WorldWideScience

Sample records for characterizing nucleosome dynamics

  1. Nucleosome repositioning underlies dynamic gene expression.

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    Nocetti, Nicolas; Whitehouse, Iestyn

    2016-03-15

    Nucleosome repositioning at gene promoters is a fundamental aspect of the regulation of gene expression. However, the extent to which nucleosome repositioning is used within eukaryotic genomes is poorly understood. Here we report a comprehensive analysis of nucleosome positions as budding yeast transit through an ultradian cycle in which expression of >50% of all genes is highly synchronized. We present evidence of extensive nucleosome repositioning at thousands of gene promoters as genes are activated and repressed. During activation, nucleosomes are relocated to allow sites of general transcription factor binding and transcription initiation to become accessible. The extent of nucleosome shifting is closely related to the dynamic range of gene transcription and generally related to DNA sequence properties and use of the coactivators TFIID or SAGA. However, dynamic gene expression is not limited to SAGA-regulated promoters and is an inherent feature of most genes. While nucleosome repositioning occurs pervasively, we found that a class of genes required for growth experience acute nucleosome shifting as cells enter the cell cycle. Significantly, our data identify that the ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling enzyme Snf2 plays a fundamental role in nucleosome repositioning and the expression of growth genes. We also reveal that nucleosome organization changes extensively in concert with phases of the cell cycle, with large, regularly spaced nucleosome arrays being established in mitosis. Collectively, our data and analysis provide a framework for understanding nucleosome dynamics in relation to fundamental DNA-dependent transactions.

  2. Dynamics of Nucleosome Positioning Maturation following Genomic Replication.

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    Vasseur, Pauline; Tonazzini, Saphia; Ziane, Rahima; Camasses, Alain; Rando, Oliver J; Radman-Livaja, Marta

    2016-09-01

    Chromatin is thought to carry epigenetic information from one generation to the next, although it is unclear how such information survives the disruptions of nucleosomal architecture occurring during genomic replication. Here, we measure a key aspect of chromatin structure dynamics during replication-how rapidly nucleosome positions are established on the newly replicated daughter genomes. By isolating newly synthesized DNA marked with 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU), we characterize nucleosome positions on both daughter genomes of S. cerevisiae during chromatin maturation. We find that nucleosomes rapidly adopt their mid-log positions at highly transcribed genes, which is consistent with a role for transcription in positioning nucleosomes in vivo. Additionally, experiments in hir1Δ mutants reveal a role for HIR in nucleosome spacing. We also characterized nucleosome positions on the leading and lagging strands, uncovering differences in chromatin maturation dynamics at hundreds of genes. Our data define the maturation dynamics of newly replicated chromatin and support a role for transcription in sculpting the chromatin template. PMID:27568571

  3. spFRET studies of nucleosome dynamics modulated by histone modifications, histone variants and neighboring nucleosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buning, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    At the basis of the regulation of the genetic code (DNA) in eukaryotes is its organization into nucleosomes. Nucleosomes modulate DNA accessibility through conformational dynamics like DNA breathing - the transient unwrapping of DNA from the nucleosome. Single-pair Fluorescence Resonance Energy Tran

  4. Characterization of Dnmt1 Binding and DNA Methylation on Nucleosomes and Nucleosomal Arrays.

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    Schrader, Anna; Gross, Thomas; Thalhammer, Verena; Längst, Gernot

    2015-01-01

    The packaging of DNA into nucleosomes and the organisation into higher order structures of chromatin limits the access of sequence specific DNA binding factors to DNA. In cells, DNA methylation is preferentially occuring in the linker region of nucleosomes, suggesting a structural impact of chromatin on DNA methylation. These observations raise the question whether DNA methyltransferases are capable to recognize the nucleosomal substrates and to modify the packaged DNA. Here, we performed a detailed analysis of nucleosome binding and nucleosomal DNA methylation by the maintenance DNA methyltransferase Dnmt1. Our binding studies show that Dnmt1 has a DNA length sensing activity, binding cooperatively to DNA, and requiring a minimal DNA length of 20 bp. Dnmt1 needs linker DNA to bind to nucleosomes and most efficiently recognizes nucleosomes with symmetric DNA linkers. Footprinting experiments reveal that Dnmt1 binds to both DNA linkers exiting the nucleosome core. The binding pattern correlates with the efficient methylation of DNA linkers. However, the enzyme lacks the ability to methylate nucleosomal CpG sites on mononucleosomes and nucleosomal arrays, unless chromatin remodeling enzymes create a dynamic chromatin state. In addition, our results show that Dnmt1 functionally interacts with specific chromatin remodeling enzymes to enable complete methylation of hemi-methylated DNA in chromatin.

  5. Characterization of Dnmt1 Binding and DNA Methylation on Nucleosomes and Nucleosomal Arrays.

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    Anna Schrader

    Full Text Available The packaging of DNA into nucleosomes and the organisation into higher order structures of chromatin limits the access of sequence specific DNA binding factors to DNA. In cells, DNA methylation is preferentially occuring in the linker region of nucleosomes, suggesting a structural impact of chromatin on DNA methylation. These observations raise the question whether DNA methyltransferases are capable to recognize the nucleosomal substrates and to modify the packaged DNA. Here, we performed a detailed analysis of nucleosome binding and nucleosomal DNA methylation by the maintenance DNA methyltransferase Dnmt1. Our binding studies show that Dnmt1 has a DNA length sensing activity, binding cooperatively to DNA, and requiring a minimal DNA length of 20 bp. Dnmt1 needs linker DNA to bind to nucleosomes and most efficiently recognizes nucleosomes with symmetric DNA linkers. Footprinting experiments reveal that Dnmt1 binds to both DNA linkers exiting the nucleosome core. The binding pattern correlates with the efficient methylation of DNA linkers. However, the enzyme lacks the ability to methylate nucleosomal CpG sites on mononucleosomes and nucleosomal arrays, unless chromatin remodeling enzymes create a dynamic chromatin state. In addition, our results show that Dnmt1 functionally interacts with specific chromatin remodeling enzymes to enable complete methylation of hemi-methylated DNA in chromatin.

  6. Dynamic regulation of transcription factors by nucleosome remodeling.

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    Li, Ming; Hada, Arjan; Sen, Payel; Olufemi, Lola; Hall, Michael A; Smith, Benjamin Y; Forth, Scott; McKnight, Jeffrey N; Patel, Ashok; Bowman, Gregory D; Bartholomew, Blaine; Wang, Michelle D

    2015-06-05

    The chromatin landscape and promoter architecture are dominated by the interplay of nucleosome and transcription factor (TF) binding to crucial DNA sequence elements. However, it remains unclear whether nucleosomes mobilized by chromatin remodelers can influence TFs that are already present on the DNA template. In this study, we investigated the interplay between nucleosome remodeling, by either yeast ISW1a or SWI/SNF, and a bound TF. We found that a TF serves as a major barrier to ISW1a remodeling, and acts as a boundary for nucleosome repositioning. In contrast, SWI/SNF was able to slide a nucleosome past a TF, with concurrent eviction of the TF from the DNA, and the TF did not significantly impact the nucleosome positioning. Our results provide direct evidence for a novel mechanism for both nucleosome positioning regulation by bound TFs and TF regulation via dynamic repositioning of nucleosomes.

  7. Trajectories of microsecond molecular dynamics simulations of nucleosomes and nucleosome core particles

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    Alexey K. Shaytan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We present here raw trajectories of molecular dynamics simulations for nucleosome with linker DNA strands as well as minimalistic nucleosome core particle model. The simulations were done in explicit solvent using CHARMM36 force field. We used this data in the research article Shaytan et al., 2016 [1]. The trajectory files are supplemented by TCL scripts providing advanced visualization capabilities.

  8. Trajectories of microsecond molecular dynamics simulations of nucleosomes and nucleosome core particles

    OpenAIRE

    Shaytan, Alexey K.; Armeev, Grigoriy A.; Goncearenco, Alexander; Zhurkin, Victor B.; Landsman, David; Panchenko, Anna R

    2016-01-01

    We present here raw trajectories of molecular dynamics simulations for nucleosome with linker DNA strands as well as minimalistic nucleosome core particle model. The simulations were done in explicit solvent using CHARMM36 force field. We used this data in the research article Shaytan et al., 2016 [1]. The trajectory files are supplemented by TCL scripts providing advanced visualization capabilities.

  9. Trajectories of microsecond molecular dynamics simulations of nucleosomes and nucleosome core particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaytan, Alexey K; Armeev, Grigoriy A; Goncearenco, Alexander; Zhurkin, Victor B; Landsman, David; Panchenko, Anna R

    2016-06-01

    We present here raw trajectories of molecular dynamics simulations for nucleosome with linker DNA strands as well as minimalistic nucleosome core particle model. The simulations were done in explicit solvent using CHARMM36 force field. We used this data in the research article Shaytan et al., 2016 [1]. The trajectory files are supplemented by TCL scripts providing advanced visualization capabilities. PMID:27222871

  10. Nucleosome dynamics during chromatin remodeling in vivo.

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    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Henikoff, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Precise positioning of nucleosomes around regulatory sites is achieved by the action of chromatin remodelers, which use the energy of ATP to slide, evict or change the composition of nucleosomes. Chromatin remodelers act to bind nucleosomes, disrupt histone-DNA interactions and translocate the DNA around the histone core to reposition nucleosomes. Hence, remodeling is expected to involve nucleosomal intermediates with a structural organization that is distinct from intact nucleosomes. We describe the identification of a partially unwrapped nucleosome structure using methods that map histone-DNA contacts genome-wide. This alternative nucleosome structure is likely formed as an intermediate or by-product during nucleosome remodeling by the RSC complex. Identification of the loss of histone-DNA contacts during chromatin remodeling by RSC in vivo has implications for the regulation of transcriptional initiation. PMID:26933790

  11. Dynamic Nucleosome Movement Provides Structural Information of Topological Chromatin Domains in Living Human Cells

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    Shinkai, Soya; Nozaki, Tadasu; Maeshima, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian genome is organized into submegabase-sized chromatin domains (CDs) including topologically associating domains, which have been identified using chromosome conformation capture-based methods. Single-nucleosome imaging in living mammalian cells has revealed subdiffusively dynamic nucleosome movement. It is unclear how single nucleosomes within CDs fluctuate and how the CD structure reflects the nucleosome movement. Here, we present a polymer model wherein CDs are characterized by fractal dimensions and the nucleosome fibers fluctuate in a viscoelastic medium with memory. We analytically show that the mean-squared displacement (MSD) of nucleosome fluctuations within CDs is subdiffusive. The diffusion coefficient and the subdiffusive exponent depend on the structural information of CDs. This analytical result enabled us to extract information from the single-nucleosome imaging data for HeLa cells. Our observation that the MSD is lower at the nuclear periphery region than the interior region indicates that CDs in the heterochromatin-rich nuclear periphery region are more compact than those in the euchromatin-rich interior region with respect to the fractal dimensions as well as the size. Finally, we evaluated that the average size of CDs is in the range of 100–500 nm and that the relaxation time of nucleosome movement within CDs is a few seconds. Our results provide physical and dynamic insights into the genome architecture in living cells. PMID:27764097

  12. Functional roles of nucleosome stability and dynamics.

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    Chereji, Răzvan V; Morozov, Alexandre V

    2015-01-01

    Nucleosome is a histone-DNA complex known as the fundamental repeating unit of chromatin. Up to 90% of eukaryotic DNA is wrapped around consecutive octamers made of the core histones H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. Nucleosome positioning affects numerous cellular processes that require robust and timely access to genomic DNA, which is packaged into the tight confines of the cell nucleus. In living cells, nucleosome positions are determined by intrinsic histone-DNA sequence preferences, competition between histones and other DNA-binding proteins for genomic sequence, and ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers. We discuss the major energetic contributions to nucleosome formation and remodeling, focusing especially on partial DNA unwrapping off the histone octamer surface. DNA unwrapping enables efficient access to nucleosome-buried binding sites and mediates rapid nucleosome removal through concerted action of two or more DNA-binding factors. High-resolution, genome-scale maps of distances between neighboring nucleosomes have shown that DNA unwrapping and nucleosome crowding (mutual invasion of nucleosome territories) are much more common than previously thought. Ultimately, constraints imposed by nucleosome energetics on the rates of ATP-dependent and spontaneous chromatin remodeling determine nucleosome occupancy genome-wide, and shape pathways of cellular response to environmental stresses.

  13. Rigid-body molecular dynamics of DNA inside a nucleosome.

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    Fathizadeh, Arman; Berdy Besya, Azim; Reza Ejtehadi, Mohammad; Schiessel, Helmut

    2013-03-01

    The majority of eukaryotic DNA, about three quarter, is wrapped around histone proteins forming so-called nucleosomes. To study nucleosomal DNA we introduce a coarse-grained molecular dynamics model based on sequence-dependent harmonic rigid base pair step parameters of DNA and nucleosomal binding sites. Mixed parametrization based on all-atom molecular dynamics and crystallographic data of protein-DNA structures is used for the base pair step parameters. The binding site parameters are adjusted by experimental B-factor values of the nucleosome crystal structure. The model is then used to determine the energy cost for placing a twist defect into the nucleosomal DNA which allows us to use Kramers theory to calculate nucleosome sliding caused by such defects. It is shown that the twist defect scenario together with the sequence-dependent elasticity of DNA can explain the slow time scales observed for nucleosome mobility along DNA. With this method we also show how the twist defect mechanism leads to a higher mobility of DNA in the presence of sin mutations near the dyad axis. Finally, by performing simulations on 5s rDNA, 601, and telomeric base pair sequences, it is demonstrated that the current model is a powerful tool to predict nucleosome positioning. PMID:23475204

  14. Local Nucleosome Dynamics Facilitate Chromatin Accessibility in Living Mammalian Cells

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    Saera Hihara

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Genome information, which is three-dimensionally organized within cells as chromatin, is searched and read by various proteins for diverse cell functions. Although how the protein factors find their targets remains unclear, the dynamic and flexible nature of chromatin is likely crucial. Using a combined approach of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, single-nucleosome imaging, and Monte Carlo computer simulations, we demonstrate local chromatin dynamics in living mammalian cells. We show that similar to interphase chromatin, dense mitotic chromosomes also have considerable chromatin accessibility. For both interphase and mitotic chromatin, we observed local fluctuation of individual nucleosomes (∼50 nm movement/30 ms, which is caused by confined Brownian motion. Inhibition of these local dynamics by crosslinking impaired accessibility in the dense chromatin regions. Our findings show that local nucleosome dynamics drive chromatin accessibility. We propose that this local nucleosome fluctuation is the basis for scanning genome information.

  15. Z curve theory-based analysis of the dynamic nature of nucleosome positioning in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

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    Wu, Xueting; Liu, Hui; Liu, Hongbo; Su, Jianzhong; Lv, Jie; Cui, Ying; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Yan

    2013-11-01

    Nucleosome is the elementary structural unit of eukaryotic chromatin. Instability of nucleosome positioning plays critical roles in chromatin remodeling in differentiation and disease. In this study, we investigated nucleosome dynamics in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome using a geometric model based on Z curve theory. We identified 52,941 stable nucleosomes and 7607 dynamic nucleosomes, compiling them into a genome-wide nucleosome dynamic positioning map and constructing a user-friendly visualization platform (http://bioinfo.hrbmu.edu.cn/nucleosome). Our approach achieved a sensitivity of 90.31% and a specificity of 87.76% for S. cerevisiae. Analysis revealed transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) were enriched in linkers. And among the sparse nucleosomes around TFBSs, dynamic nucleosomes were slightly preferred. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis indicated that stable and dynamic nucleosomes were enriched on genes involved in different biological processes and functions. This study provides an approach for comprehending chromatin remodeling and transcriptional regulation of genes.

  16. Lysine Acetylation Facilitates Spontaneous DNA Dynamics in the Nucleosome.

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    Kim, Jongseong; Lee, Jaehyoun; Lee, Tae-Hee

    2015-12-01

    The nucleosome, comprising a histone protein core wrapped around by DNA, is the fundamental packing unit of DNA in cells. Lysine acetylation at the histone core elevates DNA accessibility in the nucleosome, the mechanism of which remains largely unknown. By employing our recently developed hybrid single molecule approach, here we report how the structural dynamics of DNA in the nucleosome is altered upon acetylation at histone H3 lysine 56 (H3K56) that is critical for elevated DNA accessibility. Our results indicate that H3K56 acetylation facilitates the structural dynamics of the DNA at the nucleosome termini that spontaneously and repeatedly open and close on a ms time scale. The results support a molecular mechanism of histone acetylation in catalyzing DNA unpacking whose efficiency is ultimately limited by the spontaneous DNA dynamics at the nucleosome temini. This study provides the first and unique experimental evidence revealing a role of protein chemical modification in directly regulating the kinetic stability of the DNA packing unit.

  17. The dynamics of individual nucleosomes controls the chromatin condensation pathway: direct AFM visualization of variant chromatin

    CERN Document Server

    Montel, Fabien; Castelnovo, Martin; Bednar, Jan; Dimitrov, Stefan; Angelov, Dimitar; Faivre-Moskalenko, Cendrine

    2009-01-01

    Chromatin organization and dynamics is studied in this work at scales ranging from single nucleosome to nucleosomal array by using a unique combination of biochemical assays, single molecule imaging technique and numerical modeling. We demonstrate that a subtle modification in the nucleosome structure induced by the histone variant H2A.Bbd drastically modifies the higher order organization of the nucleosomal arrays. Importantly, as directly visualized by AFM, conventional H2A nucleosomal arrays exhibit specific local organization, in contrast to H2A.Bbd arrays, which show ?beads on a string? structure. The combination of systematic image analysis and theoretical modeling allows a quantitative description relating the observed gross structural changes of the arrays to their local organization. Our results strongly suggest that higher-order organization of H1-free nucleosomal arrays is mainly determined by the fluctuation properties of individual nucleosomes. Moreover, numerical simulations suggest the existenc...

  18. From nucleosome to chromosome: a dynamic organization of genetic information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Fransz; H. de Jong

    2011-01-01

    Gene activity is controlled at different levels of chromatin organization, which involve genomic sequences, nucleosome structure, chromatin folding and chromosome arrangement. These levels are interconnected and influence each other. At the basic level nucleosomes generally occlude the DNA sequence

  19. Dynamic nucleosome organization at hox promoters during zebrafish embryogenesis.

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    Steven E Weicksel

    Full Text Available Nucleosome organization at promoter regions plays an important role in regulating gene activity. Genome-wide studies in yeast, flies, worms, mammalian embryonic stem cells and transformed cell lines have found well-positioned nucleosomes flanking a nucleosome depleted region (NDR at transcription start sites. This nucleosome arrangement depends on DNA sequence (cis-elements as well as DNA binding factors and ATP-dependent chromatin modifiers (trans-factors. However, little is understood about how the nascent embryonic genome positions nucleosomes during development. This is particularly intriguing since the embryonic genome must undergo a broad reprogramming event upon fusion of sperm and oocyte. Using four stages of early embryonic zebrafish development, we map nucleosome positions at the promoter region of 37 zebrafish hox genes. We find that nucleosome arrangement at the hox promoters is a progressive process that takes place over several stages. At stages immediately after fertilization, nucleosomes appear to be largely disordered at hox promoter regions. At stages after activation of the embryonic genome, nucleosomes are detectable at hox promoters, with positions becoming more uniform and more highly occupied. Since the genomic sequence is invariant during embryogenesis, this progressive change in nucleosome arrangement suggests that trans-factors play an important role in organizing nucleosomes during embryogenesis. Separating hox genes into expressed and non-expressed groups shows that expressed promoters have better positioned and occupied nucleosomes, as well as distinct NDRs, than non-expressed promoters. Finally, by blocking the retinoic acid-signaling pathway, we disrupt early hox gene transcription, but observe no effect on nucleosome positions, suggesting that active hox transcription is not a driving force behind the arrangement of nucleosomes at the promoters of hox genes during early development.

  20. The nucleosome landscape of Plasmodium falciparum reveals chromatin architecture and dynamics of regulatory sequences.

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    Kensche, Philip Reiner; Hoeijmakers, Wieteke Anna Maria; Toenhake, Christa Geeke; Bras, Maaike; Chappell, Lia; Berriman, Matthew; Bártfai, Richárd

    2016-03-18

    In eukaryotes, the chromatin architecture has a pivotal role in regulating all DNA-associated processes and it is central to the control of gene expression. For Plasmodium falciparum, a causative agent of human malaria, the nucleosome positioning profile of regulatory regions deserves particular attention because of their extreme AT-content. With the aid of a highly controlled MNase-seq procedure we reveal how positioning of nucleosomes provides a structural and regulatory framework to the transcriptional unit by demarcating landmark sites (transcription/translation start and end sites). In addition, our analysis provides strong indications for the function of positioned nucleosomes in splice site recognition. Transcription start sites (TSSs) are bordered by a small nucleosome-depleted region, but lack the stereotypic downstream nucleosome arrays, highlighting a key difference in chromatin organization compared to model organisms. Furthermore, we observe transcription-coupled eviction of nucleosomes on strong TSSs during intraerythrocytic development and demonstrate that nucleosome positioning and dynamics can be predictive for the functionality of regulatory DNA elements. Collectively, the strong nucleosome positioning over splice sites and surrounding putative transcription factor binding sites highlights the regulatory capacity of the nucleosome landscape in this deadly human pathogen.

  1. Histone chaperones: assisting histone traffic and nucleosome dynamics.

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    Gurard-Levin, Zachary A; Quivy, Jean-Pierre; Almouzni, Geneviève

    2014-01-01

    The functional organization of eukaryotic DNA into chromatin uses histones as components of its building block, the nucleosome. Histone chaperones, which are proteins that escort histones throughout their cellular life, are key actors in all facets of histone metabolism; they regulate the supply and dynamics of histones at chromatin for its assembly and disassembly. Histone chaperones can also participate in the distribution of histone variants, thereby defining distinct chromatin landscapes of importance for genome function, stability, and cell identity. Here, we discuss our current knowledge of the known histone chaperones and their histone partners, focusing on histone H3 and its variants. We then place them into an escort network that distributes these histones in various deposition pathways. Through their distinct interfaces, we show how they affect dynamics during DNA replication, DNA damage, and transcription, and how they maintain genome integrity. Finally, we discuss the importance of histone chaperones during development and describe how misregulation of the histone flow can link to disease.

  2. Linker histone H1 and H3K56 acetylation are antagonistic regulators of nucleosome dynamics.

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    Bernier, Morgan; Luo, Yi; Nwokelo, Kingsley C; Goodwin, Michelle; Dreher, Sarah J; Zhang, Pei; Parthun, Mark R; Fondufe-Mittendorf, Yvonne; Ottesen, Jennifer J; Poirier, Michael G

    2015-12-09

    H1 linker histones are highly abundant proteins that compact nucleosomes and chromatin to regulate DNA accessibility and transcription. However, the mechanisms that target H1 regulation to specific regions of eukaryotic genomes are unknown. Here we report fluorescence measurements of human H1 regulation of nucleosome dynamics and transcription factor (TF) binding within nucleosomes. H1 does not block TF binding, instead it suppresses nucleosome unwrapping to reduce DNA accessibility within H1-bound nucleosomes. We then investigated H1 regulation by H3K56 and H3K122 acetylation, two transcriptional activating histone post translational modifications (PTMs). Only H3K56 acetylation, which increases nucleosome unwrapping, abolishes H1.0 reduction of TF binding. These findings show that nucleosomes remain dynamic, while H1 is bound and H1 dissociation is not required for TF binding within the nucleosome. Furthermore, our H3K56 acetylation measurements suggest that a single-histone PTM can define regions of the genome that are not regulated by H1.

  3. Dynamics of nucleosome assembly and effects of DNA methylation.

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    Lee, Ju Yeon; Lee, Jaehyoun; Yue, Hongjun; Lee, Tae-Hee

    2015-02-13

    The nucleosome is the fundamental packing unit of the eukaryotic genome, and CpG methylation is an epigenetic modification associated with gene repression and silencing. We investigated nucleosome assembly mediated by histone chaperone Nap1 and the effects of CpG methylation based on three-color single molecule FRET measurements, which enabled direct monitoring of histone binding in the context of DNA wrapping. According to our observation, (H3-H4)2 tetramer incorporation must precede H2A-H2B dimer binding, which is independent of DNA termini wrapping. Upon CpG methylation, (H3-H4)2 tetramer incorporation and DNA termini wrapping are facilitated, whereas proper incorporation of H2A-H2B dimers is inhibited. We suggest that these changes are due to rigidified DNA and increased random binding of histones to DNA. According to the results, CpG methylation expedites nucleosome assembly in the presence of abundant DNA and histones, which may help facilitate gene packaging in chromatin. The results also indicate that the slowest steps in nucleosome assembly are DNA termini wrapping and tetramer positioning, both of which are affected heavily by changes in the physical properties of DNA.

  4. Nucleosome assembly dynamics involve spontaneous fluctuations in the handedness of tetrasomes.

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    Vlijm, Rifka; Lee, Mina; Lipfert, Jan; Lusser, Alexandra; Dekker, Cees; Dekker, Nynke H

    2015-01-13

    DNA wrapping around histone octamers generates nucleosomes, the basic compaction unit of eukaryotic chromatin. Nucleosome stability is carefully tuned to maintain DNA accessibility in transcription, replication, and repair. Using freely orbiting magnetic tweezers, which measure the twist and length of single DNA molecules, we monitor the real-time loading of tetramers or complete histone octamers onto DNA by Nucleosome Assembly Protein-1 (NAP1). Remarkably, we find that tetrasomes exhibit spontaneous flipping between a preferentially occupied left-handed state (ΔLk = -0.73) and a right-handed state (ΔLk = +1.0), separated by a free energy difference of 2.3 kBT (1.5 kcal/mol). This flipping occurs without concomitant changes in DNA end-to-end length. The application of weak positive torque converts left-handed tetrasomes into right-handed tetrasomes, whereas nucleosomes display more gradual conformational changes. Our findings reveal unexpected dynamical rearrangements of the nucleosomal structure, suggesting that chromatin can serve as a "twist reservoir," offering a mechanistic explanation for the regulation of DNA supercoiling in chromatin.

  5. Stimulation of the Drosophila immune system alters genome-wide nucleosome occupancy

    OpenAIRE

    Yingxue Ren; Vera, Daniel L.; Kimberly A. Hughes; Dennis, Jonathan H.

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, nucleosomes participate in all DNA-templated events by regulating access to the underlying DNA sequence. However, nucleosome dynamics during a genome response have not been well characterized [1,2]. We stimulated Drosophila S2 cells with heat-killed Gram-negative bacteria Salmonella typhimurium, and mapped genome-wide nucleosome occupancy at high temporal resolution by MNase-seq using Illumina HiSeq 2500. We show widespread nucleosome occupancy change in S2 cells during the imm...

  6. Two distinct promoter architectures centered on dynamic nucleosomes control ribosomal protein gene transcription.

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    Knight, Britta; Kubik, Slawomir; Ghosh, Bhaswar; Bruzzone, Maria Jessica; Geertz, Marcel; Martin, Victoria; Dénervaud, Nicolas; Jacquet, Philippe; Ozkan, Burak; Rougemont, Jacques; Maerkl, Sebastian J; Naef, Félix; Shore, David

    2014-08-01

    In yeast, ribosome production is controlled transcriptionally by tight coregulation of the 138 ribosomal protein genes (RPGs). RPG promoters display limited sequence homology, and the molecular basis for their coregulation remains largely unknown. Here we identify two prevalent RPG promoter types, both characterized by upstream binding of the general transcription factor (TF) Rap1 followed by the RPG-specific Fhl1/Ifh1 pair, with one type also binding the HMG-B protein Hmo1. We show that the regulatory properties of the two promoter types are remarkably similar, suggesting that they are determined to a large extent by Rap1 and the Fhl1/Ifh1 pair. Rapid depletion experiments allowed us to define a hierarchy of TF binding in which Rap1 acts as a pioneer factor required for binding of all other TFs. We also uncovered unexpected features underlying recruitment of Fhl1, whose forkhead DNA-binding domain is not required for binding at most promoters, and Hmo1, whose binding is supported by repeated motifs. Finally, we describe unusually micrococcal nuclease (MNase)-sensitive nucleosomes at all RPG promoters, located between the canonical +1 and -1 nucleosomes, which coincide with sites of Fhl1/Ifh1 and Hmo1 binding. We speculate that these "fragile" nucleosomes play an important role in regulating RPG transcriptional output. PMID:25085421

  7. Nucleosome Assembly Dynamics Involve Spontaneous Fluctuations in the Handedness of Tetrasomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlijm, R.; Lee, M.; Lipfert, J.; Lusser, A.; Dekker, C.; Dekker, N.H.

    2015-01-01

    DNA wrapping around histone octamers generates nucleosomes, the basic compaction unit of eukaryotic chromatin. Nucleosome stability is carefully tuned to maintain DNA accessibility in transcription, replication, and repair. Using freely orbiting magnetic tweezers, which measure the twist and length

  8. Effects of MacroH2A and H2A.Z on Nucleosome Dynamics as Elucidated by Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

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    Bowerman, Samuel; Wereszczynski, Jeff

    2016-01-19

    Eukaryotes tune the transcriptional activity of their genome by altering the nucleosome core particle through multiple chemical processes. In particular, replacement of the canonical H2A histone with the variants macroH2A and H2A.Z has been shown to affect DNA accessibility and nucleosome stability; however, the processes by which this occurs remain poorly understood. In this study, we elucidate the molecular mechanisms of these variants with an extensive molecular dynamics study of the canonical nucleosome along with three variant-containing structures: H2A.Z, macroH2A, and an H2A mutant with macroH2A-like L1 loops. Simulation results show that variant L1 loops play a pivotal role in stabilizing DNA binding to the octamer through direct interactions, core structural rearrangements, and altered allosteric networks in the nucleosome. All variants influence dynamics; however, macroH2A-like systems have the largest effect on energetics. In addition, we provide a comprehensive analysis of allosteric networks in the nucleosome and demonstrate that variants take advantage of stronger interactions between L1 loops to propagate dynamics throughout the complex. Furthermore, we show that posttranslational modifications are enriched at key locations in these networks. Taken together, these results provide, to our knowledge, new insights into the relationship between the structure, dynamics, and function of the nucleosome core particle and chromatin fibers, and how they are influenced by chromatin remodeling factors.

  9. Bivalent interaction of the PZP domain of BRPF1 with the nucleosome impacts chromatin dynamics and acetylation.

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    Klein, Brianna J; Muthurajan, Uma M; Lalonde, Marie-Eve; Gibson, Matthew D; Andrews, Forest H; Hepler, Maggie; Machida, Shinichi; Yan, Kezhi; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Poirier, Michael G; Côté, Jacques; Luger, Karolin; Kutateladze, Tatiana G

    2016-01-01

    BRPF1 (bromodomain PHD finger 1) is a core subunit of the MOZ histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complex, critical for normal developmental programs and implicated in acute leukemias. BRPF1 contains a unique assembly of zinc fingers, termed a PZP domain, the physiological role of which remains unclear. Here, we elucidate the structure-function relationship of this novel epigenetic reader and detail the biological and mechanistic consequences of its interaction with nucleosomes. PZP has a globular architecture and forms a 2:1 stoichiometry complex with the nucleosome, bivalently interacting with histone H3 and DNA. This binding impacts the nucleosome dynamics, shifting the DNA unwrapping/rewrapping equilibrium toward the unwrapped state and increasing DNA accessibility. We demonstrate that the DNA-binding function of the BRPF1 PZP domain is required for the MOZ-BRPF1-ING5-hEaf6 HAT complex to be recruited to chromatin and to acetylate nucleosomal histones. Our findings reveal a novel link between chromatin dynamics and MOZ-mediated acetylation.

  10. spFRET reveals changes in nucleosome breathing by neighboring nucleosomes.

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    Buning, Ruth; Kropff, Wietske; Martens, Kirsten; van Noort, John

    2015-02-18

    Chromatin, the structure in which DNA is compacted in eukaryotic cells, plays a key role in regulating DNA accessibility. FRET experiments on single nucleosomes, the basic units in chromatin, have revealed a dynamic nucleosome where spontaneous DNA unwrapping from the ends provides access to the nucleosomal DNA. Here we investigated how this DNA breathing is affected by extension of the linker DNA and by the presence of a neighboring nucleosome. We found that both electrostatic interactions between the entering and exiting linker DNA and nucleosome-nucleosome interactions increase unwrapping. Interactions between neighboring nucleosomes are more likely in dinucleosomes spaced by 55 bp of linker DNA than in dinucleosomes spaced by 50 bp of linker DNA. Such increased unwrapping may not only increase the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA in chromatin fibers, it may also be key to folding of nucleosomes into higher order structures.

  11. Nucleosome Organization in Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puya G Yazdi

    Full Text Available The fundamental repeating unit of eukaryotic chromatin is the nucleosome. Besides being involved in packaging DNA, nucleosome organization plays an important role in transcriptional regulation and cellular identity. Currently, there is much debate about the major determinants of the nucleosome architecture of a genome and its significance with little being known about its role in stem cells. To address these questions, we performed ultra-deep sequencing of nucleosomal DNA in two human embryonic stem cell lines and integrated our data with numerous epigenomic maps. Our analyses have revealed that the genome is a determinant of nucleosome organization with transcriptionally inactive regions characterized by a "ground state" of nucleosome profiles driven by underlying DNA sequences. DNA sequence preferences are associated with heterogeneous chromatin organization around transcription start sites. Transcription, histone modifications, and DNA methylation alter this "ground state" by having distinct effects on both nucleosome positioning and occupancy. As the transcriptional rate increases, nucleosomes become better positioned. Exons transcribed and included in the final spliced mRNA have distinct nucleosome profiles in comparison to exons not included at exon-exon junctions. Genes marked by the active modification H3K4m3 are characterized by lower nucleosome occupancy before the transcription start site compared to genes marked by the inactive modification H3K27m3, while bivalent domains, genes associated with both marks, lie exactly in the middle. Combinatorial patterns of epigenetic marks (chromatin states are associated with unique nucleosome profiles. Nucleosome organization varies around transcription factor binding in enhancers versus promoters. DNA methylation is associated with increasing nucleosome occupancy and different types of methylations have distinct location preferences within the nucleosome core particle. Finally, computational

  12. Nucleosome Organization in Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdi, Puya G; Pedersen, Brian A; Taylor, Jared F; Khattab, Omar S; Chen, Yu-Han; Chen, Yumay; Jacobsen, Steven E; Wang, Ping H

    2015-01-01

    The fundamental repeating unit of eukaryotic chromatin is the nucleosome. Besides being involved in packaging DNA, nucleosome organization plays an important role in transcriptional regulation and cellular identity. Currently, there is much debate about the major determinants of the nucleosome architecture of a genome and its significance with little being known about its role in stem cells. To address these questions, we performed ultra-deep sequencing of nucleosomal DNA in two human embryonic stem cell lines and integrated our data with numerous epigenomic maps. Our analyses have revealed that the genome is a determinant of nucleosome organization with transcriptionally inactive regions characterized by a "ground state" of nucleosome profiles driven by underlying DNA sequences. DNA sequence preferences are associated with heterogeneous chromatin organization around transcription start sites. Transcription, histone modifications, and DNA methylation alter this "ground state" by having distinct effects on both nucleosome positioning and occupancy. As the transcriptional rate increases, nucleosomes become better positioned. Exons transcribed and included in the final spliced mRNA have distinct nucleosome profiles in comparison to exons not included at exon-exon junctions. Genes marked by the active modification H3K4m3 are characterized by lower nucleosome occupancy before the transcription start site compared to genes marked by the inactive modification H3K27m3, while bivalent domains, genes associated with both marks, lie exactly in the middle. Combinatorial patterns of epigenetic marks (chromatin states) are associated with unique nucleosome profiles. Nucleosome organization varies around transcription factor binding in enhancers versus promoters. DNA methylation is associated with increasing nucleosome occupancy and different types of methylations have distinct location preferences within the nucleosome core particle. Finally, computational analysis of nucleosome

  13. Effects of macroH2A and H2A.Z on nucleosome structure and dynamics as elucidated by molecular dynamics simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Bowerman, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotes tune the transcriptional activity of their genome by altering the nucleosome core particle through multiple chemical processes. In particular, replacement of the canonical H2A histone with the variants macroH2A and H2A.Z has been shown to affect DNA accessibility and nucleosome stability; however, the processes by which this occurs remain poorly understood. Here, we elucidate the molecular mechanisms of these variants with an extensive molecular dynamics study of the canonical nucleosome along with three variant-containing structures: H2A.Z, macroH2A, and an H2A mutant with macroH2A-like L1 loops. Simulation results show that variant L1 loops play a pivotal role in stabilizing DNA binding to the octamer through direct interactions, core structural rearrangements, and altered allosteric networks in the nucleosome. All variants influence dynamics; however, macroH2A-like systems have the largest effect on energetics. In addition, we provide a comprehensive analysis of allosteric networks in the nucleo...

  14. Stimulation of the Drosophila immune system alters genome-wide nucleosome occupancy

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    Yingxue Ren

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, nucleosomes participate in all DNA-templated events by regulating access to the underlying DNA sequence. However, nucleosome dynamics during a genome response have not been well characterized [1,2]. We stimulated Drosophila S2 cells with heat-killed Gram-negative bacteria Salmonella typhimurium, and mapped genome-wide nucleosome occupancy at high temporal resolution by MNase-seq using Illumina HiSeq 2500. We show widespread nucleosome occupancy change in S2 cells during the immune response, with the significant nucleosomal loss occurring at 4 h after stimulation. Data have been deposited to the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO database repository with the dataset identifier GSE64507.

  15. UV Damage in DNA Promotes Nucleosome Unwrapping*

    OpenAIRE

    Duan, Ming-Rui; Smerdon, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    The association of DNA with histones in chromatin impedes DNA repair enzymes from accessing DNA lesions. Nucleosomes exist in a dynamic equilibrium in which portions of the DNA molecule spontaneously unwrap, transiently exposing buried DNA sites. Thus, nucleosome dynamics in certain regions of chromatin may provide the exposure time and space needed for efficient repair of buried DNA lesions. We have used FRET and restriction enzyme accessibility to study nucleosome dynamics following DNA dam...

  16. Counterion atmosphere and hydration patterns near a nucleosome core particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materese, Christopher K; Savelyev, Alexey; Papoian, Garegin A

    2009-10-21

    The chromatin folding problem is an exciting and rich field for modern research. On the most basic level, chromatin fiber consists of a collection of protein-nucleic acid complexes, known as nucleosomes, joined together by segments of linker DNA. Understanding how the cell successfully compacts meters of highly charged DNA into a micrometer size nucleus while still enabling rapid access to the genetic code for transcriptional processes is a challenging goal. In this work we shed light on the way mobile ions condense around the nucleosome core particle, as revealed by an extensive all-atom molecular dynamics simulation. On a hundred nanosecond time scale, the nucleosome exhibited only small conformational fluctuations. We found that nucleosomal DNA is better neutralized by the combination of histone charges and mobile ions compared with free DNA. We provide a detailed physical explanation of this effect using ideas from electrostatics in continuous media. We also discovered that sodium condensation around the histone core is dominated by an experimentally characterized acidic patch, which is thought to play a significant role in chromatin compaction by binding with basic histone tails. Finally, we found that the nucleosome is extensively permeated by over a thousand water molecules, which in turn allows mobile ions to penetrate deeply into the complex. Overall, our work sheds light on the way ionic and hydration interactions within a nucleosome may affect internucleosomal interactions in higher order chromatin fibers. PMID:19778017

  17. Why Do Nucleosomes Unwrap Asymmetrically?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, Lennart; Tompitak, Marco; Eslami-Mossallam, Behrouz; Schiessel, Helmut

    2016-07-01

    Nucleosomes, DNA spools with a protein core, engage about three-quarters of eukaryotic DNA and play a critical role in chromosomal processes, ranging from gene regulation, recombination, and replication to chromosome condensation. For more than a decade, micromanipulation experiments where nucleosomes are put under tension, as well as the theoretical interpretations of these experiments, have deepened our understanding of the stability and dynamics of nucleosomes. Here we give a theoretical explanation for a surprising new experimental finding: nucleosomes wrapped onto the 601 positioning sequence (the sequence used in most laboratories) respond highly asymmetrically to external forces by always unwrapping from the same end. Using a computational nucleosome model, we show that this asymmetry can be explained by differences in the DNA mechanics of two very short stretches on the wrapped DNA portion. Our finding suggests that the physical properties of nucleosomes, here the response to forces, can be tuned locally by the choice of the underlying base-pair sequence. This leads to a new view of nucleosomes: a physically highly varied set of DNA-protein complexes whose properties can be tuned on evolutionary time scales to their specific function in the genomic context. PMID:26991771

  18. Monitoring Conformational Dynamics with Single-Molecule Fluorescence Energy Transfer: Applications in Nucleosome Remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deindl, Sebastian; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    Due to its ability to track distance changes within individual molecules or molecular complexes on the nanometer scale and in real time, single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (single-molecule FRET) is a powerful tool to tackle a wide range of important biological questions. Using our recently developed single-molecule FRET assay to monitor nucleosome translocation as an illustrative example, we describe here in detail how to set up, carry out, and analyze single-molecule FRET experiments that provide time-dependent information on biomolecular processes. PMID:22929765

  19. Sequence-dependent nucleosome structural and dynamic polymorphism. Potential involvement of histone H2B N-terminal tail proximal domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivolob, Andrei; Lavelle, Christophe; Prunell, Ariel

    2003-02-01

    Relaxation of nucleosomes on an homologous series (pBR) of ca 350-370 bp DNA minicircles originating from plasmid pBR322 was recently used as a tool to study their structure and dynamics. These nucleosomes thermally fluctuated between three distinct DNA conformations within a histone N-terminal tail-modulated equilibrium: one conformation was canonical, with 1.75 turn wrapping and negatively crossed entering and exiting DNAs; another was also "closed", but with these DNAs positively crossed; and the third was "open", with a lower than 1.5 turn wrapping and uncrossed DNAs. In this work, a new minicircle series (5S) of similar size was used, which contained the 5S nucleosome positioning sequence. Results showed that DNA in pBR nucleosomes was untwisted by approximately 0.2 turn relative to 5S nucleosomes, which DNase I footprinting confirmed in revealing a approximately 1 bp untwisting at each of the two dyad-distal sites where H2B N-terminal tails pass between the two gyres. In contrast, both nucleosomes showed untwistings at the dyad-proximal sites, i.e. on the other gyre, which were also observed in the high-resolution crystal structure. 5S nucleosomes also differ with respect to their dynamics: they hardly accessed the positively crossed conformation, but had an easier access to the negatively crossed conformation. Simulation showed that such reverse effects on the conformational free energies could be simply achieved by slightly altering the trajectories of entering and exiting DNAs. We propose that this is accomplished by H2B tail untwisting at the distal sites through action at a distance ( approximately 20 bp) on H3-tail interactions with the small groove at the nucleosome entry-exit. These results may help to gain a first glimpse into the two perhaps most intriguing features of the high-resolution structure: the alignment of the grooves on the two gyres and the passage of H2B and H3 N-terminal tails between them. PMID:12547190

  20. Coupling between Histone Conformations and DNA Geometry in Nucleosomes on a Microsecond Timescale: Atomistic Insights into Nucleosome Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaytan, Alexey K; Armeev, Grigoriy A; Goncearenco, Alexander; Zhurkin, Victor B; Landsman, David; Panchenko, Anna R

    2016-01-16

    An octamer of histone proteins wraps about 200bp of DNA into two superhelical turns to form nucleosomes found in chromatin. Although the static structure of the nucleosomal core particle has been solved, details of the dynamic interactions between histones and DNA remain elusive. We performed extensively long unconstrained, all-atom microsecond molecular dynamics simulations of nucleosomes including linker DNA segments and full-length histones in explicit solvent. For the first time, we were able to identify and characterize the rearrangements in nucleosomes on a microsecond timescale including the coupling between the conformation of the histone tails and the DNA geometry. We found that certain histone tail conformations promoted DNA bulging near its entry/exit sites, resulting in the formation of twist defects within the DNA. This led to a reorganization of histone-DNA interactions, suggestive of the formation of initial nucleosome sliding intermediates. We characterized the dynamics of the histone tails upon their condensation on the core and linker DNA and showed that tails may adopt conformationally constrained positions due to the insertion of "anchoring" lysines and arginines into the DNA minor grooves. Potentially, these phenomena affect the accessibility of post-translationally modified histone residues that serve as important sites for epigenetic marks (e.g., at H3K9, H3K27, H4K16), suggesting that interactions of the histone tails with the core and linker DNA modulate the processes of histone tail modifications and binding of the effector proteins. We discuss the implications of the observed results on the nucleosome function and compare our results to different experimental studies.

  1. The changing paradigm: estrogen receptor α recognition on DNA and within the dynamic nature of nucleosomes

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    William M. Scovell

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα plays a major role in the expression of estrogen-responsive genes. Although its conventional binding characteristics have been considered coincident with & exclusively in the class of steroid hormone receptors, increasing evidence challenges this paradigm. ERα was shown to bind to consensus estrogen response element half-sites (cHERE in DNA in the presence of the ubiquitous, abundant & conserved architectural protein, high mobility group protein 1 (HMGB1. It also binds to direct repeats with various spacers, in addition to everted repeats. These in vitro binding sites have been shown to be active in vivo, with both the binding affinity and transcriptional activity increased in the presence of HMGB1. Surprisingly, ERα does not bind to the optimally oriented cERE at the dyad in rotationally phased and translationally positioned nucleosomes. However, the presence of HMGB1 restructures the nucleosome to facilitate increased ERα accessibility, resulting in sequence-specific estrogen receptor binding. The finding that HMGB1 interacts with unbound ERα provides a unique avenue for enhanced ERα activity and possibly an increase in the extent of targeting at estrogen-responsive genes. The findings are consistent with ERα 1 targeting a much wider selection of genomic response elements (half-sites and inverted, direct and everted repeats and 2 exhibiting characteristics of both steroid and non steroid nuclear receptors. Growing evidence already shows a competition occurs at the DNA level between ERα and the non steroid nuclear hormone receptor, thyroid receptor (TR. Collectively, these reports suggest a less restrictive cataloging for estrogen receptor and a broader paradigm for understanding its role in the regulation of estrogen-responsive genes and influence on non steroid hormone receptor activities.

  2. AFM Imaging of SWI/SNF action: mapping the nucleosome remodeling and sliding

    CERN Document Server

    Montel, Fabien; Saint-Jean, Philippe; Castelnovo, Martin; Moskalenko-Faivre, Cendrine

    2007-01-01

    We propose a combined experimental (Atomic Force Microscopy) and theoretical study of the structural and dynamical properties of nucleosomes. In contrast to biochemical approaches, this method allows to determine simultaneously the DNA complexed length distribution and nucleosome position in various contexts. First, we show that differences in the nucleo-proteic structure observed between conventional H2A and H2A.Bbd variant nucleosomes induce quantitative changes in the in the length distribution of DNA complexed with histones. Then, the sliding action of remodeling complex SWI/SNF is characterized through the evolution of the nucleosome position and wrapped DNA length mapping. Using a linear energetic model for the distribution of DNA complexed length, we extract the net wrapping energy of DNA onto the histone octamer, and compare it to previous studies.

  3. Theoretical analysis of epigenetic cell memory by nucleosome modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Ian B; Micheelsen, Mille A; Sneppen, Kim; Thon, Geneviève

    2007-05-18

    Chromosomal regions can adopt stable and heritable alternative states resulting in bistable gene expression without changes to the DNA sequence. Such epigenetic control is often associated with alternative covalent modifications of histones. The stability and heritability of the states are thought to involve positive feedback where modified nucleosomes recruit enzymes that similarly modify nearby nucleosomes. We developed a simplified stochastic model for dynamic nucleosome modification based on the silent mating-type region of the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We show that the mechanism can give strong bistability that is resistant both to high noise due to random gain or loss of nucleosome modifications and to random partitioning upon DNA replication. However, robust bistability required: (1) cooperativity, the activity of more than one modified nucleosome, in the modification reactions and (2) that nucleosomes occasionally stimulate modification beyond their neighbor nucleosomes, arguing against a simple continuous spreading of nucleosome modification. PMID:17512413

  4. Featuring the nucleosome surface as a therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Isabel Torres Gomes; de Oliveira, Paulo Sergio Lopes; Santos, Guilherme Martins

    2015-05-01

    Chromatin is the major regulator of gene expression and genome maintenance. Proteins that bind the nucleosome, the repetitive unit of chromatin, and the histone H4 tail are critical to establishing chromatin architecture and phenotypic outcomes. Intriguingly, nucleosome-binding proteins (NBPs) and the H4 tail peptide compete for the same binding site at an acidic region on the nucleosome surface. Although the essential facts about the nucleosome were revealed 17 years ago, new insights into its atomic structure and molecular mechanisms are still emerging. Several complex nucleosome:NBP structures were recently revealed, characterizing the NBP-binding sites on the nucleosome surface. Here we discuss the potential of the nucleosome surface as a therapeutic target and the impact and development of exogenous nucleosome-binding molecules (eNBMs).

  5. Nucleosome dynamics and maintenance of epigenetic states of CpG islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneppen, Kim; Dodd, Ian B.

    2016-06-01

    Methylation of mammalian DNA occurs primarily at CG dinucleotides. These CpG sites are located nonrandomly in the genome, tending to occur within high density clusters of CpGs (islands) or within large regions of low CpG density. Cluster methylation tends to be bimodal, being dominantly unmethylated or mostly methylated. For CpG clusters near promoters, low methylation is associated with transcriptional activity, while high methylation is associated with gene silencing. Alternative CpG methylation states are thought to be stable and heritable, conferring localized epigenetic memory that allows transient signals to create long-lived gene expression states. Positive feedback where methylated CpG sites recruit enzymes that methylate nearby CpGs, can produce heritable bistability but does not easily explain that as clusters increase in size or density they change from being primarily methylated to primarily unmethylated. Here, we show that an interaction between the methylation state of a cluster and its occupancy by nucleosomes provides a mechanism to generate these features and explain genome wide systematics of CpG islands.

  6. Structure and Dynamics of Dinucleosomes Assessed by Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina A. Filenko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamics of nucleosomes and their interactions are important for understanding the mechanism of chromatin assembly. Internucleosomal interaction is required for the formation of higher-order chromatin structures. Although H1 histone is critically involved in the process of chromatin assembly, direct internucleosomal interactions contribute to this process as well. To characterize the interactions of nucleosomes within the nucleosome array, we designed a dinucleosome and performed direct AFM imaging. The analysis of the AFM data showed dinucleosomes are very dynamic systems, enabling the nucleosomes to move in a broad range along the DNA template. Di-nucleosomes in close proximity were observed, but their population was low. The use of the zwitterionic detergent, CHAPS, increased the dynamic range of the di-nucleosome, facilitating the formation of tight di-nucleosomes. The role of CHAPS and similar natural products in chromatin structure and dynamics is also discussed.

  7. Nucleosome repositioning via loop formation

    CERN Document Server

    Kulic, M L

    2002-01-01

    Active (catalysed) and passive (intrinsic) nucleosome repositioning is known to be a crucial event during the transcriptional activation of certain eucaryotic genes. Here we consider theoretically the intrinsic mechanism and study in detail the energetics and dynamics of DNA-loop-mediated nucleosome repositioning, as previously proposed by Schiessel et al. (H. Schiessel, J. Widom, R. F. Bruinsma, and W. M. Gelbart. 2001. {\\it Phys. Rev. Lett.} 86:4414-4417). The surprising outcome of the present study is the inherent nonlocality of nucleosome motion within this model -- being a direct physical consequence of the loop mechanism. On long enough DNA templates the longer jumps dominate over the previously predicted local motion, a fact that contrasts simple diffusive mechanisms considered before. The possible experimental outcome resulting from the considered mechanism is predicted, discussed and compared to existing experimental findings.

  8. Nucleosome Stability Distinguishes Two Different Promoter Types at All Protein-Coding Genes in Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubik, Slawomir; Bruzzone, Maria Jessica; Jacquet, Philippe; Falcone, Jean-Luc; Rougemont, Jacques; Shore, David

    2015-11-01

    Previous studies indicate that eukaryotic promoters display a stereotypical chromatin landscape characterized by a well-positioned +1 nucleosome near the transcription start site and an upstream -1 nucleosome that together demarcate a nucleosome-free (or -depleted) region. Here we present evidence that there are two distinct types of promoters distinguished by the resistance of the -1 nucleosome to micrococcal nuclease digestion. These different architectures are characterized by two sequence motifs that are broadly deployed at one set of promoters where a nuclease-sensitive ("fragile") nucleosome forms, but concentrated in a narrower, nucleosome-free region at all other promoters. The RSC nucleosome remodeler acts through the motifs to establish stable +1 and -1 nucleosome positions, while binding of a small set of general regulatory (pioneer) factors at fragile nucleosome promoters plays a key role in their destabilization. We propose that the fragile nucleosome promoter architecture is adapted for regulation of highly expressed, growth-related genes.

  9. Two arginine residues suppress the flexibility of nucleosomal DNA in the canonical nucleosome core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Hidetoshi; Shirayama, Kazuyoshi; Arimura, Yasuhiro; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of nucleosomes containing either canonical H3 or its centromere-specific variant CENP-A were investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations showed that the histone cores were structurally stable during simulation periods of 100 ns and 50 ns, while DNA was highly flexible at the entry and exit regions and partially dissociated from the histone core. In particular, approximately 20-25 bp of DNA at the entry and exit regions of the CENP-A nucleosome exhibited larger fluctuations than DNA at the entry and exit regions of the H3 nucleosome. Our detailed analysis clarified that this difference in dynamics was attributable to a difference in two basic amino acids in the αN helix; two arginine (Arg) residues in H3 were substituted by lysine (Lys) residues at the corresponding sites in CENP-A. The difference in the ability to form hydrogen bonds with DNA of these two residues regulated the flexibility of nucleosomal DNA at the entry and exit regions. Our exonuclease III assay consistently revealed that replacement of these two Arg residues in the H3 nucleosome by Lys enhanced endonuclease susceptibility, suggesting that the DNA ends of the CENP-A nucleosome are more flexible than those of the H3 nucleosome. This difference in the dynamics between the two types of nucleosomes may be important for forming higher order structures in different phases.

  10. Nucleosomes Inhibit Cas9 Endonuclease Activity in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, John M; Laughery, Marian F; Wyrick, John J

    2015-12-01

    During Cas9 genome editing in eukaryotic cells, the bacterial Cas9 enzyme cleaves DNA targets within chromatin. To understand how chromatin affects Cas9 targeting, we characterized Cas9 activity on nucleosome substrates in vitro. We find that Cas9 endonuclease activity is strongly inhibited when its target site is located within the nucleosome core. In contrast, the nucleosome structure does not affect Cas9 activity at a target site within the adjacent linker DNA. Analysis of target sites that partially overlap with the nucleosome edge indicates that the accessibility of the protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM) is the critical determinant of Cas9 activity on a nucleosome.

  11. Nucleosome Repositioning: A Novel Mechanism for Nicotine- and Cocaine-Induced Epigenetic Changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber N Brown

    Full Text Available Drugs of abuse modify behavior by altering gene expression in the brain. Gene expression can be regulated by changes in DNA methylation as well as by histone modifications, which alter chromatin structure, DNA compaction and DNA accessibility. In order to better understand the molecular mechanisms directing drug-induced changes in chromatin structure, we examined DNA-nucleosome interactions within promoter regions of 858 genes in human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y exposed to nicotine or cocaine. Widespread, drug- and time-resolved repositioning of nucleosomes was identified at the transcription start site and promoter region of multiple genes. Nicotine and cocaine produced unique and shared changes in terms of the numbers and types of genes affected, as well as repositioning of nucleosomes at sites which could increase or decrease the probability of gene expression based on DNA accessibility. Half of the drug-induced nucleosome positions approximated a theoretical model of nucleosome occupancy based on physical and chemical characteristics of the DNA sequence, whereas the basal or drug naïve positions were generally DNA sequence independent. Thus we suggest that nucleosome repositioning represents an initial dynamic genome-wide alteration of the transcriptional landscape preceding more selective downstream transcriptional reprogramming, which ultimately characterizes the cell- and tissue-specific responses to drugs of abuse.

  12. Nucleosome Repositioning: A Novel Mechanism for Nicotine- and Cocaine-Induced Epigenetic Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Amber N; Vied, Cynthia; Dennis, Jonathan H; Bhide, Pradeep G

    2015-01-01

    Drugs of abuse modify behavior by altering gene expression in the brain. Gene expression can be regulated by changes in DNA methylation as well as by histone modifications, which alter chromatin structure, DNA compaction and DNA accessibility. In order to better understand the molecular mechanisms directing drug-induced changes in chromatin structure, we examined DNA-nucleosome interactions within promoter regions of 858 genes in human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) exposed to nicotine or cocaine. Widespread, drug- and time-resolved repositioning of nucleosomes was identified at the transcription start site and promoter region of multiple genes. Nicotine and cocaine produced unique and shared changes in terms of the numbers and types of genes affected, as well as repositioning of nucleosomes at sites which could increase or decrease the probability of gene expression based on DNA accessibility. Half of the drug-induced nucleosome positions approximated a theoretical model of nucleosome occupancy based on physical and chemical characteristics of the DNA sequence, whereas the basal or drug naïve positions were generally DNA sequence independent. Thus we suggest that nucleosome repositioning represents an initial dynamic genome-wide alteration of the transcriptional landscape preceding more selective downstream transcriptional reprogramming, which ultimately characterizes the cell- and tissue-specific responses to drugs of abuse.

  13. Nucleosome alterations caused by mutations at modifiable histone residues in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongde; Wang, Pingyan; Liu, Lingjie; Min, Zhu; Luo, Kun; Wan, Yakun

    2015-10-26

    Nucleosome organization exhibits dynamic properties depending on the cell state and environment. Histone proteins, fundamental components of nucleosomes, are subject to chemical modifications on particular residues. We examined the effect of substituting modifiable residues of four core histones with the non-modifiable residue alanine on nucleosome dynamics. We mapped the genome-wide nucleosomes in 22 histone mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and compared the nucleosome alterations relative to the wild-type strain. Our results indicated that different types of histone mutation resulted in different phenotypes and a distinct reorganization of nucleosomes. Nucleosome occupancy was altered at telomeres, but not at centromeres. The first nucleosomes upstream (-1) and downstream (+1) of the transcription start site (TSS) were more dynamic than other nucleosomes. Mutations in histones affected the nucleosome array downstream of the TSS. Highly expressed genes, such as ribosome genes and genes involved in glycolysis, showed increased nucleosome occupancy in many types of histone mutant. In particular, the H3K56A mutant exhibited a high percentage of dynamic genomic regions, decreased nucleosome occupancy at telomeres, increased occupancy at the +1 and -1 nucleosomes, and a slow growth phenotype under stress conditions. Our findings provide insight into the influence of histone mutations on nucleosome dynamics.

  14. Asymmetric unwrapping of nucleosomes under tension directed by DNA local flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Thuy T M; Zhang, Qiucen; Zhou, Ruobo; Yodh, Jaya G; Ha, Taekjip

    2015-03-12

    Dynamics of the nucleosome and exposure of nucleosomal DNA play key roles in many nuclear processes, but local dynamics of the nucleosome and its modulation by DNA sequence are poorly understood. Using single-molecule assays, we observed that the nucleosome can unwrap asymmetrically and directionally under force. The relative DNA flexibility of the inner quarters of nucleosomal DNA controls the unwrapping direction such that the nucleosome unwraps from the stiffer side. If the DNA flexibility is similar on two sides, it stochastically unwraps from either side. The two ends of the nucleosome are orchestrated such that the opening of one end helps to stabilize the other end, providing a mechanism to amplify even small differences in flexibility to a large asymmetry in nucleosome stability. Our discovery of DNA flexibility as a critical factor for nucleosome dynamics and mechanical stability suggests a novel mechanism of gene regulation by DNA sequence and modifications.

  15. Dynamic Histone Acetylation of H3K4me3 Nucleosome Regulates MCL1 Pre-mRNA Splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Dilshad H; Gonzalez, Carolina; Tailor, Nikesh; Hamedani, Mohammad K; Leygue, Etienne; Davie, James R

    2016-10-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing is a cotranscriptional process affected by the chromatin architecture along the body of coding genes. Recruited to the pre-mRNA by splicing factors, histone deacetylases (HDACs) and K-acetyltransferases (KATs) catalyze dynamic histone acetylation along the gene. In colon carcinoma HCT 116 cells, HDAC inhibition specifically increased KAT2B occupancy as well as H3 and H4 acetylation of the H3K4 trimethylated (H3K4me3) nucleosome positioned over alternative exon 2 of the MCL1 gene, an event paralleled with the exclusion of exon 2. These results were reproduced in MDA-MB-231, but not in MCF7 breast adenocarcinoma cells. These later cells have much higher levels of demethylase KDM5B than either HCT 116 or MDA-MB-231 cells. We show that H3K4me3 steady-state levels and H3K4me3 occupancy at the end of exon 1 and over exon 2 of the MCL1 gene were lower in MCF7 than in MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, in MCF7 cells, there was minimal effect of HDAC inhibition on H3/H4 acetylation and H3K4me3 levels along the MCL1 gene and no change in pre-mRNA splicing choice. These results show that, upon HDAC inhibition, the H3K4me3 mark plays a critical role in the exclusion of exon 2 from the MCL1 pre-mRNA. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2196-2204, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26864447

  16. Design, synthesis, and characterization of nucleosomes containing site-specific DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, John-Stephen

    2015-12-01

    How DNA damaged is formed, recognized, and repaired in chromatin is an area of intense study. To better understand the structure activity relationships of damaged chromatin, mono and dinucleosomes containing site-specific damage have been prepared and studied. This review will focus on the design, synthesis, and characterization of model systems of damaged chromatin for structural, physical, and enzymatic studies.

  17. NAP1-Assisted Nucleosome Assembly on DNA Measured in Real Time by Single-Molecule Magnetic Tweezers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlijm, R.; Smitshuijzen, J.S.J.; Lusser, A.; Dekker, C.

    2012-01-01

    While many proteins are involved in the assembly and (re)positioning of nucleosomes, the dynamics of protein-assisted nucleosome formation are not well understood. We study NAP1 (nucleosome assembly protein 1) assisted nucleosome formation at the single-molecule level using magnetic tweezers. This m

  18. Nucleosome positioning and composition modulate in silico chromatin flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauvelin, N; Lo, P; Kulaeva, O I; Nizovtseva, E V; Diaz-Montes, J; Zola, J; Parashar, M; Studitsky, V M; Olson, W K

    2015-02-18

    The dynamic organization of chromatin plays an essential role in the regulation of gene expression and in other fundamental cellular processes. The underlying physical basis of these activities lies in the sequential positioning, chemical composition, and intermolecular interactions of the nucleosomes-the familiar assemblies of ∼150 DNA base pairs and eight histone proteins-found on chromatin fibers. Here we introduce a mesoscale model of short nucleosomal arrays and a computational framework that make it possible to incorporate detailed structural features of DNA and histones in simulations of short chromatin constructs. We explore the effects of nucleosome positioning and the presence or absence of cationic N-terminal histone tails on the 'local' inter-nucleosomal interactions and the global deformations of the simulated chains. The correspondence between the predicted and observed effects of nucleosome composition and numbers on the long-range communication between the ends of designed nucleosome arrays lends credence to the model and to the molecular insights gleaned from the simulated structures. We also extract effective nucleosome-nucleosome potentials from the simulations and implement the potentials in a larger-scale computational treatment of regularly repeating chromatin fibers. Our results reveal a remarkable effect of nucleosome spacing on chromatin flexibility, with small changes in DNA linker length significantly altering the interactions of nucleosomes and the dimensions of the fiber as a whole. In addition, we find that these changes in nucleosome positioning influence the statistical properties of long chromatin constructs. That is, simulated chromatin fibers with the same number of nucleosomes exhibit polymeric behaviors ranging from Gaussian to worm-like, depending upon nucleosome spacing. These findings suggest that the physical and mechanical properties of chromatin can span a wide range of behaviors, depending on nucleosome positioning, and

  19. Interactions between DNA and histones- a dynamic process of nucleosome formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李伟; 王鹏业; 窦硕星; 童培庆

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the dynamic process of interactions between a DNA chain and a histone octamer by numerical simulations. It is found that DNA indeed may wrap around the histone octaner about two turns as in the actual situations. The simulation shows that the interaction potential between DNA and histone is a key factor for the wrapping of DNA, and the temperature is also an important parameter in the process.

  20. Asymmetric nucleosomes flank promoters in the budding yeast genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Zentner, Gabriel E; Henikoff, Steven

    2015-03-01

    Nucleosomes in active chromatin are dynamic, but whether they have distinct structural conformations is unknown. To identify nucleosomes with alternative structures genome-wide, we used H4S47C-anchored cleavage mapping, which revealed that 5% of budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) nucleosome positions have asymmetric histone-DNA interactions. These asymmetric interactions are enriched at nucleosome positions that flank promoters. Micrococcal nuclease (MNase) sequence-based profiles of asymmetric nucleosome positions revealed a corresponding asymmetry in MNase protection near the dyad axis, suggesting that the loss of DNA contacts around H4S47 is accompanied by protection of the DNA from MNase. Chromatin immunoprecipitation mapping of selected nucleosome remodelers indicated that asymmetric nucleosomes are bound by the RSC chromatin remodeling complex, which is required for maintaining nucleosomes at asymmetric positions. These results imply that the asymmetric nucleosome-RSC complex is a metastable intermediate representing partial unwrapping and protection of nucleosomal DNA on one side of the dyad axis during chromatin remodeling.

  1. Nucleosome immobilization strategies for single-pair FRET microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopmans, Wiepke J A; Schmidt, Thomas; van Noort, John

    2008-10-01

    All genomic transactions in eukaryotes take place in the context of the nucleosome, the basic unit of chromatin, which is responsible for DNA compaction. Overcoming the steric hindrance that nucleosomes present for DNA-processing enzymes requires significant conformational changes. The dynamics of these have been hard to resolve. Single-pair Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (spFRET) microscopy is a powerful technique for observing conformational dynamics of the nucleosome. Nucleosome immobilization allows the extension of observation times to a limit set only by photobleaching, and thus opens the possibility of studying processes occurring on timescales ranging from milliseconds to minutes. It is crucial however, that immobilization itself does not introduce artifacts in the dynamics. Here we report on various nucleosome immobilization strategies, such as single-point attachment to polyethylene glycol (PEG) or surfaces coated with bovine serum albumin (BSA), and confinement in porous agarose or polyacrylamide gels. We compare the immobilization specificity and structural integrity of immobilized nucleosomes. A crosslinked star polyethylene glycol coating performs best with respect to tethering specificity and nucleosome integrity, and enables us to reproduce for the first time bulk nucleosome unwrapping kinetics in single nucleosomes without immobilization artifacts.

  2. Nucleosome Positioning and Epigenetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, David; Bruinsma, Robijn

    2008-03-01

    The role of chromatin structure in gene regulation has recently taken center stage in the field of epigenetics, phenomena that change the phenotype without changing the DNA sequence. Recent work has also shown that nucleosomes, a complex of DNA wrapped around a histone octamer, experience a sequence dependent energy landscape due to the variation in DNA bend stiffness with sequence composition. In this talk, we consider the role nucleosome positioning might play in the formation of heterochromatin, a compact form of DNA generically responsible for gene silencing. In particular, we discuss how different patterns of nucleosome positions, periodic or random, could either facilitate or suppress heterochromatin stability and formation.

  3. Baculoviruses and nucleosome management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkman, Loy E

    2015-02-01

    Negatively-supercoiled-ds DNA molecules, including the genomes of baculoviruses, spontaneously wrap around cores of histones to form nucleosomes when present within eukaryotic nuclei. Hence, nucleosome management should be essential for baculovirus genome replication and temporal regulation of transcription, but this has not been documented. Nucleosome mobilization is the dominion of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes. SWI/SNF and INO80, two of the best-studied complexes, as well as chromatin modifier TIP60, all contain actin as a subunit. Retrospective analysis of results of AcMNPV time course experiments wherein actin polymerization was blocked by cytochalasin D drug treatment implicate actin-containing chromatin modifying complexes in decatenating baculovirus genomes, shutting down host transcription, and regulating late and very late phases of viral transcription. Moreover, virus-mediated nuclear localization of actin early during infection may contribute to nucleosome management.

