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Sample records for characterizing tissue culture

  1. Isolation, culturing and characterization of rat adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells: a simple technique

    OpenAIRE

    NİYAZ, Mehmet; Özer Aylin GÜRPINAR; GÜNAYDIN, Serdar; Onur, Mehmet Ali

    2012-01-01

    In this study, our aim was to develop a new simple technique for isolation of mesenchymal stem cells from adipose tissue. For this purpose, mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from rat adipose tissue by using the primary explant culture technique. When the cells became confluent, they were passaged 4 times by using the standard trypsinization method with trypsin/EDTA solution. Cells at second passage were characterized by using immunofluorescence staining against CD13 and CD29 markers. The r...

  2. Whole genome characterization of non-tissue culture adapted HRSV strains in severely infected children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumaria Rajni

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV is the most important virus causing lower respiratory infection in young children. The complete genetic characterization of RSV clinical strains is a prerequisite for understanding HRSV infection in the clinical context. Current information about the genetic structure of the HRSV genome has largely been obtained using tissue culture adapted viruses. During tissue culture adaptation genetic changes can be introduced into the virus genome, which may obscure subtle variations in the genetic structure of different RSV strains. Methods In this study we describe a novel Sanger sequencing strategy which allowed the complete genetic characterisation of 14 clinical HRSV strains. The viruses were sequenced directly in the nasal washes of severely hospitalized children, and without prior passage of the viruses in tissue culture. Results The analysis of nucleotide sequences suggested that vRNA length is a variable factor among primary strains, while the phylogenetic analysis suggests selective pressure for change. The G gene showed the greatest sequence variation (2-6.4%, while small hydrophobic protein and matrix genes were completely conserved across all clinical strains studied. A number of sequence changes in the F, L, M2-1 and M2-2 genes were observed that have not been described in laboratory isolates. The gene junction regions showed more sequence variability, and in particular the intergenic regions showed a highest level of sequence variation. Although the clinical strains grew slower than the HRSVA2 virus isolate in tissue culture, the HRSVA2 isolate and clinical strains formed similar virus structures such as virus filaments and inclusion bodies in infected cells; supporting the clinical relevance of these virus structures. Conclusion This is the first report to describe the complete genetic characterization of HRSV clinical strains that have been sequenced directly from clinical

  3. Plant tissue culture techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Rolf Dieter Illg

    1991-01-01

    Plant cell and tissue culture in a simple fashion refers to techniques which utilize either single plant cells, groups of unorganized cells (callus) or organized tissues or organs put in culture, under controlled sterile conditions.

  4. Plant tissue culture techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Dieter Illg

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell and tissue culture in a simple fashion refers to techniques which utilize either single plant cells, groups of unorganized cells (callus or organized tissues or organs put in culture, under controlled sterile conditions.

  5. Detection, isolation, and preliminary characterization of bacteria contaminating plant tissue cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Kałużna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to limit the contamination problem in plant tissue cultures experiments on selection of media suitable for detection and isolation of bacteria contaminating plant tissue explants, and preliminary characterization of isolates were made. In the first experiment aiming at detection of bacteria in plant explants four strains representing genera most often occurring at our survey of plant tissue cultures, and earlier isolated and identified (Bacillus, Methylobacterium, Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas were streaked on five bacteriological media (NA, King B, K, R2A and 523 and on the medium used for plant culture initiation – ½ MS with milk albumin (IM. All strains grew on all media but on K and IM at the slowest rate and on 523 medium at the fastest. The IM medium proved to be useful for immediate bacteria detection at the initial stage of culture. In the second experiment, aiming at characterization of isolates on the basis of colony growth and morphology 14 strains (Agrobacterium, Bacillus, Curtobacterium, Flavobacterium, Lactobacillus, Methylobacterium – 2 strains Mycobacterium, Paenibacillus, Plantibacterium, Pseudomonas, Stenotrophomonas, Xanthomonas, and species Serratia marcescens were streaked on five microbiological media: KB, NBY, YDC, YNA and YPGA. All strains grew on all those media but at different rates. The only exception was the strain of Lactobacillus spp., which did not grow on King B medium. This medium allowed the detection of such characteristic traits as fluorescence (Pseudomonas and secretion of inclusions (Stenotrophomonas. The third experiment was focussed on assessment of the sensitivity of detection of specific bacteria in pure cultures and in plant tis- sue cultures using standard PCR and BIO-PCR techniques with genus specific primers and 2 methods of DNA isolation. Results showed that the use of Genomic Mini kit enabled an increase of the sensitivity by 100 times as compared to extraction of DNA by boiling

  6. Molecular characterization of three anther tissue culture varieties of tobaco (Nicotiana tabacum L. using RAPD analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Azucena Fernández B.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPO analysis was used to characterize two new Flue Cured and one black tobacco type varieties derived from in vitro anther tissue culture technique. RAPOs are proposed as an appropriate complement of the morphoagronomic characteristics evaluations to fulfil international seed registration standards established for the identification of tobacco varieties. The identification of three tobacco varieties and their parents was carried out using the RAPO analysis with 64 random primers. Polymorphic products, 214 in number, were amplified only from 14 primers. Statistical analysis realized with the NTSYS program version 1.2 using the Jaccard similarity coefficient. The visual inspection revealed that five primers allowed the separation of the varieties in two groups, according to the type of tobacco: the Flue Cured and Black; while a group of nine primers separates each variety and establish its genetic relationship with their parents. The results obtained show that this technique is appropiated to establish genetic differences between tobacco varieties.

  7. Characterization of connective tissue growth factor expression in primary cultures of human tubular epithelial cells: modulation by hypoxia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Kroening; E. Neubauer; B. Wullich; J. Aten; M. Goppelt-Struebe

    2010-01-01

    Kroening S, Neubauer E, Wullich B, Aten J, Goppelt-Struebe M. Characterization of connective tissue growth factor expression in primary cultures of human tubular epithelial cells: modulation by hypoxia. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 298:F796-F806, 2010. First published December 23, 2009; doi:10.1152/aj

  8. Mass spectrometric characterization of elements and molecules in cell cultures and tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlinghaus, H. F.; Kriegeskotte, C.; Fartmann, M.; Wittig, A.; Sauerwein, W.; Lipinsky, D.

    2006-07-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and laser post-ionization secondary neutral mass spectrometry (laser-SNMS) have been used to image and quantify targeted compounds, intrinsic elements and molecules with subcellular resolution in single cells of both cell cultures and tissues. Special preparation procedures for analyzing cell cultures and tissue materials were developed. Cancer cells type MeWo, incubated with boronated compounds, were sandwiched between two substrates, cryofixed, freeze-fractured and freeze-dried. Also, after injection with boronated compounds, different types of mouse tissues were extracted, prepared on a special specimen carrier and plunged with high velocity into LN 2-cooled propane for cryofixation. After trimming, these tissue blocks were freeze-dried. The measurements of the K/Na ratio demonstrated that for both cell cultures and tissue materials the special preparation techniques used were appropriate for preserving the chemical and structural integrity of the living cell. The boron images show inter- and intracellular boron signals with different intensities. Molecular images show distinct features partly correlated with the cell structure. A comparison between laser-SNMS and ToF-SIMS showed that especially laser-SNMS is particularly well-suited for identifying specific cell structures and imaging ultratrace element concentrations in tissues.

  9. Mass spectrometric characterization of elements and molecules in cell cultures and tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arlinghaus, H.F. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Muenster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Str. 10, D-48149 Muenster (Germany)]. E-mail: arlinghaus@uni-muenster.de; Kriegeskotte, C. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Muenster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Str. 10, D-48149 Muenster (Germany); Fartmann, M. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Muenster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Str. 10, D-48149 Muenster (Germany); Wittig, A. [Strahlenklinik, Universitaetsklinikum Essen, D-45122 Essen (Germany); Sauerwein, W. [Strahlenklinik, Universitaetsklinikum Essen, D-45122 Essen (Germany); Lipinsky, D. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Muenster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Str. 10, D-48149 Muenster (Germany)

    2006-07-30

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and laser post-ionization secondary neutral mass spectrometry (laser-SNMS) have been used to image and quantify targeted compounds, intrinsic elements and molecules with subcellular resolution in single cells of both cell cultures and tissues. Special preparation procedures for analyzing cell cultures and tissue materials were developed. Cancer cells type MeWo, incubated with boronated compounds, were sandwiched between two substrates, cryofixed, freeze-fractured and freeze-dried. Also, after injection with boronated compounds, different types of mouse tissues were extracted, prepared on a special specimen carrier and plunged with high velocity into LN{sub 2}-cooled propane for cryofixation. After trimming, these tissue blocks were freeze-dried. The measurements of the K/Na ratio demonstrated that for both cell cultures and tissue materials the special preparation techniques used were appropriate for preserving the chemical and structural integrity of the living cell. The boron images show inter- and intracellular boron signals with different intensities. Molecular images show distinct features partly correlated with the cell structure. A comparison between laser-SNMS and ToF-SIMS showed that especially laser-SNMS is particularly well-suited for identifying specific cell structures and imaging ultratrace element concentrations in tissues.

  10. Optimization and comprehensive characterization of a faithful tissue culture model of the benign and malignant human prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maund, Sophia Lisette; Nolley, Rosalie; Peehl, Donna Mae

    2014-02-01

    Few preclinical models accurately depict normal human prostate tissue or primary prostate cancer (PCa). In vitro systems typically lack complex cellular interactions among structured prostatic epithelia and a stromal microenvironment, and genetic and molecular fidelity are concerns in both in vitro and in vivo models. 'Tissue slice cultures' (TSCs) provide realistic preclinical models of diverse tissues and organs, but have not been fully developed or widely utilized for prostate studies. Problems encountered include degeneration of differentiated secretory cells, basal cell hyperplasia, and poor survival of PCa. Here, we optimized, characterized, and applied a TSC model of primary human PCa and benign prostate tissue that overcomes many deficiencies of current in vitro models. Tissue cores from fresh prostatectomy specimens were precision-cut at 300 μm and incubated in a rotary culture apparatus. The ability of varied culture conditions to faithfully maintain benign and cancer cell and tissue structure and function over time was evaluated by immunohistological and biochemical assays. After optimization of the culture system, molecular and cellular responses to androgen ablation and to piperlongumine (PL), purported to specifically reduce androgen signaling in PCa, were investigated. Optimized culture conditions successfully maintained the structural and functional fidelity of both benign and PCa TSCs for 5 days. TSCs exhibited androgen dependence, appropriately undergoing ductal degeneration, reduced proliferation, and decreased prostate-specific antigen expression upon androgen ablation. Further, TSCs revealed cancer-specific reduction of androgen receptor and increased apoptosis upon treatment with PL, validating data from cell lines. We demonstrate a TSC model that authentically recapitulates the structural, cellular, and genetic characteristics of the benign and malignant human prostate, androgen dependence of the native tissue, and cancer-specific response

  11. Plant tissue culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plant tissue culture refers to growing and multiplication of cells, tissues and organs of plants on defined solid or liquid media under aseptic and controlled environment. The commercial technology is primarily based on micropropagation, in which rapid proliferation is achieved from tiny stem cuttings, axillary buds, and to a limited extent from somatic embryos, cell clumps in suspension cultures and bioreactors. The cultured cells and tissue can take several pathways. The pathways that lead to the production of true-to-type plants in large numbers are the preferred ones for commercial multiplication. The process of micropropagation is usually divided into several stages i.e., pre-propagation, initiation of explants, subculture of explants for proliferation, shooting and rooting, and hardening. These stages are universally applicable in large-scale multiplication of plants. The delivery of hardened small micropropagated plants to growers and market also requires extra care. (author)

  12. Tissue Culture in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellis, Neal R.; Duray, Paul H.; Hatfill, Steven J.

    1997-01-01

    Attempts to simulate normal tissue micro-environments in vitro have been thwarted by the complexity and plasticity of the extracellular matrix, which is important in regulating cytoskeletal and nuclear matrix proteins. Gravity is one of the problems, tending to separate components that should be kept together. For space shuttle experiments, NASA engineers devised a double-walled rotating bioreactor, which is proving to be a useful tissue culture device on earth as well as in space.

  13. Plant Tissue Culture Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert Alan

    Plant tissue culture has developed into a valid botanical discipline and is considered a key area of biotechnology, but it has not been a key component of the science curriculum because of the expensive and technical nature of research in this area. This manual presents a number of activities that are relatively easy to prepare and perform. The…

  14. Characterization of aldehyde dehydrogenase isozymes in ovarian cancer tissues and sphere cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases belong to a superfamily of detoxifying enzymes that protect cells from carcinogenic aldehydes. Of the superfamily, ALDH1A1 has gained most attention because current studies have shown that its expression is associated with human cancer stem cells. However, ALDH1A1 is only one of the 19 human ALDH subfamilies currently known. The purpose of the present study was to determine if the expression and activities of other major ALDH isozymes are associated with human ovarian cancer and ovarian cancer sphere cultures. Immunohistochemistry was used to delineate ALDH isozyme localization in clinical ovarian tissues. Western Blot analyses were performed on lysates prepared from cancer cell lines and ovarian cancer spheres to confirm the immunohistochemistry findings. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions were used to measure the mRNA expression levels. The Aldefluor® assay was used to measure ALDH activity in cancer cells from the four tumor subtypes. Immunohistochemical staining showed significant overexpression of ALDH1A3, ALDH3A2, and ALDH7A1 isozymes in ovarian tumors relative to normal ovarian tissues. The expression and activity of ALDH1A1 is tumor type-dependent, as seen from immunohistochemisty, Western blot analysis, and the Aldefluor® assay. The expression was elevated in the mucinous and endometrioid ovarian epithelial tumors than in serous and clear cell tumors. In some serous and most clear cell tumors, ALDH1A1 expression was found in the stromal fibroblasts. RNA expression of all studied ALDH isozymes also showed higher expression in endometrioid and mucinous tumors than in the serous and clear cell subtypes. The expression of ALDH enzymes showed tumor type-dependent induction in ovarian cancer cells growing as sphere suspensions in serum-free medium. The results of our study indicate that ALDH enzyme expression and activity may be associated with specific cell types in ovarian tumor tissues and vary according to

  15. Jatobal virus antigenic characterization by ELISA and neutralization test using EIA as indicator, on tissue culture

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    Luiz Tadeu M. Figueiredo

    1988-06-01

    Full Text Available A virus antigenic characterization methodology using an indirect method of antibody detection ELISA with virus-infected cultured cells as antigen and a micro virus neutralisation test using EIA (NT-EIA as an aid to reading were used for antigenic characterization of Jatobal (BeAn 423380. Jatobal virus was characterized as a Bunyaviridae, Bunyavirus genus, Simbu serogroup virus. ELISA using infected cultured cells as antigen is a sensitive and reliable method for identification of viruses and has many advantages over conventional antibody capture ELISA's and other tests: it eliminates solid phase coating with virus and laborious antigen preparation; it permits screening of large numbers of virus antisera faster and more easily than by CF, HAI, or plaque reduction NT. ELISA and NT using EIA as an aid to reading can be applicable to viruses which do not produce cytopathogenic effect. Both techniques are applicable to identification of viruses which grow in mosquito cells.A caracterização antigênica do vírus Jatobal (BeAn 423380 foi efetuada utilizando uma técnica de ELISA para deteccão de anticorpos que utiliza culturas celulares infectadas como antígeno e um micro teste de neutralização para vírus que utiliza o método imunoenzimático como auxiliar para a leitura dos resultados (NT-EIA. O vírus Jatobal foi caracterizado como um Bunyaviridae, gênero Bunyavirus, pertencente ao sorogrupo Simbu. A técnica de ELISA, utilizando culturas celulares infectadas como antígeno, trata-se de método sensível e confiável na identificação de agentes virais, possuindo muitas vantagens sobre ELISA convencionais e outros testes: elimina a preparação laboriosa de antígenos para o revestimento em fase sólida; permite que se teste de forma mais rápida e fácil que por CF, HAI e neutralização por redução de plaques um grande número de antisoros de vírus. ELISA e NT-EIA podem ser utilizados para a classificação de vírus que não produzem

  16. NASA Bioreactor tissue culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Lisa E. Freed of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and her colleagues have reported that initially disc-like specimens tend to become spherical in space, demonstrating that tissues can grow and differentiate into distinct structures in microgravity. The Mir Increment 3 (Sept. 16, 1996 - Jan. 22, 1997) samples were smaller, more spherical, and mechanically weaker than Earth-grown control samples. These results demonstrate the feasibility of microgravity tissue engineering and may have implications for long human space voyages and for treating musculoskeletal disorders on earth. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  17. Tissue culture: the unrealized potential

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Gordon

    2007-01-01

    Lack of differentiated functions of the tissue of origin in tissue culture thought to be due to dedifferentiation was shown to be due to selective overgrowth of fibroblasts. Enrichment culture techniques, (alternate animal and culture passage), designed to give the functionally differentiated cells selective advantage over the fibroblasts resulted in a large number of functionally differentiated clonal strains. Thus the dogma of dedifferentiation was destroyed. It is proposed to substitute th...

  18. Culture - duodenal tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a lab, and placed in a special dish (culture media) that allows bacteria or viruses to grow. The sample is looked at under a microscope regularly to see if any organisms are growing. Organisms that grow on the culture are identified.

  19. Culture - colonic tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Once the sample is taken, the culture does not involve you. Therefore, there is no pain. ... Your health care provider may order this test if you have signs or ... tests such as a stool culture could not identify the cause of ...

  20. Gastric tissue biopsy and culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the belly Black stools Vomiting blood or coffee ground-like material A gastric tissue biopsy and culture can help detect: Cancer Infections, most commonly Helicobacter pylori , the bacteria that can cause stomach ulcers Normal Results A ...

  1. Terpene emission in tissue culture

    OpenAIRE

    Predieri, S.; Rapparini, F.

    2007-01-01

    Tissue cultured plants' vessel headspace is subject to changes during subculture, and the analysis of its variation offers a non-destructive approach for monitoring plant physiology. Among the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that can be released by plants and be potentially recovered in the airspace of plant tissue cultures, terpenes are very important since they can offer a snapshot of the physiological status of the plant under in vitro cultivation. Terpenes are synthesized from carbon di...

  2. Culture of insect tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several aspects are discussed related to the behavior of politenic chromosomes from Rhyncosciara salivary glands kept in culture during different periods of time, without interference of insect hormones. Nucleic acid-and protein synthesis in isolated nuclei and chromosomes are also investigated. Autoradiographic techniques and radioactive precursors for nucleic acids and proteins are used in the research. (M.A.)

  3. Biomedical advances from tissue culture

    OpenAIRE

    Okamoto, Tetsuji; Sato, J. Denry; Barnes, David W.; Sato, Gordon H.

    2013-01-01

    The demonstration that the “dedifferentiation” of cells commonly observed in the early days of tissue culture was due to selective overgrowth of fibroblasts led to enrichment culture techniques (alternate animal and culture passage) designed to give a selective advantage to functionally differentiated tumor cells. These experiments resulted in the derivation of a large number of functionally differentiated clonal strains of a range of cell types. These results gave rise to the hypothesis that...

  4. Application of Tissue Culture in Ornamental Breeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant tissue culture can be broadly defined as the culture of plant cells, tissues, or organs under sterile or aseptic conditions. To most growers, micropropagation is the term that perhaps best describes plant tissue culture. However, plant tissue culture plays an important role through its many ap...

  5. Three Dimensional Optic Tissue Culture and Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    OConnor, Kim C. (Inventor); Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor); Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Aten, Laurie A. (Inventor); Francis, Karen M. (Inventor); Caldwell, Delmar R. (Inventor); Prewett, Tacey L. (Inventor); Fitzgerald, Wendy S. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A process for artificially producing three-dimensional optic tissue has been developed. The optic cells are cultured in a bioireactor at low shear conditions. The tissue forms as normal, functional tissue grows with tissue organization and extracellular matrix formation.

  6. Norway spruce (Picea abies) laccases:Characterization of a laccase in a lignin-forming tissue culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sanna Koutaniemi; Heli A Malmberg; Liisa K Simola; Teemu H Teeri; Anna Karkonen

    2015-01-01

    Secondarily thickened cel wal s of water-conducting vessels and tracheids and support-giving sclerenchyma cel s contain lignin that makes the cel wal s water impermeable and strong. To what extent laccases and peroxidases contribute to lignin biosynthesis in muro is under active evaluation. We performed an in silico study of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) laccases utilizing available genomic data. As many as 292 laccase encoding sequences (genes, gene fragments, and pseudogenes) were detected in the spruce genome. Out of the 112 genes annotated as laccases, 79 are expressed at some level. We isolated five ful-length laccase cDNAs from developing xylem and an extracel ular lignin-forming cel culture of spruce. In addition, we purified and biochemical y characterized one culture medium laccase from the lignin-forming cel culture. This laccase has an acidic pH optimum (pH 3.8–4.2) for coniferyl alcohol oxidation. It has a high affinity to coniferyl alcohol with an apparent Km value of 3.5 mM;however, the laccase has a lower catalytic efficiency (Vmax/Km) for coniferyl alcohol oxidation compared with some purified culture medium peroxidases. The properties are discussed in the context of the information already known about laccases/coniferyl alcohol oxidases of coniferous plants.

  7. Induction and characterization of a cytochrome P-450-dependent camphor hydroxylase in tissue cultures of common sage (Salvia officinalis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funk, C.; Croteau, R. (Washington State Univ., Pullman (United States))

    1993-04-01

    (+)-Camphor, a major monoterpene of the essential oil of common sage (Salvia officinalis), is catabolized in senescent tissue, and the pathway for the breakdown of this bicyclic ketone has been previously elucidated in sage cell-suspension cultures. In the initial step of catabolism, camphor is oxidized to 6-exo-hydroxycamphor, and the corresponding NADPH- and O[sub 2]-dependent hydroxylase activity was demonstrated in microsomal preparations of sage cells. Several well-established inhibitors of cytochrome P-450-dependent reactions, including cytochrome c, clotrimazole, and CO, inhibited the hydroxylation of camphor, and CO-dependent inhibition was partially reversed by blue light. Upon treatment of sage suspension cultures with 30 mM MnCl[sub 2], camphor-6-hydroxylase activity was induced up to 7-fold. A polypeptide with estimated molecular mass of 58 kD from sage microsomal membranes exhibited antigenic cross-reactivity in western blot experiments with two heterologous polyclonal antibodies raised against cytochrome P-450 camphor-5-exo-hydroxylase from Pseudomonas putida and cytochrome P-450 limonene-6S-hydroxylase from spearmint (Mentha spicata). Dot blotting indicated that the concentration of this polypeptide increased with camphor hydroxylase activity in microsomes of Mn[sup 2+]-induced sage cells. These results suggest that camphor-6-exo-hydroxylase from sage is a microsomal cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase that may share common properties and epitopes with bacterial and other plant monoterpene hydroxylases. 44 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Tissue culture of ornamental cacti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio Pérez-Molphe-Balch

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cacti species are plants that are well adapted to growing in arid and semiarid regions where the main problem is water availability. Cacti have developed a series of adaptations to cope with water scarcity, such as reduced leaf surface via morphological modifications including spines, cereous cuticles, extended root systems and stem tissue modifications to increase water storage, and crassulacean acid metabolism to reduce transpiration and water loss. Furthermore, seeds of these plants very often exhibit dormancy, a phenomenon that helps to prevent germination when the availability of water is reduced. In general, cactus species exhibit a low growth rate that makes their rapid propagation difficult. Cacti are much appreciated as ornamental plants due to their great variety and diversity of forms and their beautiful short-life flowers; however, due to difficulties in propagating them rapidly to meet market demand, they are very often over-collected in their natural habitats, which leads to numerous species being threatened, endangered or becoming extinct. Therefore, plant tissue culture techniques may facilitate their propagation over a shorter time period than conventional techniques used for commercial purposes; or may help to recover populations of endangered or threatened species for their re-introduction in the wild; or may also be of value to the preservation and conservation of the genetic resources of this important family. Herein we present the state-of-the-art of tissue culture techniques used for ornamental cacti and selected suggestions for solving a number of the problems faced by members of the Cactaceae family.

  9. Flow cytometric characterization of culture expanded multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from horse adipose tissue: towards the definition of minimal stemness criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascucci, L; Curina, G; Mercati, F; Marini, C; Dall'Aglio, C; Paternesi, B; Ceccarelli, P

    2011-12-15

    In the last decades, multipotent mesenchymal progenitor cells have been isolated from many adult tissues of different species. The International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) has recently established that multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) is the currently recommended designation. In this study, we used flow cytometry to evaluate the expression of several molecules related to stemness (CD90, CD44, CD73 and STRO-1) in undifferentiated, early-passaged MSCs isolated from adipose tissue of four donor horses (AdMSCs). The four populations unanimously expressed high levels of CD90 and CD44. On the contrary, they were unexpectedly negative to CD73. A small percentage of the cells, finally, showed the expression of STRO-1. This last result might be due to the existence of a small subpopulation of STRO-1+ cells or to a poor cross-reactivity of the antibody. A remarkable donor-to-donor consistency and reproducibility of these findings was demonstrated. The data presented herein support the idea that equine AdMSCs may be easily isolated and selected by adherence to tissue culture plastic and exhibit a surface profile characterized by some peculiar differences in comparison to those described in other species. Continued characterization of these cells will help to clarify several aspects of their biology and may ultimately enable the isolation of specific, purified subpopulations. PMID:21839521

  10. Optimization and comprehensive characterization of a faithful tissue culture model of the benign and malignant human prostate

    OpenAIRE

    Sophia L Maund; Nolley, Rosalie; Donna M Peehl

    2013-01-01

    Few preclinical models accurately depict normal human prostate tissue or primary prostate cancer (PCa). In vitro systems typically lack complex cellular interactions among structured prostatic epithelia and a stromal microenvironment, and genetic and molecular fidelity are concerns in both in vitro and in vivo models. “Tissue slice cultures” (TSC) provide realistic preclinical models of diverse tissues and organs, but have not been fully developed or widely utilized for prostate studies. Prob...

  11. Plant Tissue Culture in a Bag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Mike

    2000-01-01

    Describes the use of an oven bag as a sterile chamber for culture initiation and tissue transfer. Plant tissue culture is an ideal tool for introducing students to plants, cloning, and experimental design. Includes materials, methods, discussion, and conclusion sections. (SAH)

  12. Progress in planta transformation without tissue culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Yun-Hong; YU Zeng-Liang; QIN Guang-Yong; HUO Yu-Ping

    2004-01-01

    With the development of planta genetic engineering, more emphases have been laid on convenient and high efficient genetic transformation methods. And transformation without tissue culture is a prospective direction of it. In this paper, traditional transformation methods and the methods of non-tissue culture were summarized. With the exploration and application of Arabidopsis transformation mechanism, with the use of ion beam-mediated transformation invented by Chinese scientists and the development of other transformation methods, transformation methods without tissue culture and planta genetic engineering could be improved rapidly.

  13. Conservation of Biodiversity Through Tissue culture

    OpenAIRE

    Sujata Mathur

    2013-01-01

    Biodiversity is the degree of variation of life forms within a given ecosystem, biome or an entire planet. Biodiversity is a measure of the health of ecosystems. Biodiversity is in part a function of climate. Plant tissue culture comprises a set of in vitro techniques, methods and strategies that are part of the group of technologies called plant biotechnology. Tissue culture has been exploited to create genetic variability from which crop plants can be improved, to improve the state of healt...

  14. Multimodality instrument for tissue characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Robert W. (Inventor); Andrews, Russell J. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A system with multimodality instrument for tissue identification includes a computer-controlled motor driven heuristic probe with a multisensory tip. For neurosurgical applications, the instrument is mounted on a stereotactic frame for the probe to penetrate the brain in a precisely controlled fashion. The resistance of the brain tissue being penetrated is continually monitored by a miniaturized strain gauge attached to the probe tip. Other modality sensors may be mounted near the probe tip to provide real-time tissue characterizations and the ability to detect the proximity of blood vessels, thus eliminating errors normally associated with registration of pre-operative scans, tissue swelling, elastic tissue deformation, human judgement, etc., and rendering surgical procedures safer, more accurate, and efficient. A neural network program adaptively learns the information on resistance and other characteristic features of normal brain tissue during the surgery and provides near real-time modeling. A fuzzy logic interface to the neural network program incorporates expert medical knowledge in the learning process. Identification of abnormal brain tissue is determined by the detection of change and comparison with previously learned models of abnormal brain tissues. The operation of the instrument is controlled through a user friendly graphical interface. Patient data is presented in a 3D stereographics display. Acoustic feedback of selected information may optionally be provided. Upon detection of the close proximity to blood vessels or abnormal brain tissue, the computer-controlled motor immediately stops probe penetration. The use of this system will make surgical procedures safer, more accurate, and more efficient. Other applications of this system include the detection, prognosis and treatment of breast cancer, prostate cancer, spinal diseases, and use in general exploratory surgery.

  15. Differentiation of Haemopoietic Tissue in Organ Cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As is well known, it is not possible to maintain over lengthy periods the normal differentiation of haemopoietic tissue in cultures. It seems probable that the lack of success attending such attempts is due to the fact that cultures do not present the necessary conditions for local interactions of haemopoietic matter with the stroma of the organs concerned. In order to test this possibility, recourse was had to the method of organ culturing on millipore filters. It was found that when fragments of embryonic liver or embryonic bone of mouse are cultured on filters, hepatic parenchymatous matter on bone stroma develops. In the former case haemopoiesis is also maintained in the cultures for a duration of 20 days, the foci of myeloid and less frequently erythroid cells being visible. In such cultures colony-forming cells are also maintained, their number amounting to between 20 and 40 per 10s cells by day 8 to day 12. In the second case, where embryonic bone is cultured, the addition of adult bone-marrow cells results in haemopoiesis being maintained in the explant over a period of 16 days (without bone tissue haemopoiesis in organ cultures stops within 5 days). The paper discusses the part played by such local interactions between haemopoietic cells and bone tissue or embryonic liver parenchyma in maintaining haemopoiesis. (author)

  16. 1. Improving Strawberry Through Gamma Irradiation and Tissue Culture; 2. Characterization of some Induced Mutants in the M1V2 Generation of Irradiated Population Derived Tissue Culture Using Morphological and Genetic Markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The plantlets obtained from multiplicated meristems of strawberry variety chandleron the MS medium provided with 15μM 2ip in vitro were irradiated with gamma ray doses of 0 (control) and 55 gray (mutational dose). The survived plantlets were multiplied by subculturing 4 times on the same medium. The plantlets of M1V2 generation were cultured on the rooting medium (MS + 2μM IBA). After root formation, they were transferred to pots in the greenhouse to be acclimatized. When the plantlets become healthy, they were transferred to the open field. Results indicated that irradiated population showed a significant increase in total soluble solids content, anthocyanin content, number of fruits/plant and fruit weight /plant in comparison with un-irradiated control. However, no significant difference was obtained between the irradiated population and the control for other studied traits. Five different morphological variants were selected in the M1V2 generation. These were characterized by multirunner, monofoliate leaves, long flower peduncle, fruit of spherical shape and late flowering. Concerning the fractionated protein in the SDS-PAGE gels in the induced mutants, results indicated that bands 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 9, 12 and 14 did not appear in control plants. The densities in bands 1, 8 and 13 were higher in the control plants than those of the mutants. The lowest similarity index was recorded between the round fruit and the late flowering plants (0.588). (Authors)

  17. STUDY OF CULTURING CARDIOVASCULAR TISSUE IN VITRO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    成少飞; 叶清

    2004-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility of utilizing vascular cells combined with folded and framed culture model to develop completely autologous human tissue without using any scaffold material under the principles of Tissue Engineering. Methods Human vascular cells cultured from ascending aorta (group A) and saphenous vein (group B) were seeded into 15cm-dishes (each n =12 ) and cultured to form cell sheets over a period of four weeks with Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium supplemented with lmmol/L L-ascorbic acid 2-phosphate. Thereafter, cell sheets (6 samples of each group) were four-layer folded and cultured in a newly developed frame device for additional four weeks. Controls remained under standard culture conditions. Tissue development was evaluated by light and electron microscopy, biochemical assays. Results The formation of multi-layered cell sheets and production of extracellular matrix were observed in each group after the initial four weeks. Analysis of the folded and framed neo-tissue revealed a solid structure with increased matrix formation and tissue organization compared to the control groups after additional four weeks. DNA assay indicated significantly lower cell proliferation in folded and framed cell sheets than in that of unframed counterparts. Yet hydroxyproline assay demonstrated significant increase of collagen content in the framed aortic and venous derived tissues, which contained 82 % and 42 % that of human pericardium. Conclusion It is feasible to obtain completely autologous human cardiovascular tissue with the alternative new approach. Numerous issues including improvement of mechanical strength of neo-tissue remain to be investingated.

  18. The autologus graft of epithelial tissue culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minaee B

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available With the intention of research about culture and autologus graft of epithelial tissue we used 4 french Albino Rabbits with an average age of 2 months. After reproduction on the support in EMEM (Eagle's Minimum Essential Medium we used this for graft after 4 weeks. This region which grafted total replaced. After fixation of this sample and passing them through various process, histological sections were prepared. These sections were stained with H & E and masson's trichrome and studied by light microscope. We succeeded in graft. We hope in the near future by using the method of epithelium tissue culture improving to treat burned patients.

  19. Proteoglycan modifications by granulation tissue in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintner, M I; Kollar, E J; Rossomando, E F

    1982-01-01

    To study the process of tissue remodeling that occurs during wound healing, radioactive proteoglycan ([35S]-PGS) was used to assay for enzymatic activities present in the extracellular fluid of healing tissue. Mice, wounded by removal of a 2 x 1.5 cm patch of skin from the dorsal surface, were sacrificed after 3 days of healing. Granulation tissue (1 cm2) was removed, spread onto a sterile wire mesh support and placed in the center well of an organ culture dish. To each well was added 1 ml MCDB medium supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum and antibiotics and 5-20 microliters of [35S]-PGS (100,000 cpm/10 microliters). Medium, removed from the well by aspiration after 24 and 48 h of culture, was boiled 5 min at 100 degrees C and stored frozen at -20 degrees C. Alterations of the PGS were assayed with a Sepharose 4B column (1 x 50 cm) which had an excluded and included volume of 17 and 46 ml, respectively. PGS, incubated without cells or with tissues from unwounded animals, eluted at 26 ml. PGS, incubated with granulation tissue and cultured for either 24 or 48 h, eluted from the Sepharose 4B at 29 ml, a 10% increase in elution volume, suggesting that the size or shape of the PGS has been altered by enzymes secreted by the cells of the granulation tissue. In contrast, PGS incubated with tissues from unwounded animals or without granulation tissue showed no changes. These data suggest that enzymatic activities secreted by cells of granulation tissue may be involved in remodeling during healing. PMID:6749574

  20. Conservation of Biodiversity Through Tissue culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujata Mathur

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Biodiversity is the degree of variation of life forms within a given ecosystem, biome or an entire planet. Biodiversity is a measure of the health of ecosystems. Biodiversity is in part a function of climate. Plant tissue culture comprises a set of in vitro techniques, methods and strategies that are part of the group of technologies called plant biotechnology. Tissue culture has been exploited to create genetic variability from which crop plants can be improved, to improve the state of health of the planted material and to increase the number of desirable germ plasms available to the plant breeder. Tissue-culture protocols are available for most crop species, although continued optimization is still required for many crops, especially cereals and woody plants. Tissue culture techniques, in combination with molecular techniques, have been successfully used to incorporate specific traits through gene transfer. In vitro techniques for the culture of protoplasts, anthers, microspores, ovules and embryos have been used to create new genetic variation in the breeding lines, often via haploid production. Cell culture has also produced somaclonal and gametoclonal variants with crop-improvement potential. The culture of single cells and meristems can be effectively used to eradicate pathogens from planting material and thereby dramatically improve the yield of established cultivars. Large-scale micropropagation laboratories are providing millions of plants for the commercial ornamental market and the agricultural, clonally-propagated crop market. With selected laboratory material typically taking one or two decades to reach the commercial market through plant breeding, this technology can be expected to have an ever increasing impact on crop improvement as we approach the new millenium.

  1. Substituted Indoleacetic Acids Tested in Tissue Cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1978-01-01

    Monochloro substituted IAA inhibited shoot induction in tobacco tissue cultures about as much as IAA. Dichloro substituted IAA inhibited shoot formation less. Other substituted IAA except 5-fluoro- and 5-bromoindole-3-acetic acid were less active than IAA. Callus growth was quite variable and not...... and not correlated with auxin strength measured in the Avena coleoptile test....

  2. Photoacoustic characterization of ovarian tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Andres; Gamelin, John; Guo, Puyun; Yan, Shikui; Sanders, Mary; Brewer, Molly; Zhu, Quing

    2009-02-01

    Ovarian cancer has the highest mortality of all gynecologic cancers with a five-year survival rate of only 30%. Because current imaging techniques (ultrasound, CT, MRI, PET) are not capable of detecting ovarian cancer early, most diagnoses occur in later stages (III/IV). Thus many women are not correctly diagnosed until the cancer becomes widely metastatic. On the other hand, while the majority of women with a detectable ultrasound abnormality do not harbor a cancer, they all undergo unnecessary oophorectomy. Hence, new imaging techniques that can provide functional and molecular contrasts are needed for improving the specificity of ovarian cancer detection and characterization. One such technique is photoacoustic imaging, which has great potential to reveal early tumor angiogenesis through intrinsic optical absorption contrast from hemoglobin or extrinsic contrast from conjugated agents binding to appropriate molecular receptors. To better understand the cancer disease process of ovarian tissue using photoacoustic imaging, it is necessary to first characterize the properties of normal ovarian tissue. We have imaged ex-vivo ovarian tissue using a 3D co-registered ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging system. The system is capable of volumetric imaging by means of electronic focusing. Detecting and visualizing small features from multiple viewing angles is possible without the need for any mechanical movement. The results show strong optical absorption from vasculature, especially highly vascularized corpora lutea, and low absorption from follicles. We will present correlation of photoacoustic images from animals with histology. Potential application of this technology would be the noninvasive imaging of the ovaries for screening or diagnostic purposes.

  3. Pathogen propagation in cultured three-dimensional tissue mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor); Wolf, David A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A process for propagating a pathogen in a three-dimensional tissue mass cultured at microgravity conditions in a culture vessel containing culture media and a culture matrix is provided. The three-dimensional tissue mass is inoculated with a pathogen and pathogen replication in the cells of the tissue mass achieved.

  4. Production and Characterization of a Novel, Electrospun, Tri-Layer Polycaprolactone Membrane for the Segregated Co-Culture of Bone and Soft Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasima Puwanun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Composite tissue-engineered constructs combining bone and soft tissue have applications in regenerative medicine, particularly dentistry. This study generated a tri-layer, electrospun, poly-ε-caprolactone membrane, with two microfiber layers separated by a layer of nanofibers, for the spatially segregated culture of mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs and fibroblasts. The two cell types were seeded on either side, and cell proliferation and spatial organization were investigated over several weeks. Calcium deposition by MPCs was detected using xylenol orange (XO and the separation between fibroblasts and the calcified matrix was visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy. SEM confirmed that the scaffold consisted of two layers of micron-diameter fibers with a thin layer of nano-diameter fibers in-between. Complete separation of cell types was maintained and calcified matrix was observed on only one side of the membrane. This novel tri-layer membrane is capable of supporting the formation of a bilayer of calcified and non-calcified connective tissue.

  5. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell...

  6. Culturing Mouse Cardiac Valves in the Miniature Tissue Culture System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruithof, Boudewijn P T; Lieber, Samuel C; Kruithof-de Julio, Marianna; Gaussin, Vincian; Goumans, Marie José

    2015-01-01

    Heart valve disease is a major burden in the Western world and no effective treatment is available. This is mainly due to a lack of knowledge of the molecular, cellular and mechanical mechanisms underlying the maintenance and/or loss of the valvular structure. Current models used to study valvular biology include in vitro cultures of valvular endothelial and interstitial cells. Although, in vitro culturing models provide both cellular and molecular mechanisms, the mechanisms involved in the 3D-organization of the valve remain unclear. While in vivo models have provided insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying valvular development, insight into adult valvular biology is still elusive. In order to be able to study the regulation of the valvular 3D-organization on tissue, cellular and molecular levels, we have developed the Miniature Tissue Culture System. In this ex vivo flow model the mitral or the aortic valve is cultured in its natural position in the heart. The natural configuration and composition of the leaflet are maintained allowing the most natural response of the valvular cells to stimuli. The valves remain viable and are responsive to changing environmental conditions. This MTCS may provide advantages on studying questions including but not limited to, how does the 3D organization affect valvular biology, what factors affect 3D organization of the valve, and which network of signaling pathways regulates the 3D organization of the valve. PMID:26555276

  7. Propagation of gnetum by tissue culture technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Te-chato, S.

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Plantlet regeneration from tissue culture of gnetum could be induced using two pathways depending upon explant types. Leaf lamina yielded somatic embryos through somatic embryogenesis in basal MS supplemented with the same concentration of BA and TDZ at 0.5 mg/l. Using cluster of flowers or ovules in the same medium formula, however, callus formation took place and developed into meristemoid structures. These calli are called meristematic nodular calli and the pathway was organogenesis. Both pathways of plantlet regeneration could be applied for mass propagation of gnetum on a commercial scale in the future.

  8. A comprehensive study on characterization of elite Neem chemotypes through mycofloral, tissue-cultural, ecomorphological and molecular analyses using azadirachtin-A as a biomarker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chary, Parvathi

    2011-03-01

    Azadirachtin-A (Aza-A), a tetranortriterpenoid, found in minuscule amounts in the Neem seed-kernels, has proved to be a potent biopesticide. Given the vast biodiversity of Azadirachta indica (Neem) in India, this study is an overview of four main aspects that corroborate with each other in identifying elite Neem chemotypes based on their Aza-A content. These biomarkers included mycofloral, tissue-cultural, ecomorphometrical and molecular analyses on accessions from five ecogeographically different regions in Andhra Pradesh, India, which high-lighted the characteristics of trees that yielded the highest Aza-A. In essence, extremely-arid-alkaline regions with maximum soil pH (8.05) yielded trees with the highest amount of this biopesticide. Likewise, both VAM and soil fungal diversity and frequency exhibited maximal values in their rhizosphere, whereas it exhibited the least values for percentage moisture and also for several micronutrients measured (P2O5, Zn, Fe and Cu). In vitro studies on seeds with high versus low Aza-A content gave sturdier seedlings in the former; with profusely coiled roots and fibirillar foliage in tissue-culture; in addition to these seeds being more viable. Furthermore, their cotyledons alone exhibited significant amount of Aza-A, as measured by HPLC. Besides this significant difference, the impact of growth factors culminated not only in the variations of several secondary metabolites, but also differences in DNA patterns from various parts of a single in vitro plant. Ecomorphometric analyses clearly indicated that at least eight parameters (seed diameter, soil pH, percentage moisture, K2O, P2O5, Zn, lower lobe serrations and upper-lobe-distance of leaves) were significantly related to the quantitative variations in Aza-A. Finally, PCR analyses exhibited a habitat-based molecular concordance of ISSR and FISSR profiles with Aza-A content among the Neem chemotypes. Their relatedness was based on dendrograms constructed by UPGMA algorithms

  9. The establishment of an in vitro gene bank in Dianthus spiculifolius Schur and D. glacialis ssp. gelidus (Schott Nym. et Kotschy Tutin: I. The initiation of a tissue collection and the characterization of the cultures in minimal growth conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Holobiuc

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades the plants have to cope with the warming of the climate. As a consequence of this process more than half of the plant species could become vulnerable or threatened until 2080. Romania has a high plant diversity, with endemic and endangered plant species, the measures of biodiversity conservation being necessary. The integrated approach of biodiversity conservation involves both in situ and ex situ strategies. Among ex situ methods of conservation, besides the traditional ones (including field and botanic collection and seed banks, in vitro tissues techniques offer a viable alternative. The germplasm collections can efficiently preserve the species (of economic, scientific and conservative importance, in the same time being a source of plant material for international exchanges and for reintroduction in the native habitats.The "in vitro gene banking" term refers to in vitro tissues cultures from many accessions of a target species and involves the collection of plant material from field or from native habitats, the elaboration of sterilization, micropropagation and maintaining protocols. These collections have to be maintained in optimal conditions, morphologically and genetically characterized. The aim of our work was to characterize the response of the plant material to the minimal in vitro growth protocol for medium-term cultures achievement as a prerequisite condition for an active gene bank establishment in two rare Caryophyllaceae taxa: Dianthus spiculifolius and D. glacialis ssp. gelidus. Among different factors previously tested for medium-term preservation in Dianthus genus, mannitol proved to be more efficient for minimal cultures achievement. In vitro, the cultures were evaluated concerning their growth, regenerability and enzyme activity (POX, SOD, CAT as a response to the preservation conditions in the incipient phase of the initiation of the in vitro collection. The two species considered in this study showed a

  10. Characterization of novel tumor stroma markers identified by gene expression profiling of human cancer tissues and 3D co-culture models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tumor stroma plays an important role in tumorigenesis. During cancer progression it undergoes changes in architecture, gene expression and secretion of proteolytic enzymes that are essential for the invasive and metastatic phenotype of malignant tumors. Cancer associated fibroblasts (Cafes) represent the major cellular component of the stroma and recent studies demonstrated the prognostic and therapeutic significance of CaF-related molecular signatures. The identification and characterization of genes and signaling pathways involved in the molecular interactions between tumor and stromal cells has been the focus of this study. For that purpose we have used two complementary approaches: the identification of novel tumor stroma targets in human colon cancer samples using whole genome Affymetrix GeneChip analysis and the validation of theses targets in a newly established of 3D co-culture model that mimics the cellular and molecular heterogeneity of human cancers. We have demonstrated increased expression of gene sets related to hypoxia, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and TGFβ pathway activation in CAFs vs their normal counterparts in both systems. The putative TGFβ target IGFBP7 (insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7) was identified as a tumor stroma marker of epithelial cancers and as a tumor antigen in mesenchyme-derived sarcomas. IGFPB7 was shown to promote anchorage-independent growth in malignant mesenchymal cells and malignant epithelial cells with an EMT-phenotype, whereas a tumor suppressor function was observed in tumor epithelial cells. In summary, we have demonstrated that a number of important signaling pathways involved in cancer progression and metastasis are specifically dysregulated in the tumor stroma both in our in vivo screen and in the in vitro 3D model, illustrating the value of these approaches for the identification and characterization of novel stromal markers. (author)

  11. Development of germ-free plants and tissue culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venketeswaran, S.

    1973-01-01

    The botanical program is reported for experiments performed at the Lunar Receiving Laboratory. Papers prepared during this program are listed. The studies reported include: tissues cultured on various mediums, nutritional studies, preparation of plant cultures for Apollo 15, and pine tissue cultures.

  12. Nanotechnology, Cell Culture and Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazutoshi Haraguchi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have fabricated new types of polymer hydrogels and polymer nanocomposites, i.e., nanocomposite gels (NC gels and soft, polymer nanocomposites (M-NCs: solid, with novel organic/inorganic network structures. Both NC gels and M-NCs were synthesized by in-situ free-radical polymerization in the presence of exfoliated clay platelets in aqueous systems and were obtained in various forms such as film, sheet, tube, coating, etc. and sizes with a wide range of clay contents. Here, disk-like inorganic clay nanoparticles act as multi-functional crosslinkers to form new types of network systems. Both NC gels and M-NCs have extraordinary optical and mechanical properties including ultra-high reversible extensibility, as well as a number of new characteristics relating to optical anisotropy, polymer/clay morphology, biocompatibility, stimuli-sensitive surfaces, micro-patterning, etc. For examples, the biological testing of medical devices, comprised of a sensitization test, an irritation test, an intracutaneous test and an in vitro cytotoxicity test,was carried out for NC gels and M-NCs. The safety of NC gels and M-NCs was confirmed in all tests. Also, the interaction of living tissue with NC gel was investigated in vivo by implantation in live goats; neither inflammation nor concrescence occurred around the NC gels. Furthermore, it was found that both N-NC gels consisting of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide(PNIPA/clay network and M-NCs consisting of poly(2-methoxyethyacrylate(PMEA/clay network show characteristic cell culture and subsequent cell detachment on their surfaces, although it was almost impossible to culture cells on conventional, chemically-crosslinked PNIPA hydrogels and chemically crossslinked PMEA, regardless of their crosslinker concentration. Various kinds of cells, such ashumanhepatoma cells (HepG2, normal human dermal fibroblast (NHDF, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC, could be cultured to be confluent on the surfaces of N

  13. Induction of mutants with useful traits in a Chinese cassava genotype via irradiation combined with tissue culture and molecular characterization of induced mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We concentrated on investigation of the following four aspects: A. Investigate the sensitive dosage of 60Co γ-ray for irradiating stem segments of a Chinese cassava genotype grown in the field, in soil pot or from in vitro seedling for the purpose of mutation induction. B. Create and select cassava mutations with improved root yielding ability and lysine content. C. Establishment of a protocol for induction of somatic embryos from auxiliary buds. D. Establishment of molecular marker technique for identification of induced mutations of cassava. Sensitive dosages of irradiation had been determined to be 25- 30 Gy for stem segments taken from field or soil pot grown plants, 20-25 Gy for in vitro grown stem segments. For either kind of stems, restoring process after irradiation was necessary for about 30-40 days in the soil pot or onto MS medium before the stem could be cut for further culture in MS based medium for trait segregation. In addition, cassava callus from petioles was also irradiated by 60Co γ-ray and 9 Gy irradiation dosage was effective dosage to be used to induce mutation accordingly. Cassava mutations with changed root yielding ability and lysine content through gamma irradiation combined with tissue culture have been obtained from irradiated test tube seedlings after segregations over 4 generations. By the end of last year, 16 mutagenic plant lines were generated. Compared with the non-mutagenic control, some mutagenic lines like MV4, MV1, MV6 harvested more than 2 times of tube root by fresh weight. Lysine content in the root also showed big difference among different lines and the control. And what is interesting is that some mutagenic lines showed higher lysine content than the parent line, especially in the root parenchyma. However, the difference among mutagenic lines in lysine content was not as obvious as in root yield. An efficient and reproducible plant regeneration system via germination of somatic embryos induced from auxiliary buds of a

  14. In vitro Micropropagation of Cassava Through Low Cost Tissue Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Kwame O. Ogero; Gitonga N. Mburugu; Maina Mwangi; Omwoyo Ombori; Michael Ngugi

    2012-01-01

    Adoption of drought-tolerant crops such as cassava can help alleviate food insecurity in sub-Saharan Africa. However, production is constrained by lack of disease-free planting materials. This can be circumvented through tissue culture but the technology is costly limiting its adoption. There is therefore, need to put in place interventions that will reduce the cost of production hence making tissue culture products affordable. In this research, a low cost protocol for cassava tissue culture ...

  15. Trends in the use of tissue culture in forest improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haissig, B.E.; Nelson, N.D.; Kidd, G.H.

    1987-01-01

    We have analyzed and described the problems and potentials of using tissue culture in micropropagation and biotechnologies related to forest improvement. Trends in forest management concepts, commerical micropropagation, and tissue culture biotechnologies are discussed. Our analysis suggests that tissue culture will contribute significantly to the improvement of forests through exploitation of existing genotypes and production of new, commercially valuble genotypes. Such changes may significantly influence worldwide management decisions in forestry. 97 references.

  16. Keratocytes Derived from Spheroid Culture of Corneal Stromal Cells Resemble Tissue Resident Keratocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Byun, Yong-Soo; Tibrewal, Sapna; Kim, Eunjae; Yco, Lisette; Sarkar, Joy; Ivanir, Yair; Liu, Chia-Yang; Sano, Cecile M.; Jain, Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Corneal stromal cells transform to precursor cells in spheroid culture. We determined whether keratocytes derived from spheroid culture of murine corneal stromal cells resemble tissue resident keratocytes. Methods Spheroid culture was performed by seeding dissociated stromal cells onto ultra-low attachment plates containing serum-free mesenchymal stem cell culture medium. Spheroids were characterized with phenotype specific markers and stemness transcription factor genes. Spheroids an...

  17. Anaerobic Cultures from Preserved Tissues of Baby Mammoth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.; Fisher, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Microbiological analysis of several cold-preserved tissue samples from the Siberian baby mammoth known as Lyuba revealed a number of culturable bacterial strains that were grown on anaerobic media at 4 C. Lactic acid produced by LAB (lactic acid bacteria) group, usually by members of the genera Carnobacterium and Lactosphera, appears to be a wonderful preservative that prevents other bacteria from over-dominating a system. Permafrost and lactic acid preserved the body of this one-month old baby mammoth and kept it in exceptionally good condition, resulting in this mammoth being the most complete such specimen ever recovered. The diversity of novel anaerobic isolates was expressed on morphological, physiological and phylogenetic levels. Here we discuss the specifics of the isolation of new strains, differentiation from trivial contamination, and preliminary results for the characterization of cultures.

  18. Anaerobic cultures from preserved tissues of baby mammoth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Fisher, Daniel; Hoover, Richard B.

    2011-10-01

    Microbiological analysis of several cold-preserved tissue samples from the Siberian baby mammoth known as Lyuba revealed a number of culturable bacterial strains that were grown on anaerobic media at 3 oC. Lactic acid produced by LAB (lactic acid bacteria) group, usually by members of the genera Carnobacterium and Lactosphera, appears to be a wonderful preservative that keeps other bacteria from colonizing a system. Permafrost and lactic acid preserved the body of this one month-old baby mammoth and kept it in exceptionally good condition, resulting in this mammoth being the most complete sample of the species ever recovered. The diversity of novel psychrophilic anaerobic isolates was expressed on morphological, physiological and phylogenetic levels. Here, we discuss the specifics of the isolation of new psychrophilic strains, differentiation from trivial contamination, and preliminary results for characterization of the cultures.

  19. Rat fetal ventral mesencephalon grown as solid tissue cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höglinger, G U; Sautter, J; Meyer, Morten;

    1998-01-01

    Free-floating roller tube (FFRT) cultures of fetal rat and human nigral tissue are a means for tissue storage prior to grafting in experimental Parkinson's disease. In the present study, FFRT cultures prepared from embryonic-day-14 rat ventral mesencephalon were maintained for 4, 8, 12, or 16 day...

  20. The establishment of an in vitro gene bank in Dianthus spiculifolius Schur and D. glacialis ssp. gelidus (Schott Nym. et Kotschy Tutin: I. The initiation of a tissue collection and the characterization of the cultures in minimal growth conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Holobiuc

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades the plants have to cope with the warming of the climate. As a consequence of this process more than half of the plant species could become vulnerable or threatened until 2080. Romania has a high plant diversity, with endemic and endangered plant species, the measures of biodiversity conservation being necessary. The integrated approach of biodiversity conservation involves bothin situ and ex situ strategies. Among ex situ methods of conservation, besides the traditional ones (including field and botanic collection and seed banks, in vitro tissues techniques offer a viable alternative. The germplasm collections can efficiently preserve the species (of economic, scientific and conservative importance, in the same time being a source of plant material for international exchanges and for reintroduction in the native habitats.The "in vitro gene banking" term refers to in vitro tissuescultures from many accessions of a target species and involves the collection of plant material from field or from native habitats, the elaboration of sterilization, micropropagation and maintaining protocols. These collections have to be maintained in optimal conditions, morphologically and genetically characterized. The aim of our work was to characterize the response of the plant material to the minimal in vitro growth protocol for medium-term cultures achievement as a prerequisite condition for an active gene bank establishment in two rare Caryophyllaceae taxa: Dianthus spiculifolius and D. glacialis ssp. gelidus. Among different factors previously tested for medium-term preservation in Dianthus genus, mannitol proved to be more efficient for minimal cultures achievement. In vitro, the cultures were evaluated concerning their growth, regenerability and enzyme activity (POX, SOD, CAT as a response to the preservation conditions in the incipient phase of the initiation of the in vitro collection. The two species considered in this study showed a

  1. Cultures of cancer patient's skin tissue fibroblast and radiosensitivity assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to test the radiosensitivity of normal skin tissue, the authors cultured cancer patient's skin tissue fibroblast, surviving fraction experiment was employed to provide data for understanding of the different radiosensitivity among the cancer patients, Method: cancer patient's skin tissue fibroblast were cultured in vitro by the way of tar's attachment, cells were irradiated by graded doses of γ-ray , cell dose response experiment was used to test the radiosensitivity of cell. Result: Cancer patient's skin fibroblast could be propagated and passaged by the method of culture in vitro. Radiosensitivity are different among the various cancer patient's skin tissue fibroblasts

  2. Effect of lunar materials on plant tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkinshaw, C. H.; Venketeswaran, S.; Baur, P. S.; Croley, T. E.; Scholes, V. E.; Weete, J. D.; Halliwell, R. S.; Hall, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    Lunar material collected during the Apollo 11, 12, 14, and 15 missions has been used to treat 12 species of higher plant tissue cultures. Biochemical and morphological studies have been conducted on several of these species. Tobacco tissue cultures treated with 0.22 g of lunar material exhibited increased greening more complex chloroplasts, less cytoplasmic vacuolation and greater vesiculation. Pine tissue cultures reacted to treatment by an increased deposition of tannin-like materials. The percentage of dry weight and soluble protein was increased in cultures treated with either lunar or terrestrial rock materials.

  3. Techniques for mammalian cell tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Mary C

    2006-05-01

    This unit opens with detailed discussions on the latest principles of sterile technique and preparation of culture media. Step-by-step protocols describe trypsinizing and subculturing monolayer cultures, passaging suspension cultures, freezing and thawing cells, counting cells using a hemacytometer, and preparing cells for transport. PMID:18770828

  4. A Simple Method for Measuring Organotypic Tissue Slice Culture Thickness

    OpenAIRE

    Guy, Yifat; Rupert, Amy; Sandberg, Mats; Weber, Stephen G.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a simple method to measure tissue slice thicknesses using an ohmmeter. The circuit described here is composed of a metal probe, an ohmmeter, a counter electrode, culture medium or physiological buffer, and tissue slice. The probe and the electrode are on opposite interfaces of an organotypic hippocampal slice culture. The circuit closes when the metal probe makes contact with the surface of the tissue slice. The probe position is recorded and compared to its position when ...

  5. The role of silicon in plant tissue culture

    OpenAIRE

    Sivanesan, Iyyakkannu; Park, Se Won

    2014-01-01

    Growth and morphogenesis of in vitro cultures of plant cells, tissues, and organs are greatly influenced by the composition of the culture medium. Mineral nutrients are necessary for the growth and development of plants. Several morpho-physiological disorders such as hooked leaves, hyperhydricity, fasciation, and shoot tip necrosis are often associated with the concentration of inorganic nutrient in the tissue culture medium. Silicon (Si) is the most abundant mineral element in the soil. The ...

  6. Ex vivo culture of patient tissue & examination of gene delivery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rajendran, Simon

    2012-01-31

    This video describes the use of patient tissue as an ex vivo model for the study of gene delivery. Fresh patient tissue obtained at the time of surgery is sliced and maintained in culture. The ex vivo model system allows for the physical delivery of genes into intact patient tissue and gene expression is analysed by bioluminescence imaging using the IVIS detection system. The bioluminescent detection system demonstrates rapid and accurate quantification of gene expression within individual slices without the need for tissue sacrifice. This slice tissue culture system may be used in a variety of tissue types including normal and malignant tissue and allows us to study the effects of the heterogeneous nature of intact tissue and the high degree of variability between individual patients. This model system could be used in certain situations as an alternative to animal models and as a complementary preclinical mode prior to entering clinical trial.

  7. Discarded human fetal tissue and cell cultures for transplantation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A feasibility study has been performed to explore the utility of various tissues from discarded human abortuses for transplantation and related research. Specifically, aborted fetuses plus parental blood samples and all relevant clinical data were obtained through a local hospital complex. Whenever possible, pancreas, skin and skeletal muscle, heart, liver, kidney, cartilage and lung tissues were removed, dissociated and subfractionated for cryopreservation, characterization and cultivation trials in vitro. Existing protocols for these manipulations were compared and improved upon as required. Clonal culture, cell aggregate maintenance techniques and use of feeder cell populations have been utilized where appropriate to develop quantitative comparative data. Histological and biochemical assays were applied both to evaluate separation/cultivation methods and to identify optimal culture conditions for maintaining functional cells. Immunochemical and molecular biological procedures were applied to study expression of Major Histocompatibility Vomplex (MHC) class 1 and 11 molecules on cell lines derived. Tissue and cell culture populations were examined for infections with bacteria, ftingi, mycoplasma, HIV, CMV, hepatitis B and other viruses. Only 1% of the abortuses tested were virally infected. Cytogenetic analyses confin-ned the normal diploid status in the vast majority (>98%) of lines tested. A total of over 250 abortuses have been obtained and processed. Only 25 were found to be contaminated with bacteria or fungi and unsuitable for further cultivation trials. A total of over 200 cell populations were isolated, characterized and cryopreserved for further study. Included were kidney, lung, liver and epidermal epithelia: cartilage-derived cells from the spine and epiphyses plus myogenic myoblasts. Selected lines have been immortalized using HPV I 6E6/E7 sequences. Epithelia from the liver and pancreas and cardiac myocytes were the most problematic in that initial

  8. Cytological studies of lunar treated tissue cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliwell, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    An electron microscopic study was made of botanical materials, particularly pine tissues, treated with lunar materials collected by Apollo 12 quarantine mission. Results show unusual structural changes within several of the treated tissues. The bodies, as yet unidentified, resemble virus particles observed within infected plant cells. Although the size and shape of the structures are comparable to rod shaped virus particles such as Tobacco mosaic, the numerical distribution, affinity for stains, and intercellular location are different.

  9. Extraction and Assembly of Tissue-Derived Gels for Cell Culture and Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Uriel, Shiri; Labay, Edwardine; Francis-Sedlak, Megan; Moya, Monica L.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Ervin, Natalia; Cankova, Zdravka; Eric M Brey

    2008-01-01

    Interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM) play an important role in regulating cell function. Cells cultured in, or on, three-dimensional ECM recapitulate similar features to those found in vivo that are not present in traditional two-dimensional culture. In addition, both natural and synthetic materials containing ECM components have shown promise in a number of tissue engineering applications. Current materials available for cell culture and tissue engineering do not adequately refle...

  10. Using Tissue Culture To Investigate Plant Cell Differentiation and Dedifferentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzone, Donna M.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an experimental project that uses plant tissue culture techniques to examine cell differentiation in the carrot. Allows students to gain experience in some important techniques and to explore fundamental questions about cell differentiation. (DDR)

  11. Cell/Tissue Culture Radiation Exposure Facility Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a Cell/Tissue Culture Radiation Exposure Facility (CTC-REF) to enable radiobiologists to investigate the real-time radiation effects on...

  12. Induced engulfment of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by tissue culture cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, W P; Sadoff, J C

    1988-01-01

    Engulfment of gonococci by mammalian tissue culture cells was examined as a model of the penetration of host cells in gonorrhea. Engulfment required viable organisms; killing the gonococci with heat or refrigeration abolished the process. Engulfment also required tissue culture cell microtubule- and microfilament-dependent movement; treating the cells with cytochalasin B (0.5 micrograms/ml) or demecolcine (Colcemid; Ciba-Geigy AG, Basel, Switzerland) (10 micrograms/ml) also prevented his proc...

  13. Metabolic Profile of Pancreatic Acinar and Islet Tissue in Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Suszynski, Thomas M; Mueller, Kathryn; Gruessner, Angelika C.; Papas, Klearchos K.

    2014-01-01

    The amount and condition of exocrine impurities may affect the quality of islet preparations especially during culture. In this study, the objective was to determine the oxygen demandand viability of islet and acinar tissue post-isolation and whether they change disproportionately while in culture. We compare the OCR normalized to DNA (OCR/DNA, a measure of fractional viability in units nmol/min/mg DNA), and percent change in OCR and DNA recoveries between adult porcine islet and acinar tissu...

  14. Explant exenisation for tissue culture in marine macroalgae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuewu; Kloareg, Bernard

    1992-09-01

    Unialgal explants from Laminaria digitata, and from a variety of red algae, were obtained by hand removing the visible epiphytes, and stirring the tissue in the presence of glass beads. Two antibiotic mixtures were found to be efficient in removing the contaminating fungi and bacteria from the algae. The procedure proved suitable as a primary step in the tissue culture of the investigated species.

  15. Tissue-Culture Method of Cloning Rubber Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, E. A.

    1983-01-01

    Guayule plant, a high-yield rubber plant cloned by tissue-culture method to produce multiple new plants that mature quickly. By adjusting culture medium, excised shoot tip produces up to 50 identical guayule plants. Varying concentration of cytokinin, single excised tip produces either 1 or several (up to 50) new plants.

  16. Bioreactors as a low cost option for tissue culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioreactors are vessels designed for large-scale cell, tissue or organ culture in liquid media. Functionally, plant culture bioreactors can be divided into two broad types: those in which the cultures are immersed partially or temporarily in the medium, and those in which the cultures are continuously submerged. Bioreactors provide more precise control of the plant growth gaseous exchange, illumination, medium agitation, temperature and pH than the conventional culture vessels. Bioreactor-based propagation of plants can increase rate of multiplication and growth of cultures and reduce space, energy and labour requirements in commercial micropropagation. They can therefore be attractive to developing countries as regards new or expanding plant culture facilities, in combination with a conventional laboratory. However, to be cost- effective, use of bioreactors requires indexed plant cultures, and attention to aseptic procedures during handling of plant material. Hence, the integration of bioreactors into production systems should only be attempted by facilities with skilled and experienced propagators. (author)

  17. Tissue culture apparatus for flight experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheld, H. W.; Magnuson, J. W.; Krikorian, A. D.

    1985-01-01

    The development of an apparatus for in-flight treatment of cells, tissues, or small organisms for microscopic and chemical analyses is discussed. The hardware for the apparatus is to have: (1) automated functions, (2) the capability to interface with ground-based facilities, (3) independently controlled chambers, (4) variable chamber configurations and volumes, and (4) the capabilities for processing the materials. The components of the equipment used on Skylab 3 for the study of animal cells are described. The design of an apparatus which incorporates all the required capabilities is proposed.

