WorldWideScience

Sample records for charcot foot reconstruction

  1. Ostectomy and Medial Plantar Artery Flap Reconstruction for Charcot Foot Ulceration Involving the Midfoot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tomoya; Ichioka, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Charcot foot is a serious complication of diabetes, characterized by deformity and overlying ulceration. The condition most commonly affects the midfoot. However, little information is available on the use of a medial plantar artery flap to treat diabetic midfoot ulceration. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the versatility of ostectomy and medial plantar flap reconstruction for midfoot plantar ulceration associated with rocker-bottom deformity secondary to Charcot foot. Four patients underwent ostectomy and medial plantar flap reconstruction. Before flap reconstruction, the devitalized soft tissues and bone were radically resected. After the infection had been controlled, the ulcerated portion was minimally excised, and the bony prominence underlying the ulcer was removed. A medial plantar artery flap was applied to the ulcer. The donor site was covered with a split-thickness skin graft or artificial dermis. In all patients, the ulcers healed and independent ambulation was achieved. However, 1 patient experienced ulcer recurrence, and subsequent infection necessitated a major amputation. Limb salvage is challenging in the setting of deformity and intractable plantar ulceration. The advantages of medial plantar artery flap reconstruction are that tissues with a rich blood supply are used to cover the exposed bone, and the flap can withstand the pressure and shear stress of the patient's body weight. However, a dominant artery in the foot is sacrificed. Therefore, the patency of the dorsalis pedis artery must be confirmed in every patient. The results of the present study have demonstrated that a medial plantar artery can be an effective alternative for diabetic patients with a plantar ulcer secondary to Charcot foot. PMID:26190780

  2. Imaging of Charcot foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The onset of a Charcot foot ist a feared complication of a long lasting diabetes mellitus. A peripheral neuropathy and continuous weight bearing of the foot subsequent to repeated traumas depict the conditions. There exist three types of a Charcot foot, an atrophic, a hypertophic and a mixed type. In early stages a differentiation from osteoarthritis is difficult. Subluxation or luxation within the Lisfranc's joint is typical. The joints of the foot could rapidly and extensively be destroyed or may present the morphology of a 'superosteoarthritis'. Often, soft tissue infections or osteomyelitis evolve from ulcers of the skin as entry points. Diagnosis of osteomyelitis necessitate MR imaging as plain radiography offers only low sensitivity for detection of an osteomyelitis. The existence of periosteal reactions is not a proof for osteomyelitis. Bone marrow edema and soft tissue edema also appear in a non infected Charcot foot. The range of soft tissue infections goes from cellulitis over phlegmon to abscesses. The ghost sign is the most suitable diagnostic criterion for osteomyelitis. In addition, the penumbra sign or the existence of a sinus tract between a skin ulcer and the affected bone may be helpful. (orig.)

  3. Surgical treatment of the Charcot foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzur, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    With the increased number of diabetics worldwide and the increased incidence of morbid obesity in more prosperous cultures, there has become an increased awareness of Charcot arthropathy of the foot and ankle. Outcome studies would suggest that patients with deformity associated with Charcot Foot arthropathy have impaired health related quality of life. This awareness has led reconstructive-minded foot and ankle surgeons to develop surgical strategies to treat these acquired deformities. This article outlines the current clinical approach to this disabling medical condition. PMID:26813619

  4. An overview of the Charcot foot pathophysiology

    OpenAIRE

    ÖĞÜT, Tahir; Kaynak, Gökhan; Birsel, Olgar; Güven, Mehmet Fatih

    2013-01-01

    Charcot arthropathy of the foot is a rare but devastating complication of diabetes that remains to be a challenging issue for the foot and ankle surgeons. Charcot foot fails to be an obvious diagnostic option that comes to mind, even in a pathognomonic clinical appearance. The rarity of the disorder, more common pathologies that mimic the condition, and the self-limiting prognosis deviate the clinician from the right diagnosis. The clinical challenges in the diagnosis of Charcot foot require ...

  5. Imaging of Charcot foot; Bildgebung des Charcot-Fusses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erlemann, Rainer; Schmitz, Annette [Helios Klinikum Duisburg, Helios St. Johannes Klinik, Duisburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    2014-03-15

    The onset of a Charcot foot ist a feared complication of a long lasting diabetes mellitus. A peripheral neuropathy and continuous weight bearing of the foot subsequent to repeated traumas depict the conditions. There exist three types of a Charcot foot, an atrophic, a hypertophic and a mixed type. In early stages a differentiation from osteoarthritis is difficult. Subluxation or luxation within the Lisfranc's joint is typical. The joints of the foot could rapidly and extensively be destroyed or may present the morphology of a 'superosteoarthritis'. Often, soft tissue infections or osteomyelitis evolve from ulcers of the skin as entry points. Diagnosis of osteomyelitis necessitate MR imaging as plain radiography offers only low sensitivity for detection of an osteomyelitis. The existence of periosteal reactions is not a proof for osteomyelitis. Bone marrow edema and soft tissue edema also appear in a non infected Charcot foot. The range of soft tissue infections goes from cellulitis over phlegmon to abscesses. The ghost sign is the most suitable diagnostic criterion for osteomyelitis. In addition, the penumbra sign or the existence of a sinus tract between a skin ulcer and the affected bone may be helpful. (orig.)

  6. Combined Internal and External Fixation for Diabetic Charcot Reconstruction: A Retrospective Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegewald, Kenneth W; Wilder, Megan L; Chappell, Todd M; Hutchinson, Byron L

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic Charcot neuroarthropathy is a complex, limb-threatening disease process with major lifestyle-altering repercussions for patients. When Charcot neuroarthropathy leads to unstable deformity, ulceration, and potential infection despite conservative therapies, foot and ankle surgeons often consider reconstructive limb salvage procedures to restore function. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcomes of diabetic Charcot reconstruction using combined internal and external fixation. A total of 22 patients were reviewed; 16 (72.73%) midfoot and 6 (27.27%) tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis procedures were consecutively performed from March 2009 to May 2013. All surgical procedures were performed in nonacute phases of the Charcot process in patients with diagnosed diabetes mellitus and documented peripheral neuropathy. Patients were excluded from the study if they were not diabetic despite having undergone Charcot reconstruction, regardless of the fixation method, or if they did not complete radiographic imaging. During a mean follow-up period of 58.60 ± 42.37 (range 16 to 164) weeks, limb salvage was achieved in 20 patients (90.91%), and 2 (9.09%) required below-the-knee amputation at a mean of 42 ± 14.14 weeks. Wound dehiscence occurred in 8 (36.36%), pin tract infection in 10 (45.45%), and superficial wound infection in 9 (40.91%) and peaked in bimodal fashion at 4 and 8 weeks postoperatively. Radiographic analysis of the pre- versus postoperative alignment showed statistically significant changes in the lateral talo-first metatarsal angle (p = .02) and lateral talar declination angle (p = .01). The limb salvage rates with diabetic Charcot reconstruction are improving in part because of the continued development of increasingly superior modalities for both internal and external fixation. PMID:26188625

  7. Pressure pain perception in the diabetic Charcot foot: facts and hypotheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernst A. Chantelau

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background:Reduced traumatic and posttraumatic (nociceptive pain is a key feature of diabetic neuropathy. Underlying condition is a gradual degeneration of endings of pain nerves (A-delta fibers and C-fibers, which operate as receivers of noxious stimuli (nociceptors. Hence, the absence of A-delta fiber mediated sharp pain (“first” pain, and of C-fiber mediated dull pain (“second” pain. However, patients with diabetic neuropathy and acute Charcot foot often experience deep dull aching in the Charcot foot while walking on it. Aim: To create a unifying hypothesis on the kind of pain in an acute Charcot foot. Result: Absence of punctuate (pinprick pain perception at the sole of a Charcot foot, as was shown recently, likely corresponds to vanished intraepidermal A-delta fiber endings. C-fiber nociceptors are reduced, according to histopathology studies. Both types of fibers contribute to posttraumatic hyperalgesia at the skin level, as studies show. Their deficiencies likely impact on posttraumatic hyperalgesia at the skin level and, probably, also at the skeletal level. Conclusion: It is hypothesised that deep dull aching in an acute diabetic Charcot foot may represent faulty posttraumatic hyperalgesia involving cutaneous and skeletal tissues.

  8. Osteomyelitis or Charcot neuroosteoarthropathy? Differentiating these disorders in diabetic patients with a foot problem

    OpenAIRE

    Bulent M. Ertugrul; Lipsky, Benjamin A; Savk, Oner

    2013-01-01

    Both osteomyelitis and Charcot neuro-osteoarthropathy (CN) are potentially limb-threatening complications of diabetic neuropathy, but they require quite different treatments. Almost all bone infections in the diabetic foot originate from an infected foot ulcer while diabetic osteoarthropathy is a non-infectious process in which peripheral neuropathy plays the critical role. Differentiating between diabetic foot osteomyelitis and CN requires careful evaluation of the patient, including the med...

  9. Osteomyelitis or Charcot neuro-osteoarthropathy? Differentiating these disorders in diabetic patients with a foot problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulent M. Ertugrul

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Both osteomyelitis and Charcot neuro-osteoarthropathy (CN are potentially limb-threatening complications of diabetic neuropathy, but they require quite different treatments. Almost all bone infections in the diabetic foot originate from an infected foot ulcer while diabetic osteoarthropathy is a non-infectious process in which peripheral neuropathy plays the critical role. Differentiating between diabetic foot osteomyelitis and CN requires careful evaluation of the patient, including the medical history, physical examination, selected laboratory findings, and imaging studies. Based on available studies, we review the approaches to the diagnostic differentiation of osteomyelitis from CN of the foot in diabetic patients.

  10. Osteomyelitis or Charcot neuro-osteoarthropathy? Differentiating these disorders in diabetic patients with a foot problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertugrul, Bulent M; Lipsky, Benjamin A; Savk, Oner

    2013-01-01

    Both osteomyelitis and Charcot neuro-osteoarthropathy (CN) are potentially limb-threatening complications of diabetic neuropathy, but they require quite different treatments. Almost all bone infections in the diabetic foot originate from an infected foot ulcer while diabetic osteoarthropathy is a non-infectious process in which peripheral neuropathy plays the critical role. Differentiating between diabetic foot osteomyelitis and CN requires careful evaluation of the patient, including the medical history, physical examination, selected laboratory findings, and imaging studies. Based on available studies, we review the approaches to the diagnostic differentiation of osteomyelitis from CN of the foot in diabetic patients. PMID:24205433

  11. Routine MRI findings of the asymptomatic foot in diabetic patients with unilateral Charcot foot

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    Poll Ludger W

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Imaging studies of bones in patients with sensory deficits are scarce. Aim To investigate bone MR images of the lower limb in diabetic patients with severe sensory polyneuropathy, and in control subjects without sensory deficits. Methods Routine T1 weighted and T2-fat-suppressed-STIR-sequences without contrast media were performed of the asymptomatic foot in 10 diabetic patients with polyneuropathy and unilateral inactive Charcot foot, and in 10 matched and 10 younger, non-obese unmatched control subjects. Simultaneously, a Gadolinium containing phantom was also assessed for reference. T1 weighted signal intensity (SI was recorded at representative regions of interest at the peritendineal soft tissue, the tibia, the calcaneus, and at the phantom. Any abnormal skeletal morphology was also recorded. Results Mean SI at the soft tissue, the calcaneus, and the tibia, respectively, was 105%, 105% and 84% of that at the phantom in the matched and unmatched control subjects, compared to 102% (soft tissue, 112% (calcaneus and 64% (tibia in the patients; differences of tibia vs. calcaneus or soft tissue were highly significant (p Conclusion MR imaging did not reveal grossly abnormal bone marrow signalling in the limbs with severe sensory polyneuropathy, but occult sequelae of previous traumatic injuries.

  12. Charcot foot in diabetes and an update on imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Ergen, Fatma Bilge; Sanverdi, Saziye Eser; Oznur, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Charcot neuroarthropathy (CN) is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus that can cause major morbidity including limb amputation. Since it was first described in 1883, and attributed to diabetes mellitus in 1936, the diagnosis of CN has been very challenging even for the experienced practitioners. Imaging plays a central role in the early and accurate diagnosis of CN, and in distinction of CN from osteomyelitis. Conventional radiography, computed tomography, nuclear medicine scintigraphy...

  13. Sudeck's disease stage 1, or diabetic Charcot's foot stage 0? Case report and assessment of the diagnostic value of MRI

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    Poll Ludger W

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The diagnosis of Sudeck's syndrome stage 1 (nowadays termed complex regional pain syndrome I, abbreviated CRPS I is based on clinical features, namely swelling and pain in a limb. Plain X-ray may be normal. In the absence of pain sensitivity, e.g. in diabetic neuropathy, CRPS I of the foot can be mistaken for Charcot's foot stage 0 (so-called neuro-osteoarthropathy. Case presentation The case of a type-1 diabetic woman is reported, in whom CRPS I following a calcaneal fracture was mistaken for Charcot's osteoarthropathy (because of bone marrow edema displayed by conventional MR imaging. In addition, a review is presented on 6 consecutive cases with CRPS I of the foot, and on 20 cases with Charcot's foot stage 0, with particular emphasis on MR imaging findings. The number of bones per foot affected with marrow edema was similar in either condition, with a tendency towards a more patchy, diffuse distribution of bone marrow edema in CRPS I. Bone marrow edema apparently regressed more promptly in response to treatment in Charcot's foot stage 0. Conclusion Differentiation of CRPS I from Charcot's foot stage 0 remains a diagnostic dilemma in patients with pain insensitivity. Conventional MRI may be helpful, when repeated for monitoring the treatment response.

  14. Criteria of immobilization duration of the affected foot in diabetic Charcot neuro-osteoarthropathy

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    Anastasia Gennadyevna Demina

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Long-term offloading is the key factor in the treatment of the acute stage of Charcot foot. The indication for remobilization and transition of the affected foot to weight-bearing activities is believed to be based on two factors: the absence of the clinical signs of inflammation and results of the objective diagnostic tests. At the present time, consensus about appropriate methods sufficient for initiating weight-bearing activities after immobilization is absent. This paper discusses current data on clinical and laboratory tests and methods and describes their advantages and disadvantages.

  15. Charcot foot in diabetes and an update on imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Bilge Ergen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Charcot neuroarthropathy (CN is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus that can cause major morbidity including limb amputation. Since it was first described in 1883, and attributed to diabetes mellitus in 1936, the diagnosis of CN has been very challenging even for the experienced practitioners. Imaging plays a central role in the early and accurate diagnosis of CN, and in distinction of CN from osteomyelitis. Conventional radiography, computed tomography, nuclear medicine scintigraphy, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography are the imaging techniques currently in use for the evaluation of CN but modalities other than magnetic resonance imaging appeared to be complementary. This study focuses on imaging findings of acute and chronic neuropathic osteoarthropathy in diabetes and discrimination of infected vs. non-infected neuropathic osteoarthropathy.

  16. Charcot foot in diabetes and an update on imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergen, Fatma Bilge; Sanverdi, Saziye Eser; Oznur, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Charcot neuroarthropathy (CN) is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus that can cause major morbidity including limb amputation. Since it was first described in 1883, and attributed to diabetes mellitus in 1936, the diagnosis of CN has been very challenging even for the experienced practitioners. Imaging plays a central role in the early and accurate diagnosis of CN, and in distinction of CN from osteomyelitis. Conventional radiography, computed tomography, nuclear medicine scintigraphy, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography are the imaging techniques currently in use for the evaluation of CN but modalities other than magnetic resonance imaging appeared to be complementary. This study focuses on imaging findings of acute and chronic neuropathic osteoarthropathy in diabetes and discrimination of infected vs. non-infected neuropathic osteoarthropathy. PMID:24273635

  17. Lisfranc fracture-dislocation precipitating acute Charcot arthopathy in a neuropathic diabetic foot: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeoh, Joey; Muir, Kenneth Ross; Dissanayake, Ajith Munasinghe; Tzu-Chieh, Wendy Yu

    2008-01-01

    The Lisfranc injury is relatively uncommon yet remains popular in the literature due to its variable causative mechanisms and subtleties in radiographic features despite its potential for disabling long term outcomes if treatment is inadequate, inappropriate or delayed. These injuries are especially pertinent in diabetic patients, especially those with neuropathy, since they are more common, can lead to Charcot neuropathic joint, ulcers and have different causative mechanisms compared to the general population. We describe the case of a neuropathic diabetic patient who presented with a Lisfranc injury which precipitated the development of acute Charcot arthropathy in the right foot. The case serves to illustrate several salient points about the Lisfranc joint and related injuries in diabetic patients. PMID:18973700

  18. [Charcot's arthropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, T.M.; Yderstraede, K.; Ejskjaer, N.; Jakobsen, P.E.; Kjaer, I.L.; Levin, S.; Nielsen, A.L.; Svendsen, O.L.; Holstein, P.

    2008-01-01

    Charcot's arthropathy is a rare complication to diabetes with peripheral neuropathy. The diagnosis is based on a red, oedematous foot with 2 degrees C difference in skin temperature between the affected foot compared to the unaffected foot. The condition is characterised by fractures, dislocation...

  19. A literature-based guide to the conservative and surgical management of the acute Charcot foot and ankle

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    Valerie L. Schade

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute Charcot neuroarthropathy of the foot and ankle presents with the insidious onset of a unilateral acutely edematous, erythematous, and warm lower extremity. The acute stages are typically defined as Eichenholtz Stage 1, or Stage 0, which was first described by Shibata et al. in 1990. The ultimate goal of treatment is maintenance of a stable, plantigrade foot which can be easily shod, minimizing the risk of callus, ulceration, infection, and amputation. The gold standard of treatment is non-weight-bearing immobilization in a total contact cast. Surgical intervention remains controversial. A review of the literature was performed to provide an evidenced-based approach to the conservative and surgical management of acute Charcot neuroarthropathy of the foot and ankle.

  20. Bone mineral density in diabetes mellitus patients with and without a Charcot foot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tomas M; Bülow, Jens; Simonsen, Lene;

    2010-01-01

    To measure bone mineral density in patients with diabetes mellitus and the complication Charcot osteoarthropathy (CA).......To measure bone mineral density in patients with diabetes mellitus and the complication Charcot osteoarthropathy (CA)....

  1. Microsurgical Reconstruction of Plantar Ulcers of the Insensate Foot.

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    Kadam, Dinesh

    2016-06-01

    Background Plantar, neuropathic, or trophic ulcers are often found in patients with decreased sensation in the foot. These ulcers can be complicated by infection, deformity, and increased patient morbidity. Excision results in wider defects and local tissues are often insufficient for reconstruction Methods Total 26 free flaps were used in 25 patients to reconstruct plantar ulcers between years 2007 and 2013. The etiology included diabetic neuropathy (n = 13), leprosy (n = 3), spinal/peripheral nerve injury (n = 7), spina bifida (n = 1), and peripheral neuropathy (n = 1). The duration of the ulcer ranged from 1 to 18 years. Fifteen patients had associated systemic comorbidities and six had previous attempts. Free flaps used in reconstruction were the anterolateral thigh flap (n = 18), radial artery forearm flap (n = 4), and the gracilis muscle flap (n = 4). Recipient vessels were the posterior tibial artery (end to side) in 19 and the dorsalis pedis artery in 7. Results The average age at presentation was 44.6 years with mean duration of ulcer of 5.8 years predominantly located over weight-bearing areas. Mean size of ulcer was 59.45 cm(2) and mean follow-up period was 48 months. All flaps survived except a partial loss. Average time to resume ambulation was 6 weeks. Three patients had recurrence with mean follow-up of 48 months. Secondary flap reduction and bony resection was done in four. Conclusion Microvascular reconstruction of the sole has advantages of vascularity, adequate tissue, and leaving rest of the foot undisturbed for offloading. Three significant local conditions influencing selection and transfer of the flap include (1) distally located forefoot ulcers, (2) extensive subcutaneous fibrosis secondary to frequent inflammation, and (3) Charcot arthropathy. In our series, the anterolateral thigh flap is our first choice for reconstruction of these defects. PMID:26910652

  2. Role of dynamic MRI in the follow-up of acute Charcot foot in patients with diabetes mellitus

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    Zampa, Virna; Bargellini, Irene; Turini, Francesca; Ortori, Simona; Bartolozzi, Carlo [University of Pisa, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Pisa (Italy); Rizzo, Loredana; Piaggesi, Alberto [University of Pisa, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Diabetic Foot Section, Pisa (Italy)

    2011-08-15

    To evaluate the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in assessing the level of activity of acute Charcot foot, monitoring treatment response and predicting healing time. Forty diabetic patients with acute Charcot foot were prospectively enrolled. Patients underwent limb immobilization and were followed every 3 months by clinical examination (skin temperature and circumferences) and MRI. MR protocol included T1-weighted and fast spin echo inversion recovery (FSE-IR) sequences, and a dynamic study (fast spoiled gradient echo), after gadolinium administration (0.1 ml/kg). The contrast medium uptake rate at D-MRI and the signal intensity (SI) ratio on the FSE-IR sequence were measured. At baseline, mean contrast medium uptake rate was 136{+-}49.7% and the mean SI ratio was 5{+-}3. A high intra- and inter-observer agreement was found for the contrast medium uptake rate, whereas a low agreement was observed for the SI ratio. At 3 months' follow-up, reduction of the contrast medium uptake rate was observed in all patients with improved clinical findings (n = 34), whereas the SI ratio was reduced in 15/34 (44.1%) patients. Mean healing time was significantly related to the baseline contrast medium uptake rate (P=0.005); it was 5.3 {+-} 2.7 months in patients with contrast medium uptake rate {<=}100%, compared with 9.1 {+-} 2.5 months in the remaining patients (P=0.0003). Contrast medium uptake rate obtained at D-MRI represents a reproducible parameter that is reliable for predicting and monitoring treatment outcome in acute Charcot foot. (orig.)

  3. Role of dynamic MRI in the follow-up of acute Charcot foot in patients with diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in assessing the level of activity of acute Charcot foot, monitoring treatment response and predicting healing time. Forty diabetic patients with acute Charcot foot were prospectively enrolled. Patients underwent limb immobilization and were followed every 3 months by clinical examination (skin temperature and circumferences) and MRI. MR protocol included T1-weighted and fast spin echo inversion recovery (FSE-IR) sequences, and a dynamic study (fast spoiled gradient echo), after gadolinium administration (0.1 ml/kg). The contrast medium uptake rate at D-MRI and the signal intensity (SI) ratio on the FSE-IR sequence were measured. At baseline, mean contrast medium uptake rate was 136±49.7% and the mean SI ratio was 5±3. A high intra- and inter-observer agreement was found for the contrast medium uptake rate, whereas a low agreement was observed for the SI ratio. At 3 months' follow-up, reduction of the contrast medium uptake rate was observed in all patients with improved clinical findings (n = 34), whereas the SI ratio was reduced in 15/34 (44.1%) patients. Mean healing time was significantly related to the baseline contrast medium uptake rate (P=0.005); it was 5.3 ± 2.7 months in patients with contrast medium uptake rate ≤100%, compared with 9.1 ± 2.5 months in the remaining patients (P=0.0003). Contrast medium uptake rate obtained at D-MRI represents a reproducible parameter that is reliable for predicting and monitoring treatment outcome in acute Charcot foot. (orig.)

  4. Den diabetiske Charcots fod

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tomas Møller; Yderstraede, Knud; Ejskjaer, Niels;

    2008-01-01

    Charcot's arthropathy is a rare complication to diabetes with peripheral neuropathy. The diagnosis is based on a red, oedematous foot with 2 degrees C difference in skin temperature between the affected foot compared to the unaffected foot. The condition is characterised by fractures, dislocation...

  5. Lisfranc fracture-dislocation precipitating acute Charcot arthopathy in a neuropathic diabetic foot: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Yeoh, Joey; Muir, Kenneth Ross; Dissanayake, Ajith Munasinghe; Tzu-Chieh, Wendy Yu

    2008-01-01

    The Lisfranc injury is relatively uncommon yet remains popular in the literature due to its variable causative mechanisms and subtleties in radiographic features despite its potential for disabling long term outcomes if treatment is inadequate, inappropriate or delayed. These injuries are especially pertinent in diabetic patients, especially those with neuropathy, since they are more common, can lead to Charcot neuropathic joint, ulcers and have different causative mechanisms compared to the ...

  6. Surgical reconstruction in diabetic foot syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umid Shoyusupov

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Considerable morbidity upon spontaneous wound healing (phlegmons, osteomyelitis, and purulent osteoarthritis of metatarsophalangeal joint as well as loss of the diseased foot’s walking ability are among the reasons for transition to plastic surgery in management tactics. The longer foot lesion persists, the higher probability of amputation. Improvement of treatment of both wound and ulcer lesions by means of reconstructive surgery in patients with diabetic foot syndrome was the main aim of the study. Outcomes of treatment of 460 patients managed at the Center for the Scientific and Clinical Study of Endocrinology, within the period from 2001 to 2009 were analyzed. Size, form, depth and localization of a wound, tissue composition of the wound bed as well as circulation in skin flaps caused the choice of specific operation: autodermoplasty by Parin (with the split-thickness skin flap, local tissue plastic operation (with the sliding or inter-advancing skin flaps, flaps from previously amputated toe or Indian flaps, plastic operation with the controlled tissue tension or combined plastic operation. Reconstructive foot wound surgery allows restoring load-bearing function of the extremity much earlier in contrast to spontaneous healing, reducing incidence of post-operative and long-term complications, amputations and re-amputations, decreasing period of treatment.

  7. Quantum dot-based diabetic foot mapping for diagnosing osteomyelitis and Charcot neuroarthropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Farzaneh; Nabipour, Iraj; Kalantarhormozi, Mohammadreza; Assadi, Tahereh; Raeisi, Alireza; Assadi, Majid

    2015-07-01

    The location of osteomyelitis is very important in Charcot neuroarthropathy (CN), especially when a physician is considering amputation of the affected extremity. In diabetic CN, the presence of osteomyelitis is likely. Thus, to identify the infected tissue that needs to be removed, the specific area of infection must be correctly identified. Both CN and osteomyelitis have high mortality rates, but osteomyelitis is more life threatening and needs aggressive treatment. We propose a QD-based method for distinguishing CN with sterile inflammation from osteomyelitis that does not require multiple and frequent imaging modalities. The method utilizes two different colored QDs (i.e., red and green). The red QD is attached to a UBI, an antimicrobial peptide, which attaches to bacteria, enabling their detection. The green QD is attached to MDP, which accumulates in areas of inflammation. When these QDs are injected intravenously at the same time, the red QD-UBI accumulates in infected areas and attaches to bacteria, and the green QD-MDP accumulates both in areas with sterile inflammation and infected areas. The accumulation of only green QDs in the suspect extremity signifies a sterile inflammation process (CN). However, the accumulation of both the red and green QDs signify infectious and inflammation processes (i.e., osteomyelitis or a soft tissue infection, depending on the location). In the latter case, the treatment needs to be more intensive, with even amputation considered. PMID:25801484

  8. Surgical Management of Charcot Deformity for the Foot and Ankle-Radiologic Outcome After Internal/External Fixation.

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    Ettinger, Sarah; Plaass, Christian; Claassen, Leif; Stukenborg-Colsman, Christina; Yao, Daiwei; Daniilidis, Kiriakos

    2016-01-01

    Charcot neuropathy (CN) is a severe joint disease that makes surgical planning very challenging, because it is combined with ankle instability, serious deformities, and recurrent ulceration. The aim of the present study was to examine the rate of bone fusion after external or internal fixation in patients with CN. We retrospectively examined 58 patients with CN who had undergone reconstruction of the ankle either with tibiotalocalcaneal or tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis. The mean age was 59.1 (range 26 to 81) years at surgery. Of the 58 patients, 38 were treated using intramedullary nail arthrodesis and 19 using an external fixator (1 patient received neither). At a mean follow-up period of 31.3 (range 12 to 57) months, limb salvage and bone fusion had been achieved in 94.83%. The mean time to bone fusion was 12 (range 6 to 18) months. Three patients (5.2%) required a more proximal amputation. All but these 3 patients gained independent mobilization in custom feet orthoses or off the shelf orthoses. Of the 58 patients in the present cohort, 56 (96.6%) would undergo surgery again. In conclusion, internal and external fixation both lead to promising results in the treatment of CN. Internal fixation should be preferred when no indications of ulcer or infection are present. PMID:26898396

  9. Three-phase bone scintigraphy for diagnosis of Charcot neuropathic osteoarthropathy in the diabetic foot - does quantitative data improve diagnostic value?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, M; Reving, S; Petersen, E H;

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether inclusion of quantitative data on blood flow distribution compared with visual qualitative evaluation improve the reliability and diagnostic performance of (99 m) Tc-hydroxymethylene diphosphate three-phase bone scintigraphy (TPBS) in patients suspected for charcot...... neuropathic osteoarthropathy (CNO) of the foot. METHOD: A retrospective cohort study of TPBS performed on 148 patients with suspected acute CNO referred from a single specialized diabetes care centre. The quantitative blood flow distribution was calculated based on the method described by Deutsch et al. All...... scintigraphies were re-evaluated by independent, blinded observers twice with and without quantitative data on blood flow distribution at ankle and focus level, respectively. The diagnostic validity of TPBS was determined by subsequent review of clinical data and radiological examinations. RESULTS: A total of 90...

  10. Reconstructive foot and ankle surgeries in diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajit Kumar Varma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic foot and ankle deformities are secondary to long-standing diabetes and neglected foot care. The concept of surgical correction for these deformities is quite recent. The primary objective of reconstructive foot and ankle surgery is the reduction of increased plantar pressures, reduction of pain and the restoration of function, stability and proper appearance. Foot and ankle deformities can result in significant disability, loss of life style, employment and even the loss of the lower limb. Therefore, restoration of normal, problem free foot function and activities will have a significant impact on peoples′ lives. Reconstructive surgical procedures are complex and during reconstruction, internal and external fixation devices, including pins, compression screws, staples, and wires, may be used for repair and stabilization. The surgeries performed depend on the type and severity of the condition. Surgery can involve any part of the foot and ankle, and may involve tendon, bone, joint, tissue or skin repair. Corrective surgeries can at times be performed on an outpatient basis with minimally invasive techniques. Recovery time depends on the type of condition being treated.

  11. Modification of hand reconstruction with unilateral foot donation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Cun-yi; LIU Xu-dong; CAI Pei-hua; JIANG Pei-zhu; YU Zhong-jia; ZENG Bing-fang

    2007-01-01

    @@ Multiple toes transplantation is an effective method for restoring the prehension of the hands.1-5 Generally, the thumb, index and middle finger are reconstructed by transferring a free big toe skin-nail flap with the second and third toes from a same foot. The great saphenous vein, superficial veins on the dorsum of the foot, the dorsalis pedis artery, and the first dorsal metatarsal artery are resected to be used as the donor pedicle. The arterial pedicle is freed up to the dorsal digital artery of the big and second toes. Both the second and third toes are supplied by the dorsal digital artery of the second toe on the tibial side. By using unilateral toe donation to reconstruct a digitless hand, we can preserve the normal form and function of the contralateral foot.However, because of the small length of the digital arteries between the big and second toes, the first web space is limited. Here we present our experiences on two cases of hand reconstruction with unilateral three toes transplantation. Good function and motion range of the thumb were achieved in both the patients.

  12. Dorsalis pedis arterialized venous flap for hand and foot reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Guang; LEI Hong-yu; GUO Shuang; HUANG Jian-hua; YU Hao

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To report the results of repair of skin defects in the extremities with arterialized venous flap harvested from the lateral aspect of the dorsum of the foot.Methods:Six cases of skin and soft tissue defects over the foot and hands were resurfaced by free arterialized venous flaps,including five patients with skin defects of the hands,and one with defects at the dorsum of the foot.The flaps were harvested from the lateral aspect of the dorsum of the foot with the sizes ranging from 2 cm×5.5 cm to 6 cm×11 cm.Two veins at the proximal margin of the flap were retained,one of which was anastomosed to a recipient bed artery to provide arterial inflow and the other was anastomosed to a recipient bed vein for venous outflow.Results:All flaps demonstrated mild edema and survived completely.Blisters appeared on four flaps.Using this technique,we achieved good functional and cosmetic results in this series.Conclusions:Dorsalis pedis arterialized venous flap with rich vascular communications could enhance peripheral perfusion and decrease congestion of venous flaps,thereby improves reliability and utility for extremity reconstruction.

  13. Sustainability of Forefoot Reconstruction for the Rheumatoid Foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitt, Kathie J; Rincker, Sarah A; Hyer, Christopher F

    2016-01-01

    Ninety percent of patients with rheumatoid arthritis will display foot and ankle pathologic features, including hallux valgus, lesser metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint subluxation/dislocation, and hammertoe deformity. Recently, a trend has ensued toward joint preservation with distal metatarsal osteotomies and various bunion corrective procedures. However, the reference standard remains first MTP joint fusion, lesser metatarsal head resection, and lesser proximal interphalangeal joint fusion. The present retrospective study followed the results of 4 different surgeons who had performed the reference standard rheumatoid forefoot reconstruction from August 2008 to August 2012 on patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Radiographic and statistical analysis of the data from 20 patients determined an overall first MTP joint fusion rate of 90%, often occurring by 108 (range 64 to 202) days postoperatively. Radiographic nonunion occurred in 2 of the 20 patients (10%), although both were asymptomatic, with no revision necessary. Lesser digit deformity revision occurred in 1 patient (5%), and mild to moderate infection developed in 4 patients (20%). The radiographic and clinical follow-up period was 12 months. Our study found that this technique provides exceptional radiographic improvement, an acceptable time to fusion, a low reoperation rate, and minimal complications. In addition, correction of the deformity was maintained at 1 year postoperatively. In conclusion, first MTP joint fusion with lesser metatarsal head resection should remain the reference standard for surgical intervention of the rheumatoid foot. PMID:26970909

  14. PCA-based 3D Shape Reconstruction of Human Foot Using Multiple Viewpoint Cameras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Edmée Amstutz; Tomoaki Teshima; Makoto Kimura; Masaaki Mochimaru; Hideo Saito

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a multiple camera-based method to reconstruct the 3D shape of a human foot. From a foot database,an initial 3D model of the foot represented by a cloud of points is built. The shape parameters, which can characterize more than 92% of a foot, are defined by using the principal component analysis method. Then, using "active shape models", the initial 3D model is adapted to the real foot captured in multiple images by applying some constraints (edge points' distance and color variance). We insist here on the experiment part where we demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method on a plastic foot model, and also on real human feet with various shapes. We propose and compare different ways of texturing the foot which is needed for reconstruction. We present an experiment performed on the plastic foot model and on human feet and propose two different ways to improve the final 3D shape's accuracy according to the previous experiments' results. The first improvement proposed is the densification of the cloud of points used to represent the initial model and the foot database. The second improvement concerns the projected patterns used to texture the foot. We conclude by showing the obtained results for a human foot with the average computed shape error being only 1.06mm.

  15. Prediction of complications in a high-risk cohort of patients undergoing corrective arthrodesis of late stage Charcot deformity based on the PEDIS score

    OpenAIRE

    Eschler, Anica; Gradl, Georg; Wussow, Annekatrin; Mittlmeier, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background All diabetic neuroosteoarthropathy (Charcot arthropathy) treatment concepts are focused on a long-term infection-free, ulcer-free, and plantigrade sufficiently stable foot in order to avoid amputation. Reconstructive arthrodesis techniques for severe deformities are associated with high postoperative complication rates. This study reports a detailed complication analysis and provides a strategy that may help detect patients at risk for a complicated postoperative course. Methods Th...

  16. Charcot's hysteria renaissant.

    OpenAIRE

    Critchley, E M; Cantor, H E

    1984-01-01

    The authenticity of Charcot's original descriptions of hysteria has been questioned in the popular media. None the less, it is still possible to encounter florid forms of hysteria in culturally deprived communities, and to answer Charcot's present day critics we present a selection of patients from Kentucky's Appalachian countries with hysterial neurological disease. Their case histories are contrasted with those Charcot himself described and thereby form a modern commentary on such condition...

  17. The role of an extended medial column arthrodesis for Charcot midfoot neuroarthropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Capobianco, Claire M; Stapleton, John J.; Zgonis, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The etiology of diabetic Charcot neuroarthropathy involving the midfoot often includes an inciting traumatic event or repetitive micro-trauma from an uncompensated biomechanical imbalance that potentiates an incompletely understood pathway that leads to a rocker-bottom foot deformity and ulceration. In the setting of a severe Charcot foot fracture and/or dislocation with obvious osseous instability, diagnostic delay can potentiate the limb threatening sequelae of infected midfoot ulcerations...

  18. Reconstruction of bilateral tibial aplasia and split hand-foot syndrome in a father and daughter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Al Kaissi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tibial aplasia is of heterogeneous aetiology, the majority of reports are sporadic. We describe the reconstruction procedures in two subjects - a daughter and father manifested autosomal dominant (AD inheritance of the bilateral tibial aplasia and split hand-foot syndrome. Materials and Methods: Reconstruction of these patients required multiple surgical procedures and orthoprosthesis was mandatory. The main goal of treatment was to achieve walking. Stabilization of the ankle joint by fibular-talar-chondrodesis on both sides, followed by bilateral Brown-procedure at the knee joint level has been applied accordingly. Results: The outcome was with improved function of the deformed limbs and walking was achieved with simultaneous designation of orthotic fitting. Conclusion: This is the first study encompassing the diagnosis and management of a father and daughter with bilateral tibial aplasia associated with variable split hand/foot deformity without foot ablation. Our patients showed the typical AD pattern of inheritance of split-hand/foot and tibial aplasia.

  19. Distally based sural lesser saphenous neuro-veno-adipo-fascial (NVAF) flap for reconstruction in the foot: lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kamlesh B; Bartholomew, Samuel V; Wong, Michael S; Stevenson, Thomas R

    2010-09-01

    We report nine cases in which the neuro-veno-adipo-fascial (NVAF) flap was used to perform reconstruction of foot wounds over a 7-year period. Complications occurred in five (56%) patients. One patient suffered total loss of the flap and four experienced partial loss of the NVAF flap. Complications are to be expected with the use of the NVAF flap for foot wounds, but in most cases the flap is salvageable. The NVAF flap is an option in foot reconstruction when free tissue transfer is not available, contraindicated due to patient factors or when a prior free flap has failed. PMID:20655007

  20. Adipofascial sural artery flap for foot and ankle reconstruction in children: for better aesthetic outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheel spoke injury of the ankle and foot is very common in children and its reconstruction is challenging. Reverse flow sural artery fasciocutaneous flap is versatile for this area but lead to significant donor site morbidity. Free tissue transfer is an option in children which needs a micro-vascular expertise, expensive equipment and long operating time. Method: Fifteen adipofascial flaps were done for foot and ankle coverage from June 2011 to June 2014 at CH and ICH Lahore. The efficacy of adipofascial sural artery flap for the coverage of these defects was evaluated. Results: Fifteen children presented with defects of foot and ankle, 11 (73%) were male and 4 (27%) were female. Their age ranged from 1 - 13 years. All patients had trauma to the foot due to wheel spoke injury. Flaps were used to cover tendoachilles and malleoli. In one patient there was flap tip necrosis with partial graft loss which healed with dressings. Donor site aesthetic outcome was satisfactory in all cases. Mean follow-up was I year. Conclusion: Adipofascial Sural artery flap is quick and safe with wide arc of rotation, minimal donor site morbidity and better aesthetic outcome and it does not sacrifice major extremity vessel. (author)

  1. Use of the semitendinosus tendon for foot and ankle tendon reconstructions,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico Lutti Guerra de Aguiar Zink

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To demonstrate the results obtained from foot and ankle tendon reconstructions using the tendon of the semitendinosus muscle. The clinical results, the patient's degree of satisfaction and complications in the graft donor and recipient areas were evaluated.Methods:This was a retrospective study in which the medical files of 38 patients who underwent this surgical procedure between 2006 and 2010 were surveyed. The functional results from this technique, the complications in the donor and recipient areas and the patients' degree of satisfaction were evaluated.Results:Three patients presented complications in the recipient area (skin necrosis; one patient showed complications in the donor area (pain and insensitivity; and all patients had satisfactory functional results, with complete range of motion.Conclusion:The semitendinosus muscle is a good option for treatments for foot and ankle tendon injuries.

  2. Comparison of Arthrodesis with Total Contact Casting for Midfoot Ulcerations Associated with Charcot Neuroarthropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yan; Zhou, Junlin; Yan, Fen; Li, Gong; Duan, Xiaofen; PAN, HENG; He, Jiao

    2015-01-01

    Background Gross deformity of the foot in Charcot neuroarthropathy can lead to foot collapse and subsequent ulceration, infection, amputation, or premature death. Total-contact casting (TCC) is a well-established treatment for neuropathic diabetic plantar foot ulcers. It was hypothesized that arthrodesis plus TCC may have advantages over TCC alone. This pilot study compared the effectiveness of arthrodesis plus TCC with TCC alone for the prevention, treatment, and recurrence of midfoot ulcera...

  3. The diabetic foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Familiarity with the spectrum of findings in the different imaging modalities appears essential. Radiographically, significant changes include Charcot joints of the tarsus (destructive type) and bone absorption of the forefoot (mutilating type). In diabetic foot problems, magnetic resonance imaging and leukocyte scintigraphy appear to be the most effective tools for detection of osteomyelitis, and a negative study makes osteomyelitis unlikely. However, the findings of both techniques in active, noninfected neuropathic osteoarthropathy may be indistinguishable from those of osteomyelitis. (orig.)

  4. Diabetic Lisfranc fracture-dislocations and Charcot neuroarthropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Bradley A; Stapleton, John J; Zgonis, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    The goal with Lisfranc fracture-dislocations is to regain joint congruity and reestablish midfoot stability to avoid debilitating posttraumatic arthrosis and chronic pain in the sensate patient. In the diabetic population, dense peripheral neuropathy and/or vascular disease are equally important and may alter the surgical approach to traumatic tarsometatarsal injuries. The initial diagnosis in the diabetic population may be delayed due to subtle radiographic findings and/or patient unawareness of trauma in the insensate foot. Failure to initiate treatment in the early stages of acute diabetic neuropathic Lisfranc injuries can predispose the patient to midfoot instability, potential ulceration, infection, and Charcot neuroarthropathy. PMID:23465814

  5. Reconstruction of Soft-Tissue Defects at the Foot and Ankle after Oncological Resection

    OpenAIRE

    Ring, Andrej; Kirchhoff, Pascal; Goertz, Ole; Behr, Bjorn; Daigeler, Adrien; Lehnhardt, Marcus; HARATI, KAMRAN

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Solid malignancies at the foot and ankle region are rare and include mainly soft-tissue sarcomas, bone sarcomas, and skin malignancies. Complete surgical resection with clear margins still remains the mainstay of therapy in these malignancies. However, attainment of negative surgical margins in patients with locally advanced tumors of the foot and ankle region may require extensive surgery and could result in loss of extremity function. In these circumstances, plastic surgical...

  6. Reconstruction of Soft-Tissue Defects at the Foot and Ankle after Oncological Resection

    OpenAIRE

    Ring, Andrej; Kirchhoff, Pascal; Goertz, Ole; Behr, Bjorn; Daigeler, Adrien; Lehnhardt, Marcus; HARATI, KAMRAN

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Solid malignancies at the foot and ankle region are rare and include mainly soft-tissue sarcomas, bone sarcomas, and skin malignancies. Complete surgical resection with clear margins still remains the mainstay of therapy in these malignancies. However, attainment of negative surgical margins in patients with locally advanced tumors of the foot and ankle region may require extensive surgery and could result in loss of extremity function. In these circumstances, plastic surgical te...

  7. Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a group of genetic nerve disorders. It is named after the three doctors who first identified it. ... a nerve biopsy. There is no cure. The disease can be so mild you don't realize ...

  8. Preoperative imaging of charcot neuroarthropathy. Does the additional application of {sup 18}F-FDG-PET make sense?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoepfner, S. [Abt. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Giessen und Marburg, Standort Giessen (Germany); Krolak, C. [Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie, Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Kessler, S. [Chirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Tiling, R. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    With about 4 million diabetics in Germany and presumed inclination over the following years the treatment of diabetic complications like diabetic foot will become an even more important point. The management of Charcot's foot has undergone fundamental change in the last few years. Formerly, treatment was almost exclusively limited to non surgical measures; since the late 1990's, however, current practice has shifted to early, stage-appropriate surgical therapy. The aim of the present prospective study was to investigate the value of positron emission tomography (PET) in the pre-operative work-up of Charcot's foot. PET were compared to magnetic resonance tomography (MRI). Patients, methods: MRI and PET imaging were used as part of the preoperative work-up in 18 patients with Type II diabetes mellitus. The diagnosis of Charcot's foot requiring surgical treatment were made on the basis of clinical and radiologic criteria. Results: of 46 Charcot's lesions confirmed at surgery, 44 and 35 were detected by means of PET and MRI, respectively. PET can be used in the work-up of patients with metal implants where the MRI does not show adequate findings. PET shows the areas of detritus formation exhibit only moderately increased glucose metabolism and at visual interpretation do not usually impress as typical for acute osteomyelitis. Average SUV values stood at 1.2 (range: 0.5-2.9). Conclusions: the differentiation between Charcot's lesions and floride osteomyelitis provides the surgeon with important additional information, which is often unavailable from MRI. Because of this important additional data, PET could be considered preferable to morphologic imaging (CT, projection radiography) in the preoperative work-up of Charcot's foot. (orig.)

  9. Mid-foot reconstruction following involvement of five bones by giant cell tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szendroei, M.; Antal, I.; Perlaky, G. [Dept. of Orthopaedics, Semmelweis Univ., Budapest (Hungary)

    2000-11-01

    We report on a patient who had giant cell tumor involving multiple bones of the mid-foot. The tumor originated from the navicular bone, but also destroyed the cuboid, and all cuneiform bones. This unusual presentation of giant cell tumor presented a therapeutic challenge for the surgeons. The patient was treated with en bloc resection and the bony defect replaced with a massive iliac crest graft which united within 9 months and has remained stable for 7 years without local recurrence, and with excellent function of the foot. (orig.)

  10. Mid-foot reconstruction following involvement of five bones by giant cell tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a patient who had giant cell tumor involving multiple bones of the mid-foot. The tumor originated from the navicular bone, but also destroyed the cuboid, and all cuneiform bones. This unusual presentation of giant cell tumor presented a therapeutic challenge for the surgeons. The patient was treated with en bloc resection and the bony defect replaced with a massive iliac crest graft which united within 9 months and has remained stable for 7 years without local recurrence, and with excellent function of the foot. (orig.)

  11. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Reilly, Mary M

    2011-03-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the commonest inherited neuromuscular disorder affecting at least 1 in 2,500. Over the last two decades, there have been rapid advances in understanding the molecular basis for many forms of CMT with more than 30 causative genes now described. This has made obtaining an accurate genetic diagnosis possible but at times challenging for clinicians. This review aims to provide a simple, pragmatic approach to diagnosing CMT from a clinician\\'s perspective.

  12. [Rehabilitation of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Fumihiro; Nakamura, Takeshi; Nishimura, Yukihide; Arakawa, Hideki; Kawasaki, Takashi; Ogawa, Takahiro; Nishiyama, Kazunari

    2016-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is one of the most commonly inherited neuromuscular diseases causing progressive muscle weakness; contracture; deformity in the feet, legs, and hands; and impairments of ambulation and handgrip. Reduced physical ability can be attributed not only to the disease but also to physical deconditioning. Previously, most physicians in the field of rehabilitation were anxious about the hypothesis of overwork weakness in CMT, and did not conduct intensive exercise programs for patients with CMT. However, recent studies have reported that progressive resistance strengthening programs for lower extremities are feasible, safe, beneficial, and improve exercise intolerance and undue fatigue in patients with CMT. Although the improvement in exercise tolerance may be partly due to the reversal of deconditioning effect of related sedentary lifestyle, progressive resistance training and physical fitness can improve walking function, activities of daily living, and subjective perception of pain and fatigue in patients with CMT. To increase the daily physical function, some studies described the potential benefits of ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs); however, no control study supported it. So far, the training programs on CMT have been dependent on the exercise programs for able-bodied individuals. To increase the effects of rehabilitation, optimal programs that combine the training protocol and AFO strategies will have to be designed for patients with CMT. PMID:26764300

  13. The distally based superficial sural flap for reconstruction of the lower leg and foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajacic, N; Darweesh, M; Jayakrishnan, K; Gang, R K; Jojic, S

    1996-09-01

    We describe our experience with the use of distally based superficial sural flaps for coverage of defects in the lower leg and foot in 21 patients. In 18 patients the flap was successfully transferred, in 2 cases partial necrosis of the flap occurred and 1 flap failed completely. In 18 cases the flap was used as a fasciocutaneous flap and in 3 cases as a fascial flap only. The advantages of this flap are: easy and quick dissection, hence saving operating time, minimal morbidity of donor site and preservation of major arteries of the leg. Although the flap was described as reliable for covering defects around the ankle joint, we have been able to cover defects of the dorsum of the foot distally and up to the mid-third of the tibia proximally. PMID:8881785

  14. The use of differential scintigraphy in the clinical diagnosis of osseous and soft tissue changes affecting the diabetic foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prompt recognition of cellulitis, osteomyelitis, diabetic osteolysis, Charcot neuroarthropathy, septic synovitis, and deep plantar abscesses in the diabetic foot is essential because the therapy is drastically different. Differential diagnosis has been greatly facilitated by recently developed scanning techniques

  15. [Demonology and demonopathy under Charcot].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Céard, J

    1994-01-01

    What an advantage, he, who is studying devil and witchcraft stories, would get with "Retrospective medicine" carried through the "Ecole de la Salpêtrière"? Those are collected in the Sister Jeanne des Anges autobiography plentiful annotations, printed by the "Bibliothèque Diabolique" from Bourneville (1886) and "Les démoniaques dans l'art", written by Charcot and Richer (1887). The first one is proposing to evoque the nun's symptoms as hysterical facts and to find every typical expression regarding that disease. It does not go thoroughly into the hallucinations content, that is to say the imaginative part of them, as well as contemporary people minding that hysteria remains unchanging year after year and that its cultural alterations are really uninteresting. Charcot and Richer's book asserts that the devilish is a devilish without fiend, that is why it is approving the Saint-Médard's convulsive people but, on the contrary, nothing is said about the bright witchcraft pictures. Then, despite its history, devilish contain is going hand to hand. Those historical studies are not trying to give a run down on a medical view of devilish approach but to make clear real hysterical knowledge; it means that before the medical deepening every one knows that dense disease. PMID:11640487

  16. Learning about Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and/or hearing loss, and, in some individuals, scoliosis (curvature of the spine). People with CMT disease ... MBBS, Associate Professor, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Loma Linda University Medical Center, about Charcot-Marie- ...