  4. Baculoviruses and nucleosome management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkman, Loy E., E-mail: lvolkman@berkeley.edu

    2015-02-15

    Negatively-supercoiled-ds DNA molecules, including the genomes of baculoviruses, spontaneously wrap around cores of histones to form nucleosomes when present within eukaryotic nuclei. Hence, nucleosome management should be essential for baculovirus genome replication and temporal regulation of transcription, but this has not been documented. Nucleosome mobilization is the dominion of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes. SWI/SNF and INO80, two of the best-studied complexes, as well as chromatin modifier TIP60, all contain actin as a subunit. Retrospective analysis of results of AcMNPV time course experiments wherein actin polymerization was blocked by cytochalasin D drug treatment implicate actin-containing chromatin modifying complexes in decatenating baculovirus genomes, shutting down host transcription, and regulating late and very late phases of viral transcription. Moreover, virus-mediated nuclear localization of actin early during infection may contribute to nucleosome management. - Highlights: • Baculoviruses have negatively-supercoiled, circular ds DNA. • Negatively-supercoiled DNA spontaneously forms nucleosomes in the nucleus. • Nucleosomes must be mobilized for replication and transcription to proceed. • Actin-containing chromatin modifiers participate in baculovirus replication.

  5. Yeast H2A.Z, FACT complex and RSC regulate transcription of tRNA gene through differential dynamics of flanking nucleosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatra, Sahasransu; Dewari, Pooran S; Bhardwaj, Anubhav; Bhargava, Purnima

    2011-05-01

    FACT complex is involved in elongation and ensures fidelity in the initiation step of transcription by RNA polymerase (pol) II. Histone variant H2A.Z is found in nucleosomes at the 5'-end of many genes. We report here H2A.Z-chaperone activity of the yeast FACT complex on the short, nucleosome-free, non-coding, pol III-transcribed yeast tRNA genes. On a prototype gene, yeast SUP4, chromatin remodeler RSC and FACT regulate its transcription through novel mechanisms, wherein the two gene-flanking nucleosomes containing H2A.Z, play different roles. Nhp6, which ensures transcription fidelity and helps load yFACT onto the gene flanking nucleosomes, has inhibitory role. RSC maintains a nucleosome abutting the gene terminator downstream, which results in reduced transcription rate in active state while H2A.Z probably helps RSC in keeping the gene nucleosome-free and serves as stress-sensor. All these factors maintain an epigenetic state which allows the gene to return quickly from repressed to active state and tones down the expression from the active SUP4 gene, required probably to maintain the balance in cellular tRNA pool.

  6. The size of the nucleosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob; Olsen, Kasper

    2011-01-01

    The structural origin of the size of the 11 nm nucleosomal disc is addressed. On the nanometer length-scale the organization of DNA as chromatin in the chromosomes involves a coiling of DNA around the histone core of the nucleosome. We suggest that the size of the nucleosome core particle...... is a necessity when allowing for transient tensile stresses during the reorganization of DNA, e.g., during the reposition, or sliding, of a nucleosome along the DNA double helix. The mathematical model we apply is based on a tubular description of double helices assuming hard walls. When the base......-pairs of the linker-DNA is included the estimate of the size of an ideal nucleosome is in close agreement with the experimental numbers. Interestingly, the size of the nucleosome is shown to be a consequence of intrinsic properties of the DNA double helix....

  7. Nucleosomes undergo slow spontaneous gaping

    OpenAIRE

    Ngo, Thuy T.M.; Ha, Taekjip

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, DNA is packaged into a basic unit, the nucleosome which consists of 147 bp of DNA wrapped around a histone octamer composed of two copies each of the histones H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. Nucleosome structures are diverse not only by histone variants, histone modifications, histone composition but also through accommodating different conformational states such as DNA breathing and dimer splitting. Variation in nucleosome structures allows it to perform a variety of cellular functions. ...

  8. Nucleosomes undergo slow spontaneous gaping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Thuy T M; Ha, Taekjip

    2015-04-30

    In eukaryotes, DNA is packaged into a basic unit, the nucleosome which consists of 147 bp of DNA wrapped around a histone octamer composed of two copies each of the histones H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. Nucleosome structures are diverse not only by histone variants, histone modifications, histone composition but also through accommodating different conformational states such as DNA breathing and dimer splitting. Variation in nucleosome structures allows it to perform a variety of cellular functions. Here, we identified a novel spontaneous conformational switching of nucleosomes under physiological conditions using single-molecule FRET. Using FRET probes placed at various positions on the nucleosomal DNA to monitor conformation of the nucleosome over a long period of time (30-60 min) at various ionic conditions, we identified conformational changes we refer to as nucleosome gaping. Gaping transitions are distinct from nucleosome breathing, sliding or tightening. Gaping modes switch along the direction normal to the DNA plane through about 5-10 angstroms and at minutes (1-10 min) time scale. This conformational transition, which has not been observed previously, may be potentially important for enzymatic reactions/transactions on nucleosomal substrate and the formation of multiple compression forms of chromatin fibers.

  9. Characterizing and controlling intrinsic biases of lambda exonuclease in nascent strand sequencing reveals phasing between nucleosomes and G-quadruplex motifs around a subset of human replication origins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foulk, M. S.; Urban, J. M.; Casella, Cinzia;

    2015-01-01

    Nascent strand sequencing (NS-seq) is used to discover DNA replication origins genome-wide, allowing identification of features for their specification. NS-seq depends on the ability of lambda exonuclease (lambda-exo) to efficiently digest parental DNA while leaving RNA-primer protected nascent...... are not general determinants for origin specification but may play a role for a subset. Interestingly, we observed a periodic spacing of G4 motifs and nucleosomes around the peak summits, suggesting that G4s may position nucleosomes at this subset of origins. Finally, we demonstrate that use of Na+ instead of K...

  10. DiNuP: a systematic approach to identify regions of differential nucleosome positioning

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Kai; Tang, Qianzi; Feng, Jianxing; Liu, Xiaole Shirley; Zhang, Yong

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: With the rapid development of high-throughput sequencing technologies, the genome-wide profiling of nucleosome positioning has become increasingly affordable. Many future studies will investigate the dynamic behaviour of nucleosome positioning in cells that have different states or that are exposed to different conditions. However, a robust method to effectively identify the regions of differential nucleosome positioning (RDNPs) has not been previously available. Results: We descr...

  11. Structured nucleosome fingerprints enable high-resolution mapping of chromatin architecture within regulatory regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schep, Alicia N; Buenrostro, Jason D; Denny, Sarah K; Schwartz, Katja; Sherlock, Gavin; Greenleaf, William J

    2015-11-01

    Transcription factors canonically bind nucleosome-free DNA, making the positioning of nucleosomes within regulatory regions crucial to the regulation of gene expression. Using the assay of transposase accessible chromatin (ATAC-seq), we observe a highly structured pattern of DNA fragment lengths and positions around nucleosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and use this distinctive two-dimensional nucleosomal "fingerprint" as the basis for a new nucleosome-positioning algorithm called NucleoATAC. We show that NucleoATAC can identify the rotational and translational positions of nucleosomes with up to base-pair resolution and provide quantitative measures of nucleosome occupancy in S. cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and human cells. We demonstrate the application of NucleoATAC to a number of outstanding problems in chromatin biology, including analysis of sequence features underlying nucleosome positioning, promoter chromatin architecture across species, identification of transient changes in nucleosome occupancy and positioning during a dynamic cellular response, and integrated analysis of nucleosome occupancy and transcription factor binding.

  12. Histone acetylation dependent energy landscapes in tri-nucleosome revealed by residue-resolved molecular simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Le; Takada, Shoji

    2016-01-01

    Histone tail acetylation is a key epigenetic marker that tends to open chromatin folding and activate transcription. Despite intensive studies, precise roles of individual lysine acetylation in chromatin folding have only been poorly understood. Here, we revealed structural dynamics of tri-nucleosomes with several histone tail acetylation states and analyzed histone tail interactions with DNA by performing molecular simulations at an unprecedentedly high resolution. We found versatile acetylation-dependent landscapes of tri-nucleosome. The H4 and H2A tail acetylation reduced the contact between the first and third nucleosomes mediated by the histone tails. The H3 tail acetylation reduced its interaction with neighboring linker DNAs resulting in increase of the distance between consecutive nucleosomes. Notably, two copies of the same histone in a single nucleosome have markedly asymmetric interactions with DNAs, suggesting specific pattern of nucleosome docking albeit high inherent flexibility. Estimated transcription factor accessibility was significantly high for the H4 tail acetylated structures. PMID:27698366

  13. New insights into two distinct nucleosome distributions: comparison of cross-platform positioning datasets in the yeast genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Yangyang

    2010-01-01

    discrepancy and consistency, reflects the mechanisms of nucleosome packaging in vivo more faithfully than individual studies. Furthermore, nucleosomes can be divided into two classes according to their stable and dynamic characteristics. We found that two different nucleosome-positioning characteristics may significantly impact transcription programs. Besides, some positioned-nucleosomes are involved in the transition from stable state to dynamic state in response to abrupt environmental changes.

  14. Histone Acetylation near the Nucleosome Dyad Axis Enhances Nucleosome Disassembly by RSC and SWI/SNF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Nilanjana; North, Justin A; Dechassa, Mekonnen Lemma; Manohar, Mridula; Prasad, Rashmi; Luger, Karolin; Ottesen, Jennifer J; Poirier, Michael G; Bartholomew, Blaine

    2015-12-01

    Signaling associated with transcription activation occurs through posttranslational modification of histones and is best exemplified by lysine acetylation. Lysines are acetylated in histone tails and the core domain/lateral surface of histone octamers. While acetylated lysines in histone tails are frequently recognized by other factors referred to as "readers," which promote transcription, the mechanistic role of the modifications in the lateral surface of the histone octamer remains unclear. By using X-ray crystallography, we found that acetylated lysines 115 and 122 in histone H3 are solvent accessible, but in biochemical assays they appear not to interact with the bromodomains of SWI/SNF and RSC to enhance recruitment or nucleosome mobilization, as previously shown for acetylated lysines in H3 histone tails. Instead, we found that acetylation of lysines 115 and 122 increases the predisposition of nucleosomes for disassembly by SWI/SNF and RSC up to 7-fold, independent of bromodomains, and only in conjunction with contiguous nucleosomes. Thus, in combination with SWI/SNF and RSC, acetylation of lateral surface lysines in the histone octamer serves as a crucial regulator of nucleosomal dynamics distinct from the histone code readers and writers.

  15. Divalent Metal- and High Mobility Group N Protein-Dependent Nucleosome Stability and Conformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle S. Ong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available High mobility group N proteins (HMGNs bind specifically to the nucleosome core and act as chromatin unfolding and activating factors. Using an all-Xenopus system, we found that HMGN1 and HMGN2 binding to nucleosomes results in distinct ion-dependent conformation and stability. HMGN2 association with nucleosome core particle or nucleosomal array in the presence of divalent metal triggers a reversible transition to a species with much reduced electrophoretic mobility, consistent with a less compact state of the nucleosome. Residues outside of the nucleosome binding domain are required for the activity, which is also displayed by an HMGN1 truncation product lacking part of the regulatory domain. In addition, thermal denaturation assays show that the presence of 1 mM Mg2+> or Ca2+ gives a reduction in nucleosome core terminus stability, which is further substantially diminished by the binding of HMGN2 or truncated HMGN1. Our findings emphasize the importance of divalent metals in nucleosome dynamics and suggest that the differential biological activities of HMGNs in chromatin activation may involve different conformational alterations and modulation of nucleosome core stability.

  16. An in vitro-identified high-affinity nucleosome-positioning signal is capable of transiently positioning a nucleosome in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gracey Lia E

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The physiological function of eukaryotic DNA occurs in the context of nucleosomal arrays that can expose or obscure defined segments of the genome. Certain DNA sequences are capable of strongly positioning a nucleosome in vitro, suggesting the possibility that favorable intrinsic signals might reproducibly structure chromatin segments. As high-throughput sequencing analyses of nucleosome coverage in vitro and in vivo have become possible, a vigorous debate has arisen over the degree to which intrinsic DNA:nucleosome affinities orchestrate the in vivo positions of nucleosomes, thereby controlling physical accessibility of specific sequences in DNA. Results We describe here the in vivo consequences of placing a synthetic high-affinity nucleosome-positioning signal, the 601 sequence, into a DNA plasmid vector in mice. Strikingly, the 601 sequence was sufficient to position nucleosomes during an early phase after introduction of the DNA into the mice (when the plasmid vector transgene was active. This positioning capability was transient, with a loss of strong positioning at a later time point when the transgenes had become silent. Conclusions These results demonstrate an ability of DNA sequences selected solely for nucleosome affinity to organize chromatin in vivo, and the ability of other mechanisms to overcome these interactions in a dynamic nuclear environment.

  17. Nanopores suggest a negligible influence of CpG methylation on nucleosome packaging and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langecker, Martin; Ivankin, Andrey; Carson, Spencer; Kinney, Shannon R M; Simmel, Friedrich C; Wanunu, Meni

    2015-01-14

    Nucleosomes are the fundamental repeating units of chromatin, and dynamic regulation of their positioning along DNA governs gene accessibility in eukaryotes. Although epigenetic factors have been shown to influence nucleosome structure and dynamics, the impact of DNA methylation on nucleosome packaging remains controversial. Further, all measurements to date have been carried out under zero-force conditions. In this paper, we present the first automated force measurements that probe the impact of CpG DNA methylation on nucleosome stability. In solid-state nanopore force spectroscopy, a nucleosomal DNA tail is captured into a pore and pulled on with a time-varying electrophoretic force until unraveling is detected. This is automatically repeated for hundreds of nucleosomes, yielding statistics of nucleosome lifetime vs electrophoretic force. The force geometry, which is similar to displacement forces exerted by DNA polymerases and helicases, reveals that nucleosome stability is sensitive to DNA sequence yet insensitive to CpG methylation. Our label-free method provides high-throughput data that favorably compares with other force spectroscopy experiments and is suitable for studying a variety of DNA-protein complexes.

  18. Chromosomes. CENP-C reshapes and stabilizes CENP-A nucleosomes at the centromere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Samantha J; Guo, Lucie Y; Sekulic, Nikolina; Smoak, Evan M; Mani, Tomoyasu; Logsdon, Glennis A; Gupta, Kushol; Jansen, Lars E T; Van Duyne, Gregory D; Vinogradov, Sergei A; Lampson, Michael A; Black, Ben E

    2015-05-01

    Inheritance of each chromosome depends upon its centromere. A histone H3 variant, centromere protein A (CENP-A), is essential for epigenetically marking centromere location. We find that CENP-A is quantitatively retained at the centromere upon which it is initially assembled. CENP-C binds to CENP-A nucleosomes and is a prime candidate to stabilize centromeric chromatin. Using purified components, we find that CENP-C reshapes the octameric histone core of CENP-A nucleosomes, rigidifies both surface and internal nucleosome structure, and modulates terminal DNA to match the loose wrap that is found on native CENP-A nucleosomes at functional human centromeres. Thus, CENP-C affects nucleosome shape and dynamics in a manner analogous to allosteric regulation of enzymes. CENP-C depletion leads to rapid removal of CENP-A from centromeres, indicating their collaboration in maintaining centromere identity.

  19. Genome-Wide Nucleosome Occupancy and Positioning and Their Impact on Gene Expression and Evolution in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Wenli; Jiang, Jiming

    2015-08-01

    The fundamental unit of chromatin is the nucleosome that consists of a protein octamer composed of the four core histones (Hs; H3, H4, H2A, and H2B) wrapped by 147 bp of DNA. Nucleosome occupancy and positioning have proven to be dynamic and have a critical impact on expression, regulation, and evolution of eukaryotic genes. We developed nucleosome occupancy and positioning data sets using leaf tissue of rice (Oryza sativa) and both leaf and flower tissues of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We show that model plant and animal species share the fundamental characteristics associated with nucleosome dynamics. Only 12% and 16% of the Arabidopsis and rice genomes, respectively, were occupied by well-positioned nucleosomes. The cores of positioned nucleosomes were enriched with G/C dinucleotides and showed a lower C→T mutation rate than the linker sequences. We discovered that nucleosomes associated with heterochromatic regions were more spaced with longer linkers than those in euchromatic regions in both plant species. Surprisingly, different nucleosome densities were found to be associated with chromatin in leaf and flower tissues in Arabidopsis. We show that deep MNase-seq data sets can be used to map nucleosome occupancy of specific genomic loci and reveal gene expression patterns correlated with chromatin dynamics in plant genomes.

  20. Conditions for positioning of nucleosomes on DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheinman, Michael; Chung, Ho-Ryun

    2015-08-01

    Positioning of nucleosomes along a eukaryotic genome plays an important role in its organization and regulation. There are many different factors affecting the location of nucleosomes. Some can be viewed as preferential binding of a single nucleosome to different locations along the DNA and some as interactions between neighboring nucleosomes. In this study, we analyze positioning of nucleosomes and derive conditions for their good positioning. Using analytic and numerical approaches we find that, if the binding preferences are very weak, an interplay between the interactions and the binding preferences is essential for a good positioning of nucleosomes, especially on correlated energy landscapes. Analyzing the empirical energy landscape, we conclude that good positioning of nucleosomes in vivo is possible only if they strongly interact. In this case, our model, predicting long-length-scale fluctuations of nucleosomes' occupancy along the DNA, accounts well for the empirical observations.

  1. The size of the nucleosome

    CERN Document Server

    Bohr, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    The structural origin of the size of the 11 nm nucleosomal disc is addressed. On the nanometer length-scale the organization of DNA as chromatin in the chromosomes involves a coiling of DNA around the histone core of the nucleosome. We suggest that the size of the nucleosome core particle is dictated by the fulfillment of two criteria: One is optimizing the volume fraction of the DNA double helix; this requirement for close-packing has its root in optimizing atomic and molecular interactions. The other criterion being that of having a zero strain-twist coupling; being a zero-twist structure is a necessity when allowing for transient tensile stresses during the reorganization of DNA, e.g., during the reposition, or sliding, of a nucleosome along the DNA double helix. The mathematical model we apply is based on a tubular description of double helices assuming hard walls. When the base-pairs of the linker-DNA is included the estimate of the size of an ideal nucleosome is in close agreement with the experimental ...

  2. Visible periodicity of strong nucleosome DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Bilal; Tripathi, Vijay; Trifonov, Edward N

    2015-01-01

    Fifteen years ago, Lowary and Widom assembled nucleosomes on synthetic random sequence DNA molecules, selected the strongest nucleosomes and discovered that the TA dinucleotides in these strong nucleosome sequences often appear at 10-11 bases from one another or at distances which are multiples of this period. We repeated this experiment computationally, on large ensembles of natural genomic sequences, by selecting the strongest nucleosomes--i.e. those with such distances between like-named dinucleotides, multiples of 10.4 bases, the structural and sequence period of nucleosome DNA. The analysis confirmed the periodicity of TA dinucleotides in the strong nucleosomes, and revealed as well other periodic sequence elements, notably classical AA and TT dinucleotides. The matrices of DNA bendability and their simple linear forms--nucleosome positioning motifs--are calculated from the strong nucleosome DNA sequences. The motifs are in full accord with nucleosome positioning sequences derived earlier, thus confirming that the new technique, indeed, detects strong nucleosomes. Species- and isochore-specific variations of the matrices and of the positioning motifs are demonstrated. The strong nucleosome DNA sequences manifest the highest hitherto nucleosome positioning sequence signals, showing the dinucleotide periodicities in directly observable rather than in hidden form.

  3. Review fifteen years of search for strong nucleosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifonov, Edward N; Nibhani, Reshma

    2015-08-01

    Don Crothers, Mikael Kubista, Jon Widom, and their teams have been first to look for strong nucleosomes, in a bid to reveal the nucleosome positioning pattern(s) carried by the nucleosome DNA sequences. They were first to demonstrate that the nucleosome stability correlates with 10-11 base sequence periodicity, and that the strong nucleosomes localize preferentially in centromeres. This review describes these findings and their connection to recent discovery of the strong nucleosomes (SNs) with visibly periodic nucleosome DNA sequences.

  4. Characterizing and controlling intrinsic biases of lambda exonuclease in nascent strand sequencing reveals phasing between nucleosomes and G-quadruplex motifs around a subset of human replication origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulk, Michael S; Urban, John M; Casella, Cinzia; Gerbi, Susan A

    2015-05-01

    Nascent strand sequencing (NS-seq) is used to discover DNA replication origins genome-wide, allowing identification of features for their specification. NS-seq depends on the ability of lambda exonuclease (λ-exo) to efficiently digest parental DNA while leaving RNA-primer protected nascent strands intact. We used genomics and biochemical approaches to determine if λ-exo digests all parental DNA sequences equally. We report that λ-exo does not efficiently digest G-quadruplex (G4) structures in a plasmid. Moreover, λ-exo digestion of nonreplicating genomic DNA (LexoG0) enriches GC-rich DNA and G4 motifs genome-wide. We used LexoG0 data to control for nascent strand-independent λ-exo biases in NS-seq and validated this approach at the rDNA locus. The λ-exo-controlled NS-seq peaks are not GC-rich, and only 35.5% overlap with 6.8% of all G4s, suggesting that G4s are not general determinants for origin specification but may play a role for a subset. Interestingly, we observed a periodic spacing of G4 motifs and nucleosomes around the peak summits, suggesting that G4s may position nucleosomes at this subset of origins. Finally, we demonstrate that use of Na(+) instead of K(+) in the λ-exo digestion buffer reduced the effect of G4s on λ-exo digestion and discuss ways to increase both the sensitivity and specificity of NS-seq.

  5. Shearing of the CENP-A dimerization interface mediates plasticity in the octameric centromeric nucleosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winogradoff, David; Zhao, Haiqing; Dalal, Yamini; Papoian, Garegin A

    2015-11-25

    The centromeric nucleosome is a key epigenetic determinant of centromere identity and function. Consequently, deciphering how CENP-A containing nucleosomes contribute structurally to centromere function is a fundamental question in chromosome biology. Here, we performed microsecond timescale all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of CENP-A and H3 nucleosomes, and report that the octameric CENP-A core particles and nucleosomes display different dynamics from their canonical H3-containing counterparts. The most significant motion observed is within key interactions at the heart of the CENP-A octameric core, wherein shearing of contacts within the CENP-A:CENP-A' dimerization interface results in a weaker four helix bundle, and an extrusion of 10-30 bp of DNA near the pseudo-dyad. Coupled to other local and global fluctuations, the CENP-A nucleosome occupies a more rugged free energy landscape than the canonical H3 nucleosome. Taken together, our data suggest that CENP-A encodes enhanced distortability to the octameric nucleosome, which may allow for enhanced flexing of the histone core in vivo.

  6. Conditions for positioning of nucleosomes on DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Sheinman, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Positioning of nucleosomes along eukaryotic genomes plays an important role in their organization and regulation. There are many different factors affecting the location of nucleosomes. Some can be viewed as preferential binding of a single nucleosome to different locations along the DNA and some as interactions between neighboring nucleosomes. In this study we analyzed how well nucleosomes are positioned along the DNA as a function of strength of the preferential binding, correlation length of the binding energy landscape, interactions between neighboring nucleosomes and others relevant system properties. We analyze different scenarios: designed energy landscapes and generically disordered ones and derive conditions for good positioning. Using analytic and numerical approaches we find that, even if the binding preferences are very weak, synergistic interplay between the interactions and the binding preferences is essential for a good positioning of nucleosomes, especially on correlated energy landscapes. Ana...

  7. Characterizing and modeling citation dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Eom, Young-Ho; 10.1371/journal.pone.0024926

    2011-01-01

    Citation distributions are crucial for the analysis and modeling of the activity of scientists. We investigated bibliometric data of papers published in journals of the American Physical Society, searching for the type of function which best describes the observed citation distributions. We used the goodness of fit with Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistics for three classes of functions: log-normal, simple power law and shifted power law. The shifted power law turns out to be the most reliable hypothesis for all citation networks we derived, which correspond to different time spans. We find that citation dynamics is characterized by bursts, usually occurring within a few years since publication of a paper, and the burst size spans several orders of magnitude. We also investigated the microscopic mechanisms for the evolution of citation networks, by proposing a linear preferential attachment with time dependent initial attractiveness. The model successfully reproduces the empirical citation distributions and accounts...

  8. Physical properties of naked DNA influence nucleosome positioning and correlate with transcription start and termination sites in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soler-López Montserrat

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In eukaryotic organisms, DNA is packaged into chromatin structure, where most of DNA is wrapped into nucleosomes. DNA compaction and nucleosome positioning have clear functional implications, since they modulate the accessibility of genomic regions to regulatory proteins. Despite the intensive research effort focused in this area, the rules defining nucleosome positioning and the location of DNA regulatory regions still remain elusive. Results Naked (histone-free and nucleosomal DNA from yeast were digested by microccocal nuclease (MNase and sequenced genome-wide. MNase cutting preferences were determined for both naked and nucleosomal DNAs. Integration of their sequencing profiles with DNA conformational descriptors derived from atomistic molecular dynamic simulations enabled us to extract the physical properties of DNA on a genomic scale and to correlate them with chromatin structure and gene regulation. The local structure of DNA around regulatory regions was found to be unusually flexible and to display a unique pattern of nucleosome positioning. Ab initio physical descriptors derived from molecular dynamics were used to develop a computational method that accurately predicts nucleosome enriched and depleted regions. Conclusions Our experimental and computational analyses jointly demonstrate a clear correlation between sequence-dependent physical properties of naked DNA and regulatory signals in the chromatin structure. These results demonstrate that nucleosome positioning around TSS (Transcription Start Site and TTS (Transcription Termination Site (at least in yeast is strongly dependent on DNA physical properties, which can define a basal regulatory mechanism of gene expression.

  9. Insights into DNA signals for nucleosome positioning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiming DAI; Xianhua DAI; Jihua FENG; Qian XIANG; Yangyang DENG; Jiang WANG

    2008-01-01

    The nucleosome is the fundamental unit of eukaryotic genomes. Its positioning in the promoter region plays a central role in regulating gene transcription. Experimental evidence suggests that the genomic DNA sequence is one important determinant of nucleosome positioning. Several approaches have been developed to predict nucleosome positions based on DNA sequence features, but the results indicate that there is room for improvement. This paper presents a new computational approach to predict genome-wide nucleosome locations in promoter regions. Importantly, the proposed approach outperforms existing approaches in yeast. Further anal-ysis demonstrates that DNA signals for nucleosome posi-tioning vary with species and composition of histones. Analysis of individual genes reveals that the role of the underlying DNA sequence in nucleosome positioning var-ies with genes.

  10. Nucleosome spacing generated by ISWI and CHD1 remodelers is constant regardless of nucleosome density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieleg, Corinna; Ketterer, Philip; Nuebler, Johannes; Ludwigsen, Johanna; Gerland, Ulrich; Dietz, Hendrik; Mueller-Planitz, Felix; Korber, Philipp

    2015-05-01

    Arrays of regularly spaced nucleosomes are a hallmark of chromatin, but it remains unclear how they are generated. Recent genome-wide studies, in vitro and in vivo, showed constant nucleosome spacing even if the histone concentration was experimentally reduced. This counters the long-held assumption that nucleosome density determines spacing and calls for factors keeping spacing constant regardless of nucleosome density. We call this a clamping activity. Here, we show in a purified system that ISWI- and CHD1-type nucleosome remodelers have a clamping activity such that they not only generate regularly spaced nucleosome arrays but also generate constant spacing regardless of nucleosome density. This points to a functionally attractive nucleosome interaction that could be mediated either directly by nucleosome-nucleosome contacts or indirectly through the remodelers. Mutant Drosophila melanogaster ISWI without the Hand-Sant-Slide (HSS) domain had no detectable spacing activity even though it is known to remodel and slide nucleosomes. This suggests that the role of ISWI remodelers in generating constant spacing is not just to mediate nucleosome sliding; they actively contribute to the attractive interaction. Additional factors are necessary to set physiological spacing in absolute terms.

  11. Nucleosomes shape DNA polymorphism and divergence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasha A Langley

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available An estimated 80% of genomic DNA in eukaryotes is packaged as nucleosomes, which, together with the remaining interstitial linker regions, generate higher order chromatin structures [1]. Nucleosome sequences isolated from diverse organisms exhibit ∼10 bp periodic variations in AA, TT and GC dinucleotide frequencies. These sequence elements generate intrinsically curved DNA and help establish the histone-DNA interface. We investigated an important unanswered question concerning the interplay between chromatin organization and genome evolution: do the DNA sequence preferences inherent to the highly conserved histone core exert detectable natural selection on genomic divergence and polymorphism? To address this hypothesis, we isolated nucleosomal DNA sequences from Drosophila melanogaster embryos and examined the underlying genomic variation within and between species. We found that divergence along the D. melanogaster lineage is periodic across nucleosome regions with base changes following preferred nucleotides, providing new evidence for systematic evolutionary forces in the generation and maintenance of nucleosome-associated dinucleotide periodicities. Further, Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP frequency spectra show striking periodicities across nucleosomal regions, paralleling divergence patterns. Preferred alleles occur at higher frequencies in natural populations, consistent with a central role for natural selection. These patterns are stronger for nucleosomes in introns than in intergenic regions, suggesting selection is stronger in transcribed regions where nucleosomes undergo more displacement, remodeling and functional modification. In addition, we observe a large-scale (∼180 bp periodic enrichment of AA/TT dinucleotides associated with nucleosome occupancy, while GC dinucleotide frequency peaks in linker regions. Divergence and polymorphism data also support a role for natural selection in the generation and maintenance of these

  12. Reading sequence-directed computational nucleosome maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nibhani, Reshma; Trifonov, Edward N

    2015-01-01

    Recently developed latest version of the sequence-directed single-base resolution nucleosome mapping reveals existence of strong nucleosomes and chromatin columnar structures (columns). Broad application of this simple technique for further studies of chromatin and chromosome structure requires some basic understanding as to how it works and what information it affords. The paper provides such an introduction to the method. The oscillating maps of singular nucleosomes, of short and long oligonucleosome columns, are explained, as well as maps of chromatin on satellite DNA and occurrences of counter-phase (antiparallel) nucleosome neighbors.

  13. Understanding the connection between epigenetic DNA methylation and nucleosome positioning from computer simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillem Portella

    Full Text Available Cytosine methylation is one of the most important epigenetic marks that regulate the process of gene expression. Here, we have examined the effect of epigenetic DNA methylation on nucleosomal stability using molecular dynamics simulations and elastic deformation models. We found that methylation of CpG steps destabilizes nucleosomes, especially when these are placed in sites where the DNA minor groove faces the histone core. The larger stiffness of methylated CpG steps is a crucial factor behind the decrease in nucleosome stability. Methylation changes the positioning and phasing of the nucleosomal DNA, altering the accessibility of DNA to regulatory proteins, and accordingly gene functionality. Our theoretical calculations highlight a simple physical-based explanation on the foundations of epigenetic signaling.

  14. Characterizing and modeling citation dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Ho Eom

    Full Text Available Citation distributions are crucial for the analysis and modeling of the activity of scientists. We investigated bibliometric data of papers published in journals of the American Physical Society, searching for the type of function which best describes the observed citation distributions. We used the goodness of fit with Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistics for three classes of functions: log-normal, simple power law and shifted power law. The shifted power law turns out to be the most reliable hypothesis for all citation networks we derived, which correspond to different time spans. We find that citation dynamics is characterized by bursts, usually occurring within a few years since publication of a paper, and the burst size spans several orders of magnitude. We also investigated the microscopic mechanisms for the evolution of citation networks, by proposing a linear preferential attachment with time dependent initial attractiveness. The model successfully reproduces the empirical citation distributions and accounts for the presence of citation bursts as well.

  15. Histone H2A (H2A.X and H2A.Z variants in molluscs: molecular characterization and potential implications for chromatin dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo González-Romero

    Full Text Available Histone variants are used by the cell to build specialized nucleosomes, replacing canonical histones and generating functionally specialized chromatin domains. Among many other processes, the specialization imparted by histone H2A (H2A.X and H2A.Z variants to the nucleosome core particle constitutes the earliest response to DNA damage in the cell. Consequently, chromatin-based genotoxicity tests have been developed in those cases where enough information pertaining chromatin structure and dynamics is available (i.e., human and mouse. However, detailed chromatin knowledge is almost absent in most organisms, specially protostome animals. Molluscs (which represent sentinel organisms for the study of pollution are not an exception to this lack of knowledge. In the present work we first identified the existence of functionally differentiated histone H2A.X and H2A.Z variants in the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis (MgH2A.X and MgH2A.Z, a marine organism widely used in biomonitoring programs. Our results support the functional specialization of these variants based on: a their active expression in different tissues, as revealed by the isolation of native MgH2A.X and MgH2A.Z proteins in gonad and hepatopancreas; b the evolutionary conservation of different residues encompassing functional relevance; and c their ability to confer specialization to nucleosomes, as revealed by nucleosome reconstitution experiments using recombinant MgH2A.X and MgH2A.Z histones. Given the seminal role of these variants in maintaining genomic integrity and regulating gene expression, their preliminary characterization opens up new potential applications for the future development of chromatin-based genotoxicity tests in pollution biomonitoring programs.

  16. A Positive Twist to the Centromeric Nucleosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefina Ocampo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Centromeric nucleosomes are critical for chromosome attachment to the mitotic spindle. In this issue of Cell Reports, Diaz-Ingelmo et al. (2015 propose that the yeast centromeric nucleosome is stabilized by a positively supercoiled loop formed by the sequence-specific CBF3 complex.

  17. A brief review of nucleosome structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutter, Amber R; Hayes, Jeffrey J

    2015-10-01

    The nucleosomal subunit organization of chromatin provides a multitude of functions. Nucleosomes elicit an initial ∼7-fold linear compaction of genomic DNA. They provide a critical mechanism for stable repression of genes and other DNA-dependent activities by restricting binding of trans-acting factors to cognate DNA sequences. Conversely they are engineered to be nearly meta-stable and disassembled (and reassembled) in a facile manner to allow rapid access to the underlying DNA during processes such as transcription, replication and DNA repair. Nucleosomes protect the genome from DNA damaging agents and provide a lattice onto which a myriad of epigenetic signals are deposited. Moreover, vast strings of nucleosomes provide a framework for assembly of the chromatin fiber and higher-order chromatin structures. Thus, in order to provide a foundation for understanding these functions, we present a review of the basic elements of nucleosome structure and stability, including the association of linker histones.

  18. Single-Molecule Studies of the Linker Histone H1 Binding to DNA and the Nucleosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Hongjun; Fang, He; Wei, Sijie; Hayes, Jeffrey J; Lee, Tae-Hee

    2016-04-12

    Linker histone H1 regulates chromatin structure and gene expression. Investigating the dynamics and stoichiometry of binding of H1 to DNA and the nucleosome is crucial to elucidating its functions. Because of the abundant positive charges and the strong self-affinity of H1, quantitative in vitro studies of its binding to DNA and the nucleosome have generated results that vary widely and, therefore, should be interpreted in a system specific manner. We sought to overcome this limitation by developing a specially passivated microscope slide surface to monitor binding of H1 to DNA and the nucleosome at a single-molecule level. According to our measurements, the stoichiometry of binding of H1 to DNA and the nucleosome is very heterogeneous with a wide distribution whose averages are in reasonable agreement with previously published values. Our study also revealed that H1 does not dissociate from DNA or the nucleosome on a time scale of tens of minutes. We found that histone chaperone Nap1 readily dissociates H1 from DNA and superstoichiometrically bound H1 from the nucleosome, supporting a hypothesis whereby histone chaperones contribute to the regulation of the H1 profile in chromatin.

  19. Inducible nucleosome depletion at OREBP-binding-sites by hypertonic stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith H Y Tong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Osmotic Response Element-Binding Protein (OREBP, also known as TonEBP or NFAT5, is a unique transcription factor. It is hitherto the only known mammalian transcription factor that regulates hypertonic stress-induced gene transcription. In addition, unlike other monomeric members of the NFAT family, OREBP exists as a homodimer and it is the only transcription factor known to bind naked DNA targets by complete encirclement in vitro. Nevertheless, how OREBP interacts with target DNA, also known as ORE/TonE, and how it elicits gene transcription in vivo, remains unknown. METHODOLOGY: Using hypertonic induction of the aldose reductase (AR gene activation as a model, we showed that OREs contained dynamic nucleosomes. Hypertonic stress induced a rapid and reversible loss of nucleosome(s around the OREs. The loss of nucleosome(s was found to be initiated by an OREBP-independent mechanism, but was significantly potentiated in the presence of OREBP. Furthermore, hypertonic induction of AR gene was associated with an OREBP-dependent hyperacetylation of histones that spanned the 5' upstream sequences and at least some exons of the gene. Nevertheless, nucleosome loss was not regulated by the acetylation status of histone. SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings offer novel insights into the mechanism of OREBP-dependent transcriptional regulation and provide a basis for understanding how histone eviction and transcription factor recruitment are coupled.

  20. Theoretical estimates of exposure timescales of protein binding sites on DNA regulated by nucleosome kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Jyotsana J; Das, Dibyendu; Padinhateeri, Ranjith

    2016-02-29

    It is being increasingly realized that nucleosome organization on DNA crucially regulates DNA-protein interactions and the resulting gene expression. While the spatial character of the nucleosome positioning on DNA has been experimentally and theoretically studied extensively, the temporal character is poorly understood. Accounting for ATPase activity and DNA-sequence effects on nucleosome kinetics, we develop a theoretical method to estimate the time of continuous exposure of binding sites of non-histone proteins (e.g. transcription factors and TATA binding proteins) along any genome. Applying the method to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we show that the exposure timescales are determined by cooperative dynamics of multiple nucleosomes, and their behavior is often different from expectations based on static nucleosome occupancy. Examining exposure times in the promoters of GAL1 and PHO5, we show that our theoretical predictions are consistent with known experiments. We apply our method genome-wide and discover huge gene-to-gene variability of mean exposure times of TATA boxes and patches adjacent to TSS (+1 nucleosome region); the resulting timescale distributions have non-exponential tails.

  1. Relating periodicity of nucleosome organization and gene regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Wan, Jun; Lin, Jimmy; Zack, Donald J.; Qian, Jiang

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: The relationship between nucleosome positioning and gene regulation is fundamental yet complex. Previous studies on genomic nucleosome positions have revealed a correlation between nucleosome occupancy on promoters and gene expression levels. Many of these studies focused on individual nucleosomes, especially those proximal to transcription start sites. To study the collective effect of multiple nucleosomes on the gene expression, we developed a mathematical approach based on auto...

  2. Strong nucleosomes of A. thaliana concentrate in centromere regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Bilal; Trifonov, Edward N

    2015-01-01

    Earlier identified strongest nucleosome DNA sequences of A. thaliana, those with visible 10-11 base sequence periodicity, are mapped along chromosomes. Resulting positional distributions reveal distinct maxima, one per chromosome, located in the centromere regions. Sequence-directed nucleosome mapping demonstrates that the strong nucleosomes (SNs) make tight arrays, several 'parallel' nucleosomes each, suggesting a columnar chromatin structure. The SNs represent a new class of centromeric nucleosomes, presumably, participating in synapsis of chromatids and securing the centromere architecture.

  3. Structural basis for retroviral integration into nucleosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskell, Daniel P; Renault, Ludovic; Serrao, Erik; Lesbats, Paul; Matadeen, Rishi; Hare, Stephen; Lindemann, Dirk; Engelman, Alan N; Costa, Alessandro; Cherepanov, Peter

    2015-07-16

    Retroviral integration is catalysed by a tetramer of integrase (IN) assembled on viral DNA ends in a stable complex, known as the intasome. How the intasome interfaces with chromosomal DNA, which exists in the form of nucleosomal arrays, is currently unknown. Here we show that the prototype foamy virus (PFV) intasome is proficient at stable capture of nucleosomes as targets for integration. Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy reveals a multivalent intasome-nucleosome interface involving both gyres of nucleosomal DNA and one H2A-H2B heterodimer. While the histone octamer remains intact, the DNA is lifted from the surface of the H2A-H2B heterodimer to allow integration at strongly preferred superhelix location ±3.5 positions. Amino acid substitutions disrupting these contacts impinge on the ability of the intasome to engage nucleosomes in vitro and redistribute viral integration sites on the genomic scale. Our findings elucidate the molecular basis for nucleosome capture by the viral DNA recombination machinery and the underlying nucleosome plasticity that allows integration.

  4. Histone chaperone-mediated nucleosome assembly process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hsiu-Fang; Liu, Zi-Ning; Chow, Sih-Yao; Lu, Yi-Han; Li, Hsin

    2015-01-01

    A huge amount of information is stored in genomic DNA and this stored information resides inside the nucleus with the aid of chromosomal condensation factors. It has been reported that the repeat nucleosome core particle (NCP) consists of 147-bp of DNA and two copies of H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. Regulation of chromosomal structure is important to many processes inside the cell. In vivo, a group of histone chaperones facilitate and regulate nucleosome assembly. How NCPs are constructed with the aid of histone chaperones remains unclear. In this study, the histone chaperone-mediated nucleosome assembly process was investigated using single-molecule tethered particle motion (TPM) experiments. It was found that Asf1 is able to exert more influence than Nap1 and poly glutamate acid (PGA) on the nucleosome formation process, which highlights Asf1's specific role in tetrasome formation. Thermodynamic parameters supported a model whereby energetically favored nucleosomal complexes compete with non-nucleosomal complexes. In addition, our kinetic findings propose the model that histone chaperones mediate nucleosome assembly along a path that leads to enthalpy-favored products with free histones as reaction substrates.

  5. Stepwise nucleosome translocation by RSC remodeling complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Bryan T; Hwang, William L; Deindl, Sebastian; Chatterjee, Nilanjana; Bartholomew, Blaine; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-02-19

    The SWI/SNF-family remodelers regulate chromatin structure by coupling the free energy from ATP hydrolysis to the repositioning and restructuring of nucleosomes, but how the ATPase activity of these enzymes drives the motion of DNA across the nucleosome remains unclear. Here, we used single-molecule FRET to monitor the remodeling of mononucleosomes by the yeast SWI/SNF remodeler, RSC. We observed that RSC primarily translocates DNA around the nucleosome without substantial displacement of the H2A-H2B dimer. At the sites where DNA enters and exits the nucleosome, the DNA moves largely along or near its canonical wrapping path. The translocation of DNA occurs in a stepwise manner, and at both sites where DNA enters and exits the nucleosome, the step size distributions exhibit a peak at approximately 1-2 bp. These results suggest that the movement of DNA across the nucleosome is likely coupled directly to DNA translocation by the ATPase at its binding site inside the nucleosome.

  6. Characterizing popularity dynamics of online videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhuo-Ming; Shi, Yu-Qiang; Liao, Hao

    2016-07-01

    Online popularity has a major impact on videos, music, news and other contexts in online systems. Characterizing online popularity dynamics is nature to explain the observed properties in terms of the already acquired popularity of each individual. In this paper, we provide a quantitative, large scale, temporal analysis of the popularity dynamics in two online video-provided websites, namely MovieLens and Netflix. The two collected data sets contain over 100 million records and even span a decade. We characterize that the popularity dynamics of online videos evolve over time, and find that the dynamics of the online video popularity can be characterized by the burst behaviors, typically occurring in the early life span of a video, and later restricting to the classic preferential popularity increase mechanism.

  7. SWI/SNF- and RSC-catalyzed nucleosome mobilization requires internal DNA loop translocation within nucleosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Peterson, Craig L; Hayes, Jeffrey J

    2011-10-01

    The multisubunit SWI/SNF and RSC complexes utilize energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to mobilize nucleosomes and render the DNA accessible for various nuclear processes. Here we test the idea that remodeling involves intermediates with mobile DNA bulges or loops within the nucleosome by cross-linking the H2A N- or C-terminal tails together to generate protein "loops" that constrict separation of the DNA from the histone surface. Analyses indicate that this intranucleosomal cross-linking causes little or no change in remodeling-dependent exposure of DNA sequences within the nucleosome to restriction enzymes. However, cross-linking inhibits nucleosome mobilization and blocks complete movement of nucleosomes to extreme end positions on the DNA fragments. These results are consistent with evidence that nucleosome remodeling involves intermediates with DNA loops on the nucleosome surface but indicate that such loops do not freely diffuse about the surface of the histone octamer. We propose a threading model for movement of DNA loops around the perimeter of the nucleosome core.

  8. Operational Characterization of Divisibility of Dynamical Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Joonwoo; Chruściński, Dariusz

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we show the operational characterization to the divisibility of dynamical maps in terms of the distinguishability of quantum channels. It is proven that the distinguishability of any pair of quantum channels does not increase under divisible maps, in which the full hierarchy of divisibility is isomorphic to the structure of entanglement between system and environment. This shows that (i) channel distinguishability is the operational quantity signifying (detecting) divisibility (indivisibility) of dynamical maps and (ii) the decision problem for the divisibility of maps is as hard as the separability problem in entanglement theory. We also provide the information-theoretic characterization to the divisibility of maps with conditional min-entropy.

  9. An advanced coarse-grained nucleosome core particle model for computer simulations of nucleosome-nucleosome interactions under varying ionic conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanping Fan

    Full Text Available In the eukaryotic cell nucleus, DNA exists as chromatin, a compact but dynamic complex with histone proteins. The first level of DNA organization is the linear array of nucleosome core particles (NCPs. The NCP is a well-defined complex of 147 bp DNA with an octamer of histones. Interactions between NCPs are of paramount importance for higher levels of chromatin compaction. The polyelectrolyte nature of the NCP implies that nucleosome-nucleosome interactions must exhibit a great influence from both the ionic environment as well as the positively charged and highly flexible N-terminal histone tails, protruding out from the NCP. The large size of the system precludes a modelling analysis of chromatin at an all-atom level and calls for coarse-grained approximations. Here, a model of the NCP that include the globular histone core and the flexible histone tails described by one particle per each amino acid and taking into account their net charge is proposed. DNA wrapped around the histone core was approximated at the level of two base pairs represented by one bead (bases and sugar plus four beads of charged phosphate groups. Computer simulations, using a Langevin thermostat, in a dielectric continuum with explicit monovalent (K(+, divalent (Mg(2+ or trivalent (Co(NH(3(6 (3+ cations were performed for systems with one or ten NCPs. Increase of the counterion charge results in a switch from repulsive NCP-NCP interaction in the presence of K(+, to partial aggregation with Mg(2+ and to strong mutual attraction of all 10 NCPs in the presence of CoHex(3+. The new model reproduced experimental results and the structure of the NCP-NCP contacts is in agreement with available data. Cation screening, ion-ion correlations and tail bridging contribute to the NCP-NCP attraction and the new NCP model accounts for these interactions.

  10. An advanced coarse-grained nucleosome core particle model for computer simulations of nucleosome-nucleosome interactions under varying ionic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yanping; Korolev, Nikolay; Lyubartsev, Alexander P; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2013-01-01

    In the eukaryotic cell nucleus, DNA exists as chromatin, a compact but dynamic complex with histone proteins. The first level of DNA organization is the linear array of nucleosome core particles (NCPs). The NCP is a well-defined complex of 147 bp DNA with an octamer of histones. Interactions between NCPs are of paramount importance for higher levels of chromatin compaction. The polyelectrolyte nature of the NCP implies that nucleosome-nucleosome interactions must exhibit a great influence from both the ionic environment as well as the positively charged and highly flexible N-terminal histone tails, protruding out from the NCP. The large size of the system precludes a modelling analysis of chromatin at an all-atom level and calls for coarse-grained approximations. Here, a model of the NCP that include the globular histone core and the flexible histone tails described by one particle per each amino acid and taking into account their net charge is proposed. DNA wrapped around the histone core was approximated at the level of two base pairs represented by one bead (bases and sugar) plus four beads of charged phosphate groups. Computer simulations, using a Langevin thermostat, in a dielectric continuum with explicit monovalent (K(+)), divalent (Mg(2+)) or trivalent (Co(NH(3))(6) (3+)) cations were performed for systems with one or ten NCPs. Increase of the counterion charge results in a switch from repulsive NCP-NCP interaction in the presence of K(+), to partial aggregation with Mg(2+) and to strong mutual attraction of all 10 NCPs in the presence of CoHex(3+). The new model reproduced experimental results and the structure of the NCP-NCP contacts is in agreement with available data. Cation screening, ion-ion correlations and tail bridging contribute to the NCP-NCP attraction and the new NCP model accounts for these interactions.

  11. Zelda overcomes the high intrinsic nucleosome barrier at enhancers during Drosophila zygotic genome activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yujia; Nien, Chung-Yi; Chen, Kai; Liu, Hsiao-Yun; Johnston, Jeff; Zeitlinger, Julia; Rushlow, Christine

    2015-11-01

    The Drosophila genome activator Vielfaltig (Vfl), also known as Zelda (Zld), is thought to prime enhancers for activation by patterning transcription factors (TFs). Such priming is accompanied by increased chromatin accessibility, but the mechanisms by which this occurs are poorly understood. Here, we analyze the effect of Zld on genome-wide nucleosome occupancy and binding of the patterning TF Dorsal (Dl). Our results show that early enhancers are characterized by an intrinsically high nucleosome barrier. Zld tackles this nucleosome barrier through local depletion of nucleosomes with the effect being dependent on the number and position of Zld motifs. Without Zld, Dl binding decreases at enhancers and redistributes to open regions devoid of enhancer activity. We propose that Zld primes enhancers by lowering the high nucleosome barrier just enough to assist TFs in accessing their binding motifs and promoting spatially controlled enhancer activation if the right patterning TFs are present. We envision that genome activators in general will utilize this mechanism to activate the zygotic genome in a robust and precise manner.

  12. Automatic characterization of dynamics in Absence Epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Katrine N. H.; Nielsen, Trine N.; Kjær, Troels W.;

    2013-01-01

    Dynamics of the spike-wave paroxysms in Childhood Absence Epilepsy (CAE) are automatically characterized using novel approaches. Features are extracted from scalograms formed by Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT). Detection algorithms are designed to identify an estimate of the temporal development...

  13. Nucleosome positioning, nucleotide excision repair and photoreactivation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guintini, Laetitia; Charton, Romain; Peyresaubes, François; Thoma, Fritz; Conconi, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    The position of nucleosomes on DNA participates in gene regulation and DNA replication. Nucleosomes can be repressors by limiting access of factors to regulatory sequences, or activators by facilitating binding of factors to exposed DNA sequences on the surface of the core histones. The formation of UV induced DNA lesions, like cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), is modulated by DNA bending around the core histones. Since CPDs are removed by nucleotide excision repair (NER) and photolyase repair, it is of paramount importance to understand how DNA damage and repair are tempered by the position of nucleosomes. In vitro, nucleosomes inhibit NER and photolyase repair. In vivo, nucleosomes slow down NER and considerably obstruct photoreactivation of CPDs. However, over-expression of photolyase allows repair of nucleosomal DNA in a second time scale. It is proposed that the intrinsic abilities of nucleosomes to move and transiently unwrap could facilitate damage recognition and repair in nucleosomal DNA.

  14. Nucleosome positioning in yeasts: methods, maps, and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieleg, Corinna; Krietenstein, Nils; Walker, Maria; Korber, Philipp

    2015-06-01

    Eukaryotic nuclear DNA is packaged into nucleosomes. During the past decade, genome-wide nucleosome mapping across species revealed the high degree of order in nucleosome positioning. There is a conserved stereotypical nucleosome organization around transcription start sites (TSSs) with a nucleosome-depleted region (NDR) upstream of the TSS and a TSS-aligned regular array of evenly spaced nucleosomes downstream over the gene body. As nucleosomes largely impede access to DNA and thereby provide an important level of genome regulation, it is of general interest to understand the mechanisms generating nucleosome positioning and especially the stereotypical NDR-array pattern. We focus here on the most advanced models, unicellular yeasts, and review the progress in mapping nucleosomes and which nucleosome positioning mechanisms are discussed. There are four mechanistic aspects: How are NDRs generated? How are individual nucleosomes positioned, especially those flanking the NDRs? How are nucleosomes evenly spaced leading to regular arrays? How are regular arrays aligned at TSSs? The main candidates for nucleosome positioning determinants are intrinsic DNA binding preferences of the histone octamer, specific DNA binding factors, nucleosome remodeling enzymes, transcription, and statistical positioning. We summarize the state of the art in an integrative model where nucleosomes are positioned by a combination of all these candidate determinants. We highlight the predominance of active mechanisms involving nucleosome remodeling enzymes which may be recruited by DNA binding factors and the transcription machinery. While this mechanistic framework emerged clearly during recent years, the involved factors and their mechanisms are still poorly understood and require future efforts combining in vivo and in vitro approaches.

  15. Electrostatic mechanism of nucleosomal array folding revealed by computer simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Jian; Zhang, Qing; Schlick, Tamar

    2005-01-01

    Although numerous experiments indicate that the chromatin fiber displays salt-dependent conformations, the associated molecular mechanism remains unclear. Here, we apply an irregular Discrete Surface Charge Optimization (DiSCO) model of the nucleosome with all histone tails incorporated to describe by Monte Carlo simulations salt-dependent rearrangements of a nucleosomal array with 12 nucleosomes. The ensemble of nucleosomal array conformations display salt-dependent condensation in good agre...

  16. Traceless Synthesis of Asymmetrically Modified Bivalent Nucleosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Carolin C; Agashe, Ninad D; Fierz, Beat

    2016-02-18

    Nucleosomes carry extensive post-translational modifications (PTMs), which results in complex modification patterns that are involved in epigenetic signaling. Although two copies of each histone coexist in a nucleosome, they may not carry the same PTMs and are often differently modified (asymmetric). In bivalent domains, a chromatin signature prevalent in embryonic stem cells (ESCs), namely H3 methylated at lysine 4 (H3K4me3), coexists with H3K27me3 in asymmetric nucleosomes. We report a general, modular, and traceless method for producing asymmetrically modified nucleosomes. We further show that in bivalent nucleosomes, H3K4me3 inhibits the activity of the H3K27-specific lysine methyltransferase (KMT) polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) solely on the same histone tail, whereas H3K27me3 stimulates PRC2 activity across tails, thereby partially overriding the H3K4me3-mediated repressive effect. To maintain bivalent domains in ESCs, PRC2 activity must thus be locally restricted or reversed.

  17. Histone H3 lysine 14 (H3K14) acetylation facilitates DNA repair in a positioned nucleosome by stabilizing the binding of the chromatin Remodeler RSC (Remodels Structure of Chromatin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Ming-Rui; Smerdon, Michael J

    2014-03-21

    Histone H3 acetylation is induced by UV damage in yeast and may play an important role in regulating the repair of UV photolesions in nucleosome-loaded genomic loci. However, it remains elusive how H3 acetylation facilitates repair. We generated a strongly positioned nucleosome containing homogeneously acetylated H3 at Lys-14 (H3K14ac) and investigated possible mechanisms by which H3K14 acetylation modulates repair. We show that H3K14ac does not alter nucleosome unfolding dynamics or enhance the repair of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers by UV photolyase. Importantly, however, nucleosomes with H3K14ac have a higher affinity for purified chromatin remodeling complex RSC (Remodels the Structure of Chromatin) and show greater cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer repair compared with unacetylated nucleosomes. Our study indicates that, by anchoring RSC, H3K14 acetylation plays an important role in the unfolding of strongly positioned nucleosomes during repair of UV damage.

  18. Nucleosome adaptability conferred by sequence and structural variations in histone H2A-H2B dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaytan, Alexey K; Landsman, David; Panchenko, Anna R

    2015-06-01

    Nucleosome variability is essential for their functions in compacting the chromatin structure and regulation of transcription, replication and cell reprogramming. The DNA molecule in nucleosomes is wrapped around an octamer composed of four types of core histones (H3, H4, H2A, H2B). Nucleosomes represent dynamic entities and may change their conformation, stability and binding properties by employing different sets of histone variants or by becoming post-translationally modified. There are many variants of histones H2A and H2B. Specific H2A and H2B variants may preferentially associate with each other resulting in different combinations of variants and leading to the increased combinatorial complexity of nucleosomes. In addition, the H2A-H2B dimer can be recognized and substituted by chaperones/remodelers as a distinct unit, can assemble independently and is stable during nucleosome unwinding. In this review we discuss how sequence and structural variations in H2A-H2B dimers may provide necessary complexity and confer the nucleosome functional variability.

  19. Reservoir resistivity characterization incorporating flow dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Arango, Santiago

    2016-04-07

    Systems and methods for reservoir resistivity characterization are provided, in various aspects, an integrated framework for the estimation of Archie\\'s parameters for a strongly heterogeneous reservoir utilizing the dynamics of the reservoir are provided. The framework can encompass a Bayesian estimation/inversion method for estimating the reservoir parameters, integrating production and time lapse formation conductivity data to achieve a better understanding of the subsurface rock conductivity properties and hence improve water saturation imaging.

  20. Structure and function of human histone H3.Y nucleosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujirai, Tomoya; Horikoshi, Naoki; Sato, Koichi; Maehara, Kazumitsu; Machida, Shinichi; Osakabe, Akihisa; Kimura, Hiroshi; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2016-07-27

    Histone H3.Y is a primate-specific, distant H3 variant. It is evolutionarily derived from H3.3, and may function in transcription regulation. However, the mechanism by which H3.Y regulates transcription has not been elucidated. In the present study, we determined the crystal structure of the H3.Y nucleosome, and found that many H3.Y-specific residues are located on the entry/exit sites of the nucleosome. Biochemical analyses revealed that the DNA ends of the H3.Y nucleosome were more flexible than those of the H3.3 nucleosome, although the H3.Y nucleosome was stable in vitro and in vivo Interestingly, the linker histone H1, which compacts nucleosomal DNA, appears to bind to the H3.Y nucleosome less efficiently, as compared to the H3.3 nucleosome. These characteristics of the H3.Y nucleosome are also conserved in the H3.Y/H3.3 heterotypic nucleosome, which may be the predominant form in cells. In human cells, H3.Y preferentially accumulated around transcription start sites (TSSs). Taken together, H3.Y-containing nucleosomes around transcription start sites may form relaxed chromatin that allows transcription factor access, to regulate the transcription status of specific genes.

  1. Human nucleosomes: special role of CG dinucleotides and Alu-nucleosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trifonov Edward N

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The periodical occurrence of dinucleotides with a period of 10.4 bases now is undeniably a hallmark of nucleosome positioning. Whereas many eukaryotic genomes contain visible and even strong signals for periodic distribution of dinucleotides, the human genome is rather featureless in this respect. The exact sequence features in the human genome that govern the nucleosome positioning remain largely unknown. Results When analyzing the human genome sequence with the positional autocorrelation method, we found that only the dinucleotide CG shows the 10.4 base periodicity, which is indicative of the presence of nucleosomes. There is a high occurrence of CG dinucleotides that are either 31 (10.4 × 3 or 62 (10.4 × 6 base pairs apart from one another - a sequence bias known to be characteristic of Alu-sequences. In a similar analysis with repetitive sequences removed, peaks of repeating CG motifs can be seen at positions 10, 21 and 31, the nearest integers of multiples of 10.4. Conclusions Although the CG dinucleotides are dominant, other elements of the standard nucleosome positioning pattern are present in the human genome as well. The positional autocorrelation analysis of the human genome demonstrates that the CG dinucleotide is, indeed, one visible element of the human nucleosome positioning pattern, which appears both in Alu sequences and in sequences without repeats. The dominant role that CG dinucleotides play in organizing human chromatin is to indicate the involvement of human nucleosomes in tuning the regulation of gene expression and chromatin structure, which is very likely due to cytosine-methylation/-demethylation in CG dinucleotides contained in the human nucleosomes. This is further confirmed by the positions of CG-periodical nucleosomes on Alu sequences. Alu repeats appear as monomers, dimers and trimers, harboring two to six nucleosomes in a run. Considering the exceptional role CG dinucleotides play in the

  2. Tension-dependent Free Energies of Nucleosome Unwrapping

    CERN Document Server

    Lequieu, Joshua; Schwartz, David C; de Pablo, Juan J

    2016-01-01

    Nucleosomes form the basic unit of compaction within eukaryotic genomes and their locations represent an important, yet poorly understood, mechanism of genetic regulation. Quantifying the strength of interactions within the nucleosome is a central problem in biophysics and is critical to understanding how nucleosome positions influence gene expression. By comparing to single-molecule experiments, we demonstrate that a coarse-grained molecular model of the nucleosome can reproduce key aspects of nucleosome unwrapping. Using detailed simulations of DNA and histone proteins, we calculate the tension-dependent free energy surface corresponding to the unwrapping process. The model reproduces quantitatively the forces required to unwrap the nucleosome, and reveals the role played by electrostatic interactions during this process. We then demonstrate that histone modifications and DNA sequence can have significant effects on the energies of nucleosome formation. Most notably, we show that histone tails are crucial f...

  3. Acetylation Mimics Within a Single Nucleosome Alter Local DNA Accessibility In Compacted Nucleosome Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Laxmi N.; Pepenella, Sharon; Rogge, Ryan; Hansen, Jeffrey C.; Hayes, Jeffrey J.

    2016-01-01

    The activation of a silent gene locus is thought to involve pioneering transcription factors that initiate changes in the local chromatin structure to increase promoter accessibility and binding of downstream effectors. To better understand the molecular requirements for the first steps of locus activation, we investigated whether acetylation of a single nucleosome is sufficient to alter DNA accessibility within a condensed 25-nucleosome array. We found that acetylation mimics within the histone H4 tail domain increased accessibility of the surrounding linker DNA, with the increased accessibility localized to the immediate vicinity of the modified nucleosome. In contrast, acetylation mimics within the H3 tail had little effect, but were able to synergize with H4 tail acetylation mimics to further increase accessibility. Moreover, replacement of the central nucleosome with a nucleosome free region also resulted in increased local, but not global DNA accessibility. Our results indicate that modification or disruption of only a single target nucleosome results in significant changes in local chromatin architecture and suggest that very localized chromatin modifications imparted by pioneer transcription factors are sufficient to initiate a cascade of events leading to promoter activation. PMID:27708426

  4. Regulation of Nucleosome Architecture and Factor Binding Revealed by Nuclease Footprinting of the ESC Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainer, Sarah J; Fazzio, Thomas G

    2015-10-01

    Functional interactions between gene regulatory factors and chromatin architecture have been difficult to directly assess. Here, we use micrococcal nuclease (MNase) footprinting to probe the functions of two chromatin-remodeling complexes. By simultaneously quantifying alterations in small MNase footprints over the binding sites of 30 regulatory factors in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs), we provide evidence that esBAF and Mbd3/NuRD modulate the binding of several regulatory proteins. In addition, we find that nucleosome occupancy is reduced at specific loci in favor of subnucleosomes upon depletion of esBAF, including sites of histone H2A.Z localization. Consistent with these data, we demonstrate that esBAF is required for normal H2A.Z localization in ESCs, suggesting esBAF either stabilizes H2A.Z-containing nucleosomes or promotes subnucleosome to nucleosome conversion by facilitating H2A.Z deposition. Therefore, integrative examination of MNase footprints reveals insights into nucleosome dynamics and functional interactions between chromatin structure and key gene-regulatory factors.

  5. Substantial histone reduction modulates genomewide nucleosomal occupancy and global transcriptional output.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Celona

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The basic unit of genome packaging is the nucleosome, and nucleosomes have long been proposed to restrict DNA accessibility both to damage and to transcription. Nucleosome number in cells was considered fixed, but recently aging yeast and mammalian cells were shown to contain fewer nucleosomes. We show here that mammalian cells lacking High Mobility Group Box 1 protein (HMGB1 contain a reduced amount of core, linker, and variant histones, and a correspondingly reduced number of nucleosomes, possibly because HMGB1 facilitates nucleosome assembly. Yeast nhp6 mutants lacking Nhp6a and -b proteins, which are related to HMGB1, also have a reduced amount of histones and fewer nucleosomes. Nucleosome limitation in both mammalian and yeast cells increases the sensitivity of DNA to damage, increases transcription globally, and affects the relative expression of about 10% of genes. In yeast nhp6 cells the loss of more than one nucleosome in four does not affect the location of nucleosomes and their spacing, but nucleosomal occupancy. The decrease in nucleosomal occupancy is non-uniform and can be modelled assuming that different nucleosomal sites compete for available histones. Sites with a high propensity to occupation are almost always packaged into nucleosomes both in wild type and nucleosome-depleted cells; nucleosomes on sites with low propensity to occupation are disproportionately lost in nucleosome-depleted cells. We suggest that variation in nucleosome number, by affecting nucleosomal occupancy both genomewide and gene-specifically, constitutes a novel layer of epigenetic regulation.

  6. Universal full-length nucleosome mapping sequence probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Vijay; Salih, Bilal; Trifonov, Edward N

    2015-01-01

    For the computational sequence-directed mapping of the nucleosomes, the knowledge of the nucleosome positioning motifs - 10-11 base long sequences - and respective matrices of bendability, is not sufficient, since there is no justified way to fuse these motifs in one continuous nucleosome DNA sequence. Discovery of the strong nucleosome (SN) DNA sequences, with visible sequence periodicity allows derivation of the full-length nucleosome DNA bendability pattern as matrix or consensus sequence. The SN sequences of three species (A. thaliana, C. elegans, and H. sapiens) are aligned (512 sequences for each species), and long (115 dinucleotides) matrices of bendability derived for the species. The matrices have strong common property - alternation of runs of purine-purine (RR) and pyrimidine-pyrimidine (YY) dinucleotides, with average period 10.4 bases. On this basis the universal [R,Y] consensus of the nucleosome DNA sequence is derived, with exactly defined positions of respective penta- and hexamers RRRRR, RRRRRR, YYYYY, and YYYYYY.

  7. Enhancement of the nucleosomal pattern in sequences of lower complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolshoy, Alexander; Shapiro, Kevin; Trifonov, Edward N.;

    1997-01-01

    Intuitively, the complexity of a given DNA sequence is related to the number of various superimposed biological messages it contains. Here we assess the expectation that in nucleosome DNA sequences of lower linguistic complexity, the nucleosome DNA positioning pattern would be more pronounced than...... in those of higher linguistic complexity. The nucleosome DNA positioning pattern is one of the weakest (highly degenerate) sequence patterns. It has been extracted recently by specially designed multiple alignment procedures. We applied the most sensitive of these procedures to nearly equal subsets...... of a nucleosome database separated according to linguistic complexity. The pattern extracted from the subset of the simpler nucleosome sequences not only possesses all major attributes of the known nucleosomal pattern, but is substantially stronger with respect to amplitude in comparison with the total database...

  8. Nucleosome breathing and remodeling constrain CRISPR-Cas9 function.

    OpenAIRE

    Isaac, RS; Jiang, F; Doudna, JA; Lim, WA; Narlikar, GJ; De Almeida, R

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR-Cas9 bacterial surveillance system has become a versatile tool for genome editing and gene regulation in eukaryotic cells, yet how CRISPR-Cas9 contends with the barriers presented by eukaryotic chromatin is poorly understood. Here we investigate how the smallest unit of chromatin, a nucleosome, constrains the activity of the CRISPR-Cas9 system. We find that nucleosomes assembled on native DNA sequences are permissive to Cas9 action. However, the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA to ...

  9. Prediction of nucleosome positioning based on transcription factor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianfu Yi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The DNA of all eukaryotic organisms is packaged into nucleosomes, the basic repeating units of chromatin. The nucleosome consists of a histone octamer around which a DNA core is wrapped and the linker histone H1, which is associated with linker DNA. By altering the accessibility of DNA sequences, the nucleosome has profound effects on all DNA-dependent processes. Understanding the factors that influence nucleosome positioning is of great importance for the study of genomic control mechanisms. Transcription factors (TFs have been suggested to play a role in nucleosome positioning in vivo. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, the minimum redundancy maximum relevance (mRMR feature selection algorithm, the nearest neighbor algorithm (NNA, and the incremental feature selection (IFS method were used to identify the most important TFs that either favor or inhibit nucleosome positioning by analyzing the numbers of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs in 53,021 nucleosomal DNA sequences and 50,299 linker DNA sequences. A total of nine important families of TFs were extracted from 35 families, and the overall prediction accuracy was 87.4% as evaluated by the jackknife cross-validation test. CONCLUSIONS: Our results are consistent with the notion that TFs are more likely to bind linker DNA sequences than the sequences in the nucleosomes. In addition, our results imply that there may be some TFs that are important for nucleosome positioning but that play an insignificant role in discriminating nucleosome-forming DNA sequences from nucleosome-inhibiting DNA sequences. The hypothesis that TFs play a role in nucleosome positioning is, thus, confirmed by the results of this study.

  10. The prenucleosome, a stable conformational isomer of the nucleosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Jia; Torigoe, Sharon E; Brown, Christopher R; Khuong, Mai T; Kassavetis, George A; Boeger, Hinrich; Kadonaga, James T

    2015-12-15

    Chromatin comprises nucleosomes as well as nonnucleosomal histone-DNA particles. Prenucleosomes are rapidly formed histone-DNA particles that can be converted into canonical nucleosomes by a motor protein such as ACF. Here we show that the prenucleosome is a stable conformational isomer of the nucleosome. It consists of a histone octamer associated with ∼ 80 base pair (bp) of DNA, which is located at a position that corresponds to the central 80 bp of a nucleosome core particle. Monomeric prenucleosomes with free flanking DNA do not spontaneously fold into nucleosomes but can be converted into canonical nucleosomes by an ATP-driven motor protein such as ACF or Chd1. In addition, histone H3K56, which is located at the DNA entry and exit points of a canonical nucleosome, is specifically acetylated by p300 in prenucleosomes relative to nucleosomes. Prenucleosomes assembled in vitro exhibit properties that are strikingly similar to those of nonnucleosomal histone-DNA particles in the upstream region of active promoters in vivo. These findings suggest that the prenucleosome, the only known stable conformational isomer of the nucleosome, is related to nonnucleosomal histone-DNA species in the cell.