  18. Development of a vinasse culture medium for plant tissue culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinasse is the main pollutant (effluent) obtained from the distillation of sugarcane in the production of fuel alcohol. However, this residue is rich in nutrients that are required by plants. We developed a new culture medium using vinasse for the In vitro propagation of an orchid. The vinasse was treated (decanted and filtered), and the nutrients were determined and quantified. Different formulations using vinasse were tested for an In vitro culture. The vinasse dilutions demonstrated a good buffering effect. The ideal vinasse dilution for media formulation was 2.5%. The best KC formulations with vinasse were KCV1 and KCV5. Compared to KC medium, these formulations demonstrated similar results for In vitro multiplication, with the exception of protocorm-like body number, which was inferior in the vinasse formulations. Conversely, for In vitro elongation and rooting, these vinasse media were superior to KC medium. KC medium promotes a low rooting rate (8%) compared to 68 and 100% obtained by KCV1 and KCV5, respectively. Moreover, plantlets cultured on KC medium become protocorm-like body clusters, which impeded the acclimatization of these explants. Plantlets elongated and rooted on KCV1 and KCV5 were successfully acclimatized with a 91% survival rate for both KC vinasse formulations. This study shows the great potential of this technology as a rational alternative to vinasse disposal and adds value to what is currently considered a waste product. (author)

  19. Characterization of Ocular Tissues Using Microindentation and Hertzian Viscoelastic Models

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, Lawrence; Reed, Jason; Shin, Andrew; Kung, Jennifer; Gimzewski, James K; Poukens, Vadims; Goldberg, Robert A; Mancini, Ronald; Taban, Mehryar; Moy, Ronald; Demer, Joseph L.

    2011-01-01

    Microindentation permits biomechanical characterization of small specimens of ocular tissues and demonstrates that although properties of periocular fatty tissues vary markedly by location, comparable bovine and human tissues behave similarly.

  20. Fabrication of a thermoresponsive cell culture dish: a key technology for cell sheet tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Jun Kobayashi and Teruo Okano

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the properties and characterization of an intelligent thermoresponsive surface, which is a key technology for cell sheet-based tissue engineering. Intelligent thermoresponsive surfaces grafted with poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) exhibit hydrophilic/hydrophobic alteration in response to temperature change. Cultured cells are harvested on thermoresponsive cell culture dishes by decreasing the temperature without the use of digestive enzymes or chelating agents. Our group has d...

  1. Whole breast tissue characterization with ultrasound tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duric, Neb; Littrup, Peter; Li, Cuiping; Roy, Olivier; Schmidt, Steve; Seamans, John; Wallen, Andrea; Bey-Knight, Lisa

    2015-03-01

    A number of clinical trials have shown that screening ultrasound, supplemental to mammography, detects additional cancers in women with dense breasts. However, labor intensity, operator dependence and high recall rates have limited adoption. This paper describes the use of ultrasound tomography for whole-breast tissue stiffness measurements as a first step toward addressing the issue of high recall rates. The validation of the technique using an anthropomorphic phantom is described. In-vivo applications are demonstrated on 13 breast masses, indicating that lesion stiffness correlates with lesion type as expected. Comparison of lesion stiffness measurements with standard elastography was available for 11 masses and showed a strong correlation between the 2 measures. It is concluded that ultrasound tomography can map out the 3 dimensional distribution of tissue stiffness over the whole breast. Such a capability is well suited for screening where additional characterization may improve the specificity of screening ultrasound, thereby lowering barriers to acceptance.

  2. Metabolism of PCBs by plant tissue cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiolabeled congeners of biphenyls with increasing chlorine content were provided to suspension cultures of rose (Rosa sp. cv. Paul's Scarlet) for 4 days. Both the kinetics of 14C exchange between the cells and medium, and the metabolism of the parent compounds depended on the chlorine content of the congeners. Analysis of both the cells and their medium showed that of the recovered radioactivity 88%, 86%, and 3% of the biphenyl, 1-PCB, and 2,2',4,4'-PCB were metabolized respectively to polar and insoluble residue products. Chemical analyses of the PCB-products formed from monochlorobiphenyl showed that plant cells are capable of enzymatically converting PCBs initially to hydroxylated and subsequently to glycosylated derivatives. The environmental and technological significance of these findings are discussed in relation to the fate of PCBs in terrestrial ecosystems

  3. Specimen Sample Preservation for Cell and Tissue Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeker, Gabrielle; Ronzana, Karolyn; Schibner, Karen; Evans, Robert

    1996-01-01

    The era of the International Space Station with its longer duration missions will pose unique challenges to microgravity life sciences research. The Space Station Biological Research Project (SSBRP) is responsible for addressing these challenges and defining the science requirements necessary to conduct life science research on-board the International Space Station. Space Station will support a wide range of cell and tissue culture experiments for durations of 1 to 30 days. Space Shuttle flights to bring experimental samples back to Earth for analyses will only occur every 90 days. Therefore, samples may have to be retained for periods up to 60 days. This presents a new challenge in fresh specimen sample storage for cell biology. Fresh specimen samples are defined as samples that are preserved by means other than fixation and cryopreservation. The challenge of long-term storage of fresh specimen samples includes the need to suspend or inhibit proliferation and metabolism pending return to Earth-based laboratories. With this challenge being unique to space research, there have not been any ground based studies performed to address this issue. It was decided hy SSBRP that experiment support studies to address the following issues were needed: Fixative Solution Management; Media Storage Conditions; Fresh Specimen Sample Storage of Mammalian Cell/Tissue Cultures; Fresh Specimen Sample Storage of Plant Cell/Tissue Cultures; Fresh Specimen Sample Storage of Aquatic Cell/Tissue Cultures; and Fresh Specimen Sample Storage of Microbial Cell/Tissue Cultures. The objective of these studies was to derive a set of conditions and recommendations that can be used in a long duration microgravity environment such as Space Station that will permit extended storage of cell and tissue culture specimens in a state consistent with zero or minimal growth, while at the same time maintaining their stability and viability.

  4. Renal cell carcinoma primary cultures maintain genomic and phenotypic profile of parental tumor tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is characterized by recurrent copy number alterations (CNAs) and loss of heterozygosity (LOH), which may have potential diagnostic and prognostic applications. Here, we explored whether ccRCC primary cultures, established from surgical tumor specimens, maintain the DNA profile of parental tumor tissues allowing a more confident CNAs and LOH discrimination with respect to the original tissues. We established a collection of 9 phenotypically well-characterized ccRCC primary cell cultures. Using the Affymetrix SNP array technology, we performed the genome-wide copy number (CN) profiling of both cultures and corresponding tumor tissues. Global concordance for each culture/tissue pair was assayed evaluating the correlations between whole-genome CN profiles and SNP allelic calls. CN analysis was performed using the two CNAG v3.0 and Partek software, and comparing results returned by two different algorithms (Hidden Markov Model and Genomic Segmentation). A very good overlap between the CNAs of each culture and corresponding tissue was observed. The finding, reinforced by high whole-genome CN correlations and SNP call concordances, provided evidence that each culture was derived from its corresponding tissue and maintained the genomic alterations of parental tumor. In addition, primary culture DNA profile remained stable for at least 3 weeks, till to third passage. These cultures showed a greater cell homogeneity and enrichment in tumor component than original tissues, thus enabling a better discrimination of CNAs and LOH. Especially for hemizygous deletions, primary cultures presented more evident CN losses, typically accompanied by LOH; differently, in original tissues the intensity of these deletions was weaken by normal cell contamination and LOH calls were missed. ccRCC primary cultures are a reliable in vitro model, well-reproducing original tumor genetics and phenotype, potentially useful for future functional approaches

  5. Establishment of primary keratinocyte culture from horse tissue biopsates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jernej OGOREVC

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Primary cell lines established from skin tissue can be used in immunological, proteomic and genomic studies as in vitro skin models. The goal of our study was to establish a primary keratinocyte cell culture from tissue biopsates of two horses. The primary keratinocyte cell culture was obtained by mechanical and enzymatic dissociation and with explant culture method. The result was a heterogeneous primary culture comprised of keratinocytes and fibroblasts. To distinguish epithelial and mesenchymal cells immunofluorescent characterisation was performed, using antibodies against cytokeratin 14 and vimentin. We successfully at attained a primary cell line of keratinocytes, which could potentially be used to study equine skin diseases, as an animal model for human diseases, and for cosmetic and therapeutic product testing.

  6. HYPOLIPIDEMIC EFFECT OF ARGLABIN IN HEPATOMA TISSUE CULTURE

    OpenAIRE

    A. V. Ratkin; Yu. A. Pfarger; V. V. Ivanov; S. M. Adekenov; O. A. Kaidash; V. S. Chuchalin; V. V. Novitsky

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Investigation of hypolipidemic effect of sesquiterpene γ-lactone Arglabin in hepatoma tissue culture (HTC).Materials and methods. In this study we’ve evaluated the effect of sesquiterpene γ-lactone Arglabin and gemfibrozil (reference drug) on the lipid content in the hepatoma tissue culture (HTC) which were incubated with a fat emulsion “Lipofundin” by fluorescent method with vital dye Nile Red. The cell viability was investigated using the MTT-test and staining by Trypan blue.Resu...

  7. Role of low cost options in tissue culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary application of micropropagation has been to produce high quality planting material Low-cost tissue culture technology is the adoption of practices and use of equipment to reduce the unit cost of micropropagule and plant production. Low cost options should lower the cost of production without compromising the quality of the micropropagules and plants. In low cost technology cost reduction is achieved by improving process efficiency and better utilization of resources. Low-cost tissue-culture technology will stay a high priority in agriculture, horticulture, forestry, and floriculture of many developing countries for the production of suitably priced high quality planting material. (author)

  8. The role of silicon in plant tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivanesan, Iyyakkannu; Park, Se Won

    2014-01-01

    Growth and morphogenesis of in vitro cultures of plant cells, tissues, and organs are greatly influenced by the composition of the culture medium. Mineral nutrients are necessary for the growth and development of plants. Several morpho-physiological disorders such as hooked leaves, hyperhydricity, fasciation, and shoot tip necrosis are often associated with the concentration of inorganic nutrient in the tissue culture medium. Silicon (Si) is the most abundant mineral element in the soil. The application of Si has been demonstrated to be beneficial for growth, development and yield of various plants and to alleviate various stresses including nutrient imbalance. Addition of Si to the tissue culture medium improves organogenesis, embryogenesis, growth traits, morphological, anatomical, and physiological characteristics of leaves, enhances tolerance to low temperature and salinity, protects cells and against metal toxicity, prevents oxidative phenolic browning and reduces the incidence of hyperhydricity in various plants. Therefore, Si possesses considerable potential for application in a wide range of plant tissue culture studies such as cryopreservation, organogenesis, micropropagation, somatic embryogenesis and secondary metabolites production. PMID:25374578

  9. Mulberry improvements via plastid transformation and tissue culture engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Umate, Pavan

    2010-01-01

    The in vitro tissue culture and micropropagation studies for Morus spp., a pivotal sericulture plant, are well established. The rapid and reproducible in vitro response to plant growth regulator treatments has emerged as an essential complement of transformation studies for this plant species. A major area of study is the use of protoplast culture and fusion techniques where advantages to mulberry improvement can be applied. The advancements in genetic transformation of mulberry are reviewed,...

  10. Ultrasound Tissue Characterization of Vulnerable Atherosclerotic Plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio Picano

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A thrombotic occlusion of the vessel fed by ruptured coronary atherosclerotic plaque may result in unstable angina, myocardial infarction or death, whereas embolization from a plaque in carotid arteries may result in transient ischemic attack or stroke. The atherosclerotic plaque prone to such clinical events is termed high-risk or vulnerable plaque, and its identification in humans before it becomes symptomatic has been elusive to date. Ultrasonic tissue characterization of the atherosclerotic plaque is possible with different techniques—such as vascular, transesophageal, and intravascular ultrasound—on a variety of arterial segments, including carotid, aorta, and coronary districts. The image analysis can be based on visual, video-densitometric or radiofrequency methods and identifies three distinct textural patterns: hypo-echoic (corresponding to lipid- and hemorrhage-rich plaque, iso- or moderately hyper-echoic (fibrotic or fibro-fatty plaque, and markedly hyperechoic with shadowing (calcific plaque. Hypoechoic or dishomogeneous plaques, with spotty microcalcification and large plaque burden, with plaque neovascularization and surface irregularities by contrast-enhanced ultrasound, are more prone to clinical complications than hyperechoic, extensively calcified, homogeneous plaques with limited plaque burden, smooth luminal plaque surface and absence of neovascularization. Plaque ultrasound morphology is important, along with plaque geometry, in determining the atherosclerotic prognostic burden in the individual patient. New quantitative methods beyond backscatter (to include speed of sound, attenuation, strain, temperature, and high order statistics are under development to evaluate vascular tissues. Although not yet ready for widespread clinical use, tissue characterization is listed by the American Society of Echocardiography roadmap to 2020 as one of the most promising fields of application in cardiovascular ultrasound imaging

  11. The use of animal tissues alongside human tissue: Cultural and ethical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaw, Anu; Jones, D Gareth; Zhang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Teaching and research facilities often use cadaveric material alongside animal tissues, although there appear to be differences in the way we handle, treat, and dispose of human cadaveric material compared to animal tissue. This study sought to analyze cultural and ethical considerations and provides policy recommendations on the use of animal tissues alongside human tissue. The status of human and animal remains and the respect because of human and animal tissues were compared and analyzed from ethical, legal, and cultural perspectives. The use of animal organs and tissues is carried out within the context of understanding human anatomy and function. Consequently, the interests of human donors are to be pre-eminent in any policies that are enunciated, so that if any donors find the presence of animal remains unacceptable, the latter should not be employed. The major differences appear to lie in differences in our perceptions of their respective intrinsic and instrumental values. Animals are considered to have lesser intrinsic value and greater instrumental value than humans. These differences stem from the role played by culture and ethical considerations, and are manifested in the resulting legal frameworks. In light of this discussion, six policy recommendations are proposed, encompassing the nature of consent, respect for animal tissues as well as human remains, and appropriate separation of both sets of tissues in preparation and display. PMID:26475721

  12. Tissue culture-mediated biotechnological intervention in pomegranate: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Soumendra K; Chand, Pradeep K

    2011-05-01

    The past 30 years have witnessed a series of systematic biotechnological advances made in pomegranate. These encompass optimization and establishment of in vitro culture techniques including micropropagation, somatic embryogenesis, synthetic seed production, plant regeneration via callus-mediated shoot organogenesis, adventitious shoot regeneration, anther culture, tetraploid induction and genetic transformation. This review attempts to provide a comprehensive account on the tissue culture-mediated biotechnological interventions made in pomegranate aimed at complementing conventional programmes for improvement of this nutraceutically important fruit crop. PMID:21161233

  13. Molecular evidence of genetic changes induced via in vitro tissue culture in sugar cane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential of in vitro tissue culture as a breeding tool has received wide attention, recognizing the genetic changes induced by callus culture. Phenotypic markers that are stable in conventional vegetative propagation provide a tool for examining the rate and extent of these changes. Development of molecular markers, particularly for sugar can genome mapping, is currently being performed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and polymerase chain reaction technologies. Detection of major genes and their linkage to markers will be used in selecting improved varieties with desirable agronomical traits such as disease resistance, productivity and stress tolerance. Resistance to eyespot disease of sugar can has been characterized in a group of resistant somaclones obtained by tissue culture from a highly susceptible donor variety. A group of somaclones with a high sugar content and tolerant to salinity stress was characterized at the mitochondrial and genomic DNA levels by RFLP analysis. 5 refs, 1 fig

  14. Practical Instruction in Tissue Culture and Cytogenetics for Sandwich Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D. C.; Bishun, N. P.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the training and practical techniques taught to students involved in a sandwich course at the Tissue Culture and Cytogenetics Unit of the Marie Curie Memorial Foundation, Surrey, England. Students spend a minimum of six months involved in the sandwich course before returning to university for a final academic year. (JR)

  15. Immunomodulatory potential of shatavarins produced from Asparagus racemosus tissue cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pise, Mashitha Vinod; Rudra, Jaishree Amal; Upadhyay, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal properties of Asparagus racemosus (vernacular name: Shatavari) are attributed to its steroidal saponins called shatavarins. This plant is facing the threat of being endangered due to several developmental, seasonal constrains and malpractices involved in its collection and storage. To support its conservation, a tissue culture protocol is standardized which produces 20 fold higher levels of shatavarin. Here we evaluate the bioactivity and immunomodulatory potential of in vitro produced shatavarins from cell cultures of AR using human peripheral blood lymphocytes. In vitro produced shatavarin stimulated immune cell proliferation and IgG secretion in a dose dependent manner. It stimulated interleukin (IL)-12 production and inhibited production of IL-6. It also had strong modulatory effects on Th1/Th2 cytokine profile, indicating its potential application for immunotherapies where Th1/Th2 balance is envisaged. Our study demonstrating the bioactivity of tissue cultured AR extracts supports further in vivo evaluation of its immunomodulatory efficacy. PMID:26283842

  16. Propagation of Aquilaria malaccensis seedlings through tissue culture techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquilaria malaccensis or karas is the principal source of gaharu resin, which is used in many cultures for incense, perfumes and traditional medicines. The species is mainly propagated conventionally through seeds, cuttings and graftings. Propagation by seeds is usually a reliable method for other forest species, but for karas, this technique is inadequate to meet the current demand of seedling supplies. This is principally due to its low seed viability, low germination rate, delayed rooting of seedlings, long life-cycle and rare seed production. Tissue culture has several advantages over conventional propagation, especially for obtaining large number of uniform and high-yielding plantlets or clones. This paper presents the current progress on mass-propagation of Aquilaria malaccensis seedlings through tissue culture technique at Nuclear Malaysia. (author)

  17. Variations on metabolic activities of legume tissues through radiation in tissue culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell cultures from Arachis hypogaea L. cultivated in a modified medium developed by Murashige and Skoog (1962) showed vigorous qrowth after radiation treatment. Investigations on the effect of various sugars on the chlorophyll formation and growth of the irradiated tissues showed that sucrose was superior to maltose, glucose or fructose as a carbon source. Lactose and mannitol supported growth and development of chlorophyll to a less degree. On prolonging the cultures on a sugar free medium, the tissues failed to regain either growth or chlorophyll content. (author)

  18. Adipose tissue-organotypic culture system as a promising model for studying adipose tissue biology and regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Toda, Shuji; Uchihashi, Kazuyoshi; Aoki, Shigehisa; Sonoda, Emiko; Yamasaki, Fumio; Piao, Meihua; Ootani, Akifumi; Yonemitsu, Nobuhisa; Sugihara, Hajime

    2009-01-01

    Adipose tissue consists of mature adipocytes, preadipocytes and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), but a culture system for analyzing their cell types within the tissue has not been established. We have recently developed “adipose tissue-organotypic culture system” that maintains unilocular structure, proliferative ability and functions of mature adipocytes for a long term, using three-dimensional collagen gel culture of the tissue fragments. In this system, both preadipocytes and MSCs regenerate...

  19. Mouse pancreas tissue slice culture facilitates long-term studies of exocrine and endocrine cell physiology in situ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Marciniak

    Full Text Available Studies on pancreatic cell physiology rely on the investigation of exocrine and endocrine cells in vitro. Particularly, in the case of the exocrine tissue these studies have suffered from a reduced functional viability of acinar cells in culture. As a result not only investigations on dispersed acinar cells and isolated acini were limited in their potential, but also prolonged studies on pancreatic exocrine and endocrine cells in an intact pancreatic tissue environment were unfeasible. To overcome these limitations, we aimed to establish a pancreas tissue slice culture platform to allow long-term studies on exocrine and endocrine cells in the intact pancreatic environment. Mouse pancreas tissue slice morphology was assessed to determine optimal long-term culture settings for intact pancreatic tissue. Utilizing optimized culture conditions, cell specificity and function of exocrine acinar cells and endocrine beta cells were characterized over a culture period of 7 days. We found pancreas tissue slices cultured under optimized conditions to have intact tissue specific morphology for the entire culture period. Amylase positive intact acini were present at all time points of culture and acinar cells displayed a typical strong cell polarity. Amylase release from pancreas tissue slices decreased during culture, but maintained the characteristic bell-shaped dose-response curve to increasing caerulein concentrations and a ca. 4-fold maximal over basal release. Additionally, endocrine beta cell viability and function was well preserved until the end of the observation period. Our results show that the tissue slice culture platform provides unprecedented maintenance of pancreatic tissue specific morphology and function over a culture period for at least 4 days and in part even up to 1 week. This analytical advancement now allows mid -to long-term studies on the cell biology of pancreatic disorder pathogenesis and therapy in an intact surrounding in situ.

  20. Research on Rapid Propagation of Gongshui Pomelo by Tissue Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuqiong WU; Kaiming SHI; Yanfang ZHU; Zhiyuan LI; Qian MOU

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to investigate the optimal medium and hor-mone combinations for efficient rapid propagation of Gongshui pomelo and analyze key technical measures in the tissue culture process. [Method] Stem tips and stem segments with buds were col ected from four varieties of pomelo adult trees as ex-plants, to investigate the main effect and key regulatory factors of vegetative organs and tissue culture explants and to propose a series of measures to prevent and control microbial contamination. Final y, an efficient rapid propagation technology system of Gongshui pomelo was established. [Result] Spring shoot explants con-tained large amounts of auxin, cytokinins, gibberel ins and other growth regulators, which could be used for tissue culture with high bud generation rate and rapid growth. Different conditions led to various culture results. Specifical y, mature pomelo seeds should be generated on semi-solid 1/2MS medium and transferred to solid MS medium for incubation. The propagation coefficient of stem segments with axil-lary buds was greater than that of stem tips, exhibiting significant differences. In ad-dition, the optimal hormone combination was 6-BA 0.5 mg/L + NAA 0.5 mg/L, which significantly promoted the induction and differentiation of adventitious buds. [Conclu-sion] This study provided basis for basic research, production and application of pomelo germplasm resources.

  1. Genetic and epigenetic changes induced by maize tissue culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The efficiency of crop improvement can presumably be enhanced via a somatic cell genetic system. Effective procedures for transformation also focus on the use of cultured cells. Although genetic variation is a critical element of plant breeding, many of the applications of cell and tissue culture depend on genetic stability. Tissue culture induced variation appears to be a common features of most tissue culture systems, the frequency of which depends on several factors, including the genomic structure of the species. An understanding of the mechanisms leading to this variation is important relative to attempts to manipulate the frequency. Previous studies with maize have documented the occurrence of single gene mutations, chromosomal aberrations, quantitative trait variation, transposable element activation and changes in DNA methylatin. The data on methylation reported on here show that hypomethylation occurs 3.5 times more frequently than hypermethylation among regenerated lines, massive genomic methylation does not occur, changes in methylation are often detected in normally transcribing genes, and base changes are relatively rare. In addition, 24% of the 756 regenerant family-probe combinations tested revealed homozygous DNA methylation changes in the original regenerated plant. Information on the role of methylation with regard to DNA binding proteins is discussed relative to these results. (author). 60 refs, 2 tabs

  2. Improved Diagnosis of Prosthetic Joint Infection by Culturing Periprosthetic Tissue Specimens in Blood Culture Bottles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peel, Trisha N.; Dylla, Brenda L.; Hughes, John G.; Lynch, David T.; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Cheng, Allen C.; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite known low sensitivity, culture of periprosthetic tissue specimens on agars and in broths is routine. Culture of periprosthetic tissue samples in blood culture bottles (BCBs) is potentially more convenient, but it has been evaluated in a limited way and has not been widely adopted. The aim of this study was to compare the sensitivity and specificity of inoculation of periprosthetic tissue specimens into blood culture bottles with standard agar and thioglycolate broth culture, applying Bayesian latent class modeling (LCM) in addition to applying the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) criteria for prosthetic joint infection. This prospective cohort study was conducted over a 9-month period (August 2013 to April 2014) at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, and included all consecutive patients undergoing revision arthroplasty. Overall, 369 subjects were studied; 117 (32%) met IDSA criteria for prosthetic joint infection, and 82% had late chronic infection. Applying LCM, inoculation of tissues into BCBs was associated with a 47% improvement in sensitivity compared to the sensitivity of conventional agar and broth cultures (92.1 versus 62.6%, respectively); this magnitude of change was similar when IDSA criteria were applied (60.7 versus 44.4%, respectively; P = 0.003). The time to microorganism detection was shorter with BCBs than with standard media (P < 0.0001), with aerobic and anaerobic BCBs yielding positive results within a median of 21 and 23 h, respectively. Results of our study demonstrate that the semiautomated method of periprosthetic tissue culture in blood culture bottles is more sensitive than and as specific as agar and thioglycolate broth cultures and yields results faster. PMID:26733067

  3. Dissection, culture, and analysis of Xenopus laevis embryonic retinal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, Molly J; Allen, Chelsea E; Ng-Sui-Hing, Ng-Kwet-Leok A; Rabe, Brian A; Lewis, Brittany B; Saha, Margaret S

    2012-01-01

    The process by which the anterior region of the neural plate gives rise to the vertebrate retina continues to be a major focus of both clinical and basic research. In addition to the obvious medical relevance for understanding and treating retinal disease, the development of the vertebrate retina continues to serve as an important and elegant model system for understanding neuronal cell type determination and differentiation(1-16). The neural retina consists of six discrete cell types (ganglion, amacrine, horizontal, photoreceptors, bipolar cells, and Müller glial cells) arranged in stereotypical layers, a pattern that is largely conserved among all vertebrates (12,14-18). While studying the retina in the intact developing embryo is clearly required for understanding how this complex organ develops from a protrusion of the forebrain into a layered structure, there are many questions that benefit from employing approaches using primary cell culture of presumptive retinal cells (7,19-23). For example, analyzing cells from tissues removed and dissociated at different stages allows one to discern the state of specification of individual cells at different developmental stages, that is, the fate of the cells in the absence of interactions with neighboring tissues (8,19-22,24-33). Primary cell culture also allows the investigator to treat the culture with specific reagents and analyze the results on a single cell level (5,8,21,24,27-30,33-39). Xenopus laevis, a classic model system for the study of early neural development (19,27,29,31-32,40-42), serves as a particularly suitable system for retinal primary cell culture (10,38,43-45). Presumptive retinal tissue is accessible from the earliest stages of development, immediately following neural induction (25,38,43). In addition, given that each cell in the embryo contains a supply of yolk, retinal cells can be cultured in a very simple defined media consisting of a buffered salt solution, thus removing the confounding

  4. Micropropagation of Catalpa bignonioides Walt. through tissue cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Halina Wysokińska; Lucjan Świątek

    2014-01-01

    The conditions used in the micropropagation of Catalpa bignonioides Walt. (Bignoniaceae) from callus tissue are described. The multiplication of shoots was best on Schenk and Hildebrandt (SH) solid medium supplemented with 0.5mg dm-3 indolil-3-acetic acid (IAA) and 2.0 mg dm-3 benzylaminopurine (BAP). Under these conditions, 11 shoots per culture could be developed within 4 weeks. To develop roots, the shoots were then transferred to basal SH medium without growth regulators. Rooted plantlets...

  5. Characterization of mesenchymal stem cells derived from equine adipose tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Carvalho

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy has shown promising results in tendinitis and osteoarthritis in equine medicine. The purpose of this work was to characterize the adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AdMSCs in horses through (1 the assessment of the capacity of progenitor cells to perform adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation; and (2 flow cytometry analysis using the stemness related markers: CD44, CD90, CD105 and MHC Class II. Five mixed-breed horses, aged 2-4 years-old were used to collect adipose tissue from the base of the tail. After isolation and culture of AdMSCs, immunophenotypic characterization was performed through flow cytometry. There was a high expression of CD44, CD90 and CD105, and no expression of MHC Class II markers. The tri-lineage differentiation was confirmed by specific staining: adipogenic (Oil Red O, osteogenic (Alizarin Red, and chondrogenic (Alcian Blue. The equine AdMSCs are a promising type of adult progenitor cell for tissue engineering in veterinary medicine.

  6. Effects of cold atmospheric plasma on mucosal tissue culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal plasmas have been commonly used in medical applications such as plasma ablation and blood coagulation. Newer developments show that plasmas can be generated with ion temperatures close to room temperature: these non-thermal or so-called cold atmospheric plasmas (CAPs) therefore open up a wide range of further biomedical applications. Based on the understanding of the bactericidal, virucidal and fungicidal properties of CAPs, information about the effects of CAP on mucosal cells and tissue is still lacking. Therefore this study focuses on the interaction of CAP with healthy head and neck mucosal cells on a molecular level. To analyse this interaction in detail, fresh tissue samples from healthy nasal and pharyngeal mucosa were harvested during surgery, assembled to a three-dimensional tissue culture model (mini organ cultures) and treated with CAP for different treatment times. Effects on the viability, necrosis induction and mutagenic activity were evaluated with the trypan blue exclusion test, Annexin-V/PI staining and alkaline microgel electrophoresis (comet assay). Trypan blue exclusion test revealed that the CAP treatment significantly decreases the cell viability for all tested treatment times (5, 10, 30, 60 and 120 s; p < 0.05), but only a treatment time of 120 s showed a cytotoxic effect as the viability dropped below 90%. Annexin-V/PI staining revealed a significant increase in necrosis in CAP treated pharyngeal tissue cultures for treatment times of 60 and 120 s (p < 0.05). For nasal tissue this effect was already detected for a 30 s treatment (p < 0.05). Comet assay analysis showed no mutagenic effects after exposure to CAP.

  7. Hydrodynamic effects on cells in agitated tissue culture reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, R. S.; Papoutsakis, E. T.

    1986-01-01

    The mechanisms by which hydrodynamic forces can affect cells grown on microcarrier beads in agitated cell culture reactors were investigated by analyzing the motion of microcarriers relative to the surrounding fluid, to each other, and to moving or stationary solid surfaces. It was found that harmful effects on cell cultures that have been previously attributed to shear can be better explained as the effects of turbulence (of a size scale comparable to the microcarriers or the spacing between them) or collisions. The primary mechanisms of cell damage involve direct interaction between microcarriers and turbulent eddies, collisions between microcarriers in turbulent flow, and collisions against the impeller or other solid surfaces. The implications of these analytical results for the design of tissue culture reactors are discussed.

  8. Micropropagation and tissue culture of Eucalyptus-a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, J J; Staden, J V

    1991-12-01

    Micropropagation has the potential to provide very high multiplication rates of selected tree genotypes, with resulting short-term silvicultural gains. Aseptic cultures have been established from seeds, seedlings, shoots, flowers and lignotubers. Callus cultures have been established from a wide range of tissue sources for at least 30 species of Eucalyptus. Plant regeneration from callus was successful for 12 of these species. Micropropagation through axillary proliferation, or adventitious shoot proliferation on nodal explants, or both, has been successful. An agar-based medium of Murashige and Skoog with a low auxin/cytokinin ratio is most commonly used for shoot multiplication. Vitrification and shoot senescence remain problems. Gibberellic acid was added in some media to stimulate shoot elongation. Various media are used for in vitro root initiation. Suspension and protoplast cultures have been achieved and plants have been regenerated from protoplasts. In vitro techniques are presently being applied to Eucalyptus to achieve genetic transformations. PMID:14972839

  9. Culture and characterization of rat hair follicle stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Renfu; Zheng, Xuan; Ni, Yueming; Xie, Shangju; Li, Changming

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish methods for isolation, culture, expansion, and characterization of rat hair follicle stem cells (rHFSCs). Hair follicles were harvested from 1-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats and digested with dispase and collagenase IV. The bulge of the hair follicle was dissected under a microscope and cultured in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium/F12 supplemented with KnockOut™ Serum Replacement serum substitute, penicillin-streptomycin, L-glutamine, non-essential amino acids, epidermal growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, polyhydric alcohol, and hydrocortisone. The rHFSCs were purified using adhesion to collagen IV. Cells were characterized by detecting marker genes with immunofluorescent staining and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The proliferation and vitality of rHFSCs at different passages were evaluated. The cultured rHFSCs showed typical cobblestone morphology with good adhesion and colony-forming ability. Expression of keratin 15, integrin α6, and integrin β1 were shown by immunocytochemistry staining. On day 1-2, the cells were in the latent phase. On day 5-6, the cells were in the logarithmic phase. Cell vitality gradually decreased from the 7th passage. Real-time PCR showed that the purified rHFSCs had good vitality and proliferative capacity and contained no keratinocytes. Highly purified rHFSCs can be obtained using tissue culture and adhesion to collagen IV. The cultured cells had good proliferative capacity and could therefore be a useful cell source for tissue-engineered hair follicles, vessels, and skin. PMID:25407732

  10. HYPOLIPIDEMIC EFFECT OF ARGLABIN IN HEPATOMA TISSUE CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Ratkin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Investigation of hypolipidemic effect of sesquiterpene γ-lactone Arglabin in hepatoma tissue culture (HTC.Materials and methods. In this study we’ve evaluated the effect of sesquiterpene γ-lactone Arglabin and gemfibrozil (reference drug on the lipid content in the hepatoma tissue culture (HTC which were incubated with a fat emulsion “Lipofundin” by fluorescent method with vital dye Nile Red. The cell viability was investigated using the MTT-test and staining by Trypan blue.Results. Cultivation of cell cultures of rat’s hepatoma cell line HTC with Arglabin and gemfibrozil in concentrations from 10 to 50 μmol and from 0.25 to 0.5 mmol, respectively, had no cytotoxic effect. HTC cell viability did not change compared with the corresponding rate in the control culture. Experimental hyperlipidemia in hepatoma culture was induced by the addition in the incubation medium of fat emulsion “Lipofundin” in a final concentration of 0.05 %. The fluorescence intensity of Nile Red in the cells was increased 4-fold (p < 0.05, which indicates a significant accumulation of lipids in the cytosol of cells. In these steady-state Arglabin and gemfibrozil at concentrations 75–100 μM and 0.25–1.0 mM, respectively, reduced the content of lipid in cells. Conclusion. In the model of hyperlipidemia induced by lipofundin, sesquiterpene γ-lactone Arglabin prevents the accumulation of lipids in the HTC cell line, as evidenced by a decrease in Nile Red fluorescence. However hypolipidemic effect of Arglabin is associated with cytotoxic effects, which is typical for anticancer drugs.

  11. OA02.17. Medicinal plant tissue culture and its ayurvedic perspective.

    OpenAIRE

    Kilankaje, Ashakiran; ,

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Introduction of Plant tissue culture (PTC) concept to the Ayurveda realm. Method: 1. Analysis of principles the plant tissue culture based on the literature review and real wet lab images of tissue culture 2. Analysis of ayurvedic principles which are relevant in the context 3. Logical concept development. Result: Plant tissue culture is based on the natural ability of plant cells to grow in to fullfledged organism, called as totipotency. Plant cell can exhibit totipotency only when ...

  12. Effects of cold atmospheric plasma on mucosal tissue culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welz, Christian; Becker, Sven; Li, Yang-Fang; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Jeon, Jin; Schwenk-Zieger, Sabina; Thomas, Hubertus M.; Isbary, Georg; Morfill, Gregor E.; Harréus, Ulrich; Zimmermann, Julia L.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal plasmas have been commonly used in medical applications such as plasma ablation and blood coagulation. Newer developments show that plasmas can be generated with ion temperatures close to room temperature: these non-thermal or so-called cold atmospheric plasmas (CAPs) therefore open up a wide range of further biomedical applications. Based on the understanding of the bactericidal, virucidal and fungicidal properties of CAPs, information about the effects of CAP on mucosal cells and tissue is still lacking. Therefore this study focuses on the interaction of CAP with healthy head and neck mucosal cells on a molecular level. To analyse this interaction in detail, fresh tissue samples from healthy nasal and pharyngeal mucosa were harvested during surgery, assembled to a three-dimensional tissue culture model (mini organ cultures) and treated with CAP for different treatment times. Effects on the viability, necrosis induction and mutagenic activity were evaluated with the trypan blue exclusion test, Annexin-V/PI staining and alkaline microgel electrophoresis (comet assay). Trypan blue exclusion test revealed that the CAP treatment significantly decreases the cell viability for all tested treatment times (5, 10, 30, 60 and 120 s p Comet assay analysis showed no mutagenic effects after exposure to CAP.

  13. Early detection of influenza virus by using a fluorometric assay of infected tissue culture.

    OpenAIRE

    Pachucki, C T; Creticos, C

    1988-01-01

    A fluorometric substrate, 4-methylumbelliferyl-alpha-ketoside of N-acetylneuramide, was used directly on clinical specimens and infected tissue culture 24 h after inoculation for the detection of influenza viral neuraminidase. Viral neuraminidase was detected in infected tissue culture but not in clinical specimens. The sensitivity of the assay on tissue culture was 92%, and the specificity was 96%.

  14. Cytoplasm T-maize tissue culture to obtain methomyl resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The calli of two cytoplasm T-maize hybrids were cultured in vitro with methomyl in the medium in order to obtain resistance. A mutagenic pretreatment was performed in one of the hybrids by injecting ethylmethane sulphonate (EMS) into the ear cob before fetilization. The atrophic tissue method was utilized to obtain totipotent callus. After treatment, coloured pericarp grains were observed in the regenerated plants. Different esterase electrophoretic patterns also appeared in one of them. In the methomyl resistance test, some nearly resistant (R-) and some less susceptible (S-) plants were detected within the same descendance (possibly due to mitochondrial variability). The interaction between mutagenic treatment with EMS and in vitro culture may be a suitable method for inducing changes of methomyl susceptibility in cms-T maize plants. (author)

  15. Media Compositions for Three-Dimensional Mammalian Tissue Growth under Microgravity Culture Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Normal mammalian tissue and the culturing process has been developed for the three groups of organ, structural and blood tissue.The cells are grown in vitro under microgravity culture conditions and form three dimensional cells aggregates with normal cell function. The microgravity culture conditions may be microgravity or simulated microgravity created in a horizontal rotating wall culture vessel.

  16. Media Compositions for Three Dimensional Mammalian Tissue Growth Under Microgravity Culture Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Normal mammalian tissue and the culturing process has been developed for the three groups of organ, structural and blood tissue. The cells are grown in vitro under microgravity culture conditions and form three dimensional cells aggregates with normal cell function. The microgravity culture conditions may be microgravity or simulated microgravity created in a horizontal rotating wall culture vessel.

  17. Identification of Eucalyptus citriodora clones micropropagated in tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, E; Izumi, M; Tanabe, T; Matsuda, M; Shimizu, T; Murakami, A; Murakami, K

    1997-01-01

    The extent of genetic identity observed in the young individuals which were micropropagated from a single Eucalyptus individual was analyzed by using DNA-fingerprinting. Among 40,000 tissue-cultured-seedings of E.citriodora, 200 plants were randomly chosen so that each total DNA might be extracted from their leaves. Using these DNAs as template, PCR was performed with some primers we found in advance that leads polymorphism for DNA of E. citriodora. In this study, all over the 200 cases, the band pattern formed cDNA fragment on a gel after electrophoresis was the identical one mutually. PMID:9586054

  18. Shoot tissue culture of Robinia pseudoacacia f. decaisneana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Robinia pseudoacacia f. decaisneana is a transfiguration of Robinia pseudoacacia. For enhancing propagation coefficient of the species, the experiment of shoot tissue culture of Robinia pseudoacacia f. decaisneana was conducted in Forestry College of Shenyang Agricultural University from July 1999 to July 2001. The experiment included medium selection of explant induction survival, initial culture, subculture as well as rooting culture, and forming seedling with callus. The results showed that shoot segment in vitro survive rate is larger in spring than in autumn, and green dense callus could form plantlet. The best medium for initial culture was SH+0.5mg/L BA+0.05 mg/L NAA, with a propagation coefficient of 4.1 (per micro-cutting in a month), and for subculture it was B5+0.5 mg/L BA+0.05 mg/L NAA+ 10 mg/L Glu., with a propagation coefficient of 4.7. The best rooting medium was 1/2MS+0.5 mg/L NAA+10 mg/L Glu., with a rooting rate of 84.4%. These results provide reference data for reproduction of superior individuals of Robinia pseudoacacia f. decaisneana.

  19. Organ and plantlet regeneration of Menyanthes trifoliata through tissue culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urszula Adamczyk-Rogozińska

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The conditions for the regeneration of plants through organogenesis from callus tissues of Menyanthes trifoliata are described. The shoot multiplication rate was affected by basal culture media, the type and concentration of cytokinin and subculture number. The best response was obtained when caulogenic calli were cultured on the modified Schenk and Hildebrandt medium (SH-M containing indole-3-acetic acid (IAA 0,5 mg/l and 6-benzyladenine (BA 1 mg/l or zeatin (2 mg/l. Under these conditions ca 7 shoots (mostly 1 cm or more in length per culture in the 5th and 6th passages could be developed. In older cultures (after 11-12 passages there was a trend for more numerous but shorter shoot formation. All regenerated shoots could be rooted on the SH-M medium supplemented with 0.5 mg/l IAA within 6 weeks; 80% of in vitro rooted plantlets survived their transfer to soil.

  20. Contamination and browning in tissue culture of Platanus occidentalis L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Feng-jie; Zhang Zhi-yi; Zhou Jun; Yao Na; Wang Dong-mei

    2007-01-01

    Twigs of 2-3-year-old Platanus occidentalis L. were used as experimental material to find the causes for the contamination and browning in the initial stages of tissue cultures. To compare the degree of browning of explants picked off from different growing seasons,the experimental material was excised from trees on each of the first ten days in January, March,May and July,2006. The results indicated that the contamination and browning rates of the material cut off in January (14. 2% and 30. 6%. respectively)and March were somewhat lower than those in July. The pretreatment of soaking the explants in different anti-oxidants and absorbents at the same time could diminish some side effects. The pretreatment of using 10 g·L-1 vitamin C reduced the contamination and browning rate effectively. An orthogonal experiment showed that the optimal factor and level arrangement is 0. 5 mg·L-1 BA,2. 0 g·L-1 active carbon and 1. 5 g·L-1 PVP which resulted in a browning rate of only 16. 5%. In general,sampling period,physical properties and pretreatment of explants are the main factors responsible for the contamination and browning of material in the initial stages of P. occidentalis tissue cultures.

  1. Physiological properties of vertebrate nerve cells in tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dichter, M A

    1975-01-01

    Vertebrate neurons in tissue culture are providing us with a new model system for studying the complex events which occur during neuronal differentiation, synaptogenesis, and neural network formation. It is already apparent that dissociated embryo neurons are capable of differentiating both morphologically and physiologically along predetermined lines in the absence of external influences. These neurons can form new connections with one another but retain some specificity in their selections. Both simple and complex neural networks can be seen. At the present time, the development of the invitro model system is just being explored. The potential value of a system of this kind at a variety of investigative levels should be appreciated. Questions of a fundamental nature in neurobiology, such as how synapses form, what rules govern such interaction, how cells recognize one another, and the nature of the basic two-, three-, or four-cell circuits that comprise the more complex neurons tissue can be approached with this system. Studies of the neurons and synapses themselves can lead to a more basic understanding of vertebrate nervous system functioning. The development of certain pathophysiological processes and the effects of neuroactive drugs on vertebrate neurons may be studied at the cellular level. Finally, the basic mechanism of some genetic abnormalities which produce abnormal nervous structure and function may be more easily determined in a simplified in vitro model than in the intact central nervous system. The value of any model is not inherent in the elegance of the model itseld, but only in its ability to suggest answers to fundamental questions about the system being modeled. Many fundamental questions about brain mechanisms in mental retardation remain unanswered. Perhaps some day the model of nerve cells in tissue culture will bring us closer to the answers to these questions. PMID:173059

  2. Technological assessment of the biogalvanic method for tissue characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biogalvanic cells have the potential to be used in characterizing biological tissue properties and ultimately tissue health. A biogalvanic cell is established by placing two differing metal electrodes across a target tissue allowing an electrical tissue-specific internal resistance to be determined. A novel data analysis method using least-squares fitting has been developed to more effectively determine the parameters of the biogalvanic system model proposed in the literature. The validity of the method has been examined through characterization of electrical models, ex vivo porcine tissue, and in vivo porcine tissue. Strong agreement between test results and the proposed characterization model has been shown. However, determined internal resistances are influenced by mechanical strain, current modulation direction and tissue thickness, indicating complexities at the electrode–tissue interface. These complexities undermine some assumptions upon which the biogalvanic model is based. Ultimately this technique could offer potential for use in minimally invasive surgery for discriminating tissue health but requires improved understanding and control of testing conditions. (paper)

  3. Lipid composition of slash pine tissue cultures grown with lunar and earth soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laseter, J. L.; Weete, J. D.; Baur, P. S.; Walkinshaw, C. H.

    1973-01-01

    Lipid analyses were conducted on slash pine tissues grown in culture in the presence of lunar (Apollo 15) and earth soils. Significant reductions in the total lipids, fatty acids, and sterol components were found in the tissues grown in contact with each of the soils employed when compared to the control. Tissues grown with lunar soil showed the greatest reductions. These results are discussed with respect to previous ultrastructural studies on similarly treated slash pine tissues and lipid analyses on tobacco tissue cultures.

  4. ESTABLISHMENT OF PHELIPANCHE RAMOSA TISSUE CULTURE AND EFFECT OF KANAMYCIN ON CULTURE GROWTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmara Kullačová

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Orobanchaceae family includes parasitic plants that attack many important food crops. Genus Phelipanche, belonging to this family is considered to cause high negative impact on food production. Developing Phelipanche plant must establish connection with the root of host plant, from which it receives all resources needed for further development. Nowadays big effort is directed to finding a reliable strategy to control parasitic plants. In vitro cultures of P. ramosa can be genetically manipulated and used for study of genes involved in host-parasite interactions. We established in vitro cultures of parasitic species Phelipanche ramosa on solid and liquid media in parallel. The obtained results point out that development of P. ramosa calli was origin specific. We tested the effect of antibiotic kanamycin on in vitro cultures of Phelipanche ramosa with aim to develop system for its genetic manipulation and selection of transgenic tissue using kanamycin- resistance approach. The selection pressure of kanamycin was stronger in liquid grown cultures. However, concentrations of kanamycin tested (up to 250 mg.l-1 did not ensured elimination of kanamycine non-resistant tissue. Tests of other candidate selection markers are currently in progress.

  5. Micropropagation and maintenance of phytoplasmas in tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertaccini, Assunta; Paltrinieri, Samanta; Martini, Marta; Tedeschi, Mara; Contaldo, Nicoletta

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance of phytoplasma strains in tissue culture is achievable for all strains transmitted to periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus), and also for other naturally infected plant host species. Shoots of 1-3 cm length are grown in a solid medium containing Murashige and Skoog (MS) micro- and macroelements and 0.12 mg/L benzylaminopurine. The continued presence of phytoplasmas in infected shoots of periwinkle that have been maintained in micropropagation for up to 20 years can be shown by diagnostic methods such as nested PCR tests using the 16S rDNA gene (see Chapters 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25,and 26 for phytoplasma diagnostic methods). PMID:22987403

  6. Micropropagation of Catalpa bignonioides Walt. through tissue cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halina Wysokińska

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The conditions used in the micropropagation of Catalpa bignonioides Walt. (Bignoniaceae from callus tissue are described. The multiplication of shoots was best on Schenk and Hildebrandt (SH solid medium supplemented with 0.5mg dm-3 indolil-3-acetic acid (IAA and 2.0 mg dm-3 benzylaminopurine (BAP. Under these conditions, 11 shoots per culture could be developed within 4 weeks. To develop roots, the shoots were then transferred to basal SH medium without growth regulators. Rooted plantlets were obtained within 2-8 weeks. Regenerated plants were fully capable of further development in soil. Generally, ca 10 plants could be obtained from a fragment of callus within 10-12 weeks.

  7. Methods for the Organogenesis of Skeletal Muscle in Tissue Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenburgh, Herman; Shansky, Janet; DelTatto, Michael; Chromiak, Joseph

    1997-01-01

    Skeletal muscle structure is regulated by many factors, including nutrition, hormones, electrical activity, and tension. The muscle cells are subjected to both passive and active mechanical forces at all stages of development and these forces play important but poorly understood roles in regulating muscle organogenesis and growth. For example, during embryogenesis, the rapidly growing skeleton places large passive mechanical forces on the attached muscle tissue. These forces not only help to organize the proliferating mononucleated myoblasts into the oriented, multinucleated myofibers of a functional muscle but also tightly couple the growth rate of muscle to that of bone. Postnatally, the actively contracting, innervated muscle fibers are subjected to different patterns of active and passive tensions which regulate longitudinal and cross sectional myofiber growth. These mechanically-induced organogenic processes have been difficult to study under normal tissue culture conditions, resulting in the development of numerous methods and specialized equipment to simulate the in vivo mechanical environment.These techniques have led to the "engineering" of bioartificial muscles (organoids) which display many of the characteristics of in vivo muscle including parallel arrays of postmitotic fibers organized into fascicle-like structures with tendon-like ends. They are contractile, express adult isoforms of contractile proteins, perform directed work, and can be maintained in culture for long periods. The in vivo-like characteristics and durability of these muscle organoids make them useful for long term in vitro studies on mechanotransduction mechanisms and on muscle atrophy induced by decreased tension. In this report, we described a simple method for generating muscle organoids from either primary embrionic avain or neonatal rodent myoblasts.

  8. Tissue culture and micropropagation for forest biomass production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, E.; Maine, F.W.

    1984-09-01

    An increase in forest production will be necessary in the future when wood becomes a major renewable source of energy and chemicals along with its traditional role of fibre source. This increase could eventually by achieved be proper selection and breeding of trees. Clonal forestry by vegetative propagation of cuttings is becoming a viable alternative to a seedling-based forestry with many advantages, and cutting could be used to quickly propagate large numbers of clones of control-pollinated seedlings. Most forest trees are propagated sexually and seed orchards were started in the US and Canada in the last 40-50 years for breeding purposes. Forests could ultimately be established with improved seedlings instead of from seed with unknown genetic potential, or by natural regeneration. Micropropagation is the term used to refer to the propagation of plants raised by tissue culture methods rather than from seeds or cuttings. Many clonal plantlets could be regenerated asexually in the laboratory and eventually transplanted to permanent sites. In addition the technology could be developed to produce new variants from somatic cells. Tissue culture is a technique which may be useful for plant propagation where conventional methods are inadequate or unsuitable. However, traditional studies of field planting observed over long periods of time would still be necessary. This document has the object of informing those who may wish to know more about these techniques in relation to practical application, and require a general overview rather than experimental details, which are given in an annotated bilbiography. 274 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Tissue culture of black pepper (piper nigrum l.) in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black pepper (Piper nigrum L.) the 'King of Spices' is a universal table condiment. It is extensively used in Pakistani cuisines and herbal medicines and imported in bulk from neighboring countries. The black pepper vine is generally cultivated by seed because other vegetative propagation methods are slow and time consuming. Therefore the tissue culture technique is considered more efficient and reliable method for rapid and mass propagation of this economically important plant. The present study was initiated to develop protocol for micro-propagation of black pepper vine. The stem, leaf and shoot tip explants from mature vine were cultured on MS medium supplemented with different concentrations of plant growth regulators (2,4-D, BA, IBA). Best callus was produced on MS medium with 1.5 mg/l BA by shoot tip explant. Shoot regeneration was excellent on MS medium with 0.5 mg/l BA. The plantlets formed were rooted best on 1.5 mg/l IBA. The rooted plants were transplanted in soil medium and acclimatized in growth room. The plants raised were test planted under the local conditions of Hattar. (author)

  10. Robotic palpation and mechanical property characterization for abnormal tissue localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Bummo; Kim, Yeongjin; Oh, Cheol Kyu; Kim, Jung

    2012-09-01

    Palpation is an intuitive examination procedure in which the kinesthetic and tactile sensations of the physician are used. Although it has been widely used to detect and localize diseased tissues in many clinical fields, the procedure is subjective and dependent on the experience of the individual physician. Palpation results and biomechanics-based mechanical property characterization are possible solutions that can enable the acquisition of objective and quantitative information on abnormal tissue localization during diagnosis and surgery. This paper presents an integrated approach for robotic palpation combined with biomechanical soft tissue characterization. In particular, we propose a new palpation method that is inspired by the actual finger motions that occur during palpation procedures. To validate the proposed method, robotic palpation experiments on silicone soft tissue phantoms with embedded hard inclusions were performed and the force responses of the phantoms were measured using a robotic palpation system. Furthermore, we carried out a numerical analysis, simulating the experiments and estimating the objective and quantitative properties of the tissues. The results indicate that the proposed approach can differentiate diseased tissue from normal tissue and can characterize the mechanical information of diseased tissue, which means that this method can be applied as a means of abnormality localization to diagnose prostate cancers. PMID:22772733

  11. Characterizing Tissue with Acoustic Parameters Derived from Ultrasound Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Littrup, P; Duric, N; Leach, R R; Azevedo, S G; Candy, J V; Moore, T; Chambers, D H; Mast, J E; Johnson, S A; Holsapple, E

    2002-01-23

    In contrast to standard reflection ultrasound (US), transmission US holds the promise of more thorough tissue characterization by generating quantitative acoustic parameters. We compare results from a conventional US scanner with data acquired using an experimental circular scanner operating at frequencies of 0.3 - 1.5 MHz. Data were obtained on phantoms and a normal, formalin-fixed, excised breast. Both reflection and transmission-based algorithms were used to generate images of reflectivity, sound speed and attenuation.. Images of the phantoms demonstrate the ability to detect sub-mm features and quantify acoustic properties such as sound speed and attenuation. The human breast specimen showed full field evaluation, improved penetration and tissue definition. Comparison with conventional US indicates the potential for better margin definition and acoustic characterization of masses, particularly in the complex scattering environments of human breast tissue. The use of morphology, in the context of reflectivity, sound speed and attenuation, for characterizing tissue, is discussed.

  12. The use of tissue culture techniques to detect irradiated vegetables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    the ability of two tissue culture methods, callus and vegetable growth induction, to detect irradiated vegetables was evaluated. Potato tubers, carrot roots, garlic cloves and onion bulbs were subjected to various gamma radiation doses (0, 25, 100, 150, 250, 500, 750, and 1000 Gy). Irradiated vegetables were cultured in vitro and in vivo (pots). Gamma irradiation significantly reduced callus-forming ability especially in carrot and potato where no callus was observed in doses higher than 50 Gy. Length of shoots and roots growing from irradiated garlic and onion explants was considerably reduced starting from the 25 Gy dose. No roots were formed on garlic explants at any irradiation dose. Garlic leaves growing from irradiated explants were spotted with purple to brown spots. The intensity of these spots increased as gamma ray dosage increased. In the pot experiment, potato plant appeared in the control only. On the contrary, a complete sprouting of garlic and onion was seen in all irradiation treatments. It was not possible to distinguish between the various irradiation treatments and the control 3 days after planting in pots. The two in vitro techniques, tested in our study, may effectively be used to detect irradiated vegetables and estimate the range of doses used. The callus formation method is more useful for potato and carrot, since regeneration of shoots in vitro from these two plants takes along time, making this method unpractical. The other technique is very useful in the case of onion and garlic since it is rapid. The two techniques can be used with most of the vegetables that can be cultured in vitro. (Author)

  13. Detection of irradiated vegetables using tissue culture techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability of two tissue culture methods, callus and vegetative growth induction, to detect irradiated vegetables was evaluated. Potato tubers, carrot roots, garlic cloves, and onion bulbs were subjected to various gamma irradiation doses (0, 25, 50, 100, 150, 250, 500, 750, and 1000 Gy). Irradiated vegetables were cultured in vitro and in vivo (pots). Gamma irradiation significantly reduced callus-forming ability especially in carrot and carrot and potato where no callus was observed in doses higher than 50 Gy. Length of shoots and roots growing from irradiated garlic and onion explants was considerably reduced starting from the 25 Gy dose. No roots were formed on garlic explants at any irradiation dose. Garlic leaves growing from irradiated explants were spotted with purple to brown spots. The intensity of these spots increased as gamma ray dosage increased. In the pot experiment, potato plants appeared in the control only. On the contrary, a complete sprouting of garlic and onion was seen in all irradiation treatments. It was not possible to distinguish between the various irradiation treatments and the control 3 days after planting in pots. The two in vitro techniques, tested in our study, may effectively be used to detect irradiated vegetables and estimate the range of doses used. The callus formation method is more useful for potato and carrot, since regeneration of shoots in vitro from these two plants takes a long time, making this method unpractical. The other technique is very useful in the case of onion and garlic since it is rapid. The two techniques can be used with most of the vegetables that can be cultured in vitro. (Author)

  14. Radiopharmaceuticals as probes to characterize tumour tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Israt S.; Arshad, Mubarik A.; Nguyen, Quang-De; Aboagye, Eric O. [Imperial College London, Comprehensive Cancer Imaging Centre, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-01

    Tumour cells exhibit several properties that allow them to grow and divide. A number of these properties are detectable by nuclear imaging methods. We discuss crucial tumour properties that can be described by current radioprobe technologies, further discuss areas of emerging radioprobe development, and finally articulate need areas that our field should aspire to develop. The review focuses largely on positron emission tomography and draws upon the seminal 'Hallmarks of Cancer' review article by Hanahan and Weinberg in 2011 placing into context the present and future roles of radiotracer imaging in characterizing tumours. (orig.)

  15. Thermal property of biological tissues characterized by piezoelectric photoacoustic technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Chunming; ZHANG Shuyi; CHEN Yan; SHUI Xiuji; YANG Yuetao

    2004-01-01

    A photoacoustic piezoelectric method based on a simplified thermoelastic theory is employed to determine thermal diffusivities of biological tissues. The thermal diffusivities of porcine tissues with different preparation conditions, including fresh, dry and specially prepared conditions, are characterized. Comparing the experimental evaluated diffusivities of the tissues in three conditions with each other, it can be seen that the diffusivities of the fresh tissues are the biggest and the diffusivities of the specially prepared tissues are bigger than that of the dry ones generally. The results show that the piezoelectric photoacoustic method is especially effective for determining macro-effective (average) thermal diffusivities of biological materials with micro- inhomogeneity and easy to be performed, which can provide useful information for researching thermal characters of biological tissues.

  16. Biomechanical characterization of soft tissue injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winnem, Andreas Meyer; Randeberg, Lise Lyngsnes; Larsen, Eivind L. P.; Lilledahl, Magnus B.; Haaverstad, Rune; Haugen, Olav A.; Skallerud, Bjørn; Svaasand, Lars O.

    2007-02-01

    Determining the cause of an injury and the force behind the impact may be of crucial importance in a court case. For non-penetrating soft tissue injuries there is a lack of information available in the literature. In this study controlled bruises were inflicted on an anesthetized pig by high speed, low-weight paintball projectiles (diameter 17.1 mm, weight 3.15 g). The speed of the object and the impact itself were monitored using a high speed camera. Punch biopsies (5 mm) were collected from the injury sites. A red and purple ring with a diameter of 1.5 cm appeared on the skin within 30 seconds after the paintball impact. The ring was visually fully established after 5-10 minutes. Numerical finite element simulations performed with ABAQUSExplicit showed a build up of shear stresses in the skin where the ring formed. Biopsies demonstrated severe dermal vessel damage in the same area. It is concluded that considerable shear stresses during the impact will create dermal vessel damage and thereby cause a visible bruise. Larger forces are required for compressive stresses to inflict equivalent vascular damage.

  17. Three-dimensional hydrogel cell culture systems for modeling neural tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frampton, John

    Two-dimensional (2-D) neural cell culture systems have served as physiological models for understanding the cellular and molecular events that underlie responses to physical and chemical stimuli, control sensory and motor function, and lead to the development of neurological diseases. However, the development of three-dimensional (3-D) cell culture systems will be essential for the advancement of experimental research in a variety of fields including tissue engineering, chemical transport and delivery, cell growth, and cell-cell communication. In 3-D cell culture, cells are provided with an environment similar to tissue, in which they are surrounded on all sides by other cells, structural molecules and adhesion ligands. Cells grown in 3-D culture systems display morphologies and functions more similar to those observed in vivo, and can be cultured in such a way as to recapitulate the structural organization and biological properties of tissue. This thesis describes a hydrogel-based culture system, capable of supporting the growth and function of several neural cell types in 3-D. Alginate hydrogels were characterized in terms of their biomechanical and biochemical properties and were functionalized by covalent attachment of whole proteins and peptide epitopes. Methods were developed for rapid cross-linking of alginate hydrogels, thus permitting the incorporation of cells into 3-D scaffolds without adversely affecting cell viability or function. A variety of neural cell types were tested including astrocytes, microglia, and neurons. Cells remained viable and functional for longer than two weeks in culture and displayed process outgrowth in 3-D. Cell constructs were created that varied in cell density, type and organization, providing experimental flexibility for studying cell interactions and behavior. In one set of experiments, 3-D glial-endothelial cell co-cultures were used to model blood-brain barrier (BBB) structure and function. This co-culture system was

  18. A Well-Controlled Nucleus Pulposus Tissue Culture System with Injection Port for Evaluating Regenerative Therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Arkesteijn, ITM Irene; Mouser, WHM; F Mwale; van Dijk; Ito, K Keita

    2015-01-01

    In vitro evaluation of nucleus pulposus (NP) tissue regeneration would be useful, but current systems for NP culture are not ideal for injections. The aim of this study was to develop a long-term culture system for NP tissue that allows injections of regenerative agents. Bovine caudal NPs were harvested and placed in the newly designed culture system. After equilibration of the tissue to 0.3 MPa the volume was fixed and the tissue was cultured for 28 days. The cell viability and extracellular...

  19. Physiological basis for multiplication of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) using tissue culture

    OpenAIRE

    Andersone-Ozola, Una

    2009-01-01

    Physiological basis for multiplication of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) using tissue culture The aim of the present study was to create the physiological basis for micropropagation of mature Pinus sylvestris L. in tissue culture. The most suitable time for introduction in vitro of mature P. sylvestris bud tissue was from July to late October. Long cold storage of dormant mature Scots pine buds before introduction in vitro increases their morphogenic competence in tissue cult...

  20. Effects of Apollo 12 lunar material on lipid levels of tobacco tissue and slash pine cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weete, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    Investigations of the lipid components of pine tissues (Pinus elloitii) are discussed, emphasizing fatty acids and steroids. The response by slash pine tissue cultures to growth in contact with Apollo lunar soil, earth basalt, and Iowa soil is studied. Tissue cultures of tobacco grown for 12 weeks in contact with lunar material from Apollo 12 flight contained 21 to 35 percent more total pigment than control tissues. No differences were noted in the fresh or dry weight of the experimental and control samples.

  1. An Assessment of Cell Culture Plate Surface Chemistry for in Vitro Studies of Tissue Engineering Scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander Röder; Elena García-Gareta; Christina Theodoropoulos; Nikola Ristovski; Keith A. Blackwood; Woodruff, Maria A.

    2015-01-01

    The use of biopolymers as a three dimensional (3D) support structure for cell growth is a leading tissue engineering approach in regenerative medicine. Achieving consistent cell seeding and uniform cell distribution throughout 3D scaffold culture in vitro is an ongoing challenge. Traditionally, 3D scaffolds are cultured within tissue culture plates to enable reproducible cell seeding and ease of culture media change. In this study, we compared two different well-plates with different surface ...

  2. Mechanical characterization of bioprinted in vitro soft tissue models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent development in bioprinting technology enables the fabrication of complex, precisely controlled cell-encapsulated tissue constructs. Bioprinted tissue constructs have potential in both therapeutic applications and nontherapeutic applications such as drug discovery and screening, disease modelling and basic biological studies such as in vitro tissue modelling. The mechanical properties of bioprinted in vitro tissue models play an important role in mimicking in vivo the mechanochemical microenvironment. In this study, we have constructed three-dimensional in vitro soft tissue models with varying structure and porosity based on the 3D cell-assembly technique. Gelatin/alginate hybrid materials were used as the matrix material and cells were embedded. The mechanical properties of these models were assessed via compression tests at various culture times, and applicability of three material constitutive models was examined for fitting the experimental data. An assessment of cell bioactivity in these models was also carried out. The results show that the mechanical properties can be improved through structure design, and the compression modulus and strength decrease with respect to time during the first week of culture. In addition, the experimental data fit well with the Ogden model and experiential function. These results provide a foundation to further study the mechanical properties, structural and combined effects in the design and the fabrication of in vitro soft tissue models. (paper)

  3. Multilineage co-culture of adipose-derived stem cells for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yimu; Waldman, Stephen D; Flynn, Lauren E

    2015-07-01

    Stem cell interactions through paracrine cell signalling can regulate a range of cell responses, including metabolic activity, proliferation and differentiation. Moving towards the development of optimized tissue-engineering strategies with adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs), the focus of this study was on developing indirect co-culture models to study the effects of mature adipocytes, chondrocytes and osteoblasts on bovine ASC multilineage differentiation. For each lineage, ASC differentiation was characterized by histology, gene expression and protein expression, in the absence of key inductive differentiation factors for the ASCs. Co-culture with each of the mature cell populations was shown to successfully induce or enhance lineage-specific differentiation of the ASCs. In general, a more homogeneous but lower-level differentiation response was observed in co-culture as compared to stimulating the bovine ASCs with inductive differentiation media. To explore the role of the Wnt canonical and non-canonical signalling pathways within the model systems, the effects of the Wnt inhibitors WIF-1 and DKK-1 on multilineage differentiation in co-culture were assessed. The data indicated that Wnt signalling may play a role in mediating ASC differentiation in co-culture with the mature cell populations. PMID:23135884

  4. Mass micropropagation of pineapple tissue culture using bioreactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pineapple (ananas comosus) is the most important fruit in terms of revenue earner in this country. The export of the canned pineapple is about 2 million standard cases annually valued at RM 60 million, while the export of fresh pineapple is about 40,000 tonnes worth about RM 10 million. The industry for canning is however, an ailing industry with production on the decline since the 70s. Scaling up the pineapple propagation using in vitro methods seems to be possible solutions for the lack of planting material. Temporary immersion system (TIS) has been described by Teisson and Alvard (1995) for plant tissue culture propagation. This system, also known as RITA, has been successfully used with embryogenic tissues of banana (Alvard et al 1993), coffee (Berthouly 1991), rubber (Etienne et al 1993) and sugarcane (Lorenzo et al 1998). In this study, the system has been set up with a potential capacity of 3 manifolds with 10 RITA each, to multiply meristem explants at different immersion periods. The system was compared with the conventional micropropagation system on solid medium. Both systems were treated with MS media containing 2.5 mg/l BAP and 0.1 NAA. In TIS the shoots were able to multiplied faster in comparison with solid media. The multiplication rates were increased up to 1:3 to 1:5 compared to normal propagation on solid media. The results show that TIS not only increase the propagation rates of pineapple but could also be adapted to reduce implementation costs to establish low-cost propagation systems. (Author)

  5. Prediction and Characterization of Lung Tissue Motion during Quiet Respiration

    OpenAIRE

    White, Benjamin Michael

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this dissertation is to quantitatively characterize and predict lung tissue motion with the goal of improving the local control of lung cancer. This is accomplished by producing a biomechanical model of lung tissue motion during quiet respiration. This dissertation proposes the development of algorithms and protocols for the analysis of motion information in 4DCT images.Methods: A cohort of 50 patients was acquired with a 16-slice CT scanner. This data was used th...