  17. Charcot's son, commander Jean-Baptiste Charcot: from neurology to "Pourquoi Pas?"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio A. G. Teive

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Charcot name became very famous around the world, firstly because of the work of Professor Jean-Martin Charcot, the founder of Clinical Neurology, and, secondly, because of his son, Jean-Baptiste, the world famous maritime explorer.

  18. Amputation versus functional reconstruction in the management of complex hind foot injuries caused by land-mine explosions: a long-term retrospective comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiralp, Bahtiyar; Ege, Tolga; Kose, Ozkan; Yurttas, Yuksel; Basbozkurt, Mustafa

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the long-term clinical outcomes of patients who were treated with either hind foot reconstruction or amputation in complex hind foot injuries accompanied with bone and soft tissue loss due to land-mine explosions. Between 1994 and 2004, all patients with hind foot complex injuries due to land-mine explosion, who were operated in our clinic, were enrolled to the study. All patients were evaluated with Short-Form 36 (SF-36), Foot and Ankle Disability Index (FADI) and Body Image Quality of Life Inventory (BIQLI) after a mean of 15.1 ± 2.2 (range 9-19) years of follow-up. Demographic characteristics, number of operations, necessity of psychiatric treatment and all complications were compared between groups. There were a total of 42 patients [21 in reconstruction group (Gr I) and 21 in amputation group (Gr II)]. The mean age at the time of final follow-up was 38.4 ± 3.04 years in Gr I and 38.2 ± 4.24 years in Gr II (p = 0.732). The mean follow-up duration was 15.7 ± 2.07 years in Gr I and 14.57 ± 2.29 years in Gr II (p = 0.081). The number of operations was significantly higher in Gr I (8.66 ± 10.2 times vs. 4.42 ± 7.7 times, respectively, p = 0.001). The mean FADI score at the final follow-up was 64.3 ± 18.1 in Gr I. In amputation group, more patients needed psychotherapy due to major depression (12 patients vs. 4 patients, p = 0.012). Major complications in Gr I were musculocutaneous flap atrophy in calcaneal region (n = 8 patients), limited ankle motion (n = 11) and painful osteophytes on plantar region (n = 6). In Gr II, stump problems were dominating (pain and tenderness n = 10, ulcer n = 2, allergic skin lesions n = 7, painful neuroma n = 10, bony spur n = 5, paresthesia n = 1, excessive sweating n = 12). At the final visit, although SF-36 scores were similar between groups (p = 0.182), extremity reconstruction group had significantly higher BIQLI scores than the amputation group (p = 0.016). If the dorsalis pedis is

  19. Critical Limb Ischemia in Association with Charcot Neuroarthropathy: Complex Endovascular Therapy for Limb Salvage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palena, Luis Mariano, E-mail: marianopalena@hotmail.com [Policlinico Abano Terme, Interventional Radiology Unit (Italy); Brocco, Enrico [Policlinico Abano Terme, Diabetic Foot Department, Foot and Ankle Clinic (Italy); Manzi, Marco [Policlinico Abano Terme, Interventional Radiology Unit (Italy)

    2013-05-09

    Charcot neuroarthropathy is a low-incidence complication of diabetic foot and is associated with ankle and hind foot deformity. Patients who have not developed deep ulcers are managed with offloading and supportive bracing or orthopedic arthrodesis. In patients who have developed ulcers and severe ankle instability and deformity, below-the-knee amputation is often indicated, especially when deformity and cutaneous involvement result in osteomyelitis. Ischemic association has not been described but can be present as a part of peripheral arterial disease in the diabetic population. In this extreme and advanced stage of combined neuroischemic diabetic foot disease, revascularization strategies can support surgical and orthopedic therapy, thus preventing osteomyelitis and leading to limb and foot salvage.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease Charcot- ...

  1. [Prevention of diabetic foot].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metelko, Zeljko; Brkljacić Crkvencić, Neva

    2013-10-01

    , lipid disorders (treatment with fenofibrate reduces the incidence of DF amputations (EBM-Ib/A), hypertension, hyperuricemia, neuropathy, and angiopathy (surgical reconstructive bypass) or endovascular (percutaneous transluminar angioplasty). In the low-risk group of PwDM, no particular results can be achieved, in contrast to the high-risk groups of PwDM where patient and professional education has shown significant achievement (EBM-IV/C). In secondary prevention of DF, it is necessary to perform patient and professional education how to avoid most of external influences for DE Patient education should include all topics from primary prevention, danger of neural analgesia (no cooling or warming the foot), careful selection of shoes, daily observation of foot, early detection all foot changes or small wounds, daily hygiene of foot skin, which has to be clean and moist, regular self measurements of skin temperature between the two feet (EBM-Ib/A), prevention of self treatment of foot deformities, changing wrong habits (walking footless), medical consultation for even small foot changes (EBM-Ib/A) and consultation by multidisciplinary team (EBM-IIb/B). Tertiary DF prevention includes ulcer treatment, prevention of amputation and level of amputation. In spite of the primary and secondary prevention measures, DF ulcers develop very often. Because of different etiologic reasons as well as different principles of treatment which are at the same time prevention of the level of amputation, the approach to PwDF has to be multidisciplinary. A high place in the treatment of DF ulcers, especially neuropathic ulcers, have the off-loading principles (EBM-Ib/A), even instead of surgical treatment (EBM-Ib/A). Necrectomy, taking samples for analysis from the deep of ulcer, together with x-ray diagnostics (in particular NMR), the size of the changes can be detected, together with appropriate antibiotic use and indication for major surgical treatment. The patient has to be instructed to the

  2. Migrating bone shards in dissecting Charcot joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, D M; Magre, G

    1978-06-01

    Extensive periarticular calcification is characteristic of Charcot joints. Fragmentation of the articular margins of bone contributes to the bony detritus, but the majority forms de novo in the joint capsule. Occasionally the calcific debris is seen far removed from the joint. Dissection of a chronically distended joint along muscle planes is most commonly associated with the inflammatory joint disease of rheumatoid arthritis. Its occurrence in Charcot joints is documented by arthrography, which demonstrates continuity of the joint space and the distant calcifications. PMID:418652

  3. Syringomyelia with Chiari I malformation presenting as hip charcot arthropathy: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memarpour, Roya; Tashtoush, Basheer; Issac, Lydia; Gonzalez-Ibarra, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Neuroarthropathy (neuropathic osteoarthropathy), also known as Charcot joint, is a condition characterized by a progressive articular surface destruction in the setting of impaired nociceptive and proprioceptive innervation of the involved joint. It is seen most commonly in the foot and ankle secondary to peripheral neuropathy associated with diabetes mellitus. Cases of hip (Charcot) neuroarthropathy are rare and almost exclusively reported in patients with neurosyphilis (tabes dorsalis). We report a case of a 36-year-old man who presented to the emergency department complaining of right hip pain. On physical examination, pain and thermal sensory deficits were noted in the upper torso with a cape-like distribution, as well as signs of an upper motor neuron lesion in the left upper and lower extremities. A magnetic resonance imaging study (MRI) of the right hip showed evidence of early articular surface destruction and periarticular edema consistent with hip Charcot arthropathy. An MRI of the spine revealed an Arnold-Chiari type I malformation with extensive syringohydromyelia of the cervical and thoracic spine. PMID:25692057

  4. Trench Foot or Immersion Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Weather Information on Specific Types of Emergencies Trench Foot or Immersion Foot DISASTER RECOVERY FACT SHEET Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir What is trench foot? Trench foot, also known as immersion foot, occurs ...

  5. Trench Foot or Immersion Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tsunamis Volcanoes Wildfires Winter Weather Trench Foot or Immersion Foot DISASTER RECOVERY FACT SHEET Recommend on Facebook ... is trench foot? Trench foot, also known as immersion foot, occurs when the feet are wet for ...

  6. ALS5/SPG11/KIAA1840 mutations cause autosomal recessive axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montecchiani, Celeste; Pedace, Lucia; Lo Giudice, Temistocle; Casella, Antonella; Mearini, Marzia; Gaudiello, Fabrizio; Pedroso, José L; Terracciano, Chiara; Caltagirone, Carlo; Massa, Roberto; St George-Hyslop, Peter H; Barsottini, Orlando G P; Kawarai, Toshitaka; Orlacchio, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is a group of hereditary peripheral neuropathies that share clinical characteristics of progressive distal muscle weakness and atrophy, foot deformities, distal sensory loss, as well as diminished tendon reflexes. Hundreds of causative DNA changes have been found, but much of the genetic basis of the disease is still unexplained. Mutations in the ALS5/SPG11/KIAA1840 gene are a frequent cause of autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum and peripheral axonal neuropathy, and account for ∼ 40% of autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The overlap of axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with both diseases, as well as the common autosomal recessive inheritance pattern of thin corpus callosum and axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease in three related patients, prompted us to analyse the ALS5/SPG11/KIAA1840 gene in affected individuals with autosomal recessive axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. We investigated 28 unrelated families with autosomal recessive axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease defined by clinical, electrophysiological, as well as pathological evaluation. Besides, we screened for all the known genes related to axonal autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT2A2/HMSN2A2/MFN2, CMT2B1/LMNA, CMT2B2/MED25, CMT2B5/NEFL, ARCMT2F/dHMN2B/HSPB1, CMT2K/GDAP1, CMT2P/LRSAM1, CMT2R/TRIM2, CMT2S/IGHMBP2, CMT2T/HSJ1, CMTRID/COX6A1, ARAN-NM/HINT and GAN/GAN), for the genes related to autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum and axonal peripheral neuropathy (SPG7/PGN, SPG15/ZFYVE26, SPG21/ACP33, SPG35/FA2H, SPG46/GBA2, SPG55/C12orf65 and SPG56/CYP2U1), as well as for the causative gene of peripheral neuropathy with or without agenesis of the corpus callosum (SLC12A6). Mitochondrial disorders related to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 were also excluded by sequencing POLG and TYMP genes. An additional locus for autosomal recessive Charcot

  7. COMBINATION TREATMENT FOR ANTERIOR FOOT DEFORMITIES VIA RECONSTRUCTIVE AND JOINT-SPARING SURGERY IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya B Khrennikov

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion. The Weil-osteotomy group showed the preservation and partial salvage of osteotomized heads, which promoted the recovery of swinging function of the foot. The new procedures made it possible to prevent recurrent valgus and hammer toe deformities and callus formation in the late postoperative period, to improve quality of life, and to reduce the time of rehabilitation and the length of hospital stay.

  8. Significance of Charcot Leyden crystals in hepatic aspirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misra Vatsala

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Charcot Leyden crystals are hexagonal bipyramidal structures localised in the primary granules of the cytoplasm of eosinophils and basophils. Their presence, along with eosinophilic infiltrate, is an indirect evidence of parasitic infestation particularly with Toxocara, Capilliriasis, Ascariasis, or Fasciola. We report here two cases where Charcot Leyden crystals with eosinophilic infiltrate were found in the smears prepared from hepatic abscess.

  9. Facts that every vascular surgeon needs to know about the diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, M

    2014-04-01

    This paper describes important aspects of the diabetic foot which the vascular surgeon needs to understand to efficiently manage the diabetic foot. Firstly, it emphasises the three main pathologies which come together in the diabetic foot, namely neuropathy, ischemia and immunopathy, the latter predisposing to infection. As a result of neuropathy, the signs and symptoms of tissue breakdown, infection and ischemia may be minimal. Nevertheless the pathology emanating from such clinical events proceeds rapidly without the body being aware of it and the end stage of tissue death and necrosis is quickly reached. It is important to have a prompt system of evaluation and intervention to prevent the rapid progression to necrosis. Thus, secondly, the paper describes a simple rapid assessment of the diabetic foot, which comprises inspection, palpation and sensory testing and leads on to a modern classification and staging of the diabetic foot. This classifies six subdivisions of the diabetic foot: foot with neuropathic ulceration, Charcot foot, neuroischemic foot, critically ischemic foot, acutely ischemic foot and renal ischemic foot and six stages in the natural history of each of these subdivisions: normal foot, high risk foot, ulcerated foot, infected foot, necrotic foot and unsalvageable foot. Thirdly, it describes modern management of the diabetic foot, emphazising wound care and revascularization within the context of a multidisciplinary care team that provides integrated care focused in a diabetic foot clinic, to which patients with diabetes should have easy and rapid access. Members of the team include podiatrist, nurse, orthotist, physician, radiologist and surgeons. PMID:24796920

  10. The use of a combined bipedicled axial perforator based fasciocutaneous flap for the treatment of a traumatic diabetic foot wound: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Ignatiadis, Ioannis A.; Georgakopoulos, Georgios D.; Tsiampa, Vassiliki A.; Matei, Ileana R.; Georgescu, Alexandru V.; Polyzois, Vasilios D.

    2011-01-01

    The axial and perforator vascularised fasciocutaneous flaps are reliable and effective treatment methods for covering lower limb post-traumatic, septic, Charcot, and diabetic foot wounds. The authors describe the unique utilisation of a hybrid flap as an axial-perforator flap combination for the treatment of a traumatic diabetic foot wound. Keywords: diabetic foot; trauma; calcaneus; fasciocutaneous flap; plastic surgery(Published: 7 February 2011)Citation: Diabetic Foot & Ankle 2011, 2: ...

  11. The use of a combined bipedicled axial perforator based fasciocutaneous flap for the treatment of a traumatic diabetic foot wound: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis A. Ignatiadis

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The axial and perforator vascularised fasciocutaneous flaps are reliable and effective treatment methods for covering lower limb post-traumatic, septic, Charcot, and diabetic foot wounds. The authors describe the unique utilisation of a hybrid flap as an axial-perforator flap combination for the treatment of a traumatic diabetic foot wound.

  12. Foot Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... toenails straight across and not too short Your foot health can be a clue to your overall ... disease, heart disease, or high blood pressure. Good foot care and regular foot checks are an important ...

  13. Foot Drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Foot Drop Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... research is being done? Clinical Trials What is Foot Drop? Foot drop describes the inability to raise ...

  14. Effect of painless diabetic neuropathy on pressure pain hypersensitivity (hyperalgesia) after acute foot trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Wienemann, Tobias; Chantelau, Ernst A; Koller, Armin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction and objective: Acute injury transiently lowers local mechanical pain thresholds at a limb. To elucidate the impact of painless (diabetic) neuropathy on this post-traumatic hyperalgesia, pressure pain perception thresholds after a skeletal foot trauma were studied in consecutive persons without and with neuropathy (i.e. history of foot ulcer or Charcot arthropathy).Design and methods: A case–control study was done on 25 unselected clinical routine patients with acute unilateral fo...

  15. Jean-Baptiste Charcot, the French Antarctic expedition and scurvy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teive, Hélio Afonso Ghizoni; Germiniani, Francisco Manoel Branco; Munhoz, Renato Puppi

    2014-07-01

    During the second expedition to the South Pole, Commander Jean-Baptiste Charcot and some members of the crew of "Pourquoi Pas?" developed symptoms suggestive of scurvy. The clinical picture was totally reversed after dietary changes. PMID:25054991

  16. Jean-Baptiste Charcot, the French Antarctic expedition and scurvy

    OpenAIRE

    Hélio Afonso Ghizoni Teive; Francisco Manoel Branco Germiniani; Renato Puppi Munhoz

    2014-01-01

    During the second expedition to the South Pole, Commander Jean-Baptiste Charcot and some members of the crew of “Pourquoi Pas?” developed symptoms suggestive of scurvy. The clinical picture was totally reversed after dietary changes.

  17. [Treatment for Patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease: Orthopaedic Aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kota

    2016-01-01

    The orthopedic manifestations in patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease include deformity and dysfunction of the extremities and spine. Conservative treatment is the first choice. Orthosis and rehabilitation can improve function, and are important for the prevention of joint contractures. Foot problems are most commonly observed and require surgical treatment. Foot deformities include pes cavus, cavovarus, claw toes, or drop foot. Single or combined surgeries selected for soft tissues are plantar release, tendon transfer, or Achilles tendon lengthening, and those for bones are osteotomies and joint fusions. The upper limb initially demonstrates loss of power of the intrinsic hand muscles followed by symmetrical atrophy of the forearm muscle groups. The typical hand deformity is claw hand. Tendon transfer, joint fusion, soft tissue release, or nerve decompression procedures are performed for correction of hand deformities. Acetabular dysplasia in the hip joints is sometimes observed and osteotomy is selected as surgical treatment in such cases. The associated spinal deformity is scoliosis with or without kyphosis. Similar to treatment of idiopathic scoliosis, posterior spinal fusion is performed in patients with progressive spinal deformities. PMID:26764299

  18. Athlete's foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinea pedis; Fungal infection - feet; Tinea of the foot; Infection - fungal - feet; Ringworm - foot ... 77. Hay RJ. Dermatophytosis (ringworm) and other superficial mycoses. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. ...

  19. Foot Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... much higher rates of foot problems. For women, pain in the toes and ball of the foot is much more common than in men, and it gets worse with age. However, pain in the heel tends to decrease as we ...

  20. Athlete's Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athlete's foot is a common infection caused by a fungus. It most often affects the space between the toes. ... skin between your toes. You can get athlete's foot from damp surfaces, such as showers, swimming pools, ...

  1. Foot pain

    OpenAIRE

    Formosa, Aaron

    2005-01-01

    Foot complaints are very common in general practice and their incidence increases with age. Three out of four people complain of foot pain during the course of a lifetime, while approximately 20% of people aged 65 years or older complain of non-traumatic foot problems.

  2. Foot Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... straight across and not too short Your foot health can be a clue to your overall health. For example, joint stiffness could mean arthritis. Tingling ... foot checks are an important part of your health care. If you have foot problems, be sure ...

  3. Management of diabetic neuropathic foot and ankle malunions and nonunions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Stapleton

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The management of diabetic neuropathic foot and ankle malunions and/or nonunions is often complicated by the presence of broken or loosened hardware, Charcot joints, infection, osteomyelitis, avascular bone necrosis, unstable deformities, bone loss, disuse and pathologic osteopenia, and ulcerations. The author discusses a rational approach to functional limb salvage with various surgical techniques that are aimed at achieving anatomic alignment, long-term osseous stability, and adequate soft tissue coverage. Emphasis is placed on techniques to overcome the inherent challenges that are encountered when surgically managing a diabetic nonunion and/or malunion. Particular attention is directed to the management of deep infection and Charcot neuroarthropathy in the majority of the cases presented.

  4. The heart of a dragon: 3D anatomical reconstruction of the ‘scaly-foot gastropod’ (Mollusca: Gastropoda: Neomphalina) reveals its extraordinary circulatory system

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Chong; Copley, Jonathan T.; Linse,Katrin; Rogers, Alex D.; Sigwart, Julia D.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The ‘scaly-foot gastropod’ (Chrysomallon squamiferum Chen et al., 2015) from deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystems of the Indian Ocean is an active mobile gastropod occurring in locally high densities, and it is distinctive for the dermal scales covering the exterior surface of its foot. These iron-sulfide coated sclerites, and its nutritional dependence on endosymbiotic bacteria, are both noted as adaptations to the extreme environment in the flow of hydrogen sulfide. We present...

  5. Jean-Baptiste Charcot, the French Antarctic expedition and scurvy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio Afonso Ghizoni Teive

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available During the second expedition to the South Pole, Commander Jean-Baptiste Charcot and some members of the crew of “Pourquoi Pas?” developed symptoms suggestive of scurvy. The clinical picture was totally reversed after dietary changes.

  6. Molecular Diagnosis of Charcot-Marie Tooth Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gordon Millichap

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of mutations in certain genes in 153 unrelated patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT was determined by DNA sequencing before clinical testing at the Departments of Molecular and Human Genetics and Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, and other centers.

  7. Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath with simultaneous two tendon involvement of the foot treated with excision of the tumour and reconstruction of the flexor retinaculum using tibialis posterior tendon in a paediatric patient: A rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Vivek; Ansari, Tahir; Mittal, Samarth; Sharma, Pankaj; Nalwa, Aasma

    2015-12-01

    Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath is a benign soft tissue tumour arising from the tendon sheath. The involvement of foot and ankle by such tumours is relatively rare. Children are not commonly afflicted by this condition. All such tumours are reported to arise either from a single tendon sheath or one joint. We report a case of giant cell tumour of tendon sheath in a 12-year-old child, arising simultaneously from the tendon sheaths of tibialis posterior and flexor digitorum longus tendons, as well as extending into the ankle joint. It was treated by complete excision of the mass along with the tendon sheaths with reconstruction of the flexor retinaculum. The location of the tumour, age of the patient, diffuse nature of the tumour and novel technique of reconstruction of the flexor retinaculum make this case extremely rare and the first to be reported in literature. PMID:26564735

  8. Quality-of-Life in Charcot Marie Tooth Disease: The Patient's Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Nicholas E.; Heatwole, Chad R; Dilek, Nuran; Sowden, Janet; Kirk, Callyn A; Shereff, Denise; Shy, Michael E; Herrmann, David N.

    2014-01-01

    This study determines the impact of symptoms associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease on quality-of-life. Charcot-Marie-Tooth patients in the Inherited Neuropathies Consortium Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network Contact Registry were surveyed. The survey inquired about 214 symptoms and 20 themes previously identified as important to Charcot-Marie-Tooth patients through patient interviews. Symptom population impact was calculated as the prevalence multiplied by the relative importance o...

  9. Charcots artropati som årsag til hypoparatyroid hyperkalcæmi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, Susanne; Jensen, Jens-Erik Beck; Kønig, Karen Bay

    2012-01-01

    A 45-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes and multiple diabetic complications was diagnosed with hypoparathyroid hypercalcaemia. The bone scintigraphy showed Charcots arthropathy. Blood tests, computer tomography and mammography did not give any indication of malignancy, vitamin-D intoxication nor...... hyperthyroidism. Charcots arthropathy is not a recognized cause of hypoparathyroid hypercalcaemia, but the mechanism might be increased boneresorption. We recommend that Charcots arthropathy is considered a cause of hypoparathyroid hypercalcaemia in patients with diabetic neuropathy....

  10. Club foot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engell, V; Damborg, F; Andersen, M;

    2006-01-01

    The aetiology of congenital club foot is unclear. Although studies on populations, families and twins suggest a genetic component, the mode of inheritance does not comply with distinctive patterns. The Odense-based Danish Twin Registry contains data on all 73,000 twin pairs born in Denmark over the...... last 130 years. In 2002 all 46 418 twins born between 1931 and 1982 received a 17-page questionnaire, one question of which was 'Were you born with club foot?' A total of 94 twins answered 'Yes', giving an overall self-reported prevalence of congenital club foot of 0.0027 (95% confidence interval (CI.......09 (95% CI 0.01 to 0.32) for DZss and 0.05 (95% CI 0.006 to 0.18) for all dizygotic (DZtot) twins. We have found evidence of a genetic component in congenital club foot, although non-genetic factors must play a predominant role....

  11. Foot Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the toe to maintain realignment. Neuroma Surgery: Neuroma surgery involves removing a benign enlargement of a nerve, usually between the metatarsal heads in the ball of the foot. This soft tissue surgery tends to have a ...

  12. Foot Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... irritation of the arch ligament and tissues, called PLANTAR FASCIITIS. Try to keep weight off your foot until ... bone, but more likely to be due to PLANTAR FASCIITIS. See your doctor. He or she can suggest ...

  13. Sarcopenia and body composition in diabetic Charcot osteoarthropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Rasmus Bo; Christensen, Tomas Møller; Bülow, Jens;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment of Charcot osteoarthropathy (COA) requires restricted walking and offloading for several months, which lead to fat re-distribution and increased sarcopenia. OBJECTIVES/AIM: To investigate whether subjects with COA have an altered body composition compared to controls. METHODS......: Cross-sectional case-control study of people with diabetes with acute or chronic Charcot osteoarthropathy, matched with otherwise healthy people with diabetes. A total of 49 subjects (distribution ~1:1) had a total body DXA-scanning, measuring appendicular lean mass, android/gynoid and truncal....../total body fat distribution ratios. RESULTS: Sarcopenia frequency was higher in the total population with diabetes overall (9-40%), compared to normal materials. Using two different models for correlating appendicular lean mass to sarcopenia, there were no differences in sarcopenia-rates between the groups...

  14. Vestibular impairment in patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    OpenAIRE

    Poretti, A.; Palla, A; Tarnutzer, A A; Petersen, J A; Weber, K P; Straumann, D; Jung, H H

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This case-control study aimed to determine whether the imbalance in Charcot-Marie-tooth (CMT) disease is caused only by reduced proprioceptive input or whether the involvement of the vestibular nerve is an additional factor. METHODS: Fifteen patients with CMT disease (aged 48 ± 17 years; 8 women) underwent cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials, which reflect otolith-spinal reflex function, and quantitative horizontal search-coil head-impulse testing, which assesses the hi...

  15. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: insights from skin biopsy

    OpenAIRE

    Pisciotta, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Inherited neuropathies, collectively known as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), are a group of genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous peripheral neuropathies associated with mutations or copy number variations in over 80 distinct genes. The advent of genetic testing has made sural nerve biopsy unnecessary for diagnosing most cases of CMT, particularly because the technique is somewhat invasive. Unfortunately, this has led to an inability to evaluate morphological effects by the various...

  16. Diagnostic imaging of the diabetic foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diabetic foot syndrome is a significant complication of diabetes. Diagnostic imaging is a crucial factor determining surgical decision and extent of surgical intervention. At present the gold standard is MRI scanning, whilst the role of bone scanning is decreasing, although in some cases it brings valuable information. In particular, in early stages of osteitis and Charcot neuro-osteoarthropathy, radionuclide imaging may be superior to MRI. Additionally, a significant contribution of inflammation-targeted scintigraphy should be noted. Probably the role of PET scanning will grow, although its high cost and low availability may be a limiting factor. In every case, vascular status should be determined, at least with Doppler ultrasound, with following conventional angiography or MR angiography. (authors)

  17. The diabetic foot; Der diabetische Fuss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vestring, T. [Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie, Univ. Muenster (Germany); Fiedler, R. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Technische Orthopaedie und Rehabilitation, Univ. Muenster (Germany); Greitemann, B. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Technische Orthopaedie und Rehabilitation, Univ. Muenster (Germany); Sciuk, J. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Univ. Muenster (Germany); Peters, P.E. [Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie, Univ. Muenster (Germany)

    1995-07-01

    Familiarity with the spectrum of findings in the different imaging modalities appears essential. Radiographically, significant changes include Charcot joints of the tarsus (destructive type) and bone absorption of the forefoot (mutilating type). In diabetic foot problems, magnetic resonance imaging and leukocyte scintigraphy appear to be the most effective tools for detection of osteomyelitis, and a negative study makes osteomyelitis unlikely. However, the findings of both techniques in active, noninfected neuropathic osteoarthropathy may be indistinguishable from those of osteomyelitis. (orig.) [Deutsch] Da der diabetische Fuss zu einer der haeufigsten Komplikationen der Grunderkrankung zaehlt, muss das Befundspektrum bei den verschiedenen bildgebenden Verfahren bekannt sein. Bei der diabetischen Osteoarthropathie werden uebersichtsradiographisch 2 Formen unterschieden: der destruierende Typ, der die Tarsalknochen bevorzugt, und der mutilierende Typ, welcher sich an den Roehrenknochen des Fusses manifestiert. Die Magnetresonanztomographie und die Leukozytenszintigraphie sind zum Nachweis bzw. Ausschluss einer Osteomyelitis am besten geeignet. Aber auch diese Methoden koennen nicht sicher eine nicht infizierte, aktive Osteoarthropathie von einer Osteomyelitis differenzieren. (orig.)

  18. Charcot Neuroarthropathy in Patients With Diabetes: An Updated Systematic Review of Surgical Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneekloth, Brian J; Lowery, Nicholas J; Wukich, Dane K

    2016-01-01

    Charcot neuroarthropathy (CN) of the foot and ankle is a demanding clinical dilemma, and surgical management can be very complicated. Historically, the evidence guiding surgical management of CN has been small retrospective case series and expert opinions. The purpose of the present report was to provide a systematic review of studies published from 2009 to 2014 and to review the indications for surgery. A Medline search was performed, and a systematic review of studies discussing the surgical management of CN was undertaken. Thirty reports fit the inclusion criteria for our study, including 860 patients who had undergone a surgical procedure for the treatment of CN. The surgical procedures included amputation, arthrodesis, debridement of ulcers, drainage of infections, and exostectomy. The midfoot was addressed in 26.9% of cases, the hindfoot in 41.6%, and the ankle in 38.4%. Of the 30 studies, 24 were retrospective case series (level 4), 4 were controlled retrospective studies (level 3), and 2 were level II studies. The overall amputation rate was 8.9%. The quality of the published data on the surgical management of CN has improved during the past several years. Evidence concerning the timing of treatment and the use of different fixation methods remains inconclusive. PMID:26810129

  19. Pé cavo adquirido na doença de Charcot-Marie-Tooth Acquired pes cavus in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Augusto Carvalho Maranho

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available As neuropatias sensitivomotoras hereditárias, principalmente a doença de Charcot-Marie-Tooth, manifestam-se frequentemente com o aparecimento de pé cavovaro, deformidade caracterizada pela acentuação fixa do arco plantar e inversão do retropé. O diagnóstico da doença de base e a cuidadosa avaliação do paciente fornecem os elementos-chave para decisão do tratamento. O cavo pode situar-se no antepé, retropé ou ser o resultado da associação das duas localizações. Deformidades combinadas, principalmente varismo e garras dos artelhos, devem ser bem avaliadas; as características clínicas como grau das alterações, acometimento da força muscular, flexibilidade e idade são fatores importantes para a decisão da conduta. O tratamento conservador do pé cavovaro por meio de fisioterapia, palmilhas e adaptação nos calçados é reservado ao paciente mais jovem ou casos levemente acometidos. Entretanto, há tendência de agravamento das deformidades devido à característica progressiva da doença neurológica de base. Assim, o tratamento cirúrgico pelas técnicas clássicas é indicado precocemente, sendo importante identificar as alterações primárias, diferenciá-las das secundárias e corrigi-las, se possível. As transferências musculares são usadas no sentido de minimizar o desequilíbrio, estruturas retraídas são seccionadas ou alongadas e osteotomias localizadas devem ser preferíveis às artrodeses, que são reservadas para pés rígidos e muito deformados de pacientes adultos.Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies, especially Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, are frequently expressed with an acquired cavusvarus foot which is characterized by a fixed increase of the plantar arch and hindfoot inversion. Diagnosis of the underlying condition achieved through careful patient assessment and local evaluations is the keystone for decision-making about the adequate treatment. The cavus may present as an isolated deformity of

  20. Socioeconomic profile of diabetic patients with and without foot problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Nather

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To identify the differences in a socioeconomic profile between two cohorts of diabetic patients – one with diabetic foot problems and another without diabetic foot problems. Materials and methods: The cohort with diabetic foot problems (including cellulitis, abscess, osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, gangrene, ulcers, or Charcot joint disease consisted of 122 diabetic patients, while the other cohort without foot problems consisted of 112 diabetic patients. Both were seen at the National University Hospital from January to April 2007. A detailed protocol was designed and the factors studied included patient profile, average monthly household income, education, compliance to diabetic medication, attendance at clinics for diabetic treatment, exercise, smoking, alcohol consumption, gender, and glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1C level. These were studied for significant differences using univariate and stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results: With multivariate analysis, Malay ethnicity (p<0.001, education of up to secondary school only (p=0.021, low average monthly household income of less than SGD $2,000 (p=0.030, lack of exercise (at least once a week, p=0.04, and elevated HbA1C level (>7.0%; p=0.015 were found to be significantly higher in the cohort with diabetic foot problems than the cohort without. Conclusions: There are significant differences in the socioeconomic factors between diabetic patients with diabetic foot problems and those without.

  1. Foot Disorders, Foot Posture, and Foot Function: The Framingham Foot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Hagedorn, Thomas J; Alyssa B Dufour; RISKOWSKI, JODY L.; Hillstrom, Howard J; Menz, Hylton B.; Casey, Virginia A.; Hannan, Marian T

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Foot disorders are common among older adults and may lead to outcomes such as falls and functional limitation. However, the associations of foot posture and foot function to specific foot disorders at the population level remain poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to assess the relation between specific foot disorders, foot posture, and foot function. Methods: Participants were from the population-based Framingham Foot Study. Quintiles of the modified arch index and...

  2. Athlete's Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... um) too small to be seen by the naked eye. This fungus eats old skin cells. And plenty of them can be found on the feet! Although athlete's foot occurs mostly among teen and young adult guys, kids and women can get it, too. People with sweaty or ...

  3. Foot pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Elsevier; 2009:section D. Brodsky JW, Bruck N. Stress fractures of the foot and ankle. In: DeLee JC, Drez D Jr, Miller MD, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic Sports Medicine. 3rd ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2009: ...

  4. [Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893): a physician with multiple facets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lellouch, Alain

    2013-12-01

    This work is registered in the year (2013) commemorating the 120 years since Jean-Martin Charcot's (1825-1893) death. Presently, the event takes place during 2013, in France, in Paris, at Hôpital de la Salpêtrière where Charcot practiced as medical chief of l'Hospice de la Vieillesse-Femmes, from 1862 until he died in 1893. The aim of the research is to show, from various examples and sources (printed and handwritten: fonds d'archives Charcot de la Salpêtrière) how talented Charcot was as a clinician, pathologist and microscopist, researcher and experimenter, teacher, artist, designer, cartoonist, polyglot and traveller), how varied his medical career was and how innovative his scientific method was. All this permitted Charcot to make an impressive number of medical discoveries in various fields which are today known as geriatrics and rheumatology, internal medicine, cardiology, neurology, psychiatry and paranormal processes. PMID:26035927

  5. Reconstruction of large wounds using a combination of negative pressure wound therapy and punch grafting after excision of acral lentiginous melanoma on the foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jimyung; Kim, Jihee; Nam, Kyoung Ae; Zheng, Zhenlong; Oh, Byung Ho; Chung, Kee Yang

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma in darker-pigmented individuals often develops in an acral lentiginous fashion on the foot. After surgical removal of a tumor at this site, repair of the wound can be challenging. This is because there is an insufficient local skin pool and lack of mobility of the skin in this area. Moreover, functional aspects such as walking and weight bearing should be considered. We performed a combination treatment of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) and punch grafting on 15 patients, after wide excision of acral lentiginous melanomas on the foot, and compared these to 26 patients who underwent either secondary intention healing (SIH, n = 13) or NPWT (n = 13) alone. The punch grafting with NPWT group showed significantly shorter healing times than those of the other two groups. Evaluation of completely healed wounds using the Vancouver Burn Scar Assessment Scale revealed that the punch grafting group had mean values better, or comparable, to the SIH or NPWT group in four of the five scales (except pigmentation). As for complications, only one patient developed a wound infection after punch grafting. Further, by utilizing NPWT for fixation of punch grafts, it was possible to treat all subjects as outpatients after punch grafting. These results show that a combination treatment of NPWT and punch grafting is an excellent therapeutic option for post-wide excision wounds on the feet, with significantly shortened healing times and favorable cosmetic outcomes. PMID:26173565

  6. Mycetoma foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somnath Gooptu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycetoma is an uncommon chronic granulomatous infective disease of the skin, dermis and subcutaneous tissues predominantly seen in tropical countries. A patient presented to our hospital with the swelling of the left foot with a healed sinus and a painful nodule. He gave a history of sinuses in the left foot from which there was discharge of yellow granules. Culture of the ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration cytology of the nodule revealed growths of Nocardia species. The patient was treated with a multi-drug therapy along with debridement of the painful nodule. He experienced symptomatic relief and a regression of the swelling within the three months of follow-up so far. Due to the relatively slow progression of the disease, patients are diagnosed at a late stage. Hence, emphasis should be placed on health education and the importance of wearing footwear.

  7. A Novel Mutation of GDAP1 Associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease in An Iranian Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmaeel MOHAMMADI PARGOO

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available As a result of higher distributed consanguinity in the Mediterranean region and the Middle East, autosomal-recessive forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (ARCMT are more common in these areas. CMT disease caused by mutations in the ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein 1 (GDAP1 gene is a severe autosomal recessive neuropathy resulting in either demyelinating CMT4A neuropathy or axonal neuropathy with vocal cord paresis. The patient was an 8-year-old boy with AR inheritance that showed some delayed achievement of motor milestones, including walking, also bilateral foot drop, wasting of distal muscles in the legs, pes cavus and marked weakness of the foot dorsiflexors. He had no hoarseness or vocal cord paralysis. Total genomic DNA was extracted from whole peripheral blood of the patient and his family by using standard procedures. PCR- sequencing method were used to analysis the whole coding regions of the GDAP1 gene. A novel homozygote insertion of T nucleotide in codon 34 was detected (c.100_101insT that probably led to an early stop codon. This mutation may be associated with a common haplotype, suggesting a common ancestor that needs further investigation in the Iranian population.

  8. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Jens Michael; Børglum, A D; Brandt, C A; Flint, T; Bisgaard, C

    1994-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) is an autosomal dominant peripheral neuropathy associated with a DNA duplication on chromosome 17p11.2-p12 in the majority of cases. Most of the sporadic cases are due to a de novo duplication. We have screened for this duplication in 11 Danish patients...... with CMT type 1, using four different techniques, and identified a de novo duplication in a sporadic case. Analysis of the fully informative pVAW409R3a alleles in this family showed the duplication to be of paternal origin....

  9. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease complicating type 2 diabetes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Win, Htet Htet Ne

    2012-02-01

    Although both conditions are relatively common, there are very few descriptions of type 2 diabetes mellitus coexisting with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). This case report and literature review describes a 53-year-old Irish man who presented with type 2 diabetes and significant neuropathy, and who was subsequently diagnosed with CMT type 1A. This case report will also discuss how to differentiate diabetic neuropathy from a progressive hereditary neuropathy and how coexistence aggravates the progression of neuropathy thus necessitating early diagnosis.

  10. Charcot-marie-tooth disease complicating type 2 diabetes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Win, Htet Htet Ne

    2011-07-01

    Although both conditions are relatively common, there are very few descriptions of type 2 diabetes mellitus coexisting with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). This case report and literature review describes a 53-year-old Irish man who presented with type 2 diabetes and significant neuropathy, and who was subsequently diagnosed with CMT type 1A. This case report will also discuss how to differentiate diabetic neuropathy from a progressive hereditary neuropathy and how coexistence aggravates the progression of neuropathy thus necessitating early diagnosis.

  11. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: genetic and rehabilitation aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana CEVEI

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Charcot-Marie-Tooth hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy refers to a group of disorders characterized by a chronic motor and sensory polyneuropathy. Typical cases have distal muscle weakness and peroneal atrophy often associated with mild to moderate sensory loss, depressed tendon reflexes, and pes cavus. Hereditary neuropathies are categorized by mode of inheritance and chromosomal locus. The diagnosis is based on family history, characteristic findings on physical examination, EMG, nerve conduction velocity testing, and occasionally on nerve biopsy. The disorder shows allelic and non-allelic genetic heterogeneity, thus mutations of different genes leading to the same clinical features. Also, different mutations of the same gene may lead to different phenotypes. Molecular genetic testing is available in clinical laboratories for diagnosis of 7 subtypes of the disease. Genetic counseling and risk assessment depend on the inheritance. We present two cases with Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1 and type 2 respectively. There is no cure for the disorder, although physical therapy and moderate activity are often recommended to maintain muscle strength and endurance.

  12. The diabetic foot: Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourteen diabetic patients with suspected foot infection and/or neuropathic joint (Charcot Joint) were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in an attempt to assess the extent of the infection and also to distinguish infection from the changes seen with neuroarthropathy. The majority of patients with infection had more than one site of involvement and the following diagnoses were made by MRI evaluation: Osteomyelitis (n=8), abscess (n=7), neuropathic joint (n=5), septic arthritis (n=4), and tenosynovitis (n=4). Clinical or surgical/pathological confirmation of the MRI diagnoses was obtained in all but nine sites of infection or cases of neuropathic joint. If the two diagnostic categories of septic arthritis and tenosynovitis are excluded, all but four of the MRI diagnoses were confirmed. A distinctive pattern for neuroarthropathy was identified in five cases, consisting of low signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted images within the bone marrow space adjacent to the involved joint. We conclude that MRI is a valuable adjunct in the evaluation of the diabetic foot, and that it provides accurate information regarding the presence and extent of infection in this subset of patients. MRI has proven particularly helpful in differentiating neuroarthropathy from osteomyelitis. (orig.)

  13. Angiography in the region of the foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is reported on technique, incidence and findings of angiography of the foot which provided magnifying angiography and non-ionic contrast media are used, is especially qualified for the differentiation of diabetic and non-diabetic angiopathies as well as for the identification of peripherical embolizations and digital arterial occlusions at thrombocytosis or polycythemia. The arteries of the foot represent the peripherical outflow at peripherical reconstructive performances at the lower leg and have to be studied prior to such reconstructive surgical interventions. The different localization of arterial obliterations and changes of the walls in diabetics of stage I-IV according to Fontaine shows the particularly large number of vascular-pathological findings in arteries of the lower leg and foot in diabetics with arterial occlusive diseases of stage III and IV. Therefore, the unfavourable prognoses of arterial occlusive diseases in diabetics have also to be made for peripherical arterial obliterations of the foot and lower leg. (orig.)

  14. Foot amputation - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amputation - foot - discharge; Trans-metatarsal amputation - discharge ... You have had a foot amputation. You may have had an accident, or your foot may have had an infection or disease and doctors could ...

  15. Common Foot Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Common Foot Problems A A A Trauma, infection, skin disease, ... the sole of the front part of the foot and on the toes. Foot infections include warts; ...

  16. Foot sprain - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mid-foot sprain ... There are many bones and ligaments in your foot. A ligament is a strong flexible tissue that holds bones together. When the foot lands awkwardly, some ligaments can stretch and tear. ...

  17. Jean-Baptiste Charcot in Rio de Janeiro: glamorous trip and celebrity in 1908

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio A. G. Teive

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The authors review the visit of Commander Charcot and the crew of his ship, the “Pourquoi Pas?”, to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in 1908, where he stayed for eight days, while en-route as part of the second French expedition to the Antarctic. It was a glamorous stay as Commander Charcot was treated as a true star and international celebrity, befitting his position.

  18. Rehabilitation issues in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenis-Coskun, Ozge; Matthews, Dennis J

    2016-02-27

    Charcot Marie Tooth (CMT) disease is the most common hereditary sensorimotor neuropathy that has a slow onset. It presents usually in childhood, starting distally and from the lower limbs progressing to more proximal muscles. Due to the lack of curative medical treatments and the problematic outcomes of surgical intervention, rehabilitation continues to play a major role in treatment. This paper aims to summarize the rehabilitation approaches like aerobic, stretching and strengthening exercises. Orthotics is another important part of treatment that complete rehabilitative approaches. Orthotic devices that are currently being used and investigated in patients with CMT are also reviewed. The evidence shows that exercise is effective in improving strength and general fitness. Stretching is somewhat effective in maintaining range of motion. Orthotic devices are the mainstay of maintaining mobility and ambulation and upper extremity function. PMID:26966798

  19. Hand weakness in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease 1X.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Arthur-Farraj, P J

    2012-07-01

    There have been suggestions from previous studies that patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) have weaker dominant hand muscles. Since all studies to date have included a heterogeneous group of CMT patients we decided to analyse hand strength in 43 patients with CMT1X. We recorded handedness and the MRC scores for the first dorsal interosseous and abductor pollicis brevis muscles, median and ulnar nerve compound motor action potentials and conduction velocities in dominant and non-dominant hands. Twenty-two CMT1X patients (51%) had a weaker dominant hand; none had a stronger dominant hand. Mean MRC scores were significantly higher for first dorsal interosseous and abductor pollicis brevis in non-dominant hands compared to dominant hands. Median nerve compound motor action potentials were significantly reduced in dominant compared to non-dominant hands. We conclude that the dominant hand is weaker than the non-dominant hand in patients with CMT1X.

  20. Noncompaction Cardiomyopathy with Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherif Ali Eltawansy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 53-year-old female presenting with a new-onset heart failure that was contributed secondary to noncompaction cardiomyopathy. The diagnosis was made by echocardiogram and confirmed by cardiac MRI. Noncompaction cardiomyopathy (also known as ventricular hypertrabeculation is a newly discovered disease. It is considered to be congenital (genetic cardiomyopathy. It is usually associated with genetic disorders and that could explain the genetic pathogenesis of the non-compaction cardiomyopathy. Our case had a history of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. There is a high incidence of arrhythmia and embolic complications. The treatment usually consists of the medical management, defibrillator placement, and lifelong anticoagulation. Heart transplantation will be the last resort.

  1. PLEKHG5 deficiency leads to an intermediate form of autosomal-recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzedine, Hamid; Zavadakova, Petra; Planté-Bordeneuve, Violaine; Vaz Pato, Maria; Pinto, Nuno; Bartesaghi, Luca; Zenker, Jennifer; Poirot, Olivier; Bernard-Marissal, Nathalie; Arnaud Gouttenoire, Estelle; Cartoni, Romain; Title, Alexandra; Venturini, Giulia; Médard, Jean-Jacques; Makowski, Edward; Schöls, Ludger; Claeys, Kristl G; Stendel, Claudia; Roos, Andreas; Weis, Joachim; Dubourg, Odile; Leal Loureiro, José; Stevanin, Giovanni; Said, Gérard; Amato, Anthony; Baraban, Jay; LeGuern, Eric; Senderek, Jan; Rivolta, Carlo; Chrast, Roman

    2013-10-15

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) comprises a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of peripheral neuropathies characterized by progressive distal muscle weakness and atrophy, foot deformities and distal sensory loss. Following the analysis of two consanguineous families affected by a medium to late-onset recessive form of intermediate CMT, we identified overlapping regions of homozygosity on chromosome 1p36 with a combined maximum LOD score of 5.4. Molecular investigation of the genes from this region allowed identification of two homozygous mutations in PLEKHG5 that produce premature stop codons and are predicted to result in functional null alleles. Analysis of Plekhg5 in the mouse revealed that this gene is expressed in neurons and glial cells of the peripheral nervous system, and that knockout mice display reduced nerve conduction velocities that are comparable with those of affected individuals from both families. Interestingly, a homozygous PLEKHG5 missense mutation was previously reported in a recessive form of severe childhood onset lower motor neuron disease (LMND) leading to loss of the ability to walk and need for respiratory assistance. Together, these observations indicate that different mutations in PLEKHG5 lead to clinically diverse outcomes (intermediate CMT or LMND) affecting the function of neurons and glial cells. PMID:23777631

  2. 18-F flourodeoxy glucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography imaging: A viable alternative to three phase bone scan in evaluating diabetic foot complications?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is based on the initial findings from a prospective ongoing study to evaluate the efficacy of flourodeoxy glucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (FDG-PET CT) in diabetic foot evaluation. The aim was to compare the diagnostic accuracies of three phase bone scan (TPBS) and FDG PET-CT (FDG-PET) in diabetic foot evaluation. Seventy-nine patients with complicated diabetic foot (osteomyelitis/cellulitis, Charcot's neuropathy) were prospectively investigated. TPBS (15 mci methylene di phosphonate [MDP] intravenous [IV]), followed by FDG-PET (5 mci IV) within 5 days were performed in all patients. Based on referral indication, patients grouped into Group I, n = 36, (?osteomyelitis/cellulitis) and Group II, n = 43 (?Charcot's neuropathy). Interpretation was based on intensity, extent, pattern of MDP and FDG uptake (standardized uptake value) along with CT correlation. Findings were compared with final diagnostic outcome based on bone/soft tissue culture in Group I and clinical, radiological or scintigraphic followup in Group II. Results: Group I: For diagnosing osteomyelitis, TP: TN: FP: FN were 14:5:2:2 by FDG PET and 13:02:05:03 by TPBS respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value (NPV) of FDG-PET were 87.5%, 71%, 87.5% and 71% and 81.25%, 28.5%, 72% and 40% for TPBS, respectively. Group II: charcot's: cellulitis: Normal were 22:14:7 by FDG PET and 32:5:6 by TPBS, respectively. Flourodeoxy glucose PET-CT has a higher specificity and NPV than TPBS in diagnosing pedal osteomyelitis. TPBS, being highly sensitive is more useful than FDG-PET in detecting Charcot's neuropathy

  3. Jean-Martin Charcot and art: relationship of the "founder of neurology" with various aspects of art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogousslavsky, Julien; Boller, François

    2013-01-01

    Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893), the "father of neurology" in France and much beyond, was also the man who established academic psychiatry in Paris, differentiating it from clinical alienism. In his teaching, he used artistic representations from previous centuries to illustrate the historical developments of hysteria, mainly with the help of his pupil Paul Richer. Charcot liked to draw portraits (in particular, sketches of colleagues during boring faculty meetings and students' examinations), caricatures of himself and others, church sculptures, landscapes, soldiers, etc. He also used this skill in his clinical and scientific work; he drew histological or anatomic specimens, as well as patients' features and demeanor. His most daring artistic experiments were drawing under the influence of hashish. Charcot's tastes in art were conservative; he displayed no affinity for the avant-gardes of his time, including impressionism, or for contemporary musicians, such as César Franck or Hector Berlioz. Léon Daudet, son of Charcot's former friend and famous writer Alphonse Daudet, described Charcot's home as a pseudo-gothic kitsch accumulation of heteroclite pieces of furniture and materials. However, as Henry Meige wrote a few years after his mentor's death, Charcot the artist remains "inseparable from Charcot the physician." PMID:24041281

  4. Piet Mondrian's trees and the evolution in understanding multiple sclerosis, Charcot Prize Lecture 2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steinman, L.; Axtell, R.C.; Barbieri, D.; Bhat, R.; Brownell, S.E.; Jong, B.A. de; Dunn, S.E.; Grant, J.L.; Han, M.H.; Ho, P.P.; Kuipers, H.F.; Kurnellas, M.P.; Ousman, S.S.; Rothbard, J.B.