  11. A positioned +1 nucleosome enhances promoter-proximal pausing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimeno-González, Silvia; Ceballos-Chávez, María; Reyes, José C

    2015-03-31

    Chromatin distribution is not uniform along the human genome. In most genes there is a promoter-associated nucleosome free region (NFR) followed by an array of nucleosomes towards the gene body in which the first (+1) nucleosome is strongly positioned. The function of this characteristic chromatin distribution in transcription is not fully understood. Here we show in vivo that the +1 nucleosome plays a role in modulating RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) promoter-proximal pausing. When a +1 nucleosome is strongly positioned, elongating RNAPII has a tendency to stall at the promoter-proximal region, recruits more negative elongation factor (NELF) and produces less mRNA. The nucleosome-induced pause favors pre-mRNA quality control by promoting the addition of the cap to the nascent RNA. Moreover, the uncapped RNAs produced in the absence of a positioned nucleosome are degraded by the 5'-3' exonuclease XRN2. Interestingly, reducing the levels of the chromatin remodeler ISWI factor SNF2H decreases +1 nucleosome positioning and increases RNAPII pause release. This work demonstrates a function for +1 nucleosome in regulation of transcription elongation, pre-mRNA processing and gene expression.

  12. The effect of DNA supercoiling on nucleosome structure and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbel, Tabea; Langowski, Jörg

    2015-02-18

    Nucleosomes have to open to allow access to DNA in transcription, replication, and DNA damage repair. Changes in DNA torsional strain (e.g. during transcription elongation) influence the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA. Here we investigated the effect of DNA supercoiling-induced torsional strain on nucleosome structure and stability by scanning force microscopy (SFM) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). Nucleosomes were reconstituted onto 2.7 kb DNA plasmids with varying superhelical densities. The SFM results show a clear dependence of the amount of DNA wrapped around the nucleosome core on the strength and type of supercoiling. Negative supercoiling led to smaller nucleosome opening angles as compared to relaxed or positively supercoiled DNA. FCS experiments show that nucleosomes reconstituted on negatively superhelical DNA are more resistant to salt-induced destabilization, as seen by reduced H2A-H2B dimer eviction from the nucleosome. Our results show that changes in DNA topology, e.g. during transcription elongation, affect the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA.

  13. Nucleosome conformational flexibility in experiments with single chromatin fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivolob A. V.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies on the chromatin nucleosome organization play an ever increasing role in our comprehension of mechanisms of the gene activity regulation. This minireview describes the results on the nucleosome conformational flexibility, which were obtained using magnetic tweezers to apply torsion to oligonucleosome fibers reconstituted on single DNA molecules. Such an approach revealed a new structural form of the nucleosome, the reversome, in which DNA is wrapped in a right-handed superhelix around a distorted histone octamer. Molecular mechanisms of the nucleosome structural flexibility and its biological relevance are discussed.

  14. Nucleosome DNA sequence structure of isochores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trifonov Edward N

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Significant differences in G+C content between different isochore types suggest that the nucleosome positioning patterns in DNA of the isochores should be different as well. Results Extraction of the patterns from the isochore DNA sequences by Shannon N-gram extension reveals that while the general motif YRRRRRYYYYYR is characteristic for all isochore types, the dominant positioning patterns of the isochores vary between TAAAAATTTTTA and CGGGGGCCCCCG due to the large differences in G+C composition. This is observed in human, mouse and chicken isochores, demonstrating that the variations of the positioning patterns are largely G+C dependent rather than species-specific. The species-specificity of nucleosome positioning patterns is revealed by dinucleotide periodicity analyses in isochore sequences. While human sequences are showing CG periodicity, chicken isochores display AG (CT periodicity. Mouse isochores show very weak CG periodicity only. Conclusions Nucleosome positioning pattern as revealed by Shannon N-gram extension is strongly dependent on G+C content and different in different isochores. Species-specificity of the pattern is subtle. It is reflected in the choice of preferentially periodical dinucleotides.

  15. Topological diversity of chromatin fibers: Interplay between nucleosome repeat length, DNA linking number and the level of transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davood Norouzi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The spatial organization of nucleosomes in 30-nm fibers remains unknown in detail. To tackle this problem, we analyzed all stereochemically possible configurations of two-start chromatin fibers with DNA linkers L = 10-70 bp (nucleosome repeat length NRL = 157-217 bp. In our model, the energy of a fiber is a sum of the elastic energy of the linker DNA, steric repulsion, electrostatics, and the H4 tail-acidic patch interaction between two stacked nucleosomes. We found two families of energetically feasible conformations of the fibers—one observed earlier, and the other novel. The fibers from the two families are characterized by different DNA linking numbers—that is, they are topologically different. Remarkably, the optimal geometry of a fiber and its topology depend on the linker length: the fibers with linkers L = 10n and 10n + 5 bp have DNA linking numbers per nucleosome DLk >>-1.5 and -1.0, respectively. In other words, the level of DNA supercoiling is directly related to the length of the inter-nucleosome linker in the chromatin fiber (and therefore, to NRL. We hypothesize that this topological polymorphism of chromatin fibers may play a role in the process of transcription, which is known to generate different levels of DNA supercoiling upstream and downstream from RNA polymerase. A genome-wide analysis of the NRL distribution in active and silent yeast genes yielded results consistent with this assumption.

  16. Histone chaperone Anp32e removes H2A.Z from DNA double-strand breaks and promotes nucleosome reorganization and DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gursoy-Yuzugullu, Ozge; Ayrapetov, Marina K; Price, Brendan D

    2015-06-16

    The repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) requires open, flexible chromatin domains. The NuA4-Tip60 complex creates these flexible chromatin structures by exchanging histone H2A.Z onto nucleosomes and promoting acetylation of histone H4. Here, we demonstrate that the accumulation of H2A.Z on nucleosomes at DSBs is transient, and that rapid eviction of H2A.Z is required for DSB repair. Anp32e, an H2A.Z chaperone that interacts with the C-terminal docking domain of H2A.Z, is rapidly recruited to DSBs. Anp32e functions to remove H2A.Z from nucleosomes, so that H2A.Z levels return to basal within 10 min of DNA damage. Further, H2A.Z removal by Anp32e disrupts inhibitory interactions between the histone H4 tail and the nucleosome surface, facilitating increased acetylation of histone H4 following DNA damage. When H2A.Z removal by Anp32e is blocked, nucleosomes at DSBs retain elevated levels of H2A.Z, and assume a more stable, hypoacetylated conformation. Further, loss of Anp32e leads to increased CtIP-dependent end resection, accumulation of single-stranded DNA, and an increase in repair by the alternative nonhomologous end joining pathway. Exchange of H2A.Z onto the chromatin and subsequent rapid removal by Anp32e are therefore critical for creating open, acetylated nucleosome structures and for controlling end resection by CtIP. Dynamic modulation of H2A.Z exchange and removal by Anp32e reveals the importance of the nucleosome surface and nucleosome dynamics in processing the damaged chromatin template during DSB repair.

  17. Characterization of majorization monotone quantum dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Haidong

    2015-01-01

    In this article I study the dynamics of open quantum system in Markovian environment. I give necessary and sufficient conditions for such dynamics to be majorization monotone, which are those dynamics always mixing the states.

  18. MeCP2 binds to nucleosome free (linker DNA) regions and to H3K9/H3K27 methylated nucleosomes in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thambirajah, Anita A.; Ng, Marlee K.; Frehlick, Lindsay J.; Li, Andra; Serpa, Jason J.; Petrotchenko, Evgeniy V.; Silva-Moreno, Begonia; Missiaen, Kristal K.; Borchers, Christoph H.; Adam Hall, J.; Mackie, Ryan; Lutz, Frank; Gowen, Brent E.; Hendzel, Michael; Georgel, Philippe T.; Ausió, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is a chromatin-binding protein that mediates transcriptional regulation, and is highly abundant in brain. The nature of its binding to reconstituted templates has been well characterized in vitro. However, its interactions with native chromatin are less understood. Here we show that MeCP2 displays a distinct distribution within fractionated chromatin from various tissues and cell types. Artificially induced global changes in DNA methylation by 3-aminobenzamide or 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine, do not significantly affect the distribution or amount of MeCP2 in HeLa S3 or 3T3 cells. Most MeCP2 in brain is chromatin-bound and localized within highly nuclease-accessible regions. We also show that, while in most tissues and cell lines, MeCP2 forms stable complexes with nucleosome, in brain, a fraction of it is loosely bound to chromatin, likely to nucleosome-depleted regions. Finally, we provide evidence for novel associations of MeCP2 with mononucleosomes containing histone H2A.X, H3K9me2 and H3K27me3 in different chromatin fractions from brain cortex and in vitro. We postulate that the functional compartmentalization and tissue-specific distribution of MeCP2 within different chromatin types may be directed by its association with nucleosomes containing specific histone variants, and post-translational modifications. PMID:22144686

  19. Genome wide nucleosome mapping for HSV-1 shows nucleosomes are deposited at preferred positions during lytic infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jaewook; Sanders, Iryna F; Chen, Eric Z; Li, Hongzhe; Tobias, John W; Isett, R Benjamin; Penubarthi, Sindura; Sun, Hao; Baldwin, Don A; Fraser, Nigel W

    2015-01-01

    HSV is a large double stranded DNA virus, capable of causing a variety of diseases from the common cold sore to devastating encephalitis. Although DNA within the HSV virion does not contain any histone protein, within 1 h of infecting a cell and entering its nucleus the viral genome acquires some histone protein (nucleosomes). During lytic infection, partial micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion does not give the classic ladder band pattern, seen on digestion of cell DNA or latent viral DNA. However, complete digestion does give a mono-nucleosome band, strongly suggesting that there are some nucleosomes present on the viral genome during the lytic infection, but that they are not evenly positioned, with a 200 bp repeat pattern, like cell DNA. Where then are the nucleosomes positioned? Here we perform HSV-1 genome wide nucleosome mapping, at a time when viral replication is in full swing (6 hr PI), using a microarray consisting of 50mer oligonucleotides, covering the whole viral genome (152 kb). Arrays were probed with MNase-protected fragments of DNA from infected cells. Cells were not treated with crosslinking agents, thus we are only mapping tightly bound nucleosomes. The data show that nucleosome deposition is not random. The distribution of signal on the arrays suggest that nucleosomes are located at preferred positions on the genome, and that there are some positions that are not occupied (nucleosome free regions -NFR or Nucleosome depleted regions -NDR), or occupied at frequency below our limit of detection in the population of genomes. Occupancy of only a fraction of the possible sites may explain the lack of a typical MNase partial digestion band ladder pattern for HSV DNA during lytic infection. On average, DNA encoding Immediate Early (IE), Early (E) and Late (L) genes appear to have a similar density of nucleosomes.

  20. Tetrameric structure of centromeric nucleosomes in interphase Drosophila cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamini Dalal

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Centromeres, the specialized chromatin structures that are responsible for equal segregation of chromosomes at mitosis, are epigenetically maintained by a centromere-specific histone H3 variant (CenH3. However, the mechanistic basis for centromere maintenance is unknown. We investigated biochemical properties of CenH3 nucleosomes from Drosophila melanogaster cells. Cross-linking of CenH3 nucleosomes identifies heterotypic tetramers containing one copy of CenH3, H2A, H2B, and H4 each. Interphase CenH3 particles display a stable association of approximately 120 DNA base pairs. Purified centromeric nucleosomal arrays have typical "beads-on-a-string" appearance by electron microscopy but appear to resist condensation under physiological conditions. Atomic force microscopy reveals that native CenH3-containing nucleosomes are only half as high as canonical octameric nucleosomes are, confirming that the tetrameric structure detected by cross-linking comprises the entire interphase nucleosome particle. This demonstration of stable half-nucleosomes in vivo provides a possible basis for the instability of centromeric nucleosomes that are deposited in euchromatic regions, which might help maintain centromere identity.

  1. Touch, act and go: landing and operating on nucleosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speranzini, Valentina; Pilotto, Simona; Sixma, Titia K; Mattevi, Andrea

    2016-02-15

    Chromatin-associated enzymes are responsible for the installation, removal and reading of precise post-translation modifications on DNA and histone proteins. They are specifically recruited to the target gene by associated factors, and as a result of their activity, they contribute in modulating cell identity and differentiation. Structural and biophysical approaches are broadening our knowledge on these processes, demonstrating that DNA, histone tails and histone surfaces can each function as distinct yet functionally interconnected anchoring points promoting nucleosome binding and modification. The mechanisms underlying nucleosome recognition have been described for many histone modifiers and related readers. Here, we review the recent literature on the structural organization of these nucleosome-associated proteins, the binding properties that drive nucleosome modification and the methodological advances in their analysis. The overarching conclusion is that besides acting on the same substrate (the nucleosome), each system functions through characteristic modes of action, which bring about specific biological functions in gene expression regulation.

  2. A nucleosome turnover map reveals that the stability of histone H4 Lys20 methylation depends on histone recycling in transcribed chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, J Peter; Shukla, Manu; Menendez-Benito, Victoria; Norman-Axelsson, Ulrika; Audergon, Pauline; Sinha, Indranil; Tanny, Jason C; Allshire, Robin C; Ekwall, Karl

    2015-06-01

    Nucleosome composition actively contributes to chromatin structure and accessibility. Cells have developed mechanisms to remove or recycle histones, generating a landscape of differentially aged nucleosomes. This study aimed to create a high-resolution, genome-wide map of nucleosome turnover in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The recombination-induced tag exchange (RITE) method was used to study replication-independent nucleosome turnover through the appearance of new histone H3 and the disappearance or preservation of old histone H3. The genome-wide location of histones was determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation-exonuclease methodology (ChIP-exo). The findings were compared with diverse chromatin marks, including histone variant H2A.Z, post-translational histone modifications, and Pol II binding. Finally, genome-wide mapping of the methylation states of H4K20 was performed to determine the relationship between methylation (mono, di, and tri) of this residue and nucleosome turnover. Our analysis showed that histone recycling resulted in low nucleosome turnover in the coding regions of active genes, stably expressed at intermediate levels. High levels of transcription resulted in the incorporation of new histones primarily at the end of transcribed units. H4K20 was methylated in low-turnover nucleosomes in euchromatic regions, notably in the coding regions of long genes that were expressed at low levels. This transcription-dependent accumulation of histone methylation was dependent on the histone chaperone complex FACT. Our data showed that nucleosome turnover is highly dynamic in the genome and that several mechanisms are at play to either maintain or suppress stability. In particular, we found that FACT-associated transcription conserves histones by recycling them and is required for progressive H4K20 methylation.

  3. Summary: The nucleus--a close-knit community of dynamic structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henikoff, S

    2010-01-01

    The 75th Cold Spring Harbor Symposium on Nuclear Organization and Function explored topics ranging from nucleosomes to nuclear pores. Exciting new genomic and imaging technologies have been used to characterize the nuclear interior, which consists of stable chromatin territories, dynamic domains, and self-organizing nuclear bodies. Histone variants and chaperones, posttranslational modifications, and ATP-dependent remodelers mediate nucleosome dynamics, regulated by Polycomb and other chromatin-associated proteins. Epigenetic memory is an emergent property of chromatin dynamics that is key to understanding how differentiated cells can become reprogrammed. Nuclear body composition and structure are becoming increasingly well understood, although their functions, if any, remain speculative. The nuclear envelope is strengthened by a fibrous lamin network that anchors chromosomes and represses gene expression, and disruption can lead to disease. Nuclear pores regulate the flow of substrates and products, using unstructured polypeptides to filter small molecules and flexible walls that allow large macromolecular assemblages to pass through. At mitosis, nucleosomes collapse into tightly packed nonfibrous cylinders that are then pulled to opposite poles at their kinetochores, where novel centromeric nucleosomes, mitotic motors, and spindle microtubules come together. By considering these complex processes in the context of the nucleus, the Symposium provided a coherent view of the genome in its native habitat.

  4. DPNuc: Identifying Nucleosome Positions Based on the Dirichlet Process Mixture Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huidong; Guan, Jihong; Zhou, Shuigeng

    2015-01-01

    Nucleosomes and the free linker DNA between them assemble the chromatin. Nucleosome positioning plays an important role in gene transcription regulation, DNA replication and repair, alternative splicing, and so on. With the rapid development of ChIP-seq, it is possible to computationally detect the positions of nucleosomes on chromosomes. However, existing methods cannot provide accurate and detailed information about the detected nucleosomes, especially for the nucleosomes with complex configurations where overlaps and noise exist. Meanwhile, they usually require some prior knowledge of nucleosomes as input, such as the size or the number of the unknown nucleosomes, which may significantly influence the detection results. In this paper, we propose a novel approach DPNuc for identifying nucleosome positions based on the Dirichlet process mixture model. In our method, Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulations are employed to determine the mixture model with no need of prior knowledge about nucleosomes. Compared with three existing methods, our approach can provide more detailed information of the detected nucleosomes and can more reasonably reveal the real configurations of the chromosomes; especially, our approach performs better in the complex overlapping situations. By mapping the detected nucleosomes to a synthetic benchmark nucleosome map and two existing benchmark nucleosome maps, it is shown that our approach achieves a better performance in identifying nucleosome positions and gets a higher F-score. Finally, we show that our approach can more reliably detect the size distribution of nucleosomes.

  5. DPNuc: Identifying Nucleosome Positions Based on the Dirichlet Process Mixture Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huidong; Guan, Jihong; Zhou, Shuigeng

    2015-01-01

    Nucleosomes and the free linker DNA between them assemble the chromatin. Nucleosome positioning plays an important role in gene transcription regulation, DNA replication and repair, alternative splicing, and so on. With the rapid development of ChIP-seq, it is possible to computationally detect the positions of nucleosomes on chromosomes. However, existing methods cannot provide accurate and detailed information about the detected nucleosomes, especially for the nucleosomes with complex configurations where overlaps and noise exist. Meanwhile, they usually require some prior knowledge of nucleosomes as input, such as the size or the number of the unknown nucleosomes, which may significantly influence the detection results. In this paper, we propose a novel approach DPNuc for identifying nucleosome positions based on the Dirichlet process mixture model. In our method, Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulations are employed to determine the mixture model with no need of prior knowledge about nucleosomes. Compared with three existing methods, our approach can provide more detailed information of the detected nucleosomes and can more reasonably reveal the real configurations of the chromosomes; especially, our approach performs better in the complex overlapping situations. By mapping the detected nucleosomes to a synthetic benchmark nucleosome map and two existing benchmark nucleosome maps, it is shown that our approach achieves a better performance in identifying nucleosome positions and gets a higher F-score. Finally, we show that our approach can more reliably detect the size distribution of nucleosomes. PMID:26671796

  6. CHD4 Is a Peripheral Component of the Nucleosome Remodeling and Deacetylase Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Jason K K; Webb, Sarah R; Silva, Ana P G; Saathoff, Hinnerk; Ryan, Daniel P; Torrado, Mario; Brofelth, Mattias; Parker, Benjamin L; Shepherd, Nicholas E; Mackay, Joel P

    2016-07-22

    Chromatin remodeling enzymes act to dynamically regulate gene accessibility. In many cases, these enzymes function as large multicomponent complexes that in general comprise a central ATP-dependent Snf2 family helicase that is decorated with a variable number of regulatory subunits. The nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex, which is essential for normal development in higher organisms, is one such macromolecular machine. The NuRD complex comprises ∼10 subunits, including the histone deacetylases 1 and 2 (HDAC1 and HDAC2), and is defined by the presence of a CHD family remodeling enzyme, most commonly CHD4 (chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4). The existing paradigm holds that CHD4 acts as the central hub upon which the complex is built. We show here that this paradigm does not, in fact, hold and that CHD4 is a peripheral component of the NuRD complex. A complex lacking CHD4 that has HDAC activity can exist as a stable species. The addition of recombinant CHD4 to this nucleosome deacetylase complex reconstitutes a NuRD complex with nucleosome remodeling activity. These data contribute to our understanding of the architecture of the NuRD complex.

  7. Twist Neutrality and the Diameter of the Nucleosome Core Particle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob; Olsen, Kasper

    2012-01-01

    The diameter of the nucleosome core particle is the same for all the eukaryotes. Here we discuss the possibility that this selectiveness is consistent with a propensity for twist neutrality, in particular, for the double helical DNA to stay rotationally neutral when strained. Reorganization of DNA...... cannot be done without some level of temporal tensile stress, and as a consequence chiral molecules, such as helices, will twist under strain. The requirement that the nucleosome, constituting the nucleosome core particle and linker DNA, has a vanishing strain-twist coupling leads to a requirement...

  8. Roles of histones and nucleosomes in gene transcription

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews the latest research developments in the field of eukaryotic gene regulation by the structural alterations of chromatin and nucleosomes. The following issues are briefly addressed: (ⅰ) nucleosome and histone modifications by both the ATP-dependent remodel- ing com-plexes and the histone acetyltransferases and their roles in gene activation; (ⅱ) competitive binding of histones and transcription factors on gene promoters, and transcription repression by nucleosomes; and (ⅲ) influences of linker histone H1 on gene regulation. Meanwhile, the significance and impact of these new research progresses, as well as issues worthwhile for further study are commented.

  9. Systems Biological Determination of the Epi-Genomic Structure Function Relation: : Nucleosomal Association Changes, Intra/Inter Chromosomal Architecture, Transcriptional Structure Relationship, Simulations of Nucleosomal/Chromatin Fiber/Chromosome Architecture and Dynamics, System Biological/Medical Result Integration via the GLOBE 3D Genome Platform.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); P.R. Cook (Peter); K. Rippe (Karsten); Gernot Längst; G. Wedemann (Gero); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractDespite our knowledge of the sequence of the human genome, the relation of its three-dimensional dynamic architecture with its function – the storage and expression of genetic information – remains one of the central unresolved issues of our age. It became very clear meanwhile that this

  10. Triple helix DNA alters nucleosomal histone-DNA interactions and acts as a nucleosome barrier.

    OpenAIRE

    Westin, L; Blomquist, P.; Milligan, J F; Wrange, O

    1995-01-01

    Oligonucleotides which form triple helical complexes on double-stranded DNA have been previously reported to selectively inhibit transcription both in vitro and in vivo by physically blocking RNA polymerase or transcription factor access to the DNA template. Here we show that a 16mer oligonucleotide, which forms triple helix DNA by binding to a 16 bp homopurine segment, alters the formation of histone-DNA contacts during in vitro nucleosome reconstitution. This effect was DNA sequence-specifi...

  11. Dynamic characterization and analysis of space shuttle SRM solid propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufferd, W. L.

    1979-01-01

    The dynamic response properties of the space shuttle solid rocket moter (TP-H1148) propellant were characterized and the expected limits of propellant variability were established. Dynamic shear modulus tests conducted on six production batches of TP-H1148 at various static and dynamic strain levels over the temperature range from 40 F to 90 F. A heat conduction analysis and dynamic response analysis of the space shuttle solid rocket motor (SRM) were also conducted. The dynamic test results show significant dependence on static and dynamic strain levels and considerable batch-to-batch and within-batch variability. However, the results of the SRM dynamic response analyses clearly demonstrate that the stiffness of the propellant has no consequential on the overall SRM dynamic response. Only the mass of the propellant needs to be considered in the dynamic analysis of the space shuttle SRM.

  12. Multiplexing Genetic and Nucleosome Positioning Codes: A Computational Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami-Mossallam, Behrouz; Schram, Raoul D; Tompitak, Marco; van Noort, John; Schiessel, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic DNA is strongly bent inside fundamental packaging units: the nucleosomes. It is known that their positions are strongly influenced by the mechanical properties of the underlying DNA sequence. Here we discuss the possibility that these mechanical properties and the concomitant nucleosome positions are not just a side product of the given DNA sequence, e.g. that of the genes, but that a mechanical evolution of DNA molecules might have taken place. We first demonstrate the possibility of multiplexing classical and mechanical genetic information using a computational nucleosome model. In a second step we give evidence for genome-wide multiplexing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosacharomyces pombe. This suggests that the exact positions of nucleosomes play crucial roles in chromatin function. PMID:27272176

  13. The universality of nucleosome organization: from yeast to human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chereji, Razvan

    The basic units of DNA packaging are called nucleosomes. Their locations on the chromosomes play an essential role in gene regulation. We study nucleosome positioning in yeast, fly, mouse, and human, and build biophysical models in order to explain the genome-wide nucleosome organization. We show that DNA sequence alone is not able to generate the phased arrays of nucleosomes observed in vivo near the transcription start sites. We discuss simple models which can account for the formation of nucleosome depleted regions and nucleosome phasing at the gene promoters. We show that the same principles apply to different organisms. References: [1] RV Chereji, D Tolkunov, G Locke, AV Morozov - Phys. Rev. E 83, 050903 (2011) [2] RV Chereji, AV Morozov - J. Stat. Phys. 144, 379 (2011) [3] RV Chereji, AV Morozov - Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 111, 5236 (2014) [4] RV Chereji, T-W Kan, et al. - Nucleic Acids Res. (2015) doi: 10.1093/nar/gkv978 [5] RV Chereji, AV Morozov - Brief. Funct. Genomics 14, 50 (2015) [6] HA Cole, J Ocampo, JR Iben, RV Chereji, DJ Clark - Nucleic Acids Res. 42, 12512 (2014) [7] D Ganguli, RV Chereji, J Iben, HA Cole, DJ Clark - Genome Res. 24, 1637 (2014)

  14. Nucleosomes determine their own patch size in base excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meas, Rithy; Smerdon, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) processes non-helix distorting lesions (e.g., uracils and gaps) and is composed of two subpathways that differ in the number of nucleotides (nts) incorporated during the DNA synthesis step: short patch (SP) repair incorporates 1 nt and long patch (LP) repair incorporates 2-12 nts. This choice for either LP or SP repair has not been analyzed in the context of nucleosomes. Initial studies with uracil located in nucleosome core DNA showed a distinct DNA polymerase extension profile in cell-free extracts that specifically limits extension to 1 nt, suggesting a preference for SP BER. Therefore, we developed an assay to differentiate long and short repair patches in 'designed' nucleosomes containing a single-nucleotide gap at specific locations relative to the dyad center. Using cell-free extracts or purified enzymes, we found that DNA lesions in the nucleosome core are preferentially repaired by DNA polymerase β and there is a significant reduction in BER polymerase extension beyond 1 nt, creating a striking bias for incorporation of short patches into nucleosomal DNA. These results show that nucleosomes control the patch size used by BER. PMID:27265863

  15. Role of nucleosome remodeling in neurodevelopmental and intellectual disability disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto J Lopez

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available It is becoming increasingly important to understand how epigenetic mechanisms control gene expression during neurodevelopment. Two epigenetic mechanisms that have received considerable attention are DNA methylation and histone acetylation. Human exome sequencing and genome-wide association studies have linked several neurobiological disorders to genes whose products actively regulate DNA methylation and histone acetylation. More recently, a third major epigenetic mechanism, nucleosome remodeling, has been implicated in human developmental and intellectual disability disorders. Nucleosome remodeling is driven primarily through nucleosome remodeling complexes with specialized ATP-dependent enzymes. These enzymes directly interact with DNA or chromatin structure, as well as histone subunits, to restructure the shape and organization of nucleosome positioning to ultimately regulate gene expression. Of particular interest is the neuron-specific Brg1/hBrm Associated Factor (nBAF complex. Mutations in nBAF subunit genes have so far been linked to Coffin-Siris syndrome, Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome, schizophrenia, and Autism Spectrum Disorder. Together, these human developmental and intellectual disability disorders are powerful examples of the impact of epigenetic modulation on gene expression. This review focuses on the new and emerging role of nucleosome remodeling in neurodevelopmental and intellectual disability disorders and whether nucleosome remodeling affects gene expression required for cognition independently of its role in regulating gene expression required for development.

  16. Single-nucleosome mapping of histone modifications in S. cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih Long Liu

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Covalent modification of histone proteins plays a role in virtually every process on eukaryotic DNA, from transcription to DNA repair. Many different residues can be covalently modified, and it has been suggested that these modifications occur in a great number of independent, meaningful combinations. Published low-resolution microarray studies on the combinatorial complexity of histone modification patterns suffer from confounding effects caused by the averaging of modification levels over multiple nucleosomes. To overcome this problem, we used a high-resolution tiled microarray with single-nucleosome resolution to investigate the occurrence of combinations of 12 histone modifications on thousands of nucleosomes in actively growing S. cerevisiae. We found that histone modifications do not occur independently; there are roughly two groups of co-occurring modifications. One group of lysine acetylations shows a sharply defined domain of two hypo-acetylated nucleosomes, adjacent to the transcriptional start site, whose occurrence does not correlate with transcription levels. The other group consists of modifications occurring in gradients through the coding regions of genes in a pattern associated with transcription. We found no evidence for a deterministic code of many discrete states, but instead we saw blended, continuous patterns that distinguish nucleosomes at one location (e.g., promoter nucleosomes from those at another location (e.g., over the 3' ends of coding regions. These results are consistent with the idea of a simple, redundant histone code, in which multiple modifications share the same role.

  17. Binding of NF-κB to nucleosomes: effect of translational positioning, nucleosome remodeling and linker histone H1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imtiaz Nisar Lone

    Full Text Available NF-κB is a key transcription factor regulating the expression of inflammatory responsive genes. How NF-κB binds to naked DNA templates is well documented, but how it interacts with chromatin is far from being clear. Here we used a combination of UV laser footprinting, hydroxyl footprinting and electrophoretic mobility shift assay to investigate the binding of NF-κB to nucleosomal templates. We show that NF-κB p50 homodimer is able to bind to its recognition sequence, when it is localized at the edge of the core particle, but not when the recognition sequence is at the interior of the nucleosome. Remodeling of the nucleosome by the chromatin remodeling machine RSC was not sufficient to allow binding of NF-κB to its recognition sequence located in the vicinity of the nucleosome dyad, but RSC-induced histone octamer sliding allowed clearly detectable binding of NF-κB with the slid particle. Importantly, nucleosome dilution-driven removal of H2A-H2B dimer led to complete accessibility of the site located close to the dyad to NF-κB. Finally, we found that NF-κB was able to displace histone H1 and prevent its binding to nucleosome. These data provide important insight on the role of chromatin structure in the regulation of transcription of NF-κB dependent genes.

  18. Dynamic Characterization of Polymer Optical Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefani, Alessio; Andresen, Søren; Yuan, Wu;

    2012-01-01

    With the increasing interest in fiber sensors based on polymer optical fibers, it becomes fundamental to determine the real applicability and reliability of this type of sensor. The viscoelastic nature of polymers gives rise to questions about the mechanical behavior of the fibers. In particular...... to the limit set by our measurement system. A more detailed analysis shows that viscoelastic effects are present and that they increase with both applied strain and frequency. However, the possibility of developing sensors that measure small dynamic deformations is not compromised. A stress...

  19. Current Proteomic Methods to Investigate the Dynamics of Histone Turnover in the Central Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrelly, L.A.; Dill, B.D.; Molina, H.; Birtwistle, M.R.; Maze, I.

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing the dynamic behavior of nucleosomes in the central nervous system is vital to our understanding of brain-specific chromatin-templated processes and their roles in transcriptional plasticity. Histone turnover—the complete loss of old, and replacement by new, nucleosomal histones—is one such phenomenon that has recently been shown to be critical for cell-type-specific transcription in brain, synaptic plasticity, and cognition. Such revelations that histones, long believed to static proteins in postmitotic cells, are highly dynamic in neurons were only possible owing to significant advances in analytical chemistry-based techniques, which now provide a platform for investigations of histone dynamics in both healthy and diseased tissues. Here, we discuss both past and present proteomic methods (eg, mass spectrometry, human “bomb pulse labeling”) for investigating histone turnover in brain with the hope that such information may stimulate future investigations of both adaptive and aberrant forms of “neuroepigenetic” plasticity. PMID:27423867

  20. Multiple distinct stimuli increase measured nucleosome occupancy around human promoters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuong D Pham

    Full Text Available Nucleosomes can block access to transcription factors. Thus the precise localization of nucleosomes relative to transcription start sites and other factor binding sites is expected to be a critical component of transcriptional regulation. Recently developed microarray approaches have allowed the rapid mapping of nucleosome positions over hundreds of kilobases (kb of human genomic DNA, although these approaches have not yet been widely used to measure chromatin changes associated with changes in transcription. Here, we use custom tiling microarrays to reveal changes in nucleosome positions and abundance that occur when hormone-bound glucocorticoid receptor (GR binds to sites near target gene promoters in human osteosarcoma cells. The most striking change is an increase in measured nucleosome occupancy at sites spanning ∼1 kb upstream and downstream of transcription start sites, which occurs one hour after addition of hormone, but is lost at 4 hours. Unexpectedly, this increase was seen both on GR-regulated and GR-non-regulated genes. In addition, the human SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling factor (a GR co-activator was found to be important for increased occupancy upon hormone treatment and also for low nucleosome occupancy without hormone. Most surprisingly, similar increases in nucleosome occupancy were also seen on both regulated and non-regulated promoters during differentiation of human myeloid leukemia cells and upon activation of human CD4+ T-cells. These results indicate that dramatic changes in chromatin structure over ∼2 kb of human promoters may occur genomewide and in response to a variety of stimuli, and suggest novel models for transcriptional regulation.

  1. Discovery, Characterization, and Dynamics of Transiting Exoplanets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Eylen, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Are we alone in the Universe? So far, the question remains unanswered, but a significant leap forward was achieved two decades ago, with the discovery of the first planets orbiting stars other than our Sun. Almost 2000 exoplanets have now been detected. They are diverse in radius, mass and orbital......, in this thesis I make use of the transit method, which is based on the observed brightness drop of a star as a planet crosses in front of it. This thesis consists of two parts. The first part focuses on the discovery of new planets and the understanding of exoplanet properties. I report the discovery...... results of this study, constraining the masses and bulk compositions of three planets. The second part of this thesis focuses on dynamics of exoplanets. All the solar system planets orbit in nearly the same plane, and that plane is also aligned with the equatorial plane of the Sun. That is not true...

  2. The RSC chromatin remodelling enzyme has a unique role in directing the accurate positioning of nucleosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wippo, Christian J; Israel, Lars; Watanabe, Shinya; Hochheimer, Andreas; Peterson, Craig L; Korber, Philipp

    2011-04-01

    Nucleosomes impede access to DNA. Therefore, nucleosome positioning is fundamental to genome regulation. Nevertheless, the molecular nucleosome positioning mechanisms are poorly understood. This is partly because in vitro reconstitution of in vivo-like nucleosome positions from purified components is mostly lacking, barring biochemical studies. Using a yeast extract in vitro reconstitution system that generates in vivo-like nucleosome patterns at S. cerevisiae loci, we find that the RSC chromatin remodelling enzyme is necessary for nucleosome positioning. This was previously suggested by genome-wide in vivo studies and is confirmed here in vivo for individual loci. Beyond the limitations of conditional mutants, we show biochemically that RSC functions directly, can be sufficient, but mostly relies on other factors to properly position nucleosomes. Strikingly, RSC could not be replaced by either the closely related SWI/SNF or the Isw2 remodelling enzyme. Thus, we pinpoint that nucleosome positioning specifically depends on the unique properties of the RSC complex.

  3. Chromatin fibers are formed by heterogeneous groups of nucleosomes in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Maria Aurelia; Manzo, Carlo; García-Parajo, María Filomena; Lakadamyali, Melike; Cosma, Maria Pia

    2015-03-12

    Nucleosomes help structure chromosomes by compacting DNA into fibers. To gain insight into how nucleosomes are arranged in vivo, we combined quantitative super-resolution nanoscopy with computer simulations to visualize and count nucleosomes along the chromatin fiber in single nuclei. Nucleosomes assembled in heterogeneous groups of varying sizes, here termed "clutches," and these were interspersed with nucleosome-depleted regions. The median number of nucleosomes inside clutches and their compaction defined as nucleosome density were cell-type-specific. Ground-state pluripotent stem cells had, on average, less dense clutches containing fewer nucleosomes and clutch size strongly correlated with the pluripotency potential of induced pluripotent stem cells. RNA polymerase II preferentially associated with the smallest clutches while linker histone H1 and heterochromatin were enriched in the largest ones. Our results reveal how the chromatin fiber is formed at nanoscale level and link chromatin fiber architecture to stem cell state.

  4. Differential dynamic microscopy to characterize Brownian motion and bacteria motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, David; Leocmach, Mathieu; Gibaud, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a lab module for undergraduate students, which involves the process of quantifying the dynamics of a suspension of microscopic particles using Differential Dynamic Microscopy (DDM). DDM is a relatively new technique that constitutes an alternative method to more classical techniques such as dynamic light scattering (DLS) or video particle tracking (VPT). The technique consists of imaging a particle dispersion with a standard light microscope and a camera and analyzing the images using a digital Fourier transform to obtain the intermediate scattering function, an autocorrelation function that characterizes the dynamics of the dispersion. We first illustrate DDM in the textbook case of colloids under Brownian motion, where we measure the diffusion coefficient. Then we show that DDM is a pertinent tool to characterize biological systems such as motile bacteria.

  5. High Dynamic Range Characterization of the Trauma Patient Plasma Proteome

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Tao; Qian, Wei-Jun; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Moldawer, Lyle L; Kaushal, Amit; Monroe, Matthew E.; Susan M Varnum; Moore, Ronald J.; Purvine, Samuel O; Ronald V Maier; Davis, Ronald W; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Camp II, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-01-01

    While human plasma represents an attractive sample for disease biomarker discovery, the extreme complexity and large dynamic range in protein concentrations present significant challenges for characterization, candidate biomarker discovery, and validation. Herein, we describe a strategy that combines immunoaffinity subtraction and subsequent chemical fractionation based on cysteinyl peptide and N-glycopeptide captures with 2D-LC-MS/MS to increase the dynamic range of analysis for plasma. Appl...

  6. Integrated molecular mechanism directing nucleosome reorganization by human FACT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunaka, Yasuo; Fujiwara, Yoshie; Oyama, Takuji; Hirose, Susumu; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2016-03-15

    Facilitates chromatin transcription (FACT) plays essential roles in chromatin remodeling during DNA transcription, replication, and repair. Our structural and biochemical studies of human FACT-histone interactions present precise views of nucleosome reorganization, conducted by the FACT-SPT16 (suppressor of Ty 16) Mid domain and its adjacent acidic AID segment. AID accesses the H2B N-terminal basic region exposed by partial unwrapping of the nucleosomal DNA, thereby triggering the invasion of FACT into the nucleosome. The crystal structure of the Mid domain complexed with an H3-H4 tetramer exhibits two separate contact sites; the Mid domain forms a novel intermolecular β structure with H4. At the other site, the Mid-H2A steric collision on the H2A-docking surface of the H3-H4 tetramer within the nucleosome induces H2A-H2B displacement. This integrated mechanism results in disrupting the H3 αN helix, which is essential for retaining the nucleosomal DNA ends, and hence facilitates DNA stripping from histone. PMID:26966247

  7. Reactivity in ELISA with DNA-loaded nucleosomes in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieker, J.W.; Schlumberger, W.; McHugh, N.; Hamann, P.; Vlag, J. van der; Berden, J.H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Autoantibodies against nucleosomes are considered a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We compared in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis the diagnostic usefulness of a dsDNA-loaded nucleosome ELISA (anti-dsDNA-NcX) with ELISAs in which dsDNA or nucleosomes alone were coated. Fi

  8. Specificity of monoclonal anti-nucleosome auto-antibodies derived from lupus mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramers, K; Stemmer, C; Monestier, M; vanBruggen, MCJ; RijkeSchilder, TPM; Hylkema, MN; Smeenk, RJT; Muller, S; Berden, JHM

    1996-01-01

    Recently, anti-nucleosome antibodies, which do not bind to DNA or to individual histones, have been identified in longitudinal studies in lupus mice. These anti-nucleosome antibodies occur early in spontaneous SLE and are formed prior to other anti-nuclear specificities. However, nucleosomal epitope

  9. Genome-wide profiling of nucleosome sensitivity and chromatin accessibility in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chereji, Răzvan V; Kan, Tsung-Wai; Grudniewska, Magda K; Romashchenko, Alexander V; Berezikov, Eugene; Zhimulev, Igor F; Guryev, Victor; Morozov, Alexandre V; Moshkin, Yuri M

    2016-02-18

    Nucleosomal DNA is thought to be generally inaccessible to DNA-binding factors, such as micrococcal nuclease (MNase). Here, we digest Drosophila chromatin with high and low concentrations of MNase to reveal two distinct nucleosome types: MNase-sensitive and MNase-resistant. MNase-resistant nucleosomes assemble on sequences depleted of A/T and enriched in G/C-containing dinucleotides, whereas MNase-sensitive nucleosomes form on A/T-rich sequences found at transcription start and termination sites, enhancers and DNase I hypersensitive sites. Estimates of nucleosome formation energies indicate that MNase-sensitive nucleosomes tend to be less stable than MNase-resistant ones. Strikingly, a decrease in cell growth temperature of about 10°C makes MNase-sensitive nucleosomes less accessible, suggesting that observed variations in MNase sensitivity are related to either thermal fluctuations of chromatin fibers or the activity of enzymatic machinery. In the vicinity of active genes and DNase I hypersensitive sites nucleosomes are organized into periodic arrays, likely due to 'phasing' off potential barriers formed by DNA-bound factors or by nucleosomes anchored to their positions through external interactions. The latter idea is substantiated by our biophysical model of nucleosome positioning and energetics, which predicts that nucleosomes immediately downstream of transcription start sites are anchored and recapitulates nucleosome phasing at active genes significantly better than sequence-dependent models.

  10. DNA transposon Hermes inserts into DNA in nucleosome-free regions in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangadharan, Sunil; Mularoni, Loris; Fain-Thornton, Jennifer; Wheelan, Sarah J; Craig, Nancy L

    2010-12-21

    Transposons are mobile genetic elements that are an important source of genetic variation and are useful tools for genome engineering, mutagenesis screens, and vectors for transgenesis including gene therapy. We have used second-generation sequencing to analyze ≈2 × 10(5) unique de novo transposon insertion sites of the transposon Hermes in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome from both in vitro transposition reactions by using purified yeast genomic DNA, to better characterize intrinsic sequence specificity, and sites recovered from in vivo transposition events, to characterize the effect of intracellular factors such as chromatin on target site selection. We find that Hermes transposon targeting in vivo is profoundly affected by chromatin structure: The subset of genome-wide target sites used in vivo is strongly associated (P < 2e-16 by Fisher's exact test) with nucleosome-free chromatin. Our characterization of the insertion site preferences of Hermes not only assists in the future use of this transposon as a molecular biology tool but also establishes methods to more fully determine targeting mechanisms of other transposons. We have also discovered a long-range sequence motif that defines S. cerevisiae nucleosome-free regions. PMID:21131571

  11. Rapid Histone-Catalyzed DNA Lesion Excision and Accompanying Protein Modification in Nucleosomes and Nucleosome Core Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Liwei; Greenberg, Marc M

    2015-09-01

    C5'-Hydrogen atoms are frequently abstracted during DNA oxidation. The oxidized abasic lesion 5'-(2-phosphoryl-1,4-dioxobutane) (DOB) is an electrophilic product of the C5'-radical. DOB is a potent irreversible inhibitor of DNA polymerase β, and forms interstrand cross-links in free DNA. We examined the reactivity of DOB within nucleosomes and nucleosome core particles (NCPs), the monomeric component of chromatin. Depending upon the position at which DOB is generated within a NCP, it is excised from nucleosomal DNA at a rate 275-1500-fold faster than that in free DNA. The half-life of DOB (7.0-16.8 min) in NCPs is shorter than any other abasic lesion. DOB's lifetime in NCPs is also significantly shorter than the estimated lifetime of an abasic site within a cell, suggesting that the observed chemistry would occur intracellularly. Histones also catalyze DOB excision when the lesion is present in the DNA linker region of a nucleosome. Schiff-base formation between DOB and histone proteins is detected in nucleosomes and NCPs, resulting in pyrrolone formation at the lysine residues. The lysines modified by DOB are often post-translationally modified. Consequently, the histone modifications described herein could affect the regulation of gene expression and may provide a chemical basis for the cytotoxicity of the DNA damaging agents that produce this lesion.

  12. Naturally occuring nucleosome positioning signals in human exons and introns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldi, Pierre; Brunak, Søren; Chauvin, Yves;

    1996-01-01

    of roughly ten nucleotides. The periodic pattern is also present in intron sequences, although the strength per nucleotide is weaker. Using two independent profile methods based on triplet bendability parameters from DNase I experiments and nucleosome positioning data, we show that the pattern in multiple...... alignments of internal exon and intron sequences corresponds to a periodic "in phase" bending potential towards the major groove of the DNA. The nucleosome positioning data show that the consensus triplets (and their complements) have a preference for locations on a bent double helix where the major groove...... faces inward and is compressed. The in-phase triplets are located adjacent to GCC/GGC triplets known to have the strongest bias in their positioning on the nucleosome. Analysis of mRNA sequences encoding proteins with known tertiary structure exclude the possibility that the pattern is a consequence...

  13. Nucleosome Presence at AML-1 Binding Sites Inversely Correlates with Ly49 Expression: Revelations from an Informatics Analysis of Nucleosomes and Immune Cell Transcription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wight, Andrew; Yang, Doo; Ioshikhes, Ilya; Makrigiannis, Andrew P

    2016-04-01

    Beyond its role in genomic organization and compaction, the nucleosome is believed to participate in the regulation of gene transcription. Here, we report a computational method to evaluate the nucleosome sensitivity for a transcription factor over a given stretch of the genome. Sensitive factors are predicted to be those with binding sites preferentially contained within nucleosome boundaries and lacking 10 bp periodicity. Based on these criteria, the Acute Myeloid Leukemia-1a (AML-1a) transcription factor, a regulator of immune gene expression, was identified as potentially sensitive to nucleosomal regulation within the mouse Ly49 gene family. This result was confirmed in RMA, a cell line with natural expression of Ly49, using MNase-Seq to generate a nucleosome map of chromosome 6, where the Ly49 gene family is located. Analysis of this map revealed a specific depletion of nucleosomes at AML-1a binding sites in the expressed Ly49A when compared to the other, silent Ly49 genes. Our data suggest that nucleosome-based regulation contributes to the expression of Ly49 genes, and we propose that this method of predicting nucleosome sensitivity could aid in dissecting the regulatory role of nucleosomes in general.

  14. Direct Characterization of Quantum Dynamics with Noisy Ancilla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrescu, Eugene; Humble, Travis

    We present methods for the direct characterization of quantum dynamics (DCQD) in which both the principal and ancilla systems undergo noisy processes. Using a concatenated error detection code, we discriminate between located and unlocated errors on the principal system in what amounts to filtering of ancilla noise. The example of composite noise involving amplitude damping and depolarizing channels is used to demonstrate the method, while we find the rate of noise filtering is more generally dependent on code distance. Our results indicate the accuracy of quantum process characterization can be greatly improved while remaining within reach of current experimental capabilities. We acknowledge support from the IC postdoctoral research program.

  15. Dynamic characterization of the cutting conditions in dry turning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra, R [ENI Val de Loire, Universite Francois Rabelais de Tours, Laboratoire de Mecanique et Rheologie, E.A. 2640, B.P. 3410, 41034 Blois Cedex (France); Chibane, H [Universite Francois Rabelais, Laboratoire de Mecanique et Rheologie, E.A. 2640, B.P. 3410, 41034 Blois Cedex (France); Leroy, R, E-mail: roger.serra@univ-tours.f [Universite Francois Rabelais, Polytech' Tours, Laboratoire de Mecanique et Rheologie, E.A. 2640, 7 Avenue Marcel Dassault, 37200 Tours (France)

    2009-08-01

    Machining instability in the form of violent vibrations or chatter is a physical process characterized by extreme cutting force at the cutting point. The process has very negative impact on machine integrity, tool life, surface quality and dimensional accuracy. Thus it could significantly compromise productivity and manufacturing quality. In the present paper, the importance of characterization and identification of dynamic instability in dry turning operation are shown. The stability behaviour of machine vibration or chatter has been examined and the various relevant parameters are studied and discuted. For chatter detection and identification of the transition between stable and unstable states, different methods are used. Results obtained proof the accuracy of these methods.

  16. Effect of the Spiroiminodihydantoin Lesion on Nucleosome Stability and Positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norabuena, Erika M; Barnes Williams, Sara; Klureza, Margaret A; Goehring, Liana J; Gruessner, Brian; Radhakrishnan, Mala L; Jamieson, Elizabeth R; Núñez, Megan E

    2016-04-26

    DNA is constantly under attack by oxidants, generating a variety of potentially mutagenic covalently modified species, including oxidized guanine base products. One such product is spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp), a chiral, propeller-shaped lesion that strongly destabilizes the DNA helix in its vicinity. Despite its unusual shape and thermodynamic effect on double-stranded DNA structure, DNA duplexes containing the Sp lesion form stable nucleosomes upon being incubated with histone octamers. Indeed, among six different combinations of lesion location and stereochemistry, only two duplexes display a diminished ability to form nucleosomes, and these only by ∼25%; the other four are statistically indistinguishable from the control. Nonetheless, kinetic factors also play a role: when the histone proteins have less time during assembly of the core particle to sample both lesion-containing and normal DNA strands, they are more likely to bind the Sp lesion DNA than during slower assembly processes that better approximate thermodynamic equilibrium. Using DNase I footprinting and molecular modeling, we discovered that the Sp lesion causes only a small perturbation (±1-2 bp) on the translational position of the DNA within the nucleosome. Each diastereomeric pair of lesions has the same effect on nucleosome positioning, but lesions placed at different locations behave differently, illustrating that the location of the lesion and not its shape serves as the primary determinant of the most stable DNA orientation. PMID:27074396

  17. Comparative analysis of methods for genome-wide nucleosome cartography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintales, Luis; Vázquez, Enrique; Antequera, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    Nucleosomes contribute to compacting the genome into the nucleus and regulate the physical access of regulatory proteins to DNA either directly or through the epigenetic modifications of the histone tails. Precise mapping of nucleosome positioning across the genome is, therefore, essential to understanding the genome regulation. In recent years, several experimental protocols have been developed for this purpose that include the enzymatic digestion, chemical cleavage or immunoprecipitation of chromatin followed by next-generation sequencing of the resulting DNA fragments. Here, we compare the performance and resolution of these methods from the initial biochemical steps through the alignment of the millions of short-sequence reads to a reference genome to the final computational analysis to generate genome-wide maps of nucleosome occupancy. Because of the lack of a unified protocol to process data sets obtained through the different approaches, we have developed a new computational tool (NUCwave), which facilitates their analysis, comparison and assessment and will enable researchers to choose the most suitable method for any particular purpose. NUCwave is freely available at http://nucleosome.usal.es/nucwave along with a step-by-step protocol for its use.

  18. Comparative analysis of methods for genome-wide nucleosome cartography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintales, Luis; Vázquez, Enrique; Antequera, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    Nucleosomes contribute to compacting the genome into the nucleus and regulate the physical access of regulatory proteins to DNA either directly or through the epigenetic modifications of the histone tails. Precise mapping of nucleosome positioning across the genome is, therefore, essential to understanding the genome regulation. In recent years, several experimental protocols have been developed for this purpose that include the enzymatic digestion, chemical cleavage or immunoprecipitation of chromatin followed by next-generation sequencing of the resulting DNA fragments. Here, we compare the performance and resolution of these methods from the initial biochemical steps through the alignment of the millions of short-sequence reads to a reference genome to the final computational analysis to generate genome-wide maps of nucleosome occupancy. Because of the lack of a unified protocol to process data sets obtained through the different approaches, we have developed a new computational tool (NUCwave), which facilitates their analysis, comparison and assessment and will enable researchers to choose the most suitable method for any particular purpose. NUCwave is freely available at http://nucleosome.usal.es/nucwave along with a step-by-step protocol for its use. PMID:25296770

  19. Role of nucleosome remodeling in neurodevelopmental and intellectual disability disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez, Alberto J.; Wood, Marcelo A.

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly important to understand how epigenetic mechanisms control gene expression during neurodevelopment. Two epigenetic mechanisms that have received considerable attention are DNA methylation and histone acetylation. Human exome sequencing and genome-wide association studies have linked several neurobiological disorders to genes whose products actively regulate DNA methylation and histone acetylation. More recently, a third major epigenetic mechanism, nucleosome remodel...

  20. Nucleosome structure of the yeast CHA1 promoter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreira, José Manuel Alfonso; Holmberg, S

    1998-01-01

    the in vivo chromatin structure of the CHA1 chromosomal locus, both in the non-induced state and upon induction. Upon activation, a precisely positioned nucleosome (nuc-1) occluding the TATA box and the transcription start site is removed. A strain devoid of Cha4p showed no chromatin alteration under inducing...

  1. Escherichia coli activity characterization using a laser dynamic speckle technique

    CERN Document Server

    Ramírez-Miquet, Evelio E; Contreras-Alarcón, Orestes R

    2012-01-01

    The results of applying a laser dynamic speckle technique to characterize bacterial activity are presented. The speckle activity was detected in two-compartment Petri dishes. One compartment was inoculated and the other one was left as a control blank. The speckled images were processed by the recently reported temporal difference method. Three inoculums of 0.3, 0.5, and 0.7 McFarland units of cell concentration were tested; each inoculum was tested twice for a total of six experiments. The dependences on time of the mean activity, the standard deviation of activity and other descriptors of the speckle pattern evolution were calculated for both the inoculated compartment and the blank. In conclusion the proposed dynamic speckle technique allows characterizing the activity of Escherichia coli bacteria in solid medium.

  2. Thermal characterization of green roofs through dynamic simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Gorrino, Alice; Corrado, Vincenzo; Capozzoli, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate a simplified parameter to characterize green roofs summer dynamic thermal performance through a mathematical approach. The inside face surface conduction in a green roof component is calculated through the Fast all-season soil strength (FASST) model. A parametric analysis is carried out to evaluate which roof design options have the greatest effect on the green roof Thermal behavior during the summer period. The results show the relevance of the leaf area ...

  3. Some Characterization Results on Dynamic Cumulative Residual Tsallis Entropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madan Mohan Sati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a generalized cumulative residual information measure based on Tsallis entropy and its dynamic version. We study the characterizations of the proposed information measure and define new classes of life distributions based on this measure. Some applications are provided in relation to weighted and equilibrium probability models. Finally the empirical cumulative Tsallis entropy is proposed to estimate the new information measure.

  4. Dynamic Propagation Channel Characterization and Modeling for Human Body Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Lei Wang; Jingjing Ma; Zhicheng Li; Hong Chen; Zedong Nie

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the first characterization and modeling of dynamic propagation channels for human body communication (HBC). In-situ experiments were performed using customized transceivers in an anechoic chamber. Three HBC propagation channels, i.e., from right leg to left leg, from right hand to left hand and from right hand to left leg, were investigated under thirty-three motion scenarios. Snapshots of data (2,800,000) were acquired from five volunteers. Various path gains caused by di...

  5. Effects of cytosine modifications on DNA flexibility and nucleosome mechanical stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Thuy T. M.; Yoo, Jejoong; Dai, Qing; Zhang, Qiucen; He, Chuan; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Ha, Taekjip

    2016-02-01

    Cytosine can undergo modifications, forming 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) and its oxidized products 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5-fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5-caC). Despite their importance as epigenetic markers and as central players in cellular processes, it is not well understood how these modifications influence physical properties of DNA and chromatin. Here we report a comprehensive survey of the effect of cytosine modifications on DNA flexibility. We find that even a single copy of 5-fC increases DNA flexibility markedly. 5-mC reduces and 5-hmC enhances flexibility, and 5-caC does not have a measurable effect. Molecular dynamics simulations show that these modifications promote or dampen structural fluctuations, likely through competing effects of base polarity and steric hindrance, without changing the average structure. The increase in DNA flexibility increases the mechanical stability of the nucleosome and vice versa, suggesting a gene regulation mechanism where cytosine modifications change the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA through their effects on DNA flexibility.

  6. Arabidopsis FORGETTER1 mediates stress-induced chromatin memory through nucleosome remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzezinka, Krzysztof; Altmann, Simone; Czesnick, Hjördis; Nicolas, Philippe; Gorka, Michal; Benke, Eileen; Kabelitz, Tina; Jähne, Felix; Graf, Alexander; Kappel, Christian; Bäurle, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Plants as sessile organisms can adapt to environmental stress to mitigate its adverse effects. As part of such adaptation they maintain an active memory of heat stress for several days that promotes a more efficient response to recurring stress. We show that this heat stress memory requires the activity of the FORGETTER1 (FGT1) locus, with fgt1 mutants displaying reduced maintenance of heat-induced gene expression. FGT1 encodes the Arabidopsis thaliana orthologue of Strawberry notch (Sno), and the protein globally associates with the promoter regions of actively expressed genes in a heat-dependent fashion. FGT1 interacts with chromatin remodelers of the SWI/SNF and ISWI families, which also display reduced heat stress memory. Genomic targets of the BRM remodeler overlap significantly with FGT1 targets. Accordingly, nucleosome dynamics at loci with altered maintenance of heat-induced expression are affected in fgt1. Together, our results suggest that by modulating nucleosome occupancy, FGT1 mediates stress-induced chromatin memory. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17061.001 PMID:27680998

  7. Characterizing and modeling the dynamics of online popularity

    CERN Document Server

    Ratkiewicz, Jacob; Fortunato, Santo; Flammini, Alessandro; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    Online popularity has enormous impact on opinions, culture, policy, and profits. We provide a quantitative, large scale, longitudinal analysis of the dynamics of online content popularity in two massive model systems, the Wikipedia and an entire country's Web space. We find that the dynamics of popularity are characterized by bursts, displaying characteristic features of critical systems such as fat-tailed distributions of magnitude and inter-event time. We propose a minimal model combining the classic preferential popularity increase mechanism with the occurrence of random popularity shift due to exogenous factors. The model recovers the critical features observed in the empirical analysis of the systems analyzed here, highlighting the key factors needed in the description of popularity dynamics.

  8. Regulation of DNA Translocation Efficiency within the Chromatin Remodeler RSC/Sth1 Potentiates Nucleosome Sliding and Ejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapier, Cedric R; Kasten, Margaret M; Parnell, Timothy J; Viswanathan, Ramya; Szerlong, Heather; Sirinakis, George; Zhang, Yongli; Cairns, Bradley R

    2016-05-01

    The RSC chromatin remodeler slides and ejects nucleosomes, utilizing a catalytic subunit (Sth1) with DNA translocation activity, which can pump DNA around the nucleosome. A central question is whether and how DNA translocation is regulated to achieve sliding versus ejection. Here, we report the regulation of DNA translocation efficiency by two domains residing on Sth1 (Post-HSA and Protrusion 1) and by actin-related proteins (ARPs) that bind Sth1. ARPs facilitated sliding and ejection by improving "coupling"-the amount of DNA translocation by Sth1 relative to ATP hydrolysis. We also identified and characterized Protrusion 1 mutations that promote "coupling," and Post-HSA mutations that improve ATP hydrolysis; notably, the strongest mutations conferred efficient nucleosome ejection without ARPs. Taken together, sliding-to-ejection involves a continuum of DNA translocation efficiency, consistent with higher magnitudes of ATPase and coupling activities (involving ARPs and Sth1 domains), enabling the simultaneous rupture of multiple histone-DNA contacts facilitating ejection.

  9. Nucleosomal DNA binding drives the recognition of H3K36-methylated nucleosomes by the PSIP1-PWWP domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nuland, R.; van Schaik, F.M.; Simonis, M.; van Heesch, S.; Cuppen, E.; Boelens, R.; Timmers, H.M.; van Ingen, H.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recognition of histone modifications by specialized protein domains is a key step in the regulation of DNA-mediated processes like gene transcription. The structural basis of these interactions is usually studied using histone peptide models, neglecting the nucleosomal context. Here, we

  10. ATP-independent cooperative binding of yeast Isw1a to bare and nucleosomal DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne De Cian

    Full Text Available Among chromatin remodeling factors, the ISWI family displays a nucleosome-enhanced ATPase activity coupled to DNA translocation. While these enzymes are known to bind to DNA, their activity has not been fully characterized. Here we use TEM imaging and single molecule manipulation to investigate the interaction between DNA and yeast Isw1a. We show that Isw1a displays a highly cooperative ATP-independent binding to and bridging between DNA segments. Under appropriate tension, rare single nucleation events can sometimes be observed and loop DNA with a regular step. These nucleation events are often followed by binding of successive complexes bridging between nearby DNA segments in a zipper-like fashion, as confirmed by TEM observations. On nucleosomal substrates, we show that the specific ATP-dependent remodeling activity occurs in the context of cooperative Isw1a complexes bridging extranucleosomal DNA. Our results are interpreted in the context of the recently published partial structure of Isw1a and support its acting as a "protein ruler" (with possibly more than one tick.

  11. The in vitro reconstitution of nucleosome and its binding patterns with HMG1/2 and HMG14/17 proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA HUA HU; JIE JIANG; YING HUA MA; NA YANG; MAO HU ZHANG; MIN WU; JIAN FEI; LI HE GUO

    2003-01-01

    Using atomic force microscopy (AFM), the dynamic process of the in vitro nucleosome reconstitution followed by slow dilution from high salt to low salt was visualized. Data showed that the histone octamers were dissociated from DNA at 1M NaCl. When the salt concentration was slowly reduced to 650 mMand 300 mM, the core histones bound to the naked DNA gradually. Once the salt concentration was reduced to 50 mM the classic "beads-on-a-string" structure was clearly visualized. Furthermore, using the technique of the in vitro reconstitution ofnucleosome,the mono- and di- nucleosomes were assembled in vitro with both HS2core (-10681 to -10970 bp) and NCR2 (-372to -194 bp) DNA sequences in the 5'flanking sequence of human b-globin gene. Data revealed that HMG 1/2 and HMG 14/17 proteins binding to both DNA sequences are changeable following the assembly and disassembly of nucleosomes. We suggest that the changeable binding patterns of HMG 14/17 and HMG1/2 proteins with these regulatory elements may be critical in the process of nucleosome assembly, recruitment of chromatin-modifying activities, and the regulation of human b-globin gene expression.

  12. Dynamic characterization of oil fields, complex stratigraphically using genetic algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel methodology is presented in this paper for the characterization of highly heterogeneous oil fields by integration of the oil fields dynamic information to the static updated model. The objective of the oil field's characterization process is to build an oil field model, as realistic as possible, through the incorporation of all the available information. The classical approach consists in producing a model based in the oil field's static information, having as the process final stage the validation model with the dynamic information available. It is important to clarify that the term validation implies a punctual process by nature, generally intended to secure the required coherence between productive zones and petrophysical properties. The objective of the proposed methodology is to enhance the prediction capacity of the oil field's model by previously integrating, parameters inherent to the oil field's fluid dynamics by a process of dynamic data inversion through an optimization procedure based on evolutionary computation. The proposed methodology relies on the construction of the oil field's high-resolution static model, escalated by means of hybrid techniques while aiming to preserve the oil field's heterogeneity. Afterwards, using an analytic simulator as reference, the scaled model is methodically modified by means of an optimization process that uses genetic algorithms and production data as conditional information. The process's final product is a model that observes the static and dynamic conditions of the oil field with the capacity to minimize the economic impact that generates production historical adjustments to the simulation tasks. This final model features some petrophysical properties (porosity, permeability and water saturation), as modified to achieve a better adjustment of the simulated production's history versus the real one history matching. Additionally, the process involves a slight modification of relative permeability, which has

  13. Crystal structure of the nucleosome containing ultraviolet light-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikoshi, Naoki; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Kagawa, Wataru; Osakabe, Akihisa; Matsumoto, Syota; Iwai, Shigenori; Sugasawa, Kaoru; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2016-02-26

    The cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) is induced in genomic DNA by ultraviolet (UV) light. In mammals, this photolesion is primarily induced within nucleosomal DNA, and repaired exclusively by the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. However, the mechanism by which the CPD is accommodated within the nucleosome has remained unknown. We now report the crystal structure of a nucleosome containing CPDs. In the nucleosome, the CPD induces only limited local backbone distortion, and the affected bases are accommodated within the duplex. Interestingly, one of the affected thymine bases is located within 3.0 Å from the undamaged complementary adenine base, suggesting the formation of complementary hydrogen bonds in the nucleosome. We also found that UV-DDB, which binds the CPD at the initial stage of the NER pathway, also efficiently binds to the nucleosomal CPD. These results provide important structural and biochemical information for understanding how the CPD is accommodated and recognized in chromatin.

  14. Dimensional characterization of anesthesia dynamic in reconstructed embedding space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifani, P; Rabiee, H R; Hashemi, M; Ghanbari, M

    2007-01-01

    The depth of anesthesia quantification has been one of the most research interests in the field of EEG signal processing and nonlinear dynamical analysis has emerged as a novel method for the study of complex systems in the past few decades. In this investigation we use the concept of nonlinear time series analysis techniques to reconstruct the attractor of anesthesia from EEG signal which have been obtained from different hypnotic states during surgery to give a characterization of the dimensional complexity of EEG by Correlation Dimension estimation. The dimension of the anesthesia strange attractor can be thought of as a measure of the degrees of freedom or the ;complexity' of the dynamics at different hypnotic levels. The results imply that for awaked state the correlation dimension is high, On the other hand, for light, moderate and deep hypnotic states these values decrease respectively; which means for anesthetized situation we expect lower correlation dimension.

  15. Dynamic Analysis & Characterization of Conventional Hydraulic Power Supply Units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lasse; Bech, Michael Møller; Liedhegener, Michael;

    2016-01-01

    Hydraulic power units operated as constant supply pres-sure systems remain to be widely used in the industry, to supply valve controlled hydraulic drives etc., where the hydraulic power units are constituted by variable pumps with mechanical outlet pressure control, driven by induction motors...... such that limited impact on the drive dynamics is observed. Such ideal properties however, are not necessarily present in industrial hydraulic applications for various reasons, with the most common being large volumes of supply lines. Long supply lines, hence large supply line volumes, between the sup-ply system...... with internal pi-lot supply are used. This paper is concerned with the analysis and characterization of the coupled pump-induction motor dy-namics, confined to hydraulic power units constituted by an axial piston pump with mechanical outlet pressure control, driven by an induction motor operated at grid...

  16. Characterization of a periodically driven chaotic dynamical system

    CERN Document Server

    Crisanti, A; Lacorata, G; Purini, R; Crisanti, A

    1996-01-01

    We discuss how to characterize the behavior of a chaotic dynamical system depending on a parameter that varies periodically in time. In particular, we study the predictability time, the correlations and the mean responses, by defining a local--in--time version of these quantities. In systems where the time scale related to the time periodic variation of the parameter is much larger than the ``internal'' time scale, one has that the local quantities strongly depend on the phase of the cycle. In this case, the standard global quantities can give misleading information.

  17. Dynamic modal characterization of musical instruments using digital holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoli, Nazif; Demoli, Ivan

    2005-06-27

    This study shows that a dynamic modal characterization of musical instruments with membrane can be carried out using a low-cost device and that the obtained very informative results can be presented as a movie. The proposed device is based on a digital holography technique using the quasi-Fourier configuration and time-average principle. Its practical realization with a commercial digital camera and large plane mirrors allows relatively simple analyzing of big vibration surfaces. The experimental measurements given for a percussion instrument are supported by the mathematical formulation of the problem.

  18. Nucleosome Positioning in Budding Yeast = Posicionamiento de nucleosomas en Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Deniz, Ozgen

    2014-01-01

    Tesi realitzada a l'Institut de Recerca Biomèdica de Barcelona (IRB) The nucleosome is the fundamental structural unit of DNA compaction in eukaryotic cells and is formed by the wrapping of 147 bp double stranded DNA around a histone octamer. Nucleosome organization plays a major role in controlling DNA accessibility to regulatory proteins, hence affecting cellular processes such as transcription, DNA replication and repair. Our study focuses on genome-wide nucleosome positioning in S...

  19. Preferential Nucleosome Assembly at DNA Triplet Repeats from the Myotonic Dystrophy Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuh-Hwa; Amirhaeri, Sorour; Kang, Seongman; Wells, Robert D.; Griffith, Jack D.

    1994-07-01

    The expansion of CTG repeats in DNA occurs in or near genes involved in several human diseases, including myotonic dystrophy and Huntington's disease. Nucleosomes, the basic structural element of chromosomes, consist of 146 base pairs of DNA coiled about an octamer of histone proteins and mediate general transcriptional repression. Electron microscopy was used to examine in vitro the nucleosome assembly of DNA containing repeating CTG triplets. The efficiency of nucleosome formation increased with expanded triplet blocks, suggesting that such blocks may repress transcription through the creation of stable nucleosomes.