  6. Investigation of Various Tissue Culture Monolayers Sensitivity in Detection of Clostridium difficile Toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH Salari

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Backround: Clostridium difficile is the most common cause of nosocomial diarrhea. It is usually a consequence of antibi­otic treatment, but sporadic cases can occur. The purpose of this study was to investigate five tissue culture monolayers sen­sitivity in detection of C. difficile-toxin. Methods: A total of 402 stool samples from patients with nosocomial diarrhea hospitalized in three hospitals of Tehran Uni­versity of Medical Sciences (TUMS were collected. The samples were cultured on a selective cycloserine cefoxitin fructose agar (CCFA and incubated in anaerobic conditions, at 37 °C for 4 days. Isolates were characterized to species level by con­ventional biochemical tests. Bacterial cytotoxicity was assayed on five tissue culture monolayers. Results: Our findings show that of the total patients, 24 toxigenic C. difficile (6% were isolated. All 24 C. difficile toxins showed cytotoxic effect at ³ 1:10 dilution on Hela, Hep2, Vero, McCoy and Mdck cells after 16, 20, 24, 24 and 30 hours, re­spectively. C. difficile toxin showed cytotoxic effect at ³ 1:100 dilutions only on Hela cell monolayer after 48 hours. Conclusion: Hela cell monolayer may be a satisfactory substitute for the detection of C. difficile toxin in clinical specimens.   

  7. NMR-based metabolomics of mammalian cell and tissue cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NMR spectroscopy was used to evaluate growth media and the cellular metabolome in two systems of interest to biomedical research. The first of these was a Chinese hamster ovary cell line engineered to express a recombinant protein. Here, NMR spectroscopy and a quantum mechanical total line shape analysis were utilized to quantify 30 metabolites such as amino acids, Krebs cycle intermediates, activated sugars, cofactors, and others in both media and cell extracts. The impact of bioreactor scale and addition of anti-apoptotic agents to the media on the extracellular and intracellular metabolome indicated changes in metabolic pathways of energy utilization. These results shed light into culture parameters that can be manipulated to optimize growth and protein production. Second, metabolomic analysis was performed on the superfusion media in a common model used for drug metabolism and toxicology studies, in vitro liver slices. In this study, it is demonstrated that two of the 48 standard media components, choline and histidine are depleted at a faster rate than many other nutrients. Augmenting the starting media with extra choline and histidine improves the long-term liver slice viability as measured by higher tissues levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), glutathione and ATP, as well as lower LDH levels in the media at time points out to 94 h after initiation of incubation. In both models, media components and cellular metabolites are measured over time and correlated with currently accepted endpoint measures.

  8. Micropropagation of Woody Legume (Albizia lebbeck Through Tissue Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N.K. Mamun

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The woody legume, Albizia lebbeck, commonly cultivated for social forestry in rural area of Bangladesh was selected for micropropagation by tissue culture technique. Cotyledon, nodal segment of in vitro grown seedlings and nodal segments of field grown mature tree were used as explants. With proper manipulation of cytokinin and auxin combinations and concentrations, it was possible to induce callus from three types of explants of Albizia lebbeck. Different combinations of BA with NAA and KIN with NAA were proved efficient media formulation for callus induction. Among all the hormonal supplements used BA-NAA combination with MS medium was proved best in all respect of callusing response in Albizia lebbeck. Among the explants the in vitro internodal segments were the best for callus induction. The highest 100% callus induction was observed in media having MS+2.0 mg L-1 BA+0.2 mg L-1 NAA and the fresh weight of callus was 1.3 g. Among these three explants of Albizia lebbeck only calli derived from cotyledon regenerated best shoots in MS media supplemented with BA singly or in combination with NAA and KIN. In respect of direct shoot regeneration nodal explants of Albizia lebbeck produced highest range of regenerated shoots.

  9. Characterization of European Management Perspective Hofstede's Cultural Dimensions Comparative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida CÎMPEANU

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Because Europe is characterized by the coexistence of several cultures whose characteristics have both similarities and differences but appreciable, the results of researchers in this regard are different from each other, this distinction is often made based on the prevailing values of that culture , which determines the orientation of the country for a certain system, management style or to a specific profile manager. A particularly important role in characterizing cultural factors play European management, each differing from the other culture as module in addressing various fundamental issues that characterize that society. These issues can be characterized by certain general cultural dimensions that Hofstede defines them as aspects of a culture that can be measured in relation to other cultures. The differences between management systems in European countries (mainly EU countries in the context of this article, the study is based on four cultural dimensions of Hofstede model (power distance, individualism vs. collectivism, uncertainty avoidance, femininity vs. masculinity and change scores recorded for these dimensions in each country. Dimensions considered primarily affect organizational culture which in turn significantly influence the development and performance of the organization and its members, management practices and policies.Data from Hofstede's study reinforce and support the claim that European countries can be grouped systematically cultural groups (Nordic countries, Latin, Germanic, Anglo-Saxon, Eastern Europe that allow significant interpretation in terms of management organization, and that can speak of a typical single European culture but you can see all dimensions of cultural differences taken into account.

  10. Characterizing parameters of Jatropha curcas cell cultures for microgravity studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendrame, Wagner A.; Pinares, Ania

    2013-06-01

    Jatropha (Jatropha curcas) is a tropical perennial species identified as a potential biofuel crop. The oil is of excellent quality and it has been successfully tested as biodiesel and in jet fuel mixes. However, studies on breeding and genetic improvement of jatropha are limited. Space offers a unique environment for experiments aiming at the assessment of mutations and differential gene expression of crops and in vitro cultures of plants are convenient for studies of genetic variation as affected by microgravity. However, before microgravity studies can be successfully performed, pre-flight experiments are necessary to characterize plant material and validate flight hardware environmental conditions. Such preliminary studies set the ground for subsequent spaceflight experiments. The objectives of this study were to compare the in vitro growth of cultures from three explant sources (cotyledon, leaf, and stem sections) of three jatropha accessions (Brazil, India, and Tanzania) outside and inside the petriGAP, a modified group activation pack (GAP) flight hardware to fit petri dishes. In vitro jatropha cell cultures were established in petri dishes containing a modified MS medium and maintained in a plant growth chamber at 25 ± 2 °C in the dark. Parameters evaluated were surface area of the explant tissue (A), fresh weight (FW), and dry weight (DW) for a period of 12 weeks. Growth was observed for cultures from all accessions at week 12, including subsequent plantlet regeneration. For all accessions differences in A, FW and DW were observed for inside vs. outside the PetriGAPs. Growth parameters were affected by accession (genotype), explant type, and environment. The type of explant influenced the type of cell growth and subsequent plantlet regeneration capacity. However, overall cell growth showed no abnormalities. The present study demonstrated that jatropha in vitro cell cultures are suitable for growth inside PetriGAPs for a period of 12 weeks. The parameters

  11. Jaundice and wound healing: a tissue-culture study.

    OpenAIRE

    Taube, M.; Elliot, P.; Ellis, H.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of jaundice on wound healing have been studied by growing fibroblasts, in vitro, in normal culture media, in culture media to which bilirubin has been added, and in culture media containing sera from jaundiced patients. It has been found that the addition of bilirubin to the culture media causes morphological changes in the fibroblasts, and impairs the growth of cells. The addition of jaundiced human sera to the culture also causes similar changes.

  12. Characterization of European Management Perspective Hofstede's Cultural Dimensions Comparative Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Aida CÎMPEANU; Sergiu PÎRJU; Gabriela MIRONOV

    2011-01-01

    Because Europe is characterized by the coexistence of several cultures whose characteristics have both similarities and differences but appreciable, the results of researchers in this regard are different from each other, this distinction is often made based on the prevailing values of that culture , which determines the orientation of the country for a certain system, management style or to a specific profile manager. A particularly important role in characterizing cultural factors play Euro...

  13. 21 CFR 864.2240 - Cell and tissue culture supplies and equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cell and tissue culture supplies and equipment. 864.2240 Section 864.2240 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture...

  14. Pre-metatarsal skeletal development in tissue culture at unit- and microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klement, B. J.; Spooner, B. S.

    1994-01-01

    Explant organ culture was used to demonstrate that isolated embryonic mouse pre-metatarsal mesenchyme is capable of undergoing a series of differentiative and morphogenetic developmental events. Mesenchyme differentiation into chondrocytes, and concurrent morphogenetic patterning of the cartilage tissue, and terminal chondrocyte differentiation with subsequent matrix mineralization show that cultured tissue closely parallels in vivo development. Whole mount alizarin red staining of the cultured tissue demonstrates that the extracellular matrix around the hypertrophied chondrocytes is competent to support mineralization. Intensely stained mineralized bands are similar to those formed in pre-metatarsals developing in vivo. We have adapted the culture strategy for experimentation in a reduced gravity environment on the Space Shuttle. Spaceflight culture of pre-metatarsals, which have already initiated chondrogenesis and morphogenetic patterning, results in an increase in cartilage rod size and maintenance of rod shape, compared to controls. Older pre-metatarsal tissue, already terminally differentiated to hypertrophied cartilage, maintained rod structure and cartilage phenotype during spaceflight culture.

  15. Somaclonal variation in tobacco and tomato plants regenerated from tissue cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper is devoted to the results of investigations on the somaclonal variation of regenerants of six N. tabacum varieties and four species of the genus Lycopersicon (L. esculentum, L. peruvianum, L. chilense and L. cheesmanii var. minor). The 1300 regenerated tobacco plants obtained differed from each other and from the initial varieties by their habitus, height of stem, size and form of the leaves and flowers, duration of the vegetative period and other characters. Cytological investigations of the root meristems of the regenerated plants demonstrated great variability of chromosome number, many being mixoploid, aneuploid or tetraploid. The meiosis of the regenerants was characterized by a great number of disturbances which resulted in their low fertility, or complete sterility. After testing the progenies of the regenerated plants in R1 and R2, 100 lines were obtained, 10 of which had higher yield and valuable qualities. The same great variability of morphological and cytological properties and pollen fertility was observed in regenerants obtained from tissue cultures of tomato leaves and flower buds. Self-compatible forms were obtained from initially completely self-compatible plants of L. peruvianum and L. chilense. Recessive, jointless, pedicel mutation was observed in plants regenerated from tissue cultures of L. peruvianum. It was established that segregation of fruit-carotenoid composition occurred in R1 progenies of regenerants from L. cheesmanii. Some plants formed normal orange fruits with high β-carotene content (genotype BB+). Others formed red fruits with high lycopene and low β-carotene contents (genotype B+B+). Progenies of these R2 plants were also red-fruited. The data obtained from the investigations show mutation of the dominant gene B into a recessive B+. The results of these investigations show that somaclonal variation in tissue cultures can be successfully applied in genetics and plant breeding to obtain valuable lines and varieties

  16. Culture and characterization of juvenile rabbit tenocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard-Beaubois, K; Hecquet, C; Houcine, O; Hayem, G; Adolphe, M

    1997-02-01

    The culture of rabbit tenocytes could be a useful model in the study of the physiopathology and pharmacotoxicology of tendons. This work was undertaken to examine the in vitro behavior of tenocytes form juvenile rabbit Achilles tendons. We report observations of the morphological and biological characteristics of primary culture and subsequent passages of rabbit tendon cells cultured in monolayer. Data obtained by electron microscopy and growth curves were complementary. After 36 passages, the generation time of tenocytes did not change and no sign of senescence could be seen. Primary culture and the first passages retained the expression of tenocyte differentiated functions, synthesis of type I collagen and decorin. Cell growth behavior was not modified upon passaging. However, when subcultured, tenocytes displayed a modulated phenotype. PMID:9049100

  17. Propagation of jarrah (Eucalyptus marginata) by organ and tissue culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, M.J.; McComb, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    Micropropagation methods are described for the production of clonal lines from Eucalyptus marginata (jarrah) seedlings. Nodal explants from mature trees can also yield shoot cultures, but a high frequency of contamination occurs among such explants. Uncontaminated callus cultures can be produced from mature trees by culturing stamen filaments and shoots can subsequently be regenerated from this callus. The rooting percentage of shoot cultures from either nodes or stamen callus of mature trees is low compared with that from seedling explants. Considerable variation was observed between trees in the ability of stamen callus to regenerate shoots and in the frequency of rooting. (Refs. 27)

  18. Depot-dependent effects of adipose tissue explants on co-cultured hepatocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Zhen-Yu; Ma, Tao; Lock, Erik-Jan;

    2011-01-01

    We have developed an in vitro hepatocyte-adipose tissue explant (ATE) co-culture model enabling examination of the effect of visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissues on primary rat hepatocytes. Initial analyses of inflammatory marker genes were performed in fractionated epididymal or inguinal ad......), particularly macrophages, in inguinal adipose tissue resulting in stronger responses in terms of hepatotoxicity and insulin-resistance....... elicited a stronger cytotoxic response and higher level of insulin resistance in the co-cultured hepatocytes. In conclusion, our results reveal depot-dependent effects of ATEs on co-cultured primary hepatocytes, which in part may be related to a more pronounced infiltration of stromal vascular cells (SVCs......We have developed an in vitro hepatocyte-adipose tissue explant (ATE) co-culture model enabling examination of the effect of visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissues on primary rat hepatocytes. Initial analyses of inflammatory marker genes were performed in fractionated epididymal or inguinal...

  19. Demonstration of the economic feasibility of plant tissue culture for jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) and Euphorbia spp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sluis, C.

    1980-09-01

    The economic feasibility of plant tissue culture was demonstrated as applied to two plants: jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) and Euphorbia spp. The gopher weed (Euphorbia lathyris) was selected as the species of Euphorbia to research due to the interest in this plant as a potential source of hydrocarbon-like compounds. High yield female selections of jojoba were chosen from native stands and were researched to determine the economic feasibility of mass producing these plants via a tissue culture micropropagation program. The female jojoba selection was successfully mass produced through tissue culture. Modifications in initiation techniques, as well as in multiplication media and rooting parameters, were necessary to apply the tissue culture system, which had been developed for juvenile seedling tissue, to mature jojobas. Since prior attempts at transfer of tissue cultured plantlets were unsuccessful, transfer research was a major part of the project and has resulted in a system for transfer of rooted jojoba plantlets to soil. Euphorbia lathyris was successfully cultured using shoot tip cultures. Media and procedures were established for culture initiation, multiplication of shoots, callus induction and growth, and root initiation. Well-developed root systems were not attained and root initiation percentages should be increased if the system is to become commercially feasible.

  20. The use of dynamic culture devices in articular cartilage tissue engineering.

    OpenAIRE

    Akmal, M.

    2006-01-01

    Tissue engineered repair of articular cartilage has now become a clinical reality with techniques for cell culture having advanced from laboratory experimentation to clinical application. Despite the advances in the use of this technology in clinical applications, the basic cell culture techniques for autologous chondrocytes are still based on primitive in-vitro monolayer culture methods. Articular chondrocytes are known to undergo fibroblastic change in monolayer culture as this is not their...

  1. Three dimensional neuronal cell cultures more accurately model voltage gated calcium channel functionality in freshly dissected nerve tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinzhi Lai

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that neuronal cells cultured on traditional flat surfaces may exhibit exaggerated voltage gated calcium channel (VGCC functionality. To gain a better understanding of this phenomenon, primary neuronal cells harvested from mice superior cervical ganglion (SCG were cultured on two dimensional (2D flat surfaces and in three dimensional (3D synthetic poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA and polystyrene (PS polymer scaffolds. These 2D- and 3D-cultured cells were compared to cells in freshly dissected SCG tissues, with respect to intracellular calcium increase in response to high K(+ depolarization. The calcium increases were identical for 3D-cultured and freshly dissected, but significantly higher for 2D-cultured cells. This finding established the physiological relevance of 3D-cultured cells. To shed light on the mechanism behind the exaggerated 2D-cultured cells' functionality, transcriptase expression and related membrane protein distributions (caveolin-1 were obtained. Our results support the view that exaggerated VGCC functionality from 2D cultured SCG cells is possibly due to differences in membrane architecture, characterized by uniquely organized caveolar lipid rafts. The practical implication of use of 3D-cultured cells in preclinical drug discovery studies is that such platforms would be more effective in eliminating false positive hits and as such improve the overall yield from screening campaigns.

  2. Long term organ culture of human prostate tissue in a NASA-designed rotating wall bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, L.; Hatfill, S.; Chuaqui, R.; Vocke, C.; Emmert-Buck, M.; Linehan, W. M.; Duray, P. H.

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: To maintain ex vivo integral prostatic tissue including intact stromal and ductal elements using the NASA-designed Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) which maintains colocalized cells in an environment that promotes both three-dimensional cellular interactions together with the uniform mass transfer of nutrients and metabolic wastes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Samples of normal prostate were obtained as a byproduct of transurethral prostatectomy or needle biopsy. Prostatic tissue dissected into small 1 x 1 mm. blocks was cultured in the Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) Bioreactor for various time periods and analyzed using histological, immunochemical, and total cell RNA assays. RESULTS: We report the long term maintenance of benign explanted human prostate tissue grown in simple culture medium, under the simulated microgravity conditions afforded by the RWV bioreactor. Mesenchymal stromal elements including blood vessels and architecturally preserved tubuloglandular acini were maintained for a minimum of 28 days. Cytokeratins, vimentin and TGF-beta2 receptor and ligand were preserved through the entire culture period as revealed by immunocytochemistry. Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) was continuously expressed during the culture period, although somewhat decreased. Prostatic specific antigen (PSA) and its transcript were down regulated over time of culture. Prostatic carcinoma cells from the TSU cell line were able to invade RWV-cultured benign prostate tissue explants. CONCLUSIONS: The RWV bioreactor represents an additional new technology for culturing prostate tissue for further investigations concerning the basic physiology and pathobiology of this clinically important tissue.

  3. A Well-Controlled Nucleus Pulposus Tissue Culture System with Injection Port for Evaluating Regenerative Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkesteijn, Irene T M; Mouser, Vivian H M; Mwale, Fackson; van Dijk, Bart G M; Ito, Keita

    2016-05-01

    In vitro evaluation of nucleus pulposus (NP) tissue regeneration would be useful, but current systems for NP culture are not ideal for injections. The aim of this study was to develop a long-term culture system for NP tissue that allows injections of regenerative agents. Bovine caudal NPs were harvested and placed in the newly designed culture system. After equilibration of the tissue to 0.3 MPa the volume was fixed and the tissue was cultured for 28 days. The cell viability and extracellular matrix composition remained unchanged during the culture period and gene expression profiles were similar to those obtained in earlier studies. Furthermore, to test the responsiveness of bovine caudal NPs in the system, samples were cultured for 4 days and injected twice (day 1 and 3) with (1) PBS, (2) Link-N, for regeneration, and (3) TNF-α, for degeneration. It was shown that TNF-α increased COX2 gene expression, whereas no effect of Link-N was detected. In conclusion, the newly designed system allows long-term culture of NP tissue, wherein tissue reactions to injected stimulants can be observed. PMID:26294008

  4. Assessment of DNA methylation changes in tissue culture of Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y; Ran, L; Kong, Y; Jiang, J; Sokolov, V; Wang, Y

    2014-11-01

    Plant tissue culture, as a fundamental technique for genetic engineering, has great potential of epigenetic variation, of which DNA methylation is well known of importance to genome activity. We assessed DNA methylation level of explants during tissue culture of Brassica napus (cv. Yangyou 9), using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assisted quantification. By detecting methylation levels in hypocotyls cultured in mediums with different concentrations of hormones, we found dissected tissue:cultured with 0.1 mg/L 2,4-D and 1.0 mg/L 6-BA, presented the lowest methylation level and highest induction rate of callus (91.0%). Different time point of cultured explants also showed obvious methylation variations, explants cultured after 6 and 21 days exhibited methylation ratios of 4.33 and 8.07%, respectively. Whereas, the methylation ratio raised to 38.7% after 30 days cultivation, indicating that methylation level of hypocotyls ranged during tissue culture. Moreover, we observed that the methylation level in callus is the highest during regeneration of rape-seed, following the regenerated plantlets and hypocotyls. This paper indicated the function of hormones and differentiation of callus is relevant to the methylation levels during tissue culture. PMID:25739287

  5. Tissue Damage Characterization Using Non-invasive Optical Modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, David

    The ability to determine the degree of cutaneous and subcutaneous tissue damage is essential for proper wound assessment and a significant factor for determining patient treatment and morbidity. Accurate characterization of tissue damage is critical for a number of medical applications including surgical removal of nonviable tissue, severity assessment of subcutaneous ulcers, and depth assessment of visually open wounds. The main objective of this research was to develop a non-invasive method for identifying the extent of tissue damage underneath intact skin that is not apparent upon visual examination. This work investigated the relationship between tissue optical properties, blood flow, and tissue viability by testing the hypotheses that (a) changes in tissue oxygenation and/or microcirculatory blood flow measurable by Diffuse Near Infrared Spectroscopy (DNIRS) and Diffuse Correlation Spectroscopy (DCS) differ between healthy and damaged tissue and (b) the magnitude of those changes differs for different degrees of tissue damage. This was accomplished by developing and validating a procedure for measuring microcirculatory blood flow and tissue oxygenation dynamics at multiple depths (up to 1 centimeter) using non-invasive DCS and DNIRS technologies. Due to the lack of pressure ulcer animal models that are compatible with our optical systems, a proof of concept was conducted in a porcine burn model prior to conducting clinical trials in order to assess the efficacy of the system in-vivo. A reduction in total hemoglobin was observed for superficial (5%) and deep burns (35%) along with a statistically significant difference between the optical properties of superficial and deep burns (p injury observed in histological stains. After proof of concept in animals, a human study was conducted and optical data was collected from 20 healthy subjects and 8 patients at risk of developing pressure ulcers. Blood flow index (BFI) values from the sacral region of patients were

  6. How-To-Do-It: Using Cauliflower to Demonstrate Plant Tissue Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldeman, Janice H.; Ellis, Jane P.

    1988-01-01

    Presents techniques used for disinfestation of plant material, preparation of equipment and media, and laboratory procedures for tissue culture using cauliflower. Details methods for preparing solutions and plant propagation by cloning. (CW)

  7. Economic Analysis of Tissue-cultured Banana and Sucker-propagated Banana

    OpenAIRE

    Alagumani, T.

    2005-01-01

    An economic analysis of tissue-cultured banana (TCB) and sucker-propagated banana (SPB) has been presented through studying their costs and returns. The factors influencing the costs of their production have been identified and resource-use efficiency has been studied. The risks in cultivation of tissue-cultured banana have been highlighted. The study has been conducted in the Theni district of Tamil Nadu using personal interview method. Probit model has been employed to find out the factor i...

  8. TCUP: A Novel hAT Transposon Active in Maize Tissue Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Alan M; Hansey, Candice N; Kaeppler, Shawn M.

    2012-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are capable of inducing heritable de novo genetic variation. The sequences capable of reactivation, and environmental factors that induce mobilization, remain poorly defined even in well-studied genomes such as maize. We treated maize tissue culture with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2-deoxcytidine and examined long-term tissue culture lines to discover silenced TEs that have the potential to induce heritable genetic variation. Through these screens we have identif...

  9. Substrate specific hydrolysis of aromatic and aromatic-aliphatic esters in orchid tissue cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Agnieszka Mironowicz; Krystyna Kukułczanka; Antoni Siewiński

    2014-01-01

    We found that tissue cultures of higher plants were able, similarly as microorganisms, to transform low-molecular-weight chemical compounds. In tissue cultures of orchids (Cymbidium 'Saint Pierre' and Dendrobium phalaenopsis) acetates of phenols and aromatic-aliphatic alcohols were hydrolyzed, whereas methyl esters of aromatic and aromatic-aliphatic acids did not undergo this reaction. Acetates of racemic aromatic-aliphatic alcohols were hydrolyzed with distinct enantiospecificity.

  10. BACTERIAL MICROORGANISMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE PLANT TISSUE CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND POSSIBLE ROLE (review)

    OpenAIRE

    S.E. DUNAEVA; Yu, S.

    2015-01-01

    Effective sterilization of plant explants and antiseptics rules compliance do not exclude the presence of so-called covert (endophytic) bacteria in in vitro cultures. But the role of these bacteria in tissues cultures has been not enough studied whereas it was related to the explants regeneration capacity and the possibility of animal and human cells transformation under in vitro cultivation. Bacterial strains pathogenic to humans can be stably maintained in cultivated tissues and ex vitro pl...

  11. Characterization of human skin cells for tissue engineering applications by Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pudlas, Marieke; Koch, Steffen; Bolwien, Carsten; Walles, Heike

    2010-02-01

    In the field of cell culture and tissue engineering is an increasing need for non-invasive methods to analyze living cells in vitro. One important application is the cell characterization in tissue engineering products. Raman spectroscopy is a method which analyzes cells without lysis, fixation or the use of any chemicals and do not affect cell vitality adversely if suitable laser powers and wavelength are used. This purely optical technique is based on inelastic scattering of laser photons by molecular vibrations of biopolymers. Basically Raman spectra of cells contain typical fingerprint regions and information about cellular properties. Characteristic peaks in Raman spectra could be assigned to biochemical molecules like proteins, nucleic acid or lipids. The distinction of cell types by a multivariate analysis of Raman spectra is possible due to their biochemical differences. As this method allows a characterization of cells without any cell damage it is a promising technology for the quality control of cells in tissue engineering or cell culture applications.

  12. Skin equivalent tissue-engineered construct: co-cultured fibroblasts/ keratinocytes on 3D matrices of sericin hope cocoons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita Nayak

    Full Text Available The development of effective and alternative tissue-engineered skin replacements to autografts, allografts and xenografts has became a clinical requirement due to the problems related to source of donor tissue and the perceived risk of disease transmission. In the present study 3D tissue engineered construct of sericin is developed using co-culture of keratinocytes on the upper surface of the fabricated matrices and with fibroblasts on lower surface. Sericin is obtained from "Sericin Hope" silkworm of Bombyx mori mutant and is extracted from cocoons by autoclave. Porous sericin matrices are prepared by freeze dried method using genipin as crosslinker. The matrices are characterized biochemically and biophysically. The cell proliferation and viability of co-cultured fibroblasts and keratinocytes on matrices for at least 28 days are observed by live/dead assay, Alamar blue assay, and by dual fluorescent staining. The growth of the fibroblasts and keratinocytes in co-culture is correlated with the expression level of TGF-β, b-FGF and IL-8 in the cultured supernatants by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The histological analysis further demonstrates a multi-layered stratified epidermal layer of uninhibited keratinocytes in co-cultured constructs. Presence of involucrin, collagen IV and the fibroblast surface protein in immuno-histochemical stained sections of co-cultured matrices indicates the significance of paracrine signaling between keratinocytes and fibroblasts in the expression of extracellular matrix protein for dermal repair. No significant amount of pro inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and nitric oxide production are evidenced when macrophages grown on the sericin matrices. The results all together depict the potentiality of sericin 3D matrices as skin equivalent tissue engineered construct in wound repair.

  13. Epithelial cell cultures from normal and cancerous human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, R B; Smith, H S; Nelson-Rees, W A; Springer, E L

    1976-04-01

    Thirty epithelial cell strains were isolated from human carcinomas and normal epithelial tissues by collagenase digestion and selective removal of fibroblasts with trypsin-Versene. Most strains were obtained from metastatic carcinomas or epithelia of the urinary and intestinal tracts. The success rate for growth of both neoplastic and normal tissues (excluding skin) was 38%. Six of these strains showed gross morphologic and chromosome changes typical of malignant cells. Nine resembled normal epithelium. The other 15 exhibited some degree of morphologic change from normal. PMID:176412

  14. Apollo 12 lunar material - Effects on lipid levels of tobacco tissue cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weete, J. D.; Walkinshaw, C. H.; Laseter, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Tobacco tissue cultures grown in contact with lunar material from Apollo 12, for a 12-week period, resulted in fluctuations of both the relative and absolute concentrations of endogenous sterols and fatty acids. The experimental tissues contained higher concentrations of sterols than the controls did. The ratio of campesterol to stigmasterol was greater than 1 in control tissues, but less than 1 in the experimental tissues after 3 weeks. High relative concentrations (17.1 to 22.2 per cent) of an unidentified compound or compounds were found only in control tissues that were 3 to 9 weeks of age.

  15. Stimulating the production of homoisoflavonoids in cell suspension cultures of Caesalpinia pulcherrima using cork tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ping; Iwamoto, Yuko; Kouno, Isao; Egami, Yasukuni; Yamamoto, Hirobumi

    2004-09-01

    It has previously been demonstrated that cork tissue increases the efficiency of the production of lipophilic secondary metabolites in diverse plant cell suspension cultures. In the present study, three new homoisoflavonoids--named dihydrobonducellin, 2'-methoxydihydrobonducellin, and 2'-methoxybonducellin--and bonducellin and isobonducellin were isolated from Caesalpinia pulcherrima cultured cells coincubated with cork tissue. Cork tissue increased the production of 2'-methoxybonducellin by about 7-fold relative to control cells, and more than 80% of the product was recoverable from the cork tissue. When cork tissue and methyl jasmonate or yeast extract were added simultaneously to the medium, the amount of 2'-methoxybonducellin produced increased further. The production of the other four homoisoflavonoids was enhanced by variable amounts. Our results indicate that the addition of cork tissue would be an effective technique for investigating formation of secondary metabolites that usually accumulate only in trace amounts. PMID:15381409

  16. 21 CFR 864.2220 - Synthetic cell and tissue culture media and components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Synthetic cell and tissue culture media and components. 864.2220 Section 864.2220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue...

  17. Expression of Ethylene Biosynthesis Genes in Barley Tissue Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    The plant hormone ethylene influences green plant regeneration rates from barley callus cultures. Our studies have focused on the effects of short treatments of an ethylene inhibitor or an ethylene precursor on green plant regeneration from two barley cultivars and the expression patterns of two eth...

  18. Organoid culture systems for prostate epithelial and cancer tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drost, Jarno; Karthaus, Wouter R; Gao, Dong; Driehuis, Else; Sawyers, Charles L; Chen, Yu; Clevers, Hans

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes a strategy for the generation of 3D prostate organoid cultures from healthy mouse and human prostate cells (either bulk or FACS-sorted single luminal and basal cells), metastatic prostate cancer lesions and circulating tumor cells. Organoids derived from healthy material cont

  19. Ultrasonic Characterization of Tissues via Backscatter Frequency Dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stetson, Paul F.; Sommer, F.G.

    1997-01-01

    Phantom and patient studies were performed to assess the potential of backscatter frequency dependence as a useful parameter for tissue characterization. A commercial phased-array ultrasonic scanner was adapted to allow digitization of the intermediate-frequency ultrasonic data, Studies of agar...... phantoms containing polystyrene microspheres with 3.5 and 5 MHz transducers indicated the ability for robust differentiation of phantoms having different scatterer size and frequency dependence, based on calculated differences in mean frequencies of backscattered spectra, Using a 3,5-MHz probe......, significantly lower mean frequency of ultrasound backscattered from cirrhotic, compared to normal, liver tissue was noted, Studies of benign and malignant liver tumors (hemangiomas and metastases, respectively) indicated differences in frequency content of these tumors, compared to the adjacent normal liver...

  20. Single nanoparticle tracking of [Formula: see text]-methyl-d-aspartate receptors in cultured and intact brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Juan A; Ferreira, Joana S; Dupuis, Julien P; Durand, Pauline; Bouchet, Delphine; Groc, Laurent

    2016-10-01

    Recent developments in single-molecule imaging have revealed many biological mechanisms, providing high spatial and temporal resolution maps of molecular events. In neurobiology, these techniques unveiled that plasma membrane neurotransmitter receptors and transporters laterally diffuse at the surface of cultured brain cells. The photostability of bright nanoprobes, such as quantum dots (QDs), has given access to neurotransmitter receptor tracking over long periods of time with a high spatial resolution. However, our knowledge has been restricted to cultured systems, i.e., neurons and organotypic slices, therefore lacking several aspects of the intact brain rheology and connectivity. Here, we used QDs to track single glutamatergic [Formula: see text]-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) in acute brain slices. By delivering functionalized nanoparticles in vivo through intraventricular injections to rats expressing genetically engineered-tagged NMDAR, we successfully tracked the receptors in native brain tissue. Comparing NMDAR tracking to different classical brain preparations (acute brain slices, cultured organotypic brain slices, and cultured neurons) revealed that the surface diffusion properties shared several features and are also influenced by the nature of the extracellular environment. Together, we describe the experimental procedures to track plasma membrane NMDAR in dissociated and native brain tissue, paving the way for investigations aiming at characterizing receptor diffusion biophysics in intact tissue and exploring the physiopathological roles of receptor surface dynamics. PMID:27429996

  1. Primary cell culture from human oral tissue: gingival keratinocytes,gingival fibroblasts and periodontal ligament fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supreya Wanichpakorn

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Primary cell culture of human oral tissue has many applications for oral biology research. There are two techniques in primary culture, which includes the enzymatic and direct explant technique. The objectives of this study were (1 to isolate and investigate the difference in percentage the success in culturing three cell types from human oral tissue: gingival keratinocytes, gingival fibroblasts and periodontal ligament fibroblasts by using the direct explant technique; (2 to compare the effect of sex and age on the success of tissue culturing. Twenty seven tissue samples were obtained from healthy human gingival tissue, 19 female and 8 male patients aged 14-67 years (37.7±17.5. The tissue was cut into 1x1 mm pieces and placed on plastic culture plates containing Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s Medium supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum, 100 U/ml penicillin, 100 µg/ml streptomycin and 1% amphotericin B. For the keratinocytes culture, after the epithelial cells started to multiply around the gingival origin and the diameter was 2-5 mm., the fibroblasts were liminated by mechanical removal under inverted microscope to prevent fibroblast overgrowth and the medium was changed to keratinocyte-SFM (Gibco, BRL supplemented with 5 µg/ml gentamycin. The results revealed that gingival fibroblast gave the highest success rate in culture (96.3%, followed by gingival keratinocytes (88.9% and periodontal ligament fibroblasts (81.5%. There was no significant difference in the success rate of cultivation between younger and older individuals, as between sex of the subjects (p>0.05. The risk of failure in culture techniques is mainly caused by microbiological contamination from the tissue samples.

  2. Acoustical characterization of polysaccharide polymers tissue-mimicking materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuccaro, Rugiada; Musacchio, Chiara; Giuliano Albo, P Alberto; Troia, Adriano; Lago, Simona

    2015-02-01

    Tissue-mimicking phantoms play a crucial role in medical ultrasound research because they can simulate biological soft tissues. In last years, many types of polymeric tissues have been proposed and characterized from an acoustical and a thermal point of view, but, rarely, a deep discussion about the quality of the measurements, in terms of the uncertainty evaluation, has been reported. In this work, considering the necessity to develop laboratory standards for the measurement of ultrasonic exposure and dose quantities, a detailed description of the experimental apparatuses for the sound speed and the attenuation coefficient measurements is given, focusing the attention on the uncertainty evaluation both of the results and analysis algorithms. In particular, this algorithm reveals a novel empirical relation, fixing a limit to the energy content (therefore limits the number of cycles) of the three parts in which the authors have proposed to divide the acoustical signal. Furthermore, the realisation of multi-components phantoms, Agar and Phytagel based tissue-mimicking gels along with others long chain molecules (dextrane or polyvinyl alcohol) and scattering materials (silicon carbide and kieselguhr) are investigated. This paper reports accurate speed of sound and attenuation coefficient measurements. Speed of sound is measured by a pulse-echo technique in far-field condition, using an optical glass buffer rod; while attenuation coefficient is determined by an insertion technique, using demineralized water as reference material. The experimental sound speed results are subjected to an overall estimated relative uncertainty of about 1.5% and the attenuation coefficient uncertainty is less than 2.5%. For the development of laboratory standards, a detailed analysis of the measurement uncertainty is fundamental to make sample properties comparable. The authors believe this study could represent the right direction to make phantoms characterizations referable and traceable

  3. Physical characterization of ultrashort laser pulse drilling of biological tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Kim, B.M.; Da Silva, L.D.; Stuart, B.C.; Perry, M.D.

    1997-07-21

    Ultrashort laser pulse ablation removes material with low energy fluence required and minimal collateral damage. The ultimate usefulness of this technology for biomedical applications depends, in part, on characterization of the physical conditions attained and determination of the zone of shockwave and heat affected material in particular tissues. Detailed numerical modeling of the relevant physics (deposition, plasma formation, shockwave generation and propagation, thermal conduction) are providing this information. A wide range of time scales is involved, ranging from picosecond for energy deposition and peak pressure and temperature, to nanosecond for development of shockwave, to microsecond for macroscopic thermophysical response.

  4. Transplacental effect of methylcobalamin on growth of mouse embryonic kidney tissue in organ culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper gives the results of a study of the transplacental action of methylcobalamin (MC) on growth of embryonic tissues during organ culture. An organ culture of embryonic mouse kidney tissue, sensitive to the transplacental action of biologically active substances, including vitamins and hormones, and also of chemical carcinogens, was used as the experimental model. 3H-thymidine was added to the nutrient medium before fixation of the explants. The stimulating effect of MC on growth of mouse kidney tissue in the prenatal period as revealed in this investigation, is said by the authors to be an important mechanism modifying the transplacental action of chemical carcinogens

  5. The Effect of Tissue Culture on Suture Holding Strength and Degradation in Canine Tendon

    OpenAIRE

    H. Omae; Zhao, C.; Sun, Y.-L.; Zobitz, M. E.; Moran, S. L.; Amadio, P. C.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess tendon metabolism and suture pull-out strength after simple tendon suture in a tissue culture model. One hundred and twelve flexor digitorum profundus tendons from 28 dogs were cultured for 7, 14, or 21 days with or without a static tensile load. In both groups increased levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) mRNA was noted. Suture pull-out strength did not decrease during tissue culture. While the presence of a static load had no effect on the pull-o...

  6. Characterization of NCAM diversity in cultured neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gegelashvili, George; Andersson, A M; Schousboe, Arne;

    1993-01-01

    A single transcript of the NCAM gene undergoes differential processing resulting in a multiplicity of mRNAs and their translation products. In this study, the diversity of NCAM in rat primary neuronal cultures was investigated utilizing immuno- and Northern blot analyses. NCAM polypeptides of 190 k......Da (NCAM-A) and 135 kDa (NCAM-B) were shown to be associated with the neuronal phenotype. These data were confirmed by Northern blotting, which in both neocortical neurons and cerebellar granule neurons revealed mRNA classes of 7.4 kb and 6.7 kb encoding for NCAM-A and -B, respectively. However......, oligonucleotide probes, specific for selected exons or exon combinations, revealed special features of cerebellar granule neurons as compared to neocortical neurons: expression of 4.3 kb NCAM mRNA, a relatively low amount of VASE-containing variants, and an apparent lack of mRNA species containing exons alpha and...

  7. Acclimatization of tissue cultured plantlets: from laboratory to land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Sheela; Bandopadhyay, Rajib; Kumar, Vijay; Chandra, Ramesh

    2010-09-01

    The ultimate success of micropropagation on a commercial scale depends on the ability to transfer plants out of culture on a large scale, at low cost and with high survival rates. During field transfer the in vitro grown plantlets are unable to compete with soil microbes and to cope with the environmental conditions. The in vitro culture conditions result in the plantlets with altered morphology, anatomy and physiology. In order to increase growth and reduce mortality in plantlets at the acclimatisation stage, efforts are focused on the control of both physical and chemical environment and biohardening of micropropagated plantlets. This review describes the abiotic and biotic stresses and current developing methods for the acclimatization of microshoots. PMID:20455074

  8. Polyphosphoinositides are present in plant tissue culture cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyphosphoinositides have been isolated from wild carrot cells grown in suspension culture. This is the first report of polyphosphoinositides in plant cells. The phospholipids were identified by comigration with known standards on thin-layer plates. After overnight labeling of the cells with myo-[2-3H] inositol, the phosphoinositides as percent recovered inositol were 93% phosphatidylinositol., 3.7% lysophosphatidylinositol, 1.7% phosphatidylinositol monophosphate, 0.8% phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate

  9. Tissue culture technique as new approach to combat Striga hermonthica

    OpenAIRE

    M.M. Hassan; Osman, M. G.; Mohammed Ahmed, M. M.; Abdalaleem, K. G.; Abdelgain, M. E.; Babiker, A. G. T.

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of media type, sugars, Ammonium nitrate, Potassium phosphate, auxins and cytokinine in different concentrations on in vitro Striga seed germination. Medium B5 was showed to induce Striga germination after short period of time. Striga germination reached 100% after 10 day of culture. This may be due to chemical components of this media that induced Striga germination. Results indicated that Striga seeds germination was affected by sugars. Sucrose...

  10. Micropropagation of six Paulownia genotypes through tissue culture

    OpenAIRE

    Lydia Shtereva; VASSILEVSKA-IVANOVA, Roumiana; Tania Karceva; Boris KRAPTCHEV

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of genotype and culture medium on the in vitro germination and development of plantlets from seeds of 6 different Paulownia genotypes (P. tomentosa, hybrid lines P. tomentosa P. fortunei (Mega, Ganter and Caroline), P. elongata and hybrid line P. elongata P. fortunei). Nodal and shoot tip explants were used for micropropagation of Paulownia genotypes by manipulating plant growth regulators. The highest germination percentage for all genotypes was obtained for seed...

  11. Studies on the use of gamma irradiation and tissue culture in improving brassica napus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this study were to:1- Studying the effect of different doses of gamma rays on some growth and yield component traits of three Brassica napus cultivars (Serow6, Serow4 and Pactol) during four consecutive generations aiming to create new genotypes characterized with high yielding traits. 2- Studying the effect of different doses of gamma rays on in vitro biotechnology technique (tissue culture) used in improving Brassica napus. Seeds of three Brassica napus cultivars were irradiated with different gamma ray doses then sown for four consecutive seasons. Data were collected and recorded to clarify the effect gamma irradiation on some yield component traits which were days to flowering , plant height, number of main branches per plant, number of secondary branches per plant, number of pods per plant, number of seeds per pod, weight of 1000-seed, weight of grain yield/plant and oil content of seeds). Results showed that high doses of gamma radiation had enhanced all of the studied traits for each of the three tested cultivars (except the plant height trait for Serow6 and Pactol cultivars). Seven new mutant lines were selected for their superiority in one or more of the studied yield component traits. Regarding the effect of gamma rays on tissue culture techniques, the applied gamma radiation doses did not affect the percentage of seed germination of the three studied cultivars, whereas the percentage of callus induction decreased by increasing the dose of gamma rays for each of the three cultivars and in both types of explants (hypocotyl and cotyledons) used in this experiment.

  12. Multifunctional sensing membrane-based platform for tissue or cell culturing and monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    , layer of a conducting polymer material defining at least one electrode and having a thickness of 0.001-1.0 [mu]m. The application also discloses a tissue or cell culture sample monitoring assembly comprising a sensor assembly and a tissue sample or a cell culture sample arranged on top of the third......The present application discloses a water-permeable sensor membrane comprising i) a first layer of a conductive material defining at least one electrode and having a thickness of 0.1-,000 [mu]m; ii) a second layer of a nanostructure material build on the first layer; and iii) a third, topmost...... layer of the sensor membrane, and a method of monitoring the concentration or presence of a tissue analyte in the proximity of a tissue sample or cell culture sample....

  13. The basic design and requirement for plant tissue culture laboratory in MINT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of multiple species plantlets involves a relatively complex process and it is a highly specialized operation. Tissue culture technology is rapidly becoming a commercialized method for propagating new cultivars, rare species and difficult-to-propagate plant. Not only are skills and knowledge essential but the laboratory itself also plays an important role to ensure the successful growth of the plantlets. To produce quality plantlets, plant tissue culture laboratories should fulfill the basic requirements. The laboratory should have proper building and layout which comprise of media preparation and washing room, sterilization or autoclave room, transfer room and culture or growth room. The scope of this paper is to compare these fundamental requirements with the plant tissue culture laboratory in MINT. All the basic needs and differences will be discussed and the proposal for corrective actions will be presented. (Author)

  14. A High Rate Tension Device for Characterizing Brain Tissue

    CERN Document Server

    Rashid, Badar; Gilchrist, Michael; 10.1177/1754337112436900

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical characterization of brain tissue at high loading velocities is vital for understanding and modeling Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). The most severe form of TBI is diffuse axonal injury (DAI) which involves damage to individual nerve cells (neurons). DAI in animals and humans occurs at strains > 10% and strain rates > 10/s. The mechanical properties of brain tissues at these strains and strain rates are of particular significance, as they can be used in finite element human head models to accurately predict brain injuries under different impact conditions. Existing conventional tensile testing machines can only achieve maximum loading velocities of 500 mm/min, whereas the Kolsky bar apparatus is more suitable for strain rates > 100/s. In this study, a custom-designed high rate tension device is developed and calibrated to estimate the mechanical properties of brain tissue in tension at strain rates < 90/s, while maintaining a uniform velocity. The range of strain can also be extended to 100% de...

  15. Mapping and characterization of iron compounds in Alzheimer's tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding the management of iron in the brain is of great importance in the study of neurodegeneration, where regional iron overload is frequently evident. A variety of approaches have been employed, from quantifying iron in various anatomical structures, to identifying genetic risk factors related to iron metabolism, and exploring chelation approaches to tackle iron overload in neurodegenerative disease. However, the ease with which iron can change valence state ensures that it is present in vivo in a wide variety of forms, both soluble and insoluble. Here, we review recent developments in approaches to locate and identify iron compounds in neurodegenerative tissue. In addition to complementary techniques that allow us to quantify and identify iron compounds using magnetometry, extraction, and electron microscopy, we are utilizing a powerful combined mapping/characterization approach with synchrotron X-rays. This has enabled the location and characterization of iron accumulations containing magnetite and ferritin in human Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain tissue sections in situ at micron-resolution. It is hoped that such approaches will contribute to our understanding of the role of unusual iron accumulations in disease pathogenesis, and optimise the potential to use brain iron as a clinical biomarker for early detection and diagnosis.

  16. Tissue culture regeneration and radiation induced mutagenesis in banana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation induced mutagenesis is an important tool for banana genetic improvement. At BARC, protocols for shoo-tip multiplication of commercial banana varieties have been developed and transferred to user agencies for commercial production. Excellent embryogenic cell suspensions were established in banana cvs. Rasthali and Rajeli, and were maintained at low temperatures for long-term storage. Normal plantlets were successfully regenerated from these cell suspensions. The cell suspensions and shoot-tip cultures were gamma-irradiated for mutagenesis. The mutagenized populations were field screened and a few interesting mutants have been isolated. The existence of genetic variation was confirmed using DNA markers. Further evaluation of these mutants is in progress. (author)

  17. Tissue culture studies in tomato (lycopersicon esculentum) var. moneymaker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A protocol was developed for callus induction and regeneration in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) var. Moneymaker. Hypocotyl and leaf disc explants of tomato were used as a starting material for callus induction. Explants were cultured on MS medium having different concentrations of hormones. Maximum callogenesis from hypocotyls was obtained on MS medium supplemented with IAA (2 mg/l), NAA (2 mg/l), BAP (5 mg/l) and Kin (4 mg/l). It was 65.2% for hypocotyls. For leaf discs maximum callogenesis was achieved on MS medium supplemented with IAA (2 mg/l), NAA (2 mg/l), BAP (2 mg/l) and Kin (4 mg/l). It was 81.3% for leaf discs. Calli were cultured on MS medium having concentrations of Zeatin (1 mg/l) and IAA (1 mg/l) for regeneration. They showed maximum regeneration of 69.2% from hypocotyls. Minimum regeneration of 2.8% was obtained on MS medium supplemented with IAA (2 mg/l), NAA (2 mg/l), BAP (2 mg/l) and Kin (4 mg/l). Tomato shoots were shifted to one half MS medium containing IBA (0.1 mg/l) and BAP (0.0025 mg/l) for rooting and all responded positively to rooting. (author)

  18. Tissue culture of forest trees - clonal propagation of mature trees of ecualyptus citriodora hook, by tissue culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, P.K.; Mascarenhas, A.F.; Jagannathan, V.

    1981-01-01

    Multiple shoots were obtained from terminal buds of 20-year-old trees of Eucalyptus citriodora Hook on Murashige and Skoog's medium supplemented with calcium pantothenate, biotin, benzylaminopurine and kinetin. Rooting could be induced by naphthalene-acetic acid in shoot cultures only after they had undergone three subcultures. Incubation at 15/sup 0/C with continuous illumination followed by growth in agitated liquid cultures was essential for inducing shoot development in the primary terminal buds. These treatments were not necessary in later subcultures or with explants from seedlings obtained from seeds. Fifteen subcultures have so far been carried out and healthy viable plantlets obtained in each subculture. It is estimated that over 100,000 plants can be obtained by this method in a year from a single bud of mature Eucalyptus citriodora trees.

  19. Human colon tissue in organ culture: preservation of normal and neoplastic characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Dame, Michael K.; Bhagavathula, Narasimharao; Mankey, Cohra; DaSilva, Marissa; Paruchuri, Tejaswi; Aslam, Muhammad Nadeem; Varani, James

    2010-01-01

    Normal and neoplastic human colon tissue obtained at surgery was used to establish conditions for organ culture. Optimal conditions included an atmosphere of 5% CO2 and 95% O2; tissue partially submerged with mucosa at the gas interface; and serum-free medium with 1.5 mM Ca2+ and a number of growth supplements. Histological, histochemical, and immunohistochemical features that distinguish normal and neoplastic tissue were preserved over a 2-d period. With normal tissue, this included the pres...

  20. Oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq. tissue culture ESTs: Identifying genes associated with callogenesis and embryogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ooi Leslie CL

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq. is one of the most important oil bearing crops in the world. However, genetic improvement of oil palm through conventional breeding is extremely slow and costly, as the breeding cycle can take up to 10 years. This has brought about interest in vegetative propagation of oil palm. Since the introduction of oil palm tissue culture in the 1970s, clonal propagation has proven to be useful, not only in producing uniform planting materials, but also in the development of the genetic engineering programme. Despite considerable progress in improving the tissue culture techniques, the callusing and embryogenesis rates from proliferating callus cultures remain very low. Thus, understanding the gene diversity and expression profiles in oil palm tissue culture is critical in increasing the efficiency of these processes. Results A total of 12 standard cDNA libraries, representing three main developmental stages in oil palm tissue culture, were generated in this study. Random sequencing of clones from these cDNA libraries generated 17,599 expressed sequence tags (ESTs. The ESTs were analysed, annotated and assembled to generate 9,584 putative unigenes distributed in 3,268 consensi and 6,316 singletons. These unigenes were assigned putative functions based on similarity and gene ontology annotations. Cluster analysis, which surveyed the relatedness of each library based on the abundance of ESTs in each consensus, revealed that lipid transfer proteins were highly expressed in embryogenic tissues. A glutathione S-transferase was found to be highly expressed in non-embryogenic callus. Further analysis of the unigenes identified 648 non-redundant simple sequence repeats and 211 putative full-length open reading frames. Conclusion This study has provided an overview of genes expressed during oil palm tissue culture. Candidate genes with expression that are modulated during tissue culture were identified. However

  1. A Comparison of Tissue versus Swab Culturing of Infected Diabetic Foot Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Cao, Ying; Zou, Mengchen; Luo, Xiangrong; Jiang, Ya; Xue, Yaoming; Gao, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To compare the efficacy of swabbing versus tissue biopsy for microbiological diagnosis of diabetic foot infection. Methods. This was a prospective trial. Fifty-six patients with diabetic foot infection were divided into the following 3 groups according to the PEDIS grading system: grade 2 (n = 10), grade 3 (n = 29), and grade 4 (n = 17). Two specimens were collected from each wound for microbial culturing after debridement, including a superficial swab and a deep tissue punch biopsy specimen. Results. Swab culturing identified all of the microorganisms isolated from the corresponding deep tissue specimens in 9/10 of grade 2 wounds (90.0%), and this proportion decreased to 12/29 (41.4%) and 7/17 (41.2%) for grades 3 and 4 wounds, respectively (p = 0.02). Moreover, the sensitivity for identifying Gram-negative bacteria, such as E. coli and Citrobacter, by swabbing was low (33.3%). In addition, some Gram-negative bacteria, such as Serratia and Ralstonia pickettii, were isolated from deep tissues but not from swabs. Conclusions. Swab culturing may be reliable for identification of pathogens in diabetic foot wounds classified as grade 2. However, it is advisable to culture deep tissue specimens for wounds of grade ≥3 because swab culturing is associated with a high risk of missing pathogens, especially Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:27123004

  2. A Comparison of Tissue versus Swab Culturing of Infected Diabetic Foot Wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare the efficacy of swabbing versus tissue biopsy for microbiological diagnosis of diabetic foot infection. Methods. This was a prospective trial. Fifty-six patients with diabetic foot infection were divided into the following 3 groups according to the PEDIS grading system: grade 2 (n=10, grade 3 (n=29, and grade 4 (n=17. Two specimens were collected from each wound for microbial culturing after debridement, including a superficial swab and a deep tissue punch biopsy specimen. Results. Swab culturing identified all of the microorganisms isolated from the corresponding deep tissue specimens in 9/10 of grade 2 wounds (90.0%, and this proportion decreased to 12/29 (41.4% and 7/17 (41.2% for grades 3 and 4 wounds, respectively (p=0.02. Moreover, the sensitivity for identifying Gram-negative bacteria, such as E. coli and Citrobacter, by swabbing was low (33.3%. In addition, some Gram-negative bacteria, such as Serratia and Ralstonia pickettii, were isolated from deep tissues but not from swabs. Conclusions. Swab culturing may be reliable for identification of pathogens in diabetic foot wounds classified as grade 2. However, it is advisable to culture deep tissue specimens for wounds of grade ≥3 because swab culturing is associated with a high risk of missing pathogens, especially Gram-negative bacteria.

  3. Micropropagation of six Paulownia genotypes through tissue culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Shtereva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effect of genotype and culture medium on the in vitro germination and development of plantlets from seeds of 6 different Paulownia genotypes (P. tomentosa, hybrid lines P. tomentosa P. fortunei (Mega, Ganter and Caroline, P. elongata and hybrid line P. elongata P. fortunei. Nodal and shoot tip explants were used for micropropagation of Paulownia genotypes by manipulating plant growth regulators. The highest germination percentage for all genotypes was obtained for seeds inoculated on medium supplemented with 50 mg*L GA3 (MSG2. On Thidiazuron containing media, the explants of hybrid line P. elongata P. fortunei exhibited the highest frequency of axillary shoot proliferation following by P. tomentosa P. fortunei. The results are discussed with the perspective of applying an improved protocol for in vitro seed germination and plantlet formation in several economically valuable Paulownia genotypes.

  4. Effect of induced mutagenesis in rice tissue culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of chemical mutagens and ionising radiation on growth, regenerative capacity of rice callus culture and the effect o9f mutagens on frequency and spectrum of mutant regenerants, derived from calli and determination of approximate semi-lethal dose of each mutagen on rice calli was studied. Intact mature de-husked grains and pieces of primordial particles of four varieties were used as explants in the experiment. Organogenesis was induced using MS media supplemented with agar. After thirty days calluses were subjected to varying concentrations/dosage of mutagens. The effect of mutagens on growth of callus was stimulative in low concentration/doses at short exposure, but in higher concentration/doses at longer exposure it was oppressive. In x-radiation treatment all the studied doses showed only stimulative effect on growth. The effect of mutagenic treatment on regenerative capacity was negative. No specificity was found even between two chemical mutagens of their action on studied characters

  5. Micropropagation of Dalbergia sissoo Roxb. through tissue culture technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Jyoti; Khan, Shagufta; Sahu, Ram Kumar; Roy, Amit

    2014-04-01

    Multiple shoots of Dalbergia sissoo Roxb. (Sissoo) were incited from seeds through indirect somatic embryogenesis method. Seeds were inoculated in Murashige and Skoog's medium without any growth hormone. Than cotyledonary leaves were struck and used for callus induction on MS medium amplified with 2, 4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (0.5 to 4 mg mL(-1)). After 3 to 4 weeks the embryogenic callus clumps was transferred to medium supplemented with cytokinin (BAP 1 to 5 mg L(-1), kinetin 1-5.0 mg L(-1)) for embryo maturation and germination. The high-frequency shoot proliferation (82%) and maximum number of shoots per explants were recorded in MS medium containing NAA (0.5)+BAP (0.5). The findings of recent investigations have shown that, it is possible to induce indirect somatic embryogenesis in Dalbergia sissoo and plant regeneration from callus cultures derived from cotyledonary leaves as explants. PMID:25911856

  6. Morphological and Immunohistochemical Characterization of Canine Osteosarcoma Spheroid Cell Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhard, C; Gabriel, C; Walter, I

    2016-06-01

    Spheroid cell culture emerges as powerful in vitro tool for experimental tumour research. In this study, we established a scaffold-free three-dimensional spheroid system built from canine osteosarcoma (OS) cells (D17). Spheroids (7, 14 and 19 days of cultivation) and monolayer cultures (2 and 7 days of cultivation) were evaluated and compared on light and electron microscopy. Monolayer and spheroid cultures were tested for vimentin, cytokeratin, alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin and collagen I by means of immunohistochemistry. The spheroid cell culture exhibited a distinct network of collagen I in particular after 19-day cultivation, whereas in monolayer cultures, collagen I was arranged as a lamellar basal structure. Necrotic centres of large spheroids, as observed in 14- and 19-day cultures, were characterized by significant amounts of osteocalcin. Proliferative activity as determined by Ki-67 immunoreactivity showed an even distribution in two-dimensional cultures. In spheroids, proliferation was predominating in the peripheral areas. Metastasis-associated markers ezrin and S100A4 were shown to be continuously expressed in monolayer and spheroid cultures. We conclude that the scaffold-free spheroid system from canine OS cells has the ability to mimic the architecture of the in vivo tumour, in particular cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. PMID:26287450

  7. Microbiome Heterogeneity Characterizing Intestinal Tissue and Inflammatory Bowel Disease Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Andrea D; Kirsch, Richard; Milgrom, Raquel; Stempak, Joanne M; Kabakchiev, Boyko; Silverberg, Mark S

    2016-04-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease has been associated with differential abundance of numerous organisms when compared to healthy controls (HCs); however, few studies have investigated variability in the microbiome across intestinal locations and how this variability might be related to disease location and phenotype. In this study, we have analyzed the microbiome of a large cohort of individuals recruited at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto, Canada. Biopsies were taken from subjects with Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, and HC, and also individuals having undergone ileal pouch-anal anastomosis for treatment of ulcerative colitis or familial adenomatous polyposis. Microbial 16S rRNA was sequenced using the Illumina MiSeq platform. We observed a great deal of variability in the microbiome characterizing different sampling locations. Samples from pouch and afferent limb were comparable in microbial composition. When comparing sigmoid and terminal ileum samples, more differences were observed. The greatest number of differentially abundant microbes was observed when comparing either pouch or afferent limb samples to sigmoid or terminal ileum. Despite these differences, we were able to observe modest microbial variability between inflammatory bowel disease phenotypes and HCs, even when controlling for sampling location and additional experimental factors. Most detected associations were observed between HCs and Crohn's disease, with decreases in specific genera in the families Ruminococcaceae and Lachnospiraceae characterizing tissue samples from individuals with Crohn's disease. This study highlights important considerations when analyzing the composition of the microbiome and also provides useful insight into differences in the microbiome characterizing these seemingly related phenotypes. PMID:26954709

  8. Gas-permeable lifecell tissue culture flasks give improved growth of Helicobacter pylori in a liquid medium.

    OpenAIRE

    Secker, D A; Tompkins, D S; Alderson, G

    1991-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the microaerobic culture of Helicobacter pylori in a liquid medium by using gas-permeable Lifecell tissue culture flasks. Growth in Lifecell tissue culture flasks was 1.2 to 1.6 log units greater than that in glass control bottles. These results were comparable to those reported by the use of gyrated media.

  9. Hollow Fiber Bioreactors for In Vivo-like Mammalian Tissue Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Michael P.; Sorrell, Ian; Shipley, Rebecca; Regan, Sophie; Luetchford, Kim A.; Sathish, Jean; Webb, Steven; Ellis, Marianne J.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue culture has been used for over 100 years to study cells and responses ex vivo. The convention of this technique is the growth of anchorage dependent cells on the 2-dimensional surface of tissue culture plastic. More recently, there is a growing body of data demonstrating more in vivo-like behaviors of cells grown in 3-dimensional culture systems. This manuscript describes in detail the set-up and operation of a hollow fiber bioreactor system for the in vivo-like culture of mammalian cells. The hollow fiber bioreactor system delivers media to the cells in a manner akin to the delivery of blood through the capillary networks in vivo. The system is designed to fit onto the shelf of a standard CO2 incubator and is simple enough to be set-up by any competent cell biologist with a good understanding of aseptic technique. The systems utility is demonstrated by culturing the hepatocarcinoma cell line HepG2/C3A for 7 days. Further to this and in line with other published reports on the functionality of cells grown in 3-dimensional culture systems the cells are shown to possess increased albumin production (an important hepatic function) when compared to standard 2-dimensional tissue culture. PMID:27285826

  10. Project on production of mutants by irradiation of in vitro cultured tissues of coconut and banana and their mass propagation by the tissue culture technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fruit pulp tissue, ovary segments with or without ovules and sections from shoot tips of banana were used for studies on growth stimulating or morphogenetic effects of irradiation. Irradiation at 0.1-1.0 kR tended to induce faster callus growth in the otherwise slow-growing cultures. The physical condition and composition of the culture media especially with respect to growth regulators were studied, as were techniques to overcome discoloration of explants, the best choice of plant tissue for explant, and radiation effects on growth and morphogenesis. Due to the difficulty of callus induction with coconut, only the effects of irradiation on embryos cultured in vitro were studied. They were irradiated at various stages of development, i.e. during the early and final stage of liquid culture, and several days after transfer to a solid medium. Adverse effects of irradiation became evident only during the subsequent growth in solid, during the latter stage of which morphological changes were observed. Whereas irradiation of the liquid as well as solid media up to 50 kR had no adverse effect; survival and development became adversely affected at a dose of 1 kR

  11. Radiosensitivity of different tissues from carrot root at different phases of growth in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work compares the effect of γ-radiation dose and time in culture on the growth of cambium and phloem carrot (Daucus carota) root explants. It was found that the phloem is more radiosensitive than the cambium and that both tissues were more radiosensitive when irradiated on excision at the G1 phase rather than at the end of the lag phase on the ninth day of growth in culture when cells were predominantly at the G2 phase. The nuclear volumes of cells from both tissues were similar but were larger at the end of the more radioresistant lag phase than those of the G1 phase on excision. However, nuclear volume could not account for the differences in radiosensitivity between either the tissues or irradiation times in culture

  12. Tissue culture system using a PANDA ring resonator and wavelength router for hydroponic plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamoldilok, Surachart; Suwanpayak, Nathaporn; Suttirak, Saisudawan; Yupapin, Preecha P

    2012-06-01

    A novel system of nanofluidics trapping and delivery, which is known as a tissue culture system is proposed. By using the intense optical pulse(i.e., a soliton pulse) and a system constructed by a liquid core waveguide, the optical vortices (gradient optical fields/wells) can be generated, where the trapping tools in the same way as the optical tweezers in the PANDA ring resonator can be formed. By controlling the suitable parameters, the intense optical vortices can be generated within the PANDA ring resonator, in which the nanofluidics can be trapped and moved (transported) dynamically within the Tissue culture system(a wavelength router), which can be used for tissue culture and delivery in the hydroponic plant system. PMID:22411055

  13. Clinical and morphological investigations on ependymomas and their tissue cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casentini, L; Gullotta, F; Möhrer, U

    1981-03-01

    A morphological investigation was carried out on 56 ependymomas cultivated in vitro as short-term cultures in roller tubes. The tumours had been histologically classified as cellular and fibrillary ependymomas, subependymomas, myxopapillary and malignant ependymomas (Table 1). A very good growth was detected in 32 cases, most of them being cellular and malignant ependymomas (Table 2). The prevailing growth pattern was epithelial in type, i.e. proliferating cells forming a carpet. In some cases, in the first stages of growth elongated bipolar cells did appear, but they evolved later as flattened epithelial elements. In four cases, a mixed proliferation of piloid astrocytes and ependymal cells was seen; these tumours were regarded as mixed gliomas. In 46 cases an exact evaluation of the history was possible. Although no correlation could be found between histology and survival time (Table 4), the longest survival was observed in spinal tumours (Table 3). Tumours in children had a slightly worse prognosis in comparison with adults (Table 5). A radical removal of the tumour was generally followed by a longer survival time (Table 6), although the operative procedure employed did not seem to influence the development of recurrences (Table 7). PMID:7219656

  14. Comprehensive Protocols to Isolate, Characterize, and Culture pure-population of Multi-potent Stem Cell from Mouse Epidermis

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    A pure-population of keratinocyte stem cell culture is required for applications such as transgenic-mouse-stem cell preparation, stem cell therapy, tissue engineering, iPS technology, besides study of growth & differentiation, toxicology, and related mechanistic aspects. Protocols available in literature do not conform to desired purity and better yield in short span of time, culture-condition for rapid growth, and characterization methods (1-24). We report here the improved, albeit compr...

