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Sample records for characterizing multisegment foot

  1. Characterizing multisegment foot kinematics during gait in diabetic foot patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denti Paolo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of diabetes mellitus has reached epidemic proportions, this condition may result in multiple and chronic invalidating long term complications. Among these, the diabetic foot, is determined by the simultaneous presence of both peripheral neuropathy and vasculopathy that alter the biomechanics of the foot with the formation of callosity and ulcerations. To diagnose and treat the diabetic foot is crucial to understand the foot complex kinematics. Most of gait analysis protocols represent the entire foot as a rigid body connected to the shank. Nevertheless the existing multisegment models cannot completely decipher the impairments associated with the diabetic foot. Methods A four segment foot and ankle model for assessing the kinematics of the diabetic foot was developed. Ten normal subjects and 10 diabetics gait patterns were collected and major sources of variability were tested. Repeatability analysis was performed both on a normal and on a diabetic subject. Direct skin marker placement was chosen in correspondence of 13 anatomical landmarks and an optoelectronic system was used to collect the data. Results Joint rotation normative bands (mean plus/minus one standard deviation were generated using the data of the control group. Three representative strides per subject were selected. The repeatability analysis on normal and pathological subjects results have been compared with literature and found comparable. Normal and pathological gait have been compared and showed major statistically significant differences in the forefoot and midfoot dorsi-plantarflexion. Conclusion Even though various biomechanical models have been developed so far to study the properties and behaviour of the foot, the present study focuses on developing a methodology for the functional assessment of the foot-ankle complex and for the definition of a functional model of the diabetic neuropathic foot. It is, of course, important to evaluate

  2. Body of evidence supporting the clinical use of 3-D Multisegment Foot Models: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Deschamps, Kevin; Staes, Filip; Roosen, Philip; Nobels, Frank; Desloovere, Kaat; Bruyninckx, Herman; Matricali, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Background: A critical component in the characterization of foot mechanics during clinical gait analysis is the quantitative measurement of foot kinematics. Currently, the use of 3-D multisegment foot models (3DMFMs) is popular in gait laboratories as it would seem to be an adequate tool for the in vivo analysis of dynamic foot kinematics. This systematic review identifies and evaluates current evidence for the use of 3DMFMs in clinical gait analysis. Methods: A targeted search strategy tr...

  3. Changes in multi-segment foot biomechanics with a heat-mouldable semi-custom foot orthotic device

    OpenAIRE

    Ferber Reed; Benson Brittany

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Semi-custom foot orthoses (SCO) are thought to be a cost-effective alternative to custom-made devices. However, previous biomechanical research involving either custom or SCO has only focused on rearfoot biomechanics. The purpose of this study was therefore to determine changes in multi-segment foot biomechanics during shod walking with and without an SCO. We chose to investigate an SCO device that incorporates a heat-moulding process, to further understand if the moulding...

  4. Changes in multi-segment foot biomechanics with a heat-mouldable semi-custom foot orthotic device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferber Reed

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Semi-custom foot orthoses (SCO are thought to be a cost-effective alternative to custom-made devices. However, previous biomechanical research involving either custom or SCO has only focused on rearfoot biomechanics. The purpose of this study was therefore to determine changes in multi-segment foot biomechanics during shod walking with and without an SCO. We chose to investigate an SCO device that incorporates a heat-moulding process, to further understand if the moulding process would significantly alter rearfoot, midfoot, or shank kinematics as compared to a no-orthotic condition. We hypothesized the SCO, whether moulded or non-moulded, would reduce peak rearfoot eversion, tibial internal rotation, arch deformation, and plantar fascia strain as compared to the no-orthoses condition. Methods Twenty participants had retroreflective markers placed on the right limb to represent forefoot, midfoot, rearfoot and shank segments. 3D kinematics were recorded using an 8-camera motion capture system while participants walked on a treadmill. Results Plantar fascia strain was reduced by 34% when participants walked in either the moulded or non-moulded SCO condition compared to no-orthoses. However, there were no significant differences in peak rearfoot eversion, tibial internal rotation, or medial longitudinal arch angles between any conditions. Conclusions A semi-custom moulded orthotic does not control rearfoot, shank, or arch deformation but does, however, reduce plantar fascia strain compared to walking without an orthoses. Heat-moulding the orthotic device does not have a measurable effect on any biomechanical variables compared to the non-moulded condition. These data may, in part, help explain the clinical efficacy of orthotic devices.

  5. Multi-segmented Magnetic Nanowires Fabrication and Characterization

    KAUST Repository

    Moreno Garcia, Julian

    2016-04-28

    In this work, nickel-gold multi-segmented magnetic nanowires were grown by electrodeposition in anodized alumina templates. The templates were fabricated by a two step anodization process of aluminum disks in an aqueous solution of oxalic acid. In this process, ordered pores grew in an alumina oxide layer at the exposed aluminum area. Each disk was electropolished before the anodization process and the features at its surface were characterized to assess the effect on the pore ordering. Nickel Watts and gold cyanide electrolyte baths were prepared to electrodeposit pure nickel and gold in the templates. Both solutions response to a range of externally applied voltages was characterized and a threshold voltage above which deposition occurs is reported. Single nanowires were isolated by chemically dissolving the template and dispersed in ethanol. Devices were fabricated with these isolated nanowires in which gold contacts were deposited to measure the resistance. A current pulse setup was implemented in a magnetoresistance system allowing to send current pulses with amplitude as low as 2nA and 50μs width. Magneto resistance measurement were carried out on the single nanowires devices and the effect of current pulses was studied. It was found that distinct resistance states can be achieved by applying a determined current pulse at a constant applied field and that the initial state can be recovered by removing excess charge from the nanowire. Finally, the effect of annealing the nanowires in an air atmosphere at 150°C for 24 hours is studied showing that the nickel sections oxidize and the gold sections remain unchanged.

  6. Aerodynamic Effects of a 24-foot Multisegmented Telescoping Nose Boom on an F-15B Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumming, Stephen B.; Smith, Mark S.; Frederick, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    An experimental multisegmented telescoping nose boom has been installed on an F-15B airplane to be tested in a flight environment. The experimental nose boom is representative of one that could be used to tailor the sonic boom signature of an airplane such as a supersonic business jet. The nose boom consists of multiple sections and could be extended during flight to a length of 24 ft. The preliminary analyses indicate that the addition of the experimental nose boom could adversely affect vehicle flight characteristics and air data systems. Before the boom was added, a series of flights was conducted to update the aerodynamic model and characterize the air data systems of the baseline airplane. The baseline results have been used in conjunction with estimates of the nose boom's influence to prepare for a series of research flights conducted with the nose boom installed. Data from these flights indicate that the presence of the experimental boom reduced the static pitch and yaw stability of the airplane. The boom also adversely affected the static-position error of the airplane but did not significantly affect angle-of-attack or angle-of-sideslip measurements. The research flight series has been successfully completed.

  7. Reliability study of tibialis posterior and selected leg muscle EMG and multi-segment foot kinematics in rheumatoid arthritis associated pes planovalgus

    OpenAIRE

    Barn, Ruth; Rafferty, Daniel; Turner, Deborah E; Woodburn, James

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine within- and between-day reliability characteristics of electromyographic (EMG) activity patterns of selected lower leg muscles and kinematic variables in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and pes planovalgus. Methods Five patients with RA underwent gait analysis barefoot and shod on two occasions 1 week apart. Fine-wire (tibialis posterior [TP]) and surface EMG for selected muscles and 3D kinematics using a multi-segmented foot model was undertaken barefoot and sh...

  8. Multisegmented FeCo/Cu nanowires: electrosynthesis, characterization, and magnetic control of biomolecule desorption

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Özkale, B.; Shamsudhin, N.; Chatzipirpiridis, G.; Hoop, M.; Gramm, F.; Chen, Y.; Martí, Xavier; Sort, J.; Pellicer, E.; Pané, S.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 13 (2015), s. 7389-7396. ISSN 1944-8244 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : multisegmented nanowires * template-assisted electrodeposition * tunable magnetic properties * magnetically triggered release Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 6.723, year: 2014

  9. Fabrication and characterization of single segment CoNiP and multisegment CoNiP/Au nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the fabrication of CoNiP single segment and CoNiP/Au multisegment nanowires. We have fabricated these nanowires by electrodeposition method into polycarbonate templates with a nominal pore diameter about 100 nm. The hysteresis loops were measured with the applied magnetic field parallel and perpendicular to the wire axis using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The structure morphology was observed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and the element composition of CoNiP/Au multisegment nanowires were analyzed by EDS. The results show that nanowires are very uniform with the diameter of 100 nm. The observed coercivity (HC) and squareness (Mr/Ms) of CoNiP single segment nanowires are larger than the CoNiP/Au multisegment nanowires. (author)

  10. Characterization of foot-and-mouth disease virus types Ο and Asia 1 RNA

    OpenAIRE

    S. Vasantha; LAL, SM; Antony, A

    1988-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease is an acute and highly contagious febrile disease affecting cloven-footed animals. Identification of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), the causative agent of the disease, posed problems because of the occurrence of many types and subtypes of the virus. A molecular approach based on oligonucleotide mapping of FMDV RNA has been used for the identification and characterization of virus isolates obtained in a disease outbreak (King et al., 1981). One-dimensiona...

  11. Electrochemical template synthesis of multisegment nanowires: fabrication and protein functionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildt, Bridget; Mali, Prashant; Searson, Peter C

    2006-12-01

    Multisegment nanowires represent a unique platform for engineering multifunctional nanoparticles for a wide range of applications. For example, the optical and magnetic properties of nanowires can be tailored by modifying the size, shape, and composition of each segment. Similarly, surface modification can be used to tailor chemical and biological properties. In this article, we report on recent work on electrochemical template synthesis of nanogap electrodes, the fabrication of multisegment nanowires with embedded catalysts, and the selective functionalization of multisegment nanowires with proteins. PMID:17129026

  12. Passive legged, multi-segmented, robotic vehicle.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayward, David R.

    2003-11-01

    The Passive-legged, Multi-segmented, Robotic Vehicle concept is a simple legged vehicle that is modular and scaleable, and can be sized to fit through confined areas that are slightly larger than the size of the vehicle. A specific goal of this project was to be able to fit through the opening in the fabric of a chain link fence. This terrain agile robotic platform will be composed of multiple segments that are each equipped with appendages (legs) that resemble oars extending from a boat. Motion is achieved by pushing with these legs that can also flex to fold next to the body when passing through a constricted area. Each segment is attached to another segment using an actuated joint. This joint represents the only actuation required for mobility. The major feature of this type of mobility is that the terrain agility advantage of legs can be attained without the complexity of the multiple-actuation normally required for the many joints of an active leg. The minimum number of segments is two, but some concepts require three or more segments. This report discusses several concepts for achieving this type of mobility, their design, and the results obtained for each.

  13. Metastable Congested States in Multisegment Traffic Cellular Automaton

    OpenAIRE

    Nishimura, Yutaka; Cheon, Taksu; Seba, Petr

    2005-01-01

    We investigate a simple multisegment cellular automaton model of traffic flow. With the introduction of segment-dependent deceleration probability, metastable congested states in the intermediate density region emerge, and the initial state dependence of the flow is observed. The essential feature of three-phased structure empirically found in real-world traffic flow is reproduced without elaborate assumptions.

  14. Characterization of Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Function After Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Infection and Vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Patch, Jared R; Kenney, Mary; Pacheco, Juan M.; Grubman, Marvin J.; Golde, William T.

    2013-01-01

    The induction of neutralizing antibodies specific for foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) has been the central goal of vaccination efforts against this economically important disease of cloven-hoofed animals. Although these efforts have yielded much success, challenges remain, including little cross-serotype protection and inadequate duration of immunity. Commonly, viral infections are characterized by induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), yet the function of CTL in FMDV immunity is poo...

  15. Characterization of foot-and-mouth disease virus's viral peptides with LC-ESI-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peptides and proteins play a central role in numerous biological and physiological processes in living organisms. Viral capsid peptides are part of the viruses' outer shell of genetic materials. Viruses are recognized by immune system via capsid peptides. Depending on this property of capsid peptides, prototypes synthetic peptide-based vaccine can be developed. In this work, we synthesized three different viral peptide sequences of foot-and-mouth disease virus with microwave enhanced solid phase synthesis method. These peptides were characterized by using liquid chromatography electro spray interface mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS) with electro spray ionization. We briefly describe the essential facts for peptide characterization. (author)

  16. Characterization and expression analysis of microRNAs in the tube foot of sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongdi Wang

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of endogenous non-coding small RNA with average length of 22 nucleotides, participating in the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. In this study, we report the identification and characterization of miRNAs in the tube foot of sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus by next generation sequencing with Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. Through the bioinformatic analysis, we identified 260 conserved miRNAs and six novel miRNAs from the tube foot small RNA transcriptome. Quantitative realtime PCR (qRT-PCR was performed to characterize the specific expression in the tube foot. The results indicated that four miRNAs, including miR-29a, miR-29b, miR-2005 and miR-278-3p, were significantly up-regulated in the tube foot. The target genes of the four specifically expressed miRNAs were predicted in silico and validated by performing qRT-PCR. Gene ontology (GO and KEGG pathway analyses with the target genes of these four miRNAs were conducted to further understand the regulatory function in the tube foot. This is the first study to profile the miRNA transcriptome of the tube foot in sea cucumber. This work will provide valuable genomic resources to understand the mechanisms of gene regulation in the tube foot, and will be useful to assist the molecular breeding in sea cucumber.

  17. Characterization and Expression Analysis of MicroRNAs in the Tube Foot of Sea Cucumber Apostichopus japonicus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jun; Li, Chengze; Qiu, Xuemei; Chang, Yaqing; Liu, Zhanjiang; Wang, Xiuli

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenous non-coding small RNA with average length of 22 nucleotides, participating in the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. In this study, we report the identification and characterization of miRNAs in the tube foot of sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) by next generation sequencing with Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. Through the bioinformatic analysis, we identified 260 conserved miRNAs and six novel miRNAs from the tube foot small RNA transcriptome. Quantitative realtime PCR (qRT-PCR) was performed to characterize the specific expression in the tube foot. The results indicated that four miRNAs, including miR-29a, miR-29b, miR-2005 and miR-278-3p, were significantly up-regulated in the tube foot. The target genes of the four specifically expressed miRNAs were predicted in silico and validated by performing qRT-PCR. Gene ontology (GO) and KEGG pathway analyses with the target genes of these four miRNAs were conducted to further understand the regulatory function in the tube foot. This is the first study to profile the miRNA transcriptome of the tube foot in sea cucumber. This work will provide valuable genomic resources to understand the mechanisms of gene regulation in the tube foot, and will be useful to assist the molecular breeding in sea cucumber. PMID:25372871

  18. Trench Foot or Immersion Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Weather Information on Specific Types of Emergencies Trench Foot or Immersion Foot DISASTER RECOVERY FACT SHEET Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir What is trench foot? Trench foot, also known as immersion foot, occurs ...

  19. Trench Foot or Immersion Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tsunamis Volcanoes Wildfires Winter Weather Trench Foot or Immersion Foot DISASTER RECOVERY FACT SHEET Recommend on Facebook ... is trench foot? Trench foot, also known as immersion foot, occurs when the feet are wet for ...

  20. Moment-Balanced Characteristic Earthquake Model Rates For Multi-Segment Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxall, B.

    2001-12-01

    Characterization of a multi-segment faults for probabilistic seismic hazard analysis requires definition of alternative rupture scenarios that involve different combinations of contiguous fault segments. In general, there are n(n+1)/2 possible rupture sources for a fault with n segments: for example, three rupture sources are possible for a fault having two segments, A and B -- A or B rupturing alone and A+B rupturing together. We have developed a flexible general algorithm for computing earthquake occurrence rates on multi-segment faults according to a generalized form of the characteristic earthquake magnitude-frequency relationship of Youngs and Coppersmith (BSSA, 1985), given estimates of the probabilities of failure of the segmentation barriers along the fault. The computed rates conserve the seismic moment-rate budget for the fault constrained by the geologic slip rates on the individual segments and the segment rupture areas. We have incorporated the algorithm in a Monte Carlo routine for hazard calculation in which the input fault parameters, including the segmentation barrier failure probabilities, are selected from distributions, allowing the often large uncertainties in fault parameters to be propagated through the hazard calculation to provide rigorous estimates of the hazard uncertainty bounds. We explore the sensitivity of the rate and hazard calculations to variations in the input parameters, and in particular to the subjectively assigned probabilities of segmentation barrier failure. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  1. Characterization and Expression Analysis of MicroRNAs in the Tube Foot of Sea Cucumber Apostichopus japonicus

    OpenAIRE

    Hongdi Wang; Shikai Liu; Jun Cui; Chengze Li; Xuemei Qiu; Yaqing Chang; Zhanjiang Liu; Xiuli Wang

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenous non-coding small RNA with average length of 22 nucleotides, participating in the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. In this study, we report the identification and characterization of miRNAs in the tube foot of sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) by next generation sequencing with Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. Through the bioinformatic analysis, we identified 260 conserved miRNAs and six novel miRNAs from the tube foot small RNA ...

  2. Multisegment Kinematics of the Spinal Column: Soft Tissue Artifacts Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahallati, Sara; Rouhani, Hossein; Preuss, Richard; Masani, Kei; Popovic, Milos R

    2016-07-01

    A major challenge in the assessment of intersegmental spinal column angles during trunk motion is the inherent error in recording the movement of bony anatomical landmarks caused by soft tissue artifacts (STAs). This study aims to perform an uncertainty analysis and estimate the typical errors induced by STA into the intersegmental angles of a multisegment spinal column model during trunk bending in different directions by modeling the relative displacement between skin-mounted markers and actual bony landmarks during trunk bending. First, we modeled the maximum displacement of markers relative to the bony landmarks with a multivariate Gaussian distribution. In order to estimate the distribution parameters, we measured these relative displacements on five subjects at maximum trunk bending posture. Then, in order to model the error depending on trunk bending angle, we assumed that the error grows linearly as a function of the bending angle. Second, we applied our error model to the trunk motion measurement of 11 subjects to estimate the corrected trajectories of the bony landmarks and investigate the errors induced into the intersegmental angles of a multisegment spinal column model. For this purpose, the trunk was modeled as a seven-segment rigid-body system described using 23 reflective markers placed on various bony landmarks of the spinal column. Eleven seated subjects performed trunk bending in five directions and the three-dimensional (3D) intersegmental angles during trunk bending were calculated before and after error correction. While STA minimally affected the intersegmental angles in the sagittal plane (makes the measurement more appropriate for use in clinical decision-making processes. PMID:27151927

  3. Foot Anthropometry and Morphology Phenomena

    OpenAIRE

    Agić, Ante; NIKOLIĆ, VASILIJE; Mijović, Budimir

    2006-01-01

    Foot structure description is important for many reasons. The foot anthropometric morphology phenomena are analyzed together with hidden biomechanical functionality in order to fully characterize foot structure and function. For younger Croatian population the scatter data of the individual foot variables were interpolated by multivariate statistics. Foot structure descriptors are influenced by many factors, as a style of life, race, climate, and things of the great importance in ...

  4. Foot Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... toenails straight across and not too short Your foot health can be a clue to your overall ... disease, heart disease, or high blood pressure. Good foot care and regular foot checks are an important ...

  5. Foot Drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Foot Drop Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... research is being done? Clinical Trials What is Foot Drop? Foot drop describes the inability to raise ...

  6. Molecular Characterization of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Type C of Indian Origin

    OpenAIRE

    Nagendrakumar, Singanallur Balasubramanian; Reddy, Guddeti Srinivas; Chandran, Dev; Thiagarajan, Dorairajan; Rangarajan, Pundi Narasimha; Srinivasan, Villuppanoor Alwar

    2005-01-01

    Comparison of nucleotide sequences of the partial 1D region of foot-and-mouth disease type C viruses of Indian origin with those of European, South American, and Southeast Asian viruses revealed that the Indian viruses form a distinct genotype. The vaccine strain C IND/51/79 belongs to this genotype and may be a prototype strain of this genotype.

  7. Characterization of cytotoxic T lymphocyte function following foot-and-mouth disease virus infection and vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is an economically important disease of cloven-hoofed animals that remains a global threat to livestock species. The induction of neutralizing antibodies against FMD virus (FMDV) has been the central goal of vaccination efforts against this disease. Although these effort...

  8. Molecular characterization of foot and mouth disease viruses collected from Suez Canal area, Egypt from 2009 to 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed F. Mandour; Mohamed M. AbdEldaim; Shahira A. M. Abdelwahab; Abu Elnaga, H.I.; Elshahidy, M. S.; Azab, A. M.; Eltarabily, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    Foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) is characterized by high genetic and antigenic variations. The nucleotide sequence of VP1 gene of FMDV serotypes O and A were determined and compared to the sequences of some national and international FMDV from GenBank. Six PCR positive samples were selected for sequencing as one from serotype O and A from the 3 governorates of Suez Canal area (Ismailia, Suez and Port Said). Results of the sequencing of VP1 gene of FMDV serotype A revealed that there are s...

  9. DDoS Defense Algorithm Based on Multi-Segment Timeout Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Ruizhong; YANG Xiaohui; MA Xiaoxue; HE Xinfeng

    2006-01-01

    Through the analysis to the DDoS(distributed denial of service) attack, it will conclude that at different time segments, the arrive rate of normal SYN (Synchronization) package are similar, while the abnormal packages are different with the normal ones. Toward this situation a DDoS defense algorithm based on multi-segment timeout technology is presented, more than one timeout segment are set to control the net flow. Experiment results show that in the case of little flow, multi-segment timeout has the ability dynamic defense, so the system performance is improved and the system has high response rate.

  10. Further characterization of a protein kinase from foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Grubman, M J

    1982-01-01

    Acid disruption of foot-and-mouth disease virus released a protein kinase activity that sedimented at less than 7S. This enzyme was separated into three peaks of activity by ion-exchange and hydroxylapatite chromatography. Analysis of the various enzyme fractions by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining revealed that one of the fractions lacked the major virion structural proteins, but still contained two or three other polypeptides. This enzyme phosphorylated mainly one prot...

  11. Characterization of epitope-tagged foot-and-mouth disease virus

    OpenAIRE

    Seago, J.; Jackson, T; C Doel; Fry, E; Stuart, D; Harmsen, M. M.; Charleston, B; Juleff, N.

    2012-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious and economically devastating disease of cloven-hoofed animals with an almost-worldwide distribution. Conventional FMD vaccines consisting of chemically inactivated viruses have aided in the eradication of FMD from Europe and remain the main tool for control in endemic countries. Although significant steps have been made to improve the quality of vaccines, such as improved methods of antigen concentration and purification, manufacturing proce...

  12. Athlete's foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinea pedis; Fungal infection - feet; Tinea of the foot; Infection - fungal - feet; Ringworm - foot ... 77. Hay RJ. Dermatophytosis (ringworm) and other superficial mycoses. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. ...

  13. Foot Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... much higher rates of foot problems. For women, pain in the toes and ball of the foot is much more common than in men, and it gets worse with age. However, pain in the heel tends to decrease as we ...

  14. Athlete's Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athlete's foot is a common infection caused by a fungus. It most often affects the space between the toes. ... skin between your toes. You can get athlete's foot from damp surfaces, such as showers, swimming pools, ...

  15. Development of the multi-segment lumbar spine for humanoid robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penčić Marko M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents development of multi-segment lumbar structure based on the human spine. The research is performed within the project based on development of socially acceptable robot named "SARA". Two approaches for spine realization of humanoids exist: multi-joint viscoelastic structures (5-10 joints that have variable flexibility and structures that consist of one joint - torso/waist joint, which has low elasticity and high stiffness. We propose multi-joint flexible structure with stiff, low backlash and self-locking mechanisms that require small actuators. Based on kinematic-dynamic requirements dynamical model of robot is formed. Dynamical simulation is performed for several postures of the robot and driving torques of lumbar structure are determined. During development of the lumbar structure 16 variant solutions are considered. Developed lumbar structure consists of three equal segments, it has 6 DOFs (2 DOFs per segment and allows movements of lateral flexion ±30° and torsion ±45°, as well as the combination of these two movements. In development phase the movements of flexion/extension are excluded, for the bending of the body forward to an angle of 45° is achieved by rotation in the hip joints. Proposed solution of the lumbar structure is characterized by self-locking of mechanisms (if for any reason actuators stop working, lumbar structure retains current posture, low backlash (high positioning accuracy and repeatability of movements, compactness, high carrying capacity and small dimensions. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III44008 and by Provincial secretariat for science and technological development under contract 114-451-2116/2011

  16. Foot pain

    OpenAIRE

    Formosa, Aaron

    2005-01-01

    Foot complaints are very common in general practice and their incidence increases with age. Three out of four people complain of foot pain during the course of a lifetime, while approximately 20% of people aged 65 years or older complain of non-traumatic foot problems.

  17. Foot Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... straight across and not too short Your foot health can be a clue to your overall health. For example, joint stiffness could mean arthritis. Tingling ... foot checks are an important part of your health care. If you have foot problems, be sure ...

  18. The Effects of Various Running Inclines on Three-Segment Foot Mechanics and Plantar Fascia Strain

    OpenAIRE

    Sinclair Jonathan; Atkins Stephen; Vincent Hayley

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. There has yet to be a combined analysis of three-dimensional multi-segment foot kinematics and plantar fascia strain in running gait at various degrees of inclination. The aim of the current study was therefore to investigate the above during treadmill running at different inclines (0°, 5°, 10° and 15°). Methods. Twelve male participants ran at 4.0 m · s-1 in the four different inclinations. Three-dimensional kinematics of the foot segments and plantar fascia strain were quantified f...

  19. Molecular Characterization of a Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus (FMDV) Containing a 57-Nucleotide Insertion in the 3' Untranslated Region (3'UTR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) virus containing a 57 nt insertion in the 3’ untranslated region (3’UTR) was generated by a transposon (tn) mediated mutagenesis. Characterization of the mutant virus (A24-3’UTR8110) revealed no significant differences in virus growth, translation efficiency and...

  20. Analytical modeling of open-Circuit air-Gap field distributions in multisegment and multilayer interior permanent-magnet machines

    OpenAIRE

    L. Zhu; Jiang, S. Z.; Zhu, Z Q; Chan, C. C.

    2009-01-01

    We present a simple lumped magnetic circuit model for interior permanent-magnet (IPM) machines with multisegment and multilayer permanent magnets. We derived analytically the open-circuit air-gap field distribution, average air-gap flux density, and leakage fluxes. To verify the developed models and analytical method, we adopted finite-element analysis (FEA). We show that for prototype machines, the errors between the FEA and analytically predicted results are $≪$1% for multisegment IPM machi...

  1. First isolation and genomic characterization of enterovirus A71 and coxsackievirus A16 from hand foot and mouth disease patients in the Lao PDR

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, V. H.; Sibounheuang, B.; Phommasone, K; Vongsouvath, M; Newton, P.N.; Piorkowski, G; Baronti, C.; de Lamballerie, X.; A. Dubot‐Pérès

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus A71 (EV‐A71) and coxsackievirus A16 (CV‐A16) are major aetiological agents of hand, foot and mouth disease in Asia. We established the first genomic characterization of strains isolated in 2011 from Lao patients. Isolates were related to EV‐A71 genotype C4 and CV‐A16 genotype B1a that circulated in neighbouring countries during the same period. This confirms the regional character of hand, foot and mouth disease epidemiology and makes plausible the occurrence of severe disease in ...

  2. Biomechanical Model of the Diabetic Foot

    OpenAIRE

    Agić, Ante; NIKOLIĆ, VASILIJE; Mijović, Budimir; Reischl, Uwe

    2008-01-01

    In this work, a two dimensional (2D) finite element foot model was established from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of a male subject. The model comprises first medial planar cross-section through the foot, representing the foot in standing posture. For specified external load, the stress and strain distribution field under foot structure are determined. The material characterization of foot structure components are stronger related to diabetic phenomena. The new material model f...

  3. De novo assembly and characterization of foot transcriptome and microsatellite marker development for Paphia textile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoming; Li, Jiakai; Xiao, Shijun; Liu, Xiande

    2016-01-15

    Paphia textile is an important, aquaculture bivalve clam species distributed mainly in China, Philippines, and Malaysia. Recent studies of P. textile have focused mainly on artificial breeding and nutrition analysis, and the transcriptome and genome of P. textile have rarely been reported. In this work, the transcriptome of P. textile foot tissue was sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq™ 2000 platform. A total of 20,219,795 reads were generated, resulting in 4.08 Gb of raw data. The raw reads were cleaned and assembled into 54,852 unigenes with an N50 length of 829 bp. Of these unigenes, 38.92% were successfully annotated based on their matches to sequences in seven public databases. Among the annotated unigenes, 14,571 were assigned Gene Ontology terms, 5448 were classified to Clusters of Orthologous Groups categories, and 6738 were mapped to 228 pathways in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database. For functional marker development, 5605 candidate simple sequence repeats were identified in the transcriptome and 80 primer pairs were selected randomly and amplified in a wild population of P. textile. A total of 36 loci that exhibited obvious repeat length polymorphisms were detected. The transcriptomic data and microsatellite markers will provide valuable resources for future functional gene analyses, genetic map construction, and quantitative trait loci mapping in P. textile. PMID:26546834

  4. The foot of Homo naledi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harcourt-Smith, W E H; Throckmorton, Z; Congdon, K A; Zipfel, B; Deane, A S; Drapeau, M S M; Churchill, S E; Berger, L R; DeSilva, J M

    2015-01-01

    Modern humans are characterized by a highly specialized foot that reflects our obligate bipedalism. Our understanding of hominin foot evolution is, although, hindered by a paucity of well-associated remains. Here we describe the foot of Homo naledi from Dinaledi Chamber, South Africa, using 107 pedal elements, including one nearly-complete adult foot. The H. naledi foot is predominantly modern human-like in morphology and inferred function, with an adducted hallux, an elongated tarsus, and derived ankle and calcaneocuboid joints. In combination, these features indicate a foot well adapted for striding bipedalism. However, the H. naledi foot differs from modern humans in having more curved proximal pedal phalanges, and features suggestive of a reduced medial longitudinal arch. Within the context of primitive features found elsewhere in the skeleton, these findings suggest a unique locomotor repertoire for H. naledi, thus providing further evidence of locomotor diversity within both the hominin clade and the genus Homo. PMID:26439101

  5. Verification and Validation of Multisegmented Mooring Capabilities in FAST v8: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, Morten T.; Wendt, Fabian; Robertson, Amy; Jonkman, Jason; Hall, Matthew

    2016-08-01

    The quasi-static and dynamic mooring modules of the open-source aero-hydro-servo-elastic wind turbine simulation software, FAST v8, have previously been verified and validated, but only for mooring arrangements consisting of single lines connecting each fairlead and anchor. This paper extends the previous verification and validation efforts to focus on the multisegmented mooring capability of the FAST v8 modules: MAP++, MoorDyn, and the OrcaFlex interface. The OC3-Hywind spar buoy system tested by the DeepCwind consortium at the MARIN ocean basin, which includes a multisegmented bridle layout of the mooring system, was used for the verification and validation activities.