  20. Genome-wide mapping of nucleosome positioning and DNA methylation within individual DNA molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Theresa K.; Liu, Yaping; Lay, Fides D.; Liang, Gangning; Berman, Benjamin P.; Jones, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation and nucleosome positioning work together to generate chromatin structures that regulate gene expression. Nucleosomes are typically mapped using nuclease digestion requiring significant amounts of material and varying enzyme concentrations. We have developed a method (NOMe-seq) that uses a GpC methyltransferase (M.CviPI) and next generation sequencing to generate a high resolution footprint of nucleosome positioning genome-wide using less than 1 million cells while retaining endogenous DNA methylation information from the same DNA strand. Using a novel bioinformatics pipeline, we show a striking anti-correlation between nucleosome occupancy and DNA methylation at CTCF regions that is not present at promoters. We further show that the extent of nucleosome depletion at promoters is directly correlated to expression level and can accommodate multiple nucleosomes and provide genome-wide evidence that expressed non-CpG island promoters are nucleosome-depleted. Importantly, NOMe-seq obtains DNA methylation and nucleosome positioning information from the same DNA molecule, giving the first genome-wide DNA methylation and nucleosome positioning correlation at the single molecule, and thus, single cell level, that can be used to monitor disease progression and response to therapy. PMID:22960375

  1. Activator control of nucleosome occupancy in activation and repression of transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gene O Bryant

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between chromatin structure and gene expression is a subject of intense study. The universal transcriptional activator Gal4 removes promoter nucleosomes as it triggers transcription, but how it does so has remained obscure. The reverse process, repression of transcription, has often been correlated with the presence of nucleosomes. But it is not known whether nucleosomes are required for that effect. A new quantitative assay describes, for any given location, the fraction of DNA molecules in the population that bears a nucleosome at any given instant. This allows us to follow the time courses of nucleosome removal and reformation, in wild-type and mutant cells, upon activation (by galactose and repression (by glucose of the GAL genes of yeast. We show that upon being freed of its inhibitor Gal80 by the action of galactose, Gal4 quickly recruits SWI/SNF to the genes, and that nucleosome "remodeler" rapidly removes promoter nucleosomes. In the absence of SWI/SNF, Gal4's action also results in nucleosome removal and the activation of transcription, but both processes are significantly delayed. Addition of glucose to cells growing in galactose represses transcription. But if galactose remains present, Gal4 continues to work, recruiting SWI/SNF and maintaining the promoter nucleosome-free despite it being repressed. This requirement for galactose is obviated in a mutant in which Gal4 works constitutively. These results show how an activator's recruiting function can control chromatin structure both during gene activation and repression. Thus, both under activating and repressing conditions, the activator can recruit an enzymatic machine that removes promoter nucleosomes. Our results show that whereas promoter nucleosome removal invariably accompanies activation, reformation of nucleosomes is not required for repression. The finding that there are two routes to nucleosome removal and activation of transcription-one that requires the

  2. The role of histone H4 biotinylation in the structure of nucleosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina A Filenko

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Post-translational modifications of histones play important roles in regulating nucleosome structure and gene transcription. It has been shown that biotinylation of histone H4 at lysine-12 in histone H4 (K12Bio-H4 is associated with repression of a number of genes. We hypothesized that biotinylation modifies the physical structure of nucleosomes, and that biotin-induced conformational changes contribute to gene silencing associated with histone biotinylation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test this hypothesis we used atomic force microscopy to directly analyze structures of nucleosomes formed with biotin-modified and non-modified H4. The analysis of the AFM images revealed a 13% increase in the length of DNA wrapped around the histone core in nucleosomes with biotinylated H4. This statistically significant (p<0.001 difference between native and biotinylated nucleosomes corresponds to adding approximately 20 bp to the classical 147 bp length of nucleosomal DNA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The increase in nucleosomal DNA length is predicted to stabilize the association of DNA with histones and therefore to prevent nucleosomes from unwrapping. This provides a mechanistic explanation for the gene silencing associated with K12Bio-H4. The proposed single-molecule AFM approach will be instrumental for studying the effects of various epigenetic modifications of nucleosomes, in addition to biotinylation.

  3. DNA-guided establishment of nucleosome patterns within coding regions of a eukaryotic genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beh, Leslie Y; Müller, Manuel M; Muir, Tom W; Kaplan, Noam; Landweber, Laura F

    2015-11-01

    A conserved hallmark of eukaryotic chromatin architecture is the distinctive array of well-positioned nucleosomes downstream from transcription start sites (TSS). Recent studies indicate that trans-acting factors establish this stereotypical array. Here, we present the first genome-wide in vitro and in vivo nucleosome maps for the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila. In contrast with previous studies in yeast, we find that the stereotypical nucleosome array is preserved in the in vitro reconstituted map, which is governed only by the DNA sequence preferences of nucleosomes. Remarkably, this average in vitro pattern arises from the presence of subsets of nucleosomes, rather than the whole array, in individual Tetrahymena genes. Variation in GC content contributes to the positioning of these sequence-directed nucleosomes and affects codon usage and amino acid composition in genes. Given that the AT-rich Tetrahymena genome is intrinsically unfavorable for nucleosome formation, we propose that these "seed" nucleosomes--together with trans-acting factors--may facilitate the establishment of nucleosome arrays within genes in vivo, while minimizing changes to the underlying coding sequences.

  4. Structure of human nucleosome containing the testis-specific histone variant TSH2B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urahama, Takashi; Horikoshi, Naoki; Osakabe, Akihisa; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi, E-mail: kurumizaka@waseda.jp [Waseda University, 2-2 Wakamatsu-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8480 (Japan)

    2014-03-25

    The crystal structure of human nucleosome containing the testis-specific TSH2B variant has been determined. The TSH2B Ser85 residue does not interact with H4 in the nucleosome, and induces a local structural difference between TSH2B and H2B in nucleosomes. The human histone H2B variant TSH2B is highly expressed in testis and may function in the chromatin transition during spermatogenesis. In the present study, the crystal structure of the human testis-specific nucleosome containing TSH2B was determined at 2.8 Å resolution. A local structural difference between TSH2B and canonical H2B in nucleosomes was detected around the TSH2B-specific amino-acid residue Ser85. The TSH2B Ser85 residue does not interact with H4 in the nucleosome, but in the canonical nucleosome the H2B Asn84 residue (corresponding to the TSH2B Ser85 residue) forms water-mediated hydrogen bonds with the H4 Arg78 residue. In contrast, the other TSH2B-specific amino-acid residues did not induce any significant local structural changes in the TSH2B nucleosome. These findings may provide important information for understanding how testis-specific histone variants form nucleosomes during spermatogenesis.

  5. Genome-Wide Mapping Targets of the Metazoan Chromatin Remodeling Factor NURF Reveals Nucleosome Remodeling at Enhancers, Core Promoters and Gene Insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, So Yeon; Grisan, Valentina; Jang, Boyun; Herbert, John; Badenhorst, Paul

    2016-04-01

    NURF is a conserved higher eukaryotic ISWI-containing chromatin remodeling complex that catalyzes ATP-dependent nucleosome sliding. By sliding nucleosomes, NURF is able to alter chromatin dynamics to control transcription and genome organization. Previous biochemical and genetic analysis of the specificity-subunit of Drosophila NURF (Nurf301/Enhancer of Bithorax (E(bx)) has defined NURF as a critical regulator of homeotic, heat-shock and steroid-responsive gene transcription. It has been speculated that NURF controls pathway specific transcription by co-operating with sequence-specific transcription factors to remodel chromatin at dedicated enhancers. However, conclusive in vivo demonstration of this is lacking and precise regulatory elements targeted by NURF are poorly defined. To address this, we have generated a comprehensive map of in vivo NURF activity, using MNase-sequencing to determine at base pair resolution NURF target nucleosomes, and ChIP-sequencing to define sites of NURF recruitment. Our data show that, besides anticipated roles at enhancers, NURF interacts physically and functionally with the TRF2/DREF basal transcription factor to organize nucleosomes downstream of active promoters. Moreover, we detect NURF remodeling and recruitment at distal insulator sites, where NURF functionally interacts with and co-localizes with DREF and insulator proteins including CP190 to establish nucleosome-depleted domains. This insulator function of NURF is most apparent at subclasses of insulators that mark the boundaries of chromatin domains, where multiple insulator proteins co-associate. By visualizing the complete repertoire of in vivo NURF chromatin targets, our data provide new insights into how chromatin remodeling can control genome organization and regulatory interactions. PMID:27046080

  6. Genome-Wide Mapping Targets of the Metazoan Chromatin Remodeling Factor NURF Reveals Nucleosome Remodeling at Enhancers, Core Promoters and Gene Insulators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Yeon Kwon

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available NURF is a conserved higher eukaryotic ISWI-containing chromatin remodeling complex that catalyzes ATP-dependent nucleosome sliding. By sliding nucleosomes, NURF is able to alter chromatin dynamics to control transcription and genome organization. Previous biochemical and genetic analysis of the specificity-subunit of Drosophila NURF (Nurf301/Enhancer of Bithorax (E(bx has defined NURF as a critical regulator of homeotic, heat-shock and steroid-responsive gene transcription. It has been speculated that NURF controls pathway specific transcription by co-operating with sequence-specific transcription factors to remodel chromatin at dedicated enhancers. However, conclusive in vivo demonstration of this is lacking and precise regulatory elements targeted by NURF are poorly defined. To address this, we have generated a comprehensive map of in vivo NURF activity, using MNase-sequencing to determine at base pair resolution NURF target nucleosomes, and ChIP-sequencing to define sites of NURF recruitment. Our data show that, besides anticipated roles at enhancers, NURF interacts physically and functionally with the TRF2/DREF basal transcription factor to organize nucleosomes downstream of active promoters. Moreover, we detect NURF remodeling and recruitment at distal insulator sites, where NURF functionally interacts with and co-localizes with DREF and insulator proteins including CP190 to establish nucleosome-depleted domains. This insulator function of NURF is most apparent at subclasses of insulators that mark the boundaries of chromatin domains, where multiple insulator proteins co-associate. By visualizing the complete repertoire of in vivo NURF chromatin targets, our data provide new insights into how chromatin remodeling can control genome organization and regulatory interactions.

  7. Cracking the chromatin code: Precise rule of nucleosome positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifonov, Edward N.

    2011-03-01

    Various aspects of packaging DNA in eukaryotic cells are outlined in physical rather than biological terms. The informational and physical nature of packaging instructions encoded in DNA sequences is discussed with the emphasis on signal processing difficulties - very low signal-to-noise ratio and high degeneracy of the nucleosome positioning signal. As the author has been contributing to the field from its very onset in 1980, the review is mostly focused at the works of the author and his colleagues. The leading concept of the overview is the role of deformational properties of DNA in the nucleosome positioning. The target of the studies is to derive the DNA bendability matrix describing where along the DNA various dinucleotide elements should be positioned, to facilitate its bending in the nucleosome. Three different approaches are described leading to derivation of the DNA deformability sequence pattern, which is a simplified linear presentation of the bendability matrix. All three approaches converge to the same unique sequence motif CGRAAATTTYCG or, in binary form, YRRRRRYYYYYR, both representing the chromatin code.

  8. Analytical model for nanoscale viscoelastic properties characterization using dynamic nanoindentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuya, Philip A.; Patel, Nimitt G.

    2014-08-01

    In the last few decades, nanoindentation has gained widespread acceptance as a technique for materials properties characterization at micron and submicron length scales. Accurate and precise characterization of material properties with a nanoindenter is critically dependent on the ability to correctly model the response of the test equipment in contact with the material. In dynamic nanoindention analysis, a simple Kelvin-Voigt model is commonly used to capture the viscoelastic response. However, this model oversimplifies the response of real viscoelastic materials such as polymers. A model is developed that captures the dynamic nanoindentation response of a viscoelastic material. Indenter tip-sample contact forces are modelled using a generalized Maxwell model. The results on a silicon elastomer were analysed using conventional two element Kelvin-Voigt model and contrasted to analysis done using the Maxwell model. The results show that conventional Kelvin-Voigt model overestimates the storage modulus of the silicone elastomer by ~30%. Maxwell model represents a significant improvement in capturing the viscoelastic material behaviour over the Voigt model.

  9. Dynamic Characterization and Modeling of Potting Materials for Electronics Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Vasant; Lee, Gilbert; Santiago, Jaime

    2015-06-01

    Prediction of survivability of encapsulated electronic components subject to impact relies on accurate modeling. Both static and dynamic characterization of encapsulation material is needed to generate a robust material model. Current focus is on potting materials to mitigate high rate loading on impact. In this effort, encapsulation scheme consists of layers of polymeric material Sylgard 184 and Triggerbond Epoxy-20-3001. Experiments conducted for characterization of materials include conventional tension and compression tests, Hopkinson bar, dynamic material analyzer (DMA) and a non-conventional accelerometer based resonance tests for obtaining high frequency data. For an ideal material, data can be fitted to Williams-Landel-Ferry (WLF) model. A new temperature-time shift (TTS) macro was written to compare idealized temperature shift factor (WLF model) with experimental incremental shift factors. Deviations can be observed by comparison of experimental data with the model fit to determine the actual material behavior. Similarly, another macro written for obtaining Ogden model parameter from Hopkinson Bar tests indicates deviations from experimental high strain rate data. In this paper, experimental results for different materials used for mitigating impact, and ways to combine data from resonance, DMA and Hopkinson bar together with modeling refinements will be presented.

  10. Assembling a single-molecule view on nucleosome dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlijm, R.

    2014-01-01

    The main focus of this thesis is a better understanding of the basic compaction mechanism of our DNA using multiple single-molecule techniques. The stretched-out length of our DNA is enormous compared with the dimensions of a cell. To make DNA fit within a cell it is systematically wrapped around pr

  11. Statistical characterization of spatiotemporal sediment dynamics in the Venice lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carniello, Luca; D'Alpaos, Andrea; Botter, Gianluca; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Characterizing the dynamics of suspended sediment is crucial when investigating the long-term evolution of tidal landscapes. Here we apply a widely tested mathematical model which describes the dynamics of cohesive and noncohesive sediments, driven by the combined effect of tidal currents and wind waves, using 1 year long time series of observed water levels and wind data from the Venice lagoon. The spatiotemporal evolution of the computed suspended sediment concentration (SSC) is analyzed on the basis of the "peak over threshold" theory. Our analysis suggests that events characterized by high SSC can be modeled as a marked Poisson process over most of the lagoon. The interarrival time between two consecutive over threshold events, the intensity of peak excesses, and the duration are found to be exponentially distributed random variables over most of tidal flats. Our study suggests that intensity and duration of over threshold events are temporally correlated, while almost no correlation exists between interarrival times and both durations and intensities. The benthic vegetation colonizing the central southern part of the Venice lagoon is found to exert a crucial role on sediment dynamics: vegetation locally decreases the frequency of significant resuspension events by affecting spatiotemporal patterns of SSCs also in adjacent areas. Spatial patterns of the mean interarrival of over threshold SSC events are found to be less heterogeneous than the corresponding patterns of mean interarrivals of over threshold bottom shear stress events because of the role of advection/dispersion processes in mixing suspended sediments within the lagoon. Implications for long-term morphodynamic modeling of tidal environments are discussed.

  12. Pixel Analysis and Plasma Dynamics Characterized by Photospheric Spectral Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasca, Anthony P.; Chen, James; Pevtsov, Alexei A.

    2016-05-01

    Recent observations of the photosphere using high spatial and temporal resolutions show small dynamic features at the resolving limit during emerging flux events. However, line-of-sight (LOS) magnetogram pixels only contain the net uncanceled magnetic flux, which is expected to increase for fixed regions as resolution limits improve. A new pixel dynamics method uses spectrographic images to characterize photospheric absorption line profiles by variations in line displacement, width, asymmetry, and peakedness and is applied to quiet-sun regions, active regions with no eruption, and an active region with an ongoing eruption. Using Stokes I images from SOLIS/VSM on 2012 March 13, variations in line width and peakedness of Fe I 6301.5 Å are shown to have a strong spatial and temporal relationship with an M7.9 X-ray flare originating from NOAA 11429. This relationship is observed as a flattening in the line profile as the X-ray flare approaches peak intensity and was not present in area scans of a non-eruptive active region on 2011 April 14. These results are used to estimate dynamic plasma properties on sub-pixel scales and provide both spatial and temporal information of sub-pixel activity at the photosphere. The analysis can be extended to include the full Stokes parameters and study signatures of magnetic fields and coupled plasma properties.

  13. High Dynamic Range Characterization of the Trauma Patient Plasma Proteome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Tao; Qian, Weijun; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Kaushal, Amit; Monroe, Matthew E.; Varnum, Susan M.; Moore, Ronald J.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Maier, Ronald V.; Davis, Ronald W.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-06-08

    While human plasma represents an attractive sample for disease biomarker discovery, the extreme complexity and large dynamic range in protein concentrations present significant challenges for characterization, candidate biomarker discovery, and validation. Herein, we describe a strategy that combines immunoaffinity subtraction and chemical fractionation based on cysteinyl peptide and N-glycopeptide captures with 2D-LC-MS/MS to increase the dynamic range of analysis for plasma. Application of this ''divide-and-conquer'' strategy to trauma patient plasma significantly improved the overall dynamic range of detection and resulted in confident identification of 22,267 unique peptides from four different peptide populations (cysteinyl peptides, non-cysteinyl peptides, N-glycopeptides, and non-glycopeptides) that covered 3654 nonredundant proteins. Numerous low-abundance proteins were identified, exemplified by 78 ''classic'' cytokines and cytokine receptors and by 136 human cell differentiation molecules. Additionally, a total of 2910 different N-glycopeptides that correspond to 662 N-glycoproteins and 1553 N-glycosylation sites were identified. A panel of the proteins identified in this study is known to be involved in inflammation and immune responses. This study established an extensive reference protein database for trauma patients, which provides a foundation for future high-throughput quantitative plasma proteomic studies designed to elucidate the mechanisms that underlie systemic inflammatory responses.

  14. Reactivity in ELISA with DNA-loaded nucleosomes in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieker, Jürgen; Schlumberger, Wolfgang; McHugh, Neil; Hamann, Philip; van der Vlag, Johan; Berden, Jo H

    2015-11-01

    Autoantibodies against nucleosomes are considered a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We compared in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis the diagnostic usefulness of a dsDNA-loaded nucleosome ELISA (anti-dsDNA-NcX) with ELISAs in which dsDNA or nucleosomes alone were coated. First, we analysed whether DNA loading on nucleosomes led to masking of epitopes by using defined monoclonal anti-DNA, anti-histone and nucleosome-specific autoantibodies to evaluate the accessibility of nucleosomal epitopes in the anti-dsDNA-NcX ELISA. Second, autoantibody levels were measured in these 3 ELISAs in 100 patients with proliferative lupus nephritis (LN) before immunosuppressive treatment and in 128 non-SLE disease controls. In patients with LN inter-assay comparisons and associations with clinical and serological parameters were analysed. The panel of monoclonal antibodies revealed that all epitopes were equally accessible in the anti-dsDNA-NcX ELISA as in the two other ELISAs. Patients with proliferative lupus nephritis were positive with dsDNA-loaded nucleosomes in 86%, with DNA in 66% and with nucleosomes in 85%. In the non-lupus disease control group these frequencies were 1.6% (2 out of 128) for both the anti-dsDNA-NcX and the anti-dsDNA ELISA and 0% in the anti-nucleosome ELISA. The levels in the anti-dsDNA-NcX ELISA were high in a group of patients with LN that showed absent reactivity in the anti-DNA or low levels in the anti-nucleosome ELISA. Anti-dsDNA-NcX positivity was associated with higher SLEDAI scores within this group. Within nucleosome-based ELISAs, we propose the anti-dsDNA-NcX ELISA as the preferred test system. PMID:26597199

  15. Chromatin reconstitution on small DNA rings. IV. DNA supercoiling and nucleosome sequence preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duband-Goulet, I; Carot, V; Ulyanov, A V; Douc-Rasy, S; Prunell, A

    1992-04-20

    Nucleosome formation on inverted repeats or on some alternations of purines and pyrimidines can be inhibited in vitro by DNA supercoiling through their supercoiling-induced structural transitions to cruciforms or Z-form DNA, respectively. We report here, as a result of study of single nucleosome reconstitutions on a DNA minicircle, that a physiological level of DNA supercoiling can also enhance nucleosome sequence preference. The 357 base-pair minicircle was composed of a promoter of phage SP6 RNA polymerase joined to a 256 base-pair fragment containing a sea urchin 5 S RNA gene. Nucleosome formation on the promoter was found to be enhanced on a topoisomer with in vivo superhelix density when compared to topoisomers of lower or higher superhelical densities, to the nicked circle, or to the linear DNA. In contrast, nucleosomes at other positions appeared to be insensitive to supercoiling. This observation relied on a novel procedure for the investigation of nucleosome positioning. The reconstituted circular chromatin was first linearized using a restriction endonuclease, and the linear chromatin so obtained was electrophoresed as nucleoprotein in a polyacrylamide gel. The gel showed well-fractionated bands whose mobilities were a V-like function of nucleosome positions, with the nucleosome near the middle migrating less. This behavior is similar to that previously observed for complexes of sequence-specific DNA-bending proteins with circularly permuted DNA fragments, and presumably reflects the change in the direction of the DNA axis between the entrance and the exit of the particle. Possible mechanisms for such supercoiling-induced modulation of nucleosome formation are discussed in the light of the supercoiling-dependent susceptibility to cleavage of the naked minicircle with S1 and Bal31 nucleases; and a comparison between DNase I cleavage patterns of the modulated nucleosome and of another, non-modulated, overlapping nucleosome. PMID:1314907

  16. Determinants of nucleosome positioning and their influence on plant gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming-Jung; Seddon, Alexander E; Tsai, Zing Tsung-Yeh; Major, Ian T; Floer, Monique; Howe, Gregg A; Shiu, Shin-Han

    2015-08-01

    Nucleosome positioning influences the access of transcription factors (TFs) to their binding sites and gene expression. Studies in plant, animal, and fungal models demonstrate similar nucleosome positioning patterns along genes and correlations between occupancy and expression. However, the relationships among nucleosome positioning, cis-regulatory element accessibility, and gene expression in plants remain undefined. Here we showed that plant nucleosome depletion occurs on specific 6-mer motifs and this sequence-specific nucleosome depletion is predictive of expression levels. Nucleosome-depleted regions in Arabidopsis thaliana tend to have higher G/C content, unlike yeast, and are centered on specific G/C-rich 6-mers, suggesting that intrinsic sequence properties, such as G/C content, cannot fully explain plant nucleosome positioning. These 6-mer motif sites showed higher DNase I hypersensitivity and are flanked by strongly phased nucleosomes, consistent with known TF binding sites. Intriguingly, this 6-mer-specific nucleosome depletion pattern occurs not only in promoter but also in genic regions and is significantly correlated with higher gene expression level, a phenomenon also found in rice but not in yeast. Among the 6-mer motifs enriched in genes responsive to treatment with the defense hormone jasmonate, there are no significant changes in nucleosome occupancy, suggesting that these sites are potentially preconditioned to enable rapid response without changing chromatin state significantly. Our study provides a global assessment of the joint contribution of nucleosome occupancy and motif sequences that are likely cis-elements to the control of gene expression in plants. Our findings pave the way for further understanding the impact of chromatin state on plant transcriptional regulatory circuits.

  17. Stable complex formation of CENP-B with the CENP-A nucleosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Risa; Otake, Koichiro; Arimura, Yasuhiro; Horikoshi, Naoki; Miya, Yuta; Shiga, Tatsuya; Osakabe, Akihisa; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Ohzeki, Jun-ichirou; Larionov, Vladimir; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2015-05-26

    CENP-A and CENP-B are major components of centromeric chromatin. CENP-A is the histone H3 variant, which forms the centromere-specific nucleosome. CENP-B specifically binds to the CENP-B box DNA sequence on the centromere-specific repetitive DNA. In the present study, we found that the CENP-A nucleosome more stably retains human CENP-B than the H3.1 nucleosome in vitro. Specifically, CENP-B forms a stable complex with the CENP-A nucleosome, when the CENP-B box sequence is located at the proximal edge of the nucleosome. Surprisingly, the CENP-B binding was weaker when the CENP-B box sequence was located in the distal linker region of the nucleosome. This difference in CENP-B binding, depending on the CENP-B box location, was not observed with the H3.1 nucleosome. Consistently, we found that the DNA-binding domain of CENP-B specifically interacted with the CENP-A-H4 complex, but not with the H3.1-H4 complex, in vitro. These results suggested that CENP-B forms a more stable complex with the CENP-A nucleosome through specific interactions with CENP-A, if the CENP-B box is located proximal to the CENP-A nucleosome. Our in vivo assay also revealed that CENP-B binding in the vicinity of the CENP-A nucleosome substantially stabilizes the CENP-A nucleosome on alphoid DNA in human cells.

  18. Reactivity in ELISA with DNA-loaded nucleosomes in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieker, Jürgen; Schlumberger, Wolfgang; McHugh, Neil; Hamann, Philip; van der Vlag, Johan; Berden, Jo H

    2015-11-01

    Autoantibodies against nucleosomes are considered a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We compared in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis the diagnostic usefulness of a dsDNA-loaded nucleosome ELISA (anti-dsDNA-NcX) with ELISAs in which dsDNA or nucleosomes alone were coated. First, we analysed whether DNA loading on nucleosomes led to masking of epitopes by using defined monoclonal anti-DNA, anti-histone and nucleosome-specific autoantibodies to evaluate the accessibility of nucleosomal epitopes in the anti-dsDNA-NcX ELISA. Second, autoantibody levels were measured in these 3 ELISAs in 100 patients with proliferative lupus nephritis (LN) before immunosuppressive treatment and in 128 non-SLE disease controls. In patients with LN inter-assay comparisons and associations with clinical and serological parameters were analysed. The panel of monoclonal antibodies revealed that all epitopes were equally accessible in the anti-dsDNA-NcX ELISA as in the two other ELISAs. Patients with proliferative lupus nephritis were positive with dsDNA-loaded nucleosomes in 86%, with DNA in 66% and with nucleosomes in 85%. In the non-lupus disease control group these frequencies were 1.6% (2 out of 128) for both the anti-dsDNA-NcX and the anti-dsDNA ELISA and 0% in the anti-nucleosome ELISA. The levels in the anti-dsDNA-NcX ELISA were high in a group of patients with LN that showed absent reactivity in the anti-DNA or low levels in the anti-nucleosome ELISA. Anti-dsDNA-NcX positivity was associated with higher SLEDAI scores within this group. Within nucleosome-based ELISAs, we propose the anti-dsDNA-NcX ELISA as the preferred test system.

  19. Characterization and Modeling of Segmental Dynamics in Silicone Based Nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, R S; Baumann, T; Gee, R; Maiti, A; Patel, M; Lewicki, J

    2009-03-27

    The addition of nano-particles with novel chemical, optical, or barrier properties further opens the door to the development of so-called multifunctional materials (1). Key to developing robust, tailored composites is a detailed understanding of the structural contributions to the engineering properties of the composite and how they may change with time in harsh service conditions. The segmental dynamics and local order underlie much of the fundamental physics that influence the performance of elastomers and can serve as important diagnostics for reinforcement and other fundamental properties (e.g., network topology, cross-link density, the number and distance between chemical and physical (entanglements) cross-links, the type and volume fraction of filler) and thus provide a route to this fundamental understanding. {sup 1}H MQ-NMR spectroscopy has shown the ability to provide more reliable and quantitative information regarding the elastomer network structure and heterogeneities (2). {sup 1}H MQ-NMR methods allow for the measurement of absolute residual dipolar couplings (<{Omega}{sub d}>) and thus the segmental/cooperative dynamics Thus, the MQ-NMR method allows for the direct measure of network topology and in many cases, filler-particle interactions. The ability of MD methods to uncover structural motifs and dynamics at the atomistic scale is well known. In polymer systems, however, the relationship to bulk material properties can be somewhat tenuous due to often limited number of atoms and short time durations that can be studied. Extending these MD simulations to large assemblies of atoms and extending them to longer times using state of the art computational resources has allowed us to probe some useful relationships. MD provides static and dynamic properties for a collection of particles that allow atomic scale insights that are difficult to gain otherwise. We have been exploiting these methods to characterize the effects of network structure and filler

  20. Deposition of nucleosomal antigens (histones and DNA) in the epidermal basement membrane in human lupus nephritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootscholten, C.; Bruggen, M.C.J. van; Pijl, J.W. van der; Jong, E.M.G.J. de; Ligtenberg, G.; Derksen, R.H.W.M.; Berden, J.H.M.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Antinuclear autoantibodies complexed to nucleosomes can bind to heparan sulfate (HS) in the glomerular basement membrane. This binding is due to the binding of the positively charged histones to the strongly anionic HS. Nucleosomes and histones have been identified in glomerular deposits

  1. Molecular determinants of nucleosome retention at CpG-rich sequences in mouse spermatozoa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkek, S.; Hisano, M.; Liang, C.Y.; Gill, M.; Murr, R.; Dieker, J.W.C.; Schubeler, D.; Vlag, J. van der; Stadler, M.B.; Peters, A.H.

    2013-01-01

    In mammalian spermatozoa, most but not all of the genome is densely packaged by protamines. Here we reveal the molecular logic underlying the retention of nucleosomes in mouse spermatozoa, which contain only 1% residual histones. We observe high enrichment throughout the genome of nucleosomes at CpG

  2. The Arabidopsis Adh gene exhibits diverse nucleosome arrangements within a small DNase I-sensitive domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Palas, M A; Ferl, R J

    1995-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene from Arabidopsis shows enhanced sensitivity to DNase I in cells that express the gene. This generalized sensitivity to DNase I is demarcated by position -500 on the 5' side and the end of the mRNA on the 3' side. Thus, the gene defined as the promoter and mRNA coding region corresponds very closely in size with the gene defined as a nuclease-sensitive domain. This is a remarkably close correspondence between a sensitive domain and a eukaryotic transcriptional unit, because previously reported DNase I-sensitive domains include large regions of DNA that are not transcribed. Nucleosomes are present in the coding region of the Adh gene when it is expressed, indicating that the transcriptional elongation process causes nucleosome disruption rather than release of nucleosomes from the coding region. In addition, the regulatory region contains a loosely positioned nucleosome that is separated from adjacent nucleosomes by internucleosomic DNA segments longer than the average linker DNA in bulk chromatin. This specific array of nucleosomes coexists with bound transcription factors that could contribute to the organization of the nucleosome arrangement. These results enhance our understanding of the complex interactions among DNA, nucleosomes, and transcription factors during gene expression in plants. PMID:8535143

  3. Genome-wide nucleosome specificity and function of chromatin remodellers in ES cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Dieuleveult, Maud; Yen, Kuangyu; Hmitou, Isabelle; Depaux, Arnaud; Boussouar, Fayçal; Dargham, Daria Bou; Jounier, Sylvie; Humbertclaude, Hélène; Ribierre, Florence; Baulard, Céline; Farrell, Nina P.; Park, Bongsoo; Keime, Céline; Carrière, Lucie; Berlivet, Soizick; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo; Werner, Michel; Deleuze, Jean-François; Olaso, Robert; Aude, Jean-Christophe; Chantalat, Sophie; Pugh, B. Franklin; Gérard, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    Summary ATP-dependent chromatin remodellers allow access to DNA for transcription factors and the general transcription machinery, but whether mammalian chromatin remodellers1–3 target specific nucleosomes to regulate transcription is unclear. Here, we present genome-wide remodeller-nucleosome interaction profiles for Chd1, Chd2, Chd4, Chd6, Chd8, Chd9, Brg1 and Ep400 in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. These remodellers bind one or both full nucleosomes that flank MNase-defined nucleosome-free promoter regions (NFRs), where they separate divergent transcription. Surprisingly, large CpG-rich NFRs that extend downstream of annotated transcriptional start sites (TSSs) are nevertheless chromatinized with non-nucleosomal or subnucleosomal histone variants (H3.3 and H2A.Z) and modifications (H3K4me3 and H3K27ac). RNA polymerase (pol) II therefore navigates hundreds of bp of altered chromatin in the sense direction before encountering an MNase-resistant nucleosome at the 3′ end of the NFR. Transcriptome analysis upon remodeller depletion reveals reciprocal mechanisms of transcriptional regulation by remodellers. Whereas at active genes individual remodellers play either positive or negative roles via altering nucleosome stability, at polycomb-enriched bivalent genes the same remodellers act in an opposite manner. These findings indicate that remodellers target specific nucleosomes at the edge of NFRs, where they regulate ES cell transcriptional programs. PMID:26814966

  4. Effects of Alu elements on global nucleosome positioning in the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamashita Riu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the genome sequence-specific positioning of nucleosomes is essential to understand various cellular processes, such as transcriptional regulation and replication. As a typical example, the 10-bp periodicity of AA/TT and GC dinucleotides has been reported in several species, but it is still unclear whether this feature can be observed in the whole genomes of all eukaryotes. Results With Fourier analysis, we found that this is not the case: 84-bp and 167-bp periodicities are prevalent in primates. The 167-bp periodicity is intriguing because it is almost equal to the sum of the lengths of a nucleosomal unit and its linker region. After masking Alu elements, these periodicities were greatly diminished. Next, using two independent large-scale sets of nucleosome mapping data, we analyzed the distribution of nucleosomes in the vicinity of Alu elements and showed that (1 there are one or two fixed slot(s for nucleosome positioning within the Alu element and (2 the positioning of neighboring nucleosomes seems to be in phase, more or less, with the presence of Alu elements. Furthermore, (3 these effects of Alu elements on nucleosome positioning are consistent with inactivation of promoter activity in Alu elements. Conclusions Our discoveries suggest that the principle governing nucleosome positioning differs greatly across species and that the Alu family is an important factor in primate genomes.

  5. Genome-wide nucleosome specificity and function of chromatin remodellers in ES cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Dieuleveult, Maud; Yen, Kuangyu; Hmitou, Isabelle; Depaux, Arnaud; Boussouar, Fayçal; Bou Dargham, Daria; Jounier, Sylvie; Humbertclaude, Hélène; Ribierre, Florence; Baulard, Céline; Farrell, Nina P; Park, Bongsoo; Keime, Céline; Carrière, Lucie; Berlivet, Soizick; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo; Werner, Michel; Deleuze, Jean-François; Olaso, Robert; Aude, Jean-Christophe; Chantalat, Sophie; Pugh, B Franklin; Gérard, Matthieu

    2016-02-01

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodellers allow access to DNA for transcription factors and the general transcription machinery, but whether mammalian chromatin remodellers target specific nucleosomes to regulate transcription is unclear. Here we present genome-wide remodeller-nucleosome interaction profiles for the chromatin remodellers Chd1, Chd2, Chd4, Chd6, Chd8, Chd9, Brg1 and Ep400 in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. These remodellers bind one or both full nucleosomes that flank micrococcal nuclease (MNase)-defined nucleosome-free promoter regions (NFRs), where they separate divergent transcription. Surprisingly, large CpG-rich NFRs that extend downstream of annotated transcriptional start sites are nevertheless bound by non-nucleosomal or subnucleosomal histone variants (H3.3 and H2A.Z) and marked by H3K4me3 and H3K27ac modifications. RNA polymerase II therefore navigates hundreds of base pairs of altered chromatin in the sense direction before encountering an MNase-resistant nucleosome at the 3' end of the NFR. Transcriptome analysis after remodeller depletion reveals reciprocal mechanisms of transcriptional regulation by remodellers. Whereas at active genes individual remodellers have either positive or negative roles via altering nucleosome stability, at polycomb-enriched bivalent genes the same remodellers act in an opposite manner. These findings indicate that remodellers target specific nucleosomes at the edge of NFRs, where they regulate ES cell transcriptional programs.

  6. The impact of the HIRA histone chaperone upon global nucleosome architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Csenge; Moore, Karen M; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Kent, Nicholas A; Whitehall, Simon K

    2015-01-01

    HIRA is an evolutionarily conserved histone chaperone that mediates replication-independent nucleosome assembly and is important for a variety of processes such as cell cycle progression, development, and senescence. Here we have used a chromatin sequencing approach to determine the genome-wide contribution of HIRA to nucleosome organization in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Cells lacking HIRA experience a global reduction in nucleosome occupancy at gene sequences, consistent with the proposed role for HIRA in chromatin reassembly behind elongating RNA polymerase II. In addition, we find that at its target promoters, HIRA commonly maintains the full occupancy of the -1 nucleosome. HIRA does not affect global chromatin structure at replication origins or in rDNA repeats but is required for nucleosome occupancy in silent regions of the genome. Nucleosome organization associated with the heterochromatic (dg-dh) repeats located at the centromere is perturbed by loss of HIRA function and furthermore HIRA is required for normal nucleosome occupancy at Tf2 LTR retrotransposons. Overall, our data indicate that HIRA plays an important role in maintaining nucleosome architecture at both euchromatic and heterochromatic loci.

  7. Multivalent Interactions by the Set8 Histone Methyltransferase With Its Nucleosome Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girish, Taverekere S; McGinty, Robert K; Tan, Song

    2016-04-24

    Set8 is the only mammalian monomethyltransferase responsible for H4K20me1, a methyl mark critical for genomic integrity of eukaryotic cells. We present here a structural model for how Set8 uses multivalent interactions to bind and methylate the nucleosome based on crystallographic and solution studies of the Set8/nucleosome complex. Our studies indicate that Set8 employs its i-SET and c-SET domains to engage nucleosomal DNA 1 to 1.5 turns from the nucleosomal dyad and in doing so, it positions the SET domain for catalysis with H4 Lys20. Surprisingly, we find that a basic N-terminal extension to the SET domain plays an even more prominent role in nucleosome binding, possibly by making an arginine anchor interaction with the nucleosome H2A/H2B acidic patch. We further show that proliferating cell nuclear antigen and the nucleosome compete for binding to Set8 through this basic extension, suggesting a mechanism for how nucleosome binding protects Set8 from proliferating cell nuclear antigen-dependent degradation during the cell cycle.

  8. Differential Nucleosome Occupancies across Oct4-Sox2 Binding Sites in Murine Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Sebeson

    Full Text Available The binding sequence for any transcription factor can be found millions of times within a genome, yet only a small fraction of these sequences encode functional transcription factor binding sites. One of the reasons for this dichotomy is that many other factors, such as nucleosomes, compete for binding. To study how the competition between nucleosomes and transcription factors helps determine a functional transcription factor site from a predicted transcription factor site, we compared experimentally-generated in vitro nucleosome occupancy with in vivo nucleosome occupancy and transcription factor binding in murine embryonic stem cells. Using a solution hybridization enrichment technique, we generated a high-resolution nucleosome map from targeted regions of the genome containing predicted sites and functional sites of Oct4/Sox2 regulation. We found that at Pax6 and Nes, which are bivalently poised in stem cells, functional Oct4 and Sox2 sites show high amounts of in vivo nucleosome displacement compared to in vitro. Oct4 and Sox2, which are active, show no significant displacement of in vivo nucleosomes at functional sites, similar to nonfunctional Oct4/Sox2 binding. This study highlights a complex interplay between Oct4 and Sox2 transcription factors and nucleosomes among different target genes, which may result in distinct patterns of stem cell gene regulation.

  9. Differential Nucleosome Occupancies across Oct4-Sox2 Binding Sites in Murine Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebeson, Amy; Xi, Liqun; Zhang, Quanwei; Sigmund, Audrey; Wang, Ji-Ping; Widom, Jonathan; Wang, Xiaozhong

    2015-01-01

    The binding sequence for any transcription factor can be found millions of times within a genome, yet only a small fraction of these sequences encode functional transcription factor binding sites. One of the reasons for this dichotomy is that many other factors, such as nucleosomes, compete for binding. To study how the competition between nucleosomes and transcription factors helps determine a functional transcription factor site from a predicted transcription factor site, we compared experimentally-generated in vitro nucleosome occupancy with in vivo nucleosome occupancy and transcription factor binding in murine embryonic stem cells. Using a solution hybridization enrichment technique, we generated a high-resolution nucleosome map from targeted regions of the genome containing predicted sites and functional sites of Oct4/Sox2 regulation. We found that at Pax6 and Nes, which are bivalently poised in stem cells, functional Oct4 and Sox2 sites show high amounts of in vivo nucleosome displacement compared to in vitro. Oct4 and Sox2, which are active, show no significant displacement of in vivo nucleosomes at functional sites, similar to nonfunctional Oct4/Sox2 binding. This study highlights a complex interplay between Oct4 and Sox2 transcription factors and nucleosomes among different target genes, which may result in distinct patterns of stem cell gene regulation.

  10. Novel nucleosomal particles containing core histones and linker DNA but no histone H1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Hope A; Cui, Feng; Ocampo, Josefina; Burke, Tara L; Nikitina, Tatiana; Nagarajavel, V; Kotomura, Naoe; Zhurkin, Victor B; Clark, David J

    2016-01-29

    Eukaryotic chromosomal DNA is assembled into regularly spaced nucleosomes, which play a central role in gene regulation by determining accessibility of control regions. The nucleosome contains ∼147 bp of DNA wrapped ∼1.7 times around a central core histone octamer. The linker histone, H1, binds both to the nucleosome, sealing the DNA coils, and to the linker DNA between nucleosomes, directing chromatin folding. Micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digests the linker to yield the chromatosome, containing H1 and ∼160 bp, and then converts it to a core particle, containing ∼147 bp and no H1. Sequencing of nucleosomal DNA obtained after MNase digestion (MNase-seq) generates genome-wide nucleosome maps that are important for understanding gene regulation. We present an improved MNase-seq method involving simultaneous digestion with exonuclease III, which removes linker DNA. Remarkably, we discovered two novel intermediate particles containing 154 or 161 bp, corresponding to 7 bp protruding from one or both sides of the nucleosome core. These particles are detected in yeast lacking H1 and in H1-depleted mouse chromatin. They can be reconstituted in vitro using purified core histones and DNA. We propose that these 'proto-chromatosomes' are fundamental chromatin subunits, which include the H1 binding site and influence nucleosome spacing independently of H1.

  11. Characterization of treated porcelain surfaces via dynamic contact angle analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoenix, R D; Shen, C

    1995-01-01

    Successful porcelain repair requires conditioning of porcelain surfaces. Conditioning is intended to facilitate wetting by repair materials and improve interfacial bonding. The objective of this investigation was to determine the effects of selected surface treatments upon the wettability of a representative feldspathic porcelain. Dynamic contact angle analysis and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the effects of such treatments. Standardized porcelain specimens were subjected to the following five treatment regimens: (1) control (no treatment); (2) airborne particle abrasion using 50 microns aluminum oxide; (3) etching with ammonium bifluoride gel; (4) etching with acidulated phosphate fluoride gel; and (5) etching with hydrofluoric acid gel. Following treatment, specimens were cleansed and dried. Advancing contact angles were quantified using dynamic contact angle analysis. Mean values and 95% confidence intervals were (in degrees): control, 63.8 +/- 2.7; ammonium bifluoride, 39.4 +/- 2.0; airborne particle abrading, 29.1 +/- 2.9; acidulated phosphate fluoride, 24.9 +/- 1.7; and hydrofluoric acid, 16.5 +/- 1.2. Significant differences were found between all treatment groups (P = .05). Subsequent scanning electron microscopy examination of treated surfaces indicated lesser contact angles were associated with surfaces displaying deeper and wider grooves. Apparently, the resultant increase in surface area produces increased wettability. It is inferred that an increase in surface area may correspond to enhanced resin-porcelain bonding.

  12. Study on attribute characterization for reservoir dynamic monitoring by seismic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Study on characterizing reservoir parameters dynamic variations by time-lapse seismic attributes is the theoretical basis for effectively distinguishing reservoir parameters variations and conducting time-lapse seismic interpretation,and it is also a key step for time-lapse seismic application in real oil fields. Based on the rock physical model of unconsolidated sandstone,the different effects of oil saturation and effective pressure variations on seismic P-wave and S-wave velocities are calculated and analyzed. Using numerical simulation on decoupled wave equations,the responses of seismic amplitude with different offsets to reservoir oil saturation variations are analyzed,pre-stack time-lapse seismic attributes differences for oil saturation and effective pressure variations of P-P wave and P-S converted wave are calculated,and time-lapse seismic AVO (Amplitude Versus Offset) response rules of P-P wave and P-S converted wave to effective pressure and oil saturation variations are compared. The theoretical modeling study shows that it is feasible to distinguish different reservoir parameters dynamic variations by pre-stack time-lapse seismic information,including pre-stack time-lapse seismic attributes and AVO information,which has great potential in improving time-lapse seismic interpreta-tion precision. It also shows that the time-lapse seismic response mechanism study on objective oil fields is especially important in establishing effective time-lapse seismic data process and interpreta-tion scheme.

  13. Dynamic behavior of micro-diaphragms and its characterized description

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Diaphragm structures with micron scale play a significant role in microtransducers and micro-nano devices, and the performance of these devices depends mainly on the dynamic behaviour of diaphragms. Micro-diaphragms are treated commonly as membranes and in some cases as plates or plates in tension (called TD plates for short), but they also show in many cases the behaviour of plates in tension and supported by air spring (called TDK plates for short). Therefore, it is necessary to perform systematic research on the dynamic behaviour of micro-diaphragms, and establish a characterized mathematical description. This paper focuses on the TDK plates since they possess universality, gives the corresponding basic equations, and then derives analytical solutions of TDK circular plates under clamped and simply supported boundary conditions. This paper also gives a 3D plot representation of characteristic curved surfaces, revealing the transition from the TDK and TD plate to the pure plate or pure membrane behaviour; and further uses the value φ to determine the property of diaphragms. Its two extreme cases, i.e. φ = 0 and φ = ∞ , correspond to pure plate or pure membrane, respectively. Thus, membrane, plate and TD plate can be treated as special cases of TDK plate. In addition, this paper reveals that the presence of air-spring not only enhances the restoring force of diaphragm such that increases its natural frequencies, but also results in the resonance of a dynamic system consisting of diaphragm and air-spring. These analytical and computational results are significant for the understanding of the operation mechanism of capacitive microtransducers and their optimized design.

  14. RSC remodeling of oligo-nucleosomes: an atomic force microscopy study

    CERN Document Server

    Montel, Fabien; Menoni, Hervé; Angelov, Dimitar; Dimitrov, Stéfan; Faivre-Moskalenko, Cendrine

    2010-01-01

    RSC is an essential chromatin remodeling factor that is required for the control of several processes including transcription, repair and replication. The ability of RSC to relocate centrally positioned mononucleosomes at the end of nucleosomal DNA is firmly established, but the data on RSC action on oligo-nucleosomal templates remains still scarce. By using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) imaging, we have quantitatively studied the RSC- induced mobilization of positioned di- and trinucleosomes as well as the directionality of mobilization on mononucleosomal template labeled at one end with streptavidin. AFM imaging showed only a limited set of distinct configurational states for the remodeling products. No stepwise or preferred directionality of the nucleosome motion was observed. Analysis of the corresponding reaction pathways allows deciphering the mechanistic features of RSC-induced nucleosome relocation. The final outcome of RSC remodeling of oligosome templates is the packing of the nucleosomes at the edg...

  15. Electrostatic effect of H1-histone protein binding on nucleosome repeat length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherstvy, Andrey G.; Teif, Vladimir B.

    2014-08-01

    Within a simple biophysical model we describe the effect of electrostatic binding of H1 histone proteins on the nucleosome repeat length in chromatin. The length of wrapped DNA optimizes its binding energy to the histone core and the elastic energy penalty of DNA wrapping. The magnitude of the effect predicted from our model is in agreement with the systematic experimental data on the linear variation of nucleosome repeat lengths with H1/nucleosome ratio (Woodcock C L et al 2006 Chromos. Res. 14 17-25). We compare our model to the data for different cell types and organisms, with a widely varying ratio of bound H1 histones per nucleosome. We underline the importance of this non-specific histone-DNA charge-balance mechanism in regulating the positioning of nucleosomes and the degree of compaction of chromatin fibers in eukaryotic cells.

  16. Drosophila Yemanuclein and HIRA cooperate for de novo assembly of H3.3-containing nucleosomes in the male pronucleus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo A Orsi

    Full Text Available The differentiation of post-meiotic spermatids in animals is characterized by a unique reorganization of their nuclear architecture and chromatin composition. In many species, the formation of sperm nuclei involves the massive replacement of nucleosomes with protamines, followed by a phase of extreme nuclear compaction. At fertilization, the reconstitution of a nucleosome-based paternal chromatin after the removal of protamines requires the deposition of maternally provided histones before the first round of DNA replication. This process exclusively uses the histone H3 variant H3.3 and constitutes a unique case of genome-wide replication-independent (RI de novo chromatin assembly. We had previously shown that the histone H3.3 chaperone HIRA plays a central role for paternal chromatin assembly in Drosophila. Although several conserved HIRA-interacting proteins have been identified from yeast to human, their conservation in Drosophila, as well as their actual implication in this highly peculiar RI nucleosome assembly process, is an open question. Here, we show that Yemanuclein (YEM, the Drosophila member of the Hpc2/Ubinuclein family, is essential for histone deposition in the male pronucleus. yem loss of function alleles affect male pronucleus formation in a way remarkably similar to Hira mutants and abolish RI paternal chromatin assembly. In addition, we demonstrate that HIRA and YEM proteins interact and are mutually dependent for their targeting to the decondensing male pronucleus. Finally, we show that the alternative ATRX/XNP-dependent H3.3 deposition pathway is not involved in paternal chromatin assembly, thus underlining the specific implication of the HIRA/YEM complex for this essential step of zygote formation.

  17. Characterization of dynamic loads on the LMFBR rotating shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rotating shields structure is a potential weak point of some current designs of primary containment against postulated whole core explosions. The calculation of the effect of transient loads on this structure, resulting from such an explosion, is therefore important in developing a safety case. The transient loads are usually calculated by computer codes such as ASTARTE, SEURBNUK, REXCO or ICECO and the effect of these loads on the structure by a suitable finite element code. Such procedure can be lengthly and costly. The present paper proposed a procedure which allows the consequences of changes in the transient loads, resulting from design changes for example, to be quickly and simply gauged. The load-impulse method of characterizing dynamic response of a structural system is well established. Provided loads with a similar temporal variation are compared, it can be shown that the dynamic response depends on only two features of the load, an average load and a time intregrated load or impulse. The scope of this approach has been extended by Youngdahl who has shown, for structures which deform in a rigid-plastic manner, that complex laoding histories can be equated to a rectangular form of loading, in a precise manner for simple structures and in an approximate manner for more complicated structures. This paper proposes that the failure characteristics of the rotating shields for which extensive plastic deformation is involved, be calculated for rectangular type loadings. The complex transient loadings calculated for various explosions and various changes in the primary vessel design can then be reduced to an equivalent rectangular form and the consequencial response of the shields structure deduced. (orig.)

  18. The Pioneer Transcription Factor FoxA Maintains an Accessible Nucleosome Configuration at Enhancers for Tissue-Specific Gene Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwafuchi-Doi, Makiko; Donahue, Greg; Kakumanu, Akshay; Watts, Jason A; Mahony, Shaun; Pugh, B Franklin; Lee, Dolim; Kaestner, Klaus H; Zaret, Kenneth S

    2016-04-01

    Nuclear DNA wraps around core histones to form nucleosomes, which restricts the binding of transcription factors to gene regulatory sequences. Pioneer transcription factors can bind DNA sites on nucleosomes and initiate gene regulatory events, often leading to the local opening of chromatin. However, the nucleosomal configuration of open chromatin and the basis for its regulation is unclear. We combined low and high levels of micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion along with core histone mapping to assess the nucleosomal configuration at enhancers and promoters in mouse liver. We find that MNase-accessible nucleosomes, bound by transcription factors, are retained more at liver-specific enhancers than at promoters and ubiquitous enhancers. The pioneer factor FoxA displaces linker histone H1, thereby keeping enhancer nucleosomes accessible in chromatin and allowing other liver-specific transcription factors to bind and stimulate transcription. Thus, nucleosomes are not exclusively repressive to gene regulation when they are retained with, and exposed by, pioneer factors.

  19. CENP-C directs a structural transition of CENP-A nucleosomes mainly through sliding of DNA gyres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Samantha J; Lee, Jaehyoun; Sekulic, Nikolina; Sennett, Michael A; Lee, Tae-Hee; Black, Ben E

    2016-03-01

    The histone H3 variant CENP-A is incorporated into nucleosomes that mark centromere location. We have recently reported that CENP-A nucleosomes, compared with their H3 counterparts, confer an altered nucleosome shape. Here, using a single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) approach with recombinant human histones and centromere DNA, we found that the nucleosome shape change directed by CENP-A is dominated by lateral passing of two DNA gyres (gyre sliding). A nonhistone centromere protein, CENP-C, binds and reshapes the nucleosome, sliding the DNA gyres back to positions similar to those in canonical nucleosomes containing conventional histone H3. The model that we generated to explain the CENP-A-nucleosome transition provides an example of a shape change imposed by external binding proteins and has notable implications for understanding of the epigenetic basis of the faithful inheritance of centromere location on chromosomes.

  20. Experimental characterization of collision avoidance in pedestrian dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Daniel R.; Negri, Pablo A.; Bruno, Luciana

    2016-08-01

    In the present paper, the avoidance behavior of pedestrians was characterized by controlled experiments. Several conflict situations were studied considering different flow rates and group sizes in crossing and head-on configurations. Pedestrians were recorded from above, and individual two-dimensional trajectories of their displacement were recovered after image processing. Lateral swaying amplitude and step lengths were measured for free pedestrians, obtaining similar values to the ones reported in the literature. Minimum avoidance distances were computed in two-pedestrian experiments. In the case of one pedestrian dodging an arrested one, the avoidance distance did not depend on the relative orientation of the still pedestrian with respect to the direction of motion of the first. When both pedestrians were moving, the avoidance distance in a perpendicular encounter was longer than the one obtained during a head-on approach. It was found that the mean curvature of the trajectories was linearly anticorrelated with the mean speed. Furthermore, two common avoidance maneuvers, stopping and steering, were defined from the analysis of the acceleration and curvature in single trajectories. Interestingly, it was more probable to observe steering events than stopping ones, also the probability of simultaneous steering and stopping occurrences was negligible. The results obtained in this paper can be used to validate and calibrate pedestrian dynamics models.

  1. Dynamic Propagation Channel Characterization and Modeling for Human Body Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the first characterization and modeling of dynamic propagation channels for human body communication (HBC. In-situ experiments were performed using customized transceivers in an anechoic chamber. Three HBC propagation channels, i.e., from right leg to left leg, from right hand to left hand and from right hand to left leg, were investigated under thirty-three motion scenarios. Snapshots of data (2,800,000 were acquired from five volunteers. Various path gains caused by different locations and movements were quantified and the statistical distributions were estimated. In general, for a given reference threshold è = −10 dB, the maximum average level crossing rate of the HBC was approximately 1.99 Hz, the maximum average fade time was 59.4 ms, and the percentage of bad channel duration time was less than 4.16%. The HBC exhibited a fade depth of −4 dB at 90% complementary cumulative probability. The statistical parameters were observed to be centered for each propagation channel. Subsequently a Fritchman model was implemented to estimate the burst characteristics of the on-body fading. It was concluded that the HBC is motion-insensitive, which is sufficient for reliable communication link during motions, and therefore it has great potential for body sensor/area networks.

  2. Characterization of Affective States by Pupillary Dynamics and Autonomic Correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco eOnorati

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available With the recent advent of new recording devices and an easier access to signal processing tools, researchers are increasingly exploring and studying the Pupil Dilation (PD signal. Recently, numerous studies pointed out the relations between PD dynamics and psychophysiological states. Although it is well known that PD is controlled by the Autonomic Nervous System (ANS, and ANS responses are related to emotional events/stimuli, the relationship between emotional states and PD is still an open issue. The aim of this study is to define the statistical properties of the PD signal, to understand its relation with ANS correlates such as Heart Rate Variability (HRV and respiration, and to explore if PD could provide information for the evaluation of the psychophysiological response of ANS to affective triggering events. ECG, respiration (RESP and Pupil Dilation (PD data from 13 normal subjects were recorded during a memory recall paradigm, and processed with spectral and cross-spectral analysis. Our results demonstrate that variability indices extracted from fast PD oscillations, not observable through standard cardiorespiratory identification in the frequency domain, would be able to discern psychophysiological responses elicited by basic emotional stimuli. A strong linear coupling was found between the variables, due to the influence of RESP on both PD and HRV within the High Frequency (HF band, from 0.15 and 0.45 Hz. Most importantly, our results point at PD features as possible candidates for characterizing basic emotional stimuli.

  3. Genome-wide chromatin remodeling identified at GC-rich long nucleosome-free regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Schwarzbauer

    Full Text Available To gain deeper insights into principles of cell biology, it is essential to understand how cells reorganize their genomes by chromatin remodeling. We analyzed chromatin remodeling on next generation sequencing data from resting and activated T cells to determine a whole-genome chromatin remodeling landscape. We consider chromatin remodeling in terms of nucleosome repositioning which can be observed most robustly in long nucleosome-free regions (LNFRs that are occupied by nucleosomes in another cell state. We found that LNFR sequences are either AT-rich or GC-rich, where nucleosome repositioning was observed much more prominently in GC-rich LNFRs - a considerable proportion of them outside promoter regions. Using support vector machines with string kernels, we identified a GC-rich DNA sequence pattern indicating loci of nucleosome repositioning in resting T cells. This pattern appears to be also typical for CpG islands. We found out that nucleosome repositioning in GC-rich LNFRs is indeed associated with CpG islands and with binding sites of the CpG-island-binding ZF-CXXC proteins KDM2A and CFP1. That this association occurs prominently inside and also prominently outside of promoter regions hints at a mechanism governing nucleosome repositioning that acts on a whole-genome scale.

  4. A high-resolution map of nucleosome positioning on a fission yeast centromere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jun S; Liu, Xingkun; Liu, X Shirley; He, Xiangwei

    2008-07-01

    A key element for defining the centromere identity is the incorporation of a specific histone H3, CENPA, known as Cnp1p in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Previous studies have suggested that functional S. pombe centromeres lack regularly positioned nucleosomes and may involve chromatin remodeling as a key step of kinetochore assembly. We used tiling microarrays to show that nucleosomes are, in fact, positioned in regular intervals in the core of centromere 2, providing the first high-resolution map of regional centromere chromatin. Nucleosome locations are not disrupted by mutations in kinetochore protein genes cnp1, mis18, mis12, nuf2, mal2; overexpression of cnp1; or the deletion of ams2, which encodes a GATA-like factor participating in CENPA incorporation. Bioinformatics analysis of the centromere sequence indicates certain enriched motifs in linker regions between nucleosomes and reveals a sequence bias in nucleosome positioning. In addition, sequence analysis of nucleosome-free regions identifies novel binding sites of Ams2p. We conclude that centromeric nucleosome positions are stable and may be derived from the underlying DNA sequence. PMID:18411404

  5. RSC remodeling of oligo-nucleosomes: an atomic force microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montel, Fabien; Castelnovo, Martin; Menoni, Hervé; Angelov, Dimitar; Dimitrov, Stefan; Faivre-Moskalenko, Cendrine

    2011-04-01

    The 'remodels structure of chromatin' (RSC) complex is an essential chromatin remodeling factor that is required for the control of several processes including transcription, repair and replication. The ability of RSC to relocate centrally positioned mononucleosomes at the end of nucleosomal DNA is firmly established, but the data on RSC action on oligo-nucleosomal templates remains still scarce. By using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging, we have quantitatively studied the RSC-induced mobilization of positioned di- and trinucleosomes as well as the directionality of mobilization on mononucleosomal template labeled at one end with streptavidin. AFM imaging showed only a limited set of distinct configurational states for the remodeling products. No stepwise or preferred directionality of the nucleosome motion was observed. Analysis of the corresponding reaction pathways allows deciphering the mechanistic features of RSC-induced nucleosome relocation. The final outcome of RSC remodeling of oligosome templates is the packing of the nucleosomes at the edge of the template, providing large stretches of DNA depleted of nucleosomes. This feature of RSC may be used by the cell to overcome the barrier imposed by the presence of nucleosomes.

  6. Evaluation of the protective capabilities of nucleosome STRs obtained by large-scale sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chunnan; Yang, Yadong; Yan, Jiangwei; Fu, Lihong; Zhang, Xiaojing; Cong, Bin; Li, Shujin

    2015-07-01

    Partial DNA profiles are often obtained from degraded forensic samples and are hard to analyze and interpret. With in-depth studies on degraded DNA, an increasing number of forensic scientists have focused on the intrinsic structural properties of DNA. In theory, nucleosomes offer protection to the bound DNA by limiting access to enzymes. In our study, we performed large-scale DNA sequencing on nucleosome core DNA of human leucocytes. Five nucleosome short tandem repeats (STRs) were selected (including three forensic common STRs (i.e. TPOX, TH01, and D10S1248) and two unpublished STRs (i.e. AC012568.7 and AC007160.3)). We performed a population genetic investigation and forensic genetic statistical analysis of these two unpublished loci on 108 healthy unrelated individuals of the HeBei Han population in China. We estimated the protective capabilities of five selected nucleosome loci and MiniFiler™ loci with artificial degraded DNA and case samples. We also analyzed differences between sequencing results and software predicted results. Our findings showed that nucleosome STRs were more likely to be detected than MiniFiler™ loci. They were well protected from degradation by nucleosomes and could be candidates for further nucleosome multiplex construction, which would increase the chances of obtaining a better balanced profile with fewer allelic drop-outs.

  7. Comparative Genomics Reveals Chd1 as a Determinant of Nucleosome Spacing in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Amanda L; Rando, Oliver J

    2015-07-14

    Packaging of genomic DNA into nucleosomes is nearly universally conserved in eukaryotes, and many features of the nucleosome landscape are quite conserved. Nonetheless, quantitative aspects of nucleosome packaging differ between species because, for example, the average length of linker DNA between nucleosomes can differ significantly even between closely related species. We recently showed that the difference in nucleosome spacing between two Hemiascomycete species-Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis-is established by trans-acting factors rather than being encoded in cis in the DNA sequence. Here, we generated several S. cerevisiae strains in which endogenous copies of candidate nucleosome spacing factors are deleted and replaced with the orthologous factors from K. lactis. We find no change in nucleosome spacing in such strains in which H1 or Isw1 complexes are swapped. In contrast, the K. lactis gene encoding the ATP-dependent remodeler Chd1 was found to direct longer internucleosomal spacing in S. cerevisiae, establishing that this remodeler is partially responsible for the relatively long internucleosomal spacing observed in K. lactis. By analyzing several chimeric proteins, we find that sequence differences that contribute to the spacing activity of this remodeler are dispersed throughout the coding sequence, but that the strongest spacing effect is linked to the understudied N-terminal end of Chd1. Taken together, our data find a role for sequence evolution of a chromatin remodeler in establishing quantitative aspects of the chromatin landscape in a species-specific manner.

  8. FSAP-mediated nucleosome release from late apoptotic cells is inhibited by autoantibodies present in SLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsman, Gerben; Stephan, Femke; de Leeuw, Karina; Bulder, Ingrid; Ruinard, Jessica T; de Jong, Jan; Westra, Johanna; Bultink, Irene E M; Voskuyl, Alexandre E; Aarden, Lucien A; Luken, Brenda M; Kallenberg, Cees G M; Zeerleder, Sacha

    2016-03-01

    Inefficient clearance of apoptotic cells and the subsequent exposure of the immune system to nuclear contents are crucially involved in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Factor VII-activating protease (FSAP) is activated in serum upon contact with dead cells, and releases nucleosomes from late apoptotic cells into the extracellular environment. We investigated whether FSAP-mediated nucleosome release from late apoptotic cells is affected in SLE patients. Nucleosome release in sera of 27 SLE patients and 30 healthy controls was investigated by incubating late apoptotic Jurkat cells with serum and analyzing the remaining DNA content by flow cytometry. We found that nucleosome release in sera of SLE patients with high disease activity was significantly decreased when compared with that in SLE sera obtained during low disease activity or from healthy individuals. Upon removal of IgG/IgM antibodies from SLE sera, nucleosome release was restored. Similarly, monoclonal antinuclear antibodies inhibited nucleosome release in healthy donor serum or by plasma-purified FSAP. This inhibition was lost when Fab fragments were used, suggesting that antigen cross-linking is involved. In conclusion, FSAP-mediated nucleosome release from late apoptotic cells is greatly impaired in SLE patient sera, possibly hampering the clearance of these cells and thereby propagating inflammation.

  9. DNA sequence templates adjacent nucleosome and ORC sites at gene amplification origins in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Zimmer, Kurt; Rusch, Douglas B; Paranjape, Neha; Podicheti, Ram; Tang, Haixu; Calvi, Brian R

    2015-10-15

    Eukaryotic origins of DNA replication are bound by the origin recognition complex (ORC), which scaffolds assembly of a pre-replicative complex (pre-RC) that is then activated to initiate replication. Both pre-RC assembly and activation are strongly influenced by developmental changes to the epigenome, but molecular mechanisms remain incompletely defined. We have been examining the activation of origins responsible for developmental gene amplification in Drosophila. At a specific time in oogenesis, somatic follicle cells transition from genomic replication to a locus-specific replication from six amplicon origins. Previous evidence indicated that these amplicon origins are activated by nucleosome acetylation, but how this affects origin chromatin is unknown. Here, we examine nucleosome position in follicle cells using micrococcal nuclease digestion with Ilumina sequencing. The results indicate that ORC binding sites and other essential origin sequences are nucleosome-depleted regions (NDRs). Nucleosome position at the amplicons was highly similar among developmental stages during which ORC is or is not bound, indicating that being an NDR is not sufficient to specify ORC binding. Importantly, the data suggest that nucleosomes and ORC have opposite preferences for DNA sequence and structure. We propose that nucleosome hyperacetylation promotes pre-RC assembly onto adjacent DNA sequences that are disfavored by nucleosomes but favored by ORC.

  10. Selective removal of promoter nucleosomes by the RSC chromatin-remodeling complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorch, Yahli; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Boeger, Hinrich; Maier-Davis, Barbara; Kornberg, Roger D

    2011-08-01

    Purified chromatin rings, excised from the PHO5 locus of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in transcriptionally repressed and activated states, were remodeled with RSC and ATP. Nucleosomes were translocated, and those originating on the promoter of repressed rings were removed, whereas those originating on the open reading frame (ORF) were retained. Treatment of the repressed rings with histone deacetylase diminished the removal of promoter nucleosomes. These findings point to a principle of promoter chromatin remodeling for transcription, namely that promoter specificity resides primarily in the nucleosomes rather than in the remodeling complex that acts upon them.

  11. Design of synthetic yeast promoters via tuning of nucleosome architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Kathleen A; Crook, Nathan C; Karim, Ashty S; Gupta, Akash; Wagman, Allison M; Alper, Hal S

    2014-01-01

    Model-based design of biological parts is a critical goal of synthetic biology, especially for eukaryotes. Here we demonstrate that nucleosome architecture can have a role in defining yeast promoter activity and utilize a computationally-guided approach that can enable both the redesign of endogenous promoter sequences and the de novo design of synthetic promoters. Initially, we use our approach to reprogram native promoters for increased expression and evaluate their performance in various genetic contexts. Increases in expression ranging from 1.5- to nearly 6-fold in a plasmid-based system and up to 16-fold in a genomic context were obtained. Next, we demonstrate that, in a single design cycle, it is possible to create functional, purely synthetic yeast promoters that achieve substantial expression levels (within the top sixth percentile among native yeast promoters). In doing so, this work establishes a unique DNA-level specification of promoter activity and demonstrates predictive design of synthetic parts. PMID:24862902

  12. Differential Dynamic Microscopy to characterize Brownian motion and bacteria motility

    OpenAIRE

    Germain, David; Leocmach, Mathieu; Gibaud, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a lab work module where we teach undergraduate students how to quantify the dynamics of a suspension of microscopic particles, measuring and analyzing the motion of those particles at the individual level or as a group. Differential Dynamic Microscopy (DDM) is a relatively recent technique that precisely does that and constitutes an alternative method to more classical techniques such as dynamics light scattering (DLS) or video particle tracking (VPT). DDM consists in imagin...

  13. A RSC/nucleosome complex determines chromatin architecture and facilitates activator binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floer, Monique; Wang, Xin; Prabhu, Vidya; Berrozpe, Georgina; Narayan, Santosh; Spagna, Dan; Alvarez, David; Kendall, Jude; Krasnitz, Alexander; Stepansky, Asya; Hicks, James; Bryant, Gene O; Ptashne, Mark

    2010-04-30

    How is chromatin architecture established and what role does it play in transcription? We show that the yeast regulatory locus UASg bears, in addition to binding sites for the activator Gal4, sites bound by the RSC complex. RSC positions a nucleosome, evidently partially unwound, in a structure that facilitates Gal4 binding to its sites. The complex comprises a barrier that imposes characteristic features of chromatin architecture. In the absence of RSC, ordinary nucleosomes encroach over the UASg and compete with Gal4 for binding. Taken with our previous work, the results show that both prior to and following induction, specific DNA-binding proteins are the predominant determinants of chromatin architecture at the GAL1/10 genes. RSC/nucleosome complexes are also found scattered around the yeast genome. Higher eukaryotic RSC lacks the specific DNA-binding determinants found on yeast RSC, and evidently Gal4 works in those organisms despite whatever obstacle broadly positioned nucleosomes present.