  15. Physical characterization of hydroxyapatite porous scaffolds for tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study refers to the preparation and characterization of porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds to be used as matrices for bone regeneration or as specific release vehicles. Ceramics are widely used for bone tissue engineering purposes and in this study, hydroxyapatite porous scaffolds were produced using the polymer replication method. Polyurethane sponges were used as templates and impregnated with a ceramic slurry at different ratios, and sintered at 1300 deg. C following a specific thermal cycle. The characteristics of the hydroxyapatite porous scaffolds and respective powder used as starting material, were investigated by using scanning electron microscopy, particle size distribution, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy and compressive mechanical testing techniques. It was possible to produce highly porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds presenting micro and macropores and pore interconnectivity.

  16. Physical characterization of hydroxyapatite porous scaffolds for tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, S., E-mail: smsilva@ineb.up.pt [INEB - Instituto de Engenharia Biomedica, Divisao de Biomateriais, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 823, 4150-180 Porto (Portugal); Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Engenharia, Departamento de Engenharia Metalurgica e Materiais, Porto (Portugal); Rodriguez, M.A.; Pena, P.; De Aza, A.H.; De Aza, S. [Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio, CSIC, 28049-Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Ferraz, M.P. [INEB - Instituto de Engenharia Biomedica, Divisao de Biomateriais, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 823, 4150-180 Porto (Portugal); Faculdade de Ciencias da Saude da Universidade Fernando Pessoa, Rua Carlos da Maia, 296, 4200-150 Porto (Portugal); Monteiro, F.J. [INEB - Instituto de Engenharia Biomedica, Divisao de Biomateriais, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 823, 4150-180 Porto (Portugal); Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Engenharia, Departamento de Engenharia Metalurgica e Materiais, Porto (Portugal)

    2009-06-01

    The present study refers to the preparation and characterization of porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds to be used as matrices for bone regeneration or as specific release vehicles. Ceramics are widely used for bone tissue engineering purposes and in this study, hydroxyapatite porous scaffolds were produced using the polymer replication method. Polyurethane sponges were used as templates and impregnated with a ceramic slurry at different ratios, and sintered at 1300 deg. C following a specific thermal cycle. The characteristics of the hydroxyapatite porous scaffolds and respective powder used as starting material, were investigated by using scanning electron microscopy, particle size distribution, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy and compressive mechanical testing techniques. It was possible to produce highly porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds presenting micro and macropores and pore interconnectivity.

  17. Host DNA synthesis-suppressing factor in culture fluid of tissue cultures infected with measles virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Host DNA synthesis is suppressed by the culture fluid of cell cultures infected with measles virus. This activity in the culture fluid is initiated somewhat later than the growth of infectious virus. Ninety percent of host DNA synthesis in HeLa cells is inhibited by culture fluid of 3-day-old cell cultures of Vero or HeLa cells infected with measles virus. This suppressing activity is not a property of the virion, but is due to nonvirion-associated componentnent which shows none of the activities of measles virus such as hemagglutination, hemolysis, or cell fusion nor does it have the antigenicity of measles virus as tested by complement-fixation or hemagglutination-inhibiting antibody blocking tests. Neutralization of the activity of this component is not attained with the pooled sera of convalescent measles patients. This component has molecular weights of about 45,000, 20,000, and 3,000 and appears to be a heat-stable protein. The production of host DNA suppressing factor (DSF) is blocked by cycloheximide. Neither uv-inactivated nor antiserum-neutralized measles virus produce DSF. Furthermore, such activity of nonvirion-associated component is not detected in the culture fluid of cultures infected with other RNA viruses such as poliovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus, or Sindbis virus. (auth)

  18. Toxicological and radiobiological investigations using tissue cultures: Substitute and supplement for animal experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments are carried out on cell cultures with the aim of researching the biochemistry, sub-cellular distribution and toxicity of radio-nuclides and heavy metals. Investigations with the advanced tissue culture system of the multi-cellular spheroids are used to obtain reliable data on radiation tolerance and the origin of cancers in specific tissue conditions. In particular, there are reports on the results of chelate formation for treating cadmium poisoning and for the decorporation of radio-nuclides (Pu poisoning) and on radiation biology examination of Xeroderma Pigmentosum and the histology of cells of carcinoma of the cervix and hepatozytes. (DG)

  19. Characterization of Diaphanous-related formin FMNL2 in human tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kampf Caroline

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diaphanous-related formins govern actin-based processes involved in many cellular functions, such as cell movement and invasion. Possible connections to developmental processes and cellular changes associated with malignant phenotype make them interesting study targets. In spite of this, very little is known of the tissue distribution and cellular location of any mammalian formin. Here we have carried out a comprehensive analysis of the formin family member formin -like 2 (FMNL2 in human tissues. Results An FMNL2 antibody was raised and characterized. The affinity-purified FMNL2 antibody was validated by Western blotting, Northern blotting, a peptide competition assay and siRNA experiments. Bioinformatics-based mRNA profiling indicated that FMNL2 is widely expressed in human tissues. The highest mRNA levels were seen in central and peripheral nervous systems. Immunohistochemical analysis of 26 different human tissues showed that FMNL2 is widely expressed, in agreement with the mRNA profile. The widest expression was detected in the central nervous system, since both neurons and glial cells expressed FMNL2. Strong expression was also seen in many epithelia. However, the expression in different cell types was not ubiquitous. Many mesenchymal cell types showed weak immunoreactivity and cells lacking expression were seen in many tissues. The subcellular location of FMNL2 was cytoplasmic, and in some tissues a strong perinuclear dot was detected. In cultured cells FMNL2 showed mostly a cytoplasmic localization with perinuclear accumulation consistent with the Golgi apparatus. Furthermore, FMNL2 co-localized with F-actin to the tips of cellular protrusions in WM164 human melanoma cells. This finding is in line with FMNL2's proposed function in the formation of actin filaments in cellular protrusions, during amoeboid cellular migration. Conclusion FMNL2 is expressed in multiple human tissues, not only in the central nervous system

  20. Production of immunoglobulins in gingival tissue explant cultures from juvenile periodontitis patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, E.R.; Falkler, W.A. Jr.; Suzuki, J.B. (Univ. of Maryland Dental School, Baltimore (USA))

    1990-10-01

    B lymphocytes and plasma cells are histologically observed in granulomatous periodontal tissues of juvenile periodontitis (JP) patients. Local immune processes may participate in protective or immunopathologic roles in the pathogenesis of this disease. An in vitro explant culture system was utilized to demonstrate the production of immunoglobulins by diseased JP tissues. Immunodiffusion studies using goat anti-human gamma, alpha, or mu chain serum revealed IgG to be the major immunoglobulin present in 92% of the day 1 supernatant fluids (SF) of the 47 JP gingival tissue explant cultures. IgA was present in 15% of the SF; however, no IgM was detected. Staph Protein A isolated 14C-labeled IgG from the SF, when allowed to react with goat anti-human gamma chain serum, formed lines of precipitation. Positive autoradiographs confirmed the biosynthesis of IgG by the explant cultures. The in vitro gingival tissue explant culture system described provides a useful model for the study of localized immunoglobulins produced by diseased tissues of JP patients.

  1. Production of immunoglobulins in gingival tissue explant cultures from juvenile periodontitis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    B lymphocytes and plasma cells are histologically observed in granulomatous periodontal tissues of juvenile periodontitis (JP) patients. Local immune processes may participate in protective or immunopathologic roles in the pathogenesis of this disease. An in vitro explant culture system was utilized to demonstrate the production of immunoglobulins by diseased JP tissues. Immunodiffusion studies using goat anti-human gamma, alpha, or mu chain serum revealed IgG to be the major immunoglobulin present in 92% of the day 1 supernatant fluids (SF) of the 47 JP gingival tissue explant cultures. IgA was present in 15% of the SF; however, no IgM was detected. Staph Protein A isolated 14C-labeled IgG from the SF, when allowed to react with goat anti-human gamma chain serum, formed lines of precipitation. Positive autoradiographs confirmed the biosynthesis of IgG by the explant cultures. The in vitro gingival tissue explant culture system described provides a useful model for the study of localized immunoglobulins produced by diseased tissues of JP patients

  2. A Comparison of Tissue versus Swab Culturing of Infected Diabetic Foot Wounds

    OpenAIRE

    Ying Huang; Ying Cao; Mengchen Zou; Xiangrong Luo; Ya Jiang; Yaoming Xue; Fang Gao

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To compare the efficacy of swabbing versus tissue biopsy for microbiological diagnosis of diabetic foot infection. Methods. This was a prospective trial. Fifty-six patients with diabetic foot infection were divided into the following 3 groups according to the PEDIS grading system: grade 2 (n = 10), grade 3 (n = 29), and grade 4 (n = 17). Two specimens were collected from each wound for microbial culturing after debridement, including a superficial swab and a deep tissue punch biops...

  3. The effect of a fungal preparation on the tissue cultures of Holarrhena anfidysenterica (Roxb.) Wall.

    OpenAIRE

    Barbara Dohnal; Wanda Kisiel

    2014-01-01

    The addition of an aqueous extract from fruitbodies of Tylopilus felleus to tissue cultures of Holarrhena antidysenterica (Apocynaceae) caused the accumulation of an unknown compound in the culture medium. The compound was isolated and identified as 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furancarboxaldehyde (1). Moreover, biosynthesis of phenolic compounds was stimulated in response to the stress agents of the fungal preparation. Methyl ferulate (2) was the major phenolic constituent.

  4. Culture of three-dimensional tissue model and its application in bystander-effect research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compared with the cultured monolayer (2D) cells, three-dimensional (3D) tissue could be more similar to the environment in vivo including the physical support, chemical factors, cell-cell and cell-matrix interaction and so on. With the development of three-dimensional cell culture techniques (TDCC), 3D tissue is widely used in the areas of bystander effect research. This review focuses on introducing the TDCC method and its application in bystander-effect research. First, the development process of 3D tissue culture method was introduced. Secondly, the induction of radiation induced bystander effects both in 2D cell and 3D tissue and its mechanisms were reviewed. Finally, because heavy ion (carbon ion beam) has been developed as a useful tool to cure solid cancer, and the 3D tissue model is an ideal material to study the damages on body after being irradiated and to understand the underlying mechanisms, future study about heavy ion radiation inducing bystander effect in 3D tissue was discussed. (authors)

  5. Detection of genotoxicity in the marine environment: A preliminary feasibility study using primary mussel tissue culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornet, Michel [UMR 5805 EPOC ' Environnements et Paleoenvironnements Oceaniques' , Universite Bordeaux 1, CNRS, Avenue des Facultes, 33405 Talence Cedex (France)]. E-mail: m.cornet@epoc.u-bordeaux1.fr

    2007-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and potential usefulness of primary cultures of somatic tissues from adult mussel by means of sister chromatid exchange induction (SCE). This research is an initial pilot study carried out with mussel mantle tissue using seawater artificially contaminated with cadmium and polluted seawater from the port of Arcachon. With regard to cadmium concentration, mean SCE numbers showed a progressive increase from 1.07 {+-} 0.18 per diploid cell in controls (i.e. cultures without contaminant) to 2.91 {+-} 0.42 per diploid cell for the highest concentration, 10{sup -4} M. With regard to the medium prepared with seawater from the port of Arcachon, the mean SCE number reached a value of 5.85 {+-} 0.85 per diploid cell. The analysis of SCEs induced by cadmium showed DNA responses even at the lowest concentration (i.e. 10{sup -7} M). The study demonstrates the feasibility of the sister chromatid exchange (SCE) approach based upon primary mussel tissue culture, for the genotoxicity testing of contaminated seawater. Highlights from this procedure are (1) the presence of an active cell proliferation, (2) the use whole-water samples, (3) the possibility of culturing without serum, (4) the absence of cell dissociation before culturing and (5) a cellular proliferation which can be obtained in cultures carried out in a medium containing seawater whose salinity is comprise between 28 and 35 per mille.

  6. Detection of genotoxicity in the marine environment: A preliminary feasibility study using primary mussel tissue culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and potential usefulness of primary cultures of somatic tissues from adult mussel by means of sister chromatid exchange induction (SCE). This research is an initial pilot study carried out with mussel mantle tissue using seawater artificially contaminated with cadmium and polluted seawater from the port of Arcachon. With regard to cadmium concentration, mean SCE numbers showed a progressive increase from 1.07 ± 0.18 per diploid cell in controls (i.e. cultures without contaminant) to 2.91 ± 0.42 per diploid cell for the highest concentration, 10-4 M. With regard to the medium prepared with seawater from the port of Arcachon, the mean SCE number reached a value of 5.85 ± 0.85 per diploid cell. The analysis of SCEs induced by cadmium showed DNA responses even at the lowest concentration (i.e. 10-7 M). The study demonstrates the feasibility of the sister chromatid exchange (SCE) approach based upon primary mussel tissue culture, for the genotoxicity testing of contaminated seawater. Highlights from this procedure are (1) the presence of an active cell proliferation, (2) the use whole-water samples, (3) the possibility of culturing without serum, (4) the absence of cell dissociation before culturing and (5) a cellular proliferation which can be obtained in cultures carried out in a medium containing seawater whose salinity is comprise between 28 and 35 per mille

  7. Fractal characterization of tissue with the new Pyramid Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The characterization of tissue by in-silico analysis is an active field of research in digital pathology. Successively improved imaging techniques in medicine reveal ever finer morphological details in the gained images, which enhance the outcome of different image-processing algorithms. Nevertheless, since the majority of real word objects exhibit similar structures at different scales, the application of fractal methods is obligatory if significant and comparable results should be obtained. By using this approach our group was able to characterize different types of samples, e.g. to distinguish between different grades of neoplasia. Currently we developed a new method for the calculation of the fractal dimension based on the well established Box Counting Method (BCM). The astounding results showed that in case of binary images this new method is able to obtain results with the same quality as with BCM but within significantly faster computational times. Ongoing developments towards an implementation for real histological (grey value/color) images confirm this trend. Therewith high resolution images can be processed in a few seconds, which is a prerequisite for the aim of real-time analysis in digital pathology. (author)

  8. In situ fiber-optical monitoring of cytosolic calcium in tissue explant cultures

    CERN Document Server

    Ryser, Manuel; Geiser, Marianne; Frenz, Martin; Rička, Jaro

    2014-01-01

    We present a fluorescence-lifetime based method for monitoring cell and tissue activity in situ, during cell culturing and in the presence of a strong autofluorescence background. The miniature fiber-optic probes are easily incorporated in the tight space of a cell culture chamber or in an endoscope. As a first application we monitored the cytosolic calcium levels in porcine tracheal explant cultures using the Calcium Green-5N (CG5N) indicator. Despite the simplicity of the optical setup we are able to detect changes of calcium concentration as small as 2.5 nM, with a monitoring time resolution of less than 1 s.

  9. Primary insect cell culture from total embryo and embryonic brain tissue of Periplaneta americana: A preliminary study

    OpenAIRE

    Soya Seçkin; Can Hüseyin; Yıkılmaz Mehmet Salih

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this preliminary study was to establish a primary insect cell culture from total embryos and embryonic brain tissues of Periplaneta americana, collected from Izmir, Turkey. Cells were cultured at 29ºC in Grace’s insect medium for one month. In the embryonic brain tissue culture, single cells and cell clumps containing spherical and ovoid as well as dividing cells were observed. Single bipolar neurons were detected after 4 days in culture. Network...

  10. Participation of cob tissue in the transport of medium components into maize kernels cultured in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maize (Zea mays L.) kernels cultured in vitro while still attached to cob pieces have been used as a model system to study the physiology of kernel development. In this study, the role of the cob tissue in uptake of medium components into kernels was examined. Cob tissue was essential for in vitro kernel growth, and better growth occurred with larger cob/kernel ratios. A symplastically transported fluorescent dye readily permeated the endosperm when supplied in the medium, while an apoplastic dye did not. Slicing the cob tissue to disrupt vascular connections, but not apoplastic continuity, greatly reduced [14C]sucrose uptake into kernels. [14C]Sucrose uptake by cob and kernel tissue was reduced 31% and 68%, respectively, by 5 mM PCMBS. L-[14C]glucose was absorbed much more slowly than D-[14C]glucose. These and other results indicate that phloem loading of sugars occurs in the cob tissue. Passage of medium components through the symplast cob tissue may be a prerequisite for uptake into the kernel. Simple diffusion from the medium to the kernels is unlikely. Therefore, the ability of substances to be transported into cob tissue cells should be considered in formulating culture medium

  11. Human colon tissue in organ culture: preservation of normal and neoplastic characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagavathula, Narasimharao; Mankey, Cohra; DaSilva, Marissa; Paruchuri, Tejaswi; Aslam, Muhammad Nadeem; Varani, James

    2009-01-01

    Normal and neoplastic human colon tissue obtained at surgery was used to establish conditions for organ culture. Optimal conditions included an atmosphere of 5% CO2 and 95% O2; tissue partially submerged with mucosa at the gas interface; and serum-free medium with 1.5 mM Ca2+ and a number of growth supplements. Histological, histochemical, and immunohistochemical features that distinguish normal and neoplastic tissue were preserved over a 2-d period. With normal tissue, this included the presence of elongated crypts with small, densely packed cells at the crypt base and mucin-containing goblet cells in the upper portion. Ki67 staining, for proliferating cells, was confined to the lower third of the crypt, while expression of extracellular calcium-sensing receptor was seen in the upper third and surface epithelium. E-cadherin and β-catenin were expressed throughout the epithelium and confined to the cell surface. In tumor tissue, the same disorganized, abnormal glandular structures seen at time zero were present after 2 d. The majority of cells in these structures were mucin-poor, but occasional goblet cells were seen and mucin staining was present. Ki67 staining was seen throughout the abnormal epithelium and calcium-sensing receptor expression was weak and variable. E-cadherin was seen at the cell surface (similar to normal tissue), but in some places, there was diffuse cytoplasmic staining. Finally, intense cytoplasmic and nuclear β-catenin staining was observed in cultured neoplastic tissue. PMID:19915935

  12. Using Peat Pellets in Liquid Media to Root Sunflower Tissue Culture Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traditional plant breeding is often limited by the genetic diversity within a species. The use of biotechnology allows introducing into a plant, specific traits that come from the same or another plant species. In this paper, we focus on tissue culture of sunflower (Helianthus annus L., Asteraceae...

  13. Expression Analysis of Ethylene Biosynthesis and Receptor Genes From Barley Embryo and Tissue Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethylene affects regeneration of green plants from barley tissue culture. With the availability of the HarvEST barley database and barley GeneChip, genome-wide expression studies have focused on differential development between Morex and Golden Promise at various stages of plant growth. The data f...

  14. Human parvovirus B19 can infect cynomolgus monkey marrow cells in tissue culture.

    OpenAIRE

    Gallinella, G.; Anderson, S M; Young, N S; Brown, K E

    1995-01-01

    The human pathogenic parvovirus B19 cannot be grown in standard tissue culture but propagates in human bone marrow, where it is cytotoxic to erythroid progenitor cells. We now show that parvovirus B19 can replicate in cynomolgus bone marrow. Cynomolgus monkeys may be a suitable animal model for pathogenesis studies of parvovirus B19.

  15. The chemical constituents of the tissue culture cells of Daphne giraldii cullus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Hua Wu; Li Bo Wang; Hui Yuan Gao; Jian Huang; Bo Hang Sun; Shu Hui Li; Li Jun Wu

    2009-01-01

    Three compounds were isolated from the tissue culture cells of Daphne giraldii cullus, their structures were identified as daphneolone (1), S-(+)-1-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-3-hydroxy-5-phenyl-1-pentanone (2), S-(+)-1-(4-methoxyphenyl)-3-hydroxy-5-phenyl-1-pentanone (3), and among them, 2 was a new compound, 3 was a novel natural product.

  16. Extended metAFLP approach in studies of tissue culture induced variation (TCIV) in triticale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machczyńska, Joanna; Orłowska, Renata; Zimny, Janusz; Bednarek, Piotr Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    We present the development of the theoretical background of the metAFLP approach which allows for partition of complex variation into sequence changes, de novo methylation and demethylation of the regenerants derived via in vitro tissue culture methods in the case of triticale. It was demonstrated that, independent of whether andro- or embryogenesis was used for plant regeneration, the level of sequence changes identified between regenerants is about 10 %. Moreover, DNA demethylation prevails over de novo methylation of the regenerants compared to the donor plant. The metAFLP approach allows for the evaluation of numerous quantitative characteristics. For instance, one may quantify the number of sites unaffected by tissue culture approaches, global site DNA methylation etc. It is suggested that the approach could be useful for breeders in order to control plant material uniformity or for the evaluation of modified in vitro tissue culture approaches allowing for control of the (epi)mutation level. The extended metAFLP approach presented here delivers sufficient background for the evaluation of software that could facilitate analyses of the tissue culture induced variation. PMID:25242884

  17. Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics in Molecular Diagnostics: Discovery of Cancer Biomarkers Using Tissue Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debasish Paul

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate diagnosis and proper monitoring of cancer patients remain a key obstacle for successful cancer treatment and prevention. Therein comes the need for biomarker discovery, which is crucial to the current oncological and other clinical practices having the potential to impact the diagnosis and prognosis. In fact, most of the biomarkers have been discovered utilizing the proteomics-based approaches. Although high-throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches like SILAC, 2D-DIGE, and iTRAQ are filling up the pitfalls of the conventional techniques, still serum proteomics importunately poses hurdle in overcoming a wide range of protein concentrations, and also the availability of patient tissue samples is a limitation for the biomarker discovery. Thus, researchers have looked for alternatives, and profiling of candidate biomarkers through tissue culture of tumor cell lines comes up as a promising option. It is a rich source of tumor cell-derived proteins, thereby, representing a wide array of potential biomarkers. Interestingly, most of the clinical biomarkers in use today (CA 125, CA 15.3, CA 19.9, and PSA were discovered through tissue culture-based system and tissue extracts. This paper tries to emphasize the tissue culture-based discovery of candidate biomarkers through various mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches.

  18. Quantification of the tissue-culture induced variation in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bednarek Piotr T

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When plant tissue is passaged through in vitro culture, many regenerated plants appear to be no longer clonal copies of their donor genotype. Among the factors that affect this so-called tissue culture induced variation are explant genotype, explant tissue origin, medium composition, and the length of time in culture. Variation is understood to be generated via a combination of genetic and/or epigenetic changes. A lack of any phenotypic variation between regenerants does not necessarily imply a concomitant lack of genetic (or epigenetic change, and it is therefore of interest to assay the outcomes of tissue culture at the genotypic level. Results A variant of methylation sensitive AFLP, based on the isoschizomeric combinations Acc65I/MseI and KpnI/MseI was applied to analyze, at both the sequence and methylation levels, the outcomes of regeneration from tissue culture in barley. Both sequence mutation and alteration in methylation pattern were detected. Two sets of regenerants from each of five DH donor lines were compared. One set was derived via androgenesis, and the other via somatic embryogenesis, developed from immature embryos. These comparisons delivered a quantitative assessment of the various types of somaclonal variation induced. The average level of variation was 6%, of which almost 1.7% could be accounted for by nucleotide mutation, and the remainder by changes in methylation state. The nucleotide mutation rates and the rate of epimutations were substantially similar between the andro- and embryo-derived sets of regenerants across all the donors. Conclusion We have developed an AFLP based approach that is capable of describing the qualitative and quantitative characteristics of the tissue culture-induced variation. We believe that this approach will find particular value in the study of patterns of inheritance of somaclonal variation, since non-heritable variation is of little interest for the improvement of plant

  19. Ex-vivo Potential of Cadaveric and Fresh Limbal Tissues to Regenerate Cultured Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vemuganti Geeta

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate and compare the ex-vivo growth potential and formation of cultured corneal epithelium from residual corneo-limbal rings obtained from the operating room after penetrating keratoplasty, and fresh limbal tissues from patients undergoing routine cataract surgery. Methods: With the approval of the Institutional Review Board and informed consent from patients, 1-2mm of limbal tissues from 15 patients and 31 tissues from the cadaveric limbal ring preserved in MK medium (16 tissues and Optisol (15 tissues were used for the study. Donor data included age, time lapse between death and collection, collection and preservation and preservation and culture. Tiny bits of the limbal tissue were explanted on the de-epithelialised human amniotic membrane prepared following standard guidelines, and cultured using Human Corneal Epithelial cell medium. Radial growth from the explant was observed and measured by phase contrast microscopy over 2-4 weeks. After adequate confluent growth, whole mount preparation of the membrane was made and stained with haematoxylin and eosin. Part of the membrane was fixed in formalin and processed for routine histologic examination. The sections were stained with haematoxylin and eosin. Results: Forty-six tissues were evaluated from 42 eyes (15 from patients, 31 from cadaveric eyes with a mean age of 55.3 years ± 21.23 years (range 18 years - 110 years. The growth pattern observed was similar in all the positive cases with clusters of cells budding from the explant over 24- 72 hours, and subsequent formation of a monolayer over the next 2-3 weeks. The stained whole mount preparation showed a radial growth of cells around explants with diameter ranging from 5 to 16mm. Histologic evaluation of the membrane confirmed the growth of 2-3 cell-layered epithelium over the amniotic membrane. Cultivated epithelium around explant cell cultures was observed in 100% (15/15 of limbal tissue obtained from patients, as against

  20. Isolation, culture and characterization of primary mouse RPE cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Godino, Rosario; Garland, Donita L; Pierce, Eric A

    2016-07-01

    Mouse models are powerful tools for the study of ocular diseases. Alterations in the morphology and function of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) are common features shared by many ocular disorders. We report a detailed protocol to collect, seed, culture and characterize RPE cells from mice. We describe a reproducible method that we previously developed to collect and culture murine RPE cells on Transwells as functional polarized monolayers. The collection of RPE cells takes ∼3 h, and the cultures mimic in vivo RPE cell features within 1 week. This protocol also describes methods to characterize the cells on Transwells within 1-2 weeks by transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM and SEM, respectively), immunostaining of vibratome sections and flat mounts, and measurement of transepithelial electrical resistance. The RPE cell cultures are suitable to study the biology of the RPE from wild-type and genetically modified strains of mice between the ages of 10 d and 12 months. The RPE cells can also be manipulated to investigate molecular mechanisms underlying the RPE pathology in the numerous mouse models of ocular disorders. Furthermore, modeling the RPE pathology in vitro represents a new approach to testing drugs that will help accelerate the development of therapies for vision-threatening disorders such as macular degeneration (MD). PMID:27281648

  1. Metabolomics reveals the heterogeneous secretome of two entomopathogenic fungi to ex vivo cultured insect tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charissa de Bekker

    Full Text Available Fungal entomopathogens rely on cellular heterogeneity during the different stages of insect host infection. Their pathogenicity is exhibited through the secretion of secondary metabolites, which implies that the infection life history of this group of environmentally important fungi can be revealed using metabolomics. Here metabolomic analysis in combination with ex vivo insect tissue culturing shows that two generalist isolates of the genus Metarhizium and Beauveria, commonly used as biological pesticides, employ significantly different arrays of secondary metabolites during infectious and saprophytic growth. It also reveals that both fungi exhibit tissue specific strategies by a distinguishable metabolite secretion on the insect tissues tested in this study. In addition to showing the important heterogeneous nature of these two entomopathogens, this study also resulted in the discovery of several novel destruxins and beauverolides that have not been described before, most likely because previous surveys did not use insect tissues as a culturing system. While Beauveria secreted these cyclic depsipeptides when encountering live insect tissues, Metarhizium employed them primarily on dead tissue. This implies that, while these fungi employ comparable strategies when it comes to entomopathogenesis, there are most certainly significant differences at the molecular level that deserve to be studied.

  2. Mechanical Characterization of Breast Tissue Constituents for Cancer Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Zaeimdar, Shima

    2014-01-01

    Breast elastography is a method of cancer detection that uses the response of soft tissue to deformations, leading to discovery of abnormalities. The methods of Clinical Breast Examination and Breast Self-Examination are based primarily on stiffness and, hence, on the mechanics of tissue constituents examined by palpation (Goodson, 1996). However, little is known about the mechanical characteristics of breast tissue under compression and the contribution of tissue mechanics to breast cancer d...

  3. Dental hard tissue characterization using laser-based ultrasonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blodgett, David W.; Massey, Ward L.

    2003-07-01

    Dental health care and research workers require a means of imaging the structures within teeth in vivo. One critical need is the detection of tooth decay in its early stages. If decay can be detected early enough, the process can be monitored and interventional procedures, such as fluoride washes and controlled diet, can be initiated to help re-mineralize the tooth. Currently employed x-ray imaging is limited in its ability to visualize interfaces and incapable of detecting decay at a stage early enough to avoid invasive cavity preparation followed by a restoration. To this end, non-destructive and non-contact in vitro measurements on extracted human molars using laser-based ultrasonics are presented. Broadband ultrasonic waves are excited in the extracted sections by using a pulsed carbon-dioxide (CO2) laser operating in a region of high optical absorption in the dental hard tissues. Optical interferometric detection of the ultrasonic wave surface displacements in accomplished with a path-stabilized Michelson-type interferometer. Results for bulk and surface in-vitro characterization of caries are presented on extracted molars with pre-existing caries.

  4. Molecular characterization of some lignicolous species from fungal culture collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stević Nevena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Culture collections of microorganisms, including fungi, are strain deposits recognised as Biological Resource Centers (BRCs with a great importance in science, industry and education. Their objective is to preserve the purity, viability and genomic integrity of every single strain as a member of such collection. Since improvement of molecular methods nowadays brought many novel approaches in manipulation with strains of microorganisms, they can also be useful for characterization of existing stored strains. ITS1 region in nuclear DNA is preferred barcoding marker for taxon identification, which can be explained by its great inter-species variability. This paper presents results from analysing ITS1 region sequences (17 obtained from fungal DNA of culture collection of autochthonous, lignicolous genera Piptoporus, Pleurotus, Ganoderma and Schizophyllum cultured on malt agar plates for 14 days at 25°C. BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool was used for comparison with online databases, while alignment of sequences was made with MEGA 5.10 software. Morphological determination of species or genus was confirmed for 13 cultures, while the others were disproved. The resulting alignment indicated small intra-species variability of ITS1 region and pointed to it as an ideal marker for verification of fungal culture collections' authenticity. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III43002 and by the Provincial Secretariat for Science and Technological Development, Vojvodina, Serbia APV 114-4513592/2013-03: Molecular and phenotypic diversity of taxa of economical and epidemiological importance, and endangered and endemic species in Europe

  5. Phytoceramide in vertebrate tissues: one step chromatography separation for molecular characterization of ceramide species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somsankar Dasgupta

    Full Text Available Ceramide is a precursor for complex sphingolipids in vertebrates, while plants contain phytoceramide. By using a novel chromatography purification method we show that phytoceramide comprises a significant proportion of animal sphingolipids. Total ceramide including phytoceramide from mouse tissue (brain, heart, liver lipid extracts and cell culture (mouse primary astrocytes, human oligodendroglioma cells was eluted as a single homogenous fraction, and then analyzed by thin layer chromatography, and further characterized by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. We detected a unique band that migrated between non-hydroxy fatty acyl ceramide and hydroxy fatty acyl ceramide, and identified it as phytoceramide. Using RT-PCR, we confirmed that mouse tissues expressed desaturase 2, an enzyme that has been reported to generate phytoceramide from dihydroceramide. Previously, only trace amounts of phytoceramide were reported in vertebrate intestine, kidney, and skin. While its function is still elusive, this is the first report of phytoceramide characterization in glial cells and vertebrate brain, heart, and liver.

  6. On-chip clearing of arrays of 3-D cell cultures and micro-tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grist, S M; Nasseri, S S; Poon, T; Roskelley, C; Cheung, K C

    2016-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) cell cultures are beneficial models for mimicking the complexities of in vivo tissues, especially in tumour studies where transport limitations can complicate response to cancer drugs. 3-D optical microscopy techniques are less involved than traditional embedding and sectioning, but are impeded by optical scattering properties of the tissues. Confocal and even two-photon microscopy limit sample imaging to approximately 100-200 μm depth, which is insufficient to image hypoxic spheroid cores. Optical clearing methods have permitted high-depth imaging of tissues without physical sectioning, but they are difficult to implement for smaller 3-D cultures due to sample loss in solution exchange. In this work, we demonstrate a microfluidic platform for high-throughput on-chip optical clearing of breast cancer spheroids using the SeeDB, Clear(T2), and ScaleSQ clearing methods. Although all three methods are able to effectively clear the spheroids, we find that SeeDB and ScaleSQ more effectively clear the sample than Clear(T2); however, SeeDB induces green autofluorescence while ScaleS causes sample expansion. Our unique on-chip implementation permits clearing arrays of 3-D cultures using perfusion while monitoring the 3-D cultures throughout the process, enabling visualization of the clearing endpoint as well as monitoring of transient changes that could induce image artefacts. Our microfluidic device is compatible with on-chip 3-D cell culture, permitting the use of on-chip clearing at the endpoint after monitoring the same spheroids during their culture. This on-chip method has the potential to improve readout from 3-D cultures, facilitating their use in cell-based assays for high-content drug screening and other applications. PMID:27493703

  7. Morphological analysis on adhesion and invasion involved in endometriosis with tissue culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Jing-hua; YANG Yan-jun; DONG Zhe; LANG Jing-he; LENG Jin-hua

    2011-01-01

    Background Endometriosis (EM) is a benign gynecologic disease predominantly found in women of reproductive age.However, its pathogenesis is still poorly understood. Our experiment was designed to establish a stable and reliable cultural environment for coculture of endometrium and peritoneum, so as to observe the adhesion/invasion ability of endometrium from patients with or without EM.Methods Endometria of secretory phase and peritoneum were sampled from 6 women with endometriois during laparoscopy. Six with ovarian teratoma or simple ovarian cyst were taken as control. We cocultured endometrium and peritoneum into four groups (endometrium from EM cultured with peritoneum from EM, endometrium from control cultured with peritoneum from control, endometrium from EM cultured with peritoneum from non-EM and the endometrium from control cultured with peritoneum from EM) to observe the adhesion/invasion process in gas-liquid surface culture and in-medium culture. Specimens were collected at 1 hour, 6 hours, 12 hours, 24 hours, 2 days, 3 days,4 days, 5 days, 6 days and 7 days for histology, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical analysis on cytokeratin 8(CK8) and CD10.Results The gas-liquid surface culture was superior to in-medium culture for the maintenance of tissue morphology and survival of endometrium. CK8 immunoflurescence demonstrated no remarkable difference in adhesion process between patients with and without EM. CD10 immunochemistry manifested frequent invasion of endometrial stromal cells from EM patients into peritoneum of up to 3 days culture, while the endometriotic cells from non-EM patients did not invade into peritoneum.Conclusions Gas-liquid surface culture is a suitable model for observing the early events in EM lesion formation.Endometrium from patients with EM showed increased invasion capacity during coculture, which might help to explain the etiology of endometriosis.

  8. A Protocol for Rapid, Measurable Plant Tissue Culture Using Stem Disc Meristem Micropropagation of Garlic ("Allium Sativum L.")

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peat, Gerry; Jones, Meriel

    2012-01-01

    Plant tissue culture is becoming an important technique for the mass propagation of plants. Problems with existing techniques, such as slow growth and contamination, have restricted the practical work in plant tissue culture carried out in schools. The new protocol using garlic meristematic stem discs explained in this article addresses many of…

  9. Thermal compression and characterization of three-dimensional nonwoven PET matrices as tissue engineering scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Ma, T; Yang, S T; Kniss, D A

    2001-03-01

    Nonwoven fibrous matrices have been widely used as scaffolds in tissue engineering, and modification of microstructure of these matrices is needed to organize cells in three-dimensional space with spatially balanced proliferation and differentiation required for functional tissue development. The method of thermal compression of nonwoven polyethylene terephthalate (PET) fabrics was developed and key parameters of temperature, pressure, and compression duration were evaluated in this study. The permanent deformation was obtained at elevated temperature under pressure and the viscoelastic compressional behaviors were observed, characterized by a distinct apparent modulus change in glass transition temperature region. A liquid extrusion method was further employed to analyze both pore size and its distribution for matrices with porosity ranging from 84 to 93%. It is also found that a more uniformly distributed pore size was resulted from thermal compression and the isotropic nature of nonwoven fabrics was preserved because of the proportional reduction of the pore by compression. The thermally compressed fabric matrices with two different pore sizes (15 and 20 microm in pore radius) were used to culture human trophoblast ED27 and NIH 3T3 cells. It was found that cells cultured in the different pore-size PET matrices had different cell spatial organization and proliferation rates. The smaller pores in the matrix allowed cells to spread better and proliferate faster, while cells in the larger pores tended to form large aggregates and had lower proliferation rate. The thermal compression technique also can be applied to other synthetic fibrous matrices including biodegradable polymers used in tissue engineering to modify the microstructure according to their viscoelastic properties. PMID:11219726

  10. Studies on the reaction in tissue culture of tomato genotypes under biotic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Hanus-Fajerska

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant regeneration in vitro from virus-infected somatic tomato (Lycopersicon sp. tissue was performed. Regeneration experiments were started after the determination of virus presence, using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, in leaves used as a source of explants. Leaf explants infected with selected strains of tomato mosaic Tobamovirus or cucumber mosaic Cucumovirus respectively, were cultured on a standarised MS agar medium to induce adventitious shoots, which were afterwards excised, rooted in vitro and cultured to plants. Explants were also screened for their ability to produce callus. Diverse effects of viral infection, ranging from stimulation to inhibition of callus formation and of morphogenesis rate, were observed. The health condition of the tissue proved to affect regeneration potential of Lycopersicon esculentum, whereas wild accesions did not react in that case so distinctly. In cultivated tomato was encountered the decline in competence to reproduce shoots adventitiously in infected tissue. There was also relationship between donor plant health condition and adventitious root formation in regenerated shoots. Experiments with short-term cultures of L. esculenum reveled also that a certain number of shoots regenerated from diseased tissue can be virus-free.

  11. Organ and tissue donation in migrants: advanced course for cross-cultural mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potenza, R; Guermani, A; Grosso, M; Fossarello, L; Fontaneto, C; Casciola, A; Donadio, P P

    2013-09-01

    Between 2004 and 2010 in Piedmont (Italy Northern Region) 1556 brain-death situations were reported, including 113 (7.3%) in migrants as potential organ and tissue donors. The health staff often has to face migrants, who show great cultural differences and language difficulties. The Molinette Hospital Customer Care Service, the Piedmont Regional Tissue and Organ Procurement Coordination Agency (RPC), and the Cross-Cultural Mediators Association (CMA) organized a special course for intercultural mediators, to decrease misunderstandings between the health staff and the migrants' families and to improve professional communication. In 2011, 28 cultural-linguistic mediators representing different groups of migrants in Piemonte took part in a specific course. Over a 5 month period they were informed about emotional and communicative aspects, proper to the moment of death, as well as organ donation as an intercultural field, the professional role of the mediator, the clinical and forensic aspects of brain death and donation, and the psychological aspects of organ donation. The course was organized by cultural-linguistic mediators of the CMA, the staff of the RPC and the teachers at Turin University. The list of the 21 mediators who passed the final exam was given to organ and tissue donation hospital co-ordinators in Piedmont, so that if necessary, they could obtain the cooperation of these qualified people. PMID:24033996

  12. Transcriptomic comparisons between cultured human adipose tissue-derived pericytes and mesenchymal stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindolfo da Silva Meirelles

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, sometimes called mesenchymal stem cells, are cultured cells able to give rise to mature mesenchymal cells such as adipocytes, osteoblasts, and chondrocytes, and to secrete a wide range of trophic and immunomodulatory molecules. Evidence indicates that pericytes, cells that surround and maintain physical connections with endothelial cells in blood vessels, can give rise to MSCs (da Silva Meirelles et al., 2008 [1]; Caplan and Correa, 2011 [2]. We have compared the transcriptomes of highly purified, human adipose tissue pericytes subjected to culture-expansion in pericyte medium or MSC medium, with that of human adipose tissue MSCs isolated with traditional methods to test the hypothesis that their transcriptomes are similar (da Silva Meirelles et al., 2015 [3]. Here, we provide further information and analyses of microarray data from three pericyte populations cultured in pericyte medium, three pericyte populations cultured in MSC medium, and three adipose tissue MSC populations deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus under accession number GSE67747.

  13. Cartilage-derived extracellular matrix extract promotes chondrocytic phenotype in three-dimensional tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngstrom, Daniel W; Cakstina, Inese; Jakobsons, Eriks

    2016-05-01

    Cell transplantation is a promising regenerative therapy for cartilage degeneration. However, obtaining sufficient numbers of cells for this purpose is a challenge, due a lack of autologous donor tissue and the difficulty of culturing chondrocytes in vitro. Tissue engineering strategies that induce or maintain chondrocytic phenotype may solve these problems by (1) broadening the range of available donor tissue, and (2) facilitating the expansion of these cells while controlling phenotypic drift. In this study, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and cartilage-derived cells (CDCs) were cultured on composite hydrogels containing agarose and homogenized cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM). MSCs cultured on agarose-ECM scaffolds did not show significant signs of chondrogenic differentiation in the absence of additional cues. However, CDCs cultured on agarose-ECM scaffolds proliferated more rapidly than their ECM-free counterparts and MSCs, while retaining chondrocytic morphology. These results were corroborated via expression of cartilage marker genes: in autologous constructs, SOX 9 expression was upregulated by 12.6 ± 5.3-fold, and COL II was upregulated by 2.0 ± 0.3-fold. Agarose-ECM composite hydrogels are therefore useful for expanding partially differentiated CDCs for applications in regenerative medicine. PMID:25707441

  14. An Assessment of Cell Culture Plate Surface Chemistry for in Vitro Studies of Tissue Engineering Scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Röder

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of biopolymers as a three dimensional (3D support structure for cell growth is a leading tissue engineering approach in regenerative medicine. Achieving consistent cell seeding and uniform cell distribution throughout 3D scaffold culture in vitro is an ongoing challenge. Traditionally, 3D scaffolds are cultured within tissue culture plates to enable reproducible cell seeding and ease of culture media change. In this study, we compared two different well-plates with different surface properties to assess whether seeding efficiencies and cell growth on 3D scaffolds were affected. Cell attachment and growth of murine calvarial osteoblast (MC3T3-E1 cells within a melt-electrospun poly-ε-caprolactone scaffold were assessed when cultured in either “low-adhesive” non-treated or corona discharged-treated well-plates. Increased cell adhesion was observed on the scaffold placed in the surface treated culture plates compared to the scaffold in the non-treated plates 24 h after seeding, although it was not significant. However, higher cell metabolic activity was observed on the bases of all well-plates than on the scaffold, except for day 21, well metabolic activity was higher in the scaffold contained in non-treated plate than the base. These results indicate that there is no advantage in using non-treated plates to improve initial cell seeding in 3D polymeric tissue engineering scaffolds, however non-treated plates may provide an improved metabolic environment for long-term studies.

  15. Morphological study of dynamic culture of thermosensitive collagen hydrogel in constructing tissue engineering complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lanfeng; Xu, Feixiang; Guo, Bin; Ma, Jianchao; Zhao, Jinsong

    2016-07-01

    ABSTACT The purpose of this study is to research the morphologies and functional characteristics of the cell-scaffold complex in vitro constructed under dynamic culture conditions. BMSCs were isolated from the long bones of Fischer344 rats, and performed in vitro amplification to the third generation as seed cells, together with thermosensitive collagen hydrogel (TCH) as cell adhesion matrix, and poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) as scaffold, to construct cell-scaffold complex. The cell-scaffold complexes in the experiment group and the control group were then performed dynamic culture and static culture. After 7 d of in vitro culture, the complexes in the 2 groups were performed gross observation and SEM; meanwhile, the total DNA content in the complex was detected on D0,1,3, and 7 of culture. After cultured using these 2 ways, collagen could both wrap the PLLA scaffold, forming dense film-like structures on the PLLA surface. The total DNA contents in the cell-scaffold complex of the experiment group on D1,3, and 7 were significantly higher than the control group (P constructed complex extracellular matrix had good biocompatibility, and dynamic culture could promote the distribution of BMSCs on the surface and inside the structure, thus promoting cell proliferation, so it could be used for the in vitro construction of tissue engineering complex. PMID:27459597

  16. Induction of variant in potato cultivar Spunta for stress tolerance via tissue culture method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potato, one of the world's most important food crop which is highly sensitive to salinity stress. Development of stress tolerant variants through breeding is difficult and time consuming. Attempts were made to develop salinity stress tolerant variant potato via tissue culture techniques. Callus was induced from the shoot tip explants of potato cultivar Spunta under high concentrations of 2,4-D (2,4-dichloro phenoxy acetic acid) and maintained for longer duration (more than 3 months). The callus survived under high concentration of 2,4-D (100 mg/l) were multiplied in the same culture media and screened for salinity tolerance under in vitro culture condition. Callus cultures tolerant up to 10,770 ppm TDS (Total dissolved salts) salinity were isolated and plantlets were regenerated from these variants using in vitro techniques under low salinity culture media or normal MS media containing 4770 ppm TDS. The regenerated plantlets were transferred to high salinity culture medium containing 10,770 ppm TDS. The plantlets showing good growth under high salinity were multiplied through stem and shoot tip multiplication method. The salt tolerant variant obtained from the potato cultivar Spunta were experimented for micro tuber production under in vitro saline culture media and mini tubers under in vivo saline conditions. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments confirmed their tolerance towards salinity. Preliminary field trial with brackish water (11,000 ppm) irrigation also showed normal plant growth and yield. (author)

  17. Low cost options for tissue culture technology in developing countries. Proceedings of a technical meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tissue culture technology is used for the production of doubled haploids, cryopreservation, propagating new plant varieties, conserving rare and endangered plants, difficult-to-propagate plants, and to produce secondary metabolites and transgenic plants. The production of high quality planting material of crop plants and fruit trees, propagated from vegetative parts, has created new opportunities in global trading, benefited growers, farmers, and nursery owners, and improved rural employment. However, there are still major opportunities to produce and distribute high quality planting material, e.g. crops like banana, date palm, cassava, pineapple, plantain, potato, sugarcane, sweet potato, yams, ornamentals, fruit and forest trees. The main advantage of tissue culture technology lies in the production of high quality and uniform planting material that can be multiplied on a year-round basis under disease-free conditions anywhere irrespective of the season and weather. However, the technology is capital, labor and energy intensive. Although, labor is cheap in many developing countries, the resources of trained personnel and equipment are often not readily available. In addition, energy, particularly electricity, and clean water are costly. The energy requirements for tissue culture technology depend on day temperature, day-length and relative humidity, and they have to be controlled during the process of propagation. Individual plant species also differ in their growth requirements. Hence, it is necessary to have low cost options for weaning, hardening of micropropagated plants and finally growing them in the field. This publication describes options for reducing costs to establish and operate tissue culture facilities and primarily focus on plant micropropagation. It includes papers on the basics of tissue culture technology, low cost options for the design of laboratories, use of culture media and containers, energy and labor saving, integration and adoption of

  18. Effect of Sodium Chloride on Growth of Staphylococcus aureus in Synthetic Tissue Culture Medium

    OpenAIRE

    出来尾, 哲; 地土井, 襄爾

    1983-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus Smith was cultured in a synthetic tissue culture medium containing various concentrations of sodium chloride. The growth was at a higher level in the media containing sodium chloride of concentrations of 2.0 and 4.0% than in those of less than 2.0% and more than 4.0%. The result suggests that the bacteria grow more vigorously in the fairly high concentrations of sodium chloride than in the physiological concentration of it, in the synthetic medium. It may be considered t...

  19. Ontogenetically-regulated male sterility in tissue culture - induced and spontaneous sorghum mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elkonin L.A.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Variability of male fertility expression in the AS-1 line, a somaclonal variant obtained from tissue culture of CMS-plant, and in the progeny of revenant '124-1' obtained from fertile tiller, which developed on CMS-plant transferred from the field to the greenhouse, was investigated. Both revertants were characterized by similar expression of male fertility during plant ontogenesis: the panicle on the main tiller was almost completely sterile whereas formation of fertile pollen grains and seed set were observed on the panicles of the shoot tillers. A clear basipetal gradient of male fertility was manifested on all panicles: the base had significantly higher per cent of fertile pollen grains in comparison with the middle part, while in the top the anthers were either absent or had few sterile pollen grains. Such an ontogenetically-regulated restoration of male fertility was controlled by nuclear genes and could be transferred through the pollen in crosses with progenitor CMS-line. Growing of AS-1 plants in the growth chambers simultaneously under a long (16/8 and a short (12/12 daylength conditions demonstrated that differences of fertility level in different tillers was not caused by change of photoperiod during plant ontogenesis and functioning of photoperiod-sensitive fertility restoring gene. Whereas, the ontogenetically-regulated expression of male fertility in both revenants was temperature-dependent and was clearly manifested under relatively cool conditions during 2-week period before the beginning of anthesis of the first panicle (average daily temperature 21°C. The increase of the average daily temperature by 2-3 С resulted in sharp increase of male fertility level. Possibility of using AS-1 line in a new "two-line system" of hybrid seed production, which require only two lines (sterile mutant and fertility restorer, is discussed.

  20. Ectopic Osteogenesis of Macroscopic Tissue Constructs Assembled from Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Laden Microcarriers through In Vitro Perfusion Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Maiqin Chen; Min Zhou; Zhaoyang Ye; Yan Zhou; Wen-Song Tan

    2014-01-01

    We had previously demonstrated the feasibility of preparing a centimeter-sized bone tissue construct by following a modular approach. In the present study, the objectives were to evaluate osteogenesis and tissue formation of human amniotic mesenchymal stem cells-laden CultiSpher S microcarriers during in vitro perfusion culture and after subcutaneous implantation. Microtissues were prepared in dynamic culture using spinner flasks in 28 days. In comparison with 1-week perfusion culture, microt...

  1. Morphological, biochemical and genetic influence of mutagen treatments on medicinal plant tissue cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma rays and/or alkylant agents have been applied on callus tissue, young regenerants and cell suspension in order to establish their effect on morphogenesis, regeneration ability and biosynthetic potential. Growth dynamics, morpho-anatomic variables, secondary metabolite production, cell cytogenetics, enzyme specific activities, isoperoxidase and isoesterase patterns were analyzed in relation to the morphogenetic response of Atropa belladonna, Datura innoxia, Lavandula angustifolia, Chamomilla recutita, Digitalis lanata and Vinca minor tissue cultures. The effects of gamma-ray doses varied from one species to another; 10 to 20 Gy were generally able to stimulate growth and plant regeneration (via organogenesis and somatic embryogenesis), while 10 to 50 Gy enhanced secondary metabolite biosynthesis both in callus and cell suspension culture. Semnificative increase of secondary metabolite production was obtained when treatments with EMS (0.1-0.2%) have been applied to young regenerants. Many differences in biological features and biochemical behaviour were registered 20 days and one year, respectively, after treatment. (author)

  2. Turmeric powder (Curcuma longa Linn. as an antifungal agent in plant tissue culture studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S. Upendra

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Culturing the individual plant cells, tissues (explants and organs in laboratory or in vitro on synthetic media (MS media under aseptic conditions is a usual process in plant tissue culture studies. The medium is rich in nutrients, also supports the growth of variety of microorganisms especially bacteria and fungi, which causecontamination of the medium, though the media is sterilized by autoclaving. During the process of cooling and transferring the media, the chances of fungal contamination remain high. This is avoided to the maximum extent following the good laboratory practices. A novel means could be incorporating turmeric, a well -known antifungal agent, into the media. In the present study, attempts were made to avoid fungal contamination using the media with various concentration of turmeric powder. Results of the investigation revealed that turmeric powder used at the concentrations of 0.8 g/L and 1.0 g/L in the media resulted in appreciable control of fungal contamination.

  3. Characterization of the human visceral adipose tissue secretome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alvarez Llamas, Gloria; Szalowska, Ewa; de Vries, Marcel P.; Weening, Desiree; Landman, Karloes; Hoek, Annemieke; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Roelofsen, Johan; Vonk, Roel J.

    2007-01-01

    Adipose tissue is an endocrine organ involved in storage and release of energy but also in regulation of energy metabolism in other organs via secretion of peptide and protein hormones (adipokines). Especially visceral adipose tissue has been implicated in the development of metabolic syndrome and t

  4. Efficacy of resistance selection to Verticillium wilt in strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa Duch. tissue culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadwiga I. Żebrowska

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The soil-borne pathogenic fungus Verticillium dahliae Kleb. causes economic losses in crops in temperate regions of the world and hence is the most studied species. Strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa Duch. belongs to plant species susceptible to Verticillium dahliae, although the response to infection caused by this pathogen is varied and depends on the cultivar. Due to a lack of efficient methods in Verticillium wilt elimination, the selection of genetically resistant plant material is a priority direction in breeding programs. Efficacy of resistance selection to Verticillium dahliae Kleb. in strawberry tissue culture was examined on the basis of response to in vitro infection by this pathogenic fungus in two tissue cultured strawberry cultivars, i.e. 'Filon' and 'Teresa'. Culture was conducted for 16 months in an environmentally controlled growth room at 18-20°C, 60-70% relative humidity and light intensity of 100 µm E × m-2 × s-1 on a 16h light / 8h dark cycle. Subcultures were proliferated every 6 weeks on modified Murashige and Skoog medium. Four hundred microplants from each tissue cultured cultivar were inoculated under in vitro conditions at the 4-leaf stage with a homogenate of liquid mycelium of Verticillium dahliae serving as the selecting agent. Disease symptoms were observed at 15, 30, 45, 60, and 75th days post inoculation. The extent of leaf chlorosis was rated on a scale of 0-4. At day 75th post inoculation, the percentage of totally chlorotic plants in micropropagated cv. Teresa reached the value of 76.27%, whereas the proportion of such plants in inoculated tissue cultured cv. Filon reached the value of 89.40%. Also, the index of infection calculated for very severe disease symptoms in the subclone 'Teresa' reached the mean value lower when compared with that calculated for subclone 'Filon' (0.0962 and 0.1150, respectively. These results suggested that the micropropagated cv. Teresa exhibited higher genetic resistance to the

  5. Investigating the effect of photodynamic therapy on nerves using tissue engineered culture models

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, K.E.; Liniker, E; MacRobert, A J; Brown, R A; Saffrey, M. J.; Phillips, J B

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Photodynamic therapy (PDT) shows potential as an effective treatment for prostate cancer. Clinical observations indicate that this approach causes fewer nerve damage related side-effects than conventional treatments. The aim here is to investigate the effect of PDT on nerve tissue using engineered 3-dimensional cell culture models. Initial experiments focussed on establishing photosensitiser localisation in neurones and Schwann cells, then developing a model for simulating ne...

  6. Development of tissue culture and virus-induced gene silencing for Calendula officinalis

    OpenAIRE

    LIU, YANBO

    2011-01-01

    Calendula officinalis is grown widely as an ornamental plant across Europe. It belongs to the large. Asteraceae family. In this study, the aim was to explore the possibilities to use Calendula officinalis as a new model organism for flower development and secondary mechanism studies in Asteraceae. Tissue culture of Calendula officinalis was established using nine different cultivars. Murashige & Skoog (MS) medium with four different combinations of plant growth regulators were tested. Of all ...

  7. Isometric contraction by fibroblasts and endothelial cells in tissue culture: a quantitative study

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    We have used an isometric force transducer to study contraction of two types of nonmuscle cells in tissue culture. This method permits the quantitative measurement of contractile force generated by cells of defined type under the influence of external agents while allowing detailed morphological observation. Chick embryo fibroblasts (CEF), which form a contractile network inside a collagen matrix, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVE), which are located in a monolayer on the surfa...

  8. Plant regeneration from petiole segments of some species in tissue culture

    OpenAIRE

    Krystyna Klimaszewska

    2013-01-01

    The regeneration ability of 21 plant species belonging to 14 families was tested. The method of tissue culture in vitro was applied, on basic MS medium with an addition of growth regulators from the auxin and cytokinin groups. From among the investigated plant groups Peperomia scandens and Caladium × hortulanum were capable of plant regeneration, Passiilora coerulea regenerated shoots, Hedera helix, Begonia glabra, Coleus blumei, Fuchsia hybrida, Passiflora suberosa and Peperomia eburnea form...

  9. Array Analysis of Simian Varicella Virus Gene Transcription in Productively Infected Cells in Tissue Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Deitch, Steven B.; Gilden, Donald H.; Wellish, Mary; Smith, John; Cohrs, Randall J.; Mahalingam, Ravi

    2005-01-01

    Simian varicella virus (SVV) is a neurotropic alphaherpesvirus of monkeys that is a model for varicella pathogenesis and latency. Like human varicella-zoster virus (VZV), SVV causes chicken pox (varicella), becomes latent in ganglia along the entire neuraxis, and reactivates to produce shingles (zoster). We developed macroarrays to determine the extent of viral transcription from all 70 predicted SVV open reading frames (ORFs) in infected cells in tissue culture. Cloned fragments (200 to 400 ...

  10. Impact of tissue culture banana technology in Kenya: A difference-in-difference estimation approach

    OpenAIRE

    Kikulwe, Enoch M.; Nassul S. Kabunga; Qaim, Matin

    2012-01-01

    Most micro-level studies on the impact of agricultural technologies build on cross-section data, which can lead to unreliable impact estimates. Here, we use panel data covering two time periods to estimate the impact of tissue culture (TC) banana technology in the Kenyan small farm sector. TC banana is an interesting case, because previous impact studies showed mixed results. We combine propensity score matching with a difference-in-difference estimator to control for selection bias and accou...

  11. Improvement of potato tolerance to salinity using tissue culture techniques and irradiation with in vitro selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mutation breeding program was conducted to improve potato (Solanum tuberosum) tolerance to salinity. In vitro cultured explants from potato cvs. Draga, Diamant, Spunta were irradiated with gamma doses 25, 30, and 35 Gy. Mutants were isolated to get rid of chimeral tissues and subsequently propagated for in vitro and pot selection pressure. Cultivar Sponta produced the highest number of tolerant plants (4) and only one plant was obtained from Diamant. (authors)

  12. Influence of Pseudomonas fluorescens as Biofertilizer in Secondary Hardening of Tissue Cultured Banana Var. Poovan

    OpenAIRE

    Y. Ramesh; V. Ramassamy

    2015-01-01

    The present study brings out the effects of Pseudomonas fluorescens in secondary hardening of tissue cultured banana var.Poovan. Two concentrations (1% & 2%) of liquid medium grown Pseudomonas fluorescens (3×109 cells/ml) were used in borewell water and the growth performance of the banana plantlets was assessed. Seven different growth parameters were studiedviz. shoot weight, height and girth, leaf length, leaf width, no. of leaves and chlorophyll content. Best results were obtained in1%Pseu...

  13. Analysis of laser-induced fluorescence spectra of in vitro plant tissue cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Muñoz, Ana Celia; Gutiérrez-Pulido, Humberto; Rodríguez-Domínguez, José Manuel; Gutiérrez-Mora, Antonia; Rodríguez-Garay, Benjamín; Cervantes-Martínez, Jesús

    2007-04-01

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) for monitoring the development and stress detection of in vitro tissue cultures in a nondestructive and noninvasive way. The changes in LIF spectra caused by the induction of organogenesis, the increase of the F690/F740 ratio as a result of the stress originated in the organogenic explants due to shoot emergence, and the relationship between fluorescence spectra and shoot development were detected by LIF through closed containers of Saintpaulia ionantha.

  14. STEADY STATE THERMAL CONDITIONS INSIDE PLANT TISSUE CULTURE VESSELS SUBMITTED TO A CONSTANT LEVEL OF IRRADIATION

    OpenAIRE

    Urban, L.; Jaffrin, A.

    1990-01-01

    A simple mathematical model for quasi-stationary heat and mass transfers inside plant tissue culture vessels was developed and applied to various physical conditions. The validation of the convective coefficients was done with the help of actual temperature measurements performed in situ under strictly dry conditions. The extension to water vapor mass transfers inside the vessels was then obtained by a similarity argument. When applied to describe stationary conditions, the model shows that t...

  15. Enhancing plant regeneration in tissue culture: A molecular approach through manipulation of cytokinin sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Kristine; Schaller, G. Eric

    2013-01-01

    Micropropagation is used for commercial purposes worldwide, but the capacity to undergo somatic organogenesis and plant regeneration varies greatly among species. The plant hormones auxin and cytokinin are critical for plant regeneration in tissue culture, with cytokinin playing an instrumental role in shoot organogenesis. Type-B response regulators govern the transcriptional output in response to cytokinin and are required for plant regeneration. In our paper published in Plant Physiology, w...

  16. An Efficient In vitro Hardening Technique of Tissue Culture Raised Plants

    OpenAIRE

    C.R. Deb; T. Imchen

    2010-01-01

    Micropropagation has been extensively used for the rapid multiplication of many plants species. However, its wider use is restricted often by the high percentage of plant loss or damaged when transferred to ex vitro condition. To acclimatize the micropropagated plants, different workers have employed different approach toward successful establishment of in vitro raised plants under ex vitro condition. In the present study, a successful attempt has been made to acclimatize the tissue culture r...

  17. Micropropagation of Woody Legume (Albizia lebbeck) Through Tissue Culture

    OpenAIRE

    A.N.K. Mamun; M.N. Matin; Bari, M. A.; N.A. Siddique; R.S. Sultana; M.H. Rahman; Musa, A.S.M.

    2004-01-01

    The woody legume, Albizia lebbeck, commonly cultivated for social forestry in rural area of Bangladesh was selected for micropropagation by tissue culture technique. Cotyledon, nodal segment of in vitro grown seedlings and nodal segments of field grown mature tree were used as explants. With proper manipulation of cytokinin and auxin combinations and concentrations, it was possible to induce callus from three types of explants of Albizia lebbeck. Different combinations of BA with NAA and KIN ...

  18. Impact of Tissue Culture Banana Technology on Farm Household Income and Food Security in Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Nassul S. Kabunga; Dubois, Thomas; Qaim, Matin

    2011-01-01

    While tissue culture (TC) technology for vegetative plant propagation is gradually gaining in importance in Africa, rigorous ex post assessments of welfare effects for smallholder farm households is lacking. Using recent survey data and accounting for self-selection in technology adoption, we analyze the impacts of TC banana technology on household income and food security in Kenya. To assess food security outcomes, we employ the Household Food Insecurity Access Scale (HFIAS) – a tool that ha...

  19. GENETIC VARIABILITY OF CULTURED PLANT TISSUES UNDER NORMAL CONDITIONS AND UNDER STRESS

    OpenAIRE

    Dolgikh Yu.I.; E.S. Osipova; A.I. Solov’eva; E. A. Lysenko; O.N. Vysotskaya

    2012-01-01

    The genetic variability induced by in vitro conditions known as somaclonal variation is of practical interest due to its potential uses in plant breeding but, on the other hand, if clonal propagation or transformation is main goal, it becomes an unwelcome phenomenon. Thus, it is important to know frequency, the genomic distribution, the mechanisms and factors influencing somaclonal variation. We studied variability of PCR-based DNA markers of cultured tissues and regenerated plants of maize a...

  20. [Penetration of polyene antibiotics into human embryonic kidney tissue cell cultures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko, L S; Sokolov, V N; Vaĭnshteĭn, V A; Diment, A V; Tereshin, I M

    1977-12-01

    Penetration of 14C-amphotericin AM-2 into the cells of the tissue culture of the human embryon kidneys was studied by means of light autoradiography after incubation with the antibiotic. Microscopic examination of the autographs of the cell slices revealed the presence of the radioactive label in the cytoplasm and nucleoplasm of the cells. The revealed intracellular localization of the label was evident of the antibiotic penetration into the cells. PMID:596858

  1. Characterization of human breast cancer tissues by infrared imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdonck, M; Denayer, A; Delvaux, B; Garaud, S; De Wind, R; Desmedt, C; Sotiriou, C; Willard-Gallo, K; Goormaghtigh, E

    2016-01-21

    Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy coupled to microscopy (IR imaging) has shown unique advantages in detecting morphological and molecular pathologic alterations in biological tissues. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of IR imaging as a diagnostic tool to identify characteristics of breast epithelial cells and the stroma. In this study a total of 19 breast tissue samples were obtained from 13 patients. For 6 of the patients, we also obtained Non-Adjacent Non-Tumor tissue samples. Infrared images were recorded on the main cell/tissue types identified in all breast tissue samples. Unsupervised Principal Component Analyses and supervised Partial Least Square Discriminant Analyses (PLS-DA) were used to discriminate spectra. Leave-one-out cross-validation was used to evaluate the performance of PLS-DA models. Our results show that IR imaging coupled with PLS-DA can efficiently identify the main cell types present in FFPE breast tissue sections, i.e. epithelial cells, lymphocytes, connective tissue, vascular tissue and erythrocytes. A second PLS-DA model could distinguish normal and tumor breast epithelial cells in the breast tissue sections. A patient-specific model reached particularly high sensitivity, specificity and MCC rates. Finally, we showed that the stroma located close or at distance from the tumor exhibits distinct spectral characteristics. In conclusion FTIR imaging combined with computational algorithms could be an accurate, rapid and objective tool to identify/quantify breast epithelial cells and differentiate tumor from normal breast tissue as well as normal from tumor-associated stroma, paving the way to the establishment of a potential complementary tool to ensure safe tumor margins. PMID:26535413

  2. Mechanical Stimulus Inhibits the Growth of a Bone Tissue Model Cultured In Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zong-ming Wan; Lu Liu; Jian-yu Li; Rui-xin Li; Yong Guo; Hao Li; Jian-ming Zhang; Xi-zheng Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To construct the cancellous bone explant model and a method of culturing these bone tissues in vitro, and to investigate the effect of mechanical load on growth of cancellous bone tissue in vitro. Methods Cancellous bone were extracted from rabbit femoral head and cut into 1-mm-thick and 8-mm-diameter slices under sterile conditions. HE staining and scanning electron microscopy were employed to identify the histomorphology of the model after being cultured with a new dynamic load and circulating perfusion bioreactor system for 0, 3, 5, and 7 days, respectively. We built a three-dimensional model using microCT and analyzed the loading effects using finite element analysis. The model was subjected to mechanical load of 1000, 2000, 3000, and 4000μεrespectively for 30 minutes per day. After 5 days of continuous stimuli, the activities of alkaline phosphatase (AKP) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) were detected. Apoptosis was analyzed by DNA ladder detection and caspase-3/8/9 activity detection. Results After being cultured for 3, 5, and 7 days, the bone explant model grew well. HE staining showed the apparent nucleus in cells at the each indicated time, and electron microscope revealed the living cells in the bone tissue. The activities of AKP and TRAP in the bone explant model under mechanical load of 3000 and 4000μεwere significantly lower than those in the unstressed bone tissues (all P Conclusions The cancellous bone explant model extracted from the rabbit femoral head could be alive at least for 7 days in the dynamic load and circulating perfusion bioreactor system, however, pathological mechanical load could affect the bone tissue growth by apoptosis in vitro. The differentiation of osteoblasts and osteoclasts might be inhibited after the model is stimulated by mechanical load of 3000 and 4000με.