  6. Magnetic reversal modes in multisegmented nanowire arrays with long aspect ratio

    OpenAIRE

    Rando, E. A.; Allende, S.

    2015-01-01

    A detailed numerical analysis of the magnetization reversal processes in multisegmented nanowire arrays was developed. The nanowires have a long aspect ratio and are formed by magnetic and non-magnetic sections alternately arranged in such a way that the array resembles magnetic layers separated by non-magnetic layers. Attention has been focused on the influence of magnetostatic interaction in the magnetic pattern formation of these magnetic nanostructures. Results from a magnetic correlation...

  7. Magnetic properties of multisegmented cylindrical nanoparticles with alternating magnetic wire and tube segments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar-Aravena, D.; Corona, R.M. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), Avda. Ecuador 3493, 917-0124 Santiago (Chile); Goerlitz, D.; Nielsch, K. [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Hamburg, Jungiusstrasse 11, D-20355 Hamburg (Germany); Escrig, J., E-mail: jescrigm@gmail.com [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), Avda. Ecuador 3493, 917-0124 Santiago (Chile); Center for the Development of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (CEDENNA), Avda. Ecuador 3493, 917-0124 Santiago (Chile)

    2013-11-15

    The magnetic properties in multisegmented cylindrical nanostructures comprised of nanowire and nanotube segments are investigated numerically as a function of their geometry. In this work we report systematic changes in the coercivity and remanence in these systems. Besides, we have found the ideal conditions for a magnetic configuration with two antiparallel domains that could be used to help to stabilize magnetic nanoparticles inside ferromagnetic multisegmented cylindrical nanoparticles. This magnetic behavior is due to the fact that the tube segment reverses its magnetization before the wire segment, allowing the control of the magnetic domain walls motion between two segments. In this way, these magnetic nanoobjects can be an alternative to store information or even perform logic functions. - Highlights: • Magnetic states of wire/tube were investigated as a function of their geometry. • Multisegmented systems present two well-defined jumps in the hysteresis curve. • It is possible to prepare an antiparallel magnetic configuration. • The step width for the optimum condition reaches 60 mT. • The tube segments reverse their magnetization first than the wire segments.

  8. Computer-assisted multi-segment gradient optimization in ion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyteca, Eva; Park, Soo Hyun; Shellie, Robert A; Haddad, Paul R; Desmet, Gert

    2015-02-13

    This study reports simulation and optimization of ion chromatography separations using multi-segment gradient elution. First, an analytical expression for the gradient retention factor under these complex elution profiles was derived. This allows a rapid retention time prediction calculations under different gradient conditions, during computer-assisted method development. Next, these analytical expressions were implemented in an in-house written Matlab(®) routine that searches for the optimal (multi-segment) gradient conditions, either via a four-segment grid search or via the recently proposed one-segment-per-component search, in which the slope is adjusted after the elution of each individual component. Evaluation of the retention time simulation and optimization approaches was performed on a mixture of 18 inorganic anions and different subsets with varying number of compounds. The two considered multi-segment gradient optimization searches resulted in similar proposed gradient profiles, and corresponding chromatograms. Moreover, the resultant chromatograms were clearly superior to the chromatograms obtained from the best simple linear gradient profiles, found via a fine grid search. The proposed approach is useful for automated method development in ion chromatography in which complex elution profiles are often used to increase the separation power. PMID:25596760

  9. Foot-and-mouth disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belsham, Graham; Charleston, Bryan; Jackson, Terry;

    2009-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease is an economically important, highly contagious, disease of cloven-hoofed animals characterized by the appearance of vesicles (blisters) on the feet and in and around the mouth. The causative agent, foot-and-mouth disease virus, was the first mammalian virus to be discovered...

  10. [Osteochondrosis of the pediatric foot].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbab, D; Wingenfeld, C; Rath, B; Lüring, C; Quack, V; Tingart, M

    2013-01-01

    Osteochondrosis is a heterogeneous group of self-limiting conditions characterized by disturbance of enchondral ossification caused by a lack of circulation. Foot pain is a relatively common problem in children and adolescents and may be due to osteochondrosis. Osteochondrosis of the growing foot shows painful radiological alterations including increased density, fragmentation and irregularity of the epiphyses, physes and apophyses. Lacking etiologic and pathophysiologic information, ostoechondroses have been documented in almost every bone of the foot and therefore should be considered in the differential diagnosis when evaluating pediatric foot pain. The most common localizations of osteochondroses of the growing foot include the navicular as Kohler's syndrome, the metatarsal as Freiberg's infraction and calcaneal apophysitis as Sever's disease. Prognosis and final outcome vary considerably between the different localizations. Physicians should therefore be informed about the etiology, clinical presentation and treatment options for osteochondroses of the growing foot. PMID:23254328

  11. Club foot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engell, V; Damborg, F; Andersen, M;

    2006-01-01

    The aetiology of congenital club foot is unclear. Although studies on populations, families and twins suggest a genetic component, the mode of inheritance does not comply with distinctive patterns. The Odense-based Danish Twin Registry contains data on all 73,000 twin pairs born in Denmark over the...... last 130 years. In 2002 all 46 418 twins born between 1931 and 1982 received a 17-page questionnaire, one question of which was 'Were you born with club foot?' A total of 94 twins answered 'Yes', giving an overall self-reported prevalence of congenital club foot of 0.0027 (95% confidence interval (CI.......09 (95% CI 0.01 to 0.32) for DZss and 0.05 (95% CI 0.006 to 0.18) for all dizygotic (DZtot) twins. We have found evidence of a genetic component in congenital club foot, although non-genetic factors must play a predominant role....

  12. Foot Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the toe to maintain realignment. Neuroma Surgery: Neuroma surgery involves removing a benign enlargement of a nerve, usually between the metatarsal heads in the ball of the foot. This soft tissue surgery tends to have a ...

  13. Foot Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... irritation of the arch ligament and tissues, called PLANTAR FASCIITIS. Try to keep weight off your foot until ... bone, but more likely to be due to PLANTAR FASCIITIS. See your doctor. He or she can suggest ...

  14. Characterization of foot-and-mouth disease virus gene products with antisera against bacterially synthesized fusion proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Defined segments of the cloned foot-and-mouth disease virus genome corresponding to all parts of the coding region were expressed in Escherichia coli as fusions to the N-terminal part of the MS2-polymerase gene under the control of the inducible λPL promoter. All constructs yielded large amounts of proteins, which were purified and used to raise sequence-specific antisera in rabbits. These antisera were used to identify the corresponding viral gene products in 35S-labeled extracts from foot-and-mouth disease virus-infected BHK cells. This allowed us to locate unequivocally all mature foot-and-mouth disease virus gene products in the nucleotide sequence, to identify precursor-product relationships, and to detect several foot-and mouth disease virus gene products not previously identified in vivo or in vitro

  15. Multi-segment analysis of spinal kinematics during sit-to-stand in patients with chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christe, Guillaume; Redhead, Lucy; Legrand, Thomas; Jolles, Brigitte M; Favre, Julien

    2016-07-01

    While alterations in spinal kinematics have been frequently reported in patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP), a better characterization of the kinematics during functional activities is needed to improve our understanding and therapeutic solutions for this condition. Recent studies on healthy subjects showed the value of analyzing the spine during sit-to-stand transition (STST) using multi-segment models, suggesting that additional knowledge could be gained by conducting similar assessments in CLBP patients. The objectives of this study were to characterize three dimensional kinematics at the lower lumbar (LLS), upper lumbar (ULS), lower thoracic (LTS) and upper thoracic (UTS) joints during STST, and to test the hypothesis that CLBP patients perform this movement with smaller angle and angular velocity compared to asymptomatic controls. Ten CLBP patients (with minimal to moderate disability) and 11 asymptomatic controls with comparable demographics (52% male, 37.4±5.6 years old, 22.5±2.8kg/m(2)) were tested using a three-dimensional camera-based system following previously proposed protocols. Characteristic patterns of movement were identified at the LLS, ULS and UTS joints in the sagittal plane only. Significant differences in the form of smaller sagittal-plane angle and smaller angular velocity in the patient group compared to the control group were observed at these three joints. This indicated a more rigid spine in the patient group and suggested that CLBP rehabilitation could potentially be enhanced by targeting movement deficits in functional activities. The results further recommended the analysis of STST kinematics using a pelvis-lumbar-thoracic model including lower and upper lumbar and thoracic segments. PMID:27262182

  16. Foot Disorders, Foot Posture, and Foot Function: The Framingham Foot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Hagedorn, Thomas J; Alyssa B Dufour; RISKOWSKI, JODY L.; Hillstrom, Howard J; Menz, Hylton B.; Casey, Virginia A.; Hannan, Marian T

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Foot disorders are common among older adults and may lead to outcomes such as falls and functional limitation. However, the associations of foot posture and foot function to specific foot disorders at the population level remain poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to assess the relation between specific foot disorders, foot posture, and foot function. Methods: Participants were from the population-based Framingham Foot Study. Quintiles of the modified arch index and...

  17. Athlete's Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... um) too small to be seen by the naked eye. This fungus eats old skin cells. And plenty of them can be found on the feet! Although athlete's foot occurs mostly among teen and young adult guys, kids and women can get it, too. People with sweaty or ...

  18. Foot pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Elsevier; 2009:section D. Brodsky JW, Bruck N. Stress fractures of the foot and ankle. In: DeLee JC, Drez D Jr, Miller MD, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic Sports Medicine. 3rd ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2009: ...

  19. Characterization of a chimeric foot-and-mouth disease virus bearing bovine rhinitis B virus leader proteinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our recent study has shown that bovine rhinovirus type 2 (BRV2), a new member of the Aphthovirus genus, shares many motifs and sequence similarities with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Despite low sequence conservation (36percent amino acid identity) and N- and C-terminus folding differences,...

  20. Glucose biosensor based on multisegment nanowires exhibiting reversible magnetic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerola, Gislaine P; Takahashi, Giovanna S; Perez, Geraldo G; Recco, Lucas C; Pedrosa, Valber A

    2014-11-01

    We describe the amperometric detection of glucose using oriented nanowires with magnetic switching of the bioelectrochemical process. The fabrication process of the nanowires was prepared through controlled nucleation and growth during a stepwise electrochemical deposition, and it was characterized using scanning electron microscopy. Cyclic voltammetry and amperometry were used to study the magnetoswitchable property; this control was accomplished by changing the surface orientation of nanowires. Under the optimal condition, the amperometric response was also linear up to a glucose concentration of 0.1-16.0 mmol L(-1) with a sensitivity of 81 μA mM(-1). The detection limit was estimated for 4.8×10(-8) mol L(-1), defined from a signal/noise ratio of 3. It also exhibits good reproducibility and high selectivity with insignificant interference from ascorbic acid, acetoaminophen, and uric acid. The resulting biosensor was applied to detect the blood sugar in human serum samples without any pretreatment, and the results were comparatively in agreement with the clinical assay. PMID:25127595

  1. Tibialis posterior tenosynovitis and associated pes plano valgus in rheumatoid arthritis: electromyography, multisegment foot kinematics, and ultrasound features

    OpenAIRE

    Barn, R.; Turner, D.E.; Rafferty, D.; Sturrock, R D; Woodburn, J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare electromyographic (EMG), kinematic, kinetic, and ultrasound (US) features of pes plano valgus associated with US-confirmed tibialis posterior (TP) tenosynovitis in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and healthy control subjects. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, patients with RA and US-confirmed tenosynovitis of TP underwent gait analysis, including 3-dimensional kinematics, kinetics, and intramuscular EMG of TP, and findings were compared with a group of healthy indivi...

  2. Relationship between foot type, foot deformity, and ulcer occurrence in the high-risk diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledoux, William R; Shofer, Jane B; Smith, Douglas G; Sullivan, Katrina; Hayes, Shane G; Assal, Mathieu; Reiber, Gayle E

    2005-01-01

    We hypothesized an association between foot type, foot deformity, and foot ulceration and conducted an analysis of a well-characterized, high-risk diabetic population of 398 subjects. The average age was 62 years of age and 74% of the study population were males. Foot-type distributions were 19.5% pes cavus (high arch), 51.5% neutrally aligned (normal arch), and 29.0% pes planus (low arch). We quantified the presence of hallux valgus (23.9%), hammer/claw toes (46.7%), and hallux limitus (24.4%). A significant association was found between foot type and hallux valgus (p = 0.003); pes planus feet had the highest prevalence as compared with neutrally aligned feet (odds ratio [OR] = 2.43, p = 0.0006). Foot type was also significantly associated with fixed hammer/claw toes (p = 0.01); pes cavus feet had the highest prevalence as compared with neutrally aligned feet (OR = 3.89, p = 0.001). Foot type was also significantly associated with hallux limitus (p = 0.006) with pes planus feet having the highest prevalence as compared with neutrally aligned feet (OR = 2.19, p = 0.003). However, foot type was not significantly related to any ulcer outcome (p = 0.7). Fixed hammer/claw toes (OR = 3.91, p = 0.003) and hallux limitus (OR = 3.02, p = 0.006) were associated with increased risk of any ulcer occurrence. This study affirms that foot type and foot deformity are related and that foot deformities are associated with ulcer occurrence. PMID:16586192

  3. Mycetoma foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somnath Gooptu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycetoma is an uncommon chronic granulomatous infective disease of the skin, dermis and subcutaneous tissues predominantly seen in tropical countries. A patient presented to our hospital with the swelling of the left foot with a healed sinus and a painful nodule. He gave a history of sinuses in the left foot from which there was discharge of yellow granules. Culture of the ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration cytology of the nodule revealed growths of Nocardia species. The patient was treated with a multi-drug therapy along with debridement of the painful nodule. He experienced symptomatic relief and a regression of the swelling within the three months of follow-up so far. Due to the relatively slow progression of the disease, patients are diagnosed at a late stage. Hence, emphasis should be placed on health education and the importance of wearing footwear.

  4. Tuning the magnetic properties of multisegmented Ni/Cu electrodeposited nanowires with controllable Ni lengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susano, M.; Proenca, M. P.; Moraes, S.; Sousa, C. T.; Araújo, J. P.

    2016-08-01

    The fabrication of segmented Ni/Cu nanowires (NWs), with tunable structural and magnetic properties, is reported. A potentiostatic electrodeposition method with a single electrolytic bath has been used to fabricate multisegmented Ni/Cu NWs inside a highly hexagonally ordered anodic nanoporous alumina membrane, with diameters of 50 nm and Ni segment lengths (L Ni) tuned from 10 nm up to 140 nm. The x-ray diffraction results evidenced a strong dependence of the Ni NWs crystallographic face-centered-cubic (fcc) texture along the [220] direction on the aspect ratio of the NWs. The magnetic behavior of the multisegmented Ni/Cu NW arrays, as a function of the magnetic field and temperature, is also studied and correlated with their structural and morphological properties. Micromagnetic simulations, together with the experimental results, showed a dominant antiferromagnetic coupling between Ni segments along the wire length for small low aspect-ratio magnetic segments. When increasing the Ni segments’ length, the magnetic interactions between these along the wire became stronger, favouring a ferromagnetic coupling. The Curie temperature of the NWs was also found to strongly depend on the Ni magnetic segment length. Particularly the Curie temperature was found to be reduced 75 K for the 20 nm Ni segments, following the finite-size scaling relation with ξ 0 = 8.1 Å and γ = 0.48. These results emphasize the advantages of using a template assisted method to electrodeposit multilayer NWs, as it allows an easy tailor of the respective morphological, chemical, structural and magnetic properties.

  5. Characterization of foot-and-mouth disease virus gene products with antisera against bacterially synthesized fusion proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Strebel, K; De Beck, E.; K Strohmaier; Schaller, H

    1986-01-01

    Defined segments of the cloned foot-and-mouth disease virus genome corresponding to all parts of the coding region were expressed in Escherichia coli as fusions to the N-terminal part of the MS2-polymerase gene under the control of the inducible lambda PL promoter. All constructs yielded large amounts of proteins, which were purified and used to raise sequence-specific antisera in rabbits. These antisera were used to identify the corresponding viral gene products in 35S-labeled extracts from ...

  6. Foot amputation - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amputation - foot - discharge; Trans-metatarsal amputation - discharge ... You have had a foot amputation. You may have had an accident, or your foot may have had an infection or disease and doctors could ...

  7. Common Foot Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Common Foot Problems A A A Trauma, infection, skin disease, ... the sole of the front part of the foot and on the toes. Foot infections include warts; ...

  8. Foot sprain - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mid-foot sprain ... There are many bones and ligaments in your foot. A ligament is a strong flexible tissue that holds bones together. When the foot lands awkwardly, some ligaments can stretch and tear. ...

  9. Multisegment one-step RT-PCR fluorescent labeling of influenza A virus genome for use in diagnostic microarray applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microarray technology is one of the most challenging methods of influenza A virus subtyping, which is based on the antigenic properties of viral surface glycoproteins - hemagglutinin and neuraminidase. On the example of biochip for detection of influenza A/H5N1 virus we showed the possibility of using multisegment RTPCR method for amplification of fluorescently labeled cDNA of all possible influenza A virus subtypes with a single pair of primers in influenza diagnostic microarrays.

  10. Assembly and characterization of foot-and-mouth disease virus empty capsid particles expressed within mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gullberg, Maria; Muszynski, Bartosz; Organtini, Lindsey J.; Ashley, Robert E.; Hafenstein, Susan L.; Belsham, Graham J.; Polacek, Charlotta

    The foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) structural protein precursor, P1-2A, is cleaved by the virus-encoded 3C protease (3Cpro) into the capsid proteins VP0, VP1 and VP3 (and 2A). In some systems, it is difficult to produce large amounts of these processed capsid proteins since 3Cpro can be toxic...... for cells. The expression level of 3Cpro activity has now been reduced relative to the P1-2A, and the effect on the yield of processed capsid proteins and their assembly into empty capsid particles within mammalian cells has been determined. Using a vaccinia-virus-based transient expression system, P1...

  11. The Effects of Various Running Inclines on Three-Segment Foot Mechanics and Plantar Fascia Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinclair Jonathan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. There has yet to be a combined analysis of three-dimensional multi-segment foot kinematics and plantar fascia strain in running gait at various degrees of inclination. The aim of the current study was therefore to investigate the above during treadmill running at different inclines (0°, 5°, 10° and 15°. Methods. Twelve male participants ran at 4.0 m · s-1 in the four different inclinations. Three-dimensional kinematics of the foot segments and plantar fascia strain were quantified for each incline and contrasted using one-way repeated measures ANOVA. Results and conclusions. The results showed that plantar fascia strain increased significantly as a function of running incline. Given the projected association between plantar fascia strain and the aetiology of injury, inclined running may be associated with a greater incidence of injury to the plantar fascia.

  12. Characterization of foot- and mouth disease virus antigen by surface-enhanced laser desorption ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry in aqueous and oil-emulsion formulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmsen, M.M.; Jansen, J.; Westra, D.F.; Coco-Martin, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    We have used a novel method, surface-enhanced laser desorption ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS), to characterize foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) vaccine antigens. Using specific capture with FMDV binding recombinant antibody fragments and tryptic digestion of FMDV antig

  13. Assembly and characterization of foot-and-mouth disease virus empty capsid particles expressed within mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gullberg, Maria; Muszynski, Bartosz; Organtini, Lindsey J.;

    2013-01-01

    The foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) structural protein precursor, P1-2A, is cleaved by the virus-encoded 3C protease (3Cpro) into the capsid proteins VP0, VP1 and VP3 (and 2A). In some systems, it is difficult to produce large amounts of these processed capsid proteins since 3Cpro can be toxic...... (from serotypes O and A) and 3Cpro were expressed from monocistronic cDNA cassettes as P1-2A-3C, or from dicistronic cassettes with the 3Cpro expression dependent on a mutant FMDV internal ribosome entry site (IRES) (designated P1-2A-mIRES-3C). The effects of using a mutant 3Cpro with reduced catalytic....... These products self-assembled to form FMDV empty capsid particles, which have a related, but distinct, morphology (as determined by electron microscopy and reconstruction) from that determined previously by X-ray crystallography. The assembled empty capsids bind, in a divalent cation-dependent manner, to the RGD...

  14. Analytical and experimental studies of an optimum multisegment phased liner noise suppression concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawdy, D. T.; Beckemeyer, R. J.; Patterson, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented from detailed analytical studies made to define methods for obtaining improved multisegment lining performance by taking advantage of relative placement of each lining segment. Properly phased liner segments reflect and spatially redistribute the incident acoustic energy and thus provide additional attenuation. A mathematical model was developed for rectangular ducts with uniform mean flow. Segmented acoustic fields were represented by duct eigenfunction expansions, and mode-matching was used to ensure continuity of the total field. Parametric studies were performed to identify attenuation mechanisms and define preliminary liner configurations. An optimization procedure was used to determine optimum liner impedance values for a given total lining length, Mach number, and incident modal distribution. Optimal segmented liners are presented and it is shown that, provided the sound source is well-defined and flow environment is known, conventional infinite duct optimum attenuation rates can be improved. To confirm these results, an experimental program was conducted in a laboratory test facility. The measured data are presented in the form of analytical-experimental correlations. Excellent agreement between theory and experiment verifies and substantiates the analytical prediction techniques. The results indicate that phased liners may be of immediate benefit in the development of improved aircraft exhaust duct noise suppressors.

  15. A multi-segment soft actuator for biomedical applications based on IPMCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dongxu; Wang, Yanjie; Liu, Jiayu; Luo, Meng; Li, Dichen; Chen, Hualing

    2015-04-01

    With rapid progress of biomedical devices towards miniaturization, flexibility, multifunction and low cost, the restrictions of traditional mechanical structures become particularly apparent, while soft materials become research focus in broad fields. As one of the most attractive soft materials, Ionic Polymer-Metal Composite (IPMC) is widely used as artificial muscles and actuators, with the advantages of low driving-voltage, high efficiency of electromechanical transduction and functional stabilization. In this paper, a new intuitive control method was presented to achieve the omnidirectional bending movements and was applied on a representative actuation structure of a multi-degree-offreedom soft actuator composed of two segments bar-shaped IPMC with a square cross section. Firstly, the bar-shaped IPMCs were fabricated by the solution casting method, reducing plating, autocatalytic plating method and cut into shapes successively. The connectors of the multi-segment IPMC actuator were fabricated by 3D printing. Then, a new control method was introduced to realize the intuitive mapping relationship between the actuator and the joystick manipulator. The control circuit was designed and tested. Finally, the multi-degree-of-freedom actuator of 2 segments bar-shaped IPMCs was implemented and omnidirectional bending movements were achieved, which could be a promising actuator for biomedical applications, such as endoscope, catheterism, laparoscopy and the surgical resection of tumors.

  16. Quantitative magnetometry analysis and structural characterization of multisegmented cobalt–nickel nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantu-Valle, Jesus [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, TX 78249 (United States); Díaz Barriga-Castro, Enrique [Centro de Investigación de Ciencias Físico Matemáticas/Facultad de Ciencias Físico Matemáticas, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Pedro de Alba s/n, San Nicolás de Los Garza, Nuevo León 66450 (Mexico); Vega, Víctor; García, Javier [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Oviedo, Calvo Sotelo s/n, Oviedo 33007 (Spain); Mendoza-Reséndez, Raquel [Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica. Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Pedro de Alba s/n, San Nicolás de Los Garza, Nuevo León 66450 (Mexico); Luna, Carlos [Centro de Investigación de Ciencias Físico Matemáticas/Facultad de Ciencias Físico Matemáticas, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Pedro de Alba s/n, San Nicolás de Los Garza, Nuevo León 66450 (Mexico); Manuel Prida, Víctor [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Oviedo, Calvo Sotelo s/n, Oviedo 33007 (Spain); and others

    2015-04-01

    Understanding and measuring the magnetic properties of an individual nanowire and their relationship with crystalline structure and geometry are of scientific and technological great interest. In this work, we report the localized study of the magnetic flux distribution and the undisturbed magnetization of a single ferromagnetic nanowire that poses a bar-code like structure using off-axis electron holography (EH) under Lorentz conditions. The nanowires were grown by template-assisted electrodeposition, using AAO templates. Electron holography allows the visualization of the magnetic flux distribution within and surroundings as well as its quantification. The magnetic analysis performed at individual nanowires was correlated with the chemical composition and crystalline orientation of the nanowires. - Highlights: • The structure-magnetic property relationship of CoNi nanowires is determined. • Off axis electron holography for the magnetic nanowires is used for the analysis. • The magnetization is quantitatively obtained from the retrieved phase images. • These results lead to a better comprehension of the magneto-crystalline phenomena.

  17. Quantitative magnetometry analysis and structural characterization of multisegmented cobalt–nickel nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding and measuring the magnetic properties of an individual nanowire and their relationship with crystalline structure and geometry are of scientific and technological great interest. In this work, we report the localized study of the magnetic flux distribution and the undisturbed magnetization of a single ferromagnetic nanowire that poses a bar-code like structure using off-axis electron holography (EH) under Lorentz conditions. The nanowires were grown by template-assisted electrodeposition, using AAO templates. Electron holography allows the visualization of the magnetic flux distribution within and surroundings as well as its quantification. The magnetic analysis performed at individual nanowires was correlated with the chemical composition and crystalline orientation of the nanowires. - Highlights: • The structure-magnetic property relationship of CoNi nanowires is determined. • Off axis electron holography for the magnetic nanowires is used for the analysis. • The magnetization is quantitatively obtained from the retrieved phase images. • These results lead to a better comprehension of the magneto-crystalline phenomena

  18. Detection and characterization of viruses causing hand, foot and mouth disease from children in Seri Kembangan, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Beh Poay; Jalilian, Farid Azizi; Harmal, Nabil Saad; Yubbu, Putri; Sekawi, Zamberi

    2014-12-01

    Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) is a common viral infection among infants and children. The major causative agents of HFMD are enterovirus 71 (EV71) and coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16). Recently, coxsackievirus A6 (CVA6) infections were reported in neighboring countries. Infected infants and children may present with fever, mouth/throat ulcers, rashes and vesicles on hands and feet. Moreover, EV71 infections might cause fatal neurological complications. Since 1997, EV71 caused fatalities in Sarawak and Peninsula Malaysia. The purpose of this study was to identify and classify the viruses which detected from the patients who presenting clinical signs and symptoms of HFMD in Seri Kembangan, Malaysia. From December 2012 until July 2013, a total of 28 specimens were collected from patients with clinical case definitions of HFMD. The HFMD viruses were detected by using semi-nested reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (snRT-PCR). The positive snRT-PCR products were sequenced and phylogenetic analyses of the viruses were performed. 12 of 28 specimens (42.9%) were positive in snRT-PCR, seven are CVA6 (58.3%), two CVA16 (16.7%) and three EV71 (25%). Based on phylogenetic analysis studies, EV71 strains were identified as sub-genotype B5; CVA16 strains classified into sub-genotype B2b and B2c; CVA6 strains closely related to strains in Taiwan and Japan. In this study, HFMD in Seri Kembangan were caused by different types of Enterovirus, which were EV71, CVA6 and CVA16. PMID:25776590

  19. Non-sagittal plane foot movement during late swing

    OpenAIRE

    VAN ZWIETEN, Koos Jaap; Biesmans, Steven; REYSKENS, Ann; ROBEYNS, Inge; VANDERSTEEN, Marjan; Schmidt, Klaus; LIPPENS, Peter; NARAIN, Faridi; MAHABIER, Roberto; Lamur, K. S.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Foot dorsiflexor m.tibialis anterior causes foot inversion too. Foot inversion turns the footsole inwards; eversion turns it outwards. Backgrounds: Quadrupedalism in primates and precursors is characterized by moving forward in a parasagittal plane, while the forefoot keeps clinging to the substratum. This imposes external rotation on the lower leg, tranferred to foot inversion by cardan-like functions of the ankle-joint. Such rotational movements include calcaneo-cuboid pivot i...

  20. Optimal compliant-surface jumping: a multi-segment model of springboard standing jumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kuangyou B; Hubbard, Mont

    2005-09-01

    A multi-segment model is used to investigate optimal compliant-surface jumping strategies and is applied to springboard standing jumps. The human model has four segments representing the feet, shanks, thighs, and trunk-head-arms. A rigid bar with a rotational spring on one end and a point mass on the other end (the tip) models the springboard. Board tip mass, length, and stiffness are functions of the fulcrum setting. Body segments and board tip are connected by frictionless hinge joints and are driven by joint torque actuators at the ankle, knee, and hip. One constant (maximum isometric torque) and three variable functions (of instantaneous joint angle, angular velocity, and activation level) determine each joint torque. Movement from a nearly straight motionless initial posture to jump takeoff is simulated. The objective is to find joint torque activation patterns during board contact so that jump height can be maximized. Minimum and maximum joint angles, rates of change of normalized activation levels, and contact duration are constrained. Optimal springboard jumping simulations can reasonably predict jumper vertical velocity and jump height. Qualitatively similar joint torque activation patterns are found over different fulcrum settings. Different from rigid-surface jumping where maximal activation is maintained until takeoff, joint activation decreases near takeoff in compliant-surface jumping. The fulcrum-height relations in experimental data were predicted by the models. However, lack of practice at non-preferred fulcrum settings might have caused less jump height than the models' prediction. Larger fulcrum numbers are beneficial for taller/heavier jumpers because they need more time to extend joints. PMID:16023469

  1. Molecular characterization of serotype Asia-1 foot-and-mouth disease viruses in Pakistan and Afghanistan; emergence of a new genetic Group and evidence for a novel recombinant virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamal, Syed Muhammad; Ferrari, Giancarlo; Ahmed, Safia;

    2011-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is endemic in Pakistan and Afghanistan. The FMD virus serotypes O, A and Asia-1 are responsible for the outbreaks in these countries. Diverse strains of FMDV, even within the same serotype, co-circulate. Characterization of the viruses in circulation can facilitate...... appropriate vaccine selection and tracing of outbreaks.The present study characterized foot-and-mouth disease serotype Asia-1 viruses circulating in Pakistan and Afghanistan during the period 1998–2009. Phylogenetic analysis of FMDV type Asia-1 revealed that three different genetic Groups of serotype Asia-1...... of the A-Iran05AFG-07 sub-lineage. The Asia-1 FMDVs currently circulating in Pakistan and Afghanistan are not efficiently neutralized by antisera raised against the Asia-1/Shamir vaccine strain. Thus, new Asia-1 vaccine strains may be required to block the spread of the current Asia-1 viruses....

  2. Does Multi-Segment Rupture Occur on the Wasatch Fault Zone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duross, C. B.