    2013-01-01

    Four questions were posed about multiple sclerosis (MS) at the 2011 Charcot Lecture, Oct. 22, 2011. 1. The Male/Female Disparity: Why are women developing MS so much more frequently than men? 2. Neuronal and Glial Protection: Are there guardian molecules that protect the nervous system in MS? 3. Pre

  5. Neuromuscular Hip Dysplasia in Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease Type 1A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamford, Nigel S.; White, Klane K.; Robinett, Stephanie A.; Otto, Randolph K.; Gospe, Sidney M., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is one of the most common inherited neurological disorders, affecting 36 in 100,000 people. CMT type 1A (hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy) is the most frequent form of this disease, affecting 60 to 80% of the CMT population, but its diagnosis may be delayed because of inconsistent clinical signs and…

  6. Hereditaer motorisk sensorisk neuropati (Charcot-Marie-Tooths sygdom). Molekyloergenetiske aspekter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, M J; Børglum, Anders; Brandt, C A; Bisgård, C

    1995-01-01

    Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) comprises a heterogenous group of peripheral neuropathies which are classified on the basis of symptoms, mode of inheritance and electrophysiological and neuropathological investigations. HMSN type I, or Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) type 1, is a...

  7. Auditory processing in patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neijenhuis, C.A.M.; Beynon, A.J.; Snik, A.F.M.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Broek, P. van den

    2003-01-01

    HYPOTHESIS: It is unclear whether Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, type 1A, causes auditory processing disorders. Therefore, auditory processing abilities were investigated in five CMT1A patients with normal hearing. BACKGROUND: Previous studies have failed to separate peripheral from central audi

  8. Motor axon loss is associated with hand dysfunction in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease 1a.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Videler, A.J.; Dijk, J.P. van; Beelen, A.; Visser, M. de; Nollet, F.; Schaik, I.N. van

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Charcot Marie Tooth type 1a (CMT1a) is a primarily demyelinating neuropathy, characterized by slowly progressive muscle weakness, atrophy, and sensory loss, and is most pronounced in both feet and hands. There is increasing evidence that muscle weakness is determined by motor axonal dysf

  9. Hip Subluxation, first clinical manifestation in a boy with illness of Charcot Marie Tooth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is a motor and sensitive neuropathy characterized by limb atrophy and weakness, cavus feet and in some cases acetabular dysplasia. We present a case of bilateral hip subluxation caused by this disease, which needed surgical correction

  10. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: frequency of genetic subtypes and guidelines for genetic testing.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Sinead M

    2012-07-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of diseases with approximately 45 different causative genes described. The aims of this study were to determine the frequency of different genes in a large cohort of patients with CMT and devise guidelines for genetic testing in practice.

  11. [Presentation of a flap web space laterodigital in cleft foot].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szwebel, J; Haddad, R; Mitrofanoff, M

    2012-08-01

    Cleft foot deformity is characterized by the absence of one or more median rays of the foot. This rare polymorphous congenital anomaly occurs more frequently in males, with a frequent autosomal dominant type of transmission. The purpose of surgical treatment is to narrow the width of the foot, but also to improve its global aesthetic look. Toe reparation, and more specifically web space reconstruction, provide the main technical challenges. We present an adaptation to the foot of a laterodigital cutaneous flap published by Barsky in 1964 for commissural reconstruction in cleft hand syndroms. The anatomical structure of fingers and toes commisures being different, this flap seems more adapted to the surgery of the foot. We gathered seven patients' files treated for ectrodactyly of the foot with this technique by the same surgeon from 2005 to 2008. No particular postoperative complications were noted, and the patients all expressed their satisfaction regarding the improvement of the appearance of their foot. We recommend to add the use of this flap in the "tool box" of the surgeon in charge of the management of foot deformities. PMID:20947236

  12. Sesamoid Injuries in the Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FootNotes Newsletter Current Issue Archive Subscribe Home » Foot & Ankle Conditions » Sesamoid Injuries in the Foot A A A | Print | Share ... or certain activities. Diagnosis In diagnosing a sesamoid injury, the foot and ankle surgeon will examine the foot, focusing on the ...

  13. A neurological bias in the history of hysteria: from the womb to the nervous system and Charcot

    OpenAIRE

    Marleide da Mota Gomes; Eliasz Engelhardt

    2014-01-01

    Hysteria conceptions, from ancient Egypt until the 19th century Parisian hospital based studies, are presented from gynaecological and demonological theories to neurological ones. The hysteria protean behavioral disorders based on nervous origin was proposed at the beginning, mainly in Great Britain, by the “enlightenment nerve doctors”. The following personages are highlighted: Galen, William, Sydenham, Cullen, Briquet, and Charcot with his School. Charcot who had hysteria and hypnotism prob...

  14. Malignant Melanoma of the Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Print Bookmark Malignant Melanoma of the Foot What is Malignant Melanoma? Melanoma is a cancer ... age groups, even the young. Melanoma in the Foot Melanoma that occurs in the foot or ankle ...

  15. Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Hand, Foot & Mouth Disease Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... sick Is HFMD the Same as Foot-and-Mouth Disease? No. HFMD is often confused with foot- ...

  16. Treatment of diabetic foot ulcer: an overview strategies for clinical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Paola, Luca; Faglia, Ezio

    2006-11-01

    Diabetic foot disease is a major health problem, which concerns 15% of the 200 million patients with diabetes worldwide. Major amputation, above or below the knee, is a feared complication of diabetes. More than 60% of non-traumatic amputations in the western world are performed in the diabetic population. Many patients who undergo an amputation, have a history of ulceration. Major amputations increase morbility and mortality and reduce the patient's quality of life. Treatment of foot complications is one of the main items in the absorption of economic and health resources addressed to the diabetic population. It is clear that effective treatment can bring about a reduction in the number of major amputations. Over recent years, we have seen a significant increase in knowledge about the physiopathological pathways of this complication, together with improvements in diagnostic techniques, but above all a standardized conservative therapeutic approach, which allows limb salvage in a high percentage of cases. This target has been achieved in specialized centers. An important prelude to diabetic foot treatment is the differing diagnosis of neuropathic and neuroischemic foot. This differentiation is essential for effective treatment. Ulceration in neuropathic foot is due to biomechanical stress and high pressure, which involves the plantar surface of toes and metatarsal heads. Treatment of a neuropathic plantar ulcer must correct pathological plantar pressures through weight bearing relief. Surgical treatment of deformities, with or without ulcerations, is effective therapy. A neuropathic ulcer that is not adequately treated can become a chronic ulcer that does not heal. An ulcer that does not heal for many months has a high probability of leading to osteomyelitis, for which treatment with antibiotics is not useful and which usually requires a surgical procedure. Charcot neuroarthropathy is a particular complication of neuropathy which may lead to fragmentation or

  17. The foot and ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging of the foot and ankle can be difficult because of the complex anatomy. Familiarity with the bony and ligamentous anatomy is essential for proper evaluation of radiographic findings. Therefore, pertinent anatomy is discussed as it applies to specific injuries. Special views, tomography, arthrography, and other techniques may be indicated for complete evaluation of foot and ankle trauma

  18. The lateral lesser toe fillet flap for diabetic foot soft tissue closure: surgical technique and case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sze-Ryn Chung

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Wound closure for the diabetic foot can be challenging and often involves amputation or reconstruction. The authors describe a surgical technique and a case report of lateral lesser toe fillet flap in the management of a diabetic foot wound. The lateral lesser toe fillet flap reconstruction is a reproducible technique that incurs comparatively minimal technical complexity and provides a favorable option in the management of diabetic foot wounds where soft tissue coverage is required.

  19. The lateral lesser toe fillet flap for diabetic foot soft tissue closure: surgical technique and case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sze-Ryn; Wong, Keng L.; Cheah, Andre E. J.

    2014-01-01

    Wound closure for the diabetic foot can be challenging and often involves amputation or reconstruction. The authors describe a surgical technique and a case report of lateral lesser toe fillet flap in the management of a diabetic foot wound. The lateral lesser toe fillet flap reconstruction is a reproducible technique that incurs comparatively minimal technical complexity and provides a favorable option in the management of diabetic foot wounds where soft tissue coverage is required. PMID:25527137

  20. Effect of painless diabetic neuropathy on pressure pain hypersensitivity (hyperalgesia after acute foot trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Wienemann

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: Acute injury transiently lowers local mechanical pain thresholds at a limb. To elucidate the impact of painless (diabetic neuropathy on this post-traumatic hyperalgesia, pressure pain perception thresholds after a skeletal foot trauma were studied in consecutive persons without and with neuropathy (i.e. history of foot ulcer or Charcot arthropathy. Design and methods: A case–control study was done on 25 unselected clinical routine patients with acute unilateral foot trauma (cases: elective bone surgery; controls: sprain, toe fracture. Cases were 12 patients (11 diabetic subjects with severe painless neuropathy and chronic foot pathology. Controls were 13 non-neuropathic persons. Over 1 week after the trauma, cutaneous pressure pain perception threshold (CPPPT and deep pressure pain perception threshold (DPPPT were measured repeatedly, adjacent to the injury and at the opposite foot (pinprick stimulators, Algometer II®. Results: In the control group, post-traumatic DPPPT (but not CPPPT at the injured foot was reduced by about 15–25%. In the case group, pre- and post-operative CPPPT and DPPPT were supranormal. Although DPPPT fell post-operatively by about 15–20%, it remained always higher than the post-traumatic DPPPT in the control group: over musculus abductor hallucis 615 kPa (kilopascal versus 422 kPa, and over metatarsophalangeal joint 518 kPa versus 375 kPa (medians; case vs. control group; CPPPT did not decrease post-operatively. Conclusion: Physiological nociception and post-traumatic hyperalgesia to pressure are diminished at the foot with severe painless (diabetic neuropathy. A degree of post-traumatic hypersensitivity required to ‘pull away’ from any one, even innocuous, mechanical impact in order to avoid additional damage is, therefore, lacking.

  1. Effect of painless diabetic neuropathy on pressure pain hypersensitivity (hyperalgesia) after acute foot trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienemann, Tobias; Chantelau, Ernst A.; Koller, Armin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction and objective Acute injury transiently lowers local mechanical pain thresholds at a limb. To elucidate the impact of painless (diabetic) neuropathy on this post-traumatic hyperalgesia, pressure pain perception thresholds after a skeletal foot trauma were studied in consecutive persons without and with neuropathy (i.e. history of foot ulcer or Charcot arthropathy). Design and methods A case–control study was done on 25 unselected clinical routine patients with acute unilateral foot trauma (cases: elective bone surgery; controls: sprain, toe fracture). Cases were 12 patients (11 diabetic subjects) with severe painless neuropathy and chronic foot pathology. Controls were 13 non-neuropathic persons. Over 1 week after the trauma, cutaneous pressure pain perception threshold (CPPPT) and deep pressure pain perception threshold (DPPPT) were measured repeatedly, adjacent to the injury and at the opposite foot (pinprick stimulators, Algometer II®). Results In the control group, post-traumatic DPPPT (but not CPPPT) at the injured foot was reduced by about 15–25%. In the case group, pre- and post-operative CPPPT and DPPPT were supranormal. Although DPPPT fell post-operatively by about 15–20%, it remained always higher than the post-traumatic DPPPT in the control group: over musculus abductor hallucis 615 kPa (kilopascal) versus 422 kPa, and over metatarsophalangeal joint 518 kPa versus 375 kPa (medians; case vs. control group); CPPPT did not decrease post-operatively. Conclusion Physiological nociception and post-traumatic hyperalgesia to pressure are diminished at the foot with severe painless (diabetic) neuropathy. A degree of post-traumatic hypersensitivity required to ‘pull away’ from any one, even innocuous, mechanical impact in order to avoid additional damage is, therefore, lacking. PMID:25397867

  2. An Unusual Presentation of Charcot Arthropathy Caused by Syringomyelia Mimicking a Soft Tissue Tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Cuneyd Gunay; Ebru Atalar; Baybars Ataoglu

    2014-01-01

    Charcot arthropathy is a chronic, degenerative condition and is associated with decreased sensorial innervation. Numerous causes of this arthropathy have been described. Here we report a case of neuropathic arthropathy secondary to syringomyelia which was misdiagnosed as a soft tissue tumor and treated surgically and additionally with radiotherapy at another institution. The patient had clinical and radiological signs of syringomyelia, associated with a limited range of motion, swelling, and ...

  3. Disability and quality of life in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1

    OpenAIRE

    PFEIFFER, G; Wicklein, E; Ratusinski, T; Schmitt, L; Kunze, K

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type I (CMT1) is a hereditary sensorimotor neuropathy causing variable degrees of handicap. The risk for relevant disability in respect to genetic counselling is unknown. An attempt was made to define it.
METHODS—Disability and ambulation of 50 patients with CMT1 were scored by the Hauser ambulation index score and the Rankin scale. Rankin score 2 was subdivided into 2a (independent without relevant slowness) and 2b (independent, ...

  4. XVI European Charcot Foundation Lecture: Nutrition and environment, can MS be prevented?

    OpenAIRE

    Simon, Kelly Claire; Munger, Kassandra L; Ascherio, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a relatively common debilitating neurologic disease that affects people in early adulthood. While the characteristic pathology of MS has been well described, the etiology of the disease is not well understood, despite decades of research and the identification of strong genetic and environmental candidates for susceptibility. A question central to all diseases, but posed specifically for MS at the XVI European Charcot Foundation Lecture, was ‘Can MS be prevented?’ To add...

  5. An Algorithm for Genetic Testing of Serbian Patients with Demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth

    OpenAIRE

    Keckarevic Markovic, Milica P.; Dackovic, Jelena; Mladenovic, Jelena; Milic-Rasic, Vedrana; Kecmanovic, Miljana; Keckarevic, Dusan; Romac, Stanka

    2013-01-01

    Charcot-Marie Tooth (CMT) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of diseases with rough genotype–phenotype correlation, so the final diagnosis requires extensive clinical and electrophysiological examination, family data, and gene mutation analysis. Although there is a common pattern of genetic basis of CMT, there could be some population differences that should be taken into account to facilitate analyses. Here we present the algorithm for genetic testing in Serbian patients wit...

  6. SMN gene analysis of the spinal form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Hanash, A.; LeGuern, E.; Birouk, N; Clermont, O; Pouget, J; Bouche, P; Munnich, A; Brice, A; Melki, J

    1997-01-01

    The spinal form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (spinal CMT) is a rare genetic disorder of the peripheral nervous system, the genetic basis of which remains unknown. To test the hypothesis that a defect of survival motor neuron (SMN), the determining gene for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), would result in spinal CMT, 18 unrelated spinal CMT patients were studied. Nine of them were sporadic cases and the other nine belonged to unrelated autosomal dominant pedigrees. None of the 18 patients show...

  7. Outcome measures for Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: clinical and neurofunctional assessment in children

    OpenAIRE

    Pagliano, Emanuela; Moroni, Isabella; Baranello, Giovanni; Magro, Anita; Marchi, Alessia; Bulgheroni, Sara; Ferrarin, Maurizio; Pareyson, Davide

    2011-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the most common inherited neuromuscular disorder, presenting with symptoms often occurring since childhood, and showing a progressive course. At present, there are no valid and reliable measures for evaluation of impairment and disability in the pediatric population. The aim of this study was to determine the usefulness of outcome measures, commonly used in adult patients, in CMT children. We report the results of a comprehensive evaluation of 21 children ...

  8. Diabetes and Foot Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease, and Other Dental Problems Diabetic Eye Disease Diabetes and Foot Problems How can diabetes affect my feet? Too much glucose, also called ... you have any of these signs. How can diabetes change the shape of my feet? Nerve damage ...

  9. [The infected diabetic foot].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voide, C; Trampuz, A; Orasch, C

    2012-10-31

    Disorders of local immunity associated with diabetes, neuropathy, vascular disease and pressure lesions all contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetic foot lesions. Diabetic foot infections are frequently encountered, comprising multifactorial pathology and high morbidity and mortality rates. Microbiological sampling is indicated only when infection is suspected clinically, that is, when a lesion presents a minimum of two of the following six signs: erythema, heat, pain, tumefaction, induration or purulent discharge. PMID:23117963

  10. Diabetic foot risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodbury, M Gail

    2016-05-01

    Diabetes is a serious chronic disease that results in foot complications for many people world-wide. In 2014, the World Health Organization estimated the global prevalence of diabetes in adults to be 9%. To ascertain the risk that an individual patient might develop a diabetic foot ulcer that could lead to an amputation, clinicians are strongly encouraged to perform a risk assessment. Monteiro-Soares and Dinis-Ribeiro have presented a new DIAbetic FOot Risk Assessment with the acronym DIAFORA. It is different from other risk assessments in that it predicts the risk of developing both diabetic foot ulcers and amputation specifically. The risk variables were derived by regression analysis based on a data set of 293 patients from a high-risk setting, a Hospital Diabetic Foot Clinic, who had diabetes and a diabetic foot ulcers. Clear descriptions of the risk variables are provided as well as sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values for the risk categories. As an added benefit, likelihood ratios are provided that will help clinicians determine the risk of amputation for individual patients. Having a risk assessment form is important for clinician use and examples exist. A question is raised about the effectiveness of risk assessment and how effectiveness might be determined. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26825436

  11. Foot Anthropometry and Morphology Phenomena

    OpenAIRE

    Agić, Ante; NIKOLIĆ, VASILIJE; Mijović, Budimir

    2006-01-01

    Foot structure description is important for many reasons. The foot anthropometric morphology phenomena are analyzed together with hidden biomechanical functionality in order to fully characterize foot structure and function. For younger Croatian population the scatter data of the individual foot variables were interpolated by multivariate statistics. Foot structure descriptors are influenced by many factors, as a style of life, race, climate, and things of the great importance in ...

  12. Number of circulating pro‐angiogenic cells, growth factor and anti‐oxidative gene profiles might be altered in type 2 diabetes with and without diabetic foot syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Witold N. Nowak; Borys, Sebastian; Kusińska, Katarzyna; Bukowska‐Strakova, Karolina; Witek, Przemysław; Koblik, Teresa; Józkowicz, Alicja; Małecki, Maciej Tadeusz; Dulak, Józef

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims/Introduction Type 2 diabetes is often complicated by diabetic foot syndrome (DFS). We analyzed the circulating stem cells, growth factor and anti‐oxidant gene expression profiles in type 2 diabetes patients without or with different forms of DFS. Materials and Methods Healthy volunteers (n = 13) and type 2 diabetes patients: (i) without DFS (n = 10); or with (ii) Charcot osteoneuropathy (n = 10); (iii) non‐infected (n = 17); (iv) infected (n = 11); and (v) healed ulceration were...

  13. About medicine and the arts. Charcot and French literature at the fin-de-siècle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, P

    2001-03-01

    The relationship between medicine and the arts, literature in particular, has many aspects. One of the most obvious relations is the use of literature as a source for historical studies. Jean-Martin Charcot and his school often appear in French literature at the end of the 19th century. Several aspects will be highlighted in this study, including (1) the ideas about degenerative diseases in the work of Emile Zola, the main author of the naturalistic movement; (2) decadence and spiritism in two "transitional" novels by Joris Karl Huysmans, who, once supporter of the naturalistic movement, changed his ideas following observations of disease and cure that could not be explained in a scientific way. Charcot's work on hysteria and hypnosis, as well as Brown-Séquard's rejuvenation experiments with testicular extracts played an important role with this respect; (3) Charcot's relationship with the Daudets, in particular his treatment of Alphonse's tabes dorsalis and the ambivalent attitude of his son Léon Daudet towards Charcot; (4) the influence of the lectures at the Salpêtrière on the work of Guy de Maupassant, who attended the lessons in the mid-1880s. The reading of novels and biographies of these authors provides a part of the social context and the cultural atmosphere in Paris at the "fin-de-siècle" when Charcot and his school played an important role in medicine. Moreover, it shows the influence of medicine and science on society as recorded by writers. PMID:11446262

  14. Foot Loading Characteristics of Different Graduations of Partial Weight Bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusinde, Johannes; Pauser, Johannes; Swoboda, Bernd; Gelse, Kolja; Carl, Hans-Dieter

    2011-01-01

    Limited weight bearing of the lower extremity is a commonly applied procedure in orthopaedic rehabilitation after reconstructive forefoot surgery, trauma surgery and joint replacement. The most frequent limitations are given as percentage of body weight (BW) and represent 10 or 50% BW. The extent of foot loading under these graduations of partial…

  15. Doença de Charcot-Marie-Tooth: estudos eletromiográficos em 45 pacientes Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: electromyographic studies in 45 cases

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos R. G. de freitas; Nascimento, Osvaldo J.M.; Maria T. Nevares; Tânia M. Escada

    1995-01-01

    Foi realizada eletroneuromiografia em 45 pacientes com doença de Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT). A classificação em tipo I e tipo II da doença de CMT foi feita com base na neurocondução motora do mediano e do ulnar. Assim 11 pacientes eram do tipo I e 34 eram do tipo II. No tipo I não houve relação entre a queda da VCN motora do ulnar e mediano com o quadro clínico da doença. Devido a ausência do potencial de ação sensitivo (PAS) do nervo sural em muitos casos, achamos impossível a classificação d...

  16. Sesamoid Injuries in the Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Print Bookmark Sesamoid Injuries in the Foot What is a Sesamoid? A sesamoid is a ... contributing factor. Types of Sesamoid Injuries in the Foot There are three types of sesamoid injuries in ...

  17. Foot Health Facts for Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Facts for Athletes Text Size Print Bookmark Foot Health Facts for Athletes From the repeated pounding ... sports injuries. Prompt evaluation and treatment by a foot and ankle surgeon is important because sometimes that “ ...

  18. Foot Push-Up Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News, Videos & Podcasts » Articles » Text Size Print Bookmark Foot Push-Up Test Take this simple test to ... Stand with your back straight, and lift one foot off the floor. Slowly lift the heel of ...

  19. Hand-foot-mouth disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand-foot-mouth disease is a common viral infection that most often begins in the throat. ... Hand-foot-mouth disease (HFMD) is most commonly caused by a virus called coxsackievirus A16. Children under age 10 ...

  20. Foot, leg, and ankle swelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swelling of the ankles - feet - legs; Ankle swelling; Foot swelling; Leg swelling; Edema - peripheral; Peripheral edema ... Foot, leg, and ankle swelling is common when the person also: Is overweight Has a blood clot ...

  1. Hand-foot-mouth disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000965.htm Hand-foot-mouth disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hand-foot-mouth disease is a common viral infection that most ...

  2. What Is a Foot and Ankle Surgeon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Foot & Ankle Surgeon? A A A | Print | Share What is a Foot & Ankle Surgeon? Foot and ankle ... of conditions that affect people of every age. What education has a foot and ankle surgeon received? ...

  3. Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease (HFMD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with infected people Commonly Confused With Foot-and-Mouth Disease Hand, foot, and mouth disease is often ... and-Mouth Disease . Outbreaks of Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease Large outbreaks of hand, foot, and mouth ...

  4. Selected items from the Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) Neuropathy Score and secondary clinical outcome measures serve as sensitive clinical markers of disease severity in CMT1A patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannil, Manoj; Solari, Alessandra; Leha, Andreas; Pelayo-Negro, Ana L; Berciano, José; Schlotter-Weigel, Beate; Walter, Maggie C; Rautenstrauss, Bernd; Schnizer, Tuuli J; Schenone, Angelo; Seeman, Pavel; Kadian, Chandini; Schreiber, Olivia; Angarita, Natalia G; Fabrizi, Gian Maria; Gemignani, Franco; Padua, Luca; Santoro, Lucio; Quattrone, Aldo; Vita, Giuseppe; Calabrese, Daniela; Young, Peter; Laurà, Matilde; Haberlová, Jana; Mazanec, Radim; Paulus, Walter; Beissbarth, Tim; Shy, Michael E; Reilly, Mary M; Pareyson, Davide; Sereda, Michael W

    2014-11-01

    This study evaluates primary and secondary clinical outcome measures in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) with regard to their contribution towards discrimination of disease severity. The nine components of the composite Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease Neuropathy Score and six additional secondary clinical outcome measures were assessed in 479 adult patients with genetically proven CMT1A and 126 healthy controls. Using hierarchical clustering, we identified four significant clusters of patients according to clinical severity. We then tested the impact of each of the CMTNS components and of the secondary clinical parameters with regard to their power to differentiate these four clusters. The CMTNS components ulnar sensory nerve action potential (SNAP), pin sensibility, vibration and strength of arms did not increase the discriminant value of the remaining five CMTNS components (Ulnar compound motor action potential [CMAP], leg motor symptoms, arm motor symptoms, leg strength and sensory symptoms). However, three of the six additional clinical outcome measures - the 10m-timed walking test (T10MW), 9 hole-peg test (9HPT), and foot dorsal flexion dynamometry - further improved discrimination between severely and mildly affected patients. From these findings, we identified three different composite measures as score hypotheses and compared their discriminant power with that of the CMTNS. A composite of eight components CMAP, Motor symptoms legs, Motor symptoms arms, Strength of Legs, Sensory symptoms), displayed the strongest power to discriminate between the clusters. As a conclusion, five items from the CMTNS and three secondary clinical outcome measures improve the clinical assessment of patients with CMT1A significantly and are beneficial for upcoming clinical and therapeutic trials. PMID:25085517

  5. An Unusual Presentation of Charcot Arthropathy Caused by Syringomyelia Mimicking a Soft Tissue Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atalar, Ebru; Ataoglu, Baybars

    2014-01-01

    Charcot arthropathy is a chronic, degenerative condition and is associated with decreased sensorial innervation. Numerous causes of this arthropathy have been described. Here we report a case of neuropathic arthropathy secondary to syringomyelia which was misdiagnosed as a soft tissue tumor and treated surgically and additionally with radiotherapy at another institution. The patient had clinical and radiological signs of syringomyelia, associated with a limited range of motion, swelling, and pain in the affected joint. Neuropathic arthropathy, although less common, should be considered in cases of unexplained joint swelling, pain, and limited range of motion of the affected joint. PMID:25126434

  6. Sport activity in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: A case study of a Paralympic swimmer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vita, Giuseppe; La Foresta, Stefania; Russo, Massimo; Vita, Gian Luca; Messina, Sonia; Lunetta, Christian; Mazzeo, Anna

    2016-09-01

    This study reports the positive physical, emotional and psychosocial changes induced by sport activity in a Paralympic swimmer with Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) type 4A. When we compared evaluations before initiating sport activity with those after five years of competitive activity, we found: i) increased proximal muscles strength of upper limbs; ii) augmented ability to propel wheelchair independently; iii) improved quality of life; iv) reduced trait anxiety and striking improvement of depression; v) enhanced self-esteem. Longitudinal studies in large cohorts to evaluate the positive effects of sport activity are needed to support provision of evidence-based advice to patients and families. PMID:27460291

  7. Imaging diagnostics of the foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book on imaging diagnostics of the foot contains the following chapters: (1) Imaging techniques. (2) Clinical diagnostics. (3) Ankle joint and hind foot. (4) Metatarsus. (5) Forefoot. (6) Pathology of plantar soft tissue. (7) Nervous system diseases. (8) Diseases without specific anatomic localization. (9) System diseases including the foot. (10) Tumor like lesions. (11) Normative variants.

  8. X-Ray Exam: Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth X-Ray Exam: Foot KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Foot Print A A A Text Size ... español Radiografía: pie What It Is A foot X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  9. Gustilo ⅢB、ⅢC型小腿及足踝部开放性骨折的一期修复与重建%One-stage reconstruction of open fractures of leg, ankle and foot of Gustilo types Ⅲ B and Ⅲ C

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈雪松; 徐永清; 陈建明; 何金顺; 张黎明; 余晓军; 江珉; 吉丽; 李小松

    2014-01-01

    目的 探讨GustiloⅢB、ⅢC型小腿及足踝部开放性骨折一期修复与重建的临床疗效及手术要点.方法 回顾性分析2001年1月至2012年4月收治的160例GustiloⅢB、ⅢC型小腿及足踝部开放性骨折患者,男103例,女57例;平均年龄为36.3岁.骨折部位及Gustilo分型:胫骨干1 13例(ⅢB型91例,ⅢC型22例),胫骨远端4例(ⅢB型3例,ⅢC型1例),足踝部43例(ⅢB型37例,ⅢC型6例).受伤至手术时间为3~37 h,平均12.7h.彻底清创后应用穿支皮瓣、皮神经营养血管皮瓣、传统轴型皮瓣及肌皮瓣、局部皮瓣一期修复关键创面,选择外固定支架(121例)、钢板(20例)、螺钉或克氏针(14例)及髓内钉(5例)确定性固定骨折,同时完成其他必要的肢体结构及功能重建.结果 本组患者平均住院时间为28.0 d(9 ~76 d),关键创面均经初次手术获得修复.除1例GustiloⅢC型胫腓骨骨折患者因主诉伤肢持续性疼痛而截肢外,其余159例保肢成功患者术后获12~ 83个月(平均21.3个月)随访.随访期间均未发生严重或持续的骨感染,骨性愈合时间为6~19个月(平均11.7个月),肢体功能、外形恢复满意.结论 应用标准的修复重建外科技术及骨折固定技术一期修复与重建GustiloⅢB、ⅢC型小腿及足踝部开放性骨折可显著缩短治疗周期,减少并发症;新鲜创面解剖清晰,手术更为灵活;仅修复关键创面可减少供区牺牲,避免外形臃肿.%Objective To explore one-stage reconstruction of open fractures of leg,ankle and foot of Gustilo types Ⅲ B and ⅢC.Methods From January 2001 to April 2012,160 open fractures of leg,ankle and foot of Gustilo types Ⅲ B and Ⅲ C were treated with one-stage reconstruction.They were 103 men and 57 women,with an average age of 36.3 years.There were 113 cases of tibial shaft fracture (type ⅢB in 91 and type ⅢC in 22),4 cases of tibial distal end fracture (ⅢB in 3 and type ⅢC in one),and 43 cases of

  10. Foot posture, foot function and low back pain: the Framingham Foot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Menz, Hylton B.; Alyssa B Dufour; RISKOWSKI, JODY L.; Hillstrom, Howard J; Hannan, Marian T

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Abnormal foot posture and function have been proposed as possible risk factors for low back pain, but this has not been examined in detail. The objective of this study was to explore the associations of foot posture and foot function with low back pain in 1930 members of the Framingham Study (2002–05).

  11. The foot of Homo naledi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harcourt-Smith, W E H; Throckmorton, Z; Congdon, K A; Zipfel, B; Deane, A S; Drapeau, M S M; Churchill, S E; Berger, L R; DeSilva, J M

    2015-01-01

    Modern humans are characterized by a highly specialized foot that reflects our obligate bipedalism. Our understanding of hominin foot evolution is, although, hindered by a paucity of well-associated remains. Here we describe the foot of Homo naledi from Dinaledi Chamber, South Africa, using 107 pedal elements, including one nearly-complete adult foot. The H. naledi foot is predominantly modern human-like in morphology and inferred function, with an adducted hallux, an elongated tarsus, and derived ankle and calcaneocuboid joints. In combination, these features indicate a foot well adapted for striding bipedalism. However, the H. naledi foot differs from modern humans in having more curved proximal pedal phalanges, and features suggestive of a reduced medial longitudinal arch. Within the context of primitive features found elsewhere in the skeleton, these findings suggest a unique locomotor repertoire for H. naledi, thus providing further evidence of locomotor diversity within both the hominin clade and the genus Homo. PMID:26439101

  12. Age-related changes in motor unit number estimates in adult patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. van Dijk; C. Verhamme; I.N. van Schaik; H.J. Schelhaas; E. Mans; L.J. Bour; D.F. Stegeman; M.J. Zwarts

    2010-01-01

    Background: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) is known as a demyelinating hereditary neuropathy. Secondary axonal dysfunction is the most important determinant of disease severity. In adult patients, clinical progression may be because of further axonal deterioration as was shown with comp

  13. Age-related changes in motor unit number estimates in adult patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, J.P. van; Verhamme, C.; Schaik, I.N. van; Schelhaas, H.J.; Mans, E.; Bour, L.J.; Stegeman, D.F.; Zwarts, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) is known as a demyelinating hereditary neuropathy. Secondary axonal dysfunction is the most important determinant of disease severity. In adult patients, clinical progression may be because of further axonal deterioration as was shown with comp

  14. Reliability of the CMT neuropathy score (second version) in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Sinéad M

    2011-09-01

    The Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy score (CMTNS) is a reliable and valid composite score comprising symptoms, signs, and neurophysiological tests, which has been used in natural history studies of CMT1A and CMT1X and as an outcome measure in treatment trials of CMT1A. Following an international workshop on outcome measures in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), the CMTNS was modified to attempt to reduce floor and ceiling effects and to standardize patient assessment, aiming to improve its sensitivity for detecting change over time and the effect of an intervention. After agreeing on the modifications made to the CMTNS (CMTNS2), three examiners evaluated 16 patients to determine inter-rater reliability; one examiner evaluated 18 patients twice within 8 weeks to determine intra-rater reliability. Three examiners evaluated 63 patients using the CMTNS and the CMTNS2 to determine how the modifications altered scoring. For inter- and intra-rater reliability, intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) were ≥0.96 for the CMT symptom score and the CMT examination score. There were small but significant differences in some of the individual components of the CMTNS compared with the CMTNS2, mainly in the components that had been modified the most. A longitudinal study is in progress to determine whether the CMTNS2 is more sensitive than the CMTNS for detecting change over time.

  15. Hemodynamic study of ischemic limb by velocity measurement in foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By means of a tracer technique with 99mTc-pertechnetate, provided with seven zonal regions of interest, 6 mm in width, placed at equal spaces of 18 mm, from the toe tip to the midfoot at a right angle to the long axis of the foot, arterial flow velocity in the foot during reactive hyperemia was measured. The mean velocity in the foot was 5.66 +/- 1.78 cm/sec in 14 normal limbs, 1.58 +/- 1.07 cm/sec in 29 limbs with distal thromboangiitis obliterans (TAO), 0.89 +/- 0.61 cm/sec in 13 limbs with proximal TAO, and 0.97 +/- 0.85 cm/sec in 15 limbs with arteriosclerosis obliterans (ASO). The velocity returned to normal in all 12 limbs after successful arterial reconstruction, whereas the foot or toe blood pressure remained pathologic in 9 of the 12 limbs postoperatively; the velocity reverted to normal in 4 of 13 limbs after lumbar sympathectomy. When the velocity was normalized after operation, the ulceration healed favorably, and the ischemic limb was salvaged. The most characteristic feature of peripheral arterial occlusive disease of the lower extremity was a stagnation of arterial circulation in the foot, and the flow velocity in the foot was a sensitive predictive index of limb salvage

  16. [Diabetic foot infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryšková, Lenka

    2015-06-01

    Diabetic foot infections (DFIs) are serious problems in persons with diabetes, about 10 to 25 % of patients with dia-betes develop a foot ulcer and 60 % of them are infected. DFIs cause morbidity, limit mobility, worsen patients quality of life. Infections are classified as mild, moderate, or severe. Most DFIs are polymicrobial, with Gram-positive cocci (especially staphylococci), Gram-negative bacilli and obligate anaerobes. Successful therapy of DFI requires proper topical care and often includes surgical interventions but appropriate antibiotic treatment plays a key role. Initial antimicrobial therapy of these infections is usually empirical, the antibiotic regimen should be based on the severity of the infection. Definitive therapy should then be tailored according to the results of culture and susceptibility tests from a reliably obtained specimen. PMID:26258977

  17. Estimation of foot trajectory during human walking by a wearable inertial measurement unit mounted to the foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Naoki; Ogihara, Naomichi

    2016-03-01

    To establish a supportive technology for reducing the risk of falling in older people, it is essential to clarify gait characteristics in elderly individuals that are possibly linked to the risk of falling during actual daily activities. In this study, we developed a system to monitor human gait in an outdoor environment using an inertial measurement unit consisting of a tri-axial accelerometer and tri-axial gyroscope. Step-by-step foot trajectories were estimated from the sensor unit attached to the dorsum of the foot. Specifically, stride length and foot clearance were calculated by integrating the gravity-compensated translational acceleration over time during the swing phase. Zero vertical velocity and displacement corrections were applied to obtain the final trajectory, assuming the slope of the walking surface is negligible. Short, normal, and long stride-length walking of 10 healthy participants was simultaneously measured using the proposed system and a conventional motion capture system to evaluate the accuracy of the estimated foot trajectory. Mean accuracy and precision were approximately 20 ± 50 mm, for stride length, and 2 ± 7 mm for foot clearance, indicating that the swing phase trajectory of the sensor unit attached to the foot was reconstructed more accurately and precisely using the proposed system than with previously published methods owing to the flat floor assumption. Although some methodological limitations certainly apply, this system will serve as a useful tool to monitor human walking during daily activities. PMID:26979891

  18. Relationship between static foot posture and foot mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McPoil Thomas G

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is not uncommon for a person's foot posture and/or mobility to be assessed during a clinical examination. The exact relationship, however, between static posture and mobility is not known. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the degree of association between static foot posture and mobility. Method The static foot posture and foot mobility of 203 healthy individuals was assessed and then analyzed to determine if low arched or "pronated" feet are more mobile than high arched or "supinated" feet. Results The study demonstrated that those individuals with a lower standing dorsal arch height and/or a wider standing midfoot width had greater mobility in their foot. In addition, those individuals with higher Foot Posture Index (FPI values demonstrated greater mobility and those with lower FPI values demonstrated less mobility. Finally, the amount of foot mobility that an individual has can be predicted reasonably well using either a 3 or 4 variable linear regression model. Conclusions Because of the relationship between static foot posture and mobility, it is recommended that both be assessed as part of a comprehensive evaluation of a individual with foot problems.

  19. [Osteochondrosis of the pediatric foot].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbab, D; Wingenfeld, C; Rath, B; Lüring, C; Quack, V; Tingart, M

    2013-01-01

    Osteochondrosis is a heterogeneous group of self-limiting conditions characterized by disturbance of enchondral ossification caused by a lack of circulation. Foot pain is a relatively common problem in children and adolescents and may be due to osteochondrosis. Osteochondrosis of the growing foot shows painful radiological alterations including increased density, fragmentation and irregularity of the epiphyses, physes and apophyses. Lacking etiologic and pathophysiologic information, ostoechondroses have been documented in almost every bone of the foot and therefore should be considered in the differential diagnosis when evaluating pediatric foot pain. The most common localizations of osteochondroses of the growing foot include the navicular as Kohler's syndrome, the metatarsal as Freiberg's infraction and calcaneal apophysitis as Sever's disease. Prognosis and final outcome vary considerably between the different localizations. Physicians should therefore be informed about the etiology, clinical presentation and treatment options for osteochondroses of the growing foot. PMID:23254328

  20. Unfavourable results in thumb reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir M Kumta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The history of thumb reconstruction parallels the history of hand surgery. The attributes that make the thumb unique, and that the reconstructive surgeon must assess and try to restore when reconstructing a thumb, are: Position, stability, strength, length, motion, sensibility and appearance. Deficiency in any of these attributes can reduce the utility of the reconstructed thumb. A detailed assessment of the patient and his requirements needs to be performed before embarking on a thumb reconstruction. Most unsatisfactory results can be attributed to wrong choice of procedure. Component defects of the thumb are commonly treated by tissue from adjacent fingers, hand or forearm. With refinements in microsurgery, the foot has become a major source of tissue for component replacement in the thumb. Bone lengthening, osteoplastic reconstruction, pollicisation, and toe to hand transfers are the commonest methods of thumb reconstruction. Unfavourable results can be classified as functional and aesthetic. Some are common to all types of procedures. However each type of reconstruction has its own unique set of problems. Meticulous planning and execution is essential to give an aesthetic and functionally useful thumb. Secondary surgeries like tendon transfers, bone grafting, debulking, arthrodesis, may be required to correct deficiencies in the reconstruction. Attention needs to be paid to the donor site as well.

  1. Imaging of diabetic foot infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridman, Robert; Bar-David, Tzvi; Kamen, Stewart; Staron, Ronald B; Leung, David K; Rasiej, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Complications from diabetic foot infections are a leading cause of nontraumatic lower-extremity amputations. Nearly 85% of these amputations result from an infected foot ulcer. Osteomyelitis is present in approximately 20% of diabetic foot infections. It is imperative that clinicians make quick and successful diagnoses of diabetic foot osteomyelitis (DFO) because a delay in treatment may lead to worsening outcomes. Imaging studies, such as plain films, bone scans, musculoskeletal ultrasound, computerized tomography scans, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography scans, aid in the diagnosis. However, there are several mimickers of DFO, which present problems to making a correct diagnosis. PMID:24296017

  2. Melanoma of the Foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, Ivan; Bower, Chris

    2016-07-01

    Melanoma is a rare form of skin cancer that is responsible for most skin cancer deaths globally. Tumors arising on the foot continue to be a particular challenge. Patients present later and lesions are frequently misdiagnosed, leading to more advanced disease with an overall poorer prognosis then melanoma elsewhere. In order to improve early recognition, this article reviews the clinical features of the disease along with published algorithms. Emerging assessment techniques such as dermoscopy are also discussed as tools to improve clinical decision making. Contemporary drug therapies in the treatment of advanced disease are also discussed. PMID:27215160

  3. Diabetic foot complications and their risk factors from a large retrospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Al-Rubeaan

    Full Text Available Foot complications are considered to be a serious consequence of diabetes mellitus, posing a major medical and economical threat. Identifying the extent of this problem and its risk factors will enable health providers to set up better prevention programs. Saudi National Diabetes Registry (SNDR, being a large database source, would be the best tool to evaluate this problem.This is a cross-sectional study of a cohort of 62,681 patients aged ≥ 25 years from SNDR database, selected for studying foot complications associated with diabetes and related risk factors.The overall prevalence of diabetic foot complications was 3.3% with 95% confidence interval (95% CI of (3.16%-3.44%, whilst the prevalences of foot ulcer, gangrene, and amputations were 2.05% (1.94%-2.16%, 0.19% (0.16%-0.22%, and 1.06% (0.98%-1.14%, respectively. The prevalence of foot complications increased with age and diabetes duration predominantly amongst the male patients. Diabetic foot is more commonly seen among type 2 patients, although it is more prevalent among type 1 diabetic patients. The Univariate analysis showed Charcot joints, peripheral vascular disease (PVD, neuropathy, diabetes duration ≥ 10 years, insulin use, retinopathy, nephropathy, age ≥ 45 years, cerebral vascular disease (CVD, poor glycemic control, coronary artery disease (CAD, male gender, smoking, and hypertension to be significant risk factors with odds ratio and 95% CI at 42.53 (18.16-99.62, 14.47 (8.99-23.31, 12.06 (10.54-13.80, 7.22 (6.10-8.55, 4.69 (4.28-5.14, 4.45 (4.05-4.89, 2.88 (2.43-3.40, 2.81 (2.31-3.43, 2.24 (1.98-2.45, 2.02 (1.84-2.22, 1.54 (1.29-1.83, and 1.51 (1.38-1.65, respectively.Risk factors for diabetic foot complications are highly prevalent; they have put these complications at a higher rate and warrant primary and secondary prevention programs to minimize morbidity and mortality in addition to economic impact of the complications. Other measurements, such as decompression of lower

  4. Diagnóstico clínico de la enfermedad Charcot-Marie-Tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuselis Pérez Cid

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available La enfermedad de Charcot-Marie-Tooth es un trastorno polineuropático genéticamente heterogéneo, en la que se han identificado más de 30 genes responsables; sin embargo, el diagnóstico es posible establecerlo sobre las bases de los estudios clínicos y electrofisiológicos. Constituye un reto en la práctica médica de los países del tercer mundo contar con la realización sistemática de estudios genéticos moleculares de las neuropatías hereditarias, por lo que en este trabajo se enfatiza en los estudios clínico-electrofisiológicos para la clasificación de la CMT

  5. Piet Mondrian's trees and the evolution in understanding multiple sclerosis, Charcot Prize Lecture 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Lawrence; Axtell, Robert C; Barbieri, Donald; Bhat, Roopa; Brownell, Sara E; de Jong, Brigit A; Dunn, Shannon E; Grant, Jacqueline L; Han, May H; Ho, Peggy P; Kuipers, Hedwich F; Kurnellas, Michael P; Ousman, Shalina S; Rothbard, Jonathan B

    2013-01-01

    Four questions were posed about multiple sclerosis (MS) at the 2011 Charcot Lecture, Oct. 22, 2011. 1. The Male/Female Disparity: Why are women developing MS so much more frequently than men? 2. Neuronal and Glial Protection: Are there guardian molecules that protect the nervous system in MS? 3. Predictive Medicine: With all the approved drugs, how can we rationally decide which one to use? 4. The Precise Scalpel vs. the Big Hammer for Therapy: Is antigen-specific therapy for demyelinating disease possible? To emphasize how our views on the pathogenesis and treatment of MS are evolving, and given the location of the talk in Amsterdam, Piet Mondrian's progressive interpretations of trees serve as a heuristic. PMID:23303879

  6. Anesthetic Management of a Patient With Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshita, Naohiro; Oka, Saeko; Tsuji, Kaname; Yoshida, Hiroaki; Morita, Shosuke; Momota, Yoshihiro; Tsutsumi, Yasuo M

    2016-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTD) is a hereditary peripheral neuropathy and is characterized by progressive muscle atrophy and motor-sensory disorders in all 4 limbs. Most reports have indicated that major challenges with general anesthetic administration in CMTD patients are the appropriate use of nondepolarizing muscle relaxants and preparation for malignant hyperthermia in neuromuscular disease. Moderate sedation may be associated with the same complications as those of general anesthesia, as well as dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system, reduced perioperative respiratory function, difficulty in positioning, and sensitivity to intravenous anesthetic agents. We decided to use intravenous sedation in a CMTD patient and administered midazolam initially and propofol continuously, with total doses of 1.5 mg and 300 mg, respectively. Anesthesia was completed in 3 hours and 30 minutes without adverse events. We suggest that dental anesthetic treatment with propofol and midazolam may be effective for patients with CMTD. PMID:27269665

  7. Genetic dysfunction of MT-ATP6 causes axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pitceathly, Robert D S

    2012-09-11

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the most common inherited neuromuscular disorder, affecting 1 in 2,500 individuals. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are not generally considered within the differential diagnosis of patients with uncomplicated inherited neuropathy, despite the essential requirement of ATP for axonal function. We identified the mtDNA mutation m.9185T>C in MT-ATP6, encoding the ATP6 subunit of the mitochondrial ATP synthase (OXPHOS complex V), at homoplasmic levels in a family with mitochondrial disease in whom a severe motor axonal neuropathy was a striking feature. This led us to hypothesize that mutations in the 2 mtDNA complex V subunit encoding genes, MT-ATP6 and MT-ATP8, might be an unrecognized cause of isolated axonal CMT and distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN).

  8. Jean-Martin Charcot, father of modern neurology: an homage 120 years after his death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marleide da Mota Gomes

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Jean-Martin Charcot was a pioneer in a variety of subjects, including nervous system diseases; anatomy; physiology; pathology; and diseases of ageing, joints, and lungs. His medical achievements were mainly based on his anatomopathological proficiency, his observation, and his personal thoroughness that favored the delineation of the nosology of the main neurological diseases, including multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, peroneal muscular atrophy, and hysteria/epilepsy. The link of this anatomoclinical method with iconographic representations and theatrical lessons, and the rich bibliographical documentations, carried out in a crowded diseased people barn - Salpetrière hospital were the basis of his achievements, which are still discussed 120 years after his death.

  9. Next-generation sequencing and genetic diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Verma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Over 70 different Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT–associated genes have now been discovered and their number is growing. Conventional genetic testing for all CMT genes is cumbersome, expensive, and impractical in an individual patient. Next-generation sequencing (NGS technology allows cost-effective sequencing of large scale DNA, even entire exome (coding sequences or whole genome and thus, NGS platform can be employed to effectively target a large number or all CMT-related genes for accurate diagnosis. This overview discusses how NGS can be strategically used for genetic diagnosis in patients with CMT or unexplained neuropathy. A comment is made to combine simple clinical and electrophysiological algorithm to assign patients to major CMT subtypes and then employ NGS to screen for all known mutations in the subtype-specific CMT gene panel.

  10. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease and dilated cardiomyopathy. A rare combination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Pila Pérez

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta el caso de un paciente de 50 años de edad, con 14 años de evolución de manifestaciones clínicas, destacándose las alteraciones musculoesqueléticas de los cuatro miembros con atrofia de las prominencias tenar e hipotenar y de la musculatura de ambas piernas. Se destacó la presencia de alteraciones sensitivas en miembros inferiores con distribución en calcetín, atrofia, atonía, arreflexia y marcha equina. Desde el punto de vista cardiaco, el paciente presentaba un fibriloaleteo. La radiografía de tórax mostró un aumento marcado del área cardiaca y la ecocardiografía puso de manifiesto una miocardiopatía dilatada. El estudio histopatológico confirmó la presencia de la enfermedad de Charcot-Marie-Tooth asociada a miocardiopatía dilatada. El diagnóstico se basó en las características clínicas, la velocidad de conducción motora, y el estudio histopatológico, que demostró desmielinización con lesiones en “cebolla”, si bien faltaron los estudios genéticos. La enfermedad de Charcot-Marie-Tooth es una enfermedad rara; aproximadamente un 60 % de los pacientes que la padecen, son portadores de una duplicación del cromosoma 17. Por ello, se consideró oportuno transmitir la experiencia de este caso.

  11. Cosmetic Foot Surgery: Fashion's Pandora's Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News, Videos & Podcasts » Articles » Text Size Print Bookmark Cosmetic Foot Surgery: Fashion’s Pandora’s Box? Cosmetic Foot Surgery: Fashion’s Pandora’s Box? Foot and Ankle Surgeons Warn ...

  12. Vascular Surgery, Microsurgery and Supramicrosurgery for Treatment of Chronic Diabetic Foot Ulcers to Prevent Amputations

    OpenAIRE

    Schirmer, Steffen; Ritter, Ralf-Gerhard; Fansa, Hisham

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Diabetic foot ulcers occur in approximately 2,5% of patients suffering from diabetes and may lead to major infections and amputation. Such ulcers are responsible for a prolonged period of hospitalization and co- morbidities caused by infected diabetic foot ulcers. Small, superficial ulcers can be treated by special conservative means. However, exposed bones or tendons require surgical intervention in order to prevent osteomyelitis. In many cases reconstructive surgery is necessar...

  13. Foot Push-Up Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... If you can easily rise up onto the ball of your foot but experience pain in your arch, your arch may be inflamed ... at any point between the heel and the ball of the foot is often referred to as arch pain. Although this description is nonspecific, most arch pain ...

  14. Foot-and-mouth disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belsham, Graham; Charleston, Bryan; Jackson, Terry;

    2009-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease is an economically important, highly contagious, disease of cloven-hoofed animals characterized by the appearance of vesicles (blisters) on the feet and in and around the mouth. The causative agent, foot-and-mouth disease virus, was the first mammalian virus to be discovered...

