severity correlation to be 1.760 ΁ 0.434. Conclusion: Periodontal disease was more evident in type 1 diabetes mellitus patients and periodontal inflammation is greatly increased in subjects with longer disease course, poor metabolic control and diabetic complications.

  6. Castleman Disease of Hyaline Vascular Type in the Infrathyroidal Region: A Masquerader of Parathyroid Adenoma

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    Lee, Sang Kwon; Kwon, Sun Young [Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    Castleman disease of the infrathyroidal region is extremely rare. We report both CT and sonographic findings of a case of infrathyroidal paratracheal Castleman disease of hyaline vascular type, which masquerades parathyroid adenoma, in a 48-year-old woman. We further provide its histological findings at sonographically guided core-needle biopsy (US-CNB) and excisional biopsy. The lesion was ovoid with homogeneous intense enhancement on contrast-enhanced CT (CECT), and was homogeneous, markedly hypoechoic, and hypervascular on ultrasonography (US). Histological findings of the specimen obtained by US-CNB suggested lymphoproliferative lesion, and thus was inconclusive; those obtained by excisional biopsy were characteristics of Castleman disease of hyaline vascular type. Hyaline vascular type Castleman's disease should be included in the differential diagnosis of a mass of the infrathyroidal region with homogeneous intense enhancement on CECT, as well as with marked hypoechogenicity and hypervascularity on US. US-CNB may be of limited value in the histological diagnosis of this entity.

  7. Eliglustat tartrate for the treatment of adults with type 1 Gaucher disease

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    Bennett LL

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Lunawati L Bennett, Kelsey TurcotteSchool of Pharmacy, Union University, Jackson, TN, USA Abstract: The purpose of this article is to review eliglustat tartrate, a substrate reduction therapy, for the treatment of Gaucher disease type 1 (GD1. GD is an rare inborn error of metabolism caused by accumulation of lipid substrates such as glucosylceramide within the monocyte-macrophage system that affects the body by causing enlargement of the spleen and liver, destruction of bone, and abnormalities of the lungs and blood, such as anemia, thrombocytopenia, and leukopenia. GD is classified into three types: GD1, a chronic and non-neuronopathic disease accounting for 95% of GD cases; and types 2 and 3 (GD2 GD3 which are more progressive diseases with no approved drugs available at this time. Treatment options for GD1 include enzyme replacement therapy and substrate reduction therapy. Eliglustat works by inhibiting UDP-glucosylceramide synthase, the first enzyme that catalyzes the biosynthesis of glycosphingolipids, thus reducing the load of glucosylceramide influx into the lysosome. Eliglustat was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration after three Phase I, two Phase II, and two Phase III clinical trials. The dose of eliglustat is 84 mg twice a day or once daily depending on the cytochrome P450 2D6 genotype of the patient. Keywords: Gaucher disease, glucocerebrosidase, glucosylceramide synthase, eliglustat tartrate, substrate reduction therapy

  8. McArdle disease does not affect skeletal muscle fibre type profiles in humans

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    Tertius Abraham Kohn

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Patients suffering from glycogen storage disease V (McArdle disease were shown to have higher surface electrical activity in their skeletal muscles when exercising at the same intensity as their healthy counterparts, indicating more muscle fibre recruitment. To explain this phenomenon, this study investigated whether muscle fibre type is shifted towards a predominance in type I fibres as a consequence of the disease. Muscle biopsies from the Biceps brachii (BB (n = 9 or Vastus lateralis (VL (n = 8 were collected over a 13-year period from male and female patients diagnosed with McArdle disease, analysed for myosin heavy chain (MHC isoform content using SDS-PAGE, and compared to healthy controls (BB: n = 3; VL: n = 10. All three isoforms were expressed and no difference in isoform expression in VL was found between the McArdle patients and healthy controls (MHC I: 33±19% vs. 43±7%; MHC IIa: 52±9% vs. 40±7%; MHC IIx: 15±18% vs. 17±9%. Similarly, the BB isoform content was also not different between the two groups (MHC I: 33±14% vs. 30±11%; MHC IIa: 46±17% vs. 39±5%; MHC IIx: 21±13% vs. 31±14%. In conclusion, fibre type distribution does not seem to explain the higher surface EMG in McArdle patients. Future studies need to investigate muscle fibre size and contractility of McArdle patients.

  9. Cystatin C and collagen type IV in diagnostics of chronic kidney disease in type 2 diabetic patients

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    Vadim Valer'evich Klimontov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available AimTo compare kidney disease markers: glomerular filtration rate (GFR, calculated upon creatinine and cystatin C, urinary cystatin C, collagen type IV and albumin in type 2 diabetic patients with normal and moderately reduced renal function.Materials and methods56 patients, aged 43–70 years, and 16 healthy controls, aged 40-72 years, were included in the study. GFR was calculated by equations based on creatinine (CKD-EPIcreat, cystatin C (CKD-EPIcys or both markers (CKD-EPIcreat-cys. Serum and urinary cystatin C was measured by immunoturbidimetric method, urinary albumin, albumin excretion rate (AER and collagen type IV excretion was determined by ELISA. The body composition was investigated in 24 patients by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.ResultsIn diabetic patients serum cystatin C level correlated positively with age (r=0.37, GFR calculated by CKD-EPIcreat (r=-0.43 and fat mass percentage (r=0.55. There was a positive correlation between GFR calculated by the CKD-EPIcys and GFR by CKD-EPIcreat (r=0.48. In multiple regression analysis the percentage of body fat influenced the GFR calculated by CKD-EPIcys or CKD-EPIcreat-cys. No correlation between urinary cystatin C and serum cystatin C level, GFR and AER was found. Collagen type IV excretion was increased in patients with decreased GFR, compared to those with normal GFR (p=0.002. Urinary collagen type IV correlated with both GFR and AER (r=-0.28 and r=0.47.ConclusionThe measurement of serum cystatin C with calculation of GFR by CKD-EPIcys and CKD-EPIcreat-cys, in addition to the CKD-EPIcreat, increases the accuracy of CKD diagnostics in type 2 diabetic patients. However, obesity and particularly body fat mass affect the results of estimation of GFR based on cystatin C. The increase in urinary collagen type IV, but not in cystatin C excretion, is related to GFR decline and AER elevation in these patients.

  10. Partitioning Heritability of Regulatory and Cell-Type-Specific Variants across 11 Common Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusev, Alexander; Lee, S. Hong; Trynka, Gosia; Finucane, Hilary; Vilhjálmsson, Bjarni J.; Xu, Han; Zang, Chongzhi; Ripke, Stephan; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Stahl, Eli; Ripke, Stephan; Neale, Benjamin M.; Corvin, Aiden; Walters, James T.R.; Farh, Kai-How; Holmans, Peter A.; Lee, Phil; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Collier, David A.; Huang, Hailiang; Pers, Tune H.; Agartz, Ingrid; Agerbo, Esben; Albus, Margot; Alexander, Madeline; Amin, Farooq; Bacanu, Silviu A.; Begemann, Martin; Belliveau, Richard A.; Bene, Judit; Bergen, Sarah E.; Bevilacqua, Elizabeth; Bigdeli, Tim B.; Black, Donald W.; Børglum, Anders D.; Bruggeman, Richard; Buccola, Nancy G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Byerley, William; Cahn, Wiepke; Cai, Guiqing; Campion, Dominique; Cantor, Rita M.; Carr, Vaughan J.; Carrera, Noa; Catts, Stanley V.; Chambert, Kimberly D.; Chan, Raymond C.K.; Chen, Ronald Y.L.; Chen, Eric Y.H.; Cheng, Wei; Cheung, Eric F.C.; Chong, Siow Ann; Cloninger, C. Robert; Cohen, David; Cohen, Nadine; Cormican, Paul; Craddock, Nick; Crowley, James J.; Curtis, David; Davidson, Michael; Davis, Kenneth L.; Degenhardt, Franziska; Del Favero, Jurgen; DeLisi, Lynn E.; Demontis, Ditte; Dikeos, Dimitris; Dinan, Timothy; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drapeau, Elodie; Duan, Jubao; Dudbridge, Frank; Durmishi, Naser; Eichhammer, Peter; Eriksson, Johan; Escott-Price, Valentina; Essioux, Laurent; Fanous, Ayman H.; Farrell, Martilias S.; Frank, Josef; Franke, Lude; Freedman, Robert; Freimer, Nelson B.; Friedl, Marion; Friedman, Joseph I.; Fromer, Menachem; Genovese, Giulio; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Gershon, Elliot S.; Giegling, Ina; Giusti-Rodrguez, Paola; Godard, Stephanie; Goldstein, Jacqueline I.; Golimbet, Vera; Gopal, Srihari; Gratten, Jacob; Grove, Jakob; de Haan, Lieuwe; Hammer, Christian; Hamshere, Marian L.; Hansen, Mark; Hansen, Thomas; Haroutunian, Vahram; Hartmann, Annette M.; Henskens, Frans A.; Herms, Stefan; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hoffmann, Per; Hofman, Andrea; Hollegaard, Mads V.; Hougaard, David M.; Ikeda, Masashi; Joa, Inge; Julià, Antonio; Kahn, René S.; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Karachanak-Yankova, Sena; Karjalainen, Juha; Kavanagh, David; Keller, Matthew C.; Kelly, Brian J.; Kennedy, James L.; Khrunin, Andrey; Kim, Yunjung; Klovins, Janis; Knowles, James A.; Konte, Bettina; Kucinskas, Vaidutis; Kucinskiene, Zita Ausrele; Kuzelova-Ptackova, Hana; Kähler, Anna K.; Laurent, Claudine; Keong, Jimmy Lee Chee; Lee, S. Hong; Legge, Sophie E.; Lerer, Bernard; Li, Miaoxin; Li, Tao; Liang, Kung-Yee; Lieberman, Jeffrey; Limborska, Svetlana; Loughland, Carmel M.; Lubinski, Jan; Lnnqvist, Jouko; Macek, Milan; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Maher, Brion S.; Maier, Wolfgang; Mallet, Jacques; Marsal, Sara; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mattingsdal, Morten; McCarley, Robert W.; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Meier, Sandra; Meijer, Carin J.; Melegh, Bela; Melle, Ingrid; Mesholam-Gately, Raquelle I.; Metspalu, Andres; Michie, Patricia T.; Milani, Lili; Milanova, Vihra; Mokrab, Younes; Morris, Derek W.; Mors, Ole; Mortensen, Preben B.; Murphy, Kieran C.; Murray, Robin M.; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Mller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nelis, Mari; Nenadic, Igor; Nertney, Deborah A.; Nestadt, Gerald; Nicodemus, Kristin K.; Nikitina-Zake, Liene; Nisenbaum, Laura; Nordin, Annelie; O’Callaghan, Eadbhard; O’Dushlaine, Colm; O’Neill, F. Anthony; Oh, Sang-Yun; Olincy, Ann; Olsen, Line; Van Os, Jim; Pantelis, Christos; Papadimitriou, George N.; Papiol, Sergi; Parkhomenko, Elena; Pato, Michele T.; Paunio, Tiina; Pejovic-Milovancevic, Milica; Perkins, Diana O.; Pietilinen, Olli; Pimm, Jonathan; Pocklington, Andrew J.; Powell, John; Price, Alkes; Pulver, Ann E.; Purcell, Shaun M.; Quested, Digby; Rasmussen, Henrik B.; Reichenberg, Abraham; Reimers, Mark A.; Richards, Alexander L.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Roussos, Panos; Ruderfer, Douglas M.; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R.; Schall, Ulrich; Schubert, Christian R.; Schulze, Thomas G.; Schwab, Sibylle G.; Scolnick, Edward M.; Scott, Rodney J.; Seidman, Larry J.; Shi, Jianxin; Sigurdsson, Engilbert; Silagadze, Teimuraz; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Sim, Kang; Slominsky, Petr; Smoller, Jordan W.; So, Hon-Cheong; Spencer, Chris C.A.; Stahl, Eli A.; Stefansson, Hreinn; Steinberg, Stacy; Stogmann, Elisabeth; Straub, Richard E.; Strengman, Eric; Strohmaier, Jana; Stroup, T. Scott; Subramaniam, Mythily; Suvisaari, Jaana; Svrakic, Dragan M.; Szatkiewicz, Jin P.; Sderman, Erik; Thirumalai, Srinivas; Toncheva, Draga; Tooney, Paul A.; Tosato, Sarah; Veijola, Juha; Waddington, John; Walsh, Dermot; Wang, Dai; Wang, Qiang; Webb, Bradley T.; Weiser, Mark; Wildenauer, Dieter B.; Williams, Nigel M.; Williams, Stephanie; Witt, Stephanie H.; Wolen, Aaron R.; Wong, Emily H.M.; Wormley, Brandon K.; Wu, Jing Qin; Xi, Hualin Simon; Zai, Clement C.; Zheng, Xuebin; Zimprich, Fritz; Wray, Naomi R.; Stefansson, Kari; Visscher, Peter M.; Adolfsson, Rolf; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blackwood, Douglas H.R.; Bramon, Elvira; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Brglum, Anders D.; Cichon, Sven; Darvasi, Ariel; Domenici, Enrico; Ehrenreich, Hannelore; Esko, Tõnu; Gejman, Pablo V.; Gill, Michael; Gurling, Hugh; Hultman, Christina M.; Iwata, Nakao; Jablensky, Assen V.; Jönsson, Erik G.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Kirov, George; Knight, Jo; Lencz, Todd; Levinson, Douglas F.; Li, Qingqin S.; Liu, Jianjun; Malhotra, Anil K.; McCarroll, Steven A.; McQuillin, Andrew; Moran, Jennifer L.; Mortensen, Preben B.; Mowry, Bryan J.; Nthen, Markus M.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Owen, Michael J.; Palotie, Aarno; Pato, Carlos N.; Petryshen, Tracey L.; Posthuma, Danielle; Rietschel, Marcella; Riley, Brien P.; Rujescu, Dan; Sham, Pak C.; Sklar, Pamela; St. Clair, David; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Wendland, Jens R.; Werge, Thomas; Daly, Mark J.; Sullivan, Patrick F.; O’Donovan, Michael C.; Ripke, Stephan; O’Dushlaine, Colm; Chambert, Kimberly; Moran, Jennifer L.; Kähler, Anna K.; Akterin, Susanne; Bergen, Sarah; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Ruderfer, Douglas; Scolnick, Edward; Purcell, Shaun; McCarroll, Steve; Sklar, Pamela; Hultman, Christina M.; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Kähler, Anna K.; Hultman, Christina M.; Purcell, Shaun M.; McCarroll, Steven A.; Daly, Mark; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Wray, Naomi R.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Price, Alkes L.

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory and coding variants are known to be enriched with associations identified by genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of complex disease, but their contributions to trait heritability are currently unknown. We applied variance-component methods to imputed genotype data for 11 common diseases to partition the heritability explained by genotyped SNPs (hg2) across functional categories (while accounting for shared variance due to linkage disequilibrium). Extensive simulations showed that in contrast to current estimates from GWAS summary statistics, the variance-component approach partitions heritability accurately under a wide range of complex-disease architectures. Across the 11 diseases DNaseI hypersensitivity sites (DHSs) from 217 cell types spanned 16% of imputed SNPs (and 24% of genotyped SNPs) but explained an average of 79% (SE = 8%) of hg2 from imputed SNPs (5.1× enrichment; p = 3.7 × 10−17) and 38% (SE = 4%) of hg2 from genotyped SNPs (1.6× enrichment, p = 1.0 × 10−4). Further enrichment was observed at enhancer DHSs and cell-type-specific DHSs. In contrast, coding variants, which span 1% of the genome, explained <10% of hg2 despite having the highest enrichment. We replicated these findings but found no significant contribution from rare coding variants in independent schizophrenia cohorts genotyped on GWAS and exome chips. Our results highlight the value of analyzing components of heritability to unravel the functional architecture of common disease. PMID:25439723

  11. Relationships between Diet, Alcohol Preference, and Heart Disease and Type 2 Diabetes among Americans.

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    Michael K Adjemian

    Full Text Available Although excessive alcohol consumption is a recognized cause of morbidity and mortality, many studies have linked moderate alcohol consumption to improved cardiovascular health and a lower risk of Type 2 Diabetes (T2D. Self-reported alcohol and diet data used to generate these results suffer from measurement error due to recall bias. We estimate the effects of diet, alcohol, and lifestyle choices on the prevalence and incidence of cardiovascular disease and T2D among U.S. adults using a nationally representative cohort of households with scanner data representing their food-at-home, alcohol, and tobacco purchases from 2007-2010, and self-reported health surveys for the same study participants from 2010-2012. Multivariate regression models were used to identify significant associations among purchase data and lifestyle/demographic factors with disease prevalence in 2010, and with incidence of new disease from 2011-2012. After controlling for important confounders, respondents who purchased moderate levels of wine were 25% less likely than non-drinkers to report heart disease in 2010. However, no alcohol-related expenditure variables significantly affected the likelihood of reporting incident heart disease from 2011-2012. In contrast, many types of alcohol-related purchases were associated with a lower prevalence of T2D, and respondents who purchased the greatest volumes of wine or beer--but not liquor--were less likely to report being diagnosed with T2D in 2011-2012 than non-drinkers.

  12. Type and cause of liver disease in Korea: single-center experience, 2005-2010

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sang Soo; Byoun, Young-Sang; Jeong, Sook-Hyang; Kim, Yeo Myung; Gil, Ho; Min, Bo-young; Seong, Mun Hyuk; Jang, Eun Sun; Kim, Jin-Wook

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims The aim of this study was to describe the types and causes of liver disease in patients from a single community hospital in Korea between April 2005 and May 2010. Methods A cohort of patients who visited the liver clinic of the hospital during the aforementioned time period were consecutively enrolled (n=6,307). Consistent diagnostic criteria for each liver disease were set by a single, experienced hepatologist, and the diagnosis of all of the enrolled patients was confirmed b...

  13. Association of Chronic Kidney Disease and Cerebral Small Vessel Disease with Cognitive Impairment in Elderly Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

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    Toshitaka Umemura

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: In recent years, the relationship between chronic kidney disease (CKD and cognitive impairment has been attracting attention. Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD is also associated with an increased risk of cognitive impairment. However, it is still unknown whether CKD markers are associated with cognitive impairment independently of SVD in elderly diabetic patients. Methods: Seventy-nine type 2 diabetic patients (mean age, 76.0 years were enrolled in the present study. CKD was defined as the presence of albuminuria and/or a low estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR 2. SVD was evaluated by the presence and severity of silent brain infarcts (SBIs and white matter lesions (WMLs on brain magnetic resonance imaging. Neuropsychological tests were assessed using four validated cognitive instruments. Results: In multiple linear regression analyses, albuminuria was associated with worse modified Stroop Color Word scores (β = 0.284, p = 0.017 and low eGFR was associated with reduced Digit Symbol Substitution scores (β = -0.224, p = 0.026 after adjustment for age, sex, education years, diabetes duration, hypertension, multiple SBIs, and advanced WMLs. In contrast, there were no significant associations between CKD markers and Mini-Mental State Examination or Word Recall scores. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that albuminuria and low eGFR are associated with frontal lobe dysfunction independently of SVD in elderly type 2 diabetic patients.

  14. Cold agglutinin disease associated with mycoplasma infection in an individual with type 2 diabetes: An atypical case

    OpenAIRE

    Chandrama Shrestha; Liu Min; Zhaohui Mo

    2012-01-01

    Cold Agglutinin Disease is a hemolytic anemia associated with cold reactive autoantibodies. Although the acute form of cold agglutinin disease can be attributed to autoimmune or infectious diseases and lymphoproliferative diseases, it has, to the best of our knowledge, so far,never been reported as secondary to mycoplasma pneumonia in a type 2 diabetic individual. In this paper, we report a case of cold agglutinin disease following mycoplasma pneumonia in a 47-year-old female patient with typ...