    2006-12-01

    The Wasatch fault zone (WFZ) is one of the most-studied normal faults in the Basin and Range Province, but the potential for multi-segment ruptures (MSRs) among its segments is poorly understood. Evaluating the characteristics of surface faulting along the WFZ, including whether paleoseismic data support the possibility of MSRs between adjacent segments, is an important step in understanding normal-fault hazards and improving earthquake-probability studies. Vertical-displacement (VD) data from 16 paleoseismic sites on the central WFZ segments (Brigham City to Levan) indicate a tendency for single-segment ruptures (SSRs), but do not preclude the possibility of MSRs. The VD observations range from 0.5-0.8 to 4.7 m, and the mean VD per earthquake is 2.1±0.97 m (1 sigma), based on 35 measurements. The largest VDs along the WFZ correspond well with the maximum displacements predicted from a displacement - surface-rupture-length (D-SRL) regression for normal faults. However, 86-90% of the WFZ VDs are larger than the average displacements predicted by D-SRL regressions for normal- and all-fault types. When normalized by segment length, over 70% of the VD data fit within a half- ellipse-shaped slip envelope that shows VD decreasing from a maximum of 1.8-3.4 m near the segment centers to ~0.8-2.1 m near the segment ends. Although the VD data support SSRs, several anomalously large VDs near the ends of the segments suggest fault ruptures at least 20 km longer than the mapped segment lengths. Evaluating the potential for MSRs among WFZ paleoearthquakes requires quantifying the uncertainty in the timing of individual events, similarity in the timing of events on adjacent segments (low to high MSR potential), and quality of supporting chronological data (low to high paleoseismic-event confidence). On the four central- most segments (Brigham City to Provo), existing paleoseismic data suggest the possibility of six MSR pairs among 16 post-6500 cal yr B.P. earthquakes. Among the

  3. A Case of Hot Foot Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Mutlu Çayırlı; Sinem Budak

    2012-01-01

    Hot foot syndrome (HFS) is a benign, self-limited disorder, which is apparently caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. The disease is characterized by the acute onset in children with painful plantar nodules which generally does not require antibiotic therapy. Particularly, the mechanically stressed areas of the foot are affected after contact with contaminated water from saunas, swimming pools or hot tubs. HFS is a potentially important public health hazard that may causes outbreaks. In...

  4. Molecular characterization of SAT-2 foot-and-mouth disease virus isolates obtained from cattle during a four-month period in 2001 in Limpopo Province, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.S. Phologane

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD is an acute, highly contagious viral infection of domestic and wild cloven-hoofed animals. The virus is a single-stranded RNA virus that has a high rate of nucleotide mutation and amino acid substitution. In southern Africa the South African Territories (SAT 1-3 serotypes of FMD virus are maintained by large numbers of African buffaloes (Syncerus caffer, which provide a potential source of infection for domestic livestock and wild animals. During February 2001, an outbreak of SAT-2 was recorded in cattle in the FMD control zone of South Africa, adjacent to the Kruger National Park (KNP. They had not been vaccinated against the disease since they form the buffer between the vaccination and free zones but in the face of the outbreak, they were vaccinated as part of the control measures to contain the disease. The virus was, however, isolated from some of them on several occasions up to May 2001. These isolates were characterized to determine the rate of genetic change in the main antigenic determinant, the 1D/2A gene. Nucleotide substitutions at 12 different sites were identified of which five led to amino acid changes. Three of these occurred in known antigenic sites, viz. the GH-loop and C-terminal part of the protein, and two of these have previously been shown to be subject to positive selection. Likelihood models indicated that the ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous changes among the outbreak sequences recovered from cattle was four times higher than among comparable sequences isolated from wildlife, suggesting that the virus may be under greater selective pressure during rapid transmission events.

  5. Molecular characterization of SAT-2 foot-and-mouth disease virus isolates obtained from cattle during a four-month period in 2001 in Limpopo Province, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phologane, B S; Dwarka, R M; Haydon, D T; Gerber, L J; Vosloo, W

    2008-12-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is an acute, highly contagious viral infection of domestic and wild cloven-hoofed animals. The virus is a single-stranded RNA virus that has a high rate of nucleotide mutation and amino acid substitution. In southern Africa the South African Territories (SAT) 1-3 serotypes of FMD virus are maintained by large numbers of African buffaloes (Syncerus caffer), which provide a potential source of infection for domestic livestock and wild animals. During February 2001, an outbreak of SAT-2 was recorded in cattle in the FMD control zone of South Africa, adjacent to the Kruger National Park (KNP). They had not been vaccinated against the disease since they form the buffer between the vaccination and free zones but in the face of the outbreak, they were vaccinated as part of the control measures to contain the disease. The virus was, however, isolated from some of them on several occasions up to May 2001. These isolates were characterized to determine the rate of genetic change in the main antigenic determinant, the 1 D/2A gene. Nucleotide substitutions at 12 different sites were identified of which five led to amino acid changes. Three of these occurred in known antigenic sites, viz. the GH-loop and C-terminal part of the protein, and two of these have previously been shown to be subject to positive selection. Likelihood models indicated that the ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous changes among the outbreak sequences recovered from cattle was four times higher than among comparable sequences isolated from wildlife, suggesting that the virus may be under greater selective pressure during rapid transmission events. PMID:19294983

  6. Innovative application of classic and newer techniques for the characterization of haemocytes in the New Zealand black-footed abalone (Haliotis iris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandiosa, Roffi; Mérien, Fabrice; Pillay, Krish; Alfaro, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Haemocytes play an important role in innate immune responses within invertebrate organisms. However, identification and quantification of different types of haemocytes can be extremely challenging, and has led to numerous inconsistencies and misinterpretations within the literature. As a step to rectify this issue, we present a comprehensive and detailed approach to characterize haemocytes using a combination of classical (cytochemical and phagocytosis assays with optical microscopy) and novel (flow cytometry with Sysmex XN-1000 and Muse(®) Cell analyser) techniques. The Sysmex XN-1000 is an innovative fluorescent flow cytometric analyser that can effectively detect, identify and count haemocytes, while the Muse(®) Cell analyser provides accurate and rapid haemocyte cell counts and viability. To illustrate this approach, we present the first report on morphological and functional features of New Zealand black-footed abalone (Haliotis iris) haemocyte cells. Two types of haemocytes were identified in this study, including type I (monocyte-like) and type II (lymphocyte-like) cells. Granular cells, which have been reported in other molluscan species, were not detected in H. iris. Cell types were categorized based on shape, size, internal structures and function. The lymphocyte-like haemocytes were the most abundant hemocytes in the haemolymph samples, and they had large nuclei and basic cytoplasms. Monocyte-like cells generally were larger cells compared to lymphocyte-like cells, and had low nucleus-cytoplasm ratios. Monocyte-like cells showed higher phagocytic activity when encountering Zymosan A particles compared to lymphocyte-like cells. The present study provides a comprehensive and accurate new approach to identify and quantify haemocyte cells for future comparative studies on the immune system of abalone and other molluscan species. PMID:26672903

  7. Characterization of Coxsackievirus A6- and Enterovirus 71-Associated Hand Foot and Mouth Disease in Beijing, China, from 2013 to 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Sun, Ying; Du, Yiwei; Yan, Yuxiang; Huo, Da; Liu, Yuan; Peng, Xiaoxia; Yang, Yang; Liu, Fen; Lin, Changying; Liang, Zhichao; Jia, Lei; Chen, Lijuan; Wang, Quanyi; He, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Etiology surveillance of Hand Foot and Mouth disease (HFMD) in Beijing showed that Coxsackievirus A6 (CVA6) became the major pathogen of HFMD in 2013 and 2015. In order to understand the epidemiological characteristics and clinical manifestations of CVA6-associated HFMD, a comparison study among CVA6-, EV71- (Enterovirus 71), and CVA16- (Coxsackievirus A16) associated HFMD was performed. Methods: Epidemiological characteristics and clinical manifestations among CVA6-, EV71- and CVA16-associated mild or severe cases were compared from 2013 to 2015. VP1 gene of CVA6 and EV71 from mild cases, severe cases were sequenced, aligned, and compared with strains from 2009 to 2015 in Beijing and strains available in GenBank. Phylogenetic tree was constructed by neighbor-joining method. Results: CVA6 became the predominant causative agent of HFMD and accounted for 35.4 and 36.9% of total positive cases in 2013 and 2015, respectively. From 2013 to 2015, a total of 305 severe cases and 7 fatal cases were reported. CVA6 and EV71 were responsible for 57.5% of the severe cases. Five out six samples from fatal cases were identified as EV71. High fever, onychomadesis, and decrustation were the typical symptoms of CVA6-associated mild HFMD. CVA6-associated severe cases were characterized by high fever with shorter duration and twitch compared with EV71-associated severe cases which were characterized by poor mental condition, abnormal pupil, and vomiting. Poor mental condition, lung wet rales, abnormal pupil, and tachycardia were the most common clinical features of fatal cases. The percentage of lymphocyte in CVA6-associated cases was significantly lower than that of EV71. High percentage of lymphocyte and low percentage of neutrophils were the typical characteristics of fatal cases. VP1 sequences between CVA6- or EV71-associated mild and severe cases were highly homologous. Conclusion: CVA6 became one of the major pathogens of HFMD in 2013 and 2015 in Beijing

  8. Characterization of Coxsackievirus A6- and Enterovirus 71-associated Hand Foot and Mouth disease in Beijing, China, from 2013 to 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie eLi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Etiology surveillance of Hand Foot and Mouth disease (HFMD in Beijing showed that Coxsackievirus A6 (CVA6 became the major pathogen of HFMD in 2013 and 2015. In order to understand the epidemiological characteristics and clinical manifestations of CVA6-associated HFMD, a comparison study among CVA6-, EV71- (Enterovirus 71 and CVA16- (Coxsackievirus A16 associated HFMD was performed.Methods: Epidemiological characteristics and clinical manifestations among CVA6-, EV71- and CVA16-associated mild or severe cases were compared from 2013 to 2015. VP1 gene of CVA6 and EV71 from mild cases, severe cases were sequenced, aligned and compared with strains from 2009 to 2015 in Beijing and strains available in GenBank. Phylogenetic tree was constructed by neighbor-joining method.Results: CVA6 became the predominant causative agent of HFMD and accounted for 35.4% and 36.9% of total positive cases in 2013 and 2015, respectively. From 2013 to 2015, a total of 305 severe cases and 7 fatal cases were reported. CVA6 and EV71 were responsible for 57.5% of the severe cases. Five out six samples from fatal cases were identified as EV71. High fever, onychomadesis and decrustation were the typical symptoms of CVA6-associated mild HFMD. CVA6-associated severe cases were characterized by high fever with shorter duration and twitch compared with EV71-associated severe cases which were characterized by poor mental condition, abnormal pupil and vomiting. Poor mental condition, lung wet rales, abnormal pupil and tachycardia were the most common clinical features of fatal cases. The percentage of lymphocyte in CVA6-associated cases was significantly lower than that of EV71. High percentage of lymphocyte and low percentage of neutrophils were the typical characteristics of fatal cases. VP1 sequences between CVA6- or EV71-associated mild and severe cases were highly homologous.Conclusion: CVA6 became one of the major pathogens of HFMD in 2013 and 2015 in Beijing

  9. Sesamoid Injuries in the Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FootNotes Newsletter Current Issue Archive Subscribe Home » Foot & Ankle Conditions » Sesamoid Injuries in the Foot A A A | Print | Share ... or certain activities. Diagnosis In diagnosing a sesamoid injury, the foot and ankle surgeon will examine the foot, focusing on the ...

  10. Amplification and Characterization of Bull Semen Infected Naturally with Foot-and-mouth Disease Virus Type Asial by RT-PCR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-jun SHAO; Xiang-tao LIU; Zai-xin LIU; Ji-xing LIU; Hui-yun CHANG; Tong LIN; Guo-zheng CONG; Jun-zheng DU; Jian-hong GUO; Hui-fang BAO; You-jun SHANG; Ya-min YANG

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the security of semen biologically, 15 bull semen samples were collected (of which 5 exhibited clinical signs of Foot-and-mouth disease) and identified by RT-PCR and virus isolation. The results indicated that the semen of the infected bulls were contaminated by Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), but FMDV was not detected in semen samples from those bulls not showing clinical signs of Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD). This is the first report of the presence of FMDV in bull semen due to natural infection in China. The analysis of the partial sequence of the VP1 gene showed that the virus strain isolated from semen has 97.9% identity with the virus isolated from vesicular liquid of infected bulls showing typical signs of FMD and belonged to the same gene sub-group.

  11. Malignant Melanoma of the Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Print Bookmark Malignant Melanoma of the Foot What is Malignant Melanoma? Melanoma is a cancer ... age groups, even the young. Melanoma in the Foot Melanoma that occurs in the foot or ankle ...

  12. Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Hand, Foot & Mouth Disease Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... sick Is HFMD the Same as Foot-and-Mouth Disease? No. HFMD is often confused with foot- ...

  13. Characterization of foot-and-mouth disease viruses from Ugandan cattle outbreaks during 2012-2013: Evidence for circulation of multiple serotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Namatovu, Alice; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Belsham, Graham;

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) serotypes circulating in Uganda’s cattle population, both serological and virological analyses of samples from outbreaks that occurred during 2012-2013 were performed. Altogether, 79 sera and 60 oropharyngeal fluid (OP)/tissue/oral swab samples...

  14. The foot and ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging of the foot and ankle can be difficult because of the complex anatomy. Familiarity with the bony and ligamentous anatomy is essential for proper evaluation of radiographic findings. Therefore, pertinent anatomy is discussed as it applies to specific injuries. Special views, tomography, arthrography, and other techniques may be indicated for complete evaluation of foot and ankle trauma

  15. Hand, foot and mouth disease - a short case report

    OpenAIRE

    Kashyap, Roopashri Rajesh; Kashyap, Rajesh Shanker

    2015-01-01

    Hand, foot and mouth disease, that was once considered a disease of cattle, has been emerging as a common human childhood disease in the last few years. It is a viral disease characterized by a brief febrile illness and typical vesicular rashes. In rare cases, patients may also develop neurological complications. This report describes a case of hand, foot and mouth disease, presented with typical clinical features in the South Indian region. Key words:Hand, foot and mouth disease, viral lesio...

  16. Characterization and Multilineage Differentiation of Domestic and Black-Footed Cat Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells from Abdominal and Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Martha C; Qin, Qian; Biancardi, Monica N; Galiguis, Jason; Dumas, Cherie; MacLean, Robert A; Wang, Guoshun; Pope, C Earle

    2015-10-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from bone marrow or adipose tissue is emerging as a promising tool for cell replacement therapy and regenerative medicine in domestic and endangered animal species. Defining the differentiation capability of adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (AMSCs) collected from different depot sites of adipose tissue will be essential for developing strategies for cell replacement therapy. In the present study, we compared the biological characteristics of domestic cat AMSCs isolated from visceral fat of the abdominal cavity (AB) with AMSCs from subcutaneous (SQ) tissue, and the functional capability of domestic and black-footed cat (Felis nigripes) AMSCs to differentiate into other cell types. Our results showed that both domestic and black-footed cat adipose-derived stromal vascular fractions contained AMSCs. Both domestic cat AB- and SQ-AMSCs showed important clonogenic ability and the minimal MSC immunophenotype as defined by the International Society for Cellular Therapy in humans. However, domestic cat AB-AMSCs had higher percentages of cells positive for MSCs-associated cluster of differentiation (CD) markers CD90(+) and CD105(+) (92% and 80%, respectively) than those of SQ-AMSCs (77% and 58%, respectively). Although these results may suggest that AB-AMSCs may be more multipotent than SQ-AMSCs, both types of cells showed similar expression of pluripotent genes Oct-4 and Klf4, except for higher expression of Nanog than in AB-AMSCs, and equivalent in vitro multilineage differentiation. Under appropriate stimuli, the black-footed cat and both domestic cat AB- and SQ-AMSCs differentiated not only toward mesoderm cell lineages but also toward ectoderm cell lineage, such as neuron cell-like cells. Black-footed cat AMSCs had more capability to differentiate toward chondrocytes. These results suggest that the defined AMSC population (regardless of site of collection) could potentially be employed as a

  17. Characterization of Coxsackievirus A6- and Enterovirus 71-Associated Hand Foot and Mouth Disease in Beijing, China, from 2013 to 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jie; Sun, Ying; Du, Yiwei; Yan, Yuxiang; Huo, Da; Liu, Yuan; Peng, Xiaoxia; Yang, Yang; Liu, Fen; Lin, Changying; Liang, Zhichao; Jia, Lei; Chen, Lijuan; Wang, Quanyi; He, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Etiology surveillance of Hand Foot and Mouth disease (HFMD) in Beijing showed that Coxsackievirus A6 (CVA6) became the major pathogen of HFMD in 2013 and 2015. In order to understand the epidemiological characteristics and clinical manifestations of CVA6-associated HFMD, a comparison study among CVA6-, EV71- (Enterovirus 71), and CVA16- (Coxsackievirus A16) associated HFMD was performed. Methods: Epidemiological characteristics and clinical manifestations among CVA6-, EV71- and...

  18. Characterization of Coxsackievirus A6- and Enterovirus 71-Associated Hand Foot and Mouth Disease in Beijing, China, from 2013 to 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jie; Sun, Ying; Du, Yiwei; Yan, Yuxiang; Huo, Da; Liu, Yuan; Peng, Xiaoxia; Yang, Yang; Liu, Fen; Lin, Changying; Liang, Zhichao; Jia, Lei; Chen, Lijuan; Wang, Quanyi; He, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Etiology surveillance of Hand Foot and Mouth disease (HFMD) in Beijing showed that Coxsackievirus A6 (CVA6) became the major pathogen of HFMD in 2013 and 2015. In order to understand the epidemiological characteristics and clinical manifestations of CVA6-associated HFMD, a comparison study among CVA6-, EV71- (Enterovirus 71), and CVA16- (Coxsackievirus A16) associated HFMD was performed. Methods: Epidemiological characteristics and clinical manifestations among CVA6-, EV71- and CV...

  19. Molecular linkage of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome to the white-footed mouse, Peromyscus leucopus: genetic characterization of the M genome of New York virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Hjelle, B; Lee, S. W.; Song, W.; Torrez-Martinez, N; Song, J. W.; Yanagihara, R; Gavrilovskaya, I; Mackow, E R

    1995-01-01

    The complete M segment sequences of hantaviruses amplified from tissues of a patient with hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in the northeastern United States and from white-footed mice, Peromyscus leucopus, from New York were 99% identical and differed from those of Four Corners virus by 23%. The serum of this patient failed to recognize a conserved, immunodominant epitope of the Four Corners virus G1 glycoprotein. Collectively, these findings indicate that P. leucopus harbors a genetically and a...

  20. Development and Characterization of A Multiplexed RT-PCR Species Specific Assay for Bovine and one for Porcine Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Rule-Out

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S M; Danganan, L; Tammero, L; Vitalis, B; Lenhoff, R; Naraghi-arani, P; Hindson, B

    2007-08-06

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in collaboration with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (APHIS) has developed candidate multiplexed assays that may potentially be used within the National Animal Health Laboratory Network (NAHLN), the National Veterinary Services Laboratory (Ames, Iowa) and the Plum Island Animal Disease Center (PIADC). This effort has the ability to improve our nation's capability to discriminate between foreign animal diseases and those that are endemic using a single assay, thereby increasing our ability to protect food and agricultural resources with a diagnostic test which could enhance the nation's capabilities for early detection of a foreign animal disease. In FY2005 with funding from the DHS, LLNL developed the first version (Version 1.0) of a multiplexed (MUX) nucleic-acid-based RT-PCR assay that included signatures for foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) detection with rule-out tests for two other foreign animal diseases (FADs) of swine, Vesicular Exanthema of Swine (VESV) and Swine Vesicular Disease Virus (SVDV), and four other domestic viral diseases Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV), Bovine Herpes Virus 1 (BHV-1), Bluetongue virus (BTV) and Parapox virus complex (which includes Bovine Papular Stomatitis Virus [BPSV], Orf of sheep, and Pseudocowpox). In FY06, LLNL has developed Bovine and Porcine species-specific panel which included existing signatures from Version 1.0 panel as well as new signatures. The MUX RT-PCR porcine assay for detection of FMDV includes the FADs, VESV and SVD in addition to vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS). LLNL has also developed a MUX RT-PCR bovine assay for detection of FMDV with rule out tests for the two bovine FADs malignant catarrhal fever (MCF), rinderpest virus (RPV) and the domestic diseases vesicular stomatitis

  1. Diabetes and Foot Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease, and Other Dental Problems Diabetic Eye Disease Diabetes and Foot Problems How can diabetes affect my feet? Too much glucose, also called ... you have any of these signs. How can diabetes change the shape of my feet? Nerve damage ...

  2. Multi-segment and multi-ply overlapping process of multi coupled activities based on valid information evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiliang; Wang, Yunxia; Qiu, Shenghai

    2013-01-01

    Complex product development will inevitably face the design planning of the multi-coupled activities, and overlapping these activities could potentially reduce product development time, but there is a risk of the additional cost. Although the downstream task information dependence to the upstream task is already considered in the current researches, but the design process overall iteration caused by the information interdependence between activities is hardly discussed; especially the impact on the design process' overall iteration from the valid information accumulation process. Secondly, most studies only focus on the single overlapping process of two activities, rarely take multi-segment and multi-ply overlapping process of multi coupled activities into account; especially the inherent link between product development time and cost which originates from the overlapping process of multi coupled activities. For the purpose of solving the above problems, as to the insufficiency of the accumulated valid information in overlapping process, the function of the valid information evolution (VIE) degree is constructed. Stochastic process theory is used to describe the design information exchange and the valid information accumulation in the overlapping segment, and then the planning models of the single overlapping segment are built. On these bases, by analyzing overlapping processes and overlapping features of multi-coupling activities, multi-segment and multi-ply overlapping planning models are built; by sorting overlapping processes and analyzing the construction of these planning models, two conclusions are obtained: (1) As to multi-segment and multi-ply overlapping of multi coupled activities, the total decrement of the task set development time is the sum of the time decrement caused by basic overlapping segments, and minus the sum of the time increment caused by multiple overlapping segments; (2) the total increment of development cost is the sum of the cost

  3. [The infected diabetic foot].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voide, C; Trampuz, A; Orasch, C

    2012-10-31

    Disorders of local immunity associated with diabetes, neuropathy, vascular disease and pressure lesions all contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetic foot lesions. Diabetic foot infections are frequently encountered, comprising multifactorial pathology and high morbidity and mortality rates. Microbiological sampling is indicated only when infection is suspected clinically, that is, when a lesion presents a minimum of two of the following six signs: erythema, heat, pain, tumefaction, induration or purulent discharge. PMID:23117963

  4. Diabetic foot risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodbury, M Gail

    2016-05-01

    Diabetes is a serious chronic disease that results in foot complications for many people world-wide. In 2014, the World Health Organization estimated the global prevalence of diabetes in adults to be 9%. To ascertain the risk that an individual patient might develop a diabetic foot ulcer that could lead to an amputation, clinicians are strongly encouraged to perform a risk assessment. Monteiro-Soares and Dinis-Ribeiro have presented a new DIAbetic FOot Risk Assessment with the acronym DIAFORA. It is different from other risk assessments in that it predicts the risk of developing both diabetic foot ulcers and amputation specifically. The risk variables were derived by regression analysis based on a data set of 293 patients from a high-risk setting, a Hospital Diabetic Foot Clinic, who had diabetes and a diabetic foot ulcers. Clear descriptions of the risk variables are provided as well as sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values for the risk categories. As an added benefit, likelihood ratios are provided that will help clinicians determine the risk of amputation for individual patients. Having a risk assessment form is important for clinician use and examples exist. A question is raised about the effectiveness of risk assessment and how effectiveness might be determined. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26825436

  5. Salient Features of the Maasai Foot: Analysis of 1,096 Maasai Subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Jun Young; Suh, Jin Soo; Seo, Lan

    2014-01-01

    Background The Maasai are the most widely known African ethnic group located in Kenya and northern Tanzania. Most spend their days either barefoot or in their traditional shoes made of car tires. Although they walk long distances of up to sixty kilometers a day, they do not suffer from any foot ailments. Little is known about their foot structure and gait. The goal of this investigation was to characterize various aspects of Maasai foot in standing and walking. Methods Foot length, calf circu...

  6. Imaging of Charcot foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The onset of a Charcot foot ist a feared complication of a long lasting diabetes mellitus. A peripheral neuropathy and continuous weight bearing of the foot subsequent to repeated traumas depict the conditions. There exist three types of a Charcot foot, an atrophic, a hypertophic and a mixed type. In early stages a differentiation from osteoarthritis is difficult. Subluxation or luxation within the Lisfranc's joint is typical. The joints of the foot could rapidly and extensively be destroyed or may present the morphology of a 'superosteoarthritis'. Often, soft tissue infections or osteomyelitis evolve from ulcers of the skin as entry points. Diagnosis of osteomyelitis necessitate MR imaging as plain radiography offers only low sensitivity for detection of an osteomyelitis. The existence of periosteal reactions is not a proof for osteomyelitis. Bone marrow edema and soft tissue edema also appear in a non infected Charcot foot. The range of soft tissue infections goes from cellulitis over phlegmon to abscesses. The ghost sign is the most suitable diagnostic criterion for osteomyelitis. In addition, the penumbra sign or the existence of a sinus tract between a skin ulcer and the affected bone may be helpful. (orig.)

  7. Construction and characterization of a full-length infectious cDNA clone of foot-and-mouth disease virus strain O/JPN/2010 isolated in Japan in 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Tatsuya; Onozato, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Seiichi; Fukai, Katsuhiko; Yamada, Manabu; Morioka, Kazuki; Kanno, Toru

    2016-06-01

    A full-length infectious cDNA clone of the genome of a foot-and-mouth disease virus isolated from the 2010 epidemic in Japan was constructed and designated pSVL-f02. Transfection of Cos-7 or IBRS-2 cells with this clone allowed the recovery of infectious virus. The recovered virus had the same in vitro characterization as the parental virus with regard to antigenicity in neutralization and indirect immunofluorescence tests, plaque size and one-step growth. Pigs were experimentally infected with the parental virus or the recombinant virus recovered from pSVL-f02 transfected cells. There were no significant differences in clinical signs or antibody responses between the two groups, and virus isolation and viral RNA detection from clinical samples were similar. Virus recovered from transfected cells therefore retained the in vitro characteristics and the in vivo pathogenicity of their parental strain. This cDNA clone should be a valuable tool to analyze determinants of pathogenicity and mechanisms of virus replication, and to develop genetically engineered vaccines against foot-and-mouth disease virus. PMID:27234555

  8. A Case of Hot Foot Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutlu Çayırlı

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Hot foot syndrome (HFS is a benign, self-limited disorder, which is apparently caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. The disease is characterized by the acute onset in children with painful plantar nodules which generally does not require antibiotic therapy. Particularly, the mechanically stressed areas of the foot are affected after contact with contaminated water from saunas, swimming pools or hot tubs. HFS is a potentially important public health hazard that may causes outbreaks. In search of literature we detected three published reports to date of outbreaks of pseudomonas hot foot syndrome associated with the use of community whirlpools. Here we present a four-year old girl presented with painful plantar erythematous nodules localized in heels that developed one day after contacting with contaminated water from bath tub. According to data of literature we able to reach, our case is the first HFS case presented in Turkey. (Turk J Dermatol 2012; 6: 111-3

  9. Molecular characterization of SAT 2 foot-and-mouth disease virus from post-outbreak slaughtered animals: implications for disease control in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balinda, S N; Belsham, G J; Masembe, C; Sangula, A K; Siegismund, H R; Muwanika, V B

    2010-08-01

    In Uganda, limiting the extent of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) spread during outbreaks involves short-term measures such as ring vaccination and restrictions of the movement of livestock and their products to and from the affected areas. In this study, the presence of FMD virus RNA was investigated in cattle samples 3 months after FMD quarantine measures had been lifted following an outbreak in 2004. Oropharyngeal tissue samples were obtained from 12 cattle slaughtered in a small town abattoir in Kiboga. FMD virus RNA was detected by diagnostic RT-PCR in nine of the 12 tissue samples. Part of the coding region for the capsid protein VP1 was amplified and sequenced. All samples were identified as belonging to the SAT 2 serotype. The implications for FMD control of both virus introduction into Uganda and the presence of carrier animals following outbreaks are discussed. PMID:20003615

  10. Characterization of foot-and-mouth disease viruses from Ugandan cattle outbreaks during 2012-2013: Evidence for circulation of multiple serotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Namatovu, Alice; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Belsham, Graham;

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) serotypes circulating in Uganda’s cattle population, both serological and virological analyses of samples from outbreaks that occurred during 2012-2013 were performed. Altogether, 79 sera and 60 oropharyngeal fluid (OP)/tissue/oral swab samples...... were collected from herds with reported FMD outbreaks in seven different Ugandan districts. Overall, 61/79 (77%) of the cattle sera were positive for antibodies against FMDV by PrioCHECK® FMDV NS ELISA and solid phase blocking ELISA detected titres ≥ 80 for serotypes O, SAT 1, SAT 2 and SAT 3 in 41, 45...... Kiruhura, Isingiro and Ntungamo districts. Consistent with the detection of high levels of neutralising antibodies against SAT 2, was the isolation of a SAT 2 FMDV from Isingiro; sequencing (for the VP1 coding region) indicated that this virus belonged to lineage I within this serotype, like the currently...

  11. Sesamoid Injuries in the Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Print Bookmark Sesamoid Injuries in the Foot What is a Sesamoid? A sesamoid is a ... contributing factor. Types of Sesamoid Injuries in the Foot There are three types of sesamoid injuries in ...

  12. Foot Health Facts for Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Facts for Athletes Text Size Print Bookmark Foot Health Facts for Athletes From the repeated pounding ... sports injuries. Prompt evaluation and treatment by a foot and ankle surgeon is important because sometimes that “ ...

  13. Foot Push-Up Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News, Videos & Podcasts » Articles » Text Size Print Bookmark Foot Push-Up Test Take this simple test to ... Stand with your back straight, and lift one foot off the floor. Slowly lift the heel of ...

  14. Hand-foot-mouth disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand-foot-mouth disease is a common viral infection that most often begins in the throat. ... Hand-foot-mouth disease (HFMD) is most commonly caused by a virus called coxsackievirus A16. Children under age 10 ...

  15. Foot, leg, and ankle swelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swelling of the ankles - feet - legs; Ankle swelling; Foot swelling; Leg swelling; Edema - peripheral; Peripheral edema ... Foot, leg, and ankle swelling is common when the person also: Is overweight Has a blood clot ...

  16. Hand-foot-mouth disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000965.htm Hand-foot-mouth disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hand-foot-mouth disease is a common viral infection that most ...

  17. What Is a Foot and Ankle Surgeon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Foot & Ankle Surgeon? A A A | Print | Share What is a Foot & Ankle Surgeon? Foot and ankle ... of conditions that affect people of every age. What education has a foot and ankle surgeon received? ...