  14. Influence of DNA methylation on positioning and DNA flexibility of nucleosomes with pericentric satellite DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osakabe, Akihisa; Adachi, Fumiya; Arimura, Yasuhiro; Maehara, Kazumitsu; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2015-10-01

    DNA methylation occurs on CpG sites and is important to form pericentric heterochromatin domains. The satellite 2 sequence, containing seven CpG sites, is located in the pericentric region of human chromosome 1 and is highly methylated in normal cells. In contrast, the satellite 2 region is reportedly hypomethylated in cancer cells, suggesting that the methylation status may affect the chromatin structure around the pericentric regions in tumours. In this study, we mapped the nucleosome positioning on the satellite 2 sequence in vitro and found that DNA methylation modestly affects the distribution of the nucleosome positioning. The micrococcal nuclease assay revealed that the DNA end flexibility of the nucleosomes changes, depending on the DNA methylation status. However, the structures and thermal stabilities of the nucleosomes are unaffected by DNA methylation. These findings provide new information to understand how DNA methylation functions in regulating pericentric heterochromatin formation and maintenance in normal and malignant cells.

  15. Genome-wide nucleosome occupancy and DNA methylation profiling of four human cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron L. Statham

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation and nucleosome positioning are two key mechanisms that contribute to the epigenetic control of gene expression. During carcinogenesis, the expression of many genes is altered alongside extensive changes in the epigenome, with repressed genes often being associated with local DNA hypermethylation and gain of nucleosomes at their promoters. However the spectrum of alterations that occur at distal regulatory regions has not been extensively studied. To address this we used Nucleosome Occupancy and Methylation sequencing (NOMe-seq to compare the genome-wide DNA methylation and nucleosome occupancy profiles between normal and cancer cell line models of the breast and prostate. Here we describe the bioinformatic pipeline and methods that we developed for the processing and analysis of the NOMe-seq data published by (Taberlay et al., 2014 [1] and deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus with accession GSE57498.

  16. nuMap:A Web Platform for Accurate Prediction of Nucleosome Positioning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bader A Alharbi; Thamir H Alshammari; Nathan L Felton; Victor B Zhurkin; Feng Cui

    2014-01-01

    Nucleosome positioning is critical for gene expression and of major biological interest. The high cost of experimentally mapping nucleosomal arrangement signifies the need for computational approaches to predict nucleosome positions at high resolution. Here, we present a web-based application to fulfill this need by implementing two models, YR and W/S schemes, for the translational and rotational positioning of nucleosomes, respectively. Our methods are based on sequence-dependent anisotropic bending that dictates how DNA is wrapped around a histone octamer. This application allows users to specify a number of options such as schemes and param-eters for threading calculation and provides multiple layout formats. The nuMap is implemented in Java/Perl/MySQL and is freely available for public use at http://numap.rit.edu. The user manual, implementation notes, description of the methodology and examples are available at the site.

  17. Regulation of nucleosome landscape and transcription factor targeting at tissue-specific enhancers by BRG1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Gangqing; Schones, Dustin E.; Cui, Kairong; Ybarra, River; Northrup, Daniel; Tang, Qingsong; Gattinoni, Luca; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Huang, Suming; Zhao, Keji

    2011-01-01

    Enhancers of transcription activate transcription via binding of sequence-specific transcription factors to their target sites in chromatin. In this report, we identify GATA1-bound distal sites genome-wide and find a global reorganization of the nucleosomes at these potential enhancers during differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to erythrocytes. We show that the catalytic subunit BRG1 of BAF complexes localizes to these distal sites during differentiation and generates a longer nucleosome linker region surrounding the GATA1 sites by shifting the flanking nucleosomes away. Intriguingly, we find that the nucleosome shifting specifically facilitates binding of TAL1 but not GATA1 and is linked to subsequent transcriptional regulation of target genes. PMID:21795385

  18. Reassembly of nucleosomes at the MLH1 promoter initiates resilencing following decitabine exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke B Hesson

    Full Text Available Hypomethylating agents reactivate tumor suppressor genes that are epigenetically silenced in cancer. Inevitably these genes are resilenced, leading to drug resistance. Using the MLH1 tumor suppressor gene as a model, we showed that decitabine-induced re-expression was dependent upon demethylation and eviction of promoter nucleosomes. Following decitabine withdrawal, MLH1 was rapidly resilenced despite persistent promoter demethylation. Single molecule analysis at multiple time points showed that gene resilencing was initiated by nucleosome reassembly on demethylated DNA and only then was followed by remethylation and stable silencing. Taken together, these data establish the importance of nucleosome positioning in mediating resilencing of drug-induced gene reactivation and suggest a role for therapeutic targeting of nucleosome assembly as a mechanism to overcome drug resistance.

  19. A high-resolution map of nucleosome positioning on a fission yeast centromere

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Jun S.; Liu, Xingkun; Liu, X. Shirley; He, Xiangwei

    2008-01-01

    A key element for defining the centromere identity is the incorporation of a specific histone H3, CENPA, known as Cnp1p in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Previous studies have suggested that functional S. pombe centromeres lack regularly positioned nucleosomes and may involve chromatin remodeling as a key step of kinetochore assembly. We used tiling microarrays to show that nucleosomes are, in fact, positioned in regular intervals in the core of centromere 2, providing the first high-resolution m...

  20. A role for FACT in repopulation of nucleosomes at inducible genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren P Voth

    Full Text Available Xenobiotic drugs induce Pleiotropic Drug Resistance (PDR genes via the orthologous Pdr1/Pdr3 transcription activators. We previously identified the Mediator transcription co-activator complex as a key target of Pdr1 orthologs and demonstrated that Pdr1 interacts directly with the Gal11/Med15 subunit of the Mediator complex. Based on an interaction between Pdr1 and the FACT complex, we show that strains with spt16 or pob3 mutations are sensitive to xenobiotic drugs and display diminished PDR gene induction. Although FACT acts during the activation of some genes by assisting in the nucleosomes eviction at promoters, PDR promoters already contain nucleosome-depleted regions (NDRs before induction. To determine the function of FACT at PDR genes, we examined the kinetics of RNA accumulation and changes in nucleosome occupancy following exposure to a xenobiotic drug in wild type and FACT mutant yeast strains. In the presence of normal FACT, PDR genes are transcribed within 5 minutes of xenobiotic stimulation and transcription returns to basal levels by 30-40 min. Nucleosomes are constitutively depleted in the promoter regions, are lost from the open reading frames during transcription, and the ORFs are wholly repopulated with nucleosomes as transcription ceases. While FACT mutations cause minor delays in activation of PDR genes, much more pronounced and significant defects in nucleosome repopulation in the ORFs are observed in FACT mutants upon transcription termination. FACT therefore has a major role in nucleosome redeposition following cessation of transcription at the PDR genes, the opposite of its better-known function in nucleosome disassembly.

  1. Serum nucleosomes during neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with cervical cancer. Predictive and prognostic significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cetina Lucely

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been shown that free DNA circulates in serum plasma of patients with cancer and that at least part is present in the form of oligo- and monucleosomes, a marker of cell death. Preliminary data has shown a good correlation between decrease of nucleosomes with response and prognosis. Here, we performed pre- and post-chemotherapy determinations of serum nucleosomes with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA method in a group of patients with cervical cancer receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods From December 2000 to June 2001, 41 patients with cervical cancer staged as FIGO stages IB2-IIIB received three 21-day courses of carboplatin and paclitaxel, both administered at day 1; then, patients underwent radical hysterectomy. Nucleosomes were measured the day before (baseline, at day seven of the first course and day seven of the third course of chemotherapy. Values of nucleosomes were analyzed with regard to pathologic response and to time to progression-free and overall survival. Results All patients completed chemotherapy, were evaluable for pathologic response, and had nucleosome levels determined. At a mean follow-up of 23 months (range, 7–26 months, projected progression time and overall survival were 80.3 and 80.4%, respectively. Mean differential values of nucleosomes were lower in the third course as compared with the first course (p >0.001. The decrease in the third course correlated with pathologic response (p = 0.041. Survival analysis showed a statistically significant, better progression-free and survival time in patients who showed lower levels at the third course (p = 0.0243 and p = 0.0260, respectively. Cox regression analysis demonstrated that nucleosome increase in the third course increased risk of death to 6.86 (95% confidence interval [CI 95%], 0.84–56.0. Conclusion Serum nucleosomes may have a predictive role for response and prognostic significance in patients with cervical cancer

  2. Characterization of groundwater dynamics in landslides in varved clays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Spek, J.E.; Bogaard, T.A.; Bakker, M.

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater dynamics may play a significant role in landslides. A detailed model is developed of the groundwater dynamics in landslides in varved clays in the Trièves area in the French Alps. The varved clays consist of a sequence of alternating silt and clay layers, covered by a colluvium layer and

  3. Characterization of groundwater dynamics in landslides in varved clays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Spek, J.E.; Bogaard, T.A.; Bakker, M.

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater dynamics may play a significant role in landslides. A detailed model is developed of the groundwater dynamics in landslides in varved clays in the Trieves area in the French Alps. The varved clays consist of a sequence of alternating silt and clay layers, covered by a colluvium layer and

  4. Barriers and silencers: a theoretical toolkit for control and containment of nucleosome-based epigenetic states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Ian B; Sneppen, Kim

    2011-12-01

    Positive feedback in nucleosome modification has been proposed to allow large chromatin regions to exist stably and heritably in distinct expression states. However, modeling has shown that such epigenetic bistability requires that modifying enzymes recruited by nucleosomes are active on distant nucleosomes, potentially allowing uncontrollable spreading of modification. By modeling the silencing of mating-type loci in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we show that a modification reaction that combines a long-range component and a locally acting component can provide bistability and can be blocked by simple barriers that interrupt the nucleosome chain. We find that robust containment of the silenced region could be achieved by the presence of a number of weak simple barriers in the surrounding chromatin and a limited capacity of the positive feedback reaction. In addition, we show that the state of the silenced region can be regulated by silencer elements acting only on neighboring nucleosomes. Thus, a relatively simple set of nucleosome-modifying enzymes and recognition domains is all that is needed to make chromatin-based epigenetics useful and safe. PMID:22037584

  5. RSC-dependent constructive and destructive interference between opposing arrays of phased nucleosomes in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguli, Dwaipayan; Chereji, Răzvan V; Iben, James R; Cole, Hope A; Clark, David J

    2014-10-01

    RSC and SWI/SNF are related ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling machines that move nucleosomes, regulating access to DNA. We addressed their roles in nucleosome phasing relative to transcription start sites in yeast. SWI/SNF has no effect on phasing at the global level. In contrast, RSC depletion results in global nucleosome repositioning: Both upstream and downstream nucleosomal arrays shift toward the nucleosome-depleted region (NDR), with no change in spacing, resulting in a narrower and partly filled NDR. The global picture of RSC-depleted chromatin represents the average of a range of chromatin structures, with most genes showing a shift of the +1 or the -1 nucleosome into the NDR. Using RSC ChIP data reported by others, we show that RSC occupancy is highest on the coding regions of heavily transcribed genes, though not at their NDRs. We propose that RSC has a role in restoring chromatin structure after transcription. Analysis of gene pairs in different orientations demonstrates that phasing patterns reflect competition between phasing signals emanating from neighboring NDRs. These signals may be in phase, resulting in constructive interference and a regular array, or out of phase, resulting in destructive interference and fuzzy positioning. We propose a modified barrier model, in which a stable complex located at the NDR acts as a bidirectional phasing barrier. In RSC-depleted cells, this barrier has a smaller footprint, resulting in narrower NDRs. Thus, RSC plays a critical role in organizing yeast chromatin.

  6. Reproducibility and consistency of in vitro nucleosome reconstitutions demonstrated by invitrosome isolation and sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colton E Kempton

    Full Text Available Nucleosomes and their positions in the eukaryotic genome play an important role in regulating gene expression by influencing accessibility to DNA. Many factors influence a nucleosome's final position in the chromatin landscape including the underlying genomic sequence. One of the primary reasons for performing in vitro nucleosome reconstitution experiments is to identify how the underlying DNA sequence will influence a nucleosome's position in the absence of other compounding cellular factors. However, concerns have been raised about the reproducibility of data generated from these kinds of experiments. Here we present data for in vitro nucleosome reconstitution experiments performed on linear plasmid DNA that demonstrate that, when coverage is deep enough, these reconstitution experiments are exquisitely reproducible and highly consistent. Our data also suggests that a coverage depth of 35X be maintained for maximal confidence when assaying nucleosome positions, but lower coverage levels may be generally sufficient. These coverage depth recommendations are sufficient in the experimental system and conditions used in this study, but may vary depending on the exact parameters used in other systems.

  7. GAA triplet-repeats cause nucleosome depletion in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongyu; Xing, Yongqiang; Liu, Guoqing; Chen, Ping; Zhao, Xiujuan; Li, Guohong; Cai, Lu

    2015-08-01

    Although there have been many investigations into how trinucleotide repeats affect nucleosome formation and local chromatin structure, the nucleosome positioning of GAA triplet-repeats in the human genome has remained elusive. In this work, the nucleosome occupancy around GAA triplet-repeats across the human genome was computed statistically. The results showed a nucleosome-depleted region in the vicinity of GAA triplet-repeats in activated and resting CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, the A-tract was frequently adjacent to the upstream region of GAA triplet-repeats and could enhance the depletion surrounding GAA triplet-repeats. In vitro chromatin reconstitution assays with GAA-containing plasmids also demonstrated that the inserted GAA triplet-repeats destabilized the ability of recombinant plasmids to assemble nucleosomes. Our results suggested that GAA triplet-repeats have lower affinity to histones and can change local nucleosome positioning. These findings may be helpful for understanding the mechanism of Friedreich's ataxia, which is associated with GAA triplet-repeats at the chromatin level.

  8. Relationship between nucleosome positioning and progesterone-induced alternative splicing in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannone, Camilla; Pohl, Andy; Papasaikas, Panagiotis; Soronellas, Daniel; Vicent, Guillermo P; Beato, Miguel; ValcáRcel, Juan

    2015-03-01

    Splicing of mRNA precursors can occur cotranscriptionally and it has been proposed that chromatin structure influences splice site recognition and regulation. Here we have systematically explored potential links between nucleosome positioning and alternative splicing regulation upon progesterone stimulation of breast cancer cells. We confirm preferential nucleosome positioning in exons and report four distinct profiles of nucleosome density around alternatively spliced exons, with RNA polymerase II accumulation closely following nucleosome positioning. Hormone stimulation induces switches between profile classes, correlating with a subset of alternative splicing changes. Hormone-induced exon inclusion often correlates with higher nucleosome occupancy at the exon or the preceding intronic region and with higher RNA polymerase II accumulation. In contrast, exons skipped upon hormone stimulation display low nucleosome densities even before hormone treatment, suggesting that chromatin structure primes alternative splicing regulation. Skipped exons frequently harbor binding sites for hnRNP AB, a hormone-induced splicing regulator whose knock down prevents some hormone-induced skipping events. Collectively, our results argue that a variety of chromatin architecture mechanisms can influence alternative splicing decisions.

  9. AFM studies in diverse ionic environments of nucleosomes reconstituted on the 601 positioning sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarov, Igor; Chekliarova, Iana; Rychkov, Georgy; Ilatovskiy, Andrey V; Crane-Robinson, Colyn; Tomilin, Alexey

    2016-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study mononucleosomes reconstituted from a DNA duplex of 353 bp containing the strong 601 octamer positioning sequence, together with recombinant human core histone octamers. Three parameters were measured: 1) the length of DNA wrapped around the core histones; 2) the number of superhelical turns, calculated from the total angle through which the DNA is bent, and 3) the volume of the DNA-histone core. This approach allowed us to define in detail the structural diversity of nucleosomes caused by disassembly of the octasome to form subnucleosomal structures containing hexasomes, tetrasomes and disomes. At low ionic strength (TE buffer) and in the presence of physiological concentrations of monovalent cations, the majority of the particles were subnucleosomal, but physiological concentrations of bivalent cations resulted in about half of the nucleosomes being canonical octasomes in which the exiting DNA duplexes cross orthogonally. The dominance of this last species explains why bivalent but not monovalent cations can induce the initial step towards compaction and convergence of neighboring nucleosomes in nucleosomal arrays to form the chromatin fiber in the absence of linker histone. The observed nucleosome structural diversity may reflect the functional plasticity of nucleosomes under physiological conditions.

  10. A 1-dimensional statistical mechanics model for nucleosome positioning on genomic DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Tesoro, S; Morozov, A N; Sulaiman, N; Marenduzzo, D

    2015-01-01

    The first level of folding of DNA in eukaryotes is provided by the so called '10nm chromatin fibre', where DNA wraps around histone proteins (approx. 10 nm in size) to form nucleosomes, which go on to create a zig zagging 'bead on a string' structure. In this work we present a one dimensional statistical mechanics model to study nucleosome positioning within one such 10 nm fibre. We consider both the case of homogeneous DNA, where the problem can be mapped to a Tonks gas, and that of genomic sheep DNA, where our modelling is informed by high-resolution nucleosome positioning data. First, we consider the simple, analytically solvable, case where nucleosomes are assumed to be point like. Then, we perform numerical simulations to gauge the effect of their finite size on the nucleosomal distribution probabilities. Finally, we compare nucleosome distributions and simulated nuclease digestion patterns for the two cases (homogeneous and sheep DNA), thereby providing testable predictions of the effect of sequence on ...

  11. Dynamic Simulation of VEGA SRM Bench Firing By Using Propellant Complex Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Trapani, C. D.; Mastrella, E.; Bartoccini, D.; Squeo, E. A.; Mastroddi, F.; Coppotelli, G.; Linari, M.

    2012-07-01

    During the VEGA launcher development, from the 2004 up to now, 8 firing tests have been performed at Salto di Quirra (Sardinia, Italy) and Kourou (Guyana, Fr) with the objective to characterize and qualify of the Zefiros and P80 Solid Rocket Motors (SRM). In fact the VEGA launcher configuration foreseen 3 solid stages based on P80, Z23 and Z9 Solid Rocket Motors respectively. One of the primary objectives of the firing test is to correctly characterize the dynamic response of the SRM in order to apply such a characterization to the predictions and simulations of the VEGA launch dynamic environment. Considering that the solid propellant is around 90% of the SRM mass, it is very important to dynamically characterize it, and to increase the confidence in the simulation of the dynamic levels transmitted to the LV upper part from the SRMs. The activity is articulated in three parts: • consolidation of an experimental method for the dynamic characterization of the complex dynamic elasticity modulus of elasticity of visco-elastic materials applicable to the SRM propellant operative conditions • introduction of the complex dynamic elasticity modulus in a numerical FEM benchmark based on MSC NASTRAN solver • analysis of the effect of the introduction of the complex dynamic elasticity modulus in the Zefiros FEM focusing on experimental firing test data reproduction with numerical approach.

  12. Organisation of nucleosomal arrays reconstituted with repetitive African green monkey α-satellite DNA as analysed by atomic force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Bussiek, Malte; Müller, Gabriele; Waldeck, Waldemar; Diekmann, Stephan; Langowski, Jörg

    2007-01-01

    Alpha-satellite DNA (AS) is part of centromeric DNA and could be relevant for centromeric chromatin structure: its repetitive character may generate a specifically ordered nucleosomal arrangement and thereby facilitate kinetochore protein binding and chromatin condensation. Although nucleosomal positioning on some satellite sequences had been shown, including AS from African green monkey (AGM), the sequence-dependent nucleosomal organisation of repetitive AS of this species has so far not bee...

  13. Increased Nucleosomes and Neutrophil Activation Link to Disease Progression in Patients with Scrub Typhus but Not Murine Typhus in Laos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Daniel H; Stephan, Femke; Bulder, Ingrid; Wouters, Diana; van der Poll, Tom; Newton, Paul N; Day, Nicholas P J; Zeerleder, Sacha

    2015-01-01

    Cell-mediated immunity is essential in protection against rickettsial illnesses, but the role of neutrophils in these intracellular vasculotropic infections remains unclear. This study analyzed the plasma levels of nucleosomes, FSAP-activation (nucleosome-releasing factor), and neutrophil activation, as evidenced by neutrophil-elastase (ELA) complexes, in sympatric Lao patients with scrub typhus and murine typhus. In acute scrub typhus elevated nucleosome levels correlated with lower GCS scores, raised respiratory rate, jaundice and impaired liver function, whereas neutrophil activation correlated with fibrinolysis and high IL-8 plasma levels, a recently identified predictor of severe disease and mortality. Nucleosome and ELA complex levels were associated with a 4.8-fold and 4-fold increased risk of developing severe scrub typhus, beyond cut off values of 1,040 U/ml for nucleosomes and 275 U/ml for ELA complexes respectively. In murine typhus, nucleosome levels associated with pro-inflammatory cytokines and the duration of illness, while ELA complexes correlated strongly with inflammation markers, jaundice and increased respiratory rates. This study found strong correlations between circulating nucleosomes and neutrophil activation in patients with scrub typhus, but not murine typhus, providing indirect evidence that nucleosomes could originate from neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) degradation. High circulating plasma nucleosomes and ELA complexes represent independent risk factors for developing severe complications in scrub typhus. As nucleosomes and histones exposed on NETs are highly cytotoxic to endothelial cells and are strongly pro-coagulant, neutrophil-derived nucleosomes could contribute to vascular damage, the pro-coagulant state and exacerbation of disease in scrub typhus, thus indicating a detrimental role of neutrophil activation. The data suggest that increased neutrophil activation relates to disease progression and severe complications, and

  14. Dynamic Characterization of Materials from a Refrigerator Compartment

    OpenAIRE

    Ilka, Bringhenti; Martinez, Jesus Alberto Ortiz; Lenzi, Arcanjo; Pellegrini, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    The dynamic properties of materials are important parameters for numerical vibro-acoustics analysis of a household refrigerator. The compartment of a household refrigerator is typically composed by three types of materials: hot rolled steel, polyurethane rigid foam (PUR) and high impact polystyrene (HIPS). In this work, the mechanical properties (dynamical Young‟s modulus and loss factor) of these materials were determinate in order to comprehend its frequency-dependent behavior to use them p...

  15. Effective Transmission Coverage Area-Based Link Dynamics Characterization of VANET in Highway Scenario

    OpenAIRE

    Chunfeng Liu; Oliver; Yang; Gen Li; Yantai Shu

    2015-01-01

    This paper uses the concept of effective transmission coverage area as a model for the derivation of analytic expressions in order to characterize the dynamic statistics of link lifetime, new link arrival rate, new link interarrival time, link breakage interarrival time, and so forth. Extensive simulations have been undertaken to verify the derived analytical expressions via generated mobility traces. Results demonstrate that the proposed analytical model can characterize the dynamic statisti...

  16. Multiple aspects of ATP-dependent nucleosome translocation by RSC and Mi-2 are directed by the underlying DNA sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joke J F A van Vugt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chromosome structure, DNA metabolic processes and cell type identity can all be affected by changing the positions of nucleosomes along chromosomal DNA, a reaction that is catalysed by SNF2-type ATP-driven chromatin remodelers. Recently it was suggested that in vivo, more than 50% of the nucleosome positions can be predicted simply by DNA sequence, especially within promoter regions. This seemingly contrasts with remodeler induced nucleosome mobility. The ability of remodeling enzymes to mobilise nucleosomes over short DNA distances is well documented. However, the nucleosome translocation processivity along DNA remains elusive. Furthermore, it is unknown what determines the initial direction of movement and how new nucleosome positions are adopted. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have used AFM imaging and high resolution PAGE of mononucleosomes on 600 and 2500 bp DNA molecules to analyze ATP-dependent nucleosome repositioning by native and recombinant SNF2-type enzymes. We report that the underlying DNA sequence can control the initial direction of translocation, translocation distance, as well as the new positions adopted by nucleosomes upon enzymatic mobilization. Within a strong nucleosomal positioning sequence both recombinant Drosophila Mi-2 (CHD-type and native RSC from yeast (SWI/SNF-type repositioned the nucleosome at 10 bp intervals, which are intrinsic to the positioning sequence. Furthermore, RSC-catalyzed nucleosome translocation was noticeably more efficient when beyond the influence of this sequence. Interestingly, under limiting ATP conditions RSC preferred to position the nucleosome with 20 bp intervals within the positioning sequence, suggesting that native RSC preferentially translocates nucleosomes with 15 to 25 bp DNA steps. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Nucleosome repositioning thus appears to be influenced by both remodeler intrinsic and DNA sequence specific properties that interplay to define ATPase

  17. Increasing Nucleosome Occupancy Is Correlated with an Increasing Mutation Rate so Long as DNA Repair Machinery Is Intact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdi, Puya G; Pedersen, Brian A; Taylor, Jared F; Khattab, Omar S; Chen, Yu-Han; Chen, Yumay; Jacobsen, Steven E; Wang, Ping H

    2015-01-01

    Deciphering the multitude of epigenomic and genomic factors that influence the mutation rate is an area of great interest in modern biology. Recently, chromatin has been shown to play a part in this process. To elucidate this relationship further, we integrated our own ultra-deep sequenced human nucleosomal DNA data set with a host of published human genomic and cancer genomic data sets. Our results revealed, that differences in nucleosome occupancy are associated with changes in base-specific mutation rates. Increasing nucleosome occupancy is associated with an increasing transition to transversion ratio and an increased germline mutation rate within the human genome. Additionally, cancer single nucleotide variants and microindels are enriched within nucleosomes and both the coding and non-coding cancer mutation rate increases with increasing nucleosome occupancy. There is an enrichment of cancer indels at the theoretical start (74 bp) and end (115 bp) of linker DNA between two nucleosomes. We then hypothesized that increasing nucleosome occupancy decreases access to DNA by DNA repair machinery and could account for the increasing mutation rate. Such a relationship should not exist in DNA repair knockouts, and we thus repeated our analysis in DNA repair machinery knockouts to test our hypothesis. Indeed, our results revealed no correlation between increasing nucleosome occupancy and increasing mutation rate in DNA repair knockouts. Our findings emphasize the linkage of the genome and epigenome through the nucleosome whose properties can affect genome evolution and genetic aberrations such as cancer.

  18. Mutation bias, rather than binding preference, underlies the nucleosome-associated G+C% variation in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Ke; He, Xionglei

    2015-03-18

    The effects of genetic content on epigenetic status have been extensively studied, but how epigenetic status affects genetic content is not well understood. As a key epigenetic factor the nucleosome structure is highly correlated with local G+C% in eukaryotic genomes. The prevailing explanation to the pattern is that nucleosome occupancy favors higher G+C% sequences more than lower G+C% sequences. However, recent observation of a biased mutation spectrum caused by nucleosome occupancy suggests that the higher G+C% of nucleosomal DNA might be the evolutionary consequence of nucleosome occupancy. To distinguish the two explanations, we examined data from an in vitro nucleosome reconstitution experiment in which histones are incubated with yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli genomic DNA, the former has been shaped by nucleosome structure while the latter has not. There is a strong positive correlation between nucleosome density and G+C% for the yeast DNA, an observation consistent with in vivo data, and such a pattern nearly vanishes for E. coli genomic DNA, suggesting that biased mutation, rather than biased occupancy, explains the most nucleosome-associated G+C% variation in eukaryotic genomes.

  19. Nucleosome transactions on the Hypocrea jecorina (Trichoderma reesei) cellulase promoter cbh2 associated with cellulase induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeilinger, S; Schmoll, M; Pail, M; Mach, R L; Kubicek, C P

    2003-10-01

    The 5' regulatory region of the cbh2 gene of Hypocrea jecorina contains the cbh2 activating element (CAE) which is essential for induction of cbh2 gene expression by sophorose and cellulose. The CAE consists of two motifs, a CCAAT box on the template strand and a GTAATA box on the coding strand, which cooperate during induction. Northern analyses of cbh2 gene expression has revealed an absolute dependence on induction, but no direct effect of Cre1-mediated carbon catabolite repression. Investigation of the chromatin structure in the wild-type strain showed that, under repressing conditions, there is a nucleosome free region (nfr) around the CAE, which is flanked by strictly positioned nucleosomes. Induction results in a loss of positioning of nucleosomes -1 and -2 downstream of the CAE, thus making the TATA box accessible. Simultaneous mutation of both motifs of the CAE, or of the CCAAT-box alone, also leads to shifting of nucleosome -1, which normally covers the TATA-box under repressing conditions, whereas mutation of the GTAATA element results in a narrowing of the nfr, indicating that the proteins that bind to both motifs in the CAE interact with chromatin, although in different ways. A cellulase-negative mutant strain, which has previously been shown to be altered in protein binding to the CAE, still displayed the induction-specific changes in nucleosome structure, indicating that none of the proteins that directly interact with CAE are affected, and that nucleosome rearrangement and induction of cbh2 expression are uncoupled. Interestingly, the carbon catabolite repressor Cre1 is essential for strict nucleosome positioning in the 5' regulatory sequences of cbh2 under all of the conditions tested, and induction can occur in a promoter that lacks positioned nucleosomes. These data suggest that Cre1, the Hap2/3/5 complex and the GTAATA-binding protein are all involved in nucleosome assembly on the cbh2 promoter, and that the latter two respond to inducing

  20. Cost effective ER data acquisition using a dynamic characterization strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The important first step in remediating contaminated sites is completing characterization. The process for characterization of natural environmental media (i.e., soil, sediment, surface water, groundwater) involves three basic steps: (1) develop a plan, (2) implement the plan by collecting information necessary to define the nature and extent of contaminants in the natural media, and (3) integrate, interpret and report the results. Because of budgetary constraints, these three steps are typically applied linearly with the expectation that by the end of one application of the process the site will be characterized with sufficient resolution to make decisions about remedial actions. Our experience over the past 13 years at a complex site in Tennessee has shown that this linear approach to characterization does not produce the desired resolution. Because characterization is typically a process of defining unknowns the inflexible nature of the linear approach makes it impractical to react as the conceptual understanding of site contaminants changes in response to the acquisition of new data. An alternative, flexible approach to characterization has been developed based on lessons learned. Over the past 3 years the flexible approach has cost-effectively produced the information needed for decision making. (authors)

  1. Characterizing dynamic local functional connectivity in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lifu; Sun, Junfeng; Cheng, Lin; Tong, Shanbao

    2016-01-01

    Functional connectivity (FC), obtained from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), brings insights into the functional organization of the brain. Recently, rich and complex behaviour of brain has been revealed by the dynamic fluctuation of FC, which had previously been regarded as confounding 'noise'. While the dynamics of long-distance, inter-regional FC has been extensively studied, the dynamics of local FC within a few millimetres in space remains largely unexplored. In this study, the local FC was depicted by regional homogeneity (ReHo), and the dynamics of local FC was obtained using sliding windows method. We observed a robust positive correlation between ReHo and its temporal variability, which was shown to be an intrinsic feature of the brain rather than a pure stochastic effect. Furthermore, fluctuation of ReHo was associated with global functional organization: (i) brain regions with higher centrality of inter-regional FC tended to possess higher ReHo variability; (ii) coherence of ReHo fluctuation was higher within brain's functional modules. Finally, we observed alteration of ReHo variability during a motor task compared with resting-state. Our findings associated the temporal fluctuation of ReHo with brain function, opening up the possibility of dynamic local FC study in the future. PMID:27231194

  2. iNuc-PhysChem: a sequence-based predictor for identifying nucleosomes via physicochemical properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chen

    Full Text Available Nucleosome positioning has important roles in key cellular processes. Although intensive efforts have been made in this area, the rules defining nucleosome positioning is still elusive and debated. In this study, we carried out a systematic comparison among the profiles of twelve DNA physicochemical features between the nucleosomal and linker sequences in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. We found that nucleosomal sequences have some position-specific physicochemical features, which can be used for in-depth studying nucleosomes. Meanwhile, a new predictor, called iNuc-PhysChem, was developed for identification of nucleosomal sequences by incorporating these physicochemical properties into a 1788-D (dimensional feature vector, which was further reduced to a 884-D vector via the IFS (incremental feature selection procedure to optimize the feature set. It was observed by a cross-validation test on a benchmark dataset that the overall success rate achieved by iNuc-PhysChem was over 96% in identifying nucleosomal or linker sequences. As a web-server, iNuc-PhysChem is freely accessible to the public at http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/iNuc-PhysChem. For the convenience of the vast majority of experimental scientists, a step-by-step guide is provided on how to use the web-server to get the desired results without the need to follow the complicated mathematics that were presented just for the integrity in developing the predictor. Meanwhile, for those who prefer to run predictions in their own computers, the predictor's code can be easily downloaded from the web-server. It is anticipated that iNuc-PhysChem may become a useful high throughput tool for both basic research and drug design.

  3. Label-free characterization of biomembranes: from structure to dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mashaghi, A.; Mashaghi, S.; Reviakine, I.; Heeren, R.M.A.; Sandoghdarf, V.; Bonn, M.

    2013-01-01

    We review recent progress in the study of the structure and dynamics of phospholipid membranes and associated proteins, using novel label-free analytical tools. We describe these techniques and illustrate them with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations. Recent advances in applyi

  4. Label-free characterization of biomembranes: from structure to dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Mashaghi, A.; Mashaghi, S.; Reviakine, I.; Heeren, R.M.A.; Sandoghdarf, V.; Bonn, M. (Marie-Luise)

    2013-01-01

    We review recent progress in the study of the structure and dynamics of phospholipid membranes and associated proteins, using novel label-free analytical tools. We describe these techniques and illustrate them with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations. Recent advances in applying such techniques to biological and model membranes for biophysical studies and biosensing applications are presented, and future prospects are discussed.

  5. Microstructural characterization of nickel subjected to dynamic plastic deformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Z.P.; Mishin, Oleg; Zhang, Yubin;

    2012-01-01

    Average microstructural parameters and the extent of microstructural heterogeneity in nickel deformed at a high strain rate have been characterized quantitatively and compared to those after compression at a quasi-static strain rate. The microstructure in the high strain rate sample was found...

  6. Dynamic characterization of thin-film inflatable structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Kara Nicole

    Inflatable structures constructed from thin polyimide films form a key part of several technology development programs for solar thermal propulsion for satellites, as well as for other applications both in space and on earth. This project investigates the mechanical properties of several of these structures, focusing primarily on their dynamic behavior. The primary focus is the Shooting Star Experiment prototype developed by NASA, but a simpler cylindrical structure is also considered in order to provide an analytically tractable situation for the evaluation of testing and modeling techniques. The cylindrical strut is tested statically to determine its load-deflection characteristics both in linear and nonlinear regimes. The phenomenon of wrinkling is observed under large deflection conditions, particularly at lower pressure. Then, modal testing is used to determine the dynamic properties of the strut for comparison to numerical models. Modal testing is also conducted on Pathfinder 3, a prototype inflatable solar concentrator for the Shooting Star Experiment, both in vacuum and ambient atmospheric conditions. The orbital terminator crossing test is used to determine the dynamic susceptibility of the Pathfinder 3 structure to thermal shock, and it is found to undergo only quasistatic deformations. Finite element models of the cylinder and the Pathfinder 3 concentrator are then constructed using MSC NASTRAN. The inflatable cylinder may be modeled as a beam if only global bending is considered. This restriction leads to the development of a frequency-dependent modulus of elasticity in bending for the structure, developed from engineering beam theory. Both frequency-dependent beam models and shell models are constructed and evaluated for their efficacy. The results from the modeling of the strut are then applied to the inflatable concentrator, where it is found that the shell model captures more of the dynamic subtleties of the system than the beam model, but that both

  7. Coordinated Action of Nap1 and RSC in Disassembly of Tandem Nucleosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Rashmi; D'Arcy, Sheena; Hada, Arjan; Luger, Karolin; Bartholomew, Blaine

    2016-09-01

    The SWI/SNF and RSC family of ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers disassembles nucleosomes by moving nucleosomes into the vicinity of adjoining nucleosomes. We found that the histone chaperone Nap1 efficiently promotes disassembly of adjacent nucleosomes with which RSC collides and not the disassembly of nucleosomes mobilized by RSC. Nap1 is specific to RSC, as it does not target SWI/SNF, its paralog in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Extensive mutational analysis of Nap1 has revealed that Nap1 affinity for histones H2A-H2B and H3-H4 and its ability to displace histones from DNA are required for Nap1 to enhance RSC-mediated disassembly. Other histone chaperones, such as Vps75, that also bind histones are not able to enhance RSC-mediated disassembly. Our study suggests a mechanism by which Nap1 is recruited to actively transcribed regions and assists in the passage of the transcription complex through chromatin, and it provides a novel mechanism for the coordinated action of RSC and Nap1.

  8. Nucleosome Positions and Differential Methylation Status of Various Regions within MLH1 CpG Island

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Hua; ZHOU Jing; DENG Da-jun

    2008-01-01

    Objective:To determine the relationship between nucleosome positions and formation of differential methylation of the reported region A,B,C,and D within the MLH1 CpG island. Methods:Methylation of the MLH1 promoter was analyzed by combined of bisulfite restriction assay.Chromatin of RKO and MGC803 cells were extracted and digested by Mnase.Mononucleosomal DNA fragment was isolated and used as templates for detection of nucleosomal distribution by a battery of quantitative PCRs covering the full MLH1 promoter region. Results:The MLH1 was methylated in RKO and unmethylated in MGC803.At the region B,where methylation of CpG sites did not correlated with transcription of this gene well,qPCR product of the M-3(-599nt~-475nt)fragment was amplified in both RKO and MGC803 cells.However,at the region C and D within the core promoter,where methylation of CpG sites correlated with loss of MLH1 transcription well,the M-7(-257nt~-153nt)and M-8(-189nt~-71nt)fragments were amplified remarkably only in RKO cells. Conclusion:Nucleosome may be the basic unit for both CpG methylation and methylation-related regulation of gene transcription.Methylation status of CpG sites within the same nucleosome may be homogeneous;between different nucleosomes,homogeneous or heterogeneous.

  9. Abo1, a conserved bromodomain AAA-ATPase, maintains global nucleosome occupancy and organisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Csenge; Murton, Heather E; Subramanian, Lakxmi; Whale, Alex J; Moore, Karen M; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Codlin, Sandra; Bähler, Jürg; Creamer, Kevin M; Partridge, Janet F; Allshire, Robin C; Kent, Nicholas A; Whitehall, Simon K

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of the correct level and organisation of nucleosomes is crucial for genome function. Here, we uncover a role for a conserved bromodomain AAA-ATPase, Abo1, in the maintenance of nucleosome architecture in fission yeast. Cells lacking abo1(+) experience both a reduction and mis-positioning of nucleosomes at transcribed sequences in addition to increased intragenic transcription, phenotypes that are hallmarks of defective chromatin re-establishment behind RNA polymerase II. Abo1 is recruited to gene sequences and associates with histone H3 and the histone chaperone FACT. Furthermore, the distribution of Abo1 on chromatin is disturbed by impaired FACT function. The role of Abo1 extends to some promoters and also to silent heterochromatin. Abo1 is recruited to pericentromeric heterochromatin independently of the HP1 ortholog, Swi6, where it enforces proper nucleosome occupancy. Consequently, loss of Abo1 alleviates silencing and causes elevated chromosome mis-segregation. We suggest that Abo1 provides a histone chaperone function that maintains nucleosome architecture genome-wide.

  10. Thermal characterization of nanoscale phononic crystals using supercell lattice dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce L. Davis

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of a phononic crystal can in principle be realized at the nanoscale whenever the conditions for coherent phonon transport exist. Under such conditions, the dispersion characteristics of both the constitutive material lattice (defined by a primitive cell and the phononic crystal lattice (defined by a supercell contribute to the value of the thermal conductivity. It is therefore necessary in this emerging class of phononic materials to treat the lattice dynamics at both periodicity levels. Here we demonstrate the utility of using supercell lattice dynamics to investigate the thermal transport behavior of three-dimensional nanoscale phononic crystals formed from silicon and cubic voids of vacuum. The periodicity of the voids follows a simple cubic arrangement with a lattice constant that is around an order of magnitude larger than that of the bulk crystalline silicon primitive cell. We consider an atomic-scale supercell which incorporates all the details of the silicon atomic locations and the void geometry. For this supercell, we compute the phonon band structure and subsequently predict the thermal conductivity following the Callaway-Holland model. Our findings dictate that for an analysis based on supercell lattice dynamics to be representative of the properties of the underlying lattice model, a minimum supercell size is needed along with a minimum wave vector sampling resolution. Below these minimum values, a thermal conductivity prediction of a bulk material based on a supercell will not adequately recover the value obtained based on a primitive cell. Furthermore, our results show that for the relatively small voids and void spacings we consider (where boundary scattering is dominant, dispersion at the phononic crystal unit cell level plays a noticeable role in determining the thermal conductivity.

  11. Characterization of Static/Dynamic Topological Routing For Grid Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutierrez Lopez, Jose Manuel; Cuevas, Ruben; Riaz, M. Tahir;

    2009-01-01

    Grid or 2D Mesh structures are becoming one of the most attractive network topologies to study. They can be used in many different fields raging from future broadband networks to multiprocessors structures. In addition, the high requirements of future services and applications demand more flexible...... and adaptive networks. Topological routing in grid networks is a simple and efficient alternative to traditional routing techniques, e.g. routing tables, and the paper extends this kind of routing providing a "Dynamic" attribute. This new property attempts to improve the overall network performance for future...

  12. Dynamical characterization of the last prolonged solar minima

    OpenAIRE

    Cionco, Rodolfo Gustavo; Compagnucci, Rosa Hilda

    2012-01-01

    The planetary hypothesis of the solar cycle is an old idea in which the gravitational influence of the planets has a non-negligible effect on the causes of the solar magnetic cycle. In this work we looked for a possible causal link in relation with solar barycentric dynamics and prolonged minima events. We searched for particular changes in the Sun's acceleration and concentrated on long-term variations of the solar cycle. We show how the orbital angular momentum of the Sun evolves and how th...

  13. Dynamic FDG PET in characterizing and staging lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CT has proven inadequate for staging lung cancer. This study evaluates F-18 deoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in assessing mediastinal metastases of lung tumors, differentiating benign from malignant parenchymal masses, and complementing radiographic and laboratory findings in lymphoma. The authors of this paper examined 13 patients with pulmonary masses as determined by chest radiographs and CT scans. PET scans were obtained with 255.3-592 MBq FDG scanned in dynamic mode at 5 minutes per frame for 45 minutes and one 15 minutes per frame. Image analysis included visual inspection, time activity curves (TAC), and calculation of differential uptake ratio (DUR) in regions of interest versus normal tissue

  14. Nucleosome-induced neutrophil activation occurs independently of TLR9 and endosomal acidification: implications for systemic lupus erythematosus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindau, D.S.U.; Ronnefarth, V.; Erbacher, A.; Rammensee, H.G.; Decker, P. de

    2011-01-01

    The nucleosome is a major autoantigen known to activate PMN in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). TLR9 recognizes bacterial and even mammalian DNA under certain circumstances. Nevertheless, the role of TLR9 in SLE development is still unclear. Since nucleosomes are composed of DNA, we investigated

  15. Characterization of groundwater dynamics in landslides in varved clays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. van der Spek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater dynamics may play a significant role in landslides. A detailed model is developed of the groundwater dynamics in landslides in varved clays in the Trièves area in the French Alps. The varved clays consist of a sequence of alternating silt and clay layers, covered by a colluvium layer and cut through by fissures. The hydraulic conductivity of the clay layers is negligible compared to the silt layers. It is conceptualized that fissures form a hydraulic connection between the colluvium and the varved clays. Groundwater recharge flows through the colluvium into the fissures where water is exchanged horizontally between the fissure and the silt layers of the varved clays. Groundwater flow in the colluvium is simulated with the Boussinesq equation while flow in the silt layers of the varved clays is simulated with the Richards' equation. Longitudinal outflow from the fissure is simulated with a linear-reservoir model. Scattered data of relatively short monitoring periods is available for several landslides in the region. A good similarity between observed and simulated heads is obtained, especially when considering the lack of important physical parameters such as the fissure width and the distance between the monitoring point and the fissure. A simulation for the period 1959–2004 showed some correlation between peaks in the simulated heads and the recorded occurrence of landslides while the bottom of the varved clays remained saturated during the entire simulation period.

  16. Characterizing and modeling the dynamics of activity and popularity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhang

    Full Text Available Social media, regarded as two-layer networks consisting of users and items, turn out to be the most important channels for access to massive information in the era of Web 2.0. The dynamics of human activity and item popularity is a crucial issue in social media networks. In this paper, by analyzing the growth of user activity and item popularity in four empirical social media networks, i.e., Amazon, Flickr, Delicious and Wikipedia, it is found that cross links between users and items are more likely to be created by active users and to be acquired by popular items, where user activity and item popularity are measured by the number of cross links associated with users and items. This indicates that users generally trace popular items, overall. However, it is found that the inactive users more severely trace popular items than the active users. Inspired by empirical analysis, we propose an evolving model for such networks, in which the evolution is driven only by two-step random walk. Numerical experiments verified that the model can qualitatively reproduce the distributions of user activity and item popularity observed in empirical networks. These results might shed light on the understandings of micro dynamics of activity and popularity in social media networks.

  17. Wafer-scale characterization of carrier dynamics in graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buron, Jonas Christian Due; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth; Bøggild, Peter;

    2015-01-01

    The electronic properties of single-layer graphene, such as surface conductance, carrier concentration, scattering time and mobility, can be characterized in a noncontact manner by THz time-domain spectroscopy. Standard spectroscopic imaging reveals the AC conductance over large areas with a few...... hundred μm resolution, and spectroscopic imaging on back-gated graphene allows for extraction of both the carrier concentration and the mobility. We find that spatial variations of the conductance of single-layer CVD-grown graphene are predominantly due to variations in mobility rather than in carrier...

  18. Repetitive motor behavior: further characterization of development and temporal dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlmann, Amber M; Bliznyuk, Nikolay; Duerr, Isaac; Lewis, Mark H

    2015-03-01

    Repetitive behaviors are diagnostic for autism spectrum disorders, common in related neurodevelopmental disorders, and normative in typical development. In order to identify factors that mediate repetitive behavior development, it is necessary to characterize the expression of these behaviors from an early age. Extending previous findings, we characterized further the ontogeny of stereotyped motor behavior both in terms of frequency and temporal organization in deer mice. A three group trajectory model provided a good fit to the frequencies of stereotyped behavior across eight developmental time points. Group based trajectory analysis using a measure of temporal organization of stereotyped behavior also resulted in a three group solution. Additionally, as the frequency of stereotyped behavior increased with age, the temporal distribution of stereotyped responses became increasingly regular or organized indicating a strong association between these measures. Classification tree and principal components analysis showed that accurate classification of trajectory group could be done with fewer observations. This ability to identify trajectory group membership earlier in development allows for examination of a wide range of variables, both experiential and biological, to determine their impact on altering the expected trajectory of repetitive behavior across development. Such studies would have important implications for treatment efforts in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism.

  19. Molecular dynamics characterization of as-implanted damage in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have analyzed the as-implanted damage produced in silicon by B, Si and Ge ions using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Implantations were carried out at 50 K to avoid damage migration and annealing. In order to make a statistical study of the damage features, we have simulated hundreds of independent cascades for each ion for the same nuclear deposited energy. We have obtained that the average number of displaced atoms (DA) from perfect lattice positions and the size of defect clusters formed increases with ion mass. This dependence has not been obtained from equivalent binary collisions simulations. This indicates that multiple interactions play an important role in the generation of damage. Amorphous regions are directly formed during the collisional phase of the cascade of Ge and Si ions

  20. Molecular dynamics characterization of as-implanted damage in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Ivan [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, E.T.S.I. Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes s/n, 47011 Valladolid (Spain)]. E-mail: ivasan@ele.uva.es; Marques, Luis A. [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, E.T.S.I. Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes s/n, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Pelaz, Lourdes [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, E.T.S.I. Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes s/n, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Lopez, Pedro [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, E.T.S.I. Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes s/n, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Aboy, Maria [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, E.T.S.I. Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes s/n, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Barbolla, Juan [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, E.T.S.I. Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes s/n, 47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2005-12-05

    We have analyzed the as-implanted damage produced in silicon by B, Si and Ge ions using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Implantations were carried out at 50 K to avoid damage migration and annealing. In order to make a statistical study of the damage features, we have simulated hundreds of independent cascades for each ion for the same nuclear deposited energy. We have obtained that the average number of displaced atoms (DA) from perfect lattice positions and the size of defect clusters formed increases with ion mass. This dependence has not been obtained from equivalent binary collisions simulations. This indicates that multiple interactions play an important role in the generation of damage. Amorphous regions are directly formed during the collisional phase of the cascade of Ge and Si ions.

  1. Multi-Relational Characterization of Dynamic Social Network Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Ru; Sundaram, Hari; Kelliher, Aisling

    The emergence of the mediated social web - a distributed network of participants creating rich media content and engaging in interactive conversations through Internet-based communication technologies - has contributed to the evolution of powerful social, economic and cultural change. Online social network sites and blogs, such as Facebook, Twitter, Flickr and LiveJournal, thrive due to their fundamental sense of "community". The growth of online communities offers both opportunities and challenges for researchers and practitioners. Participation in online communities has been observed to influence people's behavior in diverse ways ranging from financial decision-making to political choices, suggesting the rich potential for diverse applications. However, although studies on the social web have been extensive, discovering communities from online social media remains challenging, due to the interdisciplinary nature of this subject. In this article, we present our recent work on characterization of communities in online social media using computational approaches grounded on the observations from social science.

  2. Characterizing Self-Heating Dynamics Using Cyclostationary Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Shin, SangHoon; Alam, Muhammad Ashraful

    2016-01-01

    Self-heating in surrounding gate transistors can degrade its on-current performance and reduce lifetime. If a transistor heats/cools with time-constants less than the inverse of the operating frequency, a predictable, frequency-independent performance is expected; if not, the signal pattern must be optimized for highest performance. Typically, time-constants are measured by expensive, ultra-fast instruments with high temporal resolution. Instead, here we demonstrate an alternate, inexpensive, cyclostationary measurement technique to characterize self-heating (and cooling) with sub-microsecond resolution. The results are independently confirmed by direct imaging of the transient heating/cooling of the channel temperature by the thermoreflectance (TR) method. A routine use of the proposed technique will help improve the surrounding gate transistor design and shorten the design cycle.

  3. ATP-Dependent Chromatin Remodeling Factors and Their Roles in Affecting Nucleosome Fiber Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Lusser

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors of the SNF2 family are key components of the cellular machineries that shape and regulate chromatin structure and function. Members of this group of proteins have broad and heterogeneous functions ranging from controlling gene activity, facilitating DNA damage repair, promoting homologous recombination to maintaining genomic stability. Several chromatin remodeling factors are critical components of nucleosome assembly processes, and recent reports have identified specific functions of distinct chromatin remodeling factors in the assembly of variant histones into chromatin. In this review we will discuss the specific roles of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors in determining nucleosome composition and, thus, chromatin fiber properties.

  4. Nucleosomal organization of chromatin in sperm nuclei of the bivalve mollusc Aulacomya ater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, C; Ruiz, S

    1991-03-13

    The sperm nuclei of Aulacomya ater, family Mitylidae, contain three proteins (X, Aa5 and Aa6) which are specific to this cell type coexisting with a set of five somatic-type histones. Information about the chromatin structure resulting from this kind of association is scarce. Therefore, we have probed the structure of this sperm chromatin through digestion with micrococcal nuclease in combination with salt fractionation. The data obtained have allowed us to propose a nucleosomal arrangement for this chromatin. However, two types of nucleosomes would be present in agreement with their protein components. PMID:1861676

  5. Nucleosome distortion as a possible mechanism of transcription activation domain function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkina, Tamara Y; Erkine, Alexandre M

    2016-01-01

    After more than three decades since the discovery of transcription activation domains (ADs) in gene-specific activators, the mechanism of their function remains enigmatic. The widely accepted model of direct recruitment by ADs of co-activators and basal transcriptional machinery components, however, is not always compatible with the short size yet very high degree of sequence randomness and intrinsic structural disorder of natural and synthetic ADs. In this review, we formulate the basis for an alternative and complementary model, whereby sequence randomness and intrinsic structural disorder of ADs are necessary for transient distorting interactions with promoter nucleosomes, triggering promoter nucleosome translocation and subsequently gene activation. PMID:27679670

  6. Characterization of sediment dynamics in an estuary environment using acoustic techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Hermand, J.-P.; L. Perichon; Verbanck, M.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, acoustic-based methods have been developed to characterize the dynamical behavior of loose sediments and bed deposits in very shallow water environments. In this paper, we present preliminary results on the estimation of the dynamic changes in an estuarine environment using data from dual-frequency echosounding at high resolution and contemporaneous hydrological measurements including suspended matter concentration, density subbottom profiling, and data assimilation based on ...

  7. Acoustic characterization of slow compaction dynamics in noncohesive disordered granular media

    OpenAIRE

    Legland, Jean-Baptiste; Tournat, Vincent; Gusev, Vitaly

    2012-01-01

    Noncohesive disordered granular media are well known to exhibit very complex behaviour when being excited by mechanical solicitations. This work presents our studies of the slow dynamics in granular media undergoing a compaction process. The characterization of slow dynamics is performed by an acoustic probing of the packing after mechanical solicitation. With this aim we have built a special setup to increase the density of the granular medium and to probe its elastic properties by the acous...

  8. Nucleosome positioning identification and functional analysis on the position weight matrix%基于位置权重矩阵的核小体识别及功能分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    岁品品; 邢旭东; 王宏; 崔颖

    2016-01-01

    This study was based on high throughout nucleosome positioning data of CD4+T cell in human genome to investigate the model of nucleosome positioning and category the nucleosomes. We constructed three the models by using position weight matrix, including stable nucleosome model, dynamic nucleosome model and linker sequences model respectively. Ten⁃fold cross validation was used to evaluate the performance of the three models, and the assessment results were compared with Segal model and curvature profile method. It was found that the position weight matrix method was superior to the other two methods in terms of sensitivity, precision and accuracy. At the same time the sliding window method is adopted to select candidate sequences in the genome to identify the nucleosomes. Furthermore we mined the related genes of nucleosome positioning and completed enrichment analysis of gene functions and found that different nucleosome positioning modes involved in both a certain similarity and difference in regulation function in biological processes.Whereas there are some biological processes are co⁃regulated by different nucleosome positioning modes,such as regulation of macromolecule.%为研究高通量的人类CD4+T细胞的核小体定位模式,使用迭代算法对核小体定位模式进行分类,并利用位置权重矩阵方法分别构建稳定核小体定位序列、动态核小体定位序列和连接区序列模型,通过十倍交叉验证评估模型性能,并与Segal方法与弯曲度方法进行比较,发现位置权重矩阵方法在敏感性、精度和准确性方面都具有一定优越性。同时采用滑窗法在全基因组选取候选序列进行核小体识别,挖掘核小体定位相关基因,并进行基因生物学进程功能富集分析,发现稳定与动态核小体、真实与潜在核小体对应的基因所参与调控的生物学过程各有不同,但也有一些生物学过程为不同类别核小体所共有,例

  9. Characterizing and Modeling the Dynamics of Activity and Popularity

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Peng; Gao, Liang; Fan, Ying; Di, Zengru

    2013-01-01

    Social media, regarded as two-layer networks consisting of users and items, turn out to be the most important channels for access to massive information in the era of Web 2.0. The dynamics of human activity and item popularity is a crucial issue in social media networks. In this paper, by analyzing the growth of user activity and item popularity in four empirical social media networks, i.e., Amazon, Flickr, Delicious and Wikipedia, it is found that cross links between users and items are more likely to be created by active users and to be acquired by popular items, where user activity and item popularity are measured by the number of cross links associated with users and items. This indicates that users generally trace popular items, overall. However, it is found that the inactive users much more severely trace popular items than the active users. Inspired by empirical analysis, we propose an evolving model for such networks, in which the evolution is driven only by two-step random walk. Numerical experiments...

  10. Dynamical characterization of the last prolonged solar minima

    CERN Document Server

    Cionco, Rodolfo Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    The planetary hypothesis of the solar cycle is an old idea in which the gravitational influence of the planets has a non-negligible effect on the causes of the solar magnetic cycle. In this work we looked for a possible causal link in relation with solar barycentric dynamics and prolonged minima events. We searched for particular changes in the Sun's acceleration and concentrated on long-term variations of the solar cycle. We show how the orbital angular momentum of the Sun evolves and how the inclination of the solar barycentric orbit varies during the epochs of orbital retrogressions. In particular, at these moments, the radial component of the Sun's acceleration (i.e., in the barycentre-Sun direction) had an exceptional magnitude. These radial impulses occurred at the very beginning of the Maunder Minimum, during the Dalton Minimum and also at the maximum of cycle 22 before the present extended minimum. We also found a strong correlation between the planetary torque and the observed sunspots international ...

  11. Dynamic Characterization of Crystalline Supramolecular Rotors Assembled through Halogen Bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, Luca; Pérez-Estrada, Salvador; Terraneo, Giancarlo; Pilati, Tullio; Resnati, Giuseppe; Metrangolo, Pierangelo; Garcia-Garibay, Miguel A

    2015-12-16

    A modular molecular kit for the preparation of crystalline molecular rotors was devised from a set of stators and rotators to gain simple access to a large number of structures with different dynamic performance and physical properties. In this work, we have accomplished this with crystalline molecular rotors self-assembled by halogen bonding of diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane, acting as a rotator, and a set of five fluorine-substituted iodobenzenes that take the role of the stator. Using variable-temperature (1)H T1 spin-lattice relaxation measurements, we have shown that all structures display ultrafast Brownian rotation with activation energies of 2.4-4.9 kcal/mol and pre-exponential factors of the order of (1-9) × 10(12) s(-1). Line shape analysis of quadrupolar echo (2)H NMR measurements in selected examples indicated rotational trajectories consistent with the 3-fold or 6-fold symmetric potential of the rotator. PMID:26583701

  12. Dynamic characterization of satellite components through non-invasive methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullins, Joshua G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wiest, Heather K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mascarenas, David D. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Macknelly, David [INST-OFF/AWE; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-10-21

    The rapid deployment of satellites is hindered by the need to flight-qualify their components and the resulting mechanical assembly. Conventional methods for qualification testing of satellite components are costly and time consuming. Furthermore, full-scale vehicles must be subjected to launch loads during testing. This harsh testing environment increases the risk of component damage during qualification. The focus of this research effort was to assess the performance of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) techniques as a replacement for traditional vibration testing. SHM techniques were applied on a small-scale structure representative of a responsive satellite. The test structure consisted of an extruded aluminum space-frame covered with aluminum shear plates, which was assembled using bolted joints. Multiple piezoelectric patches were bonded to the test structure and acted as combined actuators and sensors. Various methods of SHM were explored including impedance-based health monitoring, wave propagation, and conventional frequency response functions. Using these methods in conjunction with finite element modelling, the dynamic properties of the test structure were established and areas of potential damage were identified and localized. The adequacy of the results from each SHM method was validated by comparison to results from conventional vibration testing.

  13. Dynamic characterization of satellite components through non-invasive methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullens, Joshua G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wiest, Heather K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mascarenas, David D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-24

    The rapid deployment of satellites is hindered by the need to flight-qualify their components and the resulting mechanical assembly. Conventional methods for qualification testing of satellite components are costly and time consuming. Furthermore, full-scale vehicles must be subjected to launch loads during testing. The harsh testing environment increases the risk of component damage during qualification. The focus of this research effort was to assess the performance of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) techniques as replacement for traditional vibration testing. SHM techniques were applied on a small-scale structure representative of a responsive satellite. The test structure consisted of an extruded aluminum space-frame covered with aluminum shear plates, which was assembled using bolted joints. Multiple piezoelectric patches were bonded to the test structure and acted as combined actuators and sensors. Various methods of SHM were explored including impedance-based health monitoring, wave propagation, and conventional frequency response functions. Using these methods in conjunction with finite element modeling, the dynamic properties of the test structure were established and areas of potential damage were identified and localized. The adequacy of the results from each SHM method was validated by comparison to results from conventional vibration testing.

  14. Comparative studies of genome-wide maps of nucleosomes between deletion mutants of elp3 and hos2 genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Matsumoto

    Full Text Available In order to elucidate the influence of histone acetylation upon nucleosomal DNA length and nucleosome position, we compared nucleosome maps of the following three yeast strains; strain BY4741 (control, the elp3 (one of histone acetyltransferase genes deletion mutant, and the hos2 (one of histone deactylase genes deletion mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We sequenced mononucleosomal DNA fragments after treatment with micrococcal nuclease. After mapping the DNA fragments to the genome, we identified the nucleosome positions. We showed that the distributions of the nucleosomal DNA lengths of the control and the hos2 disruptant were similar. On the other hand, the distribution of the nucleosomal DNA lengths of the elp3 disruptant shifted toward shorter than that of the control. It strongly suggests that inhibition of Elp3-induced histone acetylation causes the nucleosomal DNA length reduction. Next, we compared the profiles of nucleosome mapping numbers in gene promoter regions between the control and the disruptant. We detected 24 genes with low conservation level of nucleosome positions in promoters between the control and the elp3 disruptant as well as between the control and the hos2 disruptant. It indicates that both Elp3-induced acetylation and Hos2-induced deacetylation influence the nucleosome positions in the promoters of those 24 genes. Interestingly, in 19 of the 24 genes, the profiles of nucleosome mapping numbers were similar between the two disruptants.

  15. Experimental characterization of energetic material dynamics for multiphase blast simulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beresh, Steven Jay; Wagner, Justin L.; Kearney, Sean Patrick; Wright, Elton K.; Baer, Melvin R.; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2011-09-01

    experiments. The development of the Multiphase Shock Tube and associated diagnostic capabilities offers experimental capability to a previously inaccessible regime, which can provide unprecedented data concerning particle dynamics of dense gas-solid flows.

  16. Intra- and inter-nucleosomal interactions of the histone H4 tail revealed with a human nucleosome core particle with genetically-incorporated H4 tetra-acetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakamori, Masatoshi; Fujii, Yoshifumi; Suka, Noriyuki; Shirouzu, Mikako; Sakamoto, Kensaku; Umehara, Takashi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2015-11-26

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of histones, such as lysine acetylation of the N-terminal tails, play crucial roles in controlling gene expression. Due to the difficulty in reconstituting site-specifically acetylated nucleosomes with crystallization quality, structural analyses of histone acetylation are currently performed using synthesized tail peptides. Through engineering of the genetic code, translation termination, and cell-free protein synthesis, we reconstituted human H4-mono- to tetra-acetylated nucleosome core particles (NCPs), and solved the crystal structures of the H4-K5/K8/K12/K16-tetra-acetylated NCP and unmodified NCP at 2.4 Å and 2.2 Å resolutions, respectively. The structure of the H4-tetra-acetylated NCP resembled that of the unmodified NCP, and the DNA wrapped the histone octamer as precisely as in the unmodified NCP. However, the B-factors were significantly increased for the peripheral DNAs near the N-terminal tail of the intra- or inter-nucleosomal H4. In contrast, the B-factors were negligibly affected by the H4 tetra-acetylation in histone core residues, including those composing the acidic patch, and at H4-R23, which interacts with the acidic patch of the neighboring NCP. The present study revealed that the H4 tetra-acetylation impairs NCP self-association by changing the interactions of the H4 tail with DNA, and is the first demonstration of crystallization quality NCPs reconstituted with genuine PTMs.

  17. Viscoelastic limit of polymer optical fibers: characterization of the dynamic response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefani, Alessio; Yuan, Scott Wu; Andresen, S.;

    2011-01-01

    Characterization of polymer optical fibers (POFs) in terms of dynamic behavior is important for many sensors applications for which this type of fibers offers big advantages. We report measurements of the Young’s modulus on microstructured and step index polymer optical fibers and their comparison...

  18. Characterizing system dynamics with a weighted and directed network constructed from time series data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoran; Small, Michael; Zhao, Yi; Xue, Xiaoping

    2014-06-01

    In this work, we propose a novel method to transform a time series into a weighted and directed network. For a given time series, we first generate a set of segments via a sliding window, and then use a doubly symbolic scheme to characterize every windowed segment by combining absolute amplitude information with an ordinal pattern characterization. Based on this construction, a network can be directly constructed from the given time series: segments corresponding to different symbol-pairs are mapped to network nodes and the temporal succession between nodes is represented by directed links. With this conversion, dynamics underlying the time series has been encoded into the network structure. We illustrate the potential of our networks with a well-studied dynamical model as a benchmark example. Results show that network measures for characterizing global properties can detect the dynamical transitions in the underlying system. Moreover, we employ a random walk algorithm to sample loops in our networks, and find that time series with different dynamics exhibits distinct cycle structure. That is, the relative prevalence of loops with different lengths can be used to identify the underlying dynamics.

  19. Chromatin modification by PSC occurs at one PSC per nucleosome and does not require the acidic patch of histone H2A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Stanley M; McElroy, Kyle A; Francis, Nicole J

    2012-01-01

    Chromatin architecture is regulated through both enzymatic and non-enzymatic activities. For example, the Polycomb Group (PcG) proteins maintain developmental gene silencing using an array of chromatin-based mechanisms. The essential Drosophila PcG protein, Posterior Sex Combs (PSC), compacts chromatin and inhibits chromatin remodeling and transcription through a non-enzymatic mechanism involving nucleosome bridging. Nucleosome bridging is achieved through a combination of nucleosome binding and self-interaction. Precisely how PSC interacts with chromatin to bridge nucleosomes is not known and is the subject of this work. We determine the stoichiometry of PSC-chromatin interactions in compact chromatin (in which nucleosomes are bridged) using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM). We find that full compaction occurs with one PSC per nucleosome. In addition to compacting chromatin, we show that PSC oligomerizes nucleosome arrays. PSC-mediated oligomerization of chromatin occurs at similar stoichiometry as compaction suggesting it may also involve nucleosome bridging. Interactions between the tail of histone H4 and the acidic patch of histone H2A are important for chromatin folding and oligomerization, and several chromatin proteins bind the histone H2A acidic patch. However, mutation of the acidic patch of histone H2A does not affect PSC's ability to inhibit chromatin remodeling or bridge nucleosomes. In fact, PSC does not require nucleosomes for bridging activity but can bridge naked DNA segments. PSC clusters nucleosomes on sparsely assembled templates, suggesting it interacts preferentially with nucleosomes over bare DNA. This may be due to the ability of PSC to bind free histones. Our data are consistent with a model in which each PSC binds a nucleosome and at least one other PSC to directly bridge nucleosomes and compact chromatin, but also suggest that naked DNA can be included in compacted structures. We discuss how our data highlight the diversity

  20. The docking domain of histone H2A is required for H1 binding and RSC-mediated nucleosome remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Manu Shubhdarshan; Syed, Sajad Hussain; Goutte-Gattat, Damien; Richard, John Lalith Charles; Montel, Fabien; Hamiche, Ali; Travers, Andrew; Faivre-Moskalenko, Cendrine; Bednar, Jan; Hayes, Jeffrey J; Angelov, Dimitar; Dimitrov, Stefan

    2011-04-01

    Histone variants within the H2A family show high divergences in their C-terminal regions. In this work, we have studied how these divergences and in particular, how a part of the H2A COOH-terminus, the docking domain, is implicated in both structural and functional properties of the nucleosome. Using biochemical methods in combination with Atomic Force Microscopy and Electron Cryo-Microscopy, we show that the H2A-docking domain is a key structural feature within the nucleosome. Deletion of this domain or replacement with the incomplete docking domain from the variant H2A.Bbd results in significant structural alterations in the nucleosome, including an increase in overall accessibility to nucleases, un-wrapping of ∼10 bp of DNA from each end of the nucleosome and associated changes in the entry/exit angle of DNA ends. These structural alterations are associated with a reduced ability of the chromatin remodeler RSC to both remodel and mobilize the nucleosomes. Linker histone H1 binding is also abrogated in nucleosomes containing the incomplete docking domain of H2A.Bbd. Our data illustrate the unique role of the H2A-docking domain in coordinating the structural-functional aspects of the nucleosome properties. Moreover, our data suggest that incorporation of a 'defective' docking domain may be a primary structural role of H2A.Bbd in chromatin.