  15. Predictors of dropout in the German disease management program for type 2 diabetes

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    Fullerton Birgit

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To improve and assess the effectiveness of disease management programs (DMPs, it is critical to understand how many people drop out of disease management programs and why. Methods We used routine data provided by a statutory health insurance fund from the regions North Rhine, North Wurttemberg and Hesse. As part of the German DMP for type 2 diabetes, the insurance fund received regular documentation of all members participating in the program. We followed 10,989 patients who enrolled in the DMP between July 2004 and December 2005 until the end of 2007 to study how many patients dropped out of the program. Dropout was defined based on the discontinuation of program documentation on a particular patient, excluding situations in which the patient died or left the insurance fund. Predictors of dropout, assessed at the time of program enrolment, were explored using logistic regression analysis. Results 5.5% of the patients dropped out of the disease management program within the observation period. Predictors of dropout at the time of enrolment were: region; retirement status; the number of secondary diseases; presence of a disabling secondary disease; doctor's recommendations to stop smoking or to seek nutritional counselling; and the completion and outcome of the routine foot and eye exams. Different trends of dropout were observed among retired and employed patients: retired patients of old age, who possibly drop out of the program due to other health care priorities and employed people of younger age who have not yet developed many secondary diseases, but were recommended to change their lifestyle. Conclusions Overall, dropout rates for the German disease management programs for type 2 diabetes were low compared to other studies. Factors assessed at the time of program enrolment were predictive of later dropout and should be further studied to provide information for future program improvements.

  16. Niemann-Pick type B disease. Identification of a single codon deletion in the acid sphingomyelinase gene and genotype/phenotype correlations in type A and B patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Levran, O; Desnick, R. J.; Schuchman, E H

    1991-01-01

    Types A and B Niemann-Pick disease both result from the deficient activity of the lysosomal hydrolase, acid sphingomyelinase (E.C. 3.1.4.12). Type A Niemann-Pick disease is a severe neurodegenerative disorder of infancy which leads to death by three years of age, whereas Type B disease has a later age at onset, little or no neurologic involvement, and most patients survive into adulthood. To investigate the molecular basis for the remarkable phenotypic heterogeneity, the nature of the mutatio...

  17. Identification of susceptibility variants in ADIPOR1 gene associated with type 2 diabetes, coronary artery disease and the comorbidity of type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease.

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    Zening Jin

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Adiponectin receptor 1 (encoded by ADIPOR1 is one of the major adiponectin receptors, and plays an important role in glucose and lipid metabolism. However, few studies have reported simultaneous associations between ADIPOR1 variants and type 2 diabetes (T2D, coronary artery disease (CAD and T2D with CAD. Based on the "common soil" hypothesis, we investigated whether ADIPOR1 polymorphisms contributed to the etiology of T2D, CAD, or T2D with CAD in a Northern Han Chinese population. METHODS: Our multi-disease comparison study enrolled 657 subjects, including 165 with T2D, 173 with CAD, 174 with both T2D and CAD (T2D+CAD, and 145 local healthy controls. Six ADIPOR1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were genotyped and their association with disease risk was analyzed. RESULTS: Multi-case-control comparison identified two ADIPOR1 variants: rs3737884-G, which was simultaneously associated with an increased risk of T2D, CAD, and T2D+CAD (P-value range, 9.80×10(-5-6.30×10(-4; odds ratio (OR range: 1.96-2.42 and 16850797-C, which was separately associated with T2D and T2D+CAD (P-value range: 0.007-0.014; OR range: 1.71-1.77. The risk genotypes of both rs3737884 and 16850797 were consistently associated with common metabolic phenotypes in all three diseases (P-value range: 4.81×10(-42-0.001. We observed an increase in the genetic dose-dependent cumulative risk with increasing risk allele numbers in T2D, CAD and T2D+CAD (P trend from 1.35×10(-5-0.002. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that ADIPOR1 risk polymorphisms are a strong candidate for the "common soil" hypothesis and could partially contribute to disease susceptibility to T2D, CAD, and T2D with CAD in the Northern Han Chinese population.

  18. Impact of obesity on disease severity in patients with plaque type psoriasis

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    Nuriye Kayıran

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory systemic disease involving the skin, scalp, nails, and the joints and is characterized by periods of remission and exacerbation. Although the pathogenesis of psoriasis is not fully understood, many genetic and environmental factors are believed to have a role in the development of the disease. Obesity, smoking, family history of psoriasis, repetitive physical traumas and major stress disorders are the factors thought to affect the severity and progress of the disease. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of obesity on the clinical severity of psoriasis in patients with chronic plaque psoriasis. Materials and Methods: Three hundred twenty-five outpatients with chronic plaque-type psoriasis were enrolled in the study. Body Mass Index (BMI and Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI values were recorded for each patient. Results: When normal, overweight and obese psoriasis patients were compared, a statistically significant difference was not found in disease severity (p=0.707. There was also no significant correlation between BMI and PASI values (r=0.006, p=0916. Conclusion: Although no effect of obesity on the severity of the disease was shown in our study, further controlled population based studies are needed to investigate the possible role of obesity in triggering and beginning of the disease.

  19. Prenatal diagnosis of Morquio disease type A using a simple fluorometric enzyme assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H; Van Diggelen, O P; Thoomes, R; Huijmans, J; Young, E; Mazurczak, T; Kleijer, W J

    1990-02-01

    A new fluorogenic substrate, 4 methylumbelliferyl beta-D-6-sulphogalactoside, was used for the assay of galactose-6-sulphate sulphatase activity in chorionic villi, cultured villus cells, and amniocytes. The fluorometric assay is much more convenient than the conventional assay using radiolabelled, sulphated oligosaccharides. Both types of substrate were used in the prenatal diagnosis of three pregnancies at risk for Morquio type A disease using amniocytes. These enzyme tests, as well as electrophoresis of glycosaminoglycans in the amniotic fluid, indicated affected fetuses in two pregnancies and a non-affected fetus in one. PMID:2111546

  20. E4 antibodies facilitate detection and type-assignment of active HPV infection in cervical disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Griffin

    Full Text Available High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV infections are the cause of nearly all cases of cervical cancer. Although the detection of HPV DNA has proved useful in cervical diagnosis, it does not necessarily predict disease presence or severity, and cannot conclusively identify the causative type when multiple HPVs are present. Such limitations may be addressed using complementary approaches such as cytology, laser capture microscopy, and/or the use of infection biomarkers. One such infection biomarker is the HPV E4 protein, which is expressed at high level in cells that are supporting (or have supported viral genome amplification. Its distribution in lesions has suggested a role in disease staging. Here we have examined whether type-specific E4 antibodies may also allow the identification and/or confirmation of causal HPV-type. To do this, type-specific polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies against three E4 proteins (HPV-16, -18, and -58 were generated and validated by ELISA and western blotting, and by immunohistochemistry (IHC staining of epithelial rafts containing these individual HPV types. Type-specific detection of HPV and its associated disease was subsequently examined using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded cervical intra-epithelial neoplasias (CIN, (n = 247 and normal controls (n = 28. All koilocytotic CIN1 lesions showed type-specific E4 expression of their respective HPV types. Differences were noted amongst E4 expression patterns in CIN3. HPV-18 E4 was not detected in any of the 6 HPV-18 DNA-positive CIN3 lesions examined, whereas in HPV-16 and -58 CIN3, 28/37 (76% and 5/9 (55.6% expressed E4 respectively, usually in regions of epithelial differentiation. Our results demonstrate that type-specific E4 antibodies can be used to help establish causality, as may be required when multiple HPV types are detected. The unique characteristics of the E4 biomarker suggest a role in diagnosis and patient management particularly when used in combination.

  1. The earth as a living planet: Human-type diseases in the earthquake preparation process

    CERN Document Server

    Contoyiannis, Y F; Eftaxias, K

    2013-01-01

    The new field of complex systems supports the view that a number of systems arising from disciplines as diverse as physics, biology, engineering, and economics may have certain quantitative features that are intriguingly similar. The earth is a living planet where many complex systems run perfectly without stopping at all. The earthquake generation is a fundamental sign that the earth is a living planet. Recently, analyses have shown that human-brain-type disease appears during the earthquake generation process. Herein, we show that human-heart-type disease appears during the earthquake preparation of the earthquake process. The investigation is mainly attempted by means of critical phenomena, which have been proposed as the likely paradigm to explain the origins of both heart electric fluctuations and fracture induced electromagnetic fluctuations. We show that a time window of the damage evolution within the heterogeneous Earth's crust and the healthy heart's electrical action present the characteristic feat...

  2. Daughter and mother with orofaciodigital syndrome type 1 and glomerulocystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Takashi; Hoshino, Junichi; Mise, Koki; Sumida, Keiichi; Suwabe, Tatsuya; Hayami, Noriko; Ueno, Toshiharu; Takaichi, Kenmei; Fujii, Takeshi; Ohashi, Kenichi; Morisada, Naoya; Iijima, Kazumoto; Ubara, Yoshifumi

    2016-09-01

    A 35-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for evaluation of end-stage renal failure. Diagnostic imaging, including ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging, showed polycystic kidneys and peribiliary hepatic cysts, but the renal cysts were isointense and her kidneys were smaller than the end-stage kidneys of patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Glomerulocystic kidney disease was diagnosed by renal biopsy. Clinical examination revealed findings such as a missing maxillary canine, lingual anomalies, and brachydactyly. Genetic testing gave a diagnosis of orofaciodigital syndrome type 1 with a 5 nucleotide deletion indicating a frameshift mutation in exon 9. The patient's mother had the same mutation and similar clinical findings. This case is useful for understanding kidney and liver involvement in orofaciodigital syndrome type 1. PMID:27131853

  3. Spreading of infectious diseases on heterogeneous populations: multi-type network approach

    CERN Document Server

    Vazquez, Alexei

    2006-01-01

    I study the spreading of infectious diseases on heterogeneous populations. I represent the population structure by a contact-graph where vertices represent agents and edges represent disease transmission channels among them. The population heterogeneity is taken into account by the agent's subdivision in types and the mixing matrix among them. I introduce a type-network representation for the mixing matrix allowing an intuitive understanding of the mixing patterns and the analytical calculations. Using an iterative approach I obtain recursive equations for the probability distribution of the outbreak size as a function of time. I demonstrate that the expected outbreak size and its progression in time are determined by the largest eigenvalue of the reproductive number matrix and the characteristic distance between agents on the contact-graph. Finally, I discuss the impact of intervention strategies to halt epidemic outbreaks. This work provides both a qualitative understanding and tools to obtain quantitative ...

  4. Impact of smoking on disease severity in patients with plaque type psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuriye Kayıran

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Psoriasis is a chronic enflammatory systemic disease involving skin, scalp, nails and joints and is characterized by remission and activation periods. Although the etiopathogenesis of psoriasis has not been fully elucidated, many genetic and environmental factors are believed to have a role in the development of the disease. Obesity, smoking, family history of psoriasis, repetitive physical traumas and stress are the factors thought to affect the severity and progress of the disease. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of smoking on the clinical severity of psoriasis in patients with chronic plaque psoriasis. Materials and Methods: Three hundred outpatients with chronic plaque-type psoriasis were enrolled in the study. Data on age, gender, family history, smoking history, educational status, history of chronic illness, and psoriasis area severity index (PASI scores were recorded for each patient. The effects of these factors on PASI were evaluated. Results: Current smokers, never smokers and former smokers were compared in terms of disease severity. The median PASI values of current smokers and never smokers were compared. The mean PASI value was statistically significantly higher in smokers (p=0.049. In multiple logistic regression analysis, it was detected that the risk of moderate and severe disease increased by male sex 2 times, by family history 2.3 times, and by smoking period above 20 years, 10 times. In smokers of more than 1 pack a day, this risk further increased. Conclusion: On the basis of these data, it may be concluded that smoking affects the severity of disease significantly. In addition to amount of daily cigarette consumption, smoking period was shown to have an effect on the severity of disease. Elimination of risk factors such as smoking, which appears to increase the severity of diseases, may be helpful in the management of psoriasis.

  5. PREVALENCE OF MEIBOMIAN GLAND DISEASE IN TYPE II DIABETIC PATIENTS & ITS CLINICAL PRESENTATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reshma Pathan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AIMS : To study the prevalence of the meibomian gland disease in typ e 2 diabetic patients and its clinical presentations. SETTING AND DESIGN : A hospital based cross sectional descriptive study of 100 type 2 diabetic patients attending a medical college was conducted. METHODS : Detailed diabetic history was recorded. Assessment of ocular surface i.e. the lid margins , conjunctiva , corneal surface was done via slit lamp biomicroscopy. Meibomian gland disease (MGD severity was assessed by the quality and expressibility of the meibomian secretion. Dry eye tests like schir mer’s test and tear film breakup time were done. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED : SPSS statistical software version 17 was used. RESULTS : 56% of the patients out of 100 diabetic patients had MGD. The most common symptom was burning (46.9% , followed by dryness ( 23.5% , 5.6% had conjunctival injection , 7.14% had corneal erosions , 25% had mucus debris , 53.65% had dry eye which was statistically significant (p=0.001 , 56.25% males and 72.2% females had the disease which was not statistically significant. CONCLUSION : The prevalence of Meibomian gland disease in the diabetic population was 56% which is more than the general population prevalence. Apart from other disorders diabetics are also more prone for ocular surface diseases like Meibomian gland disease. MGD is an important pre disposer for severe diseases like Dry eye in this subgroup of patients which can lead to complications like conjunctival keratinisations , corneal erosions and perforations. Careful examination of these patients for ocular surface disease and prompt treatment is required.

  6. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 olfactory impairment shows a pattern similar to other major neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez-Pérez, Luis; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan; Díaz, Rosalinda; González, Ruth Pérez; Ochoa, Nalia Canales; Cruz, Gilberto Sánchez; Mederos, Luis Enrique Almaguer; Góngora, Edilberto Martínez; Hudson, Robyn; Drucker-Colin, René

    2006-09-01

    Olfactory function is affected in different neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, it has been found that some hereditary ataxias are also associated with significant olfactory impairment. However, the initial findings did not examine the nature of the olfactory impairment associated with these ataxias. In the present article the effect of spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) on olfactory function was studied in 53 SCA2 patients and 53 healthy control subjects from Holguín, Cuba. Several tests were applied to evaluate olfactory threshold, description, identification and discrimination. The results show significant impairment in SCA2 patients on all olfactory measurements, and the pattern of olfactory deficits found suggests that they have much in common with those reported for other neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. PMID:16609806

  7. Infantile Type Sandhoff Disease with Striking Brain MRI Findings and a Novel Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beker-Acay, Mehtap; Elmas, Muhsin; Koken, Resit; Unlu, Ebru; Bukulmez, Aysegul

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Sandhoff disease is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by β-hexosaminidase deficiency in which the ganglioside GM2 and other glycolipids accumulate intracellularly within lysosomes. This process results in progressive motor neuron manifestations, death from respiratory failure and infections in infantiles. Case Report This report presents a 22-month-old girl with infantile type Sandhoff disease that was hospitalized for generalized seizures and psychomotor retardation. She was diagnosed with a genetically proven novel mutation and by demonstrating it’s specific imaging findings. Conclusions Determination of spesific changes in neuroimaging which are initial findings for GM2 gangliosidosis is important from the point of diagnosis and follow-up in infants suspected of having a neurodegenerative disease. PMID:26985245

  8. Urinary albumin excretion rate and cardiovascular disease in Spaniard type 2 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relimpio, F; Pumar, A; Losada, F; Molina, J; Maynar, A; Acosta, D; Astorga, R

    1997-05-01

    To assess the prevalence of urinary albumin excretion abnormalities and their associations with cardiovascular disease or its classical risk factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus, 1348 clinic-proceeding patients have been studied retrospectively. The overnight urinary albumin excretion rate, blood pressure, smoking, ophthalmic and cardiovascular status, current therapies, estimates of glycemic control, plasma lipids, serum creatinine and uric acid have been ascertained. 767 (56.8%) patients were found normoalbuminuric, 461 (34.1%) microalbuminuric and 120 (8.9%) macroalbuminuric. In bivariate analyses, the urinary albumin excretion rate had statistically significant (P creatinine, uric acid, triglycerides, high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol and apolipoprotein B. Borderline statistically significant (P creatinine, HbA1c, male sex and hypertension were sequentially selected as independently associated with macroalbuminuria. Micro and macroalbuminuria are frequent abnormalities associated with poorly controlled and complicated disease, with overt cardiovascular disease and its classical risk factors as well as with the male sex. PMID:9229197

  9. Immune-Mediated Inflammation May Contribute to the Pathogenesis of Cardiovascular Disease in Mucopolysaccharidosis Type I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Khalid

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease, a progressive manifestation of α-L-iduronidase deficiency or mucopolysaccharidosis type I, continues in patients both untreated and treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation or intravenous enzyme replacement. Few studies have examined the effects of α-L-iduronidase deficiency and subsequent glycosaminoglycan storage upon arterial gene expression to understand the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease.Gene expression in carotid artery, ascending, and descending aortas from four non-tolerized, non-enzyme treated 19 month-old mucopolysaccharidosis type I dogs was compared with expression in corresponding vascular segments from three normal, age-matched dogs. Data were analyzed using R and whole genome network correlation analysis, a bias-free method of categorizing expression level and significance into discrete modules. Genes were further categorized based on module-trait relationships. Expression of clusterin, a protein implicated in other etiologies of cardiovascular disease, was assessed in canine and murine mucopolysaccharidosis type I aortas via Western blot and in situ immunohistochemistry.Gene families with more than two-fold, significant increased expression involved lysosomal function, proteasome function, and immune regulation. Significantly downregulated genes were related to cellular adhesion, cytoskeletal elements, and calcium regulation. Clusterin gene overexpression (9-fold and protein overexpression (1.3 to 1.62-fold was confirmed and located specifically in arterial plaques of mucopolysaccharidosis-affected dogs and mice.Overexpression of lysosomal and proteasomal-related genes are expected responses to cellular stress induced by lysosomal storage in mucopolysaccharidosis type I. Upregulation of immunity-related genes implicates the potential involvement of glycosaminoglycan-induced inflammation in the pathogenesis of mucopolysaccharidosis-related arterial disease, for which clusterin

  10. Niemann-Pick type C disease: molecular mechanisms and potential therapeutic approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenbaum, Anton I.; Maxfield, Frederick R.

    2011-01-01

    Cholesterol is an important lipid of mammalian cells. Its unique physicochemical properties modulate membrane behavior and it serves as the precursor for steroid hormones, oxysterols and vitamin D. Cholesterol is effluxed from the late endosomes/lysosomes via the concerted action of at least two distinct proteins: Niemann-Pick C1 and Niemann-Pick C2. Mutations in these two proteins manifest as Niemann-Pick type C disease – a very rare, usually fatal, autosomal, recessive, neurovisceral, lysos...

  11. Unusually prominent horizontal gaze palsy in a case of Niemann-Pick type C disease

    OpenAIRE

    Pritikanta Paul; Banashree Mondal; Arijit Kumar Mukherjee; Madhuparna Paul; Hrishikesh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Niemann-Pick Type C disease (NPC) is a rare inherited metabolic disorder characterized by lipid accumulation and systemic manifestations due to multiple organ involvement. Only a few cases of NPC have been reported so far from India. Varying presentations and often lack of access to complex diagnostic tests have leaded to initial misdiagnosis on few occasions. We here report a provisionally diagnosed case of NPC with prominent horizontal gaze palsy along with characteristic vertical gaze pals...