  18. Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease (HFMD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with infected people Commonly Confused With Foot-and-Mouth Disease Hand, foot, and mouth disease is often ... and-Mouth Disease . Outbreaks of Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease Large outbreaks of hand, foot, and mouth ...

  19. Adding Stiffness to the Foot Modulates Soleus Force-Velocity Behaviour during Human Walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kota Z; Gross, Michael T; van Werkhoven, Herman; Piazza, Stephen J; Sawicki, Gregory S

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies of human locomotion indicate that foot and ankle structures can interact in complex ways. The structure of the foot defines the input and output lever arms that influences the force-generating capacity of the ankle plantar flexors during push-off. At the same time, deformation of the foot may dissipate some of the mechanical energy generated by the plantar flexors during push-off. We investigated this foot-ankle interplay during walking by adding stiffness to the foot through shoes and insoles, and characterized the resulting changes in in vivo soleus muscle-tendon mechanics using ultrasonography. Added stiffness decreased energy dissipation at the foot (p body metabolic cost during walking increased with added foot stiffness (p < 0.001). This increased metabolic cost is likely due to the added force demand on the plantar flexors, as walking on a more rigid foot/shoe surface compromises the plantar flexors' mechanical advantage. PMID:27417976

  20. Imaging diagnostics of the foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book on imaging diagnostics of the foot contains the following chapters: (1) Imaging techniques. (2) Clinical diagnostics. (3) Ankle joint and hind foot. (4) Metatarsus. (5) Forefoot. (6) Pathology of plantar soft tissue. (7) Nervous system diseases. (8) Diseases without specific anatomic localization. (9) System diseases including the foot. (10) Tumor like lesions. (11) Normative variants.

  1. X-Ray Exam: Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth X-Ray Exam: Foot KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Foot Print A A A Text Size ... español Radiografía: pie What It Is A foot X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  2. Real-time visual communication to aid disaster recovery in a multi-segment hybrid wireless networking system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Hadhrami, Tawfik; Wang, Qi; Grecos, Christos

    2012-06-01

    When natural disasters or other large-scale incidents occur, obtaining accurate and timely information on the developing situation is vital to effective disaster recovery operations. High-quality video streams and high-resolution images, if available in real time, would provide an invaluable source of current situation reports to the incident management team. Meanwhile, a disaster often causes significant damage to the communications infrastructure. Therefore, another essential requirement for disaster management is the ability to rapidly deploy a flexible incident area communication network. Such a network would facilitate the transmission of real-time video streams and still images from the disrupted area to remote command and control locations. In this paper, a comprehensive end-to-end video/image transmission system between an incident area and a remote control centre is proposed and implemented, and its performance is experimentally investigated. In this study a hybrid multi-segment communication network is designed that seamlessly integrates terrestrial wireless mesh networks (WMNs), distributed wireless visual sensor networks, an airborne platform with video camera balloons, and a Digital Video Broadcasting- Satellite (DVB-S) system. By carefully integrating all of these rapidly deployable, interworking and collaborative networking technologies, we can fully exploit the joint benefits provided by WMNs, WSNs, balloon camera networks and DVB-S for real-time video streaming and image delivery in emergency situations among the disaster hit area, the remote control centre and the rescue teams in the field. The whole proposed system is implemented in a proven simulator. Through extensive simulations, the real-time visual communication performance of this integrated system has been numerically evaluated, towards a more in-depth understanding in supporting high-quality visual communications in such a demanding context.

  3. [Presentation of a flap web space laterodigital in cleft foot].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szwebel, J; Haddad, R; Mitrofanoff, M

    2012-08-01

    Cleft foot deformity is characterized by the absence of one or more median rays of the foot. This rare polymorphous congenital anomaly occurs more frequently in males, with a frequent autosomal dominant type of transmission. The purpose of surgical treatment is to narrow the width of the foot, but also to improve its global aesthetic look. Toe reparation, and more specifically web space reconstruction, provide the main technical challenges. We present an adaptation to the foot of a laterodigital cutaneous flap published by Barsky in 1964 for commissural reconstruction in cleft hand syndroms. The anatomical structure of fingers and toes commisures being different, this flap seems more adapted to the surgery of the foot. We gathered seven patients' files treated for ectrodactyly of the foot with this technique by the same surgeon from 2005 to 2008. No particular postoperative complications were noted, and the patients all expressed their satisfaction regarding the improvement of the appearance of their foot. We recommend to add the use of this flap in the "tool box" of the surgeon in charge of the management of foot deformities. PMID:20947236

  4. Foot posture, foot function and low back pain: the Framingham Foot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Menz, Hylton B.; Alyssa B Dufour; RISKOWSKI, JODY L.; Hillstrom, Howard J; Hannan, Marian T

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Abnormal foot posture and function have been proposed as possible risk factors for low back pain, but this has not been examined in detail. The objective of this study was to explore the associations of foot posture and foot function with low back pain in 1930 members of the Framingham Study (2002–05).

  5. [Diabetic foot infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryšková, Lenka

    2015-06-01

    Diabetic foot infections (DFIs) are serious problems in persons with diabetes, about 10 to 25 % of patients with dia-betes develop a foot ulcer and 60 % of them are infected. DFIs cause morbidity, limit mobility, worsen patients quality of life. Infections are classified as mild, moderate, or severe. Most DFIs are polymicrobial, with Gram-positive cocci (especially staphylococci), Gram-negative bacilli and obligate anaerobes. Successful therapy of DFI requires proper topical care and often includes surgical interventions but appropriate antibiotic treatment plays a key role. Initial antimicrobial therapy of these infections is usually empirical, the antibiotic regimen should be based on the severity of the infection. Definitive therapy should then be tailored according to the results of culture and susceptibility tests from a reliably obtained specimen. PMID:26258977

  6. The diabetic foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Familiarity with the spectrum of findings in the different imaging modalities appears essential. Radiographically, significant changes include Charcot joints of the tarsus (destructive type) and bone absorption of the forefoot (mutilating type). In diabetic foot problems, magnetic resonance imaging and leukocyte scintigraphy appear to be the most effective tools for detection of osteomyelitis, and a negative study makes osteomyelitis unlikely. However, the findings of both techniques in active, noninfected neuropathic osteoarthropathy may be indistinguishable from those of osteomyelitis. (orig.)

  7. Hand Foot Skin Reaction Associated with Sunitinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bengü Çevirgen Cemil

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Sunitinib is a multi-targeted kinase inhibitor showing benefits in patients with renal cell carcinoma, and gastrointestinal stromal tumor. Sunitinib may cause various cutaneous toxicities. The most characteristic and common cutaneous toxicity is hand-foot skin reaction. Lesions are characterized by yellow painful callus like hyperkeratosis surrounded by a rim of erythema, they are well-demarcated and localized especially over pressure areas. A 54-year-old male patient with a history of renal cell carcinoma developed painful eruption twenty days after oral sunitinib had been started on 50 mg daily. Dermatological examination showed multiple, yellow, hyperkeratotic plaques with erythematous halos on palms, and soles. The patient was diagnosed as hand-foot skin reaction due to sunitinib due to descriptive clinical findings. Hand-foot skin reaction can greatly affect patients’ quality of life and treatment dosages. Early diagnosis and timely treatment of hand-foot skin reaction will be vital to ensure maximum potential of these drugs.

  8. Relationship between static foot posture and foot mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McPoil Thomas G

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is not uncommon for a person's foot posture and/or mobility to be assessed during a clinical examination. The exact relationship, however, between static posture and mobility is not known. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the degree of association between static foot posture and mobility. Method The static foot posture and foot mobility of 203 healthy individuals was assessed and then analyzed to determine if low arched or "pronated" feet are more mobile than high arched or "supinated" feet. Results The study demonstrated that those individuals with a lower standing dorsal arch height and/or a wider standing midfoot width had greater mobility in their foot. In addition, those individuals with higher Foot Posture Index (FPI values demonstrated greater mobility and those with lower FPI values demonstrated less mobility. Finally, the amount of foot mobility that an individual has can be predicted reasonably well using either a 3 or 4 variable linear regression model. Conclusions Because of the relationship between static foot posture and mobility, it is recommended that both be assessed as part of a comprehensive evaluation of a individual with foot problems.

  9. [Prevention of diabetic foot].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metelko, Zeljko; Brkljacić Crkvencić, Neva

    2013-10-01

    Diabetic foot (DF) is the most common chronic complication, which depends mostly on the duration and successful treatment of diabetes mellitus. Based on epidemiological studies, it is estimated that 25% of persons with diabetes mellitus (PwDM) will develop the problems with DF during lifetime, while 5% do 15% will be treated for foot or leg amputation. The treatment is prolonged and expensive, while the results are uncertain. The changes in DF are influenced by different factors usually connected with the duration and regulation of diabetes mellitus. The first problems with DF are the result of misbalance between nutritional, defensive and reparatory mechanisms on the one hand and the intensity of damaging factors against DF on the other hand. Diabetes mellitus is a state of chronic hyperglycemia, consisting of changes in carbohydrate, protein and fat metabolism. As a consequence of the long duration of diabetes mellitus, late complications can develop. Foot is in its structure very complex, combined with many large and small bones connected with ligaments, directed by many small and large muscles, interconnected with many small and large blood vessels and nerves. Every of these structures can be changed by nutritional, defensive and reparatory mechanisms with consequential DE Primary prevention of DF includes all measures involved in appropriate maintenance of nutrition, defense and reparatory mechanisms.First, it is necessary to identify the high-risk population for DF, in particular for macrovascular, microvascular and neural complications. The high-risk population of PwDM should be identified during regular examination and appropriate education should be performed. In this group, it is necessary to include more frequent and intensified empowerment for lifestyle changes, appropriate diet, regular exercise (including frequent breaks for short exercise during sedentary work), regular self control of body weight, quit smoking, and appropriate treatment of glycemia

  10. Imaging of diabetic foot infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridman, Robert; Bar-David, Tzvi; Kamen, Stewart; Staron, Ronald B; Leung, David K; Rasiej, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Complications from diabetic foot infections are a leading cause of nontraumatic lower-extremity amputations. Nearly 85% of these amputations result from an infected foot ulcer. Osteomyelitis is present in approximately 20% of diabetic foot infections. It is imperative that clinicians make quick and successful diagnoses of diabetic foot osteomyelitis (DFO) because a delay in treatment may lead to worsening outcomes. Imaging studies, such as plain films, bone scans, musculoskeletal ultrasound, computerized tomography scans, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography scans, aid in the diagnosis. However, there are several mimickers of DFO, which present problems to making a correct diagnosis. PMID:24296017

  11. Melanoma of the Foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, Ivan; Bower, Chris

    2016-07-01

    Melanoma is a rare form of skin cancer that is responsible for most skin cancer deaths globally. Tumors arising on the foot continue to be a particular challenge. Patients present later and lesions are frequently misdiagnosed, leading to more advanced disease with an overall poorer prognosis then melanoma elsewhere. In order to improve early recognition, this article reviews the clinical features of the disease along with published algorithms. Emerging assessment techniques such as dermoscopy are also discussed as tools to improve clinical decision making. Contemporary drug therapies in the treatment of advanced disease are also discussed. PMID:27215160

  12. PCA-based 3D Shape Reconstruction of Human Foot Using Multiple Viewpoint Cameras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Edmée Amstutz; Tomoaki Teshima; Makoto Kimura; Masaaki Mochimaru; Hideo Saito

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a multiple camera-based method to reconstruct the 3D shape of a human foot. From a foot database,an initial 3D model of the foot represented by a cloud of points is built. The shape parameters, which can characterize more than 92% of a foot, are defined by using the principal component analysis method. Then, using "active shape models", the initial 3D model is adapted to the real foot captured in multiple images by applying some constraints (edge points' distance and color variance). We insist here on the experiment part where we demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method on a plastic foot model, and also on real human feet with various shapes. We propose and compare different ways of texturing the foot which is needed for reconstruction. We present an experiment performed on the plastic foot model and on human feet and propose two different ways to improve the final 3D shape's accuracy according to the previous experiments' results. The first improvement proposed is the densification of the cloud of points used to represent the initial model and the foot database. The second improvement concerns the projected patterns used to texture the foot. We conclude by showing the obtained results for a human foot with the average computed shape error being only 1.06mm.

  13. Development and Characterization of a Multiplexed RT-PCR Species Specific Assay for Bovine and one for Porcine Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Rule-Out Supplemental Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S; Danganan, L; Tammero, L; Lenhoff, R; Naraghi-arani, P; Hindson, B

    2007-08-06

    viruses which are of two bovine types bovine papular stomatitis virus (BPSV) and psuedocowpox (PCP). This document provides details of signature generation, evaluation, and testing, as well as the specific methods and materials used. A condensed summary of the development, testing and performance of the multiplexed assay panel was presented in a 126 page separate document, entitled 'Development and Characterization of A Multiplexed RT-PCR Species Specific Assay for Bovine and one for Porcine Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Rule-Out'. This supplemental document provides additional details of large amount of data collected for signature generation, evaluation, and testing, as well as the specific methods and materials used for all steps in the assay development and utilization processes. In contrast to last years effort, the development of the bovine and porcine panels is pending additional work to complete analytical characterization of FMDV, VESV, VSV, SVD, RPV and MCF. The signature screening process and final panel composition impacts this effort. The unique challenge presented this year was having strict predecessor limitations in completing characterization, where efforts at LLNL must preceed efforts at PIADC, such challenges were alleviated in the 2006 reporting by having characterization data from the interlaboratory comparison and at Plum Island under AgDDAP project. We will present an addendum at a later date with additional data on the characterization of the porcine and bovine multiplex assays when that data is available.

  14. Location of foot arteries using infrared images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villasenor-Mora, Carlos; González-Vega, Arturo; Martín Osmany Falcón, Antonio; Benítez Ferro, Jesús Francisco Guillemo; Córdova Fraga, Teodoro

    2014-11-01

    In this work are presented the results of localization of foot arteries, in a young group of participants by using infrared thermal images, these are the dorsal, posterior tibial and anterior tibial arteries. No inclusion criteria were considered, that causes that no strong statistical data about the influence of the age in the arterial localization. It was achieved to solve the confusion when veins present a heat distribution similar to the artery and in the position of this. it contributes to enhance the rate of location of arteries. In general it is possible to say that the use of infrared thermal images is a good technique to find the foot arteries and can be applied in its characterization in a future. The procedure proposed is a non-invasive technique, and in certain fashion does not requires specialized personnel to achieve locate the arteries. It is portable, safe, and relatively economical.

  15. Cosmetic Foot Surgery: Fashion's Pandora's Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News, Videos & Podcasts » Articles » Text Size Print Bookmark Cosmetic Foot Surgery: Fashion’s Pandora’s Box? Cosmetic Foot Surgery: Fashion’s Pandora’s Box? Foot and Ankle Surgeons Warn ...

  16. Foot Push-Up Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... If you can easily rise up onto the ball of your foot but experience pain in your arch, your arch may be inflamed ... at any point between the heel and the ball of the foot is often referred to as arch pain. Although this description is nonspecific, most arch pain ...

  17. Functional analysis of the foot and ankle myology of gibbons and bonobos

    OpenAIRE

    Vereecke, Evie; D'Aout, K; Payne, R; Aerts, P.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigates the foot and ankle myology of gibbons and bonobos, and compares it with the human foot. Gibbons and bonobos are both highly arboreal species, yet they have a different locomotor behaviour. Gibbon locomotion is almost exclusively arboreal and is characterized by speed and mobility, whereas bonobo locomotion entails some terrestrial knuckle-walking and both mobility and stability are important. We examine if these differences in locomotion are reflected in their foot myo...

  18. New Tendon Transfer for Correction of Drop-foot in Common Peroneal Nerve Palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Vigasio, Adolfo; Marcoccio, Ignazio; Patelli, Alberto; Mattiuzzo, Valerio; Prestini, Greta

    2008-01-01

    Common peroneal nerve palsy has been reported to be the most frequent lower extremity palsy characterized by a supinated equinovarus foot deformity and foot drop. Dynamic tendon transposition represents the gold standard for surgical restoration of dorsiflexion of a permanently paralyzed foot. Between 1998 and 2005, we operated on a selected series of 16 patients with traumatic complete common peroneal nerve palsy. In all cases, we performed a double tendon transfer through the interosseous m...

  19. The Effect of Taping on Foot Structure, Functional Foot Stability and Running Gait Patterns of the Foot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Malia Ho; Tsai Djun; John Cher Chay Tan

    2015-01-01

    Running related foot injuries are associated with excessive foot movements due to malaligned foot structure and poor functional foot stability. Clinicians tape the foot to alleviate pain and prevent further injuries, whilst allowing the athlete to continue training. However, the effect of taping is not conclusive. The purpose of this study is to investigate if taping effectively improves foot structure, functional foot stability and reduces excessive foot movements during running. Twenty-two subjects had their foot structure identified as: fiat foot stable, fiat foot unstable and normal arched unstable according to the FPI (foot posture index) and the Modified Romberg's Test with the BESS (balance error scoring system) criteria. The subjects ran on an instrumented treadmill barefooted with their feet taped and untaped. Running kinetic and kinematic data were collected and analysed using a paired t-test and 3x2 ANOVA. Taping improved foot structure but not functional foot stability. During running, taping significantly reduced rearfoot eversion. Taping increased the loading rate in the fiat foot and normal arched unstable groups but reduced the loading rate for the flat foot stable group. Implication on the appropriate use of foot taping was discussed.

  20. Subungual exostosis of the foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Palma, L; Gigante, A; Specchia, N

    1996-12-01

    Eleven subungual exostoses of the foot (10 on the hallux, 1 on the third toe) were studied. The initial symptom was subungual pain. When a subungual mass of fibrous tissue appeared, the nail was pushed up and in one case the mass became infected. X-rays exhibited a bone mass protruding from the terminal phalanx on the dorsomedial aspect of the toe in all cases. All patients underwent surgical excision of the lesions with partial onychectomy. Three layers were identified in five cases: a cap of fibrous tissue, a middle zone of hyaline cartilage with enchondral ossification, and a deep zone of cancellous bone. In three other cases, the histological pattern was pleomorphic and poorly characterized. The study shows that most subungual bone masses exhibited the pathological features of conventional osteochondromas. Nonetheless, a small number of lesions were pleomorphic and differed from osteochondromas, with abundant fibrous tissue merging irregularly into scattered islets of cartilage that was not organized in columns. Radical excision of the mass achieved complete relief of symptoms and recovery without recurrences in all cases. PMID:8973899

  1. Foot-Ground Interaction during Upright Standing in Children with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pau, Massimiliano; Galli, Manuela; Crivellini, Marcello; Albertini, Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to quantitatively characterize the main foot-ground contact parameters during static upright standing and to assess foot evolution with increasing age in young individuals affected by Down syndrome (DS). To this end, 99 children with DS of mean age 9.7 (1.7) were tested using a pressure sensitive mat, and the raw data were…

  2. Diabetic Foot - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Daily Foot Check amarunya (Amharic) Bilingual PDF Harborview Medical Center Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Diabetic Foot Care English 糖尿病足部护理 - 简体中文 ( ... Foot Care English 糖尿病足部護理 - 繁體中文 (Chinese - Traditional) PDF Chinese Community ... Medical Center Diabetes Foot Care SONKOROWGA AMA MACAANKA: Xanaanada ...

  3. Sports Injuries to the Foot and Ankle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FootNotes Newsletter Current Issue Archive Subscribe Home » Foot & Ankle Conditions » Sports Injuries to the Foot and Ankle A A A | ... page. Please enable Javascript in your browser. Sports Injuries to the Foot and Ankle Depending on the sport, your feet and ankles ...

  4. Freeing the foot: integrating the foot core system into rehabilitation for lower extremity injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeon, Patrick O; Fourchet, François

    2015-04-01

    The intrinsic muscles of the foot play a critical role in the regulation of absorption and propulsion during dynamic activities. Dysfunction of these may lead to an increased demand on the remaining components within the foot core system to maintain dynamic foot control, leading to a more rapid breakdown of these contributors and those proximal to the foot. Training the intrinsic foot muscles through a systematic progression of isolation via the short foot exercise offers the opportunity to reincorporate their contribution into the foot core system. This article discusses the function of the intrinsic foot muscles, their contributions to dynamic foot control, and a progressive training paradigm. PMID:25818718

  5. Foot Health Facts for Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain —This condition is most often caused by plantar fasciitis, although other things, such as stress fractures or ... foot structure is the most common cause of plantar fasciitis, it can also result from wearing shoes that ...

  6. Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-08-08

    Hand, foot, and mouth disease is a contagious illness that mainly affects children under five. In this podcast, Dr. Eileen Schneider talks about the symptoms of hand, foot, and mouth disease, how it spreads, and ways to help protect yourself and your children from getting infected with the virus.  Created: 8/8/2013 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 8/8/2013.

  7. Synovial sarcoma of the foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekarev, Mikhail; Elsinger, Elisabeth C; Villanueva-Siles, Esperanza; Borzykowski, Ross M; Geller, David S

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 75-year-old male who underwent lung lobectomy for presumed lung cancer. Thereafter, he presented with a painful mass between the third and fourth metatarsal heads in the foot that was assumed to be Morton's neuroma. After extensive oncologic evaluation, the foot mass was diagnosed as a synovial sarcoma. In retrospect, his lung lesion was understood to be metastatic disease. PMID:23632071

  8. Imaging the diabetic foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early and accurate diagnosis of infection or neuropathy of the diabetic foot is the key to successful management. Angiopathy leads to ischemia which, in combination with peripheral neuropathy, predisposes to pedal skin ulceration, the precursor of osteomyelitis. Chronic hyperglycemia promotes production of glycosylated end products which accumulate on endothelial proteins, causing ischemia of the vasa nervorum. When combined with axonal degeneration of the sensory nerves, the result is hypertrophic neuroarthropathy. Should the sympathetic nerve fibers also be damaged, the resultant loss of vasoconstrictive impulses leads to hyperemia and atrophic neuroarthropathy. Plain radiography, although less sensitive than radionuclide, magnetic resonance (MR), and computed tomographic examinations, should be the initial procedure for imaging suspected osteomyelitis in the diabetic patient. If the radiographs are normal but the clinical suspicion of osteomyelitis is strong, a three-phase 99mTc-MDP scan or MR imaging is recommended. An equivocal 99mTc-MDP scan should be followed by MR imaging. To exclude osteomyelitis at a site of neuroarthropathy, a 111In white blood cell scan is preferable. To obtain a specimen of bone for bacteriological studies, percutaneous core biopsy is the procedure of choice, with the entrance of the needle well beyond the edge of the subjacent ulcer. (orig.)

  9. Imaging the diabetic foot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gold, R.H. [Dept. of Radiological Sciences, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Tong, D.T.F. [Dept. of Radiological Sciences, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Crim, J.R. [Durham Radiology Associates, Durham, NC (United States); Seeger, L.L. [Dept. of Radiological Sciences, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Early and accurate diagnosis of infection or neuropathy of the diabetic foot is the key to successful management. Angiopathy leads to ischemia which, in combination with peripheral neuropathy, predisposes to pedal skin ulceration, the precursor of osteomyelitis. Chronic hyperglycemia promotes production of glycosylated end products which accumulate on endothelial proteins, causing ischemia of the vasa nervorum. When combined with axonal degeneration of the sensory nerves, the result is hypertrophic neuroarthropathy. Should the sympathetic nerve fibers also be damaged, the resultant loss of vasoconstrictive impulses leads to hyperemia and atrophic neuroarthropathy. Plain radiography, although less sensitive than radionuclide, magnetic resonance (MR), and computed tomographic examinations, should be the initial procedure for imaging suspected osteomyelitis in the diabetic patient. If the radiographs are normal but the clinical suspicion of osteomyelitis is strong, a three-phase {sup 99m}Tc-MDP scan or MR imaging is recommended. An equivocal {sup 99m}Tc-MDP scan should be followed by MR imaging. To exclude osteomyelitis at a site of neuroarthropathy, a {sup 111}In white blood cell scan is preferable. To obtain a specimen of bone for bacteriological studies, percutaneous core biopsy is the procedure of choice, with the entrance of the needle well beyond the edge of the subjacent ulcer. (orig.)

  10. Flexible Foot Test Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurita, C.H.; /Fermilab

    1987-04-27

    A test model of the flexible foot support was constructed early in the design stages to check its reactions to applied loads. The prototype was made of SS 304 and contained four vertical plates as opposed to the fourteen Inconel 718 plates which comprise the actual structure. Due to the fact that the prototype was built before the design of the support was finalized, the plate dimensions are different from those of the actual proposed design (i.e. model plate thickness is approximately one-half that of the actual plates). See DWG. 3740.210-MC-222376 for assembly details of the test model and DWG. 3740.210-MB-222377 for plate dimensions. This stanchion will be required to not only support the load of the inner vessel of the cryostat and its contents, but it must also allow for the movement of the vessel due to thermal contraction. Assuming that each vertical plate acts as a column, then the following formula from the Manual of Steel Construction (American Institute of Steel Construction, Inc., Eigth edition, 1980) can be applied to determine whether or not such columns undergoing simultaneous axial compression and transverse loading are considered safe for the given loading. The first term is representative of the axially compressive stress, and the second term, the bending stress. If the actual compressive stress is greater than 15% of the allowable compressive stress, then there are additional considerations which must be accounted for in the bending stress term.

  11. Overview of diabetic foot; novel treatments in diabetic foot ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larijani

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Foot ulcers are one of the main complications in diabetes mellitus, with a 15% life time risk in all diabetic patients. The problem and features are infection, ulceration, or gangrene. Neuropathy, poor circulation, and susceptibility to infection are the three major contributors to the development of diabetic foot; which when present, foot deformities or minor trauma can readily lead to ulceration and infection. Not all diabetic foots are preventable, but appropriate preventive measures can dramatically reduce their occurrences. Awareness of physicians about foot problems in diabetic patients, clinical examination and Para clinical assessment, regular foot examination, patient education, simple hygienic practices and provision of appropriate footwear combined with prompt treatment of minor injuries can decrease ulcer occurrence by 50%. Many different methods have been proposed and their goal is to accelerate the wound healing. These treatments other than standard therapy include local use of epidermal growth factor, vacuum-compression therapy (VCT, hyperbaric oxygen and peripheral Stem cell injection. Since all these treatments have a partial effect in ulcer improvement and amputation rate; so more effective treatments are essential."nA novel drug for treatment of this complication is an herbal extract, ANGIPARSTM, which has been studied in all steps of clinical trial. This new treatment by topical, oral and intravenous routs has had beneficial effects in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcer after one month. Angiogenesis is one of the considered mechanisms of action of this drug. Results of these clinical trials showed that this treatment can be superior to other treatments.

  12. Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Serotype A in Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Knowles, Nick J.; Wadsworth, Jemma; Reid, Scott M; Swabey, Katherine G.; El-Kholy, Alaa A.; El-Rahman, Adel Omar Abd; Soliman, Hatem M.; Ebert, Katja; Ferris, Nigel P.; Hutchings, Geoffrey H.; Statham, Robert J.; King, Donald P.; Paton, David J.

    2007-01-01

    We describe the characterization of a foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) serotype A virus responsible for recent outbreaks of disease in Egypt. Phylogenetic analysis of VP1 nucleotide sequences demonstrated a close relationship to recent FMD virus isolates from East Africa, rather than to viruses currently circulating in the Middle East.

  13. Adding Stiffness to the Foot Modulates Soleus Force-Velocity Behaviour during Human Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kota Z.; Gross, Michael T.; van Werkhoven, Herman; Piazza, Stephen J.; Sawicki, Gregory S.

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies of human locomotion indicate that foot and ankle structures can interact in complex ways. The structure of the foot defines the input and output lever arms that influences the force-generating capacity of the ankle plantar flexors during push-off. At the same time, deformation of the foot may dissipate some of the mechanical energy generated by the plantar flexors during push-off. We investigated this foot-ankle interplay during walking by adding stiffness to the foot through shoes and insoles, and characterized the resulting changes in in vivo soleus muscle-tendon mechanics using ultrasonography. Added stiffness decreased energy dissipation at the foot (p lever arms) (p < 0.001). Added foot stiffness also altered soleus muscle behaviour, leading to greater peak force (p < 0.001) and reduced fascicle shortening speed (p < 0.001). Despite this shift in force-velocity behaviour, the whole-body metabolic cost during walking increased with added foot stiffness (p < 0.001). This increased metabolic cost is likely due to the added force demand on the plantar flexors, as walking on a more rigid foot/shoe surface compromises the plantar flexors’ mechanical advantage.

  14. [Foot equipment of diabetic arteriopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miault, D; Brun, J P; Dupre, J C; Pill, M; Miault, P; Deschamps, E; Priollet, P; Laurian, C; Fichelle, J M; Cormier, J M

    1993-01-01

    Surgical appliances have a place of choice in the care of the foot with trophic lesions in diabetics, after partial amputation and as a preventive measure when it is free from trophic disorders. The type of appliance will depend on the footwear and the possibility of wearing orthopedic soles, whatever the stage of the affection. For the foot free from trophic disorders the shoes should be wide fitting, in soft leather and of the seamless type. Made to measure shoes should be reserved for badly deformed feet. The soles should be molded in silicone or polyurethane to distribute weight bearing and to avoid it over zones at risk. Appliances for the foot with trophic lesions should allow the resumption of walking. If the lesions are too extensive an orthosis is performed or a specific type of slipper with molded soles is worn to avoid pressure on the wounds. After amputation of toes a silicone orthoplasty is used to fill the interdigital space to avoid deformity of the other toes. If a front of foot has been amputated a corrected silicone molded sole with false extremity is applied. For a back of foot amputation an orthoprosthesis is made, preferentially in silicone introductible in a regular high sided shoe. In order to fulfil its preventive or temporary role, the appliance should evolve with time and be followed up regularly with close collaboration between the diabetic specialist the podologist and the orthotist. PMID:8473812

  15. Genomic and biological variability of foot and mouth disease virus serotype A: Exploration of the 'quasispecies' nature of RNA viruses and characterization of A24 variants in naive and vaccinated cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is an acute, systemic disease of domestic and wild cloven-hoofed animal species and is caused by FMDV. The quasispecies nature of FMDV, and other RNA viruses is a hallmark of RNA virus genetics. Thus, investigation of the potential hypervariability of FMDV is relevant to...