  15. Relationship between foot type, foot deformity, and ulcer occurrence in the high-risk diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledoux, William R; Shofer, Jane B; Smith, Douglas G; Sullivan, Katrina; Hayes, Shane G; Assal, Mathieu; Reiber, Gayle E

    2005-01-01

    We hypothesized an association between foot type, foot deformity, and foot ulceration and conducted an analysis of a well-characterized, high-risk diabetic population of 398 subjects. The average age was 62 years of age and 74% of the study population were males. Foot-type distributions were 19.5% pes cavus (high arch), 51.5% neutrally aligned (normal arch), and 29.0% pes planus (low arch). We quantified the presence of hallux valgus (23.9%), hammer/claw toes (46.7%), and hallux limitus (24.4%). A significant association was found between foot type and hallux valgus (p = 0.003); pes planus feet had the highest prevalence as compared with neutrally aligned feet (odds ratio [OR] = 2.43, p = 0.0006). Foot type was also significantly associated with fixed hammer/claw toes (p = 0.01); pes cavus feet had the highest prevalence as compared with neutrally aligned feet (OR = 3.89, p = 0.001). Foot type was also significantly associated with hallux limitus (p = 0.006) with pes planus feet having the highest prevalence as compared with neutrally aligned feet (OR = 2.19, p = 0.003). However, foot type was not significantly related to any ulcer outcome (p = 0.7). Fixed hammer/claw toes (OR = 3.91, p = 0.003) and hallux limitus (OR = 3.02, p = 0.006) were associated with increased risk of any ulcer occurrence. This study affirms that foot type and foot deformity are related and that foot deformities are associated with ulcer occurrence. PMID:16586192

  16. A neurological bias in the history of hysteria: from the womb to the nervous system and Charcot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marleide da Mota Gomes

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hysteria conceptions, from ancient Egypt until the 19th century Parisian hospital based studies, are presented from gynaecological and demonological theories to neurological ones. The hysteria protean behavioral disorders based on nervous origin was proposed at the beginning, mainly in Great Britain, by the “enlightenment nerve doctors”. The following personages are highlighted: Galen, William, Sydenham, Cullen, Briquet, and Charcot with his School. Charcot who had hysteria and hypnotism probably as his most important long term work, developed his conceptions, initially, based on the same methodology he applied to studies of other neurological disorder. Some of his associates followed him in his hysteria theories, mainly Paul Richer and Gilles de La Tourette who produced, with the master's support, expressive books on Salpêtrière School view on hysteria.

  17. The Effect of Taping on Foot Structure, Functional Foot Stability and Running Gait Patterns of the Foot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Malia Ho; Tsai Djun; John Cher Chay Tan

    2015-01-01

    Running related foot injuries are associated with excessive foot movements due to malaligned foot structure and poor functional foot stability. Clinicians tape the foot to alleviate pain and prevent further injuries, whilst allowing the athlete to continue training. However, the effect of taping is not conclusive. The purpose of this study is to investigate if taping effectively improves foot structure, functional foot stability and reduces excessive foot movements during running. Twenty-two subjects had their foot structure identified as: fiat foot stable, fiat foot unstable and normal arched unstable according to the FPI (foot posture index) and the Modified Romberg's Test with the BESS (balance error scoring system) criteria. The subjects ran on an instrumented treadmill barefooted with their feet taped and untaped. Running kinetic and kinematic data were collected and analysed using a paired t-test and 3x2 ANOVA. Taping improved foot structure but not functional foot stability. During running, taping significantly reduced rearfoot eversion. Taping increased the loading rate in the fiat foot and normal arched unstable groups but reduced the loading rate for the flat foot stable group. Implication on the appropriate use of foot taping was discussed.

  18. Electrophysiological Evaluation of Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth Type 1: Dispersion and Correlation Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Ji Hyuk; Kim, Hye Jeong; Lee, Eun Ryeong

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to analyze and compare electrophysiological characteristics observed in nerve conduction studies (NCS) of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 (CMT 1). [Subjects] A differential diagnosis of acquired and congenital demyelinating neuropathies was based on a study of 35 patients with NCS-confirmed CIDP and 30 patients with CMT 1 genetically proven by peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP-22) gene anal...

  19. Flexor digitorum superficialis opposition tendon transfer improves hand function in children with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: Case series

    OpenAIRE

    Estilow, T.; Kozin, S.H.; Glanzman, A. M.; Burns, J; Finkel, R.S.

    2012-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease limits hand function. Tendon transfer has not been reported in pediatric CMT. We report two severely affected children following long finger flexor digitorum superficialis opposition tendon transfer. Improvement was noted in palmar abduction, (30°/40°), opposition, (thumb to all digits), and acquisition of pincer, palmar, and lateral pinch with measureable force (1 lb). Dexterity testing improved on the 9 Hole Peg Test (1.03 s/77 s, 22 s) and Functional Dexterity T...

  20. Molecular analyses of unrelated Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease patients suggest a high frequency of the CMTIA duplication.

    OpenAIRE

    Wise, C A; GARCIA, C. A.; Davis, S.N.; Heju, Z; Pentao, L; Patel, P.I.; Lupski, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most common inherited peripheral neuropathy. One form of CMT, CMT type 1A, is characterized by uniformly decreased nerve conduction velocities, usually shows autosomal dominant inheritance, and is associated with a large submicroscopic duplication of the p11.2-p12 region of chromosome 17. A cohort of 75 unrelated patients diagnosed clinically with CMT and evaluated by electrophysiological methods were analyzed molecularly for the presence of the CMT1A ...

  1. Clinical Efficacy and Safety of a New Method for Pressure Off-load for Patients with Diabetic Foot Syndrome: Ankle-foot Pneumoorthosis with TM Orlett

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina Yurevna Strakhova

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available AimThe purpose of this study was to assess the clinical efficacy, safety and consumer properties of ankle-foot pneumoorthosis with a HAS-337 TM Orlett compared with non-removable total contact cast (TCC immobilization.Materials and methodsOur study included 40 patients with diabetes mellitus type 1 (DM1 and type 2 (DM2 with neuropathic diabetic foot syndrome and chronic uninfected wounds of the plantar surface of the forefoot, with wound duration of at least 3 weeks, wound areas not less than 1 cm2 and wound depths not more than stage II based on Wagner’s classification. We excluded patients with infected wounds, osteomyelitis, Charcot osteoarthropathy or peripheral vascular disease. Our test group included 20 patients who received pressure off-load using ankle-foot pneumoorthosis with a HAS-337 TM Orlett. For a control group (n = 20, pressure off-load was achieved using TCC immobilization. Both groups were comparable with regard to age, gender, duration and degree of diabetes compensation and by original wound defect sizes (p >0.05. The study duration was 6 months. Plantar pressure was measured inside the orthosis or TCC and was compared with test shoe measurements. Our major criteria for pressure relief were reduced pressures in the wound area and the whole foot and the rate of wound healing.ResultsAt the end of the 6-month period, complete healing of all ulcers was achieved. The average healing time was 46.1±19.0 days for the test group and was 48.3±20.5 days for the control group (p >0.05. Two patients who wore pneumoorthosis with HAS-337 were discontinued upon patient request.With pneumoorthosis, the maximum peak pressure on the foot and wound defect areas was reduced by 26% and 57%, respectively. The pressure/time integral decreased on average by 41% (p >0.05. Furthermore, in the midfoot area with pneumoorthosis, the maximum pressure increased by 48% and the pressure/time integral increased by 47%.ConclusionsUsing pneumoorthosis with

  2. Recommendations to enable drug development for inherited neuropathies: Charcot-Marie-Tooth and Giant Axonal Neuropathy [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/3am

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori Sames

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 1 in 2500 Americans suffer from Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT disease. The underlying disease mechanisms are unique in most forms of CMT, with many point mutations on various genes causing a toxic accumulation of misfolded proteins. Symptoms of the disease often present within the first two decades of life, with CMT1A patients having reduced compound muscle and sensory action potentials, slow nerve conduction velocities, sensory loss, progressive distal weakness, foot and hand deformities, decreased reflexes, bilateral foot drop and about 5% become wheelchair bound. In contrast, the ultra-rare disease Giant Axonal Neuropathy (GAN is frequently described as a recessively inherited condition that results in progressive nerve death. GAN usually appears in early childhood and progresses slowly as neuronal injury becomes more severe and leads to death in the second or third decade. There are currently no treatments for any of the forms of CMTs or GAN. We suggest that further clinical studies should analyse electrical impedance myography as an outcome measure for CMT. Further, additional quality of life (QoL assessments for these CMTs are required, and we need to identify GAN biomarkers as well as develop new genetic testing panels for both diseases. We propose that using the Global Registry of Inherited Neuropathy (GRIN could be useful for many of these studies. Patient advocacy groups and professional organizations (such as the Hereditary Neuropathy Foundation (HNF, Hannah's Hope Fund (HHF, The Neuropathy Association (TNA and the American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AANEM can play a central role in educating clinicians and patients. Undertaking these studies will assist in the correct diagnosis of disease recruiting patients for clinical studies, and will ultimately improve the endpoints for clinical trials. By addressing obstacles that prevent industry investment in various forms of inherited neuropathies

  3. Recommendations to enable drug development for inherited neuropathies: Charcot-Marie-Tooth and Giant Axonal Neuropathy [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/33n

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori Sames

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 1 in 2500 Americans suffer from Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT disease. The underlying disease mechanisms are unique in most forms of CMT, with many point mutations on various genes causing a toxic accumulation of misfolded proteins. Symptoms of the disease often present within the first two decades of life, with CMT1A patients having reduced compound muscle and sensory action potentials, slow nerve conduction velocities, sensory loss, progressive distal weakness, foot and hand deformities, decreased reflexes, bilateral foot drop and about 5% become wheelchair bound. In contrast, the ultra-rare disease Giant Axonal Neuropathy (GAN is frequently described as a recessively inherited condition that results in progressive nerve death. GAN usually appears in early childhood and progresses slowly as neuronal injury becomes more severe and leads to death in the second or third decade. There are currently no treatments for any of the forms of CMTs or GAN. We suggest that further clinical studies should analyse electrical impedance myography as an outcome measure for CMT. Further, additional quality of life (QoL assessments for these CMTs are required, and we need to identify GAN biomarkers as well as develop new genetic testing panels for both diseases. We propose that using the Global Registry of Inherited Neuropathy (GRIN could be useful for many of these studies. Patient advocacy groups and professional organizations (such as the Hereditary Neuropathy Foundation (HNF, Hannah's Hope Fund (HHF, The Neuropathy Association (TNA and the American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AANEM can play a central role in educating clinicians and patients. Undertaking these studies will assist in the correct diagnosis of disease recruiting patients for clinical studies, and will ultimately improve the endpoints for clinical trials. By addressing obstacles that prevent industry investment in various forms of inherited neuropathies

  4. Characterizing multisegment foot kinematics during gait in diabetic foot patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denti Paolo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of diabetes mellitus has reached epidemic proportions, this condition may result in multiple and chronic invalidating long term complications. Among these, the diabetic foot, is determined by the simultaneous presence of both peripheral neuropathy and vasculopathy that alter the biomechanics of the foot with the formation of callosity and ulcerations. To diagnose and treat the diabetic foot is crucial to understand the foot complex kinematics. Most of gait analysis protocols represent the entire foot as a rigid body connected to the shank. Nevertheless the existing multisegment models cannot completely decipher the impairments associated with the diabetic foot. Methods A four segment foot and ankle model for assessing the kinematics of the diabetic foot was developed. Ten normal subjects and 10 diabetics gait patterns were collected and major sources of variability were tested. Repeatability analysis was performed both on a normal and on a diabetic subject. Direct skin marker placement was chosen in correspondence of 13 anatomical landmarks and an optoelectronic system was used to collect the data. Results Joint rotation normative bands (mean plus/minus one standard deviation were generated using the data of the control group. Three representative strides per subject were selected. The repeatability analysis on normal and pathological subjects results have been compared with literature and found comparable. Normal and pathological gait have been compared and showed major statistically significant differences in the forefoot and midfoot dorsi-plantarflexion. Conclusion Even though various biomechanical models have been developed so far to study the properties and behaviour of the foot, the present study focuses on developing a methodology for the functional assessment of the foot-ankle complex and for the definition of a functional model of the diabetic neuropathic foot. It is, of course, important to evaluate

  5. Diabetic Foot - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Daily Foot Check amarunya (Amharic) Bilingual PDF Harborview Medical Center Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Diabetic Foot Care English 糖尿病足部护理 - 简体中文 ( ... Foot Care English 糖尿病足部護理 - 繁體中文 (Chinese - Traditional) PDF Chinese Community ... Medical Center Diabetes Foot Care SONKOROWGA AMA MACAANKA: Xanaanada ...

  6. Sports Injuries to the Foot and Ankle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FootNotes Newsletter Current Issue Archive Subscribe Home » Foot & Ankle Conditions » Sports Injuries to the Foot and Ankle A A A | ... page. Please enable Javascript in your browser. Sports Injuries to the Foot and Ankle Depending on the sport, your feet and ankles ...

  7. Freeing the foot: integrating the foot core system into rehabilitation for lower extremity injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeon, Patrick O; Fourchet, François

    2015-04-01

    The intrinsic muscles of the foot play a critical role in the regulation of absorption and propulsion during dynamic activities. Dysfunction of these may lead to an increased demand on the remaining components within the foot core system to maintain dynamic foot control, leading to a more rapid breakdown of these contributors and those proximal to the foot. Training the intrinsic foot muscles through a systematic progression of isolation via the short foot exercise offers the opportunity to reincorporate their contribution into the foot core system. This article discusses the function of the intrinsic foot muscles, their contributions to dynamic foot control, and a progressive training paradigm. PMID:25818718

  8. Foot Health Facts for Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain —This condition is most often caused by plantar fasciitis, although other things, such as stress fractures or ... foot structure is the most common cause of plantar fasciitis, it can also result from wearing shoes that ...

  9. Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-08-08

    Hand, foot, and mouth disease is a contagious illness that mainly affects children under five. In this podcast, Dr. Eileen Schneider talks about the symptoms of hand, foot, and mouth disease, how it spreads, and ways to help protect yourself and your children from getting infected with the virus.  Created: 8/8/2013 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 8/8/2013.

  10. Synovial sarcoma of the foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekarev, Mikhail; Elsinger, Elisabeth C; Villanueva-Siles, Esperanza; Borzykowski, Ross M; Geller, David S

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 75-year-old male who underwent lung lobectomy for presumed lung cancer. Thereafter, he presented with a painful mass between the third and fourth metatarsal heads in the foot that was assumed to be Morton's neuroma. After extensive oncologic evaluation, the foot mass was diagnosed as a synovial sarcoma. In retrospect, his lung lesion was understood to be metastatic disease. PMID:23632071

  11. Imaging the diabetic foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early and accurate diagnosis of infection or neuropathy of the diabetic foot is the key to successful management. Angiopathy leads to ischemia which, in combination with peripheral neuropathy, predisposes to pedal skin ulceration, the precursor of osteomyelitis. Chronic hyperglycemia promotes production of glycosylated end products which accumulate on endothelial proteins, causing ischemia of the vasa nervorum. When combined with axonal degeneration of the sensory nerves, the result is hypertrophic neuroarthropathy. Should the sympathetic nerve fibers also be damaged, the resultant loss of vasoconstrictive impulses leads to hyperemia and atrophic neuroarthropathy. Plain radiography, although less sensitive than radionuclide, magnetic resonance (MR), and computed tomographic examinations, should be the initial procedure for imaging suspected osteomyelitis in the diabetic patient. If the radiographs are normal but the clinical suspicion of osteomyelitis is strong, a three-phase 99mTc-MDP scan or MR imaging is recommended. An equivocal 99mTc-MDP scan should be followed by MR imaging. To exclude osteomyelitis at a site of neuroarthropathy, a 111In white blood cell scan is preferable. To obtain a specimen of bone for bacteriological studies, percutaneous core biopsy is the procedure of choice, with the entrance of the needle well beyond the edge of the subjacent ulcer. (orig.)

  12. Imaging the diabetic foot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gold, R.H. [Dept. of Radiological Sciences, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Tong, D.T.F. [Dept. of Radiological Sciences, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Crim, J.R. [Durham Radiology Associates, Durham, NC (United States); Seeger, L.L. [Dept. of Radiological Sciences, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Early and accurate diagnosis of infection or neuropathy of the diabetic foot is the key to successful management. Angiopathy leads to ischemia which, in combination with peripheral neuropathy, predisposes to pedal skin ulceration, the precursor of osteomyelitis. Chronic hyperglycemia promotes production of glycosylated end products which accumulate on endothelial proteins, causing ischemia of the vasa nervorum. When combined with axonal degeneration of the sensory nerves, the result is hypertrophic neuroarthropathy. Should the sympathetic nerve fibers also be damaged, the resultant loss of vasoconstrictive impulses leads to hyperemia and atrophic neuroarthropathy. Plain radiography, although less sensitive than radionuclide, magnetic resonance (MR), and computed tomographic examinations, should be the initial procedure for imaging suspected osteomyelitis in the diabetic patient. If the radiographs are normal but the clinical suspicion of osteomyelitis is strong, a three-phase {sup 99m}Tc-MDP scan or MR imaging is recommended. An equivocal {sup 99m}Tc-MDP scan should be followed by MR imaging. To exclude osteomyelitis at a site of neuroarthropathy, a {sup 111}In white blood cell scan is preferable. To obtain a specimen of bone for bacteriological studies, percutaneous core biopsy is the procedure of choice, with the entrance of the needle well beyond the edge of the subjacent ulcer. (orig.)

  13. Flexible Foot Test Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurita, C.H.; /Fermilab

    1987-04-27

    A test model of the flexible foot support was constructed early in the design stages to check its reactions to applied loads. The prototype was made of SS 304 and contained four vertical plates as opposed to the fourteen Inconel 718 plates which comprise the actual structure. Due to the fact that the prototype was built before the design of the support was finalized, the plate dimensions are different from those of the actual proposed design (i.e. model plate thickness is approximately one-half that of the actual plates). See DWG. 3740.210-MC-222376 for assembly details of the test model and DWG. 3740.210-MB-222377 for plate dimensions. This stanchion will be required to not only support the load of the inner vessel of the cryostat and its contents, but it must also allow for the movement of the vessel due to thermal contraction. Assuming that each vertical plate acts as a column, then the following formula from the Manual of Steel Construction (American Institute of Steel Construction, Inc., Eigth edition, 1980) can be applied to determine whether or not such columns undergoing simultaneous axial compression and transverse loading are considered safe for the given loading. The first term is representative of the axially compressive stress, and the second term, the bending stress. If the actual compressive stress is greater than 15% of the allowable compressive stress, then there are additional considerations which must be accounted for in the bending stress term.

  14. Biomechanical Model of the Diabetic Foot

    OpenAIRE

    Agić, Ante; NIKOLIĆ, VASILIJE; Mijović, Budimir; Reischl, Uwe

    2008-01-01

    In this work, a two dimensional (2D) finite element foot model was established from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of a male subject. The model comprises first medial planar cross-section through the foot, representing the foot in standing posture. For specified external load, the stress and strain distribution field under foot structure are determined. The material characterization of foot structure components are stronger related to diabetic phenomena. The new material model f...

  15. Overview of diabetic foot; novel treatments in diabetic foot ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larijani

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Foot ulcers are one of the main complications in diabetes mellitus, with a 15% life time risk in all diabetic patients. The problem and features are infection, ulceration, or gangrene. Neuropathy, poor circulation, and susceptibility to infection are the three major contributors to the development of diabetic foot; which when present, foot deformities or minor trauma can readily lead to ulceration and infection. Not all diabetic foots are preventable, but appropriate preventive measures can dramatically reduce their occurrences. Awareness of physicians about foot problems in diabetic patients, clinical examination and Para clinical assessment, regular foot examination, patient education, simple hygienic practices and provision of appropriate footwear combined with prompt treatment of minor injuries can decrease ulcer occurrence by 50%. Many different methods have been proposed and their goal is to accelerate the wound healing. These treatments other than standard therapy include local use of epidermal growth factor, vacuum-compression therapy (VCT, hyperbaric oxygen and peripheral Stem cell injection. Since all these treatments have a partial effect in ulcer improvement and amputation rate; so more effective treatments are essential."nA novel drug for treatment of this complication is an herbal extract, ANGIPARSTM, which has been studied in all steps of clinical trial. This new treatment by topical, oral and intravenous routs has had beneficial effects in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcer after one month. Angiogenesis is one of the considered mechanisms of action of this drug. Results of these clinical trials showed that this treatment can be superior to other treatments.

  16. Dynamic 3D shape of the plantar surface of the foot using coded structured light: a technical report

    KAUST Repository

    Thabet, Ali Kassem

    2014-01-23

    Background The foot provides a crucial contribution to the balance and stability of the musculoskeletal system, and accurate foot measurements are important in applications such as designing custom insoles/footwear. With better understanding of the dynamic behavior of the foot, dynamic foot reconstruction techniques are surfacing as useful ways to properly measure the shape of the foot. This paper presents a novel design and implementation of a structured-light prototype system providing dense three dimensional (3D) measurements of the foot in motion. The input to the system is a video sequence of a foot during a single step; the output is a 3D reconstruction of the plantar surface of the foot for each frame of the input. Methods Engineering and clinical tests were carried out to test the accuracy and repeatability of the system. Accuracy experiments involved imaging a planar surface from different orientations and elevations and measuring the fitting errors of the data to a plane. Repeatability experiments were done using reconstructions from 27 different subjects, where for each one both right and left feet were reconstructed in static and dynamic conditions over two different days. Results The static accuracy of the system was found to be 0.3 mm with planar test objects. In tests with real feet, the system proved repeatable, with reconstruction differences between trials one week apart averaging 2.4 mm (static case) and 2.8 mm (dynamic case). Conclusion The results obtained in the experiments show positive accuracy and repeatability results when compared to current literature. The design also shows to be superior to the systems available in the literature in several factors. Further studies need to be done to quantify the reliability of the system in clinical environments.

  17. Charcot-Marine-Tooth CMT-2 Polyneuropathy Syndrome A Case Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arbind Kumar Choudhary

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease CMT refers to the inherited peripheral neuropathies affect approximately one in 2500 people they are among the most common inherited neurological disorders. The majority of CMT patients have autosomal dominant inheritance although X-linked dominant and autosomal recessive forms also exist. The majority of cases are demyelinating although up to one third appear to be primary axonal or neuronal disorders. A patient of 9-year-old girl visited our hospital because of began to suffer from an insidious onset of progressive distal weakness and numbness and muscle twitching in both in her upper and lower limbs. Nerve conduction studies showed sensory nerve conduction SNCV of bilateral median and ulnar nerve was reduced in upper limb and bilateral sural nerve was reduced in lower limb While in case of motor nerve conduction MNCV bilateral median and ulnar nerve was reduced in upper limb and common peroneal nerve CPN as well as posterior tibial nerve was decreased leg. F response latencies were markedly prolonged in patient. Family history along with electrophysiological studied showed It was typical case of autosomal dominant CMT 2 axonal neuropathy. CMT is currently an untreatable disorder and at the moment the treatment of CMT is only supportive as there are no drugs available that would halt the disease symptoms. The care of a CMT patient is challenging for the health care team.

  18. [Phenotypes of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Syndrome and Differential Diagnosis Focused in Inflammatory Neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), the most frequent form of inherited neuropathy, is a genetically heterogeneous syndrome of the peripheral nervous system with a rather homologous clinical phenotype (slowly progressive distal weakness and muscle atrophy, skeletal deformities, and areflexia in each limb). CMT1 is the autosomal-dominant demyelinating form, and CMT1A (mostly PMP22 duplication) is the most frequent subtype, followed by CMTX1, HNPP (hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies), CMT1B, or CMT2. As CMT is characterized by slowly progressive motor and sensory disturbances in each limb, it could be misdiagnosed as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) occasionally. Some points can distinguish demyelinating CMT from CIDP. CMT1 patients do not show the conduction block that is frequent in CIDP. In addition, ultrasonographic findings are useful because CMT1 suggests diffuse enlargement of peripheral nerves, whereas CIDP is characterized by asymmetrical or focal enlargement of peripheral nerves. Some CMT1 cases show favorable responses to immunomodulating therapeutics such as corticosteroids, IVIg, and plasma exchange. Such CIDP-like CMT1 (especially CMT1B or CMT2A) shows moderate to high levels of cerebrospinal fluid protein and infiltrated inflammatory macrophages. PMID:26764297

  19. Vestibular impairment in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Garrigues, Herminio; Sivera, Rafael; Vílchez, Juan Jesús; Espinós, Carmen; Palau, Francesc; Sevilla, Teresa

    2014-07-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4C (CMT4C) is a hereditary neuropathy with prominent unsteadiness. The objective of the current study is to determine whether the imbalance in CMT4C is caused only by reduced proprioceptive input or if vestibular nerve involvement is an additional factor. We selected 10 CMT4C patients and 10 age-matched and sex-matched controls. We performed a comprehensive evaluation of the vestibular system, including video Head Impulse Test, bithermal caloric test, galvanic stimulation test and skull vibration-induced nystagmus test. None of the patients experienced dizziness, spontaneous or gaze-evoked nystagmus, but all had significant vestibular impairment when tested when compared to controls. Seven had completely unexcitable vestibular systems and abnormal vestibuloocular reflex. There was no correlation between the degree of vestibulopathy and age or clinical severity. Significant vestibular impairment is a consistent finding in CMT4C and is present early in disease evolution. The profound imbalance that is so disabling in these patients may result from a combination of proprioceptive loss and vestibular neuropathy, and this would modify the recommended rehabilitation strategies. PMID:24614092

  20. Behavioural profiling of a murine Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norreel, J C; Jamon, M; Riviere, G; Passage, E; Fontes, M; Clarac, F

    2001-04-01

    Different features of motor behaviour were studied on a transgenic mouse model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth's disease (CMT). Mutants with 4 or 7 copies of the human PMP22 gene leading to a phenotype significantly close to CMT's disease type 1A were compared with control animals. The aim of the study was to validate this transgenic model and to characterise the impairments occurring in the various lines. Three main types of analysis were performed in 2-month-old mice without any peculiar visible deficit: (i) a study of standardised clinical tests (SHIRPA protocol) demonstrated that only a few motor deficits were expressed; (ii) a measurement of general spontaneous activity by means of a commercial video-tracking system was performed and revealed that the main spontaneous activities were identical in the three lines with, however, some slight localised modifications; and, (iii) by contrast, the three lines respond very differently to the footprints, grip strength, splay test and rotarod test. Even in lines with a significantly limited copy number of the transgene, we observed and quantified impairments. In conclusion, mutants of CMT1A seem to be a very pertinent model of this human pathology and will certainly be useful for therapeutic procedures and for theoretical studies on this disease. PMID:11328356

  1. X inactivation in females with X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Sinéad M

    2012-07-01

    X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT1X) is the second most common inherited neuropathy, caused by mutations in gap junction beta-1 (GJB1). Males have a uniformly moderately severe phenotype while females have a variable phenotype, suggested to be due to X inactivation. We aimed to assess X inactivation pattern in females with CMT1X and correlate this with phenotype using the CMT examination score to determine whether the X inactivation pattern accounted for the variable phenotype in females with CMT1X. We determined X inactivation pattern in 67 females with CMT1X and 24 controls using the androgen receptor assay. We were able to determine which X chromosome carried the GJB1 mutation in 30 females. There was no difference in X inactivation pattern between patients and controls. In addition, there was no correlation between X inactivation pattern in blood and phenotype. A possible explanation for these findings is that the X inactivation pattern in Schwann cells rather than in blood may explain the variable phenotype in females with CMT1X.

  2. Oral Health, Temporomandibular Disorder, and Masticatory Performance in Patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth Type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rejane L. S. Rezende

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this study was to evaluate the oral health status of temporomandibular disorders (TMD and bruxism, as well as to measure masticatory performance of subjects with Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2 (CMT2. Methods and Results. The average number of decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT for both groups, control (CG and CMT2, was considered low (CG = 2.46; CMT2 = 1.85, P=0.227. The OHIP-14 score was considered low (CG = 2.86, CMT2 = 5.83, P=0.899. The prevalence of self-reported TMD was 33.3% and 38.9% (P=0.718 in CG and CMT2 respectively and for self-reported bruxism was 4.8% (CG and 22.2% (CMT2, without significant difference between groups (P=0.162. The most common clinical sign of TMD was masseter (CG = 38.1%; CMT2 = 66.7% and temporalis (CG = 19.0%; GCMT2 = 33.3% muscle pain. The geometric mean diameter (GMD was not significantly different between groups (CG = 4369; CMT2 = 4627, P=0.157. Conclusion. We conclude that the CMT2 disease did not negatively have influence either on oral health status in the presence and severity of TMD and bruxism or on masticatory performance.

  3. Rehabilitation Management of the Charcot-Marie-Tooth Syndrome: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrado, Bruno; Ciardi, Gianluca; Bargigli, Chiara

    2016-04-01

    The Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) causes significant muscular deficits in the affected patients, restricts daily activities (ADL), and involves a severe disability. Although the conservative intervention is the only treatment for the disease, there is no scientific evidence so far on rehabilitation treatment. Objectives of the review are: research the best literary evidence so far on the rehabilitation treatment of CMT; critically analyze the outcome, to build an evidence-based work protocol.A systematic review of the rehabilitation of a patient with CMT, including the results from the following databases: Pubmed, Medline, Embase, Pedro, Cinahl, Ebsco discovery. Criteria for inclusion: randomized/controlled studies, analytic studies, transversal studies on a cohort of at least 10 individuals; medium/long-term report of the results.Eleven studies in total have been admitted to the final review phase; trials about physiotherapy CMT treatment (5), about orthosis treatment (6). Despite the wide range of outcomes and proposed interventions, the data points to the following: strength or endurance trainings improve functionality and ADLs of affected patients, while orthotic role is, at the moment, not completely clear.Physiotherapy treatment is a useful tool to manage CMT; more studies on a larger number of cases are needed to define orthosis utility and to establish the gold standard of the treatment. PMID:27124017

  4. Duration of off-loading and recurrence rate in Charcot osteo-arthropathy treated with less restrictive regimen with removable walker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tomas M; Gade-Rasmussen, Birthe; Pedersen, Lis W;

    2013-01-01

    Recent literature on acute diabetic Charcot osteoarthropathy (CA) reports unusually long periods of off-loading. Data suggest that this might increase the re-currence rate. Subsequently we evaluated the influence of duration of off-loading on the risk of required re-casting.......Recent literature on acute diabetic Charcot osteoarthropathy (CA) reports unusually long periods of off-loading. Data suggest that this might increase the re-currence rate. Subsequently we evaluated the influence of duration of off-loading on the risk of required re-casting....

  5. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease and dilated cardiomyopathy. A rare combination. Enfermedad de Charcot-Marie-Tooth y miocardiopatía dilatada. Una rara asociación.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Pila Pérez

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available

    Se presenta el caso de un paciente de 50 años de edad, con 14 años de evolución de manifestaciones clínicas, destacándose las alteraciones musculoesqueléticas de los cuatro miembros con atrofia de las prominencias tenar e hipotenar y de la musculatura de ambas piernas. Se destacó la presencia de alteraciones sensitivas en miembros inferiores con distribución en calcetín, atrofia, atonía, arreflexia y marcha equina. Desde el punto de vista cardiaco, el paciente presentaba un fibriloaleteo. La radiografía de tórax mostró un aumento marcado del área cardiaca y la ecocardiografía puso de manifiesto una miocardiopatía dilatada. El estudio histopatológico confirmó la presencia de la enfermedad de Charcot-Marie-Tooth asociada a miocardiopatía dilatada. El diagnóstico se basó en las características clínicas, la velocidad de conducción motora, y el estudio histopatológico, que demostró desmielinización con lesiones en “cebolla”, si bien faltaron los estudios genéticos. La enfermedad de Charcot-Marie-Tooth es una enfermedad rara; aproximadamente un 60 % de los pacientes que la padecen, son portadores de una duplicación del cromosoma 17. Por ello, se consideró oportuno transmitir la experiencia de este caso.

    The case of a 50 years old male patient is presented. Along 14 years of clinical evolution, four limbs musculoskeletal disorders with atrophy of the thenar and hypothenar prominences and muscles of both legs had been emphasized. The presence of sensory impairment in lower limbs with stocking distribution, atrophy, weakness, areflexia and equine gait were very peculiar in this case. From the cardiac point of view, the patient presented a fibrillation/flutter. Chest radiography showed a marked increase in the cardiac area and echocardiography revealed dilated cardiomyopathy. Histopathological examination confirmed the presence of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease associated with dilated cardiomyopathy. While genetic

  6. [Foot equipment of diabetic arteriopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miault, D; Brun, J P; Dupre, J C; Pill, M; Miault, P; Deschamps, E; Priollet, P; Laurian, C; Fichelle, J M; Cormier, J M

    1993-01-01

    Surgical appliances have a place of choice in the care of the foot with trophic lesions in diabetics, after partial amputation and as a preventive measure when it is free from trophic disorders. The type of appliance will depend on the footwear and the possibility of wearing orthopedic soles, whatever the stage of the affection. For the foot free from trophic disorders the shoes should be wide fitting, in soft leather and of the seamless type. Made to measure shoes should be reserved for badly deformed feet. The soles should be molded in silicone or polyurethane to distribute weight bearing and to avoid it over zones at risk. Appliances for the foot with trophic lesions should allow the resumption of walking. If the lesions are too extensive an orthosis is performed or a specific type of slipper with molded soles is worn to avoid pressure on the wounds. After amputation of toes a silicone orthoplasty is used to fill the interdigital space to avoid deformity of the other toes. If a front of foot has been amputated a corrected silicone molded sole with false extremity is applied. For a back of foot amputation an orthoprosthesis is made, preferentially in silicone introductible in a regular high sided shoe. In order to fulfil its preventive or temporary role, the appliance should evolve with time and be followed up regularly with close collaboration between the diabetic specialist the podologist and the orthotist. PMID:8473812

  7. Secondary digital nerve repair in the foot with resorbable p(DLLA-epsilon-CL) nerve conduits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, MF; Nicolai, JPA; Robinson, PH

    2006-01-01

    Nerve guides are increasingly being used in peripheral nerve repair. In the last decade, Much preclinical research has been undertaken into a resorbable nerve guide composed of p(DLLA-epsilon-CL). This report describes the results of secondary digital nerve reconstruction in the foot in a patient wi

  8. Copy number variations are a rare cause of non-CMT1A Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Jia; Wu, Xingyao; Montenegro, Gladys; Price, Justin; Wang, GaoFeng; Vance, Jeffery M.; Shy, Michael E.; Züchner, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary peripheral neuropathies present a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous entities. All known forms, including the various forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) are characterized as Mendelian traits and over 35 genes have been identified thus far. The mutational mechanism of the most common CMT type, CMT1A, is a 1.5 Mb chromosomal duplication at 17p12 that contains the gene PMP22. Only recently it has been realized that such copy number variants (CNV) are a widesprea...

  9. Genética de la enfermedad de Charcot-Marie-Tooth autosómica recesiva

    OpenAIRE

    Claramunt Alonso, Reyes

    2008-01-01

    RESUMEN El objetivo de esta tesis doctoral es profundizar en el conocimiento de las bases genéticas y moleculares de la enfermedad de Charcot-Marie-Tooth, especialmente de las formas con herencia autosómica recesiva. En este sentido, se incluyen los resultados obtenidos del análisis genético y molecular del gen GDAP1 en una serie de 118 familias de origen español, cuyas mutaciones son las causantes de la forma autosómica recesiva axonal tipo 4A (CMT4A), así como también, el estudio genétic...

  10. CT guided diagnostic foot injections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AIM: To describe a CT technique for guiding diagnostic and therapeutic injections in the hind- and mid-foot. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Over a period of 50 months, 28 individuals were referred for diagnostic and therapeutic hind- and mid-foot injections before possible arthrodesis. A CT technique was developed that allowed entry into the various joints using a vertical approach. Numbers of joints injected were as follows: posterior subtalar, 21; talonavicular, 4; calcaneonavicular, calcaneocuboid, navicular-cuneiform and 5th metatarsocuboid joints, 1 each. RESULTS: All injections but one were technically successful. Significant relief of symptoms was noted by 16 participants, whereas for 9 there was no improvement and for 3 a partial response was achieved. CONCLUSION: CT is a simple and safe alternative to fluoroscopy for guiding diagnostic and therapeutic foot injections, and may be the technique of choice in cases of disordered anatomy

  11. CT guided diagnostic foot injections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saifuddin, A. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: asaifuddin@aol.com; Abdus-Samee, M. [Department of Foot and Ankle Surgery, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore (United Kingdom); Mann, C. [Department of Foot and Ankle Surgery, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore (United Kingdom); Singh, D. [Department of Foot and Ankle Surgery, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore (United Kingdom); Angel, J.C. [Department of Foot and Ankle Surgery, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore (United Kingdom)

    2005-02-01

    AIM: To describe a CT technique for guiding diagnostic and therapeutic injections in the hind- and mid-foot. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Over a period of 50 months, 28 individuals were referred for diagnostic and therapeutic hind- and mid-foot injections before possible arthrodesis. A CT technique was developed that allowed entry into the various joints using a vertical approach. Numbers of joints injected were as follows: posterior subtalar, 21; talonavicular, 4; calcaneonavicular, calcaneocuboid, navicular-cuneiform and 5th metatarsocuboid joints, 1 each. RESULTS: All injections but one were technically successful. Significant relief of symptoms was noted by 16 participants, whereas for 9 there was no improvement and for 3 a partial response was achieved. CONCLUSION: CT is a simple and safe alternative to fluoroscopy for guiding diagnostic and therapeutic foot injections, and may be the technique of choice in cases of disordered anatomy.

  12. Penile reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Garaffa, Giulio; Sansalone, Salvatore; Ralph, David J.

    2012-01-01

    During the most recent years, a variety of new techniques of penile reconstruction have been described in the literature. This paper focuses on the most recent advances in male genital reconstruction after trauma, excision of benign and malignant disease, in gender reassignment surgery and aphallia with emphasis on surgical technique, cosmetic and functional outcome.

  13. Penile reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giulio Garaffa; Salvatore Sansalone; David J Ralph

    2013-01-01

    During the most recent years,a variety of new techniques of penile reconstruction have been described in the literature.This paper focuses on the most recent advances in male genital reconstruction after trauma,excision of benign and malignant disease,in gender reassignment surgery and aphallia with emphasis on surgical technique,cosmetic and functional outcome.

  14. Interpreting radiographs. 1. The foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiography of the foot of a conscious standing horse is within the capability of all modern portable X-ray machines; radiographic examination of the feet of horses with long-standing lameness is frequently carried out in practice. With the introduction of modern fast intensifying screens and films there is little excuse for poor results caused by movement or the low output of portable machines. Sadly, although the foot is the most commonly radiographed part of the horse, a high percentage of the films taken are not of diagnostic quality. This is due, first, to over exposure, secondly, to poor developing techniques and thirdly, to poor positioning

  15. Diagnostic radiology of the foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The X-ray radiography continues to be the first and most applied method for diagnostic imaging of the foot and ankle joint. The application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for examination of the foot and ankle joint is on the rise, due to the excellent imaging of soft tissue lesions. A basic requirement of purposeful application, and correct diagnosis, of the various radiological modalities available is a profound knowledge of the anatomy as well as the pathology of the morphological and functional features. (orig./CB)

  16. Innovative quantitative testing of hand function in Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, Maria A; Mori, Laura; Francini, Luca; Poggi, Ilaria; Monti Bragadin, Margherita; Bellone, Emilia; Grandis, Marina; Maggi, Giovanni; Reni, Lizia; Sormani, Maria P; Tacchino, Andrea; Padua, Luca; Prada, Valeria; Bove, Marco; Schenone, Angelo

    2015-12-01

    To describe a new test to quantitatively evaluate hand function in patients affected by Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (CMT). The sensor-engineered glove test (SEGT) was applied to CMT patients (N: 26) and compared with a cohort of healthy controls (HC, N: 26). CMT patients were further divided into subjects with clinically normal (group 1) or impaired hand (group 2) function. The SEGT parameters evaluated were touch duration, inter-tapping interval, and movement rate parameters of two different sequences: finger tapping (FT) and index-medium-ring-little (IMRL) performed at self-paced mode (SPM) and maximum velocity (MV). Hand function and strength were assessed by the 9-hole peg test (9HPT) and dynamometry. Disability of patients was measured by the CMT neuropathy score. CMT patients had significantly worst performances at SEGT than controls regarding the rate of execution of both FT (at MV) and IMRL sequences (at SPM and MV). The rate parameter at MV in IMRL sequence showed a significant trend of decreasing in its average between HC (n: 26, rate = 3.08 ± 0.52 Hz), group 1 (n: 9, rate = 2.64 ± 0.66 Hz) and group 2 (n: 17, rate = 2.19 ± 0.45 Hz) (p for trend CMT neuropathy score. The SEGT test is sensitive to show hand dysfunction in CMT patients, with and without clinically impaired hands. PMID:26456943

  17. American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... education site of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society. Patients Visit the official patient education site of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society. Patients Visit the official patient education site of ...

  18. Osteoarthritis of the Foot and Ankle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... joint. Diagnosis In diagnosing osteoarthritis, the foot and ankle surgeon will examine the foot thoroughly, looking for swelling in the joint, limited mobility, and pain with movement. In some cases, deformity ...

  19. Hand-Foot-and-Mouth Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Hand-Foot-and-Mouth Disease A parent's guide for infants and babies ... a herpes virus infection. Overview Hand-foot-and-mouth disease is a common illness of infants and ...

  20. Tuberculosis of the foot: An osteolytic variety

    OpenAIRE

    Dhillon, Mandeep S; Sameer Aggarwal; Sharad Prabhakar; Vikas Bachhal

    2012-01-01

    Background: Foot involvement in osteoarticular tuberculosis is uncommon and isolated bony involvement of foot bones with an osteolytic defect is even more rare; diagnostic and therapeutic delays can occur, worsening the prognosis. We present a retrospective series of osteolytic variety of foot tuberculosis. Materials and Methods: We present 24 osteolytic variety of foot tuberculosis (Eleven calcaneus, four cuboid, two cunieforms, one talus, three metatarsals, three phalanges) out of 92 fo...

  1. Diabetic foot ulcers. Pathophysiology, assessment, and therapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Bowering, C. K.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review underlying causes of diabetic foot ulceration, provide a practical assessment of patients at risk, and outline an evidence-based approach to therapy for diabetic patients with foot ulcers. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search was conducted for the period from 1979 to 1999 for articles relating to diabetic foot ulcers. Most studies found were case series or small controlled trials. MAIN MESSAGE: Foot ulcers in diabetic patients are common and frequently lead to lower limb...

  2. MDCT classification of osseous ankle and foot injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional radiography plays an essential role in the primary evaluation of acute ankle and foot trauma. In the case of complex injuries, however, subsequent computed tomography (CT) is nowadays recommended. In this connection, multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) allows better temporal, spatial, and contrast resolution compared with the conventional single-slice spiral CT. Multiplanar reformation and three-dimensional reconstruction of the acquired data sets are also helpful tools for critical assessment of therapeutic intervention. This report reviews the potential of the MDCT technique for accurate fracture classification, precise illustration of displaced components, and postoperative control of arrangement of typical lesions. (orig.)

  3. Rapid genetic screening of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaobo Li; Kun Xia; Beisha Tang; Ruxu Zhang; Xiaohong Zi; Lin Li; Yajing Zhan; Shunxiang Huang; Jin Li; Xuning Li; Xigui Li; Zhengmao Hu

    2012-01-01

    We used the allele-specific PCR-double digestion method on peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) to determine duplication and deletion mutations in the proband and family members of one family with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 and one family with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies. The proband and one subclinical family member from the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 family had a PMP22 gene duplication; one patient from the hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies family had a PMP22 gene deletion. Electron microscopic analysis of ultrathin sections of the superficial peroneal nerve from the two probands demonstrated demyelination and myelin sheath hyperplasia, as well as an ‘onion-like’ structure in the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A patient. We observed an irregular thickened myelin sheath and ‘mouse-nibbled’-like changes in the patient with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies. In the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A patient, nerve electrophysiological examination revealed moderate-to-severe reductions in the motor and sensory conduction velocities of the bilateral median nerve, ulnar nerve, tibial nerve, and sural nerve. Moreover, the compound muscle action potential amplitude was decreased. In the patient with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies, the nerve conduction velocity of the bilateral tibial nerve and sural nerve was moderately reduced, and the nerve conduction velocity of the median nerve and ulnar nerve of both upper extremities was slightly reduced.

  4. Foot-and-mouth disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious viral disease of cloven-hoofed animals. An outbreak of FMD can have a significant economic impact because of the restrictions on international trade of susceptible animals and their products with FMD-free countries. In this chapter we discuss vario...

  5. Modern Orthopedic Inpatient Care of the Orthopedic Patient With Diabetic Foot Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Antony H; Bradford, Sara; Hester, Thomas W; Kubelka, Igor; Tremlett, Jennifer; Morris, Victoria; Pendry, Elizabeth; Kavarthapu, Venu; Edmonds, Michael E

    2015-12-01

    In this article, we describe emergency and elective pathways within our orthopedic multidisciplinary inpatient care of patients with diabetic foot problems. We performed a retrospective cohort review of 19 complex patients requiring orthopedic surgical treatment of infected ulceration or Charcot feet or deformity at our institution. A total of 30 admissions (19 emergency, 11 elective) were included. The pathways were coordinated by a multidisciplinary team and comprised initial assessment and investigation and a series of key events, which consisted of emergency and elective surgery together with the introduction, and change of intravenous antibiotics when indicated. Patients had rigorous microbiological assessment, in the form of deep ulcer swabs, operative tissue specimens, joint aspirates, and blood cultures according to their clinical presentation as well as close clinical and biochemical surveillance, which expedited the prompt institution of key events. Outcomes were assessed using amputation rates and patient satisfaction. In the emergency group, there were 5.6 ± 3.0 (mean ± SD) key events per admission, including 4.2 ± 2.1 antibiotic changes. In the elective group, there were 4.8 ± 1.4 key events per inpatient episode, with 3.7 ± 1.3 antibiotic changes. Overall, there were 3 minor amputations, and no major amputations. The podiatric and surgical tissue specimens showed a wide array of Gram-positive, Gram-negative, aerobic and anaerobic isolates and 15% of blood cultures showed bacteremia. When 9 podiatric specimens were compared with 9 contemporaneous surgical samples, there was concordance in 2 out of 9 pairs. We have described the successful modern care of the orthopedic diabetic foot patient, which involves close clinical, microbiological, and biochemical surveillance by the multidisciplinary team directing patients through emergency and elective pathways. This has enabled successful surgical intervention involving debridement, pressure relief, and

  6. 29 CFR 1915.156 - Foot protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Foot protection. 1915.156 Section 1915.156 Labor... (PPE) § 1915.156 Foot protection. (a) Use. The employer shall ensure that each affected employee wears protective footwear when working in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or...

  7. 29 CFR 1918.104 - Foot protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Foot protection. 1918.104 Section 1918.104 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Personal Protective Equipment § 1918.104 Foot... in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or rolling objects or...

  8. 29 CFR 1917.94 - Foot protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Foot protection. 1917.94 Section 1917.94 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Personal Protection § 1917.94 Foot protection. (a) The employer shall ensure that each affected employee wears protective footwear when working in areas where there is a danger of foot...

  9. 33 CFR 142.33 - Foot protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Foot protection. 142.33 Section... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES WORKPLACE SAFETY AND HEALTH Personal Protective Equipment § 142.33 Foot... for foot injury to occur shall wear footwear meeting the specifications of ANSI Z41, except...

  10. 29 CFR 1910.136 - Foot protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Foot protection. 1910.136 Section 1910.136 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Personal Protective Equipment § 1910.136 Foot protection. (a) General... areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or rolling objects, or objects...

  11. Clinical and Electrophysiological Studies of a Family with Probable X-linked Dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth Neuropathy and Ptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Wu

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The X-linked dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (CMTX is ahereditary motor and sensory neuropathy linked to a variety of mutations inthe connexin32 (Cx32 gene. Clinical and genetic features of CMTX havenot previously been reported in Taiwanese.Methods: Clinical evaluations and electrophysiological studies were carried out on 25family members of a Taiwanese family group. Molecular genetic analysis ofthe Cx32 gene was performed. A sural nerve biopsy was obtained from 1patient.Results: Nine patients had clinical features of X-linked dominant inheritance and amoderate Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT neuropathy phenotype. Moleculargenetic analysis showed no mutation of the Cx32 coding region, but revealeda G-to-A transition at position -215 of the nerve-specific promoter P2 of theCx32 gene. Ptosis is 1 clinical manifestation of neuropathy in this probableCMTX family. Familial hyperthyroidism is an additional independent featureof the family. Electrophysiological and histological studies showed featuresof axonal neuropathy. Multimodality evoked potential studies revealed normalcentral motor and sensory conduction velocities.Conclusions: The presence of ptosis in this family illustrates the existence of clinical heterogeneityamong related family members with CMTX similar to that inCMT of autosomal inheritance. Electrophysiological and histological findingsrevealed normal central conduction and axonal neuropathy.

  12. Management of diabetic foot infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the infecting agent in diabetic food infection with the susceptibility pattern, and to evaluate the effect of wound infection, was culopathy, neuropathy and control of diabetes mellitus on the outcome of the patients. Design: A descriptive and observational study. Place and duration of study: Patients with diabetic foot, admitted in surgical unit 1, B.V. Hospital Bahawalpur, from April 1999 to April 2000, were included in this study. Subject and methods: A total of 60 known diabetic patients were studied, out of these 47 were males and 13 females. They were assessed for angiopathy, neuropathy and extend of foot involvement. Necessary investigations, including x-ray foot, ECG, serum urea and creatinine, pus culture and sensitivity were carried out. Diabetes was controlled on insulin of the basis of serum sugar and urine sugar chart and treated accordingly. Results: The most common age of foot involvement was between 40-70 years. Right side was involved more often than the left (67%: 37%). Most of the infections were due to staphylococcus (50%), pseudomonas (25%) and streptococci (8%). Antibiotic was started based on sensitivity report. Fluoro quinolone plus clindamycin was used in 50%, fluoro quinolone plus metronidazole in 20% and amoxicillin/clavulanate in 23%. Most of the patients (61.7%) were in grade iii or iv of Meggit wagner classification of diabetic foot. Three patients (5%) were treated by below knee amputations while 1.7% patient by above knee amputation. In twenty-four (40%) patients some form of to amputation/ray amputation had to be done,while 32(53.3%) patients had complete healing of would without any amputation. Mortality was 3.33% all the 4 patients (6.7%) who presented late, having uncontrolled diabetes, with angiopathy (absent foot pulses), neuropathy, infection of the foot (grade iii or above) resulted in major amputation sooner or latter. The 32 patients (53.3%) having controlled diabetes mellitus with no angiopathy or

  13. Climate Reconstructions

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Paleoclimatology Program archives reconstructions of past climatic conditions derived from paleoclimate proxies, in addition to the Program's large...