  12. Niemann-Pick disease type C: a case series of Brazilian patients

    OpenAIRE

    Paulo José Lorenzoni; Elaine Cardoso; Ana C.S. Crippa; Charles Marques Lourenço; Fernanda Timm Seabra Souza; Roberto Giugliani; Maria Luiza Saraiva-Pereira; Salmo Raskin; Isac Bruck; Cláudia S. K. Kay; Rosana H. Scola; Werneck, Lineu C.; Teive, Hélio A.G.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze a series of Brazilian patients with Niemann-Pick disease type C (NP-C). Method Correlations between clinical findings, laboratory data, molecular findings and treatment response are presented. Result The sample consisted of 5 patients aged 8 to 26 years. Vertical supranuclear gaze palsy, cerebellar ataxia, dementia, dystonia and dysarthria were present in all cases. Filipin staining showed the “classical” pattern in two patients and a “variant” pattern i...

  13. Exosome Secretion Ameliorates Lysosomal Storage of Cholesterol in Niemann-Pick Type C Disease*

    OpenAIRE

    STRAUSS, K; C. GOEBEL; Runz, H.; Mobius, W.; Weiss, S; Feussner, I.; M. Simons; A. Schneider

    2010-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C1 disease is an autosomal-recessive lysosomal storage disorder. Loss of function of the npc1 gene leads to abnormal accumulation of free cholesterol and sphingolipids within the late endosomal and lysosomal compartments resulting in progressive neurodegeneration and dysmyelination. Here, we show that oligodendroglial cells secrete cholesterol by exosomes when challenged with cholesterol or U18666A, which induces late endosomal cholesterol accumulation. Up-regulation of exos...

  14. Niemann–Pick type C disease proteins: orphan transporters or membrane rheostats?

    OpenAIRE

    Munkacsi, Andrew B.; Porto, Anthony F.; Sturley, Stephen L.

    2007-01-01

    Niemann–Pick type C (NPC) disease is a panethnic lysosomal lipidosis, which results in severe cerebellar impairment and death, and is proposed to be a consequence of defective metabolite transport. Numerous models of this disorder have defined the phenotypic impact of misfunction of the NPC proteins, however, their mechanism of action and definition of substrate(s) remain vague and disputed. The proteins may be lipid chaperones, nonspecific transporters, orphan transporters or membrane-sensin...

  15. Elimination of endoplasmic reticulum stress and cardiovascular, type 2 diabetic, and other metabolic diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Luoma, Pauli V

    2012-01-01

    Multiple factors including unhealthy living habits influence the life-maintaining functions of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and induce ER stress and metabolic abnormalities. The ER responds to the disturbances by activating mechanisms that increase the capacity to eliminate ER stress. This article elucidates the effects of ER activation that eliminates both ER stress and associated cardiovascular, type 2 diabetic (DM2), and other metabolic diseases. ER-activating compounds eliminate ER stre...

  16. Predictors of all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality in type 2 diabetes: Diabetes Heart Study

    OpenAIRE

    Raffield, Laura M.; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Cox, Amanda J.; Carr, J. Jeffrey; Freedman, Barry I.; Bowden, Donald W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Many studies evaluated the best predictors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) events in individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D), but few studies examined the factors most strongly associated with mortality in T2D. The Diabetes Heart Study (DHS), an intensively phenotyped family-based cohort enriched for T2D, provided an opportunity to address this question. Methods Associations with mortality were examined in 1022 European Americans affected by T2D from 476 DHS families. All-cause mor...

  17. Immune-Mediated Inflammation May Contribute to the Pathogenesis of Cardiovascular Disease in Mucopolysaccharidosis Type I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordts, Philip L.; Ellinwood, N. Matthew; Schwartz, Philip H.; Dickson, Patricia I.; Esko, Jeffrey D.; Wang, Raymond Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease, a progressive manifestation of α-L-iduronidase deficiency or mucopolysaccharidosis type I, continues in patients both untreated and treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation or intravenous enzyme replacement. Few studies have examined the effects of α-L-iduronidase deficiency and subsequent glycosaminoglycan storage upon arterial gene expression to understand the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Methods Gene expression in carotid artery, ascending, and descending aortas from four non-tolerized, non-enzyme treated 19 month-old mucopolysaccharidosis type I dogs was compared with expression in corresponding vascular segments from three normal, age-matched dogs. Data were analyzed using R and whole genome network correlation analysis, a bias-free method of categorizing expression level and significance into discrete modules. Genes were further categorized based on module-trait relationships. Expression of clusterin, a protein implicated in other etiologies of cardiovascular disease, was assessed in canine and murine mucopolysaccharidosis type I aortas via Western blot and in situ immunohistochemistry. Results Gene families with more than two-fold, significant increased expression involved lysosomal function, proteasome function, and immune regulation. Significantly downregulated genes were related to cellular adhesion, cytoskeletal elements, and calcium regulation. Clusterin gene overexpression (9-fold) and protein overexpression (1.3 to 1.62-fold) was confirmed and located specifically in arterial plaques of mucopolysaccharidosis-affected dogs and mice. Conclusions Overexpression of lysosomal and proteasomal-related genes are expected responses to cellular stress induced by lysosomal storage in mucopolysaccharidosis type I. Upregulation of immunity-related genes implicates the potential involvement of glycosaminoglycan-induced inflammation in the pathogenesis of mucopolysaccharidosis-related arterial disease, for

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Type A Circulating in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Ullah, Huzzat; Siddique, Mohammad Anwar; Sultana, Munawar; Hossain, M. Anwar

    2014-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of a foot-and-and mouth disease virus (FMDV) type A strain (BAN/GA/Sa-197/2013), isolated from Gazipur in Bangladesh, revealed an 84-nucleotide insertion within the 5′-untranslated region (UTR), a lengthened poly(C) tract, and amino acid substitutions at the VP1 region compared to the available genome sequence of the vaccine strain (GenBank accession no. HM854025).

  19. Epidemiology of Type 2 Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease: Translation From Population to Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Meigs, James B.

    2010-01-01

    In the book Epidemiology of Diabetes and Its Vascular Lesions (1978), Kelly West summarized extant knowledge of the distribution and causes of diabetes. The 30 years of epidemiological research that followed have seen remarkable advances in the understanding of obesity as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, and diabetes and pre-diabetes as risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Increasingly detailed understanding of these relationships has, unfortunately, been accompanied by an alarming incr...

  20. Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors, Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, and the Framingham Heart Study

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, Caroline S

    2010-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a common disorder and an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). The Framingham Heart Study (FHS) is a population-based epidemiologic study that has contributed to our knowledge of CVD and its risk factors. This review will focus on the contemporary contributions of the FHS to the field of diabetes epidemiology, including data on diabetes trends, genetics, and future advances in population-based studies.

  1. Periodontal Diseases and Dental Caries in Children with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Marta Novotna; Stepan Podzimek; Zdenek Broukal; Erika Lencova; Jana Duskova

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disease of an autoimmune origin with early manifestation predominantly in the childhood. Its incidence has been rising in most European countries. Diabetes has been intensively studied by all branches of medicine. There were a number of studies investigating oral consequences of diabetes; however, unambiguous conclusions were drawn only for the relationship between diabetes and periodontal impairment. Many studies confirmed higher plaque levels ...

  2. Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 2 and inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Spalinger, Marianne R.; MCCOLE, DECLAN F.; Rogler, Gerhard; Scharl, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Genome wide association studies have associated single nucleotide polymorphisms within the gene locus encoding protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 2 (PTPN2) with the onset of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and other inflammatory disorders. Expression of PTPN2 is enhanced in actively inflamed intestinal tissue featuring a marked up-regulation in intestinal epithelial cells. PTPN2 deficient mice suffer from severe intestinal and systemic inflammation and display aberrant innate and...

  3. Telomere length, antioxidant status and incidence of ischaemic heart disease in type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Masi, S.; D'Aiuto, F; Cooper, J.; Salpea, K.; Stephens, J. W.; Hurel, S. J.; Deanfield, J E; Humphries, S. E.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with an increased risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD). An accelerated process of vascular ageing induced by an increased oxidative stress exposure is suggested as potential pathway accounting for this association. However, no studies have explored the relationship between markers of vascular ageing, measures of oxidative stress and risk of IHD in T2D. OBJECTIVES: To explore the association between plasma antioxidant status, marker of cellular ...

  4. A Case of Adult Type 1 Gaucher Disease Complicated by Temporal Intestinal Hemorrhage

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Junitsu; Saito, Takafumi; Numakura, Chikahiko; Iwaba, Akiko; Sugahara, Shinpei; Ishii, Rika; Sato, Chikako; Haga, Hiroaki; Okumoto, Kazuo; Nishise, Yuko; Watanabe, Hisayoshi; Ida, Hiroyuki; Hayasaka, Kiyoshi; Togashi, Hitoshi; Kawata, Sumio

    2013-01-01

    A 21-year-old man with a history of sudden rectal hemorrhage was referred to our hospital. Examination disclosed thrombocytopenia and hepatosplenomegaly. A liver biopsy specimen demonstrated Gaucher cells in Glisson's capsule. Additional investigations revealed a low level of leukocyte β-glucosidase activity and common mutations of the glucocerebrosidase gene, L444P/D409H. We diagnosed the patient with Gaucher disease type 1. He underwent enzyme replacement therapy. Thrombocytopenia and hepat...

  5. Importance of cardiovascular disease risk management in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Lorber D

    2014-01-01

    Daniel Lorber Division of Endocrinology, New York Hospital Queens, Department of Medicine, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is commonly accompanied by other cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, such as hypertension, obesity, and dyslipidemia. Furthermore, CVD is the most common cause of death in people with T2DM. It is therefore of critical importance to minimize the risk of macrovascular complications by carefully...

  6. Screening for thyroid disease among children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Omar, Magdy A; Moustafa M. Rizk; Ahmed A. El-Kafoury; Doaa Kilany

    2014-01-01

    Altered thyroid hormones have been described in patients with diabetes especially those with poor glycemic control. The aim of this work was to evaluate; the presence of serum anti-thyroid peroxidase (serum anti-TPO) autoantibodies and the prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Patients and methods: Fifty diabetic children coming for regular follow-up in the diabetes clinic of El-Shatby University Children’s Hospital were enrolled in the study a...

  7. Regeneration of different plant functional types in a Masson pine forest following pine wilt disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Hu

    Full Text Available Pine wilt disease is a severe threat to the native pine forests in East Asia. Understanding the natural regeneration of the forests disturbed by pine wilt disease is thus critical for the conservation of biodiversity in this realm. We studied the dynamics of composition and structure within different plant functional types (PFTs in Masson pine forests affected by pine wilt disease (PWD. Based on plant traits, all species were assigned to four PFTs: evergreen woody species (PFT1, deciduous woody species (PFT2, herbs (PFT3, and ferns (PFT4. We analyzed the changes in these PFTs during the initial disturbance period and during post-disturbance regeneration. The species richness, abundance and basal area, as well as life-stage structure of the PFTs changed differently after pine wilt disease. The direction of plant community regeneration depended on the differential response of the PFTs. PFT1, which has a higher tolerance to disturbances, became dominant during the post-disturbance regeneration, and a young evergreen-broad-leaved forest developed quickly after PWD. Results also indicated that the impacts of PWD were dampened by the feedbacks between PFTs and the microclimate, in which PFT4 played an important ecological role. In conclusion, we propose management at the functional type level instead of at the population level as a promising approach in ecological restoration and biodiversity conservation.

  8. Regeneration of different plant functional types in a Masson pine forest following pine wilt disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guang; Xu, Xuehong; Wang, Yuling; Lu, Gao; Feeley, Kenneth J; Yu, Mingjian

    2012-01-01

    Pine wilt disease is a severe threat to the native pine forests in East Asia. Understanding the natural regeneration of the forests disturbed by pine wilt disease is thus critical for the conservation of biodiversity in this realm. We studied the dynamics of composition and structure within different plant functional types (PFTs) in Masson pine forests affected by pine wilt disease (PWD). Based on plant traits, all species were assigned to four PFTs: evergreen woody species (PFT1), deciduous woody species (PFT2), herbs (PFT3), and ferns (PFT4). We analyzed the changes in these PFTs during the initial disturbance period and during post-disturbance regeneration. The species richness, abundance and basal area, as well as life-stage structure of the PFTs changed differently after pine wilt disease. The direction of plant community regeneration depended on the differential response of the PFTs. PFT1, which has a higher tolerance to disturbances, became dominant during the post-disturbance regeneration, and a young evergreen-broad-leaved forest developed quickly after PWD. Results also indicated that the impacts of PWD were dampened by the feedbacks between PFTs and the microclimate, in which PFT4 played an important ecological role. In conclusion, we propose management at the functional type level instead of at the population level as a promising approach in ecological restoration and biodiversity conservation. PMID:22563499

  9. Thyroid Diseases in Omani Type 2 Diabetics: A Retrospective Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaa Al-Sumry

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Diabetes mellitus and thyroid diseases are common endocrine disorders in the general population and found to exist simultaneously. This study aimed to establish the prevalence of thyroid dysfunction among Omani type 2 diabetics and its association with glycemic control. Methodology. A retrospective cross-sectional randomized primary and secondary care based study of 285 Omani type 2 diabetics, ≥ 30 years of age with known thyroid function. The following parameters were examined: age, sex, duration of diabetes, duration of thyroid disease, thyroid morphology, thyroid function, thyroid antibodies, and the mean glycated hemoglobin (mean HbA1C. The prevalence of thyroid dysfunction was compared to an independent control group of randomly selected healthy individuals with known thyroid function. Results. Thyroid dysfunction was found in 12.6% of the diabetic patients compared to 4.9% in the control group. The prevalence was higher among the diabetic females (86% compared to diabetic males (14%. The commonest thyroid dysfunction among diabetics was overt hypothyroidism (4.6%. Subclinical hypothyroidism was the commonest thyroid dysfunction seen in less controlled diabetics at a mean HbA1c of 7.8 (± 0.7. Conclusion. Screening for thyroid dysfunction in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus should be routinely performed considering the higher prevalence of thyroid diseases in this group compared to the general population.

  10. Oxidative Stress Parameters in Saliva and Its Association with Periodontal Disease and Types of Bacteria

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    Jose Manuel Almerich-Silla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the association between oxidative stress parameters with periodontal disease, bleeding, and the presence of different periodontal bacteria. Methods. A cross-sectional study in a sample of eighty-six patients, divided into three groups depending on their periodontal status. Thirty-three with chronic periodontitis, sixteen with gingivitis, and thirty-seven with periodontal healthy as control. Oxidative stress biomarkers (8-OHdG and MDA, total antioxidant capacity (TAOC, and the activity of two antioxidant enzymes (GPx and SOD were determined in saliva. Subgingival plaque samples were obtained from the deepest periodontal pocket and PCR was used to determine the presence of the 6 fimA genotypes of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola. Results. Periodontal disease was found to be associated with increased oxidative stress parameter levels. These levels rose according to the number and type of different periodontal bacteria found in the periodontal pockets. The presence of different types of periodontal bacteria is predictive independent variables in linear regresion models of oxidative stress parameters as dependent variable, above all 8-OHdG. Conclusions. Oxidative stress parameter levels are correlated with the presence of different types of bacteria. Determination of these levels and periodontal bacteria could be a potent tool for controlling periodontal disease development.

  11. Oxidative Stress Parameters in Saliva and Its Association with Periodontal Disease and Types of Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almerich-Silla, Jose Manuel; Montiel-Company, Jose María; Pastor, Sara; Serrano, Felipe; Puig-Silla, Miriam; Dasí, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To determine the association between oxidative stress parameters with periodontal disease, bleeding, and the presence of different periodontal bacteria. Methods. A cross-sectional study in a sample of eighty-six patients, divided into three groups depending on their periodontal status. Thirty-three with chronic periodontitis, sixteen with gingivitis, and thirty-seven with periodontal healthy as control. Oxidative stress biomarkers (8-OHdG and MDA), total antioxidant capacity (TAOC), and the activity of two antioxidant enzymes (GPx and SOD) were determined in saliva. Subgingival plaque samples were obtained from the deepest periodontal pocket and PCR was used to determine the presence of the 6 fimA genotypes of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola. Results. Periodontal disease was found to be associated with increased oxidative stress parameter levels. These levels rose according to the number and type of different periodontal bacteria found in the periodontal pockets. The presence of different types of periodontal bacteria is predictive independent variables in linear regresion models of oxidative stress parameters as dependent variable, above all 8-OHdG. Conclusions. Oxidative stress parameter levels are correlated with the presence of different types of bacteria. Determination of these levels and periodontal bacteria could be a potent tool for controlling periodontal disease development. PMID:26494938

  12. Clinical potential of eliglustat tartrate in the treatment of type 1 Gaucher disease

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    Kaplan P

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Paige KaplanLysosomal Disorders Center, Section of Metabolic Diseases, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Nonneuropathic type 1 Gaucher disease is an autosomal recessive inherited disease caused by the deficiency or absence of beta glucocerebrosidase (beta glucosidase. The highest prevalence of type 1 is in Ashkenazi Jews, but it affects all ethnic groups. It manifests at any age but is seen predominantly in the first two decades. The phenotype is characterized by painless splenomegaly and secondary hypersplenism (low hemoglobin concentration and low platelet and white blood cell counts. Symptoms and signs include splenomegaly; chronic fatigue, frequent nose bleeds, prolonged bleeding, and/or bruising; hepatomegaly; bone pain, bone destruction and low bone density; and poor growth in childhood and delayed pubertal development. Current treatment with intravenous enzyme replacement has been generally successful. However, oral treatments have been developed because enzyme replacement is time-consuming and invasive, and intravenous infusions are not universally available for patients who live far from medical centers or home infusion nurses. Furthermore, it may become difficult to access veins after repeated infusions. Orally administered substrate reduction is a newer treatment approach. The aim is to limit the synthesis of the substrate, glucosylceramide. The residual intrinsic enzyme, acting alone or with recombinant enzyme, can then completely catabolize the smaller amounts of glucosylceramide that are transported into lysosomes. Eliglustat tartrate is a new specific inhibitor of glucosylceramide synthase. Phase III trials in humans have been completed. Eliglustat tartrate has been shown to be efficacious and safe in adult humans. The results are as good or better compared with intravenous replacement with regard to reductions in spleen and liver enlargement and improvements in hemoglobin concentrations, platelet

  13. Pseudo (Platelet-type von Willebrand disease in pregnancy: a case report

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    Grover Neetu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudo (platelet-type-von Willebrand disease is a rare autosomal dominant bleeding disorder caused by an abnormal function of the glycoprotein lb protein; the receptor for von Willebrand factor. This leads to an increased removal of VWF multimers from the circulation as well as platelets and this results in a bleeding diathesis. Worldwide, less than 50 patients are reported with platelet type von Willebrand disease (PT-VWD. Case presentation We describe the management of platelet type von Willebrand disease in pregnancy of a 26 year old Caucasian primigravida. The initial diagnosis was made earlier following a significant haemorrhage post tonsillectomy several years prior to pregnancy. The patient was managed under a multidisciplinary team which included obstetricians, haematologists, anaesthetists and neonatologists. Care plans were made for the ante- natal, intra-partum and post-partum periods in partnership with the patient. The patient’s platelet count levels dropped significantly during the antenatal period. This necessitated the active exclusion of other causes of thrombocytopenia in pregnancy. A vaginal delivery was desired and plans were made for induction of labour at 38 weeks of gestation with platelet cover in view of the progressive fall of the platelet count. The patient however went into spontaneous labour on the day of induction. She was transfused two units of platelets before delivery. She had an unassisted vaginal delivery of a healthy baby. The successful antenatal counselling has encouraged the diagnosis of the same condition in her mother and sister. We found this to be a particularly interesting case as well as challenging to manage due to its rarity. Psuedo von Willebrand disease in pregnancy can be confused with a number of other differential diagnoses, such as gestational thrombocutopenia, idiopathatic thrombocytopenia, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and pre-eclampsia; all need consideration

  14. Mucopolysaccharidosis type II: European recommendations for the diagnosis and multidisciplinary management of a rare disease

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    Scarpa Maurizio

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II is a rare, life-limiting, X-linked recessive disease characterised by deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase. Consequent accumulation of glycosaminoglycans leads to pathological changes in multiple body systems. Age at onset, signs and symptoms, and disease progression are heterogeneous, and patients may present with many different manifestations to a wide range of specialists. Expertise in diagnosing and managing MPS II varies widely between countries, and substantial delays between disease onset and diagnosis can occur. In recent years, disease-specific treatments such as enzyme replacement therapy and stem cell transplantation have helped to address the underlying enzyme deficiency in patients with MPS II. However, the multisystem nature of this disorder and the irreversibility of some manifestations mean that most patients require substantial medical support from many different specialists, even if they are receiving treatment. This article presents an overview of how to recognise, diagnose, and care for patients with MPS II. Particular focus is given to the multidisciplinary nature of patient management, which requires input from paediatricians, specialist nurses, otorhinolaryngologists, orthopaedic surgeons, ophthalmologists, cardiologists, pneumologists, anaesthesiologists, neurologists, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, speech therapists, psychologists, social workers, homecare companies and patient societies. Take-home message Expertise in recognising and treating patients with MPS II varies widely between countries. This article presents pan-European recommendations for the diagnosis and management of this life-limiting disease.