  1. Organisation of nucleosomal arrays reconstituted with repetitive African green monkey α-satellite DNA as analysed by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussiek, Malte; Müller, Gabriele; Waldeck, Waldemar; Diekmann, Stephan

    2007-01-01

    Alpha-satellite DNA (AS) is part of centromeric DNA and could be relevant for centromeric chromatin structure: its repetitive character may generate a specifically ordered nucleosomal arrangement and thereby facilitate kinetochore protein binding and chromatin condensation. Although nucleosomal positioning on some satellite sequences had been shown, including AS from African green monkey (AGM), the sequence-dependent nucleosomal organisation of repetitive AS of this species has so far not been analysed. We therefore studied the positioning of reconstituted nucleosomes on AGM AS tandemly repeated DNA. Enzymatic analysis of nucleosome arrays formed on an AS heptamer as well as the localisation of mononucleosomes on an AS dimer by atomic force microscopy (AFM) showed one major positioning frame, in agreement with earlier results. The occupancy of this site was in the range of 45–50%, in quite good agreement with published in vivo observations. AFM measurements of internucleosomal distances formed on the heptamer indicated that the nucleosomal arrangement is governed by sequence-specific DNA-histone interactions yielding defined internucleosomal distances, which, nevertheless, are not compatible with a uniform phasing of the nucleosomes with the AGM AS repeats. PMID:17503032

  2. Full-field dynamic characterization of superhydrophobic condensation on biotemplated nanostructured surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ölçeroğlu, Emre; Hsieh, Chia-Yun; Rahman, Md Mahamudur; Lau, Kenneth K S; McCarthy, Matthew

    2014-07-01

    While superhydrophobic nanostructured surfaces have been shown to promote condensation heat transfer, the successful implementation of these coatings relies on the development of scalable manufacturing strategies as well as continued research into the fundamental physical mechanisms of enhancement. This work demonstrates the fabrication and characterization of superhydrophobic coatings using a simple scalable nanofabrication technique based on self-assembly of the Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) combined with initiated chemical vapor deposition. TMV biotemplating is compatible with a wide range of surface materials and applicable over large areas and complex geometries without the use of any power or heat. The virus-structured coatings fabricated here are macroscopically superhydrophobic (contact angle >170°) and have been characterized using environmental electron scanning microscopy showing sustained and robust coalescence-induced ejection of condensate droplets. Additionally, full-field dynamic characterization of these surfaces during condensation in the presence of noncondensable gases is reported. This technique uses optical microscopy combined with image processing algorithms to track the wetting and growth dynamics of 100s to 1000s of microscale condensate droplets simultaneously. Using this approach, over 3 million independent measurements of droplet size have been used to characterize global heat transfer performance as a function of nucleation site density, coalescence length, and the apparent wetted surface area during dynamic loading. Additionally, the history and behavior of individual nucleation sites, including coalescence events, has been characterized. This work elucidates the nature of superhydrophobic condensation and its enhancement, including the role of nucleation site density during transient operation.

  3. Pre-mRNA splicing is a determinant of nucleosome organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadas Keren-Shaul

    Full Text Available Chromatin organization affects alternative splicing and previous studies have shown that exons have increased nucleosome occupancy compared with their flanking introns. To determine whether alternative splicing affects chromatin organization we developed a system in which the alternative splicing pattern switched from inclusion to skipping as a function of time. Changes in nucleosome occupancy were correlated with the change in the splicing pattern. Surprisingly, strengthening of the 5' splice site or strengthening the base pairing of U1 snRNA with an internal exon abrogated the skipping of the internal exons and also affected chromatin organization. Over-expression of splicing regulatory proteins also affected the splicing pattern and changed nucleosome occupancy. A specific splicing inhibitor was used to show that splicing impacts nucleosome organization endogenously. The effect of splicing on the chromatin required a functional U1 snRNA base pairing with the 5' splice site, but U1 pairing was not essential for U1 snRNA enhancement of transcription. Overall, these results suggest that splicing can affect chromatin organization.

  4. Circulating nucleosomes and severity of illness in children suffering from meningococcal sepsis treated with protein C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeerleder, Sacha; Stephan, Femke; Emonts, Marieke; de Kleijn, Ester D.; Esmon, Charles T.; Varadi, Katalin; Hack, Cornelis Erik; Hazelzet, Jan A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Cell death leading to circulating nucleosomes and histones is a critical step in the pathogenesis of sepsis and contributes to lethality. Activated protein C was demonstrated to attenuate the harmful effects of histones. The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate whether nu

  5. An Innovative Method for Dynamic Characterization of Fan FilterUnit Operation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Tengfang

    2006-12-21

    Fan filter units (FFU) are widely used to deliver re-circulated air while providing filtration control of particle concentration in controlled environments such as cleanrooms, minienvironments, and operating rooms in hospitals. The objective of this paper is to document an innovative method for characterizing operation and control of an individual fan filter unit within its operable conditions. Built upon the draft laboratory method previously published [1] , this paper presents an updated method including a testing procedure to characterize dynamic operation of fan filter units, i.e., steady-state operation conditions determined by varied control schemes, airflow rates, and pressure differential across the units. The parameters for dynamic characterization include total electric power demand, total pressure efficiency, airflow rate, pressure differential across fan filter units, and airflow uniformity.

  6. Characterization of dynamical phase transitions in quantum jump trajectories beyond the properties of the stationary state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesanovsky, Igor; van Horssen, Merlijn; Guţă, Mădălin; Garrahan, Juan P

    2013-04-12

    We describe how to characterize dynamical phase transitions in open quantum systems from a purely dynamical perspective, namely, through the statistical behavior of quantum jump trajectories. This approach goes beyond considering only properties of the steady state. While in small quantum systems dynamical transitions can only occur trivially at limiting values of the controlling parameters, in many-body systems they arise as collective phenomena and within this perspective they are reminiscent of thermodynamic phase transitions. We illustrate this in open models of increasing complexity: a three-level system, the micromaser, and a dissipative version of the quantum Ising model. In these examples dynamical transitions are accompanied by clear changes in static behavior. This is however not always the case, and, in general, dynamical phases need to be uncovered by observables which are strictly dynamical, e.g., dynamical counting fields. We demonstrate this via the example of a class of models of dissipative quantum glasses, whose dynamics can vary widely despite having identical (and trivial) stationary states. PMID:25167231

  7. Autoantibodies to histone, DNA and nucleosome antigens in canine systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monestier, M; Novick, K E; Karam, E T; Chabanne, L; Monier, J C; Rigal, D

    1995-01-01

    Dogs can develop systemic lupus erythematosus syndromes that are clinically similar to those seen in humans. In contrast, previous observations suggest differences in their autoantibody reactivity patterns against histones and DNA which are components of the nucleosome in chromatin. The objective of this study was to assess comprehensively the levels of autoantibodies against histone, DNA and nucleosome antigens in a population of lupus dogs. The specificities of antibodies in lupus and control dog sera were determined using IgM- and IgG-specific reagents in an ELISA against a variety of chromatin antigens. When compared with control sera, IgG antibodies to individual histones H1, H2A, H3 and H4 were significantly higher in the lupus group. In contrast, we did not detect IgG antibodies specific for H2B, H2A-H2B, DNA, H2A-H2B-DNA or nucleosome in lupus dogs. There was no significant increase in any of the IgM specificities tested. Therefore, the reactivity pattern to nucleosome antigens in canine lupus is restricted to IgG antibodies against individual histones H1, H2A, H3 and H4. This stands in contrast with human and murine lupus, where autoantibodies are directed against a wide variety of nucleosomal determinants, suggesting that unique mechanisms lead to the expansion of anti-histone antibody clones in canine lupus. The high incidence of glomerulonephritis in dog lupus suggests that anti-DNA antibodies are not required for the development of this complication, whereas IgG anti-histone antibodies may be relevant to its pathogenesis. PMID:7529150

  8. Human tNASP promotes in vitro nucleosome assembly with histone H3.3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Daiki; Osakabe, Akihisa; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Hiroki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2015-02-10

    Nuclear autoantigenic sperm proteins (NASPs) are members of the acidic histone chaperones, which promote nucleosome assembly. In humans, two splicing variants proposed for the somatic and testicular isoforms, sNASP and tNASP, respectively, have been found, and the shorter form, sNASP, reportedly promotes nucleosome assembly with the histone H3 isoforms, H3.1, H3.2, and H3.3. However, the biochemical properties of the longer form, tNASP, have not been reported. tNASP is considered to exist specifically in the testis. Our present results revealed that the tNASP protein is ubiquitously produced in various human tissues, in addition to testis. Unexpectedly, we found that the nucleosome assembly activity of purified tNASP was extremely low with the canonical histone H3.1 or H3.2, but was substantially detected with the replacement histone H3.3 variant. A mutational analysis revealed that the H3.3 Ile89 residue, corresponding to the H3.1 Val89 residue, is responsible for the tNASP-mediated nucleosome assembly with H3.3. A histone deposition assay showed that the H3.3-H4 complex is more efficiently deposited onto DNA by tNASP than the H3.1-H4 complex. These results provide evidence that tNASP is ubiquitously produced in various types of human tissues and promotes in vitro nucleosome assembly with H3 variant specificity.

  9. Numerical characterization of nonlinear dynamical systems using parallel computing: The role of GPUS approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazanaro, Filipe I.; Soriano, Diogo C.; Suyama, Ricardo; Madrid, Marconi K.; Oliveira, José Raimundo de; Muñoz, Ignacio Bravo; Attux, Romis

    2016-08-01

    The characterization of nonlinear dynamical systems and their attractors in terms of invariant measures, basins of attractions and the structure of their vector fields usually outlines a task strongly related to the underlying computational cost. In this work, the practical aspects related to the use of parallel computing - specially the use of Graphics Processing Units (GPUS) and of the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) - are reviewed and discussed in the context of nonlinear dynamical systems characterization. In this work such characterization is performed by obtaining both local and global Lyapunov exponents for the classical forced Duffing oscillator. The local divergence measure was employed by the computation of the Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCSS), revealing the general organization of the flow according to the obtained separatrices, while the global Lyapunov exponents were used to characterize the attractors obtained under one or more bifurcation parameters. These simulation sets also illustrate the required computation time and speedup gains provided by different parallel computing strategies, justifying the employment and the relevance of GPUS and CUDA in such extensive numerical approach. Finally, more than simply providing an overview supported by a representative set of simulations, this work also aims to be a unified introduction to the use of the mentioned parallel computing tools in the context of nonlinear dynamical systems, providing codes and examples to be executed in MATLAB and using the CUDA environment, something that is usually fragmented in different scientific communities and restricted to specialists on parallel computing strategies.

  10. High-Bandwidth Dynamic Full-Field Profilometry for Nano-Scale Characterization of MEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article describes an innovative optical interferometric methodology to delivery dynamic surface profilometry with a measurement bandwidth up to 10MHz or higher and a vertical resolution up to 1 nm. Previous work using stroboscopic microscopic interferometry for dynamic characterization of micro (opto)electromechanical systems (M(O)EMS) has been limited in measurement bandwidth mainly within a couple of MHz. For high resonant mode analysis, the stroboscopic light pulse is insufficiently short to capture the moving fringes from dynamic motion of the detected structure. In view of this need, a microscopic prototype based on white-light stroboscopic interferometry with an innovative light superposition strategy was developed to achieve dynamic full-field profilometry with a high measurement bandwidth up to 10MHz or higher. The system primarily consists of an optical microscope, on which a Mirau interferometric objective embedded with a piezoelectric vertical translator, a high-power LED light module with dual operation modes and light synchronizing electronics unit are integrated. A micro cantilever beam used in AFM was measured to verify the system capability in accurate characterisation of dynamic behaviours of the device. The full-field seventh-mode vibration at a vibratory frequency of 3.7MHz can be fully characterized and nano-scale vertical measurement resolution as well as tens micrometers of vertical measurement range can be performed

  11. Structure and nucleosome interaction of the yeast NuA4 and Piccolo-NuA4 histone acetyltransferase complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chittuluru, Johnathan R; Chaban, Yuriy; Monnet-Saksouk, Julie; Carrozza, Michael J; Sapountzi, Vasileia; Selleck, William; Huang, Jiehuan; Utley, Rhea T; Cramet, Myriam; Allard, Stephane; Cai, Gang; Workman, Jerry L; Fried, Michael G; Tan, Song; Côté, Jacques; Asturias, Francisco J

    2011-10-09

    We have used EM and biochemistry to characterize the structure of NuA4, an essential yeast histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complex conserved throughout eukaryotes, and we have determined the interaction of NuA4 with the nucleosome core particle (NCP). The ATM-related Tra1 subunit, which is shared with the SAGA coactivator complex, forms a large domain joined to a second region that accommodates the catalytic subcomplex Piccolo and other NuA4 subunits. EM analysis of a NuA4-NCP complex shows the NCP bound at the periphery of NuA4. EM characterization of Piccolo and Piccolo-NCP provided further information about subunit organization and confirmed that histone acetylation requires minimal contact with the NCP. A small conserved region at the N terminus of Piccolo subunit enhancer of Polycomb-like 1 (Epl1) is essential for NCP interaction, whereas the subunit yeast homolog of mammalian Ing1 2 (Yng2) apparently positions Piccolo for efficient acetylation of histone H4 or histone H2A tails. Taken together, these results provide an understanding of the NuA4 subunit organization and the NuA4-NCP interactions.

  12. Electromechanical and Dynamic Characterization of In-House-Fabricated Amplified Piezo Actuator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Panda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A diamond-shaped amplified piezo actuator (APA fabricated using six multilayered piezo stacks with maximum displacement of 173 μm at 175 V and the amplification factor of 4.3. The dynamic characterization of the actuator was carried out at different frequencies (100 Hz–1 kHz and at different AC voltages (20 V–40 V. The actuator response over this frequency range was found neat, without attenuation of the signal. Numerical modeling of multilayered stack actuator was carried out using empirical equations, and the electromechanical analysis was carried out using ABAQUS software. The block force of the APA was 81 N, calculated by electromechanical analysis. This is similar to that calculated by dynamic characterization method.

  13. Fresh-frozen plasma resuscitation after traumatic brain injury and shock attenuates extracellular nucleosome levels and deoxyribonuclease 1 depletion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Martin; Jin, Guang; Oklu, Rahmi;

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury and shock are among the leading causes of trauma-related mortality. We have previously shown that fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) resuscitation reduces the size of brain lesion and associated swelling compared with crystalloids. We hypothesized that this effect would be associate...... with an attenuation of circulating nucleosome levels, a biomarker of injury with cytotoxic potential, through reconstitution of circulating deoxyribonuclease-1 (DNAse1), an enzyme identified as critical in nucleosome clearance from the circulation....

  14. Characterization of Various Plant-Produced Asphalt Concrete Mixtures Using Dynamic Modulus Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Irfan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This research characterizes the performance of various plant-produced asphalt concrete mixtures by dynamic modulus |E∗| test using asphalt mixture performance tester (AMPT. Marshall designed specimens of seven different mixtures were prepared using the Superpave gyratory compactor and subjected to sinusoidal compressive loading at various temperatures (4.4 to 54.4°C and loading frequencies (0.1 to 25 Hz. A catalog of default dynamic modulus values for typical asphalt concrete mixtures of Pakistan was established by developing stress-dependent master curves separately, for wearing and base course mixtures. The sensitivity of temperature and loading frequency on determination of dynamic modulus value was observed by typical isothermal and isochronal curves, respectively. Also, the effects of various variables on dynamic modulus were investigated using statistical technique of two-level factorial design of experiment. Furthermore, two dynamic modulus prediction models, namely, Witczak and Hirsch, were evaluated for their regional applicability. Results indicated that both the Witczak and Hirsch models mostly underpredict the value of dynamic modulus for the selected conditions/mixtures. The findings of this study are envisaged to facilitate the implementation of relatively new performance based mechanistic-empirical structural design and analysis approach.

  15. A Chemical Biology Approach to Reveal Sirt6-targeted Histone H3 Sites in Nucleosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wesley Wei; Zeng, Yu; Wu, Bo; Deiters, Alexander; Liu, Wenshe R

    2016-07-15

    As a member of a highly conserved family of NAD(+)-dependent histone deacetylases, Sirt6 is a key regulator of mammalian genome stability, metabolism, and life span. Previous studies indicated that Sirt6 is hardwired to remove histone acetylation at H3K9 and H3K56. However, how Sirt6 recognizes its nucleosome substrates has been elusive due to the difficulty of accessing homogeneous acetyl-nucleosomes and the low activity of Sirt6 toward peptide substrates. Based on the fact that Sirt6 has an enhanced activity to remove long chain fatty acylation from lysine, we developed an approach to recombinantly synthesize histone H3 with a fatty acylated lysine, N(ε)-(7-octenoyl)-lysine (OcK), installed at a number of lysine sites and used these acyl-H3 proteins to assemble acyl-nucleosomes as active Sirt6 substrates. A chemical biology approach that visualizes OcK in nucleosomes and therefore allows direct sensitization of Sirt6 activities on its acyl-nucleosome substrates was also formulated. By combining these two approaches, we showed that Sirt6 actively removes acylation from H3K9, H3K18, and H3K27; has relatively low activities toward H3K4 and K3K23; but sluggishly removes acylation at H3K14, H3K36, H3K56, and H3K79. Overexpressing Sirt6 in 293T cells led to downregulated acetylation at H3K18 and K3K27, confirming these two novel Sirt6-targeted nucleosome lysine sites in cells. Given that downregulation of H3K18 acetylation is correlated with a poor prognosis of several cancer types and H3K27 acetylation antagonizes repressive gene regulation by di- and trimethylation at H3K27, our current study implies that Sirt6 may serve as a target for cancer intervention and regulatory pathway investigation in cells. PMID:27152839

  16. The structural basis of modified nucleosome recognition by 53BP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Marcus D; Benlekbir, Samir; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Sherker, Alana; Julien, Jean-Philippe; McEwan, Andrea; Noordermeer, Sylvie M; Sicheri, Frank; Rubinstein, John L; Durocher, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) elicit a histone modification cascade that controls DNA repair. This pathway involves the sequential ubiquitination of histones H1 and H2A by the E3 ubiquitin ligases RNF8 and RNF168, respectively. RNF168 ubiquitinates H2A on lysine 13 and lysine 15 (refs 7, 8) (yielding H2AK13ub and H2AK15ub, respectively), an event that triggers the recruitment of 53BP1 (also known as TP53BP1) to chromatin flanking DSBs. 53BP1 binds specifically to H2AK15ub-containing nucleosomes through a peptide segment termed the ubiquitination-dependent recruitment motif (UDR), which requires the simultaneous engagement of histone H4 lysine 20 dimethylation (H4K20me2) by its tandem Tudor domain. How 53BP1 interacts with these two histone marks in the nucleosomal context, how it recognizes ubiquitin, and how it discriminates between H2AK13ub and H2AK15ub is unknown. Here we present the electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) structure of a dimerized human 53BP1 fragment bound to a H4K20me2-containing and H2AK15ub-containing nucleosome core particle (NCP-ubme) at 4.5 Å resolution. The structure reveals that H4K20me2 and H2AK15ub recognition involves intimate contacts with multiple nucleosomal elements including the acidic patch. Ubiquitin recognition by 53BP1 is unusual and involves the sandwiching of the UDR segment between ubiquitin and the NCP surface. The selectivity for H2AK15ub is imparted by two arginine fingers in the H2A amino-terminal tail, which straddle the nucleosomal DNA and serve to position ubiquitin over the NCP-bound UDR segment. The structure of the complex between NCP-ubme and 53BP1 reveals the basis of 53BP1 recruitment to DSB sites and illuminates how combinations of histone marks and nucleosomal elements cooperate to produce highly specific chromatin responses, such as those elicited following chromosome breaks.

  17. Dynamic Light Scattering for the Characterization of Polydisperse Fractal Systems by the Example of Pyrogenic Silica

    OpenAIRE

    Kätzel, Uwe

    2007-01-01

    Dynamic light scattering (DLS) is a method to size submicron particles by measuring their thermal motion (diffusion) in suspensions and emulsions. However, the validity of the Stokes-Einstein equation that relates the diffusion coefficient and the particle size is limited to spherical particles and very low concentrations. Within this thesis, DLS is used for the characterization of suspensions of pyrogenic silica which consists of fractal-like aggregates composed of sintered spherical primary...

  18. Spatially Distributed Characterization of Soil Dynamics Using Travel-Time Distributions

    OpenAIRE

    Heße, Falk; Zink, Matthias; Kumar, Rohini; Samaniego, Luis; Attinger, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Travel-time distributions are a comprehensive tool for the characterization of hydrological system dynamics. Unlike streamflow hydrographs, they describe the movement and storage of water inside and through the hydrological system. Until recently, studies using such travel-time distributions have generally either been applied to simple (artificial toy) models or to real-world catchments using available time series, e.g. stable isotopes. Whereas the former are limited in their realism, the lat...

  19. Observation and characterization of chimera states in coupled dynamical systems with nonlocal coupling

    OpenAIRE

    Gopal, R; Chandrasekar, V. K.; Venkatesan, A.; Lakshmanan, M.

    2014-01-01

    By developing the concepts of strength of incoherence and discontinuity measure, we show that a distinct quantitative characterization of chimera and multichimera states which occur in networks of coupled nonlinear dynamical systems admitting nonlocal interactions of finite radius can be made. These measures also clearly distinguish between chimera or multichimera states (both stable and breathing types) and coherent and incoherent as well as cluster states....

  20. A self-test and dynamics characterization circuit for MEMS electrostatic actuators

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Martínez, Daniel; Madrenas Boadas, Jordi; Cosp Vilella, Jordi

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a high-bandwidth capacitance estimation and driving circuit especially tailored for its use with MEMS electrostatic actuators. The circuit can be integrated as a part of a system comprising an electrostatic actuator to provide self-testing and failure prediction capabilities and also as a simple and low-cost actuator dynamics characterization system capable of measuring both periodic and nonperiodic movements. Peer Reviewed

  1. Structure and mechanical characterization of DNA i-motif nanowires by molecular dynamics simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Raghvendra Pratap; Cleri, Fabrizio

    2013-01-01

    We studied the structure and mechanical properties of DNA i-motif nanowires by means of molecular dynamics computer simulations. We built up to 230 nm long nanowires, based on a repeated TC5 sequence from crystallographic data, fully relaxed and equilibrated in water. The unusual stacked C*C+ stacked structure, formed by four ssDNA strands arranged in an intercalated tetramer, is here fully characterized both statically and dynamically. By applying stretching, compression and bending deformation with the steered molecular dynamics and umbrella sampling methods, we extract the apparent Young's and bending moduli of the nanowire, as wel as estimates for the tensile strength and persistence length. According to our results, the i-motif nanowire shares similarities with structural proteins, as far as its tensile stiffness, but is closer to nucleic acids and flexible proteins, as far as its bending rigidity is concerned. Furthermore, thanks to its very thin cross section, the apparent tensile toughness is close to...

  2. Characterizing the dynamical accumulation of nuclear DNA in the sperm cells of Lycium barbarum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Deng

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available When sperm cells of the plant Lycium barbarum L. (L. barbarum form in a style they begin to synthesize nuclear DNA (nDNA, which monotonically increases over time. To characterize the dynamics of nDNA accumulation, we present two new dynamical/statistical models. We applied these models to the accumulation of the nDNA content of sperm cells in L. barbarum between 16 to 32 hours after pollination in a style. A statistical analysis of experimental data, involving Markov chain Monte Carlo methods, allowed estimation of parameters of the models. We conclude that the model with no variation in the rate of nDNA accumulation adequately summarizes the data. This is the first work where the dynamics of nDNA accumulation has been quantitatively modeled and analyzed.

  3. Dynamic high-temperature characterization of an iridium alloy in tension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Bo [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nelson, Kevin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Jin, Helena [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Lipinski, Ronald J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bignell, John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ulrich, G. B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); George, E. P. [Ruhr Univ., Bochum (Germany)

    2015-09-01

    Iridium alloys have been utilized as structural materials for certain high-temperature applications, due to their superior strength and ductility at elevated temperatures. The mechanical properties, including failure response at high strain rates and elevated temperatures of the iridium alloys need to be characterized to better understand high-speed impacts at elevated temperatures. A DOP-26 iridium alloy has been dynamically characterized in compression at elevated temperatures with high-temperature Kolsky compression bar techniques. However, the dynamic high-temperature compression tests were not able to provide sufficient dynamic high-temperature failure information of the iridium alloy. In this study, we modified current room-temperature Kolsky tension bar techniques for obtaining dynamic tensile stress-strain curves of the DOP-26 iridium alloy at two different strain rates (~1000 and ~3000 s-1) and temperatures (~750°C and ~1030°C). The effects of strain rate and temperature on the tensile stress-strain response of the iridium alloy were determined. The DOP-26 iridium alloy exhibited high ductility in stress-strain response that strongly depended on both strain rate and temperature.

  4. Nucleosome-specific, time-dependent changes in histone modifications during activation of the early growth response 1 (Egr1) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riffo-Campos, Ángela L; Castillo, Josefa; Tur, Gema; González-Figueroa, Paula; Georgieva, Elena I; Rodríguez, José L; López-Rodas, Gerardo; Rodrigo, M Isabel; Franco, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Histone post-translational modifications and nucleosome remodeling are coordinate events involved in eukaryotic transcriptional regulation. There are relatively few data on the time course with which these events occur in individual nucleosomes. As a contribution to fill this gap, we first describe the nature and time course of structural changes in the nucleosomes -2, -1, and +1 of the murine Egr1 gene upon induction. To initiate the transient activation of the gene, we used the stimulation of MLP29 cells with phorbol esters and the in vivo activation after partial hepatectomy. In both models, nucleosomes -1 and +1 are partially evicted, whereas nucleosomes +1 and -2 slide downstream during transcription. The sliding of the latter nucleosome allows the EGR1 protein to bind its site, resulting in the repression of the gene. To decide whether EGR1 is involved in the sliding of nucleosome -2, Egr1 was knocked down. In the absence of detectable EGR1, the nucleosome still slides and remains downstream longer than in control cells, suggesting that the product of the gene may be rather involved in the returning of the nucleosome to the basal position. Moreover, the presence of eight epigenetic histone marks has been determined at a mononucleosomal level in that chromatin region. H3S10phK14ac, H3K4me3, H3K9me3, and H3K27me3 are characteristic of nucleosome +1, and H3K9ac and H4K16ac are mainly found in nucleosome -1, and H3K27ac predominates in nucleosomes -2 and -1. The temporal changes in these marks suggest distinct functions for some of them, although changes in H3K4me3 may result from histone turnover.

  5. Inferring coarse-grain histone-DNA interaction potentials from high-resolution structures of the nucleosome

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Sam

    2014-01-01

    The histone-DNA interaction in the nucleosome is a fundamental mechanism of genomic compaction and regulation, which remains largely unkown despite a growing structural knowledge of the complex. Here, we propose a framework for the extraction of a nanoscale histone-DNA force-field from a collection of high-resolution structures, which may be adapted to a larger class of protein-DNA complexes. We apply the procedure on a large crystallographic database extended by snapshots from molecular dynamics simulations. The comparison of the structural models first shows that, at the sites of histone-DNA contact, the DNA base-pairs are locally shifted outwards, consistent with locally repulsive forces exerted by the histones. In a second step, we show that the various force profiles of the analyzed structures derive locally from a unique, sequence-independent, quadratic repulsive force field, while the sequence preferences are entirely due to the internal DNA mechanics. We thus obtain the first knowledge-derived nanosca...

  6. Charge State of the Globular Histone Core Controls Stability of the Nucleosome

    OpenAIRE

    Fenley, Andrew T.; Adams, David A.; Onufriev, Alexey V.

    2010-01-01

    Presented here is a quantitative model of the wrapping and unwrapping of the DNA around the histone core of the nucleosome that suggests a mechanism by which this transition can be controlled: alteration of the charge state of the globular histone core. The mechanism is relevant to several classes of posttranslational modifications such as histone acetylation and phosphorylation; several specific scenarios consistent with recent in vivo experiments are considered. The model integrates a descr...

  7. Charge State of the Globular Histone Core Controls Stability of the Nucleosome

    OpenAIRE

    Fenley, Andrew T.; Adams, D. A.; Onufriev, Alexey V.

    2010-01-01

    Presented here is a quantitative model of the wrapping and unwrapping of the DNA around the histone core of the nucleosome that suggests a mechanism by which this transition can be controlled: alteration of the charge state of the globular histone core. The mechanism is relevant to several classes of posttranslational modifications such as histone acetylation and phosphorylation; several specific scenarios consistent with recent in vivo experiments are considered. The model integrates a descr...

  8. Rapid accessibility of nucleosomal DNA in yeast on a second time scale

    OpenAIRE

    Bucceri, Andrea; Kapitza, Kristin; Thoma, Fritz

    2006-01-01

    Packaging DNA in nucleosomes and higher-order chromatin structures restricts its accessibility and constitutes a barrier for all DNA transactions including gene regulation and DNA repair. How and how fast proteins find access to DNA buried in chromatin of living cells is poorly understood. To address this question in a real time in vivo approach, we investigated DNA repair by photolyase in yeast. We show that overexpressed photolyase, a light-dependent DNA-repair enzyme, recognizes and repair...

  9. Genome-wide analysis reveals positional-nucleosome-oriented binding pattern of pioneer factor FOXA1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhenqing; Chen, Zhong; Sunkel, Benjamin; Frietze, Seth; Huang, Tim H.-M.; Wang, Qianben; Jin, Victor X.

    2016-01-01

    The compaction of nucleosomal structures creates a barrier for DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) to access their cognate cis-regulatory elements. Pioneer factors (PFs) such as FOXA1 are able to directly access these cis-targets within compact chromatin. However, how these PFs interplay with nucleosomes remains to be elucidated, and is critical for us to understand the underlying mechanism of gene regulation. Here, we have conducted a computational analysis on a strand-specific paired-end ChIP-exo (termed as ChIP-ePENS) data of FOXA1 in LNCaP cells by our novel algorithm ePEST. We find that FOXA1 chromatin binding occurs via four distinct border modes (or footprint boundary patterns), with a preferential footprint boundary patterns relative to FOXA1 motif orientation. In addition, from this analysis three fundamental nucleotide positions (oG, oS and oH) emerged as major determinants for blocking exo-digestion and forming these four distinct border modes. By integrating histone MNase-seq data, we found an astonishingly consistent, ‘well-positioned’ configuration occurs between FOXA1 motifs and dyads of nucleosomes genome-wide. We further performed ChIP-seq of eight chromatin remodelers and found an increased occupancy of these remodelers on FOXA1 motifs for all four border modes (or footprint boundary patterns), indicating the full occupancy of FOXA1 complex on the three blocking sites (oG, oS and oH) likely produces an active regulatory status with well-positioned phasing for protein binding events. Together, our results suggest a positional-nucleosome-oriented accessing model for PFs seeking target motifs, in which FOXA1 can examine each underlying DNA nucleotide and is able to sense all potential motifs regardless of whether they face inward or outward from histone octamers along the DNA helix axis. PMID:27458208

  10. Whole genome nucleosome sequencing identifies novel types of forensic markers in degraded DNA samples

    OpenAIRE

    Chun-nan Dong; Ya-dong Yang; Shu-jin Li; Ya-ran Yang; Xiao-jing Zhang; Xiang-dong Fang; Jiang-wei Yan; Bin Cong

    2016-01-01

    In the case of mass disasters, missing persons and forensic caseworks, highly degraded biological samples are often encountered. It can be a challenge to analyze and interpret the DNA profiles from these samples. Here we provide a new strategy to solve the problem by taking advantage of the intrinsic structural properties of DNA. We have assessed the in vivo positions of more than 35 million putative nucleosome cores in human leukocytes using high-throughput whole genome sequencing, and ident...

  11. Theory of Nucleosome Corkscrew Sliding in the Presence of Synthetic DNA Ligands

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad-Rafiee, Farshid; Kulic, Igor M.; Schiessel, H.

    2004-01-01

    Histone octamers show a heat-induced mobility along DNA. Recent theoretical studies have established two mechanisms that are qualitatively and quantitatively compatible with in vitro experiments on nucleosome sliding: Octamer repositiong through one-basepair twist defects and through ten-basepair bulge defects. A recent experiment demonstrated that the repositioning is strongly suppressed in the presence of minor-groove binding DNA ligands. In the present study we give a quantitative theory f...

  12. Regulation of nucleosome landscape and transcription factor targeting at tissue-specific enhancers by BRG1

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Gangqing; Dustin E Schones; Cui, Kairong; Ybarra, River; Northrup, Daniel; Tang, Qingsong; Gattinoni, Luca; Restifo, Nicholas P; Huang, Suming; Zhao, Keji

    2011-01-01

    Enhancers of transcription activate transcription via binding of sequence-specific transcription factors to their target sites in chromatin. In this report, we identify GATA1-bound distal sites genome-wide and find a global reorganization of the nucleosomes at these potential enhancers during differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to erythrocytes. We show that the catalytic subunit BRG1 of BAF complexes localizes to these distal sites during differentiation and generates a longer ...

  13. Attenuation of DNA charge transport by compaction into a nucleosome core particle

    OpenAIRE

    Bjorklund, Chad C.; Davis, William B.

    2006-01-01

    The nucleosome core particle (NCP) is the fundamental building block of chromatin which compacts ∼146 bp of DNA around a core histone protein octamer. The effects of NCP packaging on long-range DNA charge transport reactions have not been adequately assessed to date. Here we study DNA hole transport reactions in a 157 bp DNA duplex (AQ-157TG) incorporating multiple repeats of the DNA TG-motif, a strong NCP positioning sequence and a covalently attached Anthraquinone photooxidant. Following a ...

  14. Structural and dynamic characterization of eukaryotic gene regulatory protein domains in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, A L [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1996-05-01

    Solution NMR was primarily used to characterize structure and dynamics in two different eukaryotic protein systems: the {delta}-Al-{var_epsilon} activation domain from c-jun and the Drosophila RNA-binding protein Sex-lethal. The second system is the Drosophila Sex-lethal (Sxl) protein, an RNA-binding protein which is the ``master switch`` in sex determination. Sxl contains two adjacent RNA-binding domains (RBDs) of the RNP consensus-type. The NMR spectrum of the second RBD (Sxl-RBD2) was assigned using multidimensional heteronuclear NMR, and an intermediate-resolution family of structures was calculated from primarily NOE distance restraints. The overall fold was determined to be similar to other RBDs: a {beta}{alpha}{beta}-{beta}{alpha}{beta} pattern of secondary structure, with the two helices packed against a 4-stranded anti-parallel {beta}-sheet. In addition {sup 15}N T{sub 1}, T{sub 2}, and {sup 15}N/{sup 1}H NOE relaxation measurements were carried out to characterize the backbone dynamics of Sxl-RBD2 in solution. RNA corresponding to the polypyrimidine tract of transformer pre-mRNA was generated and titrated into 3 different Sxl-RBD protein constructs. Combining Sxl-RBD1+2 (bht RBDs) with this RNA formed a specific, high affinity protein/RNA complex that is amenable to further NMR characterization. The backbone {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N resonances of Sxl-RBD1+2 were assigned using a triple-resonance approach, and {sup 15}N relaxation experiments were carried out to characterize the backbone dynamics of this complex. The changes in chemical shift in Sxl-RBD1+2 upon binding RNA are observed using Sxl-RBD2 as a substitute for unbound Sxl-RBD1+2. This allowed the binding interface to be qualitatively mapped for the second domain.

  15. Crystalline and liquid Si3 N4 characterization by first-principles molecular dynamics simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castellani Niccoló

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Silicon nitride (Si3 N4 has a wide range of engineering applications where its mechanical and electronic properties can be effectively exploited. In particular, in the microelectronics field, the amorphous silicon nitride films are widely used as charge storage layer in metal-alumina-nitrideoxide nonvolatile memory devices. Atomic structure of amorphous silicon nitride is characterized by an high concentration of traps that control the electric behavior of the final device by the trappingde-trapping mechanism of the electrical charge occurring in its traps. In order to have a deep understanding of the material properties and, in particular, the nature of the electrical active traps a detailed numerical characterization of the crystalline and liquid phases is mandatory. For these reasons first-principles molecular dynamics simulations are extensively employed to simulate the crystalline Si3 N4 in its crystalline and liquid phases. Good agreement with experimental results is obtained in terms of density and formation entalpy. Detailed characterization of c-Si3 N4 electronic properties is performed in terms of band structure and band gap. Then constant temperature and constant volume first-principles molecular dynamics is used to disorder a stoichiometric sample of Si3 N4 . Extensive molecular dynamics simulations are performed to obtain a reliable liquid sample whose atomic structure does not depend on the starting atomic configuration. Detailed characterization of the atomic structure is achieved in terms of radial distribution functions and total structure factor.

  16. Dynamic characterization of small fibers based on the flexural vibrations of a piezoelectric cantilever probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaofei; Ye, Xuan; Li, Xide

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we present a cantilever-probe system excited by a piezoelectric actuator, and use it to measure the dynamic mechanical properties of a micro- and nanoscale fiber. Coupling the fiber to the free end of the cantilever probe, we found the dynamic stiffness and damping coefficient of the fiber from the resonance frequency and the quality factor of the fiber-cantilever-probe system. The properties of Bacillus subtilis fibers measured using our proposed system agreed with tensile measurements, validating our method. Our measurements show that the piezoelectric actuator coupled to cantilever probe can be made equivalent to a clamped cantilever with an effective length, and calculated results show that the errors of measured natural frequency of the system can be ignored if the coupled fiber has an inclination angle of alignment of less than 10°. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the first or second resonant mode is the sensitive mode to test the sample’s dynamic stiffness, while the damping property has different sensitivities for the first four modes. Our theoretical analysis demonstrates that the double-cantilever probe is also an effective sensitive structure that can be used to perform dynamic loading and characterize dynamic response. Our method has the advantage of using amplitude-frequency curves to obtain the dynamic mechanical properties without directly measuring displacements and forces as in tensile tests, and it also avoids the effects of the complex surface structure and deformation presenting in contact resonance method. Our method is effective for measuring the dynamic mechanical properties of fiber-like one-dimensional (1D) materials.

  17. Pseudo-dynamic source characterization accounting for rough-fault effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galis, Martin; Thingbaijam, Kiran K. S.; Mai, P. Martin

    2016-04-01

    Broadband ground-motion simulations, ideally for frequencies up to ~10Hz or higher, are important for earthquake engineering; for example, seismic hazard analysis for critical facilities. An issue with such simulations is realistic generation of radiated wave-field in the desired frequency range. Numerical simulations of dynamic ruptures propagating on rough faults suggest that fault roughness is necessary for realistic high-frequency radiation. However, simulations of dynamic ruptures are too expensive for routine applications. Therefore, simplified synthetic kinematic models are often used. They are usually based on rigorous statistical analysis of rupture models inferred by inversions of seismic and/or geodetic data. However, due to limited resolution of the inversions, these models are valid only for low-frequency range. In addition to the slip, parameters such as rupture-onset time, rise time and source time functions are needed for complete spatiotemporal characterization of the earthquake rupture. But these parameters are poorly resolved in the source inversions. To obtain a physically consistent quantification of these parameters, we simulate and analyze spontaneous dynamic ruptures on rough faults. First, by analyzing the impact of fault roughness on the rupture and seismic radiation, we develop equivalent planar-fault kinematic analogues of the dynamic ruptures. Next, we investigate the spatial interdependencies between the source parameters to allow consistent modeling that emulates the observed behavior of dynamic ruptures capturing the rough-fault effects. Based on these analyses, we formulate a framework for pseudo-dynamic source model, physically consistent with the dynamic ruptures on rough faults.

  18. Whole genome nucleosome sequencing identifies novel types of forensic markers in degraded DNA samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chun-Nan; Yang, Ya-Dong; Li, Shu-Jin; Yang, Ya-Ran; Zhang, Xiao-Jing; Fang, Xiang-Dong; Yan, Jiang-Wei; Cong, Bin

    2016-01-01

    In the case of mass disasters, missing persons and forensic caseworks, highly degraded biological samples are often encountered. It can be a challenge to analyze and interpret the DNA profiles from these samples. Here we provide a new strategy to solve the problem by taking advantage of the intrinsic structural properties of DNA. We have assessed the in vivo positions of more than 35 million putative nucleosome cores in human leukocytes using high-throughput whole genome sequencing, and identified 2,462 single nucleotide variations (SNVs), 128 insertion-deletion polymorphisms (indels). After comparing the sequence reads with 44 STR loci commonly used in forensics, five STRs (TH01, TPOX, D18S51, DYS391, and D10S1248)were matched. We compared these "nucleosome protected STRs" (NPSTRs) with five other non-NPSTRs using mini-STR primer design, real-time PCR, and capillary gel electrophoresis on artificially degraded DNA. Moreover, genotyping performance of the five NPSTRs and five non-NPSTRs was also tested with real casework samples. All results show that loci located in nucleosomes are more likely to be successfully genotyped in degraded samples. In conclusion, after further strict validation, these markers could be incorporated into future forensic and paleontology identification kits, resulting in higher discriminatory power for certain degraded sample types. PMID:27189082

  19. Whole genome nucleosome sequencing identifies novel types of forensic markers in degraded DNA samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chun-nan; Yang, Ya-dong; Li, Shu-jin; Yang, Ya-ran; Zhang, Xiao-jing; Fang, Xiang-dong; Yan, Jiang-wei; Cong, Bin

    2016-01-01

    In the case of mass disasters, missing persons and forensic caseworks, highly degraded biological samples are often encountered. It can be a challenge to analyze and interpret the DNA profiles from these samples. Here we provide a new strategy to solve the problem by taking advantage of the intrinsic structural properties of DNA. We have assessed the in vivo positions of more than 35 million putative nucleosome cores in human leukocytes using high-throughput whole genome sequencing, and identified 2,462 single nucleotide variations (SNVs), 128 insertion-deletion polymorphisms (indels). After comparing the sequence reads with 44 STR loci commonly used in forensics, five STRs (TH01, TPOX, D18S51, DYS391, and D10S1248)were matched. We compared these “nucleosome protected STRs” (NPSTRs) with five other non-NPSTRs using mini-STR primer design, real-time PCR, and capillary gel electrophoresis on artificially degraded DNA. Moreover, genotyping performance of the five NPSTRs and five non-NPSTRs was also tested with real casework samples. All results show that loci located in nucleosomes are more likely to be successfully genotyped in degraded samples. In conclusion, after further strict validation, these markers could be incorporated into future forensic and paleontology identification kits, resulting in higher discriminatory power for certain degraded sample types. PMID:27189082

  20. Influence of Rotational Nucleosome Positioning on Transcription Start Site Selection in Animal Promoters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosini, Giovanna; Bucher, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    The recruitment of RNA-Pol-II to the transcription start site (TSS) is an important step in gene regulation in all organisms. Core promoter elements (CPE) are conserved sequence motifs that guide Pol-II to the TSS by interacting with specific transcription factors (TFs). However, only a minority of animal promoters contains CPEs. It is still unknown how Pol-II selects the TSS in their absence. Here we present a comparative analysis of promoters’ sequence composition and chromatin architecture in five eukaryotic model organisms, which shows the presence of common and unique DNA-encoded features used to organize chromatin. Analysis of Pol-II initiation patterns uncovers that, in the absence of certain CPEs, there is a strong correlation between the spread of initiation and the intensity of the 10 bp periodic signal in the nearest downstream nucleosome. Moreover, promoters’ primary and secondary initiation sites show a characteristic 10 bp periodicity in the absence of CPEs. We also show that DNA natural variants in the region immediately downstream the TSS are able to affect both the nucleosome-DNA affinity and Pol-II initiation pattern. These findings support the notion that, in addition to CPEs mediated selection, sequence–induced nucleosome positioning could be a common and conserved mechanism of TSS selection in animals. PMID:27716823

  1. Role of anti-nucleosome antibodies in the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus and as a marker for lupus nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Gawad, Eman R; Mansour, Amira I; Abdel Aziz, Yasser A; Soliman, Aml F; Fawzy, Rasha M

    2014-01-01

    SLE is a heterogeneous disease, characterized by variation in clinical and serological manifestations. This study intended to verify the role of anti-nucleosome (anti-NCS) antibodies in diagnosis of SLE and lupus nephritis and to establish the correlation between antibody reactivity and disease activity. Study subjects included 35 patients diagnosed as SLE and two control groups. While the first is a group with other collagen diseases (n = 80), the second included 50 matched apparently healthy subjects. Serum IgG anti-NCS antibodies in all subjects were detected by ELISA. Serum anti-NCS were higher in SLE than in the two control groups (P antibodies showed a higher diagnostic sensitivity (74.7%) and specificity (96%) than anti-dsDNA. Combining data of anti-NCS and anti-dsDNA antibodies increased the diagnostic specificity to 97.3%. In conclusion, serum anti-NCS antibodies have diagnostic value and play role in the assessment of disease activity especially active renal disease and may predict disease outcome.

  2. Dynamic characterization of contact interactions of micro-robotic leg structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryou, Jeong Hoon; Oldham, Kenn Richard

    2014-05-01

    Contact dynamics of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) are typically complicated and it is consequently difficult to model all dynamic characteristics observed in time-domain responses involving impact. This issue becomes worse when a device, such as a mobile micro-robot, is not clamped to a substrate and has a complex mechanical structure. To characterize such a contact interaction situation, two walking micro-robot prototypes are tested having intentionally simple structures with different dimensions (21.2 mm × 16.3 mm × 0.75 mm and 32 mm × 25.4 mm × 4.1 mm) and weights (0.16 and 2.7 g). Contact interaction behaviors are characterized by analyzing experimental data under various excitation signals. A numerical approach was used to derive a novel contact model consisting of a coefficient of restitution matrix that uses modal vibration information. Experimental validation of the simulation model shows that it captures various dynamic features of the contact interaction when simulating leg behavior more accurately than previous contact models, such as single-point coefficient of restitution or compliant ground models. In addition, this paper shows that small-scale forces can be added to the simulation to improve model accuracy, resulting in average errors across driving conditions on the order of 2-6% for bounce frequency, maximum foot height, and average foot height, although there is substantial variation from case to case.

  3. Dynamic characterization of silicon nanowires using a terahertz optical asymmetric demultiplexer-based pump-probe scheme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ji, Hua; Cleary, C. S.; Dailey, J. M.;

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic phase and amplitude all-optical responses of silicon nanowires are characterized using a terahertz optical asymmetric demultiplexer (TOAD) based pump-probe scheme. Ultra-fast recovery is observed for moderate pump powers....

  4. Histone-modifying enzymes, histone modifications and histone chaperones in nucleosome assembly: Lessons learned from Rtt109 histone acetyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Jayme L; Chen, Xiaoyue; Walters, Michael A; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    During DNA replication, nucleosomes ahead of replication forks are disassembled to accommodate replication machinery. Following DNA replication, nucleosomes are then reassembled onto replicated DNA using both parental and newly synthesized histones. This process, termed DNA replication-coupled nucleosome assembly (RCNA), is critical for maintaining genome integrity and for the propagation of epigenetic information, dysfunctions of which have been implicated in cancers and aging. In recent years, it has been shown that RCNA is carefully orchestrated by a series of histone modifications, histone chaperones and histone-modifying enzymes. Interestingly, many features of RCNA are also found in processes involving DNA replication-independent nucleosome assembly like histone exchange and gene transcription. In yeast, histone H3 lysine K56 acetylation (H3K56ac) is found in newly synthesized histone H3 and is critical for proper nucleosome assembly and for maintaining genomic stability. The histone acetyltransferase (HAT) regulator of Ty1 transposition 109 (Rtt109) is the sole enzyme responsible for H3K56ac in yeast. Much research has centered on this particular histone modification and histone-modifying enzyme. This Critical Review summarizes much of our current understanding of nucleosome assembly and highlights many important insights learned from studying Rtt109 HATs in fungi. We highlight some seminal features in nucleosome assembly conserved in mammalian systems and describe some of the lingering questions in the field. Further studying fungal and mammalian chromatin assembly may have important public health implications, including deeper understandings of human cancers and aging as well as the pursuit of novel anti-fungal therapies.

  5. Promiscuous presentation and recognition of nucleosomal autoepitopes in lupus: role of autoimmune T cell receptor alpha chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Y; Kaliyaperumal, A; Lu, L; Southwood, S; Sette, A; Michaels, M A; Datta, S K

    1998-02-01

    T cells specific for nucleosomal autoepitopes are selectively expanded in lupus mice and these Th cells drive autoimmune B cells to produce pathogenic antinuclear antibodies. We transfected the TCR-alpha and -beta chain genes of a representative, pathogenic autoantibody-inducing Th clone specific for the nucleosomal core histone peptide H471-94 into TCR-negative recipient cells. Although the autoimmune TCRs were originally derived from SNF1 (I-Ad/q) mice, the transfectants could recognize the nucleosomal autoepitope presented by APC-bearing I-A molecules of all haplotypes tested, as well as human DR molecules. Competition assays indicated that the autoepitopes bound to the MHC class II groove. Most remarkably, MHC-unrestricted recognition of the nucleosomal peptide epitope was conferred by the lupus TCR-alpha chain even when it paired with a TCR-beta chain of irrelevant specificity. Several other disease-relevant Th clones and splenic T cells of lupus mice had similar properties. The TCR-alpha chains of these murine lupus Th clones shared related motifs and charged residues in their CDRs, and similar motifs were apparent even in TCR-alpha chains of human lupus Th clones. The lupus TCR-alpha chains probably contact the nucleosomal peptide complexed with MHC with relatively high affinity/avidity to sustain TCR signaling, because CD4 coreceptor was not required for promiscuous recognition. Indeed, pathogenic autoantibody-inducing, CD4-negative, TCR-alphabeta+ Th cells are expanded in systemic lupus erythematosus. These results have implications regarding thymic selection and peripheral expansion of nucleosome-specific T cells in lupus. They also suggest that universally tolerogenic epitopes could be designed for therapy of lupus patients with diverse HLA alleles. We propose to designate nucleosomes and other antigens bearing universal epitopes "Pantigens" (for promiscuous antigens).

  6. A novel test rig for the dynamic characterization of large size tilting pad journal bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, P.; Ciulli, E.; Saba, D.

    2016-09-01

    The present work concerns the realization of a test bench for the dynamic characterization of high performance tilting pad journal bearings, within a collaboration between the Department of Civil and Industrial Engineering of Pisa, GE Oil&Gas and AM Testing. The objective is to cover journal diameters of interest of GE, from 150 to 300 mm, with peripheral speeds up to 150 m/s, static load up to 270 kN, dynamic loads up to 30 kN and frequencies up to 350 Hz, performances that make the apparatus very competitive worldwide. The adopted configuration has the test article (TA) floating at the mid-span of a rotor supported by two rolling bearings. The TA is statically loaded by a hydraulic actuator and excited dynamically by two orthogonal hydraulic actuators. Construction was recently concluded and preliminary tests are under way. In order to assess in advance the possible accuracy of the tests, a dynamic lumped parameter model of the test bench was developed to perform virtual experiments, including several possible sources of experimental errors and uncertainties. The model was implemented using reduced stiffness and mass matrices obtained from Finite Element Analysis by Component Modal Synthesis.

  7. Dynamic Characterization of Mock Explosive Material Using Reverse Taylor Impact Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferranti, L; Gagliardi, F J; Cunningham, B J; Vandersall, K S

    2010-03-25

    The motivation for the current study is to evaluate the dynamic loading response of an inert mock explosive material used to replicate the physical and mechanical properties of LX-17-1 and PBX 9502 insensitive high explosives. The evaluation of dynamic material parameters is needed for predicting the deformation behavior including the onset of failure and intensity of fragmentation resulting from high velocity impact events. These parameters are necessary for developing and validating physically based material constitutive models that will characterize the safety and performance of energetic materials. The preliminary study uses a reverse Taylor impact configuration that was designed to measure the dynamic behavior of the explosive mock up to and including associated fragmentation. A stationary rod-shaped specimen was impacted using a compressed-gas gun by accelerating a rigid steel anvil attached to a sabot. The impact test employed high-speed imaging and velocity interferometry diagnostics for capturing the transient deformation of the sample at discrete times. Once established as a viable experimental technique with mock explosives, future studies will examine the dynamic response of insensitive high explosives and propellants.

  8. Final rubbery state characterization using a hollow cylinder dynamic shear sample on DMA7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilaiporn Luksameevanish

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic properties of raw natural rubber were examined using a hollow cylinder shaped samplesubjected to shear deformation on a laboratory Dynamic Mechanical Analyser. According to Cox-Merz’s study, dynamic complex viscosity obtained by this method showed a good agreement with shear flow viscosity measured by capillary rheometer. A master curve derived from the dynamic properties were then characterized. A crossing point of storage modulus (G’ and loss modulus (G’’ curves in the master curves was used to identify the final rubbery state, which indicated the transition of rubbery state and molten state. The position of this point depends on quantities and types of reinforcing or non-reinforcing fillers. The final rubbery state was shifted to higher frequency or lower temperature. It was found that the final rubbery state of CaCO3-filled rubber compounds was shifted to higher frequency or lower temperature by approximately 4 decades, while the translation of carbon black-filled rubber compounds was lower than unfilled rubber by about 1 decade. This phenomenon can be used to explain rubber elasticity, i.e. a decreasing of die swell of CaCO3 filled compounds at any high processing temperature. On the other hand, high magnitude of die swell for carbon black filled compound was still obtained.

  9. Using Digital Imaging to Characterize Threshold Dynamic Parameters in Porous Media Based on Lattice Boltzmann Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU You-Sheng; LIU Yang; HUANG Guo-Xiang

    2004-01-01

    @@ Digital images (DI) and lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) are used to characterize the threshold dynamic parameters of porous media. Two-dimensional representations of the porous structure are reconstructed from segmentation of digital images obtained from a series of tiny samples. The threshold pressure gradients and threshold Péclet numbers are researched on seven test samples by using LBM. Numerical results are in agreement with that obtained by integrating Darcy's law. The results also indicate that fluids can flow through porous media only if the fluid force is large enough to overcome threshold pressure gradient in porous media. One synthetic case is used to further illustrate the applicability of the proposed technique. In addition, the dynamical rules in our model are local, therefore it can be run on parallel computers with well computational efficiency.

  10. Divergence-based characterization of fundamental limitations of adaptive dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Raginsky, Maxim

    2010-01-01

    Adaptive dynamical systems arise in a multitude of contexts, e.g., optimization, control, communications, signal processing, and machine learning. A precise characterization of their fundamental limitations is therefore of paramount importance. In this paper, we consider the general problem of adaptively controlling and/or identifying a stochastic dynamical system, where our {\\em a priori} knowledge allows us to place the system in a subset of a metric space (the uncertainty set). We present an information-theoretic meta-theorem that captures the trade-off between the metric complexity (or richness) of the uncertainty set, the amount of information acquired online in the process of controlling and observing the system, and the residual uncertainty remaining after the observations have been collected. Following the approach of Zames, we quantify {\\em a priori} information by the Kolmogorov (metric) entropy of the uncertainty set, while the information acquired online is expressed as a sum of information diverg...

  11. Dynamic tunneling force microscopy for characterizing electronic trap states in non-conductive surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, R.; Williams, C. C., E-mail: clayton@physics.utah.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Dynamic tunneling force microscopy (DTFM) is a scanning probe technique for real space mapping and characterization of individual electronic trap states in non-conductive films with atomic scale spatial resolution. The method is based upon the quantum mechanical tunneling of a single electron back and forth between a metallic atomic force microscopy tip and individual trap states in completely non-conducting surface. This single electron shuttling is measured by detecting the electrostatic force induced on the probe tip at the shuttling frequency. In this paper, the physical basis for the DTFM method is unfolded through a physical model and a derivation of the dynamic tunneling signal as a function of several experimental parameters is shown. Experimental data are compared with the theoretical simulations, showing quantitative consistency and verifying the physical model used. The experimental system is described and representative imaging results are shown.

  12. Dynamic tunneling force microscopy for characterizing electronic trap states in non-conductive surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamic tunneling force microscopy (DTFM) is a scanning probe technique for real space mapping and characterization of individual electronic trap states in non-conductive films with atomic scale spatial resolution. The method is based upon the quantum mechanical tunneling of a single electron back and forth between a metallic atomic force microscopy tip and individual trap states in completely non-conducting surface. This single electron shuttling is measured by detecting the electrostatic force induced on the probe tip at the shuttling frequency. In this paper, the physical basis for the DTFM method is unfolded through a physical model and a derivation of the dynamic tunneling signal as a function of several experimental parameters is shown. Experimental data are compared with the theoretical simulations, showing quantitative consistency and verifying the physical model used. The experimental system is described and representative imaging results are shown

  13. Characterization and application of microearthquake clusters to problems of scaling, fault zone dynamics, and seismic monitoring at Parkfield, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadeau, R.M.

    1995-10-01

    This document contains information about the characterization and application of microearthquake clusters and fault zone dynamics. Topics discussed include: Seismological studies; fault-zone dynamics; periodic recurrence; scaling of microearthquakes to large earthquakes; implications of fault mechanics and seismic hazards; and wave propagation and temporal changes.

  14. Experimental dynamical characterization of five autonomous chaotic oscillators with tunable series resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minati, Ludovico, E-mail: lminati@ieee.org, E-mail: ludovico.minati@unitn.it [MR-Lab, Center for Mind/Brain Science, University of Trento, Trento, Italy and Scientific Department, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Carlo Besta, Milan (Italy)

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, an experimental characterization of the dynamical properties of five autonomous chaotic oscillators, based on bipolar-junction transistors and obtained de-novo through a genetic algorithm in a previous study, is presented. In these circuits, a variable resistor connected in series to the DC voltage source acts as control parameter, for a range of which the largest Lyapunov exponent, correlation dimension, approximate entropy, and amplitude variance asymmetry are calculated, alongside bifurcation diagrams and spectrograms. Numerical simulations are compared to experimental measurements. The oscillators can generate a considerable variety of regular and chaotic sine-like and spike-like signals.

  15. Experimental characterization and damage model of the human skin response to dynamic loadings

    OpenAIRE

    JACQUEMOUD,C; Coret, M; BRUYERE-GARNIER,K; Brunet, M.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this work is to characterize and to model the damage of planar and fibrous soft tissues at high strain rate. As first step, we choose to study the human skin. A dynamic tensile test up to failure is performed on 10x30mm human skin samples. The test is based on the drop test principle and allows loading of samples at a strain rate close to 40 s-1. Classical measurement techniques give global strains whereas a full local strain field is measured on the sample surface by an Imag...

  16. Synthesis, characterization and dynamic NMR studies of a novel chalcone based N-substituted morpholine derivative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskar, R.; Baby, C.; Moni, M. S.; Subramanian, K.

    2013-05-01

    The synthesis of a novel chalcone based N-substituted morpholine derivative namely, (E)-1-(biphenyl-4-yl)-3-(4-(5-morpholinopentyloxy) phenyl) prop-2-en-1-one (BMPP), using a two step protocol is reported. The compound is characterized by FTIR, GC-MS and FTNMR spectroscopy techniques. Advanced 2D NMR techniques such as gradient enhanced COSY, HSQC, HMBC and NOESY were employed to establish through-bond and through-space correlations. Dynamic NMR measurements were carried out to obtain the energy barrier to ring inversion of the morpholine moiety.

  17. Relevance of circulating nucleosomes and oncological biomarkers for predicting response to transarterial chemoembolization therapy in liver cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) therapy is an effective locoregional treatment in hepatocellular cancer (HCC) patients. For early modification of therapy, markers predicting therapy response are urgently required. Here, sera of 50 prospectively and consecutively included HCC patients undergoing 71 TACE therapies were taken before and 3 h, 6 h and 24 h after TACE application to analyze concentrations of circulating nucleosomes, cytokeratin-19 fragments (CYFRA 21-1), alpha fetoprotein (AFP), C-reactive protein (CRP) and several liver biomarkers, and to compare these with radiological response to therapy. While nucleosomes, CYFRA 21-1, CRP and some liver biomarkers increased already 24 h after TACE, percental changes of nucleosome concentrations before and 24 h after TACE and pre- and posttherapeutic values of AFP, gamma-glutamyl-transferase (GGT) and alkaline phosphatase (AP) significantly indicated the later therapy response (39 progression versus 32 no progression). In multivariate analysis, nucleosomes (24 h), AP (24 h) and TACE number were independent predictive markers. The risk score of this combination model achieved an AUC of 81.8% in receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and a sensitivity for prediction of non-response to therapy of 41% at 97% specificity, and of 72% at 78% specificity. Circulating nucleosomes and liver markers are valuable tools for early estimation of the efficacy of TACE therapy in HCC patients

  18. Relevance of circulating nucleosomes and oncological biomarkers for predicting response to transarterial chemoembolization therapy in liver cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durner Jürgen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE therapy is an effective locoregional treatment in hepatocellular cancer (HCC patients. For early modification of therapy, markers predicting therapy response are urgently required. Methods Here, sera of 50 prospectively and consecutively included HCC patients undergoing 71 TACE therapies were taken before and 3 h, 6 h and 24 h after TACE application to analyze concentrations of circulating nucleosomes, cytokeratin-19 fragments (CYFRA 21-1, alpha fetoprotein (AFP, C-reactive protein (CRP and several liver biomarkers, and to compare these with radiological response to therapy. Results While nucleosomes, CYFRA 21-1, CRP and some liver biomarkers increased already 24 h after TACE, percental changes of nucleosome concentrations before and 24 h after TACE and pre- and posttherapeutic values of AFP, gamma-glutamyl-transferase (GGT and alkaline phosphatase (AP significantly indicated the later therapy response (39 progression versus 32 no progression. In multivariate analysis, nucleosomes (24 h, AP (24 h and TACE number were independent predictive markers. The risk score of this combination model achieved an AUC of 81.8% in receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves and a sensitivity for prediction of non-response to therapy of 41% at 97% specificity, and of 72% at 78% specificity. Conclusion Circulating nucleosomes and liver markers are valuable tools for early estimation of the efficacy of TACE therapy in HCC patients.

  19. Genome-wide nucleosome positioning mode and relationship with TFBS dis-tribution in human CD4 +T cell%人类CD4+T细胞核小体定位模式及其与TFBS分布特征关系研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蓝贤梅; 黄艳; 崔颖

    2014-01-01

    目的:研究人类CD4+T细胞全基因组核小体抑制和激活状态下的定位模式,转录因子结合位点( Transcription factor binding site , TFBS)分布特征以及两者之间的关系。方法采用生物信息学软件R、Java等通过编写比对算法进行统计学分析。结果人类CD4+T细胞中核小体定位在染色质上的分布比例为0.6,从休眠到激活状态核小体定位发生位置改变,呈现稳定定位模式和动态定位模式,且比例分别为2%和98%,核小体定位具有较大的动态变化性;核小体定位与TFBS位置关系研究中,发现分布在核小体内的TFBS数目较大,但总体长度较短;而分布在连接DNA上的TFBS数目相对较少,但总体长度较长。结论人类CD4+T细胞休眠和激活状态下全基因组的核小体定位模式基本一致,核小体定位与TFBS关系有明显特征。%Objective To study the human genome-wide nucleosome positioning mode from CD4 +T cell under inhibition and activation status , TFBS distribution characteristics as well as the relationship between them .Methods Using bioinformatics software R , Java to write align-ment algorithms to perform statistical analysis .Results The nucleosomes positioning rate on the chromatin in human CD 4 +T cell was about 60%.Nucleosome positioning lacation came to change when condition of cell was from rest condition to activity condition , both stable positio-ning mode and dynamic positioning mode , and the proportion of them in all of nucleosome posi-tioning were 2%and 98%respectively .Nucleosome positioning appeared larger dynamic varia-bility.Studying the position relationship between nucleosome positioning and TFBS , found that the distribution number of TFBS in nucleosome positioning sequences was bigger , but the over-all length was shorter .And distribution number in the linker was relatively small , but the over-all length was longer than the other .Conclusion The distribution

  20. Developments in ambient noise analysis for the characterization of dynamic response of slopes to seismic shaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Gaudio, Vincenzo; Wasowski, Janusz

    2016-04-01

    In the last few decades, we have witnessed a growing awareness of the role of site dynamic response to seismic shaking in slope failures during earthquakes. Considering the time and costs involved in acquiring accelerometer data on landslide prone slopes, the analysis of ambient noise offers a profitable investigative alternative. Standard procedures of ambient noise analysis, according to the technique known as HVNR or Nakamura's method, were originally devised to interpret data under simple site conditions similar to 1D layering (flat horizontal layering infinitely extended). In such cases, conditions of site amplification, characterized by a strong impedance contrast between a soft surface layer and a stiff bedrock, result in a single pronounced isotropic maximum of spectral ratios between horizontal and vertical component of ambient noise. However, previous studies have shown that the dynamic response of slopes affected by landslides is rather complex, being characterized by multiple resonance peaks with directional variability, thus, the use of standard techniques can encounter difficulties in providing reliable information. A new approach of data analysis has recently been proposed to exploit the potential of information content of Rayleigh waves present in ambient noise, with regard to the identification of frequency and orientation of directional resonance. By exploiting ground motion ellipticity this approach can also provide information on vertical distribution of S-wave velocity, which controls site amplification factors. The method, based on the identification of Rayleigh wave packets from instantaneous polarization properties of ambient noise, was first tested using synthetic signals in order to optimize the data processing system. Then the improved processing scheme is adopted to re-process and re-interpret the ambient noise data acquired on landslide prone slopes around Caramanico Terme (central Italy), at sites monitored also with accelerometer

  1. On the mechanical characterization and modeling of polymer gel brain substitute under dynamic rotational loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenier, B; Hault-Dubrulle, A; Drazetic, P; Fontaine, C; Naceur, H

    2016-10-01

    The use of highly sensitive soft materials has become increasingly apparent in the last few years in numerous industrial fields, due to their viscous and damping nature. Unfortunately these materials remain difficult to characterize using conventional techniques, mainly because of the very low internal forces supported by these materials especially under high strain-rates of deformation. The aim of this work is to investigate the dynamic response of a polymer gel brain analog material under specific rotational-impact experiments. The selected polymer gel commercially known as Sylgard 527 has been studied using a specific procedure for its experimental characterization and numerical modeling. At first an indentation experiment was conducted at several loading rates to study the strain rate sensitivity of the Sylgard 527 gel. During the unloading several relaxation tests were performed after indentation, to assess the viscous behavior of the material. A specific numerical procedure based on moving least square approximation and response surface method was then performed to determine adequate robust material parameters of the Sylgard 527 gel. A sensitivity analysis was assessed to confirm the robustness of the obtained material parameters. For the validation of the obtained material model, a second experiment was conducted using a dynamic rotational loading apparatus. It consists of a metallic cylindrical cup filled with the polymer gel and subjected to an eccentric transient rotational impact. Complete kinematics of the cup and the large strains induced in the Sylgard 527 gel, have been recorded at several patterns by means of optical measurement. The whole apparatus was modeled by the Finite Element Method using explicit dynamic time integration available within Ls-dyna(®) software. Comparison between the physical and the numerical models of the Sylgard 527 gel behavior under rotational choc shows excellent agreements.

  2. Experimental Characterization of the Anatomical Structures of the Lumbar Spine Under Dynamic Sagittal Bending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradfield, C A; Demetropoulos, C K; Luongo, M E; Pyles, C O; Armiger, R S; Merkle, A C

    2015-01-01

    Underbody blast (UBB) events transmit high-rate vertical loads through the seated occupant’s lumbar spine and have a high probability of inducing severe injury. While previous studies have characterized the lumbar spine under quasi-static loading, additional work should focus on the complex kinetic and kinematic response under high loading rates. To discern the biomechanical influence of the lumbar spine’s anatomical structures during dynamic loading, the axial force, flexion-extension moments and range of motion for lumbar motion segments (n=18) were measured during different states of progressive dissection. Pre-compression was applied using a static mass while dynamic bending was applied using an offset drop mass. Dynamic loading resulted in peak axial loads of 4,224±133 N, while maximum peak extension and flexion moments were 19.6±12.5 and -44.8±8.6 Nm in the pre-dissected state, respectively. Upon dissection, transection of the interspinous ligament, ligamentum flavum and facet capsules resulted in significantly larger flexion angles, while the removal of the posterior elements increased the total peak angular displacement in extension from 3.3±1.5 to 5.0±1.7 degrees (p=0.002). This study provides insight on the contribution of individual anatomical components on overall lumbar response under high-rate loading, as well as validation data for numerical models. PMID:25996712

  3. A new experimental setup to characterize the dynamic mechanical behaviour of ballistic yarns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, C.; Kerisit, C.; Boussu, F.; Coutellier, D.; Faderl, N.; Klavzar, A.

    2016-10-01

    Fabrics have been widely used as part of ballistic protections since the 1970s and the development of new ballistic solutions made from fabrics need numerical simulations, in order to predict the performance of the ballistic protection. The performances and the induced mechanisms in ballistic fabrics during an impact depend on the weaving parameters and also on the inner parameters of the yarns used inside these structures. Thus, knowing the dynamic behaviour of yarn is essential to determine the ballistic behaviour of fabrics during an impact. Two major experimental devices exist and are used to test ballistic yarns in a dynamic uniaxial tension. The first one corresponds to the Split Hopkinson Tensile Bars device, which is commonly used to characterize the mechanical properties of materials in uniaxial tension and under high loading. The second one is the transversal impact device. The real conditions of ballistic impact can be realized with this device. Then, this paper deals with a new experimental setup developed in our laboratory and called the ‘tensile impact test for yarn’ (TITY) device. With this device, specific absorbed energy measurements of para-aramid yarns (336 Tex, Twaron™, 1000 filaments) have been carried out and revealed that static and dynamic properties of para-aramid are different.