  14. Laryngopharyngeal reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Kazi, Rehan A

    2006-01-01

    There is a high incidence of hypopharyngeal cancer is our country due to the habits of tobacco and alcohol. Moreover these cases are often detected in the late stages thereby making the issue of reconstruction very tedious and unpredictable. There are a number of options for laryngopharyngeal reconstruction available now including the use of microvascular flaps depending upon the patient’s fitness, motivation, technical expertise, size and extent of the defect. This article reviews the differ...

  15. Selected items from the Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) Neuropathy Score and secondary clinical outcome measures serve as sensitive clinical markers of disease severity in CMT1A patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Mannil, M.; Solari, A.; Leha, A.; Pelayo-Negro, A. L.; Berciano, J; Schlotter-Weigel, B.; Walter, M.C.; Rautenstrauss, B.; Schnizer, T. J.; Schenone, A.; Seeman, P; Kadian, C.; Schreiber, O.; Angarita, N. G.; Fabrizi, G.M.

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates primary and secondary clinical outcome measures in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) with regard to their contribution towards discrimination of disease severity. The nine components of the composite Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease Neuropathy Score and six additional secondary clinical outcome measures were assessed in 479 adult patients with genetically proven CMT1A and 126 healthy controls. Using hierarchical clustering, we identified four significant clusters of ...

  16. Obese older adults suffer foot pain and foot-related functional limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickle, Karen J; Steele, Julie R

    2015-10-01

    There is evidence to suggest being overweight or obese places adults at greater risk of developing foot complications such as osteoarthritis, tendonitis and plantar fasciitis. However, no research has comprehensively examined the effects of overweight or obesity on the feet of individuals older than 60 years of age. Therefore we investigated whether foot pain, foot structure, and/or foot function is affected by obesity in older adults. Three hundred and twelve Australian men and women, aged over 60 years, completed validated questionnaires to establish the presence of foot pain and health related quality of life. Foot structure (anthropometrics and soft tissue thickness) and foot function (ankle dorsiflexion strength and flexibility, toe flexor strength, plantar pressures and spatiotemporal gait parameters) were also measured. Obese participants (BMI >30) were compared to those who were overweight (BMI=25-30) and not overweight (BMI <25). Obese participants were found to have a significantly higher prevalence of foot pain and scored significantly lower on the SF-36. Obesity was also associated with foot-related functional limitation whereby ankle dorsiflexion strength, hallux and lesser toe strength, stride/step length and walking speed were significantly reduced in obese participants compared to their leaner counterparts. Therefore, disabling foot pain and altered foot structure and foot function are consequences of obesity for older adults, and impact upon their quality of life. Interventions designed to reduce excess fat mass may relieve loading of the foot structures and, in turn, improve foot pain and quality of life for older obese individuals. PMID:26260010

  17. Acute bilateral isolated foot drop: Report of two cases

    OpenAIRE

    Kertmen, H.; Gürer, B.; Yimaz, E. R.; Sekerci, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Foot drop is defined as the weakness of the foot and ankle dorsiflexion. Acute unilateral foot drop is a well-documented entity, whereas bilateral foot drop is rarely documented. Slowly progressing bilateral foot drop may occur with various metabolic causes, parasagittal intracranial pathologies, and cauda equina syndrome. Acute onset of bilateral foot drop due to disc herniation is extremely rare. Here we present two cases of acute bilateral foot drop due to disc herniation. The first patien...

  18. Distribución Espacial de la Enfermedad Charcot- Marie-Tooth en Costa Rica, 1990-2003 Spatial Distribution of the Charcot-Marie- Tooth Disease in Costa Rica,1990-2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger E Bonilla

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Evaluar la distribución espacial como indicador de la incidencia de la enfermedad de Charcot-Marie-Tooth por los egresos hospitalarios reportados en Costa Rica entre el período 1990-2003. Métodos: Se aplicó un rastreo estadístico espacial de la incidencia de la enfermedad y se evaluó la significancia estadística de los conglomerados con excesos de casos. Resultados: El exceso de casos observados de la enfermedad en la zona de Naranjo fue estadísticamente significativo (56 versus 26.3 p Objective: To evaluate the spatial distribution of Charcot- Marie-Tooth disease as indicator of incidence in Costa Rica between 1990-2003. Methods: A spatial statistical scan was performed for the CMT incidence. We evaluated the statistical significance of high rate clusters. Results: The excess of observed cases of the disease in the area of Naranjo was statistically significant (56 vs. 26.3 p <0.05. Other regions showing significant excess of cases of CMT are: Tibás (33 vs. 13.5, Alajuela Centro (20 vs. 6, Turrialba Centro (16 vs. 4.5, Golfito (18 vs. 5.6 and Puntarenas Centro (9 vs. 1.5. Discussion: Spatial statistical scan is proposed as a tool in the decision making process in order to reduce the incidence of the disease and respond appropriately to those affected by CMT and their families. The method identifies clusters where it is necessary to focus efforts in evaluating the incidence of the disease.

  19. A novel mitofusin 2 gene mutation causing Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2A disease in a Chinese family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEING Chor Kwan; LAU Kwok Kwong; YU Kwok Wai; CHAN Yan Wo Albert; MAK Miu Chloe

    2010-01-01

    @@ Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), also known as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies, comprises a genetically heterogeneous group of inherited peripheral neuropathies. Clinically it is characterized by progressive distal weakness, muscle atrophy, distal sensory loss and loss of deep tendon reflexes. Following electrophysiological criteria, CMT is divided into two main forms: the primarily demyelinating neuropathy CMT1 with severely decreased nerve conduction velocity (NCV) (38 m/s) but decreased amplitudes.1 CMT2A, an autosomal dominant disease caused by mitofusin 2 gene (MFN2) mutations, is the most common type of CMT2, accounting for up to 33% of familial CMT2 cases.2 We reported a patient with clinical diagnosis of CMT2 caused by a novel MFN2 mutation. To our knowledge, this is a relatively early report of genetically confirmed CMT2A in Chinese.

  20. Coexistent Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A and type 2 diabetes mellitus neuropathies in a Chinese family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A-ping Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A is caused by duplication of the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22 gene on chromosome 17. It is the most common inherited demyelinating neuropathy. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a common metabolic disorder that frequently causes predominantly sensory neuropathy. In this study, we report the occurrence of CMT1A in a Chinese family affected by type 2 diabetes mellitus. In this family, seven individuals had duplication of the PMP22 gene, although only four had clinical features of polyneuropathy. All CMT1A patients with a clinical phenotype also presented with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The other three individuals had no signs of CMT1A or type 2 diabetes mellitus. We believe that there may be a genetic link between these two diseases.

  1. Project Reconstruct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helisek, Harriet; Pratt, Donald

    1994-01-01

    Presents a project in which students monitor their use of trash, input and analyze information via a database and computerized graphs, and "reconstruct" extinct or endangered animals from recyclable materials. The activity was done with second-grade students over a period of three to four weeks. (PR)

  2. Vaginal reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesavoy, M.A.

    1985-05-01

    Vaginal reconstruction can be an uncomplicated and straightforward procedure when attention to detail is maintained. The Abbe-McIndoe procedure of lining the neovaginal canal with split-thickness skin grafts has become standard. The use of the inflatable Heyer-Schulte vaginal stent provides comfort to the patient and ease to the surgeon in maintaining approximation of the skin graft. For large vaginal and perineal defects, myocutaneous flaps such as the gracilis island have been extremely useful for correction of radiation-damaged tissue of the perineum or for the reconstruction of large ablative defects. Minimal morbidity and scarring ensue because the donor site can be closed primarily. With all vaginal reconstruction, a compliant patient is a necessity. The patient must wear a vaginal obturator for a minimum of 3 to 6 months postoperatively and is encouraged to use intercourse as an excellent obturator. In general, vaginal reconstruction can be an extremely gratifying procedure for both the functional and emotional well-being of patients.

  3. Vaginal reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaginal reconstruction can be an uncomplicated and straightforward procedure when attention to detail is maintained. The Abbe-McIndoe procedure of lining the neovaginal canal with split-thickness skin grafts has become standard. The use of the inflatable Heyer-Schulte vaginal stent provides comfort to the patient and ease to the surgeon in maintaining approximation of the skin graft. For large vaginal and perineal defects, myocutaneous flaps such as the gracilis island have been extremely useful for correction of radiation-damaged tissue of the perineum or for the reconstruction of large ablative defects. Minimal morbidity and scarring ensue because the donor site can be closed primarily. With all vaginal reconstruction, a compliant patient is a necessity. The patient must wear a vaginal obturator for a minimum of 3 to 6 months postoperatively and is encouraged to use intercourse as an excellent obturator. In general, vaginal reconstruction can be an extremely gratifying procedure for both the functional and emotional well-being of patients

  4. Primary infragenicular angioplasty for diabetic neuroischemic foot ulcers following the angiosome distribution: a new paradigm for the vascular interventionist?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandrescu V

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Vlad Alexandrescu1, Gerard Hubermont21Department of Vascular Surgery, Princess Paola Hospital, Marche- en-Famenne, Belgium; 2Department of Diabetology, Princess Paola Hospital, Marche-en-Famenne and Sainte-Thérèse Hospital, Bastogne, BelgiumAbstract: The angiosome principle was first described by Jan Taylor in 1987 in the plastic reconstructive surgery field, providing useful information on the vascular anatomy of the human body. Specifically concerning foot and ankle pathology, it may help the clinician to select better vascular access and specific strategies for revascularization. This knowledge may be particularly beneficial when treating diabetic neuroischemic foot wounds associated with particularly aggressive atherosclerotic disease and a poor collateral circulation. The implementation of angiosome-based strategies in diabetic infragenicular vascular reconstruction may afford encouraging wound healing and limb preservation rates using both bypass and endovascular techniques. The minimal invasiveness of these novel strategies enables us to perform more specific and more distal tibial and/or foot arterial reconstructions, in one or multiple targeted vessels. This paper reviews the available literature on this revascularization strategy and focuses on the potential benefit of angiosome-guided primary angioplasty for diabetic ischemic foot ulcers.Keywords: critical limb ischemia, diabetic foot, limb salvage, angiosomes, angioplasty

  5. Foot Plantar Pressure Measurement System: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufridin Wahab

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Foot plantar pressure is the pressure field that acts between the foot and the support surface during everyday locomotor activities. Information derived from such pressure measures is important in gait and posture research for diagnosing lower limb problems, footwear design, sport biomechanics, injury prevention and other applications. This paper reviews foot plantar sensors characteristics as reported in the literature in addition to foot plantar pressure measurement systems applied to a variety of research problems. Strengths and limitations of current systems are discussed and a wireless foot plantar pressure system is proposed suitable for measuring high pressure distributions under the foot with high accuracy and reliability. The novel system is based on highly linear pressure sensors with no hysteresis.

  6. ACL reconstruction - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction - discharge; ACL reconstruction - discharge ... had surgery to reconstruct your anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The surgeon drilled holes in the bones of ...

  7. Bacteriological study of diabetic foot infections.

    OpenAIRE

    Khairul Azmi ABD KADIR; Muppidi SATYAVANI; Ketan PANDE

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Foot infections are one of the major complications of diabetes mellitus and a significant risk factor for lower extremity amputation. Providing effective antimicrobial therapy is an important component in treating these infections. This study assesses the microbial isolates of patients with diabetic foot infections and their antibiotic susceptibility pattern. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study of 75 patients with diabetic foot infections admitted to RIPAS hospital betw...

  8. Hyperspectral Imaging in Diabetic Foot Wound Care

    OpenAIRE

    Yudovsky, Dmitry; Nouvong, Aksone; Pilon, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration is a major complication of diabetes and afflicts as many as 15 to 25% of type 1 and 2 diabetes patients during their lifetime. If untreated, diabetic foot ulcers may become infected and require total or partial amputation of the affected limb. Early identification of tissue at risk of ulcerating could enable proper preventive care, thereby reducing the incidence of foot ulceration. Furthermore, noninvasive assessment of tissue viability around already formed ulcers co...

  9. Foot Deformities in Patients with Cerebral Palsy

    OpenAIRE

    E Ameri; A. Yeganeh

    2007-01-01

    Introduction & Objective: In patients with cerebral palsy (CP) the most common presentation is lower extremity deformity specially foot deformity. Inability to ambulation is the one of the most important disabilities, that dependent to the variety of factors such as severity of disease, kind of CP, etc. This study was aimed to assess prevalence of kinds of foot deformity in CP and communication between kind of CP and foot deformity and another hand inability to ambulation.Materials & Methods...

  10. The diabetic foot: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricco, J B; Thanh Phong, L; Schneider, F; Illuminati, G; Belmonte, R; Valagier, A; Régnault De La Mothe, G

    2013-12-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration (DFU) is among the most frequent complications of diabetes. Neuropathy and ischaemia are the initiating factors and infection is mostly a consequence. We have shown in this review that any DFU should be considered to have vascular impairment. DFU will generally heal if the toe pressure is >55 mmHg and a transcutaneous oxygen pressure (TcPO2) <30 mmHg has been considered to predict that a diabetic ulcer may not heal. The decision to intervene is complex and made according to the symptoms and clinical findings. If both an endovascular and a bypass procedure are possible with an equal outcome to be expected, endovascular treatments should be preferred. Primary and secondary mid-term patency rates are better after bypass, but there is no difference in limb salvage. Bedridden patients with poor life expectancy and a non-revascularisable leg are indications for performing a major amputation. A deep infection is the immediate cause of amputation in 25% to 50% of diabetic patients. Patients with uncontrolled abscess, bone or joint involvement, gangrene, or necrotising fasciitis have a "foot-at risk" and need prompt surgical intervention with debridement and revascularisation. As demonstrated in this review, foot ulcer in diabetic is associated with high mortality and morbidity. Early referral, non-invasive vascular testing, imaging and intervention are crucial to improve DFU healing and to prevent amputation. Diabetics are eight to twenty-four times more likely than non-diabetics to have a lower limb amputation and it has been suggested that a large part of those amputations could be avoided by an early diagnosis and a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:24126512

  11. Vascular surgery, microsurgery and supramicrosurgery for treatment of chronic diabetic foot ulcers to prevent amputations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Schirmer

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Diabetic foot ulcers occur in approximately 2,5% of patients suffering from diabetes and may lead to major infections and amputation. Such ulcers are responsible for a prolonged period of hospitalization and co- morbidities caused by infected diabetic foot ulcers. Small, superficial ulcers can be treated by special conservative means. However, exposed bones or tendons require surgical intervention in order to prevent osteomyelitis. In many cases reconstructive surgery is necessary, sometimes in combination with revascularization of the foot. There are studies on non surgical treatment of the diabetic foot ulcer. Most of them include patients, classified Wagner 1-2 without infection. Patients presenting Wagner 3D and 4D however are at a higher risk of amputation. The evolution of microsurgery has extended the possibilities of limb salvage. Perforator based flaps can minimize the donorsite morbidity. PATIENTS AND METHODS: 41 patients were treated with free tissue transfer for diabetic foot syndrome and chronic defects. 44 microvascular flaps were needed. The average age of patients was 64.3 years. 18 patients needed revascularization. 3 patients needed 2 microvascular flaps. In 6 cases supramicrosurgical technique was used. RESULTS: There were 2 flap losses leading to amputation. 4 other patients required amputation within 6 months postoperatively due to severe infection or bypass failure. Another 4 patients died within one year after reconstruction. The remaining patients were ambulated. DISCUSSION: Large defects of the foot can be treated by free microvascular myocutaneous or fasciocutaneous tissue transfer. If however, small defects, exposing bones or tendons, are not eligible for local flaps, small free microvascular flaps can be applied. These flaps cause a very low donor site morbidity. Arterialized venous flaps are another option for defect closure. Amputation means reduction of quality of life and can lead to an increased

  12. Reliability and normative values of the foot line test: a technique to assess foot posture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brushøj, C; Larsen, Klaus; Nielsen, MB;

    2007-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Test-retest reliability. OBJECTIVE: To examine the reliability and report normative values of a novel test, the foot line test (FLT), to describe foot morphology. BACKGROUND: Numerous foot examinations are performed each day, but most existing examination techniques have considerabl...

  13. Radio Reconstructions

    OpenAIRE

    Bulley, James; Jones, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Radio Reconstructions is a sound installation which use indeterminate radio broadcasts as its raw material. Each piece is structured by a notated score, which controls its rhythm, dynamics and melodic contour over time. The audio elements used to enact this score are selected in real-time from unknown radio transmissions, by an autonomous software system which is continuously scanning the radio waves in search of similar fragments of audio. Using a technique known as audio mosaicing, hund...

  14. Crime, hysteria and belle époque hypnotism: the path traced by Jean-Martin Charcot and Georges Gilles de la Tourette.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogousslavsky, Julien; Walusinski, Olivier; Veyrunes, Denis

    2009-01-01

    Hysteria and hypnotism became a favorite topic of studies in the fin de siècle neurology that emerged from the school organized at La Salpêtrière by Jean-Martin Charcot, where he had arrived in 1861. Georges Gilles de la Tourette started working with Charcot in 1884 and probably remained his most faithful student, even after his mentor's death in 1893. This collaboration was particularly intense on 'criminal hypnotism', an issue on which Hippolyte Bernheim and his colleagues from the Nancy School challenged the positions taken by the Salpêtrière School. Bernheim claimed that hypnotism was not a diagnostic feature of hysteria and that there were real-life examples of murders suggested under hypnosis, while hypnosis susceptibility was identified with hysteria by Charcot and Gilles de la Tourette, who saw rape as the only crime associated with hypnotism. The quarrel was particularly virulent during a series of famous criminal cases which took place between 1888 and 1890. At the time, it was considered that La Salpêtrière had succeeded over Nancy, since the role of hypnotism was discarded during these famous trials. However, the theories of Charcot and Gilles de la Tourette were also damaged by the fight, which probably triggered the conceptual evolution leading to Joseph Babinski's revision of hysteria in 1901. Gilles de la Tourette's strong and public interest in hypnotism nearly cost him his life, when a young woman who claimed to have been hypnotized against her will shot him in the head at his own home in 1893. It was subsequently shown that hypnotism had nothing to do with it. The delusional woman was interned at Sainte-Anne for mental disturbance, thus escaping trial. Ironically, Gilles de la Tourette may have been partly responsible, since he had been one of the strongest proponents of placing mentally-ill criminals in asylums instead of prisons. PMID:19602893

  15. Diagnostic laboratory testing for Charcot Marie Tooth disease (CMT): the spectrum of gene defects in Norwegian patients with CMT and its implications for future genetic test strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Østern, Rune André Helland; Fagerheim, Toril; Hjellnes, Helene; Nygård, Bjørn; Mellgren, Svein Ivar; Nilssen, Øivind

    2013-01-01

    Background Current genetic test algorithms for Charcot Marie Tooth (CMT) disease are based on family details and comprehensive clinical and neurophysiological data gathered under ideal conditions for clinical assessment. However, in a diagnostic laboratory setting relying on external test requisitions and patient samples, such conditions are not always met. Our objective was therefore to perform a retrospective evaluation of the data given in laboratory request forms and to assess their quali...

  16. On Sound Footing: The Health of Your Feet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... link, please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe On Sound Footing The Health of Your Feet Your feet ... search Features A Bang to the Brain On Sound Footing Wise Choices Links Foot Health Tips Use ...

  17. Site-directed mutagenesis of the foot-and-mouth disease virus RNA-polymerase gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The foot-and-mouth disease virus RNA-polymerase gene was mutagenised in its active site. Pst I digestion of the polymerase gene (cDNA) generated a 790 bp fragment containing the critical sequence. This fragment was subcloned in M13mp8 for mutagenesis method. The polymerase gene was then reconstructed and subcloned in pUC19. These mutants will be used to study the enzyme structure and activity and to develop intracellular immunization assays in eukaryotic cells. (author)

  18. Foot Pain and Cycling: a survey of frequency, type, location, associations and amelioration of foot pain

    OpenAIRE

    Hayley Uden; Sara Jones; Karen Grimmer

    2012-01-01

    The foot – pedal interface is the primary site for energy transfer from the cyclist to the bicycle, with anecdotal evidence that foot injuries from cycling are common. However, there is little research regarding the prevalence, aetiology and/or management of such injuries. 1) What is the distribution of age, gender, foot/pedal interface use and distances cycled amongst cyclists who experience foot pain? 2) What type of pain and what region of the foot do cyclists experience pain? 3) What amel...

  19. A review of becaplermin gel in the treatment of diabetic neuropathic foot ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C Fang

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Robert C Fang, Robert D GalianoDivision of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Wound Healing Research Laboratory, Department of Surgery, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Diabetic neuropathic foot ulcers represent a serious health care burden to patients and to society. While the management of chronic diabetic foot ulcers has improved in recent years, it remains a frustrating problem for a variety of clinicians. This review examines the scientific underpinnings supporting the use of becaplermin (Regranex®; Ortho-McNeil Pharmaceutical, Raritan, NJ, or recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor (rhPDGF-BB, in diabetic forefoot wounds. An emphasis is placed upon proper medical and surgical care of diabetic foot wounds, as multiple studies have demonstrated that the success of this growth factor in accelerating healing is ultimately dependent on proper ulcer care. A focus on the cost-effectiveness of this form of therapy in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers is also outlined.Keywords: becaplermin, diabetes, foot ulcer, growth factor

  20. Foot Deformities in Patients with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Ameri

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: In patients with cerebral palsy (CP the most common presentation is lower extremity deformity specially foot deformity. Inability to ambulation is the one of the most important disabilities, that dependent to the variety of factors such as severity of disease, kind of CP, etc. This study was aimed to assess prevalence of kinds of foot deformity in CP and communication between kind of CP and foot deformity and another hand inability to ambulation.Materials & Methods: 100 patients with cerebral palsy with age 3-20 y (average 12.9y were assessed in Shafa Yahyaian Orthopedic Center and kinds of CP & foot deformity was evaluated. In these patients, 84 subjects were selected with age 7-20 y and were evaluated for ability to walking.Results: The most common type of CP was spastic and the most common form of CP was (Quadri-Di-hemi-para plegic respectively. The most common form of foot deformity was equines. Inability to walking in patients with foot deformity was more than without it (P<0.03, and in quadriplegic CP more than another types and in hemiplegic less than others.Conclusion: The most common deformity in foot in patients with CP was equines and then equino varus & equines valgus respectively. Foot deformity is the one of the factors that effect on ability to ambulation in patients with CP. Inability to ambulation in quadriplegic CP is more than others and in hemiplegic CP less than other types of CP.

  1. Cosmetic Foot Surgery: Fashion's Pandora's Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fashion’s Pandora’s Box? A A A | Print | Share Cosmetic Foot Surgery: Fashion’s Pandora’s Box? Foot and ankle ... extreme and imprudent as it may sound, the cosmetic surgery craze isn't just for faces anymore- ...

  2. Sports Injuries to the Foot and Ankle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Foot and Ankle Text Size Print Bookmark Sports Injuries to the Foot and Ankle Depending on the sport, your feet and ankles can certainly take a ... the injury risk factors while playing your favorite sport, see the topics listed below or read the ...

  3. A comparison of haemolytic responses in fore-foot and rear-foot distance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, Stuart; McDonald, Kirsty A; Dawson, Brian; Stearne, Sarah M; Green, Ben A; Rubenson, Jonas; Clemons, Tristan D; Peeling, Peter

    2016-08-01

    This study examined the haemolytic effects of an interval-based running task in fore-foot and rear-foot striking runners. Nineteen male distance runners (10 fore-foot, 9 rear-foot) completed 8 × 3 min repeats at 90% vVO2peak on a motorised treadmill. Pre- and post-exercise venous blood samples were analysed for serum haptoglobin to quantify the haemolytic response to running. Vertical ground reaction forces were also captured via a force plate beneath the treadmill belt. Haptoglobin levels were significantly decreased following exercise (P = 0.001) in both groups (but not between groups), suggesting that the running task created a haemolytic stress. The ground reaction force data showed strong effect sizes for a greater peak force (d = 1.20) and impulse (d = 1.37) in fore-foot runners, and a greater rate of force development (d = 2.74) in rear-foot runners. The lack of difference in haptoglobin response between groups may be explained by the trend for fore-foot runners to experience greater peak force and impulse during the stance phase of their running gait, potentially negating any impact of the greater rate of force development occurring from the rear-foot runners' heel strike. Neither type of runner (fore-foot or rear-foot) appears more susceptible to technique-related foot-strike haemolysis. PMID:26618486

  4. Utility of Fresh Frozen Section Analysis in Foot and Ankle Surgery: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, Spencer J; Manway, Jeffery M; Burns, Patrick R

    2016-01-01

    The use of intraoperative fresh frozen section (FFS) analysis to determine the presence of infection has been well reported in orthopedic studies. Specifically, the number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes per high-power field has been used to diagnose total joint arthroplasty-related infection. Less commonly, reconstructive surgeons have extended the use of FFS analysis for intraoperative evaluation when suspicion of deep infection with or without hardware is high. The purpose of the present study was to retrospectively review the data from 11 patients undergoing foot and ankle reconstruction in the setting of possible deep infection and determine the usefulness of FFS analysis. A retrospective review of the medical records of patients who had undergone reconstructive foot and ankle revision surgery with intraoperative FFS analysis and tissue/swab cultures available was performed. A positive FFS was defined as >5 polymorphonuclear leukocytes per high-power field. A positive frozen section was associated with a positive tissue culture 4 of 7 times (57%). The sensitivity and specificity of FFS analysis for infection was 80% and 50%, respectively. The positive and negative predictive value of the FFS result was 57.1% and 75%, respectively. In conclusion, FFS analysis and intraoperative cultures correlated only 57% of the time in the present series. This test had moderate sensitivity for detecting infection at 80%, but the specificity was poor (50%). More research is needed to further evaluate the role of FFS analysis in foot and ankle surgery. PMID:27068638

  5. Isolation of a substance activating foot formation in hydra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimmelikhuijzen, C J; Schaller, H C

    1977-01-01

    We have developed an assay for a substance from hydra that accelerates foot regeneration in the animal. This substance is specific for the foot as evidenced by the following findings: (1) It is present in the animal as a steep gradient descending from foot to head, paralleling the foot......-forming potential of the tissue (2) It does not accelerate head regeneration, nor do the head factors of hydra discovered by Schaller (1973) and Berking (1977) accelerate foot regeneration. We propose that the foot-activating substance is a morphogen responsible for foot formation in hydra. The foot activator can...

  6. Tracheal reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikrishna, S V; Shekar, P S; Shetty, N

    1998-12-01

    Surgical reconstruction of the trachea is a relatively complex procedure. We had 20 cases of tracheal stenosis. We have a modest experience of 16 tracheal reconstructions for acquired tracheal stenosis. Two patients underwent laser treatment while another two died before any intervention. The majority of these cases were a result of prolonged ventilation (14 cases), following organophosphorous poisoning (11 cases), Guillain-Barré syndrome, bullet injury, fat embolism and surprisingly only one tumor, a case of mucoepidermoid carcinoma, who had a very unusual presentation. There were 12 males and 4 females in this series, age ranging from 12-35 years. The duration of ventilation ranged from 1-21 days and the interval from decannulation to development of stridor was between 5-34 days. Six of them were approached by the cervical route, 5 by thoracotomy and cervical approach, 2 via median sternotomy and 3 by thoracotomy alone. Five of them required an additional laryngeal drop and 1 required pericardiotomy and release of pulmonary veins to gain additional length. The excised segments of trachea measured 3 to 5 cms in length. All were end to end anastomosis with interrupted Vicryl sutures. We have had no experience with stents or prosthetic tubes. Three patients developed anastomotic leaks which were controlled conservatively. Almost all of them required postoperative tracheo-bronchial suctioning with fibreoptic bronchoscope. We had one death in this series due to sepsis. PMID:9914459

  7. As contribuições de Charcot e de Marsden para o desenvolvimento dos distúrbios do movimento nos séculos XIX e XX Contributions of Charcot and Marsden to the development of movement disorders in the 19th and 20th centuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio A.G. Teive

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Charcot contribuiu significativamente no século XIX na descrição de várias enfermidades neurológicas, em particular na área dos distúrbios do movimento. Charcot contribuiu de forma exponencial na descrição clínica minuciosa da doença de Parkinson, além de introduzir o primeiro tratamento farmacológico. Na área das hipercinesias realizou estudos sobre a síndrome de Tourette, o diagnóstico diferencial dos tremores, das coréias e o estudo inicial sobre startle. Marsden, recentemente falecido, destacou-se no século XX com inúmeras publicações na área dos movimentos anormais.São contribuições seminais os estudos sobre a doença de Parkinson, distonias, mioclonias , tremor essencial, a descrição das síndromes " Painful Legs Moving Toes ", "Gait Ignition Failure" e o "Tremor Primário da Escrita". As contribuições de Charcot no século XIX e de Marsden no século XX na área dos distúrbios do movimento permitem concluir que ambos foram as figuras mais representativas desta área nos últimos dois séculos.Charcot described many neurological diseases in the 19th century, particularly in movement disorders.Charcot contributed in the clinical description of Parkinson's disease, and introduced its first pharmacological treatment. He also studied the hyperkinesias, e.g. of Tourette syndrome, differential diagnosis of tremors, dystonias, choreas and startle disease. Marsden, who died recently, was an exponent in the study of Movement Disorders, with many publications in this field in the 20th century. His most important contributions are definitions and classifications of movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, dystonia, myoclonus, essential tremor, the description of the syndromes "Painful Legs Moving Toes", "Gait Ignition Failure" and "Primary Writing Tremor". The contributions of Charcot in the 19th century and Marsden in the 20th century to the movement disorders allow us to conclude that both of them were the most

  8. Clinical anatomy of the ankle and foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Díaz, Cristina; Saavedra, Miguel Ángel; Navarro-Zarza, José Eduardo; Canoso, Juan J; Villaseñor-Ovies, Pablo; Vargas, Angélica; Kalish, Robert A

    This paper emphasizes the anatomical substrate of several foot conditions that are seldom discussed in this context. These include the insertional and non-insertional Achilles tendinopathies, plantar fasciopathy, inferior and posterior heel spurs, foot compartment syndromes, intermetatarsal bursitis and Morton's neuroma. It is a rather superficial anatomical review of an organ that remains largely neglected by rheumatologists. It is our hope that the cases discussed and the cross examination by instructors and participants will stimulate study of the foot and the attention it deserves. PMID:23228530

  9. Clinical and functional correlates of foot pain in diabetic patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijken, P.M.; Dekker, J.; Rauwerda, J.A.; Dekker, E.; Lankhorst, G.J.; Bakker, K.; Dooren, J.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: patients with diabetes mellitus frequently suffer from foot pain. This pain seems to be a neglected area in studies on the diabetic foot. The purpose of this study was to identify clinical variables associated with foot pain in diabetic patients. In addition, the relationships between foot

  10. Effect of forward/backward standing posture on foot shape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Tan, T.K.; Punte, P.A.J.

    2000-01-01

    Foot length and breadth are generally used to determine the correct shoe size. An important question is whether foot length and foot breadth are dependent upon body posture. Therefore, the effect of leaning forward/backward on foot length and breadth is investigated in this study. Seven subjects par

  11. PATTERN OF AEROBIC B ACTERIAL INFECTION O F DIABETIC FOOT

    OpenAIRE

    Parmeshwari; Basavaraj

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diabetic foot ulcer is one of the commonest complications of longstanding diabetes. Diabetic foot is a common cause of hospital admission in diabetic patients in India. The trio of problems leading onto diabetic foot is neuropathy, vascular changes and infections, which constitute the diabetic foot syndrome. OBJECTIVES: To determine ...

  12. MDCT assessment of CAD in type-2 diabetic subjects with diabetic neuropathy: the role of Charcot neuro-arthropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the CACS and CAD severity assessed by MDCT in neuropathic type-2 diabetic patients with and without Charcot-neuroarthropathy (CN). Thirty-four CN asymptomatic-patients and 36 asymptomatic-patients with diabetic-neuropathy (DN) without CN underwent MDCT to assess CACS and severity of CAD. Patients were classified as positive for significant CAD in presence of at least one stenosis >50 % on MDCT-coronary-angiography (MDCT-CA). Groups were matched for age, sex and traditional CAD risk-factors. The coronary-angiography (CA) was performed in all patients with at least a significant stenosis detected by MDCT-CA, both as reference and eventually as treatment. CN patients showed higher rates of significant CAD in comparison with DN subjects [p < 0.001], while non-significant differences were observed in CACS (p = 0.980). No significant differences were also observed in CACS distribution in all subjects for stenosis ≥/<50 % (p = 0.814), as well as in both groups (p = 0.661 and 0.559, respectively). The MDCT-CA showed an overall diagnostic-accuracy for significant CAD of 87 %. These preliminary data suggest that CN-patients have a higher prevalence of severe CAD in comparison with DN-patients, while coronary plaques do not exhibit an increased amount of calcium. MDCT may be helpful to assess the CV risk in such asymptomatic type-2-diabetic patients with autonomic-neuropathy. (orig.)

  13. Occurrence of Optic Neuritis and Cervical Cord Schwannoma with Charcot-Marie-Tooth Type 4B1 Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Patrick; Bruwer, Zandre; Al-Kharusi, Khalsa; Meftah, Douja; Al-Murshedi, Fathiya

    2016-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 4B1 (CMT4B1) disease is a rare subtype of CMT4 with reported association of facial weakness, vocal cord paresis, chest deformities, and claw hands. We report the unusual occurrence of optic neuritis and cervical cord schwannoma in a male individual with confirmed CMT4B1 disease. Sequencing of the MTMR2 gene revealed a novel nonsense homozygous mutation c.1768C>T (p.Gln590*). The mutation was identified in affected relatives of the proband and a second, apparently unrelated, family. The rare association of optic neuritis or schwannoma with genetically confirmed CMT1A has been individually observed, but never with recessive CMT. To the best of our knowledge, the occurrence of optic neuritis and cervical cord schwannoma in the same patient has never been reported with any form of CMT including CMT4B1. In similar cases, we recommend immediate medical attention to rule out the possibility of schwannomas in patients with all demyelinating CMT subtypes in case of the development of focal neurological signs or acute worsening of clinical status. PMID:27162595

  14. DGAT2 Mutation in a Family with Autosomal-Dominant Early-Onset Axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Young Bin; Kang, Junghee; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jinho; Kwak, Geon; Hyun, Young Se; Nam, Soo Hyun; Hong, Hyun Dae; Choi, Yu-Ri; Jung, Sung-Chul; Koo, Heasoo; Lee, Ji Eun; Choi, Byung-Ok; Chung, Ki Wha

    2016-05-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most common inherited peripheral neuropathy and is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous disorder. We examined a Korean family in which two individuals had an autosomal-dominant axonal CMT with early-onset, sensory ataxia, tremor, and slow disease progression. Pedigree analysis and exome sequencing identified a de novo missense mutation (p.Y223H) in the diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 2 (DGAT2) gene. DGAT2 encodes an endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrial-associated membrane protein, acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase, which catalyzes the final step of the triglyceride (TG) biosynthesis pathway. The patient showed consistently decreased serum TG levels, and overexpression of the mutant DGAT2 significantly inhibited the proliferation of mouse motor neuron cells. Moreover, the variant form of human DGAT2 inhibited the axonal branching in the peripheral nervous system of zebrafish. We suggest that mutation of DGAT2 is the novel underlying cause of an autosomal-dominant axonal CMT2 neuropathy. This study will help provide a better understanding of the pathophysiology of axonal CMT and contribute to the molecular diagnostics of peripheral neuropathies. PMID:26786738

  15. Genetics of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT Disease within the Frame of the Human Genome Project Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Timmerman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT neuropathies comprise a group of monogenic disorders affecting the peripheral nervous system. CMT is characterized by a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neuropathies, involving all types of Mendelian inheritance patterns. Over 1,000 different mutations have been discovered in 80 disease-associated genes. Genetic research of CMT has pioneered the discovery of genomic disorders and aided in understanding the effects of copy number variation and the mechanisms of genomic rearrangements. CMT genetic study also unraveled common pathomechanisms for peripheral nerve degeneration, elucidated gene networks, and initiated the development of therapeutic approaches. The reference genome, which became available thanks to the Human Genome Project, and the development of next generation sequencing tools, considerably accelerated gene and mutation discoveries. In fact, the first clinical whole genome sequence was reported in a patient with CMT. Here we review the history of CMT gene discoveries, starting with technologies from the early days in human genetics through the high-throughput application of modern DNA analyses. We highlight the most relevant examples of CMT genes and mutation mechanisms, some of which provide promising treatment strategies. Finally, we propose future initiatives to accelerate diagnosis of CMT patients through new ways of sharing large datasets and genetic variants, and at ever diminishing costs.

  16. PMP22 messenger RNA levels in skin biopsies: testing the effectiveness of a Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A biomarker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobbio, Lucilla; Visigalli, Davide; Radice, Davide; Fiorina, Elisabetta; Solari, Alessandra; Lauria, Giuseppe; Reilly, Mary M; Santoro, Lucio; Schenone, Angelo; Pareyson, Davide

    2014-06-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) is associated with increased gene dosage for PMP22. Therapeutic approaches are currently aiming at correcting PMP22 over-expression. It is unknown whether PMP22 can be used as a biological marker of disease progression and therapy efficacy. We performed quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction on skin biopsies of 45 patients with CMT1A, obtained at study entry and after 24-months of treatment either with ascorbic acid or placebo. Data of a subgroup of patients were also compared with matched healthy subjects. Finally, we analysed PMP22 messenger RNA levels in sural nerve biopsies. We did not find significant differences in the levels of any known PMP22 transcripts in treated or untreated patients with CMT1A, thus confirming that ascorbic acid does not impact on the molecular features of CMT1A. Most importantly, we did not observe any correlation between PMP22 messenger RNA levels and the different clinical and electrophysiological outcome measures, underscoring the weakness of PMP22 to mirror the phenotypic variability of patients with CMT1A. We did not find increased PMP22 messenger RNA levels in skin and sural nerve biopsies of patients with CMT1A compared with relative controls. In conclusion, this study shows that ascorbic acid does not impact on PMP22 transcriptional regulation and PMP22 is not a suitable biomarker for CMT1A. PMID:24812204

  17. Occurrence of Optic Neuritis and Cervical Cord Schwannoma with Charcot-Marie-Tooth Type 4B1 Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Patrick; Bruwer, Zandre; Al-Kharusi, Khalsa; Meftah, Douja; Al-Murshedi, Fathiya

    2016-05-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 4B1 (CMT4B1) disease is a rare subtype of CMT4 with reported association of facial weakness, vocal cord paresis, chest deformities, and claw hands. We report the unusual occurrence of optic neuritis and cervical cord schwannoma in a male individual with confirmed CMT4B1 disease. Sequencing of the MTMR2 gene revealed a novel nonsense homozygous mutation c.1768C>T (p.Gln590*). The mutation was identified in affected relatives of the proband and a second, apparently unrelated, family. The rare association of optic neuritis or schwannoma with genetically confirmed CMT1A has been individually observed, but never with recessive CMT. To the best of our knowledge, the occurrence of optic neuritis and cervical cord schwannoma in the same patient has never been reported with any form of CMT including CMT4B1. In similar cases, we recommend immediate medical attention to rule out the possibility of schwannomas in patients with all demyelinating CMT subtypes in case of the development of focal neurological signs or acute worsening of clinical status. PMID:27162595

  18. MDCT assessment of CAD in type-2 diabetic subjects with diabetic neuropathy: the role of Charcot neuro-arthropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marano, Riccardo; Savino, Giancarlo; Merlino, Biagio; Pirro, Federica; Rutigliano, Claudia; Santangelo, Carolina; Minoiu, Aurelian Costin; Natale, Luigi; Bonomo, Lorenzo [Catholic University of Rome, ' ' A. Gemelli' ' University Hospital, Department of Radiological Sciences - Institute of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Pitocco, Dario [Catholic University of Rome, ' ' A. Gemelli' ' University Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Rome (Italy); Di Stasio, Enrico [Catholic University of Rome, ' ' A. Gemelli' ' University Hospital, Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Rome (Italy); Trani, Carlo [Catholic University of Rome, ' ' A. Gemelli' ' University Hospital, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine - Institute of Cardiology, Rome (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    To compare the CACS and CAD severity assessed by MDCT in neuropathic type-2 diabetic patients with and without Charcot-neuroarthropathy (CN). Thirty-four CN asymptomatic-patients and 36 asymptomatic-patients with diabetic-neuropathy (DN) without CN underwent MDCT to assess CACS and severity of CAD. Patients were classified as positive for significant CAD in presence of at least one stenosis >50 % on MDCT-coronary-angiography (MDCT-CA). Groups were matched for age, sex and traditional CAD risk-factors. The coronary-angiography (CA) was performed in all patients with at least a significant stenosis detected by MDCT-CA, both as reference and eventually as treatment. CN patients showed higher rates of significant CAD in comparison with DN subjects [p < 0.001], while non-significant differences were observed in CACS (p = 0.980). No significant differences were also observed in CACS distribution in all subjects for stenosis ≥/<50 % (p = 0.814), as well as in both groups (p = 0.661 and 0.559, respectively). The MDCT-CA showed an overall diagnostic-accuracy for significant CAD of 87 %. These preliminary data suggest that CN-patients have a higher prevalence of severe CAD in comparison with DN-patients, while coronary plaques do not exhibit an increased amount of calcium. MDCT may be helpful to assess the CV risk in such asymptomatic type-2-diabetic patients with autonomic-neuropathy. (orig.)

  19. Clinical classification and gene mutation of Chinese probands with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease Analysis of 57 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruxu Zhang; Xiaobo Li; Xiaohong Zi; Shunxiang Huang; Fufeng Zhang; Kun Xia; Qian Pan; Beisha Tang

    2011-01-01

    Charcot-Mafie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the most common inherited peripheral neuropathic disorder.CMT is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. To date, 27 genes associated with the disease have been cloned. The present study carried out clinical classification according to clinical,electrophysiological and pathological features, conducted inheritance classification according to inheritance patterns, and performed mutation analysis of 13 CMT disease genes (PMP22, CX32,HSPB1, MNF2, MPZ, HSPB8, GDAP1, NFL, EGR2, SIMPLE, RAB7, LMNA, MTMR2) in 57 Chinese probands with CMT. Five cases of AD-CMT1 and 13 cases of sporadic CMT1 were diagnosed as CMT1A; five cases of X-CMT1, one case of X-CMT2 and one case of sporadic CMT1 were diagnosed as CMTX1; four cases of AD-CMT2 were diagnosed as CMT2F; one case of AD-CMT2 and one case of sporadic CMT2 were diagnosed as CMT2A2; one case of AD-CMT2 was diagnosed as CMT2L; one case of AD-CMT2 was diagnosed as CMT2J; one case of AR-CMT1 was diagnosed as CMT4A. Among the 57 CMT probands, seven genotypes were determined among 34 patients, with a detection rate of 59.6%. The results indicated that the clinical classification and inheritance classification are indispensable for selecting potential disease genes for mutation detection, and for efficient molecular diagnosis.

  20. Radiographic examination of the equine foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A complete radiographic examination of the equine foot consists of properly exposed, processed, and positioned radiographs. For radiographic interpretation, in addition to knowing radiographic signs of disease, a knowledge of normal radiographic anatomy and possible insignificant anatomic variations is necessary

  1. Diabetic foot resulting in amputation: our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. G. Patel

    2014-02-01

    Conclusions: Foot ulceration in diabetic patients is a resource consuming, disabling morbidity that often is the first step towards lower extremity amputation. Prevention is the best treatment. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(1.000: 210-214

  2. What Is a Foot and Ankle Surgeon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... school, the foot and ankle surgeon enters a postgraduate residency in podiatric medicine and surgery approved by ... disorders and injuries that affect people of all ages. They are uniquely qualified to detect the early ...

  3. Parametric study of orthopedic insole of valgus foot on partial foot amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jun-Chao; Wang, Li-Zhen; Chen, Wei; Du, Cheng-Fei; Mo, Zhong-Jun; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2016-06-01

    Orthopedic insole was important for partial foot amputation (PFA) to achieve foot balance and avoid foot deformity. The inapposite insole orthosis was thought to be one of the risk factors of reamputation for foot valgus patient, but biomechanical effects of internal tissues on valgus foot had not been clearly addressed. In this study, plantar pressure on heel and metatarsal regions of PFA was measured using F-Scan. The three-dimensional finite element (FE) model of partial foot evaluated different medial wedge angles (MWAs) (0.0°-10.0°) of orthopedic insole on valgus foot. The effect of orthopedic insole on the internal bone stress, the medial ligament tension of ankle, plantar fascia tension, and plantar pressure was investigated. Plantar pressure on medial heel region was about 2.5 times higher than that of lateral region based on the F-Scan measurements. FE-predicted results showed that the tension of medial ankle ligaments was the lowest, and the plantar pressure was redistributed around the heel, the first metatarsal, and the lateral longitudinal arch regions when MWA of orthopedic insole ranged from 7.5° to 8.0°. The plantar fascias maintained about 3.5% of the total load bearing on foot. However, the internal stresses from foot bones increased. The simulation in this study would provide the suggestion of guiding optimal design of orthopedic insole and therapeutic planning to pedorthist. PMID:26291149

  4. Breast Reconstruction and Prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have breast reconstruction If you choose to have reconstructive surgery, follow these steps: STEP 1 — Ask your doctor to refer you to a plastic surgeon who is an expert in breast reconstruction. ...

  5. Pixel classification for automated diabetic foot diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kloeze, C.; Klein, A; Hazenberg, S.; Heijden, van der, Hans; Baal, van, A.H.M.; Bus, S.A.

    2009-01-01

    Worldwide, more than 180 million people suffer from diabetes mellitus. Approximately 50% of these patients will develop complications to their feet. Neuropathy, combined with poor blood supply and biomechanical changes results in a high risk for foot ulcers, which is a key problem in the diabetic foot; when these wounds become infected, this can ultimately result in lower extremity amputation, which has a serious effect on the quality of life of the patient, and causes a large economic burden...

  6. New insights in diabetic foot infection

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Foot ulcers are common in diabetic patients, have a cumulative lifetime incidence rate as high as 25% and frequently become infected. The spread of infection to soft tissue and bone is a major causal factor for lower-limb amputation. For this reason, early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are essential, including treatment which is both local (of the foot) and systemic (metabolic), and this requires coordination by a multidisciplinary team. Optimal treatment also often involves extensive s...

  7. The 'ABC' of examining foot radiographs.

    OpenAIRE

    Pearse, Eyiyemi O.; Klass, Benjamin; Bendall, Stephen P.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We report a simple systematic method of assessing foot radiographs that improves diagnostic accuracy and can reduce the incidence of inappropriate management of serious forefoot and midfoot injuries, particularly the Lisfranc-type injury. STUDY GROUP AND METHODS: Five recently appointed senior house officers (SHOs), with no casualty or Orthopaedic experience prior to their appointment, were shown a set of 10 foot radiographs and told the history and examination findings recorded...

  8. A Case of Hot Foot Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Mutlu Çayırlı; Sinem Budak

    2012-01-01

    Hot foot syndrome (HFS) is a benign, self-limited disorder, which is apparently caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. The disease is characterized by the acute onset in children with painful plantar nodules which generally does not require antibiotic therapy. Particularly, the mechanically stressed areas of the foot are affected after contact with contaminated water from saunas, swimming pools or hot tubs. HFS is a potentially important public health hazard that may causes outbreaks. In...

  9. Postoperative infection in the foot and ankle.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chan, Victoria O

    2012-07-01

    Our discussion highlights the commonly performed surgical procedures in the foot and ankle and reviews the various imaging modalities available for the detection of infection with graphic examples to better enable radiologists to approach the radiological evaluation of postoperative infection in the foot and ankle. Discrimination between infectious and noninfectious inflammation remains a diagnostic challenge usually needing a combination of clinical assessment, laboratory investigations, and imaging studies to increase diagnostic accuracy.

  10. Diabetic foot infections: current concept review

    OpenAIRE

    Wukich, Dane K.; Hobizal, Kimberlee B.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to provide a current concept review on the diagnosis and management of diabetic foot infections which are among the most serious and frequent complications encountered in patients with diabetes mellitus. A literature review on diabetic foot infections with emphasis on pathophysiology, identifiable risk factors, evaluation including physical examination, laboratory values, treatment strategies and assessing the severity of infection has been performed in detai...

  11. Subungual exostosis of the foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Palma, L; Gigante, A; Specchia, N

    1996-12-01

    Eleven subungual exostoses of the foot (10 on the hallux, 1 on the third toe) were studied. The initial symptom was subungual pain. When a subungual mass of fibrous tissue appeared, the nail was pushed up and in one case the mass became infected. X-rays exhibited a bone mass protruding from the terminal phalanx on the dorsomedial aspect of the toe in all cases. All patients underwent surgical excision of the lesions with partial onychectomy. Three layers were identified in five cases: a cap of fibrous tissue, a middle zone of hyaline cartilage with enchondral ossification, and a deep zone of cancellous bone. In three other cases, the histological pattern was pleomorphic and poorly characterized. The study shows that most subungual bone masses exhibited the pathological features of conventional osteochondromas. Nonetheless, a small number of lesions were pleomorphic and differed from osteochondromas, with abundant fibrous tissue merging irregularly into scattered islets of cartilage that was not organized in columns. Radical excision of the mass achieved complete relief of symptoms and recovery without recurrences in all cases. PMID:8973899

  12. Hand, foot and mouth disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika Muppa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD is an acute viral illness with a distinct clinical presentation of oral and characteristic distal extremity lesions. Knowledge of this is important for the dentists as the oral lesions are the first clinical signs and sometimes may be the only sign because the condition occasionally may regress even before the lesions appear on the extremities. This case describes a 5-year-old boy in whom low-grade fever of 38.7°C and oral lesions were the initial manifestations. Proper diagnosis was established later based on the typical location of the initial intraoral ulcers on the soft palate followed by cutaneous lesions on the hands and feet with vesicle formation surrounded by an erythematous halo. The recognition of HFMD is important for both pediatricians and pedodontists as oral manifestations are the first signs and may mimic many other conditions like acute herpetic gingivostomstomatitis, apthous stomatitis, chickenpox, erythema multiformae and misdiagnosis may involve an inappropriate prescription of medication.