  3. Chemical evaluation of strawberry plants produced by tissue culturing of gamma irradiated seedlings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    studies were conducted to evaluate the influence of gamma irradiation as a supplementary factor precedes tissue culture application on strawberry seedlings (c.v.Rosa Linda). the strawberry seedling were irradiated using 8 doses of co 60 gamma rays 50.75.100.125 ,150,250, 350 and 500 gray. tissue culture technique was applied on irradiated and unirradiated strawberry seedling. different characteristics of plantlets, plant and fruit of strawberry produced from the double treatment (irradiation followed by tissue culture) were studied as well as the early, total and exportable fruit yields. data indicated that, low radiation doses 50,75 and 100 gray increased all morphological and chemical characteristics of the plantlets, plant and fruit of strawberry, whereas radiation doses higher than 100 gray decreased them significantly. moreover 350 and gray were lethal doses. radiation dose 50 gray increased the survival percentage and the length of plantlets by 1.5% and 50% respectively more than the unirradiated treatment in all multiplication stages

  4. Cryopreservation, Culture, and Transplantation of Human Fetal Mesencephalic Tissue into Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, D. E.; Naftolin, F.; Collier, T. J.; Leranth, C.; Robbins, R. J.; Sladek, C. D.; Roth, R. H.; Sladek, J. R.

    1988-11-01

    Studies in animals suggest that fetal neural grafts might restore lost neurological function in Parkinson's disease. In monkeys, such grafts survive for many months and reverse signs of parkinsonism, without attendant graft rejection. The successful and reliable application of a similar transplantation procedure to human patients, however, will require neural tissue obtained from human fetal cadavers, with demonstrated cellular identity, viability, and biological safety. In this report, human fetal neural tissue was successfully grafted into the brains of monkeys. Neural tissue was collected from human fetal cadavers after 9 to 12 weeks of gestation and cryopreserved in liquid nitrogen. Viability after up to 2 months of storage was demonstrated by cell culture and by transplantation into monkeys. Cryopreservation and storage of human fetal neural tissue would allow formation of a tissue bank. The stored cells could then be specifically tested to assure their cellular identity, viability, and bacteriological and virological safety before clinical use. The capacity to collect and maintain viable human fetal neural tissue would also facilitate research efforts to understand the development and function of the human brain and provide opportunities to study neurological diseases.

  5. Biodynamic Doppler imaging of subcellular motion inside 3D living tissue culture and biopsies (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, David D.

    2016-03-01

    Biodynamic imaging is an emerging 3D optical imaging technology that probes up to 1 mm deep inside three-dimensional living tissue using short-coherence dynamic light scattering to measure the intracellular motions of cells inside their natural microenvironments. Biodynamic imaging is label-free and non-invasive. The information content of biodynamic imaging is captured through tissue dynamics spectroscopy that displays the changes in the Doppler signatures from intracellular constituents in response to applied compounds. The affected dynamic intracellular mechanisms include organelle transport, membrane undulations, cytoskeletal restructuring, strain at cellular adhesions, cytokinesis, mitosis, exo- and endo-cytosis among others. The development of 3D high-content assays such as biodynamic profiling can become a critical new tool for assessing efficacy of drugs and the suitability of specific types of tissue growth for drug discovery and development. The use of biodynamic profiling to predict clinical outcome of living biopsies to cancer therapeutics can be developed into a phenotypic companion diagnostic, as well as a new tool for therapy selection in personalized medicine. This invited talk will present an overview of the optical, physical and physiological processes involved in biodynamic imaging. Several different biodynamic imaging modalities include motility contrast imaging (MCI), tissue-dynamics spectroscopy (TDS) and tissue-dynamics imaging (TDI). A wide range of potential applications will be described that include process monitoring for 3D tissue culture, drug discovery and development, cancer therapy selection, embryo assessment for in-vitro fertilization and artificial reproductive technologies, among others.

  6. Reconstruction of auto-tissue-engineered lamellar cornea by dynamic culture for transplantation: a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zheng; Zhou, Qiang; Duan, Haoyun; Wang, Xiaoran; Xiao, Jianhui; Duan, Hucheng; Li, Naiyang; Li, Chaoyang; Wan, Pengxia; Liu, Ying; Song, Yiyue; Zhou, Chenjing; Huang, Zheqian; Wang, Zhichong

    2014-01-01

    To construct an auto-tissue-engineered lamellar cornea (ATELC) for transplantation, based on acellular porcine corneal stroma and autologous corneal limbal explants, a dynamic culture process, which composed of a submersion culture, a perfusion culture and a dynamic air-liquid interface culture, was performed using appropriate parameters. The results showed that the ATELC-Dynamic possessed histological structure and DNA content that were similar to native lamellar cornea (NLC, p>0.05). Compared to NLC, the protein contents of zonula occludens-1, desmocollin-2 and integrin β4 in ATELC-Dynamic reached 93%, 89% and 73%, respectively. The basal cells of ATELC-Dynamic showed a better differentiation phenotype (K3-, P63+, ABCG2+) compared with that of ATELC in static air-lift culture (ATELC-Static, K3+, P63-, ABCG2-). Accordingly, the cell-cloning efficiency of ATELC-Dynamic (9.72±3.5%) was significantly higher than that of ATELC-Static (2.13±1.46%, p0.05). Rabbit lamellar keratoplasty showed that the barrier function of ATELC-Dynamic was intact, and there were no signs of epithelial shedding or neovascularization. Furthermore, the ATELC-Dynamic group had similar optical properties and wound healing processes compared with the NLC group. Thus, the sequential dynamic culture process that was designed according to corneal physiological characteristics could successfully reconstruct an auto-lamellar cornea with favorable morphological characteristics and satisfactory physiological function. PMID:24705327

  7. Reconstruction of auto-tissue-engineered lamellar cornea by dynamic culture for transplantation: a rabbit model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Wu

    Full Text Available To construct an auto-tissue-engineered lamellar cornea (ATELC for transplantation, based on acellular porcine corneal stroma and autologous corneal limbal explants, a dynamic culture process, which composed of a submersion culture, a perfusion culture and a dynamic air-liquid interface culture, was performed using appropriate parameters. The results showed that the ATELC-Dynamic possessed histological structure and DNA content that were similar to native lamellar cornea (NLC, p>0.05. Compared to NLC, the protein contents of zonula occludens-1, desmocollin-2 and integrin β4 in ATELC-Dynamic reached 93%, 89% and 73%, respectively. The basal cells of ATELC-Dynamic showed a better differentiation phenotype (K3-, P63+, ABCG2+ compared with that of ATELC in static air-lift culture (ATELC-Static, K3+, P63-, ABCG2-. Accordingly, the cell-cloning efficiency of ATELC-Dynamic (9.72±3.5% was significantly higher than that of ATELC-Static (2.13±1.46%, p0.05. Rabbit lamellar keratoplasty showed that the barrier function of ATELC-Dynamic was intact, and there were no signs of epithelial shedding or neovascularization. Furthermore, the ATELC-Dynamic group had similar optical properties and wound healing processes compared with the NLC group. Thus, the sequential dynamic culture process that was designed according to corneal physiological characteristics could successfully reconstruct an auto-lamellar cornea with favorable morphological characteristics and satisfactory physiological function.

  8. Beta-cell function in isolated human pancreatic islets in long-term tissue culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    1981-01-01

    Human pancreatic islets were isolated by collagenase treatment of pancreatic tissue obtained from 27 individuals aged 12 to 69 years. The islets were maintained free floating in tissue culture medium RPMI 1640 supplemented with calf or human serum. In two cases the insulin production was followed...... adult human pancreatic tissue and that their beta-cell function can be maintained for up to two years. The variation in insulin production rate could not be ascribed to age or sex and may reflect both physiological and methodological factors....... up to nearly two years. The insulin production rate of the individual islet preparations varied between 0.2 and 8 ng per islet per day. No significant correlation with donor age or sex was found. The glucose concentration in the medium influenced the insulin release in a dose dependent manner. The...

  9. Fusarium growth on culture media made of tissue juice from irradiated and unirradiated potato tubers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusarium Sulphureum Schlecht is one of the tuber pathogens causing potato storage disease knowing as dry rot. Because irradiation can disturb the tissue defence mechanism against the pathogen, it was decided to carry out experiments on influence of the treatment on subsequent tuber tissue reaction to a maceration process. The maceration as a physical stress was a substitute for the pathogen activity. Tubers of two potato varieties were tested: Mila -a resistant variety to Fusarium and Atol - susceptible one. Tubers of both varieties were irradiated with a dose of 105 kGy. Unirradiated tubers were taken as a control. A day after irradiation the cortex tissue was macerated using an ordinary rasper and the resulted tissue pulp was strained through medical gauze to obtain crude juice. The juice was clarified by centrifugation and then added to dissolved PDA. The volume ratio of juice to PDA was 1:1. The prepared media were dispensed into Petri dishes. Small pieces of the Fusarium culture were put on the surface of the medium at the centre of each Petri dish. Subsequent growth of the fungus was assessed by measurement of culture diameters every 24 hours. Linear functions of the Fusarium growth were obtained for Mila control and Atol control. In the case of Mila, the Fusarium found more favourable conditions for its growth in the presence of juice from irradiated tubers than from the control ones. Making the same comparison for Atol, no difference was detected. (author)

  10. Free amino Acid contents of stem and phylloxera gall tissue cultures of grape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warick, R P; Hildebrandt, A C

    1966-04-01

    Free amino acid constituents were determined of grape stem and Phylloxera leaf gall callus in tissue culture. Fast, medium and slow growing single cell clones of, respectively, stem and gall origins were grown on a mineral salt-sucrose medium supplemented with coconut milk and alpha-naphthaleneacetic acid. Stem and gall clones showed qualitative similarities and quantitative variations in the amino acids and nitrogenous constituents. Nineteen amino acids, glucosamine, ethanolamine, sarcosine, methionine sulfoxides and ammonia were identified. Two free polypeptides accounted for over 30% of the amino compounds in the stem and gall callus tissues which were not found in the intact plant parts. Stem clones of different growth rates grown on agar showed generally an excess of amino acid constituents over gall tissues of similar growth rates, except for the free polypeptides. Fast growing stem clones grown on agar medium contained lower amounts of certain amino acids than the fast growing gall clones, but when grown in liquid medium they contained higher amounts of these acids than the gall clones. The total and nonsoluble nitrogen of stem clones were higher than in the gall clones. Tissue cultures differed from the original plant parts with respect to their free polypeptides and high amino acid contents. PMID:16656290

  11. Mutagenic potential of a 193-nm excimer laser on fibroblasts in tissue culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In response to concerns regarding possible DNA damage by far ultraviolet radiation during excimer laser corneal surgery, the mutagenic potential of an argon fluoride excimer laser (193 nm) on BALB/3T3 mouse fibroblasts grown in tissue culture was investigated. The cumulative incidence of anaplastic transformation after subablative radiant exposures from 3.5 mJ/cm2/pulse to 13.4 mJ/cm2/pulse was 3.6% of all cell cultures. The incidence of anaplastic transformation in nonirradiated controls was 4.2%. Transformation after exposure to x-ray radiation (60.9 rad) was 98.8%. The difference between the incidence of transformation of nonirradiated controls or excimer-treated cultures compared with x-ray radiation-treated cells was significant P less than 0.0001 (chi square test). In this standard cell line, 193-nm laser energy does not appear to have substantial mutagenic potential

  12. Astrocyte cultures derived from human brain tissue express angiotensinogen mRNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milsted, A.; Barna, B.P.; Ransohoff, R.M.; Brosnihan, K.B.; Ferrario, C.M. (Cleveland Clinic Foundation, OH (USA))

    1990-08-01

    The authors have identified human cultured cell lines that are useful for studying angiotensinogen gene expression and its regulation in the central nervous system. A model cell system of human central nervous system origin expressing angiotensinogen has not previously been available. Expression of angiotensinogen mRNA appears to be a basal property of noninduced human astrocytes, since astrocytic cell lines derived from human glioblastomas or nonneoplastic human brain tissue invariably produced angiotensinogen mRNA. In situ hybridization histochemistry revealed that angiotensinogen mRNA production was not limited to a subpopulation of astrocytes because >99% of cells in these cultures contained angiotensinogen mRNA. These cell lines will be useful in studies of the molecular mechanisms controlling angiotensin synthesis and the role of biologically active angiotensin in the human brain by allowing the authors to examine regulation of expression of the renin-angiotensin system in human astrocyte cultures.

  13. Micropropagation of Pear Rootstock (Pyrus Communis) by using tissue culture technique and gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New growing shoots from healthy pear rootstock (Pyrus communis) trees were taken and sterilized 3 times in dipping water. Explants were subjected to antioxidant treatment, different media, different additives and different BAP and NAA concentrations. The obtained results showed that Murashig-Skoog (MS) supplemented with 1 mg/l BA was better than Gamborg medium. Adding antioxidant solution and adenine sulphate to the culture medium was preferred for maximizing explants development. Exposing the explants to gamma irradiation at different doses decreased tissue culture parameters with increasing gamma doses. However, the low dose of gamma rays (1 Krad) significantly increased the number of shoots than other gamma treatments. Adding of BAP at 2 mg/l to the culture medium increased number and length of shoots. However, addition of 1 mg/l NAA to the rooting medium led to increase the root formation

  14. Astrocyte cultures derived from human brain tissue express angiotensinogen mRNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have identified human cultured cell lines that are useful for studying angiotensinogen gene expression and its regulation in the central nervous system. A model cell system of human central nervous system origin expressing angiotensinogen has not previously been available. Expression of angiotensinogen mRNA appears to be a basal property of noninduced human astrocytes, since astrocytic cell lines derived from human glioblastomas or nonneoplastic human brain tissue invariably produced angiotensinogen mRNA. In situ hybridization histochemistry revealed that angiotensinogen mRNA production was not limited to a subpopulation of astrocytes because >99% of cells in these cultures contained angiotensinogen mRNA. These cell lines will be useful in studies of the molecular mechanisms controlling angiotensin synthesis and the role of biologically active angiotensin in the human brain by allowing the authors to examine regulation of expression of the renin-angiotensin system in human astrocyte cultures

  15. The structure of tissue on cell culture-extracted thyroglobulin is independent of its iodine content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delain, E; Aouani, A; Vignal, A; Couture-Tosi, E; Hovsépian, S; Fayet, G

    1987-02-01

    The major protein synthesized in vitro by the ovine thyroid cell line OVNIS 6H is the prothyroid hormone thyroglobulin. Purified from serum-free cell culture media using sucrose gradient centrifugation, the thyroglobulin dimer was analysed for iodine content and observed by electron microscopy. In their usual medium, the OVNIS 6H cells produce a very poorly iodinated thyroglobulin containing 0.05 I atom per molecule. When cultured with methimazole or propylthiouracil, two inhibitors of iodide organification, less than 0.007 I atom/molecules was found. These molecules purified from cell cultures were compared to those purified from ovine thyroid tissue containing 26 I atoms/mol. Despite large differences in iodine content, the three preparations all consist of 19 S thyroglobulin dimers with the classical ovoidal shape. The variability in size measurements remains in a 2% range for all thyroglobulin types. Consequently, no real significant variation can be found between the highly iodinated thyroglobulin isolated from tissue, and the poorly or non-iodinated thyroglobulins isolated from cells cultured with or without methimazole or propylthiouracil. PMID:3556752

  16. Characterization of Sulfated Alginate Hybrid Gels for Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Aaen, Ragnhild

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering is a field aiming to replace damaged tissue while reducing the great need of organ donors the world is facing today. Alginates are linear co-polymers consisting of the two monosaccharides β-D-mannuronic acid (M), and its 5-epimer α-L-guluronic acid (G). They can form hydrogels, and are candidates for use in tissue engineering scaffolds. Alginate is readily available at a low cost, and its hydrogels meet requirements of scaffolds such as mechanical strength and good biocomp...

  17. Characterization of abalone Haliotis tuberculata-Vibrio harveyi interactions in gill primary cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichon, Delphine; Cudennec, Benoit; Huchette, Sylvain; Djediat, Chakib; Renault, Tristan; Paillard, Christine; Auzoux-Bordenave, Stéphanie

    2013-10-01

    The decline of European abalone Haliotis tuberculata populations has been associated with various pathogens including bacteria of the genus Vibrio. Following the summer mortality outbreaks reported in France between 1998 and 2000, Vibrio harveyi strains were isolated from moribund abalones, allowing in vivo and in vitro studies on the interactions between abalone H. tuberculata and V. harveyi. This work reports the development of primary cell cultures from abalone gill tissue, a target tissue for bacterial colonisation, and their use for in vitro study of host cell-V. harveyi interactions. Gill cells originated from four-day-old explant primary cultures were successfully sub-cultured in multi-well plates and maintained in vitro for up to 24 days. Cytological parameters, cell morphology and viability were monitored over time using flow cytometry analysis and semi-quantitative assay (XTT). Then, gill cell cultures were used to investigate in vitro the interactions with V. harveyi. The effects of two bacterial strains were evaluated on gill cells: a pathogenic bacterial strain ORM4 which is responsible for abalone mortalities and LMG7890 which is a non-pathogenic strain. Cellular responses of gill cells exposed to increasing concentrations of bacteria were evaluated by measuring mitochondrial activity (XTT assay) and phenoloxidase activity, an enzyme which is strongly involved in immune response. The ability of gill cells to phagocyte GFP-tagged V. harveyi was evaluated by flow cytometry and gill cells-V. harveyi interactions were characterized using fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. During phagocytosis process we evidenced that V. harveyi bacteria induced significant changes in gill cells metabolism and immune response. Together, the results showed that primary cell cultures from abalone gills are suitable for in vitro study of host-pathogen interactions, providing complementary assays to in vivo experiments. PMID:23756730

  18. Obtaining unique large kernel rice using chemical mutagenesis in tissue culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Lines with improved characters have been received by chemical mutagenesis in rice tissue culture. The japonica rice (Oryza sativa L.) varieties 'Krasnodarskii 424', 'Dubovskii 129', 'Slavyanetz', 'Liman', 'Lomello', 'VNIIR 2471' were used for mutation induction. Nnitrozo-N-methylurea (MNH) has been used as a mutagen. Two approaches were applied: 1. Development mutants by mutagenic treatment of seeds 2. Development regenerants from somatic tissue culture. In the first case, dry seeds with removed covering glumes have been treated with a solution of NMH (exposure 24 hours, tested concentrations 0.05%; 0.1%; 0.2%). After treatment seeds have been rinsed and planted into the soil in vessels. The effect of mutagen was very much genotype dependant. The highest frequency of mutants were observed in the following concentrations of MNH: for variety VNIIR 2471 - 0.05-0.1%, for variety Slavyanetz - 0.1%; for Lomello - 0.2%; for Linman - 0.05% and 0.2%. The mutant N 95, which has been selected from variety Liman after treatment with 0.2% concentration of mutagen, had the following improved characters: vegetation period 103 days (110 days for the parent variety); plant height 93.2 cm (98.2 cm - parent variety); length of the main panicle 17.2 cm; 1000 grain mass 44.9 g (39.2 g - parent variety). Mutant line N 101 selected from the same variety Liman after treatment with 0.05% concentration of mutagen mutated also in many characters: vegetation period 103 days; plant height 106 cm; 1000 grain mass was 47.0 g. In the second experiment, a somatic callus of the 2nd passage from varieties Kransnodarskii 424, Dubovskii 129, Slavyanetz, Liman were treated with the solution of mutagen NMH (concentration: 0.05%; 0.1%; 0.2% + 0.1% PABA by 40 minutes at Certomat shaking machine (100 rev./min). The treated callus has been cultivated at MS regeneration media (4 mg 2.4 D + 20 mg /l of sucrose) and MS intermediate media (non-hormonal + PABA) to obtain regenerants. Plant

  19. High resolution ultrasound characterization of soft tissue masses in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forty-two soft tissue masses in infants and children were examined with high resolution ultrasonography. Sonography was diagnostically specific in 17/42 (40%), useful but not diagnostic in 24/42 (58%), and misleading in 1/42 (2%) of soft tissue masses. Lesions with diagnostic sonographic features included cystic hygroma, fibromatosis colli, lymphadenopathy with abscess formation, and one case of osteomyelitis. (orig.)

  20. Characterization of thermoplastic polyurethane/polylactic acid (TPU/PLA) tissue engineering scaffolds fabricated by microcellular injection molding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polylactic acid (PLA) and thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) are two kinds of biocompatible and biodegradable polymers that can be used in biomedical applications. PLA has rigid mechanical properties while TPU possesses flexible mechanical properties. Blended TPU/PLA tissue engineering scaffolds at different ratios for tunable properties were fabricated via twin screw extrusion and microcellular injection molding techniques for the first time. Multiple test methods were used to characterize these materials. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) confirmed the existence of the two components in the blends; differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) confirmed the immiscibility between the TPU and PLA. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images verified that, at the composition ratios studied, PLA was dispersed as spheres or islands inside the TPU matrix and that this phase morphology further influenced the scaffold's microstructure and surface roughness. The blends exhibited a large range of mechanical properties that covered several human tissue requirements. 3T3 fibroblast cell culture showed that the scaffolds supported cell proliferation and migration properly. Most importantly, this study demonstrated the feasibility of mass producing biocompatible PLA/TPU scaffolds with tunable microstructures, surface roughnesses, and mechanical properties that have the potential to be used as artificial scaffolds in multiple tissue engineering applications. - Highlights: • Microcellular injection molding was used to fabricate tissue engineering scaffolds. • TPU/PLA tissue engineering scaffolds with tunable properties were fabricated. • Multiple test methods were used to characterize the scaffolds. • The biocompatibility of the scaffolds was confirmed by fibroblast cell culture. • Scaffolds produced have the potential to be used in multiple tissue applications

  1. Production of mutants by irradiation of in vitro-cultured tissues of coconut and banana and their mass propagation by the tissue culture technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regeneration of buds/shoots as well as plantlets was induced from banana shoot tip explants cultured in highly modified Murashige and Skoog's medium supplemented with coconut water and benzyladenine. Initially shoot regeneration was sparse, but on further subculture became profuse. Gamma irradiation at low dosage (1.0 kR) was stimulating to explant growth and bud formation with the two types of explants used. With Bungulan stimulation was observed even at 2.5 kR. Several morphological aberrations were exhibited by shoots of 'irradiated' in vitro plants growing in potted soil. A highly and continuously proliferating tissue strain has been isolated from a subculture which was ultimately derived from an irradiated explant. Its continued proliferation is dependent on an external supply of coconut water and benzyladenine. In vitro-produced plants have been established under field conditions. The 'irradiated' plants are comparable with, and some seem to be better than, the unirradiated controls with respect to height, girth, sucker production and number of hands and fingers per bunch. Higher doses of irradiation are required to produce an adverse effect on growth of coconut embryos during the liquid culture than when growing in solid medium. (author)

  2. Bordetella avium antibiotic resistance, novel enrichment culture, and antigenic characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Nathan M; Thompson, Seth; Mutnick, Rachel; Brown, Lisa; Kettig, Gina; Puffenbarger, Robyn; Stockwell, Stephanie B; Miyamoto, David; Temple, Louise

    2012-11-01

    Bordetella avium continues to be an economic issue in the turkey industry as the causative agent of bordetellosis, which often leads to serious secondary infections. This study presents a broad characterization of the antibiotic resistance patterns in this diverse collection of B. avium strains collected over the past thirty years. In addition, the plasmid basis for the antibiotic resistance was characterized. The antibiotic resistance pattern allowed the development of a novel enrichment culture method that was subsequently employed to gather new isolates from diseased turkeys and a healthy sawhet owl. While a healthy turkey flock was shown to seroconvert by four weeks-of-age, attempts to culture B. avium from healthy turkey poults were unsuccessful. Western blot of B. avium strains using pooled serum from diseased and healthy commercial turkey flocks revealed both antigenic similarities and differences between strains. In sum, the work documents the continued exposure of commercial turkey flocks to B. avium and the need for development of an effective, inexpensive vaccine to control spread of the disease. PMID:22721730

  3. Synthesis and characterization of a novel chitosan/montmorillonite/hydroxyapatite nanocomposite for bone tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, biopolymer-based nanocomposites have been replacing synthetic polymer composites for various biomedical applications. This is often because of the biocompatible and biodegradable behavior of natural polymers. Several studies have been reported pertaining to the synthesis and characterization of chitosan(chi)/montmorillonite(MMT) and chitosan (chi)/hydroxyapatite (HAP) for tissue engineering applications. In the present work, a biopolymer-based novel nanocomposite chitosan/montmorillonite (MMT)/hydroxyapatite (HAP) was developed for biomedical applications. The composite was prepared from chitosan, unmodified MMT and HAP precipitate in aqueous media. The properties of the composites were investigated using x-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Nanomechanical properties were measured using nanoindentation. Cell culture experiments were also conducted in order to ascertain the biocompatibility of the composite. The XRD results indicate that an intercalated structure was formed with an increase in d-spacing of montmorillonite. FTIR studies provide the evidence of molecular interaction among the three different constituents of the composite. AFM images show well-distributed nanoparticles in the chitosan matrix. The composites also exhibit a significant enhancement in nanomechanical property as compared to pure chitosan as well as the chi/HAP and chi/MMT composites. The TGA results indicate that an intercalated nanocomposite was formed with improved thermal properties even compared to chi/MMT composites. The results of cell culture experiments show that the composite is biocompatible and has a better cell proliferation rate compared to chi/HAP composites. This work represents the design of a novel clay-chitosan-hydroxyapatite composite with improved mechanical properties that has potential applications in bone tissue engineering

  4. Repair of segmental bone defect using Totally Vitalized tissue engineered bone graft by a combined perfusion seeding and culture system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The basic strategy to construct tissue engineered bone graft (TEBG is to combine osteoblastic cells with three dimensional (3D scaffold. Based on this strategy, we proposed the "Totally Vitalized TEBG" (TV-TEBG which was characterized by abundant and homogenously distributed cells with enhanced cell proliferation and differentiation and further investigated its biological performance in repairing segmental bone defect. METHODS: In this study, we constructed the TV-TEBG with the combination of customized flow perfusion seeding/culture system and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP scaffold fabricated by Rapid Prototyping (RP technique. We systemically compared three kinds of TEBG constructed by perfusion seeding and perfusion culture (PSPC method, static seeding and perfusion culture (SSPC method, and static seeding and static culture (SSSC method for their in vitro performance and bone defect healing efficacy with a rabbit model. RESULTS: Our study has demonstrated that TEBG constructed by PSPC method exhibited better biological properties with higher daily D-glucose consumption, increased cell proliferation and differentiation, and better cell distribution, indicating the successful construction of TV-TEBG. After implanted into rabbit radius defects for 12 weeks, PSPC group exerted higher X-ray score close to autograft, much greater mechanical property evidenced by the biomechanical testing and significantly higher new bone formation as shown by histological analysis compared with the other two groups, and eventually obtained favorable healing efficacy of the segmental bone defect that was the closest to autograft transplantation. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated the feasibility of TV-TEBG construction with combination of perfusion seeding, perfusion culture and RP technique which exerted excellent biological properties. The application of TV-TEBG may become a preferred candidate for segmental bone defect repair in orthopedic and

  5. Study of the agroindustrial alterations induced by the irradiated tissue culture in sugar cane, variety NA 56-79

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of plant tissue culture and the application of gamma radiation as mutation inducing agents, in the sugar cane plant, variety NA 5679, are studied. The variation in the contents of brix, pol, fiber, purity, extraction, phosphorus, nitrogen, reducing sugars as well as the morphological characteristics are analysed. The 'callus' obtained by the tissue culture were irradiated with 20, 40, and 60 Gy doses. The statistical analysis indicated that the method of tissue culture may, eventually, increase the contents of the technological parameters and the dosages of gamma radiation were not efficient for such purpose. (M.A.C.)

  6. Leaf and root volatiles produced by tissue cultures of Alpinia zerumbet (pers. Burtt & Smith under the influence of different plant growth regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Pimentel Victório

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Volatiles produced by plantlets of Alpinia zerumbet were obtained by means of simultaneous distillation-extraction (SDE. The effects of indole-3-acetic acid, kinetin, thidiazuron and 6-benzylaminopurine on leaf and root volatile composition obtained by tissue cultures were investigated. A higher content of b-pinene and a lower content of sabinene were observed in leaf volatile of plantlets cultured in control, IAA and IAA+ TDZ media, as compared with those of donor plants. In vitro conditions were favorable to increase caryophyllene content. Volatile compounds from the root were characterized mainly by camphene, fenchyl-acetate and bornyl acetate; which constitute about 60% of total volatile.

  7. Characterization of chondrocyte sheets prepared using a co-culture method with temperature-responsive culture inserts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokubo, Mami; Sato, Masato; Yamato, Masayuki; Mitani, Genya; Kutsuna, Toshiharu; Ebihara, Goro; Okano, Teruo; Mochida, Joji

    2016-06-01

    Conventional culture methods using temperature-responsive culture dishes require 4-5 weeks to prepare layered chondrocyte sheets that can be used in articular cartilage repair and regeneration. This study investigated whether the use of synovial tissue obtained from the same joint as the chondrocyte nutritive supply source could more quickly facilitate the preparation of chondrocyte sheets. After culturing derived synoviocytes and chondrocytes together (i.e. combined culture or co-culture) on temperature-responsive inserts, chondrocyte growth was assessed and a molecular analysis of the chondrocyte sheets was performed. Transplantable tissue could be obtained more quickly using this method (average 10.5 days). Real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunostaining of the three-layer chondrocyte sheets confirmed the significant expression of genes critical to cartilage maintenance, including type II collagen (COL2), aggrecan-1 and tissue metallopeptidase inhibitor 1. However, the expression of COL1, matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP3), MMP13 and A-disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs 5 was suppressed. The adhesive factor fibronectin-1 (FN1) was observed in all sheet layers, whereas in sheets generated using conventional preparation methods positive FN1 immunostaining was observed only on the surface of the sheets. The results indicate that synoviocyte co-cultures provide an optimal environment for the preparation of chondrocyte sheets for tissue transplantation and are particularly beneficial for shortening the required culture period. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23868865

  8. Characterization of culturable bacteria isolated from the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galkiewicz, Julia P; Pratte, Zoe A; Gray, Michael A; Kellogg, Christina A

    2011-08-01

    Microorganisms associated with corals are hypothesized to contribute to the function of the host animal by cycling nutrients, breaking down carbon sources, fixing nitrogen, and producing antibiotics. This is the first study to culture and characterize bacteria from Lophelia pertusa, a cold-water coral found in the deep sea, in an effort to understand the roles that the microorganisms play in the coral microbial community. Two sites in the northern Gulf of Mexico were sampled over 2 years. Bacteria were cultured from coral tissue, skeleton, and mucus, identified by 16S rRNA genes, and subjected to biochemical testing. Most isolates were members of the Gammaproteobacteria, although there was one isolate each from the Betaproteobacteria and Actinobacteria. Phylogenetic results showed that both sampling sites shared closely related isolates (e.g. Pseudoalteromonas spp.), indicating possible temporally and geographically stable bacterial-coral associations. The Kirby-Bauer antibiotic susceptibility test was used to separate bacteria to the strain level, with the results showing that isolates that were phylogenetically tightly grouped had varying responses to antibiotics. These results support the conclusion that phylogenetic placement cannot predict strain-level differences and further highlight the need for culture-based experiments to supplement culture-independent studies. PMID:21507025

  9. Characterization of culturable bacteria isolated from the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galkiewicz, Julia P.; Pratte, Zoe A.; Gray, Michael A.; Kellogg, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    Microorganisms associated with corals are hypothesized to contribute to the function of the host animal by cycling nutrients, breaking down carbon sources, fixing nitrogen, and producing antibiotics. This is the first study to culture and characterize bacteria from Lophelia pertusa, a cold-water coral found in the deep sea, in an effort to understand the roles that the microorganisms play in the coral microbial community. Two sites in the northern Gulf of Mexico were sampled over 2 years. Bacteria were cultured from coral tissue, skeleton, and mucus, identified by 16S rRNA genes, and subjected to biochemical testing. Most isolates were members of the Gammaproteobacteria, although there was one isolate each from the Betaproteobacteria and Actinobacteria. Phylogenetic results showed that both sampling sites shared closely related isolates (e.g. Pseudoalteromonas spp.), indicating possible temporally and geographically stable bacterial-coral associations. The Kirby-Bauer antibiotic susceptibility test was used to separate bacteria to the strain level, with the results showing that isolates that were phylogenetically tightly grouped had varying responses to antibiotics. These results support the conclusion that phylogenetic placement cannot predict strain-level differences and further highlight the need for culture-based experiments to supplement culture-independent studies.

  10. Prolonged survival of virulent Treponema pallidum (Nichols strain) in cell-free and tissue culture systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieldsteel, A H; Becker, F A; Stout, J G

    1977-10-01

    Survival of Treponema pallidum was found to be prolonged in the presence of tissue culture. Of the 12 cultures studied, cottontail rabbit epithelium (Sf1Ep) supported T. pallidum for the longest time. In horizontal Leighton tubes with reduced medium and an atmosphere of 5% CO2 in N2, the 50% survival time (ST50) was 5 to 6 days for treponemes associated with monolayers of Sf1Ep cells. Comparable cell-free tubes had ST50 values of less than 4 days. In vertical Leighton tubes containing 6 ml of prereduced medium incubated aerobically, gradients of O2 tension and redox potential were established. Attachment and survival of T. pallidum were greatest at a depth of about 10 to 20 mm. Motility was between 70 and 95% in this area throughout the first 14 days of incubation. Occasionally, greater than 50% motility was observed for as long as 21 days. The redox potential and O2 tension in the optimal area of gradient cultures were reproduced by adjusting the medium depth in a shell vial culture system containing cells on a horizontal cover slip. Treponemes associated with the cell monolayer in both gradient and shell vial cultures were still virulent after 21 days in vitro. The dilution of testis extract and the concentration of T. pallidum were found to be important factors in survival of T. pallidum. PMID:332639

  11. Changes in adipose tissue stromal-vascular cells in primary culture due to porcine sera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was conducted to determine the response of rat stromal-vascular cells to pig sea. Sera were collected from unselected contemporary (lean) and high backfat thickness selected (obese) pigs. Sera from obese pigs were collected either by exsanguination or cannulation. sera from lean pigs during the growing phase (45 kg) and the fattening phase (100-110 kg) were collected. Stromal-vascular cells derived rom rat inguinal tissue were cultured on either 25 cm2 flasks, collagen-coated coverslips or petri dishes. Cell proliferation was measured by [3H]-thymidine incorporation during the fourth day of culture. Coverslip cultures were used for histochemical analysis. Petri dish cultures were used for analysis of Sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) activity. All cells were plated for 24 hours in media containing 10 fetal bovine sera. Test media contained 2.5, 5.0, 10.0% sera. Sera from obese pigs increased GPDH activity and fat cell production when compared to the lean controls. The increased concentration of sera increased esterase activity and lipid as measured with oil red O. The sera from obese pigs collected at slaughter stimulated more fat cell production than obese sera collected by cannulation. These studies show there are adipogenic factors in obese pigs sera which promote fat cell development in primary cell culture

  12. Three-dimensional characterization of tissue-engineered constructs by contrast-enhanced nanofocus computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papantoniou, Ioannis; Sonnaert, Maarten; Geris, Liesbet; Luyten, Frank P; Schrooten, Jan; Kerckhofs, Greet

    2014-03-01

    To successfully implement tissue-engineered (TE) constructs as part of a clinical therapy, it is necessary to develop quality control tools that will ensure accurate and consistent TE construct release specifications. Hence, advanced methods to monitor TE construct properties need to be further developed. In this study, we showed proof of concept for contrast-enhanced nanofocus computed tomography (CE-nano-CT) as a whole-construct imaging technique with a noninvasive potential that enables three-dimensional (3D) visualization and quantification of in vitro engineered extracellular matrix (ECM) in TE constructs. In particular, we performed a 3D qualitative and quantitative structural and spatial assessment of the in vitro engineered ECM, formed during static and perfusion bioreactor cell culture in 3D TE scaffolds, using two contrast agents, namely, Hexabrix® and phosphotungstic acid (PTA). To evaluate the potential of CE-nano-CT, a comparison was made to standardly used techniques such as Live/Dead viability/cytotoxicity, Picrosirius Red staining, and to net dry weight measurements of the TE constructs. When using Hexabrix as the contrast agent, the ECM volume fitted linearly with the net dry ECM weight independent from the flow rate used, thus suggesting that it stains most of the ECM. When using PTA as the contrast agent, comparing to net weight measurements showed that PTA only stains a part of the ECM. This was attributed to the binding specificity of this contrast agent. In addition, the PTA-stained CE-nano-CT data showed pronounced distinction between flow conditions when compared to Hexabrix, indicating culture-specific structural ECM differences. This novel type of information can contribute to optimize bioreactor culture conditions and potentially critical quality characteristics of TE constructs such as ECM quantity and homogeneity, facilitating the gradual transformation of TE constructs in well-characterized TE products. PMID:23800097

  13. Electrical impedance characterization of normal and cancerous human hepatic tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The four-electrode method was used to measure the ex vivo complex electrical impedance of tissues from 14 hepatic tumors and the surrounding normal liver from six patients. Measurements were done in the frequency range 1–400 kHz. It was found that the conductivity of the tumor tissue was much higher than that of the normal liver tissue in this frequency range (from 0.14 ± 0.06 S m−1 versus 0.03 ± 0.01 S m−1 at 1 kHz to 0.25 ± 0.06 S m−1 versus 0.15 ± 0.03 S m−1 at 400 kHz). The Cole–Cole models were estimated from the experimental data and the four parameters (ρ0, ρ∞, α, fc) were obtained using a least-squares fit algorithm. The Cole–Cole parameters for the cancerous and normal liver are 9 ± 4 Ω m−1, 2.2 ± 0.7 Ω m−1, 0.5 ± 0.2, 140 ± 103 kHz and 50 ± 28 Ω m−1, 3.2 ± 0.6 Ω m−1, 0.64 ± 0.04, 10 ± 7 kHz, respectively. These data can contribute to developing bioelectric applications for tissue diagnostics and in tissue treatment planning with electrical fields such as radiofrequency tissue ablation, electrochemotherapy and gene therapy with reversible electroporation, nanoscale pulsing and irreversible electroporation

  14. Enhancing plant regeneration in tissue culture: a molecular approach through manipulation of cytokinin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Kristine; Schaller, G Eric

    2013-10-01

    Micropropagation is used for commercial purposes worldwide, but the capacity to undergo somatic organogenesis and plant regeneration varies greatly among species. The plant hormones auxin and cytokinin are critical for plant regeneration in tissue culture, with cytokinin playing an instrumental role in shoot organogenesis. Type-B response regulators govern the transcriptional output in response to cytokinin and are required for plant regeneration. In our paper published in Plant Physiology, we explored the functional redundancy among the 11 type-B Arabidopsis response regulators (ARRs). Interestingly, we discovered that the enhanced expression of one family member, ARR10, induced hypersensitivity to cytokinin in multiple assays, including callus greening and shoot induction of explants. Here we 1) discuss the hormone dependence for in vitro plant regeneration, 2) how manipulation of the cytokinin response has been used to enhance plant regeneration, and 3) the potential of the ARR10 transgene as a tool to increase the regeneration capacity of agriculturally important crop plants. The efficacy of ARR10 for enhancing plant regeneration likely arises from its ability to transcriptionally regulate key cytokinin responsive genes combined with an enhanced protein stability of ARR10 compared with other type-B ARRs. By increasing the capacity of key tissues and cell types to respond to cytokinin, ARR10, or other type-B response regulators with similar properties, could be used as a tool to combat the recalcitrance of some crop species to tissue culture techniques. PMID:23887495

  15. In vitro differentiation of rat spermatogonia into round spermatids in tissue culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reda, A.; Hou, M.; Winton, T.R.; Chapin, R.E.; Söder, O.; Stukenborg, J.-B.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Do the organ culture conditions, previously defined for in vitro murine male germ cell differentiation, also result in differentiation of rat spermatogonia into post-meiotic germ cells exhibiting specific markers for haploid germ cells? SUMMARY ANSWER We demonstrated the differentiation of rat spermatogonia into post-meiotic cells in vitro, with emphasis on exhibiting, protein markers described for round spermatids. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Full spermatogenesis in vitro from immature germ cells using an organ culture technique in mice was first reported 5 years ago. However, no studies reporting the differentiation of rat spermatogonia into post-meiotic germ cells exhibiting the characteristic protein expression profile or into functional sperm have been reported. STUDY DESIGN, SAMPLES/MATERIALS, METHODS Organ culture of testicular fragments of 5 days postpartum (dpp) neonatal rats was performed for up to 52 days. Evaluation of microscopic morphology, testosterone levels, mRNA and protein expression as measured by RT-qPCR and immunostaining were conducted to monitor germ cell differentiation in vitro. Potential effects of melatonin, Glutamax® medium, retinoic acid and the presence of epidydimal fat tissue on the spermatogenic process were evaluated. A minimum of three biological replicates were performed for all experiments presented in this study. One-way ANOVA, ANOVA on ranks and student's t-test were applied to perform the statistical analysis. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE Male germ cells, present in testicular tissue pieces grown from 5 dpp rats, exhibited positive protein expression for Acrosin and Crem (cAMP (cyclic adenosine mono phosphate) response element modulator) after 52 days of culture in vitro. Intra-testicular testosterone production could be observed after 3 days of culture, while when epididymal fat tissue was added, spontaneous contractility of cultured seminiferous tubules could be observed after 21 days. However, no

  16. Role of tissue harmonic imaging in characterization of cystic renallesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective was to determine the utility of tissue harmonic imaging inevaluating cystic renal lesions and to compare these findings withconventional ultrasound guidance (USG) and CT. Thirty patients, detected withcystic renal lesions on routine USG (over a period of 18 months from July2004 to December 2005) at the Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education andResearch Chandigarh, Chandigarh, India) were included in this study. Allpatients underwent a conventional gray scale ultrasound study (GSI), followedby tissue harmonic imaging (THI) sonography on the same machine (advancetechnology limited high definition imaging 5000). Computed tomography ofabdomen was carried out within one week of the ultrasound examinations. Allimages were evaluated for size, number and location of lesions. The findingsof THI sonography, conventional USG and CT of abdomen were recorded in theirrespective proformas. The images obtained by GSI, THI and contrast enhancedCT were also evaluated for image, quality, lesion conspicuity and fluid-soliddifferentiation. Tissue harmonic imaging showed better image quality in 27 of34 lesions, improvement in lesion conspicuity was found in 27 of 34 cysticlesions and an improved solid-fluid differentiation in 30 of 34 lesions whencompared to GSI. The THI provided additional information as compared to GSIin 8 patients. The grading of CT scan was significantly higher in overallimage quality (p=0.007) and lesion conspicuity (p=0.004), but wasnon-significant for fluid-solid differentiation (p=0.23). Tissue harmonicimaging provides better image quality, lesion delineation and superiorcharacterization than conventional gray scale sonography. (author)

  17. Tissue culture and generation of autotetraploid plants of Sophora flavescens Aiton

    OpenAIRE

    Kun-Hua, Wei; Shan-Lin, Gao; He-Ping, Huang

    2010-01-01

    Background: Sophora flavescens Aiton is an important medicinal plant in China. Early in vitro researches of S. flavescens were focused on callus induction and cell suspension culture, only a few were concerned with in vitro multiplication. Objective: To establish and optimize the rapid propagation technology of S. flavescens and to generate and characterize polyploid plants of S. flavescens. Materials and Methods: The different concentrations of 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP), indole-3-acetic acid (IA...

  18. Diagnostic utility of melanin production by fungi: Study on tissue sections and culture smears with Masson-Fontana stain

    OpenAIRE

    Challa Sundaram; G Uppin Shantveer; Pamidi Umabala; Vemu Lakshmi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dematiaceous fungi appear brown in tissue section due to melanin in their cell walls. When the brown color is not seen on routine H and E and culture is not available, differentiation of dematiaceous fungi from other fungi is difficult on morphology alone. Aims and Objective: To study if melanin production by dematiaceous fungi can help differentiate them from other types of fungi. Materials and Methods: Fifty tissue sections of various fungal infections and 13 smears from culture...

  19. Response of tobacco tissue cultures growing in contact with lunar fines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weete, J. D.; Walkinshaw, C. H.; Laseter, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    During the quarantine periods following each Apollo mission to the moon, various biological systems were placed in the presence of lunar material to determine if pathogenic agents were present. Although no detrimental effects resulted, various responses by the several plant systems tested were noted. One such response was the increased pigmentation observed in the callus tissue cultures of tobacco. Further investigations revealed that these tissues grown in the presence of lunar material resulted in as much as a 35% increase in total pigments while differences in fatty acid and sterol concentrations were also noted when compared to the controls. It is believed that these changes brought about by the lunar material can be attributed to a change in the nutritional environment caused by its dissolution.

  20. Study on rapid propagation of Zanhuang Chinese jujube by tissue culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanhuang jujube is a very precious and rare variety of Chinese jujube. Its development was restricted by the under-developed propagate technique in history. The rapid propagation by tissue culture was studied and the optimum media were screened out. Through studying the condition of initial, proliferating, acclimatizing and rooting culture, 4 media, MS +6-BA 0.5 mg/L+IBA 0.1 mg/L, MS+6-BA 1.5 mg/L+IBA 0.1-0.2 mg/L, MS+KT 0.5 mg/L+NAA 0.2 mg/L and 1/2 MS+IBA 0.6 mg/L+NAA 0.2-0.3 mg/L were selected respectively

  1. Increased adsorption of histidine-tagged proteins onto tissue culture polystyrene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Maria; Hansen, Thomas Steen; Lind, Johan Ulrik;

    2012-01-01

    In this study we compare histidine-tagged and native proteins with regards to adsorption properties. We observe significantly increased adsorption of proteins with an incorporated polyhistidine amino acid motif (HIS-tag) onto tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) compared to similar proteins without...... and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), as well as adsorption performed at different pH and ionic strength indicates that the high adsorption is caused by electrostatic interaction between negatively charged carboxylate groups on the TCPS surface and positively charged histidine residues in the proteins. Pre......-adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) does not decrease the adsorption of HIS-tagged proteins onto TCPS. Our findings identify a potential problem in using HIS-tagged signalling molecule in assays with cells cultured on TCPS, since the concentration of the molecule in solution might be affected and this could...

  2. Method for Producing Non-Neoplastic, Three Dimensional, Mammalian Tissue and Cell Aggregates Under Microgravity Culture Conditions and the Products Produced Therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Wolf, David A. (Inventor); Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor); Prewett, Tracey L. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Normal mammalian tissue and the culturing process has been developed for the three groups of organ, structural, and blood tissue. The cells are grown in vitro under microgravity culture conditions and form three dimensional cells aggregates with normal cell function. The microgravity culture conditions may be microgravity or simulated microgravity created in a horizontal rotating wall culture vessel.

  3. IN VITRO INOCULATION OF ASPARAGUS OFFICINALIS TISSUE CULTURE SHOOTS WITH FUSARIUM PROLIFERA TUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.K.MoHD OMAR

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificially inoculated asparagus tissue culture plantlets with a virulent fungus, Fusarium proliferatum showed signs of infection as early as 4 days after inoculat ion. Macroscopic observations revealed presence of early symptoms such as necrotic lesions at the affected area and light microscopic examinations clearly revealed the post-penetration events that took place including the destruction of surrounding cells. However, little is known of the hyphal activity or advancement on the host's surface at the initial stage after inoculation. Scanning electron microscopic examination clearly revealed the hyphal advancement on the surface and the mode of entrance into the host tissues beneath. Four days after inoculation, the fungi proceeded to spread out from the inoculation point onto the host surface which eventually developed into a sparse network of both aerial and non-aerial hyphae. Non-aerial hyphae form a network of mycelium that adheres to the surface and it's movement appeared to be oriented towards the stomata. Hyphal penetration occurs more often through the stomata, natural openings or wounds. In some cases, the hyphae crossed over the stomatal opening w ithout entering the host tissues. At places where the cuticle layer is absent or not well developed the hyphae successfully grew in between the epidermal cells into the tissues beneath.

  4. Uptake and Intracellular Activity of Moxifloxacin in Human Neutrophils and Tissue-Cultured Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Pascual, Alvaro; García, Isabel; Ballesta, Sofía; Perea, Evelio J.

    1999-01-01

    The penetration by moxifloxacin of human neutrophils (polymorphonuclear leukocytes [PMN]) and tissue-cultured epithelial cells (McCoy cells) was evaluated by a fluorometric assay. At extracellular concentrations of 5 mg/liter, the cellular-to-extracellular concentration ratios (C/E) of moxifloxacin in PMN and McCoy cells were 10.9 ± 1.0 and 8.7 ± 1.0, respectively (20 min; 37°C). The uptake of moxifloxacin by PMN was rapid, reversible, nonsaturable (at extracellular concentrations ranging fro...

  5. A method for testing the growth-promoting property of tissue culture media using radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new rapid and reliable method for testing the growth-promoting capacity of tissue culture media using radionuclides is described. The method is based on measuring the incorporation of 3H-thymidine or 3H-uridine into human diploid embryonic lung cells (LEP 19) during cultivation in standard Earle-Parker-LAH (EPL) medium or nutritionally deficient EPL media. The results obtained proved the possibility of using this method for testing the growth activity of media with differing degrees of nutritional deficiency. (U.K.)

  6. PLANT TISSUE CULTURE IN BIOTECHNOLOGY: RECENT ADVANCES IN TRANSFORMATION THROUGH SOMATIC EMBRYOGENESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Sidorov

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Plant genetic transformation has become an important biotechnology tool for the improvement of many crops. A solid foundation for the fast development and implementation of biotechnology in agriculture was provided by achievements in plant tissue culture. On the 30th anniversary of plant transformation, I report the advancements, recent challenges and shifts in methodology of transformation. The main focus of this paper will be on conventional and novel approaches for genetic improvements of soybean, cotton and corn. I will also highlight results on the transformation of these crops that have considerably been improved by modern biotechnology.

  7. Improvement of potato tolerance to salinity using tissue culture techniques and irradiation with in vitro selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mutation breeding program was conducted to improve potato (Solanum tuberosum) tolerance to salinity. In vitro cultured explants from potato cvs. Draga, Diamant, Spunta were irradiated with gamma doses 25, 30, and 35 Gy.Growing shoots were cut and re-cultured every 2 weeks until the 4th generation (MV4) to make sure no chimeral tissues still existed in the mutant material. Plantlets were subsequently propagated to obtain enough explants for in vitro selection pressure. Around 3000 plantlets from the three cultivars were subjected to selection pressure. MV4 explants were cultured on MS medium supplemented with the NaCl in varying concentrations ranging between 50 to 200 mM. Surviving plantlets were propagated and re-cultured on a similar medium to insure their tolerance to salinity. Tolerant plantlets were acclimatized and transferred to pots and grown under glasshouse conditions. Plants were later subjected to another selection pressure, by irrigating them using water containing NaCl in concentrations ranging between 50-250 mM in addition to controls irrigated with normal water. Cultivar Spunta produced the highest number of tolerant plants. Four plants of Spunta appeared to be tolerant to salinity whereas only one plant from Diamant and was tolerant and no plants from cultivar Draga were tolerant. Mutant plants varied in number of produced minitubers from 8 - 14. Also, weight of these minitubers varied from less than 1 to 31 grams. (author)

  8. Improving tolerance to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis in melon using tissue culture and mutation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusarium wilt is a vascular disease of the Cucurbitaceae family, especially in muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.), caused by the soil fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis (FOM). This pathogen persists in the soil for extended periods of time, and the only effective control is the use of resistant cultivars. During the last three decades, tissue culture techniques have been utilised in crop improvement to generate changes in the genetic material of plants via in vitro somaclonal variations (by organogenesis or somatic embryogenesis) and induced mutagenesis. More recently, researchers have been using in vitro techniques to investigate the effects of fungal culture filtrates or toxins on susceptible and resistant genotypes of different plant species or cultivars to assess disease resistance. This method is effectively used for cucumber and melon. There are various in vitro culture techniques that can be used for cucumber (Malepszy, 1988). In this chapter, we show a method for mass-selection of melon mutants resistant to Fusarium wilt. In vitro selection of resistant cells, from both irradiated and non- irradiated explants, is performed using culture filtrates of different FOM races. This research could lead to the development of new melon cultivars resistant to Fusarium wilt. (author)

  9. Tissue specific metal characterization of selected fish species in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mukhtiar; Ahmad, Taufiq; Liaquat, Muhammad; Abbasi, Kashif Sarfraz; Farid, Ibrahim Bayoumi Abdel; Jahangir, Muhammad

    2016-04-01

    Concentration of various metals, i.e., zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), nickel (Ni), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), chromium (Cr), and silver (Ag), was evaluated in five indigenous fish species (namely, silver carp, common carp, mahseer, thela fish, and rainbow trout), by using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. It is proved from this study that, overall, mahseer and rainbow trout had high amount of zinc, whereas thela fish and silver carp had high concentration of copper, chromium, silver, nickel, and lead, while common carp had highest amount of iron contents. Furthermore, a tissue-specific discrimination among various fish species was observed, where higher metal concentrations were noticed in fish liver, with decreasing concentration in other organs like skin, gills, and finally the least contents in fish muscle. Multivariate data analysis showed not only a variation in heavy metals among the tissues but also discrimination among the selected fish species. PMID:26951449

  10. Visual Analytics for the Exploration of Tumor Tissue Characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raidou, R. G.; Van Der Heide, U. A.; Dinh, C. V.;

    2015-01-01

    imaging data, to derive per voxel a number of features, indicative of tissue properties. However, the high dimensionality and complexity of this imaging-derived feature space is prohibiting for easy exploration and analysis - especially when clinical researchers require to associate observations from......, from which it is difficult to obtain the required insight. We propose a visual tool for: (1) easy exploration and visual analysis of the feature space of imaging-derived tissue characteristics and (2) knowledge discovery and hypothesis generation and confirmation, with respect to reference data used...... in clinical research. We employ, as central view, a 2D embedding of the imaging-derived features. Multiple linked interactive views provide functionality for the exploration and analysis of the local structure of the feature space, enabling linking to patient anatomy and clinical reference data. We performed...

  11. Modern concepts for basic radiobiological factors characterizing tumor tissue radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traditionally radiotherapy is prescribed at doses consistent with the expected therapeutic response and tolerance of tumor and normal tissues without consideration to individual differences in radiosensitivity. However, the basic radiobiological knowledge and clinical experience along this line point to significant variations in the observed therapeutic results. It has been established that cells and tissues under experimental and clinical conditions manifest a wide spectrum of individual radiosensitivity. The aim of this survey is to outline the current concepts for the basic radiobiological factors influencing tumor radiosensitivity. A thorough discussion is done of the essence, mechanisms of action, methods of determination and measurement, and effect on the prognosis in patients with malignant diseases of a number of radiobiological factors, such as: tumor-cell proliferation, apoptosis, tumor hypoxia and neovascularization. Although the knowledge of the mechanisms of radiosensitivity is constantly expanding, its clinical implementation is still rather limited. The true role of radiosensitivity in predicting the therapeutic response should be more accurately defined. (authors)

  12. Tissue culture on a chip: Developmental biology applications of self-organized capillary networks in microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Takashi; Yokokawa, Ryuji

    2016-08-01

    Organ culture systems are used to elucidate the mechanisms of pattern formation in developmental biology. Various organ culture techniques have been used, but the lack of microcirculation in such cultures impedes the long-term maintenance of larger tissues. Recent advances in microfluidic devices now enable us to utilize self-organized perfusable capillary networks in organ cultures. In this review, we will overview past approaches to organ culture and current technical advances in microfluidic devices, and discuss possible applications of microfluidics towards the study of developmental biology. PMID:27272910

  13. Comparison of mesencephalic free-floating tissue culture grafts and cell suspension grafts in the 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Morten; Widmer, H R; Wagner, B;

    1998-01-01

    Ventral mesencephalon (VM) of fetal rat and human origin grown as free-floating roller-tube (FFRT) cultures can survive subsequent grafting to the adult rat striatum. To further explore the functional efficacy of such grafts, embryonic day 13 ventral mesencephalic tissue was grafted either after 7......-term survival of grafted dopaminergic neurons and to correlate that with the behavioral effects. Additional cultures and acutely prepared explants were also fixed and stored for histological investigation in order to estimate the loss of dopaminergic neurons in culture and after transplantation. Similar...... similar numbers of TH-immunoreactive (TH-ir) neurons in grafts of cultured tissue (775 +/- 98, mean +/- SEM) and grafts of fresh, dissociated cell suspension (806 +/- 105, mean +/- SEM). Cell counts in fresh explants, 7-day-old cultures, and grafted cultures revealed a 68.2% loss of TH-ir cells 7 days...

  14. Comparison of Cultureset and Bartels Immunodiagnostics with conventional tissue culture for isolation and identification of herpes simplex virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Sewell, D L; Horn, S A; Dilbeck, P W

    1984-01-01

    Two 48-h Vero cell systems were compared with viral culture in human fibroblastic cells for isolation and identification of herpes simplex virus from clinical specimens. Both 48-h systems had 79% sensitivity and greater than 99% specificity as compared with the conventional tissue culture method.

  15. Influence of electrical stimulation on 3D-cultures of Adipose Tissue Derived Progenitor Cells (ATDPCs) behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Castells-Sala, C.; Sánchez Terrones, Benjamín; Recha-Sancho, L.; V. Puig; Bragós Bardia, Ramon; C. E. Semino

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering has a fundamental role in regenerative medicine. Still today, the major motivation for cardiac regeneration is to design a platform that enables the complete tissue structure and physiological function regeneration of injured myocardium areas. Although tissue engineering approaches have been generally developed for two-dimensional (2D) culture systems, three-dimensional (3D) systems are being spotlighted as the means to mimic better in vivo cellular conditions. This manuscr...

  16. Microtubule distribution in cultured cells and intact tissues: improved immunolabeling resolution through the use of reversible embedment cytochemistry.

    OpenAIRE

    Gorbsky, G; Borisy, G G

    1985-01-01

    To investigate the detailed distributions of microtubules in cultured cells and intact tissues we developed a reversible embedment method for antibody labeling of sectioned material. Fixed tissues were infiltrated with fully polymerized polymethylmethacrylate dissolved in an organic solvent. Evaporation of the solvent left the tissue embedded in hard plastic. After sectioning by conventional methods, the plastic was extracted and sections were processed for indirect immunofluorescence to labe...

  17. A collection of primary tissue cultures of tumors from vacuum packed and cooled surgical specimens: a feasibility study

    OpenAIRE

    Annaratone, Laura; Marchiò, Caterina; Russo, Rosalia; Ciardo, Luigi; Rondon-Lagos, Sandra Milena; Goia, Margherita; Scalzo, Maria Stella; Bolla, Stefania; Castellano, Isabella; Verdun di Cantogno, Ludovica; Bussolati, Gianni; Sapino, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Primary cultures represent an invaluable tool to set up functional experimental conditions; however, creation of tissue cultures from solid tumors is troublesome and often unproductive. Several features can affect the success rate of primary cultures, including technical issues from pre-analytical procedures employed in surgical theaters and pathology laboratories. We have recently introduced a new method of collection, transfer, and preservation of surgical specimens that requires immediate ...

  18. Factors affecting proliferation and elongation of shoots of Phak Liang (Gnetum gnemon Linn.) through tissue culture technique

    OpenAIRE

    Te-chato, S.; Noochum, P.

    2003-01-01

    The tissue culture of Phak Liang (Gnetum gnemon Linn.) was investigated for micropropagation. The types of explant, culture media, types and concentrations of plant growth regulators, orientation of explant and section of explant were tested for their efficacy in inducing and proliferating shoot buds. The elongation of shoots and root induction was also studied. Young leaves gave the highest number of shoot buds when they were cultured in Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with 0.25...

  19. A Case Study of Native Plants at Industrially Contaminated Area in Bhopal and Their Tissue Culture Approach for Phytoremediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwini A Waoo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In phytoremediation techniques,experiments were done with normal soil-grown or hydroponically grown plants. In recent days, more and more effort is directed toward research to understand and improve the performance of plants in remediation technologies, the number of results obtained with the help of in vitro plant cell and tissue cultures is rapidly increasing.This review focuses on the report of various phytoremediation technologies, paying special attention to removal of pollutants from soil and the application of in vitro systems for basic research in the role of plants for the remediation of contaminated sites, and in the improvement of their effectiveness. Present study was conducted in Govind pura industrial area having heavy metal polluted soil. Extensive botanical survey was carried out in that area for selection of heavy metal accumulated plants, which can be used for phytoremediation of soil. Techniques of Plant tissue culture like callus culture, cell suspension culture, and hairy root culture are applied frequently in phytoremediation research as model plant systems.Tissue culture is a powerful tool that gives the possibility to grow millions of cells under in vitro conditions, and to understand physiological information about the behavior of the plant cells under stress conditions. Plant tissue culture and molecular genetics have opened new avenues in plant improvement. Screening and selection at the plant cell level has established plant clones with increased tolerance or resistance in salt, heat, cold, drought, disease, insects, heavy metals and herbicides. Plant cell and tissue culture is considered an important tool for fundamental studies that provide information about the plant-contaminant interactions, it also helps to forecast plant cell responses towards environmental pollutants, and redesign the plants with improved characteristics for phytoremediation. Plant tissue culture is used to study the interactions among plants

  20. In vitro culture and characterization of alveolar bone osteoblasts isolated from type 2 diabetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to understand the mechanisms of poor osseointegration following dental implants in type 2 diabetics, it is important to study the biological properties of alveolar bone osteoblasts isolated from these patients. We collected alveolar bone chips under aseptic conditions and cultured them in vitro using the tissue explants adherent method. The biological properties of these cells were characterized using the following methods: alkaline phosphatase (ALP) chemical staining for cell viability, Alizarin red staining for osteogenic characteristics, MTT test for cell proliferation, enzyme dynamics for ALP contents, radio-immunoassay for bone gla protein (BGP) concentration, and ELISA for the concentration of type I collagen (COL-I) in the supernatant. Furthermore, we detected the adhesion ability of two types of cells from titanium slices using non-specific immunofluorescence staining and cell count. The two cell forms showed no significant difference in morphology under the same culture conditions. However, the alveolar bone osteoblasts received from type 2 diabetic patients had slower growth, lower cell activity and calcium nodule formation than the normal ones. The concentration of ALP, BGP and COL-I was lower in the supernatant of alveolar bone osteoblasts received from type 2 diabetic patients than in that received from normal subjects (P < 0.05). The alveolar bone osteoblasts obtained from type 2 diabetic patients can be successfully cultured in vitro with the same morphology and biological characteristics as those from normal patients, but with slower growth and lower concentration of specific secretion and lower combining ability with titanium than normal ones

  1. In vitro culture and characterization of alveolar bone osteoblasts isolated from type 2 diabetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Dao-Cai [Department of Implant Dentistry, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Department of Stomatology, The 291st Hospital of P.L.A, Baotou (China); Li, De-Hua [Department of Implant Dentistry, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Ji, Hui-Cang [Military Sanatorium of Retired Cadres, Baotou (China); Rao, Guo-Zhou [Center of Laboratory, School of Stomatology, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Liang, Li-Hua [Department of Implant Dentistry, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Ma, Ai-Jie [Xi' an Technology University, Xi' an (China); Xie, Chao; Zou, Gui-Ke; Song, Ying-Liang [Department of Implant Dentistry, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China)

    2012-04-05

    In order to understand the mechanisms of poor osseointegration following dental implants in type 2 diabetics, it is important to study the biological properties of alveolar bone osteoblasts isolated from these patients. We collected alveolar bone chips under aseptic conditions and cultured them in vitro using the tissue explants adherent method. The biological properties of these cells were characterized using the following methods: alkaline phosphatase (ALP) chemical staining for cell viability, Alizarin red staining for osteogenic characteristics, MTT test for cell proliferation, enzyme dynamics for ALP contents, radio-immunoassay for bone gla protein (BGP) concentration, and ELISA for the concentration of type I collagen (COL-I) in the supernatant. Furthermore, we detected the adhesion ability of two types of cells from titanium slices using non-specific immunofluorescence staining and cell count. The two cell forms showed no significant difference in morphology under the same culture conditions. However, the alveolar bone osteoblasts received from type 2 diabetic patients had slower growth, lower cell activity and calcium nodule formation than the normal ones. The concentration of ALP, BGP and COL-I was lower in the supernatant of alveolar bone osteoblasts received from type 2 diabetic patients than in that received from normal subjects (P < 0.05). The alveolar bone osteoblasts obtained from type 2 diabetic patients can be successfully cultured in vitro with the same morphology and biological characteristics as those from normal patients, but with slower growth and lower concentration of specific secretion and lower combining ability with titanium than normal ones.