  16. Construction and characterization of recombinant human adenovirus type 5 expressing foot-and-mouth disease virus capsid proteins of Indian vaccine strain, O/IND/R2/75

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Kumar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Generation of recombinant human adenovirus type 5 expressing foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV capsid protein genes along with full-length 2B, 3B and 3Cpro and its characterization. Materials and Methods: FMD viral RNA isolation, cDNA synthesis, and polymerase chain reaction were performed to synthesize expression cassettes (P1-2AB3BCwt and P1-2AB3BCm followed by cloning in pShuttle-CMV vector. Chemically competent BJ5183-AD-1 cells were transformed with the recombinant pShuttle-CMV to produce recombinant adenoviral plasmids. HEK-293 cells were transfected with the recombinant adenoviral plasmids to generate recombinant adenoviruses (hAd5/P1-2AB3BCwt and hAd5/P1-2AB3BCm. Expression of the target proteins was analyzed by sandwich ELISA and indirect immunofluorescence assay. The recombinant adenoviruses were purified and concentrated by CsCl density gradient ultracentrifugation. Growth kinetics and thermostability of the recombinant adenoviruses were compared with that of non-recombinant replication-defective adenovirus (dAd5. Results: The recombinant adenoviruses containing capsid protein genes of the FMDV O/IND/R2/75 were generated and amplified in HEK-293 cells. The titer of the recombinant adenoviruses was approximately 108, 109.5 and 1011 TCID50/ml in supernatant media, cell lysate and CsCl purified preparation, respectively. Expression of the FMDV capsid protein was detectable in sandwich ELISA and confirmed by immunofluorescence assay. Growth kinetics of the recombinant adenoviruses did not reveal a significant difference when compared with that of dAd5. A decrement of up to 10-fold at 4°C and 21-fold at 37°C was recorded in the virus titers during 60 h incubation period and found to be statistically significant (p<0.01. Conclusion: Recombinant adenoviruses expressing capsid proteins of the FMDV O/IND/R2/75 were constructed and produced in high titers. In vitro expression of the target proteins in the adenovirus vector system was

  17. Development and Characterization of Probe-Based Real Time Quantitative RT-PCR Assays for Detection and Serotyping of Foot-And-Mouth Disease Viruses Circulating in West Eurasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed M Jamal

    Full Text Available Rapid and accurate diagnosis of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD and virus serotyping are of paramount importance for control of this disease in endemic areas where vaccination is practiced. Ideally this virus characterization should be achieved without the need for virus amplification in cell culture. Due to the heterogeneity of FMD viruses (FMDVs in different parts of the world, region specific diagnostic tests are required. In this study, hydrolysable probe-based real time reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR assays were developed for specific detection and serotyping of the FMDVs currently circulating in West Eurasia. These assays were evaluated, in parallel with pan-FMDV diagnostic assays and earlier serotype-specific assays, using field samples originating from Pakistan and Afghanistan containing FMD viruses belonging to different sublineages of O-PanAsia, A-Iran05 and Asia-1 (Group-II and Group-VII (Sindh-08. In addition, field samples from Iran and Bulgaria, containing FMDVs belonging to the O-PanAsiaANT-10 sublineage were also tested. Each of the three primer/probe sets was designed to be specific for just one of the serotypes O, A and Asia-1 of FMDV and detected the RNA from the target viruses with cycle threshold (CT values comparable with those obtained with the serotype-independent pan-FMDV diagnostic assays. No cross-reactivity was observed in these assays between the heterotypic viruses circulating in the region. The assays reported here have higher diagnostic sensitivity (100% each for serotypes O and Asia-1, and 92% [95% CI = 81.4-100%] for serotype A positive samples and specificity (100% each for serotypes O, A and Asia-1 positive samples for the viruses currently circulating in West Eurasia compared to the serotyping assays reported earlier. Comparisons of the sequences of the primers and probes used in these assays and the corresponding regions of the circulating viruses provided explanations for

  18. CT guided diagnostic foot injections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AIM: To describe a CT technique for guiding diagnostic and therapeutic injections in the hind- and mid-foot. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Over a period of 50 months, 28 individuals were referred for diagnostic and therapeutic hind- and mid-foot injections before possible arthrodesis. A CT technique was developed that allowed entry into the various joints using a vertical approach. Numbers of joints injected were as follows: posterior subtalar, 21; talonavicular, 4; calcaneonavicular, calcaneocuboid, navicular-cuneiform and 5th metatarsocuboid joints, 1 each. RESULTS: All injections but one were technically successful. Significant relief of symptoms was noted by 16 participants, whereas for 9 there was no improvement and for 3 a partial response was achieved. CONCLUSION: CT is a simple and safe alternative to fluoroscopy for guiding diagnostic and therapeutic foot injections, and may be the technique of choice in cases of disordered anatomy

  19. CT guided diagnostic foot injections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saifuddin, A. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: asaifuddin@aol.com; Abdus-Samee, M. [Department of Foot and Ankle Surgery, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore (United Kingdom); Mann, C. [Department of Foot and Ankle Surgery, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore (United Kingdom); Singh, D. [Department of Foot and Ankle Surgery, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore (United Kingdom); Angel, J.C. [Department of Foot and Ankle Surgery, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore (United Kingdom)

    2005-02-01

    AIM: To describe a CT technique for guiding diagnostic and therapeutic injections in the hind- and mid-foot. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Over a period of 50 months, 28 individuals were referred for diagnostic and therapeutic hind- and mid-foot injections before possible arthrodesis. A CT technique was developed that allowed entry into the various joints using a vertical approach. Numbers of joints injected were as follows: posterior subtalar, 21; talonavicular, 4; calcaneonavicular, calcaneocuboid, navicular-cuneiform and 5th metatarsocuboid joints, 1 each. RESULTS: All injections but one were technically successful. Significant relief of symptoms was noted by 16 participants, whereas for 9 there was no improvement and for 3 a partial response was achieved. CONCLUSION: CT is a simple and safe alternative to fluoroscopy for guiding diagnostic and therapeutic foot injections, and may be the technique of choice in cases of disordered anatomy.

  20. Interpreting radiographs. 1. The foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiography of the foot of a conscious standing horse is within the capability of all modern portable X-ray machines; radiographic examination of the feet of horses with long-standing lameness is frequently carried out in practice. With the introduction of modern fast intensifying screens and films there is little excuse for poor results caused by movement or the low output of portable machines. Sadly, although the foot is the most commonly radiographed part of the horse, a high percentage of the films taken are not of diagnostic quality. This is due, first, to over exposure, secondly, to poor developing techniques and thirdly, to poor positioning

  1. Diagnostic radiology of the foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The X-ray radiography continues to be the first and most applied method for diagnostic imaging of the foot and ankle joint. The application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for examination of the foot and ankle joint is on the rise, due to the excellent imaging of soft tissue lesions. A basic requirement of purposeful application, and correct diagnosis, of the various radiological modalities available is a profound knowledge of the anatomy as well as the pathology of the morphological and functional features. (orig./CB)

  2. Wearable Multi-Frequency and Multi-Segment Bioelectrical Impedance Spectroscopy for Unobtrusively Tracking Body Fluid Shifts during Physical Activity in Real-Field Applications: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Federica; Magnani, Alessandro; Maggioni, Martina A.; Stahn, Alexander; Rampichini, Susanna; Merati, Giampiero; Castiglioni, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Bioelectrical Impedance Spectroscopy (BIS) allows assessing the composition of body districts noninvasively and quickly, potentially providing important physiological/clinical information. However, neither portable commercial instruments nor more advanced wearable prototypes simultaneously satisfy the demanding needs of unobtrusively tracking body fluid shifts in different segments simultaneously, over a broad frequency range, for long periods and with high measurements rate. These needs are often required to evaluate exercise tests in sports or rehabilitation medicine, or to assess gravitational stresses in aerospace medicine. Therefore, the aim of this work is to present a new wearable prototype for monitoring multi-segment and multi-frequency BIS unobtrusively over long periods. Our prototype guarantees low weight, small size and low power consumption. An analog board with current-injecting and voltage-sensing electrodes across three body segments interfaces a digital board that generates square-wave current stimuli and computes impedance at 10 frequencies from 1 to 796 kHz. To evaluate the information derivable from our device, we monitored the BIS of three body segments in a volunteer before, during and after physical exercise and postural shift. We show that it can describe the dynamics of exercise-induced changes and the effect of a sit-to-stand maneuver in active and inactive muscular districts separately and simultaneously. PMID:27187389

  3. Multi-segment trunk models used to investigate the crunch factor in golf and their relationship with selected swing and launch parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Christopher; Chivers, Paola; Sato, Kimitake; Burnett, Angus

    2016-10-01

    The use of multi-segment trunk models to investigate the crunch factor in golf may be warranted. The first aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between the trunk and lower trunk for crunch factor-related variables (trunk lateral bending and trunk axial rotation velocity). The second aim was to determine the level of association between crunch factor-related variables with swing (clubhead velocity) and launch (launch angle). Thirty-five high-level amateur male golfers (Mean ± SD: age = 23.8 ± 2.1 years, registered golfing handicap = 5 ± 1.9) without low back pain had kinematic data collected from their golf swing using a 10-camera motion analysis system operating at 500 Hz. Clubhead velocity and launch angle were collected using a validated real-time launch monitor. A positive relationship was found between the trunk and lower trunk for axial rotation velocity (r(35) = .47, P < .01). Cross-correlation analysis revealed a strong coupling relationship for the crunch factor (R(2) = 0.98) between the trunk and lower trunk. Using generalised linear model analysis, it was evident that faster clubhead velocities and lower launch angles of the golf ball were related to reduced lateral bending of the lower trunk. PMID:26930121

  4. Wearable Multi-Frequency and Multi-Segment Bioelectrical Impedance Spectroscopy for Unobtrusively Tracking Body Fluid Shifts during Physical Activity in Real-Field Applications: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Federica; Magnani, Alessandro; Maggioni, Martina A; Stahn, Alexander; Rampichini, Susanna; Merati, Giampiero; Castiglioni, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Bioelectrical Impedance Spectroscopy (BIS) allows assessing the composition of body districts noninvasively and quickly, potentially providing important physiological/clinical information. However, neither portable commercial instruments nor more advanced wearable prototypes simultaneously satisfy the demanding needs of unobtrusively tracking body fluid shifts in different segments simultaneously, over a broad frequency range, for long periods and with high measurements rate. These needs are often required to evaluate exercise tests in sports or rehabilitation medicine, or to assess gravitational stresses in aerospace medicine. Therefore, the aim of this work is to present a new wearable prototype for monitoring multi-segment and multi-frequency BIS unobtrusively over long periods. Our prototype guarantees low weight, small size and low power consumption. An analog board with current-injecting and voltage-sensing electrodes across three body segments interfaces a digital board that generates square-wave current stimuli and computes impedance at 10 frequencies from 1 to 796 kHz. To evaluate the information derivable from our device, we monitored the BIS of three body segments in a volunteer before, during and after physical exercise and postural shift. We show that it can describe the dynamics of exercise-induced changes and the effect of a sit-to-stand maneuver in active and inactive muscular districts separately and simultaneously. PMID:27187389

  5. Wearable Multi-Frequency and Multi-Segment Bioelectrical Impedance Spectroscopy for Unobtrusively Tracking Body Fluid Shifts during Physical Activity in Real-Field Applications: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Villa

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Bioelectrical Impedance Spectroscopy (BIS allows assessing the composition of body districts noninvasively and quickly, potentially providing important physiological/clinical information. However, neither portable commercial instruments nor more advanced wearable prototypes simultaneously satisfy the demanding needs of unobtrusively tracking body fluid shifts in different segments simultaneously, over a broad frequency range, for long periods and with high measurements rate. These needs are often required to evaluate exercise tests in sports or rehabilitation medicine, or to assess gravitational stresses in aerospace medicine. Therefore, the aim of this work is to present a new wearable prototype for monitoring multi-segment and multi-frequency BIS unobtrusively over long periods. Our prototype guarantees low weight, small size and low power consumption. An analog board with current-injecting and voltage-sensing electrodes across three body segments interfaces a digital board that generates square-wave current stimuli and computes impedance at 10 frequencies from 1 to 796 kHz. To evaluate the information derivable from our device, we monitored the BIS of three body segments in a volunteer before, during and after physical exercise and postural shift. We show that it can describe the dynamics of exercise-induced changes and the effect of a sit-to-stand maneuver in active and inactive muscular districts separately and simultaneously.

  6. American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... education site of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society. Patients Visit the official patient education site of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society. Patients Visit the official patient education site of ...

  7. Osteoarthritis of the Foot and Ankle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... joint. Diagnosis In diagnosing osteoarthritis, the foot and ankle surgeon will examine the foot thoroughly, looking for swelling in the joint, limited mobility, and pain with movement. In some cases, deformity ...

  8. Hand-Foot-and-Mouth Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Hand-Foot-and-Mouth Disease A parent's guide for infants and babies ... a herpes virus infection. Overview Hand-foot-and-mouth disease is a common illness of infants and ...

  9. Tuberculosis of the foot: An osteolytic variety

    OpenAIRE

    Dhillon, Mandeep S; Sameer Aggarwal; Sharad Prabhakar; Vikas Bachhal

    2012-01-01

    Background: Foot involvement in osteoarticular tuberculosis is uncommon and isolated bony involvement of foot bones with an osteolytic defect is even more rare; diagnostic and therapeutic delays can occur, worsening the prognosis. We present a retrospective series of osteolytic variety of foot tuberculosis. Materials and Methods: We present 24 osteolytic variety of foot tuberculosis (Eleven calcaneus, four cuboid, two cunieforms, one talus, three metatarsals, three phalanges) out of 92 fo...

  10. An overview of the Charcot foot pathophysiology

    OpenAIRE

    ÖĞÜT, Tahir; Kaynak, Gökhan; Birsel, Olgar; Güven, Mehmet Fatih

    2013-01-01

    Charcot arthropathy of the foot is a rare but devastating complication of diabetes that remains to be a challenging issue for the foot and ankle surgeons. Charcot foot fails to be an obvious diagnostic option that comes to mind, even in a pathognomonic clinical appearance. The rarity of the disorder, more common pathologies that mimic the condition, and the self-limiting prognosis deviate the clinician from the right diagnosis. The clinical challenges in the diagnosis of Charcot foot require ...

  11. Diabetic foot ulcers. Pathophysiology, assessment, and therapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Bowering, C. K.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review underlying causes of diabetic foot ulceration, provide a practical assessment of patients at risk, and outline an evidence-based approach to therapy for diabetic patients with foot ulcers. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search was conducted for the period from 1979 to 1999 for articles relating to diabetic foot ulcers. Most studies found were case series or small controlled trials. MAIN MESSAGE: Foot ulcers in diabetic patients are common and frequently lead to lower limb...

  12. Foot-and-mouth disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious viral disease of cloven-hoofed animals. An outbreak of FMD can have a significant economic impact because of the restrictions on international trade of susceptible animals and their products with FMD-free countries. In this chapter we discuss vario...

  13. 29 CFR 1915.156 - Foot protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Foot protection. 1915.156 Section 1915.156 Labor... (PPE) § 1915.156 Foot protection. (a) Use. The employer shall ensure that each affected employee wears protective footwear when working in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or...

  14. 29 CFR 1918.104 - Foot protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Foot protection. 1918.104 Section 1918.104 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Personal Protective Equipment § 1918.104 Foot... in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or rolling objects or...

  15. 29 CFR 1917.94 - Foot protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Foot protection. 1917.94 Section 1917.94 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Personal Protection § 1917.94 Foot protection. (a) The employer shall ensure that each affected employee wears protective footwear when working in areas where there is a danger of foot...

  16. 33 CFR 142.33 - Foot protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Foot protection. 142.33 Section... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES WORKPLACE SAFETY AND HEALTH Personal Protective Equipment § 142.33 Foot... for foot injury to occur shall wear footwear meeting the specifications of ANSI Z41, except...

  17. 29 CFR 1910.136 - Foot protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Foot protection. 1910.136 Section 1910.136 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Personal Protective Equipment § 1910.136 Foot protection. (a) General... areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or rolling objects, or objects...

  18. Management of diabetic foot infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the infecting agent in diabetic food infection with the susceptibility pattern, and to evaluate the effect of wound infection, was culopathy, neuropathy and control of diabetes mellitus on the outcome of the patients. Design: A descriptive and observational study. Place and duration of study: Patients with diabetic foot, admitted in surgical unit 1, B.V. Hospital Bahawalpur, from April 1999 to April 2000, were included in this study. Subject and methods: A total of 60 known diabetic patients were studied, out of these 47 were males and 13 females. They were assessed for angiopathy, neuropathy and extend of foot involvement. Necessary investigations, including x-ray foot, ECG, serum urea and creatinine, pus culture and sensitivity were carried out. Diabetes was controlled on insulin of the basis of serum sugar and urine sugar chart and treated accordingly. Results: The most common age of foot involvement was between 40-70 years. Right side was involved more often than the left (67%: 37%). Most of the infections were due to staphylococcus (50%), pseudomonas (25%) and streptococci (8%). Antibiotic was started based on sensitivity report. Fluoro quinolone plus clindamycin was used in 50%, fluoro quinolone plus metronidazole in 20% and amoxicillin/clavulanate in 23%. Most of the patients (61.7%) were in grade iii or iv of Meggit wagner classification of diabetic foot. Three patients (5%) were treated by below knee amputations while 1.7% patient by above knee amputation. In twenty-four (40%) patients some form of to amputation/ray amputation had to be done,while 32(53.3%) patients had complete healing of would without any amputation. Mortality was 3.33% all the 4 patients (6.7%) who presented late, having uncontrolled diabetes, with angiopathy (absent foot pulses), neuropathy, infection of the foot (grade iii or above) resulted in major amputation sooner or latter. The 32 patients (53.3%) having controlled diabetes mellitus with no angiopathy or

  19. Obese older adults suffer foot pain and foot-related functional limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickle, Karen J; Steele, Julie R

    2015-10-01

    There is evidence to suggest being overweight or obese places adults at greater risk of developing foot complications such as osteoarthritis, tendonitis and plantar fasciitis. However, no research has comprehensively examined the effects of overweight or obesity on the feet of individuals older than 60 years of age. Therefore we investigated whether foot pain, foot structure, and/or foot function is affected by obesity in older adults. Three hundred and twelve Australian men and women, aged over 60 years, completed validated questionnaires to establish the presence of foot pain and health related quality of life. Foot structure (anthropometrics and soft tissue thickness) and foot function (ankle dorsiflexion strength and flexibility, toe flexor strength, plantar pressures and spatiotemporal gait parameters) were also measured. Obese participants (BMI >30) were compared to those who were overweight (BMI=25-30) and not overweight (BMI <25). Obese participants were found to have a significantly higher prevalence of foot pain and scored significantly lower on the SF-36. Obesity was also associated with foot-related functional limitation whereby ankle dorsiflexion strength, hallux and lesser toe strength, stride/step length and walking speed were significantly reduced in obese participants compared to their leaner counterparts. Therefore, disabling foot pain and altered foot structure and foot function are consequences of obesity for older adults, and impact upon their quality of life. Interventions designed to reduce excess fat mass may relieve loading of the foot structures and, in turn, improve foot pain and quality of life for older obese individuals. PMID:26260010

  20. Acute bilateral isolated foot drop: Report of two cases

    OpenAIRE

    Kertmen, H.; Gürer, B.; Yimaz, E. R.; Sekerci, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Foot drop is defined as the weakness of the foot and ankle dorsiflexion. Acute unilateral foot drop is a well-documented entity, whereas bilateral foot drop is rarely documented. Slowly progressing bilateral foot drop may occur with various metabolic causes, parasagittal intracranial pathologies, and cauda equina syndrome. Acute onset of bilateral foot drop due to disc herniation is extremely rare. Here we present two cases of acute bilateral foot drop due to disc herniation. The first patien...

  1. Infected foot ulcers in male and female diabetic patients: a clinico-bioinformative study

    OpenAIRE

    Khan Asad U; Shakil Shazi

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The study aimed at (i) characterizing the mode of transmission of blaCTX-M and blaTEM-1 among extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli strains isolated from infected diabetic foot ulcers, and (ii) identifying the risk factors for "sex-associated multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacterial (MDRGNB)-infection status" of the ulcers. Methods Seventy-seven diabetic patients having clinically infected foot ulcers were studied in a consecutive series. The E...

  2. Foot Plantar Pressure Measurement System: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufridin Wahab

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Foot plantar pressure is the pressure field that acts between the foot and the support surface during everyday locomotor activities. Information derived from such pressure measures is important in gait and posture research for diagnosing lower limb problems, footwear design, sport biomechanics, injury prevention and other applications. This paper reviews foot plantar sensors characteristics as reported in the literature in addition to foot plantar pressure measurement systems applied to a variety of research problems. Strengths and limitations of current systems are discussed and a wireless foot plantar pressure system is proposed suitable for measuring high pressure distributions under the foot with high accuracy and reliability. The novel system is based on highly linear pressure sensors with no hysteresis.

  3. Bacteriological study of diabetic foot infections.

    OpenAIRE

    Khairul Azmi ABD KADIR; Muppidi SATYAVANI; Ketan PANDE

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Foot infections are one of the major complications of diabetes mellitus and a significant risk factor for lower extremity amputation. Providing effective antimicrobial therapy is an important component in treating these infections. This study assesses the microbial isolates of patients with diabetic foot infections and their antibiotic susceptibility pattern. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study of 75 patients with diabetic foot infections admitted to RIPAS hospital betw...

  4. Hyperspectral Imaging in Diabetic Foot Wound Care

    OpenAIRE

    Yudovsky, Dmitry; Nouvong, Aksone; Pilon, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration is a major complication of diabetes and afflicts as many as 15 to 25% of type 1 and 2 diabetes patients during their lifetime. If untreated, diabetic foot ulcers may become infected and require total or partial amputation of the affected limb. Early identification of tissue at risk of ulcerating could enable proper preventive care, thereby reducing the incidence of foot ulceration. Furthermore, noninvasive assessment of tissue viability around already formed ulcers co...

  5. Foot Deformities in Patients with Cerebral Palsy

    OpenAIRE

    E Ameri; A. Yeganeh

    2007-01-01

    Introduction & Objective: In patients with cerebral palsy (CP) the most common presentation is lower extremity deformity specially foot deformity. Inability to ambulation is the one of the most important disabilities, that dependent to the variety of factors such as severity of disease, kind of CP, etc. This study was aimed to assess prevalence of kinds of foot deformity in CP and communication between kind of CP and foot deformity and another hand inability to ambulation.Materials & Methods...

  6. The diabetic foot: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricco, J B; Thanh Phong, L; Schneider, F; Illuminati, G; Belmonte, R; Valagier, A; Régnault De La Mothe, G

    2013-12-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration (DFU) is among the most frequent complications of diabetes. Neuropathy and ischaemia are the initiating factors and infection is mostly a consequence. We have shown in this review that any DFU should be considered to have vascular impairment. DFU will generally heal if the toe pressure is >55 mmHg and a transcutaneous oxygen pressure (TcPO2) <30 mmHg has been considered to predict that a diabetic ulcer may not heal. The decision to intervene is complex and made according to the symptoms and clinical findings. If both an endovascular and a bypass procedure are possible with an equal outcome to be expected, endovascular treatments should be preferred. Primary and secondary mid-term patency rates are better after bypass, but there is no difference in limb salvage. Bedridden patients with poor life expectancy and a non-revascularisable leg are indications for performing a major amputation. A deep infection is the immediate cause of amputation in 25% to 50% of diabetic patients. Patients with uncontrolled abscess, bone or joint involvement, gangrene, or necrotising fasciitis have a "foot-at risk" and need prompt surgical intervention with debridement and revascularisation. As demonstrated in this review, foot ulcer in diabetic is associated with high mortality and morbidity. Early referral, non-invasive vascular testing, imaging and intervention are crucial to improve DFU healing and to prevent amputation. Diabetics are eight to twenty-four times more likely than non-diabetics to have a lower limb amputation and it has been suggested that a large part of those amputations could be avoided by an early diagnosis and a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:24126512

  7. Reliability and normative values of the foot line test: a technique to assess foot posture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brushøj, C; Larsen, Klaus; Nielsen, MB;

    2007-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Test-retest reliability. OBJECTIVE: To examine the reliability and report normative values of a novel test, the foot line test (FLT), to describe foot morphology. BACKGROUND: Numerous foot examinations are performed each day, but most existing examination techniques have considerabl...

  8. Processing of the VP1/2A Junction Is Not Necessary for Production of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Empty Capsids and Infectious Viruses: Characterization of “Self-Tagged” Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gullberg, Maria; Polacek, Charlotta; Bøtner, Anette;

    2013-01-01

    The foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) capsid protein precursor, P1-2A, is cleaved by 3Cpro to generate VP0, VP3, VP1, and the peptide 2A. The capsid proteins self-assemble into empty capsid particles or viruses which do not contain 2A. In a cell culture-adapted strain of FMDV (O1 Manisa [Lindholm...... the unmodified empty capsids in antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and integrin receptor binding assays. Furthermore, mutant viruses with uncleaved VP1-2A could be rescued in cells from full-length FMDV RNA transcripts encoding the K210E substitution in VP1. Thus, cleavage of the VP1/2A junction...

  9. Foot-and-mouth disease: past, present and future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamal, Syed Muhammad; Belsham, Graham

    2013-01-01

    within countries where the disease is endemic due to reduced animal productivity and the restrictions on international trade in animal products. The disease is caused by infection with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), a picornavirus. Seven different serotypes (and numerous variants) of FMDV have been...... it is important to characterize the viruses that are circulating if vaccination is being used for disease control. This review describes current methods for the detection and characterization of FMDVs. Sequence information is increasingly being used for identifying the source of outbreaks. In addition...

  10. On Sound Footing: The Health of Your Feet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... link, please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe On Sound Footing The Health of Your Feet Your feet ... search Features A Bang to the Brain On Sound Footing Wise Choices Links Foot Health Tips Use ...

  11. Foot Pain and Cycling: a survey of frequency, type, location, associations and amelioration of foot pain

    OpenAIRE

    Hayley Uden; Sara Jones; Karen Grimmer

    2012-01-01

    The foot – pedal interface is the primary site for energy transfer from the cyclist to the bicycle, with anecdotal evidence that foot injuries from cycling are common. However, there is little research regarding the prevalence, aetiology and/or management of such injuries. 1) What is the distribution of age, gender, foot/pedal interface use and distances cycled amongst cyclists who experience foot pain? 2) What type of pain and what region of the foot do cyclists experience pain? 3) What amel...

  12. Foot Deformities in Patients with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Ameri

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: In patients with cerebral palsy (CP the most common presentation is lower extremity deformity specially foot deformity. Inability to ambulation is the one of the most important disabilities, that dependent to the variety of factors such as severity of disease, kind of CP, etc. This study was aimed to assess prevalence of kinds of foot deformity in CP and communication between kind of CP and foot deformity and another hand inability to ambulation.Materials & Methods: 100 patients with cerebral palsy with age 3-20 y (average 12.9y were assessed in Shafa Yahyaian Orthopedic Center and kinds of CP & foot deformity was evaluated. In these patients, 84 subjects were selected with age 7-20 y and were evaluated for ability to walking.Results: The most common type of CP was spastic and the most common form of CP was (Quadri-Di-hemi-para plegic respectively. The most common form of foot deformity was equines. Inability to walking in patients with foot deformity was more than without it (P<0.03, and in quadriplegic CP more than another types and in hemiplegic less than others.Conclusion: The most common deformity in foot in patients with CP was equines and then equino varus & equines valgus respectively. Foot deformity is the one of the factors that effect on ability to ambulation in patients with CP. Inability to ambulation in quadriplegic CP is more than others and in hemiplegic CP less than other types of CP.

  13. Cosmetic Foot Surgery: Fashion's Pandora's Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fashion’s Pandora’s Box? A A A | Print | Share Cosmetic Foot Surgery: Fashion’s Pandora’s Box? Foot and ankle ... extreme and imprudent as it may sound, the cosmetic surgery craze isn't just for faces anymore- ...

  14. Sports Injuries to the Foot and Ankle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Foot and Ankle Text Size Print Bookmark Sports Injuries to the Foot and Ankle Depending on the sport, your feet and ankles can certainly take a ... the injury risk factors while playing your favorite sport, see the topics listed below or read the ...

  15. A comparison of haemolytic responses in fore-foot and rear-foot distance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, Stuart; McDonald, Kirsty A; Dawson, Brian; Stearne, Sarah M; Green, Ben A; Rubenson, Jonas; Clemons, Tristan D; Peeling, Peter

    2016-08-01

    This study examined the haemolytic effects of an interval-based running task in fore-foot and rear-foot striking runners. Nineteen male distance runners (10 fore-foot, 9 rear-foot) completed 8 × 3 min repeats at 90% vVO2peak on a motorised treadmill. Pre- and post-exercise venous blood samples were analysed for serum haptoglobin to quantify the haemolytic response to running. Vertical ground reaction forces were also captured via a force plate beneath the treadmill belt. Haptoglobin levels were significantly decreased following exercise (P = 0.001) in both groups (but not between groups), suggesting that the running task created a haemolytic stress. The ground reaction force data showed strong effect sizes for a greater peak force (d = 1.20) and impulse (d = 1.37) in fore-foot runners, and a greater rate of force development (d = 2.74) in rear-foot runners. The lack of difference in haptoglobin response between groups may be explained by the trend for fore-foot runners to experience greater peak force and impulse during the stance phase of their running gait, potentially negating any impact of the greater rate of force development occurring from the rear-foot runners' heel strike. Neither type of runner (fore-foot or rear-foot) appears more susceptible to technique-related foot-strike haemolysis. PMID:26618486

  16. Isolation of a substance activating foot formation in hydra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimmelikhuijzen, C J; Schaller, H C

    1977-01-01

    We have developed an assay for a substance from hydra that accelerates foot regeneration in the animal. This substance is specific for the foot as evidenced by the following findings: (1) It is present in the animal as a steep gradient descending from foot to head, paralleling the foot......-forming potential of the tissue (2) It does not accelerate head regeneration, nor do the head factors of hydra discovered by Schaller (1973) and Berking (1977) accelerate foot regeneration. We propose that the foot-activating substance is a morphogen responsible for foot formation in hydra. The foot activator can...

  17. Surgical treatment of the Charcot foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzur, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    With the increased number of diabetics worldwide and the increased incidence of morbid obesity in more prosperous cultures, there has become an increased awareness of Charcot arthropathy of the foot and ankle. Outcome studies would suggest that patients with deformity associated with Charcot Foot arthropathy have impaired health related quality of life. This awareness has led reconstructive-minded foot and ankle surgeons to develop surgical strategies to treat these acquired deformities. This article outlines the current clinical approach to this disabling medical condition. PMID:26813619

  18. Clinical anatomy of the ankle and foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Díaz, Cristina; Saavedra, Miguel Ángel; Navarro-Zarza, José Eduardo; Canoso, Juan J; Villaseñor-Ovies, Pablo; Vargas, Angélica; Kalish, Robert A

    This paper emphasizes the anatomical substrate of several foot conditions that are seldom discussed in this context. These include the insertional and non-insertional Achilles tendinopathies, plantar fasciopathy, inferior and posterior heel spurs, foot compartment syndromes, intermetatarsal bursitis and Morton's neuroma. It is a rather superficial anatomical review of an organ that remains largely neglected by rheumatologists. It is our hope that the cases discussed and the cross examination by instructors and participants will stimulate study of the foot and the attention it deserves. PMID:23228530

  19. Clinical and functional correlates of foot pain in diabetic patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijken, P.M.; Dekker, J.; Rauwerda, J.A.; Dekker, E.; Lankhorst, G.J.; Bakker, K.; Dooren, J.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: patients with diabetes mellitus frequently suffer from foot pain. This pain seems to be a neglected area in studies on the diabetic foot. The purpose of this study was to identify clinical variables associated with foot pain in diabetic patients. In addition, the relationships between foot

  20. Effect of forward/backward standing posture on foot shape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Tan, T.K.; Punte, P.A.J.