  4. Characterizations of Dynamic Strain-induced Transformation in Low Carbon Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luhan Hao; Mingyue Sun; Namin Xiao; Dianzhong Li

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic strain-induced transformation of the low carbon steel Q(235) at 770℃ and 850℃ leads to fine ferrite grains. The microstructure characterization and mechanism of the fine ferrite grain were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) technique. The results show that strain-induced microstructure is the mixed microstructure of ferrite and pearlite, with cementite randomly distributed on ferrite grain boundaries and the grains interiors. EBSD images of grain boundaries demonstrate that high angle grain boundaries (HAGBs) are dominant in both of the deformation induced microstructures occurring below and above A(e3) , with only a few low angle grain boundaries (LAGBs) existing in the grain interiors. It implies that the dynamic strain-induced transformation (DSIT) happens above and below A(e3) temperature and has the same phase transition mechanisms. The refinement of ferrite is the cooperative effect of DSIT and continuous dynamic recrystallization (CDRX) of ferrite. Besides, DSIT is deemed as an incomplete carbon diffusion phase transition through the analysis of microstructure and the previous simulated results. The strengths of the Q(235) steel with refined ferrite and pearlite structure get doubled than the initial state without treated by DSIT and the residual stress in the refined structure is partly responsible for the ductility loss.

  5. The Chromatin Remodelling Enzymes SNF2H and SNF2L Position Nucleosomes adjacent to CTCF and Other Transcription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiechens, Nicola; Singh, Vijender; Gkikopoulos, Triantaffyllos; Schofield, Pieta; Rocha, Sonia; Owen-Hughes, Tom

    2016-03-01

    Within the genomes of metazoans, nucleosomes are highly organised adjacent to the binding sites for a subset of transcription factors. Here we have sought to investigate which chromatin remodelling enzymes are responsible for this. We find that the ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling enzyme SNF2H plays a major role organising arrays of nucleosomes adjacent to the binding sites for the architectural transcription factor CTCF sites and acts to promote CTCF binding. At many other factor binding sites SNF2H and the related enzyme SNF2L contribute to nucleosome organisation. The action of SNF2H at CTCF sites is functionally important as depletion of CTCF or SNF2H affects transcription of a common group of genes. This suggests that chromatin remodelling ATPase's most closely related to the Drosophila ISWI protein contribute to the function of many human gene regulatory elements. PMID:27019336

  6. The Chromatin Remodelling Enzymes SNF2H and SNF2L Position Nucleosomes adjacent to CTCF and Other Transcription Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Wiechens

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Within the genomes of metazoans, nucleosomes are highly organised adjacent to the binding sites for a subset of transcription factors. Here we have sought to investigate which chromatin remodelling enzymes are responsible for this. We find that the ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling enzyme SNF2H plays a major role organising arrays of nucleosomes adjacent to the binding sites for the architectural transcription factor CTCF sites and acts to promote CTCF binding. At many other factor binding sites SNF2H and the related enzyme SNF2L contribute to nucleosome organisation. The action of SNF2H at CTCF sites is functionally important as depletion of CTCF or SNF2H affects transcription of a common group of genes. This suggests that chromatin remodelling ATPase's most closely related to the Drosophila ISWI protein contribute to the function of many human gene regulatory elements.

  7. The Chromatin Remodelling Enzymes SNF2H and SNF2L Position Nucleosomes adjacent to CTCF and Other Transcription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiechens, Nicola; Singh, Vijender; Gkikopoulos, Triantaffyllos; Schofield, Pieta; Rocha, Sonia; Owen-Hughes, Tom

    2016-03-01

    Within the genomes of metazoans, nucleosomes are highly organised adjacent to the binding sites for a subset of transcription factors. Here we have sought to investigate which chromatin remodelling enzymes are responsible for this. We find that the ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling enzyme SNF2H plays a major role organising arrays of nucleosomes adjacent to the binding sites for the architectural transcription factor CTCF sites and acts to promote CTCF binding. At many other factor binding sites SNF2H and the related enzyme SNF2L contribute to nucleosome organisation. The action of SNF2H at CTCF sites is functionally important as depletion of CTCF or SNF2H affects transcription of a common group of genes. This suggests that chromatin remodelling ATPase's most closely related to the Drosophila ISWI protein contribute to the function of many human gene regulatory elements.

  8. The disequilibrium of nucleosomes distribution along chromosomes plays a functional and evolutionarily role in regulating gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Cui

    Full Text Available To further understand the relationship between nucleosome-space occupancy (NO and global transcriptional activity in mammals, we acquired a set of genome-wide nucleosome distribution and transcriptome data from the mouse cerebrum and testis based on ChIP (H3-seq and RNA-seq, respectively. We identified a nearly consistent NO patterns among three mouse tissues--cerebrum, testis, and ESCs--and found, through clustering analysis for transcriptional activation, that the NO variations among chromosomes are closely associated with distinct expression levels between house-keeping (HK genes and tissue-specific (TS genes. Both TS and HK genes form clusters albeit the obvious majority. This feature implies that NO patterns, i.e. nucleosome binding and clustering, are coupled with gene clustering that may be functionally and evolutionarily conserved in regulating gene expression among different cell types.

  9. The disequilibrium of nucleosomes distribution along chromosomes plays a functional and evolutionarily role in regulating gene expression

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Peng

    2011-08-19

    To further understand the relationship between nucleosome-space occupancy (NO) and global transcriptional activity in mammals, we acquired a set of genome-wide nucleosome distribution and transcriptome data from the mouse cerebrum and testis based on ChIP (H3)-seq and RNA-seq, respectively. We identified a nearly consistent NO patterns among three mouse tissues-cerebrum, testis, and ESCs-and found, through clustering analysis for transcriptional activation, that the NO variations among chromosomes are closely associated with distinct expression levels between house-keeping (HK) genes and tissue-specific (TS) genes. Both TS and HK genes form clusters albeit the obvious majority. This feature implies that NO patterns, i.e. nucleosome binding and clustering, are coupled with gene clustering that may be functionally and evolutionarily conserved in regulating gene expression among different cell types. © 2011 Cui et al.

  10. Dynamic Characterization of Galfenol (Fe81.6Ga18.4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheidler, Justin J.; Asnani, Vivake M.; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2016-01-01

    Galfenol has the potential to transform the smart materials industry by allowing for the development of multifunctional, load-bearing devices. One of the primary technical challenges faced by this development is the very limited experimental data on Galfenol's frequency-dependent response to dynamic stress, which is critically important for the design of such devices. This report details a novel and precise characterization of the constitutive behavior of polycrystalline Galfenol (Fe81.6Ga18.4) under quasi-static (1 Hz) and dynamic (4 to 1000 Hz) stress loadings. Mechanical loads are applied using a high-frequency load frame. Quasi-static minor and major hysteresis loop measurements of magnetic flux density and strain are presented for constant electromagnet currents (0 to 1.1 A) and constant magnetic fields 0 to 14 kA/m (0 to 180 Oe). The dynamic stress amplitude for minor and major loops is 2.88 and 31.4 MPa (418 and 4550 psi), respectively. Quasi-static material properties closely match published values for similar Galfenol materials. Quasi-static actuation responses are also measured and compared to quasi-static sensing responses; the high degree of reversibility seen in the comparison is consistent with published measurements and modeling results. Dynamic major and minor loops are measured for dynamic stresses up to 31 MPa (4496 psi) and 1 kHz, and the bias condition resulting in maximum, quasi-static sensitivity. Eddy current effects are quantified by considering solid and laminated Galfenol rods. Three key sources of error in the dynamic measurements are accounted for: (1) electromagnetic noise in strain signals due to Galfenol's magnetic response, (2) error in load signals due to the inertial force of fixturing, and (3) phase misalignment between signals due to conditioning electronics. For dynamic characterization, strain error is kept below 1.2 percent of full scale by wiring two collocated gauges in series (noise cancellation) and through leadwire

  11. Regulation of Budding Yeast CENP-A levels Prevents Misincorporation at Promoter Nucleosomes and Transcriptional Defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica M Hildebrand

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The exclusive localization of the histone H3 variant CENP-A to centromeres is essential for accurate chromosome segregation. Ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis helps to ensure that CENP-A does not mislocalize to euchromatin, which can lead to genomic instability. Consistent with this, overexpression of the budding yeast CENP-A(Cse4 is lethal in cells lacking Psh1, the E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets CENP-A(Cse4 for degradation. To identify additional mechanisms that prevent CENP-A(Cse4 misincorporation and lethality, we analyzed the genome-wide mislocalization pattern of overexpressed CENP-A(Cse4 in the presence and absence of Psh1 by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high throughput sequencing. We found that ectopic CENP-A(Cse4 is enriched at promoters that contain histone H2A.Z(Htz1 nucleosomes, but that H2A.Z(Htz1 is not required for CENP-A(Cse4 mislocalization. Instead, the INO80 complex, which removes H2A.Z(Htz1 from nucleosomes, promotes the ectopic deposition of CENP-A(Cse4. Transcriptional profiling revealed gene expression changes in the psh1Δ cells overexpressing CENP-A(Cse4. The down-regulated genes are enriched for CENP-A(Cse4 mislocalization to promoters, while the up-regulated genes correlate with those that are also transcriptionally up-regulated in an htz1Δ strain. Together, these data show that regulating centromeric nucleosome localization is not only critical for maintaining centromere function, but also for ensuring accurate promoter function and transcriptional regulation.

  12. Regulation of Budding Yeast CENP-A levels Prevents Misincorporation at Promoter Nucleosomes and Transcriptional Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Erica M; Biggins, Sue

    2016-03-01

    The exclusive localization of the histone H3 variant CENP-A to centromeres is essential for accurate chromosome segregation. Ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis helps to ensure that CENP-A does not mislocalize to euchromatin, which can lead to genomic instability. Consistent with this, overexpression of the budding yeast CENP-A(Cse4) is lethal in cells lacking Psh1, the E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets CENP-A(Cse4) for degradation. To identify additional mechanisms that prevent CENP-A(Cse4) misincorporation and lethality, we analyzed the genome-wide mislocalization pattern of overexpressed CENP-A(Cse4) in the presence and absence of Psh1 by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high throughput sequencing. We found that ectopic CENP-A(Cse4) is enriched at promoters that contain histone H2A.Z(Htz1) nucleosomes, but that H2A.Z(Htz1) is not required for CENP-A(Cse4) mislocalization. Instead, the INO80 complex, which removes H2A.Z(Htz1) from nucleosomes, promotes the ectopic deposition of CENP-A(Cse4). Transcriptional profiling revealed gene expression changes in the psh1Δ cells overexpressing CENP-A(Cse4). The down-regulated genes are enriched for CENP-A(Cse4) mislocalization to promoters, while the up-regulated genes correlate with those that are also transcriptionally up-regulated in an htz1Δ strain. Together, these data show that regulating centromeric nucleosome localization is not only critical for maintaining centromere function, but also for ensuring accurate promoter function and transcriptional regulation.

  13. A core viral protein binds host nucleosomes to sequester immune danger signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avgousti, Daphne C; Herrmann, Christin; Kulej, Katarzyna; Pancholi, Neha J; Sekulic, Nikolina; Petrescu, Joana; Molden, Rosalynn C; Blumenthal, Daniel; Paris, Andrew J; Reyes, Emigdio D; Ostapchuk, Philomena; Hearing, Patrick; Seeholzer, Steven H; Worthen, G Scott; Black, Ben E; Garcia, Benjamin A; Weitzman, Matthew D

    2016-07-01

    Viral proteins mimic host protein structure and function to redirect cellular processes and subvert innate defenses. Small basic proteins compact and regulate both viral and cellular DNA genomes. Nucleosomes are the repeating units of cellular chromatin and play an important part in innate immune responses. Viral-encoded core basic proteins compact viral genomes, but their impact on host chromatin structure and function remains unexplored. Adenoviruses encode a highly basic protein called protein VII that resembles cellular histones. Although protein VII binds viral DNA and is incorporated with viral genomes into virus particles, it is unknown whether protein VII affects cellular chromatin. Here we show that protein VII alters cellular chromatin, leading us to hypothesize that this has an impact on antiviral responses during adenovirus infection in human cells. We find that protein VII forms complexes with nucleosomes and limits DNA accessibility. We identified post-translational modifications on protein VII that are responsible for chromatin localization. Furthermore, proteomic analysis demonstrated that protein VII is sufficient to alter the protein composition of host chromatin. We found that protein VII is necessary and sufficient for retention in the chromatin of members of the high-mobility-group protein B family (HMGB1, HMGB2 and HMGB3). HMGB1 is actively released in response to inflammatory stimuli and functions as a danger signal to activate immune responses. We showed that protein VII can directly bind HMGB1 in vitro and further demonstrated that protein VII expression in mouse lungs is sufficient to decrease inflammation-induced HMGB1 content and neutrophil recruitment in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Together, our in vitro and in vivo results show that protein VII sequesters HMGB1 and can prevent its release. This study uncovers a viral strategy in which nucleosome binding is exploited to control extracellular immune signaling.

  14. Decoherence of many-spin systems in NMR: From molecular characterization to an environmentally induced quantum dynamical phase transition

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez, Gonzalo A

    2007-01-01

    The control of open quantum systems has a fundamental relevance for fields ranging from quantum information processing to nanotechnology. Typically, the system whose coherent dynamics one wants to manipulate, interacts with an environment that smoothly degrades its quantum dynamics. Thus, a precise understanding of the inner mechanisms of this process, called "decoherence", is critical to develop strategies to control the quantum dynamics. In this thesis we solved the generalized Liouville-von Neumann quantum master equation to obtain the dynamics of many-spin systems interacting with a spin bath. We also solve the spin dynamics within the Keldysh formalism. Both methods lead to identical solutions and together gave us the possibility to obtain numerous physical predictions that contrast well with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance experiments. We applied these tools for molecular characterizations, development of new numerical methodologies and the control of quantum dynamics in experimental implementations. But, mo...

  15. Characterization of drying paint coatings by dynamic speckle and holographic interferometry measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budini, N; Mulone, C; Balducci, N; Vincitorio, F M; López, A J; Ramil, A

    2016-06-10

    In this work we implemented dynamic speckle and holographic interferometry techniques to characterize the drying process of solvent-based paint coatings. We propose a simple way to estimate drying time by measuring speckle activity and incrementally fitting experimental data through standard regression algorithms. This allowed us to predict drying time after about 20-30 min of paint application, which is fast compared to usual times required to reach the so-called tack-free state (≈2  h). In turn, we used holographic interferometry to map small thickness variations in the coating surface during drying. We also demonstrate that results obtained from both techniques correlate with each other, which allows us to improve the accuracy of the drying time estimation. PMID:27409029

  16. Differential Dynamic Microscopy: a High-Throughput Method for Characterizing the Motility of Microorganism

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez, Vincent A; Croze, Ottavio A; Tailleur, Julien; Reufer, Mathias; Schwarz-Linek, Jana; Wilson, Laurence G; Bees, Martin A; Poon, Wilson C K

    2012-01-01

    We present a fast, high-throughput method for characterizing the motility of microorganisms in 3D based on standard imaging microscopy. Instead of tracking individual cells, we analyse the spatio-temporal fluctuations of the intensity in the sample from time-lapse images and obtain the intermediate scattering function (ISF) of the system. We demonstrate our method on two different types of microorganisms: bacteria, both smooth swimming (run only) and wild type (run and tumble) Escherichia coli, and the bi-flagellate alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We validate the methodology using computer simulations and particle tracking. From the ISF, we are able to extract (i) for E. coli: the swimming speed distribution, the fraction of motile cells and the diffusivity, and (ii) for C. reinhardtii: the swimming speed distribution, the amplitude and frequency of the oscillatory dynamics. In both cases, the motility parameters are averaged over \\approx 10^4 cells and obtained in a few minutes.

  17. New Dilated LMI Characterization for the Multiobjective Full-Order Dynamic Output Feedback Synthesis Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zrida Jalel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces new dilated LMI conditions for continuous-time linear systems which not only characterize stability and performance specifications, but also, performance specifications. These new conditions offer, in addition to new analysis tools, synthesis procedures that have the advantages of keeping the controller parameters independent of the Lyapunov matrix and offering supplementary degrees of freedom. The impact of such advantages is great on the multiobjective full-order dynamic output feedback control problem as the obtained dilated LMI conditions always encompass the standard ones. It follows that much less conservatism is possible in comparison to the currently used standard LMI based synthesis procedures. A numerical simulation, based on an empirically abridged search procedure, is presented and shows the advantage of the proposed synthesis methods.

  18. Characterization of ubiquitination dependent dynamics in growth factor receptor signaling by quantitative proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akimov, Vyacheslav; Rigbolt, Kristoffer T G; Nielsen, Mogens M;

    2011-01-01

    or chains of ubiquitin molecules of various types and lengths to targeted proteins is known to alter proteins' lifespan, localization and function and to modulate protein interactions. Despite its central importance in various aspects of cellular life and function there are only a limited number of reports...... investigating ubiquitination on a proteomic scale, mainly due to the inherited complexity and heterogeneity of ubiquitination. We describe here a quantitative proteomics strategy based on the specificity of ubiquitin binding domains (UBDs) and Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino acids in Cell culture (SILAC......) for selectively decoding ubiquitination-driven processes involved in the regulation of cellular signaling networks. We applied this approach to characterize the temporal dynamics of ubiquitination events accompanying epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signal transduction. We used recombinant UBDs derived...

  19. FACT, the Bur kinase pathway, and the histone co-repressor HirC have overlapping nucleosome-related roles in yeast transcription elongation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer R Stevens

    Full Text Available Gene transcription is constrained by the nucleosomal nature of chromosomal DNA. This nucleosomal barrier is modulated by FACT, a conserved histone-binding heterodimer. FACT mediates transcription-linked nucleosome disassembly and also nucleosome reassembly in the wake of the RNA polymerase II transcription complex, and in this way maintains the repression of 'cryptic' promoters found within some genes. Here we focus on a novel mutant version of the yeast FACT subunit Spt16 that supplies essential Spt16 activities but impairs transcription-linked nucleosome reassembly in dominant fashion. This Spt16 mutant protein also has genetic effects that are recessive, which we used to show that certain Spt16 activities collaborate with histone acetylation and the activities of a Bur-kinase/Spt4-Spt5/Paf1C pathway that facilitate transcription elongation. These collaborating activities were opposed by the actions of Rpd3S, a histone deacetylase that restores a repressive chromatin environment in a transcription-linked manner. Spt16 activity paralleling that of HirC, a co-repressor of histone gene expression, was also found to be opposed by Rpd3S. Our findings suggest that Spt16, the Bur/Spt4-Spt5/Paf1C pathway, and normal histone abundance and/or stoichiometry, in mutually cooperative fashion, facilitate nucleosome disassembly during transcription elongation. The recessive nature of these effects of the mutant Spt16 protein on transcription-linked nucleosome disassembly, contrasted to its dominant negative effect on transcription-linked nucleosome reassembly, indicate that mutant FACT harbouring the mutant Spt16 protein competes poorly with normal FACT at the stage of transcription-linked nucleosome disassembly, but effectively with normal FACT for transcription-linked nucleosome reassembly. This functional difference is consistent with the idea that FACT association with the transcription elongation complex depends on nucleosome disassembly, and that the

  20. Size graded sediment dynamics: from the processes characterization to the transport modelling in the English Channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is the implementation of a sediment transport model in the English Channel. The design of such a model requires the identification of the physical processes, their modelling and their in-situ validation. Because of the sedimentary particularities of the study area, modelling of the mechanical behaviour of a non uniform mixture of sediments and particularly of the fine grains within a coarse matrix is required. This study focused on the characterization of the relevant processes by acquisition of experimental and in-situ data. Data acquired in hydro-sedimentary conditions comparable to those found in the English Channel are scarce. A new instrument and image processing technique were specifically conceived and implemented in-situ to observe and measure, with a high temporal resolution, the dynamics of a strongly heterogeneous mixture of particles in a grain-size scale. The data collected compared well with several existing formulations. One of these formulations was chosen to be adapted. The transfer dynamics of fine grains in coarse sediments and their depth of penetration were acquired from stratigraphic samples. The sediment transport model deals with multi-size grains and multi sedimentary layers, it is forced by swell and currents, and accounts for bead load and suspended load transports. It was applied to realistic scenarios for the English Channel. (author)

  1. Dynamic Characterization and Interaction Control of the CBM-Motus Robot for Upper-Limb Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Zollo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents dynamic characterization and control of an upper-limb rehabilitation machine aimed at improving robot performance in the interaction with the patient. An integrated approach between mechanics and control is the key issue of the paper for the development of a robotic machine with desirable dynamic properties. Robot inertial and acceleration properties are studied in the workspace via a graphical representation based on ellipses. Robot friction is experimentally retrieved by means of a parametric identification procedure. A current-based impedance control is developed in order to compensate for friction and enhance control performance in the interaction with the patient by means of force feedback, without increasing system inertia. To this end, servo-amplifier motor currents are monitored to provide force feedback in the interaction, thus avoiding the need for force sensors mounted at the robot end-effector. Current-based impedance control is implemented on the robot; experimental results in free space as well as in constrained space are provided.

  2. In-vitro interferometric characterization of dynamic fluid layers on contact lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primeau, Brian C.; Greivenkamp, John E.; Sullivan, John J.

    2011-08-01

    The anterior refracting surface of the eye when wearing a contact lens is the thin fluid layer that forms on the surface of the contact lens. Under normal conditions, this fluid layer is less than 10 microns thick. The fluid layer thickness and topography change over time and are affected by the material properties of the contact lens, and may affect vision quality and comfort. An in vitro method of characterizing dynamic fluid layers applied to contact lenses mounted on mechanical substrates has been developed using a phase-shifting Twyman-Green interferometer. This interferometer continuously measures light reflected from the surface of the fluid layer, allowing precision analysis of the dynamic fluid layer. Movies showing this fluid layer behavior can be generated. The fluid behavior on the contact lens surface is measured, allowing quantitative analysis beyond what typical contact angle or visual inspection methods provide. The interferometer system has measured the formation and break up of fluid layers. Different fluid and contact lens material combinations have been used, and significant fluid layer properties have been observed in some cases. The interferometer is capable of identifying features in the fluid layer less than a micron in depth with a spatial resolution of about ten microns. An area on the contact lens approximately 6 mm wide can be measured with the system. This paper will discuss the interferometer design and analysis methods used. Measurement results of different material and fluid combinations are presented.

  3. Interferometer and analysis methods for the in vitro characterization of dynamic fluid layers on contact lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primeau, Brian C.; Greivenkamp, John E.

    2012-06-01

    The anterior refracting surface of the eye when wearing a contact lens is the thin fluid layer that forms on the surface of the contact lens. Under normal conditions, this fluid layer is less than 10 μm thick. The fluid layer thickness and topography change over time and are affected by the material properties of the contact lens and may affect vision quality and comfort. An in vitro method of characterizing dynamic fluid layers applied to contact lenses mounted on mechanical substrates has been developed by use of a phase-shifting Twyman-Green interferometer. This interferometer continuously measures light reflected from the surface of the fluid layer, allowing precision analysis of the dynamic fluid layer. Movies showing this fluid layer behavior can be generated. Quantitative analysis beyond typical contact angle or visual inspection methods is provided. Different fluid and contact lens material combinations have been evaluated, and variations in fluid layer properties have been observed. This paper discusses the interferometer design and analysis methods used. Example measurement results of different contact lens are presented.

  4. Characterizing regulated reservoirs dynamics in regional to global scale hydrologic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beighley, E.; Yoon, Y.; Lee, H.; Pavelsky, T.; Allen, G. H.

    2015-12-01

    Lakes and reservoirs are widely used for water supply and flood control resulting in regulated release of outflows that are nonconcurrent with inflows. In hydrologic modeling applications, accounting for the regulated behavior of reservoirs distributed throughout a river system poses a significant challenge because detailed reservoir operation rules or strategies can be difficult or not possible to obtain. Building on this problem, this study addresses the science questions: Can we model reservoir water storage changes and outlet discharges based on satellite measurements of river water surface elevation and inundated area, and How does repeat cycle, mission duration and measurement uncertainty impact our ability to characterize reservoir behavior? A modeling framework suitable for regional to global applications and based on the forthcoming Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission is presented. Although our framework can be combined with data assimilation techniques for real-time flood forecasting, our goal is to represent reservoir storage patterns in large-scale hydrologic models for simulating: (i) impacts of future climate and/or land cover conditions on water resources, and (ii) synthetic storm events (e.g., 100-yr flood) or event catalogs for flood hazard and risk assessments. In-situ and remotely sensed reservoir dynamics are presented for select locations in the Mississippi River Basin and used in the Hillslope River Routing (HRR) hydrologic model to simulate downstream flow dynamics.

  5. Dynamic characterization of crystalline and glass phases of deuterated 1,1,2,2 tetrachloroethane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez, Silvina C., E-mail: clyde@famaf.unc.edu.ar; Zuriaga, Mariano, E-mail: zuriaga@famaf.unc.edu.ar; Serra, Pablo, E-mail: serra@famaf.unc.edu.ar; Wolfenson, Alberto, E-mail: wolf@famaf.unc.edu.ar [Facultad de Matemática, Astronomía y Física, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba and IFEG-CONICET, Ciudad Universitaria, X5016LAE Córdoba (Argentina); Negrier, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.negrier@u-bordeaux.fr [Université Bordeaux, LOMA, UMR 5798, F-33400 Talence, France and LOMA, UMR 5798, F-33400 Talence (France); Tamarit, Josep Lluis, E-mail: josep.lluis.tamarit@upc.edu [Grup de Caracterització de Materials, Departament de Física i Enginyeria Nuclear, ETSEIB, Diagonal 647, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2015-10-07

    A thorough characterization of the γ, β, and glass phases of deuterated 1,1,2,2 tetrachloroethane (C{sub 2}D{sub 2}Cl{sub 4}) via nuclear quadrupole resonance and Molecular Dynamic Simulations (MDSs) is reported. The presence of molecular reorientations was experimentally observed in the glass phase and in the β phase. In the β phase, and from MDS, these reorientations are attributed to two possible movements, i.e., a 180°  reorientation around the C{sub 2} molecular symmetry axis and a reorientation of the molecule between two non-equivalent positions. In the glass phase, the spin-lattice relaxation time T{sub 1} is of the order of 16 times lower than in the crystalline phase and varies as T{sup −1} below 100 K in good agreement with the strong quadrupolar relaxation observed in amorphous materials and in the glassy state of molecular organic systems. The activation energy of molecular reorientations in the glass phase (19 kJ/mol) is comparable to that observed in the glassy crystal of a “molecular cousin” compound, Freon 112 (C{sub 2}F{sub 2}Cl{sub 4}), for the secondary β-relaxation. Moreover, the on-site orientational motion of tetrachloroethane molecules offers a new indirect evidence of the prominent role of such orientational disorder in glassy dynamics.

  6. Characterization and dynamic behavior of wild yeast during spontaneous wine fermentation in steel tanks and amphorae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Cecilia; Molina, Ana María; Nähring, Jörg; Fischer, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    We studied the dynamic behavior of wild yeasts during spontaneous wine fermentation at a winery in the Valais region of Switzerland. Wild yeasts in the winery environment were characterized using a PCR-RFLP method. Up to 11 different yeast species were isolated from the vineyard air, whereas only seven were recovered from the grapes surface. We initially investigated a cultureindependent method in pilot-scale steel fermentation tanks and found a greater diversity of yeasts in the musts from two red grape varieties compared to three white grape varieties. We found that the yeasts Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, Pichia kluyveri, P. membranifaciens and Saccharomyces cerevisiae remained active at the end of the fermentation. We also studied the dynamic behavior of yeasts in Qvevris for the first time using a novel, highlysensitive quantitative real-time PCR method. We found that non-Saccharomyces yeasts were present during the entire fermentation process, with R. mucilaginosa and P. anomala the most prominent species. We studied the relationship between the predominance of different species and the output of the fermentation process. We identified so-called spoilage yeasts in all the fermentations, but high levels of acetic acid accumulated only in those fermentations with an extended lag phase.

  7. Structural and Dynamical Trends in Alkali-Metal Silanides Characterized by Neutron-Scattering Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Wan Si; Dimitrievska, Mirjana; Chotard, Jean-Noel; Zhou, Wei; Janot, Raphael; Skripov, Alexander V.; Udovic, Terrence J.

    2016-09-29

    Structural, vibrational, and dynamical properties of the mono- and mixed-alkali silanides (MSiH3, where M = K, Rb, Cs, K0.5Rb0.5, K0.5Cs0.5, and Rb0.5Cs0.5) were investigated by various neutron experiments, including neutron powder diffraction (NPD), neutron vibrational spectroscopy (NVS), neutron-scattering fixed-window scans (FWSs), and quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) measurements. Structural characterization showed that the mixed compounds exhibit disordered (..alpha..) and ordered (..beta..) phases for temperatures above and below about 200-250 K, respectively, in agreement with their monoalkali correspondents. Vibrational and dynamical properties are strongly influenced by the cation environment; in particular, there is a red shift in the band energies of the librational and bending modes with increasing lattice size as a result of changes in the bond lengths and force constants. Additionally, slightly broader spectral features are observed in the case of the mixed compounds, indicating the presence of structural disorder caused by the random distribution of the alkali-metal cations within the lattice. FWS measurements upon heating showed that there is a large increase in reorientational mobility as the systems go through the order-disorder (..beta..-..alpha..) phase transition, and measurements upon cooling of the ..alpha..-phase revealed the known strong hysteresis for reversion back to the ..beta..-phase. Interestingly, at a given temperature, among the different alkali silanide compounds, the relative reorientational mobilities of the SiH3- anions in the ..alpha..- and ..beta..-phases tended to decrease and increase, respectively, with increasing alkali-metal mass. This dynamical result might provide some insights concerning the enthalpy-entropy compensation effect previously observed for these potentially promising hydrogen storage materials.

  8. Evaluation and characterization of bacterial metabolic dynamics with a novel profiling technique, real-time metabolotyping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Fukuda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Environmental processes in ecosystems are dynamically altered by several metabolic responses in microorganisms, including intracellular sensing and pumping, battle for survival, and supply of or competition for nutrients. Notably, intestinal bacteria maintain homeostatic balance in mammals via multiple dynamic biochemical reactions to produce several metabolites from undigested food, and those metabolites exert various effects on mammalian cells in a time-dependent manner. We have established a method for the analysis of bacterial metabolic dynamics in real time and used it in combination with statistical NMR procedures. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a novel method called real-time metabolotyping (RT-MT, which performs sequential (1H-NMR profiling and two-dimensional (2D (1H, (13C-HSQC (heteronuclear single quantum coherence profiling during bacterial growth in an NMR tube. The profiles were evaluated with such statistical methods as Z-score analysis, principal components analysis, and time series of statistical TOtal Correlation SpectroScopY (TOCSY. In addition, using 2D (1H, (13C-HSQC with the stable isotope labeling technique, we observed the metabolic kinetics of specific biochemical reactions based on time-dependent 2D kinetic profiles. Using these methods, we clarified the pathway for linolenic acid hydrogenation by a gastrointestinal bacterium, Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens. We identified trans11, cis13 conjugated linoleic acid as the intermediate of linolenic acid hydrogenation by B. fibrisolvens, based on the results of (13C-labeling RT-MT experiments. In addition, we showed that the biohydrogenation of polyunsaturated fatty acids serves as a defense mechanism against their toxic effects. CONCLUSIONS: RT-MT is useful for the characterization of beneficial bacterium that shows potential for use as probiotic by producing bioactive compounds.

  9. Characterization of microstructures in metallic materials using static and dynamic acoustic signal processing techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalyanasundaram, P.; Raj, B.; Jayakumar, T. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2006-07-01

    Stainless steels are used in the industrial components of many chemical, petrochemical, process and nuclear industries. The microstructural characteristics of these materials can be determined by non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods such as ultrasonic and acoustic emissions. Ultrasonic techniques are used primarily for detecting defects and static changes in materials, while acoustic emission techniques (AET) reveal the dynamic changes occurring in materials. This paper focused on the use of ultrasonic techniques to detect welding defects in austenitic stainless steel and maraging steel. The study addressed issues facing the use of ultrasonic techniques based on time and frequency domain signal analysis for characterizing changes in the microstructure of type 316 stainless steel and 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel; thermomechanical processing of 15Cr-15Ni-2.3Mo-titanium modified austenitic stainless steel (alloy D9); and, the isothermal annealing behaviour of alloy D9. Ultrasonic spectral analysis based methodologies were also developed for grain size measurement in AISI type 316 stainless steel and modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel. The feasibility of using acoustic emission techniques for detecting fatigue crack growth in 316 stainless steel was also discussed along with the use of AET for on-line monitoring of the aluminium alloy forging process. This study revealed the possibility of finding viable solutions for characterizing conventional processes and components, based on careful selection of parameters of the techniques and appropriate signal analysis methods. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Dynamical systems characterization of the poor man's Navier--Stokes equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polly, J. B.; McDonough, J. M.

    2011-11-01

    The Navier-Stokes (N.-S.) equations governing fluid flow consist of a system of time-dependent, multi-dimensional, non-linear partial differential equations (PDEs) which cannot be solved in real time using current, or near-term foreseeable, computing hardware. The poor man's Navier-Stokes (PMNS) equations comprise a discrete dynamical system (DDS) that is algebraic--hence, easily (and rapidly) solved--and yet which retains many (possibly all) of the temporal behaviors of the full (PDE) N.-S. system at specific spatial locations. In this investigation we outline the derivation of the PMNS equations beginning with the incompressible N.-S. equations. We then consider common techniques to understand the DDS sensitivity to initial conditions (SIC) through calculation of bifurcation diagrams, Lyapunov exponents, and fractal dimension. These techniques are studied with consideration of their ease of computation, and ability to characterize and describe system behavior. The time series generated by the DDS are used to obtain power spectral densities (PSDs) which can be used to categorize most system behaviors. Some chaotic behaviors, however, can be difficult to distinguish via PSD analysis alone; thus we investigate the ability of other methods to characterize the system response.

  11. Combined Dynamic Light Scattering and Raman Spectroscopy Approach for Characterizing the Aggregation of Therapeutic Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Neil Lewis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Determination of the physicochemical properties of protein therapeutics and their aggregates is critical for developing formulations that enhance product efficacy, stability, safety and manufacturability. Analytical challenges are compounded for materials: (1 that are formulated at high concentration, (2 that are formulated with a variety of excipients, and (3 that are available only in small volumes. In this article, a new instrument is described that measures protein secondary and tertiary structure, as well as molecular size, over a range of concentrations and formulation conditions of low volume samples. Specifically, characterization of colloidal and conformational stability is obtained through a combination of two well-established analytical techniques: dynamic light scattering (DLS and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. As the data for these two analytical modalities are collected on the same sample at the same time, the technique enables direct correlation between them, in addition to the more straightforward benefit of minimizing sample usage by providing multiple analytical measurements on the same aliquot non-destructively. The ability to differentiate between unfolding and aggregation that the combination of these techniques provides enables insights into underlying protein aggregation mechanisms. The article will report on mechanistic insights for aggregation that have been obtained from the application of this technique to the characterization of lysozyme, which was evaluated as a function of concentration and pH.

  12. A brief histone in time: understanding the combinatorial functions of histone PTMs in the nucleosome context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Marlee K; Cheung, Peter

    2016-02-01

    It has been over 50 years since Allfrey et al. proposed that histone acetylation regulates RNA synthesis, and the study of histone modifications has progressed at an extraordinary pace for the past two decades. In this review, we provide a perspective on some key events and advances in our understanding of histone modifications. We also highlight reagents and tools from past to present that facilitated progress in this research field. Using histone H3 phosphorylation as an underlying thread, we review the rationale that led to the proposal of the histone code hypothesis, as well as examples that illustrate the concepts of combinatorial histone modifications and cross-talk pathways. We further highlight the importance of investigating these mechanisms in the context of nucleosomes rather than just at the histone level and present current and developing approaches for such studies. Overall, research on histone modifications has yielded great mechanistic insights into the regulation of genomic functions, and extending these studies using nucleosomes will further elucidate the complexity of these pathways in a more physiologically relevant context.

  13. Functionalization and characterization of persistent luminescence nanoparticles by dynamic light scattering, laser Doppler and capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-García, Gonzalo; d'Orlyé, Fanny; Gutiérrez-Granados, Silvia; Martínez-Alfaro, Minerva; Mignet, Nathalie; Richard, Cyrille; Varenne, Anne

    2015-12-01

    Zinc gallate nanoparticles doped with chromium (III) (ZnGa1.995O4:Cr0.005) are innovative persistent luminescence materials with particular optical properties allowing their use for in vivo imaging. They can be excited in the tissue transparency window by visible photons and emit light for hours after the end of the excitation. This allows to observe the probe without any time constraints and without autofluorescence signals produced by biological tissues. Modification of the surface of these nanoparticles is essential to be colloidally stable not only for cell targeting applications but also for proper distribution in living organisms. The use of different methods for controlling and characterizing the functionalization process is imperative to better understand the subsequent interactions with biological elements. This work explores for the first time the characterization and optimization of a classic functionalization sequence, starting with hydroxyl groups (ZGO-OH) at the nanoparticle surface, followed by an aminosilane-functionalization intermediate stage (ZGO-NH2) before PEGylation (ZGO-PEG). Dynamic light scattering and laser doppler electrophoresis were used in combination with capillary electrophoresis to characterize the nanoparticle functionalization processes and control their colloidal and chemical stability. The hydrodynamic diameter, zeta potential, electrophoretic mobility, stability over time and aggregation state of persistent luminescence nanoparticles under physiological-based solution conditions have been studied for each functional state. Additionally, a new protocol to improve ZGO-NH2 stability based on a thermal treatment to complete covalent binding of (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane onto the particle surface has been optimized. This thorough control increases our knowledge on these nanoparticles for subsequent toxicological studies and ultimately medical application.

  14. Characterizing phenological vegetation dynamics amidst extreme climate variability in Australia with MODIS VI data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broich, M.; Huete, A. R.; Xuanlon, M.; Davies, K.; Restrepo-Coupe, N.; Ratana, P.

    2012-12-01

    Australia's climate is extremely variable with inter-annual rainfall at any given site varying by 5- or 6-fold or more, across the continent. In addition to such inter-annual variability, there can be significant intra-annual variability, especially in monsoonal Australia (e.g. the wet tropical savannas) and Mediterranean climates in SW Australia where prolonged dry seasons occur each year. This presents unique challenges to the characterization of seasonal dynamics with satellite datasets. In contrast to annual reoccurring temperature-driven phenology of northern hemisphere mid-latitudes, vegetation dynamics of the vast and dry Australian interior are poorly quantified by existing remote sensing products. For example, in the current global-based MODIS phenology product, central Australia is covered by ~30% fill values for any given year. Two challenges are specific to Australian landscapes: first, the difficulty of characterizing seasonality of rainfall-driven ecosystems in interior Australia where duration and magnitude of green-up and brown down cycles show high inter annual variability; second, modeling two phenologic layers, the trees and the grass in savannas were the trees are evergreen but the herbaceous understory varies with rainfall. Savannas cover >50% of Australia. Australia's vegetation and climate are different from other continents. A MODIS phenology product capable of characterizing vegetation dynamics across the continent is being developed in this research as part of the AusCover national expert network aiming to provide Australian biophysical remote sensing data time-series and continental-scale map products. These products aim to support the Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN) serving ecosystem research in Australia. The MODIS land surface product for Australia first searches the entire time series of each Climate Modeling Grid pixel for low-high-low extreme point sequences. A double logistic function is then fit to each of these

  15. Dynamic characterization, monitoring and control of rotating flexible beam-mass structures via piezo-embedded techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Steven H.-Y.

    1992-01-01

    A variational principle and a finite element discretization technique were used to derive the dynamic equations for a high speed rotating flexible beam-mass system embedded with piezo-electric materials. The dynamic equation thus obtained allows the development of finite element models which accommodate both the original structural element and the piezoelectric element. The solutions of finite element models provide system dynamics needed to design a sensing system. The characterization of gyroscopic effect and damping capacity of smart rotating devices are addressed. Several simulation examples are presented to validate the analytical solution.

  16. Optimized Temporal Window for Detection and Characterization of Renal Cell Carcinomas with Dynamic CT Scanning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinhong Wang; Peijun Wang; Xiaohu Zhao; Xinqin Mao; Xiaolong Gao; Jun Liu

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the optimized time period for detection and characterization of renal cell carcinomas (RCC) when the specific CT features appear during spiral dynamic CT scanning, and to optimize an effective scanning protocol of spiral CT for evaluating RCC.METHODS Twenty-four patients with RCC verified by pathology had undergone a dynamic CT (D-CT) scan. A plain scan was employed to select the target slice. Single-level dynamic scanning started at 14-17 s after the intravenous contrast media had been administered, with a scan interval of 4.9 s acquiring a total number of 17~24 frames. A regular CT scan of the whole kidney followed by a delayed single slice acquisition through the target slice in the excretory phase was performed. Images were assessed in two ways: (1) A group of experienced radiologists reviewed the CT images to find when the specific signs appeared and when the CT features of RCC were optimally displayed; (2) Data measurement of the time-density curves (T-DC) of RCC. The exact time was obtained when the densities of the tumor, renal parenchyma, medulla and aorta reached their peak enhancement, thus also the time when the density difference between tumor and parenchyma was at maximum (Max T-M). Based on the slope of the contrast media uptake curve, T-DC types were ranked from the smallest to the biggest of slope as type A, B and C.RESULTS 1. The review of the CT images by the radiologists showed that the CT features of RCC were optimally demonstrated at 70.2 s. The earliest time at which RCC CT features were examined was at 23.9 s. 2. Image data analysis: the time that the density (or CT value) of the tumor mass reached peak enhancement was at 54 s and peak value was at 80.4 Hu for RCC. The time of the maximal difference of densities between tumor and renal parenchyma was at 102 s.CONCLUSION The following proposal is the scanning protocol for detecting RCC recommended by our research: After a plain scan to determine the target level, a

  17. Vaccination with L. infantum chagasi nucleosomal histones confers protection against new world cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania braziliensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia W Carneiro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nucleosomal histones are intracellular proteins that are highly conserved among Leishmania species. After parasite destruction or spontaneous lysis, exposure to these proteins elicits a strong host immune response. In the present study, we analyzed the protective capability of Leishmania infantum chagasi nucleosomal histones against L. braziliensis infection using different immunization strategies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: BALB/c mice were immunized with either a plasmid DNA cocktail (DNA containing four Leishmania nucleosomal histones or with the DNA cocktail followed by the corresponding recombinant proteins plus CpG (DNA/Protein. Mice were later challenged with L. braziliensis, in the presence of sand fly saliva. Lesion development, parasite load and the cellular immune response were analyzed five weeks after challenge. Immunization with either DNA alone or with DNA/Protein was able to inhibit lesion development. This finding was highlighted by the absence of infected macrophages in tissue sections. Further, parasite load at the infection site and in the draining lymph nodes was also significantly lower in vaccinated animals. This outcome was associated with increased expression of IFN-γ and down regulation of IL-4 at the infection site. CONCLUSION: The data presented here demonstrate the potential use of L. infantum chagasi nucleosomal histones as targets for the development of vaccines against infection with L. braziliensis, as shown by the significant inhibition of disease development following a live challenge.

  18. Nucleosomes and C1q bound to glomerular endothelial cells serve as targets for autoantibodies and determine complement activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Flynn, J.; Flierman, R.; Pol, P. van der; Meulemans-Rops, L.W.M.; Satchell, S.C.; Mathieson, P.W.; Kooten, C. van; Vlag, J. van der; Berden, J.H.M.; Daha, M.R.

    2011-01-01

    Various studies indicate a role for both anti-nucleosome and anti-C1q autoantibodies in glomerulonephritis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. However, a causal relationship between these autoantibodies and the development of lupus nephritis has not been fully established. Since injury of

  19. [THE MODEL OF NUCLEOSOME STRUCTURE BASED ON THE LOCAL ROTATION OF THE NUCLEOHISTONE CHAIN, WHICH INDUCES ITS FOLDING].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyatkina, T N

    2015-01-01

    An alternative model to the "double turn of DNA on the histone core" approach is forwarded based on the biochemical, cytological, and crystallographic data on the structural organization of the chromatin units--nucleosomes. The model assumes that the initial structure is a linear nucleohistone cord with a repeating symmetrical histone sequence. The compact (core) particle (a minimal nucleosome) is forming upon a stepwise rotation of DNA (kinks) at the centre and at two symmetrical sites into each repeating fragment stemming from the electrostatic binding of the lysine ε-NH2-groups with the followed one by one phosphates of the sugar-phosphate chain. As a result, we have a rhomboid structure composed of two counter-symmetrical DNA folds stabilized by histone-histone interactions. Based on disposable data, the histone sequence along nucleosome DNA is deduced. The following characteristics of the sequence are considered: continuity, non-overlapping, versatility, and dyadic symmetry in dispose of two every kind histone molecules and the sequence on the whole. The model is in agreement with a topology of nucleosome DNA, as well as the pattern of DNA-histone and histone-histone interactions in chromatin.

  20. Multiple aspects of atp-dependent nucleosome translocation by rsc and mi-2 are directed by the underlying DNA sequence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vugt, J. van; Jager, M. de; Murawska, M.; Brehm, A.; Noort, J. van; Logie, C.

    2009-01-01

    Background Chromosome structure, DNA metabolic processes and cell type identity can all be affected by changing the positions of nucleosomes along chromosomal DNA, a reaction that is catalysed by SNF2-type ATP-driven chromatin remodelers. Recently it was suggested that in vivo, more than 50% of the

  1. KSHV encoded LANA recruits Nucleosome Assembly Protein NAP1L1 for regulating viral DNA replication and transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Namrata; Thakker, Suhani; Verma, Subhash C.

    2016-09-01

    The establishment of latency is an essential for lifelong persistence and pathogenesis of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is the most abundantly expressed protein during latency and is important for viral genome replication and transcription. Replication-coupled nucleosome assembly is a major step in packaging the newly synthesized DNA into chromatin, but the mechanism of KSHV genome chromatinization post-replication is not understood. Here, we show that nucleosome assembly protein 1-like protein 1 (NAP1L1) associates with LANA. Our binding assays revealed an association of LANA with NAP1L1 in KSHV-infected cells, which binds through its amino terminal domain. Association of these proteins confirmed their localization in specific nuclear compartments of the infected cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays from NAP1L1-depleted cells showed LANA-mediated recruitment of NAP1L1 at the terminal repeat (TR) region of the viral genome. Presence of NAP1L1 stimulated LANA-mediated DNA replication and persistence of a TR-containing plasmid. Depletion of NAP1L1 led to a reduced nucleosome positioning on the viral genome. Furthermore, depletion of NAP1L1 increased the transcription of viral lytic genes and overexpression decreased the promoter activities of LANA-regulated genes. These results confirmed that LANA recruitment of NAP1L1 helps in assembling nucleosome for the chromatinization of newly synthesized viral DNA.

  2. The interactions of yeast SWI/SNF and RSC with the nucleosome before and after chromatin remodeling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sengupta, S.M.; Kanegan, M. van; Persinger, J.; Logie, C.; Cairns, B.R.; Peterson, C.L.; Bartholomew, B.

    2001-01-01

    Interactions of the yeast chromatin-remodeling complexes SWI/SNF and RSC with nucleosomes were probed using site-specific DNA photoaffinity labeling. 5 S rDNA was engineered with photoreactive nucleotides incorporated at different sites in DNA to scan for the subunits of SWI/SNF in close proximity t

  3. Numerical simulation and pattern characterization of nonlinear spatiotemporal dynamics on fractal surfaces for the whole-heart modeling applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yun; Yang, Hui

    2016-08-01

    Engineered and natural systems often involve irregular and self-similar geometric forms, which is called fractal geometry. For instance, precision machining produces a visually flat surface, while which looks like a rough mountain in the nanometer scale under the microscope. Human heart consists of a fractal network of muscle cells, Purkinje fibers, arteries and veins. Cardiac electrical activity exhibits highly nonlinear and fractal behaviors. Although space-time dynamics occur on the fractal geometry, e.g., chemical etching on the surface of machined parts and electrical conduction in the heart, most of existing works modeled space-time dynamics (e.g., reaction, diffusion and propagation) on the Euclidean geometry (e.g., flat planes and rectangular volumes). This brings inaccurate approximation of real-world dynamics, due to sensitive dependence of nonlinear dynamical systems on initial conditions. In this paper, we developed novel methods and tools for the numerical simulation and pattern recognition of spatiotemporal dynamics on fractal surfaces of complex systems, which include (1) characterization and modeling of fractal geometry, (2) fractal-based simulation and modeling of spatiotemporal dynamics, (3) recognizing and quantifying spatiotemporal patterns. Experimental results show that the proposed methods outperform traditional modeling approaches based on the Euclidean geometry, and provide effective tools to model and characterize space-time dynamics on fractal surfaces of complex systems.

  4. Magnetic tweezers based force spectroscopy studies of the structure and dynamics of nucleosomes and chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Kruithof, Maarten Christiaan

    2009-01-01

    Animals and plants are build from a large number of cells. These cells continuously respond to signals from outside and inside the cell by producing various kinds of proteins. The blueprints of these proteins are stored in genes. The genes, in cells with a nucleus, are carried in chromosomes: threadlike structures in the nucleus of a cell that become visible when the cell, upon dividing, condenses these structures. Chromosomes consist of roughly two parts: proteins, that take care of the cond...

  5. Magnetic tweezers based force spectroscopy studies of the structure and dynamics of nucleosomes and chromatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruithof, Maarten Christiaan

    2009-01-01

    Animals and plants are build from a large number of cells. These cells continuously respond to signals from outside and inside the cell by producing various kinds of proteins. The blueprints of these proteins are stored in genes. The genes, in cells with a nucleus, are carried in chromosomes: thread

  6. DNA methylation directly silences genes with non-CpG island promoters and establishes a nucleosome occupied promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Han; Cortez, Connie C; Yang, Xiaojing; Nichols, Peter W; Jones, Peter A; Liang, Gangning

    2011-11-15

    Despite the fact that 45% of all human gene promoters do not contain CpG islands, the role of DNA methylation in control of non-CpG island promoters is controversial and its relevance in normal and pathological processes is poorly understood. Among the few studies which investigate the correlation between DNA methylation and expression of genes with non-CpG island promoters, the majority do not support the view that DNA methylation directly leads to transcription silencing of these genes. Our reporter assays and gene reactivation by 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, a DNA demethylating agent, show that DNA methylation occurring at CpG poor LAMB3 promoter and RUNX3 promoter 1(RUNX3 P1) can directly lead to transcriptional silencing in cells competent to express these genes in vitro. Using Nucleosome Occupancy Methylome- Sequencing, NOMe-Seq, a single-molecule, high-resolution nucleosome positioning assay, we demonstrate that active, but not inactive, non-CpG island promoters display a nucleosome-depleted region (NDR) immediately upstream of the transcription start site (TSS). Furthermore, using NOMe-Seq and clonal analysis, we show that in RUNX3 expressing 623 melanoma cells, RUNX3 P1 has two distinct chromatin configurations: one is unmethylated with an NDR upstream of the TSS; another is methylated and nucleosome occupied, indicating that RUNX3 P1 is monoallelically methylated. Together, these results demonstrate that the epigenetic signatures comprising DNA methylation, histone marks and nucleosome occupancy of non-CpG island promoters are almost identical to CpG island promoters, suggesting that aberrant methylation patterns of non-CpG island promoters may also contribute to tumorigenesis and should therefore be included in analyses of cancer epigenetics.

  7. Intrauterine growth restriction perturbs nucleosome depletion at a growth hormone-responsive element in the mouse IGF-1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Robert A; Yost, Christian C; Yu, Xing; Wiedmeier, Julia E; Callaway, Christopher W; Brown, Ashley S; Lane, Robert H; Fung, Camille M

    2015-12-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is a common human pregnancy complication. IUGR offspring carry significant postnatal risk for early-onset metabolic syndrome, which is associated with persistent reduction in IGF-1 protein expression. We have previously shown that preadolescent IUGR male mice have decreased hepatic IGF-1 mRNA and circulating IGF-1 protein at postnatal day 21, the age when growth hormone (GH) normally upregulates hepatic IGF-1 expression. Here we studied nucleosome occupancy and CpG methylation at a putative growth hormone-responsive element in intron 2 (in2GHRE) of the hepatic IGF-1 gene in normal, sham-operated, and IUGR mice. Nucleosome occupancy and CpG methylation were determined in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and in liver at postnatal days 14, 21, and 42. For CpG methylation, additional time points out to 2 yr were analyzed. We confirmed the putative mouse in2GHRE was GH-responsive, and in normal mice, a single nucleosome was displaced from the hepatic in2GHRE by postnatal day 21, which exposed two STAT5b DNA binding sites. Nucleosome displacement correlated with developmentally programmed CpG demethylation. Finally, IUGR significantly altered the nucleosome-depleted region (NDR) at the in2GHRE of IGF-1 on postnatal day 21, with either complete absence of the NDR or with a shifted NDR exposing only one of two STAT5b DNA binding sites. An NDR shift was also seen in offspring of sham-operated mothers. We conclude that prenatal insult such as IUGR or anesthesia/surgery could perturb the proper formation of a well-positioned NDR at the mouse hepatic IGF-1 in2GHRE necessary for transitioning to an open chromatin state.

  8. Fluid-dynamic characterization of real-scale raceway reactors for microalgae production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fluid dynamic characterization of a 100 m length × 1 m wide channel raceway photobioreactor was carried out. The effects of water depth, liquid velocity and the presence, or absence, of sump baffles to improve the CO2 supply transfer were considered in relation to on the power consumption, residence time and mixing in the reactor was studied. When operated at a depth of 20 cm, the power consumption was between 1.5 and 8.4 W m−3 depending on the forward velocity, with higher values occurring when the baffle was in place. Residence times and the degree of mixing at each section of the raceway (paddlewheel, bends, channels and sump) were measured experimentally. Mixing occurred mainly in the sump, paddlewheel and bends, with a maximum dispersion coefficient of 0.07 m2 s−1. These sections, however, only contributed a small fraction to the total volume of the raceway. Bodenstein numbers from 200 to 540 for the channel sections indicated plug-flow characteristics. Mixing times ranged from 1.4 to 6 h, with the presence of the baffle greatly increasing these times despite higher specific power consumption. A total of 15–20 circuits of the raceway were needed to achieve complete mixing without the baffle, compared to 30–40 cycles with the baffle. Vertical mixing was very poor whereas axial mixing was similar to that achieved in closed photobioreactors. The methodologies applied were shown to be useful in determining the fluid dynamics of a raceway photobioreactor. Equations useful in simulating the power consumption as a function of the design and operation parameters have been validated. -- Highlights: •Power consumption due to accessories can limit the use of raceway reactors for energy purposes. •Use of baffle to enhance mass transfer dramatically increases the power consumption in this type of photobioreactors. •High mixing time, in the order of hours, in raceway reactors limits the operation mode of these systems

  9. Diagnostic Accuracy of Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Characterizing Lung Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inan, Nagihan; Arslan, Arzu; Donmez, Muhammed; Sarisoy, Hasan Tahsin

    2016-01-01

    Background Imaging plays a critical role not only in the detection, but also in the characterization of lung masses as benign or malignant. Objectives To determine the diagnostic accuracy of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant lung masses. Patients and Methods Ninety-four masses were included in this prospective study. Five dynamic series of T1-weighted spoiled gradient echo (FFE) images were obtained, followed by a T1-weighted FFE sequence in the late phase (5th minutes). Contrast enhancement patterns in the early (25th second) and late (5th minute) phase images were evaluated. For the quantitative evaluation, signal intensity (SI)-time curves were obtained and the maximum relative enhancement, wash-in rate, and time-to-peak enhancement of masses in both groups were calculated. Results The early phase contrast enhancement patterns were homogeneous in 78.2% of the benign masses, while heterogeneous in 74.4% of the malignant tumors. On the late phase images, 70.8% of the benign masses showed homogeneous enhancement, while most of the malignant masses showed heterogeneous enhancement (82.4%). During the first pass, the maximum relative enhancement and wash-in rate values of malignant masses were significantly higher than those of the benign masses (P = 0.03 and 0.04, respectively). The cutoff value at 15% yielded a sensitivity of 85.4%, specificity of 61.2%, and positive predictive value of 68.7% for the maximum relative enhancement. Conclusion Contrast enhancement patterns and SI-time curve analysis of MRI are helpful in the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant lung masses. PMID:27703654

  10. Dynamic Mechanical Behavior Characterization of Epoxy-Cast Al + Fe2O3 Thermite Mixture Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferranti, Louis; Thadhani, Naresh N.

    2007-11-01

    The dynamic mechanical behavior characterization of epoxy-cast stoichiometric mixtures of nano- or micron-scale aluminum and hematite (Fe2O3) powders is investigated in this work. Experiments conducted on rod-shaped samples, using instrumented reverse Taylor impact tests employing high-speed imaging and velocity interferometry, show that these composites exhibit viscoelastic deformation and brittle fracture behaviors. Upon impact, the samples display significant elastic and plastic deformation during both the loading and unloading stages, as determined from quantitative high-speed camera measurements of the transient deformation states. Approximately 50 pct elastic recovery of total axial strain was observed to occur rapidly (within tens of microseconds) after impact. A one-dimensional elastic-plastic wave propagation analysis was used for estimating the composite’s dynamic average yield stress and total plastic strain. The results reveal that the nano-Al + Fe2O3-containing epoxy composite is most resilient, has the highest strength, and is more capable of absorbing impact energy. The analysis additionally provides detailed information about elastic and plastic wave interactions for discrete times, up to the final state of the material. Calculations and observations through the coupling of high-speed camera images and velocity interferometry (VISAR) measurements show that the elastic recovery coincides with peak axial strain and the interaction of elastic and plastic waves propagating within the rod-shaped specimen. Hence, such an instrumented Taylor test provides a detailed view of the general wave structure within the material upon impact and, at the same time, enables a complete description of the stress-strain response.

  11. Dynamics and polyphasic characterization of odor-producing cyanobacterium Tychonema bourrellyi from Lake Erhai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hang; Song, Gaofei; Shao, Jihai; Xiang, Xianfen; Li, Qi; Chen, Youxin; Yang, Ping; Yu, Gongliang

    2016-03-01

    The previous studies indicated that Tychonema-like strains from Lake Erhai could release geosmin so that the species was listed as the potential harmful cyanobacteria influencing the drinking water safety around Lake Erhai. But, the dynamics and biological information of this species were too limited. In this study, the polyphasic approach was used to reveal its biological characterization and the dynamics in Lake Erhai. The characters of trichomes, including filaments with solitary or bundle state, reddish-brown or blue-green color, planktonic habitat, and presence of keritomized content, were examined by the microscopic method. The 16S rDNA sequences of these strains were used for phylogenetic analysis and molecular identification. The strains were morphologically classified as Tychonema bourrellyi, and geosmin and β-ionone were identified as the major volatile substances using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. No strains of T. bourrellyi were found to produce microcystin by the HPLC and mcy gene approaches. Cell numbers at 12 sampling sites in Lake Erhai were shown as an average of 3 × 10(4) cells L(-1) in 2009 and 2010. The obvious peaks occurred in July and August each year. This was the first report on occurrence of T. bourrellyi from outside of Europe, and T. bourrellyi was also a newly recorded species in China. Such a result demonstrated that T. bourrellyi could distribute extending from cold waters in North Europe to the warm waters in subtropical regions. It was interesting to observe the coincidence of the occurrence of T. bourrellyi with slightly eutrophicated waters since Lake Erhai had been regarded as an early phase of eutrophicated lake. PMID:26564199

  12. A simulation analysis to characterize the dynamics of vaccinating behaviour on contact networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bauch Chris T

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human behavior influences infectious disease transmission, and numerous "prevalence-behavior" models have analyzed this interplay. These previous analyses assumed homogeneously mixing populations without spatial or social structure. However, spatial and social heterogeneity are known to significantly impact transmission dynamics and are particularly relevant for certain diseases. Previous work has demonstrated that social contact structure can change the individual incentive to vaccinate, thus enabling eradication of a disease under a voluntary vaccination policy when the corresponding homogeneous mixing model predicts that eradication is impossible due to free rider effects. Here, we extend this work and characterize the range of possible behavior-prevalence dynamics on a network. Methods We simulate transmission of a vaccine-prevetable infection through a random, static contact network. Individuals choose whether or not to vaccinate on any given day according to perceived risks of vaccination and infection. Results We find three possible outcomes for behavior-prevalence dynamics on this type of network: small final number vaccinated and final epidemic size (due to rapid control through voluntary ring vaccination; large final number vaccinated and significant final epidemic size (due to imperfect voluntary ring vaccination, and little or no vaccination and large final epidemic size (corresponding to little or no voluntary ring vaccination. We also show that the social contact structure enables eradication under a broad range of assumptions, except when vaccine risk is sufficiently high, the disease risk is sufficiently low, or individuals vaccinate too late for the vaccine to be effective. Conclusion For populations where infection can spread only through social contact network, relatively small differences in parameter values relating to perceived risk or vaccination behavior at the individual level can translate into large

  13. Computer modeling reveals that modifications of the histone tail charges define salt-dependent interaction of the nucleosome core particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ye; Lyubartsev, Alexander P; Korolev, Nikolay; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2009-03-18

    Coarse-grained Langevin molecular dynamics computer simulations were conducted for systems that mimic solutions of nucleosome core particles (NCPs). The NCP was modeled as a negatively charged spherical particle representing the complex of DNA and the globular part of the histones combined with attached strings of connected charged beads modeling the histone tails. The size, charge, and distribution of the tails relative to the core were built to match real NCPs. Three models of NCPs were constructed to represent different extents of covalent modification on the histone tails: (nonmodified) recombinant (rNCP), acetylated (aNCP), and acetylated and phosphorylated (paNCP). The simulation cell contained 10 NCPs in a dielectric continuum with explicit mobile counterions and added salt. The NCP-NCP interaction is decisively dependent on the modification state of the histone tails and on salt conditions. Increasing the monovalent salt concentration (KCl) from salt-free to physiological concentration leads to NCP aggregation in solution for rNCP, whereas NCP associates are observed only occasionally in the system of aNCPs. In the presence of divalent salt (Mg(2+)), rNCPs form dense stable aggregates, whereas aNCPs form aggregates less frequently. Aggregates are formed via histone-tail bridging and accumulation of counterions in the regions of NCP-NCP contacts. The paNCPs do not show NCP-NCP interaction upon addition of KCl or in the presence of Mg(2+). Simulations for systems with a gradual substitution of K(+) for Mg(2+), to mimic the Mg(2+) titration of an NCP solution, were performed. The rNCP system showed stronger aggregation that occurred at lower concentrations of added Mg(2+), compared to the aNCP system. Additional molecular dynamics simulations performed with a single NCP in the simulation cell showed that detachment of the tails from the NCP core was modest under a wide range of salt concentrations. This implies that salt-induced tail dissociation of the

  14. Dynamic functional characterization and phylogenetic changes due to Long Chain Fatty Acids pulses in biogas reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kougias, Panagiotis G; Treu, Laura; Campanaro, Stefano; Zhu, Xinyu; Angelidaki, Irini

    2016-01-01

    The process stability of biogas plants is often deteriorated by the accumulation of Long Chain Fatty Acids (LCFA). The microbial community shifts due to LCFA disturbances have been poorly understood as the molecular techniques used were not able to identify the genome characteristics of uncultured microorganisms, and additionally, the presence of limited number of reference genomes in public databases prevented the comprehension of specific functional roles characterizing these microorganisms. The present study is the first research which deciphers by means of high throughput shotgun sequencing the dynamics of the microbial community during an inhibitory shock load induced by single pulses of unsaturated LCFA at two different concentrations (i.e. 2 g/L-reactor and 3 g/L-reactor). The metagenomic analysis showed that only the microbes associated with LCFA degradation could encode proteins related to "chemotaxis" and "flagellar assembly", which promoted the ability to move towards the LCFA sources so as to degrade them. Moreover, the syntrophic interactions found between Syntrophomonas sp. together with Methanosarcina sp. were possibly assigned to the menaquinone-electron transfer. Finally, it was proven that a previously exposed to LCFA inoculum is more efficient in the degradation process of LCFA due to the specialization of the microbial consortium. PMID:27353502

  15. Dynamic characterization of crystalline and glass phases of deuterated 1,1,2,2 Tetrachloroethane

    CERN Document Server

    Perez, Silvina; Serra, Pablo; Wolfenson, Alberto; Negrier, Philippe; Tamarit, Josep

    2015-01-01

    A thorough characterization of the {\\gamma}, {\\beta} and glass phases of deuterated 1,1,2,2 Tetrachloroethane (C2D2Cl4) via Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance and Molecular Dynamic Simulations (MDS) is reported. The presence of molecular reorientations was experimentally observed in the glass phase and in the {\\beta} phase. In the {\\beta} phase, and from MDS, these reorientations are attributed to two possible movements, i.e. a $180^o$ reorientation around the C2 molecular symmetry axis and a reorientation of the molecule between non-equivalent positions. In the glass phase, the spin-lattice relaxation time T1 is of the order of 16 times lower that T1 in the crystalline phase and varies as $T^{-1}$ below 100 K in good agreement with the strong quadrupolar relaxation observed in amorphous materials and in the glassy state of molecular organic systems. The activation energy of molecular reorientations in the glass phase (19 kJ/mol) is comparable to that observed in the glassy crystal of a "molecular cousin" compound,...

  16. Methods for dynamic characterization of the major muscles activating the lower limb joints in cycling motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navit Roth

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The functional activation, through electrical stimulation, of the lower limb consisting of several deficient muscles requires well-patterned and coordinated activation of these muscles. This study presents a method for characterizing the parameters of the major muscle groups controlling the ankle and knee joints in cycling motion, the latter having particular significance in the rehabilitation of locomotion. To lower mechanical indeterminacy in the joints the system is reduced by grouping the muscles acting in synergism. The joint torques were calculated by inverse dynamics methods from cycling motion data, including kinematics and foot/pedal reaction loads (forces, moments. The mechanical indeterminacy was resolved by applying optimization criteria and the individual muscle torques were parceled-out from the joint torques. System identification of the individual muscles, part of which being bi-articular, in this non-isometric condition was performed from the relationship between the evaluated force and the measured EMG of each the muscles, using both first and second order linear transfer functions. Feasibility of the presented method was demonstrated through the computation of the coefficients of the muscles involved and validating the results on the experimental data obtained from one subject.

  17. Methods for dynamic characterization of the major muscles activating the lower limb joints in cycling motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navit Roth

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The functional activation, through electrical stimulation, of the lower limb consisting of several deficient muscles requires well-patterned and coordinated activation of these muscles. This study presents a method for characterizing the parameters of the major muscle groups controlling the ankle and knee joints in cycling motion, the latter having particular significance in the rehabilitation of locomotion. To lower mechanical indeterminacy in the joints the system is reduced by grouping the muscles acting in synergism. The joint torques were calculated by inverse dynamics methods from cycling motion data, including kinematics and foot/pedal reaction loads (forces, moments. The mechanical indeterminacy was resolved by applying optimization criteria and the individual muscle torques were parceled-out from the joint torques. System identification of the individual muscles, part of which being bi-articular, in this non-isometric condition was performed from the relationship between the evaluated force and the measured EMG of each the muscles, using both first and second order linear transfer functions. Feasibility of the presented method was demonstrated through the computation of the coefficients of the muscles involved and validating the results on the experimental data obtained from one subject.

  18. Dynamic High-Temperature Characterization of an Iridium Alloy in Compression at High Strain Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Bo [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Experimental Environment Simulation Dept.; Nelson, Kevin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Mechanics of Materials Dept.; Lipinski, Ronald J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology Dept.; Bignell, John L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Structural and Thermal Analysis Dept.; Ulrich, G. B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Radioisotope Power Systems Program; George, E. P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Radioisotope Power Systems Program

    2014-06-01

    Iridium alloys have superior strength and ductility at elevated temperatures, making them useful as structural materials for certain high-temperature applications. However, experimental data on their high-temperature high-strain-rate performance are needed for understanding high-speed impacts in severe elevated-temperature environments. Kolsky bars (also called split Hopkinson bars) have been extensively employed for high-strain-rate characterization of materials at room temperature, but it has been challenging to adapt them for the measurement of dynamic properties at high temperatures. Current high-temperature Kolsky compression bar techniques are not capable of obtaining satisfactory high-temperature high-strain-rate stress-strain response of thin iridium specimens investigated in this study. We analyzed the difficulties encountered in high-temperature Kolsky compression bar testing of thin iridium alloy specimens. Appropriate modifications were made to the current high-temperature Kolsky compression bar technique to obtain reliable compressive stress-strain response of an iridium alloy at high strain rates (300 – 10000 s-1) and temperatures (750°C and 1030°C). Uncertainties in such high-temperature high-strain-rate experiments on thin iridium specimens were also analyzed. The compressive stress-strain response of the iridium alloy showed significant sensitivity to strain rate and temperature.