  2. Fluorescently labeled collagen binding proteins allow specific visualization of collagen in tissues and live cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahn, Katy Nash; Bouten, Carlijn V C; van Tuijl, Sjoerd; van Zandvoort, Marc A M J; Merkx, Maarten

    2006-03-15

    Visualization of the formation and orientation of collagen fibers in tissue engineering experiments is crucial for understanding the factors that determine the mechanical properties of tissues. In this study, collagen-specific fluorescent probes were developed using a new approach that takes advantage of the inherent specificity of collagen binding protein domains present in bacterial adhesion proteins (CNA35) and integrins (GST-alpha1I). Both collagen binding domains were obtained as fusion proteins from an Escherichia coli expression system and fluorescently labeled using either amine-reactive succinimide (CNA35) or cysteine-reactive maleimide (GST-alpha1I) dyes. Solid-phase binding assays showed that both protein-based probes are much more specific than dichlorotriazinyl aminofluorescein (DTAF), a fluorescent dye that is currently used to track collagen formation in tissue engineering experiments. The CNA35 probe showed a higher affinity for human collagen type I than did the GST-alpha1I probe (apparent K(d) values of 0.5 and 50 microM, respectively) and showed very little cross-reactivity with noncollagenous extracellular matrix proteins. The CNA35 probe was also superior to both GST-alpha1I and DTAF in visualizing the formation of collagen fibers around live human venous saphena cells. Immunohistological experiments on rat tissue showed colocalization of the CNA35 probe with collagen type I and type III antibodies. The fluorescent probes described here have important advantages over existing methods for visualization of collagen, in particular for monitoring the formation of collagen in live tissue cultures over prolonged time periods. PMID:16476406

  3. Pleurotus Spent Mushroom Compost as Green Supplementary Nutrient in Tissue Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tay Chia Chay

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effect of Pleurotus spent mushroom compost as green supplementary nutrient in tissue culture. Different concentration of Pleurotus spent mushroom compost in powder (SMC and activated carbon (SMCAC were added into Murashige and Skoog media (MS with 0.1 mg/L 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP. The shoot regeneration of Clinacantus nutans plant such as number of shoots, number of leaves and length of leaves were recorded for four weeks. Collected data was analyzed using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey test through the SPSS Statistics 21 software. The 0.1 g/L SMC recorded the highest leaves numbers. Meanwhile, 0.2 g/L SMC showed highest performance in length of shoot. The SMCAC showed a negative response in number of leaves and shoot as well as length of shoot. In summary, the SMC showed significant performance in number of leave and shoot length but less effective on number of shoot. In contradictory, the SMCAC reported poor performance in shoot regeneration but contribute in absorption of nutrient from environment and storage of the nutrient asfunction of biochar. Therefore, the SMC has a high potential as a green supplementary nutrient for tissue culture. The application of this material has contributes into the green technology via convert waste to product, which is in-line with zero waste concept.

  4. Skeletal muscle regeneration via engineered tissue culture over electrospun nanofibrous chitosan/PVA scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheradmandi, Mahsa; Vasheghani-Farahani, Ebrahim; Ghiaseddin, Ali; Ganji, Fariba

    2016-07-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue shows a remarkable potential in regeneration of injured tissue. However, in some of chronic and volumetric muscle damages, the native tissue is incapable to repair and remodeling the trauma. In the same condition, stem-cell therapy increased regeneration in situations of deficient muscle repair, but the major problem seems to be the lack of ability to attachment and survive of injected cells on the exact location. In this study, chitosan/poly(vinyl alcohol) nanofibrous scaffold was studied to promote cell attachment and provide mechanical support during regeneration. Scaffold was characterized using scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, and tensile test. Degradation and swelling behavior of scaffold were studied for 20 days. The cell-scaffold interaction was characterized by MTT assay for 10 days and in vivo biocompatibility of scaffold in a rabbit model was evaluated. Results showed that cells had a good viability, adhesion, growth, and spread on the scaffold, which make this mat a desirable engineered muscular graft. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1720-1727, 2016. PMID:26945909

  5. Experimental characterization of vascular tissue viscoelasticity with emphasis on Elastin's role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmirzadi, Danial

    Elucidating how cardiovascular biomechanics is regulated during health and disease is critical for developing diagnostic and therapeutic methods. The extracellular matrix of cardiovascular tissue is composed of multiple fibrillar networks embedded in an amorphous ground substance and has been found to reveal time-dependent mechanical behavior. Given the multiscale nature of tissue biomechanics, an accurate description of cardiovascular biomechanics can be obtained only when microstructural morphology is characterized and put together in correlation with tissue-scale mechanics. This study constitutes the initial steps toward a full description of cardiovascular tissue biomechanics by examining two fundamental questions: How does the elastin microstructure change with tissue-level deformations? And how does the extracellular matrix composition affect tissue biomechanics? The outcome of this dissertation is believed to contribute to the field of cardiovascular tissue biomechanics by addressing some of the fundamental existing questions therein. Assessing alterations in microstructural morphology requires quantified measures which can be challenging given the complex, local and interconnected conformations of tissue structural components embedded in the extracellular matrix. In this study, new image-based methods for quantification of tissue microstructure were developed and examined on aortic tissue under different deformation states. Although in their infancy stages of development, the methods yielded encouraging results consistent with existing perceptions of tissue deformation. Changes in microstructure were investigated by examining histological images of deformed and undeformed tissues. The observations shed light on roles of elastin network in regulating tissue deformation. The viscoelastic behavior of specimens was studied using native, collagen-denatured, and elastin-isolated aortic tissues. The stress-relaxation responses of specimens provide insight into the

  6. Structural Characterization of Pharmaceutical Heparins Prepared from Different Animal Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Li; LI, GUOYUN; Yang, Bo; Onishi, Akihiro; Li, Lingyun; SUN, PEILONG; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Although most pharmaceutical heparin used today is obtained from porcine intestine, heparin has historically been prepared from bovine lung and ovine intestine. There is some regulatory concern about establishing the species origin of heparin. This concern began with the outbreak of mad cow disease in the 1990s and was exacerbated during the heparin shortage in the 2000s and the heparin contamination crisis of 2007–2008. Three heparins from porcine, ovine, and bovine were characterized throug...

  7. Synthesis and Characterization of Biodegradable Polyurethane for Hypopharyngeal Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Zhisen; Lu, Dakai; Li, Qun; Zhang, Zongyong; Zhu, Yabin

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradable crosslinked polyurethane (cPU) was synthesized using polyethylene glycol (PEG), L-lactide (L-LA), and hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI), with iron acetylacetonate (Fe(acac)3) as the catalyst and PEG as the extender. Chemical components of the obtained polymers were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy, 1H NMR spectra, and Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC). The thermodynamic properties, mechanical behaviors, surface hydrophilicity, degradability, and cytotoxicity were tested via d...

  8. Use of induced mutations and tissue culture in the rice (Oryza sativa L.) improvement programme in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1986, the Rice Research Institute began to use tissue culture techniques for the genetic improvement of rice. Subsequently, in 1998, the Institute, in co-operation with the applied Research Centre for Nuclear Energy Development, started a programme of improvement by mutation using radiations with different LET. In the same year, the Centre started applying molecular biology to rice improvement. The tissue culture techniques included the culture of anthers and somatic tissue, recovery of interspecific hybrid embryos and the culture of protoplasts. Work in molecular biology has focused on the isolation and purification of total DNA and subsequent restriction analysis. The preliminary results of using these technologies in the Cuban rice improvement programme are described. (author). 7 refs, 6 tabs

  9. Induction of mutations in sweet potato by combined use of gamma irradiation and tissue culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of the growth regulators 2,4D, kinetin (KT), NAA, IAA and benzyl-adenine (BA) and their combinations as additives for in vitro culture of sweet potato tissue were examined. The observed items were induction of calli and regeneration of roots and/or shoots from leaves or stems. The frequencies of induction of root and/or shoot indicated dependence on the tissues used as explants and the genotypes used. Generally the stem was the best in the induction of roots, followed by petiole then leaf. The highest frequency of root induction attained was 96.2% (O. 1 mg/l NAA + 0.5 mg/l IAA + O.l mg/l BA). The highest frequency of shoot induction was 31.6% (2 mg/l IAA + 2 mg/l KT). Irradiation doses of more than 10 Gy inhibited callus growth. Doses of 1 Gy seemed to stimulate callus growth, but the dose of more than 5 Gy inhibited shoot induction from the calli. The culture system set up for obtaining mutant clones was as follows: (1) The callus was induced on MS medium containing 1 mg/l NAA, 2 mg/l IAA and 0.01 mg/l BA; (2) The callus was irradiated with 5 Gy gamma rays; (3) Roots and shoots were induced and cultured on 1/2 MS medium containing 2 mg/l IAA and 2 mg/l KT. 130 plantlets were obtained during 1991-1992. The frequency of callus induction was 51.2 - 56.2%. The frequency of shoot induction was 11.3 - 12.1%. Examination of the possible mutant characters at M1V2 revealed no significant results in stem length and pigmentation, tuber skin and flesh colours, but some variants of leaf shape, higher number of tubers, heavier tubers, higher yield or weak growth could be selected. (author). 25 refs, 19 tabs

  10. Cytogenetic studies on stevia rebaudiana produced by tissue culture and affected by gamma rays and drought

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present investigation was under taken to carry out in the laboratories of the Natural Products Department, National Center for Radiation Research and Technology, Atomic Energy authority, Nasr city, Cairo, Egypt, to study the effect of gamma radiation doses, osmostress and the combined effects between them on tissue culture, some biochemical analysis and molecular genetic marker in stevia rebaudiana bertoni. The results obtained were: Tissue culture 1- micropropagation media: stevia rebaudiana plantlets cultured on MS medium hormones free for micropropagation.Hormones such as BAP and NAA with different concentrations induced callus formation and give slight growth.Study the effect of gamma radiation, osmostress and the combined effects between them : 1)The effect of gamma radiation on buds survival: Gamma radiation doses (10, 20 and 30 Gy) induced decreasing in bud survival percentage with increasing radiation dose in stevia rebaudiana. The dose 30 Gy was induced 60% mortality.2) Study the effect of gamma radiation on some biochemical analysis: Gamma radiation doses induced increase in the total carbohydrate with doses (20 and 30 Gy) but decreased with dose 10 Gy. Proline contents increased in plantlets with increasing doses . The total protein was increased with doses (10 and 20 Gy), but the dose 30 Gy induced decrease in total protein. Gamma radiation doses induced decreasing in total DNA while, the nucleic acid RNA increased.3) The effect of osmostress on buds survival: The concentrations (40000,50000,60000,70000 and 80000 ppm) from sucrose or sorbitol decreased the bud survival and shoot length in stevia plantlets with increasing sucrose or sorbitol levels. 4) The effect of osmostress on some biochemical analysis: Sucrose and sorbitol concentrations (40000,50000,60000,70000 and 80000 ppm) caused decrease in total carbohydrate.

  11. INVESTIGATION OF HYPOLIPIDEMIC EFFECT OF SESQUITERPENE Γ-LACTONE AHILLIN IN HEPATOMA TISSUE CULTURE (HTC CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Ivanov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Investigation of hypolipidemic effect of sesquiterpene γ-lactone ahillin in hepatoma tissue culture (HTC cells.Material and methods. In this study we’ve evaluated the effect of γ-lactone sesquiterpene aсhillin and gemfibrozil (comparator drug on the lipid content in the hepatoma tissue culture (HTC cell which were incubated with a fat emulsion lipofundin by fluorescent method with vital dye Nile Redand staining the cells with the dye Oil Red O. The cell viability was investigated using the MTT-test and staining with Trypan blue.Results. Cultivation cells HTC with aсhillin and gemfibrozilat concentrations ranging from 0.5 to1.5 mM and from0.25 mM to0.5 mM, respectively, resulted in dose-dependent decrease of the fluorescence’s intensity Nile Red. It reflects a decrease in lipid content in the cells. At these concentrations the drugs didn’t have cytotoxic effect and the cell viability didn’t change compared to the control culture.An experimental hyperlipidemia in the hepatoma culture cells was induced by adding to the incubation medium a fat emulsion lipofundin at a final concentration 0.05%. The intensity of fluorescence Nile Red in the cells was increased 4 fold (p < 0.05. This result suggests the significant accumulation of lipids in the cell’s cytosol and confirmed by microscopy after staining neutral lipids with the dye Oil Red O. Under these conditions aсhillin and gemfibrozil reduced lipid content in cells and hadthe effect at concentrations of0.5 mM and0.25 mM respectively.Conclusion. In the lipofundin-mediated model of hyperlipidemia the sesquiterpene lactone aсhillin prevents the lipid accumulation in cells. It confirms by decrease of fluorescence Nile Red and reduction lipid drops which were stained with Oil Red O in cytosol. To establish the molecular targets of aсhillin’saction on lipid metabolism in cell culture HTC we need to investigate a gene expression of key enzymes of lipid metabolism.

  12. Characterizing microstructure of living tissues with time-dependent diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Novikov, Dmitry S; Jensen, Jens H; Helpern, Joseph A

    2012-01-01

    Molecular diffusion measurements are widely used to probe microstructure in materials and living organisms noninvasively. The precise relation of diffusion metrics to microstructure remains a major challenge: In complex samples, it is often unclear which structural features are most relevant and can be quantified. Here we classify the structural complexity in terms of the long time tail exponent in the molecular velocity autocorrelation function. The specific values of the dynamical exponent let us identify the relevant tissue microanatomy affecting water diffusion measured with MRI in muscles and in brain, and the microstructural changes in ischemic stroke. Our framework presents a systematic way to identify the most relevant part of structural complexity using transport measured with a variety of techniques.

  13. Preparation of porous bioactive ceramic microspheres and in vitro osteoblastic culturing for tissue engineering application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, S-J; Yu, H-S; Kim, H-W

    2009-06-01

    Microparticulates are useful for directly filling defective tissues as well as for delivering cells and bioactive molecules in regenerative medicine. This paper reports on the production of bioactive ceramic microspheres with an interconnected macropore structure. The sol-gel derived calcium silicate powder was homogenized with an oligomeric Camphene melt, which was used as a novel porogen, and spherical-shaped microparticulates were obtained by an oil-in-water emulsion method. A porous structure was generated through the sublimation of Camphene within the calcium silicate-Camphene solidified blend under ambient conditions. The microspheres retained the crystalline phase of apatite and wollastonite during heat treatment and induced calcium phosphate precipitation under a body-simulating medium, showing the characteristics of bone-bioactive materials. Osteoblastic cells were observed to anchor to and spread well over the surface of the porous microspheres, and further to proliferate actively with culturing time. The bioactive and porous microspheres developed are considered potentially useful in the regeneration of hard tissues as a matrix for tissue engineering as well as a direct filling material. PMID:19141374

  14. The use of tissue culture techniques with irradiation to improve potato resistance to late blight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mutation breeding program was conducted to improve potato (Solanum tuberosum) resistance to late blight disease caused by Phytophthora infestans. In vitro cultured explants from potato cvs. Draga, Diamant, Spunta were irradiated with gamma ray doses 25, 30, and 35 Gy. Growing shoots were cut and re-cultured every 2 weeks until the 4th generation (MV4) to make sure no chimeral tissues still existed in the mutant material. Plantlets were subsequently propagated to obtain enough explants for in vitro selection pressure. Around 3000 plantlets from the three cultivars were subjected to selection pressure using co-culture technique. MV4 explants were incubated in jars, containing MS medium, with mycelia of P. infestans. Surviving plantlets were propagated and re-incubated with the pathogen for three consecutive generations. Resistant plantlets were acclimatized and transferred to pots and grown under glasshouse conditions. Plants were later inoculated, at the adult stage, with sporangial suspension. Cultivar Draga produced the highest number of resistant plants. Ten plants of Draga appeared to be resistant to late blight whereas only one plant from each of the other 2 cultivars was resistant. Mutant plants varied in number of produced minitubers from 13 to 70, Also, weight of these minitubers varied from less than 1 to 35 grams. Selected mutant lines will undergo further testing under field conditions for P. infestans resistance and other agronomic characteristics. (author)

  15. In vitro culture of mantle tissue of the abalone Haliotis varia Linnaeus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suja, C P; Dharmaraj, S

    2005-02-01

    The study is aimed at developing a technology for the production of in vitro pearl through tissue culture of mantle of the abalone, Haliotis varia Linnaeus, as the production of free and spherical pearls in vivo is rather difficult in abalones. In the basic study, the cell yield was intensified from the explant after 24h incubation. Among the cells liberated, the granulocytes were dominant over hyalinocytes. The size of granulocytes ranged from 3 to 16 microm and of hyalinocytes from 13 to 18 microm. Fibroblast-like cells appeared in cultures after day 2. Both granulocytes and hyalinocytes developed pseudopodial-like extensions in all directions and formed organic matrix. Granulocytes contained granules in the cytoplasm. Specific granules were responsible for nucleation of crystals. Some crystals exhibited green colour resembling mother of pearl of abalone. scanning electron microscope (SEM) study revealed the oolitic amorphous state and rhombohedral state of crystals. Its analysis through energy dispersive X-ray microanalyzer (EDS) indicated the presence of calcium. The rhombohedral crystals under polarized light showed its high birefringence (0.18) and uniaxial optically negative calcite nature with high content of calcium. A mean survival of cells was found to be 102 days in T 25 flasks and 32 days in petri dishes. Growth of cells was studied. Thirty percent of cultures were found to have contaminated during the study. The study provides basic knowledge in the development of a technology for in vitro pearl production. PMID:15695171

  16. Rose (Rosa hybrida L.) tissue culture mutagenesis for new mutants generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tissue culture technique can be used to obtain complete regeneration of plant cells from shoots, rots, flowers, axillary buds and other parts of the plant. In this study, axillary buds from stem cuttings of Cutting Red, Christine Dior and Mini Rose varieties were used as the stating explants. Murashige and Skoog (1962) media supplemented with 6-Benzylaminopurine (BAP, at 4.44 - 8.88μM/l), Napthaleneacetic acid (NAA at 0.54μM/l),, nad 3% sucrose were used for plantlet initiation and regeneration. Cultured axillary buds were exposed to gamma ray (0.250 Gy/s) at 0, 15, 25, 35, 45, 55, 65 and 75 Gy for radiosensitivity test. From the dose respond curve, LD50 the value for cutting red variety was 25 Gy, Christion Dior 30 Gy and Mini Rose 38 Gy, yet 22% of Mini Rose samples survived at 65 Gy and another 10% at 70 Gy. Screening of M3 plants of irradiated cultured shoots, 2 colour variations were obtained at 40 Gy for Cutting Red variety, while 3 colour variations for Mini Rose at 20 Gy. When 6 varieties of Fragrance Rose were irradiated at 40 Gy, 1 colour variation was obtained from 99 screened plants. This study suggests that the dose range of 20 to 45 can be considered for rose mutagenesis study to produce mutants. (Author)

  17. Design and characterization of a conductive nanostructured polypyrrole-polycaprolactone coated magnesium/PLGA composite for tissue engineering scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haixia; Wang, Ran; Chu, Henry K; Sun, Dong

    2015-09-01

    A novel biodegradable and conductive composite consisting of magnesium (Mg), polypyrrole-block-ploycaprolactone (PPy-PCL), and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) is synthesized in a core-shell-skeleton manner for tissue engineering applications. Mg particles in the composite are first coated with a conductive nanostructured PPy-PCL layer for corrosion resistance via the UV-induced photopolymerization method. PLGA matrix is then added to tailor the biodegradability of the resultant composite. Composites with different composition ratios are examined through experiments, and their material properties are characterized. The in vitro experiments on culture of 293FT-GFP cells show that the composites are suitable for cell growth and culture. Biodegradability of the composite is also evaluated. By adding PLGA matrix to the composite, the degrading time of the composite can last for more than eight weeks, hence providing a longer period for tissue formation as compared to Mg composites or alloys. The findings of this research will offer a new opportunity to utilize a conductive, nanostructured-coated Mg/PLGA composite as the scaffold material for implants and tissue regeneration. PMID:25690806

  18. A collection of primary tissue cultures of tumors from vacuum packed and cooled surgical specimens: a feasibility study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Annaratone

    Full Text Available Primary cultures represent an invaluable tool to set up functional experimental conditions; however, creation of tissue cultures from solid tumors is troublesome and often unproductive. Several features can affect the success rate of primary cultures, including technical issues from pre-analytical procedures employed in surgical theaters and pathology laboratories. We have recently introduced a new method of collection, transfer, and preservation of surgical specimens that requires immediate vacuum sealing of excised specimens at surgical theaters, followed by time-controlled transferring at 4°C to the pathology laboratory. Here we investigate the feasibility and performance of short-term primary cell cultures derived from vacuum packed and cooled (VPAC preserved tissues. Tissue fragments were sampled from 52 surgical specimens of tumors larger than 2 cm for which surgical and VPAC times (the latter corresponding to cold ischemia time were recorded. Cell viability was determined by trypan blue dye-exclusion assay and hematoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemical stainings were performed to appreciate morphological and immunophenotypical features of cultured cells. Cell viability showed a range of 84-100% in 44 out of 52 (85% VPAC preserved tissues. Length of both surgical and VPAC times affected cell viability: the critical surgical time was set around 1 hour and 30 minutes, while cells preserved a good viability when kept for about 24 hours of vacuum at 4°C. Cells were maintained in culture for at least three passages. Immunocytochemistry confirmed the phenotype of distinct populations, that is, expression of cytokeratins in epithelioid cells and of vimentin in spindle cells. Our results suggest that VPAC preserved tissues may represent a reliable source for creation of primary cell cultures and that a careful monitoring of surgical and cold ischemia times fosters a good performance of primary tissue cultures.

  19. Quantitative ultrasound tissue characterization in shoulder and thigh muscles – a new approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, P.K.; Jensen, B.R.; Darvann, Tron Andre;

    2006-01-01

    method for characterization of ultrasound images of the supraspinatus muscle, and the vastus lateralis muscle. Methods: Computerized texture analyses employing first-order and higher-order grey-scale statistics were developed to objectively characterize ultrasound images of m. supraspinatus and m. vastus......Background: The echogenicity patterns of ultrasound scans contain information of tissue composition in muscles. The aim was: ( 1) to develop a quantitative ultrasound image analysis to characterize tissue composition in terms of intensity and structure of the ultrasound images, and ( 2) to use the...

  20. Cryopreservation and in vitro culture of primary cell types from lung tissue of a stranded pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annalaura Mancia; Spyropoulos, Demetri D; McFee, Wayne E; Newton, Danforth A; Baatz, John E

    2012-01-01

    Current models for in vitro studies of tissue function and physiology, including responses to hypoxia or environmental toxins, are limited and rely heavily on standard 2-dimensional (2-D) cultures with immortalized murine or human cell lines. To develop a new more powerful model system, we have pursued methods to establish and expand cultures of primary lung cell types and reconstituted tissues from marine mammals. What little is known about the physiology of the deep-sea diving pygmy sperm whale (PSW), Kogia breviceps, comes primarily from stranding events that occur along the coast of the southeastern United States. Thus, development of a method for preserving live tissues and retrieving live cells from deceased stranded individuals was initiated. This report documents successful cryopreservation of PSW lung tissue. We established in vitro cultures of primary lung cell types from tissue fragments that had been cryopreserved several months earlier at the stranding event. Dissociation of cryopreserved lung tissues readily provides a variety of primary cell types that, to varying degrees, can be expanded and further studied/manipulated in cell culture. In addition, PSW-specific molecular markers have been developed that permitted the monitoring of fibroblast, alveolar type II, and vascular endothelial cell types. Reconstitution of 3-D cultures of lung tissues with these cell types is now underway. This novel system may facilitate the development of rare or disease-specific lung tissue models (e.g., to test causes of PSW stranding events and lead to improved treatments for pulmonary hypertension or reperfusion injury in humans). Also, the establishment of a "living" tissue bank biorepository for rare/endangered species could serve multiple purposes as surrogates for freshly isolated samples. PMID:21501697

  1. Characterization of mesenchymal stem cells derived from equine adipose tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, A.M.; A.L.M. Yamada; M.A. Golim; L.E.C. Álvarez; L.L. Jorge; M.L. Conceição; E. Deffune; C.A. Hussni; A.L.G. Alves

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell therapy has shown promising results in tendinitis and osteoarthritis in equine medicine. The purpose of this work was to characterize the adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AdMSCs) in horses through (1) the assessment of the capacity of progenitor cells to perform adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation; and (2) flow cytometry analysis using the stemness related markers: CD44, CD90, CD105 and MHC Class II. Five mixed-breed horses, aged 2-4 years-old were used to...

  2. A method to obtain reference images for evaluation of ultrasonic tissue characterization techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, M.S.; Wilhjelm, Jens E.; Sahl, B.;

    2002-01-01

    present in the biological tissue scanned in vitro. A 30 x 10 x 2 mm(3) piece of formalin fixed porcine tissue was molded into an agar block, which on the top surface, contained a set of fiducial markers, spaced 2.5 mm. The block was submerged into 20 degreesC water and a set of parallel 7.5 MHz spatial......A general problem when evaluating ultrasonic methods for tissue characterization is that "a golden standard" is seldom known. This paper describes a manual method to obtain a reference image, with the same geometry as the ultrasound image, indicating spatial location of the different tissue types...... compound ultrasound images of tissue and fiducial markers were recorded each 0.5 mm. Guided by the fiducial markers, the agar block was subsequently cut into slices 2.5 mm thick, photographed and finally analyzed histologically identifying these tissues: collagen rich, collagen poor, micro vessels and...

  3. A method to obtain reference images for evaluation of ultrasonic tissue characterization techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, M.S.; Wilhjelm, Jens E.; Sahl, B.; Brandt, T.; Martinsen, K.; Jespersen, S.K.; Falk, E.

    A general problem when evaluating ultrasonic methods for tissue characterization is that "a golden standard" is seldom known. This paper describes a manual method to obtain a reference image, with the same geometry as the ultrasound image, indicating spatial location of the different tissue types...... present in the biological tissue scanned in vitro. A 30 x 10 x 2 mm(3) piece of formalin fixed porcine tissue was molded into an agar block, which on the top surface, contained a set of fiducial markers, spaced 2.5 mm. The block was submerged into 20 degreesC water and a set of parallel 7.5 MHz spatial...... compound ultrasound images of tissue and fiducial markers were recorded each 0.5 mm. Guided by the fiducial markers, the agar block was subsequently cut into slices 2.5 mm thick, photographed and finally analyzed histologically identifying these tissues: collagen rich, collagen poor, micro vessels and...

  4. Design and characterization of a tissue-engineered bilayer scaffold for osteochondral tissue repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannoni, Paolo; Lazzarini, Erica; Ceseracciu, Luca; Barone, Alberto C; Quarto, Rodolfo; Scaglione, Silvia

    2015-10-01

    Treatment of full-thickness cartilage defects relies on osteochondral bilayer grafts, which mimic the microenvironment and structure of the two affected tissues: articular cartilage and subchondral bone. However, the integrity and stability of the grafts are hampered by the presence of a weak interphase, generated by the layering processes of scaffold manufacturing. We describe here the design and development of a bilayer monolithic osteochondral graft, avoiding delamination of the two distinct layers but preserving the cues for selective generation of cartilage and bone. A highly porous polycaprolactone-based graft was obtained by combining solvent casting/particulate leaching techniques. Pore structure and interconnections were designed to favour in vivo vascularization only at the bony layer. Hydroxyapatite granules were added as bioactive signals at the site of bone regeneration. Unconfined compressive tests displayed optimal elastic properties and low residual deformation of the graft after unloading (< 3%). The structural integrity of the graft was successfully validated by tension fracture tests, revealing high resistance to delamination, since fractures were never displayed at the interface of the layers (n = 8). Ectopic implantation of grafts in nude mice, after seeding with bovine trabecular bone-derived mesenchymal stem cells and bovine articular chondrocytes, resulted in thick areas of mature bone surrounding ceramic granules within the bony layer, and a cartilaginous alcianophilic matrix in the chondral layer. Vascularization was mostly observed in the bony layer, with a statistically significant higher blood vessel density and mean area. Thus, the easily generated osteochondral scaffolds, since they are mechanically and biologically functional, are suitable for tissue-engineering applications for cartilage repair. PMID:23172816

  5. Ultrasonic array of thick film transducers for biological tissue characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwirc, Sergio N; Negreira, Carlos A; Marino, Nestor R

    2010-01-01

    The initial motivation for this work was to accomplish an easy way to manufacture different geometries of ultrasonic transducers and arrays using a PZT powder, combined with a standard process to have repetitive series of them. The piezoelectric thick film was obtained using a PZT paste and applying it by screen printing on an alumina substrate. Then, the film was drying and sintered with a temperature-time profile determined by the paste characteristics. Each transducer is composed by three layers, one by PZT and two acting as electrodes. The active element of the paste is a PZT powder which is dispersed in a commercial vehicle to obtain rheological properties suitable for use the screen printing process. The connection between PZT particles is improved by adding a lead borosilicate frit glass that also helps to attach the film to the substrate due to the relatively low temperature of sintered that has been used in this process. The PZT film has low density that is generated by internal porosity, so its acoustic impedance is lower than for a bulk ceramic transducer and so is well adapted to testing human tissues. At the same time the thick film technology is well suited to make medium size transducers and also arrays performed with tiny ultrasonic transducers. PMID:21097177

  6. Organotypic tissue culture of adult rodent retina followed by particle-mediated acute gene transfer in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Moritoh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Organotypic tissue culture of adult rodent retina with an acute gene transfer that enables the efficient introduction of variable transgenes would greatly facilitate studies into retinas of adult rodents as animal models. However, it has been a difficult challenge to culture adult rodent retina. The purpose of this present study was to develop organotypic tissue culture of adult rodent retina followed by particle-mediated acute gene transfer in vitro. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We established an interphase organotypic tissue culture for adult rat retinas (>P35 of age which was optimized from that used for adult rabbit retinas. We implemented three optimizations: a greater volume of Ames' medium (>26 mL per retina, a higher speed (constant 55 rpm of agitation by rotary shaker, and a greater concentration (10% of horse serum in the medium. We also successfully applied this method to adult mouse retina (>P35 of age. The organotypic tissue culture allowed us to keep adult rodent retina morphologically and structurally intact for at least 4 days. However, mouse retinas showed less viability after 4-day culture. Electrophysiologically, ganglion cells in cultured rat retina were able to generate action potentials, but exhibited less reliable light responses. After transfection of EGFP plasmids by particle-mediated acute gene transfer, we observed EGFP-expressing retinal ganglion cells as early as 1 day of culture. We also introduced polarized-targeting fusion proteins such as PSD95-GFP and melanopsin-EYFP (hOPN4-EYFP into rat retinal ganglion cells. These fusion proteins were successfully transferred into appropriate locations on individual retinal neurons. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This organotypic culture method is largely applicable to rat retinas, but it can be also applied to mouse retinas with a caveat regarding cell viability. This method is quite flexible for use in acute gene transfection in adult rodent retina, replacing

  7. Structural characterization of pharmaceutical heparins prepared from different animal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Li; Li, Guoyun; Yang, Bo; Onishi, Akihiro; Li, Lingyun; Sun, Peilong; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J

    2013-05-01

    Although most pharmaceutical heparin used today is obtained from porcine intestine, heparin has historically been prepared from bovine lung and ovine intestine. There is some regulatory concern about establishing the species origin of heparin. This concern began with the outbreak of mad cow disease in the 1990s and was exacerbated during the heparin shortage in the 2000s and the heparin contamination crisis of 2007-2008. Three heparins from porcine, ovine, and bovine were characterized through state-of-the-art carbohydrate analysis methods with a view profiling their physicochemical properties. Differences in molecular weight, monosaccharide and disaccharide composition, oligosaccharide sequence, and antithrombin III-binding affinity were observed. These data provide some insight into the variability of heparins obtained from these three species and suggest some analytical approaches that may be useful in confirming the species origin of a heparin active pharmaceutical ingredient. PMID:23526651

  8. MRI characterization of brown adipose tissue in obese and normal-weight children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Jie; Rigsby, Cynthia K.; Shore, Richard M. [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging, 225 E. Chicago Ave., Box 9, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Schoeneman, Samantha E. [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging, 225 E. Chicago Ave., Box 9, Chicago, IL (United States); Zhang, Huiyuan [John H. Stroger, Jr. Hospital of Cook County, Collaborative Research Unit, Chicago, IL (United States); Kwon, Soyang [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Stanley Manne Children' s Research Institute, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department of Pediatrics, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Josefson, Jami L. [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Division of Endocrinology, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department of Pediatrics, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is identified in mammals as an adaptive thermogenic organ for modulation of energy expenditure and heat generation. Human BAT may be primarily composed of brown-in-white (BRITE) adipocytes and stimulation of BRITE may serve as a potential target for obesity interventions. Current imaging studies of BAT detection and characterization have been mainly limited to PET/CT. MRI is an emerging application for BAT characterization in healthy children. To exploit Dixon and diffusion-weighted MRI methods to characterize cervical-supraclavicular BAT/BRITE properties in normal-weight and obese children while accounting for pubertal status. Twenty-eight healthy children (9-15 years old) with a normal or obese body mass index participated. MRI exams were performed to characterize supraclavicular adipose tissues by measuring tissue fat percentage, T2*, tissue water mobility, and microvasculature properties. We used multivariate linear regression models to compare tissue properties between normal-weight and obese groups while accounting for pubertal status. MRI measurements of BAT/BRITE tissues in obese children showed higher fat percentage (P < 0.0001), higher T2* (P < 0.0001), and lower diffusion coefficient (P = 0.015) compared with normal-weight children. Pubertal status was a significant covariate for the T2* measurement, with higher T2* (P = 0.0087) in pubertal children compared to prepubertal children. Perfusion measurements varied by pubertal status. Compared to normal-weight children, obese prepubertal children had lower perfusion fraction (P = 0.003) and pseudo-perfusion coefficient (P = 0.048); however, obese pubertal children had higher perfusion fraction (P = 0.02) and pseudo-perfusion coefficient (P = 0.028). This study utilized chemical-shift Dixon MRI and diffusion-weighted MRI methods to characterize supraclavicular BAT/BRITE tissue properties. The multi-parametric evaluation revealed evidence of morphological differences in brown

  9. MRI characterization of brown adipose tissue in obese and normal-weight children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is identified in mammals as an adaptive thermogenic organ for modulation of energy expenditure and heat generation. Human BAT may be primarily composed of brown-in-white (BRITE) adipocytes and stimulation of BRITE may serve as a potential target for obesity interventions. Current imaging studies of BAT detection and characterization have been mainly limited to PET/CT. MRI is an emerging application for BAT characterization in healthy children. To exploit Dixon and diffusion-weighted MRI methods to characterize cervical-supraclavicular BAT/BRITE properties in normal-weight and obese children while accounting for pubertal status. Twenty-eight healthy children (9-15 years old) with a normal or obese body mass index participated. MRI exams were performed to characterize supraclavicular adipose tissues by measuring tissue fat percentage, T2*, tissue water mobility, and microvasculature properties. We used multivariate linear regression models to compare tissue properties between normal-weight and obese groups while accounting for pubertal status. MRI measurements of BAT/BRITE tissues in obese children showed higher fat percentage (P < 0.0001), higher T2* (P < 0.0001), and lower diffusion coefficient (P = 0.015) compared with normal-weight children. Pubertal status was a significant covariate for the T2* measurement, with higher T2* (P = 0.0087) in pubertal children compared to prepubertal children. Perfusion measurements varied by pubertal status. Compared to normal-weight children, obese prepubertal children had lower perfusion fraction (P = 0.003) and pseudo-perfusion coefficient (P = 0.048); however, obese pubertal children had higher perfusion fraction (P = 0.02) and pseudo-perfusion coefficient (P = 0.028). This study utilized chemical-shift Dixon MRI and diffusion-weighted MRI methods to characterize supraclavicular BAT/BRITE tissue properties. The multi-parametric evaluation revealed evidence of morphological differences in brown

  10. Ectopic osteogenesis of macroscopic tissue constructs assembled from human mesenchymal stem cell-laden microcarriers through in vitro perfusion culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiqin Chen

    Full Text Available We had previously demonstrated the feasibility of preparing a centimeter-sized bone tissue construct by following a modular approach. In the present study, the objectives were to evaluate osteogenesis and tissue formation of human amniotic mesenchymal stem cells-laden CultiSpher S microcarriers during in vitro perfusion culture and after subcutaneous implantation. Microtissues were prepared in dynamic culture using spinner flasks in 28 days. In comparison with 1-week perfusion culture, microtissues became more obviously fused, demonstrating significantly higher cellularity, metabolic activity, ALP activity and calcium content while maintaining cell viability after 2-week perfusion. After subcutaneous implantation in nude mice for 6 and 12 weeks, all explants showed tight contexture, suggesting profound tissue remodeling in vivo. In addition, 12-week implantation resulted in slightly better tissue properties. However, in vitro perfusion culture time exerted great influence on the properties of corresponding explants. Degradation of microcarriers was more pronounced in the explants of 2-week perfused macrotissues compared to those of 1-week perfusion and directly implanted microtissues. Moreover, more blood vessel infiltration and bone matrix deposition with homogeneous spatial distribution were found in the explants of 2-week perfused macrotissues. Taken together, in vitro perfusion culture time is critical in engineering bone tissue replacements using such a modular approach, which holds great promise for bone regeneration.

  11. Transgenic Crops by Direct Treatment of Exogenous DNA Without Agrobacterium tumefaciens Plasmid and Tissue Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhangGuodong

    1995-01-01

    Gene transfter methods are developing quickly recently,but each method has its limitations.We introduce a new gene transfer technique in this paper,which is simple,effective,and easy to operate,but does not get enough attention from scientists.This technique is used to transform plants by injecting exogenous DNA to stigma,style,ovary,young fruit or meristem of the recipient,or soaking the recipient's seeds in exogenous DNA solution.Los of heritable variations were found in many characters of many crops,It may be used to creaste new germplasms or realize gene exchange between different species,gerera,or families,even between animals and plants,A brief discussion was given to the mechanism of exogenous DNA introduction,integration into and expression in the recipient.We also discussed the merits and limitations of the technique.Currently there are two successful approaches that can be used to transform plants genetically,but each method has its limitations that are delaying the application of the techniques to certaincommercially important crops.The first tecnhique exploits a natural genetic engineer,Agrobacterium tumefaciens,which contains a tumor-inducing(Ti) plasmid that transfers a DNA segment(the T-DNA) from the plasmid to the nuclear genome of infected plants(or in vitro to plant tissue).The method is restricted to dicotyledenous plants;monocotyledenous plants are usually not susceptible to agrobacterial infection.The second technique involves direct transfter of DNA to plant protoplast ,prepared by enzymatic digestion of cell walls,for example by chemically stimulated uptake using polyethylene glycol or a high voltage pulse,generating transient'holes'in the protoplast membrane.This technique depends on a tissue culture system that allows regeneration of mature plants from protoplasts,But so far it is impossible to achieve plant regeneration from protoplasts in many crops.Both techniques use dominant selectable markers(for example,kanamycin resistance) to

  12. Characterization of In Vitro Engineered Human Adipose Tissues: Relevant Adipokine Secretion and Impact of TNF-α

    OpenAIRE

    Kim Aubin; Meryem Safoine; Maryse Proulx; Marie-Alice Audet-Casgrain; Jean-François Côté; Félix-André Têtu; Alphonse Roy; Julie Fradette

    2015-01-01

    Representative modelling of human adipose tissue functions is central to metabolic research. Tridimensional models able to recreate human adipogenesis in a physiological tissue-like context in vitro are still scarce. We describe the engineering of white adipose tissues reconstructed from their cultured adipose-derived stromal precursor cells. We hypothesize that these reconstructed tissues can recapitulate key functions of AT under basal and pro-inflammatory conditions. These tissues, featuri...

  13. Characterization of multiphoton photoacoustic spectroscopy for subsurface brain tissue diagnosis and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahal, Sudhir; Cullum, Brian M.

    2016-04-01

    The development and demonstration of a multiphoton photoacoustic imaging technique capable of providing high spatial resolution chemical images of subsurface tissue components as deep as 1.4 cm below the tissue surface is described. By combining multiphoton excitation in the diagnostic window (650 to 1100 nm), with ultrasonic detection of nonradiative relaxation events, it is possible to rapidly reconstruct three-dimensional, chemical specific, images of samples underneath overlying structures as well as chemical species of the same material. Demonstration of this technique for subsurface tissue differentiation is shown, with the ability to distinguish between grade III astrocytoma tissue and adjacent healthy tissue in blind studies. By employing photoacoustic signal detection, the high nonradiative relaxation rates of most biological tissue components (>90%) and the minimal signal attenuation of the resulting ultrasound compensate for excitation efficiency losses associated with two-photon absorption. Furthermore, the two-photon absorption process results in a highly localized excitation volume (ca., 60 μm). Characterization of the probing depth, spatial resolution, and ability to image through overlying structures is also demonstrated in this paper using tissue phantoms with well-characterized optical scattering properties, mimicking those of tissues.

  14. Phosphopeptide mapping of proteins ectopically expressed in tissue culture cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firulli Beth A.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation play a vital role in the regulation of protein function. In our study of the basic Helix-loop-Helix (bHLH transcription factor HAND1, it was suspected that HAND1 was being phosphorylated during trophoblast giant cell differentiation and that coexpression of a constitutively active kinase with HAND1 resulted in changes in the proteins dimerization profile. In order to accurately document HAND1 phosphorylation and identify the resides being modified, we employed metabolic cell labeling with 32P of tissue culture cells coexpressing a Flag-epitope tagged HAND1 along with a number of active kinases and phosphatase subunits. We generated phosphopeptide maps of the phosphorylated HAND1 using the methods described below and linked these modifications to changes in HAND1 biological function.

  15. Potential application of urea-derived herbicides as cytokinins in plant tissue culture

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Malathi Srinivasan; Vasanthi Nachiappan; Ram Rajasekharan

    2006-12-01

    Various urea-derived herbicides and different cytokinin analogues were used to determine their effects on callusing response and shoot regenerating capacity of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and Coleus (Coleus forskohlii Briq.). The herbicides monuron and diuron evoked profuse callusing response from Coleus leaf segments and alfalfa petiole explants on Murashige and Skoog medium. Shoot regeneration by monuron (2.0 mg/l) showed a maximum of 3 multiple shoots both in alfalfa and Coleus with a frequency of 92% and 75%, respectively. Whereas diuron (0.5 mg/l) showed a high frequency of shoot regeneration (89%) with a mean number of 5 shoots in alfalfa, in C. forskohlii, the frequency of regeneration was 90% with a mean number of 6 shoots. Diuron with two chloride groups in the phenyl ring showed significantly higher cytokinin-like activity than single chloride substitution monuron. This study demonstrates the potential use of monuron and diuron as cytokinins in plant tissue culture.

  16. Advanced tissue culture used by Twyfords to build up jojoba clones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    Twyford Plant Laboratories Ltd. in the UK, using their own advanced methods of plant tissue culture, have built up a bank of 30 different male and female clones of jojoba, the arid land crop whose seeds produced a liquid wax which - amongst other uses - can be substituted for sperm whale oil. The technique involves growing microscopic parts of a parent plant on a medium containing all the necessary growth hormones, salts, vitamins and other nutrients. Growth takes place under artificial light in an all-electric controlled, air-conditioned environment. No other method is so successful for rapidly multiplying plants, particularly those that do not breed true from seed. These include most fruits and some flowers and vegetables.

  17. Plant regeneration from petiole segments of some species in tissue culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Klimaszewska

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The regeneration ability of 21 plant species belonging to 14 families was tested. The method of tissue culture in vitro was applied, on basic MS medium with an addition of growth regulators from the auxin and cytokinin groups. From among the investigated plant groups Peperomia scandens and Caladium × hortulanum were capable of plant regeneration, Passiilora coerulea regenerated shoots, Hedera helix, Begonia glabra, Coleus blumei, Fuchsia hybrida, Passiflora suberosa and Peperomia eburnea formed callus and roots, Kalanchoe blossfeldiana, Pelargonium grandiflorum, P. peltatum, P. radula, Coleus shirensis and Magnolia soulangeana produced callus, Philodendron scandens, Rhododendron smirnovii, Hibiscus rosa-sinensis, Coprosma baueri, Cestrum purpureum and Solanum rantonnetii did not exhibit any regeneration reactions.

  18. Study the Effect of Triazophos as Plant Growth Regulator in Tissue Culture of Different Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laith Ahmad Yaaqoub

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of triazophos in tissue cultures of three plants Catharanthus roseus, Zizyphus vulgaris and Eucalyptus globulus. Triazophos was compared with 2,4-D on Murashige and Skoog's (MS medium supplemented with different concentrations of them. Triazophos was tested for it is potential in callus induction and compared its activity with 2,4-D as plant growth regulator .There are no significant differences (p<0.05 in callus induction on leaf explants between Triazophos and 2,4-D of all plants. The best concentrations to initiation and maintenance callus were (0.1and 1 mg/L for Triazophos and 2,4-D respectively for all plants.

  19. Tissue culture of adult larch as a tool for breeding purposes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewald, D.; Kretzschmar, U. [Federal Research Centre of Forestry and Forest Products, Waldsieversdorf (Germany). Inst. for Forest Tree Biology

    1995-12-31

    Aimed at the identical reproduction of genotypes which are considered superior different methods were tested to establish and to propagate tissue cultures from old larch trees (L. decidua, L. kaempferi, L. sukaczewii, L. gmelinii, L. eurolepis). Serial subcultures without phytohormones (shoot tip propagation) led to the establishment of clone lines. After ten subcultures propagation velocity, shoot morphology and rooting behavior were similar to juvenile plant material. Serial subcultures which included a cytokinin induction led to the formation of adventitious shoot clusters (adventitious bud propagation). Adventitious shoots derived from male flowers of one L. kaempferi clone could be propagated via shoot tip propagation. Micrografting of meristems in vitro resulted in a regained rooting capacity of green cuttings from micrografts. Combining these in vitro techniques offers now the possibility to propagate selected mature larch trees for different breeding purposes. 23 refs, 5 figs, 2 tabs

  20. Cloning crops in a CELSS via tissue culture: Prospects and problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carman, John G.; Hess, J. Richard

    1990-01-01

    Micropropagation is currently used to clone fruits, nuts, and vegetables and involves controlling the outgrowth in vitro of basal, axillary, or adventitious buds. Following clonal multiplication, shoots are divided and rooted. This process has greatly reduced space and energy requirements in greenhouses and field nurseries and has increased multiplication rates by greater than 20 fold for some vegetatively propagated crops and breeding lines. Cereal and legume crops can also be cloned by tissue culture through somatic embryogenesis. Somatic embryos can be used to produce 'synthetic seed', which can tolerate desiccation and germinate upon rehydration. Synthetic seed of hybrid wheat, rice, soybean and other crops could be produced in a controlled ecological life support system. Thus, yield advantages of hybreds over inbreds (10 to 20 percent) could be exploited without having to provide additional facilities and energy for parental-line and hybrid seed nurseries.

  1. Histology, histochemistry and SEM are useful tools to study regeneration processes in plant tissue culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Żabicki

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Tissue cultures in vitroare used for the multiplication of plants via direct and indirect (via callus regeneration. This approach is commonly applied in the protection of endangered species by the introduction of regenerated in vitro plantlets to botanical gardens and to the nature (so called ex situ plant conservation. In vitroconditions, especially the supplementation of tissue culture media with plant growth regulators, cause a somaclonal variation, resulting in genetic differences among regenerated plants. To analyze callus structure, including cell shapes and sizes, cell differentiation (e.g. the presence of xylem vessels and regeneration processes (organogenesis, somatic embryogenesis, the histological, histochemical and SEM techniques are applied. In this study, to obtain regeneration of plants in culture conditions, we have used three Viola species (V. epipsilaLedeb., V. stagnina Kit. and V. uliginosaBesser, indicated to be critically endangered according to Polish Red Book of Plants (Kazmierczakowa & Zarzycki 2001 and two genotypes of a model plant Arabidopsis thaliana(L. Heynh. (Columbia-0 and an insertional cdkg ;2mutant line. An Arabidopsis homozygous cdkg ;2 knock-out originated from a T 3 generation of T-DNA insertional line SALK_090262 (Alonso et al. 2003 and has been selected from a subsequent T 4 generation based on PCR analysis using primers complementary to flanking positions of full-length cDNA of CDKG;2gene product (a clone isolated by Seki et al. 2002. The aims of the study were: 1 to select the most convenient method to obtain regenerated Violaplants with maternal genotype i.e., via direct organogenesis or somatic embryogenesis; 2 to determine the effect of mutation in CDKG;2 gene on the explant response to in vitroconditions, including callus proliferation and regeneration. In three Viola species organogenesis was induced on MS (Murashige and Skoog basal medium supplied with thidiazuron (TDZ in concentrations 0.5 mg

  2. Culture of equine bone marrow mononuclear fraction and adipose tissue-derived stromal vascular fraction cells in different media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gesiane Ribeiro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the culture of equine bone marrow mononuclear fraction and adipose tissue - derived stromal vascular fraction cells in two different cell culture media. Five adult horses were submitted to bone marrow aspiration from the sternum, and then from the adipose tissue of the gluteal region near the base of the tail. Mononuclear fraction and stromal vascular fraction were isolated from the samples and cultivated in DMEM medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum or in AIM-V medium. The cultures were observed once a week with an inverted microscope, to perform a qualitative analysis of the morphology of the cells as well as the general appearance of the cell culture. Colony-forming units (CFU were counted on days 5, 15 and 25 of cell culture. During the first week of culture, differences were observed between the samples from the same source maintained in different culture media. The number of colonies was significantly higher in samples of bone marrow in relation to samples of adipose tissue.

  3. Effect of α-Particle and X-Ray Irradiation on DNA Synthesis in Tissue Cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of both a-particle and X-ray irradiation on the rate of DNA synthesis in mouse fibroblast and HeLa cells in tissue culture is described. Tritiated thymidine micro autoradiography was used to indicate the rate of synthesis in the single layer cultures used. The results of the experiments show that: (1) The fraction of cells in a culture synthesizing DNA is unaffected by α-particles and X-rays in the doses used in the experiment. (2) The effect of either type of radiation is to reduce the rate of synthesis of DNA of the irradiated cells in synthesis. (3) The effect of a given dose of either type of radiation is to reduce the rate of synthesis of all the cells to a constant fraction of what it was in the unirradiated cells. (4) The rate of DNA synthesis is reduced to 37% (1/e) by a dose of ca. 25 α/μ2 or an X-ray dose of 14000 rad for mouse fibroblast cultures. In Hela cell cultures a dose of ca. 90000 rad is needed to reduce the rate of DNA synthesis to 37% of the initial value. (5) The reduction in synthesis occurs not more than a half hour after irradiation and may be an immediate effect. From (4) above the target shape can be roughly calculated and if it is assumed to be cylindrical it appears to have dimensions ca. 16 Å in one direction and 16 000 Å in the other, i. e. a long thin thread with a MW of ca. 5 * 107 in the case of the mouse fibroblast experiments. In the case of the Hela cell experiments the target volume gives a MW of ca. 107. The results are consistent with the view that the target may possibly be the DNA template (or maybe DNAP because of the high MW in one case). If the effects described reflect damage to the DNA (or DNAP) template during the exponential phase of synthesis then observations (1), (2) and (3) above follow as obvious correlatives. (author)

  4. Shear and mixing effects on cells in agitated microcarrier tissue culture reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Robert S.; Papoutsakis, E. Terry

    1987-01-01

    Tissue cells are known to be sensitive to mechanical stresses imposed on them by agitation in bioreactors. The amount of agitation provided in a microcarrier or suspension bioreactor should be only enough to provide effective homogeneity. Three distinct flow regions can be identified in the reactor: bulk turbulent flow, bulk laminar flow and boundary-layer flows. Possible mechanisms of cell damage are examined by analyzing the motion of microcarriers or free cells relative to the surrounding fluid, to each other and to moving or stationary solid surfaces. The primary mechanisms of cell damage appear to result from: (1) direct interaction between microcarriers and turbulent eddies; (2) collisions between microcarriers in turbulent flow; and (3) collisions against the impeller or other stationary surfaces. If the smallest eddies of turbulent flow are of the same size as the microcarrier beads, they may cause high shear stresses on the cells. Eddies the size of the average interbead spacing may cause bead-bead collisions which damage cells. The severity of the collisions increases when the eddies are also of the same size as the beads. Impeller collisions occur when beads cannot avoid the impeller leading edge as it advances through the liquid. The implications of the results of this analysis on the design and operation of tissue culture reactors are discussed.

  5. Comparative cytological investigations on protoplasts, tissue cultures and seedlings from Beta vulgaris (sugar-beet)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigations were carried out with the aim of determining ploidy status, at short and long intervals, using suspension and protoplast cultures and seedlings of Beta vulgaris L. var. altissima cv. Hymona (sugar-beet). Two rapid-growing strains of sugar-beet were used, strain B.14.1, with a ploidy level of 8c to 64c (with maxima between 8c and 16c) and strain B.1.9, varying in DNA content from 16c to 128c (with a maximum frequency between 32c and 64c). Long-term studies of about two years resulted in constant ploidy spectrum, whereas short-term analyses under turbidostatic conditions showed more or less regular oscillations in the frequency distribution, with an amplitude of 20-40% of the medium ploidy level and with an oscillation period of 1-2 days. The isolation of protoplasts from the two strains and the measurement of their ploidy levels before and after isolation, and at longer periods thereafter, showed a shift in ploidy level immediately after isolation. Studies on the ploidy levels in seeds and seedlings of sugar-beet could yield evidence that heterogeneity in the ploidy patterns of cell cultures is not a feature of cultivated cells or tissue alone, but also occurs naturally during plant development. (author)

  6. Constructing Failure: Leonard Hayflick, Biomedicine, and the Problems with Tissue Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyung Wook

    2016-07-01

    By examining the use of tissue culture in post-war American biomedicine, this paper investigates how scientists experience and manage failure. I study how Leonard Hayflick forged his new definition of failure and ways of managing it by refuting Alexis Carrel's definition of failure alongside his theory of the immortality of cultured cells. Unlike Carrel, Hayflick claimed that every vertebrate somatic cell should eventually die, unless it transformed into a tumour cell. This claim defined cell death, which had been a problem leading to a laboratory failure, as a normal phenomenon. On the other hand, permanent life, which had been considered a normal cellular characteristic, became a major factor causing scientific failure, since it implied malignant transformation that scientists hoped to control. Hayflick then asserted that his cell strains and method would partly enable scientists to manage this factor-especially that occurred through viral infection-alongside other causes of failure in routine tasks, including bacterial contamination. I argue that the growing biomedical enterprise fostered this work of Hayflick's, which had repercussions in both his career and the uses of cells in diverse investigations. His redefinition of failure in the age of biomedicine resulted in the broad dissemination of his cells, medium, and method as well as his long struggle with the National Institutes of Health (NIH), which caused his temporarily failed career. PMID:26236962

  7. Effect of flow on vascular endothelial cells grown in tissue culture on polytetrafluoroethylene grafts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vascular grafts lined with endothelial cells (EC) grown to confluence in culture before implantation may provide a thromboresistant flow surface. Growth of EC on and their adherence to currently available prosthetic materials under conditions of flow are two impediments remaining in the development of such a graft. To address these problems, 22 polytetrafluoroethylene grafts (PTFE) (5 cm by 4 mm inside diameter) were pretreated with collagen and fibronectin, seeded with 2 to 3 X 10(6) bovine aortic EC per graft, and placed in tissue culture (seeded grafts). Twenty-two grafts pretreated with collagen and fibronectin alone served as controls. After 2 weeks morphologic studies revealed that 20/22 seeded grafts were lined with a confluent endothelial layer. Indium 111-oxine was then used to label the EC-seeded grafts. After exposure to either low (25 ml/min) or high (200 ml/min) flow rates for 60 minutes in an in vitro circuit, examination of the luminal surface of the graft by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy revealed minimal loss of EC. These findings were corroborated by radionuclide scans that showed an insignificant loss of the EC-associated indium label during exposure to flow (7% low flow, 11% high flow). Pretreatment of PTFE grafts with collagen and fibronectin thus promotes both attachment and adherence of EC even under flow conditions

  8. Immunofluorescence detection of the cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix in tissue and cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Clerc, Josiane; Hinz, Boris

    2010-01-01

    "A picture is worth a thousand words" goes the proverb. A poor picture however can be worse than saying nothing at all. This is particularly true for immunofluorescence pictures that in addition to their informative character bear an esthetic component. We here provide a panel of straightforward methods to process tissue sections and cultured cells for immunostaining of cytoskeletal elements, primarily those associated with actin filaments. We want to emphasize to the reader the fact that the choice of the processing method will have an important influence on the outcome of the immunostaining and thus on the interpretation of the results. Fixation of cultured cells with cross-linking reagents such as paraformaldehyde efficiently preserves structural elements at the expense of reduced antigenicity. The degree and timing of cell permeabilization with detergents, along with chemical cross-linking, contributes to the clarity and resolution of distinct structures but can also lead to loss of information. Fixation with organic solvents like methanol will, in most cases, better preserve antigens but will produce a higher background and impact on structural integrity. Therefore, it is recommended to test different protocols for a "new" protein or epitope - the results will pay back your investment. PMID:19960321

  9. Clonal multiplication of Cymbidiums through tissue culture of the shoot meristem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wimber, Donald E.

    1963-09-01

    The propagation of clonal varieties of some orchids is at times exasperatingly slow and occasionally an almost futile effort. Clonal multiplication is generally confined to dlvidlng mature plants and to starting plants from pseudobulbs. There is, of course, the specialized technique for obtaining Phalaenopsis plantlets from the aseptic culture of inflorescence nodes, but this is basically the same thing as propagating plants from pseudobulbs. In certain cases it is highly desirable to rapidly multiply certain clones of orchids. Awarded varieties could thereby be dispersed with great rapidity where now it may take decades for some clones to became fairly common. Commercial flower production would be very much enhanced if certain desirable clones could be multiplied ad infinitum within a short time. Orchid flower production could then be placed more on a par with many of the other cut flowers and the clonal peculiarities of some fo the current hybrids could be pampered instead of ignored. This paper describes a tissue culture method for the rapid propagation of Cymbidium clones.

  10. Biological effect of radiation-degraded alginate on flower plants in tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Q Luan; Nguyen, Q Hien; Nagasawa, Naotsugu; Kume, Tamikazu; Yoshii, Fumio; Nakanishi, Tomoko M

    2003-12-01

    Alginate with a weight-average molecular mass (Mw) of approx. 9.04 x 10(5) Da was irradiated at 10-200 kGy in 4% (w/v) aqueous solution. The degraded alginate product was used to study its effectiveness as a growth promoter for plants in tissue culture. Alginate irradiated at 75 kGy with an Mw of approx. 1.43 x 10(4) Da had the highest positive effect in the growth of flower plants, namely limonium, lisianthus and chrysanthemum. Treatment of plants with irradiated alginate at concentrations of 30-200 mg/l increased the shoot multiplication rate from 17.5 to 40.5% compared with control. In plantlet culture, 100 mg/l irradiated alginate supplementation enhanced shoot height (9.7-23.2%), root length (9.7-39.4%) and fresh biomass (8.1-19.4%) of chrysanthemum, lisianthus and limonium compared with that of the untreated control. The survival ratios of the transferred flower plantlets treated with irradiated alginate were almost the same as the control value under greenhouse conditions. However, better growth was attained for the treated plantlets. PMID:12901723

  11. Effect of radiation-degraded chitosan on growth promotion of flower plant in tissue culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luan, Le Quang; Ha, Vo Thi Thu; Hai, Le; Hien, Nguyen Quoc [Vietnam Atomic Energy Commission, Nuclear Research Institute, Dalat (Viet Nam); Nagasawa, Naotsugu; Yoshii, Fumio; Kume, Tamikazu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2002-03-01

    Radiation is a useful tool for degradation of polysaccharides, such as starch, carrageenan, alginate and chitin/chitosan. The viscosity molecular weight (Mw) of chitosan with 80% degree of deacetylation was reduced to 1.5 x 10{sup 5} by irradiation of 50kGy in solid phase. The solution of 10% of chitosan with Mw ca. 15 x 10{sup 5} was then irradiated at doses ranging 10-250kGy for further degradation and the products were supplemented into cultural media for testing of plant growth promotion effect. The results indicated that irradiated chitosan showed a strong growth-promotion effect on the increase of the length of shoot, the length of root and fresh biomass for flower plants namely Limonium latifolium, Eustoma grandiflorum and Chrysanthemum morifolium in tissue culture. The growth-promotion effect was obtained by the treatments with 50ppm of chitosan irradiated at the doses of 75-100kGy in 10% solution. The suitable concentrations of chitosan irradiated at 100kGy are ca. 100ppm for C. morifolium, 30ppm for E. grandiflorum and 40ppm for L. latifolium. In addition, our study also indicated that the survival ratio of transferred flower plantlets treated with irradiated chitosan was improved after acclimatizing for 30 days in the greenhouse. Accordingly, it is concluded that degraded chitosan obtained by radiation degradation technique is effective as a plant growth promoter as well as irradiated alginate. (author)

  12. Factors affecting callus and protoplast production and regeneration of plants from garlic tissue cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five cultivars of garlic, two explants, six callusing media, six regeneration media, two kinds of light and several doses of gamma irradiation were used to determine the best conditions for callus induction and plant regeneration from garlic tissue cultures. Also, some experiments were conducted to study the possibility to isolate protoplast and regenerate plants. The experiment showed that medium MS9 was good for regenerating plant directly from basal plate without going through callus phase. ANOVA exhibited significant differences among used cultivars in their ability to form callus. No significant difference was observed between 16 hr light and complete darkness in callus growth. However, appearance of callus was generally better on darkness. Cultivar varied in their ability to regenerate and interaction between cultivars and media was observed. Cultivar kisswany was the best in regeneration (38%) and medium MS47 was the best among used media (35%). Light type played a significant role in regeneration of plants where red light was much better than white light in inducing regeneration (68% vs 36%). ANOVA revealed significant effect of low doses of gamma irradiation on stimulation regeneration of plant whereas high doses prevented regeneration. Many experiments were conducted to isolate protoplast and regenerate plants. The best method for culturing was the droplet and the best conditions for incubation were complete darkness at 25 Degreed centigrade. This lead to formation of cell wall but no cell division was observed (author)

  13. Conformal piezoelectric systems for clinical and experimental characterization of soft tissue biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagdeviren, Canan; Shi, Yan; Joe, Pauline; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Balooch, Guive; Usgaonkar, Karan; Gur, Onur; Tran, Phat L.; Crosby, Jessi R.; Meyer, Marcin; Su, Yewang; Chad Webb, R.; Tedesco, Andrew S.; Slepian, Marvin J.; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A.

    2015-07-01

    Mechanical assessment of soft biological tissues and organs has broad relevance in clinical diagnosis and treatment of disease. Existing characterization methods are invasive, lack microscale spatial resolution, and are tailored only for specific regions of the body under quasi-static conditions. Here, we develop conformal and piezoelectric devices that enable in vivo measurements of soft tissue viscoelasticity in the near-surface regions of the epidermis. These systems achieve conformal contact with the underlying complex topography and texture of the targeted skin, as well as other organ surfaces, under both quasi-static and dynamic conditions. Experimental and theoretical characterization of the responses of piezoelectric actuator-sensor pairs laminated on a variety of soft biological tissues and organ systems in animal models provide information on the operation of the devices. Studies on human subjects establish the clinical significance of these devices for rapid and non-invasive characterization of skin mechanical properties.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of biocompatible multicomponent polymer systems as supports for cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engineering living tissue for reconstructive surgery requires an appropriate cell source and optimal culture conditions, but also a suitable biodegradable scaffold as the basic elements. On the basis of the well known facts that scaffold chemistry and architecture can influence the fate and function of engrafted cells, a large number of polymers, as cell cultures supports, have been proposed. In this study, we report a synthesis, characterization and cell interactions with the following polymer systems: I. Poly[L- lactic acid / glycolic acid / poly(dimethylsiloxane)], copolymers; II. Poly(DL - lactic acid) / triblock PCL - PDMS - PCL copolymers; III. Blends of poly(DL - lactic - co - glycolic acid) and triblock PCL - PDMS - PCL copolymers. For the cell seeding experiments, Swiss 3T3 and/or L929 mouse fibroblasts were grown in RPMI 1640 and/or DMEM / F12 medium, and placed onto the bio polymer non porous or porous films, prepared using a particulate leaching technique. The amount of cells present on the surfaces of the scaffolds was quantified using a neutral red uptake assay. (Author)

  15. Comparative Study on Antioxidative System in Normal and Vitrified Shoots of Populus suaveolens in Tissue Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Shanzhi; Zhang Zhiyi; Lin Yuanzhen; Liu Wenfeng; Guo Huan; Zhang Wei; Zhang Chong

    2004-01-01

    To explore the physiological and biochemical mechanism of the occurrence of vitrified shoots of Populus suaveolens in tissue culture, the changes in water, chlorphyll, lignin, H2O2, phenylalanine ammonialyase (PAL), malonaldehyde (MDA), protective enzymatic systems, and some key enzymes involved in the ascorbate- glutathione cycle were comparatively studied in both normal and vitrified shoots of P. Suaveolens. The results show that the lower activities of peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), glutathione reductase (GR) and PAL, and the less contents of chlorphyll, lignin, ascorbate (ASA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) as well as the lower ratios of ASA / DHA and GSH / GSSG are observed in vitrified shoots than in normal ones during the whole culture period. While in comparison with normal shoots, the higher activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the more concentrations of water, H2O2, MDA, dehydroascorbate (DHA) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) are found in vitrified shoots. Statistical analysis indicates that the enhanced activity of SOD and the decreased activities of CAT and POD as well as some enzymes involved in the ascorbate-glutathione cycle might be closely correlated to the accumulation of H2O2. The less regeneration of ASA and GSH and the lower capacity of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle observed in vitrified shoots might be due to a significant decrease in APX, MDAR, DHAR and GR activities and a decline in redox status of ASA and GSH. The decreases in chlorphyll content might result in a decline in photosynthesis. The lower activities of POD and PAL could result in the decrease of lignin synthesis and cell wall ligination, which might be the key factor leading to the increase in water content. It is concluded that the deficiency of detoxification capacity caused by the lower capacity of the ascorbate-glutathione pathway and the decreased activity of protective enzymatic system might lead to the

  16. Lipid-mediated glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor gene transfer to cultured porcine ventral mesencephalic tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer, Matthias; Meyer, Morten; Brevig, Thomas;

    2002-01-01

    -mediated transfer of the gene for human glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) to embryonic (E27/28) porcine VM tissue kept as organotypic explant cultures. Treatment of the developing VM with two mitogens, basic fibroblast growth factor and epidermal growth factor, prior to transfection significantly...... increased transfection yields. Expression of human GDNF via an episomal vector could be detected by in situ hybridization and by the measuring of GDNF protein secreted into the culture medium. When compared to mock-transfected controls, VM tissue expressing recombinant GDNF contained significantly higher...