    2000-01-01

    Foot length and breadth are generally used to determine the correct shoe size. An important question is whether foot length and foot breadth are dependent upon body posture. Therefore, the effect of leaning forward/backward on foot length and breadth is investigated in this study. Seven subjects par

  1. PATTERN OF AEROBIC B ACTERIAL INFECTION O F DIABETIC FOOT

    OpenAIRE

    Parmeshwari; Basavaraj

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diabetic foot ulcer is one of the commonest complications of longstanding diabetes. Diabetic foot is a common cause of hospital admission in diabetic patients in India. The trio of problems leading onto diabetic foot is neuropathy, vascular changes and infections, which constitute the diabetic foot syndrome. OBJECTIVES: To determine ...

  2. Foot Reaction Forces during Long Duration Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, R.; Rice, A. J.; Genc, K. O.; Maender, C. C.; Kuklis, M. M.; Humphreys, B.; Cavanagh, P. R.

    2008-01-01

    Musculoskeletal changes, particularly in the lower extremities, are an established consequence of long-duration space flight despite exercise countermeasures. It is widely believed that disuse and reduction in load bearing are key to these physiological changes, but no quantitative data characterizing the on-orbit movement environments currently exist. Here we present data from the Foot Experiment (E318) regarding astronaut activity on the ground and on-orbit during typical days from 4 International Space Station (ISS) crew members who flew during increments 6, 8, 11, and 12.

  3. Radiographic examination of the equine foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A complete radiographic examination of the equine foot consists of properly exposed, processed, and positioned radiographs. For radiographic interpretation, in addition to knowing radiographic signs of disease, a knowledge of normal radiographic anatomy and possible insignificant anatomic variations is necessary

  4. Diabetic foot resulting in amputation: our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. G. Patel

    2014-02-01

    Conclusions: Foot ulceration in diabetic patients is a resource consuming, disabling morbidity that often is the first step towards lower extremity amputation. Prevention is the best treatment. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(1.000: 210-214

  5. What Is a Foot and Ankle Surgeon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... school, the foot and ankle surgeon enters a postgraduate residency in podiatric medicine and surgery approved by ... disorders and injuries that affect people of all ages. They are uniquely qualified to detect the early ...

  6. Angiography in the region of the foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is reported on technique, incidence and findings of angiography of the foot which provided magnifying angiography and non-ionic contrast media are used, is especially qualified for the differentiation of diabetic and non-diabetic angiopathies as well as for the identification of peripherical embolizations and digital arterial occlusions at thrombocytosis or polycythemia. The arteries of the foot represent the peripherical outflow at peripherical reconstructive performances at the lower leg and have to be studied prior to such reconstructive surgical interventions. The different localization of arterial obliterations and changes of the walls in diabetics of stage I-IV according to Fontaine shows the particularly large number of vascular-pathological findings in arteries of the lower leg and foot in diabetics with arterial occlusive diseases of stage III and IV. Therefore, the unfavourable prognoses of arterial occlusive diseases in diabetics have also to be made for peripherical arterial obliterations of the foot and lower leg. (orig.)

  7. Parametric study of orthopedic insole of valgus foot on partial foot amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jun-Chao; Wang, Li-Zhen; Chen, Wei; Du, Cheng-Fei; Mo, Zhong-Jun; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2016-06-01

    Orthopedic insole was important for partial foot amputation (PFA) to achieve foot balance and avoid foot deformity. The inapposite insole orthosis was thought to be one of the risk factors of reamputation for foot valgus patient, but biomechanical effects of internal tissues on valgus foot had not been clearly addressed. In this study, plantar pressure on heel and metatarsal regions of PFA was measured using F-Scan. The three-dimensional finite element (FE) model of partial foot evaluated different medial wedge angles (MWAs) (0.0°-10.0°) of orthopedic insole on valgus foot. The effect of orthopedic insole on the internal bone stress, the medial ligament tension of ankle, plantar fascia tension, and plantar pressure was investigated. Plantar pressure on medial heel region was about 2.5 times higher than that of lateral region based on the F-Scan measurements. FE-predicted results showed that the tension of medial ankle ligaments was the lowest, and the plantar pressure was redistributed around the heel, the first metatarsal, and the lateral longitudinal arch regions when MWA of orthopedic insole ranged from 7.5° to 8.0°. The plantar fascias maintained about 3.5% of the total load bearing on foot. However, the internal stresses from foot bones increased. The simulation in this study would provide the suggestion of guiding optimal design of orthopedic insole and therapeutic planning to pedorthist. PMID:26291149

  8. Pixel classification for automated diabetic foot diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kloeze, C.; Klein, A; Hazenberg, S.; Heijden, van der, Hans; Baal, van, A.H.M.; Bus, S.A.

    2009-01-01

    Worldwide, more than 180 million people suffer from diabetes mellitus. Approximately 50% of these patients will develop complications to their feet. Neuropathy, combined with poor blood supply and biomechanical changes results in a high risk for foot ulcers, which is a key problem in the diabetic foot; when these wounds become infected, this can ultimately result in lower extremity amputation, which has a serious effect on the quality of life of the patient, and causes a large economic burden...

  9. New insights in diabetic foot infection

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Foot ulcers are common in diabetic patients, have a cumulative lifetime incidence rate as high as 25% and frequently become infected. The spread of infection to soft tissue and bone is a major causal factor for lower-limb amputation. For this reason, early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are essential, including treatment which is both local (of the foot) and systemic (metabolic), and this requires coordination by a multidisciplinary team. Optimal treatment also often involves extensive s...

  10. The 'ABC' of examining foot radiographs.

    OpenAIRE

    Pearse, Eyiyemi O.; Klass, Benjamin; Bendall, Stephen P.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We report a simple systematic method of assessing foot radiographs that improves diagnostic accuracy and can reduce the incidence of inappropriate management of serious forefoot and midfoot injuries, particularly the Lisfranc-type injury. STUDY GROUP AND METHODS: Five recently appointed senior house officers (SHOs), with no casualty or Orthopaedic experience prior to their appointment, were shown a set of 10 foot radiographs and told the history and examination findings recorded...

  11. Postoperative infection in the foot and ankle.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chan, Victoria O

    2012-07-01

    Our discussion highlights the commonly performed surgical procedures in the foot and ankle and reviews the various imaging modalities available for the detection of infection with graphic examples to better enable radiologists to approach the radiological evaluation of postoperative infection in the foot and ankle. Discrimination between infectious and noninfectious inflammation remains a diagnostic challenge usually needing a combination of clinical assessment, laboratory investigations, and imaging studies to increase diagnostic accuracy.

  12. Diabetic foot infections: current concept review

    OpenAIRE

    Wukich, Dane K.; Hobizal, Kimberlee B.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to provide a current concept review on the diagnosis and management of diabetic foot infections which are among the most serious and frequent complications encountered in patients with diabetes mellitus. A literature review on diabetic foot infections with emphasis on pathophysiology, identifiable risk factors, evaluation including physical examination, laboratory values, treatment strategies and assessing the severity of infection has been performed in detai...

  13. Hand, foot and mouth disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika Muppa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD is an acute viral illness with a distinct clinical presentation of oral and characteristic distal extremity lesions. Knowledge of this is important for the dentists as the oral lesions are the first clinical signs and sometimes may be the only sign because the condition occasionally may regress even before the lesions appear on the extremities. This case describes a 5-year-old boy in whom low-grade fever of 38.7°C and oral lesions were the initial manifestations. Proper diagnosis was established later based on the typical location of the initial intraoral ulcers on the soft palate followed by cutaneous lesions on the hands and feet with vesicle formation surrounded by an erythematous halo. The recognition of HFMD is important for both pediatricians and pedodontists as oral manifestations are the first signs and may mimic many other conditions like acute herpetic gingivostomstomatitis, apthous stomatitis, chickenpox, erythema multiformae and misdiagnosis may involve an inappropriate prescription of medication.

  14. The management of the infected diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaggi, Carlo; Sganzaroli, Adriana; Galenda, Paolo; Bassetti, Matteo; Ferraresi, Roberto; Gabrielli, Livio

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic disease with a worldwide increasing trend. Foot complications, closely related to neuropathy and obstructive peripheral vascular disease, are responsible for more than 1 million of leg amputations every year. Foot infection can dramatically increase the risk of amputation. Although many ulcer classification systems have been proposed to stratify the severity of the infectious process, the definition of a specific therapeutic approach still remains an unsolved problem. A Diabetic Foot Triage and an Integrated Surgical Protocol are proposed to identify a diagnostic flowchart and a step-by-step surgical protocol that can be applied in the treatment of diabetic foot infection. Considering the rapid climbing of multidrug resistant strains it is very important to rationalize the use of antibiotics utilizing them only for the treatment of true infected ulcers. PAD is widely considered the most important factor conditioning the outcome of a diabetic foot ulcer. Currently no randomized control trials are reported in the international literature directly comparing open versus endovascular revascularisation in diabetic patients with CLI. Insufficient data are available to demonstrate whether open bypass surgery or endovascular interventions are more effective in these patients. A decisional flow chart in choosing the best revascularization strategy in diabetic patients with CLI is proposed. Goals and technical aspects of emergency and elective surgical procedures in diabetic foot are analysed to evaluate critical aspects and to suggest proper surgical choices. PMID:22934545

  15. The 'ABC' of examining foot radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearse, Eyiyemi O.; Klass, Benjamin; Bendall, Stephen P.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We report a simple systematic method of assessing foot radiographs that improves diagnostic accuracy and can reduce the incidence of inappropriate management of serious forefoot and midfoot injuries, particularly the Lisfranc-type injury. STUDY GROUP AND METHODS: Five recently appointed senior house officers (SHOs), with no casualty or Orthopaedic experience prior to their appointment, were shown a set of 10 foot radiographs and told the history and examination findings recorded in the casualty notes of each patient within 6 weeks of taking up their posts. They were informed that the radiographs might or might not demonstrate an abnormality. They were asked to make a diagnosis and decide on a management plan. The test was repeated after they were taught the 'ABC' method of evaluating foot radiographs. RESULTS: Diagnostic accuracy improved after SHOs were taught a systematic method of assessing foot radiographs. The proportion of correct diagnoses increased from 0.64 to 0.78 and the probability of recognising Lisfranc injuries increased from 0 to 0.6. CONCLUSIONS: The use of this simple method of assessing foot radiographs can reduce the incidence of inappropriate management of serious foot injuries by casualty SHOs, in particular the Lisfranc type injury. PMID:16263015

  16. SAT Type Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD) Chimeric Vaccine Elicits Protection in Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    The recent development of infectious cDNA clone technology for foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), Southern African Territories (SAT) viruses has provided a valuable tool for genetic and biological characterization of field and laboratory strains. Recombinant chimeric viruses, containing the capsid-coding...

  17. The forgotten foot - an assessment of foot and ankle radiograph pathology in final year medical students.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Groarke, P J

    2014-04-27

    It has been shown that doctors in Emergency Departments (EDs) have inconsistent knowledge of musculoskeletal anatomy. This is most likely due to a deficiency in focused musculoskeletal modules at undergraduate level in medical school. The aims of this study were to evaluate the knowledge of final year medical students on foot anatomy and common foot and ankle pathology as seen on radiographs.

  18. Foot lengthening and shortening during gait: a parameter to investigate foot function?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolwijk, N.M.; Koenraadt, K.L.M.; Louwerens, J.W.; Grim, D.; Duysens, J.E.J.; Keijsers, N.L.W.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Based on the windlass mechanism theory of Hicks, the medial longitudinal arch (MLA) flattens during weight bearing. Simultaneously, foot lengthening is expected. However, changes in foot length during gait and the influence of walking speed has not been investigated yet. METHODS: The f

  19. Long distance running and acute effects on plantar foot sensitivity and plantar foot loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfuth, Martin; Rosenbaum, Dieter

    2011-09-26

    The plantar surface of the foot senses local pressures during stance and locomotion. These foot loading characteristics may be affected by long distance running. Little is known about the physiological effects of sports-related loading on plantar sensitivity and their relationship with plantar foot loading. The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute effects of long distance running on plantar sensitivity to touch and their relationship with foot loading characteristics. It was hypothesized that plantar sensation would decrease after long distance running and may be related to foot loading characteristics. In 15 middle-aged runners, sensory detection thresholds to light touch and plantar pressures were measured before and after a 10 km run. After the run, no significant changes in sensory perception thresholds were observed so that correlations between foot sensitivity and foot loading could not be calculated. A significant decrease of force-time integrals and maximum forces was demonstrated in the whole foot (-6.2%, p=0.003; -3.9%, p=0.001) and the heel (-10.5%, p=0.003; -8.5%, p=0.002). Furthermore, maximum force was significantly reduced in the lateral midfoot (-6.4%, p=0.002). In conclusion, a sub-maximal 10 km running exercise appears to have no significant acute effects on plantar sensitivity, plantar pressure distribution and peak forces. PMID:21871535

  20. Nineteen-Foot Diameter Explosively Driven Blast Simulator; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the 19-foot diameter blast tunnel at Sandia National Laboratories. The blast tunnel configuration consists of a 6 foot diameter by 200 foot long shock tube, a 6 foot diameter to 19 foot diameter conical expansion section that is 40 feet long, and a 19 foot diameter test section that is 65 feet long. Therefore, the total blast tunnel length is 305 feet. The development of this 19-foot diameter blast tunnel is presented. The small scale research test results using 4 inch by 8 inch diameter and 2 foot by 6 foot diameter shock tube facilities are included. Analytically predicted parameters are compared to experimentally measured blast tunnel parameters in this report. The blast tunnel parameters include distance, time, static, overpressure, stagnation pressure, dynamic pressure, reflected pressure, shock Mach number, flow Mach number, shock velocity, flow velocity, impulse, flow duration, etc. Shadowgraphs of the shock wave are included for the three different size blast tunnels

  1. Effect of Custom-Molded Foot Orthoses on Foot Pain and Balance in Children With Symptomatic Flexible Flat Feet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hong-Jae; Lim, Kil-Byung; Yoo, JeeHyun; Yun, Hyun-Ju; Jeong, Tae-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of custom-molded foot orthoses on foot pain and balance in children with symptomatic flexible flat foot 1 month and 3 months after fitting foot orthosis. Method A total of 24 children over 6 years old with flexible flat feet and foot pain for at least 6 months were recruited for this study. Their resting calcaneal stance position and calcaneal pitch angle were measured. Individual custom-molded rigid foot orthoses were prescribed using inverted orthotic technique to control foot overpronation. Pain questionnaire was used to obtain pain sites, degree, and frequency. Balancing ability was determined using computerized posturography. These evaluations were performed prior to custom-molded foot orthoses, 1 month, and 3 months after fitting foot orthoses. Result Of 24 children with symptomatic flexible flat feet recruited for this study, 20 completed the study. Significant (p<0.001) improvements in pain degree and frequency were noted after 1 and 3 months of custom-molded foot orthoses. In addition, significant (p<0.05) improvement in balancing ability was found after 3 months of custom-molded foot orthoses. Conclusion Short-term use of custom-molded foot orthoses significantly improved foot pain and balancing ability in children with symptomatic flexible flat foot. PMID:26798604

  2. Compartments of the foot: topographic anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faymonville, C; Andermahr, J; Seidel, U; Müller, L P; Skouras, E; Eysel, P; Stein, G

    2012-12-01

    Recent publications have renewed the debate regarding the number of foot compartments. There is also no consensus regarding allocation of individual muscles and communication between compartments. The current study examines the anatomic topography of the foot compartments anew using 32 injections of epoxy-resin and subsequent sheet plastination in 12 cadaveric foot specimens. Six compartments were identified: dorsal, medial, lateral, superficial central, deep forefoot, and deep hindfoot compartments. Communication was evident between the deep hindfoot compartment and the superficial central and deep central forefoot compartments. In the hindfoot, the neurovascular bundles were located in separate tissue sheaths between the central hindfoot compartment and the medial compartment. In the forefoot, the medial and lateral bundles entered the deep central forefoot compartment. The deep central hindfoot compartment housed the quadratus plantae muscle, and after calcaneus fracture could develop an isolated compartment syndrome. PMID:22638720

  3. Challenges for Serology-Based Characterization of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Outbreaks in Endemic Areas; Identification of Two Separate Lineages of Serotype O FMDV in Uganda in 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Namatovu, A.; Belsham, Graham; Ayebazibwe, C.;

    2015-01-01

    in seven Ugandan districts, during 2011, using the PrioCHECK((R)) FMDV NS ELISA, solid-phase blocking ELISAs (SPBEs) and virus neutralization tests (VNTs), together with virological analyses for characterization of the responsible viruses. Two hundred and eighteen (218) cattle and 23 goat sera as well...... as 82 oropharyngeal fluid/epithelial tissue samples were collected. Some 50% of the cattle and 17% of the goat sera were positive by the PrioCHECK((R)) FMDV NS ELISA, while SPBEs identified titres 80 for antibodies against serotype O FMD virus (FMDV) in 51% of the anti-NSP positive cattle sera. However...

  4. Metallic Foreign Body in the Foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firat Ozan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: A foreign body injury of the foot is a frequently encountered problem. These foreign bodies can lead to various complications in the affected tissues, and their removal can be difficult and time consuming. Therefore, the removal of a foreign body requires good preoperative preparations. The surgical treatment results of patients with a foreign body, identified as a sewing needle, that had penetrated their foot were evaluated. Material and Method: Thirty-four patients (11 males, 23 females; mean age, 30.2 ± 18.6 years who were surgically treated between 2011 and 2013 were included. Data concerning the affected limb, placement of the needle, imaging techniques, season when the injury occurred, time between medical intervention and injury, anaesthesia type, fluoroscopy of use during surgery and surgical complications were analyzed. Results: A sewing needle had penetrated the right foot of 20 (58.8% patients and the left foot of 14 (41.1% patients. Broken needles were found in the toes of 14 (41.1% patients, in the middle of the foot of 12 (35.2% patients and in the heel area of 8 (23.5% patients. The injuries occurred in summer in 13 (38.2% patients, in winter in seven (20.6% patients, in spring in one (2.9% patient and in autumn in 13 (38.2% patients. Needle penetration had occurred in 28 (82.3% patients at home and 6 (17.6% patients outside of the home environment. The average follow-up time was 8.9 ± 2.8 months. Discussion: Removal of foreign bodies from the foot requires good preoperative preparations. Foreign bodies can lead to various complications in the affected tissues. It is important to perform detailed physical and radiological examinations to obtain good treatment results in these patients.

  5. Chinese Herbal Foot Bath plus Acupoint Massage Beneficial to the Improvement of Grade 0 Diabetic Foot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Xiao-xia; Xu Xu-yuan; Shangguan Bin-bin

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To observe the clinical effect of foot bath with Tao Hong Si Wu Tang plus massage on acupoints at the sole for grade 0 diabetic foot. Methods: One hundred and sixty eligible cases were randomly divided into an observation group and a control group, 80 cases in each group. The two groups were treated with routine basic medications to control blood sugar. The patients in the observation group were given foot bath withTao Hong Si Wu Tangplus massage on acupoints at the sole, once every day. At the same time, the patients were instructed to understand the knowledge of diabetes, accept the education on foot care and to know the self-management for diabetes. The patients in the control group only accepted the education on foot care and studied the self-management for diabetes. The patients in the two groups were followed up once every week by phone. The local examination was intensified for the patients in their clinical visit every month. The therapeutic effects were assessed after three months of continuous treatment. Results: The total effective rate was 92.5% in the observation group, remarkably higher than 65.0% in the control group. The difference in comparison of the general therapeutic effect was statistically significant (P Conclusion: Foot bath withTao Hong Si Wu Tang plus massage on acupoints at the sole was beneficial to the improvement of clinical symptoms of grade 0 diabetic foot.

  6. [The infected diabetic foot: diagnosis and management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicodème, Jean-Damien; Paulin, Emilie Nicodème; Zingg, Matthieu; Uçkay, Ilker; Malacarne, Sarah; Suva, Domizio

    2015-06-01

    Foot infections are a frequent and potentially harmful complication of diabetes mellitus. In one skin ulceration out of two, further evolution towards infection occurs and often leads to amputation increasing morbidity and health care costs. Skin disruptions, favored by the sensorimotor neuropathy and vascular disease, constitute the initial factors leading to this complication. To ensure effective care, these cases must be managed by a multidisciplinary team in a specialized center. All caretakers involved with patients suffering from diabetes mellitus must be capable of preventing and recognizing diabetic foot infections, as well as informing the patients about this complication and its management. PMID:26211284

  7. Pathology-designed custom molded foot orthoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbloom, Kevin B

    2011-01-01

    Treating patients with custom foot orthoses for common pathologies is a rewarding experience when the proper steps are taken during foot casting and custom-orthosis prescription writing. This article describes successful methods for orthoses casting and prescription writing for custom-molded orthoses for Achilles tendonitis, pes planus, hallux limitus, plantar fasciitis/heel spurs, lateral ankle instability, metatarsalgia, and pes cavus. In addition, a summary of orthotic laboratory instructions for each pathology-designed custom orthosis is provided, which should be considered by orthotic laboratories. PMID:21276525

  8. [Syndrome of diabetic foot: modern diagnostic methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plekhanov, A N; Markevich, P S

    2014-01-01

    We summarize the literature data on diagnostics of diabetic foot syndrome including clinical examination and special invasive and non-invasive studies of the vascular system. The main methods are ultrasound dopplerography, X-ray contrast angiography, and ultrasound duplex scanning. Special attention is given to instrumental diagnostics of diabetic neuropathies. The golden standard for the evaluation of the function of the peripheral nervous system is electroneuromyography. Methods for the study of diabetic foot complications, such as osteoarthropathy and trophic ulcers, are discussed. PMID:25782303

  9. A control model for zygodactyl bird's foot

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Anna Chiara; Loreti, Paola

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we are interested to the zygodactyly phenomenon in birds, and in particolar in parrots. This arrangement, common in species living on trees, is a distribution of the foot with two toes facing forward and two back. We give a model for the foot, and thanks to the methods of iterated function system we are able to describe the reachability set. Moreover we give a necessary and sufficient condition for the grasping problem. Finally we introduce a hybrid dynamical system modeling owl...

  10. Foot Pedals for Spacecraft Manual Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Stanley G.; Morin, Lee M.; McCabe, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Fifty years ago, NASA decided that the cockpit controls in spacecraft should be like the ones in airplanes. But controls based on the stick and rudder may not be best way to manually control a vehicle in space. A different method is based on submersible vehicles controlled with foot pedals. A new pilot can learn the sub's control scheme in minutes and drive it hands-free. We are building a pair of foot pedals for spacecraft control, and will test them in a spacecraft flight simulator.

  11. Foot and Ankle Injuries in Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenforde, Adam S; Yin, Amy; Hunt, Kenneth J

    2016-02-01

    Foot and ankle injuries account for nearly one-third of running injuries. Achilles tendinopathy, plantar fasciopathy, and ankle sprains are 3 of the most common types of injuries sustained during training. Other common injuries include other tendinopathies of the foot and ankle, bone stress injuries, nerve conditions including neuromas, and joint disease including osteoarthritis. This review provides an evidence-based framework for the evaluation and optimal management of these conditions to ensure safe return to running participation and reduce risk for future injury. PMID:26616180

  12. Distal amputations for the diabetic foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Nather

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Minor amputations in diabetic patients with foot complications have been well studied in the literature but controversy still remains as to what constitutes successful or non-successful limb salvage. In addition, there is a lack of consensus on the definition of a minor or distal amputation and a major or proximal amputation for the diabetic population. In this article, the authors review the existing literature to evaluate the efficacy of minor amputations in this selected group of patients in terms of diabetic limb salvage and also propose several definitions regarding diabetic foot amputations.

  13. [The gold standard in diabetic foot treatment: total contact cast].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Platonoff, Adriana; Florida Mejía-Mendoza, Melissa Desireé; Ibáñez-Doria, Mónica; Contreras-Ruiz, José

    2014-01-01

    In patients with diabetes, foot complications remain one of the main health issues, with ulcers representing one of the most common. These ulcerations originate from repetitive trauma on a foot with neuropathy. Inadequate care of the diabetic foot may lead to one of the gravest complications of the diabetic foot: amputation. The key to the treatment of the diabetic foot is the control of comorbidities (glucose levels and vascular disease), debridement, exudate control with the available modern dressings, treatment of infection, and offloading the affected foot. A common error in this basic treatment is the method used for offloading, leading to delayed healing as a result, and maybe even amputation. For this purpose we propose the total contact cast considered the "gold standard" in diabetic foot offloading. The objective of the present review is to present the existing evidence in the medical literature on the effectiveness of its use for healing diabetic foot ulcers and hence preventing amputations. PMID:24481432

  14. Radionuclide imaging in diagnosis and therapy of the diabetic foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early and accurate diagnosis of angiopathy or infection of the diabetic foot is the key to the successful management. Radionuclide imaging is very useful in detecting diabetic microangiopathy, assessing the prognosis of foot ulcers, and diagnosing the osteomyelitis

  15. Parents: Avoid Kids Foot Problems with the Right Shoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bookmark Parents: Avoid kids' foot problems with the right shoes Before you head to the store to ... College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights Reserved. | Privacy Statement | Disclaimer | Terms and Conditions | Site ...

  16. Parents: Avoid Kids Foot Problems with the Right Shoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print | Share Avoid Kids Foot Problems with the Right Shoes Before you head to the store to ... College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights Reserved. Privacy Statement | Disclaimer | Terms and Conditions | Site ...

  17. Recognizing the radiographic features of some common bovine foot problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiographs of an injured or infected bovine foot can be tricky to interpret - the anatomy is complex, and the signs may be subtle. This guide leads you through the classic radiographic features of several common foot conditions

  18. Foot preferences during resting in wildfowl and waders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randler, Christoph

    2007-03-01

    Footedness in birds has been reported, e.g., in parrots and chickens, but the direction of footedness remained unclear. Is a bird left-footed because it uses its left foot for holding and handling food, or is it right-footed because it uses the right foot for stabilisation and balancing while perching? In 2004 and 2006 I examined footedness in wildfowl and waders while the birds were performing a single task: roosting on the ground on one foot. Avocet (Recurvirostra avosetta), northern shoveller (Anas clypeata), oystercatcher (Haematopus ostralegus), and Eurasian curlew (Numenius arquata) were right-footed. Another 21 species did not show any significant foot preferences. This study provides some evidence that asymmetries in preferential foot use in birds may be triggered by a preference during postural control. PMID:17365634

  19. Comorbidities associated with Egyptian diabetic foot disease subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary N. Rizk

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion Special attention should be paid toward the identification of patients who are at risk of foot ulceration to help prevent foot problems. Comorbid conditions must also be identified early and managed aggressively.

  20. Back to School Foot Pain (Flip-Flops)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... foot and ankle surgeons see an increase in ankle injuries among young athletes. Football, soccer and basketball are ... to School Soccer Season Prime time for foot, ankle injuries. Parents and coaches should think twice before coaxing ...

  1. OPTIMUM PAD FOOTING DESIGN BY USING GENETIC ALGORITHM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paki TURGUT

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a Genetic Algorithm (GA has been developed in order to find the optimum geometrical sizes in pad footing design. In the solutions of pad footing sizes found by manually or/and software, there is a required assumption of pad footing sizes held by an experienced designer at the beginning. After the assumption of the initial pad footing sizes, the exact sizes have been determined by a time consuming trial and error process. In the developed GA software without the requirement in the assumption of initial pad footing sizes, the most suitable pad footing sizes has been determined within a short period by minimizing the pad footing volume. In contrast to classical methods, developed GA has simultaneously and relationally calculated the pad footing base sizes and its height.

  2. Foot Health and Mobility in People With Intellectual Disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Courtenay, K.; Murray, A

    2015-01-01

    Foot disorders affect people with intellectual disability and have an impact on their ability to mobilize; their prevalence appears to be higher than in the general population. Foot problems are recognized as part of certain syndromes associated with intellectual disabilities. Bony deformities of the foot, general health disorders, musculoskeletal disorders, and inappropriate footwear contribute to the development and aggravation of foot disorders. People with intellectual disability generall...

  3. Cerebral Infarction Presenting with Unilateral Isolated Foot Drop

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ki-Wan; Park, Jung-Soo; Koh, Eun-Jeong; Lee, Jong-Myong

    2014-01-01

    Weakness of the dorsiflexor muscles of the ankle or toe, referred to as foot drop, is a relatively common presentation. In most cases, foot drop is caused by a lower motor neuron disease such as peroneal peripheral neuropathy, L4-5 radiculopathic sciatic neuropathy, or polyneuropathy. Although upper motor neuron lesions can present as foot drop, the incidence is very rare. Here, we report an extremely rare case in which foot drop was the only presenting symptom of cerebral infarction.

  4. Trisomy 18 syndrome with cleft foot.

    OpenAIRE

    Castle, D; Bernstein, R.

    1988-01-01

    Ectrodactyly of the feet has been reported only twice in association with trisomy 18 syndrome. A severe form of this anomaly, the first with published illustrative x rays, is described in a male infant with trisomy 18 syndrome. It is suggested that this may represent an extreme expression of the foot anomalies more commonly associated with this syndrome.

  5. 49 CFR 214.115 - Foot protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from American National Standards Institute, 25 West... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Foot protection. 214.115 Section 214.115..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD WORKPLACE SAFETY Bridge Worker Safety Standards § 214.115...

  6. Impedance of Surface Footings on Layered Ground

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars; Clausen, Johan Christian

    2005-01-01

    discussed. Based on the Green's function for a stratified half-space, the impedance of a surface footing with arbitrary shape is computed. A wind turbine foundation is analysed in the frequency range 0 to 3 Hz. Analyses show that soil stratification may lead to a significant changes in the impedance related...

  7. Ron Rash: One Foot in Eden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Thomas Ærvold

    2010-01-01

    An analysis of Ron Rash's novel One Foot in Eden, focusing on his attachment to place and his depiction of the internal conflicts between farmers and townspeople in a small Appalachian community. Rash depicts the contemporary Southerner’s struggle to maintain his or her roots in a time of rapid...

  8. Impedance of Surface Footings on Layered Ground

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars; Clausen, Johan

    2007-01-01

    discussed. Based on the Green's function for a stratified half-space, the impedance of a surface footing with arbitrary shape is computed. A wind turbine foundation is analysed in the frequency range 0-3 Hz. Analyses show that soil stratification may lead to significant changes in the impedance related to...