  13. The management of the infected diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaggi, Carlo; Sganzaroli, Adriana; Galenda, Paolo; Bassetti, Matteo; Ferraresi, Roberto; Gabrielli, Livio

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic disease with a worldwide increasing trend. Foot complications, closely related to neuropathy and obstructive peripheral vascular disease, are responsible for more than 1 million of leg amputations every year. Foot infection can dramatically increase the risk of amputation. Although many ulcer classification systems have been proposed to stratify the severity of the infectious process, the definition of a specific therapeutic approach still remains an unsolved problem. A Diabetic Foot Triage and an Integrated Surgical Protocol are proposed to identify a diagnostic flowchart and a step-by-step surgical protocol that can be applied in the treatment of diabetic foot infection. Considering the rapid climbing of multidrug resistant strains it is very important to rationalize the use of antibiotics utilizing them only for the treatment of true infected ulcers. PAD is widely considered the most important factor conditioning the outcome of a diabetic foot ulcer. Currently no randomized control trials are reported in the international literature directly comparing open versus endovascular revascularisation in diabetic patients with CLI. Insufficient data are available to demonstrate whether open bypass surgery or endovascular interventions are more effective in these patients. A decisional flow chart in choosing the best revascularization strategy in diabetic patients with CLI is proposed. Goals and technical aspects of emergency and elective surgical procedures in diabetic foot are analysed to evaluate critical aspects and to suggest proper surgical choices. PMID:22934545

  14. The 'ABC' of examining foot radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearse, Eyiyemi O.; Klass, Benjamin; Bendall, Stephen P.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We report a simple systematic method of assessing foot radiographs that improves diagnostic accuracy and can reduce the incidence of inappropriate management of serious forefoot and midfoot injuries, particularly the Lisfranc-type injury. STUDY GROUP AND METHODS: Five recently appointed senior house officers (SHOs), with no casualty or Orthopaedic experience prior to their appointment, were shown a set of 10 foot radiographs and told the history and examination findings recorded in the casualty notes of each patient within 6 weeks of taking up their posts. They were informed that the radiographs might or might not demonstrate an abnormality. They were asked to make a diagnosis and decide on a management plan. The test was repeated after they were taught the 'ABC' method of evaluating foot radiographs. RESULTS: Diagnostic accuracy improved after SHOs were taught a systematic method of assessing foot radiographs. The proportion of correct diagnoses increased from 0.64 to 0.78 and the probability of recognising Lisfranc injuries increased from 0 to 0.6. CONCLUSIONS: The use of this simple method of assessing foot radiographs can reduce the incidence of inappropriate management of serious foot injuries by casualty SHOs, in particular the Lisfranc type injury. PMID:16263015

  15. Reconstruction of Traumatic Composite Tissue Defect of Medial Longitudinal Arch With Free Osteocutaneous Fibular Graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Mehmet Bekir; Seker, Ali; Demiralp, Bahtiyar; Sahin, Mustafa; Cift, Hakan Turan; Oltulu, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    A 34-year-old male sustained a crush injury resulting in bone and soft tissue loss along the medial longitudinal arch of his left foot. Specifically, the injury resulted in loss of first metatarsal without injury to the medial cuneiform or proximal phalanx, fracture of the third metatarsal, and a 5-cm × 9-cm soft tissue defect overlying the dorsomedial aspect of the right foot. After debridement and daily wound care, the defect was subsequently reconstructed using a free osteocutaneous fibular graft. Approximately 6 months after reconstructive surgery, the patient returned to his job without pain, and his pedogram showed almost equal weightbearing distribution on both feet. PMID:25459091

  16. Efeitos do uso de órteses na Doença de Charcot-Marie-Tooth: atualização da literatura Orthoses effects in Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease: update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouse Barbosa Pereira

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A Doença de Charcot-Marie-Tooth (DCMT é a neuropatia periférica hereditária mais comum em seres humanos, apresentando incidência de 1:2.500 pessoas. A fraqueza distal crural na DCMT provoca inúmeras alterações na marcha, como, por exemplo, na velocidade, no comprimento, na largura e cadência dos passos. Vários recursos em reabilitação têm sido propostos para gerenciar os problemas de deambulação, dentre eles, destaca-se a utilização de órteses. O objetivo deste estudo é apresentar e discutir os resultados de estudos sobre os efeitos da utilização de órteses nos padrões de marcha na DCMT. Neste estudo foi utilizada atualização da literatura através das principais bases de dados nacionais/internacionais (SciELO, LILACS e MEDLINE, publicados entre os anos de 2006-2012. O tratamento da DCMT consiste em fisioterapia e utilização de equipamentos de assistência, visto que ainda não há fármacos ou terapia gênica capaz de atenuar os danos clínicos e funcionais. Tal associação busca maximizar a função e melhorar a qualidade de vida desses pacientes, na tentativa de evitar agravos adicionais relativos à incapacidade física. A partir de atualização de literatura é possível concluir que existe consenso sobre a utilização de órteses nos membros inferiores para promover a estabilização das articulações do tornozelo e um padrão de deambulação mais funcional, evitando sinergias inadequadas de movimento e atenuando o risco de quedas.Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT disease is the most common hereditary peripheral neuropathy in humans, presenting incidence of 1:2.500 people. The distal crural weakness of the CMT causes numerous gait impairment changes, for example, velocity, length, width and cadence of the steps. Several rehabilitation resources have been proposed to manage the walking problems, among them, the use of orthoses is highlighted. The objective of this study was to present and discuss the results of

  17. Fisiopatología celular del déficit de GDAP1, relacionado con la enfermedad de Charcot-Marie-Tooth

    OpenAIRE

    Pla Martín, David

    2012-01-01

    La enfermedad de Charcot-Marie-Tooth es uno de los trastornos neurológicos hereditarios más comunes que afecta aproximadamente a uno de casa 2.500 – 5.000 habitantes. La enfermedad CMT se clasifica en neuropatías desmielinizantes (CMT1) y neuropatías axonales (CMT2). Para ambas entidades se han descrito diversos patrones de herencia. Actualmente se conocen más de 40 genes implicados en la enfermedad siendo GDAP1 uno de los más variables en cuanto al fenotipo. Mutaciones en el gen GDAP1 se han...

  18. Conduction block and tonic pupils in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease caused by a myelin protein zero p.Ile112Thr mutation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Sinéad M

    2011-03-01

    We report a patient with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) due to the p.Ile112Thr mutation in myelin protein zero (MPZ) who presented with a patchy neuropathy with conduction block and tonic pupils. Conduction block is unusual in inherited neuropathies, while pupil abnormalities are recognised to occur in CMT especially due to MPZ mutations. This case highlights that patchy demyelinating neuropathy with conduction block may occur in p.Ile112Thr MPZ mutations. Involvement of the pupils, as in this case, may be a pointer towards a genetic rather than inflammatory cause of neuropathy.

  19. The forgotten foot - an assessment of foot and ankle radiograph pathology in final year medical students.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Groarke, P J

    2014-04-27

    It has been shown that doctors in Emergency Departments (EDs) have inconsistent knowledge of musculoskeletal anatomy. This is most likely due to a deficiency in focused musculoskeletal modules at undergraduate level in medical school. The aims of this study were to evaluate the knowledge of final year medical students on foot anatomy and common foot and ankle pathology as seen on radiographs.

  20. Foot lengthening and shortening during gait: a parameter to investigate foot function?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolwijk, N.M.; Koenraadt, K.L.M.; Louwerens, J.W.; Grim, D.; Duysens, J.E.J.; Keijsers, N.L.W.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Based on the windlass mechanism theory of Hicks, the medial longitudinal arch (MLA) flattens during weight bearing. Simultaneously, foot lengthening is expected. However, changes in foot length during gait and the influence of walking speed has not been investigated yet. METHODS: The f

  1. Long distance running and acute effects on plantar foot sensitivity and plantar foot loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfuth, Martin; Rosenbaum, Dieter

    2011-09-26

    The plantar surface of the foot senses local pressures during stance and locomotion. These foot loading characteristics may be affected by long distance running. Little is known about the physiological effects of sports-related loading on plantar sensitivity and their relationship with plantar foot loading. The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute effects of long distance running on plantar sensitivity to touch and their relationship with foot loading characteristics. It was hypothesized that plantar sensation would decrease after long distance running and may be related to foot loading characteristics. In 15 middle-aged runners, sensory detection thresholds to light touch and plantar pressures were measured before and after a 10 km run. After the run, no significant changes in sensory perception thresholds were observed so that correlations between foot sensitivity and foot loading could not be calculated. A significant decrease of force-time integrals and maximum forces was demonstrated in the whole foot (-6.2%, p=0.003; -3.9%, p=0.001) and the heel (-10.5%, p=0.003; -8.5%, p=0.002). Furthermore, maximum force was significantly reduced in the lateral midfoot (-6.4%, p=0.002). In conclusion, a sub-maximal 10 km running exercise appears to have no significant acute effects on plantar sensitivity, plantar pressure distribution and peak forces. PMID:21871535

  2. Nineteen-Foot Diameter Explosively Driven Blast Simulator; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the 19-foot diameter blast tunnel at Sandia National Laboratories. The blast tunnel configuration consists of a 6 foot diameter by 200 foot long shock tube, a 6 foot diameter to 19 foot diameter conical expansion section that is 40 feet long, and a 19 foot diameter test section that is 65 feet long. Therefore, the total blast tunnel length is 305 feet. The development of this 19-foot diameter blast tunnel is presented. The small scale research test results using 4 inch by 8 inch diameter and 2 foot by 6 foot diameter shock tube facilities are included. Analytically predicted parameters are compared to experimentally measured blast tunnel parameters in this report. The blast tunnel parameters include distance, time, static, overpressure, stagnation pressure, dynamic pressure, reflected pressure, shock Mach number, flow Mach number, shock velocity, flow velocity, impulse, flow duration, etc. Shadowgraphs of the shock wave are included for the three different size blast tunnels

  3. Enfermedad de Charcot Marie Tooth (CMT4A por mutacion en el gen GDAP1: reporte de una familia colombiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Milena Martin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Antecedentes:Las mutaciones del gen GDAP1 son causantes de la enfermedad de Charcot Marie Tooth tanto autosómica dominante como recesiva, y se han reportado más de 40 mutaciones distintas. La mutación recesiva Q163X ha sido descrita en pacientes de ascendencia española y se ha demostrado una mutación fundadora originaria de España en pacientes de origen suramericano. Describimos las características físicas e histológicas y el impacto molecular de la mutación Q163X en una familia colombiana.Objetivo:Se describe el impacto de la mutación Q163X en las características físicas, histológicas y moleculares en una familia colombiana.Métodos:Se describe dos pacientes de sexo femenino, hijas de padres consanguíneos, quienes presentaron inicio de síntomas en los dos primeros años de vida, mostrando deterioro funcional severo, sin evidencia de dismorfía, disfonía o parálisis diafragmática. Los estudios de electrofisiología mostraron una neuropatía sensitiva y motora con patrón axonal. Se solicitó la secuenciación del gen GDAP1, y el estudio identificó una mutación homocigota puntual (c. 487 C>T en el exón 4, causando un codón de parada prematuro (p. Q163X. Este resultado confirma el diagnóstico de Enfermedad de Charcot Marie Tooth, tipo 4A (recesiva, tipo axonal.Resultados:Las pacientes fueron remitidas al servicio de Fisiatría para evaluación de métodos de asistencia para deambulación. Ellas reciben seguimiento por el servicio de Neumología, quienes vigilan la función pulmonar y el desarrollo de parálisis diafragmática. Se brindó asesoramiento genético. La genealogía del paciente, las características fenotípicas y los hallazgos en los estudios electrofisiológicos son herramientas valiosas en el enfoque clínico del paciente con CMT, de forma que se pueda plantear una posible mutación causal. Se debe considerar la presencia de mutaciones en el gen GDAP1 en pacientes de origen suramericano, en especial la

  4. Efficacy of focal mechanic vibration treatment on balance in Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A disease: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazzaglia, Costanza; Camerota, F; Germanotta, M; Di Sipio, E; Celletti, C; Padua, L

    2016-07-01

    Patients affected by Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease experience an impaired balance. Although the causes of the postural instability are not fully understood, somatosensory system seems to play a key role. Mechanical vibration seems to act on the somatosensory system and to improve its function. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of focal mechanical vibration (fMV) on the balance of CMT 1A patients. We enrolled 14 genetically confirmed CMT 1A patients (8 female and 6 male, mean age 492 years, range 32-74, mean duration of disease: 13 years, range 1-30). Patients underwent a 3-day fMV treatment on quadriceps and triceps surae and were evaluated before the treatment as well as 1 week and 1 month after the end of the treatment. The primary outcome measure was the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and the secondary were the Dynamic Gait Index (DGI), the 6 Min Walking Test (6MWT), the muscular strength of lower limbs, the Quality of Life (QoL) questionnaire and the stabilometric variables. The statistical analysis showed a significant modification of the BBS due to the effect of treatment (p CMT 1A patients determined an improvement of balance as detected by the BBS. The concurrent improvement of stabilometric variables in the eyes closed condition only suggests that fMV acts mostly on somatosensory afferences. Further studies are needed to confirm these data on a larger sample of CMT patients. PMID:27177999

  5. [An autopsy case of neuronal type Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (HMSN type II) with nerve deafness and psychiatric symptoms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, I; Yoshimura, N; Hanazono, T; Usutani, S; Muramoto, Y; Fukushima, Y

    1992-06-01

    The clinical and pathological findings of a 41-year-old male patient with atypical Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease were reported. There were 3 cases of subarachnoid haemorrhage, 2 nerve deafness and 2 hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) in his family. He had suffered from progressive nerve deafness since 5 years old and gait disturbance since 37 years old. He had been admitted to the psychiatric hospital 3 times because of hallucinatory-delusional state and behavior abnormalities. Neurological examinations at 39 years old revealed that he had mental deterioration (IQ 66), nerve deafness, diffuse muscle atrophy, most marked distally, sensory disturbance, areflexia, positive Romberg's sign, orthostatic hypotension, dysphagia and slurred speech. MCV of median nerve was 27.8 m/sec, and SCV was not evoked. EEG revealed nonspecific dysfunction of the brain. He died of ileus-like condition at 41 years old. General autopsy showed haemorrhagic infarction of the jejunum and ileum due to compression of the superior mesenteric artery and vein by an adhesion band of connective tissue formed after previous appendectomy. Neuropathological examinations revealed axonal degeneration and loss of myelinated fibers with schwannosis of anterior and posterior spinal nerve roots as well as peripheral nerves. The posterior roots were more severely affected than the anterior ones. Ganglion cells of the posterior root ganglia showed remarkable degeneration and loss. There was severe degeneration of the posterior columns, especially in the gracilis, of the spinal cord. Nerve cells in the anterior horns and Clarke's columns also displayed conspicuous atrophy or central chromatolysis followed by gliosis. There was slight degeneration of the posterior spinocerebellar tracts.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1389565

  6. Gas gangrene in the diabetic foot: lessons learned from a salvaged limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerden, D; Lipsky, B A; Denecker, N; Nieboer, K; Keymeulen, B

    2014-01-01

    A 55 year old man was seen in the emergency department with an infected right foot and sepsis. Examination of the right foot revealed subcutaneous crepitus from the metatarsal head up to the tarsus; interstitial and intramedullary gas was confirmed on x-rays and computed tomographic scans. During 44 days of hospitalization, the patient was treated with multiple courses of antibiotic therapy, various wound care modalities (including negative wound pressure therapy) and several surgical interventions (debridements, amputations, revascularizations and reconstructive plastic surgery). Although limb salvage was ultimately accomplished, in retrospect many management decisions were suboptimal. A critical reassessment of our approach to this patient allowed us to identify several areas for improvement and this audit provided us an opportunity to learn from managing this difficult case. PMID:24720142

  7. Effect of Custom-Molded Foot Orthoses on Foot Pain and Balance in Children With Symptomatic Flexible Flat Feet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hong-Jae; Lim, Kil-Byung; Yoo, JeeHyun; Yun, Hyun-Ju; Jeong, Tae-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of custom-molded foot orthoses on foot pain and balance in children with symptomatic flexible flat foot 1 month and 3 months after fitting foot orthosis. Method A total of 24 children over 6 years old with flexible flat feet and foot pain for at least 6 months were recruited for this study. Their resting calcaneal stance position and calcaneal pitch angle were measured. Individual custom-molded rigid foot orthoses were prescribed using inverted orthotic technique to control foot overpronation. Pain questionnaire was used to obtain pain sites, degree, and frequency. Balancing ability was determined using computerized posturography. These evaluations were performed prior to custom-molded foot orthoses, 1 month, and 3 months after fitting foot orthoses. Result Of 24 children with symptomatic flexible flat feet recruited for this study, 20 completed the study. Significant (p<0.001) improvements in pain degree and frequency were noted after 1 and 3 months of custom-molded foot orthoses. In addition, significant (p<0.05) improvement in balancing ability was found after 3 months of custom-molded foot orthoses. Conclusion Short-term use of custom-molded foot orthoses significantly improved foot pain and balancing ability in children with symptomatic flexible flat foot. PMID:26798604

  8. A Case of Hot Foot Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutlu Çayırlı

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Hot foot syndrome (HFS is a benign, self-limited disorder, which is apparently caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. The disease is characterized by the acute onset in children with painful plantar nodules which generally does not require antibiotic therapy. Particularly, the mechanically stressed areas of the foot are affected after contact with contaminated water from saunas, swimming pools or hot tubs. HFS is a potentially important public health hazard that may causes outbreaks. In search of literature we detected three published reports to date of outbreaks of pseudomonas hot foot syndrome associated with the use of community whirlpools. Here we present a four-year old girl presented with painful plantar erythematous nodules localized in heels that developed one day after contacting with contaminated water from bath tub. According to data of literature we able to reach, our case is the first HFS case presented in Turkey. (Turk J Dermatol 2012; 6: 111-3

  9. Compartments of the foot: topographic anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faymonville, C; Andermahr, J; Seidel, U; Müller, L P; Skouras, E; Eysel, P; Stein, G

    2012-12-01

    Recent publications have renewed the debate regarding the number of foot compartments. There is also no consensus regarding allocation of individual muscles and communication between compartments. The current study examines the anatomic topography of the foot compartments anew using 32 injections of epoxy-resin and subsequent sheet plastination in 12 cadaveric foot specimens. Six compartments were identified: dorsal, medial, lateral, superficial central, deep forefoot, and deep hindfoot compartments. Communication was evident between the deep hindfoot compartment and the superficial central and deep central forefoot compartments. In the hindfoot, the neurovascular bundles were located in separate tissue sheaths between the central hindfoot compartment and the medial compartment. In the forefoot, the medial and lateral bundles entered the deep central forefoot compartment. The deep central hindfoot compartment housed the quadratus plantae muscle, and after calcaneus fracture could develop an isolated compartment syndrome. PMID:22638720

  10. Electronic artificial hand controlled by reconstructed digit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objecive: To treat the loss of part of the forearm with a multi-dimension-freedom electronic artificial hand,which is controlled by a reconstructed finger transplanted from the second toe to the forearm stump.Methods: The female patient was 19 years old, whose right hand and wrist were crushed into pieces by machine at work and her forearm was amputated at the level of 8 cm proximal to the wrist. The second toe of her left foot was transplanted to reconstruct the digit onto the stump of her forearm. Two months after the transplantation, the patient was transferred to the rehabilitation center for further rehabilitation training, which consisted of: training for adaptation to weight bearing, testing and training of sensibility to weight. testing and training for stability of the hand, and testing and training for the controlling function of the reconstructed digit. Results: The transplanted toe survived well. After rehabilitation the reconstructed digit functioned well. In testing the performance under control mandate, the accuracy rate of the electronic artificial hand was 100%.Conclusions: A 100% accuracy rate of the electronic artificial hand can be achieved by transplantation of the toe onto the stump of the forearm. It provides a useful pathway and an example for improvement of control accuracy of a multiple-freedom electronic artificial hand and reduction of false action.

  11. Metallic Foreign Body in the Foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firat Ozan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: A foreign body injury of the foot is a frequently encountered problem. These foreign bodies can lead to various complications in the affected tissues, and their removal can be difficult and time consuming. Therefore, the removal of a foreign body requires good preoperative preparations. The surgical treatment results of patients with a foreign body, identified as a sewing needle, that had penetrated their foot were evaluated. Material and Method: Thirty-four patients (11 males, 23 females; mean age, 30.2 ± 18.6 years who were surgically treated between 2011 and 2013 were included. Data concerning the affected limb, placement of the needle, imaging techniques, season when the injury occurred, time between medical intervention and injury, anaesthesia type, fluoroscopy of use during surgery and surgical complications were analyzed. Results: A sewing needle had penetrated the right foot of 20 (58.8% patients and the left foot of 14 (41.1% patients. Broken needles were found in the toes of 14 (41.1% patients, in the middle of the foot of 12 (35.2% patients and in the heel area of 8 (23.5% patients. The injuries occurred in summer in 13 (38.2% patients, in winter in seven (20.6% patients, in spring in one (2.9% patient and in autumn in 13 (38.2% patients. Needle penetration had occurred in 28 (82.3% patients at home and 6 (17.6% patients outside of the home environment. The average follow-up time was 8.9 ± 2.8 months. Discussion: Removal of foreign bodies from the foot requires good preoperative preparations. Foreign bodies can lead to various complications in the affected tissues. It is important to perform detailed physical and radiological examinations to obtain good treatment results in these patients.

  12. Chinese Herbal Foot Bath plus Acupoint Massage Beneficial to the Improvement of Grade 0 Diabetic Foot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Xiao-xia; Xu Xu-yuan; Shangguan Bin-bin

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To observe the clinical effect of foot bath with Tao Hong Si Wu Tang plus massage on acupoints at the sole for grade 0 diabetic foot. Methods: One hundred and sixty eligible cases were randomly divided into an observation group and a control group, 80 cases in each group. The two groups were treated with routine basic medications to control blood sugar. The patients in the observation group were given foot bath withTao Hong Si Wu Tangplus massage on acupoints at the sole, once every day. At the same time, the patients were instructed to understand the knowledge of diabetes, accept the education on foot care and to know the self-management for diabetes. The patients in the control group only accepted the education on foot care and studied the self-management for diabetes. The patients in the two groups were followed up once every week by phone. The local examination was intensified for the patients in their clinical visit every month. The therapeutic effects were assessed after three months of continuous treatment. Results: The total effective rate was 92.5% in the observation group, remarkably higher than 65.0% in the control group. The difference in comparison of the general therapeutic effect was statistically significant (P Conclusion: Foot bath withTao Hong Si Wu Tang plus massage on acupoints at the sole was beneficial to the improvement of clinical symptoms of grade 0 diabetic foot.

  13. Foot CT perfusion in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD): A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To prospectively assess the technical feasibility and reproducibility of quantitative foot perfusion multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) in patients with peripheral occlusive artery disease (PAOD) and to evaluate perfusion parameters changes after endovascular treatment. Materials and methods: Institutional review board approval and informed patient consent were obtained. 10 patients older than 65 years (mean 74.1 years, range 66–95 years) with PAOD and who were referred to our department for single-limb endovascular treatment were enrolled prospectively. All patients underwent foot CT perfusion examinations before and within 72 h after endovascular treatment. A 64-row CT lightspeed VCT scanner (GE Medical Systems) was used with acquisition of eight contiguous 5-mm reconstructed sections (60-s acquisition time; 40 mL Iomeprol 400 mgI/mL, @4 mL/s). Data were analyzed by two blinded readers using commercially available software to calculate perfusion parameters. Inter-observer and intra-observer agreement of perfusion CT analysis was assessed using Bland–Altman analyses and intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). Changes in perfusion parameters after endovascular treatment were assessed using Wilcoxon's test. Results: Good inter-observer and intra-observer agreement was obtained in all patients. Good agreement was obtained for perfusion parameters for the untreated foot and in repeated studies. By comparing perfusion parameters in the treated foot, a significantly shorter mean transit time (MTT) was obtained. Conclusions: Foot CT perfusion is a feasible and reproducible technique. A significant decrease of MTT between pre- and post-revascularization suggests improved flow in the below-the-knee arteries

  14. [The infected diabetic foot: diagnosis and management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicodème, Jean-Damien; Paulin, Emilie Nicodème; Zingg, Matthieu; Uçkay, Ilker; Malacarne, Sarah; Suva, Domizio

    2015-06-01

    Foot infections are a frequent and potentially harmful complication of diabetes mellitus. In one skin ulceration out of two, further evolution towards infection occurs and often leads to amputation increasing morbidity and health care costs. Skin disruptions, favored by the sensorimotor neuropathy and vascular disease, constitute the initial factors leading to this complication. To ensure effective care, these cases must be managed by a multidisciplinary team in a specialized center. All caretakers involved with patients suffering from diabetes mellitus must be capable of preventing and recognizing diabetic foot infections, as well as informing the patients about this complication and its management. PMID:26211284

  15. Pathology-designed custom molded foot orthoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbloom, Kevin B

    2011-01-01

    Treating patients with custom foot orthoses for common pathologies is a rewarding experience when the proper steps are taken during foot casting and custom-orthosis prescription writing. This article describes successful methods for orthoses casting and prescription writing for custom-molded orthoses for Achilles tendonitis, pes planus, hallux limitus, plantar fasciitis/heel spurs, lateral ankle instability, metatarsalgia, and pes cavus. In addition, a summary of orthotic laboratory instructions for each pathology-designed custom orthosis is provided, which should be considered by orthotic laboratories. PMID:21276525

  16. [Syndrome of diabetic foot: modern diagnostic methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plekhanov, A N; Markevich, P S

    2014-01-01

    We summarize the literature data on diagnostics of diabetic foot syndrome including clinical examination and special invasive and non-invasive studies of the vascular system. The main methods are ultrasound dopplerography, X-ray contrast angiography, and ultrasound duplex scanning. Special attention is given to instrumental diagnostics of diabetic neuropathies. The golden standard for the evaluation of the function of the peripheral nervous system is electroneuromyography. Methods for the study of diabetic foot complications, such as osteoarthropathy and trophic ulcers, are discussed. PMID:25782303

  17. A control model for zygodactyl bird's foot

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Anna Chiara; Loreti, Paola

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we are interested to the zygodactyly phenomenon in birds, and in particolar in parrots. This arrangement, common in species living on trees, is a distribution of the foot with two toes facing forward and two back. We give a model for the foot, and thanks to the methods of iterated function system we are able to describe the reachability set. Moreover we give a necessary and sufficient condition for the grasping problem. Finally we introduce a hybrid dynamical system modeling owl...

  18. Foot Pedals for Spacecraft Manual Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Stanley G.; Morin, Lee M.; McCabe, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Fifty years ago, NASA decided that the cockpit controls in spacecraft should be like the ones in airplanes. But controls based on the stick and rudder may not be best way to manually control a vehicle in space. A different method is based on submersible vehicles controlled with foot pedals. A new pilot can learn the sub's control scheme in minutes and drive it hands-free. We are building a pair of foot pedals for spacecraft control, and will test them in a spacecraft flight simulator.

  19. Foot and Ankle Injuries in Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenforde, Adam S; Yin, Amy; Hunt, Kenneth J

    2016-02-01

    Foot and ankle injuries account for nearly one-third of running injuries. Achilles tendinopathy, plantar fasciopathy, and ankle sprains are 3 of the most common types of injuries sustained during training. Other common injuries include other tendinopathies of the foot and ankle, bone stress injuries, nerve conditions including neuromas, and joint disease including osteoarthritis. This review provides an evidence-based framework for the evaluation and optimal management of these conditions to ensure safe return to running participation and reduce risk for future injury. PMID:26616180

  20. Distal amputations for the diabetic foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Nather

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Minor amputations in diabetic patients with foot complications have been well studied in the literature but controversy still remains as to what constitutes successful or non-successful limb salvage. In addition, there is a lack of consensus on the definition of a minor or distal amputation and a major or proximal amputation for the diabetic population. In this article, the authors review the existing literature to evaluate the efficacy of minor amputations in this selected group of patients in terms of diabetic limb salvage and also propose several definitions regarding diabetic foot amputations.

  1. Primary infragenicular angioplasty for diabetic neuroischemic foot ulcers following the angiosome distribution: a new paradigm for the vascular interventionist?

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandrescu V; Hubermont G

    2011-01-01

    Vlad Alexandrescu1, Gerard Hubermont21Department of Vascular Surgery, Princess Paola Hospital, Marche- en-Famenne, Belgium; 2Department of Diabetology, Princess Paola Hospital, Marche-en-Famenne and Sainte-Thérèse Hospital, Bastogne, BelgiumAbstract: The angiosome principle was first described by Jan Taylor in 1987 in the plastic reconstructive surgery field, providing useful information on the vascular anatomy of the human body. Specifically concerning foot and ankle pa...

  2. Three-Dimensional Rotational Angiography of the Foot in Critical Limb Ischemia: A New Dimension in Revascularization Strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. To evaluate the additional value of three-dimensional rotational angiography (3DRA) of the foot compared with digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI). Technique. For 3DRA, the C-arm was placed in the propeller position with the foot in an isocentric position. The patient’s unaffected foot was positioned in a footrest outside the field of view. For correct timing of 3DRA, the delay from contrast injection in the popliteal artery at the level of knee joint to complete pedal arterial enhancement was assessed using DSA. With this delay, 3DRA was started after injection of 15 ml contrast. Imaging of the 3DRA could directly be reconstructed and visualized.Materials and MethodsPatients undergoing 3DRA of the foot were prospectively registered. DSA and 3DRA images were scored separately for arterial patency and presence of collaterals. Treatment strategies were proposed based on DSA with and without the availability of 3DRA. Results. Eleven patients underwent 3DRA of the foot. One 3DRA was not included because the acquisition was focused on the heel instead of the entire foot. Diagnostic quality of 3DRA was good in all ten patients. 3DRA compared with DSA showed additional patent arteries in six patients, patent plantar arch in three patients, and collaterals between the pedal arteries in five patients. Additional information from 3DRA resulted in a change of treatment strategy in six patients. Conclusion, 3DRA of the foot contains valuable additional real-time information to better guide peripheral vascular interventions in patients with CLI and nonhealing tissue lesions.

  3. [The gold standard in diabetic foot treatment: total contact cast].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Platonoff, Adriana; Florida Mejía-Mendoza, Melissa Desireé; Ibáñez-Doria, Mónica; Contreras-Ruiz, José

    2014-01-01

    In patients with diabetes, foot complications remain one of the main health issues, with ulcers representing one of the most common. These ulcerations originate from repetitive trauma on a foot with neuropathy. Inadequate care of the diabetic foot may lead to one of the gravest complications of the diabetic foot: amputation. The key to the treatment of the diabetic foot is the control of comorbidities (glucose levels and vascular disease), debridement, exudate control with the available modern dressings, treatment of infection, and offloading the affected foot. A common error in this basic treatment is the method used for offloading, leading to delayed healing as a result, and maybe even amputation. For this purpose we propose the total contact cast considered the "gold standard" in diabetic foot offloading. The objective of the present review is to present the existing evidence in the medical literature on the effectiveness of its use for healing diabetic foot ulcers and hence preventing amputations. PMID:24481432

  4. Radionuclide imaging in diagnosis and therapy of the diabetic foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early and accurate diagnosis of angiopathy or infection of the diabetic foot is the key to the successful management. Radionuclide imaging is very useful in detecting diabetic microangiopathy, assessing the prognosis of foot ulcers, and diagnosing the osteomyelitis

  5. Parents: Avoid Kids Foot Problems with the Right Shoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bookmark Parents: Avoid kids' foot problems with the right shoes Before you head to the store to ... College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights Reserved. | Privacy Statement | Disclaimer | Terms and Conditions | Site ...

  6. Parents: Avoid Kids Foot Problems with the Right Shoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print | Share Avoid Kids Foot Problems with the Right Shoes Before you head to the store to ... College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights Reserved. Privacy Statement | Disclaimer | Terms and Conditions | Site ...

  7. Recognizing the radiographic features of some common bovine foot problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiographs of an injured or infected bovine foot can be tricky to interpret - the anatomy is complex, and the signs may be subtle. This guide leads you through the classic radiographic features of several common foot conditions

  8. Foot preferences during resting in wildfowl and waders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randler, Christoph

    2007-03-01

    Footedness in birds has been reported, e.g., in parrots and chickens, but the direction of footedness remained unclear. Is a bird left-footed because it uses its left foot for holding and handling food, or is it right-footed because it uses the right foot for stabilisation and balancing while perching? In 2004 and 2006 I examined footedness in wildfowl and waders while the birds were performing a single task: roosting on the ground on one foot. Avocet (Recurvirostra avosetta), northern shoveller (Anas clypeata), oystercatcher (Haematopus ostralegus), and Eurasian curlew (Numenius arquata) were right-footed. Another 21 species did not show any significant foot preferences. This study provides some evidence that asymmetries in preferential foot use in birds may be triggered by a preference during postural control. PMID:17365634

  9. Comorbidities associated with Egyptian diabetic foot disease subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary N. Rizk

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion Special attention should be paid toward the identification of patients who are at risk of foot ulceration to help prevent foot problems. Comorbid conditions must also be identified early and managed aggressively.

  10. Back to School Foot Pain (Flip-Flops)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... foot and ankle surgeons see an increase in ankle injuries among young athletes. Football, soccer and basketball are ... to School Soccer Season Prime time for foot, ankle injuries. Parents and coaches should think twice before coaxing ...

  11. OPTIMUM PAD FOOTING DESIGN BY USING GENETIC ALGORITHM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paki TURGUT

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a Genetic Algorithm (GA has been developed in order to find the optimum geometrical sizes in pad footing design. In the solutions of pad footing sizes found by manually or/and software, there is a required assumption of pad footing sizes held by an experienced designer at the beginning. After the assumption of the initial pad footing sizes, the exact sizes have been determined by a time consuming trial and error process. In the developed GA software without the requirement in the assumption of initial pad footing sizes, the most suitable pad footing sizes has been determined within a short period by minimizing the pad footing volume. In contrast to classical methods, developed GA has simultaneously and relationally calculated the pad footing base sizes and its height.

  12. Non-sagittal plane foot movement during late swing

    OpenAIRE

    VAN ZWIETEN, Koos Jaap; Biesmans, Steven; REYSKENS, Ann; ROBEYNS, Inge; VANDERSTEEN, Marjan; Schmidt, Klaus; LIPPENS, Peter; NARAIN, Faridi; MAHABIER, Roberto; Lamur, K. S.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Foot dorsiflexor m.tibialis anterior causes foot inversion too. Foot inversion turns the footsole inwards; eversion turns it outwards. Backgrounds: Quadrupedalism in primates and precursors is characterized by moving forward in a parasagittal plane, while the forefoot keeps clinging to the substratum. This imposes external rotation on the lower leg, tranferred to foot inversion by cardan-like functions of the ankle-joint. Such rotational movements include calcaneo-cuboid pivot i...

  13. Foot Health and Mobility in People With Intellectual Disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Courtenay, K.; Murray, A

    2015-01-01

    Foot disorders affect people with intellectual disability and have an impact on their ability to mobilize; their prevalence appears to be higher than in the general population. Foot problems are recognized as part of certain syndromes associated with intellectual disabilities. Bony deformities of the foot, general health disorders, musculoskeletal disorders, and inappropriate footwear contribute to the development and aggravation of foot disorders. People with intellectual disability generall...

  14. Cerebral Infarction Presenting with Unilateral Isolated Foot Drop

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ki-Wan; Park, Jung-Soo; Koh, Eun-Jeong; Lee, Jong-Myong

    2014-01-01

    Weakness of the dorsiflexor muscles of the ankle or toe, referred to as foot drop, is a relatively common presentation. In most cases, foot drop is caused by a lower motor neuron disease such as peroneal peripheral neuropathy, L4-5 radiculopathic sciatic neuropathy, or polyneuropathy. Although upper motor neuron lesions can present as foot drop, the incidence is very rare. Here, we report an extremely rare case in which foot drop was the only presenting symptom of cerebral infarction.

  15. Trisomy 18 syndrome with cleft foot.

    OpenAIRE

    Castle, D; Bernstein, R.

    1988-01-01

    Ectrodactyly of the feet has been reported only twice in association with trisomy 18 syndrome. A severe form of this anomaly, the first with published illustrative x rays, is described in a male infant with trisomy 18 syndrome. It is suggested that this may represent an extreme expression of the foot anomalies more commonly associated with this syndrome.

  16. Hand Foot Skin Reaction Associated with Sunitinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bengü Çevirgen Cemil

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Sunitinib is a multi-targeted kinase inhibitor showing benefits in patients with renal cell carcinoma, and gastrointestinal stromal tumor. Sunitinib may cause various cutaneous toxicities. The most characteristic and common cutaneous toxicity is hand-foot skin reaction. Lesions are characterized by yellow painful callus like hyperkeratosis surrounded by a rim of erythema, they are well-demarcated and localized especially over pressure areas. A 54-year-old male patient with a history of renal cell carcinoma developed painful eruption twenty days after oral sunitinib had been started on 50 mg daily. Dermatological examination showed multiple, yellow, hyperkeratotic plaques with erythematous halos on palms, and soles. The patient was diagnosed as hand-foot skin reaction due to sunitinib due to descriptive clinical findings. Hand-foot skin reaction can greatly affect patients’ quality of life and treatment dosages. Early diagnosis and timely treatment of hand-foot skin reaction will be vital to ensure maximum potential of these drugs.

  17. 49 CFR 214.115 - Foot protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from American National Standards Institute, 25 West... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Foot protection. 214.115 Section 214.115..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD WORKPLACE SAFETY Bridge Worker Safety Standards § 214.115...

  18. Impedance of Surface Footings on Layered Ground

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars; Clausen, Johan Christian

    2005-01-01

    discussed. Based on the Green's function for a stratified half-space, the impedance of a surface footing with arbitrary shape is computed. A wind turbine foundation is analysed in the frequency range 0 to 3 Hz. Analyses show that soil stratification may lead to a significant changes in the impedance related...

  19. Ron Rash: One Foot in Eden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Thomas Ærvold

    2010-01-01

    An analysis of Ron Rash's novel One Foot in Eden, focusing on his attachment to place and his depiction of the internal conflicts between farmers and townspeople in a small Appalachian community. Rash depicts the contemporary Southerner’s struggle to maintain his or her roots in a time of rapid...

  20. Impedance of Surface Footings on Layered Ground

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars; Clausen, Johan

    2007-01-01

    discussed. Based on the Green's function for a stratified half-space, the impedance of a surface footing with arbitrary shape is computed. A wind turbine foundation is analysed in the frequency range 0-3 Hz. Analyses show that soil stratification may lead to significant changes in the impedance related to...

  1. Patient education for preventing diabetic foot ulceration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorresteijn, J.A.; Kriegsman, D.M.; Assendelft, W.J.; Valk, G.D.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ulceration of the feet, which can result in loss of limbs and even death, is one of the major health problems for people with diabetes mellitus. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of patient education on the prevention of foot ulcers in patients with diabetes mellitus. SEARCH METHODS: We

  2. ATA gas propagation - 1 foot tank experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first gas propagation experiment on ATA is planned to be conducted in a 1-foot diameter tank of up to 10 m length. The primary objectives are to measure beam parameters at injection to determine whether the desired beam conditioning is achieved, and to observe how such conditioned beams propagate in air and neon

  3. Nonlinear MHD Waves in a Prominence Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, L.; Knizhnik, K.; Kucera, T.; Schmieder, B.

    2015-11-01

    We study nonlinear waves in a prominence foot using a 2.5D MHD model motivated by recent high-resolution observations with Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope in Ca ii emission of a prominence on 2012 October 10 showing highly dynamic small-scale motions in the prominence material. Observations of Hα intensities and of Doppler shifts show similar propagating fluctuations. However, the optically thick nature of the emission lines inhibits a unique quantitative interpretation in terms of density. Nevertheless, we find evidence of nonlinear wave activity in the prominence foot by examining the relative magnitude of the fluctuation intensity (δI/I ˜ δn/n). The waves are evident as significant density fluctuations that vary with height and apparently travel upward from the chromosphere into the prominence material with quasi-periodic fluctuations with a typical period in the range of 5-11 minutes and wavelengths qualitative agreement with the propagation speed of the detected waves. The 2.5D MHD numerical model is constrained with the typical parameters of the prominence waves seen in observations. Our numerical results reproduce the nonlinear fast magnetosonic waves and provide strong support for the presence of these waves in the prominence foot. We also explore gravitational MHD oscillations of the heavy prominence foot material supported by dipped magnetic field structure.

  4. Complex interventions for preventing diabetic foot ulceration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogeveen, Ruben C; Dorresteijn, Johannes A N; Kriegsman, Didi M W; Valk, Gerlof D.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ulceration of the feet, which can lead to the amputation of feet and legs, is a major problem for people with diabetes mellitus, and can cause substantial economic burden. Single preventive strategies have not been shown to reduce the incidence of foot ulceration to a significant extent.

  5. Pixel classification for automated diabetic foot diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloeze, C.; Klein, A.; Hazenberg, S.; Heijden, van der F.; Baal, van J.G.; Bus, S.A.

    2009-01-01

    Worldwide, more than 180 million people suffer from diabetes mellitus. Approximately 50% of these patients will develop complications to their feet. Neuropathy, combined with poor blood supply and biomechanical changes results in a high risk for foot ulcers, which is a key problem in the diabetic fo

  6. The foot and ankle of Australopithecus sediba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipfel, Bernhard; DeSilva, Jeremy M; Kidd, Robert S; Carlson, Kristian J; Churchill, Steven E; Berger, Lee R

    2011-09-01

    A well-preserved and articulated partial foot and ankle of Australopithecus sediba, including an associated complete adult distal tibia, talus, and calcaneus, have been discovered at the Malapa site, South Africa, and reported in direct association with the female paratype Malapa Hominin 2. These fossils reveal a mosaic of primitive and derived features that are distinct from those seen in other hominins. The ankle (talocrural) joint is mostly humanlike in form and inferred function, and there is some evidence for a humanlike arch and Achilles tendon. However, Au. sediba is apelike in possessing a more gracile calcaneal body and a more robust medial malleolus than expected. These observations suggest, if present models of foot function are correct, that Au. sediba may have practiced a unique form of bipedalism and some degree of arboreality. Given the combination of features in the Au. sediba foot, as well as comparisons between Au. sediba and older hominins, homoplasy is implied in the acquisition of bipedal adaptations in the hominin foot. PMID:21903807

  7. On-the-Job Foot Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of protective footwear or complain about it. Safety footwear can be comfort- able, flexible, stylish, and still provide protection from injury. The foot is a most valuable part of your body subjected to injury in industry. Because of the many potential work hazards, it ...

  8. Animal health: foot-and-mouth disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is one of the most contagious viral diseases that can affect cloven-hoofed livestock and wild animals. Outbreaks of FMD have caused devastating economic losses and the slaughter of millions of animals in many regions of the world affecting the food chain and global devel...

  9. Foot-and-mouth disease virus vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD) is a highly infectious and economically devastating disease of livestock. Although vaccines, available since the early 1900s, have been instrumental in eradicating FMD from parts of the world, the disease still affects millions of animals around the globe and remains the...

  10. 38 CFR 4.57 - Static foot deformities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Static foot deformities... FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.57 Static foot deformities... anatomical changes, as compared to normal, in the relationship of the foot and leg, particularly to...

  11. Clinical and Bacteriological Survey of Diabetic Foot Infections in Lisbon

    OpenAIRE

    Mendes, JJ; Marques-Costa, A; Vilela, C.; Neves, J.; Candeias, N; Cavaco-Silva, P.; Melo-Cristino, J.

    2012-01-01

    AIMS: An epidemiological survey of diabetic foot infections (DFIs) in Lisbon, stratifying the bacterial profile based on patient demographical data, diabetic foot characteristics (PEDIS classification), ulcer duration and antibiotic therapy. METHODS: A transversal observational multicenter study, with clinical data collection using a structured questionnaire and microbiological products (aspirates, biopsies or swabs collected using the Levine method) of clinically infected foot ulcers of ...

  12. Imaging diagnostics of the foot; Bildgebende Diagnostik des Fusses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szeimies, Ulrike; Staebler, Axel [Radiologie in Muenchen-Harlaching, Muenchen (Germany); Walther, Markus (eds.) [Schoen-Klinik Muenchen-Harlaching, Muenchen (Germany). Zentrum fuer Fuss- und Sprunggelenkchirurgie

    2012-11-01

    The book on imaging diagnostics of the foot contains the following chapters: (1) Imaging techniques. (2) Clinical diagnostics. (3) Ankle joint and hind foot. (4) Metatarsus. (5) Forefoot. (6) Pathology of plantar soft tissue. (7) Nervous system diseases. (8) Diseases without specific anatomic localization. (9) System diseases including the foot. (10) Tumor like lesions. (11) Normative variants.

  13. The relation between foot arch stability, and mechanical and physiological properties of the foot

    OpenAIRE

    Sakalauskaitė, Raminta

    2013-01-01

    The foot keeps body balance and stability during walking, running and performing various physical activities. It has been determined that mechanical properties of musculoskeletal system influence motion control, body balance maintenance (Richardson et al., 2005; Biewener, Daley, 2007; Nishikawa, 2007). However, it is yet unclear whether there is a relation between body stability and foot arch stability. The relation is yet unknown between the mechanical and physiological properties of the foo...

  14. Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reconstruction with or without radiotherapy. Current Opinion in Obstetrics and Gynecology 2011;23(1):44–50. [PubMed Abstract] Barry M, Kell MR. Radiotherapy and breast reconstruction: a meta-analysis. Breast ...

  15. Tuberculosis of the foot: An osteolytic variety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandeep S Dhillon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Foot involvement in osteoarticular tuberculosis is uncommon and isolated bony involvement of foot bones with an osteolytic defect is even more rare; diagnostic and therapeutic delays can occur, worsening the prognosis. We present a retrospective series of osteolytic variety of foot tuberculosis. Materials and Methods: We present 24 osteolytic variety of foot tuberculosis (Eleven calcaneus, four cuboid, two cunieforms, one talus, three metatarsals, three phalanges out of 92 foot TB cases collected over last 20 years. There were 16 adults and eight children. Tissue diagnosis was established in 23 of 24 cases based on PCR AFB staining, culture, and histopathology. Surgical intervention was reserved for patients with either a juxtaarticular focus threatening to involve a joint or an impending collapse of a midfoot bone with cystic destruction. Results: Fifteen cases had an osteolytic lesion on the radiographs resembling a space-occupying lesion, five had patchy osteolysis, while four showed coke like sequestra; one patient had a lesion in two bones. Antitubercular chemotherapy after biopsy was sufficient to heal the lesion in 19 cases, while in five cases surgical debridement needed to be done. The lesions healed eventually. At an average followup of 8.3 years, (range 2-15 years there were no recurrences and all patients were free from pain, with no restriction of movements. Six patients complained of occasional pain during walking on uneven ground. Conclusion: When tuberculous pathology is limited to the bone, the prognosis is better than in articular disease, as there is less deformity, and hence, less residual pain and disability.

  16. Normative values for the Foot Posture Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redmond Anthony C

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Foot Posture Index (FPI is a validated method for quantifying standing foot posture, and is being used in a variety of clinical settings. There have however, been no normative data available to date for comparison and reference. This study aimed to establish normative FPI reference values. Methods Studies reporting FPI data were identified by searching online databases. Nine authors contributed anonymised versions of their original datasets comprising 1648 individual observations. The datasets included information relating to centre, age, gender, pathology (if relevant, FPI scores and body mass index (BMI where available. FPI total scores were transformed to interval logit scores as per the Rasch model and normal ranges were defined. Comparisons between groups employed t-tests or ANOVA models as appropriate and data were explored descriptively and graphically. Results The main analysis based on a normal healthy population (n = 619 confirmed that a slightly pronated foot posture is the normal position at rest (mean back transformed FPI raw score = +4. A 'U' shaped relationship existed for age, with minors and older adults exhibiting significantly higher FPI scores than the general adult population (F = 51.07, p t = -1.44, p = 0.149. No relationship was found between the FPI and BMI. Systematic differences from the adult normals were confirmed in patients with neurogenic and idiopathic cavus (F = 216.981, p Conclusion A set of population norms for children, adults and older people have been derived from a large sample. Foot posture is related to age and the presence of pathology, but not influenced by gender or BMI. The normative values identified may assist in classifying foot type for the purpose of research and clinical decision making.

  17. Associated risk factors and management of chronic diabetic foot ulcers exceeding 6 months’ duration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Gubara Musa

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The management of chronic diabetic foot ulcers (DFU poses a great challenge to the treating physician and surgeon. The aim of this study was to identify the risk factors, clinical presentation, and outcomes associated with chronic DFU > 6 months’ duration. Methods: This prospective study was performed in Jabir Abu Eliz Diabetic Centre (JADC, Khartoum, Sudan. A total of 108 patients who had DFU for >6 months were included. Recorded data included patient's demographics, DFU presentation, associated comorbidities, and outcomes. DFU description included size, depth, protective sensation, perfusion, and presence of infection. Comorbidities assessed included eye impairment, renal and heart disease. All patients received necessary local wound care with sharp debridement of any concomitant necrotic and infected tissues and off-loading with appropriate shoe gear and therapeutic devices. Results: The mean age of the studied patients was 56+SD 9 years with a male to female ratio of 3:3.3. The mean duration of DFU was 18±SD 17 months (ranging from 6 to 84 months. Ulcer healing was significantly associated with off-loading, mainly the use of total contact cast (TCC (p=0.013. Non-healing ulcerations were significantly associated with longer duration of the chronic DFU > 12 months (p=0.002, smoking (p=0.000, poor glycemic control as evidenced by an elevated HbA1c (>7%, large size (mean SD 8+4 cm, increased depth (p<0.001, presence of skin callus (p<0.000, impaired limb perfusion (p=0.001, impaired protective sensation as measured by 10 g monofilament (p=0.002, neuroischemia (p=0.002, and Charcot neuroarthropathy (p=0.017. Discussion: Risk factors associated with chronic DFU of > 6 months’ duration included the presentation of an ulcer with increased size and depth, with associated skin callus and neuroischemia, in a diabetic patient with a history of smoking and increased HbA1c >7%. Off-loading mainly with the use of TCC is an effective method

  18. The Relationship with Balance, Foot Posture, and Foot Size in School of Physical Education and Sports Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irez, Gonul Babayigit

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship of foot posture and foot size with balance. A hundred and thirteen healthy volunteers were recruited from undergraduate students (Male = 74, Female = 37, age range 18-22). The Foot Posture Index (FPI-6), anthropometric measurements, dynamic balance and static balance measurements were done…

  19. Surfaces, Digitisations and Reconstructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Sabrina Tang

    2015-01-01

    We present a new digital reconstruction of r-regular sets in three-dimensional Euclidean space. We introduce a vector field and analyse the relation between the topologies of the boundaries of the r-regular set and its reconstruction. This reconstruction can be carried out faster than prior model...