  15. Diagnostic workup and management of patients with suspected Niemann-Pick type C disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papandreou, Apostolos; Gissen, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NP-C) disease is a neurovisceral disorder caused by mutations in the NPC1 and NPC2 genes. It is characterized by lysosomal storage of a broad range of lipids as a result of abnormal intracellular lipid trafficking. Typically patients develop neurodegeneration; however, the speed of disease progression is variable. The exact functions of NPC1 and NPC2 proteins have not been determined and therefore the molecular pathophysiology of NP-C is still not clearly understood. Due to the disease's rarity and clinical heterogeneity, delays from symptom onset to diagnosis and treatment initiation are common. Current therapeutic approaches focus on multidisciplinary symptom control and deceleration (rather than reversal) of disease progression. Thus identification of cases at early stages of disease is particularly important. Recent advances in genetic and biochemical testing have resulted in the generation of relatively non-invasive, quick and cost-effective laboratory assays that are highly sensitive and specific and have the capacity to enhance the clinicians' ability to reach a diagnosis earlier. Miglustat is a compound recently licensed in many countries for the treatment of NP-C that has been shown to decelerate neurological regression, whereas many other promising drugs are currently being trialled in preclinical models or human studies. This review summarizes key clinical, genetic and biochemical features of NP-C, suggests a simple diagnostic investigation strategy and gives an overview of available therapeutic options as well as potential novel treatments currently under development. PMID:27134677

  16. Type II fuzzy systems for amyloid plaque segmentation in transgenic mouse brains for Alzheimer's disease quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khademi, April; Hosseinzadeh, Danoush

    2014-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in the elderly characterized by extracellular deposition of amyloid plaques (AP). Using animal models, AP loads have been manually measured from histological specimens to understand disease etiology, as well as response to treatment. Due to the manual nature of these approaches, obtaining the AP load is labourious, subjective and error prone. Automated algorithms can be designed to alleviate these challenges by objectively segmenting AP. In this paper, we focus on the development of a novel algorithm for AP segmentation based on robust preprocessing and a Type II fuzzy system. Type II fuzzy systems are much more advantageous over the traditional Type I fuzzy systems, since ambiguity in the membership function may be modeled and exploited to generate excellent segmentation results. The ambiguity in the membership function is defined as an adaptively changing parameter that is tuned based on the local contrast characteristics of the image. Using transgenic mouse brains with AP ground truth, validation studies were carried out showing a high degree of overlap and low degree of oversegmentation (0.8233 and 0.0917, respectively). The results highlight that such a framework is able to handle plaques of various types (diffuse, punctate), plaques with varying Aβ concentrations as well as intensity variation caused by treatment effects or staining variability.

  17. The Coexistence of Common Pulmonary Diseases on the Histologic Type of Lung Cancer in Both Genders in Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Jian, Zhi-Hong; Lung, Chia-Chi; Huang, Jing-Yang; Ko, Pei-Chieh; Jan, Shiou-Rung; Ndi Nfor, Oswald; Ku, Wen-Yuan; Ho, Chien-Chang; Pan, Hui-Hsien; Liaw, Yung-Po

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Effects of pulmonary diseases [asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and lung tuberculosis (TB)] on subsequent lung cancer development have been reported. However, whether patients with coexisting pulmonary diseases are at greater risk of developing various histologic types of lung cancer remains elusive. Patients newly diagnosed with lung cancer between 2004 and 2008 were identified from National Health Insurance Research Database (Taiwan). The histologic types of lu...

  18. Potential Biomarkers of Insulin Resistance and Atherosclerosis in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sharifah Intan Qhadijah Syed Ikmal; Hasniza Zaman Huri; Shireene Ratna Vethakkan; Wan Azman Wan Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with coronary artery disease have become a major public health concern. The occurrence of insulin resistance accompanied with endothelial dysfunction worsens the state of atherosclerosis in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. The combination of insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction leads to coronary artery disease and ischemic heart disease complications. A recognized biological marker, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, has been used widely to asse...

  19. Glycogenosis storage type I diseases and evolutive adenomatosis: an indication for liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerut, Jan P; Ciccarelli, Olga; Sempoux, Christine; Danse, Etienne; deFlandre, Jacques; Horsmans, Yves; Sokal, Etienne; Otte, Jean-Bernard

    2003-12-01

    We report on two cases of type I glycogen storage disease (GSD) complicated by malignant tumors. A 23-year-old man had GSD Ia with adenomatosis. He underwent transplantation for rapidly growing and radiologically changing adenomata. At histological examination, one adenoma had become a hepatocellular carcinoma. A 22-year-old, HBV-infected woman had GSD type Ib with adenomatosis. At follow-up, several tumors showed changing morphological characteristics. Pre-transplant laparotomy confirmed the presence of a metastatic cholangiocarcinoma. Liver transplantation should be considered in GSD type I patients with adenomatosis, especially when tumor characteristics change. Regular detailed Doppler ultrasound and magnetic nuclear resonance screening during childhood and adolescence are, therefore, mandatory in order for the timing of transplantation to be optimized. PMID:12904843

  20. New therapies in the management of Niemann-Pick type C disease: clinical utility of miglustat

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    James E Wraith

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available James E Wraith, Jackie ImrieWillink Biochemical Genetics Unit, Royal Manchester Children’s Hospital, Manchester, UKAbstract: Niemann-Pick disease type C (NP-C is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by progressive neurological deterioration leading to premature death. The disease is caused by mutations in one of two genes, NPC1 or NPC2, leading to impaired intracellular lipid transport and build-up of lipids in various tissues, particularly the brain. Miglustat (Zavesca®, a reversible inhibitor of glycosphingolipid synthesis, has recently been authorized in the European Union, Brazil and South Korea for the treatment of progressive neurological symptoms in adult and pediatric patients, and represents the first specific treatment for NP-C. Here we review current data on the pharmacology, efficacy, safety and tolerability of miglustat in patients with NP-C, based on findings from a prospective clinical trial, preclinical and retrospective studies, and case reports. Findings demonstrated clinically relevant beneficial effects of miglustat on neurological disease progression in adult, juvenile and pediatric patients with NP-C, particularly those diagnosed in late childhood (6–11 years and in juveniles and adults (12 years and older, compared with those diagnosed in early childhood (younger than 6 years. Miglustat therapy was well-tolerated in all age groups. With the approval of miglustat, treatment of patients with NP-C can now be aimed toward stabilizing neurological disease, which is likely the best attainable therapeutic goal for this disorder.Keywords: Niemann-Pick disease type C, NP-C, miglustat, Zavesca®

  1. Porcine circovirus type 2-associated disease: Update on current terminology, clinical manifestations, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and intervention strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Opriessnig, T.; Halbur, P. G.; Meng, X.-J.

    2007-01-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2)-associated disease (PCVAD) continues to be an important differential diagnosis on pig farms in the United States and worldwide. Case trend analyses indicate that the incidence of PCVAD is on the rise in the United States. Accurate diagnosis is important in order to implement appropriate intervention strategies. PCVAD can manifest as a systemic disease, as part of the respiratory disease complex, as an enteric disease, as porcine dermatitis and nephropathy synd...

  2. Coping mediates the association between type D personality and perceived health in Chinese patients with coronary heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Xiao-nan; Chen, Zhansheng; Zhang, Jianxin; Liu, Xiaohui

    2011-01-01

    Background: Increasing evidence show that Type D personality is a risk factor for morbidity, mortality, and quality of life of patients with coronary vascular disease. Few studies examined coping as a potential behavioral mechanism to explain the harmful effect of Type D personality. Purpose: This study examined the association between Type D personality, coping, and perceived health among Chinese patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods: One hundred seventeen CHD patients complete...

  3. Identification of type 1 diabetes-associated DNA methylation variable positions that precede disease diagnosis.

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    Vardhman K Rakyan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Monozygotic (MZ twin pair discordance for childhood-onset Type 1 Diabetes (T1D is ∼50%, implicating roles for genetic and non-genetic factors in the aetiology of this complex autoimmune disease. Although significant progress has been made in elucidating the genetics of T1D in recent years, the non-genetic component has remained poorly defined. We hypothesized that epigenetic variation could underlie some of the non-genetic component of T1D aetiology and, thus, performed an epigenome-wide association study (EWAS for this disease. We generated genome-wide DNA methylation profiles of purified CD14+ monocytes (an immune effector cell type relevant to T1D pathogenesis from 15 T1D-discordant MZ twin pairs. This identified 132 different CpG sites at which the direction of the intra-MZ pair DNA methylation difference significantly correlated with the diabetic state, i.e. T1D-associated methylation variable positions (T1D-MVPs. We confirmed these T1D-MVPs display statistically significant intra-MZ pair DNA methylation differences in the expected direction in an independent set of T1D-discordant MZ pairs (P = 0.035. Then, to establish the temporal origins of the T1D-MVPs, we generated two further genome-wide datasets and established that, when compared with controls, T1D-MVPs are enriched in singletons both before (P = 0.001 and at (P = 0.015 disease diagnosis, and also in singletons positive for diabetes-associated autoantibodies but disease-free even after 12 years follow-up (P = 0.0023. Combined, these results suggest that T1D-MVPs arise very early in the etiological process that leads to overt T1D. Our EWAS of T1D represents an important contribution toward understanding the etiological role of epigenetic variation in type 1 diabetes, and it is also the first systematic analysis of the temporal origins of disease-associated epigenetic variation for any human complex disease.

  4. Histopathological differences utilizing the nonalcoholic fatty liver disease activity score criteria in diabetic (type 2 diabetes mellitus) and non-diabetic patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    Puchakayala, Bharat K; Verma, Siddharth; Kanwar, Pushpjeet; Hart, John; Sanivarapu, Raghavendra R; Mohanty, Smruti R

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study clinical and histopathological features of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in patients with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) using updated nonalcoholic steatohepatitis clinical research network (NASH-CRN) grading system.

  5. Diabetic Kidney Disease in Adolescents With Type 2 Diabetes: New Insights and Potential Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornstad, Petter; Cherney, David Z; Maahs, David M; Nadeau, Kristen J

    2016-02-01

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and dialysis in the Western world. Early DKD, including microalbuminuria and renal hyperfiltration, is common in adolescents with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Furthermore, youth-onset T2D carries a higher risk of progressive DKD than adult-onset T2D of similar diabetes duration. DKD is characterized by a long clinically silent period without signs of disease. Therefore, a major challenge in preventing DKD is the difficulty in identifying high-risk T2D patients at an early stage. The Type 2 Diabetes in Adolescents and Youth (TODAY) study demonstrated a high initial prevalence that increased over time, irrespective of treatment arm. This key observation underscores the importance of discovering new therapeutic targets to supplement conventional management, in order to reduce DKD risk. In this review, we focus on early DKD in T2D and summarize potential novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:26803647

  6. Case Report Serious pulmonary infection in a splenectomized patient with adult type 1 Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Mao, Y F; Du, J M

    2015-01-01

    A 49-year-old man with a history of Gaucher disease type 1, resulting in serious splenomegaly and eating disorder, was referred to our department and underwent a splenectomy under general anesthesia. Gaucher disease is very rare, and its first signs are unexplained splenomegaly and hypersplenism. On preoperative examination, the patient's platelet count was slightly low, and his other test results were normal. Surprisingly, on the first postoperative day, the patient developed a lung infection. This gradually progressed to acute respiratory distress syndrome with respiratory failure, requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. The patient eventually recovered, and he was discharged after receiving antibiotics and other treatments to enhance immunity. However, his postoperative lung infection led to a significantly prolonged and expensive hospital stay. This case suggests that we must pay close attention to the immune dysfunction of patients with Gaucher disease type 1. Anesthesia and surgery with accompanying post-traumatic stress can weaken patients' immunity and cause susceptibility to severe lung infections. Pulmonary signs and functions should be monitored closely during the perioperative period, and, if necessary, gamma globulin and thymosin should be administered early in the preoperative or postoperative period to enhance immunity. PMID:25966100

  7. Neurofibromatosis type 1 and the "elephant man's" disease: the confusion persists: an ethnographic study.

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    Claire-Marie Legendre

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In 1986, two Canadian geneticists had demonstrated that Joseph Merrick, better known as the Elephant Man, suffered from the Proteus syndrome and not from neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1, as was alleged by dermatologist Parkes in 1909. Despite this and although the two diseases differ at several levels: prevalence, diagnostic criteria, clinical manifestations and transmission, the confusion between NF1 and the "elephant man's" disease continues in medical and social representations by current linguistic usage, and in some media reports. With this article, we want to 1 document the persistence and extent of this fallacy, 2 identify certain critical factors that contribute to its persistence, and 3 evaluate its impact on the health and well being of patients with NF1 and their family members. METHODOLOGY: Participant observation in the course of an ethnographic study on intergenerational dialogue between individuals with neurofibromatosis and their parents - Analysis of the scientific literature and of pinpoint articles in the print and online news media. FINDINGS: Our findings show that because physicians have little knowledge about NF1, several print and online news media and a lot of physicians continue to make the confusion between NF1 and the disease the "elephant man". This misconception contributes to misinformation about the disease, feeding prejudices against affected patients, exacerbating the negative impacts of the disease on their quality of life, their cognitive development, their reproductive choices, as well as depriving them of proper care and appropriate genetic counseling. CONCLUSION: If family physicians and pediatricians were properly informed about the disease, they could refer their patients with NF1 to NF clinics and to specialists. Thus, patients and their family members would benefit from better-tailored clinical management of their cases, perhaps even optimal management. [corrected

  8. Skeletal muscle fiber type: using insights from muscle developmental biology to dissect targets for susceptibility and resistance to muscle disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Jared; Maves, Lisa

    2016-07-01

    Skeletal muscle fibers are classified into fiber types, in particular, slow twitch versus fast twitch. Muscle fiber types are generally defined by the particular myosin heavy chain isoforms that they express, but many other components contribute to a fiber's physiological characteristics. Skeletal muscle fiber type can have a profound impact on muscle diseases, including certain muscular dystrophies and sarcopenia, the aging-induced loss of muscle mass and strength. These findings suggest that some muscle diseases may be treated by shifting fiber type characteristics either from slow to fast, or fast to slow phenotypes, depending on the disease. Recent studies have begun to address which components of muscle fiber types mediate their susceptibility or resistance to muscle disease. However, for many diseases it remains largely unclear why certain fiber types are affected. A substantial body of work has revealed molecular pathways that regulate muscle fiber type plasticity and early developmental muscle fiber identity. For instance, recent studies have revealed many factors that regulate muscle fiber type through modulating the activity of the muscle regulatory transcription factor MYOD1. Future studies of muscle fiber type development in animal models will continue to enhance our understanding of factors and pathways that may provide therapeutic targets to treat muscle diseases. WIREs Dev Biol 2016, 5:518-534. doi: 10.1002/wdev.230 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27199166

  9. Develope Monoclonal Antibody against Foot-and-mouth Disease Virus A Type

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tong Lin; Jing Li; Jun-jun Shao; Guo-zheng Cong; Jun-zheng Du; Shan-dian Gao; Hui-yun Chang

    2011-01-01

    In order to develop an anti-FMDV A Type monoclonal antibo by (mAb),BABL/c mice were immunized with FMDV A type.Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) 7B11 and 8H4 against Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) serotype A were produced by fusing SP2/O myeloma cells with splenocyte from the mouse immunized with A/AV88.The microneutralization titer of the mAbs 7B11 and 8H4 were 1024 and 512,respectively.Both mAbs contain kappa light chains,the mAbs were IgG1.In order to define the mAbs binding epitopes,the reactivity of these mAbs against A Type FMDV,were examined using indirect ELISA,the result showed that both mAbs reacted with A Type FMDV.These mAbs may be used for further vaccine studies,diagnostic methods,prophylaxis,etiological and immunological research on FMDV.Characterization of these ncindicated that prepared anti-FMDV A mAbs had no cross-reactivity with Swine Vesicular Disease (SVD) or FMDV O,Asial and C Type antigens.Their titers in abdomen liquor were 1:5×106 and 1:2×106,respectively.7B11 was found to be of subtype IgG1,8H4 was classified as IgG2b subtype.The mAbs prepared in this study,are specific for detection of FMDV serotype A,and is potentially useful for pen-side diagnosis.

  10. Impaired Autophagy in the Lipid-Storage Disorder Niemann-Pick Type C1 Disease

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    Sovan Sarkar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy dysfunction has been implicated in misfolded protein accumulation and cellular toxicity in several diseases. Whether alterations in autophagy also contribute to the pathology of lipid-storage disorders is not clear. Here, we show defective autophagy in Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1 disease associated with cholesterol accumulation, where the maturation of autophagosomes is impaired because of defective amphisome formation caused by failure in SNARE machinery, whereas the lysosomal proteolytic function remains unaffected. Expression of functional NPC1 protein rescues this defect. Inhibition of autophagy also causes cholesterol accumulation. Compromised autophagy was seen in disease-affected organs of Npc1 mutant mice. Of potential therapeutic relevance is that HP-β-cyclodextrin, which is used for cholesterol-depletion treatment, impedes autophagy, whereas stimulating autophagy restores its function independent of amphisome formation. Our data suggest that a low dose of HP-β-cyclodextrin that does not perturb autophagy, coupled with an autophagy inducer, may provide a rational treatment strategy for NPC1 disease.