  9. Patient education for preventing diabetic foot ulceration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorresteijn, J.A.; Kriegsman, D.M.; Assendelft, W.J.; Valk, G.D.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ulceration of the feet, which can result in loss of limbs and even death, is one of the major health problems for people with diabetes mellitus. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of patient education on the prevention of foot ulcers in patients with diabetes mellitus. SEARCH METHODS: We

  10. ATA gas propagation - 1 foot tank experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first gas propagation experiment on ATA is planned to be conducted in a 1-foot diameter tank of up to 10 m length. The primary objectives are to measure beam parameters at injection to determine whether the desired beam conditioning is achieved, and to observe how such conditioned beams propagate in air and neon

  11. Nonlinear MHD Waves in a Prominence Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, L.; Knizhnik, K.; Kucera, T.; Schmieder, B.

    2015-11-01

    We study nonlinear waves in a prominence foot using a 2.5D MHD model motivated by recent high-resolution observations with Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope in Ca ii emission of a prominence on 2012 October 10 showing highly dynamic small-scale motions in the prominence material. Observations of Hα intensities and of Doppler shifts show similar propagating fluctuations. However, the optically thick nature of the emission lines inhibits a unique quantitative interpretation in terms of density. Nevertheless, we find evidence of nonlinear wave activity in the prominence foot by examining the relative magnitude of the fluctuation intensity (δI/I ˜ δn/n). The waves are evident as significant density fluctuations that vary with height and apparently travel upward from the chromosphere into the prominence material with quasi-periodic fluctuations with a typical period in the range of 5-11 minutes and wavelengths qualitative agreement with the propagation speed of the detected waves. The 2.5D MHD numerical model is constrained with the typical parameters of the prominence waves seen in observations. Our numerical results reproduce the nonlinear fast magnetosonic waves and provide strong support for the presence of these waves in the prominence foot. We also explore gravitational MHD oscillations of the heavy prominence foot material supported by dipped magnetic field structure.

  12. Complex interventions for preventing diabetic foot ulceration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogeveen, Ruben C; Dorresteijn, Johannes A N; Kriegsman, Didi M W; Valk, Gerlof D.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ulceration of the feet, which can lead to the amputation of feet and legs, is a major problem for people with diabetes mellitus, and can cause substantial economic burden. Single preventive strategies have not been shown to reduce the incidence of foot ulceration to a significant extent.

  13. Pixel classification for automated diabetic foot diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloeze, C.; Klein, A.; Hazenberg, S.; Heijden, van der F.; Baal, van J.G.; Bus, S.A.

    2009-01-01

    Worldwide, more than 180 million people suffer from diabetes mellitus. Approximately 50% of these patients will develop complications to their feet. Neuropathy, combined with poor blood supply and biomechanical changes results in a high risk for foot ulcers, which is a key problem in the diabetic fo

  14. The foot and ankle of Australopithecus sediba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipfel, Bernhard; DeSilva, Jeremy M; Kidd, Robert S; Carlson, Kristian J; Churchill, Steven E; Berger, Lee R

    2011-09-01

    A well-preserved and articulated partial foot and ankle of Australopithecus sediba, including an associated complete adult distal tibia, talus, and calcaneus, have been discovered at the Malapa site, South Africa, and reported in direct association with the female paratype Malapa Hominin 2. These fossils reveal a mosaic of primitive and derived features that are distinct from those seen in other hominins. The ankle (talocrural) joint is mostly humanlike in form and inferred function, and there is some evidence for a humanlike arch and Achilles tendon. However, Au. sediba is apelike in possessing a more gracile calcaneal body and a more robust medial malleolus than expected. These observations suggest, if present models of foot function are correct, that Au. sediba may have practiced a unique form of bipedalism and some degree of arboreality. Given the combination of features in the Au. sediba foot, as well as comparisons between Au. sediba and older hominins, homoplasy is implied in the acquisition of bipedal adaptations in the hominin foot. PMID:21903807

  15. On-the-Job Foot Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of protective footwear or complain about it. Safety footwear can be comfort- able, flexible, stylish, and still provide protection from injury. The foot is a most valuable part of your body subjected to injury in industry. Because of the many potential work hazards, it ...

  16. Animal health: foot-and-mouth disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is one of the most contagious viral diseases that can affect cloven-hoofed livestock and wild animals. Outbreaks of FMD have caused devastating economic losses and the slaughter of millions of animals in many regions of the world affecting the food chain and global devel...

  17. Foot-and-mouth disease virus vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD) is a highly infectious and economically devastating disease of livestock. Although vaccines, available since the early 1900s, have been instrumental in eradicating FMD from parts of the world, the disease still affects millions of animals around the globe and remains the...

  18. 38 CFR 4.57 - Static foot deformities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Static foot deformities... FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.57 Static foot deformities... anatomical changes, as compared to normal, in the relationship of the foot and leg, particularly to...

  19. Clinical and Bacteriological Survey of Diabetic Foot Infections in Lisbon

    OpenAIRE

    Mendes, JJ; Marques-Costa, A; Vilela, C.; Neves, J.; Candeias, N; Cavaco-Silva, P.; Melo-Cristino, J.

    2012-01-01

    AIMS: An epidemiological survey of diabetic foot infections (DFIs) in Lisbon, stratifying the bacterial profile based on patient demographical data, diabetic foot characteristics (PEDIS classification), ulcer duration and antibiotic therapy. METHODS: A transversal observational multicenter study, with clinical data collection using a structured questionnaire and microbiological products (aspirates, biopsies or swabs collected using the Levine method) of clinically infected foot ulcers of ...

  20. Imaging diagnostics of the foot; Bildgebende Diagnostik des Fusses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szeimies, Ulrike; Staebler, Axel [Radiologie in Muenchen-Harlaching, Muenchen (Germany); Walther, Markus (eds.) [Schoen-Klinik Muenchen-Harlaching, Muenchen (Germany). Zentrum fuer Fuss- und Sprunggelenkchirurgie

    2012-11-01

    The book on imaging diagnostics of the foot contains the following chapters: (1) Imaging techniques. (2) Clinical diagnostics. (3) Ankle joint and hind foot. (4) Metatarsus. (5) Forefoot. (6) Pathology of plantar soft tissue. (7) Nervous system diseases. (8) Diseases without specific anatomic localization. (9) System diseases including the foot. (10) Tumor like lesions. (11) Normative variants.

  1. 3D morphology of the rear foot from MRI data: technical validation and clinical description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stindel, Eric; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Hirsch, Bruce E.; Odhner, Dewey; Couture, Christine

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this work is to characterize the 3D morphology of the bones of the rear foot using MR data. This work has two subaims: (1) to study the variability of the various computed architectural measures as a result of the subjectivity and variations in the various processing operations; (2) to study the morphology of the bones included in the peritalar complex. Each image data set utilized in this study consists of 60 longitudinal slices of the foot acquired on a 1.5 T commercial GE MR system. Our description of the rear foot morphology is based mainly on the principal axes, which represent the inertia axes of the bones, as well as on the bone surfaces. We use the live-wire method for segmenting and forming the surfaces of the bones. In the first part of this work, we focus on the dependence of the principal axes system on segmentation and on scan orientation. In the second part, we describe the normal morphology of the rear foot considering the four bones (calcaneus, cuboid, navicular, talus) and compare them to a population from the Upper Pleistocene. We conclude that this non-invasive method can be used in live patients to characterize the bone morphology or as a comparative method to classify population of bones. in spite of the variations involved in the various processing operations.

  2. The relation between foot arch stability, and mechanical and physiological properties of the foot

    OpenAIRE

    Sakalauskaitė, Raminta

    2013-01-01

    The foot keeps body balance and stability during walking, running and performing various physical activities. It has been determined that mechanical properties of musculoskeletal system influence motion control, body balance maintenance (Richardson et al., 2005; Biewener, Daley, 2007; Nishikawa, 2007). However, it is yet unclear whether there is a relation between body stability and foot arch stability. The relation is yet unknown between the mechanical and physiological properties of the foo...

  3. Tuberculosis of the foot: An osteolytic variety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandeep S Dhillon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Foot involvement in osteoarticular tuberculosis is uncommon and isolated bony involvement of foot bones with an osteolytic defect is even more rare; diagnostic and therapeutic delays can occur, worsening the prognosis. We present a retrospective series of osteolytic variety of foot tuberculosis. Materials and Methods: We present 24 osteolytic variety of foot tuberculosis (Eleven calcaneus, four cuboid, two cunieforms, one talus, three metatarsals, three phalanges out of 92 foot TB cases collected over last 20 years. There were 16 adults and eight children. Tissue diagnosis was established in 23 of 24 cases based on PCR AFB staining, culture, and histopathology. Surgical intervention was reserved for patients with either a juxtaarticular focus threatening to involve a joint or an impending collapse of a midfoot bone with cystic destruction. Results: Fifteen cases had an osteolytic lesion on the radiographs resembling a space-occupying lesion, five had patchy osteolysis, while four showed coke like sequestra; one patient had a lesion in two bones. Antitubercular chemotherapy after biopsy was sufficient to heal the lesion in 19 cases, while in five cases surgical debridement needed to be done. The lesions healed eventually. At an average followup of 8.3 years, (range 2-15 years there were no recurrences and all patients were free from pain, with no restriction of movements. Six patients complained of occasional pain during walking on uneven ground. Conclusion: When tuberculous pathology is limited to the bone, the prognosis is better than in articular disease, as there is less deformity, and hence, less residual pain and disability.

  4. Normative values for the Foot Posture Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redmond Anthony C

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Foot Posture Index (FPI is a validated method for quantifying standing foot posture, and is being used in a variety of clinical settings. There have however, been no normative data available to date for comparison and reference. This study aimed to establish normative FPI reference values. Methods Studies reporting FPI data were identified by searching online databases. Nine authors contributed anonymised versions of their original datasets comprising 1648 individual observations. The datasets included information relating to centre, age, gender, pathology (if relevant, FPI scores and body mass index (BMI where available. FPI total scores were transformed to interval logit scores as per the Rasch model and normal ranges were defined. Comparisons between groups employed t-tests or ANOVA models as appropriate and data were explored descriptively and graphically. Results The main analysis based on a normal healthy population (n = 619 confirmed that a slightly pronated foot posture is the normal position at rest (mean back transformed FPI raw score = +4. A 'U' shaped relationship existed for age, with minors and older adults exhibiting significantly higher FPI scores than the general adult population (F = 51.07, p t = -1.44, p = 0.149. No relationship was found between the FPI and BMI. Systematic differences from the adult normals were confirmed in patients with neurogenic and idiopathic cavus (F = 216.981, p Conclusion A set of population norms for children, adults and older people have been derived from a large sample. Foot posture is related to age and the presence of pathology, but not influenced by gender or BMI. The normative values identified may assist in classifying foot type for the purpose of research and clinical decision making.

  5. The Relationship with Balance, Foot Posture, and Foot Size in School of Physical Education and Sports Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irez, Gonul Babayigit

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship of foot posture and foot size with balance. A hundred and thirteen healthy volunteers were recruited from undergraduate students (Male = 74, Female = 37, age range 18-22). The Foot Posture Index (FPI-6), anthropometric measurements, dynamic balance and static balance measurements were done…

  6. Hubungan Kejadian Flat Foot dengan Obesitas pada Anak

    OpenAIRE

    Levenia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Flat foot is usually occurs and do not cause symptoms in under 5 years old children. But if occur in older children can cause pain even injury in children’s foot. One of flat foot’s risk factor is obesity. Although the prevalence of obesity is increasing every year, research of relationship between obesity and flat foot is still limited. The purpose of this research were to detect prevalence of obesity and flat foot, also to detect the relationship between obesity and flat foot ...

  7. The clinical assessment study of the foot (CASF): study protocol for a prospective observational study of foot pain and foot osteoarthritis in the general population

    OpenAIRE

    Menz Hylton B; D'Cruz Deborah; Marshall Michelle; Thomas Martin J; Myers Helen; Roddy Edward; Belcher John; Muller Sara; Peat George

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Symptomatic osteoarthritis (OA) affects approximately 10% of adults aged over 60 years. The foot joint complex is commonly affected by OA, yet there is relatively little research into OA of the foot, compared with other frequently affected sites such as the knee and hand. Existing epidemiological studies of foot OA have focussed predominantly on the first metatarsophalangeal joint at the expense of other joints. This three-year prospective population-based observational co...

  8. Modelling vaccination strategies against foot-and-mouth disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, M. J.; Woolhouse, M. E. J.; May, R. M.; Davies, G.; Grenfell, B. T.

    2003-01-01

    Vaccination has proved a powerful defence against a range of infectious diseases of humans and animals. However, its potential to control major epidemics of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in livestock is contentious. Using an individual farm-based model, we consider either national prophylactic vaccination campaigns in advance of an outbreak, or combinations of reactive vaccination and culling strategies during an epidemic. Consistent with standard epidemiological theory, mass prophylactic vaccination could reduce greatly the potential for a major epidemic, while the targeting of high-risk farms increases efficiency. Given sufficient resources and preparation, a combination of reactive vaccination and culling might control ongoing epidemics. We also explore a reactive strategy, `predictive' vaccination, which targets key spatial transmission loci and can reduce markedly the long tail that characterizes many FMD epidemics. These analyses have broader implications for the control of human and livestock infectious diseases in heterogeneous spatial landscapes.

  9. A prospective study of risk factors for foot ulceration: The West of Ireland Diabetes Foot Study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hurley, L

    2013-09-25

    BackgroundThis is the first study to examine risk factors for diabetic foot ulceration in Irish general practice.AimTo determine the prevalence of established risk factors for foot ulceration in a community-based cohort, and to explore the potential for estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) to act as a novel risk factor.DesignA prospective observational study.MethodsPatients with diabetes attending 12 (of 17) invited general practices were invited for foot screening. Validated clinical tests were carried out at baseline to assess for vascular and sensory impairment and foot deformity. Ulcer incidence was ascertained by patient self-report and medical record. Patients were re-assessed 18 months later. ResultsOf 828 invitees, 563 (68%) attended screening. On examination 23-25% had sensory dysfunction and 18-39% had evidence of vascular impairment. Using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network risk stratification system we found the proportion at moderate and high risk of future ulceration to be 25% and 11% respectively. At follow-up 16\\/383 patients (4.2%) developed a new foot ulcer (annual incidence rate of 2.6%). We observed an increasing probability of abnormal vascular and sensory test results (pedal pulse palpation, doppler waveform assessment, 10g monofilament, vibration perception and neuropathy disability score) with declining eGFR levels. We were unable to show an independent association between new ulceration and reduced eGFR [Odds ratio 1.01; p=0.64].ConclusionsOur data show the extent of foot complications in a representative sample of diabetes patients in Ireland. Use of eGFR did not improve identification of patients at risk of foot ulceration.

  10. How To Prevent Foot Ulcers In Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada Morshed

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of development of foot ulcers in diabetic patients is 4% to 10%, these ulcers may be infected, cause morbidity and may lead to lower extremity amputation.Objective: Prevention of diabetic foot ulcers in patients known to be diabetics by fasting blood sugar (FBS, HbA1C tests.Material and Methods: The study was done on 120 patients between March 2010 and July 2011 diagnosed as diabetics and they performed simple screening tests for peripheral neuropathy (Semmes-Weinstein monofilament examination (SWME, superficial pain, vibration testing by the on-off method, the timed method. Nerve conduction studies (NCS were used as standard criterion for detection of neuropathy, they also underwent Doppler ultrasound and ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI measurement to assess the vascularity of their lower limbs. All patients were given proper education to prevent foot ulcers, including optimising glycemic control, cessation of smoking, debridement of calluses, appropriate foot wear and foot care with periodic foot examination.Results: In our study we succeeded in increasing the prevention of foot ulceration in our diabetic patients by 95%, compared to results achieved with the previous measures.Conclusion: Screening tests are effective for all diabetic patients to identify patients at risk of foot ulceration. They may benefit from prophylactic interventions including, optimising glycemic control, cessation of smoking, debridement of calluses, appropriate foot wear and intensive foot care.Also, we take care of patients with low risk of foot ulceration by adequate foot care and periodic foot examination to prevent foot ulceration.

  11. Foot-and-mouth disease virus typing from foot-and-mouth outbreaks in the central provinces of Viet Nam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A total of 167 tissue samples were collected from Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) infected animals from 57 FMD outbreaks to detect the sero-type of the FMD virus by the ELISA technique. The ELISA kit has been prepared and standardised by the World Reference Laboratory (WRL), UK and supplied under a Research Contract as part of an FAO/IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project. Eight tissue samples from cattle and one tissue sample from pig were sent to WRL for further study on the sero-type and to characterize the FMD viruses present in Viet Nam. The study was carried out from March 1996 to May 1998 in the central region of Viet Nam and the FMD type O virus was detected in these outbreaks only. The FMD type O virus from cattle and the FMD type O virus from pig are two distinct FMD type O viruses in Viet Nam. (author)

  12. Minor amputations for diabetic foot salvage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah Y. Habel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Foot ulceration in diabetic patients is a frequent complication of diabetes mellitus (DM, necessitating hospitalization for control of infection, wound care and glycemic control. These patients are at risk for potential loss of the involved limb as well as for future loss of the contralateral limb. Diabetic foot is the consequence of peripheral neuropathy complicated by infrapopliteal peripheral vascular disease. Most of the patients present with chronic plantar ulceration and with cellulitis or an abscess. In a significant number of patients, it is observed that the frequency of life or limb threatening infection is less with an intact skin cover. Limb salvage employs the use of culture specific antibiotics, sharp debridement or a minor amputation, wound care and/or skin cover as the situation demands.

  13. Foot mounted inertial system for pedestrian navigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses algorithmic concepts, design and testing of a system based on a low-cost MEMS-based inertial measurement unit (IMU) and high-sensitivity global positioning system (HSGPS) receivers for seamless personal navigation in a GPS signal degraded environment. The system developed here is mounted on a pedestrian shoe/foot and uses measurements based on the dynamics experienced by the inertial sensors on the user's foot. The IMU measurements are processed through a conventional inertial navigation system (INS) algorithm and are then integrated with HSGPS receiver measurements and dynamics derived constraint measurements using a tightly coupled integration strategy. The ability of INS to bridge the navigation solution is evaluated through field tests conducted indoors and in severely signal degraded forest environments. The specific focus is on evaluating system performance under challenging GPS conditions

  14. Diagnostic dilemmas in foot and ankle injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keene, J.S.; Lange, R.H.

    1986-07-11

    Differential diagnosis of foot and ankle injuries should include (1) stress fractures of the great toe sesamoids, the shaft of the fifth metatarsal, and the tarsal navicular bone; (2) transchondral talar-dome fractures; (3) fractures of the os trigonum; and (4) dislocating peroneal tendons. Diagnosis of these injuries is challenging because the initial roentgenograms often are normal, and special clinical tests and ancillary studies are required.

  15. Bacteriological study of diabetic foot infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khairul Azmi ABD KADIR

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Foot infections are one of the major complications of diabetes mellitus and a significant risk factor for lower extremity amputation. Providing effective antimicrobial therapy is an important component in treating these infections. This study assesses the microbial isolates of patients with diabetic foot infections and their antibiotic susceptibility pattern. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study of 75 patients with diabetic foot infections admitted to RIPAS hospital between June 2008 and June 2010 was undertaken. Bacteriological specimens were obtained and processed using standard hospital procedure for microbiological culture and sensitivity testing. Results: Overall, 40 (54% patients had subcutaneous infections, 22 (29% had infected superficial ulcers, seven (9% had infected deep ulcers involving muscle tissues and six (8% had osteomyelitis. A total of 98 pathogens were isolated. Forty percent of the patients had polymicrobial infection, 39 (52% had single organism and 6(8% had no growth. Gram-negative bacteria (67% were more commonly isolated than gram-positive bacteria (30%. The three most frequently found gram-negative organisms were Pseudomonas aeruginosa (19.4%, Klebsiella pneumoniae (15.3%, and Acinetobacter spp. (10.2% and gram-positive organisms were Staphylococcus aureus (10.2%, Streptococcus pyogenes (7.1% and Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus [MRSA] (7.1%. Vancomycin was found to be the most effective against gram-positive bacteria while amikacin was the most effective against gram-negative bacteria based on antibiotic testing. Conclusion: In 40% of diabetic feet infection was polymicrobial. Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were the most common gram-positive and gram-negative organisms respectively. This study helps us to choose the empirical antibiotics for cases of diabetic foot infections.

  16. Diabetic foot: The orthopedic surgery angle

    OpenAIRE

    Besse, Jean-Luc; LEEMRIJSE, Thibaut; DELEU, Paul André

    2011-01-01

    As diabetes takes on pandemic proportions, it is crucial for the orthopedic surgeon to be aware of the issues involved in diabetic foot. Ulceration is related to neuropathy and to arterial disease, a vital prognostic factor for healing; infection plays an aggravating role, increasing the risk of amputation. At-risk feet need to be screened for. Ulcer classification is essential, to set treatment strategy and determine prognosis. Before any treatment is decided on, neuropathy, vascular insuffi...

  17. Therapeutic approach to "diabetic foot" complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderini, Cristina; Cioni, Federico; Haddoub, Silvia; Maccanelli, Francesco; Magotti, Maria Grazia; Tardio, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    The series of ulcers of the lower extremities known as "diabetic foot" is a common complication of diabetes and the chief cause of admission to hospital. The causes may be numerous but the main ones are distal symmetric neuropathy and peripheral obliterative arteriopathy, often complicated by infection. In this review, the Authors, after having illustrated the main pathophysiological aspects of the diabetic foot, describe the clinical characteristics of the disease, focusing particularly on the risk of suprainfection and vascular problems. The clinical and therapeutic approach to diabetic foot is also investigated with particular reference to the antibiotic treatment of infections and the treatment of peripheral arterial disease. Poor tissue repair, persistent inflammation, the presence of deep abscesses, osteomyelitis and systemic involvement can lead to a very serious clinical picture of gangrene or necrosis, which is initially localised but which can extend widely, requiring minor or major amputation surgery, in order to radically remove the infected tissue. In conclusion, space for discussion is given to the rationale of hyperbaric oxygen therapy, negative pressure wound therapy and other advanced therapies that involve the use of dermoepidermal equivalents and skin substitutes in addition to gels made of platelet-derived growth factors and the epidermal growth factor. Nonetheless, prevention is, of course, of fundamental importance, based on an intensive treat-to-target approach for the treatment of diabetes, on regular examinations of the feet, on the stratification of risk and education of the patient, which has proved successful in reducing the onset of foot lesions in at least 50% of patients. PMID:25567455

  18. Concordance in diabetic foot ulcer infection

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, EA; Backhouse, MR; Bhogal, MS; Wright-Hughes, A; Lipsky, BA; Nixon, J; Brown, S.; Gray, J

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Accurate identification of pathogens, rather than colonising bacteria, is a prerequisite for targeted antibiotic therapy to ensure optimal patient outcome in wounds, such as diabetic foot ulcers. Wound swabs are the easiest and most commonly used sampling technique but most published guidelines recommend instead removal of a tissue sample from the wound bed, which is a more complex process. The aim of this study was to assess the concordance between culture results from wound sw...

  19. Nuclear medicine imaging of diabetic foot infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Osteomyelitis of the foot is the most frequent complication in diabetic patients. Nuclear medicine plays an important role in diagnosis and for therapy follow-up, using different tracers. We reviewed 57 papers on diabetic foot imaging (published from 1982 to 2004, 50 original papers and 7 reviews), for a total of 2889 lesions. Data analysis has been carried out to establish which imaging technique could be used as a 'gold standard' for diagnosis of infection and to evaluate the extent of disease and to monitor the efficacy of therapy. Data analysis revealed that three-phase bone-scan is sensitive but not specific whereas specificity and diagnostic accuracy of 99mTc-WBC scintigraphy is higher than 111In- WBC scintigraphy. In the forefoot leukocyte scintigraphy may be useful for diagnosis of osteomyelitis and for monitoring the response to medical treatment. In the mid/hind foot the leukocytes uptake is not related only to the presence of infected region, but it is attributed to inflammation, fractures and reparative processes. Other radiopharmaceuticals such as 99mTc/111In-HIG, radiolabelled antibody and their fragments, showed high sensibility, but lower specificity than WBC (96.8/66.5, 95.8/70.2, 91.3/62 vs 85.8/84.5). Conclusion: It emerged that in the forefoot when clinical suspicious of osteomyelitis is low and medical treatment is contemplated, three-phase bon scan is the procedure of choice. A positive test is not diagnostic for osteomyelitis, and radiolabelled WBC scintigraphy is necessary. In the mid/hind foot, diagnosis of neuropathic joint with infection is problematic. Radiolabelled WBC imaging is probably the most accurate test for determining the presence of infection. Although a negative study strongly indicate the absence of osteomyelitis, it is important to note that a positive result requires a complementary study with marrow agent. (author)

  20. Nuclear medicine applications for the diabetic foot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartshorne, M.F.; Peters, V.

    1987-04-01

    Although not frequently described in the podiatric literature, nuclear medicine imaging may be of great assistance to the clinical podiatrist. This report reviews in detail the use of modern nuclear medicine approaches to the diagnosis and management of the diabetic foot. Nuclear medicine techniques are helpful in evaluating possible osteomyelitis, in determining appropriate amputation levels, and in predicting response to conservative ulcer management. Specific indications for bone, gallium, and perfusion imaging are described.

  1. Nodular Foot Myxedema Masquerading as Lymphedema

    OpenAIRE

    Couto, Javier A.; Schmidt, Birgitta A. R.; Greene, Arin K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Lymphedema results from abnormal development or injury to the lymphatic system. One-fourth of patients with lower extremity enlargement are erroneously labeled with “lymphedema.” We describe a patient with hypothyroidism who developed soft-tissue overgrowth of her foot. She was referred to our Lymphedema Program for management of “lymphedema” and overgrown toes. The patient’s lymphoscintigram showed normal lymphatic function in her extremities, and she was diagnosed with myxedema by ...

  2. Radiology of the ankle and foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a systematic approach to the diagnosis of common foot conditions, including traumatic conditions, arthritis, and tumors. The differential diagnosis of monarticular arthritis and pain in the big toe is discussed. The characteristic features of rheumatoid arthritis are compared with those of degenerative and metabolic deposition disease. Trauma, including common athletic injuries, is reviewed. Selected tumors that frequently cause confusion, such as synovial chondromatosis, PVNS, and tendon sheath xanthoma, are shown

  3. Diagnostic dilemmas in foot and ankle injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Differential diagnosis of foot and ankle injuries should include (1) stress fractures of the great toe sesamoids, the shaft of the fifth metatarsal, and the tarsal navicular bone; (2) transchondral talar-dome fractures; (3) fractures of the os trigonum; and (4) dislocating peroneal tendons. Diagnosis of these injuries is challenging because the initial roentgenograms often are normal, and special clinical tests and ancillary studies are required

  4. Nonlinear MHD Waves in a Prominence Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, L.; Knizhnik, K.; Kucera, T.; Schmieder, B.

    2015-11-01

    We study nonlinear waves in a prominence foot using a 2.5D MHD model motivated by recent high-resolution observations with Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope in Ca ii emission of a prominence on 2012 October 10 showing highly dynamic small-scale motions in the prominence material. Observations of Hα intensities and of Doppler shifts show similar propagating fluctuations. However, the optically thick nature of the emission lines inhibits a unique quantitative interpretation in terms of density. Nevertheless, we find evidence of nonlinear wave activity in the prominence foot by examining the relative magnitude of the fluctuation intensity (δI/I ˜ δn/n). The waves are evident as significant density fluctuations that vary with height and apparently travel upward from the chromosphere into the prominence material with quasi-periodic fluctuations with a typical period in the range of 5-11 minutes and wavelengths <2000 km. Recent Doppler shift observations show the transverse displacement of the propagating waves. The magnetic field was measured with the THEMIS instrument and was found to be 5-14 G. For the typical prominence density the corresponding fast magnetosonic speed is ˜20 km s-1, in qualitative agreement with the propagation speed of the detected waves. The 2.5D MHD numerical model is constrained with the typical parameters of the prominence waves seen in observations. Our numerical results reproduce the nonlinear fast magnetosonic waves and provide strong support for the presence of these waves in the prominence foot. We also explore gravitational MHD oscillations of the heavy prominence foot material supported by dipped magnetic field structure.

  5. Multiscale Phenomena Related to Diabetic Foot

    OpenAIRE

    Agić, Ante; Nikolić, Tatjana; Mijović, Budimir

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes is a group of metabolic diseases causing a system disorder, i.e.; it cannot be explained or understood by phenomena on single material scale. The diabetic foot is studied as flexible multibody structure by nonlinear finite element method. The physical and geometrical multiscale heterogeneity is solved by multilevel finite element approach. The diabetic tissue is described by internal coordinate’s formalism, as complex multiscale process in tissue. The accompanying problem...

  6. Effects of hallux limitus on plantar foot pressure and foot kinematics during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gheluwe, Bart; Dananberg, Howard J; Hagman, Friso; Vanstaen, Kerstin

    2006-01-01

    The effects of hallux limitus on plantar foot pressure and foot kinematics have received limited attention in the literature. Therefore, a study was conducted to assess the effects of limited first metatarsophalangeal joint mobility on plantar foot pressure. It was equally important to identify detection criteria based on plantar pressures and metatarsophalangeal joint kinematics, enabling differentiation between subjects affected by hallux limitus and people with normal hallux function. To further our understanding of the relation between midtarsal collapse and hallux limitus, kinematic variables relating to midtarsal pronation were also included in the study. Two populations of 19 subjects each, one with hallux limitus and the other free of functional abnormalities, were asked to walk at their preferred speed while plantar foot pressures were recorded along with three-dimensional foot kinematics. The presence of hallux limitus, structural or functional, caused peak plantar pressure under the hallux to build up significantly more and at a faster rate than under the first metatarsal head. Additional discriminators for hallux limitus were peak dorsiflexion of the first metatarsophalangeal joint, time to this peak value, peak pressure ratios of the first metatarsal head and the more lateral metatarsal heads, and time to maximal pressure under the fourth and fifth metatarsal heads. Finally, in approximately 20% of the subjects, with and without hallux limitus, midtarsal pronation occurred after heel lift, validating the claim that retrograde midtarsal pronation does occur. PMID:16988174

  7. Risk factors for developing diabetic foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Estela Willrich Boell

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the present study is to identify the risk factors for developing diabetic foot. A cross-sectional study, with a convenience sample, developed with 70 individuals with diabetes mellitus (DM, registered in three basic health units in the municipality of Florianópolis/SC, Brazil, in the period from November 2010 to May 2011. Biometric data was collected regarding their sociodemographic, health and illness conditions. An assessment of the feet was also carried out. The average participant age was 66.17 years and time with diagnosed disease was under ten years (61.42%. The following risk factors were identified: advanced age; time of DM diagnosis; few years of schooling; overweight/obesity; inadequate diet; physical inactivity; inadequate metabolic control; lack of proper and specific foot care; and arterial hypertension. We conclude that the majority of the population presented one or more risk factors that favor the appearance of foot-related complications. doi: 10.5216/ree.v16i2.20460.