  20. Hubungan Kejadian Flat Foot dengan Obesitas pada Anak

    OpenAIRE

    Levenia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Flat foot is usually occurs and do not cause symptoms in under 5 years old children. But if occur in older children can cause pain even injury in children’s foot. One of flat foot’s risk factor is obesity. Although the prevalence of obesity is increasing every year, research of relationship between obesity and flat foot is still limited. The purpose of this research were to detect prevalence of obesity and flat foot, also to detect the relationship between obesity and flat foot ...

  1. The clinical assessment study of the foot (CASF): study protocol for a prospective observational study of foot pain and foot osteoarthritis in the general population

    OpenAIRE

    Menz Hylton B; D'Cruz Deborah; Marshall Michelle; Thomas Martin J; Myers Helen; Roddy Edward; Belcher John; Muller Sara; Peat George

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Symptomatic osteoarthritis (OA) affects approximately 10% of adults aged over 60 years. The foot joint complex is commonly affected by OA, yet there is relatively little research into OA of the foot, compared with other frequently affected sites such as the knee and hand. Existing epidemiological studies of foot OA have focussed predominantly on the first metatarsophalangeal joint at the expense of other joints. This three-year prospective population-based observational co...

  2. Biomechanics of the arch of the foot. Pre- and postoperative radiological examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human foot is a complex biomechanical structure. The arch of the foot is formed by the bony and articular structure of the midfoot and supported by strong ligaments and tendons. The normal arch develops in childhood. Tendon and ligament rupture and degeneration often lead to flattening of the arch. Frequent painful conditions include hallux valgus deformity and rupture of the posterior tibial tendon both leading to flat feet. Radiological examination is necessary in a standardized, full weight bearing standing position. The standing dorsoplantar view shows hallux valgus angle and intermetatarsal 1/2 angle. The side view shows Lisfranc joint instability and decrease of the talometatarsal angle. Talonavicular instability is a frequent secondary sign of spring ligament and posterior tibial tendon lesion. After failure of conservative therapy, corrective surgery with osteotomy and realignment procedure of the malpositioned bones in combination with tendon and ligament reconstruction is the state of the art procedure. In postoperative follow-up a standing X-ray of the foot is again the standard tool. Additional MRI and CT examinations help to detect bone and cartilage lesions and tendon/ligament ruptures. (orig.)

  3. A prospective study of risk factors for foot ulceration: The West of Ireland Diabetes Foot Study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hurley, L

    2013-09-25

    BackgroundThis is the first study to examine risk factors for diabetic foot ulceration in Irish general practice.AimTo determine the prevalence of established risk factors for foot ulceration in a community-based cohort, and to explore the potential for estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) to act as a novel risk factor.DesignA prospective observational study.MethodsPatients with diabetes attending 12 (of 17) invited general practices were invited for foot screening. Validated clinical tests were carried out at baseline to assess for vascular and sensory impairment and foot deformity. Ulcer incidence was ascertained by patient self-report and medical record. Patients were re-assessed 18 months later. ResultsOf 828 invitees, 563 (68%) attended screening. On examination 23-25% had sensory dysfunction and 18-39% had evidence of vascular impairment. Using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network risk stratification system we found the proportion at moderate and high risk of future ulceration to be 25% and 11% respectively. At follow-up 16\\/383 patients (4.2%) developed a new foot ulcer (annual incidence rate of 2.6%). We observed an increasing probability of abnormal vascular and sensory test results (pedal pulse palpation, doppler waveform assessment, 10g monofilament, vibration perception and neuropathy disability score) with declining eGFR levels. We were unable to show an independent association between new ulceration and reduced eGFR [Odds ratio 1.01; p=0.64].ConclusionsOur data show the extent of foot complications in a representative sample of diabetes patients in Ireland. Use of eGFR did not improve identification of patients at risk of foot ulceration.

  4. How To Prevent Foot Ulcers In Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada Morshed

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of development of foot ulcers in diabetic patients is 4% to 10%, these ulcers may be infected, cause morbidity and may lead to lower extremity amputation.Objective: Prevention of diabetic foot ulcers in patients known to be diabetics by fasting blood sugar (FBS, HbA1C tests.Material and Methods: The study was done on 120 patients between March 2010 and July 2011 diagnosed as diabetics and they performed simple screening tests for peripheral neuropathy (Semmes-Weinstein monofilament examination (SWME, superficial pain, vibration testing by the on-off method, the timed method. Nerve conduction studies (NCS were used as standard criterion for detection of neuropathy, they also underwent Doppler ultrasound and ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI measurement to assess the vascularity of their lower limbs. All patients were given proper education to prevent foot ulcers, including optimising glycemic control, cessation of smoking, debridement of calluses, appropriate foot wear and foot care with periodic foot examination.Results: In our study we succeeded in increasing the prevention of foot ulceration in our diabetic patients by 95%, compared to results achieved with the previous measures.Conclusion: Screening tests are effective for all diabetic patients to identify patients at risk of foot ulceration. They may benefit from prophylactic interventions including, optimising glycemic control, cessation of smoking, debridement of calluses, appropriate foot wear and intensive foot care.Also, we take care of patients with low risk of foot ulceration by adequate foot care and periodic foot examination to prevent foot ulceration.

  5. Location of foot arteries using infrared images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villasenor-Mora, Carlos; González-Vega, Arturo; Martín Osmany Falcón, Antonio; Benítez Ferro, Jesús Francisco Guillemo; Córdova Fraga, Teodoro

    2014-11-01

    In this work are presented the results of localization of foot arteries, in a young group of participants by using infrared thermal images, these are the dorsal, posterior tibial and anterior tibial arteries. No inclusion criteria were considered, that causes that no strong statistical data about the influence of the age in the arterial localization. It was achieved to solve the confusion when veins present a heat distribution similar to the artery and in the position of this. it contributes to enhance the rate of location of arteries. In general it is possible to say that the use of infrared thermal images is a good technique to find the foot arteries and can be applied in its characterization in a future. The procedure proposed is a non-invasive technique, and in certain fashion does not requires specialized personnel to achieve locate the arteries. It is portable, safe, and relatively economical.

  6. Minor amputations for diabetic foot salvage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah Y. Habel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Foot ulceration in diabetic patients is a frequent complication of diabetes mellitus (DM, necessitating hospitalization for control of infection, wound care and glycemic control. These patients are at risk for potential loss of the involved limb as well as for future loss of the contralateral limb. Diabetic foot is the consequence of peripheral neuropathy complicated by infrapopliteal peripheral vascular disease. Most of the patients present with chronic plantar ulceration and with cellulitis or an abscess. In a significant number of patients, it is observed that the frequency of life or limb threatening infection is less with an intact skin cover. Limb salvage employs the use of culture specific antibiotics, sharp debridement or a minor amputation, wound care and/or skin cover as the situation demands.

  7. Foot mounted inertial system for pedestrian navigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses algorithmic concepts, design and testing of a system based on a low-cost MEMS-based inertial measurement unit (IMU) and high-sensitivity global positioning system (HSGPS) receivers for seamless personal navigation in a GPS signal degraded environment. The system developed here is mounted on a pedestrian shoe/foot and uses measurements based on the dynamics experienced by the inertial sensors on the user's foot. The IMU measurements are processed through a conventional inertial navigation system (INS) algorithm and are then integrated with HSGPS receiver measurements and dynamics derived constraint measurements using a tightly coupled integration strategy. The ability of INS to bridge the navigation solution is evaluated through field tests conducted indoors and in severely signal degraded forest environments. The specific focus is on evaluating system performance under challenging GPS conditions

  8. Early-onset osteoarthritis, Charcot-Marie-Tooth like neuropathy, autoimmune features, multiple arterial aneurysms and dissections: an unrecognized and life threatening condition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mélodie Aubart

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Severe osteoarthritis and thoracic aortic aneurysms have recently been associated with mutations in the SMAD3 gene, but the full clinical spectrum is incompletely defined. METHODS: All SMAD3 gene mutation carriers coming to our centre and their families were investigated prospectively with a structured panel including standardized clinical workup, blood tests, total body computed tomography, joint X-rays. Electroneuromyography was performed in selected cases. RESULTS: Thirty-four SMAD3 gene mutation carriers coming to our centre were identified and 16 relatives were considered affected because of aortic surgery or sudden death (total 50 subjects. Aortic disease was present in 72%, complicated with aortic dissection, surgery or sudden death in 56% at a mean age of 45 years. Aneurysm or tortuosity of the neck arteries was present in 78%, other arteries were affected in 44%, including dissection of coronary artery. Overall, 95% of mutation carriers displayed either aortic or extra-aortic arterial disease. Acrocyanosis was also present in the majority of patients. Osteoarticular manifestations were recorded in all patients. Joint involvement could be severe requiring surgery in young patients, of unusual localization such as tarsus or shoulder, or mimicking crystalline arthropathy with fibrocartilage calcifications. Sixty eight percent of patients displayed neurological symptoms, and 9 suffered peripheral neuropathy. Electroneuromyography revealed an axonal motor and sensory neuropathy in 3 different families, very evocative of type II Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT2 disease, although none had mutations in the known CMT2 genes. Autoimmune features including Sjogren's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, Hashimoto's disease, or isolated autoantibodies- were found in 36% of patients. INTERPRETATION: SMAD3 gene mutations are associated with aortic dilatation and osteoarthritis, but also autoimmunity and peripheral neuropathy which mimics type II

  9. Diagnostic dilemmas in foot and ankle injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keene, J.S.; Lange, R.H.

    1986-07-11

    Differential diagnosis of foot and ankle injuries should include (1) stress fractures of the great toe sesamoids, the shaft of the fifth metatarsal, and the tarsal navicular bone; (2) transchondral talar-dome fractures; (3) fractures of the os trigonum; and (4) dislocating peroneal tendons. Diagnosis of these injuries is challenging because the initial roentgenograms often are normal, and special clinical tests and ancillary studies are required.

  10. Bacteriological study of diabetic foot infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khairul Azmi ABD KADIR

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Foot infections are one of the major complications of diabetes mellitus and a significant risk factor for lower extremity amputation. Providing effective antimicrobial therapy is an important component in treating these infections. This study assesses the microbial isolates of patients with diabetic foot infections and their antibiotic susceptibility pattern. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study of 75 patients with diabetic foot infections admitted to RIPAS hospital between June 2008 and June 2010 was undertaken. Bacteriological specimens were obtained and processed using standard hospital procedure for microbiological culture and sensitivity testing. Results: Overall, 40 (54% patients had subcutaneous infections, 22 (29% had infected superficial ulcers, seven (9% had infected deep ulcers involving muscle tissues and six (8% had osteomyelitis. A total of 98 pathogens were isolated. Forty percent of the patients had polymicrobial infection, 39 (52% had single organism and 6(8% had no growth. Gram-negative bacteria (67% were more commonly isolated than gram-positive bacteria (30%. The three most frequently found gram-negative organisms were Pseudomonas aeruginosa (19.4%, Klebsiella pneumoniae (15.3%, and Acinetobacter spp. (10.2% and gram-positive organisms were Staphylococcus aureus (10.2%, Streptococcus pyogenes (7.1% and Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus [MRSA] (7.1%. Vancomycin was found to be the most effective against gram-positive bacteria while amikacin was the most effective against gram-negative bacteria based on antibiotic testing. Conclusion: In 40% of diabetic feet infection was polymicrobial. Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were the most common gram-positive and gram-negative organisms respectively. This study helps us to choose the empirical antibiotics for cases of diabetic foot infections.

  11. Diabetic foot: The orthopedic surgery angle

    OpenAIRE

    Besse, Jean-Luc; LEEMRIJSE, Thibaut; DELEU, Paul André

    2011-01-01

    As diabetes takes on pandemic proportions, it is crucial for the orthopedic surgeon to be aware of the issues involved in diabetic foot. Ulceration is related to neuropathy and to arterial disease, a vital prognostic factor for healing; infection plays an aggravating role, increasing the risk of amputation. At-risk feet need to be screened for. Ulcer classification is essential, to set treatment strategy and determine prognosis. Before any treatment is decided on, neuropathy, vascular insuffi...

  12. Therapeutic approach to "diabetic foot" complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderini, Cristina; Cioni, Federico; Haddoub, Silvia; Maccanelli, Francesco; Magotti, Maria Grazia; Tardio, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    The series of ulcers of the lower extremities known as "diabetic foot" is a common complication of diabetes and the chief cause of admission to hospital. The causes may be numerous but the main ones are distal symmetric neuropathy and peripheral obliterative arteriopathy, often complicated by infection. In this review, the Authors, after having illustrated the main pathophysiological aspects of the diabetic foot, describe the clinical characteristics of the disease, focusing particularly on the risk of suprainfection and vascular problems. The clinical and therapeutic approach to diabetic foot is also investigated with particular reference to the antibiotic treatment of infections and the treatment of peripheral arterial disease. Poor tissue repair, persistent inflammation, the presence of deep abscesses, osteomyelitis and systemic involvement can lead to a very serious clinical picture of gangrene or necrosis, which is initially localised but which can extend widely, requiring minor or major amputation surgery, in order to radically remove the infected tissue. In conclusion, space for discussion is given to the rationale of hyperbaric oxygen therapy, negative pressure wound therapy and other advanced therapies that involve the use of dermoepidermal equivalents and skin substitutes in addition to gels made of platelet-derived growth factors and the epidermal growth factor. Nonetheless, prevention is, of course, of fundamental importance, based on an intensive treat-to-target approach for the treatment of diabetes, on regular examinations of the feet, on the stratification of risk and education of the patient, which has proved successful in reducing the onset of foot lesions in at least 50% of patients. PMID:25567455

  13. Concordance in diabetic foot ulcer infection

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, EA; Backhouse, MR; Bhogal, MS; Wright-Hughes, A; Lipsky, BA; Nixon, J; Brown, S.; Gray, J

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Accurate identification of pathogens, rather than colonising bacteria, is a prerequisite for targeted antibiotic therapy to ensure optimal patient outcome in wounds, such as diabetic foot ulcers. Wound swabs are the easiest and most commonly used sampling technique but most published guidelines recommend instead removal of a tissue sample from the wound bed, which is a more complex process. The aim of this study was to assess the concordance between culture results from wound sw...

  14. Nuclear medicine imaging of diabetic foot infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Osteomyelitis of the foot is the most frequent complication in diabetic patients. Nuclear medicine plays an important role in diagnosis and for therapy follow-up, using different tracers. We reviewed 57 papers on diabetic foot imaging (published from 1982 to 2004, 50 original papers and 7 reviews), for a total of 2889 lesions. Data analysis has been carried out to establish which imaging technique could be used as a 'gold standard' for diagnosis of infection and to evaluate the extent of disease and to monitor the efficacy of therapy. Data analysis revealed that three-phase bone-scan is sensitive but not specific whereas specificity and diagnostic accuracy of 99mTc-WBC scintigraphy is higher than 111In- WBC scintigraphy. In the forefoot leukocyte scintigraphy may be useful for diagnosis of osteomyelitis and for monitoring the response to medical treatment. In the mid/hind foot the leukocytes uptake is not related only to the presence of infected region, but it is attributed to inflammation, fractures and reparative processes. Other radiopharmaceuticals such as 99mTc/111In-HIG, radiolabelled antibody and their fragments, showed high sensibility, but lower specificity than WBC (96.8/66.5, 95.8/70.2, 91.3/62 vs 85.8/84.5). Conclusion: It emerged that in the forefoot when clinical suspicious of osteomyelitis is low and medical treatment is contemplated, three-phase bon scan is the procedure of choice. A positive test is not diagnostic for osteomyelitis, and radiolabelled WBC scintigraphy is necessary. In the mid/hind foot, diagnosis of neuropathic joint with infection is problematic. Radiolabelled WBC imaging is probably the most accurate test for determining the presence of infection. Although a negative study strongly indicate the absence of osteomyelitis, it is important to note that a positive result requires a complementary study with marrow agent. (author)

  15. Nuclear medicine applications for the diabetic foot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartshorne, M.F.; Peters, V.

    1987-04-01

    Although not frequently described in the podiatric literature, nuclear medicine imaging may be of great assistance to the clinical podiatrist. This report reviews in detail the use of modern nuclear medicine approaches to the diagnosis and management of the diabetic foot. Nuclear medicine techniques are helpful in evaluating possible osteomyelitis, in determining appropriate amputation levels, and in predicting response to conservative ulcer management. Specific indications for bone, gallium, and perfusion imaging are described.

  16. Nodular Foot Myxedema Masquerading as Lymphedema

    OpenAIRE

    Couto, Javier A.; Schmidt, Birgitta A. R.; Greene, Arin K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Lymphedema results from abnormal development or injury to the lymphatic system. One-fourth of patients with lower extremity enlargement are erroneously labeled with “lymphedema.” We describe a patient with hypothyroidism who developed soft-tissue overgrowth of her foot. She was referred to our Lymphedema Program for management of “lymphedema” and overgrown toes. The patient’s lymphoscintigram showed normal lymphatic function in her extremities, and she was diagnosed with myxedema by ...

  17. Radiology of the ankle and foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a systematic approach to the diagnosis of common foot conditions, including traumatic conditions, arthritis, and tumors. The differential diagnosis of monarticular arthritis and pain in the big toe is discussed. The characteristic features of rheumatoid arthritis are compared with those of degenerative and metabolic deposition disease. Trauma, including common athletic injuries, is reviewed. Selected tumors that frequently cause confusion, such as synovial chondromatosis, PVNS, and tendon sheath xanthoma, are shown

  18. Diagnostic dilemmas in foot and ankle injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Differential diagnosis of foot and ankle injuries should include (1) stress fractures of the great toe sesamoids, the shaft of the fifth metatarsal, and the tarsal navicular bone; (2) transchondral talar-dome fractures; (3) fractures of the os trigonum; and (4) dislocating peroneal tendons. Diagnosis of these injuries is challenging because the initial roentgenograms often are normal, and special clinical tests and ancillary studies are required

  19. Nonlinear MHD Waves in a Prominence Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, L.; Knizhnik, K.; Kucera, T.; Schmieder, B.

    2015-11-01

    We study nonlinear waves in a prominence foot using a 2.5D MHD model motivated by recent high-resolution observations with Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope in Ca ii emission of a prominence on 2012 October 10 showing highly dynamic small-scale motions in the prominence material. Observations of Hα intensities and of Doppler shifts show similar propagating fluctuations. However, the optically thick nature of the emission lines inhibits a unique quantitative interpretation in terms of density. Nevertheless, we find evidence of nonlinear wave activity in the prominence foot by examining the relative magnitude of the fluctuation intensity (δI/I ˜ δn/n). The waves are evident as significant density fluctuations that vary with height and apparently travel upward from the chromosphere into the prominence material with quasi-periodic fluctuations with a typical period in the range of 5-11 minutes and wavelengths <2000 km. Recent Doppler shift observations show the transverse displacement of the propagating waves. The magnetic field was measured with the THEMIS instrument and was found to be 5-14 G. For the typical prominence density the corresponding fast magnetosonic speed is ˜20 km s-1, in qualitative agreement with the propagation speed of the detected waves. The 2.5D MHD numerical model is constrained with the typical parameters of the prominence waves seen in observations. Our numerical results reproduce the nonlinear fast magnetosonic waves and provide strong support for the presence of these waves in the prominence foot. We also explore gravitational MHD oscillations of the heavy prominence foot material supported by dipped magnetic field structure.

  20. Multiscale Phenomena Related to Diabetic Foot

    OpenAIRE

    Agić, Ante; Nikolić, Tatjana; Mijović, Budimir

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes is a group of metabolic diseases causing a system disorder, i.e.; it cannot be explained or understood by phenomena on single material scale. The diabetic foot is studied as flexible multibody structure by nonlinear finite element method. The physical and geometrical multiscale heterogeneity is solved by multilevel finite element approach. The diabetic tissue is described by internal coordinate’s formalism, as complex multiscale process in tissue. The accompanying problem...

  1. Strategy of Surgical Management of Peripheral Neuropathy Form of Diabetic Foot Syndrome in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. M. Rdeini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Foot disorders such as ulceration, infection, and gangrene which are often due to diabetes mellitus are some major causes of morbidity and high amputation. Aim. This study aims to use a group of methods for the management of diabetic foot ulcers (DFU in order to salvage the lower limb so as to reduce the rate of high amputations of the lower extremity. Materials and Methods. A group of different advanced methods for the management of DFU such as sharp debridement of ulcers, application of vacuum therapy, and other forms of reconstructive plastic surgical procedures were used. Data collection was done at 3 different hospitals where the treatments were given. Results. Fifty-four patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus were enrolled in the current study: females n=37 (68.51% and males n=17 (31.49% with different stages of PEDIS classification. They underwent different methods of surgical management: debridement, vacuum therapy (some constructed from locally used materials, and skin grafting giving good and fast results. Only 4 had below knee amputations. Conclusion. Using advanced surgical wound management including reconstructive plastic surgical procedures, it was possible to reduce the rate of high amputations of the lower limb.

  2. Effects of hallux limitus on plantar foot pressure and foot kinematics during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gheluwe, Bart; Dananberg, Howard J; Hagman, Friso; Vanstaen, Kerstin

    2006-01-01

    The effects of hallux limitus on plantar foot pressure and foot kinematics have received limited attention in the literature. Therefore, a study was conducted to assess the effects of limited first metatarsophalangeal joint mobility on plantar foot pressure. It was equally important to identify detection criteria based on plantar pressures and metatarsophalangeal joint kinematics, enabling differentiation between subjects affected by hallux limitus and people with normal hallux function. To further our understanding of the relation between midtarsal collapse and hallux limitus, kinematic variables relating to midtarsal pronation were also included in the study. Two populations of 19 subjects each, one with hallux limitus and the other free of functional abnormalities, were asked to walk at their preferred speed while plantar foot pressures were recorded along with three-dimensional foot kinematics. The presence of hallux limitus, structural or functional, caused peak plantar pressure under the hallux to build up significantly more and at a faster rate than under the first metatarsal head. Additional discriminators for hallux limitus were peak dorsiflexion of the first metatarsophalangeal joint, time to this peak value, peak pressure ratios of the first metatarsal head and the more lateral metatarsal heads, and time to maximal pressure under the fourth and fifth metatarsal heads. Finally, in approximately 20% of the subjects, with and without hallux limitus, midtarsal pronation occurred after heel lift, validating the claim that retrograde midtarsal pronation does occur. PMID:16988174

  3. Risk factors for developing diabetic foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Estela Willrich Boell

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the present study is to identify the risk factors for developing diabetic foot. A cross-sectional study, with a convenience sample, developed with 70 individuals with diabetes mellitus (DM, registered in three basic health units in the municipality of Florianópolis/SC, Brazil, in the period from November 2010 to May 2011. Biometric data was collected regarding their sociodemographic, health and illness conditions. An assessment of the feet was also carried out. The average participant age was 66.17 years and time with diagnosed disease was under ten years (61.42%. The following risk factors were identified: advanced age; time of DM diagnosis; few years of schooling; overweight/obesity; inadequate diet; physical inactivity; inadequate metabolic control; lack of proper and specific foot care; and arterial hypertension. We conclude that the majority of the population presented one or more risk factors that favor the appearance of foot-related complications. doi: 10.5216/ree.v16i2.20460.

  4. End effector with astronaut foot restraint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monford, Leo G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The combination of a foot restraint platform designed primarily for use by an astronaut being rigidly and permanently attached to an end effector which is suitable for attachment to the manipulator arm of a remote manipulating system is described. The foot restraint platform is attached by a brace to the end effector at a location away from the grappling interface of the end effector. The platform comprises a support plate provided with a pair of stirrups for receiving the toe portion of an astronaut's boots when standing on the platform and a pair of heel retainers in the form of raised members which are fixed to the surface of the platform and located to provide abutment surfaces for abutting engagement with the heels of the astronaut's boots when his toes are in the stirrups. The heel retainers preclude a backward sliding movement of the feet on the platform and instead require a lifting of the heels in order to extract the feet. The brace for attaching the foot restraint platform to the end effector may include a pivot or swivel joint to permit various orientations of the platform with respect to the end effector.

  5. Diabetes Foot Ulcers: A novel Treatment Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golnaz Namazi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Foot ulcers are common in 12-25 percent of diabetic patients. Preventing, controlling and treating of these kind chronic wounds are of the major clinical challenges.Evidence based documents revealed that DFU (Diabetic Foot ulcer is a chronic wound type originating from disturbed cellular and molecular mechanisms that have to be in its functional form to overcome its problem. In diabetes and some other chronic based diseases, harmonized acting machine causes chronic phases that result in conditions as foot ulceration and related complications seen commonly in diabetes.DFU needs to be transformed into acute phase in order to be healed in a physiological manner. Disturbed mechanisms have to be corrected reversely and to achieve such a goal it is essential to better understanding of disturbing factors responsible for biological abnormalities. Factors associated with DFU are as cellular and molecular recruitment and function impairments and there is need to repair these mechanisms. For this, we believe that the activated Th-1 cells (T helper-1 Cells might have a critical role in regulation of the several effector functions of the cellular and molecular mechanisms essential to the body to act the best. Evidences and our successful results urge us to suggest this regulatory role for effector cells and molecules generated through activation of Th-1 cells as a treatment strategy.

  6. The effects of prolonged running on foot posture: a repeated measures study of half marathon runners using the foot posture index and navicular height

    OpenAIRE

    Cowley, Emma; Marsden, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Background Different foot postures are associated with alterations in foot function, kinetics and the subsequent occurrence of injury. Little is known about changes in foot posture following prolonged weightbearing exercise. This study aimed to identify changes in foot posture after running a half marathon. Methods Foot posture was measured using the Foot Posture Index (FPI-6) and navicular height in thirty volunteer participants before and after running a half marathon. FPI-6 scores were con...

  7.  Hypertelorism in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease 1A from the common PMP22 duplication: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Finsterer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available  The 1.4Mb tandem-duplication in the PMP22 gene at 17p11.2 usually manifests as hereditary sensorimotor polyneuropathy with foot deformity, sensorineural hearing-loss, moderate developmental delay, and gait disturbance. Hypertelorism and marked phenotypic variability within a single family has not been reported. In a single family, the PMP22 tandem-duplication manifested as short stature, sensorimotor polyneuropathy, tremor, ataxia, sensorineural hearing-loss, and hypothyroidism in the 27 years-old index case, as mild facial dysmorphism, muscle cramps, tinnitus, intention tremor, bradydiadochokinesia, and sensorimotor polyneuropathy in the 31 year-old half-brother of the index-patient, and as sensorimotor polyneuropathy and foot deformityin the father of the two. The half-brother additionally presented with hypertelorism, not previously reported in PMP22tandem-duplication carriers. The presented cases show that the tandem-duplication 17p11.2 may present with marked intra-familialphenotype variability and that mild facial dysmorphism with stuck-out ears and hypertelorism may be a rare phenotypic feature of this mutation. The causal relation between facial dysmorphism and the PMP22 tandem-duplication, however, remains speculative.

  8. Are diabetic foot lesions precipitated by accidental trauma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshi, H K; Moissinac, K; Harwant, S

    2001-12-01

    Diabetic foot lesions may arise from frictional trauma due to tight or inappropriate footwear, repetitive stresses on parts of the foot, overlying bony prominence generated by walking and accidental trauma to the neuropathic foot. Many diabetics have been found to be unaware of their foot lesion, or know what the precipitating cause was. Based on the assumption that accidental trauma would affect the foot in a random fashion and result in lesions distributed evenly throughout the foot, a study was performed to determine whether foot lesions were distributed evenly or concentrated to certain areas of predilection. It was found that foot lesions were not evenly distributed but concentrated to certain areas of predilection. Even though relatively high proportion of the study population walked about in open slippers and barefeet, the study showed that accidental trauma was not a predominant precipitant of diabetic foot lesions. Diabetic foot lesions tend to occur as a result of cumulative, repetitive trauma to areas of prediliection rather than accidental trauma. PMID:14569763

  9. PET scanning in plastic and reconstructive surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report we highlight the use of position emission tomography (PET) scan in plastic and reconstructive surgery. PET scanning is a very important tool in plastic surgery oncology (melanoma, soft-tissue sarcomas and bone sarcomas, head and neck cancer, peripheral nerve sheath tumors of the extremities and breast cancer after breast esthetic surgery), as diagnosis, staging, treatment planning and follow-up of cancer patients is based on imaging. PET scanning seems also to be useful as a flap monitoring system as well as an infection's imaging tool, for example in the management of diabetic foot ulcer. PET also contributes to the understanding of pathophysiology of keloids which remain a therapeutic challenge. (author)

  10. Research on the Effect of the Foot Bath and Foot Massage on Residual Schizophrenia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kito, Kazuko; Suzuki, Keiko

    2016-06-01

    Researchers performed foot baths and massages for residual schizophrenia patients to gauge the effects on psychiatric symptoms. Subjects were six residual schizophrenia patients hospitalized in a psychiatric hospital. Three times a week for 4weeks, they received an 8-minute effleurage massage to their legs after a 10-minute foot bath. The effect of physiological relaxation was identified by a significant decline in heart rate in all cases. The results of the Positive and Negative Symptom Scale are as follows: a mean score of 29.0 was measured before treatment, which lowered to 21.5 after treatment, indicating that foot care improved their negative symptoms (pmassages were effective in improving psychiatric symptoms. PMID:27256944

  11. Cosmic Tidal Reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Hong-Ming; Yu, Yu; Er, Xinzhong; Chen, Xuelei

    2015-01-01

    The gravitational coupling of a long wavelength tidal field with small scale density fluctuations leads to anisotropic distortions of the locally measured small scale matter correlation function. Since the local correlation function is statistically isotropic in the absence of such tidal interactions, the tidal distortions can be used to reconstruct the long wavelength tidal field and large scale density field in analogy with the cosmic microwave background lensing reconstruction. In this paper we present in detail a formalism for the cosmic tidal reconstruction and test the reconstruction in numerical simulations. We find that the density field on large scales can be reconstructed with good accuracy and the cross correlation coefficient between the reconstructed density field and the original density field is greater than 0.9 on large scales ($k\\lesssim0.1h/\\mathrm{Mpc}$). This is useful in the 21cm intensity mapping survey, where the long wavelength radial modes are lost due to foreground subtraction proces...

  12. Re-construction

    OpenAIRE

    Bernadette Marie Devilat

    2013-01-01

    Re-construct: to build again. The necessary reconstruction process after an earthquake can be seen as an opportunity to improve previous conditions. All damaged buildings undergo a renovation process in which every piece is carefully returned to its original place. The photograph shows roof reconstruction work in San Pedro de Alcántara, a heritage area in the central valley of Chile, which was particularly affected by the 2010 earthquake. 

  13. Successful delayed reconstruction of common peroneal neuroma-in-continuity using sural nerve graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichl, Heike; Ensat, Florian; Dellon, A Lee; Wechselberger, Gottfried

    2013-02-01

    Injuries of the common peroneal nerve (CPN) are frequent and associated with poor motor outcomes. So far, the opinion is held, that nerve reconstruction is reasonable and indicated up to 6 months after injury. We describe successful sural nerve interposition grafting in a patient with neuroma-in-continuity formation of the CPN, presenting with foot drop, 13 months after injury. Due to this positive result, we think nerve grafting in neuroma-in-continuity lesions of the CPN should be contemplated in patients with foot drop even more than one year after injury. PMID:23180561

  14. Diabetic foot disease: From the evaluation of the “foot at risk” to the novel diabetic ulcer treatment modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Noha; Doupis, John

    2016-01-01

    The burden of diabetic foot disease (DFD) is expected to increase in the future. The incidence of DFD is still rising due to the high prevalence of DFD predisposing factors. DFD is multifactorial in nature; however most of the diabetic foot amputations are preceded by foot ulceration. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a major risk factor for foot ulceration. DPN leads to loss of protective sensation resulting in continuous unconscious traumas. Patient education and detection of high risk foot are essential for the prevention of foot ulceration and amputation. Proper assessment of the diabetic foot ulceration and appropriate management ensure better prognosis. Management is based on revascularization procedures, wound debridement, treatment of infection and ulcer offloading. Management and type of dressing applied are tailored according to the type of wound and the foot condition. The scope of this review paper is to describe the diabetic foot syndrome starting from the evaluation of the foot at risk for ulceration, up to the new treatment modalities. PMID:27076876

  15. Investigations of Potential Phenotypes of Foot Osteoarthritis: Cross‐Sectional Analysis From the Clinical Assessment Study of the Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Michelle; Thomas, Martin J.; Menz, Hylton B.; Myers, Helen L.; Thomas, Elaine; Downes, Thomas; Peat, George; Roddy, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the existence of distinct foot osteoarthritis (OA) phenotypes based on pattern of joint involvement and comparative symptom and risk profiles. Methods Participants ages ≥50 years reporting foot pain in the previous year were drawn from a population‐based cohort. Radiographs were scored for OA in the first metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint, first and second cuneometatarsal, navicular first cuneiform, and talonavicular joints according to a published atlas. Chi‐square tests established clustering, and odds ratios (ORs) examined symmetry and pairwise associations of radiographic OA in the feet. Distinct underlying classes of foot OA were investigated by latent class analysis (LCA) and their association with symptoms and risk factors was assessed. Results In 533 participants (mean age 64.9 years, 55.9% female) radiographic OA clustered across both feet (P < 0.001) and was highly symmetrical (adjusted OR 3.0, 95% confidence interval 2.1, 4.2). LCA identified 3 distinct classes of foot OA: no or minimal foot OA (64%), isolated first MTP joint OA (22%), and polyarticular foot OA (15%). After adjustment for age and sex, polyarticular foot OA was associated with nodal OA, increased body mass index, and more pain and functional limitation compared to the other classes. Conclusion Patterning of radiographic foot OA has provided insight into the existence of 2 forms of foot OA: isolated first MTP joint OA and polyarticular foot OA. The symptom and risk factor profiles in individuals with polyarticular foot OA indicate a possible distinctive phenotype of foot OA, but further research is needed to explore the characteristics of isolated first MTP joint and polyarticular foot OA. PMID:26238801

  16. Flexor pulley reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dy, Christopher J; Daluiski, Aaron

    2013-05-01

    Flexor pulley reconstruction is a challenging surgery. Injuries often occur after traumatic lacerations or forceful extension applied to an acutely flexed finger. Surgical treatment is reserved for patients with multiple closed pulley ruptures, persistent pain, or dysfunction after attempted nonoperative management of a single pulley rupture, or during concurrent or staged flexor tendon repair or reconstruction. If the pulley cannot be repaired primarily, pulley reconstruction can be performed using graft woven into remnant pulley rim or looping graft around the phalanx. Regardless of the reconstructive technique, the surgeon should emulate the length, tension, and glide of the native pulley. PMID:23660059

  17. Three-dimensional measurement of foot arch in preschool children

    OpenAIRE

    Chang Hsun-Wen; Lin Chien-Ju; Kuo Li-Chieh; Tsai Ming-June; Chieh Hsiao-Feng; Su Fong-Chin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The prevalence of flexible flatfoot is high among preschool-aged children, but the effects of treatment are inconclusive due to the unclear definitions of normal flatfoot. To date, a universally accepted evaluation method of the foot arch in children has not been completely established. Our aims of this study were to establish a new method to evaluate the foot arch from a three dimensional perspective and to investigate the flexibility of the foot arch among children aged ...

  18. A study of structural foot deformity in stroke patients

    OpenAIRE

    Jang, Gwon Uk; Kweon, Mi Gyoug; Park, Seol; Kim, Ji Young; Park, Ji Won

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the structural deformity of the foot joint on the affected side in hemiplegic patients to examine factors that affect this kind of structural deformity. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-one hemiplegic patients and 32 normal adults participated. The foot posture index (FPI) was used to examine the shape of the foot, the modified Ashworth scale test was used to examine the degree of ankle joint rigidity, the navicular drop test was used to investigat...

  19. Three-dimensional measurement of foot arch in preschool children

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Hsun-Wen; Lin, Chien-Ju; Kuo, Li-Chieh; Tsai, Ming-June; Chieh, Hsiao-Feng; Su, Fong-Chin

    2012-01-01

    Background The prevalence of flexible flatfoot is high among preschool-aged children, but the effects of treatment are inconclusive due to the unclear definitions of normal flatfoot. To date, a universally accepted evaluation method of the foot arch in children has not been completely established. Our aims of this study were to establish a new method to evaluate the foot arch from a three dimensional perspective and to investigate the flexibility of the foot arch among children aged from two ...

  20. Interdigital foot infections: Corynebacterium minutissimum and agents of superficial mycoses

    OpenAIRE

    Fatma Mutlu Sariguzel; A. Nedret Koc; Gülhan Yagmur; Elife Berk

    2014-01-01

    Interdigital foot infections are mostly caused initially by dermatophytes, yeasts and less frequently by bacteria. Erythrasma caused by Corynebacterium minutissimum can be confused with superficial mycoses. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of the etiologic agents of superficial mycoses and the frequency of Corynebacterium minutissimum in interdigital foot infections. All the samples obtained from the 121 patients with interdigital foot infections were examined directly wit...

  1. Health-economic consequences of diabetic foot lesions.

    OpenAIRE

    Ragnarson Tennvall, Gunnel; Apelqvist, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Diabetic foot complications result in huge costs for both society and the individual patients. Few reports on the health-economic consequences of diabetic foot infections have been published. In studies considering a wide societal perspective, costs of antibiotics were relatively low, whereas total costs for topical treatment were high relative to the total costs of foot infections. Total direct costs for healing of infected ulcers not requiring amputation are similar to$17,500 (in 1998 US do...

  2. Diabetic Foot: Infections and Outcomes in Iranian Admitted Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hadadi, Azar; Omdeh Ghiasi, Houra; Hajiabdolbaghi, Mahboubeh; Zandekarimi, Majid; Hamidian, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus (along with its complications) has become a global problem. Diabetic foot infection, among the most common complications, is responsible for 40 to 50% of foot amputations. Antibiotic-resistant microorganisms, however, have compromised empiric therapy in the infected patients. Objectives: The current study aimed to determine the most common microorganisms involved in diabetic foot infection in order to minimize the failure of antibiotic therapy and the risk of dev...

  3. Hand, foot and mouth disease - a short case report

    OpenAIRE

    Kashyap, Roopashri Rajesh; Kashyap, Rajesh Shanker

    2015-01-01

    Hand, foot and mouth disease, that was once considered a disease of cattle, has been emerging as a common human childhood disease in the last few years. It is a viral disease characterized by a brief febrile illness and typical vesicular rashes. In rare cases, patients may also develop neurological complications. This report describes a case of hand, foot and mouth disease, presented with typical clinical features in the South Indian region. Key words:Hand, foot and mouth disease, viral lesio...

  4. Costs of Deep Foot Infections in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Gunnel Ragnarson Tennvall; Jan Apelqvist; Magnus Eneroth

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To calculate costs for the management of deep foot infections and to identify the most important factors related to treatment costs. Design: Costs for in-hospital care, surgery, investigations, antibacterials, visits to the foot-care team, orthopaedic appliances and topical treatment were calculated retrospectively from diagnosis until healing or death. Multiple regression analysis was used to identify factors that independently affect costs. Setting: A multidisciplinary foot-care ...

  5. 6-Axis Force/Moment Sensor In Humanoid Robot Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai-Faifi, Badrih; Al-Shammary, Maryam; Al-Shehry, Zinab

    2014-07-01

    The foot is the most Important part of the humanoid .Thought the sensor of the robot can understand the environment In which they live, it is important to developed an intelligent foot. In order to walk on uneven terrain safely this poster describes an intelligent foot with 6- axis force/moment sensors for humanoid robot that is one of the solution that can help the robot to walk in uneven terrain safely.

  6. FootPrinter3: phylogenetic footprinting in partially alignable sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Fei; Blanchette, Mathieu

    2006-01-01

    FootPrinter3 is a web server for predicting transcription factor binding sites by using phylogenetic footprinting. Until now, phylogenetic footprinting approaches have been based either on multiple alignment analysis (e.g. PhyloVista, PhastCons), or on motif-discovery algorithms (e.g. FootPrinter2). FootPrinter3 integrates these two approaches, making use of local multiple sequence alignment blocks when those are available and reliable, but also allowing finding motifs in unalignable regions....

  7. Tibialis posterior tendon transfer for drop foot deformity

    OpenAIRE

    Bekler, Halil; Beyzadeoglu, Tahsin; Gokce, Alper

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: We evaluated tibialis posterior tendon (TPT) transfers in patients with drop foot deformity. Methods: Eight patients with drop foot deformity (2 females, 6 males; mean age 40 years; range 15 to 75 years) underwent TPT transfer to the dorsum of the foot. The deformity was on the left in three patients and on the right in five patients. Etiology was traumatic peroneal nerve injuries in six patients, and upper-level nerve injuries after hip and lumbar surgery in two patients. For ...

  8. Benign and malignant tumors of the foot and ankle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, Adam D.; Datir, Abhijit; Langley, Travis [Emory University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Section of Musculoskeletal Imaging, Atlanta, GA (United States); Tresley, Jonathan [University of Wisconsin, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Clifford, Paul D.; Jose, Jean; Subhawong, Ty K. [University of Miami, Department of Radiology, Miami, FL (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Pain and focal masses in the foot and ankle are frequently encountered and often initiate a workup including imaging. It is important to differentiate benign lesions from aggressive benign or malignant lesions. In this review, multiple examples of osseous and soft tissue tumors of the foot and ankle will be presented. Additionally, the compartmental anatomy of the foot and ankle will be discussed in terms of its relevance for percutaneous biopsy planning and eventual surgery. Finally, a general overview of the surgical management of benign, benign aggressive and malignant tumors of the foot and ankle will be discussed. (orig.)

  9. Benign and malignant tumors of the foot and ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pain and focal masses in the foot and ankle are frequently encountered and often initiate a workup including imaging. It is important to differentiate benign lesions from aggressive benign or malignant lesions. In this review, multiple examples of osseous and soft tissue tumors of the foot and ankle will be presented. Additionally, the compartmental anatomy of the foot and ankle will be discussed in terms of its relevance for percutaneous biopsy planning and eventual surgery. Finally, a general overview of the surgical management of benign, benign aggressive and malignant tumors of the foot and ankle will be discussed. (orig.)

  10. Role of industries in the care of diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, A; Lakshmi, S; Arun, Nanditha; Samith Shetty, A; Snehalatha, C

    2010-09-01

    Diabetic foot disease is a dreaded complication causing severe economic and social burden, mental and physical agony, and severe morbidity and mortality. This complication is largely preventable if the risk factors such as peripheral neuropathy and peripheral arterial disease are detected early and appropriate measures are taken to control glycemia, foot pressure, and chances of foot injury. In the case of ulceration, proper microbial control, pressure offloading by debridement, and use of appropriate footwear are mandatory to save the foot. This article focuses on the need for preventive care for diabetic complications demonstrating potentially helpful roles for industry in India. PMID:20705621

  11. Prospective study of ankle and foot fractures in elderly women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadagiri Surender Rao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The epidemiology of ankle fractures in old people is changing as time passes on. The incidence of ankle fractures increases with advancing age. The study conducted was among a rural popula-tion which comprised of 68 women (32 women with ankle fractures & 36 women with foot fractures. Patients studied were in the age group more than 50 years. The study highlights the etiological & risk factors for fractures of ankle & foot. The commonest ankle fracture was the lateral malleolar fracture & the commonest foot fracture was the 5th Metatarsal fracture. Diabetes is a risk factor which increases the occurrence of ankle and foot injuries.

  12. Pitfalls in diagnosing diabetic foot infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Edgar J

    2016-01-01

    Although the diagnosis of a diabetic foot infection is made based on clinical symptoms and signs, we also use blood laboratory, microbiological and radiological studies to make treatment decisions. All of these diagnostic studies have pitfalls that can lead to a delay in diagnosis. Such delays will likely lead to further tissue damage and to a higher chance of amputation. One of these pitfalls is that some clinicians rely on microbiological, rather than clinical data, to diagnose infection. Though subjective by nature, clinical signs predict outcome of foot infections accurately. Another pitfall is that microbiological data can be misleading. All wounds harbour microorganisms; therefore, a positive wound culture does not mean that a wound is infected. Furthermore, the outcome of cultures of wound swabs does not correlate well with culture results of tissue biopsies. Therapy guidance by wound swab will likely lead to overtreatment of non-pathogenic organisms. Genotyping might have a role in identifying previously unrecognized (combinations of) pathogens in diabetic foot infection, bacteria in sessile phenotype and non-culturable pathogens, e.g. in cases where antibiotics have already been administered. One more pitfall is that the diagnosis of osteomyelitis remains difficult. Although the result of percutaneous bone biopsy is the reference standard for osteomyelitis, some other diagnostic modalities can aid in the diagnosis. A combination of several of these diagnostic tests is probably a good strategy to achieve a higher diagnostic accuracy. Relying on a single test will likely lead to misidentification of patients with osteomyelitis with associated overtreatment and undertreatment. PMID:26813617

  13. Image Reconstruction. Chapter 13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter discusses how 2‑D or 3‑D images of tracer distribution can be reconstructed from a series of so-called projection images acquired with a gamma camera or a positron emission tomography (PET) system [13.1]. This is often called an ‘inverse problem’. The reconstruction is the inverse of the acquisition. The reconstruction is called an inverse problem because making software to compute the true tracer distribution from the acquired data turns out to be more difficult than the ‘forward’ direction, i.e. making software to simulate the acquisition. There are basically two approaches to image reconstruction: analytical reconstruction and iterative reconstruction. The analytical approach is based on mathematical inversion, yielding efficient, non-iterative reconstruction algorithms. In the iterative approach, the reconstruction problem is reduced to computing a finite number of image values from a finite number of measurements. That simplification enables the use of iterative instead of mathematical inversion. Iterative inversion tends to require more computer power, but it can cope with more complex (and hopefully more accurate) models of the acquisition process

  14. Bitzer's Model Reconstructed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lybarger, Scott; Smith, Craig R.

    1996-01-01

    Reconstructs Lloyd Bitzer's situational model to serve as a guide for the generation of multiperspectival critical assessments of rhetorical discourse. Uses two of President Bush's speeches on the drug crisis to illustrate how the reconstructed model can account for such modern problems as multiple audiences, perceptions, and exigencies. (PA)

  15. Foot pain: uncommon presentation of lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarca, Angela; Hindi, Nadia; Belda-Iniesta, Cristobal; de Castro, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Acrometastases is an unusual presentation of bone metastases, specially when they are the unique location of bone metastases. The authors report a case of a men diagnosed with a lung adenocarcinoma with a unique lytic acrometastases in his left foot. He has been treated with systemic chemotherapy with good local and systemic response. The most common sites of bone metastases are the vertebrae, pelvis, ribs, sternum and skull. Bone metastases in the distal regions of the extremities are unusual (from 0.007 to 0.3% of all patients with bone metastases), involving more frequently hands than feet. PMID:22802566

  16. The Hand and Foot in the Cold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, W C

    1983-02-01

    In brief: Physiological and physical methods were used to study the effects of chilling on the hands and feet and to compare various mittens and footwear. The woolen liner-leather shell mitten is effective protection for the hands, and the woolen sock-felt liner-shoepac combination was good for protecting the feet. Direct contact with the ground greatly increases heat loss, so the thickness of the sole is important. Superficial rewarming of the hand will stimulate blood flow to it, but blood flow will not return to the foot unless the whole body is sufficiently warm. Therefore, torso protection is as important as extremity protection for long exposures. PMID:27463168

  17. Wheeled foot quadruped robot HITAN-I

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Pengfei; Sun Lining

    2006-01-01

    In view of the robot running environment, the structure of wheeled foot and quadruped are adopted in this robot system, which combines the priorities of both wheeled robot and legged robot. Based on CAN bus, the two-class robot control system using multiple controllers and drivers is constructed. At the same time, serial inverse kinematics of swaying leg and parallel inverse kinematics of supporting legs are analyzed independently. The forward gait and turning gait are planned and experiment image is given at last.

  18. Natural gaits of the non-pathological flat foot and high-arched foot

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Yifang; Li, Zhiyu; Lv, Changsheng; Luo, Donglin

    2010-01-01

    There has been a controversy as to whether or not the non-pathological flat foot and high-arched foot have an effect on human walking activities. The 3D foot scanning system was employed to obtain static footprints from subjects adopting a half-weight-bearing stance. Based upon their footprints, the subjects were divided into two groups: the flat-footed and the high-arched. The plantar pressure measurement system was used to measure and record the subjects' successive natural gaits. Two indices were proposed: distribution of vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) of plantar and the rate of the footprint areas. Using these two indices to compare the natural gaits of the two subject groups, we found that (1) in stance phase, there is a significant difference (p<0.01) in the distributions of VGRF of plantar; (2) in a stride cycle, there is also a significant difference (p<0.01) in the rates of the footprint areas. Our analysis suggests that when walking, the VGRF of the plantar brings greater muscle tension...

  19. The CMS Reconstruction Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, David J.; CMS Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    We report on the status and plans for the event reconstruction software of the CMS experiment. The CMS reconstruction algorithms are the basis for a wide range of data analysis approaches currently under study by the CMS collaboration using the first high-energy run of the LHC. These algorithms have been primarily developed and validated using simulated data samples, and are now being commissioned with LHC proton-proton collision data samples. The CMS reconstruction is now operated routinely on all events triggered by the CMS detector, both in a close to real-time prompt reconstruction processing and in frequent passes over the full recorded CMS data set. We discuss the overall software design, development cycle, computational requirements and performance, recent operational performance, and planned improvements of the CMS reconstruction software.