  11. Mitochondrial dysfunction in fibroblasts derived from patients with Niemann-Pick type C disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woś, Marcin; Szczepanowska, Joanna; Pikuła, Sławomir; Tylki-Szymańska, Anna; Zabłocki, Krzysztof; Bandorowicz-Pikuła, Joanna

    2016-03-01

    Mutations in the NPC1 or NPC2 genes lead to Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease, a rare lysosomal storage disorder characterized by progressive neurodegeneration. These mutations result in cholesterol and glycosphingolipid accumulation in the late endosomal/lysosomal compartment. Complications in the storage of cholesterol in NPC1 mutant cells are associated with other anomalies, such as altered distribution of intracellular organelles and properties of the plasma membrane. The pathomechanism of NPC disease is largely unknown. Interestingly, other storage diseases such as Gaucher and Farber diseases are accompanied by severe mitochondrial dysfunction. This prompted us to investigate the effect of absence or dysfunction of the NPC1 protein on mitochondrial properties to confirm or deny a putative relationship between NPC1 mutations and mitochondrial function. This study was performed on primary skin fibroblasts derived from skin biopsies of two NPC patients, carrying mutations in the NPC1 gene. We observed altered organization of mitochondria in NPC1 mutant cells, significant enrichment in mitochondrial cholesterol content, increased respiration, altered composition of the respiratory chain complex, and substantial reduction in cellular ATP level. Thus, a primary lysosomal defect in NPC1 mutant fibroblasts is accompanied by deregulation of the organization and function of the mitochondrial network. PMID:26869201

  12. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy discriminates the response to microglial stimulation of wild type and Alzheimer's disease models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardon, Marie-Christine; Yanez Lopez, Maria; Yuchun, Ding; Marjańska, Małgorzata; Prior, Malcolm; Brignell, Christopher; Parhizkar, Samira; Agostini, Alessandra; Bai, Li; Auer, Dorothee P; Faas, Henryk M

    2016-01-01

    Microglia activation has emerged as a potential key factor in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Metabolite levels assessed by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) are used as markers of neuroinflammation in neurodegenerative diseases, but how they relate to microglial activation in health and chronic disease is incompletely understood. Using MRS, we monitored the brain metabolic response to lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-induced microglia activation in vivo in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (APP/PS1) and healthy controls (wild-type (WT) littermates) over 4 hours. We assessed reactive gliosis by immunohistochemistry and correlated metabolic and histological measures. In WT mice, LPS induced a microglial phenotype consistent with activation, associated with a sustained increase in macromolecule and lipid levels (ML9). This effect was not seen in APP/PS1 mice, where LPS did not lead to a microglial response measured by histology, but induced a late increase in the putative inflammation marker myoinositol (mI) and metabolic changes in total creatine and taurine previously reported to be associated with amyloid load. We argue that ML9 and mI distinguish the response of WT and APP/PS1 mice to immune mediators. Lipid and macromolecule levels may represent a biomarker of activation of healthy microglia, while mI may not be a glial marker. PMID:26813748

  13. The early life origin theory in the development of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindblom, Runa; Ververis, Katherine; Tortorella, Stephanie M; Karagiannis, Tom C

    2015-04-01

    Life expectancy has been examined from a variety of perspectives in recent history. Epidemiology is one perspective which examines causes of morbidity and mortality at the population level. Over the past few 100 years there have been dramatic shifts in the major causes of death and expected life length. This change has suffered from inconsistency across time and space with vast inequalities observed between population groups. In current focus is the challenge of rising non-communicable diseases (NCD), such as cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. In the search to discover methods to combat the rising incidence of these diseases, a number of new theories on the development of morbidity have arisen. A pertinent example is the hypothesis published by David Barker in 1995 which postulates the prenatal and early developmental origin of adult onset disease, and highlights the importance of the maternal environment. This theory has been subject to criticism however it has gradually gained acceptance. In addition, the relatively new field of epigenetics is contributing evidence in support of the theory. This review aims to explore the implication and limitations of the developmental origin hypothesis, via an historical perspective, in order to enhance understanding of the increasing incidence of NCDs, and facilitate an improvement in planning public health policy. PMID:25270249

  14. Disproportionate Contributions of Select Genomic Compartments and Cell Types to Genetic Risk for Coronary Artery Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Hee Won

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Large genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified many genetic loci associated with risk for myocardial infarction (MI and coronary artery disease (CAD. Concurrently, efforts such as the National Institutes of Health (NIH Roadmap Epigenomics Project and the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE Consortium have provided unprecedented data on functional elements of the human genome. In the present study, we systematically investigate the biological link between genetic variants associated with this complex disease and their impacts on gene function. First, we examined the heritability of MI/CAD according to genomic compartments. We observed that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs residing within nearby regulatory regions show significant polygenicity and contribute between 59-71% of the heritability for MI/CAD. Second, we showed that the polygenicity and heritability explained by these SNPs are enriched in histone modification marks in specific cell types. Third, we found that a statistically higher number of 45 MI/CAD-associated SNPs that have been identified from large-scale GWAS studies reside within certain functional elements of the genome, particularly in active enhancer and promoter regions. Finally, we observed significant heterogeneity of this signal across cell types, with strong signals observed within adipose nuclei, as well as brain and spleen cell types. These results suggest that the genetic etiology of MI/CAD is largely explained by tissue-specific regulatory perturbation within the human genome.

  15. Ficolin B in Diabetic Kidney Disease in a Mouse Model of Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Berg Holt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The innate immune system may have adverse effects in diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The complement system seems to play a key role through erroneous complement activation via hyperglycaemia-induced neoepitopes. Recently mannan-binding lectin (MBL was shown to worsen diabetic kidney changes. We hypothesize that mouse ficolin B exerts detrimental effects in the diabetic kidney as seen for MBL. Methods. We induced diabetes with streptozotocin in female wild-type mice and ficolin B knockout mice and included two similar nondiabetic groups. Renal hypertrophy and excretion of urinary albumin and creatinine were quantified to assess diabetic kidney damage. Results. In the wild-type groups, the kidney weighed 24% more in the diabetic mice compared to the controls. The diabetes-induced increase in kidney weight was 29% in the ficolin B knockout mice, that is, equal to wild-type animals (two-way ANOVA, P=0.60. In the wild-type mice the albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR was 32.5 mg/g higher in the diabetic mice compared to the controls. The difference was 62.5 mg/g in the ficolin B knockout mice, but this was not significantly different from the wild-type animals (two-way ANOVA, P=0.21. Conclusions. In conclusion, the diabetes-induced effects on kidney weight and ACR were not modified by the presence or absence of ficolin B.

  16. Ficolin B in Diabetic Kidney Disease in a Mouse Model of Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Charlotte Berg; Østergaard, Jakob Appel; Axelgaard, Esben; Nielsen, Gitte Krogh; Endo, Yuichi; Thiel, Steffen; Hansen, Troels Krarup

    2015-01-01

    Background. The innate immune system may have adverse effects in diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The complement system seems to play a key role through erroneous complement activation via hyperglycaemia-induced neoepitopes. Recently mannan-binding lectin (MBL) was shown to worsen diabetic kidney changes. We hypothesize that mouse ficolin B exerts detrimental effects in the diabetic kidney as seen for MBL. Methods. We induced diabetes with streptozotocin in female wild-type mice and ficolin B knockout mice and included two similar nondiabetic groups. Renal hypertrophy and excretion of urinary albumin and creatinine were quantified to assess diabetic kidney damage. Results. In the wild-type groups, the kidney weighed 24% more in the diabetic mice compared to the controls. The diabetes-induced increase in kidney weight was 29% in the ficolin B knockout mice, that is, equal to wild-type animals (two-way ANOVA, P = 0.60). In the wild-type mice the albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) was 32.5 mg/g higher in the diabetic mice compared to the controls. The difference was 62.5 mg/g in the ficolin B knockout mice, but this was not significantly different from the wild-type animals (two-way ANOVA, P = 0.21). Conclusions. In conclusion, the diabetes-induced effects on kidney weight and ACR were not modified by the presence or absence of ficolin B. PMID:26339138

  17. DISEASES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pletscher-Frankild, Sune; Pallejà, Albert; Tsafou, Kalliopi;

    2015-01-01

    Text mining is a flexible technology that can be applied to numerous different tasks in biology and medicine. We present a system for extracting disease-gene associations from biomedical abstracts. The system consists of a highly efficient dictionary-based tagger for named entity recognition of...... human genes and diseases, which we combine with a scoring scheme that takes into account co-occurrences both within and between sentences. We show that this approach is able to extract half of all manually curated associations with a false positive rate of only 0.16%. Nonetheless, text mining should not...... stand alone, but be combined with other types of evidence. For this reason, we have developed the DISEASES resource, which integrates the results from text mining with manually curated disease-gene associations, cancer mutation data, and genome-wide association studies from existing databases. The...

  18. Evaluation of an indirect ELISA for detection and typing of foot-and-mouth disease virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit was used for diagnosis of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) types O1, A23, C3 which occurred in Rio Grande do Sul State, Southern Brazil during 1984-1994. The samples were randomly selected and tested by ELISA, Complement Fixation Test (CFT) and in tissue culture. Out of 106 samples 78 (73,5%) were positive by ELISA and 39 (36,8%) were found positive in CFT, when original suspensions were used. Once these samples were inoculated onto tissue culture both tests gave similar results, although ELISA picked up more positive samples during the 1st passage in tissue culture. The negative samples (16) included in this study were negative in all tests. The ELISA was more sensitive than and as specific as CFT. ELISA and tissue culture together were shown to be a better system for detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus antigen than CFT. (author)

  19. [Consensus document on treatment of type 2 diabetes in patients with chronic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Huelgas, Ricardo; Martínez-Castelao, Alberto; Artola, Sara; Górriz, José L; Menéndez, Edelmiro

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are highly prevalent chronic diseases that represent a significant public health problem and require multidisciplinary management. T2DM is the main cause of CKD in our setting and it is also a major comorbidity of non-diabetic nephropathy. Patients with diabetes and renal failure represent a special risk group as they have higher morbidity and mortality and are at a higher risk of hypoglycaemia than diabetic individuals with normal renal function. Treatment of T2DM in patients with CKD is controversial because of the scarcity of evidence available. This consensus document aims to facilitate the appropriate selection and dosage of anti-diabetic drugs as well as establishing glycaemic control safety targets in patients with CKD. PMID:24611186

  20. Superoxide dismutase type 1 in monocytes of chronic kidney disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholze, Alexandra; Krueger, Katharina; Diedrich, Madeleine;

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed proteomic profiles in monocytes of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients and healthy control subjects. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and silver staining indicated differences in protein pattern. Among the analyzed proteins, superoxide dismutase type 1 (SOD1), which was...... identified both by MS/MS mass-spectrometry and immunoblotting, was reduced in kidney disease. We characterized SOD1 protein amount, using quantitative in-cell Western assay and immunostaining of 2-DE gel blots, and SOD1 gene expression, using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), in 98...... chronic hemodialysis (HD) and 211 CKD patients, and 34 control subjects. Furthermore, we showed that different SOD1 protein species exist in human monocytes. SOD1 protein amount was significantly lower in HD (normalized SOD1 protein, 27.2 ± 2.8) compared to CKD patients (34.3 ± 2.8), or control subjects...

  1. Coronary artery disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus:Recent treatment strategies and future perspectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ryo; Naito; Takatoshi; Kasai

    2015-01-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus(T2DM) are at a higher risk of developing coronary artery disease(CAD) than are non-T2 DM patients. Moreover, the clinical outcomes in CAD with T2 DM are poor despite improvements in medications and other interventions. Coronary artery bypass grafting is superior to percutaneous coronary intervention in treating multivessel coronary artery disease in diabetic patients. However, selecting a revascularization strategy depends not only on the lesion complexity but also on the patient’s medical history and comorbidities. Additionally, comprehensive risk management with medical and non-pharmacological therapies is important, as is confirmation regarding whether the risk-management strategies are being appropriately achieved. Furthermore, non-pharmacological interventions using exercise and diet during the earlier stages of glucose metabolism abnormalities, such as impaired glucose tolerance, might be beneficial in preventing the development or progression of T2 DM and in reducing the occurrence of cardiovascular events.

  2. UPON TYPE, FREQUENCY AND SOME CLINICAL ASPECTS OF PSYCHOTIC SYMPTOMS IN ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Arnaudova

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Various psychotic disorders develop often at different stages of the disease. A comprehensive approach of type, frequency and clinical aspects of the psychotic disorders patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD can optimize management of these conditions in patients with dementia. We examined 120 patients with probable AD. The routine clinical examination and observation were used to delineate the most common psychotic symptoms. Delusions, found in the explored patients were predominantly paranoid. The delusions are often short lived and lack complexity of that seen in schizophrenia. In number of cases they are difficult to be distinguished from confabulations. Hallucinations were mostly verbal, visual and tactile. Misidentification syndromes were identified in a considerable number of patients. They are often disputable or have been classified as delusions or hallucinations, depending on interpretation of psychotic phenomena. We discuss different forms of misidentification. The presence of psychotic symptoms predicts the occurrence and frequency of different forms of aggression and destructive behavior.

  3. Alzheimer’s Disease And Type 2 Diabetes: Exploring The Association To Obesity And Tyrosine Hydroxylase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyadarshini, Medha; Kamal, Mohammad A.; Greig, Nigel H.; Reale, Marcella; Abuzenadah, Adel M.; Chaudhary, Adeel G.A.; Damanhouri, Ghazi A.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are two debilitating health disorders afflicting millions worldwide. Recent research has revealed similarities between AD and T2DM. Both these protein conformational disorders are associated with obesity, insulin resistance, inflammation and endoplasmic reticulum stress, en-route initiation and/or stage aggravation. In this mini review we have tried to summarize studies describing obesity, insulin resistance and glucocorticoid imbalance as common patho-mechanisms in T2DM and AD. A reduction in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the brain has been found to occur in Parkinson’s disease (PD). AD, T2DM and PD share common risk factors like depression. Thus, whether TH is involved in the ‘state of cognitive depression’ that is the hallmark of AD and often accompanies PD and T2DM is also explored. PMID:22583431

  4. Lethal cutaneous disease in transgenic mice conditionally expressing type I human T cell leukemia virus Tax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hakju; Ogle, Louise; Benitez, Bobby; Bohuslav, Jan; Montano, Mauricio; Felsher, Dean W; Greene, Warner C

    2005-10-21

    Type I human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV-I) is etiologically linked with adult T cell leukemia, an aggressive and usually fatal expansion of activated CD4+ T lymphocytes that frequently traffic to skin. T cell transformation induced by HTLV-I involves the action of the 40-kDa viral Tax transactivator protein. Tax both stimulates the HTLV-I long terminal repeat and deregulates the expression of select cellular genes by altering the activity of specific host transcription factors, including cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB)/activating transcription factor, NF-kappaB/Rel, and serum response factor. To study initiating events involved in HTLV-I Tax-induced T cell transformation, we generated "Tet-off" transgenic mice conditionally expressing in a lymphocyte-restricted manner (EmuSR alpha promoter-enhancer) either wild-type Tax or mutant forms of Tax that selectively compromise the NF-kappaB (M22) or CREB/activating transcription factor (M47) activation pathways. Wild-type Tax and M47 Tax-expressing mice, but not M22-Tax expressing mice, developed progressive alopecia, hyperkeratosis, and skin lesions containing profuse activated CD4 T cell infiltrates with evidence of deregulated inflammatory cytokine production. In addition, these animals displayed systemic lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly. These findings suggest that Tax-mediated activation of NF-kappaB plays a key role in the development of this aggressive skin disease that shares several features in common with the skin disease occurring during the preleukemic stage in HTLV-I-infected patients. Of note, this skin disease completely resolved when Tax transgene expression was suppressed by administration of doxycycline, emphasizing the key role played by this viral oncoprotein in the observed pathology. PMID:16105841

  5. Unusually prominent horizontal gaze palsy in a case of Niemann-Pick type C disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pritikanta Paul

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick Type C disease (NPC is a rare inherited metabolic disorder characterized by lipid accumulation and systemic manifestations due to multiple organ involvement. Only a few cases of NPC have been reported so far from India. Varying presentations and often lack of access to complex diagnostic tests have leaded to initial misdiagnosis on few occasions. We here report a provisionally diagnosed case of NPC with prominent horizontal gaze palsy along with characteristic vertical gaze palsy and normal findings on microscopic examination of skin biopsy specimen.

  6. Prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity in children with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adlercreutz, Emma H; Svensson, Jannet; Hansen, Dorte;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim was to determine the prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity in children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) diagnosed in Denmark and Sweden. METHODS: A total of 662 Swedish children with T1D were matched with 1080 Danish children with T1D and 309 healthy children from Sweden and 283...... from Denmark served as controls. Sera were analyzed for the presence of IgA and IgG (IgAG) autoantibodies against deamidated gliadin peptide (DGP) and tissue transglutaminase (tTG) with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and IgG-tTG separately in a radioligand binding assay (RBA). Human...

  7. Genetic Characterization of Porcine Circovirus Type 2 from Pigs with Porcine Circovirus Associated Diseases in Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Pereda, Ariel; Piñeyro, Pablo; Bratanich, Ana; Quiroga, María Alejandra; Bucafusco, Danilo; Craig, María Isabel; Cappuccio, Javier; Machuca, Mariana; Rimondi, Agustina; Dibárbora, Marina; Sanguinetti, Hector Ramón; Perfumo, Carlos Juan

    2011-01-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV-2) has been associated with syndromes grouped by the term porcine circovirus associated diseases (PCVAD). The PCV-2 isolates have been grouped into two major groups or genotypes according to their nucleotide sequence of whole genomes and/or ORF-2: PCV-2b, which have, in turn, been subdivided into three clusters (1A–1C), and PCV-2a, which has been subdivided into five clusters (2A–2E). In the present study, we obtained 16 sequences of PCV-2 from different farms f...

  8. Anxiety and depressive disorders in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 and cerebrovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Inessa Ivanovna Dubinina; Vladimir Alekseevich Zhadnov; Svetlana Vital'evna Yankina; Aleksandra Viktorovna Solov'eva

    2012-01-01

    Aims. Current study was aimed to identify symptoms and risk factors for depression and anxiety and to estimate quality of life (QoL) in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM) and cerebrovascular disease (CVD).Materials and methods. We examined 73 patients with T2DM. 1st group included 49 patients with T2DM and CVD, 2nd group - 24 patients with T2DM and no cardiovascular pathology. The groups were not significantly different in terms of age, BMI, level of HbAlc, fasting and postprandial...

  9. Association of lyme disease and schizoaffective disorder, bipolar type: Is it inflammation mediated?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David William Mattingley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lyme disease has been reported to be associated with various psychiatric presentations. Borreliaburgdorferi (Bb can present with symptoms similar to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. It has been suggested that inflammation incurred during the Bb infection leads to neurodegenerative changes that result in schizophrenia-like presentations. We report a case of a 41-year-old male with a past history of Bb infection who presents with psychosis. Later in the course of his hospitalization, he developed mood symptoms and was diagnosed with schizoaffective disorder, bipolar type. This case highlights the diagnosis and treatment of a patient with the unique presentation of schizoaffective disorder, bipolar type in the setting of previous Bb infection.

  10. Improving the outcome of a Marek's disease challenge in multiple lines of egg type chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, J E; Arango, J; Arthur, J A; Settar, P; Kreager, K S; O'Sullivan, N P

    2013-06-01

    A challenge test following inoculation with a standard amount of a vv+ strain of the Marek's disease (MD) virus in multiple lines and multiple generations of egg type chicken and the corresponding phenotypic trend are described. This program significantly reduced mortality of progeny from selected sires for three to 11 generations in eight of the nine elite lines studied herein. In brown egg lines, a retrospective analysis of DNA indicated an association between the blood type B (major histocompatibility complex) of the sire and the MD mortality in the challenge of its progeny. As a result of the multigeneration stock amplification and crossbreeding processes used in the commercial breeding industry, improvement in survival after challenge at the elite level will translate to improved welfare for millions of birds at the commercial production level. PMID:23901770

  11. Increased expression of vascular endothelin type B and angiotensin type 1 receptors in patients with ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimitrijevic, Ivan; Edvinsson, Lars; Chen, Qingwen; Malmsjö, Malin; Kimblad, Per-Ola

    2009-01-01

    pectoris without established myocardial infarction (n = 15) and matched cardiovascular healthy controls (n = 15). Endothelin type A (ETA) and type B (ETB), and angiotensin type 1 (AT1) and type 2 (AT2) receptors expression and function were examined using immunohistochemistry, Western blot and in vitro...