  19. Structure/property (constitutive and dynamic strength/damage characterization of additively manufactured 316L SS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gray III G.T.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For additive manufacturing (AM, the certification and qualification paradigm needs to evolve as there exists no “ASTM-type” additive manufacturing certified process or AM-material produced specifications. Accordingly, utilization of AM materials to meet engineering applications requires quantification of the constitutive properties of these evolving materials in comparison to conventionally-manufactured metals and alloys. Cylinders of 316L SS were produced using a LENS MR-7 laser additive manufacturing system from Optomec (Albuquerque, NM equipped with a 1kW Yb-fiber laser. The microstructure of the AM-316L SS is detailed in both the as-built condition and following heat-treatments designed to obtain full recrystallization. The constitutive behavior as a function of strain rate and temperature is presented and compared to that of nominal annealed wrought 316L SS plate. The dynamic damage evolution and failure response of all three materials was probed using flyer-plate impact driven spallation experiments at a peak stress of 4.5 GPa to examine incipient spallation response. The spall strength of AM-produced 316L SS was found to be very similar for the peak shock stress studied to that of annealed wrought or AM-316L SS following recrystallization. The damage evolution as a function of microstructure was characterized using optical metallography.

  20. Rearrangement of nucleosome structure during excision repair in xeroderma pigmentosum (group A) human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rearrangements of chromatic structure during excision repair were examined in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP; complementation group A) human fibroblasts treated with the small-molecule alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). We observed normal levels of repair synthesis in these cells during the first 12 h after exposure to MMS, in contrast to the near zero incorporation of repair patches following exposure to u.v. light. Our results indicate that the relative nuclease sensitivity of newly repaired regions in MMS-treated XP (group A) cells is quantitatively similar to that of newly repaired regions in MMS-treated normal human fibroblasts. This enhanced sensitivity is accompanied by a marked under-representation of repair-incorporated nucleotides in isolated nucleosome core DNA. Pulse-chase experiments demonstrated that these regions rapidly undergo rearrangements in chromatin structure, and both the rate and extent of these rearrangements are similar to those observed in normal cells. (author)

  1. Towards the theoretical bases of the folding of the 100-A nucleosome filament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We attempt to model DNA packaging at the various stages of ever increasing DNA folding from the 100-A nucleosome filament to various further stages leading up to the metaphase chromosome. We have assumed that a phase transition has induced chromatin into a condensed mode. The mean-field model allows the simultaneous discussion of chromatin with packaging ration η and DNA replication at various stages of folding. We derive a formula correlating (during the S phase of the cell cycle) the DNA polymerase velocity rf (measured in nucleotides per minute) in a relation of inverse proportionality with the degree of DNA packaging: rf = λη-1/2, where the dimensional constant λ has been determined. This model suggests that in the heterochromatic regions of chromatin there is reduced activity of DNA polymerases. We discuss the possible relevance of our model to late replicating telomeres in yeast and several higher eukaryotes. (author). 28 refs, 3 tabs

  2. Possible role of Cl ions in DNA-protein interactions in the nucleosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bende, Attila; Bogár, Ferenc; Ladik, János

    2012-02-01

    The interactions of the PO4- groups of DNA and the positive parts of lysine/arginine were calculated in the nucleosomes using the ONIOM method. For the model system (3HO,K ion, PO4- group, positive side chains of lysine, arginine, resp., Cl) a triple-ζ basis set with polarization functions was applied both at the HF and MP2 levels. For the real system two dezoxyriboses and two guanines were added, the calculations were performed with a double-ζ basis set at the HF level. The direct PO4-⋯Lys/Arg bonds are ˜5 eV strong. These decrease by ˜4 eV due to the Cl ions. The water-mediated PO4-⋯HO⋯Lys/Arg bonds are ˜1 eV strong and the Cl-s hardly change their strength.

  3. PARP3 is a sensor of nicked nucleosomes and monoribosylates histone H2BGlu2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundy, Gabrielle J.; Polo, Luis M.; Zeng, Zhihong; Rulten, Stuart L.; Hoch, Nicolas C.; Paomephan, Pathompong; Xu, Yingqi; Sweet, Steve M.; Thorne, Alan W.; Oliver, Antony W.; Matthews, Steve J.; Pearl, Laurence H.; Caldecott, Keith W.

    2016-01-01

    PARP3 is a member of the ADP-ribosyl transferase superfamily that we show accelerates the repair of chromosomal DNA single-strand breaks in avian DT40 cells. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance experiments reveal that PARP3 employs a conserved DNA-binding interface to detect and stably bind DNA breaks and to accumulate at sites of chromosome damage. PARP3 preferentially binds to and is activated by mononucleosomes containing nicked DNA and which target PARP3 trans-ribosylation activity to a single-histone substrate. Although nicks in naked DNA stimulate PARP3 autoribosylation, nicks in mononucleosomes promote the trans-ribosylation of histone H2B specifically at Glu2. These data identify PARP3 as a molecular sensor of nicked nucleosomes and demonstrate, for the first time, the ribosylation of chromatin at a site-specific DNA single-strand break. PMID:27530147

  4. An all-atom model of the chromatin fiber containing linker histones reveals a versatile structure tuned by the nucleosomal repeat length.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Wong

    Full Text Available In the nucleus of eukaryotic cells, histone proteins organize the linear genome into a functional and hierarchical architecture. In this paper, we use the crystal structures of the nucleosome core particle, B-DNA and the globular domain of H5 linker histone to build the first all-atom model of compact chromatin fibers. In this 3D jigsaw puzzle, DNA bending is achieved by solving an inverse kinematics problem. Our model is based on recent electron microscopy measurements of reconstituted fiber dimensions. Strikingly, we find that the chromatin fiber containing linker histones is a polymorphic structure. We show that different fiber conformations are obtained by tuning the linker histone orientation at the nucleosomes entry/exit according to the nucleosomal repeat length. We propose that the observed in vivo quantization of nucleosomal repeat length could reflect nature's ability to use the DNA molecule's helical geometry in order to give chromatin versatile topological and mechanical properties.

  5. Histone Methylation Marks on Circulating Nucleosomes as Novel Blood-Based Biomarker in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Gezer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Circulating nucleic acids (CNAs are under investigation as a liquid biopsy in cancer as potential non-invasive biomarkers, as stable structure in circulation nucleosomes could be valuable sources for detection of cancer-specific alterations in histone modifications. Our interest is in histone methylation marks with a focus on colorectal cancer, one of the leading cancers respective the incidence and mortality. Our previous work included the analysis of trimethylations of lysine 9 on histone 3 (H3K9me3 and of lysine 20 on histone 4 (H4K20me3 by chromatin immuno- precipitation-related PCR in circulating nucleosomes. Here we asked whether global immunologic measurement of histone marks in circulation could be a suitable approach to show their potential as biomarkers. In addition to H3K9me3 and H4K20me3 we also measured H3K27me3 in plasma samples from CRC patients (n = 63 and cancer free individuals (n = 40 by ELISA-based methylation assays. Our results show that of three marks, the amounts of H3K27me3 (p = 0.04 and H4K20me3 (p < 0.001 were significantly lower in CRC patients than in healthy controls. For H3K9me3 similar amounts were measured in both groups. Areas under the curve (AUC in receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves indicating the power of CRC detection were 0.620 for H3K27me3, 0.715 for H4K20me3 and 0.769 for the combination of both markers. In conclusion, findings of this preliminary study reveal the potential of blood-based detection of CRC by quantification of histone methylation marks and the additive effect of the marker combination.

  6. Land Surface Phenology from MODIS: Characterization of the Collection 5 Global Land Cover Dynamics Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Sangram; Friedl, Mark A.; Tan, Bin; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Verma, Manish

    2010-01-01

    Information related to land surface phenology is important for a variety of applications. For example, phenology is widely used as a diagnostic of ecosystem response to global change. In addition, phenology influences seasonal scale fluxes of water, energy, and carbon between the land surface and atmosphere. Increasingly, the importance of phenology for studies of habitat and biodiversity is also being recognized. While many data sets related to plant phenology have been collected at specific sites or in networks focused on individual plants or plant species, remote sensing provides the only way to observe and monitor phenology over large scales and at regular intervals. The MODIS Global Land Cover Dynamics Product was developed to support investigations that require regional to global scale information related to spatiotemporal dynamics in land surface phenology. Here we describe the Collection 5 version of this product, which represents a substantial refinement relative to the Collection 4 product. This new version provides information related to land surface phenology at higher spatial resolution than Collection 4 (500-m vs. 1-km), and is based on 8-day instead of 16-day input data. The paper presents a brief overview of the algorithm, followed by an assessment of the product. To this end, we present (1) a comparison of results from Collection 5 versus Collection 4 for selected MODIS tiles that span a range of climate and ecological conditions, (2) a characterization of interannual variation in Collections 4 and 5 data for North America from 2001 to 2006, and (3) a comparison of Collection 5 results against ground observations for two forest sites in the northeastern United States. Results show that the Collection 5 product is qualitatively similar to Collection 4. However, Collection 5 has fewer missing values outside of regions with persistent cloud cover and atmospheric aerosols. Interannual variability in Collection 5 is consistent with expected ranges of

  7. Flow Characterization and Dynamic Analysis of a Radial Compressor with Passive Method of Surge Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillou, Erwann

    Due to recent emission regulations, the use of turbochargers for force induction of internal combustion engines has increased. Actually, the trend in diesel engines is to downsize the engine by use of turbochargers that operate at higher pressure ratio. Unfortunately, increasing the rotational speed tends to reduce the turbocharger radial compressor range of operation which is limited at low mass flow rate by the occurrence of surge. In order to extent the operability of turbochargers, compressor housings can be equipped with a passive surge control device also known as ported shroud. This specific casing treatment has been demonstrated to enhance surge margin with minor negative impact on the compressor efficiency. However, the actual working mechanisms of the bypass system remain not well understood. In order to optimize the design of the ported shroud, it is then crucial to identify the dynamic flow changes induced by the implementation of the device to control instabilities. Experimental methods were used to assess the development of instabilities from stable, stall and eventually surge regimes of a ported shroud centrifugal compressor. Systematic comparison was conducted with the same compressor design without ported shroud. Hence, the full pressure dynamic survey of both compressors' performance characteristics converged toward two different and probably interrelated driving mechanisms to the development and/or propagation of unsteadiness within each compressor. One related the pressure disturbances at the compressor inlet, and notably the more apparent development of perturbations in the non-ported compressor impeller, whereas the other was attributed to the pressure distortions induced by the presence of the tongue in the asymmetric design of the compressor volute. Specific points of operation were selected to carry out planar flow measurements. At normal working, both standard and stereoscopic particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) measurements were performed

  8. Rheological and dynamical characterization of blood analogue flows in a slit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We study blood analogue potential of H2O/glycerine/xanthan mixtures through viscosity. • Water/glycerine (35% w/w)/xanthan (0.02% w/w) solution mimics well blood viscosity. • We characterize dynamics of blood analogue flows in open slits with μPIV and CFD. • Results refer to flow rates 4.3 ⩽ Q ⩽ 25.3 L/h. • Wall shear stresses are bellow haemolysis threshold but may trigger thrombus formation. - Abstract: Thrombus formation and haemolysis are blood destructive phenomena depending on the flow hydrodynamics, particularly the shear stresses. This work addresses this issue by characterizing experimentally (using the micro-PIV technique) and numerically (using CFD) steady-state Newtonian (water and water/glycerine solutions) fluid flows and non-Newtonian (water/glycerine/xanthan) blood analogue flows, in a slit with a height of 1.3 mm and a width of 30 mm. The results obtained may provide useful information in the design of extracorporeal devices manipulating blood for diagnosis and therapeutics. Results from CFD showed that the Herschel–Bulkley viscosity model yields velocity predictions in excellent agreement with the experimental data obtained with the micro-PIV. Viscosity measurements evidenced that the water/glycerine (35% w/w)/xanthan (0.02% w/w) solution mimics well the blood global viscosity, exhibiting velocity profile shapes in fully developed flows flattened at the centre, typical of shear-thinning fluids. The maximum shear stresses obtained experimentally (1.39–3.11 Pa) for the blood analogue flows at the studied rates (6.7–25.3 L/h) evidence that haemolysis is unlikely to occur since lysis threshold values are 150 Pa for erythrocytes, 10 Pa for leucocytes and 7.5 Pa for platelets. However, the smallest flow rate cases may be of concern in blood circulation by yielding clot formation near the walls since the shear stresses there are bellow the thrombus/coagulation threshold (1.0–1.8 Pa)

  9. Accurately characterizing the importance of wave-particle interactions in radiation belt dynamics: The pitfalls of statistical wave representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kyle R.; Mann, Ian R.; Rae, I. Jonathan; Sibeck, David G.; Watt, Clare E. J.

    2016-08-01

    Wave-particle interactions play a crucial role in energetic particle dynamics in the Earth's radiation belts. However, the relative importance of different wave modes in these dynamics is poorly understood. Typically, this is assessed during geomagnetic storms using statistically averaged empirical wave models as a function of geomagnetic activity in advanced radiation belt simulations. However, statistical averages poorly characterize extreme events such as geomagnetic storms in that storm-time ultralow frequency wave power is typically larger than that derived over a solar cycle and Kp is a poor proxy for storm-time wave power.

  10. Dynamic characterization of hydrophobic and hydrophilic solutes in oleic-acid enhanced transdermal delivery using two-photon fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tseng, Te-Yu; Yang, Chiu-Sheng; Chen, Yang-Fang [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Tsung-Hua [Department of Dermatology, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Dong, Chen-Yuan, E-mail: cydong@phys.ntu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Center for Quantum Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Center for Optoelectronic Biomedicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-20

    In this letter, we propose an efficient methodology of investigating dynamic properties of sulforhodamine B and rhodamine B hexyl ester molecules transporting across ex-vivo human stratum corneum with and without oleic acid enhancement. Three-dimensional, time-lapse fluorescence images of the stratum corneum can be obtained using two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, temporal quantifications of transport enhancements in diffusion parameters can be achieved with the use of Fick's second law. Dynamic characterization of solutes transporting across the stratum corneum is an effective method for understanding transient phenomena in transdermal delivery of probe molecules, leading to improved delivery strategies of molecular species for therapeutic purposes.

  11. Dynamic characterization of hydrophobic and hydrophilic solutes in oleic-acid enhanced transdermal delivery using two-photon fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Te-Yu; Yang, Chiu-Sheng; Tsai, Tsung-Hua; Chen, Yang-Fang; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2014-10-01

    In this letter, we propose an efficient methodology of investigating dynamic properties of sulforhodamine B and rhodamine B hexyl ester molecules transporting across ex-vivo human stratum corneum with and without oleic acid enhancement. Three-dimensional, time-lapse fluorescence images of the stratum corneum can be obtained using two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, temporal quantifications of transport enhancements in diffusion parameters can be achieved with the use of Fick's second law. Dynamic characterization of solutes transporting across the stratum corneum is an effective method for understanding transient phenomena in transdermal delivery of probe molecules, leading to improved delivery strategies of molecular species for therapeutic purposes.

  12. Using informative Multinomial-Dirichlet prior in a t-mixture with reversible jump estimation of nucleosome positions for genome-wide profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samb, Rawane; Khadraoui, Khader; Belleau, Pascal; Deschênes, Astrid; Lakhal-Chaieb, Lajmi; Droit, Arnaud

    2015-12-01

    Genome-wide mapping of nucleosomes has revealed a great deal about the relationships between chromatin structure and control of gene expression. Recent next generation CHIP-chip and CHIP-Seq technologies have accelerated our understanding of basic principles of chromatin organization. These technologies have taught us that nucleosomes play a crucial role in gene regulation by allowing physical access to transcription factors. Recent methods and experimental advancements allow the determination of nucleosome positions for a given genome area. However, most of these methods estimate the number of nucleosomes either by an EM algorithm using a BIC criterion or an effective heuristic strategy. Here, we introduce a Bayesian method for identifying nucleosome positions. The proposed model is based on a Multinomial-Dirichlet classification and a hierarchical mixture distributions. The number and the positions of nucleosomes are estimated using a reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation technique. We compare the performance of our method on simulated data and MNase-Seq data from Saccharomyces cerevisiae against PING and NOrMAL methods.

  13. Using informative Multinomial-Dirichlet prior in a t-mixture with reversible jump estimation of nucleosome positions for genome-wide profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samb, Rawane; Khadraoui, Khader; Belleau, Pascal; Deschênes, Astrid; Lakhal-Chaieb, Lajmi; Droit, Arnaud

    2015-12-01

    Genome-wide mapping of nucleosomes has revealed a great deal about the relationships between chromatin structure and control of gene expression. Recent next generation CHIP-chip and CHIP-Seq technologies have accelerated our understanding of basic principles of chromatin organization. These technologies have taught us that nucleosomes play a crucial role in gene regulation by allowing physical access to transcription factors. Recent methods and experimental advancements allow the determination of nucleosome positions for a given genome area. However, most of these methods estimate the number of nucleosomes either by an EM algorithm using a BIC criterion or an effective heuristic strategy. Here, we introduce a Bayesian method for identifying nucleosome positions. The proposed model is based on a Multinomial-Dirichlet classification and a hierarchical mixture distributions. The number and the positions of nucleosomes are estimated using a reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation technique. We compare the performance of our method on simulated data and MNase-Seq data from Saccharomyces cerevisiae against PING and NOrMAL methods. PMID:26656614

  14. Characterization of flow conditions in 2 L and 20 L wave bioreactors using computational fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oncül, Alper A; Kalmbach, Andreas; Genzel, Yvonne; Reichl, Udo; Thévenin, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    Characterization of flow conditions is of great importance to control cell growth and cell damage in animal cell culture because cell viability is influenced by the flow properties in bioreactors. Alternative reactor types like Wave Bioreactors have been proposed in recent years, leading to markedly different results in cell growth and product formation. An advantage of Wave Bioreactors is the disposability of the Polyethylenterephthalet-bags after one single use (fast setup of new production facilities). Another expected advantage is a lower shear stress compared to classical stirred-tank reactors, due to the gentle liquid motion in the rocking cellbag. This property would considerably reduce possible cell damage. The purpose of the present study is to investigate in a quantitative manner the key flow properties in Wave Bioreactors, both numerically and experimentally. To describe accurately flow conditions and shear stress in Wave Bioreactors using numerical simulations, it is necessary to compute the unsteady flow applying Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Corresponding computations for two reactor scales (2 L and 20 L cellbags) are presented using the CFD code ANSYS-FLUENT. To describe correctly the free liquid surface, the present simulations employ the Volume of Fluid (VOF) method. Additionally, experimental measurements have been carried out to determine liquid level, flow velocity and liquid shear stress, which are used as a validation of the present CFD simulations. It is shown that the obtained flows stay in the laminar regime. Furthermore, the obtained shear stress levels are well below known threshold values leading to damage of animal cells. PMID:19918766

  15. Dynamic characterization and single-frequency cancellation performance of SMASH (SMA actuated stabilizing handgrip)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Anupam; Brei, Diann; Luntz, Jonathan; LaVigna, Chris; Kwatny, Harry

    2008-03-01

    In urban combat environments where it is common to have unsupported firing positions, wobble significantly decreases shooting accuracy reducing mission effectiveness and soldier survivability. The SMASH (SMA Stabilizing Handgrip) has been developed to cancel wobble using antagonistic SMA actuators which reduce weight and size relative to conventional actuation, but lead to interesting control challenges. This paper presents the specification and design of the SMA actuation system for the SMASH platform along with experimental validation of the actuation and cancellation authority on the benchtop and on an M16 platform. Analytical dynamic weapon models and shooter experiments were conducted to define actuation frequency and amplitude specifications. The SMASH, designed to meet these, was experimentally characterized from the bounding quasi-static case up to the 3 Hz range, successfully generating the +/-2 mm amplitude requirement. To effectively cancel wobble it is critical to produce the proper output functional shape which is difficult for SMA due to inherent nonlinearities, hysteresis, etc. Three distinct electrical heating input functions (square, ramp, and preheat) were investigated to shape the actuator output to produce smooth sinusoidal motion. The effect of each of these functions on the cancellation response of the SMASH applied to the M16 platform was experimentally studied across the wobble range (1-3 Hz) demonstrating significant cancellation, between 50-97% depending on the smoothing function and frequency. These results demonstrate the feasibility of a hand-held wobble cancellation device providing an important foundation for future work in overall system optimization and the development of physically based feed-forward signals for closed-loop control.

  16. Detection and Characterization of Package Defects and Integrity Failure using Dynamic Scanning Infrared Thermography (DSIRT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Scott A

    2016-02-01

    A dynamic scanning infrared thermography (DSIRT) system developed at the Univ. of Illinois Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) Packaging Lab relies on variation in transient thermal artifacts to indicate defects, and offers the possibility of characterization of many types of materials and structures. These include newer polymer and laminate-based structures for shelf-stable foods that lack a reliable, nondestructive method for inspection, which is a continuing safety issue. Preliminary trials were conducted on a polyester/aluminum foil/polypropylene retort pouch laminate containing artificially-induced failed seal and insulating inclusion defects ranging from 1 to 10 mm wide in the plane of the seal. The samples were placed in relative motion to a laterally positioned infrared laser, inducing heating through the plane of the seal. The emergent thermal artifact on the obverse side was sensed using either a bolometer camera or a thermopile sensor, with thermal anomalies indicating potential defects and the results of each sensors were compared. The bolometer camera detected defects to the limit of its measured optical resolution-approximately 1 mm at 20 cm-although the lower-resolution thermopile sensors were only capable of detecting 5 mm defects even at closer distances of approximately 5 mm. In addition, a supplementary magnification system was fitted to the bolometer camera which increased resolution but reduced field of view and would require a much higher frame rate to be useful. Automatic processing of the image data rapidly detected the model defects and can lead to development of an automated inspection system.  Much higher material throughput speeds are feasible using faster instruments, and the system is scalable. PMID:26720916

  17. Closed-loop digital control of nuclear reactors characterized by spatial dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the theoretical development and the evaluation via both simulation and, to a lesser degree, experiment of a digital method for the closed-loop control of power and temperature in reactors characterized by spatial dynamics. The major conclusions of the research are that (1) the sophistication of advanced reactor physics and thermal-hydraulic nodal methods is now such that accurate, real-time models of spatially-dependent, heterogeneous reactor cores can be run on present-generation minicomputers; (2) operation of both present-day commercial reactors as well as the multi-modular reactors now being considered for construction in the United States could be significantly improved by incorporating model-generated information on in-core conditions in a digital controller; and (3) digital controllers for spatially-dependent reactors should have a hierarchical or multi-tiered structure consisting of supervisory algorithms that preclude challenges to the safety system, global control laws designed to provide an optimal response to temperature and power perturbations, and local control laws that maintain parameters such as the margin to departure from nucleate boiling within specification. The technology described is appropriate to present-day pressurized water reactors and to the proposed multi-modular designs. The end-product of this research was a (near) real-time analytic plant-estimation code that was given the acronym POPSICLE for POwer Plant SImulator and ControlLEr. POPSICLE's core neutronics model is based on a quasi-static transient solution of the analytic nodal diffusion equations. 126 refs., 159 figs., 17 tabs

  18. Characterization of the Scale Model Acoustic Test Overpressure Environment using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Tanner; West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) is a 5% scale test of the Space Launch System (SLS), which is currently being designed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The purpose of this test is to characterize and understand a variety of acoustic phenomena that occur during the early portions of lift off, one being the overpressure environment that develops shortly after booster ignition. The pressure waves that propagate from the mobile launcher (ML) exhaust hole are defined as the ignition overpressure (IOP), while the portion of the pressure waves that exit the duct or trench are the duct overpressure (DOP). Distinguishing the IOP and DOP in scale model test data has been difficult in past experiences and in early SMAT results, due to the effects of scaling the geometry. The speed of sound of the air and combustion gas constituents is not scaled, and therefore the SMAT pressure waves propagate at approximately the same speed as occurs in full scale. However, the SMAT geometry is twenty times smaller, allowing the pressure waves to move down the exhaust hole, through the trench and duct, and impact the vehicle model much faster than occurs at full scale. The DOP waves impact portions of the vehicle at the same time as the IOP waves, making it difficult to distinguish the different waves and fully understand the data. To better understand the SMAT data, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed with a fictitious geometry that isolates the IOP and DOP. The upper and lower portions of the domain were segregated to accomplish the isolation in such a way that the flow physics were not significantly altered. The Loci/CHEM CFD software program was used to perform this analysis.

  19. Characterization of a linear device developed for research on advanced plasma imaging and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the scope of long term research on imaging diagnostics for steady-state plasmas and understanding of edge plasma physics through diagnostics with conventional spectroscopic methods, we have constructed a linear electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma device named Research on Advanced Plasma Imaging and Dynamics (RAPID). It has a variety of axial magnetic field profiles provided by eight water-cooled magnetic coils and two dc power supplies. The positions of the magnetic coils are freely adjustable along the axial direction and the power supplies can be operated with many combinations of electrical wiring to the coils. Here, a 6 kW 2.45 GHz magnetron is used to produce steady-state hydrogen, helium, and argon plasmas with central magnetic fields of 875 and/or 437.5 G (second harmonic). In order to achieve the highest possible plasma performance within the limited input parameters, wall conditioning experiments were carried out. Chamber bake-out was achieved with heating coils that were wound covering the vessel, and long-pulse electron cyclotron heating discharge cleaning was also followed after 4 days of bake-out. A uniform bake-out temperature (150 deg. C) was achieved by wrapping the vessel in high temperature thermal insulation textile and by controlling the heating coil current using a digital control system. The partial pressure changes were observed using a residual gas analyzer, and a total system pressure of 5x10-8 Torr was finally reached. Diagnostic systems including a millimeter-wave interferometer, a high resolution survey spectrometer, a Langmuir probe, and an ultrasoft x-ray detector were used to provide the evidence that the plasma performance was improved as we desired. In this work, we present characterization of the RAPID device for various system conditions and configurations.

  20. Coastal and mesoscale dynamics characterization combining glider and altimetry: case study over the Western Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerome, Bouffard; Pascual, Ananda; Ruiz, Simon; Isabelle Pujol, Marie; Faugere, Yannice; Larnicol, Gilles; Tintore, Joaquin

    the oceanic circulation characteristics at the regional scales. In summary, these studies highlight the relevance of multi-sensor approaches and the need of oceanic topography measurements at several spatial/temporal sampling requirements in view of the coastal and mesoscale dynamics characterizations.

  1. A dynamical systems approach to characterizing the contribution of neurogenesis to neural coding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merav Stern

    2014-03-01

    that agreed with experimental measurements (Cameron and McKay, 2001; Deng et al., 2010; Tashiro et al., 2007, with no adjustable parameters. It is also important to note that the optimal regime for encoding input signals is often poised near an instability associated with chaotic dynamics (Aljadeff et al., 2013; Sompolinsky et al., 1988. This observation could explain the frequent occurrence of seizures at the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease (Palop and Mucke, 2010a; Palop and Mucke, 2010b. To that extent, we analytically derive conditions for observing chaotic dynamics in networks with of an arbitrary number of neuron types. The analytical results accurately mirrored simulation in predicting the composition of the network (fraction of young neurons and the difference in their excitability and number of synapses when the networks undergoes transformation from stable to chaotic dynamics (Figure 2. Overall, these results demonstrate how a small fraction of neurons can increase the representational capacity of the neural circuit as a whole in a distributed way and provide a quantitative framework for characterizing more heterogeneous networks composed of multiple types of neurons. Figure 1. The representational capacity of a heterogeneous network. Results are shown as a function of the fraction of young neurons (y-axis and the ratio of their hyper-excitability relatively to mature neurons (x-axis. The synaptic weights between neurons are initially set to random values drawn from a Gaussian distribution. In the case of young neurons we used a distribution with larger variance compared to the value used for mature neurons. The networks were tasked with encoding a desired input pattern; the connection weights were adjusted using the algorithm from (Sussillo and Abbott, 2009. The average representation error divided by the average activity of the network is the “learning capacity index” (color. Black lines are contour plots of equal magnitude. The learning capacity

  2. Characterization of the JWST Pathfinder mirror dynamics using the center of curvature optical assembly (CoCOA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Conrad; Hadaway, James B.; Olczak, Gene; Cosentino, Joseph; Johnston, John D.; Whitman, Tony; Connolly, Mark; Chaney, David; Knight, J. Scott; Telfer, Randal

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Telescope Element (OTE) consists of a 6.6 m clear aperture, 18 segment primary mirror, all-reflective, three-mirror anastigmat operating at cryogenic temperatures. To verify performance of the primary mirror, a full aperture center of curvature optical null test is performed under cryogenic conditions in Chamber A at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) using an instantaneous phase measuring interferometer. After phasing the mirrors during the JWST Pathfinder testing, the interferometer is utilized to characterize the mirror relative piston and tilt dynamics under different facility configurations. The correlation between the motions seen on detectors at the focal plane and the interferometer validates the use of the interferometer for dynamic investigations. The success of planned test hardware improvements will be characterized by the multi-wavelength interferometer (MWIF) at the Center of Curvature Optical Assembly (CoCOA).

  3. Characterization of the JWST Pathfinder Mirror Dynamics Using the Center of Curvature Optical Assembly (CoCOA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Conrad; Hadaway, James B.; Olczak, Gene; Cosentino, Joseph; Johnston, John D.; Whitman, Tony; Connolly, Mark; Chaney, David; Knight, J. Scott; Telfer, Randal

    2016-01-01

    The JWST (James Webb Space Telescope) Optical Telescope Element (OTE) consists of a 6.6 meter clear aperture, 18-segment primary mirror, all-reflective, three-mirror anastigmat operating at cryogenic temperatures. To verify performance of the primary mirror, a full aperture center of curvature optical null test is performed under cryogenic conditions in Chamber A at NASA Johnson Space Center using an instantaneous phase measuring interferometer. After phasing the mirrors during the JWST Pathfinder testing, the interferometer is utilized to characterize the mirror relative piston and tilt dynamics under different facility configurations. The correlation between the motions seen on detectors at the focal plane and the interferometer validates the use of the interferometer for dynamic investigations. The success of planned test hardware improvements will be characterized by the multi-wavelength interferometer (MWIF) at the Center of Curvature Optical Assembly (CoCOA).

  4. Thermo-fluid dynamic characterization and technical optimization of structured open-cell metal foams by means of numerical simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Horneber, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The present contribution provides a fluid dynamic and thermal characterization of structured representatives of open-cell foams. Geometric and analytic methods as well as numeric simulations serve as tools for technical optimization. Three different types of structures are analyzed: a simple cubic structure, a Kelvin cell structure, and a diamond structure. These structures are used as carrier structures in catalysis and make up the inner part of a reactor which is built in its entirety u...

  5. Dynamics and Characterization of Soil Organic Matter on Mine Soils 16 Years after Amendment with Topsoil, Sawdust, and Sewage Sludge.

    OpenAIRE

    Bendfeldt, Eric S.

    1999-01-01

    DYNAMICS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF SOIL ORGANIC MATTER IN MINE SOILS 16 YEARS AFTER AMENDMENT WITH TOPSOIL, SAWDUST, AND SEWAGE SLUDGE. by Eric S. Bendfeldt Committee Chairman: Dr. James A. Burger Department of Forestry (ABSTRACT) The present state and future prospect of the world's soil resources has prompted scientists and researchers to address the issue of soil quality and sustainable land management. Soil quality research has focused on intensively-managed agricultural a...

  6. Genesis of chromatin and transcription dynamics in the origin of species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, Maria J E; Snel, Berend; Timmers, H. Th Marc

    2015-01-01

    Histone proteins compact and stabilize the genomes of Eukarya and Archaea. By forming nucleosome(-like) structures they restrict access of DNA-binding transcription regulators to cis-regulatory DNA elements. Dynamic competition between histones and transcription factors is facilitated by different c

  7. Genesis of Chromatin and Transcription Dynamics in the Origin of Species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, Maria J. E.; Snel, Berend; Timmers, H. Th. Marc

    2015-01-01

    Histone proteins compact and stabilize the genomes of Eukarya and Archaea. By forming nucleosome(-like) structures they restrict access of DNA-binding transcription regulators to cis-regulatory DNA elements. Dynamic competition between histones and transcription factors is facilitated by different c

  8. Binding of NF1 to the MMTV promoter in nucleosomes: influence of rotational phasing, translational positioning and histone H1.

    OpenAIRE

    Eisfeld, K; Candau, R; Truss, M; Beato, M

    1997-01-01

    To analyse the role of rotational orientation and translational positioning of nucleosomal DNA on transcription factor binding we have generated a series of mutant MMTV promoters containing insertions of various lengths between the hormone-responsive region and the binding site for NF1. These various MMTV promoter fragments were assembled in mononucleosomes and used for structural studies and binding experiments. We show that the insertions change the rotational phase and translational positi...

  9. Rapid deamination of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photoproducts at TCG sites in a translationally and rotationally positioned nucleosome in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannistraro, Vincent J; Pondugula, Santhi; Song, Qian; Taylor, John-Stephen

    2015-10-30

    Sunlight-induced C to T mutation hot spots in skin cancers occur primarily at methylated CpG sites that coincide with sites of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) formation. The C and 5-methyl-C in CPDs are not stable and deaminate to U and T, respectively, which leads to the insertion of A by the DNA damage bypass polymerase η, thereby defining a probable mechanism for the origin of UV-induced C to T mutations. Deamination rates for T(m)CG CPDs have been found to vary 12-fold with rotational position in a nucleosome in vitro. To determine the influence of nucleosome structure on deamination rates in vivo, we determined the deamination rates of CPDs at TCG sites in a stably positioned nucleosome within the FOS promoter in HeLa cells. A procedure for in vivo hydroxyl radical footprinting with Fe-EDTA was developed, and, together with results from a cytosine methylation protection assay, we determined the translational and rotational positions of the TCG sites. Consistent with the in vitro observations, deamination was slower for one CPD located at an intermediate rotational position compared with two other sites located at outside positions, and all were much faster than for CPDs at non-TCG sites. Photoproduct formation was also highly suppressed at one site, possibly due to its interaction with a histone tail. Thus, it was shown that CPDs of TCG sites deaminate the fastest in vivo and that nucleosomes can modulate both their formation and deamination, which could contribute to the UV mutation hot spots and cold spots.

  10. Rapid deamination of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photoproducts at TCG sites in a translationally and rotationally positioned nucleosome in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannistraro, Vincent J; Pondugula, Santhi; Song, Qian; Taylor, John-Stephen

    2015-10-30

    Sunlight-induced C to T mutation hot spots in skin cancers occur primarily at methylated CpG sites that coincide with sites of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) formation. The C and 5-methyl-C in CPDs are not stable and deaminate to U and T, respectively, which leads to the insertion of A by the DNA damage bypass polymerase η, thereby defining a probable mechanism for the origin of UV-induced C to T mutations. Deamination rates for T(m)CG CPDs have been found to vary 12-fold with rotational position in a nucleosome in vitro. To determine the influence of nucleosome structure on deamination rates in vivo, we determined the deamination rates of CPDs at TCG sites in a stably positioned nucleosome within the FOS promoter in HeLa cells. A procedure for in vivo hydroxyl radical footprinting with Fe-EDTA was developed, and, together with results from a cytosine methylation protection assay, we determined the translational and rotational positions of the TCG sites. Consistent with the in vitro observations, deamination was slower for one CPD located at an intermediate rotational position compared with two other sites located at outside positions, and all were much faster than for CPDs at non-TCG sites. Photoproduct formation was also highly suppressed at one site, possibly due to its interaction with a histone tail. Thus, it was shown that CPDs of TCG sites deaminate the fastest in vivo and that nucleosomes can modulate both their formation and deamination, which could contribute to the UV mutation hot spots and cold spots. PMID:26354431

  11. Multidimensional characterization of stochastic dynamical systems based on multiple perturbations and measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kryvohuz, Maksym, E-mail: mkryvohu@uci.edu; Mukamel, Shaul [Chemistry Department, University of California, Irvine, California 92697-2025 (United States)

    2015-06-07

    Generalized nonlinear response theory is presented for stochastic dynamical systems. Experiments in which multiple measurements of dynamical quantities are used along with multiple perturbations of parameters of dynamical systems are described by generalized response functions (GRFs). These constitute a new type of multidimensional measures of stochastic dynamics either in the time or the frequency domains. Closed expressions for GRFs in stochastic dynamical systems are derived and compared with numerical non-equilibrium simulations. Several types of perturbations are considered: impulsive and periodic perturbations of temperature and impulsive perturbations of coordinates. The present approach can be used to study various types of stochastic processes ranging from single-molecule conformational dynamics to chemical kinetics of finite-size reactors such as biocells.

  12. Analytic Characterization of the Dynamic Regimes of Quantum-Dot Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Lingnau

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We present analytic treatment of the three different dynamic regimes found in quantum-dot laser turn-on and modulation dynamics. A dynamic coupling, and thus density-dependent scattering lifetimes between dots and reservoir, are identified to be crucial for a realistic modeling. We derive a minimal model for the quantum-dot laser dynamics that can be seeded with experimentally accessible parameters, and give explicit analytic equations that are able to predict relaxation-oscillation frequency and damping rate.

  13. Dynamic Characterizations of an 8-frame Half-Strip High-speed X-ray Microchannel Plate Imager

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ken Moy, Ming Wu, Craig Kruschwitz, Aric Tibbits, Matt Griffin, Greg Rochau

    2008-09-05

    High-speed microchannel plate (MCP)–based imagers are critical detectors for x-ray diagnostics employed on Z-experiments at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to measure time-resolved x-ray spectra and to image dynamic hohlraums. A multiframe design using eight half strips in one imager permits recordings of radiation events in discrete temporal snapshots to yield a time-evolved movie. We present data using various facilities to characterize the performance of this design. These characterization studies include DC and pulsed-voltage biased measurements in both saturated and linear operational regimes using an intense, short-pulsed UV laser. Electrical probe measurements taken to characterize the shape of the HV pulse propagating across the strips help to corroborate the spatial gain dependence.

  14. Dynamic quantification of canopy structure to characterize early plant vigour in wheat genotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, T.; Chapman, S.C.; Holland, E.; Rebetzke, G.J.; Guo, Y.; Zheng, B.

    2016-01-01

    Early vigour is an important physiological trait to improve establishment, water-use efficiency, and grain yield for wheat. Phenotyping large numbers of lines is challenging due to the fast growth and development of wheat seedlings. Here we developed a new photo-based workflow to monitor dynamically the growth and development of the wheat canopy of two wheat lines with a contrasting early vigour trait. Multiview images were taken using a ‘vegetation stress’ camera at 2 d intervals from emergence to the sixth leaf stage. Point clouds were extracted using the Multi-View Stereo and Structure From Motion (MVS-SFM) algorithm, and segmented into individual organs using the Octree method, with leaf midribs fitted using local polynomial function. Finally, phenotypic parameters were calculated from the reconstructed point cloud including: tiller and leaf number, plant height, Haun index, phyllochron, leaf length, angle, and leaf elongation rate. There was good agreement between the observed and estimated leaf length (RMSE=8.6mm, R 2=0.98, n=322) across both lines. Significant contrasts of phenotyping parameters were observed between the two lines and were consistent with manual observations. The early vigour line had fewer tillers (2.4±0.6) and larger leaves (308.0±38.4mm and 17.1±2.7mm for leaf length and width, respectively). While the phyllochron of both lines was quite similar, the non-vigorous line had a greater Haun index (more leaves on the main stem) on any date, as the vigorous line had slower development of its first two leaves. The workflow presented in this study provides an efficient method to phenotype individual plants using a low-cost camera (an RGB camera is also suitable) and could be applied in phenotyping for applications in both simulation modelling and breeding. The rapidity and accuracy of this novel method can characterize the results of specific selection criteria (e.g. width of leaf three, number of tillers, rate of leaf appearance) that

  15. Dynamic quantification of canopy structure to characterize early plant vigour in wheat genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, T; Chapman, S C; Holland, E; Rebetzke, G J; Guo, Y; Zheng, B

    2016-08-01

    Early vigour is an important physiological trait to improve establishment, water-use efficiency, and grain yield for wheat. Phenotyping large numbers of lines is challenging due to the fast growth and development of wheat seedlings. Here we developed a new photo-based workflow to monitor dynamically the growth and development of the wheat canopy of two wheat lines with a contrasting early vigour trait. Multiview images were taken using a 'vegetation stress' camera at 2 d intervals from emergence to the sixth leaf stage. Point clouds were extracted using the Multi-View Stereo and Structure From Motion (MVS-SFM) algorithm, and segmented into individual organs using the Octree method, with leaf midribs fitted using local polynomial function. Finally, phenotypic parameters were calculated from the reconstructed point cloud including: tiller and leaf number, plant height, Haun index, phyllochron, leaf length, angle, and leaf elongation rate. There was good agreement between the observed and estimated leaf length (RMSE=8.6mm, R (2)=0.98, n=322) across both lines. Significant contrasts of phenotyping parameters were observed between the two lines and were consistent with manual observations. The early vigour line had fewer tillers (2.4±0.6) and larger leaves (308.0±38.4mm and 17.1±2.7mm for leaf length and width, respectively). While the phyllochron of both lines was quite similar, the non-vigorous line had a greater Haun index (more leaves on the main stem) on any date, as the vigorous line had slower development of its first two leaves. The workflow presented in this study provides an efficient method to phenotype individual plants using a low-cost camera (an RGB camera is also suitable) and could be applied in phenotyping for applications in both simulation modelling and breeding. The rapidity and accuracy of this novel method can characterize the results of specific selection criteria (e.g. width of leaf three, number of tillers, rate of leaf appearance) that have

  16. Characterization of Austenite Dynamic Recrystallization under Different Z Parameters in a Microalloyed Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Shaban; B. Eghbali

    2011-01-01

    A low carbon Nb-Ti microalloyed steel was subjected to hot torsion testing over the temperature range 850-1100℃ and strain rates 0.01-1 s-1 to study the influence of deformation conditions on the dynamic recrystallization characteristics of austenite. The results show that dynamic recrystallization occurs more easily with the decrease of strain rate and the increase of deformation temperature. The complete dynamically recrystallized grain size as a function of Zener-Hollomon parameter was established. It was found that dynamically recrystallized grain sizes decrease with increasing strain rate and decreasing deformation temperature. The effect of microalloying elements on peak strain was investigated and the solute drag corrected peak strain was determined. Also, the dynamic recrystallization map of austenite was obtained by using recrystallization critical parameters.

  17. Interacting bosons in a disordered lattice: Dynamical characterization of the quantum phase diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonsante, Pierfrancesco; Pezzè, Luca; Smerzi, Augusto

    2015-03-01

    We study the quantum dynamics of interacting bosons in a three-dimensional disordered lattice. We show that the superfluid current induced by an adiabatic acceleration of the disordered lattice undergoes a dynamical instability signaling the onset of the Bose-glass phase. The dynamical superfluid-Bose-glass phase diagram is found in very good agreement with static superfluid fraction calculation. A different boundary is obtained when the disorder is suddenly quenched in a moving periodic lattice. In this case we do not observe a dynamical instability but rather a depletion of the superfluid density. Our analysis is based on a dynamical Gutzwiller approach which we show to reproduce the quantum Monte Carlo static phase diagram in the strong interaction limit.

  18. Characterizing dynamic hysteresis and fractal statistics of chaotic two-phase flow and application to fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholder, Michael B.; Litster, Shawn

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we analyze the stability of two-phase flow regimes and their transitions using chaotic and fractal statistics, and we report new measurements of dynamic two-phase pressure drop hysteresis that is related to flow regime stability and channel water content. Two-phase flow dynamics are relevant to a variety of real-world systems, and quantifying transient two-phase flow phenomena is important for efficient design. We recorded two-phase (air and water) pressure drops and flow images in a microchannel under both steady and transient conditions. Using Lyapunov exponents and Hurst exponents to characterize the steady-state pressure fluctuations, we develop a new, measurable regime identification criteria based on the dynamic stability of the two-phase pressure signal. We also applied a new experimental technique by continuously cycling the air flow rate to study dynamic hysteresis in two-phase pressure drops, which is separate from steady-state hysteresis and can be used to understand two-phase flow development time scales. Using recorded images of the two-phase flow, we show that the capacitive dynamic hysteresis is related to channel water content and flow regime stability. The mixed-wettability microchannel and in-channel water introduction used in this study simulate a polymer electrolyte fuel cell cathode air flow channel.

  19. The role of anti-nucleosome antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus. Results of a study of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and other connective tissue diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Tigano

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of our study was to investigate the prevalence and the disease specificity of anti-nucleosome antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus and their association with disease activity and renal involvement. Methods: Anti-nucleosome antibodies were measured by ELISA in the sera of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE (47, rheumatoid arthritis (RA (22, mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD (19, systemic sclerosis (SSc (11 and Siögren’s syndrome (SS (10. Anti-dsDNA antibodies were measured by IIF on Chritidia luciliae. In the patients with SLE serum levels of C3 and C4 complement components were also measured. Sera of 22 healthy individuals were assayed as controls. SLE activity was evaluated by the ECLAM score. Results: Anti-nucleosome antibodies were found in 40 patients with SLE (85.1%, in 10 with RA (45.4%, in 8 with MCTD (42.1%, in 4 with SSc (36.3%, in 1 with SS (10% and in none of the healthy controls. Anti-dsDNA antibodies were found in 23 patients with SLE and were absent in the patients with other CTD and in controls. All the patients with SLE and renal involvement were positive both for anti-dsDNA antibodies and anti-nucleosome antibodies. No significant correlation was observed between anti-nucleosome antibodies and disease activity and renal involvement. Conclusion: Anti-nucleosome antibodies are present in a high percentage of the patients with SLE but they don’t seem to be specific markers of the desease. Our data don’t support a clear correlation between anti-nucleosome antibodies and disease activity and renal involvement.

  20. Apoptosis-related deregulation of proteolytic activities and high serum levels of circulating nucleosomes and DNA in blood correlate with breast cancer progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As cell-free circulating DNA exists predominantly as mono- and oligonucleosomes, the focus of the current study was to examine the interplay of circulating nucleosomes, DNA, proteases and caspases in blood of patients with benign and malignant breast diseases. The concentrations of cell-free DNA and nucleosomes as well as the protease and caspase activities were measured in serum of patients with benign breast disease (n = 20), primary breast cancer (M0, n = 31), metastatic breast cancer (M1, n = 32), and healthy individuals (n = 28) by PicoGreen, Cell Death Detection ELISA, Protease Fluorescent Detection Kit and Caspase-Glo®3/7 Assay, respectively. Patients with benign and malignant tumors had significantly higher levels of circulating nucleic acids in their blood than healthy individuals (p = 0.001, p = 0.0001), whereas these levels could not discriminate between benign and malignant lesions. Our analyses of all serum samples revealed significant correlations of circulating nucleosome with DNA concentrations (p = 0.001), nucleosome concentrations with caspase activities (p = 0.008), and caspase with protease activities (p = 0.0001). High serum levels of protease and caspase activities associated with advanced tumor stages (p = 0.009). Patients with lymph node-positive breast cancer had significantly higher nucleosome levels in their blood than node-negative patients (p = 0.004). The presence of distant metastases associated with a significant increase in serum nucleosome (p = 0.01) and DNA levels (p = 0.04), and protease activities (p = 0.008). Our findings demonstrate that high circulating nucleic acid concentrations in blood are no indicators of a malignant breast tumor. However, the observed changes in apoptosis-related deregulation of proteolytic activities along with the elevated serum levels of nucleosomes and DNA in blood are linked to breast cancer progression

  1. Characterization of viscoelastic materials by quasi-static and dynamic indentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Xianping

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the experimental measurements of the elastic modulus and hardness of viscoelastic materials under quasi-static and dynamic depth-sensing indentation using a homemade tribology probe microscope (TPM). The indentation measurements were performed using a sapphire sphere tip under various conditions. Materials such as polytetrafluoroethylene, styrene rubber and nitrile rubber were tested in both quasi-static and dynamic experiments. In quasi-static mode, the loading and unloading force curves were obtained from these specimens, and the results show a significant load effect on the measured hardness and elastic modulus. The dynamic indentation tests were conducted under a range of loading forces with various frequencies. The values of storage modulus, loss modulus and damping factor were determined by dynamic indentation. To get an accurate measurement, the stiffness and damping of the instrument were rigorously analyzed. Using dynamic indentation, it was confirmed that the variation in the frequency of the oscillation force has a significant effect on the measured results of the materials. Comparing the results obtained from the quasi-static and dynamic indentations, for the viscoelastic properties, dynamic indentation offers an advantage over the quasi-static method. Collectively, these results clearly demonstrate the capability of our homemade TPM facility to determine the constitutive behavior of viscoelastic solids in the frequency domain.

  2. Characterization of viscoelastic materials by quasi-static and dynamic indentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the experimental measurements of the elastic modulus and hardness of viscoelastic materials under quasi-static and dynamic depth-sensing indentation using a homemade tribology probe microscope (TPM). The indentation measurements were performed using a sapphire sphere tip under various conditions. Materials such as polytetrafluoroethylene, styrene rubber and nitrile rubber were tested in both quasi-static and dynamic experiments. In quasi-static mode, the loading and unloading force curves were obtained from these specimens, and the results show a significant load effect on the measured hardness and elastic modulus. The dynamic indentation tests were conducted under a range of loading forces with various frequencies. The values of storage modulus, loss modulus and damping factor were determined by dynamic indentation. To get an accurate measurement, the stiffness and damping of the instrument were rigorously analyzed. Using dynamic indentation, it was confirmed that the variation in the frequency of the oscillation force has a significant effect on the measured results of the materials. Comparing the results obtained from the quasi-static and dynamic indentations, for the viscoelastic properties, dynamic indentation offers an advantage over the quasi-static method. Collectively, these results clearly demonstrate the capability of our homemade TPM facility to determine the constitutive behavior of viscoelastic solids in the frequency domain. (paper)

  3. Cognitive Network Modeling as a Basis for Characterizing Human Communication Dynamics and Belief Contagion in Technology Adoption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutto, Clayton; Briscoe, Erica; Trewhitt, Ethan

    2012-01-01

    Societal level macro models of social behavior do not sufficiently capture nuances needed to adequately represent the dynamics of person-to-person interactions. Likewise, individual agent level micro models have limited scalability - even minute parameter changes can drastically affect a model's response characteristics. This work presents an approach that uses agent-based modeling to represent detailed intra- and inter-personal interactions, as well as a system dynamics model to integrate societal-level influences via reciprocating functions. A Cognitive Network Model (CNM) is proposed as a method of quantitatively characterizing cognitive mechanisms at the intra-individual level. To capture the rich dynamics of interpersonal communication for the propagation of beliefs and attitudes, a Socio-Cognitive Network Model (SCNM) is presented. The SCNM uses socio-cognitive tie strength to regulate how agents influence--and are influenced by--one another's beliefs during social interactions. We then present experimental results which support the use of this network analytical approach, and we discuss its applicability towards characterizing and understanding human information processing.

  4. The yeast histone chaperone hif1p functions with RNA in nucleosome assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy R Knapp

    Full Text Available Hif1p is an H3/H4-specific histone chaperone that associates with the nuclear form of the Hat1p/Hat2p complex (NuB4 complex in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. While not capable of depositing histones onto DNA on its own, Hif1p can act in conjunction with a yeast cytosolic extract to assemble nucleosomes onto a relaxed circular plasmid.To identify the factor(s that function with Hif1p to carry out chromatin assembly, multiple steps of column chromatography were carried out to fractionate the yeast cytosolic extract. Analysis of partially purified fractions indicated that Hif1p-dependent chromatin assembly activity resided in RNA rather than protein. Fractionation of isolated RNA indicated that the chromatin assembly activity did not simply purify with bulk RNA. In addition, the RNA-mediated chromatin assembly activity was blocked by mutations in the human homolog of Hif1p, sNASP, that prevent the association of this histone chaperone with histone H3 and H4 without altering its electrostatic properties.These results suggest that specific RNA species may function in concert with histone chaperones to assemble chromatin.

  5. Nucleosome acidic patch promotes RNF168- and RING1B/BMI1-dependent H2AX and H2A ubiquitination and DNA damage signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin W Leung

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Histone ubiquitinations are critical for the activation of the DNA damage response (DDR. In particular, RNF168 and RING1B/BMI1 function in the DDR by ubiquitinating H2A/H2AX on Lys-13/15 and Lys-118/119, respectively. However, it remains to be defined how the ubiquitin pathway engages chromatin to provide regulation of ubiquitin targeting of specific histone residues. Here we identify the nucleosome acid patch as a critical chromatin mediator of H2A/H2AX ubiquitination (ub. The acidic patch is required for RNF168- and RING1B/BMI1-dependent H2A/H2AXub in vivo. The acidic patch functions within the nucleosome as nucleosomes containing a mutated acidic patch exhibit defective H2A/H2AXub by RNF168 and RING1B/BMI1 in vitro. Furthermore, direct perturbation of the nucleosome acidic patch in vivo by the expression of an engineered acidic patch interacting viral peptide, LANA, results in defective H2AXub and RNF168-dependent DNA damage responses including 53BP1 and BRCA1 recruitment to DNA damage. The acidic patch therefore is a critical nucleosome feature that may serve as a scaffold to integrate multiple ubiquitin signals on chromatin to compose selective ubiquitinations on histones for DNA damage signaling.

  6. Characterization of the Electric Double Layer Formation Dynamics of a Metal/Ionic Liquid/Metal Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Elliot; Shi, Sha; Ruden, P Paul; Frisbie, C Daniel

    2016-06-15

    Although ionic liquids (ILs) have been used extensively in recent years as a high-capacitance "dielectric" in electric double layer transistors, the dynamics of the double layer formation have remained relatively unexplored. Better understanding of the dynamics and relaxation processes involved in electric double layer formation will guide device optimization, particularly with regard to switching speed. In this paper, we explore the dynamical characteristics of an IL in a metal/ionic liquid/metal (M/IL/M) capacitor. In particular, we examine a Au/IL/Au structure where the IL is 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate. The experiments consist of frequency-dependent impedance measurements and time-dependent current vs voltage measurements for applied linear voltage ramps and abrupt voltage steps. The parameters of an equivalent circuit model are determined by fits to the impedance vs frequency data and subsequently verified by calculating the current vs voltage characteristics for the applied potential profiles. The data analysis indicates that the dynamics of the structure are characterized by a wide distribution of relaxation times spanning the range of less than microseconds to longer than seconds. Possible causes for these time scales are discussed. PMID:27213215

  7. Dynamically forced cantilever system: A piezo-polymer characterization tool with possible application for micromechanical HF resonator devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwödiauer, Reinhard

    2005-04-01

    A cantilever system, driven to a dynamically forced oscillation by a small piezoelectric specimen is presented as a simple and accurate tool to determine the converse dynamic piezocoefficient up to several kHz. The piezoelectric sample is mounted on top of a reflective cantilever where it is free to oscillate without any mechanical constraint. A Nomarsky-interferometer detects the induced cantilever displacement. The presented technique is especially suited for a precise characterization of small and soft piezoelectric polymer-samples with rough surfaces. The capability of the dynamically forced cantilever principle is demonstrated with a LiNbO3 crystal and with a porous ferroelectretic polypropylene foam. Results from measurements between 400 Hz and 5 kHz were found to be in excellent agreement with published values. Additionally, the dynamically forced cantilever principle may possibly improve the sensitivity of some micromechanical cantilever-sensors and it could also be interesting for the design of enhanced micromechanical high frequency mixer filters. Some ideas about are briefly presented.

  8. Dynamic material characterization of the human heel pad based on in vivo experimental tests and numerical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardeh, M; Vogl, T J; Huebner, F; Nelson, K; Stief, F; Silber, G

    2016-09-01

    A numerical-experimental, proof-of-concept approach is described to characterize the mechanical material behavior of the human heel pad under impact conditions similar to a heel strike while running. A 3D finite-element model of the right foot of a healthy female subject was generated using magnetic resonance imaging. Based on quasi-static experimental testing of the subject's heel pad, force-displacement data was obtained. Using this experimental data as well as a numerical optimization algorithm, an inverse finite-element analysis and the 3D model, heel pad hyperelastic (long-term) material parameters were determined. Applying the same methodology, based on the dynamic experimental data from the impact test and obtained long-term parameters, linear viscoelastic parameters were established with a Prony series. Model validation was performed employing quasi-static and dynamic force-displacement data. Coefficients of determination when comparing model to experimental data during quasi-static and dynamic (initial velocity: 1480mm/s) procedure were R(2) = 0.999 and R(2) = 0.990, respectively. Knowledge of these heel pad material parameters enables realistic numerical analysis to evaluate internal stress and strain in the heel pad during different quasi-static or dynamic load conditions.

  9. Processing of styrene butadiene rubber-carbon black nanocomposites with gradation of crosslink density: Static and dynamic mechanical characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentrations of sulfur and accelerator were varied in the nanocomposites of carbon black (CB)-filled styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) matrix to introduce the gradation of the crosslink density. These curatives were varied from 1 to 11 phr (per hundred rubber) along the span of 3-mm thick sheet using the construction-based layering method. The static and dynamic mechanical characterizations of these functionally graded polymeric nanocomposites (FGPNCs) were carried out. With increasing crosslink density along thickness, hardness and modulus increase while the ultimate properties like tensile strength and elongation at break droop down. The dynamic mechanical analysis of FGPNCs exhibits the increment in the storage modulus than the uniformly dispersed polymeric nanocomposites (UDPNCs) employing the same average amount of curatives. The peak position of tan δmax remains at the same temperature while the value mitigates in FGPNCs. In FGPNCs, tan δ peak intimates the broadness in the transition region

  10. Processing of styrene butadiene rubber-carbon black nanocomposites with gradation of crosslink density: Static and dynamic mechanical characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahankari, S.S. [Advanced Nano Engineering Materials Laboratory, Materials Science Programme, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India); Kar, Kamal K. [Advanced Nano Engineering Materials Laboratory, Materials Science Programme, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India); Advanced Nano Engineering Materials Laboratory, Materials Science Programme and Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India)], E-mail: kamalkk@iitk.ac.in

    2008-09-15

    The concentrations of sulfur and accelerator were varied in the nanocomposites of carbon black (CB)-filled styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) matrix to introduce the gradation of the crosslink density. These curatives were varied from 1 to 11 phr (per hundred rubber) along the span of 3-mm thick sheet using the construction-based layering method. The static and dynamic mechanical characterizations of these functionally graded polymeric nanocomposites (FGPNCs) were carried out. With increasing crosslink density along thickness, hardness and modulus increase while the ultimate properties like tensile strength and elongation at break droop down. The dynamic mechanical analysis of FGPNCs exhibits the increment in the storage modulus than the uniformly dispersed polymeric nanocomposites (UDPNCs) employing the same average amount of curatives. The peak position of tan {delta}{sub max} remains at the same temperature while the value mitigates in FGPNCs. In FGPNCs, tan {delta} peak intimates the broadness in the transition region.

  11. Dynamical characterization of inactivation path in voltage-gated Na(+) ion channel by non-equilibrium response spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Krishnendu; Gangopadhyay, Gautam

    2016-11-01

    Inactivation path of voltage gated sodium channel has been studied here under various voltage protocols as it is the main governing factor for the periodic occurrence and shape of the action potential. These voltage protocols actually serve as non-equilibrium response spectroscopic tools to study the ion channel in non-equilibrium environment. In contrast to a lot of effort in finding the crystal structure based molecular mechanism of closed-state(CSI) and open-state inactivation(OSI); here our approach is to understand the dynamical characterization of inactivation. The kinetic flux as well as energetic contribution of the closed and open- state inactivation path is compared here for voltage protocols, namely constant, pulsed and oscillating. The non-equilibrium thermodynamic quantities used in response to these voltage protocols serve as improved characterization tools for theoretical understanding which not only agrees with the previously known kinetic measurements but also predict the energetically optimum processes to sustain the auto-regulatory mechanism of action potential and the consequent inactivation steps needed. The time dependent voltage pattern governs the population of the conformational states which when couple with characteristic rate parameters, the CSI and OSI selectivity arise dynamically to control the inactivation path. Using constant, pulsed and continuous oscillating voltage protocols we have shown that during depolarization the OSI path is more favored path of inactivation however, in the hyper-polarized situation the CSI is favored. It is also shown that the re-factorisation of inactivated sodium channel to resting state occurs via CSI path. Here we have shown how the subtle energetic and entropic cost due to the change in the depolarization magnitude determines the optimum path of inactivation. It is shown that an efficient CSI and OSI dynamical profile in principle can characterize the open-state drug blocking phenomena.

  12. A sub-μs thermal time constant electrically driven Pt nanoheater: thermo-dynamic design and frequency characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottonello Briano, Floria; Sohlström, Hans; Forsberg, Fredrik; Renoux, Pauline; Ingvarsson, Snorri; Stemme, Göran; Gylfason, Kristinn B.

    2016-05-01

    Metal nanowires can emit coherent polarized thermal radiation, work as uncooled bolometers, and provide localized heating. In this paper, we engineer the temperature dynamics of electrically driven Pt nanoheaters on a silicon-on-insulator substrate. We present three designs and we electrically characterize and model their thermal impedance in the frequency range from 3 Hz to 3 MHz. Finally, we show a temperature modulation of 300 K while consuming less than 5 mW of power, up to a frequency of 1.3 MHz. This result can lead to significant advancements in thermography and absorption spectroscopy.

  13. An Integrated Quantitative Methodology to Longitudinally Characterize Complex Dynamic Processes Associated with Ovarian Aging and the Menopausal Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiyong Zheng

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available An integrative methodology is developed to characterize the complex patterns of change in highly variable dynamic biological processes. The method permits estimatation of the population mean profile, multiple change points and length of time-windows defined by any two change points of interest using a semi-/non-parametric stochastic mixed effect model and a Bayesian Modeling Average (BMA approach to account for model uncertainty. It also allows estimation of the mean rate of change of sub-processes by fitting piecewise linear mixed effect models. The methodology is applied to characterize the stages of female ovarian aging and the menopausal transition defined by hormone measures of estradiol (E2 and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH from two large-scale epidemiological studies with community-based longitudinal designs and ethnic diversity.

  14. Soil organic matter dynamics as characterized with 1H and 13C solid-state NMR techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, Alex; Schwarz, Jette; Bertmer, Marko; Schaumann, Gabriele E.

    2010-05-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is a complex and heterogeneous matter. Characterization by solid-state NMR methods on 1H and 13C nuclei is therefore demanding. Our goal is to obtain information on the dynamic behaviour of soil samples and to study the influence of external parameters on both structure and dynamics. We regard water molecules to be the pivotal agent of soil dynamics by generating a network between organic matter via intermolecular hydrogen bonding, which leads to cross linking of organic matter and increases its rigidity. Although 1H solid-state NMR on non-rotating samples are not so commonly used for soil characterization, they enable the differentiation of proton mobilities via their linewidths which are resulting from differences in the dipole-dipole coupling strengths. Therefore, even weak molecular interactions such as hydrogen bonding can be differentiated and changes due to heat treatments and the short and long term behaviour followed. Though in principle a simple technique, static 1H measurements are complicated by several means, one of them is the high abundance in almost all matter including probe head material that has to be excluded for analysis. Finally, we selected 1H DEPTH [1] and Hahn-echo sequences to distinguish different mobilities in soil, mainly free moving water and water fixed in the soil matrix. After decomposition using Gaussian and Lorentzian lineshapes, the relative amounts of mobile and rigid water molecules can be obtained. By heating the samples above 100°C in sealed glass tubes, the proposed water network is destroyed and able to rebuild after cooling. This long term behaviour is studied on the course of months. Furthermore, the instant changes before and after heating are shown for a series of soil samples to characterize soils based on this water network model. To combine the information obtained on the 1H mobility with focus on water dynamics, 13C 2D WISE (wideline separation) measurements were done. This method yields 1

  15. Characterizing and correcting for the effect of sensor noise in the dynamic mode decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Dawson, Scott T M; Williams, Matthew O; Rowley, Clarence W

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) provides a practical means of extracting insightful dynamical information from fluids datasets. Like any data processing technique, DMD's usefulness is limited by its ability to extract real and accurate dynamical features from noise-corrupted data. Here we show analytically that DMD is biased to sensor noise, and quantify how this bias depends on the size and noise level of the data. We present three modifications to DMD that can be used to remove this bias: (i) a direct correction of the identified bias using known noise properties, (ii) combining the results of performing DMD forwards and backwards in time, and (iii) a total least-squares-inspired algorithm. We discuss the relative merits of each algorithm, and demonstrate the performance of these modifications on a range of synthetic, numerical, and experimental datasets. We further compare our modified DMD algorithms with other variants proposed in recent literature.

  16. Interaction of the histone (H3-H4)2 tetramer of the nucleosome with positively supercoiled DNA minicircles: Potential flipping of the protein from a left- to a right-handed superhelical form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamiche, A; Carot, V; Alilat, M; De Lucia, F; O'Donohue, M F; Revet, B; Prunell, A

    1996-07-23

    We have studied the ability of the histone (H3-H4)2 tetramer, the central part of the nucleosome of eukaryotic chromatin, to form particles on DNA minicircles of negative and positive superhelicities, and the effect of relaxing these particles with topoisomerase I. The results show that even modest positive torsional stress from the DNA, and in particular that generated by DNA thermal fluctuations, can trigger a major, reversible change in the conformation of the particle. Neither a large excess of naked DNA, nor a crosslink between the two H3s prevented the transition from one form to the other. This suggested that during the transition, the histones neither dissociated from the DNA nor were even significantly reshuffled. Moreover, the particles reconstituted on negatively and positively supercoiled minicircles look similar under electron microscopy. These data agree best with a transition involving a switch of the wrapped DNA from a left- to a right-handed superhelix. It is further proposed, based on the left-handed overall superhelical conformation of the tetramer within the octamer [Arents, G., Burlingame, R. W., Wang, B. C., Love, W. E. & Moudrianakis, E. N. (1991) Proc. Natl.Acad. Sci. USA 88, 10148-10152] that this change in DNA topology is mediated by a similar change in the topology of the tetramer itself, which may occur through a rotation (or a localized deformation) of the two H3-H4 dimers about their H3-H3 interface. Potential implications of this model for nucleosome dynamics in vivo are discussed. PMID:8755519

  17. Dynamic Characterization and Impulse Response Modeling of Amplitude and Phase Response of Silicon Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cleary, Ciaran S.; Ji, Hua; Dailey, James M.;

    2013-01-01

    Amplitude and phase dynamics of silicon nanowires were measured using time-resolved spectroscopy. Time shifts of the maximum phase change and minimum amplitude as a function of pump power due to saturation of the free-carrier density were observed. A phenomenological impulse response model used t...

  18. Characterization of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Protein Dynamics and Localization at the Centrosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Christina; Mok, Myth T S; Henderson, Beric R

    2016-01-01

    The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor is a multifunctional regulator of Wnt signaling and acts as a mobile scaffold at different cellular sites. APC was recently found to stimulate microtubule (MT) growth at the interphase centrosome; however, little is known about its dynamics and localization at this site. To address this, we analysed APC dynamics in fixed and live cells by fluorescence microscopy. In detergent-extracted cells, we discovered that APC was only weakly retained at the centrosome during interphase suggesting a rapid rate of exchange. This was confirmed in living cells by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), which identified two pools of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-APC: a major rapidly exchanging pool (~86%) and minor retained pool (~14%). The dynamic exchange rate of APC was unaffected by C-terminal truncations implicating a targeting role for the N-terminus. Indeed, we mapped centrosome localization to N-terminal armadillo repeat (ARM) domain amino acids 334-625. Interestingly, the rate of APC movement to the centrosome was stimulated by intact MTs, and APC dynamics slowed when MTs were disrupted by nocodazole treatment or knockdown of γ-tubulin. Thus, the rate of APC recycling at the centrosome is enhanced by MT growth, suggesting a positive feedback to stimulate its role in MT growth. PMID:27144584

  19. The Magnetic Nanoparticle Movement in Magnetic Fluid Characterized by the Laser Dynamic Speckle Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xijun Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A dual scanning laser speckle interferometry experiment was designed to observe the dynamic behavior of the magnetic fluid actuated by a magnetic field. In order to improve the spatial resolution of the dynamic speckle measurement, the phase delay scanning was used to compensate the additional phase variation which was caused by the transverse scanning. The correlation coefficients corresponding to the temporal dynamic speckle patterns within the same time interval scattering from the nanoparticles were calculated in the experiment on nanoscale magnetic clusters. In the experiment, the speckle of the magnetic nanoparticle fluid movement has been recorded by the lens unmounted CCD within the interferometry strips, although the speckle led to the distinguished annihilation of the light coherence. The results have showed that the nanoparticle fluid dynamic properties appeared synergistically in the fringe speckles. The analyses of the nanoparticle's relative speed and the speckle pattern moving amount in the fringes have proved the nanoparticle’s movement in a laminar flow in the experiment.

  20. Characterization of heat dynamics of an arctic low-energy house with floor heating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Philip Hvidthøft Delff; Jiménez, María José; Madsen, Henrik;

    2014-01-01

    the fast responses to mechanical ventilation and solar radiation through a large window facade, and the slow responses to floor heating and outdoor temperature. To successfully describe the dynamics of the system, solar radiation is given special attention in modeling of both the physical system...