  17. Mouse Pancreas Tissue Slice Culture Facilitates Long-Term Studies of Exocrine and Endocrine Cell Physiology in situ

    OpenAIRE

    Speier, Stephan; Marciniak, Anja; Selck, Claudia; Friedrich, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Studies on pancreatic cell physiology rely on the investigation of exocrine and endocrine cells in vitro. Particularly, in the case of the exocrine tissue these studies have suffered from a reduced functional viability of acinar cells in culture. As a result not only investigations on dispersed acinar cells and isolated acini were limited in their potential, but also prolonged studies on pancreatic exocrine and endocrine cells in an intact pancreatic tissue environment were unfeasible. To ove...

  18. Conventional tissue culture compared with rapid immunofluorescence for identifying Chlamydia trachomatis in specimens from patients attending a genitourinary clinic.

    OpenAIRE

    Teare, E L; Sexton, C.; Lim, F; McManus, T.; Cuttley, A H; Hodgson, J.

    1985-01-01

    Specimens collected from 182 patients with histories suggesting chlamydial disease were examined by conventional culture and direct immunofluorescence techniques. Chlamydia trachomatis was identified by both methods in 57% of all patients. There was no significant difference between the two methods in detecting C trachomatis. Where a tissue culture service is not already established, cost analysis in individual departments may justify the use of the immunofluorescence method.

  19. Prolonged hypoxic culture and trypsinization increase the pro-angiogenic potential of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jeppe Grøndahl; Frøbert, Ole; Pilgaard, Linda; Kastrup, Jens; Simonsen, Ulf; Zachar, Vladimir; Fink, Trine

    2011-01-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC), including adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASC), is a promising option in the treatment of vascular disease. Short-term hypoxic culture of MSC augments secretion of anti-apoptotic and angiogenic cytokines. We hypothesized that prolonged hypoxi...... (1% and 5% oxygen) culture and trypsinization would augment ASC expression of anti-apoptotic and angiogenic cytokines and increase the angiogenic potential of ASC-conditioned media....

  20. Studies in tissue culture of some indigenous rice (Oryza glaberrima Steud.) accessions in Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    accessions evaluated, N/4 was the most promising accession in terms of callus induction frequency and regeneration ability. The three accessions of O. glaberrima were again studied for their response to anther culture in terms of callus induction and frequency of plant regeneration using N, Garfish and D oy, MS and Nis tch tissue culture media, and supplemented with 2,4-D (1:(0-5) mg/l) were used for callus induction. No response to callus formation was obtained after 16 weeks of culture and a conclusion was drawn that all three accessions were recalcitrant to anther culture. (au)

  1. Stimulus-responsive hydrogels made from biosynthetic fibrinogen conjugates for tissue engineering: structural characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisman, Ilya; Shachaf, Yonatan; Seliktar, Dror; Bianco-Peled, Havazelet

    2011-06-01

    Nanostructured hydrogels based on "smart" polymer conjugates of poloxamers and protein molecules were developed in order to form stimulus-responsive materials with bioactive properties for 3-D cell culture. Functionalized Pluronic F127 was covalently attached to a fibrinopeptide backbone and cross-linked into a structurally versatile and mechanically stable polymer network endowed with bioactivity and temperature-responsive structural features. Small angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy combined with rheology were used to characterize the structural and mechanical features of this biosynthetic conjugate, both in solution and in hydrogel form. The temperature at which the chemical cross-linking of F127-fibrinopeptide conjugates was initiated had a profound influence on the mechanical properties of the thermo-responsive hydrogel. The analysis of the scattering data revealed modification in the structure of the protein backbone resulting from increases in ambient temperature, whereas the structure of the polymer was not affected by ambient temperature. The hydrogel cross-linking temperature also had a major influence on the modulus of the hydrogel, which was rationally correlated to the molecular structure of the polymer network. The hydrogel structure exhibited a small mesh size when cross-linked at low temperatures and a larger mesh size when cross-linked at higher temperatures. The mesh size was nicely correlated to the mechanical properties of the hydrogels at the respective cross-linking temperatures. The schematic charts that model this material's behavior help to illustrate the relationship that exists between the molecular structure, the cross-linking temperature, and the temperature-responsive features for this class of protein-polymer conjugates. The precise control over structural and mechanical properties that can be achieved with this bioactive hydrogel material is essential in designing a tissue-engineering scaffold for clinical

  2. Preparation and characterization of gelatin–hydroxyapatite composite microspheres for hard tissue repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelatin–hydroxyapatite composite microspheres composed of 21% gelatin (G) and 79% hydroxyapatite (HA) with uniform morphology and controllable size were synthesized from a mixed solution of Ca(NO3)2, NH4H2PO4 and gelatin by a wet-chemical method. Material analyses such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning/transmission electron microscopy examination (SEM/TEM) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) were used to characterize G–HA microspheres by analyzing their crystalline phase, microstructure, morphology and composition. HA crystals precipitate along G fibers to form nano-rods with diameters of 6–10 nm and tangle into porous microspheres after blending. The cell culture indicates that G–HA composite microspheres without any toxicity could enhance the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblast-like cells. In a rat calvarial defect model, G–HA bioactive scaffolds were compared with fibrin glue (F) and Osteoset® Bone Graft Substitute (OS) for their capacity of regenerating bone. Four weeks post-implantation, new bone, mineralization, and expanded blood vessel area were found in G–HA scaffolds, indicating greater osteoconductivity and bioactivity than F and OS. - Highlights: • G–HA composite microspheres were prepared by hydroxyapatite and gelatin. • In vitro tests indicated that the G–HA microspheres were biocompatible and bioactive. • In in vitro tests, G–HA microspheres could be applied in hard tissue engineering. • G–HA had healed the bone defect and provides a high proportion of surface area to open space

  3. Preparation and characterization of gelatin–hydroxyapatite composite microspheres for hard tissue repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, Shao Ching [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo-Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Department of Minimally Invasive Skull Neurosurgery, Neurological Institute, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, 1650 Taiwan Boulevard, Sect. 4, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Neurosurgery, ChangHua Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, 80 Chung Cheng Road, Sect. 2 Chiu Kuan Village, Changhua 500, Taiwan (China); Wang, Ming-Jia; Pai, Nai-Su [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo-Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Yen, Shiow-Kang, E-mail: skyen@dragon.nchu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo-Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China)

    2015-12-01

    Gelatin–hydroxyapatite composite microspheres composed of 21% gelatin (G) and 79% hydroxyapatite (HA) with uniform morphology and controllable size were synthesized from a mixed solution of Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}, NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} and gelatin by a wet-chemical method. Material analyses such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning/transmission electron microscopy examination (SEM/TEM) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) were used to characterize G–HA microspheres by analyzing their crystalline phase, microstructure, morphology and composition. HA crystals precipitate along G fibers to form nano-rods with diameters of 6–10 nm and tangle into porous microspheres after blending. The cell culture indicates that G–HA composite microspheres without any toxicity could enhance the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblast-like cells. In a rat calvarial defect model, G–HA bioactive scaffolds were compared with fibrin glue (F) and Osteoset® Bone Graft Substitute (OS) for their capacity of regenerating bone. Four weeks post-implantation, new bone, mineralization, and expanded blood vessel area were found in G–HA scaffolds, indicating greater osteoconductivity and bioactivity than F and OS. - Highlights: • G–HA composite microspheres were prepared by hydroxyapatite and gelatin. • In vitro tests indicated that the G–HA microspheres were biocompatible and bioactive. • In in vitro tests, G–HA microspheres could be applied in hard tissue engineering. • G–HA had healed the bone defect and provides a high proportion of surface area to open space.

  4. Isolation, Characterization and Virulence Potential of Tenacibaculum dicentrarchi in Salmonid Cultures in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avendaño-Herrera, R; Irgang, R; Sandoval, C; Moreno-Lira, P; Houel, A; Duchaud, E; Poblete-Morales, M; Nicolas, P; Ilardi, P

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we isolated, identified and characterized isolates of Tenacibaculum dicentrarchi in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) farmed in Chile for the first time. In 2010 and 2014, mortalities were observed in Atlantic salmon (average weight 25-30 and 480-520 g, respectively) at an aquaculture centre in Puerto Montt, Chile. Severe tail rots, frayed fins and, in some cases, damaged gills were detected. Wet smear analyses of these lesions revealed a high occurrence of Gram-negative, filamentous bacteria. Microbiological analysis of infected gill and tail tissues yielded six bacterial isolates. All were identified as T. dicentrarchi through polyphasic taxonomy, which included phenotypic characterization, 16S rRNA sequencing and multilocus sequence typing. The latter method revealed a close relationship of the Chilean genotype with the T. dicentrarchi type strain and two Norwegian Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) isolates. The pathogenic potential of the TdChD05 isolate was assessed by challenging Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for one hour, which resulted in mean cumulative mortality rates of 65% and 93%, respectively, as well as clinical signs 14 days post-challenge. However, challenged Coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) presented no mortalities or clinical signs of infection. These findings indicate that the geographical and host distribution of T. dicentrarchi is wider than previously established and that this bacterium may have negative impacts on salmonid cultures. PMID:26749435

  5. Persistence of the tissue culture origin vaccine for infectious laryngotracheitis virus in commercial chicken flocks in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Silvana H Santander; Nuñez, Luis F; Astolfi-Ferreira, Claudete S; Ferreira, Antonio J Piantino

    2015-11-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is a respiratory disease of great importance that causes serious economic losses in the poultry industry. Its control is based on biosecurity procedures and vaccination programs that use live attenuated vaccines such as tissue culture origin (TCO), chicken embryo origin (CEO), and vectored vaccines. However, problems have been reported, such as the reversion of virulence, virus latency, and field virus outbreaks. Several molecular techniques have been developed to differentiate between the field and vaccine strains. This study was conducted to determine the presence of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) in Brazil from 2012 to 2014. PCR-RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism) was used to detect and differentiate ILTV strains; DNA sequencing and predictive RFLP analysis were also used for this purpose. Molecular analysis detected the presence of ILTV in 15 samples that were characterized as strains of TCO vaccine origin. This study showed that the ILTV TCO vaccine strain has been circulating in commercial chicken flocks in Brazil since its introduction during the 2002 outbreak. PMID:26500264

  6. Characterization of laser-tissue interaction processes by low-boiling emitted substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigmann, Hans-Juergen; Lademann, Juergen; Serfling, Ulrike; Lehnert, W.; Sterry, Wolfram; Meffert, H.

    1996-01-01

    Main point in this study was the investigation of the gaseous and low-boiling substances produced in the laser plume during cw CO2 laser and XeCl laser irradiation of tissue by gas chromatography (GC)/mass spectrometry. The characteristic emitted amounts of chemicals were determined quantitatively using porcine muscular tissue. The produced components were used to determine the character of the chemical reaction conditions inside the interaction zone. It was found that the temperature, and the water content of the tissue are the main parameter determining kind and amount of the emitted substances. The relative intensity of the GC peak of benzene corresponds to a high temperature inside the interaction area while a relative strong methylbutanal peak is connected with a lower temperature which favors Maillard type reaction products. The water content of the tissue determines the extent of oxidation processes during laser tissue interaction. For that reason the moisture in the tissue is the most important parameter to reduce the emission of harmful chemicals in the laser plume. The same methods of investigation are applicable to characterize the interaction of a controlled and an uncontrolled rf electrosurgery device with tissue. The results obtained with model tissue are in agreement with the situation characteristic in laser surgery.

  7. Characterization of tissue metabolism of thyroid hormones in very premature infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyroid status was characterized in very preterm infants (gestational age 23-32 wk; n = 61) from birth through day 14; in those infants who died within 16 days of delivery (n = 10) it was also correlated with the metabolism of thyroid hormones in peripheral tissues (brain, liver, kidney, skeletal muscle, and different localities of adipose tissue). The results obtained support the view that peripheral tissues of very premature infants are involved in local generation of triiodothyronine (T3) and inactivation of thyroid hormones, but do not represent a major source of circulating T3. In this study observations on postnatal development of plasma thyroid hormone levels in normal and critically ill premature neonates are presented. Enzyme activities of all three types of iodothyronine deiodinases were followed in autopsy samples from brain, liver, kidney, muscle, and adipose tissue depots, to better characterize the relationships between peripheral metabolism of thyroid hormones and thyroid status in critically ill very preterm newborns. Plasma concentrations of total T3, total T4, and total rT3 were estimated by competitive radioimmunoassay. Plasma TSH concentrations were measured by microparticle enzyme immunoassay. Measurable activities of deiodinases of type I, II and II were detected post mortem in all tissue samples, except for type II activity in kidney. No correlation between postnatal age and the enzyme activities was found in in different tissues in the group of infants who died by 16 days of age. All activities were the highest in liver and differed significantly in particular tissues. Obtained results suggest tat, in contrast to adults, iodothyronine metabolism in peripheral tissues of premature newborns seems to be dominated by thyroid hormones inactivation, and T3 production mainly for local use inside tissues. (authors)

  8. Investigation of the in vitro culture process for skeletal-tissue-engineered constructs using computational fluid dynamics and experimental methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md Shakhawath; Chen, X B; Bergstrom, D J

    2012-12-01

    The in vitro culture process via bioreactors is critical to create tissue-engineered constructs (TECs) to repair or replace the damaged tissues/organs in various engineered applications. In the past, the TEC culture process was typically treated as a black box and performed on the basis of trial and error. Recently, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has demonstrated its potential to analyze the fluid flow inside and around the TECs, therefore, being able to provide insight into the culture process, such as information on the velocity field and shear stress distribution that can significantly affect such cellular activities as cell viability and proliferation during the culture process. This paper briefly reviews the CFD and experimental methods used to investigate the in vitro culture process of skeletal-type TECs in bioreactors, where mechanical deformation of the TEC can be ignored. Specifically, this paper presents CFD modeling approaches for the analysis of the velocity and shear stress fields, mass transfer, and cell growth during the culture process and also describes various particle image velocimetry (PIV) based experimental methods to measure the velocity and shear stress in the in vitro culture process. Some key issues and challenges are also identified and discussed along with recommendations for future research. PMID:23363205

  9. FSH supplementation to culture medium is beneficial for activation and survival of preantral follicles enclosed in equine ovarian tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, F L N; Lunardi, F O; Lima, L F; Rocha, R M P; Bruno, J B; Magalhães-Padilha, D M; Cibin, F W S; Nunes-Pinheiro, D C S; Gastal, M O; Rodrigues, A P R; Apgar, G A; Gastal, E L; Figueiredo, J R

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the effect of adding different concentrations of bovine recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone on the IVC of equine preantral follicles enclosed in ovarian tissue fragments. Randomized ovarian fragments were fixed immediately (fresh noncultured control) or cultured for 1 or 7 days in α-MEM(+) supplemented with 0, 10, 50, and 100 ng/mL FSH and subsequently analyzed by classical histology. Culture media collected on Day 1 or Day 7 and were analyzed for steroids (estradiol and progesterone) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). After Day 1 and Day 7 of culture, 50-ng/mL FSH treatment had a greater (P FSH treatment at Day 1 of culture. The percentage of developing follicles (transition, primary, and secondary), and follicular and oocyte diameters were higher (P FSH treatment compared to the other groups after Day 7 of culture. Furthermore, estradiol secretion and ROS production were maintained (P > 0.05) throughout the culture in the 50-ng/mL FSH treatment. In conclusion, the addition of 50 ng/mL of FSH promoted activation of primordial follicles to developing follicles, improved survival of preantral follicles, and maintained estradiol and ROS production of equine ovarian tissue after 7 days of culture. PMID:26723132

  10. Glucocorticoids affect 24 h clock genes expression in human adipose tissue explant cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purificación Gómez-Abellán

    Full Text Available AIMS: to examine firstly whether CLOCK exhibits a circadian expression in human visceral (V and subcutaneous (S adipose tissue (AT in vitro as compared with BMAL1 and PER2, and secondly to investigate the possible effect of the glucocorticoid analogue dexamethasone (DEX on positive and negative clock genes expression. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: VAT and SAT biopsies were obtained from morbid obese women (body mass index ≥ 40 kg/m(2 (n = 6. In order to investigate rhythmic expression pattern of clock genes and the effect of DEX on CLOCK, PER2 and BMAL1 expression, control AT (without DEX and AT explants treated with DEX (2 hours were cultured during 24 h and gene expression was analyzed at the following times: 10:00 h, 14:00 h, 18:00 h, 22:00 h, 02:00 h and 06:00 h, using qRT-PCR. RESULTS: CLOCK, BMAL1 and PER2 expression exhibited circadian patterns in both VAT and SAT explants that were adjusted to a typical 24 h sinusoidal curve. PER2 expression (negative element was in antiphase with respect to CLOCK and in phase with BMAL1 expression (both positive elements in the SAT (situation not present in VAT. A marked effect of DEX exposure on both positive and negative clock genes expression patterns was observed. Indeed, DEX treatment modified the rhythmicity pattern towards altered patterns with a period lower than 24 hours in all genes and in both tissues. CONCLUSIONS: 24 h patterns in CLOCK and BMAL1 (positive clock elements and PER2 (negative element mRNA levels were observed in human adipose explants. These patterns were altered by dexamethasone exposure.

  11. Effect of microcavitary alginate hydrogel with different pore sizes on chondrocyte culture for cartilage tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In our previous work, a novel microcavitary hydrogel was proven to be effective for proliferation of chondrocytes and maintenance of chondrocytic phenotype. In present work, we further investigated whether the size of microcavity would affect the growth and the function of chondrocytes. By changing the stirring rate, gelatin microspheres in different sizes including small size (80–120 μm), middle size (150–200 μm) and large size (250–300 μm) were prepared. And then porcine chondrocytes were encapsulated into alginate hydrogel with various sizes of gelatin microspheres. Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8), Live/dead staining and real-time PCR were used to analyze the effect of the pore size on cell proliferation and expression of specific chondrocytic genes. According to all the data, cells cultivated in microcavitary hydrogel, especially in small size, had preferable abilities of proliferation and higher expression of cartilaginous markers including type II collagen, aggrecan and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP). Furthermore, it was shown by western blot assay that the culture of chondrocytes in microcavitary hydrogel could improve the proliferation of cells potentially by inducing the Erk1/2-MAPK pathway. Taken together, this study demonstrated that chondrocytes favored microcavitary alginate hydrogel with pore size within the range of 80–120 μm for better growth and ECM synthesis, in which Erk1/2 pathway was involved. This culture system would be promising for cartilage tissue engineering. - Highlights: • A novel model with microcavitary structure was set up to study the interaction between cells and materials. • Microcavitary alginate hydrogel could enhance the proliferation of chondrocytes and promote the expression of cartilaginous genes as compared with plain alginate hydrogel. • Cells in microcavitary alginate hydrogel with pore size within the range of 80–120 μm were capable of better growth and ECM synthesis

  12. Effect of microcavitary alginate hydrogel with different pore sizes on chondrocyte culture for cartilage tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Lei; Yao, Yongchang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Tissue Restoration and Reconstruction, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Wang, Dong-an, E-mail: DAWang@ntu.edu.sg [National Engineering Research Center for Tissue Restoration and Reconstruction, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Division of Bioengineering, School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637457 (Singapore); Chen, Xiaofeng, E-mail: chenxf@scut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Tissue Restoration and Reconstruction, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2014-01-01

    In our previous work, a novel microcavitary hydrogel was proven to be effective for proliferation of chondrocytes and maintenance of chondrocytic phenotype. In present work, we further investigated whether the size of microcavity would affect the growth and the function of chondrocytes. By changing the stirring rate, gelatin microspheres in different sizes including small size (80–120 μm), middle size (150–200 μm) and large size (250–300 μm) were prepared. And then porcine chondrocytes were encapsulated into alginate hydrogel with various sizes of gelatin microspheres. Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8), Live/dead staining and real-time PCR were used to analyze the effect of the pore size on cell proliferation and expression of specific chondrocytic genes. According to all the data, cells cultivated in microcavitary hydrogel, especially in small size, had preferable abilities of proliferation and higher expression of cartilaginous markers including type II collagen, aggrecan and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP). Furthermore, it was shown by western blot assay that the culture of chondrocytes in microcavitary hydrogel could improve the proliferation of cells potentially by inducing the Erk1/2-MAPK pathway. Taken together, this study demonstrated that chondrocytes favored microcavitary alginate hydrogel with pore size within the range of 80–120 μm for better growth and ECM synthesis, in which Erk1/2 pathway was involved. This culture system would be promising for cartilage tissue engineering. - Highlights: • A novel model with microcavitary structure was set up to study the interaction between cells and materials. • Microcavitary alginate hydrogel could enhance the proliferation of chondrocytes and promote the expression of cartilaginous genes as compared with plain alginate hydrogel. • Cells in microcavitary alginate hydrogel with pore size within the range of 80–120 μm were capable of better growth and ECM synthesis.

  13. Preparation, characterization, and evaluation of genipin crosslinked chitosan/gelatin three-dimensional scaffolds for liver tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Wang, Qiang-Song; Yan, Kuo; Qi, Yun; Wang, Gui-Fang; Cui, Yuan-Lu

    2016-08-01

    In liver tissue engineering, scaffolds with porous structure desgined to supply nutrient and oxygen exchange for three-dimensional (3-D) cells culture, and maintain liver functions. Meanwhile, genipin, as a natural crosslinker, is widely used to crosslink biomaterials in tissue engineering, with lower cytotoxicity and better biocompatibility. In present study, chitosan/gelatin 3-D scaffolds crosslinked by genipin, glutaraldehyde or 1-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-3-ethyl-carbodimide hydrochloride (EDC) were prepared and characterized by Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The biocompatibility of chitosan/gelatin scaffolds corsslinked with different crosslinkers was investigated by cell viability, morphology and liver specific functions. The result showed that the 1% and 2% genipin crosslinked chitosan/gelatin scaffolds possess ideal porosity. The genipin crosslinked 3-D scaffolds possessed the best biocompatibility than that of the others, and maintained liver specific functions when HepG2 cells seeded on scaffolds. The cellular morphology of HepG2 cells seeded on scaffolds showed that cells could penetrate into the scaffolds and proliferate significantly. Therefore, genipin crosslinked chitosan/gelatin scaffolds could be a promising biomaterial used in liver tissue engineering. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1863-1870, 2016. PMID:27027247

  14. Characterization of primary and secondary cultures of astrocytes prepared from mouse cerebral cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skytt, Dorte Marie; Madsen, Karsten Kirkegaard; Pajecka, Kamilla;

    2010-01-01

    Astrocyte cultures were prepared from cerebral cortex of new-born and 7-day-old mice and additionally, the cultures from new-born animals were passaged as secondary cultures. The cultures were characterized by immunostaining for the astrocyte markers glutamine synthetase (GS), glial fibrillary...... of the astrocyte marker proteins. The metabolic pattern of the cultures from 7-day-old animals of the labeled substrates was comparable to that seen previously in astrocyte cultures prepared from new-born mouse brain showing pronounced glycolytic and oxidative metabolism of glucose. Glutamate was...... prepared from cerebral cortex of 7-day-old mice have metabolic and functional properties indistinguishable from those of classical astrocyte cultures prepared from neocortex of new-born animals. This provides flexibility with regard to preparation and use of these cultures for a variety of purposes....

  15. Comparison of Biocompatibility and Adsorption Properties of Different Plastics for Advanced Microfluidic Cell and Tissue Culture Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Midwoud, Paul M.; Janse, Arnout; Merema, M.T.; Groothuis, Geny M. M.; Verpoorte, Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    Microfluidic technology is providing new routes toward advanced cell and tissue culture models to better understand human biology and disease. Many advanced devices have been made from poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) to enable experiments, for example, to study drug metabolism by use of precision cut

  16. Prolonged hypoxic culture and trypsinization increase the pro-angiogenic potential of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jeppe Grøndahl; Frøbert, Ole; Pilgaard, Linda;

    2011-01-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC), including adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASC), is a promising option in the treatment of vascular disease. Short-term hypoxic culture of MSC augments secretion of anti-apoptotic and angiogenic cytokines. We hypothesized that prolonged hypoxic...

  17. Evaluation of viability and proliferative activity of human urothelial cells cultured onto xenogenic tissue-engineered extracellular matrices.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davis, Niall F

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the viability and proliferative activity of human urothelial cells (HUCs) cultured on tissue-engineered extracellular matrix scaffolds and to assess the potential of extracellular matrixes to support the growth of HUCs in their expected in vivo urine environment.

  18. Tissue characterization using electrical impedance spectroscopy data: a linear algebra approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we use a new linear algebra manipulation on electrical impedance spectroscopy measurements to provide real-time information regarding the nature of the tissue surrounding the needle in minimal invasive procedures. Using a Comsol Multiphysics three-dimensional model, a phantom based on ex vivo animal tissue and in vivo animal data, we demonstrate how tissue inhomogeneity can be characterized without any previous knowledge of the electrical properties of the different tissues, except that they should not be linearly dependent on a certain frequency range. This method may have applications in needle biopsies, radiation seeds, or minimally invasive surgery and can reduce the number of computer tomography or magnetic resonance imaging images. We conclude by demonstrating how this mathematical approach can be useful in other applications. (paper)

  19. The Effects of Low Dose Gamma Irradiation on The Growth of Ciplukan Plant (Physalis Angulata L.) Tissue Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of tissue culture techniques combine with gamma irradiation could improve the somaclonal variation of ciplukan plant (physalis angulata L.) as anti tumour medicinal plant. In this study, tissue culture of ciplukan plant was irradiated with gamma rays at the doses of 0,22; 0,88; and 1,54 Gy, to increase the somaclonal variation ability of the tissue. The selection was done gradually using media as follows: (1). Basic Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium; (2). Half MS macro element, micro element and Gamborg (B5) vitamin medium (3). Modified MS added by Titriplex Ill (Na2EDTA), biotin, myoinositol and growth hormones of different concentrations medium. The best culture development of the irradiated somacton cell lines was found after irradiation with a dose of 1,54 Gy, indicated by the primordial rooting from suspension culture cells, that gave 4,5 times growth ability and 46,5 times weighing capacity compared to the normal and the parent cells respectively. Gradual somaclonal selection have been able to separate the friable embryonic calli, and hence it produced the superior calli and planlet clones. From embryonic leaf and auxiliary bud calli cultures were obtained clones producing specific stems, leaves, and root organs, that depend on the soma clone as well as doses of irradiation

  20. Tissue culture-induced genetic and epigenetic variation in triticale (× Triticosecale spp. Wittmack ex A. Camus 1927) regenerants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machczyńska, Joanna; Zimny, Janusz; Bednarek, Piotr Tomasz

    2015-10-01

    Plant regeneration via in vitro culture can induce genetic and epigenetic variation; however, the extent of such changes in triticale is not yet understood. In the present study, metAFLP, a variation of methylation-sensitive amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis, was used to investigate tissue culture-induced variation in triticale regenerants derived from four distinct genotypes using androgenesis and somatic embryogenesis. The metAFLP technique enabled identification of both sequence and DNA methylation pattern changes in a single experiment. Moreover, it was possible to quantify subtle effects such as sequence variation, demethylation, and de novo methylation, which affected 19, 5.5, 4.5% of sites, respectively. Comparison of variation in different genotypes and with different in vitro regeneration approaches demonstrated that both the culture technique and genetic background of donor plants affected tissue culture-induced variation. The results showed that the metAFLP approach could be used for quantification of tissue culture-induced variation and provided direct evidence that in vitro plant regeneration could cause genetic and epigenetic variation. PMID:26337939

  1. Surface characterization of retinal tissues for the enhancement of vitreoretinal surgical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentin-Rodriguez, Celimar

    Diabetic retinopathy is the most common ophthalmic complication of diabetes and the leading cause of blindness among adults, ages 30 to 70. Surgery to remove scar tissue in the eye is the only corrective treatment once the retina is affected. Visual recovery is often hampered by retinal trauma during surgery and by low patient compliance. Our work in this project aimed to improve vitreoretinal surgical methods from information gathered by sensitive surface analysis of pre-retinal tissues found at the vitreoretinal interface. Atomic force microscopy characterization of human retinal tissues revealed that surgically excised inner limiting membrane (ILM) has a heterogeneous surface and is mainly composed of globular and fibrous structures. ILM tissues also show low adhesion for clean unmodified surfaces as opposed to those with functional groups attractive to those on the ILM surface, due to their charge. Based on these observations, layer-by-layer films with embedded gold nanoparticles with a positive outer charge were designed. These modifications increased the adhesion between surgical instruments and ILM by increasing the roughness and tuning the film surface charge. These films proved to be stable under physiological conditions. Finally, the effect of vital dyes on the topographical characteristics of ILMs was characterized and new imaging modes to further reveal ILM topography were utilized. Roughness and adhesion force data suggest that second generation dyes have no effect on the surface nanostructure of ILMs, but increase adhesion at the tip sample interface. This project clearly illustrates that physicochemical information from tissues can be used to rationally re-design surgical procedures, in this case for tissue removal purposes. This rational design method can be applied to other soft tissue excision procedures as is the case of cataract surgery or laparoscopic removal of endometrial tissue.

  2. Establishment and Molecular Characterization of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Lines Derived From Human Visceral & Subcutaneous Adipose Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Prakash Sutar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, are multipotent stem cells that can differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, myocytes and adipocytes. We utilized adipose tissue as our primary source, since it is a rich source of MSCs as well as it can be harvested using a minimally invasive surgical procedure. Both visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue (VSAT, SCAT respectively samples were cultured using growth medium without using any substratum for their attachment. We observed growth of mesenchymal like cells within 15 days of culturing. In spite of the absence of any substratum, the cells adhered to the bottom of the petri dish, and spread out within 2 hours. Presently VSAT cells have reached at passage 10 whereas; SCAT cells have reached at passage 14. Morphologically MSCs obtained from visceral adipose tissue were larger in shape than subcutaneous adipose tissue. We checked these cells for presence or absence of specific stem cell molecular markers. We found that VSAT and SCAT cells confirmed their MSC phenotype by expression of specific MSC markers CD 105 and CD13 and absence of CD34 and CD 45 markers which are specific for haematopoietic stem cells. These cells also expressed SOX2 gene confirming their ability of self-renewal as well as expressed OCT4, LIF and NANOG for their properties for pluripotency & plasticity. Overall, it was shown that adipose tissue is a good source of mesenchymal stem cells. It was also shown that MSCs, isolated from adipose tissue are multipotent stem cells that can differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, cardiomyocytes, adipocytes and liver cells which may open a new era for cell based regenerative therapies for bone, cardiac and liver disorders.

  3. Discrimination and similarity evaluation of tissue-cultured and wild Dendrobium species using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nai-dong; Chen, Han; Li, Jun; Sang, Mang-mang; Ding, Shen; Yu, Hao

    2015-04-01

    The FTIR method was applied to evaluate the similarity of tissue-cultured and wild Dendrobium huoshanense C.Z. Tang et S.J. Cheng, Dendrobium officinale Kimura et Migo and Dendrobium moniliforme (Linn.) Sw and discriminate different Dendrobium species, especially D. huoshanense and its main goldbrick Dendrobium henanense J.L. Lu et L.X. Gao. Despite the general pattern of the IR spectra, different intensities, shapes and peak positions were found in the IR spectra of these samples, especially in the range of 1800-600 cm-1, which could be used to discriminate them. The methanol, aqueous extracting procedure and the second derivative transformation obviously enlarged the tiny spectral differences among these samples. The similarity evaluation based on the IR spectra and the second derivative IR spectrum revealed that the similarity of the methanol extracts between tissue-cultured and wild Dendrobiums might be lower than that between different Dendrobium species. The similarities of the powders and aqueous extracts between tissue-cultured and wild Dendrobiums were higher than those between different Dendrobium species. The further principal component analysis showed that the first three components explained 99.7%, 87.7% and 85.1% of data variance for powder, methanol extract and aqueous extract, respectively, demonstrating a good discrimination between samples. Our research suggested that the variations of secondary metabolites between different origins of the investigated Dendrobiums might be higher than what we had supposed. Tissue culture techniques were widely used in the conversation of rare and endangered medicinal amedica, however, our study suggested that the chemical constituents of tissue-cultured plants might be quite different from their wild correspondences.

  4. Controlled surface modification of tissue culture polystyrene for selective cell binding using resilin-inspired polypeptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modified tissue culture polystyrene (TCP) surfaces have been fabricated by attachment of recombinant polypeptides based on Drosophila melanogaster resilin and the Anopheles gambiae resilin-like protein. The D. melanogaster polypeptide (Rec-1) was from the first exon of resilin and consisted of 17 very similar repeats of a 15 residue sequence. The A. gambiae polypeptide consisted of 16 repeats of an 11 residue consensus sequence (An16). Polypeptides were attached to the TCP surface through tyrosine-based photo-crosslinking using blue light in combination with (RuII(bpy)3)Cl2 and sodium persulfate. TCP that has been manufactured by mild oxidation has surface phenolic groups that are believed to participate in this crosslinking process. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and contact angle analyses were used to demonstrate polypeptide binding. At higher coating concentrations of Rec-1 and An16, the surface was passivated and fibroblasts no longer attached and spread. At coating concentrations of 1 mg ml−1 for Rec-1 and 0.1 mg ml−1 for An16, where the surface was fully passivated against fibroblast attachment, addition of a cell attachment peptide, cyclo(Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Tyr-Lys) during coating and photo-crosslinking at >0.1 mg ml−1, led to the restoration of fibroblast binding that was dependent on the integrin αV chain. (paper)

  5. Three-dimensional Micro-culture System for Tooth Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchler-Bopp, S; Bécavin, T; Kökten, T; Weickert, J L; Keller, L; Lesot, H; Deveaux, E; Benkirane-Jessel, N

    2016-06-01

    The arrangement of cells within a tissue plays an essential role in organogenesis, including tooth development. Progress is being made to regenerate teeth by reassociating dissociated embryonic dental cells and implanting them in vivo. In the present study, we tested the hanging drop method to study mixed epithelial-mesenchymal cell reorganization in a liquid instead of semisolid medium to see whether it could lead to tooth histogenesis and organogenesis. This method allowed the control of the proportion and number of cells to be used, and the forming microtissues showed homogeneous size. The liquid environment favored cell migrations as compared with collagen gels. Three protocols were compared. The one that sequentially combined the hanging drop and semisolid medium cultures prior to in vivo implantation gave the best results. Indeed, after implantation, teeth developed, showing a well-formed crown, mineralization of dentin and enamel, and the initiation of root formation. Vascularization and the cellular heterogeneity in the mesenchyme were similar to what was observed in developing molars. Finally, after coimplantation with a trigeminal ganglion, the dental mesenchyme, including the odontoblast layer, became innervated. The real advantage of this technique is the small number of cells required to make a tooth. This experimental model can be employed to study the development, physiology, metabolism, or toxicology in forming teeth and test other cell sources. PMID:26965424

  6. Sequential fractionation and isolation of subcellular proteins from tissue or cultured cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghirova, Sabina; Hughes, Bryan G.; Hendzel, Michael J.; Schulz, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Many types of studies require the localization of a protein to, or isolation of enriched protein from a specific cellular compartment. Many protocols in the literature and from commercially available kits claim to yield pure cellular fractions. However, in our hands, the former often do not work effectively and the latter may be prohibitively expensive if a large number of fractionations are required. Furthermore, the largely proprietary composition of reagents in commercial kits means that the user is not able to make adjustments if, for example, a particular component affects the activity of a protein of interest. The method described here allows the isolation of purified proteins from three cellular fractions: the cytosol, membrane-bound organelles, and the nucleus. It uses gentle buffers with increasing detergent strength that sequentially lyse the cell membrane, organelle membranes and finally the nuclear membrane.•Quick, simple to replicate or adjust; this method does not require expensive reagents or use of commercial kits•The protocol can be applied to tissue samples or cultured cells without changing buffer components•Yields purified fractions of cytosolic, membrane bound and nuclear proteins, with the proper distribution of the appropriate subcellular markers: GAPDH, VDAC, SERCA2 and lamin A/C PMID:26740924

  7. Genetic uniformity of sungkai (Peronema canescens Jack regenerated from tissue culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA IMELDA

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Sungkai or jati sebrang (Peronema canescens Jack is one of the industrial timber estate species native to Indonesia, which is commonly chosen for reforestation and as raw materials for the furniture and handicraft industry. In order to provide this planting material in large and sustainable quantities, a technique for in vitro propagation of sungkai through adventitious shoot proliferation is needed and has been successfully developed at the Research Centre for Biotechnology, LIPI. Since tissue culture method is prone to genetic variations, it is important to assess the genetic uniformity of sungkai planting materials derived from this in vitro method at an early stage. In this research, early detection of genetic uniformity was done by morphological observation of the regenerant plants and RAPD analysis using 4 primers namely OPB 5, OPB 9, OPH 11 and OPH 19. Morphological test showed differences in leaf shape, stem diameter and plant height among plantlets originating from Kalbar, Kaltim, Jambi and Cibinong. However, RAPD analysis with PCR showed that all planting materials were genetically uniform among those originating from the same or different places.

  8. Comparison of regeneration potentials in tissue cultures of primitive and cultivated tomato species (Lycopersicon sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lech

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Regeneration capacities of two tomato cultivars: Potentat and Rutgers, and of three accessions of wild tomato species: Lycopersicon peruvianum PI 128650, L. peruvianum var. dentatum PI 128655 and L. glandulosum were studied using an universal medium suitable for regeneration of those plants from leaf pieces in tissue culture. Fragments of leaf blades were taken from plants raised in greenhouse conditions and placed on a modified MS medium containing 0.3 mg/l IAA and 3.0 mg/l BAP solidified with 1% agar. The explants were transferred every 4-5 weeks on fresh medium of the same composition. It was shown that all the three primitive tomato species revealed much higher multiplication coefficients than the two cultivars. Appropriate values were: 11 - for L. glandulosum, 8 - for L. peruvianum, 7 - for L. peruvianum var. dentatum, 4 - for L. esculentum cv. Potentat and 2 - cv. Rutgers. Completely regenerated plants were obtained from all the tested species, but organogenesis occurred almost two weeks earlier in wild tomatoes than in the culitivated varieties of L. esculentum.

  9. Effects of space environment on biological characters of tissue cultured rose seedlings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Huai; LIU Min; LU Jinying; PAN Yi; ZHANG Chunhua

    2005-01-01

    Tissue cultured rose seedlings were carried into space by SHENZHOU-4 spacecraft and then used as the experimental material to investigate effects of the space environmental conditions on morphology, cytology, physiology and molecular biology of the seedlings. After loaded on the space flight, the plant's height, number of leaves, and fresh weight per seedling were all increased significantly compared to the ground controls. The content of chlorophyll was basically unchanged. In some cells, the ultrastructural changes involved twist, contraction and deformation of cell wall, curvature and loose arrangement of lamellae of some chloroplasts, and a significant increase in number of starch grains per chloroplast. In addition, the number of mitochondria increased, but some mitochondrial outer membrane broke, and some mitochondrial cristae disappeared. The activities of the defense enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase, peroxidase and catalyse, in rose leaves increased and the content of malondialdehyde decreased. In the RAPD analysis with 40 10-mer primers, 36 primers generated 148 DNA bands from both of the space flight treated seedlings and the ground controls, and five primers amplified polymorphic products. The rate of DNA variation was 6.34 %.

  10. Fatty Acid Composition of Tissue Cultured Breast Carcinoma and the Effect of Stearoyl-CoA Desaturase 1 Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh, Fatemeh; Mosayebi, Gholamali; Montazeri, Vahid; Darabi, Maryam; Fayezi, Shabnam; Shaaker, Maghsod; Rahmati, Mohammad; Baradaran, Behzad; Mehdizadeh, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1) is a novel therapeutic target in various malignancies, including breast cancer. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of the pharmacologic inhibition of SCD1 on fatty acid composition in tissue explant cultures of human breast cancer and to compare these effects with those in adjacent nonneoplastic breast tissue. Methods Paired samples of tumor and adjacent noncancerous tissue were isolated from 12 patients with infiltrating ductal breast cancer. Samples were explant cultured in vitro, exposed to the highly selective SCD1 inhibitor CAY10566, and examined for fatty acid composition by gas liquid chromatography. The cytotoxic and antigrowth effects were evaluated by quantification of lactate dehydrogenase release and by sulforhodamine B (SRB) measurement, respectively. Results Breast cancer tissue samples were found to have higher levels of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) (p<0.001) and arachidonic acid (20:4n-6, p<0.001) and a lower level of linoleic acid (18:2n-6, p=0.02) than the normal-appearing breast tissues. While exhibiting no evident cytotoxicity, treatment with the SCD1 inhibitor, CAY10566 (0.1-1 µM), for 48 hours significantly increased 18:2n-6 levels in both the tumor and adjacent normal-appearing tissue (approximately 1.2 fold, p<0.05). However, the breast cancer tissue samples showed significant increases in the levels of MUFA and 20:4n-6 compared to the normal-appearing breast tissues (p<0.05). The SRB growth assay revealed a higher rate of inhibition with the SCD1 inhibitor in breast cancer tissues than in normal-appearing tissues (p<0.01, 41% vs. 29%). The SCD1 inhibitor also elevated saturated fatty acid (1.46-fold, p=0.001) levels only in the tumor tissue explant. Conclusion The fatty acid composition and response to SCD1 inhibition differed between the explant cultures from breast cancer and the adjacent normal-appearing tissue. Altered fatty acid composition induced by SCD1 inhibition

  11. Characterization of human arterial tissue affected by atherosclerosis using multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baria, Enrico; Cicchi, Riccardo; Rotellini, Matteo; Nesi, Gabriella; Massi, Daniela; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2016-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is a widespread cardiovascular disease caused by the deposition of lipids (such as cholesterol and triglycerides) on the inner arterial wall. The rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque, resulting in a thrombus, is one of the leading causes of death in the Western World. Preventive assessment of plaque vulnerability is therefore extremely important and can be performed by studying collagen organization and lipid composition in atherosclerotic arterial tissues. Routinely used diagnostic methods, such as histopathological examination, are limited to morphological analysis of the examined tissues, whereas an exhaustive characterization requires immune-histochemical examination and a morpho-functional approach. Instead, a label-free and non-invasive alternative is provided by nonlinear microscopy. In this study, we combined SHG and FLIM microscopy in order to characterize collagen organization and lipids in human carotid ex vivo tissues affected by atherosclerosis. SHG and TPF images, acquired from different regions within atherosclerotic plaques, were processed through image pattern analysis methods (FFT, GLCM). The resulting information on collagen and cholesterol distribution and anisotropy, combined with collagen and lipids fluorescence lifetime measured from FLIM images, allowed characterization of carotid samples and discrimination of different tissue regions. The presented method can be applied for automated classification of atherosclerotic lesions and plaque vulnerability. Moreover, it lays the foundation for a potential in vivo diagnostic tool to be used in clinical setting.

  12. Detection and characterization of glaucoma-like canine retinal tissues using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Grozdanic, Sinisa D.; Harper, Matthew M.; Hamouche, Karl; Hamouche, Nicholas; Kecova, Helga; Lazic, Tatjana; Hernandez-Merino, Elena; Yu, Chenxu

    2013-06-01

    Early detection of pathological changes and progression in glaucoma and other neuroretinal diseases remains a great challenge and is critical to reduce permanent structural and functional retina and optic nerve damage. Raman spectroscopy is a sensitive technique that provides rapid biochemical characterization of tissues in a nondestructive and noninvasive fashion. In this study, spectroscopic analysis was conducted on the retinal tissues of seven beagles with acute elevation of intraocular pressure (AEIOP), six beagles with compressive optic neuropathy (CON), and five healthy beagles. Spectroscopic markers were identified associated with the different neuropathic conditions. Furthermore, the Raman spectra were subjected to multivariate discriminate analysis to classify independent tissue samples into diseased/healthy categories. The multivariate discriminant model yielded an average optimal classification accuracy of 72.6% for AEIOP and 63.4% for CON with 20 principal components being used that accounted for 87% of the total variance in the data set. A strong correlation (R2>0.92) was observed between pattern electroretinography characteristics of AEIOP dogs and Raman separation distance that measures the separation of spectra of diseased tissues from normal tissues; however, the underlining mechanism of this correlation remains to be understood. Since AEIOP mimics the pathological symptoms of acute/early-stage glaucoma, it was demonstrated that Raman spectroscopic screening has the potential to become a powerful tool for the detection and characterization of early-stage disease.

  13. Using Gamma Irradiation To Induce New Mutants In Potatoes Cv. Diamant Through Tissue Culture Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The excess salt, usually NaCl, inhibits potato plant growth and decreases tubers yield. The use of gamma irradiation to induce new mutants in potato cv. Diamant through tissue culture technique was the main task of this study. Sterilized meristemic tips of potato tubers were cultured on aseptic solid MS-medium, pH 5.7, and were incubated at 20 ± 2deg C and 16 hrs day length of 3000-Lux light intensity, to produce virus-free plantlets. Micro-propagation started after 6-8 weeks and plantlets were sub-cultured every 3-4 weeks to increase plantlets population. Plantlets were exposed to 0, or 40 Gy, dose rate 27.7 rad / sec., using Co60 source at the National Center for Research and Radiation Technology, Cairo, Egypt. Irradiated and unirradiated plantlets were transplanted into 60 ml liquid 1/2MS-medium, pH 5.7, and supplemented with 0, 2000 or 4000 ppm NaCl. And, they were incubated for 2 weeks under the same conditions of temperature and light till the new plantlets were grown up. Healthy plantlets were selected, and micro-propagated up to the sixth vegetative generation (M1V6), under the same conditions of salinity and incubation conditions Thereafter, the plantlets were transferred to tuberization liquid 1/2MS-medium, supplemented with the same mentioned concentrations of NaCl, to obtain microtubers. The microtubers were collected after 6-8 weeks and preserved at 10 deg C for 3 months approximately, to break the dormancy. Sprouted microtubers were sown to obtain minitubers, and subsequently macrotubers. All cultures were performed in 30-cm pots in a protected greenhouse, and were irrigated with the same concentrations of NaCl. It could be elicited that cv. Diamant is salinity sensitive. This was evidenced by the decrease in the average number of tubers per plant and average fresh weight of tuber under salinity stress up 4000 ppm NaCl, comparing to unsaline control treatment. Potato plants, which still healthy and produced tubers under salinity stress up to the 6th

  14. Quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has received growing interest in recent years due to its high capability in visualizing soft tissue. Breast imaging became the focus of particular attention as it is considered the most promising candidate for a first clinical application of this contrast modality. In this study, we investigate quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) at conventional polychromatic x-ray sources. Different breast specimens have been scanned at a laboratory phase-contrast imaging setup and were correlated to histopathology. Ascertained tumor types include phylloides tumor, fibroadenoma and infiltrating lobular carcinoma. Identified tissue types comprising adipose, fibroglandular and tumor tissue have been analyzed in terms of phase-contrast Hounsfield units and are compared to high-quality, high-resolution data obtained with monochromatic synchrotron radiation, as well as calculated values based on tabulated tissue properties. The results give a good impression of the method’s prospects and limitations for potential tumor detection and the associated demands on such a phase-contrast breast CT system. Furthermore, the evaluated quantitative tissue values serve as a reference for simulations and the design of dedicated phantoms for phase-contrast mammography. (paper)

  15. Quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willner, M.; Herzen, J.; Grandl, S.; Auweter, S.; Mayr, D.; Hipp, A.; Chabior, M.; Sarapata, A.; Achterhold, K.; Zanette, I.; Weitkamp, T.; Sztrókay, A.; Hellerhoff, K.; Reiser, M.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-04-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has received growing interest in recent years due to its high capability in visualizing soft tissue. Breast imaging became the focus of particular attention as it is considered the most promising candidate for a first clinical application of this contrast modality. In this study, we investigate quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) at conventional polychromatic x-ray sources. Different breast specimens have been scanned at a laboratory phase-contrast imaging setup and were correlated to histopathology. Ascertained tumor types include phylloides tumor, fibroadenoma and infiltrating lobular carcinoma. Identified tissue types comprising adipose, fibroglandular and tumor tissue have been analyzed in terms of phase-contrast Hounsfield units and are compared to high-quality, high-resolution data obtained with monochromatic synchrotron radiation, as well as calculated values based on tabulated tissue properties. The results give a good impression of the method’s prospects and limitations for potential tumor detection and the associated demands on such a phase-contrast breast CT system. Furthermore, the evaluated quantitative tissue values serve as a reference for simulations and the design of dedicated phantoms for phase-contrast mammography.

  16. Plastinated tissue samples as three-dimensional models for optical instrument characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Daniel L; Chaney, Eric J; Boppart, Stephen A

    2008-09-29

    Histology of biological specimens is largely limited to investigating two-dimensional structure because of the sectioning required to produce optically thin samples for conventional microscopy. With the advent of three-dimensional optical imaging technologies such as optical coherence tomography (OCT), diffuse optical tomography (DOT), and multiphoton microscopy (MPM), methods of tissue preparation that minimally disrupt three-dimensional structure are needed. We propose plastination as a means of transforming tissues into three-dimensional models suitable for optical instrument characterization. Tissues are plastinated by infusing them with transparent polymers, after which they can be safely handled, unlike fresh or fixed tissues. Such models are useful for investigating three-dimensional structure, testing and comparing the performance of optical instruments, and potentially investigating tissue properties not normally observed after the three-dimensional scattering properties of a biological samples are lost. We detail our plastination procedures and show examples of imaging several plastinated tissues from a pre-clinical rat model using optical coherence tomography. PMID:18825267

  17. Somaclonal variation is induced de novo via the tissue culture process: a study quantifying mutated cells in Saintpaulia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuru Sato

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The origin of somaclonal variation has not been questioned previously, i.e., "pre-existing mutations" in explants and "newly induced mutations" arising from the tissue culture process have not been distinguished. This is primarily because there has been no reliable molecular method for estimating or quantifying variation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We adopted a petal-variegated cultivar of Saintpaulia 'Thamires' (Saintpaulia sp. as the model plant. Based on the difference between the pre- and post-transposon excision sequence of the promoter region of flavonoid 3', 5'-hydoroxylase (F3'5'H, we estimated mutated (transposon-excised cell percentages using a quantitative real-time PCR. Mutated cell percentages in leaf laminae used as explants was 4.6 and 2.4% in highly or low variegation flower plants, respectively, although the occurrences of blue color mutants in their regenerants were more than 40%. Preexisting mutated cell percentages in cultured explants were considerably lower than the mutated plant percentage among total regenerants via tissue culture. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The estimation of mutated cell percentages became possible using the quantitative real-time PCR. The origins of mutations were successfully distinguished; it was confirmed that somaclonal variations are mainly caused by newly generated mutations arising from tissue culture process.

  18. The effects of gamma irradiation on the growth and cytology of carrot (Dacus Carota L.) tissue culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrot (Dacus Carota L.) tissue suspension cultures were subjected to 0.5-40 krad of gamma irradiation. Callus fresh weight was significantly increased and dry weight slightly increased by low doses (0.5 and 1 krad). Cells size increased at all doses. Cell number and colony-forming ability decreased. There was a negative correlation between radiation dose and mitotic index, and a positive correlation between dose and mitotic abnormalities (multipolar separations, lagging chromosomes, and bridges). Frequency of prophase was increased, and ana phase and telophase were reduced. Tissue culture conditions increased the incidence of aneuploidy and polyploidy in comparison to carrot root tips. Aneuploidy in tissue cultures was decreased and polyploidy was increased by gamma irradiation. Gamma irradiation stimulated shoot formation at 1 krad, and inhibited shoot formation at high doses (20-40 krads). The frequency of abnormal plants (albinos, and plants with no roots or deformation of leaves) regenerated from carrot cell cultures was increased by gamma irradiation. (authors). 30 refs., 3 figs

  19. In vitro culture and characterization of a mammary epithelial cell line from Chinese Holstein dairy cow.

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    Han Hu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to establish a culture system and elucidate the unique characteristics of a bovine mammary epithelial cell line in vitro. METHODOLOGY: Mammary tissue from a three year old lactating dairy cow (ca. 100 d relative to parturition was used as a source of the epithelial cell line, which was cultured in collagen-coated tissue culture dishes. Fibroblasts and epithelial cells successively grew and extended from the culturing mammary tissue at the third day. Pure epithelial cells were obtained by passages culture. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The strong positive immunostaining to cytokeratin 18 suggested that the resulting cell line exhibited the specific character of epithelial cells. Epithelial cells cultured in the presence of 10% FBS, supraphysiologic concentrations of insulin, and hydrocortisone maintained a normal diploid chromosome modal number of 2n=60. Furthermore, they were capable of synthesizing beta-casein (CSN2, acetyl-CoA carboxylase-alpha (ACACA and butyrophilin (BTN1A1. An important finding was that frozen preservation in a mixture of 90% FBS and 10% DMSO did not influence the growth characteristics, chromosome number, or protein secretion of the isolated epithelial cell line. CONCLUSIONS: The obtained mammary epithelial cell line had normal morphology, growth characteristics, cytogenetic and secretory characteristics, thus, it might represent an useful tool for studying the function of Chinese Holstein dairy cows mammary epithelial cell (CMECs.

  20. Increased cell viability and proliferation in post-hypoxic hippocampal tissue culture treated with Acalypha indica root extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Yolanda

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: This research was done to study the influence of Acalypha indica Linn root extract towards relative cell viability and proliferation as parameters of neurogenesis in post-hypoxic hippocampal tissue culture.Methods: Experimental in vitro study using 24 primary neuronal cell cultures obtained from adult Sprague Dawley rat exposed to hypoxia with 5% O2/5% CO2/N2 balance gas for 24 hours. Post-hypoxia, Acalypha indica Linn root extract was added at doses of 10, 15, and 20 mg/mL to 3 treatment groups. No treatment was given to the control group. Each group consists of 6 samples. After 90 hours of incubation, relative cell viability was measured by using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT examination, and cell proliferation was measured by using 5-bromo2’-deoxy-uridine (BrdU for cell proliferation. Data was analyzed using one way ANOVA parametric tests, then further analyzed with post-hoc analysis.Results: The relative cell viability of rat hippocampal tissue culture treated with Acalypha indica Linn root extract with dose of 10, 15, and 20 mg/mL was significantly higher than control (176.95%, 220.62%, and 386.02% vs. 100%. Cell proliferation of rat hippocampal tissue culture treated with Acalypha indica Linn root extract with dose of 10, 15, and 20 mg/mL was significantly higher than control (0.132, 0.117, 0.114 vs 0.096.Conclusion: Acalypha indica Linn root extract with doses of 10, 15, and 20 mg/mL can increase relative cell viability and proliferation in post-hypoxic hippocampal tissue culture. (Med J Indones 2011; 20:94-9Keywords: Acalypha indica Linn (akar kucing, cell proliferation, hypoxia, neurogenesis, relative cell viability

  1. Bordetella avium Antibiotic Resistance, Novel Enrichment Culture, and Antigenic Characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Beach, Nathan M; Thompson, Seth; Mutnick, Rachel; Brown, Lisa; Kettig, Gina; Puffenbarger, Robyn; Miyamoto, David; Temple, Louise

    2012-01-01

    Bordetella avium continues to be an economic issue in the turkey industry as the causative agent of bordetellosis, which often leads to serious secondary infections. This study presents a broad characterization of the antibiotic resistance patterns in this diverse collection of B. avium strains collected over the past thirty years. In addition, the plasmid basis for the antibiotic resistance was characterized. The antibiotic resistance pattern allowed the development of a novel enrichment cul...

  2. Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells from Discarded Neonatal Sternal Tissue: In Vitro Characterization and Angiogenic Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuyun Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Autologous and nonautologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs are being evaluated as proangiogenic agents for ischemic and vascular disease in adults but not in children. A significant number of newborns and infants with critical congenital heart disease who undergo cardiac surgery already have or are at risk of developing conditions related to inadequate tissue perfusion. During neonatal cardiac surgery, a small amount of sternal tissue is usually discarded. Here we demonstrate that MSCs can be isolated from human neonatal sternal tissue using a nonenzymatic explant culture method. Neonatal sternal bone MSCs (sbMSCs were clonogenic, had a surface marker expression profile that was characteristic of bone marrow MSCs, were multipotent, and expressed pluripotency-related genes at low levels. Neonatal sbMSCs also demonstrated in vitro proangiogenic properties. Sternal bone MSCs cooperated with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs to form 3D networks and tubes in vitro. Conditioned media from sbMSCs cultured in hypoxia also promoted HUVEC survival and migration. Given the neonatal source, ease of isolation, and proangiogenic properties, sbMSCs may have relevance to therapeutic applications.

  3. Functional characterization of detergent-decellularized equine tendon extracellular matrix for tissue engineering applications.

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    Daniel W Youngstrom

    Full Text Available Natural extracellular matrix provides a number of distinct advantages for engineering replacement orthopedic tissue due to its intrinsic functional properties. The goal of this study was to optimize a biologically derived scaffold for tendon tissue engineering using equine flexor digitorum superficialis tendons. We investigated changes in scaffold composition and ultrastructure in response to several mechanical, detergent and enzymatic decellularization protocols using microscopic techniques and a panel of biochemical assays to evaluate total protein, collagen, glycosaminoglycan, and deoxyribonucleic acid content. Biocompatibility was also assessed with static mesenchymal stem cell (MSC culture. Implementation of a combination of freeze/thaw cycles, incubation in 2% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, trypsinization, treatment with DNase-I, and ethanol sterilization produced a non-cytotoxic biomaterial free of appreciable residual cellular debris with no significant modification of biomechanical properties. These decellularized tendon scaffolds (DTS are suitable for complex tissue engineering applications, as they provide a clean slate for cell culture while maintaining native three-dimensional architecture.

  4. GENETIC VARIABILITY OF CULTURED PLANT TISSUES UNDER NORMAL CONDITIONS AND UNDER STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolgikh Yu.I.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The genetic variability induced by in vitro conditions known as somaclonal variation is of practical interest due to its potential uses in plant breeding but, on the other hand, if clonal propagation or transformation is main goal, it becomes an unwelcome phenomenon. Thus, it is important to know frequency, the genomic distribution, the mechanisms and factors influencing somaclonal variation. We studied variability of PCR-based DNA markers of cultured tissues and regenerated plants of maize and bread wheat. The original A188 line of maize and the somaclones obtained were tested using 38 RAPD and 10 ISSR primers. None of the A188 plants showed variation in the RAPD and ISSR spectra for any of the primers used. However, the PCR spectra obtained from the somaclones demonstrated some variations, i.e., 22 RAPD primers and 6 ISSR primers differentiated at least one somaclonal variant from the progenitor line. Six SCAR markers were developed based on several RAPD and ISSR fragments. The inheritance of these SCAR markers was verified in the selfing progeny of each somaclone in the R1–R4 generations and in the hybrids, with A188 as the parental line in the F1 and F2 generations. These markers were sequenced and bioinformatic searches were performed to understand the molecular events that may underlie the variability observed in the somaclones. All changes were found in noncoding sequences and were induced by different molecular events, such as the insertion of long terminal repeat transposon, precise miniature inverted repeat transposable element (MITE excision, microdeletion, recombination, and a change in the pool of mitochondrial DNA. In two groups of independently produced somaclones, the same features (morphological, molecular were variable, which confirms the theory of ‘hot spots’ occurring in the genome. The presence of the same molecular markers in the somaclones and in different non-somaclonal maize variants suggests that in some cases

  5. Artifacts by marker enzyme adsorption on nanomaterials in cytotoxicity assays with tissue cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlleben, Wendel; Kolle, Susanne N.; Hasenkamp, Laura-Carolin; Böser, Alexander; Vogel, Sandra; von Vacano, Bernhard; van Ravenzwaay, Ben; Landsiedel, Robert

    2011-07-01

    We used precision cut lung slices (PCLS) to study the cytotoxicity of cobalt ferrite nanomaterials with and without bovine serum albumin (BSA) stabilization. Using mitochondrial activity as an indicator of cytotoxicity (WST-1 assay) increasing concentrations of cobalt ferrite nanomaterial caused increasing levels of cytotoxicity in PCLS irrespective of BSA stabilization. However, there was no increase in released lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels caused by BSA stabilized nanomaterial indicating concentration depended cytotoxictiy. Moreover, non-stabilized nanomaterial caused a decrease of background LDH levels in the PCLS culture supernatant confirmed by complementary methods. Direct characterization of the protein corona of extracted nanomaterial shows that the LDH decrease is due to adsorption of LDH onto the surface of the non-stabilized nanomaterial, correlated with strong agglomeration. Preincubation with serum protein blocks the adsorption of LDH and stabilizes the nanomaterial at low agglomeration. We have thus demonstrated the cytotoxicity of nanomaterials in PCLS does not correlate with disrupted membrane integrity followed by LDH release. Furthermore, we found that intracellular enzymes such as the marker enzyme LDH are able to bind onto surfaces of nanomaterial and thereby adulterate the detection of toxic effects. A replacement of BSA by LDH or a secondary LDH-on-BSA-corona were not observed, confirming earlier indications that the protein corona exchange rate are slow or vanishing on inorganic nanomaterial. Thus, the method(s) to assess nanomaterial-mediated effects have to be carefully chosen based on the cellular effect and possible nano-specific artifacts.

  6. Tissue culture and generation of autotetraploid plants of Sophora flavescens Aiton

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    Wei Kun-Hua

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sophora flavescens Aiton is an important medicinal plant in China. Early in vitro researches of S. flavescens were focused on callus induction and cell suspension culture, only a few were concerned with in vitro multiplication. Objective: To establish and optimize the rapid propagation technology of S. flavescens and to generate and characterize polyploid plants of S. flavescens. Materials and Methods: The different concentrations of 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA and kinetin (KT were used to establish and screen the optimal rapid propagation technology of S. flavescens by orthogonal test; 0.2% colchicine solution was used to induce polyploid plants and the induced buds were identified by root-tip chromosome determination and stomatal apparatus observation. Results: A large number of buds could be induced directly from epicotyl and hypocotyl explants on the Murashige and Skoog medium (MS; 1962 supplemented with 1.4-1.6 mg/l 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP and 0.3 mg/l indole-3-acetic acid (IAA. More than 50 lines of autotetraploid plants were obtained. The chromosome number of the autotetraploid plantlet was 2n = 4x = 36. All tetraploid plants showed typical polyploid characteristics. Conclusion: Obtained autotetraploid lines will be of important genetic and breeding value and can be used for further selection and plant breeding.

  7. Two- and three-dimensional co-culture models of soft tissue healing: pericyte-endothelial cell interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennewein, Martina; Bubel, Monika; Guthörl, Silke; Metzger, Wolfgang; Weigert, Martin; Pohlemann, Tim; Oberringer, Martin

    2016-08-01

    The demographic change in western countries towards an older population is being shadowed by an increased appearance of chronic diseases influencing soft tissue healing in a negative manner. Although various promising therapeutic approaches are available for treating chronic wounds, no in vitro model exists that successfully allows the analysis of interacting cells and of the effect of therapeutic drugs within a wound. Granulation tissue assures wound stability, neo-angiogenesis and revascularization finally leading to functional soft tissue repair. As one of the first steps in developing a model for human granulation tissue, we examined microvascular endothelial cells and pericytes in conventional 2D and in 3D spheroid co-cultures. We determined which parameters could be used in a standardized manner and whether the cultures were responsive to hypoxia and to erythropoietin supplementation. The read-out parameters of cell migration, cell density, rate of apoptotic cells, spatial cell distribution in the spheroid and spheroid volume were shown to be excellent analytic measures. In addition, quantification of hypoxia-related genes identified a total of 13 genes that were up-regulated in spheroids after hypoxia. As these parameters delivered reliable results in the present approach and as the general morphological distribution of pericytes and endothelial cells within the spheroid occurred in a typical manner, we believe that this basic in vitro model will serve for the future study of diverse aspects of soft tissue healing. PMID:27026609

  8. Characterization of anisotropy in viscoelastic properties of intra-abdominal soft tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deo, Dhanannjay; Singh, Tejinder Paul; Dunnican, Ward; De, Suvranu

    2009-01-01

    A portable instrumentation rig is presented for characterizing nonlinear viscoelastic anisotropic response of intra-abdominal organ-tissues. Two linearly independent in-situ experiments are performed at each indentation site on the intra-abdominal organ, by subjecting the organ to 1) normal and 2) tangential displacement stimuli using the above robotic device. For normal indentation experiments, the indenter is ramped into the tissue and held for 10 seconds before sinusoidal indentation stimuli are applied. For tangential (shear) loading, the indenter tip is rigidly glued to the soft tissue surface. Sinusoidal displacement stimuli are then applied laterally in the tangential plane and the force response is recorded. Tangential loading is repeated along orthogonal directions to measure in-plane mechanical properties. Combined analysis of both experiments leads to assessment of anisotropy. In situ experiments on fresh human cadavers are currently under way at the Albany Medical College. PMID:19377118

  9. Bee waxes: a model of characterization for using as base simulator tissue in teletherapy with photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a model of characterization and selection of bee waxes which makes possible to certify the usage viability of that base simulator tissue in the manufacture of appropriated objects for external radiotherapy with mega volt photon beams. The work was divide into three stages, where was evaluated physical and chemical properties besides the aspects related to the capacity of beam attenuation. All the process was carefully accompanied related to the wax origin such as the bee specimen and the flora surrounding the beehives. The chemical composition of the waxes is similar to others simulators usually used in radiotherapy. The behavior of mass attenuation coefficient in the radiotherapeutic energy range is comparable to other simulators, and consequently to the soft tissue. The proposed model is efficient and allows the affirmative that the usage of determined bee wax as base simulator tissue is convenient

  10. X-ray scattering for the characterization of lyophilized breast tissue samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshemey, Wael M.; Mohamed, Fayrouz S.; Khater, Ibrahim M.