  12. Serum type IV collagen level is predictive for esophageal varices in patients with severe alcoholic disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Satoshi Mamori; Yasuyuki Searashi; Masato Matsushima; Kenichi Hashimoto; Shinichiro Uetake; Hiroshi Matsudaira; Shuji Ito; Hisato Nakajima; Hisao Tajiri

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To determine factors predictive for esophageal varices in severe alcoholic disease (SAD).METHODS: Abdominal ultrasonography (US) was performed on 444 patients suffering from alcoholism. Forty-four patients found to have splenomegaly and/ or withering of the right liver lobe were defined as those with SAD. SAD patients were examined by upper gastrointestinal (UGI) endoscopy for the presence of esophageal varices. The existence of esophageal varices was then related to clinical variables.RESULTS: Twenty-five patients (56.8%) had esophageal varices. A univariate analysis revealed a significant difference in age and type IV collagen levels between patients with and without esophageal varices. A logistic regression analysis identified type IV collagen as the only independent variable predictive for esophageal varices (P = 0.017). The area under the curve (AUC) for type IV collagen as determined by the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) for predicting esophageal varices was 0.78.CONCLUSION: This study suggests that the level of type IV collagen has a high diagnostic accuracy for the detection of esophageal varices in SAD.

  13. Progress in Enzyme Replacement Therapy in Glycogen Storage Disease Type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelini, Corrado; Semplicini, Claudio; Tonin, Paola; Filosto, Massimiliano; Pegoraro, Elena; Sorarù, Gianni; Fanin, Marina

    2009-05-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (GSDII) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding alpha-glucosidase (GAA). The disease can be clinically classified into three types: a severe infantile form, a juvenile and an adultonset form. Cases with juvenile or adult onset GSDII mimic limb-girdle muscular dystrophy or polymyositis and are often characterized by respiratory involvement. GSDII patients are diagnosed by biochemical assay and by molecular characterization of the GAA gene. Ascertaining a natural history of patients with heterogeneous late-onset GSDII is useful for evaluating their progressive functional disability. A significant decline is observed over the years in skeletal and respiratory muscle function. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has provided encouraging results in the infantile form. It is not yet known if ERT is effective in late-onset GSDII. We examined a series of 11 patients before and after ERT evaluating muscle strength by MRC, timed and graded functional tests, 6-minute walk test (6MWT), respiratory function by spirometric parameters and quality of life. We observed a partial improvement during a prolonged follow-up from 3 to 18 months. The use of different clinical parameters in the proposed protocol seems crucial to determine the efficacy of ERT, since not all late-onset patients respond similarly to ERT. PMID:21179524

  14. Interleukin-9 and T helper type 9 cells in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccia, F; Guggino, G; Ferrante, A; Cipriani, P; Giacomelli, R; Triolo, G

    2016-08-01

    Interleukin (IL)-9 is a 28-30 kDa monomeric glycosylated polypeptide belonging to the IL-7/IL-9 family of proteins that bind to a composite receptor consisting of the private receptor IL-9R and the IL-2 receptor, gamma (IL-2RG), a common gamma subunit shared by the receptors of many different cytokines. The IL-9R is expressed widely and IL-9 impacts a number of effector cells, such as effector T cells, B cells, innate lymphoid cells, mast cells, polymorphonuclear cells, epithelial cells and smooth muscle cells, playing an important role in regulating inflammatory immunity. The critical role of IL-9 in promoting cellular and humoral immune responses makes it an important focus of potential therapeutic interventions. Recently, a defined subset of T helper type cells, Th9 cells, has been identified by the potent production of IL-9. The involvement of the Th9 cell subset has been described in many types of inflammatory diseases, namely atopic diseases, helminth infections, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and ulcerative colitis. In this review, we summarize the IL-9 biological activities, highlighting roles for IL-9 and Th9 cells in rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis, systemic vasculitis, systemic lupus erythematosus and systemic sclerosis. PMID:27159882

  15. Olfactory deficits in Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1 disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Hovakimyan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Niemann-Pick type C disease (NPC is a rare autosomal recessive lipid storage disease characterized by progressive neurodegeneration. As only a few studies have been conducted on the impact of NPC on sensory systems, we used a mutant mouse model (NPC1(-/- to examine the effects of this disorder to morphologically distinct regions of the olfactory system, namely the olfactory epithelium (OE and olfactory bulb (OB. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: For structural and functional analysis immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, western blotting, and electrophysiology have been applied. For histochemistry and western blotting, we used antibodies against a series of neuronal and glia marker proteins, as well as macrophage markers. NPC1(-/- animals present myelin-like lysosomal deposits in virtually all types of cells of the peripheral and central olfactory system. Especially supporting cells of the OE and central glia cells are affected, resulting in pronounced astrocytosis and microgliosis in the OB and other olfactory cortices. Up-regulation of Galectin-3, Cathepsin D and GFAP in the cortical layers of the OB underlines the critical role and location of the OB as a possible entrance gate for noxious substances. Unmyelinated olfactory afferents of the lamina propria seem less affected than ensheathing cells. Supporting the structural findings, electro-olfactometry of the olfactory mucosa suggests that NPC1(-/- animals exhibit olfactory and trigeminal deficits. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data demonstrate a pronounced neurodegeneration and glia activation in the olfactory system of NPC1(-/-, which is accompanied by sensory deficits.

  16. Wild-type macrophages reverse disease in heme oxygenase 1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovtunovych, Gennadiy; Ghosh, Manik C; Ollivierre, Wade; Weitzel, R Patrick; Eckhaus, Michael A; Tisdale, John F; Yachie, Akihiro; Rouault, Tracey A

    2014-08-28

    Loss-of-function mutation in the heme oxygenase 1 (Hmox1) gene causes a rare and lethal disease in children, characterized by severe anemia and intravascular hemolysis, with damage to endothelia and kidneys. Previously, we found that macrophages engaged in recycling of red cells were depleted from the tissues of Hmox1(-/-) mice, which resulted in intravascular hemolysis and severe damage to the endothelial system, kidneys, and other organs. Here, we report that subablative bone marrow transplantation (BMT) has a curative effect for disease in Hmox1(-/-) animals as a result of restoration of heme recycling by repopulation of the tissues with wild-type macrophages. Although engraftment was transient, BMT reversed anemia, normalized blood chemistries and iron metabolism parameters, and prevented renal damage. The largest proportion of donor-derived cells was observed in the livers of transplanted animals. These cells, identified as Kupffer cells with high levels of Hmox1 expression, persisted months after transient engraftment of the donor bone marrow and were responsible for the full restoration of heme-recycling ability in Hmox1(-/-) mice and reversing Hmox1-deficient phenotype. Our findings suggest that BMT or the development of specific cell therapies to repopulate patients' tissues with wild-type or reengineered macrophages represent promising approaches for HMOX1 deficiency treatment in humans. PMID:24963040

  17. The Earth as a living planet: human-type diseases in the earthquake preparation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. F. Contoyiannis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The new field of complex systems supports the view that a number of systems arising from disciplines as diverse as physics, biology, engineering, and economics may have certain quantitative features that are intriguingly similar. The Earth is a living planet where many complex systems run perfectly without stopping at all. The earthquake generation is a fundamental sign that the Earth is a living planet. Recently, analyses have shown that human-brain-type disease appears during the earthquake generation process. Herein, we show that human-heart-type disease appears during the earthquake preparation of the earthquake process. The investigation is mainly attempted by means of critical phenomena, which have been proposed as the likely paradigm to explain the origins of both heart electric fluctuations and fracture-induced electromagnetic fluctuations. We show that a time window of the damage evolution within the heterogeneous Earth's crust and the healthy heart's electrical action present the characteristic features of the critical point of a thermal second-order phase transition. A dramatic breakdown of critical characteristics appears in the tail of the fracture process of heterogeneous system and the injured heart's electrical action. Analyses by means of Hurst exponent and wavelet decomposition further support the hypothesis that a dynamical analogy exists between the geological and biological systems under study.

  18. Prostaglandins in the perilymph of guinea pig with type II collagen induced ear diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have studied the prostaglandins (PGs) in the perilymph from guinea pig with type II collagen induced autoimmune ear disease. Hartly guinea pigs were immunized with type II collagen in CFA and auditory brain stem responses (ABR) were measured at 2, 3, 4, and 6 months after initial immunization perilymph was obtained and the levels of PGE2 and 6 keto-PGFlα were measured by radioimmunoassays. Temporal bones were examined for the histopathologic changes. Immunized guinea pigs showed the evidence of hearing loss by ABR. The temporal bones showed the following changes: spiral ganglia degeneration, mild to moderate degree of degeneration in organ of Corti, infrequent very mild endolymphatic hydrops and labrynthitis. The perilymph from immunized animals contained about 5 times more PGE2 and about 3 times more 6 keto-PGFlα than control animals. However, between these two groups, there was no difference in the CSF and sera levels of PGE2 and 6 keto-PGFlα. Thus, this study suggests that these inflammatory mediators might be involved in the pathogenesis of collagen induced autoimmune inner ear disease

  19. Antibody recognition of porcine circovirus type 2 capsid protein epitopes after vaccination, infection, and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trible, Benjamin R; Kerrigan, Maureen; Crossland, Nicholas; Potter, Megan; Faaberg, Kay; Hesse, Richard; Rowland, Raymond R R

    2011-05-01

    Open reading frame 2 (ORF2) of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) codes for the 233-amino-acid capsid protein (CP). Baculovirus-based vaccines that express only ORF2 are protective against clinical disease following experimental challenge or natural infection. The goal of this study was to identify regions in CP preferentially recognized by sera from experimentally infected and vaccinated pigs and to compare these responses to those of pigs diagnosed with porcine circovirus-associated disease (PCVAD), including porcine multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) and porcine dermatitis and nephropathy syndrome (PDNS). The approach was to react porcine sera with CP polypeptide fragments followed by finer mapping studies using overlapping oligopeptides that covered amino acids 141 to 200. The results showed that vaccinated pigs preferentially recognized only the largest polypeptide fragment, CP(43-233). A subset of experimentally infected pigs and pigs with PDNS showed strong reactivity against a CP oligopeptide, 169-STIDYFQPNNKR-180. Alanine scanning identified Y-173, F-174, Q-175, and K-179 as important for antibody recognition. The results from this study support the notion of PCV2 modulation of immunity, including antibody responses that may represent a precursor for disease. The recognition of CP(169-180) and other polypeptides provides opportunities to devise diagnostic tests for monitoring the immunological effectiveness of vaccination. PMID:21430122

  20. New susceptibility loci associated with kidney disease in type 1 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niina Sandholm

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic kidney disease, or diabetic nephropathy (DN, is a major complication of diabetes and the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD that requires dialysis treatment or kidney transplantation. In addition to the decrease in the quality of life, DN accounts for a large proportion of the excess mortality associated with type 1 diabetes (T1D. Whereas the degree of glycemia plays a pivotal role in DN, a subset of individuals with poorly controlled T1D do not develop DN. Furthermore, strong familial aggregation supports genetic susceptibility to DN. However, the genes and the molecular mechanisms behind the disease remain poorly understood, and current therapeutic strategies rarely result in reversal of DN. In the GEnetics of Nephropathy: an International Effort (GENIE consortium, we have undertaken a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS of T1D DN comprising ~2.4 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs imputed in 6,691 individuals. After additional genotyping of 41 top ranked SNPs representing 24 independent signals in 5,873 individuals, combined meta-analysis revealed association of two SNPs with ESRD: rs7583877 in the AFF3 gene (P = 1.2 × 10(-8 and an intergenic SNP on chromosome 15q26 between the genes RGMA and MCTP2, rs12437854 (P = 2.0 × 10(-9. Functional data suggest that AFF3 influences renal tubule fibrosis via the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β1 pathway. The strongest association with DN as a primary phenotype was seen for an intronic SNP in the ERBB4 gene (rs7588550, P = 2.1 × 10(-7, a gene with type 2 diabetes DN differential expression and in the same intron as a variant with cis-eQTL expression of ERBB4. All these detected associations represent new signals in the pathogenesis of DN.

  1. Mutations in the glucose-6-phosphatase gene that cause glycogen storage disease type 1a

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, J.Y.; Lei, K.J.; Shelly, L.L. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type la (von Gierke disease) is caused by the deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), the key enzyme in glucose homeostasis. The disease presents with clinical manifestations of severe hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly, growth retardation, lactic acidemia, hyperlipidemia, and hyperuricemia. We have succeeded in isolating a murine G6Pase cDNA from a normal mouse liver cDNA library by differentially screening method. We then isolated the human G6Pase cDNA and gene. To date, we have characterized the G6Pase genes of twelve GSD type la patients and uncovered a total of six different mutations. The mutations are comprised of R83C (an Arg at codon 83 to a Cys), Q347X (a Gly at codon 347 to a stop codon), 459insTA (a two basepair insertion at nucleotide 459 yielding a truncated G6Pase of 129 residues), R295C (an Arg at codon 295 to a Cys), G222R (a Gly at codon 222 to an Arg) and {delta}F327 (a codon deletion for Phe-327 at nucleotides 1058 to 1060). The relative incidences of these mutations are 37.5% (R83C), 33.3% (Q347X), 16.6% (459insTA), 4.2% (G222R), 4.2% (R295C) and 4.2% ({delta}F327). Site-directed mutagenesis and transient expression assays demonstrated that the R83C, Q347X, R295C, and {delta}F327 mutations abolished whereas the G222R mutation greatly reduced G6Pase activity. We further characterized the structure-function requirements of amino acids 83, 222, and 295 in G6Pase catalysis. The identification of mutations in GSD type la patients has unequivocally established the molecular basis of the type la disorder. Knowledge of the mutations may be applied to prenatal diagnosis and opens the way for developing and evaluating new therapeutic approaches.

  2. Rationale and trial design of Bardoxolone Methyl Evaluation in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease and Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Zeeuw, Dick; Akizawa, Tadao; Agarwal, Rajiv;

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus constitutes a global epidemic complicated by considerable renal and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, despite the provision of inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). Bardoxolone methyl, a synthetic...

  3. Functional state of the cardiorespiratory system of women with postmastectomy syndrome with different types of attitude to the disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuriy Briskin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to determine the peculiarities of the functional state of cardiorespiratory system in women with postmastectomy syndrome with different types of attitude to the disease. Material and Methods: analysis of the literature and empirical data; rheography, spirography, the definition of the type of attitude to the disease of personality questionnaires of Institute of Behtereva; methods of mathematical statistics. 115 women with postmastectomy syndrome on clinical stage of rehabilitation were involved in this study. Results: in women with intra- and interpsychic types of attitude to the disease decreased reserve capacity of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems respectively. Conclusions: It was proved that women with a rational relationship to the type of disease show significantly better results of the cardiovascular system compared to interpsychic and intrapsychic.

  4. Polymorphism of the dopamine transporter type 1 gene modifies the treatment response in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Caroline; Meguig, Sayah; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Labreuche, Julien; Vasseur, Francis; Duhamel, Alain; Delval, Arnaud; Bardyn, Thomas; Devedjian, Jean-Christophe; Rouaix, Nathalie; Petyt, Gregory; Brefel-Courbon, Christine; Ory-Magne, Fabienne; Guehl, Dominique; Eusebio, Alexandre; Fraix, Valérie; Saulnier, Pierre-Jean; Lagha-Boukbiza, Ouhaid; Durif, Frank; Faighel, Mirela; Giordana, Caroline; Drapier, Sophie; Maltête, David; Tranchant, Christine; Houeto, Jean-Luc; Debû, Bettina; Azulay, Jean-Philippe; Tison, François; Destée, Alain; Vidailhet, Marie; Rascol, Olivier; Dujardin, Kathy; Defebvre, Luc; Bordet, Régis; Sablonnière, Bernard; Devos, David

    2015-05-01

    After more than 50 years of treating Parkinson's disease with l-DOPA, there are still no guidelines on setting the optimal dose for a given patient. The dopamine transporter type 1, now known as solute carrier family 6 (neurotransmitter transporter), member 3 (SLC6A3) is the most powerful determinant of dopamine neurotransmission and might therefore influence the treatment response. We recently demonstrated that methylphenidate (a dopamine transporter inhibitor) is effective in patients with Parkinson's disease with motor and gait disorders. The objective of the present study was to determine whether genetic variants of the dopamine transporter type 1-encoding gene (SLC6A3) are associated with differences in the response to treatment of motor symptoms and gait disorders with l-DOPA and methylphenidate (with respect to the demographic, the disease and the treatment parameters and the other genes involved in the dopaminergic neurotransmission). This analysis was part of a multicentre, parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial of methylphenidate in Parkinson's disease (Protocol ID:2008-005801-20; ClinicalTrials.gov:NCT00914095). We scored the motor Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale and the Stand-Walk-Sit Test before and after a standardized acute l-DOPA challenge before randomization and then after 3 months of methylphenidate treatment. Patients were screened for variants of genes involved in dopamine metabolism: rs28363170 and rs3836790 polymorphisms in the SLC6A3 gene, rs921451 and rs3837091 in the DDC gene (encoding the aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase involved in the synthesis of dopamine from l-DOPA), rs1799836 in the MAOB gene (coding for monoamine oxidase B) and rs4680 in the COMT gene (coding for catechol-O-methyltransferase). Investigators and patients were blinded to the genotyping data throughout the study. Eighty-one subjects were genotyped and 61 were analysed for their acute motor response to l-DOPA. The SLC6A3

  5. Th1/Th2 cytokines in Type 1 diabetes: Relation to duration of disease and gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaseghi, Hajar; Jadali, Zohreh

    2016-01-01

    Background: T-cells are important in the pathogenesis of Type 1 diabetes (T1D). However, the exact role of T-cell subpopulations in this pathway remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to assess the expression pattern of T helper 1 (Th1) interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and Th2 interleukin-4 (IL-4) cytokines and their relationship with sex and disease duration in T1D patients. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on 21 T1D patients and 22 healthy subjects. Gene expression analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was performed using real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Results: IFN-γ gene expression was significantly lower in T1D patients compared with controls (P 0.05) while IL-4 mRNA expression in male patients was about 1.9 folds higher than female patients. Moreover, IFN-γ mRNA expression in female patients was about 1.8 folds lower than male patients. Patients were divided into two groups regarding their disease duration: 10 years. A significant increase in the IL-4 expression was observed between two groups of patients compared to controls (P < 0.0001). Conversely, there was a significant difference in the expression of IFN-γ only between patients with more than 10 years of disease duration (P = 0.02). Conclusion: These data propose supplementary implications for the role of Th1/Th2 imbalance in T1D immunopathogenesis. Moreover, factors such as sex and disease duration may have some influence on cytokine mRNA expression.

  6. Defective Cytochrome P450-Catalysed Drug Metabolism in Niemann-Pick Type C Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassif, Christopher A.; Gray, James; Burkert, Kathryn R.; Smith, David A.; Morris, Lauren; Cologna, Stephanie M.; Peer, Cody J.; Sissung, Tristan M.; Uscatu, Constantin-Daniel; Figg, William D.; Pavan, William J.; Vite, Charles H.; Porter, Forbes D.; Platt, Frances M.