  20. Imaging osteomyelitis and the diabetic foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The clinical diagnosis of osteomyelitis and the diabetic foot is in most of the patients not possible without imaging the bone. The clinical problem is to diagnose infection as early, as reliable and as cheap as possible to prevent the possible longstanding and life-threatening complications. For imaging a lot of different radiological and nuclear medicine methods are available. This article focuses on the possible results of conventional plain radiography and tomography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging as radiological and on bone scan, autologous white blood cell scintigraphy with 111In-oxin or 99mTc-HMPAO, antigranulocyte antibodies, 99mTc/111In-human immunoglobulin,67 Ga-citrate and 99mTc-nanocelloids. Different methods after different answers. Radiological methods give detailed pathological answers, nuclear medicine methods answer questions of specificity such as leukocyte infiltration. If osteomyelitis is suspected, plain radiography should be the first, three phase bone scintigraphy the second and infection specific radiopharmaceuticals the third step of examination. Only in negative images with high clinical suspicion CT or MRI should be the final imaging procedure. In the diabetic foot imaging cascade should also start with plain radiography, followed by three phase bone scintigraphy or MRI. If clinically neuropathy is present specific nuclear medicine imaging should be performed

  1. Radiographic evaluation of the diabetic foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiographic evaluation of the foot in the patient with diabetes mellitus is discussed in this paper. According to the author, it can only be of value when the soft tissue and bony and joint pathologic conditions, which occur more frequently in the diabetic patient are also considered and understood. Although not pathognomic for diabetes mellitus, neuroarthopathy, osteomyelitis, soft tissue infection, and some rheumatic disorders are present with greater frequency in diabetic populations than in non-diabetic populations. Frequently, edema, erythema, hyperthermia, and tenderness are present as nonspecific clinical findings, in which case radiographic evaluation is called upon to define the specific etiology of a particular patient's pathology. Unfortunately, many radiographic, computerized tomographic, and radionuclide studies demonstrate less than optimal positive and negative predictive values unless interpreted in view of clinical history and examination and integrated with the results of other laboratory data. Radiographic evaluation of the diabetic foot may be utilized to establish the presence of disease, the extent of pedal involvement, and the response to therapy. The establishment of the nature of disease processes from radiographic findings alone, however, may be problematic. The diagnosis of osteomyelitis, for example, rests on the recovery of the offending microorganisms from bone aspiration or culture

  2. Nonlinear MHD waves in a Prominence Foot

    CERN Document Server

    Ofman, Leon; Kucera, Therese; Schmieder, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    We study nonlinear waves in a prominence foot using 2.5D MHD model motivated by recent high-resolution observations with Hinode/SOT in Ca~II emission of a prominence on October 10, 2012 showing highly dynamic small-scale motions in the prominence material. Observations of H$\\alpha$ intensities and of Doppler shifts show similar propagating fluctuations. However the optically thick nature of the emission lines inhibits unique quantitative interpretation in terms of density. Nevertheless, we find evidence of nonlinear wave activity in the prominence foot by examining the relative magnitude of the fluctuation intensity ($\\delta I/I\\sim \\delta n/n$). The waves are evident as significant density fluctuations that vary with height, and apparently travel upward from the chromosphere into the prominence material with quasi-periodic fluctuations with typical period in the range of 5-11 minutes, and wavelengths $\\sim <$2000 km. Recent Doppler shift observations show the transverse displacement of the propagating wav...

  3. Imaging osteomyelitis and the diabetic foot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, W. (Gottingen Univ. (Germany). Dep. of Nuclear Medicine)

    1999-03-01

    The clinical diagnosis of osteomyelitis and the diabetic foot is in most of the patients not possible without imaging the bone. The clinical problem is to diagnose infection as early, as reliable and as cheap as possible to prevent the possible longstanding and life-threatening complications. For imaging a lot of different radiological and nuclear medicine methods are available. This article focuses on the possible results of conventional plain radiography and tomography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging as radiological and on bone scan, autologous white blood cell scintigraphy with [sup 111]In-oxin or [sup 99m]Tc-HMPAO, antigranulocyte antibodies, [sup 99m]Tc/[sup 111]In-human immunoglobulin,[sup 67] Ga-citrate and [sup 99m]Tc-nanocelloids. Different methods after different answers. Radiological methods give detailed pathological answers, nuclear medicine methods answer questions of specificity such as leukocyte infiltration. If osteomyelitis is suspected, plain radiography should be the first, three phase bone scintigraphy the second and infection specific radiopharmaceuticals the third step of examination. Only in negative images with high clinical suspicion CT or MRI should be the final imaging procedure. In the diabetic foot imaging cascade should also start with plain radiography, followed by three phase bone scintigraphy or MRI. If clinically neuropathy is present specific nuclear medicine imaging should be performed.

  4. Diagnosis and treatment of diabetic foot infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsky, Benjamin A; Berendt, Anthony R; Deery, H Gunner; Embil, John M; Joseph, Warren S; Karchmer, Adolf W; LeFrock, Jack L; Lew, Daniel P; Mader, Jon T; Norden, Carl; Tan, James S

    2006-06-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: 1. Foot infections in patients with diabetes cause substantial morbidity and frequent visits to health care professionals and may lead to amputation of a lower extremity. 2. Diabetic foot infections require attention to local (foot) and systemic (metabolic) issues and coordinated management, preferably by a multidisciplinary foot-care team (A-II). The team managing these infections should include, or have ready access to, an infectious diseases specialist or a medical microbiologist (B-II). 3. The major predisposing factor to these infections is foot ulceration, which is usually related to peripheral neuropathy. Peripheral vascular disease and various immunological disturbances play a secondary role. 4. Aerobic Gram-positive cocci (especially Staphylococcus aureus) are the predominant pathogens in diabetic foot infections. Patients who have chronic wounds or who have recently received antibiotic therapy may also be infected with Gram-negative rods, and those with foot ischemia or gangrene may have obligate anaerobic pathogens. 5. Wound infections must be diagnosed clinically on the basis of local (and occasionally systemic) signs and symptoms of inflammation. Laboratory (including microbiological) investigations are of limited use for diagnosing infection, except in cases of osteomyelitis (B-II). 6. Send appropriately obtained specimens for culture before starting empirical antibiotic therapy in all cases of infection, except perhaps those that are mild and previously untreated (B-III). Tissue specimens obtained by biopsy, ulcer curettage, or aspiration are preferable to wound swab specimens (A-I). 7. Imaging studies may help diagnose or better define deep, soft-tissue purulent collections and are usually needed to detect pathological findings in bone. Plain radiography may be adequate in many cases, but MRI (in preference to isotope scanning) is more sensitive and specific, especially for detection of soft-tissue lesions (A-I). 8. Infections

  5. Treatment for Common Running/Walking Foot Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Larry W.; Haar, Calin; Ihlers, Matt; Jackson, Allen; Gaudet, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Whether you are a weekend warrior or a serious athlete, most runners fear the possibility of being injured. For those who are physically active or stand on their feet all day, healthy feet are important Highly conditioned runners spend many hours performing foot maintenance to prevent unnecessary injuries. Some of the common foot injuries are:…

  6. 29 CFR 1926.96 - Occupational foot protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Occupational foot protection. 1926.96 Section 1926.96 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1926.96 Occupational foot protection. Safety-toe footwear for employees shall meet the requirements...

  7. Case 6: amputation site on an ulcerated diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, José Neves Paulos

    2016-03-01

    A patient presented with diabetic gangrene on four toes and a moderately infected ulcer on the dorsum of the foot. Following amputation of the gangrenous toes, it was possible to salvage the remaining foot using a combination of antibiotics, octenilin Wound Irrigation Solution and Octiset. PMID:26949850

  8. Diabetic foot syndrome--dermatological point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troskot, Nina; Duvancić, Tomislav; Kolić, Maja

    2013-03-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus often suffer from diabetic foot syndrome, a condition leading to foot ulceration or even amputation of lower extremity. Peripheral neuropathy combined with repetitive trauma to the foot and peripheral vascular disease are the main etiological factors in the development of foot ulcers. Other major contributive factors include the effects of callus, increased plantar pressures, and local infections. Patient education concerning their disease has a central role in the prevention of foot ulcers. Ordinary preventive measures taken by the patient include regular self-inspections, appropriate daily hygiene of the feet, appropriate footwear to reduce plantar pressures, and medical pedicure performed by a pedicurist experienced in diabetic foot patients. The importance of callus in diabetic patients has been shown in several studies by high predictability of subsequent ulcer development in patients with plantar calluses. For removing callus, urea based preparations are considered to be the treatment of choice. In case of local bacterial and fungal diabetic foot infections, systemic antibiotic and systemic antimycotic therapy is indicated, respectively. Wound dressings of various types are the mainstay in the treatment of chronic foot ulcers with avoidance of occlusive dressings in infected ulcers. Since the vast majority of ulcers and amputations can be prevented in diabetic patients, proper diagnosis and multidisciplinary approach are essential. PMID:23837279

  9. Veterinary realities: what is foot and mouth disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Law; A. Mol

    2011-01-01

    Veterinary science draws on different traditions for knowing and acting, and mobilises different kinds of materials and techniques. This article explores these differences and their tensions for the diagnosis of foot and mouth disease in the UK in 2001. It shows that when they talk of foot and mouth

  10. Efficient foot motor control by Neymar’s brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiichi eNaito

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available How very long-term (over many years motor skill training shapes internal motor representation remains poorly understood. We provide valuable evidence that the football brain of Neymar da Silva Santos Júnior (the Brasilian footballer recruits very limited neural resources in the motor-cortical foot regions during foot movements. We scanned his brain activity with a 3-tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI while he rotated his right ankle at 1Hz. We also scanned brain activity when three other age-controlled professional footballers, two top-athlete swimmers and one amateur footballer performed the identical task. A comparison was made between Neymar’s brain activity with that obtained from the others. We found activations in the left medial-wall foot motor regions during the foot movements consistently across all participants. However, the size and intensity of medial-wall activity was smaller in the four professional footballers than in the three other participants, despite no difference in amount of foot movement. Surprisingly, the reduced recruitment of medial-wall foot motor regions became apparent in Neymar. His medial-wall activity was smallest among all participants with absolutely no difference in amount of foot movement. Neymar may efficiently control given foot movements probably by largely conserving motor-cortical neural resources. We discuss this possibility in terms of over-years motor skill training effect, use-dependent plasticity, and efficient motor control.

  11. Foot Posture and Patellar Tendon Pain Among Adult Volleyball Players

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Reinier; Malliaras, Peter; Munteanu, Shannon; Payne, Craig; Morrissey, Dylan; Maffulli, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We hypothesized that individuals with a normal foot posture would be less likely to experience patellar tendon pain and pathology than those with a pronated or supinated foot. Design: Observational study. Setting: Field-based study among competing athletes. Participants: Volleyball player

  12. The Dynamic Stiffness of Surface Footings for Offshore Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vahdatirad, Mohammadjavad; Andersen, Lars; Clausen, Johan;

    2011-01-01

    This study concerns the dynamic stiffness of foundations for large offshore wind turbines. Especially, the purpose of the analysis is to quantify the uncertainties related to the first natural frequency of a turbine supported by a surface footing on layered soil. The dynamic properties of the...... uncertainties and discuss the utilization of reliability-based design of surface footings for wind turbines....

  13. Pentoxifylline: A New Armamentarium in Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    OpenAIRE

    Rewale, Venkatesh; Prabhakar, Kiran Ravi; Chitale, Anjali M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Diabetic foot ulcers are estimated to affect 15% of all diabetics and precede almost 85% of foot amputations. Pentoxyfylline a substituted xanthenes’ derivative has been reported to increase the blood flow to the microcirculation and enhances tissue oxygenation. It has been widely used in the treatment of intermittent claudication.

  14. Foot and ankle injuries in child and adolescent athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Yildirim, Yakup; Esemenli, Tanil

    2004-01-01

    Foot and ankle injuries are most commonly encountered in athletes. Of these, pediatric and adolescent injuries have unique characteristics because of the distinct growth potentials and their consequences specific to this age group. In this article, foot and ankle injuries in child and adolescent athletes are reviewed in the light of the literature.

  15. Behaviors Predicting Foot Lesions in Patients with Non-Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Suico, Jeffrey G.; Marriott, Deanna J; Vinicor, Frank; Litzelman, Debra K.

    1998-01-01

    Associations between specific foot-care behaviors and foot lesions in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus were prospectively investigated. Data from a randomized controlled trial for preventing diabetic foot lesions were analyzed as a prospective cohort using logistic regression. Independent variables included foot-care behaviors, patient self-foot examination, going barefoot, availability of foot-care assistance, and visits to health-care providers. The dependent variable w...

  16. The devil is in the detail: Prevention of diabetic foot ulceration in rural area is possible

    OpenAIRE

    Chia-Mou Lee; Chang-Cheng Chang; Chien-Ming Chen; Li-Ju Lai; Chyong-Fang Chang; Mei-Yen Chen

    2013-01-01

    Background: Foot self-care capability is an important factor in diabetic foot ulceration, especially in disadvantaged rural areas. Aim: To explore the causes of foot ulceration and practice foot self-care behaviors before and after diabetic foot ulceration. Method: A descriptive, retrospective design was conducted in a rural hospital in southern Taiwan. Results: A total of 49 participants with diabetic foot ulcers participated in this study. More than half were male (63.3%), still working in...

  17. Delayed breast implant reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsom, Gitte B.; Hölmich, Lisbet R.; Steding-Jessen, Marianne;

    2011-01-01

    -stage procedures. From the Danish Registry for Plastic Surgery of the Breast, which has prospectively registered data for women undergoing breast implantations since 1999, we identified 559 women without a history of radiation therapy undergoing 592 delayed breast reconstructions following breast cancer during the......Studies of complications following reconstructive surgery with implants among women with breast cancer are needed. As the, to our knowledge, first prospective long-term study we evaluated the occurrence of complications following delayed breast reconstruction separately for one- and two...

  18. The Modulation and Control of the Gecko's Foot Movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Ce; Dai Zhen-dong; Ji Ai-hong; Wang Wei-ying; Sun Jiu-rong

    2005-01-01

    The modulation and control of gecko's foot movements were studied electrophysiologically in order to design the motor control system of a gecko-mimic robot. In this study ( 1 ) the anatomy of the peripheral nerves controlling the gecko's foot movements was determined; (2) the relationship between the limb nerves of the gecko and its foot motor patterns was studied; (3) the afferent impulses of the nerves evoked by rubbing the gecko's toes and palm were recorded; (4) copying the natural patterns of movement of the gecko's foot (abduction, adduction, flexion, and revolution) and its limb nerve modulation and control mechanism, the nerves were stimulated under computer control, and the results recorded by CCD.Results suggest that gecko's foot movements can be successfully controlled by artificial electrical signals.

  19. Surgical Ventricular Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available SURGICAL VENTRICULAR RECONSTRUCTION MONTEFIORE-EINSTEIN HEART CENTER NEW YORK CITY, NEW YORK February 13, 2008 00:00:09 NARRATOR: Welcome to the Montefiore-Einstein Heart Center in ...

  20. Surgical Ventricular Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available SURGICAL VENTRICULAR RECONSTRUCTION MONTEFIORE-EINSTEIN HEART CENTER NEW YORK CITY, NEW YORK February 13, 2008 00:00:09 NARRATOR: Welcome to the Montefiore-Einstein Heart Center in New York City. In ...

  1. Prairie Reconstruction Initiative

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the Prairie Reconstruction Initiative Advisory Team (PRIAT) is to identify and take steps to resolve uncertainties in the process of prairie...

  2. Overview of Image Reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marr, R. B.

    1980-04-01

    Image reconstruction (or computerized tomography, etc.) is any process whereby a function, f, on Rn is estimated from empirical data pertaining to its integrals, ∫f(x) dx, for some collection of hyperplanes of dimension k < n. The paper begins with background information on how image reconstruction problems have arisen in practice, and describes some of the application areas of past or current interest; these include radioastronomy, optics, radiology and nuclear medicine, electron microscopy, acoustical imaging, geophysical tomography, nondestructive testing, and NMR zeugmatography. Then the various reconstruction algorithms are discussed in five classes: summation, or simple back-projection; convolution, or filtered back-projection; Fourier and other functional transforms; orthogonal function series expansion; and iterative methods. Certain more technical mathematical aspects of image reconstruction are considered from the standpoint of uniqueness, consistency, and stability of solution. The paper concludes by presenting certain open problems. 73 references. (RWR)

  3. Surgical Ventricular Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... reconstruction. This study is going to be a land…landmark study. And in all likelihood will influence ... improve postoperatively. But, nevertheless, this is an acute change and may take some time for the myocardium ...

  4. Overview of image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Image reconstruction (or computerized tomography, etc.) is any process whereby a function, f, on R/sup n/ is estimated from empirical data pertaining to its integrals, ∫f(x) dx, for some collection of hyperplanes of dimension k < n. The paper begins with background information on how image reconstruction problems have arisen in practice, and describes some of the application areas of past or current interest; these include radioastronomy, optics, radiology and nuclear medicine, electron microscopy, acoustical imaging, geophysical tomography, nondestructive testing, and NMR zeugmatography. Then the various reconstruction algorithms are discussed in five classes: summation, or simple back-projection; convolution, or filtered back-projection; Fourier and other functional transforms; orthogonal function series expansion; and iterative methods. Certain more technical mathematical aspects of image reconstruction are considered from the standpoint of uniqueness, consistency, and stability of solution. The paper concludes by presenting certain open problems. 73 references

  5. Breast reconstruction - natural tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    After a mastectomy , some women choose to have cosmetic surgery to remake their breast. This type of surgery ... Risks of anesthesia and surgery are: Reactions to medicines Breathing problems Bleeding, blood clots , or infection Risks of breast reconstruction with ...

  6. Permutationally invariant state reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Moroder, Tobias; Toth, Geza; Schwemmer, Christian; Niggebaum, Alexander; Gaile, Stefanie; Gühne, Otfried; Weinfurter, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Feasible tomography schemes for large particle numbers must possess, besides an appropriate data acquisition protocol, also an efficient way to reconstruct the density operator from the observed finite data set. Since state reconstruction typically requires the solution of a non-linear large-scale optimization problem, this is a major challenge in the design of scalable tomography schemes. Here we present an efficient state reconstruction scheme for permutationally invariant quantum state tomography. It works for all common state-of-the-art reconstruction principles, including, in particular, maximum likelihood and least squares methods, which are the preferred choices in today's experiments. This high efficiency is achieved by greatly reducing the dimensionality of the problem employing a particular representation of permutationally invariant states known from spin coupling combined with convex optimization, which has clear advantages regarding speed, control and accuracy in comparison to commonly employed n...

  7. Surgical Ventricular Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a better procedure, the ventricular reconstruction or heart transplantation. This particular viewer actually saw our previous video on heart transplantation. And to answer that question, they are both ...

  8. On TPC cluster reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Dydak, F; Nefedov, Y; Wotschack, J; Zhemchugov, A

    2004-01-01

    For a bias-free momentum measurement of TPC tracks, the correct determination of cluster positions is mandatory. We argue in particular that (i) the reconstruction of the entire longitudinal signal shape in view of longitudinal diffusion, electronic pulse shaping, and track inclination is important both for the polar angle reconstruction and for optimum r phi resolution; and that (ii) self-crosstalk of pad signals calls for special measures for the reconstruction of the z coordinate. The problem of 'shadow clusters' is resolved. Algorithms are presented for accepting clusters as 'good' clusters, and for the reconstruction of the r phi and z cluster coordinates, including provisions for 'bad' pads and pads next to sector boundaries, respectively.

  9. Surgical Ventricular Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... He has not been readmitted for any reasons related to heart failure. 00:41:57 ROBERT E. ... question, because it really deals with whether anything related to surgical ventricular reconstruction would add to the ...

  10. Midfoot reconstruction with serratus anterior-rib osteomuscular free flap following oncological resection of synovial sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battiston, Bruno; Artiaco, Stefano; Piana, Raimondo; Boux, Elena; Tos, Pierluigi

    2015-12-01

    During recent decades, the concept of surgical treatment of malignant bone and soft tissue sarcomas has evolved, with the aim of preserving limb function. In this paper we report a case of metatarsal reconstruction by means of serratus and rib free flap after excision of a synovial sarcoma located in the dorsal aspect of the midfoot. Five years after the operation, the patient was free from recurrence and recovered full foot function. Amputation has been widely used in the past and this procedure still remains a valuable option when limb salvage is not possible. Nevertheless, in selected cases, reconstruction by means of composite free flaps may be successfully used for limb preservation in the treatment of malignant foot tumors after surgical excision. PMID:25838161

  11. Chalet. Reconstruction from Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Gheysen, Eva

    2015-01-01

    In the research project several design tactics are developed in order to counteract the phenomenon of experiential erosion. This particular project explored one of the tactics: Reconstruction from Memory. When reconstructing space from memory, isolated spatial fragments from the past are reformed into a new, decontextualized construct that represents the most memorable experiences evoked by that space. These memories give insight in which architectural features strongly affect our experience ...

  12. Reconstructing baryon oscillations

    OpenAIRE

    Noh, Yookyung; White, Martin; Padmanabhan, Nikhil

    2009-01-01

    The baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) method for constraining the expansion history is adversely affected by non-linear structure formation, which washes out the correlation function peak created at decoupling. To increase the constraining power of low z BAO experiments, it has been proposed that one use the observed distribution of galaxies to "reconstruct'' the acoustic peak. Recently Padmanabhan, White and Cohn provided an analytic formalism for understanding how reconstruction works withi...

  13. Custom-Made Foot Orthoses Decrease Medial Foot Loading During Drop Jump in Individuals With Patellofemoral Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathleff, Michael S; Richter, Camilla; Brushøj, Christoffer;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of foot orthoses on medial-to-lateral plantar forces during drop jump and single leg squat, and second, to explore the self-reported change in symptoms after 12 weeks of wearing the orthoses in individuals with patellofemoral pain (PFP). DESIGN: Cohort study...... with 12 weeks of follow-up. SETTING: Hospital setting. PARTICIPANTS: 23 adults with PFP. INTERVENTIONS: Custom-made foot orthoses. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Foot loading (plantar pressure) was collected from the most painful side during drop jump and single leg squat using pressure sensitive Pedar insoles...... in peak medial-to-lateral force during drop jump. Individuals with a self-reported improvement after 12 weeks had a significant 4.2%-point larger reduction in medial-to-lateral foot loading during drop jump. CONCLUSIONS: This preliminary study showed that foot orthoses were associated with a decrease...

  14. Cosmic tidal reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hong-Ming; Pen, Ue-Li; Yu, Yu; Er, Xinzhong; Chen, Xuelei

    2016-05-01

    The gravitational coupling of a long-wavelength tidal field with small-scale density fluctuations leads to anisotropic distortions of the locally measured small-scale matter correlation function. Since the local correlation function is known to be statistically isotropic in the absence of such tidal interactions, the tidal distortions can be used to reconstruct the long-wavelength tidal field and large-scale density field in analogy with the cosmic microwave background lensing reconstruction. In this paper we present the theoretical framework of cosmic tidal reconstruction and test the reconstruction in numerical simulations. We find that the density field on large scales can be reconstructed with good accuracy and the cross-correlation coefficient between the reconstructed density field and the original density field is greater than 0.9 on large scales (k ≲0.1 h /Mpc ), with the filter scale ˜1.25 Mpc /h . This is useful in the 21 cm intensity mapping survey, where the long-wavelength radial modes are lost due to a foreground subtraction process.

  15. Permutationally invariant state reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moroder, Tobias; Hyllus, Philipp; Tóth, Géza;

    2012-01-01

    Feasible tomography schemes for large particle numbers must possess, besides an appropriate data acquisition protocol, an efficient way to reconstruct the density operator from the observed finite data set. Since state reconstruction typically requires the solution of a nonlinear large-scale opti......Feasible tomography schemes for large particle numbers must possess, besides an appropriate data acquisition protocol, an efficient way to reconstruct the density operator from the observed finite data set. Since state reconstruction typically requires the solution of a nonlinear large......-scale optimization problem, this is a major challenge in the design of scalable tomography schemes. Here we present an efficient state reconstruction scheme for permutationally invariant quantum state tomography. It works for all common state-of-the-art reconstruction principles, including, in particular, maximum...... likelihood and least squares methods, which are the preferred choices in today's experiments. This high efficiency is achieved by greatly reducing the dimensionality of the problem employing a particular representation of permutationally invariant states known from spin coupling combined with convex...

  16. MR imaging evaluation of diabetic foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourteen diabetic patients with suspected foot infection and/or neuropathic joint were evaluated with MR imaging to identify the presence and extent of infection and also to exclude coexistent infection in the neuropathic joint. Osteomyelitis (n = 8), abscess (n = 7), septic arthritis (n = 4), tenosynovitis (n = 4), and neuropathic joint (n = 5) were diagnosed with MR imaging. Osteomyelitis and/or abscess were excluded by MR findings in 13 instances. Most patients with infection had one more than one site of involvement. Clinical or surgical confirmation of the MR diagnoses was obtained in all but nine of the infection sites or cases of neuropathic joint. Only one false-negative diagnosis of osteomyelitis was made in this series. It is concluded that MR imaging provided accurate information regarding the presence and extent of infection and that this information was decisive in patient management

  17. Genomics and outbreaks: foot and mouth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freimanis, G L; Di Nardo, A; Bankowska, K; King, D J; Wadsworth, J; Knowles, N J; King, D P

    2016-04-01

    Foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) is an animal pathogen of global economic significance. Identifying the sources of outbreaks plays an important role in disease control; however, this can be confounded by the ease with which FMDV can spread via movement of infected livestock and animal products, aerosols or fomites, e.g. contaminated persons and objects. As sequencing technologies have advanced, this review highlights the uses of viral genomic data in helping to understand the global distribution and transboundary movements of FMDV, and the role that these approaches have played in control and surveillance programmes. The recent application of next-generation sequencing platforms to address important epidemiological and evolutionary challenges is discussed with particular reference to the advent of 'omics' technologies. PMID:27217177

  18. Pé diabético Diabetic foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nádia Duarte

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Os problemas do pé são uma complicação comum da diabetes, com uma prevalência de 23-42% para a neuropatia, 9-23% - para a doença vascular e 5-7% - para a ulceração do pé. Estes, resultam em importantes consequências médicas, sociais e económicas para os doentes, respectiva família e sociedade. A ulceração do pé diabético está associada à doença vascular periférica e neuropatia periférica, frequentemente em combinação. No entanto, os indivíduos com um risco elevado de ulceração podem ser facilmente identificados através de um exame clínico cuidadoso dos seus pés, estando a educação e follow-up periódicos indicados nestes casos. Quando a úlcera do pé é complicada por uma infecção, a combinação pode ser ameaçadora para o membro e até para a vida. A infecção é definida clinicamente, mas as culturas ajudam na identificação dos agentes patogénicos responsáveis. A terapêutica antimicrobiana deve ser guiada pelos resultados das culturas e, embora esta terapêutica possa curar a infecção isoladamente, não cicatriza a úlcera, carecendo de correcção de outros factores (focos de pressão anómala, isquémia do membro para lograr esta cicatrização.Diabetic foot problems are a common complication of diabetes, with a prevalence of - 23-42% for neuropathy, 9-23% for vascular disease and 5-7% for foot ulceration. It, results in major medical, social and economic consequences for the patients, their families, and society. Diabetic foot ulceration is associated with peripheral vascular disease and peripheral neuropathy, often in combination. Individuals with the greatest risk of ulceration can easily be identified by careful clinical examination of their feet. Education and frequent follow-up is indicated for these patients. When a foot ulcer is complicated by an infection, the combination can be limb-threatening, or life-threatening. Infection is defined clinically, but wound cultures assist in identifying

  19. Radiology of the foot in alcoholism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have reviewed the radiographic patterns of the foot in 28 patients affected by neuropathic joint disease complicating alcoholism, out of a series of 82 chronic ethylic patients. Sixteen of them were also affected by diabetes mellitus. On the basis of X-ray findings, lesion were divided into tree groups, reflecting the evolution of the disease: 1) early changes, especially affecting the soft tissue and joints;2) definite lesions, consisting of fractures, osteolysis, bone destruction and amputation, periarticulardebris; 3)''healing'' signs, simulating degenerative joint disease, which cause severe and weakening deformities. Tabe dorsalis and diabetic osteoarthropathy must be differentiated from alcohol-induced syndrome. Even though a correct differential diagnosis is often difficult to reach, it must be kept in mind that focal/diffuse osteopenia is the most characteristic manifestation of alcoholic osteopathy, whereas different radiographic findings simulate chronic degenerative arthropathies

  20. Whole Genome Sequencing Identifies a 78 kb Insertion from Chromosome 8 as the Cause of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Neuropathy CMTX3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Megan H.; Chaudhry, Rabia; Qi, Jessica; Kidambi, Aditi; Drew, Alexander P.; Ryan, Monique M.; Subramanian, Gopinath M.; Young, Helen K.; Zuchner, Stephan; Reddel, Stephen W.; Nicholson, Garth A.; Kennerson, Marina L.

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of whole exome sequencing, cases where no pathogenic coding mutations can be found are increasingly being observed in many diseases. In two large, distantly-related families that mapped to the Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy CMTX3 locus at chromosome Xq26.3-q27.3, all coding mutations were excluded. Using whole genome sequencing we found a large DNA interchromosomal insertion within the CMTX3 locus. The 78 kb insertion originates from chromosome 8q24.3, segregates fully with the disease in the two families, and is absent from the general population as well as 627 neurologically normal chromosomes from in-house controls. Large insertions into chromosome Xq27.1 are known to cause a range of diseases and this is the first neuropathy phenotype caused by an interchromosomal insertion at this locus. The CMTX3 insertion represents an understudied pathogenic structural variation mechanism for inherited peripheral neuropathies. Our finding highlights the importance of considering all structural variation types when studying unsolved inherited peripheral neuropathy cases with no pathogenic coding mutations. PMID:27438001

  1. A brief review of recent Charcot-Marie-Tooth research and priorities [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/53g

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Ekins

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This brief review of current research progress on Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT disease is a summary of discussions initiated at the Hereditary Neuropathy Foundation (HNF scientific advisory board meeting on November 7, 2014. It covers recent published and unpublished in vitro and in vivo research. We discuss recent promising preclinical work for CMT1A, the development of new biomarkers, the characterization of different animal models, and the analysis of the frequency of gene mutations in patients with CMT. We also describe how progress in related fields may benefit CMT therapeutic development, including the potential of gene therapy and stem cell research. We also discuss the potential to assess and improve the quality of life of CMT patients. This summary of CMT research identifies some of the gaps which may have an impact on upcoming clinical trials. We provide some priorities for CMT research and areas which HNF can support. The goal of this review is to inform the scientific community about ongoing research and to avoid unnecessary overlap, while also highlighting areas ripe for further investigation. The general collaborative approach we have taken may be useful for other rare neurological diseases.

  2. MRI findings, patterns of disease distribution, and muscle fat fraction calculation in five patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2 F disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaeta, Michele; Mileto, Achille; Minutoli, Fabio; Settineri, Nicola; Donato, Rocco; Ascenti, Giorgio; Blandino, Alfredo [Policlinico ' ' G. Martino' ' , Dipartimento di Scienze Radiologiche, Messina (Italy); Mazzeo, Anna; Di Leo, Rita [Policlinico ' ' G. Martino' ' , Dipartimento di Neuroscienze, Scienze Psichiatriche ed Anestesiologiche, Messina (Italy)

    2012-05-15

    To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pattern of muscle involvement and disease progression in five patients with late-onset Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease type 2 F, due to a previously unknown mutation. Five patients (three males, two females) underwent MRI of the lower limbs to define the pattern of muscle involvement and evaluate the muscle fat fraction (MFF) of residual thigh muscle with gradient-echo (GRE) dual-echo dual-flip angle technique. Evaluation of fatty infiltration both by visual inspection and MFF calculation was performed. A proximal-to-distal gradient of muscle involvement was depicted in male patients with extensive muscle wasting of lower legs, less severe impairment of distal thigh muscles, and sparing of proximal thigh muscles. A peculiar phenotype finding was that no or only slight muscle abnormalities could be found in the two female patients. We described the pattern of muscle involvement and disease progression in a family with CMT disease type 2 F. GRE dual-echo dual-flip angle MRI technique is a valuable technique to obtain a rapid quantification of MFF. (orig.)

  3. INF2 mutations associated with dominant inherited intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in two Chinese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Suqin; Wang, Wei; Wang, Renbin; Lv, He; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Zhaoxia; Jiao, Jinsong; Yuan, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Recently, mutations in the inverted formin 2 (INF2) gene have been indentified in patients with dominant inherited intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (DI-CMT) with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). We report clinical and nerve pathological changes in two Chinese patients. Case 1 is 27 years old and presented with distal muscle weakness and atrophy of legs at the age of 13 and renal failure at the age of 26. Three of his family members died due to pure renal failure. Case 2 is 22 years old and presented with distal muscle weakness and atrophy of the legs with transient attacks of difficulty in speaking at age 17. Proteinuria was found by routine urine test at the same time. Sural nerve biopsy revealed moderate-to-severe loss of myelinated fibers with union bulbs and regeneration clusters in both patients. Ultrastructurally, numerous elongated extensions of Schwann cells of unmyelinated fibers could be seen in both patients. INF2 gene mutation screening revealed c.451 T>C in case 1 and c.341 G>A in case 2. This is the first report of Chinese patients with INF2-related DI-CMT. The c.451 T>C mutant was responsible for both isolated FSGS and a dual phenotype of FSGS and neuropathy within one family. Intrafamilial variability can be found with the same INF2 mutation. The CNS manifestations further broadened the clinical spectrum of INF2- associated disorders. PMID:25943269

  4. Examining hand dominance using dynamometric grip strength testing as evidence for overwork weakness in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts-Clarke, Daniel; Fornusek, Che; Fiatarone Singh, Maria A; Burns, Joshua; Hackett, Daniel A

    2016-09-01

    This systematic review with a meta-analysis of studies was carried out to evaluate the potential of overwork weakness on the basis of grip strength of dominant and nondominant hands in individuals with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). Numerous electronic databases were searched from the earliest records to February 2016. Studies of any design including participants older than 18 years of age with a confirmed diagnosis of CMT that measured grip strength of both hands using dynamometric testing were eligible for inclusion. Of 12 593 articles identified following removal of duplicates, five articles fulfilled the criteria. A total of 166 participants, mostly with CMT1 or CMT2, were described from the studies included. Hand and finger pinch grip strength for the dominant compared with the nondominant hand was not statistically different. There is no definitive evidence that preferential use of the dominant hand in CMT impairs function relative to the nondominant hand. Thus, robust exercise trials of progressive resistance training are needed to understand the extent of adaptations possible and provide evidence of the safety of such regimens. PMID:27177353

  5. A novel synonymous mutation in the MPZ gene causing an aberrant splicing pattern and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrado, L; Magri, S; Bagarotti, A; Carecchio, M; Piscosquito, G; Pareyson, D; Varrasi, C; Vecchio, D; Zonta, A; Cantello, R; Taroni, F; D'Alfonso, S

    2016-08-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is an inherited peripheral neuropathy with a heterogeneous genetic background. Here, we describe two CMT1B families with a mild sensory-motor neuropathy and a novel synonymous variant (c.309G > T, p.G103G) in exon 3 of the MPZ gene. Next generation sequencing analysis on a 94 CMT gene panel showed no mutations in other disease genes. In vitro splicing assay and mRNA expression analysis indicated that the c.309T variant enhances a cryptic donor splice site at position c.304 resulting in the markedly increased expression of the r.304_448del alternative transcript in patients' cells. This transcript is predicted to encode a truncated P0 protein (p.V102Cfs11*) lacking the transmembrane domain, thus suggesting a possible haploinsufficiency mechanism for this mutation. This is the third reported synonymous MPZ variant associated with CMT1 and affecting splicing. These data confirm the functional impact of synonymous variants on MPZ splicing and their possible role as disease-causing mutations rather than silent polymorphisms. PMID:27344971

  6. Loss of the E3 ubiquitin ligase LRSAM1 sensitizes peripheral axons to degeneration in a mouse model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent P. Bogdanik

    2013-05-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous condition characterized by peripheral axon degeneration with subsequent motor and sensory deficits. Several CMT gene products function in endosomal sorting and trafficking to the lysosome, suggesting that defects in this cellular pathway might present a common pathogenic mechanism for these conditions. LRSAM1 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that is implicated in this process, and mutations in LRSAM1 have recently been shown to cause CMT. We have generated mouse mutations in Lrsam1 to create an animal model of this form of CMT (CMT2P. Mouse Lrsam1 is abundantly expressed in the motor and sensory neurons of the peripheral nervous system. Both homozygous and heterozygous mice have largely normal neuromuscular performance and only a very mild neuropathy phenotype with age. However, Lrsam1 mutant mice are more sensitive to challenge with acrylamide, a neurotoxic agent that causes axon degeneration, indicating that the axons in the mutant mice are indeed compromised. In transfected cells, LRSAM1 primarily localizes in a perinuclear compartment immediately beyond the Golgi and shows little colocalization with components of the endosome to lysosome trafficking pathway, suggesting that other cellular mechanisms also merit consideration.

  7. A novel mutation in the nerve-specific 5'UTR of the GJB1 gene causes X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Sinéad M

    2011-03-01

    X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT1X) is the second most common cause of CMT, and is usually caused by mutations in the gap junction protein beta 1 (GJB1) gene which codes for connexin 32 (CX32). CX32 has three tissue-specific promoters, P1 which is specific for liver and pancreas, P1a specific for liver, oocytes and embryonic stem cells, and P2 which is nerve-specific. Over 300 mutations have been described in GJB1, spread throughout the coding region. We describe two families with X-linked inheritance and a phenotype consistent with CMT1X who did not have mutations in the GJB1 coding region. The non-coding region of GJB1 was sequenced and an upstream exon-splicing variant found at approximately - 373G>A which segregated with the disease in both families and was not present in controls. This substitution is located at the last base of the nerve-specific 5\\'UTR and thus may disrupt splicing of the nerve-specific transcript. Online consensus splice-site programs predict a reduced score for the mutant sequence vs. the normal sequence. It is likely that other mutations within the GJB1 non-coding regions account for the CMT1X families who do not have coding region mutations.

  8. Mitofusin 2 expression dominates over mitofusin 1 exclusively in mouse dorsal root ganglia - a possible explanation for peripheral nervous system involvement in Charcot-Marie-Tooth 2A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawalec, Maria; Zabłocka, Barbara; Kabzińska, Dagmara; Neska, Jacek; Beręsewicz, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2), a protein of the mitochondrial outer membrane, is essential for mitochondrial fusion and contributes to the maintenance and operation of the mitochondrial network. Mutations in the mitofusin 2 gene cause axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2A (CMT2A), an inherited disease affecting peripheral nerve axons. The precise mechanism by which mutations in MFN2 selectively cause the degeneration of long peripheral axons is not known. There is a hypothesis suggesting the involvement of reduced expression of a homologous protein, mitofusin 1 (Mfn1), in the peripheral nervous system, and less effective compensation of defective mitofusin 2 by mitofusin 1. We therefore aimed to perform an analysis of the mitofusin 1 and mitofusin 2 mRNA and protein expression profiles in different mouse tissues, with special attention paid to dorsal root ganglia (DRGs), as parts of the peripheral nervous system. Quantitative measurement relating to mRNA revealed that expression of the Mfn2 gene dominates over Mfn1 mainly in mouse DRG, as opposed to other nervous system samples and other tissues studied. This result was further supported by Western blot evaluation. Both these sets of data confirm the hypothesis that the cellular consequences of mutations in the mitofusin 2 gene can mostly be manifested in the peripheral nervous system. PMID:25574749

  9. The stretcher spontaneous neurodegenerative mutation models Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4D [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/8c

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Chandler

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Mice affected by a spontaneous mutation which arose within our colony exhibited a neuromuscular phenotype involving tremor and characteristic stretching of the rear limbs. The mutant, named stretcher, was used to breed a backcross cohort for genetic mapping studies. The gene responsible for the mutant phenotype was mapped to a small region on mouse chromosome 15, with a LOD score above 20. Candidate genes within the region included the Ndrg1 gene. Examination of this gene in the mutant mouse strain revealed that exons 10 to 14 had been deleted. Mutations in the human orthologue are known to result in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4D (CMT4D a severe early-onset disorder involving Schwann cell dysfunction and extensive demyelination. The stretcher mutant mouse is more severely affected than mice in which the Ndrg1 gene had been knocked out by homologous recombination. Our results demonstrate that the Ndrg1str mutation provides a new model for CMT4D, and demonstrate that exons 10 to 14 of Ndrg1 encode amino acids crucial to the appropriate function of Ndrg1 in the central nervous system.

  10. Surgical decision criteria: Bednar tumour of the foot in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiak, Rainer; Weidner, Katrin; Bruder, Elisabeth; Kalbermatten, Daniel F; Haug, Martin

    2011-12-01

    An 8-year-old boy was admitted for excision of a putative 'blue nevus' on the left foot. Histological examination and immunohistochemistry revealed a Bednar tumour, the pigmented variant of dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans. Surgical options considered by a multidisciplinary team included wide local excision, Mohs micrographic surgery or a staged excision with examination of several histological sections. The third alternative procedure was chosen after consideration of tumour and patient factors to achieve the best possible clinical, cosmetic and functional outcome. After the final surgical procedure with resection of the third metatarsal bone, all peripheral margins were free of tumour, and the interdigital space was reconstructed with a pedicled pulpa flap. Three years after surgery, there was no tumour recurrence, and further long-term follow-up for this patient will be provided. PMID:21719366

  11. [Pelvic limb damage control following a complex foot injury. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez-Vélez, D; Durán-Martínez, N; Peñafort-García, J A; Romero-Peña, A

    2015-01-01

    More than 20% of the tarsometatarsal joint injuries (Lisfranc injuries) occur during motor vehicle accidents. This kind of trauma is infrequent and in 50% of cases closed reduction is used. A 18 year-old male patient sustained a high-energy trauma resulting in a Gustilo and Anderson III B open Lisfranc fracture dislocation of the left foot. Surgical debridement, open reduction and internal fixation, and immediate skin coverage were performed. The secondary complication rate may decrease with stringent treatment adherence and proper care of severe orthopedic injuries. Treatment of the latter, including bone and soft tissue injuries (skin, subcutaneous tissue, fascias, musculotendinous junctions, ligaments, periosteum, and neurovascular structures) should follow a multidisciplinary protocol: extensive debridement of nonviable tissue, eradication of infections, and tissue reconstruction or coverage. Thus, any orthopedic surgeon should possess basic knowledge of this protocol. Proper management, using the right technique in each case, and the right timing of treatment are of the utmost importance. PMID:27218253

  12. PATTERN OF AEROBIC B ACTERIAL INFECTION O F DIABETIC FOOT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parmeshwari

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diabetic foot ulcer is one of the commonest complications of longstanding diabetes. Diabetic foot is a common cause of hospital admission in diabetic patients in India. The trio of problems leading onto diabetic foot is neuropathy, vascular changes and infections, which constitute the diabetic foot syndrome. OBJECTIVES: To determine prevalence of aerobic pathogens in diabetic foot lesions. METHODS: Tissue samples were taken from the affected foot of 109 diabetic patients and processed by routine microbiological methods. RESULTS : A total of 244 aerobic organisms were isolated from 100 cases with an average of 2.5 organisms per case. Staphylococcus aureus was the predominant aerobe isolated (25.4% followed by Proteus mirabilis (21.3%. The other aerobes isolated were Pseudomonas aeruginosa (10.65%, Kleb siella pneumonia (8.6%, Escherichia coli (6.9%, Enterococcus faecalis (5.32%, Coagulase Negative Staphylococcus (4.5%, Proteus vulgaris (4.09%, Klebsiella oxytoca (3.27%, Citrobacter freudii (2.86%, Corynebacterium species (2.04%, Group A streptococci and Acinetobacter species (1.63%, and Enterobacter species (0.82%. MRSA was 17.8%. CONCLUSION : Diabetic foot infections are polymicrobial in nature. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common among gram - positive organisms, while P roteus mirabilis was the most frequent isolate among the gram - negative pathogens. Hence early identification of the risk factors and timely institution of appropriate treatment is indispensable to avoid amputations.

  13. The CMS Muon Reconstruction Software

    CERN Document Server

    Trocino, Daniele

    2009-01-01

    Muonic final states will provide clean signatures for many physics processes at the LHC. One of the main goals of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) design is thus to ensure efficient and accurate identification and reconstruction of muons. A sophisticated muon system is used for muon identification and stand-alone reconstruction and the inner silicon tracker exploits the high magnetic field to ensure a very precise transverse momentum resolution. The global reconstruction algorithms combine muons reconstructed in the dedicated spectrometer with tracks reconstructed in the inner detector. The CMS reconstruction software is well suited for both offline reconstruction and online event selection (HLT) and its performance has been studied in detail using Monte Carlo simulations. The muon reconstruction has also been employed successfully to reconstruct cosmic muons traversing the CMS detector. The design of the CMS muon identification and reconstruction is presented, as well as its performance on simulated and cosmi...

  14. Gait characteristics following Achilles tendon elongation: the foot rocker perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bober, Tadeusz; Dziuba, Alicja; Kobel-Buys, Krystyna; Kulig, Kornelia

    2008-01-01

    The action of three functional rockers, namely the heel, ankle and forefoot rocker, assist the progression of the leg over the supporting foot. The purpose of this case series was to analyze the occurrence of foot rockers during gait in three children with cerebral palsy (CP) who had undergone the tendo-Achilles lengthening (TAL), procedure followed by a clinic- or home-based intervention and in one child with CP without history of surgery. Self-selected gait was video-recorded in a laboratory during six testing sessions at half-year intervals rendering a 3 year period of observation. One child had pre- and post-surgical gait data and the other two had post surgical data only. Sagittal plane knee angular velocity, as well as foot to ground positions, and foot rocker occurrence were analyzed. In a child with history of CP, and without history of surgery, mean angular velocities of the 1st, 2nd and 3rd foot rocker were 3.7, 0.57 and 6.67 rad/s, respectively, and the step length and cadence were normal. In children who underwent TAL the 1st and 2nd rocker was absent, as the initial contact of the foot with the ground was either with foot-flat or forefoot. The mean velocity of the 3rd rocker in children who underwent TAL was lower by approximately 50-80% than that of the nonsurgical case. Furthermore, the characteristic pattern of the knee joint to foot-floor position during gait was not observed in these cases. Foot rocker analysis identified children with abnormal gait characteristics. Following surgery these gait characteristics remained abnormal. PMID:18634352

  15. Nipple-areola complex reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Nimboriboonporn, Anongporn; Chuthapisith, Suebwong

    2014-01-01

    Nipple areolar reconstruction (NAC) was introduced since 1940s and evolved as parallel with breast reconstruction since era of breast cancer treatment. It consists of nipple and areolar reconstruction. Ideal reconstruction of the NAC requires symmetry in position, size, shape, texture, and pigmentation and permanent projection. There are many innovative ways to create a nipple and each method has its unique characteristics that apply to certain breast types. NAC reconstruction techniques comp...

  16. Distally based superficial sural artery flap for soft tissue coverage in the distal 2/3 of leg and foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamath B

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Skin coverage for defects in the lower 2/3 of leg, ankle region and posterior heel has always been a difficult challenge for reconstructive surgeon. Methods: We describe our experience with the distally based superficial sural artery flap coverage in 48 patients with moderate sized defects in these difficult areas. Results: One out of 48 flaps (in 48 patients was lost totally and 3 suffered marginal necrosis which did not require any secondary procedure. These complications could have been avoided by proper selection of cases and refining technical skills. Conclusion: This simple procedure could be an important and versatile tool for any reconstructive surgeon in providing skin coverage in the distal leg and proximal foot. Preservation of major arteries of the lower limb, minimal donor defect, relatively uninjured donor area in compound fracture or poly trauma involving distal leg are some of the advantages of the flap.

  17. The clinical assessment study of the foot (CASF: study protocol for a prospective observational study of foot pain and foot osteoarthritis in the general population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menz Hylton B

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Symptomatic osteoarthritis (OA affects approximately 10% of adults aged over 60 years. The foot joint complex is commonly affected by OA, yet there is relatively little research into OA of the foot, compared with other frequently affected sites such as the knee and hand. Existing epidemiological studies of foot OA have focussed predominantly on the first metatarsophalangeal joint at the expense of other joints. This three-year prospective population-based observational cohort study will describe the prevalence of symptomatic radiographic foot OA, relate its occurrence to symptoms, examination findings and life-style-factors, describe the natural history of foot OA, and examine how it presents to, and is diagnosed and managed in primary care. Methods All adults aged 50 years and over registered with four general practices in North Staffordshire, UK, will be invited to participate in a postal Health Survey questionnaire. Respondents to the questionnaire who indicate that they have experienced foot pain in the preceding twelve months will be invited to attend a research clinic for a detailed clinical assessment. This assessment will consist of: clinical interview; physical examination; digital photography of both feet and ankles; plain x-rays of both feet, ankles and hands; ultrasound examination of the plantar fascia; anthropometric measurement; and a further self-complete questionnaire. Follow-up will be undertaken in consenting participants by postal questionnaire at 18 months (clinic attenders only and three years (clinic attenders and survey participants, and also by review of medical records. Discussion This three-year prospective epidemiological study will combine survey data, comprehensive clinical, x-ray and ultrasound assessment, and review of primary care records to identify radiographic phenotypes of foot OA in a population of community-dwelling older adults, and describe their impact on symptoms, function and

  18. Imaging of soft tissue lesions of the foot and ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancroft, Laura W; Peterson, Jeffrey J; Kransdorf, Mark J

    2008-11-01

    Differential diagnosis of soft tissue lesions of the foot can be narrowed with imaging. The cystic nature of ganglia, synovial cysts, and bursitis can be confirmed with MR imaging or sonography. Location and signal characteristics of noncystic lesions can suggest Morton's neuroma, giant cell tumor of tendon sheath, and plantar fibromatosis. Synovial-based lesions of the foot and ankle can be differentiated based on presence or absence of mineralization, lesion density, signal intensity, and enhancement pattern. Knowledge of the incidence of specific neoplasms of the foot and ankle based on patient age aids in providing a limited differential diagnosis. PMID:19038615

  19. Assessment of Lumped-Parameter Models for Rigid Footings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars

    2010-01-01

    The quality of consistent lumped-parameter models of rigid footings is examined. Emphasis is put on the maximum response during excitation and the geometrical damping related to free vibrations. The optimal order of a lumped-parameter model is determined for each degree of freedom, i.e. horizontal...... and vertical translations as well as torsion and rocking, and the necessity of coupling between horizontal sliding and rocking is discussed. Most of the analyses are carried out for hexagonal footings; but in order to generalise the conclusions to a broader variety of footings, comparisons are made...

  20. An overview of foot ulceration in older people with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moakes, Helen

    2012-09-01

    A patient's whole body is affected by diabetes but in particular this chronic disease can cause foot complications. Damage to the nerve and blood supply to the feet as a result of diabetes causes lack of sensation and ischaemia. These problems can lead to diabetic foot ulceration, which, if left untreated, can result in amputation or even death. An essential part of nurses' role in caring for older patients with diabetes in community, acute and residential settings is learning to recognise the signs of a high-risk diabetic foot, and when and where to get help for its treatment. PMID:23008915