    2013-09-01

    This work investigates the possibility of characterizing breast cancer by measuring the X-ray scattering profiles of lyophilized excised breast tissue samples. Since X-ray scattering from water-rich tissue is dominated by scattering from water, the removal of water by lyophilization would enhance the characterization process. In the present study, X-ray scattering profiles of 22 normal, 22 malignant and 10 benign breast tissue samples are measured. The cut-offs of scatter diagrams, sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy of three characterization parameters (full width at half maximum (FWHM) for the peak at 1.1 nm-1, area under curve (AUC), and ratio of 1st to 2nd scattering peak intensities (I1/I2%)) are calculated and compared to the data from non-lyophilized samples. Results show increased sensitivity (up to 100%) of the present data on lyophilized breast tissue samples compared to previously reported data for non-lyophilized samples while the specificity (up to 95.4%), diagnostic accuracy (up to 95.4%) and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve values (up to 0.9979) for both sets of data are comparable. The present study shows significant differences between normal samples and each of malignant and benign samples. Only subtle differences exist between malignant and benign lyophilized breast tissue samples where FWHM=0.7±0.1 and 0.8±0.3, AUC=1.3±0.2 and 1.4±0.2 and I1/I2%=44.9±11.0 and 52.4±7.6 for malignant and benign samples respectively.

  11. Characterization of Mechanical Properties of Tissue Scaffolds by Phase Contrast Imaging and Finite Element Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bawolin, Nahshon K; Dolovich, Allan T; Chen, Daniel X B; Zhang, Chris W J

    2015-08-01

    In tissue engineering, the cell and scaffold approach has shown promise as a treatment to regenerate diseased and/or damaged tissue. In this treatment, an artificial construct (scaffold) is seeded with cells, which organize and proliferate into new tissue. The scaffold itself biodegrades with time, leaving behind only newly formed tissue. The degradation qualities of the scaffold are critical during the treatment period, since the change in the mechanical properties of the scaffold with time can influence cell behavior. To observe in time the scaffold's mechanical properties, a straightforward method is to deform the scaffold and then characterize scaffold deflection accordingly. However, experimentally observing the scaffold deflection is challenging. This paper presents a novel study on characterization of mechanical properties of scaffolds by phase contrast imaging and finite element modeling, which specifically includes scaffold fabrication, scaffold imaging, image analysis, and finite elements (FEs) modeling of the scaffold mechanical properties. The innovation of the work rests on the use of in-line phase contrast X-ray imaging at 20 KeV to characterize tissue scaffold deformation caused by ultrasound radiation forces and the use of the Fourier transform to identify movement. Once deformation has been determined experimentally, it is then compared with the predictions given by the forward solution of a finite element model. A consideration of the number of separate loading conditions necessary to uniquely identify the material properties of transversely isotropic and fully orthotropic scaffolds is also presented, along with the use of an FE as a form of regularization. PMID:25902011

  12. Growth of plant tissue cultures in simulated lunar soil: Implications for a lunar base Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venketeswaran, S.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments to determine whether plant tissue cultures can be grown in the presence of simulated lunar soil (SLS) and the effect of simulated lunar soil on the growth and morphogenesis of such cultures, as well as the effect upon the germination of seeds and the development of seedlings were carried out . Preliminary results on seed germination and seedling growth of rice and calli growth of winged bean and soybean indicate that there is no toxicity or inhibition caused by SLS. SLS can be used as a support medium with supplements of certain major and micro elements.

  13. Characterizing optical properties and spatial heterogeneity of human ovarian tissue using spatial frequency domain imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandy, Sreyankar; Mostafa, Atahar; Kumavor, Patrick D; Sanders, Melinda; Brewer, Molly; Zhu, Quing

    2016-10-01

    A spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) system was developed for characterizing ex vivo human ovarian tissue using wide-field absorption and scattering properties and their spatial heterogeneities. Based on the observed differences between absorption and scattering images of different ovarian tissue groups, six parameters were quantitatively extracted. These are the mean absorption and scattering, spatial heterogeneities of both absorption and scattering maps measured by a standard deviation, and a fitting error of a Gaussian model fitted to normalized mean Radon transform of the absorption and scattering maps. A logistic regression model was used for classification of malignant and normal ovarian tissues. A sensitivity of 95%, specificity of 100%, and area under the curve of 0.98 were obtained using six parameters extracted from the SFDI images. The preliminary results demonstrate the diagnostic potential of the SFDI method for quantitative characterization of wide-field optical properties and the spatial distribution heterogeneity of human ovarian tissue. SFDI could be an extremely robust and valuable tool for evaluation of the ovary and detection of neoplastic changes of ovarian cancer. PMID:26822943

  14. Time-resolved diffused optical characterization of key tissue constituents of human bony prominence locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konugolu Venkata Sekar, Sanathana; Farina, Andrea; Martinenghi, Edoardo; Dalla Mora, Alberto; Taroni, Paola; Pifferi, Antonio; Negredo, Eugènia; Puig, Jordi; Escrig, Roser; Rosales, Quim; Lindner, Claus; Pagliazzi, Marco; Durduran, Turgut

    2015-07-01

    We report a broadband time-resolved characterization of selected bony prominence locations of the human body. A clinical study was performed at six different bony prominence locations of 53 subjects. A portable broadband time-resolved system equipped with pulse drift and distortion compensation strategy was used for absorption and scattering measurements. Key tissue constituents were quantified as a pilot step towards non-invasive optical assessment of bone pathologies.

  15. Quantitative analysis of estimated scattering coefficient and phase retardation for ovarian tissue characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Yi; Wang, Tianheng; Wang, Xiaohong; Sanders, Melinda; Brewer, Molly; Zhu, Quing

    2012-01-01

    In this report, optical scattering coefficient and phase retardation quantitatively estimated from polarization-sensitive OCT (PSOCT) were used for ovarian tissue characterization. A total of 33 ex vivo ovaries (normal: n = 26, malignant: n = 7) obtained from 18 patients were investigated. A specificity of 100% and a sensitivity of 86% were achieved by using estimated scattering coefficient alone; and a specificity of 100% and a sensitivity of 43% were obtained by using phase retardation alon...

  16. Design and characterization of a biodegradable double-layer scaffold aimed at periodontal tissue-engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requicha, João F; Viegas, Carlos A; Hede, Shantesh; Leonor, Isabel B; Reis, Rui L; Gomes, Manuela E

    2016-05-01

    The inefficacy of the currently used therapies in achieving the regeneration ad integrum of the periodontium stimulates the search for alternative approaches, such as tissue-engineering strategies. Therefore, the core objective of this study was to develop a biodegradable double-layer scaffold for periodontal tissue engineering. The design philosophy was based on a double-layered construct obtained from a blend of starch and poly-ε-caprolactone (30:70 wt%; SPCL). A SPCL fibre mesh functionalized with silanol groups to promote osteogenesis was combined with a SPCL solvent casting membrane aiming at acting as a barrier against the migration of gingival epithelium into the periodontal defect. Each layer of the double-layer scaffolds was characterized in terms of morphology, surface chemical composition, degradation behaviour and mechanical properties. Moreover, the behaviour of seeded/cultured canine adipose-derived stem cells (cASCs) was assessed. In general, the developed double-layered scaffolds demonstrated adequate degradation and mechanical behaviour for the target application. Furthermore, the biological assays revealed that both layers of the scaffold allow adhesion and proliferation of the seeded undifferentiated cASCs, and the incorporation of silanol groups into the fibre-mesh layer enhance the expression of a typical osteogenic marker. This study allowed an innovative construct to be developed, combining a three-dimensional (3D) scaffold with osteoconductive properties and with potential to assist periodontal regeneration, carrying new possible solutions to current clinical needs. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23997028

  17. Isolation and genome-wide expression and methylation characterization of CD31+ cells from normal and malignant human prostate tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wei; Hu, Qiang; Wang, Dan; Deeb, Kristin K.; Ma, Yingyu; Morrison, Carl D.; Liu, Song; Johnson, Candace S.; Trump, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are an important component involved in the angiogenesis. Little is known about the global gene expression and epigenetic regulation in tumor endothelial cells. The identification of gene expression and epigenetic difference between human prostate tumor-derived endothelial cells (TdECs) and those in normal tissues may uncover unique biological features of TdEC and facilitate the discovery of new anti-angiogenic targets. We established a method for isolation of CD31+ endothelial cells from malignant and normal prostate tissues obtained at prostatectomy. TdECs and normal-derived ECs (NdECs) showed >90% enrichment in primary culture and demonstrated microvascular endothelial cell characteristics such as cobblestone morphology in monolayer culture, diI-acetyl-LDL uptake and capillary-tube like formation in Matrigel®. In vitro primary cultures of ECs maintained expression of endothelial markers such as CD31, von Willebrand factor, intercellular adhesion molecule, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2. We then conducted a pilot study of transcriptome and methylome analysis of TdECs and matched NdECs from patients with prostate cancer. We observed a wide spectrum of differences in gene expression and methylation patterns in endothelial cells, between malignant and normal prostate tissues. Array-based expression and methylation data were validated by qRT-PCR and bisulfite DNA pyrosequencing. Further analysis of transcriptome and methylome data revealed a number of differentially expressed genes with loci whose methylation change is accompanied by an inverse change in gene expression. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of isolation of ECs from histologically normal prostate and prostate cancer via CD31+ selection. The data, although preliminary, indicates that there exist widespread differences in methylation and transcription between TdECs and NdECs. Interestingly, only a small

  18. Breeding of bitter potato (Solanum juzepczukii) through mutation induction and tissue culture techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potato and other Andean tubers are the most important cultures in Bolivia. Bitter potatoes are cultivated in high areas (4000 m above sea level) and are among the few species that tolerate abiotic factors including freeze. However, the high content of glycoalkaloids is a great inconvenient for their use as food, and using nuclear techniques is an alternative to lower the total glycoalkaloid contents, especially for solanine and solasodine. Thus, tubers of bitter potatoes and cultivated potato were collected in the main centres of genetic diversity in Humanata, Puerto Acosta, Escoma, Ambana, Moco Moco and Italaque. In La Paz, they were submitted to thermotherapy and meristem culture to eradicate viruses eventually present. Thereafter, media were optimised for micropropagation to dispose of enough plantlets to carry out dosimetry studies. Optimum doses were 22 Gy for Bola luk'y and 28 Gy for Luk'y Kheto. Large-scale multiplication was undertaken from M1V1 to M1V4 in order to eliminate chimeras, and 2000 plantlets were weaned for each variety. Mutant genotypes were identified according to phenotypic changes using a descriptor, and by changes in the level of ploidy. Due to the scarce supply of tubers, they were multiplied in the field. Once this was done, methodologies were developed for the biochemical analyses of the total glycoalkaloid content (TGA). Correlating these variables we identified one Bola luk'y mutant (clone 107) with ploidy changes and 30 mg TGA/100 g fresh tuber, and another one (clone 1564) with less than 50 mg TGA/100 g fresh tuber. In addition, for the variety Luk'y Kheto 12 mutant clones were identified. Among them, clones 379 and 399 presented ploidy changes and the most favourable TGA content ranging between 40 and 49 g TGA/100 g fresh tuber, respectively. The other mutant clones, i.e. 568,592, 768, 805, 929, 959, 978, 1005 and 1036 also presented morphological changes but these were coupled with a higher TGA content. This material should now be

  19. Tumor tissue characterization using polarization-sensitive second harmonic generation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokarz, Danielle; Cisek, Richard; Golaraei, Ahmad; Krouglov, Serguei; Navab, Roya; Niu, Carolyn; Sakashita, Shingo; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Asa, Sylvia L.; Barzda, Virginijus; Wilson, Brian C.

    2015-06-01

    Changes in the ultrastructure of collagen in various tumor and non-tumor human tissues including lung, pancreas and thyroid were investigated ex vivo by a polarization-sensitive second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy technique referred to as polarization-in, polarization-out (PIPO) SHG. This involves measuring the orientation of the linear polarization of outgoing SHG as a function of the linear polarization orientation of incident laser radiation. From the PIPO SHG data, the second-order nonlinear optical susceptibility tensor component ratio, χ(2) ZZZ'/χ(2) ZXX', for each pixel of the SHG image was obtained and presented as color-coded maps. Further, the orientation of collagen fibers in the tissue was deduced. Since the χ(2) ZZZ'/χ(2) ZXX' values represent the organization of collagen in the tissue, theses maps revealed areas of altered collagen structure (not simply concentration) within tissue sections. Statistically-significant differences in χ(2) ZZZ'/χ(2) ZXX' were found between tumor and non-tumor tissues, which varied from organ to organ. Hence, PIPO SHG microscopy could potentially be used to aid pathologists in diagnosing cancer. Additionally, PIPO SHG microscopy could aid in characterizing the structure of collagen in other collagen-related biological processes such as wound repair.

  20. Characterization of Human Dental Pulp Tissue Under Oscillatory Shear and Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Burak; Bayrak, Ece; Erisken, Cevat

    2016-06-01

    Availability of material as well as biological properties of native tissues is critical for biomaterial design and synthesis for regenerative engineering. Until recently, selection of biomaterials and biomolecule carriers for dental pulp regeneration has been done randomly or based on experience mainly due to the absence of benchmark data for dental pulp tissue. This study, for the first time, characterizes the linear viscoelastic material functions and compressive properties of human dental pulp tissue harvested from wisdom teeth, under oscillatory shear and compression. The results revealed a gel-like behavior of the pulp tissue over the frequency range of 0.1-100 rps. Uniaxial compression tests generated peak normal stress and compressive modulus values of 39.1±20.4 kPa and 5.5±2.8 kPa, respectively. Taken collectively, the linear viscoelastic and uniaxial compressive properties of the human dental pulp tissue reported here should enable the better tailoring of biomaterials or biomolecule carriers to be employed in dental pulp regeneration. PMID:27093446

  1. Endothelin-1 receptors in rat tissues: characterization by bosentan, ambrisentan and CI-1020.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Yoshinari; Osano, Ayaka; Hayashi, Hideki; Itoh, Kunihiko; Okura, Takashi; Deguchi, Yoshiharu; Ito, Yoshihiko; Yamada, Shizuo

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to characterize comparatively endothelin-1 (ET-1) receptors in rat tissues by radioligand binding assay using [(125)I]ET-1 and to examine receptor binding after oral administration of bosentan. Significant amount of specific [(125)I]ET-1 binding was detected in the lung, heart, kidney, bladder and cerebral cortex of rats. ET-1, bosentan, ambrisentan, and CI-1020 inhibited specific [(125)I]ET-1 binding in these tissues in a concentration-dependent manner. The Hill coefficients of each agent in the rat lung and cerebral cortex and those of bosentan and ET-1 in the heart, kidney and bladder were close to unity, while the Hill coefficients of ambrisentan and CI-1020 in the heart, kidney and bladder were less than one. The nonlinear least squares regression analysis revealed the presence of high- and low-affinity ET-1 receptor sites in these tissues for ambrisentan and CI-1020. Oral administration of bosentan caused a dose-dependent decrease in specific [(125)I]ET-1 binding in the rat lung, kidney and bladder, suggesting significant binding of the tissue ET-1 receptors in vivo. In conclusion, it has been shown that a significant amount of pharmacologically relevant ET-1 receptors may exist in rat tissues and that ET-1 receptor antagonists such as bosentan at pharmacological doses may exert some pharmacological effects by binding these ET-1 receptors. PMID:24583865

  2. Tissue culture of osteogenic sarcoma in rats, induced by radioactive phosphorus P-32 and the effect of the anti-cancerous agents on these tumor cells under tissue culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small pieces of osteogenic sarcoma, induced into albino rats of the C.F. Wistar strain by injection of radioactive phosphorus 32P, were cultured in mixtures of Eagle's minimum essential medium and 20% calf serum. The tumor cells cultured in this way were transplanted into the subcutaneous tissue or the intraabdominal cavity to healthy albino rats. The effect of the anticancerous agents was evaluated by the decrease of nucleic acid composition in these cultured tumor cells. As anti-cancerous agents, cyclophosphamide (CPA), mitomycin C(MMC), and 5-fluorouracil(5-FU) were put into contact with the tumor cells in cultures for two hours under the following dilutions: CPA; 10-6, 10-5, 10-4 g/ml. MMC; 2 x 10-8, 2 x 10-7, 2 x 10-6 g/ml. 5-FU; 2 x 10-6, 2 x 10-5, 2 x 10-4 g/ml. The results are as follows: Three of the seven osteogenic sarcomas in rats were successfully cultured, one of them through more than eighteen generations. After about five hundred thousand cultured cells had been transplanted into the subcutaneous tissues or abdominal cavities of rats, tumors grew in all of them. The histological findings of the tumors in the second generation were quite similar to those of the original tumor. The same process was repeated three times and the tumor showed histogical findings similar to those of the original ones. The capability of nucleic acid synthesis in these cells was decreased at twenty fours after CPA contact and at forty eight hours after MMC. (J.P.N.)

  3. Fabrication and Characterization of Spongy Denuded Amniotic Membrane Based Scaffold for Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Taghiabadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: As a biological tissue material, amniotic membrane (AM has low immunogenicity and to date has been widely adopted in clinical practice. However, some features such as low biomechanical consistency and rapid biodegradation is limited the application of AM. Therefore, in this study, we fabricated a novel three-dimensional (3D spongy scaffold made of the extracellular matrix (ECM of denuded AM. Due to their unique characteristics which are similar to the skin, these scaffolds can be considered as an alternative option in skin tissue engineering. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, cellular components of human amniotic membrane (HAM were removed with 0.03% (w/v sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS. Quantitative analysis was performed to determine levels of Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs, collagen, and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA. To increase the low efficiency and purity of the ECM component, especially collagen and GAG, we applied an acid solubilization procedure hydrochloridric acid (HCl 0.1 M with pepsin (1 mg/ml. In the present experiment 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethyl aminopropyl carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC/N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS cross linker agent was used to improve the mechanical properties of 3D lyophilized AM scaffold. The spongy 3D AM scaffolds were specified, by scanning electron microscopy, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E staining, a swelling test, and mechanical strength and in vitro biodegradation tests. Human fetal fibroblast culture systems were used to establish that the scafolds were cytocompatible. Results: Histological analysis of treated human AM showed impressive removal of cellular components. DNA content was diminished after treatment (39 ± 4.06 μg/ml vs. 341 ± 29.60 μg/ml. Differences were observed between cellular and denude AM in matrix collagen (478 ± 18.06 μg/mg vs. 361 ± 27.47 μg/mg.With the optimum concentration of 1 mM NHS/EDC ratio1:4, chemical cross-linker agent could significantly increase the

  4. Effects of tissue-cultured mountain ginseng (Panax ginseng CA Meyer) extract on male patients with erectile dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Tae-Hwan; Jeon, Seung Hyun; Hahn, Eun-Joo; Paek, Kee-Yoeup; Park, Jong Kwan; Youn, Nae Young; Lee, Hyung-Lae

    2009-01-01

    Korean ginseng and mountain ginseng (Panax ginseng CA Meyer) are important traditional herbal plants whose ginsenosides are generally accepted as serving to improve sexual functions, such as penile erection. We investigated the effects of tissue-cultured mountain ginseng extract (TMGE) on male patients with erectile dysfunction (ED). A double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted with 143 patients experiencing ED. Over the course of 8 weeks, one group took 1 000 mg of TMGE twice a day...

  5. Somaclonal Variation Is Induced De Novo via the Tissue Culture Process: A Study Quantifying Mutated Cells in Saintpaulia

    OpenAIRE

    Mitsuru Sato; Munetaka Hosokawa; Motoaki Doi

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The origin of somaclonal variation has not been questioned previously, i.e., "pre-existing mutations" in explants and "newly induced mutations" arising from the tissue culture process have not been distinguished. This is primarily because there has been no reliable molecular method for estimating or quantifying variation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We adopted a petal-variegated cultivar of Saintpaulia 'Thamires' (Saintpaulia sp.) as the model plant. Based on the difference be...

  6. Yield Effects of Tissue Culture Bananas in Kenya: Accounting for Selection Bias and the Role of Complementary Inputs

    OpenAIRE

    Kabunga, Nassul S.; Dubois, Thomas; Qaim, Matin

    2011-01-01

    We analyze yield effects of tissue culture (TC) banana technology in the Kenyan small farm sector, using recent survey data and an endogenous switching regression approach. TC banana plantlets, which are free from pests and diseases, have been introduced in East Africa since the late-1990s. While field experiments show significant yield advantages over traditional banana suckers, a rigorous assessment of impacts in farmers’ fields is still outstanding. A comparison of mean yield levels betwee...

  7. Influence of ionizing radiation on synthesis and molecular heterogeneity of catalase in tissue culture of Rauwolfia serpentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in activity and molecular heterogeneity of catalase in tissue culture of Rauwolfia serpentina following irradiation in early growth period at the doses of 8 and 50 Gy has been studied. Ionizing radiation accelerate the synthesis and degradation rates of catalase and total protein. A comparative study of changes in enzyme and protein turnover during growth on irradiated and non-irradiated medium has been made

  8. X-ray scattering for the characterization of lyophilized breast tissue samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work investigates the possibility of characterizing breast cancer by measuring the X-ray scattering profiles of lyophilized excised breast tissue samples. Since X-ray scattering from water-rich tissue is dominated by scattering from water, the removal of water by lyophilization would enhance the characterization process. In the present study, X-ray scattering profiles of 22 normal, 22 malignant and 10 benign breast tissue samples are measured. The cut-offs of scatter diagrams, sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy of three characterization parameters (full width at half maximum (FWHM) for the peak at 1.1 nm−1, area under curve (AUC), and ratio of 1st to 2nd scattering peak intensities (I1/I2%)) are calculated and compared to the data from non-lyophilized samples. Results show increased sensitivity (up to 100%) of the present data on lyophilized breast tissue samples compared to previously reported data for non-lyophilized samples while the specificity (up to 95.4%), diagnostic accuracy (up to 95.4%) and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve values (up to 0.9979) for both sets of data are comparable. The present study shows significant differences between normal samples and each of malignant and benign samples. Only subtle differences exist between malignant and benign lyophilized breast tissue samples where FWHM=0.7±0.1 and 0.8±0.3, AUC=1.3±0.2 and 1.4±0.2 and I1/I2%=44.9±11.0 and 52.4±7.6 for malignant and benign samples respectively. - Highlights: • X-ray scattering profiles of breast tissue samples are acquired. • Three X-ray profile characterization parameters are calculated. • The cut-offs, sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy are calculated. • They are compared to the data from non-lyophilized samples. • Results show increased sensitivity in case of lyophilized samples

  9. Synthesis, characterization and antioxidant activity of a novel electroactive and biodegradable polyurethane for cardiac tissue engineering application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baheiraei, Nafiseh [Department of Tissue Engineering, School of Advanced Medical Technologies, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, 1417755469 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Yeganeh, Hamid, E-mail: h.yeganeh@ippi.ac.ir [Department of Polyurethane, Iran Polymer and Petrochemical Institute, P.O. Box: 14965/115, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ai, Jafar [Department of Tissue Engineering, School of Advanced Medical Technologies, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, 1417755469 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Brain and Spinal Injury Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gharibi, Reza [Department of Polyurethane, Iran Polymer and Petrochemical Institute, P.O. Box: 14965/115, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Azami, Mahmoud; Faghihi, Faezeh [Department of Tissue Engineering, School of Advanced Medical Technologies, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, 1417755469 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-11-01

    There has been a growing trend towards applying conducting polymers for electrically excitable cells to increase electrical signal propagation within the cell-loaded substrates. A novel biodegradable electroactive polyurethane containing aniline pentamer (AP-PU) was synthesized and fully characterized by spectroscopic methods. To tune the physico-chemical properties and biocompatibility, the AP-PU was blended with polycaprolactone (PCL). The presence of electroactive moieties and the electroactivity behavior of the prepared films were confirmed by UV–visible spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. A conventional four probe analysis demonstrated the electrical conductivity of the films in the semiconductor range (∼ 10{sup −5} S/cm). MTT assays using L929 mouse fibroblast and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) showed that the prepared blend (PB) displayed more cytocompatibility compared with AP-PU due to the introduction of a biocompatible PCL moiety. The in vitro cell culture also confirmed that PB was as supportive as tissue culture plate. The antioxidant activity of the AP-PU was proved using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging assay by employing UV–vis spectroscopy. In vitro degradation tests conducted in phosphate-buffered saline, pH 7.4 and pH 5.5, proved that the films were also biodegradable. The results of this study have highlighted the potential application of this bioelectroactive polyurethane as a platform substrate to study the effect of electrical signals on cell activities and to direct desirable cell function for tissue engineering applications. - Highlights: • Straight forward methodology for synthesis of electroactive polyurethane • Biodegradability and non-toxicity through proper selection of starting materials • Supporting cell proliferation and attachment combined with antioxidant property.

  10. Synthesis, characterization and antioxidant activity of a novel electroactive and biodegradable polyurethane for cardiac tissue engineering application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There has been a growing trend towards applying conducting polymers for electrically excitable cells to increase electrical signal propagation within the cell-loaded substrates. A novel biodegradable electroactive polyurethane containing aniline pentamer (AP-PU) was synthesized and fully characterized by spectroscopic methods. To tune the physico-chemical properties and biocompatibility, the AP-PU was blended with polycaprolactone (PCL). The presence of electroactive moieties and the electroactivity behavior of the prepared films were confirmed by UV–visible spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. A conventional four probe analysis demonstrated the electrical conductivity of the films in the semiconductor range (∼ 10−5 S/cm). MTT assays using L929 mouse fibroblast and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) showed that the prepared blend (PB) displayed more cytocompatibility compared with AP-PU due to the introduction of a biocompatible PCL moiety. The in vitro cell culture also confirmed that PB was as supportive as tissue culture plate. The antioxidant activity of the AP-PU was proved using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging assay by employing UV–vis spectroscopy. In vitro degradation tests conducted in phosphate-buffered saline, pH 7.4 and pH 5.5, proved that the films were also biodegradable. The results of this study have highlighted the potential application of this bioelectroactive polyurethane as a platform substrate to study the effect of electrical signals on cell activities and to direct desirable cell function for tissue engineering applications. - Highlights: • Straight forward methodology for synthesis of electroactive polyurethane • Biodegradability and non-toxicity through proper selection of starting materials • Supporting cell proliferation and attachment combined with antioxidant property

  11. Screening Test of Greenhouse Seeding Exercise Matrix for Tissue Culture Seeding of Dendrobium Officinale Kimura et Migo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Dendrobium officinale Kimura et Migo has a high demand on planting matrix, while its tissue culture seeding has much more demands on planting matrix. To find out a seeding exercise matrix to enhance the survival rate of tissue culture seeding of Dendrobium officinale Kimura et Migo more efficiently, this article carries out a screening test of greenhouse seeding exercise matrix material for tissue culture seeding of Dendrobium officinale Kimura et Migo. The test adopts full random test design, mainly for screening test of five matrix materials, namely pine bark, camphor tree bark, fern root, peanut shell and longan bark. Compare the impact of prepared seeding exercise matrix on the survival rate and growth trend (including plant height, growth rate and bud growth rate. The test result shows that: The seeding exercise matrix prepared by fern root is the most efficient, and the survival rate, plant height, growth rate and bud growth rate have achieved 100%, 4.5cm, 43.67% and 54.33% respectively. The main reason may be that the seeding exercise matrix C prepared by fern root is fairly loose and has a great water permeability, which is conducive to the growth of Dendrobium officinale Kimura et Migo.

  12. Characterization of a novel rat cholangiocarcinoma cell culture model-CGCCA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Nan Yeh; Kun-Ju Lin; Tsung-Wen Chen; Ren-Ching Wu; Lee-Cheng Tsao; Ying-Tzu Chen; Wen-Hui Weng; Miin-Fu Chen

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To characterize a culture model of rat CCA cells, which were derived from a transplantable TTA-induced CCA and designated as Chang Gung CCA (CGCCA). METHODS: The CGCCA cells were cultured at in vitro passage 12 times on a culture dish in DMEM medium. To measure the doubling time, 103 cells were plated in a 96-well plate containing the growth medium. The cells were harvested 4 to 10 d after seeding, and a standard MTT assay was used to measure the growth. The phenotype of CACCA cell and xenograft was determined by immunohistochemical study. We also determine the chromosomal alterations of CGCCA, G-banding and spectral karyotyping studies were performed. The CGCCA cell line was transplanted into the nude mice for examining its tumorigenicity. 2-Deoxy-2-(18F)fluoro-Dglucose (FDG) autoradiography was also performed to evaluate the FDG uptake of the tumor xenograft. RESULTS: The doubling time for the CGCCA cell line was 32 h. After transplantation into nude mice, FDG autoradiography showed that the tumors formed at the cell transplantation site had a latency period of 4-6 wk with high FDG uptake excluding necrosis tissue. Moreover, immunohistochemical staining revealed prominent cytoplasmic expression of c-erb-B2, CK19, c-Met, COX-Ⅱ, EGFR, MUC4, and a negative expression of K-ras. All data confirmed the phenotypic features of the CGCCA cell line coincide with the xenograft mice tumors, indicating cells containing the tumorigenicity of CCA originated from CCA. In addition, karyotypic banding analysis showed that the diploid (2n) cell status combines with ring and giant rod marker chromosomes in these clones; either both types simultaneously appeared or only one type of marker chromosome in a pair appeared in a cell. The major materials contained in the marker chromosome were primarily identified from chromosome 4. CONCLUSION: The current CGCCA cell line may be used as a non-K-ras effect CCA model and to obtain information and reveal novel pathways for CCA. Further

  13. Effect of γ-rays on tissue culture growth and beet mosaic content of sugar beet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callus tissue of sugar beet containing beet mosaic virus was exposed to 3-27 Gy γ-rays 15 days following transplantation to a fresh nutrient medium. The virus was accumulated in irradiated callus tissue more readily than in the control: the accumulation increased with the dose increase. The virus titration was increased and the tissue growth inhibited by the effect of γ-rays

  14. Estimation of dynamic metabolic activity in micro-tissue cultures from sensor recordings with an FEM model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Cornelia; Forstmeier, Christian; Biedermann, Johannes; Schermuly, Julia; Demmel, Franz; Wolf, Peter; Kaspers, Bernd; Brischwein, Martin

    2016-05-01

    We estimated the dynamic cell metabolic activity and the distribution of the pH value and oxygen concentration in tissue samples cultured in vitro by using real-time sensor records and a numerical simulation of the underlying reaction-diffusion processes. As an experimental tissue model, we used chicken spleen slices. A finite element method model representing the biochemical processes and including the relevant sensor data was set up. By fitting the calculated results to the measured data, we derived the spatiotemporal values of the pH value, the oxygen concentration and the absolute metabolic activity (extracellular acidification and oxygen uptake rate) of the samples. Notably, the location of the samples in relation to the sensors has a great influence on the detectable metabolic rates. The long-term vitality of the tissue samples strongly depends on their size. We further discuss the benefits and limitations of the model. PMID:26296800

  15. Evaluation of the effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on cultured Rana catesbeiana tailfin tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Austin eHammond

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles (NPs, materials that have one dimension less than 100 nm, are used in manufacturing, health and food products, and consumer products including cosmetics, clothing and household appliances. Their utility to industry is derived from their high surface-area-to-volume ratios and physico-chemical properties distinct from their bulk counterparts, but the near-certainty that NPs will be released into the environment raises the possibility that they could present health risks to humans and wildlife. The thyroid hormones (THs, thyroxine and 3,3’,5-triiodothyronine (T3, are involved in development and metabolism in vertebrates including humans and frogs. Many of the processes of anuran metamorphosis are analogous to human post-embryonic development and disruption of TH action can have drastic effects. These shared features make the metamorphosis of anurans an excellent model for screening for endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs. We used the cultured tailfin (C-fin assay to examine the exposure effects of 0.1-10 nM (~8-800 ng/L of three types of ~20 nm TiO2 NPs (P25, M212, M262 and micron-sized TiO2 (μTiO2 ±10 nM T3. The actual Ti levels were 40.9 – 64.7% of the nominal value. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR was used to measure the relative amounts of mRNA transcripts encoding TH-responsive thyroid hormone receptors (thra and thrb and Rana larval keratin type I (rlk1, as well as the cellular stress-responsive heat shock protein 30 kDa (hsp30, superoxide dismutase (sod, and catalase (cat. The levels of the TH-responsive transcripts were largely unaffected by any form of TiO2. Some significant effects on stress-related transcripts were observed upon exposure to micron-sized TiO2, P25 and M212 while no effect was observed with M262 exposure. Therefore the risk of adversely affecting amphibian tissue by disrupting TH-signalling or inducing cellular stress is low for these compounds relative to other previously

  16. Evaluation of the effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on cultured Rana catesbeiana tailfin tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, S. Austin; Carew, Amanda C.; Helbing, Caren C.

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs), materials that have one dimension less than 100 nm, are used in manufacturing, health, and food products, and consumer products including cosmetics, clothing, and household appliances. Their utility to industry is derived from their high surface-area-to-volume ratios and physico-chemical properties distinct from their bulk counterparts, but the near-certainty that NPs will be released into the environment raises the possibility that they could present health risks to humans and wildlife. The thyroid hormones (THs), thyroxine, and 3,3′,5-triiodothyronine (T3), are involved in development and metabolism in vertebrates including humans and frogs. Many of the processes of anuran metamorphosis are analogous to human post-embryonic development and disruption of TH action can have drastic effects. These shared features make the metamorphosis of anurans an excellent model for screening for endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). We used the cultured tailfin (C-fin) assay to examine the exposure effects of 0.1–10 nM (~8–800 ng/L) of three types of ~20 nm TiO2 NPs (P25, M212, M262) and micron-sized TiO2 (μ TiO2) ±10 nM T3. The actual Ti levels were 40.9–64.7% of the nominal value. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) was used to measure the relative amounts of mRNA transcripts encoding TH-responsive THs receptors (thra and thrb) and Rana larval keratin type I (rlk1), as well as the cellular stress-responsive heat shock protein 30 kDa (hsp30), superoxide dismutase (sod), and catalase (cat). The levels of the TH-responsive transcripts were largely unaffected by any form of TiO2. Some significant effects on stress-related transcripts were observed upon exposure to micron-sized TiO2, P25, and M212 while no effect was observed with M262 exposure. Therefore, the risk of adversely affecting amphibian tissue by disrupting TH-signaling or inducing cellular stress is low for these compounds relative to other previously-tested NPs. PMID

  17. Characterization of printable cellular micro-fluidic channels for tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tissue engineering has been a promising field of research, offering hope of bridging the gap between organ shortage and transplantation needs. However, building three-dimensional (3D) vascularized organs remains the main technological barrier to be overcome. One of the major challenges is the inclusion of a vascular network to support cell viability in terms of nutrients and oxygen perfusion. This paper introduces a new approach to the fabrication of vessel-like microfluidic channels that has the potential to be used in thick tissue or organ fabrication in the future. In this research, we investigate the manufacturability of printable micro-fluidic channels, where micro-fluidic channels support mechanical integrity as well as enable fluid transport in 3D. A pressure-assisted solid freeform fabrication platform is developed with a coaxial needle dispenser unit to print hollow hydrogel filaments. The dispensing rheology is studied, and effects of material properties on structural formation of hollow filaments are analyzed. Sample structures are printed through the developed computer-controlled system. In addition, cell viability and gene expression studies are presented in this paper. Cell viability shows that cartilage progenitor cells (CPCs) maintained their viability right after bioprinting and during prolonged in vitro culture. Real-time PCR analysis yielded a relatively higher expression of cartilage-specific genes in alginate hollow filament encapsulating CPCs, compared with monolayer cultured CPCs, which revealed that printable semi-permeable micro-fluidic channels provided an ideal environment for cell growth and function. (paper)

  18. Characterization of printable cellular micro-fluidic channels for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yahui; Yu, Yin; Chen, Howard; Ozbolat, Ibrahim T

    2013-06-01

    Tissue engineering has been a promising field of research, offering hope of bridging the gap between organ shortage and transplantation needs. However, building three-dimensional (3D) vascularized organs remains the main technological barrier to be overcome. One of the major challenges is the inclusion of a vascular network to support cell viability in terms of nutrients and oxygen perfusion. This paper introduces a new approach to the fabrication of vessel-like microfluidic channels that has the potential to be used in thick tissue or organ fabrication in the future. In this research, we investigate the manufacturability of printable micro-fluidic channels, where micro-fluidic channels support mechanical integrity as well as enable fluid transport in 3D. A pressure-assisted solid freeform fabrication platform is developed with a coaxial needle dispenser unit to print hollow hydrogel filaments. The dispensing rheology is studied, and effects of material properties on structural formation of hollow filaments are analyzed. Sample structures are printed through the developed computer-controlled system. In addition, cell viability and gene expression studies are presented in this paper. Cell viability shows that cartilage progenitor cells (CPCs) maintained their viability right after bioprinting and during prolonged in vitro culture. Real-time PCR analysis yielded a relatively higher expression of cartilage-specific genes in alginate hollow filament encapsulating CPCs, compared with monolayer cultured CPCs, which revealed that printable semi-permeable micro-fluidic channels provided an ideal environment for cell growth and function. PMID:23458889

  19. Fabrication and characterization of PCL/gelatin composite nanofibrous scaffold for tissue engineering applications by electrospinning method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study, composite nanofibrous tissue engineering-scaffold consisting of polycaprolactone and gelatin, was fabricated by electrospinning method, using a new cost-effective solvent mixture: chloroform/methanol for polycaprolactone (PCL) and acetic acid for gelatin. The morphology of the nanofibrous scaffold was investigated by using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) which clearly indicates that the morphology of nanofibers was influenced by the weight ratio of PCL to gelatin in the solution. Uniform fibers were produced only when the weight ratio of PCL/gelatin is sufficiently high (10:1). The scaffold was further characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric (TG) analysis, and X-ray diffraction (XRD). FT-IR and TG analysis indicated some interactions between PCL and gelatin molecules within the scaffold, while XRD results demonstrated crystalline nature of PCL/gelatin composite scaffold. Cytotoxicity effect of scaffold on L929 mouse fibroblast cells was evaluated by MTT assay and cell proliferation on the scaffold was confirmed by DNA quantification. Positive results of MTT assay and DNA quantification L929 mouse fibroblast cells indicated that the scaffold made from the combination of natural polymer (gelatin) and synthetic polymer (PCL) may serve as a good candidate for tissue engineering applications. - Highlights: ► PCL/Gelatin scaffold was successfully fabricated by electrospinning method. PCL in CHCl3/CH3OH and gelatin in acetic acid: a novel polymer-solvent system. ► The morphology of nanofibers was influenced by the weight ratio of PCL/gelatin. ► Chemical interactions between PCL and gelatin molecules enhanced cell growth. ► Cell culture studies indicate the suitability of scaffold for tissue regeneration

  20. Fabrication and characterization of PCL/gelatin composite nanofibrous scaffold for tissue engineering applications by electrospinning method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gautam, Sneh [Department of Polymer and Process Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee, 247667 (India); Dinda, Amit Kumar [Department of Pathology, All India Institute of Medical Science, New Delhi, 110029 (India); Mishra, Narayan Chandra, E-mail: mishrawise@googlemail.com [Department of Polymer and Process Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee, 247667 (India)

    2013-04-01

    In the present study, composite nanofibrous tissue engineering-scaffold consisting of polycaprolactone and gelatin, was fabricated by electrospinning method, using a new cost-effective solvent mixture: chloroform/methanol for polycaprolactone (PCL) and acetic acid for gelatin. The morphology of the nanofibrous scaffold was investigated by using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) which clearly indicates that the morphology of nanofibers was influenced by the weight ratio of PCL to gelatin in the solution. Uniform fibers were produced only when the weight ratio of PCL/gelatin is sufficiently high (10:1). The scaffold was further characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric (TG) analysis, and X-ray diffraction (XRD). FT-IR and TG analysis indicated some interactions between PCL and gelatin molecules within the scaffold, while XRD results demonstrated crystalline nature of PCL/gelatin composite scaffold. Cytotoxicity effect of scaffold on L929 mouse fibroblast cells was evaluated by MTT assay and cell proliferation on the scaffold was confirmed by DNA quantification. Positive results of MTT assay and DNA quantification L929 mouse fibroblast cells indicated that the scaffold made from the combination of natural polymer (gelatin) and synthetic polymer (PCL) may serve as a good candidate for tissue engineering applications. - Highlights: ► PCL/Gelatin scaffold was successfully fabricated by electrospinning method. ► PCL in CHCl{sub 3}/CH{sub 3}OH and gelatin in acetic acid: a novel polymer-solvent system. ► The morphology of nanofibers was influenced by the weight ratio of PCL/gelatin. ► Chemical interactions between PCL and gelatin molecules enhanced cell growth. ► Cell culture studies indicate the suitability of scaffold for tissue regeneration.

  1. Irreversible damage in ovine ovarian tissue after cryopreservation in propanediol: analyses after in vitro culture and xenotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskam, I C; Lund, T; Santos, R R

    2011-10-01

    Current progress in cancer treatment has increased the incidence of long-term patient survival. Ovarian tissue cryopreservation (OT) is still the most promising fertility saving method offered to young female patients with cancer prior to the onset of radio-chemotherapy. Further follicular development of immature primordial follicles depends on transplantation or in vitro culture (IVC). Aim of this study was to evaluate the appropriateness of cryopreserved ovine OT with 1,2-propanediol (PROH) after short-term IVC and xenotransplantation (XT). Ovarian tissue fragments from young adult sheep were cryopreserved using a standard slow-freezing protocol with 1.5 M PROH. Cryopreserved OT was assessed by light- and transmission electron microscopic analyses after thawing, IVC or XT in severe immunodeficient mice. Control OT showed the presence of healthy preantral follicles (Mean: 78.8%; SE 2.9%) and normal structure of the stromal tissue. After thawing and IVC over 80% of damaged primordial follicles and poor preservation of the stromal tissue was observed. After XT, OT demonstrated deficient follicles and huge areas of vacuolization in the stromal tissue confirmed by ultrastructural assessment. In conclusion, because of the irreversible character of the follicular and stromal damage of cryopreserved ovine ovarian tissue after IVC and XT, strong improvement of the utilized protocol is needed to be suitable for the preservation of ovine ovarian tissue. The deleterious effects of PROH do not imply its exclusion as cryoprotectant, but more research is needed for the development of less toxic cryoprotectant mixtures and toxicity neutralizers with attested cryoprotectant capacity for the safe and feasible freezing of human ovarian tissue. PMID:21272097

  2. Factors affecting proliferation and elongation of shoots of Phak Liang (Gnetum gnemon Linn. through tissue culture technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Te-chato, S.

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The tissue culture of Phak Liang (Gnetum gnemon Linn. was investigated for micropropagation. The types of explant, culture media, types and concentrations of plant growth regulators, orientation of explant and section of explant were tested for their efficacy in inducing and proliferating shoot buds. The elongation of shoots and root induction was also studied. Young leaves gave the highest number of shoot buds when they were cultured in Murashige and Skoog (MS medium supplemented with 0.25 mg/l IBA and 1.53 mg/l BA. The medium supplemented with 0.25 mg/l thidiazuron (TDZ alone provided the best result on multiple shoot bud induction both in percentage of explant forming shoots and number of shoot buds per explant. The percentage of explant forming shoot buds and number of shoot buds obtained from leaves were 90% and 26.50 shoot buds, while those from stems were 96.25% and 23.00 shoot buds, respectively. One hundred percent friable callus was induced from stem explant in the same medium supplemented with 1.0 mg/l 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D after 2 months of culture. Culturing whole leaf in the position of dorsal contact with medium gave the best multiple shoot bud formation of 92% and 23.00 shoot buds/explant. Cutting stem into half and culturing in horizontal position gave the best multiple shoot bud formation of 96% and 23.00 shoot buds/explant after culture for 2 months. The best elongation of shoot buds (2.54 shoots derived from cultured leaves was induced in the liquid medium. While stem-derived shoot buds (3.45 shoots was induced in the solid medium of the same medium components. However, root could not be induced from elongated shoots.

  3. Discovery and Characterization of Nonpeptidyl Agonists of the Tissue-Protective Erythropoietin Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James L; Church, Timothy J; Leonoudakis, Dmitri; Lariosa-Willingham, Karen; Frigon, Normand L; Tettenborn, Connie S; Spencer, Jeffrey R; Punnonen, Juha

    2015-08-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) and its receptor are expressed in a wide variety of tissues, including the central nervous system. Local expression of both EPO and its receptor is upregulated upon injury or stress and plays a role in tissue homeostasis and cytoprotection. High-dose systemic administration or local injection of recombinant human EPO has demonstrated encouraging results in several models of tissue protection and organ injury, while poor tissue availability of the protein limits its efficacy. Here, we describe the discovery and characterization of the nonpeptidyl compound STS-E412 (2-[2-(4-chlorophenoxy)ethoxy]-5,7-dimethyl-[1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine), which selectively activates the tissue-protective EPO receptor, comprising an EPO receptor subunit (EPOR) and the common β-chain (CD131). STS-E412 triggered EPO receptor phosphorylation in human neuronal cells. STS-E412 also increased phosphorylation of EPOR, CD131, and the EPO-associated signaling molecules JAK2 and AKT in HEK293 transfectants expressing EPOR and CD131. At low nanomolar concentrations, STS-E412 provided EPO-like cytoprotective effects in primary neuronal cells and renal proximal tubular epithelial cells. The receptor selectivity of STS-E412 was confirmed by a lack of phosphorylation of the EPOR/EPOR homodimer, lack of activity in off-target selectivity screening, and lack of functional effects in erythroleukemia cell line TF-1 and CD34(+) progenitor cells. Permeability through artificial membranes and Caco-2 cell monolayers in vitro and penetrance across the blood-brain barrier in vivo suggest potential for central nervous system availability of the compound. To our knowledge, STS-E412 is the first nonpeptidyl, selective activator of the tissue-protective EPOR/CD131 receptor. Further evaluation of the potential of STS-E412 in central nervous system diseases and organ protection is warranted. PMID:26018904

  4. Characterization and Classification of Adherent Cells in Monolayer Culture using Automated Tracking and Evolutionary Algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Z.; Bedder, M; Smith, S L; Walker, D; Shabir, S.; Southgate, J

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for tracking and characterizing adherent cells in monolayer culture. A system of cell tracking employing computer vision techniques was applied to time-lapse videos of replicate normal human uro-epithelial cell cultures exposed to different concentrations of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and a selective purinergic P2X antagonist (PPADS), acquired over a 24hour period. Subsequent analysis following feature extraction demonstrated the ability of the technique t...

  5. Preparation and characterization of aloe vera blended collagen-chitosan composite scaffold for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jithendra, Panneerselvam; Rajam, Abraham Merlin; Kalaivani, Thambiran; Mandal, Asit Baran; Rose, Chellan

    2013-08-14

    Collagen-Chitosan (COL-CS) scaffolds supplemented with different concentrations (0.1-0.5%) of aloe vera (AV) were prepared and tested in vitro for their possible application in tissue engineering. After studying the microstructure and mechanical properties of all the composite preparations, a 0.2% AV blended COL-CS scaffold was chosen for further studies. Scaffolds were examined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and thermogravimetry analysis (TGA) to understand the intermolecular interactions and their influence on the thermal property of the complex composite. Swelling property in phosphate buffered saline (pH 7.4) and in vitro biodegradability by collagenase digestion method were monitored to assess the stability of the scaffold in a physiological medium in a hydrated condition, and to assay its resistance against enzymatic forces. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) image of the scaffold samples showed porous architecture with gradual change in their morphology and reduced tensile properties with increasing aloe vera concentration. The FTIR spectrum revealed the overlap of the AV absorption peak with the absorption peak of COL-CS. The inclusion of AV to COL-CS increased the thermal stability as well as hydrophilicity of the scaffolds. Cell culture studies on the scaffold showed enhanced growth and proliferation of fibroblasts (3T3L1) without exhibiting any toxicity. Also, normal cell morphology and proliferation were observed by fluorescence microscopy and SEM. The rate of cell growth in the presence/absence of aloe vera in the scaffolds was in the order: COL-CS-AV > COL-CS > TCP (tissue culture polystyrene plate). These results suggested that the aloe vera gel-blended COL-CS scaffolds could be a promising candidate for tissue engineering applications. PMID:23838342

  6. Seeing Through the Surface: Non-invasive Characterization of Biomaterial-Tissue Interactions Using Photoacoustic Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu Shrike; Wang, Lihong V; Xia, Younan

    2016-03-01

    At the intersection of life sciences, materials science, engineering, and medicine, regenerative medicine stands out as a rapidly progressing field that aims at retaining, restoring, or augmenting tissue/organ functions to promote the human welfare. While the field has witnessed tremendous advancements over the past few decades, it still faces many challenges. For example, it has been difficult to visualize, monitor, and assess the functions of the engineered tissue/organ constructs, particularly when three-dimensional scaffolds are involved. Conventional approaches based on histology are invasive and therefore only convey end-point assays. The development of volumetric imaging techniques such as confocal and ultrasonic imaging has enabled direct observation of intact constructs without the need of sectioning. However, the capability of these techniques is often limited in terms of penetration depth and contrast. In comparison, the recently developed photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) has allowed us to address these issues by integrating optical and ultrasonic imaging to greatly reduce the effect of tissue scattering of photons with one-way ultrasound detection while retaining the high optical absorption contrast. PAM has been successfully applied to a number of studies, such as observation of cell distribution, monitoring of vascularization, and interrogation of biomaterial degradation. In this review article, we highlight recent progress in non-invasive and volumetric characterization of biomaterial-tissue interactions using PAM. We also discuss challenges ahead and envision future directions. PMID:26471785

  7. Characterization of pediatric microtia cartilage: a reservoir of chondrocytes for auricular reconstruction using tissue engineering strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melgarejo-Ramírez, Y; Sánchez-Sánchez, R; García-López, J; Brena-Molina, A M; Gutiérrez-Gómez, C; Ibarra, C; Velasquillo, C

    2016-09-01

    The external ear is composed of elastic cartilage. Microtia is a congenital malformation of the external ear that involves a small reduction in size or a complete absence. The aim of tissue engineering is to regenerate tissues and organs clinically implantable based on the utilization of cells and biomaterials. Remnants from microtia represent a source of cells for auricular reconstruction using tissue engineering. To examine the macromolecular architecture of microtia cartilage and behavior of chondrocytes, in order to enrich the knowledge of this type of cartilage as a cell reservoir. Auricular cartilage remnants were obtained from pediatric patients with microtia undergoing reconstructive procedures. Extracellular matrix composition was characterized using immunofluorescence and histological staining methods. Chondrocytes were isolated and expanded in vitro using a mechanical-enzymatic protocol. Chondrocyte phenotype was analyzed using qualitative PCR. Microtia cartilage preserves structural organization similar to healthy elastic cartilage. Extracellular matrix is composed of typical cartilage proteins such as type II collagen, elastin and proteoglycans. Chondrocytes displayed morphological features similar to chondrocytes derived from healthy cartilage, expressing SOX9, COL2 and ELN, thus preserving chondral phenotype. Cell viability was 94.6 % during in vitro expansion. Elastic cartilage from microtia has similar characteristics, both architectural and biochemical to healthy cartilage. We confirmed the suitability of microtia remnant as a reservoir of chondrocytes with potential to be expanded in vitro, maintaining phenotypical features and viability. Microtia remnants are an accessible source of autologous cells for auricular reconstruction using tissue engineering strategies. PMID:27566509

  8. binding characteristics of 125I-labelled tetanus toxin to primary tissue cultures from mouse embryonic CNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of 125I-labelled tetanus toxin with cells in tissue cultures derived from embryonic CNS has been studied. The optimum toxin binding occurs about 2 to 3 weeks after transfer of the cells to culture conditions. The amount of label bound per culture was doubled at this time in comparison to the fourth day after inoculation. The amount of toxin bound depended on the concentration applied. It reached its maximum 8 h after application then decreased slowly. Low amounts of radioactivity were still detectable 97 h after washing off the unbound toxin. Up to 80% of the label could be replaced by simultaneous application of 'cold' toxin. Fixation of the toxin was higher at 40C than at 370C. Preincubation of the cultures with neuraminidase prevented about 75% of the binding. The presence of cytochalasin B led to a small but reproducible decrease of binding, whereas colchicine had no measurable effect. The radioactive (125I) material was identified by a double-isotope technique in disc gel electrophoresis before and after reductive cleavage of its disulphide bonds. In every test it was indistinguishable from 131I-labelled toxin added as standard. These results largely parallel those obtained with synaptosomes and other systems. They suggest that gangliosides might be the acceptor molecules, and that the culture system will be suitable for studying the actions of this toxin in vitro. (author)

  9. Metal-clad waveguide characterization for contact-based light transmission into tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chininis, Jeffrey; Whiteside, Paul; Hunt, Heather K.

    2016-02-01

    As contemporary laser dermatology procedures, like tattoo removal and skin resurfacing, become more popular, the complications of their operation are also becoming more prevalent. Frequent incidences of over-exposure, ocular injury, and excessive thermal damage represent mounting concerns for those seeking such procedures; moreover, each of these problems is a direct consequence of the standard, free-space method of laser transmission predominantly used in clinical settings. Therefore, an alternative method of light transmission is needed to minimize these problems. Here, we demonstrate and characterize an alternative method that uses planar waveguides to deliver light into sample tissue via direct contact. To do this, slab substrates made from glass were clad in layers of titanium and silver, constraining the light within the waveguide along the waveguide's length. By creating active areas on the waveguide surface, the propagating light could then optically tunnel into the tissue sample, when the waveguide was brought into contact with the tissue. SEM and EDS were used to characterize the metal film thickness and deposition rates onto the glass substrates. Laser light from a Q-switched Nd:YAG source operating at 532nm was coupled into the waveguide and transmitted into samples of pig skin. The amount of light transmitted was measured using photoacoustics techniques, in conjunction with a photodiode and integrating sphere. Transmitting light into tissue in this manner effectively resolves or circumvents the complications caused by free-space propagation methods as it reduces the operating distance to 0, which prevents hazardous back-reflections and allows for the ready incorporation of contact cooling technologies.

  10. A Novel Approach for Ovine Primary Alveolar Epithelial Type II Cell Isolation and Culture from Fresh and Cryopreserved Tissue Obtained from Premature and Juvenile Animals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariola M Marcinkiewicz

    Full Text Available The in vivo ovine model provides a clinically relevant platform to study cardiopulmonary mechanisms and treatments of disease; however, a robust ovine primary alveolar epithelial type II (ATII cell culture model is lacking. The objective of this study was to develop and optimize ovine lung tissue cryopreservation and primary ATII cell culture methodologies for the purposes of dissecting mechanisms at the cellular level to elucidate responses observed in vivo. To address this, we established in vitro submerged and air-liquid interface cultures of primary ovine ATII cells isolated from fresh or cryopreserved lung tissues obtained from mechanically ventilated sheep (128 days gestation-6 months of age. Presence, abundance, and mRNA expression of surfactant proteins was assessed by immunocytochemistry, Western Blot, and quantitative PCR respectively on the day of isolation, and throughout the 7 day cell culture study period. All biomarkers were significantly greater from cells isolated from fresh than cryopreserved tissue, and those cultured in air-liquid interface as compared to submerged culture conditions at all time points. Surfactant protein expression remained in the air-liquid interface culture system while that of cells cultured in the submerged system dissipated over time. Despite differences in biomarker magnitude between cells isolated from fresh and cryopreserved tissue, cells isolated from cryopreserved tissue remained metabolically active and demonstrated a similar response as cells from fresh tissue through 72 hr period of hyperoxia. These data demonstrate a cell culture methodology using fresh or cryopreserved tissue to support study of ovine primary ATII cell function and responses, to support expanded use of biobanked tissues, and to further understanding of mechanisms that contribute to in vivo function of the lung.

  11. A Novel Approach for Ovine Primary Alveolar Epithelial Type II Cell Isolation and Culture from Fresh and Cryopreserved Tissue Obtained from Premature and Juvenile Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinkiewicz, Mariola M; Baker, Sandy T; Wu, Jichuan; Hubert, Terrence L; Wolfson, Marla R

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo ovine model provides a clinically relevant platform to study cardiopulmonary mechanisms and treatments of disease; however, a robust ovine primary alveolar epithelial type II (ATII) cell culture model is lacking. The objective of this study was to develop and optimize ovine lung tissue cryopreservation and primary ATII cell culture methodologies for the purposes of dissecting mechanisms at the cellular level to elucidate responses observed in vivo. To address this, we established in vitro submerged and air-liquid interface cultures of primary ovine ATII cells isolated from fresh or cryopreserved lung tissues obtained from mechanically ventilated sheep (128 days gestation-6 months of age). Presence, abundance, and mRNA expression of surfactant proteins was assessed by immunocytochemistry, Western Blot, and quantitative PCR respectively on the day of isolation, and throughout the 7 day cell culture study period. All biomarkers were significantly greater from cells isolated from fresh than cryopreserved tissue, and those cultured in air-liquid interface as compared to submerged culture conditions at all time points. Surfactant protein expression remained in the air-liquid interface culture system while that of cells cultured in the submerged system dissipated over time. Despite differences in biomarker magnitude between cells isolated from fresh and cryopreserved tissue, cells isolated from cryopreserved tissue remained metabolically active and demonstrated a similar response as cells from fresh tissue through 72 hr period of hyperoxia. These data demonstrate a cell culture methodology using fresh or cryopreserved tissue to support study of ovine primary ATII cell function and responses, to support expanded use of biobanked tissues, and to further understanding of mechanisms that contribute to in vivo function of the lung. PMID:26999050

  12. Technical and theoretical considerations about gradient perfusion culture for epithelia used in tissue engineering, biomaterial testing and pharmaceutical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epithelia act as biological barriers, which are exposed to different environments at the luminal and basal sides. To simulate this situation and to improve functional features an in vitro gradient perfusion culture technique was developed in our laboratory. This innovative technique appears to be simple at first sight, but the performance needs practical and theoretical knowledge. To harvest intact epithelia after a long-term gradient culture period of many days, leakage, edge damage and pressure differences in the system have to be avoided so that the epithelial barrier function is maintained continuously. Unexpectedly, one of the major obstacles are micro-injuries in the epithelia caused by gas bubbles, which arise during transportation of the medium or due to respiration of the cultured tissue. Gas bubbles randomly accumulate either at the luminal or basal fluid flow of the gradient perfusion culture container. This phenomenon results in fluid pressure differences between the luminal and basal perfusion compartments of the gradient container, which in turn leads to damage of the barrier function. Consequently, the content of gas bubbles in the transported culture medium has to be minimized. Thus, our technical concept is the reduction of gas bubbles while keeping the content of oxygen constant. To follow this strategy we developed a new type of screw cap for media bottles specifically designed to allow fluid contact only with tube and not with cap material. Furthermore, a gas expander module separates gas bubbles from the liquid phase during transportation of the medium. Finally, a new type of gradient culture container allows a permanent elimination of transported gas bubbles. Application of this innovative equipment optimizes the parallel transportation of fluid in the luminal and basal compartments of a gradient culture container. (topical review)

  13. Production and characterization of chitosan/gelatin/β-TCP scaffolds for improved bone tissue regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra, I.R.; Fradique, R.; Vallejo, M.C.S.; Correia, T.R.; Miguel, S.P.; Correia, I.J., E-mail: icorreia@ubi.pt

    2015-10-01

    Recently, bone tissue engineering emerged as a viable therapeutic alternative, comprising bone implants and new personalized scaffolds to be used in bone replacement and regeneration. In this study, biocompatible scaffolds were produced by freeze-drying, using different formulations (chitosan, chitosan/gelatin, chitosan/β-TCP and chitosan/gelatin/β-TCP) to be used as temporary templates during bone tissue regeneration. Sample characterization was performed through attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis. Mechanical characterization and porosity analysis were performed through uniaxial compression test and liquid displacement method, respectively. In vitro studies were also done to evaluate the biomineralization activity and the cytotoxic profile of the scaffolds. Scanning electron and confocal microscopy analysis were used to study cell adhesion and proliferation at the scaffold surface and within their structure. Moreover, the antibacterial activity of the scaffolds was also evaluated through the agar diffusion method. Overall, the results obtained revealed that the produced scaffolds are bioactive and biocompatible, allow cell internalization and show antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus. Such, make these 3D structures as potential candidates for being used on the bone tissue regeneration, since they promote cell adhesion and proliferation and also prevent biofilm development at their surfaces, which is usually the main cause of implant failure. - Highlights: • Production of 3D scaffolds composed by chitosan/gelatin/β-TCP by freeze-drying for bone regeneration • Physicochemical characterization of the bone substitutes by SEM, FTIR, XRD and EDS • Evaluation of the cytotoxic profile and antibacterial activity of the 3D structures through in vitro assays.

  14. Production and characterization of chitosan/gelatin/β-TCP scaffolds for improved bone tissue regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, bone tissue engineering emerged as a viable therapeutic alternative, comprising bone implants and new personalized scaffolds to be used in bone replacement and regeneration. In this study, biocompatible scaffolds were produced by freeze-drying, using different formulations (chitosan, chitosan/gelatin, chitosan/β-TCP and chitosan/gelatin/β-TCP) to be used as temporary templates during bone tissue regeneration. Sample characterization was performed through attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis. Mechanical characterization and porosity analysis were performed through uniaxial compression test and liquid displacement method, respectively. In vitro studies were also done to evaluate the biomineralization activity and the cytotoxic profile of the scaffolds. Scanning electron and confocal microscopy analysis were used to study cell adhesion and proliferation at the scaffold surface and within their structure. Moreover, the antibacterial activity of the scaffolds was also evaluated through the agar diffusion method. Overall, the results obtained revealed that the produced scaffolds are bioactive and biocompatible, allow cell internalization and show antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus. Such, make these 3D structures as potential candidates for being used on the bone tissue regeneration, since they promote cell adhesion and proliferation and also prevent biofilm development at their surfaces, which is usually the main cause of implant failure. - Highlights: • Production of 3D scaffolds composed by chitosan/gelatin/β-TCP by freeze-drying for bone regeneration • Physicochemical characterization of the bone substitutes by SEM, FTIR, XRD and EDS • Evaluation of the cytotoxic profile and antibacterial activity of the 3D structures through in vitro assays

  15. Characterization of the homogeneous tissue mixture approximation in breast imaging dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis; Bliznakova, Kristina; Qin Xulei; Fei Baowei; Feng, Steve Si Jia [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University School of Medicine, 1701 Upper Gate Drive Northeast, Suite 5018, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Patras School of Health Sciences, 26500 Rio-Patras (Greece); Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, 1701 Upper Gate Drive Northeast, Suite 5018, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, 1701 Upper Gate Drive Northeast, Suite 5018, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Emory University and Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

    2012-08-15

    estimated using the true heterogeneous glandular tissue distribution (Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test p= 0.00046). For dedicated breast CT, the overestimation of normalized glandular dose was, on average, 8% (49 kVp spectrum, p= 0.00045) and 4% (80 kVp spectrum, p= 0.000089). Only two cases in mammography and two cases in dedicated breast CT with a tube voltage of 49 kVp resulted in lower dose estimates for the homogeneous tissue approximation compared to the heterogeneous tissue distribution. Conclusions: The normalized glandular dose based on the homogeneous tissue mixture approximation results in a significant overestimation of dose to the imaged breast. This overestimation impacts the use of dose estimates in absolute terms, such as for risk estimates, and may impact some comparative studies, such as when modalities or techniques with different x-ray energies are used. The error introduced by the homogeneous tissue mixture approximation in higher energy x-ray modalities, such as dedicated breast CT, although statistically significant, may not be of clinical concern. Further work is required to better characterize this overestimation and potentially develop new metrics or correction factors to better estimate the true glandular dose to breasts undergoing imaging with ionizing radiation.

  16. 3D BREAST TISSUE CO-CULTURES FOR SCREENING MAMMARY CARCINOGENS - PHASE I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast cancer is not a disease of individual cells, but principally a failure of cells and tissues to communicate properly. One communication mechanism that is frequently disrupted in breast cancer involves the hormone estrogen. Despite recognition that exposure to compound...

  17. Organotypic three-dimensional culture model of mesenchymal and epithelial cells to examine tissue fusion events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissue fusion during early mammalian development requires coordination of multiple cell types, the extracellular matrix, and complex signaling pathways. Fusion events during processes including heart development, neural tube closure, and palatal fusion are dependent on signaling ...

  18. Cartilage Tissue Engineering: the effect of different biomaterials, cell types and culture methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J.C.M. Marijnissen (Willem)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractChapter 1 outlines the normal structure and composition of articular cartilage and the inefficient spontaneous healing response after focal damage. Current surgical treatment options are briefly discussed and tissue engineering techniques for the repair of articular cartilage defects

  19. Absence of maternal cell contamination in mesenchymal stromal cell cultures derived from equine umbilical cord tissue

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vacková, Irena; Czerneková, V.; Tománek, M.; Navrátil, J.; Moško, Tibor; Nováková, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 8 (2014), s. 655-657. ISSN 0143-4004 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : maternal cell contamination * mesenchymal stromal cells * umbilical cord tissue Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.710, year: 2014

  20. Isolation and characterization of a monoclonal anti-protein kinase CK2 beta-subunit antibody of the IgG class for the direct detection of CK2 beta-subunit in tissue cultures of various mammalian species and human tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nastainczyk, W; Schmidt-Spaniol, I; Boldyreff, B;

    1995-01-01

    A murine monoclonal anti-protein kinase CK2 beta antibody was isolated and characterized. The antibody detects 1 pmol of purified recombinant CK2 beta-subunit after analysis on SDS-PAGE. Alternatively undenatured CK2 beta-subunit was detected by an ELISA assay either as recombinant CK2 beta-subun...