    2016-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is a neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in either the NPC1 or NPC2 gene. NPC is characterised by storage of multiple lipids in the late endosomal/lysosomal compartment, resulting in cellular and organ system dysfunction. The underlying molecular mechanisms that lead to the range of clinical presentations in NPC are not fully understood. While evaluating potential small molecule therapies in Npc1-/- mice, we observed a consistent pattern of toxicity associated with drugs metabolised by the cytochrome P450 system, suggesting a potential drug metabolism defect in NPC1 disease. Investigation of the P450 system in the context of NPC1 dysfunction revealed significant changes in the gene expression of many P450 associated genes across the full lifespan of Npc1-/- mice, decreased activity of cytochrome P450 reductase, and a global decrease of multiple cytochrome P450 catalysed dealkylation reactions. In vivo drug metabolism studies using a prototypic P450 metabolised drug, midazolam, confirmed dysfunction in drug clearance in the Npc1-/- mouse. Expression of the Phase II enzyme uridinediphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) was also significantly reduced in Npc1-/- mice. Interestingly, reduced activity within the P450 system was also observed in heterozygous Npc1+/- mice. The reduced activity of P450 enzymes may be the result of bile acid deficiency/imbalance in Npc1-/- mice, as bile acid treatment significantly rescued P450 enzyme activity in Npc1-/- mice and has the potential to be an adjunctive therapy for NPC disease patients. The dysfunction in the cytochrome P450 system were recapitulated in the NPC1 feline model. Additionally, we present the first evidence that there are alterations in the P450 system in NPC1 patients. PMID:27019000

  7. Characterization of a canine model of glycogen storage disease type IIIa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiqing Yi

    2012-11-01

    Glycogen storage disease type IIIa (GSD IIIa is an autosomal recessive disease caused by deficiency of glycogen debranching enzyme (GDE in liver and muscle. The disorder is clinically heterogeneous and progressive, and there is no effective treatment. Previously, a naturally occurring dog model for this condition was identified in curly-coated retrievers (CCR. The affected dogs carry a frame-shift mutation in the GDE gene and have no detectable GDE activity in liver and muscle. We characterized in detail the disease expression and progression in eight dogs from age 2 to 16 months. Monthly blood biochemistry revealed elevated and gradually increasing serum alanine transaminase (ALT, aspartate transaminase (AST and alkaline phosphatase (ALP activities; serum creatine phosphokinase (CPK activity exceeded normal range after 12 months. Analysis of tissue biopsy specimens at 4, 12 and 16 months revealed abnormally high glycogen contents in liver and muscle of all dogs. Fasting liver glycogen content increased from 4 months to 12 months, but dropped at 16 months possibly caused by extended fibrosis; muscle glycogen content continually increased with age. Light microscopy revealed significant glycogen accumulation in hepatocytes at all ages. Liver histology showed progressive, age-related fibrosis. In muscle, scattered cytoplasmic glycogen deposits were present in most cells at 4 months, but large, lake-like accumulation developed by 12 and 16 months. Disruption of the contractile apparatus and fraying of myofibrils was observed in muscle at 12 and 16 months by electron microscopy. In conclusion, the CCR dogs are an accurate model of GSD IIIa that will improve our understanding of the disease progression and allow opportunities to investigate treatment interventions.

  8. Characterization of a canine model of glycogen storage disease type IIIa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Haiqing; Thurberg, Beth L; Curtis, Sarah; Austin, Stephanie; Fyfe, John; Koeberl, Dwight D; Kishnani, Priya S; Sun, Baodong

    2012-11-01

    Glycogen storage disease type IIIa (GSD IIIa) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by deficiency of glycogen debranching enzyme (GDE) in liver and muscle. The disorder is clinically heterogeneous and progressive, and there is no effective treatment. Previously, a naturally occurring dog model for this condition was identified in curly-coated retrievers (CCR). The affected dogs carry a frame-shift mutation in the GDE gene and have no detectable GDE activity in liver and muscle. We characterized in detail the disease expression and progression in eight dogs from age 2 to 16 months. Monthly blood biochemistry revealed elevated and gradually increasing serum alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities; serum creatine phosphokinase (CPK) activity exceeded normal range after 12 months. Analysis of tissue biopsy specimens at 4, 12 and 16 months revealed abnormally high glycogen contents in liver and muscle of all dogs. Fasting liver glycogen content increased from 4 months to 12 months, but dropped at 16 months possibly caused by extended fibrosis; muscle glycogen content continually increased with age. Light microscopy revealed significant glycogen accumulation in hepatocytes at all ages. Liver histology showed progressive, age-related fibrosis. In muscle, scattered cytoplasmic glycogen deposits were present in most cells at 4 months, but large, lake-like accumulation developed by 12 and 16 months. Disruption of the contractile apparatus and fraying of myofibrils was observed in muscle at 12 and 16 months by electron microscopy. In conclusion, the CCR dogs are an accurate model of GSD IIIa that will improve our understanding of the disease progression and allow opportunities to investigate treatment interventions. PMID:22736456

  9. Defective Cytochrome P450-Catalysed Drug Metabolism in Niemann-Pick Type C Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoli, Elena-Raluca; Al Eisa, Nada; Cluzeau, Celine V M; Wassif, Christopher A; Gray, James; Burkert, Kathryn R; Smith, David A; Morris, Lauren; Cologna, Stephanie M; Peer, Cody J; Sissung, Tristan M; Uscatu, Constantin-Daniel; Figg, William D; Pavan, William J; Vite, Charles H; Porter, Forbes D; Platt, Frances M

    2016-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is a neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in either the NPC1 or NPC2 gene. NPC is characterised by storage of multiple lipids in the late endosomal/lysosomal compartment, resulting in cellular and organ system dysfunction. The underlying molecular mechanisms that lead to the range of clinical presentations in NPC are not fully understood. While evaluating potential small molecule therapies in Npc1-/- mice, we observed a consistent pattern of toxicity associated with drugs metabolised by the cytochrome P450 system, suggesting a potential drug metabolism defect in NPC1 disease. Investigation of the P450 system in the context of NPC1 dysfunction revealed significant changes in the gene expression of many P450 associated genes across the full lifespan of Npc1-/- mice, decreased activity of cytochrome P450 reductase, and a global decrease of multiple cytochrome P450 catalysed dealkylation reactions. In vivo drug metabolism studies using a prototypic P450 metabolised drug, midazolam, confirmed dysfunction in drug clearance in the Npc1-/- mouse. Expression of the Phase II enzyme uridinediphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) was also significantly reduced in Npc1-/- mice. Interestingly, reduced activity within the P450 system was also observed in heterozygous Npc1+/- mice. The reduced activity of P450 enzymes may be the result of bile acid deficiency/imbalance in Npc1-/- mice, as bile acid treatment significantly rescued P450 enzyme activity in Npc1-/- mice and has the potential to be an adjunctive therapy for NPC disease patients. The dysfunction in the cytochrome P450 system were recapitulated in the NPC1 feline model. Additionally, we present the first evidence that there are alterations in the P450 system in NPC1 patients. PMID:27019000

  10. Defective Cytochrome P450-Catalysed Drug Metabolism in Niemann-Pick Type C Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena-Raluca Nicoli

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick type C (NPC disease is a neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in either the NPC1 or NPC2 gene. NPC is characterised by storage of multiple lipids in the late endosomal/lysosomal compartment, resulting in cellular and organ system dysfunction. The underlying molecular mechanisms that lead to the range of clinical presentations in NPC are not fully understood. While evaluating potential small molecule therapies in Npc1-/- mice, we observed a consistent pattern of toxicity associated with drugs metabolised by the cytochrome P450 system, suggesting a potential drug metabolism defect in NPC1 disease. Investigation of the P450 system in the context of NPC1 dysfunction revealed significant changes in the gene expression of many P450 associated genes across the full lifespan of Npc1-/- mice, decreased activity of cytochrome P450 reductase, and a global decrease of multiple cytochrome P450 catalysed dealkylation reactions. In vivo drug metabolism studies using a prototypic P450 metabolised drug, midazolam, confirmed dysfunction in drug clearance in the Npc1-/- mouse. Expression of the Phase II enzyme uridinediphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT was also significantly reduced in Npc1-/- mice. Interestingly, reduced activity within the P450 system was also observed in heterozygous Npc1+/- mice. The reduced activity of P450 enzymes may be the result of bile acid deficiency/imbalance in Npc1-/- mice, as bile acid treatment significantly rescued P450 enzyme activity in Npc1-/- mice and has the potential to be an adjunctive therapy for NPC disease patients. The dysfunction in the cytochrome P450 system were recapitulated in the NPC1 feline model. Additionally, we present the first evidence that there are alterations in the P450 system in NPC1 patients.

  11. Risk of development of chronic kidney disease in patients with type 2 diabetes having metabolic syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To measure the relation of creatinine clearance in type-2 diabetic patients with different components of metabolic syndrome and to quantify the relationship of frequency of incident CKD with increasing number of metabolic syndrome components while controlling for age, gender and duration of diabetes. Cross-sectional descriptive study. Patients having type-2 Diabetes for more than 5 years were enrolled. Information regarding age, gender, duration of diabetes, type of diabetes, treatment taking, complete fasting lipid profile, fasting blood glucose, Body Mass Index (BMI), 24 hours urinary proteins and creatinine clearance, co-existent risk factors like hypertension and ischemic heart disease was taken. Patients were divided into groups having one to all five metabolic syndrome traits. Progressive increase in the metabolic syndrome traits was compared with decline in creatinine clearance. Pearson correlation test and multiple logistic regression were applied to determine correlation with significance at r and p <0.05. Out of 104 evaluated female and male patients, 70% had hypertension, ischemic heart disease and a family history of diabetes. While 20% had normal creatinine clearance, 37% had a creatinine clearance between 60-90 ml/min, 19% had a creatinine clearance of 30-59 ml/min, 18% had a creatinine clearance of less than 30 ml/min and 10% were already in stage 5 CKD. The decline in renal function was more severe in subjects evaluated who had a higher number of features of the metabolic syndrome. Age was the only significant determinant of development of CKD (p=0.05). The renal function progressively declined with 3 or more features of the metabolic syndrome. (author)

  12. Sociocultural Tailoring of a Healthy Lifestyle Intervention to Reduce Cardiovascular Disease and Type 2 Diabetes Risk Among Latinos

    OpenAIRE

    Mudd-Martin, Gia; Martinez, Maria C.; Rayens, Mary Kay; Gokun, Yevgeniya; Meininger, Janet C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Suboptimal lifestyle factors in combination with genetic susceptibility contribute to cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes risk among Latinos. We describe a community–academic collaboration that developed and explored the feasibility of implementing a socioculturally tailored, healthy lifestyle intervention integrating genomics and family history education to reduce risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes among Latinos. Community Context The community-based partici...

  13. Niemann-Pick disease type B: prenatal diagnosis and enzymatic and chemical studies on fetal brain and liver.

    OpenAIRE

    Wenger, D A; Kudoh, T; Sattler, M; Palmieri, M; Yudkoff, M

    1981-01-01

    Patients with Niemann-Pick disease type A have a severe neurovisceral disease caused by a deficiency of lysosomal sphingomyelinase activity in all tissues examined. The patients with the type B form have signs and symptoms related to storage of sphingomyelin in the spleen, liver, and lungs, while neurologically they remain normal. They also have a severe deficiency of lysosomal sphingomyelinase activity in all tissues previously examined. Here the brain and liver of a fetus with Niemann-Pick ...

  14. Platelet Dysfunction and a High Bone Mass Phenotype in a Murine Model of Platelet-Type von Willebrand Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Suva, Larry J.; Hartman, Eric; Dilley, Joshua D.; Russell, Susan; Akel, Nisreen S.; Skinner, Robert A.; Hogue, William R.; Budde, Ulrich; Varughese, Kottayil I.; Kanaji, Taisuke; Ware, Jerry

    2008-01-01

    The platelet glycoprotein Ib-IX receptor binds surface-bound von Willebrand factor and supports platelet adhesion to damaged vascular surfaces. A limited number of mutations within the glycoprotein Ib-IX complex have been described that permit a structurally altered receptor to interact with soluble von Willebrand factor, and this is the molecular basis of platelet-type von Willebrand disease. We have developed and characterized a mouse model of platelet-type von Willebrand disease (G233V) an...

  15. High frequency of mutation G377S in Brazilian type 3 Gaucher disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rozenberg

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Gaucher disease (GD, the most prevalent lysosome storage disorder, presents an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. It is a paradigm for therapeutic intervention in medical genetics due to the existence of effective enzyme replacement therapy. We report here the analysis of GD in 262 unrelated Brazilian patients, carried out in order to establish the frequency of the most common mutations and to provide prognostic information based on genotype-phenotype correlations. Among 247 type 1 GD patients, mutation N370S was detected in 47% of all the alleles, but N370S/N370S homozygosity was found in only 10% of the patients, a much lower frequency than expected, suggesting that most individuals presenting this genotype may not receive medical attention. Recombinant alleles were detected at a high frequency: 44% of the chromosomes bearing mutation L444P had other mutations derived from the pseudogene sequence, present in 25% of patients. Three neuronopathic type 2 patients were homozygous for L444P, all presenting additional mutations (E326K or recombinant alleles that probably lead to the more severe phenotypes. Six children, classified as type 1 GD patients, had a L444P/L444P genotype, showing that neuronopathic symptoms may only manifest later in life. This would indicate the need for a higher treatment dose during enzyme replacement therapy. Finally, mutation G377S was present in 4 homozygous type 1 patients and also in compound heterozygosity in 5 (42% type 3 patients. These findings indicate that G377S cannot be unambiguously classified as mild and suggest an allele-dose effect for this mutation.

  16. The Impact of the Disease Severity on the Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients Satisfaction with Quality of Care

    OpenAIRE

    Luminiţa Diţ; Adriana Băban; Dumitraşcu, Dan L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disorder that has a significant physical and emotional impact; it involves difficult lifestyle adjustments, and requires complex and long-term treatment.Objectives. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the type 2 diabetes mellitus clinical condition (disease duration, disease severity, presence of comorbidity), patient socio-demographics (age, sex, education, residence), frequency of medical visits, and disease related self-eff...

  17. Niemann-Pick disease, type B with TRAP-positive storage cells and secondary sea blue histiocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Saxena

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We present 2 cases of Niemann Pick disease, type B with secondary sea-blue histiocytosis. Strikingly, in both cases the Pick cells were positive for tartrate resistant acid phosphatase, a finding hitherto described only in Gaucher cells. This report highlights the importance of this finding as a potential cytochemical diagnostic pitfall in the diagnosis of Niemann Pick disease.

  18. Niemann-Pick disease, type B with TRAP-positive storage cells and secondary sea blue histiocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    R. Saxena; Pati, H. P.; Dutta, S.; Kar, R.; Sharma, P.

    2009-01-01

    We present 2 cases of Niemann Pick disease, type B with secondary sea-blue histiocytosis. Strikingly, in both cases the Pick cells were positive for tartrate resistant acid phosphatase, a finding hitherto described only in Gaucher cells. This report highlights the importance of this finding as a potential cytochemical diagnostic pitfall in the diagnosis of Niemann Pick disease.

  19. Effects of a fixed combination of perindopril and indapamide in patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J.; Ninomiya, Toshiharu; Perkovic, Vlado; Woodward, Mark; Zoungas, Sophia; Cass, Alan; Cooper, Mark; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Mancia, Giuseppe; Mogensen, Carl Eric; Neal, Bruce; Chalmers, John

    2010-01-01

    Individuals with diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at high risk for cardiovascular disease. In these analyses of the ADVANCE trial, we assessed the effects of a fixed combination of perindopril-indapamide on renal and cardiovascular outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes according to

  20. Cardiovascular autonomous dysfunction in diabetics: The influence of disease duration, glycoregulation degree and diabetes type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninković Vladan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Cardiovascular autonomous neuropathy (CAN in diabetes has not been still defined clinically and aetiopathogenetically. OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to determine the influence of disease duration, glycoregulation degree and diabetes type on damage of the cardiovascular part of the autonomous nervous system in our group of patients. METHOD This study included diabetics, (100 patients the same number of patients with diabetes type I and II as well as 20 healthy individuals in the control group. Classic Ewing's cardiovascular tests were used for CAN diagnosis: 1. the cardiovascular response to Valsalva manoeuvre, 2. the cardiovascular response to deep breathing (the so-called E/I ratio, 3. the cardiovascular response to rising (the so-called 30/15 ratio, 4. the test of orthostatic hypotension and 5. the TA response to handgrip. It has been arbitrarily taken that patients, whose score of 'parasympathetic' tests (Valsalva manoeuvre, E/I ratio, 30/15 is equal or bigger than 1.5 (out of possible 3, have damage of the parasympathetic part of the autonomous nervous system while patients, whose score of 'sympathetic tests' (the test of orthostatic hypotension and TA response to hand-grip is equal or bigger than 1 (out of possible 2, have damage of the sympathetic part of the autonomous nervous system. The patients whose total score is equal or bigger than 2 have cardiovascular autonomous neuropathy. The glycoregulation degree is determined by the level of HbA1c. RESULTS There is a statistically significant, positive correlation between the values of the parasympathetic score and disease duration as well as between the total score, that is, CAN and disease duration. The connection between the sympathetic score, that is, damage of the sympathetic part of the autonomous nervous system and disease duration has not been observed. There is a positive correlation between the values of the parasympathetic score and HbA1c. The same pattern

  1. Urinary albumin excretion rate is correlated with severity of coronary artery disease in elderly type 2 diabetic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Li-xin; MA Jing; CHENG Yang; ZHANG Li-na; LI Ming

    2012-01-01

    Background Coronary heart disease is the main complication of type 2 diabetes mellitus; its incidence is closely related to microalbuminuria.The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between the urinary albumin excretion rate and the incidence and severity of coronary heart disease in elderly type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.Methods A total of 612 hospitalized type 2 diabetes mellitus patients aged 60 years or older,who were given coronary angiography for diagnosis of possible coronary heart disease,participated.Their urinary albumin excretion rate was measured,and the severity of coronary artery stenosis was quantified with the Gensini scoring system to analyze the incidence of coronary heart disease and the severity of coronary artery stenosis.The optimal urinary albumin excretion rate predictive value for coronary heart disease incidence in elderly type 2 diabetes mellitus patients was determined.Results The incidence of coronary heart disease,the number of patients with coronary vascular disease and the Gensini scores were significantly different between the microalbuminuria group and the normal albuminuria group (P <0.05).The urinary albumin excretion rate was independently correlated with the occurrence of coronary heart disease in elderly type 2 diabetes mellitus patients (odds ratio (OR) =1.058,P <0.0001,95% confidence interval (CI): 1.036-1.080).Urinary albumin excretion rate and the Gensini score were independently correlated in elderly type 2 diabetes mellitus patients (β=0.476,P <0.0001).The best predictive value of urinary albumin excretion rate was 10.45 μg/min for elderly type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.The area under the curve was 0.764,with a sensitivity and specificity of 70.0% and 72.2%,respectively.Conclusions The occurrence of coronary heart disease in elderly type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with microalbuminuria was higher than that in patients with normal albuminuria,and the severity of the disease also

  2. Comparative molecular and antibody typing during the investigation of an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Nuñez, Marian; Quero, Sara; Catini, Stella; Pedro-Botet, Maria Lluisa; Mateu, Lourdes; Sopena, Nieves; Sabria, Miguel

    2013-10-01

    An outbreak of Legionnaires' disease with 113 confirmed cases was reported in the town of Mataró, Spain, in August 2002. In this study, we compared three different typing methods and characterized the clinical isolates by comparing them with other clinical isolates with the same ST from our own database to further characterize the outbreak. In the outbreak, a total of 16 clinical (nine patients) and 32 environmental (from four environmental sources) Legionella pneumophila isolates were analyzed by pulsed-field electrophoresis (PFGE), sequence-based typing (SBT), and monoclonal antibody typing (MAb). We compared the MAb and SBT profiles of the outbreak clinical isolates and other unrelated clinical isolates showing the same ST profile. We obtained seven different PFGE and SBT profiles and six MAb patterns from the outbreak isolates. PFGE and SBT showed 100% concordance during the outbreak. SBT proved to be highly discriminatory, particularly with the addition of the new neuA gene. One PFGE, SBT (ST-37), and Philadelphia profile was observed among the clinical isolates. Using PFGE, this ST37 Philadelphia profile was closely related to other unrelated clinical isolates. These findings suggest that the ST37 Philadelphia profile could be a virulence marker in our area. The combination of the three methodologies was useful to further characterize and obtain additional information on a very explosive outbreak. Despite the minor discrimination of PFGE versus SBT, the two genetic methods are recommended in outbreak investigations. Further studies are currently underway in this area to obtain more definitive conclusions. PMID:23572275

  3. Periodontal Diseases and Dental Caries in Children with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Novotna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disease of an autoimmune origin with early manifestation predominantly in the childhood. Its incidence has been rising in most European countries. Diabetes has been intensively studied by all branches of medicine. There were a number of studies investigating oral consequences of diabetes; however, unambiguous conclusions were drawn only for the relationship between diabetes and periodontal impairment. Many studies confirmed higher plaque levels and higher incidence of chronic gingivitis both in adults and in children with diabetes. Juvenile periodontitis is rare both in healthy subjects and in those with type 1 diabetes. Yet certain findings from well-conducted studies, for example, differences in oral microflora or the impact of metabolic control of diabetes on periodontal health, indicate a higher risk of periodontitis in children with type 1 diabetes. As for the association of diabetes and dental caries, the results of the studies are inconsistent. However, it was found that some risk factors for dental caries are either more or less prevalent in the diabetic population. Despite an extensive research in this area we have to acknowledge that many questions have remained unanswered. There is a need for continued, thorough research in this area.

  4. Periodontal Diseases and Dental Caries in Children with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotna, Marta; Podzimek, Stepan; Broukal, Zdenek; Lencova, Erika; Duskova, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disease of an autoimmune origin with early manifestation predominantly in the childhood. Its incidence has been rising in most European countries. Diabetes has been intensively studied by all branches of medicine. There were a number of studies investigating oral consequences of diabetes; however, unambiguous conclusions were drawn only for the relationship between diabetes and periodontal impairment. Many studies confirmed higher plaque levels and higher incidence of chronic gingivitis both in adults and in children with diabetes. Juvenile periodontitis is rare both in healthy subjects and in those with type 1 diabetes. Yet certain findings from well-conducted studies, for example, differences in oral microflora or the impact of metabolic control of diabetes on periodontal health, indicate a higher risk of periodontitis in children with type 1 diabetes. As for the association of diabetes and dental caries, the results of the studies are inconsistent. However, it was found that some risk factors for dental caries are either more or less prevalent in the diabetic population. Despite an extensive research in this area we have to acknowledge that many questions have remained unanswered. There is a need for continued, thorough research in this area. PMID:26347009

  5. Borna disease virus nucleoprotein inhibits type I interferon induction through the interferon regulatory factor 7 pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •IRF7 nuclear localisation was inhibited by BDV persistently infected. •BDV N protein resistant to IFN induction both in BDV infected OL cell and N protein plasmid transfected OL cell. •BDV N protein is related to the inhibition of IRF7 nuclear localisation. -- Abstract: The expression of type I interferon (IFN) is one of the most potent innate defences against viral infection in higher vertebrates. Borna disease virus (BDV) establishes persistent, noncytolytic infections in animals and in cultured cells. Early studies have shown that the BDV phosphoprotein can inhibit the activation of type I IFN through the TBK1–IRF3 pathway. The function of the BDV nucleoprotein in the inhibition of IFN activity is not yet clear. In this study, we demonstrated IRF7 activation and increased IFN-α/β expression in a BDV-persistently infected human oligodendroglia cell line following RNA interference-mediated BDV nucleoprotein silencing. Furthermore, we showed that BDV nucleoprotein prevented the nuclear localisation of IRF7 and inhibited endogenous IFN induction by poly(I:C), coxsackie virus B3 and IFN-β. Our findings provide evidence for a previously undescribed mechanism by which the BDV nucleoprotein inhibits type I IFN expression by interfering with the IRF7 pathway

  6. A case of stiff-person syndrome, type 1 diabetes, celiac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, Eoin P

    2009-05-01

    Antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) are involved in the pathophysiology of stiff-person syndrome (SPS) and type 1 diabetes. GAD catalyses the conversion of glutamate to gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). GABA acts as a neurotransmitter between neurones, while in pancreatic beta cells it plays an integral role in normal insulin secretion, hence the clinical presentation of muscular spasms in SPS and insulin deficiency in diabetes. Despite this apparent major overlap in pathophysiology, SPS only rarely occurs in individuals with type 1 diabetes. We report the case of a 41-year-old man presenting with a simultaneous diagnosis of both these conditions. His case is unusual in that it is the first reported case in the literature of these conditions occurring in someone with celiac disease (CD) and dermatitis herpetiformis. We discuss why SPS and type 1 diabetes co-exist in only a minority of cases and speculate on the underlying mechanism of the association with CD and dermatitis herpetiformis in our patient.

  7. Borna disease virus nucleoprotein inhibits type I interferon induction through the interferon regulatory factor 7 pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Wuqi [The Heilongjiang Key Laboratory of Immunity and Infection, Heilongjiang (China); Department of Microbiology, Harbin Medical University (China); Kao, Wenping [The Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Biology, Heilongjiang Higher Education Institutions (China); Department of Microbiology, Harbin Medical University (China); Zhai, Aixia [The Heilongjiang Key Laboratory of Immunity and Infection, Heilongjiang (China); Qian, Jun; Li, Yujun [The Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Biology, Heilongjiang Higher Education Institutions (China); Zhang, Qingmeng [The Heilongjiang Key Laboratory of Immunity and Infection, Heilongjiang (China); Zhao, Hong; Hu, Yunlong; Li, Hui [Department of Microbiology, Harbin Medical University (China); Zhang, Fengmin, E-mail: fengminzhang@ems.hrbmu.edu.cn [The Heilongjiang Key Laboratory of Immunity and Infection, Heilongjiang (China); The Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Biology, Heilongjiang Higher Education Institutions (China); Department of Microbiology, Harbin Medical University (China)

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •IRF7 nuclear localisation was inhibited by BDV persistently infected. •BDV N protein resistant to IFN induction both in BDV infected OL cell and N protein plasmid transfected OL cell. •BDV N protein is related to the inhibition of IRF7 nuclear localisation. -- Abstract: The expression of type I interferon (IFN) is one of the most potent innate defences against viral infection in higher vertebrates. Borna disease virus (BDV) establishes persistent, noncytolytic infections in animals and in cultured cells. Early studies have shown that the BDV phosphoprotein can inhibit the activation of type I IFN through the TBK1–IRF3 pathway. The function of the BDV nucleoprotein in the inhibition of IFN activity is not yet clear. In this study, we demonstrated IRF7 activation and increased IFN-α/β expression in a BDV-persistently infected human oligodendroglia cell line following RNA interference-mediated BDV nucleoprotein silencing. Furthermore, we showed that BDV nucleoprotein prevented the nuclear localisation of IRF7 and inhibited endogenous IFN induction by poly(I:C), coxsackie virus B3 and IFN-β. Our findings provide evidence for a previously undescribed mechanism by which the BDV nucleoprotein inhibits type I IFN expression by interfering with the IRF7 pathway.

  8. Combining information from common type 2 diabetes risk polymorphisms improves disease prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael N Weedon

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A limited number of studies have assessed the risk of common diseases when combining information from several predisposing polymorphisms. In most cases, individual polymorphisms only moderately increase risk (approximately 20%, and they are thought to be unhelpful in assessing individuals' risk clinically. The value of analyzing multiple alleles simultaneously is not well studied. This is often because, for any given disease, very few common risk alleles have been confirmed. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Three common variants (Lys23 of KCNJ11, Pro12 of PPARG, and the T allele at rs7903146 of TCF7L2 have been shown to predispose to type 2 diabetes mellitus across many large studies. Risk allele frequencies ranged from 0.30 to 0.88 in controls. To assess the combined effect of multiple susceptibility alleles, we genotyped these variants in a large case-control study (3,668 controls versus 2,409 cases. Individual allele odds ratios (ORs ranged from 1.14 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05 to 1.23 to 1.48 (95% CI, 1.36 to 1.60. We found no evidence of gene-gene interaction, and the risks of multiple alleles were consistent with a multiplicative model. Each additional risk allele increased the odds of type 2 diabetes by 1.28 (95% CI, 1.21 to 1.35 times. Participants with all six risk alleles had an OR of 5.71 (95% CI, 1.15 to 28.3 compared to those with no risk alleles. The 8.1% of participants that were double-homozygous for the risk alleles at TCF7L2 and Pro12Ala had an OR of 3.16 (95% CI, 2.22 to 4.50, compared to 4.3% with no TCF7L2 risk alleles and either no or one Glu23Lys or Pro12Ala risk alleles. CONCLUSIONS: Combining information from several known common risk polymorphisms allows the identification of population subgroups with markedly differing risks of developing type 2 diabetes compared to those obtained using single polymorphisms. This approach may have a role in future preventative measures for common, polygenic diseases.

  9. Risk Factors for Incident Peripheral Arterial Disease in Type 2 Diabetes: Results From the Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation in Type 2 Diabetes (BARI 2D) Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Althouse, Andrew D.; Abbott, J . Dawn; Forker, Alan D.; Bertolet, Marnie; Barinas-Mitchell, Emma; Thurston, Rebecca C.; Mulukutla, Suresh; Aboyans, Victor; Brooks, Maria Mori; ,

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this article was to define risk factors for incidence of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in a large cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), overall and within the context of differing glycemic control strategies. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation in Type 2 Diabetes (BARI 2D) randomized controlled trial assigned participants to insulin-sensitizing (IS) therapy versus insulin-providing (IP) therapy. A total...

  10. Types of Maize Virus Diseases and Progress in Virus Identification Techniques in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cui Yu; Zhang Ai-hong; Ren Ai-jun; Miao Hong-qin

    2014-01-01

    There are a total of more than 40 reported maize viral diseases worldwide. Five of them have reportedly occurred in China. They are maize rough dwarf disease, maize dwarf mosaic disease, maize streak dwarf disease, maize crimson leaf disease, maize wallaby ear disease and corn lethal necrosis disease. This paper reviewed their occurrence and distribution as well as virus identification techniques in order to provide a basis for virus identification and diagnosis in corn production.

  11. Miglustat therapy in the French cohort of paediatric patients with Niemann-Pick disease type C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héron Bénédicte

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Niemann-Pick disease type C (NP-C is a rare neurovisceral lysosomal lipid storage disease characterized by progressive neurological deterioration. Published data on the use of miglustat in paediatric patients in clinical practice settings are limited. We report findings from a prospective open-label study in the French paediatric NP-C cohort. Methods Data on all paediatric NP-C patients treated with miglustat in France between October 2006 and December 2010 were compiled. All patients had a confirmed diagnosis of NP-C, and received miglustat therapy according to manufacturer’s recommendations. Pre-treatment and follow-up assessments were conducted according to a standardized protocol. Results Twenty children were enrolled; 19 had NPC1 gene mutations and 1 had NPC2 gene mutations. The median age at diagnosis was 1.5 years, and the median age at miglustat initiation was 6.0 years. Eight NPC1 patients had the early-infantile, eight had the late-infantile, and three had the juvenile-onset forms of NP-C. A history of hepatosplenomegaly and/or other cholestatic symptoms was recorded in all 8 early-infantile onset patients, 3/8 late-infantile patients, and 1/3 juvenile onset patients. Brain imaging indicated white matter abnormalities in most patients. The median (range duration of miglustat therapy was 1.3 (0.6–2.3 years in early-infantile, 1.0 (0.8–5.0 year in late-infantile, and 1.0 (0.6–2.5 year in juvenile onset patients. NP-C disability scale scores indicated either stabilization or improvement of neurological manifestations in 1/8, 6/8, and 1/3 NPC1 patients in these subgroups, respectively. There were no correlations between brain imaging findings and disease course. Mild-to-moderate gastrointestinal disturbances were frequent during the first 3 months of miglustat therapy, but were easily managed with dietary modifications and/or anti-propulsive medication. Conclusions Miglustat can improve or stabilize neurological

  12. Bovine type III interferon significantly delays and reduces the severity of foot-and-mouth disease in cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interferons (IFNs) are the first line of defense against viral infections. Although type I and II IFNs have proven effective to inhibit foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) replication in swine, a similar approach has had only limited efficacy in cattle. Recently, a new family of IFNs, type III IFN o...

  13. Enhanced Antiviral Activity against Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus by a Combination of Type 1 and 2 Porcine Interfereons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previously, we showed that type I interferon (IFN alpha/beta) can inhibit foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) replication in cell culture and swine inoculated with 109 pfu human adenovirus type 5 expressing porcine IFN-alpha (Ad5-pIFN alpha) were protected when challenged one day later. In this stud...

  14. Co-occurrence of type 1 diabetes mellitus and celiac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    The co-occurrence of celiac disease (CD) and type 1diabetes (T1DM) has been reported as 5-7 times moreprevalent than CD alone. The clinical presentation andnatural history of CD in patients with T1DM may varyconsiderably. Less than 10% of patients with T1DMand CD show gastrointestinal symptoms. Therefore,experts support screening for CD in T1DM patients,though there is no consensus as to the recommendedfrequency of screening. When stratified by time sinceCD diagnosis, longer follow-up and coexistence of CDare associated with significant increased risk of diabeticassociated morbidity and mortality. Early CD diagnosisand treatment with a gluten-free diet are essential.

  15. Plasma copeptin as marker of cardiovascular disease in asymptomatic type 2 diabetes patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bar-Shalom, Dana; Poulsen, Mikael K; Rasmussen, Lars M;

    2014-01-01

    Recently, copeptin was found associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and all-cause mortality in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients treated in primary care. This study aimed to evaluate whether plasma copeptin correlated to CVD in asymptomatic T2DM patients intensively investigated for....... A variety of clinical investigations were performed, including blood pressure measurements, carotid intima media thickness evaluation and myocardial perfusion scintigraphy. Blood sample analyses included copeptin measurements. Median plasma copeptin concentrations were similar in the T2DM group and...... the control group. However, men had significantly higher copeptin concentrations than women in the T2DM group (p < 0.001), and also, T2DM men had significantly higher copeptin concentrations than men without T2DM (p = 0.038). Copeptin correlated significantly with a number of variables, but the...

  16. Screening for coeliac disease in adult patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus: myths, facts and controversy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Sjoerd F; Tushuizen, Maarten E; von Blomberg, Boudewina M E; Bontkes, Hetty J; Mulder, Chris J; Simsek, Suat

    2016-01-01

    This review aims at summarizing the present knowledge on the clinical consequences of concomitant coeliac disease (CD) in adult patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). The cause of the increased prevalence of CD in T1DM patients is a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Current screening guidelines for CD in adult T1DM patients are not uniform. Based on the current evidence of effects of CD on bone mineral density, diabetic complications, quality of life, morbidity and mortality in patients with T1DM, we advise periodic screening for CD in adult T1DM patients to prevent delay in CD diagnosis and subsequent CD and/or T1DM related complications. PMID:27478507

  17. Two Siblings with Adolescent/Adult Onset Niemann-Pick Disease Type C in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su-Yun; Lee, Hyung Jin; Kim, Seong Hwan; Jeong, Young Jin; Jin, Hee Kyung; Bae, Jae-Sung; Cheon, Sang-Myung; Kim, Jae Woo

    2016-07-01

    Niemann-Pick disease, type C (NP-C), is caused by NPC1 or NPC2 gene mutations. Progressive neurological, psychiatric, and visceral symptoms are characteristic. Here, we present cases of a brother (Case 1) and sister (Case 2) in their mid-20s with gait disturbance and psychosis. For the Case 1, neurological examination revealed dystonia, ataxia, vertical supranuclear-gaze palsy (VSGP), and global cognitive impairment. Case 2 showed milder, but similar symptoms, with cortical atrophy. Abdominal computed tomography showed hepatosplenomegaly in both cases. NPC1 gene sequencing revealed compound heterozygote for exon 9 (c.1552C>T [R518W]) and exon 18 (c.2780C>T [A927V]). Filipin-staining tests were also positive. When a young patient with ataxia or dystonia shows VSGP, NP-C should be considered. PMID:27366019

  18. Impact of chronic kidney disease on the prevalence of cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes in Spain: PERCEDIME2 study

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez-Poncelas, Antonio; Coll-de Tuero, Gabriel; Turrò-Garriga, Oriol; Barrot-de la Puente, Joan; Franch-Nadal, Josep; Mundet-Tuduri, Xavier; ,

    2014-01-01

    Background The presence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) increases the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) regardless of the presence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. There is controversy about the impact of each of the manifestations of CKD on the prevalence of CVD, whether it is greater with decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) or increased urine albumin creatinine ratio (UACR). Methods This study is a national cross-sectional s...

  19. Plasma osteoprotegerin is related to carotid and peripheral arterial disease, but not to myocardial ischemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Høilund-Carlsen Poul F

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD is frequent in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients due to accelerated atherosclerosis. Plasma osteoprotegerin (OPG has evolved as a biomarker for CVD. We examined the relationship between plasma OPG levels and different CVD manifestations in type 2 diabetes. Methods Type 2 diabetes patients without known CVD referred consecutively to a diabetes clinic for the first time (n = 305, aged: 58.6 ± 11.3 years, diabetes duration: 4.5 ± 5.3 years were screened for carotid arterial disease, peripheral arterial disease, and myocardial ischemia by means of carotid artery ultrasonography, peripheral ankle and toe systolic blood pressure measurements, and myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS. In addition, plasma OPG concentrations and other CVD-related markers were measured. Results The prevalence of carotid arterial disease, peripheral arterial disease, and myocardial ischemia was 42%, 15%, and 30%, respectively. Plasma OPG was significantly increased in patients with carotid and peripheral arterial disease compared to patients without (p Conclusions Increased plasma OPG concentration is associated with carotid and peripheral arterial disease in patients with type 2 diabetes, whereas no relation is observed with respect to myocardial ischemia on MPS. The reason for this discrepancy is unknown. Trial registration number at http://www.clinicaltrial.gov: NCT00298844

  20. Specific MAPK inhibitors prevent hyperglycemia-induced renal diseases in type 1 diabetic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Zhe; Hong, Zongyuan; Wu, Denglong; Nie, Hezhongrong

    2016-08-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and renin-angiotensin system (RAS) play critical roles in the process of renal diseases, but their interaction has not been comprehensively discussed. In the present studies, we investigated the renoprotective effects of MPAK inhibitors on renal diseases in type 1 diabetic mouse model, and clarify the crosstalk among MAPK signaling. Type 1 diabetic mouse model was established in male C57BL/6 J mice, and treated with or without 10 mg/kg MAPK blockers, including ERK inhibitor PD98059, p38 inhibitor SB203850, and JNK inhibitor SP600125 for four weeks. Hyperglycemia induced renal injuries, but treating them with MAPK inhibitors significantly decreased glomerular volume and glycogen in renal tissues. Although slightly changed body weight and fasting blood glucose levels, MAPK inhibitors attenuated blood urea nitrogen, urea protein, and microalbuminuria. Administration also reduced the diabetes-induced RAS activation, including angiotensin II converting enzyme (c) and Ang II, which contributed to its renal protective effects in the diabetic mice. In addition, the anti-RAS of MAPK inhibitor treatment markedly reduced gene expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and inducible nitric oxide synthase, fibrotic accumulation, and transforming growth factor-β1 levels in renal tissues. Furthermore, chemical inhibitors and genetic siRNA results identified the crosstalk among the three MAPK signaling, and proved JNK signaling played a critical role in MAPK-mediated ACE pathway in hyperglycemia state. Collectively, these results support the therapeutic effects of MAPK-specific inhibitors, especially JNK inactivation, on hyperglycemia-induced renal damages. PMID:27389030