  8. Surgical reconstruction in diabetic foot syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umid Shoyusupov

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Considerable morbidity upon spontaneous wound healing (phlegmons, osteomyelitis, and purulent osteoarthritis of metatarsophalangeal joint as well as loss of the diseased foot’s walking ability are among the reasons for transition to plastic surgery in management tactics. The longer foot lesion persists, the higher probability of amputation. Improvement of treatment of both wound and ulcer lesions by means of reconstructive surgery in patients with diabetic foot syndrome was the main aim of the study. Outcomes of treatment of 460 patients managed at the Center for the Scientific and Clinical Study of Endocrinology, within the period from 2001 to 2009 were analyzed. Size, form, depth and localization of a wound, tissue composition of the wound bed as well as circulation in skin flaps caused the choice of specific operation: autodermoplasty by Parin (with the split-thickness skin flap, local tissue plastic operation (with the sliding or inter-advancing skin flaps, flaps from previously amputated toe or Indian flaps, plastic operation with the controlled tissue tension or combined plastic operation. Reconstructive foot wound surgery allows restoring load-bearing function of the extremity much earlier in contrast to spontaneous healing, reducing incidence of post-operative and long-term complications, amputations and re-amputations, decreasing period of treatment.

  9. End effector with astronaut foot restraint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monford, Leo G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The combination of a foot restraint platform designed primarily for use by an astronaut being rigidly and permanently attached to an end effector which is suitable for attachment to the manipulator arm of a remote manipulating system is described. The foot restraint platform is attached by a brace to the end effector at a location away from the grappling interface of the end effector. The platform comprises a support plate provided with a pair of stirrups for receiving the toe portion of an astronaut's boots when standing on the platform and a pair of heel retainers in the form of raised members which are fixed to the surface of the platform and located to provide abutment surfaces for abutting engagement with the heels of the astronaut's boots when his toes are in the stirrups. The heel retainers preclude a backward sliding movement of the feet on the platform and instead require a lifting of the heels in order to extract the feet. The brace for attaching the foot restraint platform to the end effector may include a pivot or swivel joint to permit various orientations of the platform with respect to the end effector.

  10. Diabetes Foot Ulcers: A novel Treatment Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golnaz Namazi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Foot ulcers are common in 12-25 percent of diabetic patients. Preventing, controlling and treating of these kind chronic wounds are of the major clinical challenges.Evidence based documents revealed that DFU (Diabetic Foot ulcer is a chronic wound type originating from disturbed cellular and molecular mechanisms that have to be in its functional form to overcome its problem. In diabetes and some other chronic based diseases, harmonized acting machine causes chronic phases that result in conditions as foot ulceration and related complications seen commonly in diabetes.DFU needs to be transformed into acute phase in order to be healed in a physiological manner. Disturbed mechanisms have to be corrected reversely and to achieve such a goal it is essential to better understanding of disturbing factors responsible for biological abnormalities. Factors associated with DFU are as cellular and molecular recruitment and function impairments and there is need to repair these mechanisms. For this, we believe that the activated Th-1 cells (T helper-1 Cells might have a critical role in regulation of the several effector functions of the cellular and molecular mechanisms essential to the body to act the best. Evidences and our successful results urge us to suggest this regulatory role for effector cells and molecules generated through activation of Th-1 cells as a treatment strategy.

  11. The effects of prolonged running on foot posture: a repeated measures study of half marathon runners using the foot posture index and navicular height

    OpenAIRE

    Cowley, Emma; Marsden, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Background Different foot postures are associated with alterations in foot function, kinetics and the subsequent occurrence of injury. Little is known about changes in foot posture following prolonged weightbearing exercise. This study aimed to identify changes in foot posture after running a half marathon. Methods Foot posture was measured using the Foot Posture Index (FPI-6) and navicular height in thirty volunteer participants before and after running a half marathon. FPI-6 scores were con...

  12. Tumoral calcinosis of the foot: An unusual differential diagnosis of calcaneal mass

    OpenAIRE

    Amir Sobhani Eraghi; Babak Athari; Parnian Kheirkhah Rahimabad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Tumoral calcinosis (TC) is a rare disorder characterized by the development of calcified masses within the periarticular soft tissues of large joints. It commonly involves the hip, shoulders, and elbows. TC rarely involves the feet. Case presentation: In this report, we describe an unusual case of primary TC of the foot in a 76-year-old female and discuss the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and therapeutic interventions of the condition. Discussion: Due to the wide range of co...

  13. Hand, Foot, and Mouth Syndrome in an Immunocompetent Adult: a Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Flor de Lima, B; Silva, J.; Rodrigues, AC; Grilo, A.; Riso, N; Vaz Riscado, M

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hand, foot, and mouth syndrome (HFMS) is a common acute illness. It is characterized by mild clinical symptoms including fever, blisters, and sores in the mouth and on the palms and soles following a 3- to 7-day incubation period. This syndrome is rarely seen in adults. CASE PRESENTATION: A 35-year-old male Caucasian patient had a history of multiple episodes of acute pharyngitis, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and occasional abdominal pain. He presented with polyarthra...

  14. A literature review and case report of hand, foot and mouth disease in an immunocompetent adult

    OpenAIRE

    Omaña-Cepeda, Carlos; Martínez-Valverde, Andrea; del Mar Sabater- Recolons, María; Jané-Salas, Enric; Marí-Roig, Antonio; López-López, José

    2016-01-01

    Background To report an uncommon case of hand, foot and mouth disease, (HFMD) in an immunocompetent adult; a highly infectious disease, characterized by the appearance of vesicles on the mouth, hands and feet, associated with coxsackieviruses and enteroviruses; including a literature review. Case report A 23 year Caucasian male with no medical or surgical history, no allergies, was not taking any medication and smoked ten cigarettes a day, suffering from discomfort in the oral cavity; itching...

  15. Are diabetic foot lesions precipitated by accidental trauma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshi, H K; Moissinac, K; Harwant, S

    2001-12-01

    Diabetic foot lesions may arise from frictional trauma due to tight or inappropriate footwear, repetitive stresses on parts of the foot, overlying bony prominence generated by walking and accidental trauma to the neuropathic foot. Many diabetics have been found to be unaware of their foot lesion, or know what the precipitating cause was. Based on the assumption that accidental trauma would affect the foot in a random fashion and result in lesions distributed evenly throughout the foot, a study was performed to determine whether foot lesions were distributed evenly or concentrated to certain areas of predilection. It was found that foot lesions were not evenly distributed but concentrated to certain areas of predilection. Even though relatively high proportion of the study population walked about in open slippers and barefeet, the study showed that accidental trauma was not a predominant precipitant of diabetic foot lesions. Diabetic foot lesions tend to occur as a result of cumulative, repetitive trauma to areas of prediliection rather than accidental trauma. PMID:14569763

  16. Research on the Effect of the Foot Bath and Foot Massage on Residual Schizophrenia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kito, Kazuko; Suzuki, Keiko

    2016-06-01

    Researchers performed foot baths and massages for residual schizophrenia patients to gauge the effects on psychiatric symptoms. Subjects were six residual schizophrenia patients hospitalized in a psychiatric hospital. Three times a week for 4weeks, they received an 8-minute effleurage massage to their legs after a 10-minute foot bath. The effect of physiological relaxation was identified by a significant decline in heart rate in all cases. The results of the Positive and Negative Symptom Scale are as follows: a mean score of 29.0 was measured before treatment, which lowered to 21.5 after treatment, indicating that foot care improved their negative symptoms (pmassages were effective in improving psychiatric symptoms. PMID:27256944

  17. Exploring the role of the lab protein of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus (FMDV) during viral infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    The leader (L) protein of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus (FMDV) displays two forms, Lab and Lb, through initiation of translation at two in-frame AUG codons positioned 84 nucleotides apart. The short form (Lb) is the most abundant and functionally well characterized form of L. The presence of these tw...

  18. Infection dynamics of foot-and-mouth disease virus in pigs using two novel simulated natural inoculation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    In order to characterize foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) dynamics in pigs, two simulated-natural inoculation systems were developed and evaluated using two different strains of FMDV (O1-Manisa and A24-Cruzeiro) at varying doses. Direct intra-oropharyngeal (IOP) and intra-nasopharyngeal (INP) in...

  19. Complete Genome Sequence Analysis of a Vaccine Strain of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Serotype O from Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Shabbir, Muhammad Zubair; Munir, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Sequencing and subsequent analysis of a vaccine strain of foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype O is reported here. Genomic heterogeneity in the protective epitopes (VP1 protein) of the reported strain, compared to characterized strains and available sequences from Pakistan, warrants further studies to determine vaccine-induced immunity and disease protection.

  20. Diabetic foot disease: From the evaluation of the “foot at risk” to the novel diabetic ulcer treatment modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Noha; Doupis, John

    2016-01-01

    The burden of diabetic foot disease (DFD) is expected to increase in the future. The incidence of DFD is still rising due to the high prevalence of DFD predisposing factors. DFD is multifactorial in nature; however most of the diabetic foot amputations are preceded by foot ulceration. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a major risk factor for foot ulceration. DPN leads to loss of protective sensation resulting in continuous unconscious traumas. Patient education and detection of high risk foot are essential for the prevention of foot ulceration and amputation. Proper assessment of the diabetic foot ulceration and appropriate management ensure better prognosis. Management is based on revascularization procedures, wound debridement, treatment of infection and ulcer offloading. Management and type of dressing applied are tailored according to the type of wound and the foot condition. The scope of this review paper is to describe the diabetic foot syndrome starting from the evaluation of the foot at risk for ulceration, up to the new treatment modalities. PMID:27076876

  1. Investigations of Potential Phenotypes of Foot Osteoarthritis: Cross‐Sectional Analysis From the Clinical Assessment Study of the Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Michelle; Thomas, Martin J.; Menz, Hylton B.; Myers, Helen L.; Thomas, Elaine; Downes, Thomas; Peat, George; Roddy, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the existence of distinct foot osteoarthritis (OA) phenotypes based on pattern of joint involvement and comparative symptom and risk profiles. Methods Participants ages ≥50 years reporting foot pain in the previous year were drawn from a population‐based cohort. Radiographs were scored for OA in the first metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint, first and second cuneometatarsal, navicular first cuneiform, and talonavicular joints according to a published atlas. Chi‐square tests established clustering, and odds ratios (ORs) examined symmetry and pairwise associations of radiographic OA in the feet. Distinct underlying classes of foot OA were investigated by latent class analysis (LCA) and their association with symptoms and risk factors was assessed. Results In 533 participants (mean age 64.9 years, 55.9% female) radiographic OA clustered across both feet (P < 0.001) and was highly symmetrical (adjusted OR 3.0, 95% confidence interval 2.1, 4.2). LCA identified 3 distinct classes of foot OA: no or minimal foot OA (64%), isolated first MTP joint OA (22%), and polyarticular foot OA (15%). After adjustment for age and sex, polyarticular foot OA was associated with nodal OA, increased body mass index, and more pain and functional limitation compared to the other classes. Conclusion Patterning of radiographic foot OA has provided insight into the existence of 2 forms of foot OA: isolated first MTP joint OA and polyarticular foot OA. The symptom and risk factor profiles in individuals with polyarticular foot OA indicate a possible distinctive phenotype of foot OA, but further research is needed to explore the characteristics of isolated first MTP joint and polyarticular foot OA. PMID:26238801

  2. Three-dimensional measurement of foot arch in preschool children

    OpenAIRE

    Chang Hsun-Wen; Lin Chien-Ju; Kuo Li-Chieh; Tsai Ming-June; Chieh Hsiao-Feng; Su Fong-Chin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The prevalence of flexible flatfoot is high among preschool-aged children, but the effects of treatment are inconclusive due to the unclear definitions of normal flatfoot. To date, a universally accepted evaluation method of the foot arch in children has not been completely established. Our aims of this study were to establish a new method to evaluate the foot arch from a three dimensional perspective and to investigate the flexibility of the foot arch among children aged ...

  3. A study of structural foot deformity in stroke patients

    OpenAIRE

    Jang, Gwon Uk; Kweon, Mi Gyoug; Park, Seol; Kim, Ji Young; Park, Ji Won

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the structural deformity of the foot joint on the affected side in hemiplegic patients to examine factors that affect this kind of structural deformity. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-one hemiplegic patients and 32 normal adults participated. The foot posture index (FPI) was used to examine the shape of the foot, the modified Ashworth scale test was used to examine the degree of ankle joint rigidity, the navicular drop test was used to investigat...

  4. Three-dimensional measurement of foot arch in preschool children

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Hsun-Wen; Lin, Chien-Ju; Kuo, Li-Chieh; Tsai, Ming-June; Chieh, Hsiao-Feng; Su, Fong-Chin

    2012-01-01

    Background The prevalence of flexible flatfoot is high among preschool-aged children, but the effects of treatment are inconclusive due to the unclear definitions of normal flatfoot. To date, a universally accepted evaluation method of the foot arch in children has not been completely established. Our aims of this study were to establish a new method to evaluate the foot arch from a three dimensional perspective and to investigate the flexibility of the foot arch among children aged from two ...

  5. Interdigital foot infections: Corynebacterium minutissimum and agents of superficial mycoses

    OpenAIRE

    Fatma Mutlu Sariguzel; A. Nedret Koc; Gülhan Yagmur; Elife Berk

    2014-01-01

    Interdigital foot infections are mostly caused initially by dermatophytes, yeasts and less frequently by bacteria. Erythrasma caused by Corynebacterium minutissimum can be confused with superficial mycoses. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of the etiologic agents of superficial mycoses and the frequency of Corynebacterium minutissimum in interdigital foot infections. All the samples obtained from the 121 patients with interdigital foot infections were examined directly wit...

  6. Health-economic consequences of diabetic foot lesions.

    OpenAIRE

    Ragnarson Tennvall, Gunnel; Apelqvist, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Diabetic foot complications result in huge costs for both society and the individual patients. Few reports on the health-economic consequences of diabetic foot infections have been published. In studies considering a wide societal perspective, costs of antibiotics were relatively low, whereas total costs for topical treatment were high relative to the total costs of foot infections. Total direct costs for healing of infected ulcers not requiring amputation are similar to$17,500 (in 1998 US do...

  7. Diabetic Foot: Infections and Outcomes in Iranian Admitted Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hadadi, Azar; Omdeh Ghiasi, Houra; Hajiabdolbaghi, Mahboubeh; Zandekarimi, Majid; Hamidian, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus (along with its complications) has become a global problem. Diabetic foot infection, among the most common complications, is responsible for 40 to 50% of foot amputations. Antibiotic-resistant microorganisms, however, have compromised empiric therapy in the infected patients. Objectives: The current study aimed to determine the most common microorganisms involved in diabetic foot infection in order to minimize the failure of antibiotic therapy and the risk of dev...

  8. Costs of Deep Foot Infections in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Gunnel Ragnarson Tennvall; Jan Apelqvist; Magnus Eneroth

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To calculate costs for the management of deep foot infections and to identify the most important factors related to treatment costs. Design: Costs for in-hospital care, surgery, investigations, antibacterials, visits to the foot-care team, orthopaedic appliances and topical treatment were calculated retrospectively from diagnosis until healing or death. Multiple regression analysis was used to identify factors that independently affect costs. Setting: A multidisciplinary foot-care ...

  9. 6-Axis Force/Moment Sensor In Humanoid Robot Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai-Faifi, Badrih; Al-Shammary, Maryam; Al-Shehry, Zinab

    2014-07-01

    The foot is the most Important part of the humanoid .Thought the sensor of the robot can understand the environment In which they live, it is important to developed an intelligent foot. In order to walk on uneven terrain safely this poster describes an intelligent foot with 6- axis force/moment sensors for humanoid robot that is one of the solution that can help the robot to walk in uneven terrain safely.

  10. FootPrinter3: phylogenetic footprinting in partially alignable sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Fei; Blanchette, Mathieu

    2006-01-01

    FootPrinter3 is a web server for predicting transcription factor binding sites by using phylogenetic footprinting. Until now, phylogenetic footprinting approaches have been based either on multiple alignment analysis (e.g. PhyloVista, PhastCons), or on motif-discovery algorithms (e.g. FootPrinter2). FootPrinter3 integrates these two approaches, making use of local multiple sequence alignment blocks when those are available and reliable, but also allowing finding motifs in unalignable regions....

  11. Tibialis posterior tendon transfer for drop foot deformity

    OpenAIRE

    Bekler, Halil; Beyzadeoglu, Tahsin; Gokce, Alper

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: We evaluated tibialis posterior tendon (TPT) transfers in patients with drop foot deformity. Methods: Eight patients with drop foot deformity (2 females, 6 males; mean age 40 years; range 15 to 75 years) underwent TPT transfer to the dorsum of the foot. The deformity was on the left in three patients and on the right in five patients. Etiology was traumatic peroneal nerve injuries in six patients, and upper-level nerve injuries after hip and lumbar surgery in two patients. For ...

  12. Concerted Assembly and Cloning of Multiple DNA Segments Using In Vitro Site-Specific Recombination: Functional Analysis of Multi-Segment Expression Clones

    OpenAIRE

    Cheo, David L.; Titus, Steven A.; Byrd, Devon R.N.; Hartley, James L.; Temple, Gary F.; Brasch, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    The ability to clone and manipulate DNA segments is central to molecular methods that enable expression, screening, and functional characterization of genes, proteins, and regulatory elements. We previously described the development of a novel technology that utilizes in vitro site-specific recombination to provide a robust and flexible platform for high-throughput cloning and transfer of DNA segments. By using an expanded repertoire of recombination sites with unique specificities, we have e...

  13. Facts that every vascular surgeon needs to know about the diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, M

    2014-04-01

    This paper describes important aspects of the diabetic foot which the vascular surgeon needs to understand to efficiently manage the diabetic foot. Firstly, it emphasises the three main pathologies which come together in the diabetic foot, namely neuropathy, ischemia and immunopathy, the latter predisposing to infection. As a result of neuropathy, the signs and symptoms of tissue breakdown, infection and ischemia may be minimal. Nevertheless the pathology emanating from such clinical events proceeds rapidly without the body being aware of it and the end stage of tissue death and necrosis is quickly reached. It is important to have a prompt system of evaluation and intervention to prevent the rapid progression to necrosis. Thus, secondly, the paper describes a simple rapid assessment of the diabetic foot, which comprises inspection, palpation and sensory testing and leads on to a modern classification and staging of the diabetic foot. This classifies six subdivisions of the diabetic foot: foot with neuropathic ulceration, Charcot foot, neuroischemic foot, critically ischemic foot, acutely ischemic foot and renal ischemic foot and six stages in the natural history of each of these subdivisions: normal foot, high risk foot, ulcerated foot, infected foot, necrotic foot and unsalvageable foot. Thirdly, it describes modern management of the diabetic foot, emphazising wound care and revascularization within the context of a multidisciplinary care team that provides integrated care focused in a diabetic foot clinic, to which patients with diabetes should have easy and rapid access. Members of the team include podiatrist, nurse, orthotist, physician, radiologist and surgeons. PMID:24796920

  14. Benign and malignant tumors of the foot and ankle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, Adam D.; Datir, Abhijit; Langley, Travis [Emory University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Section of Musculoskeletal Imaging, Atlanta, GA (United States); Tresley, Jonathan [University of Wisconsin, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Clifford, Paul D.; Jose, Jean; Subhawong, Ty K. [University of Miami, Department of Radiology, Miami, FL (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Pain and focal masses in the foot and ankle are frequently encountered and often initiate a workup including imaging. It is important to differentiate benign lesions from aggressive benign or malignant lesions. In this review, multiple examples of osseous and soft tissue tumors of the foot and ankle will be presented. Additionally, the compartmental anatomy of the foot and ankle will be discussed in terms of its relevance for percutaneous biopsy planning and eventual surgery. Finally, a general overview of the surgical management of benign, benign aggressive and malignant tumors of the foot and ankle will be discussed. (orig.)

  15. Benign and malignant tumors of the foot and ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pain and focal masses in the foot and ankle are frequently encountered and often initiate a workup including imaging. It is important to differentiate benign lesions from aggressive benign or malignant lesions. In this review, multiple examples of osseous and soft tissue tumors of the foot and ankle will be presented. Additionally, the compartmental anatomy of the foot and ankle will be discussed in terms of its relevance for percutaneous biopsy planning and eventual surgery. Finally, a general overview of the surgical management of benign, benign aggressive and malignant tumors of the foot and ankle will be discussed. (orig.)

  16. Role of industries in the care of diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, A; Lakshmi, S; Arun, Nanditha; Samith Shetty, A; Snehalatha, C

    2010-09-01

    Diabetic foot disease is a dreaded complication causing severe economic and social burden, mental and physical agony, and severe morbidity and mortality. This complication is largely preventable if the risk factors such as peripheral neuropathy and peripheral arterial disease are detected early and appropriate measures are taken to control glycemia, foot pressure, and chances of foot injury. In the case of ulceration, proper microbial control, pressure offloading by debridement, and use of appropriate footwear are mandatory to save the foot. This article focuses on the need for preventive care for diabetic complications demonstrating potentially helpful roles for industry in India. PMID:20705621

  17. Prospective study of ankle and foot fractures in elderly women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadagiri Surender Rao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The epidemiology of ankle fractures in old people is changing as time passes on. The incidence of ankle fractures increases with advancing age. The study conducted was among a rural popula-tion which comprised of 68 women (32 women with ankle fractures & 36 women with foot fractures. Patients studied were in the age group more than 50 years. The study highlights the etiological & risk factors for fractures of ankle & foot. The commonest ankle fracture was the lateral malleolar fracture & the commonest foot fracture was the 5th Metatarsal fracture. Diabetes is a risk factor which increases the occurrence of ankle and foot injuries.

  18. Pitfalls in diagnosing diabetic foot infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Edgar J

    2016-01-01

    Although the diagnosis of a diabetic foot infection is made based on clinical symptoms and signs, we also use blood laboratory, microbiological and radiological studies to make treatment decisions. All of these diagnostic studies have pitfalls that can lead to a delay in diagnosis. Such delays will likely lead to further tissue damage and to a higher chance of amputation. One of these pitfalls is that some clinicians rely on microbiological, rather than clinical data, to diagnose infection. Though subjective by nature, clinical signs predict outcome of foot infections accurately. Another pitfall is that microbiological data can be misleading. All wounds harbour microorganisms; therefore, a positive wound culture does not mean that a wound is infected. Furthermore, the outcome of cultures of wound swabs does not correlate well with culture results of tissue biopsies. Therapy guidance by wound swab will likely lead to overtreatment of non-pathogenic organisms. Genotyping might have a role in identifying previously unrecognized (combinations of) pathogens in diabetic foot infection, bacteria in sessile phenotype and non-culturable pathogens, e.g. in cases where antibiotics have already been administered. One more pitfall is that the diagnosis of osteomyelitis remains difficult. Although the result of percutaneous bone biopsy is the reference standard for osteomyelitis, some other diagnostic modalities can aid in the diagnosis. A combination of several of these diagnostic tests is probably a good strategy to achieve a higher diagnostic accuracy. Relying on a single test will likely lead to misidentification of patients with osteomyelitis with associated overtreatment and undertreatment. PMID:26813617

  19. Characterization of scale-free properties of human electrocorticography in awake and slow wave sleep states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Zempel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Like many complex dynamic systems, the brain exhibits scale-free dynamics that follow power law scaling. Broadband power spectral density (PSD of brain electrical activity exhibits state-dependent power law scaling with a log frequency exponent that varies across frequency ranges. Widely divergent naturally occurring neural states, awake and slow wave sleep (SWS periods, were used evaluate the nature of changes in scale-free indices. We demonstrate two analytic approaches to characterizing electrocorticographic (ECoG data obtained during Awake and SWS states. A data driven approach was used, characterizing all available frequency ranges. Using an Equal Error State Discriminator (EESD, a single frequency range did not best characterize state across data from all six subjects, though the ability to distinguish awake and SWS states in individual subjects was excellent. Multisegment piecewise linear fits were used to characterize scale-free slopes across the entire frequency range (0.2-200 Hz. These scale-free slopes differed between Awake and SWS states across subjects, particularly at frequencies below 10 Hz and showed little difference at frequencies above 70 Hz. A Multivariate Maximum Likelihood Analysis (MMLA method using the multisegment slope indices successfully categorized ECoG data in most subjects, though individual variation was seen. The ECoG spectrum is not well characterized by a single linear fit across a defined set of frequencies, but is best described by a set of discrete linear fits across the full range of available frequencies. With increasing computational tractability, the use of scale-free slope values to characterize EEG data will have practical value in clinical and research EEG studies.

  20. Foot pain: uncommon presentation of lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarca, Angela; Hindi, Nadia; Belda-Iniesta, Cristobal; de Castro, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Acrometastases is an unusual presentation of bone metastases, specially when they are the unique location of bone metastases. The authors report a case of a men diagnosed with a lung adenocarcinoma with a unique lytic acrometastases in his left foot. He has been treated with systemic chemotherapy with good local and systemic response. The most common sites of bone metastases are the vertebrae, pelvis, ribs, sternum and skull. Bone metastases in the distal regions of the extremities are unusual (from 0.007 to 0.3% of all patients with bone metastases), involving more frequently hands than feet. PMID:22802566

  1. The Hand and Foot in the Cold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, W C

    1983-02-01

    In brief: Physiological and physical methods were used to study the effects of chilling on the hands and feet and to compare various mittens and footwear. The woolen liner-leather shell mitten is effective protection for the hands, and the woolen sock-felt liner-shoepac combination was good for protecting the feet. Direct contact with the ground greatly increases heat loss, so the thickness of the sole is important. Superficial rewarming of the hand will stimulate blood flow to it, but blood flow will not return to the foot unless the whole body is sufficiently warm. Therefore, torso protection is as important as extremity protection for long exposures. PMID:27463168

  2. Wheeled foot quadruped robot HITAN-I

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Pengfei; Sun Lining

    2006-01-01

    In view of the robot running environment, the structure of wheeled foot and quadruped are adopted in this robot system, which combines the priorities of both wheeled robot and legged robot. Based on CAN bus, the two-class robot control system using multiple controllers and drivers is constructed. At the same time, serial inverse kinematics of swaying leg and parallel inverse kinematics of supporting legs are analyzed independently. The forward gait and turning gait are planned and experiment image is given at last.

  3. Natural gaits of the non-pathological flat foot and high-arched foot

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Yifang; Li, Zhiyu; Lv, Changsheng; Luo, Donglin

    2010-01-01

    There has been a controversy as to whether or not the non-pathological flat foot and high-arched foot have an effect on human walking activities. The 3D foot scanning system was employed to obtain static footprints from subjects adopting a half-weight-bearing stance. Based upon their footprints, the subjects were divided into two groups: the flat-footed and the high-arched. The plantar pressure measurement system was used to measure and record the subjects' successive natural gaits. Two indices were proposed: distribution of vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) of plantar and the rate of the footprint areas. Using these two indices to compare the natural gaits of the two subject groups, we found that (1) in stance phase, there is a significant difference (p<0.01) in the distributions of VGRF of plantar; (2) in a stride cycle, there is also a significant difference (p<0.01) in the rates of the footprint areas. Our analysis suggests that when walking, the VGRF of the plantar brings greater muscle tension...

  4. A Study on Brown Seaweed Therapy ( Sargassum sp. toward MDA Levels and Histological Improvement on Rat Foot Suffering Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fauziah Fauziah

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (AR, an autoimun disease, is characterized by the inflammation in the joint area caused an excessive of free radicals. An excessive of free radicals in the body cause oxidative stress, that increasing levels of malondialdehyde (MDA as an indicator of lipid peroxidation and the decreasing levels of anti-oxidants. The treated with extract of brown seaweed (Sargassum sp. intended to find out the MDA levels in serum and the histological of the foot joints rheumatoid arthritis rats. Malondialdehyde levels are determined through a TBA test (Thio Barbituric acid, meanwhile the histological of the rat foot joints was determined by Hematoxylen-Eosin staining (HE. The results showed the brown seaweed extract therapy (Sargassum sp. was significantly (p <0.01 reduce levels of malondialdehyde (MDA in the serum of 21,24% and improving histological foot joints rheumatoid arthritis rats.

  5. Development of a Robotic Assembly for Analyzing the Instantaneous Axis of Rotation of the Foot Ankle Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salb, Kelly N.; Wido, Daniel M.; Stewart, Thomas E.; DiAngelo, Denis J.

    2016-01-01

    Ankle instantaneous axis of rotation (IAR) measurements represent a more complete parameter for characterizing joint motion. However, few studies have implemented this measurement to study normal, injured, or pathological foot ankle biomechanics. A novel testing protocol was developed to simulate aspects of in vivo foot ankle mechanics during mid-stance gait in a human cadaveric specimen. A lower leg was mounted in a robotic testing platform with the tibia upright and foot flat on the baseplate. Axial tibia loads (ATLs) were controlled as a function of a vertical ground reaction force (vGRF) set at half body weight (356 N) and a 50% vGRF (178 N) Achilles tendon load. Two specimens were repetitively loaded over 10 degrees of dorsiflexion and 20 degrees of plantar flexion. Platform axes were controlled within 2 microns and 0.008 degrees resulting in ATL measurements within ±2 N of target conditions. Mean ATLs and IAR values were not significantly different between cycles of motion, but IAR values were significantly different between dorsiflexion and plantar flexion. A linear regression analysis showed no significant differences between slopes of plantar flexion paths. The customized robotic platform and advanced testing protocol produced repeatable and accurate measurements of the IAR, useful for assessing foot ankle biomechanics under different loading scenarios and foot conditions. PMID:27099456

  6. Automatic classification of thermal patterns in diabetic foot based on morphological pattern spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Contreras, D.; Peregrina-Barreto, H.; Rangel-Magdaleno, J.; Ramirez-Cortes, J.; Renero-Carrillo, F.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to characterize and identify patterns of temperature in thermographic images of the human foot plant in support of early diagnosis and follow-up of diabetic patients. Composed feature vectors based on 3D morphological pattern spectrum (pecstrum) and relative position, allow the system to quantitatively characterize and discriminate non-diabetic (control) and diabetic (DM) groups. Non-linear classification using neural networks is used for that purpose. A classification rate of 94.33% in average was obtained with the composed feature extraction process proposed in this paper. Performance evaluation and obtained results are presented.

  7. Imaging osteomyelitis and the diabetic foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The clinical diagnosis of osteomyelitis and the diabetic foot is in most of the patients not possible without imaging the bone. The clinical problem is to diagnose infection as early, as reliable and as cheap as possible to prevent the possible longstanding and life-threatening complications. For imaging a lot of different radiological and nuclear medicine methods are available. This article focuses on the possible results of conventional plain radiography and tomography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging as radiological and on bone scan, autologous white blood cell scintigraphy with 111In-oxin or 99mTc-HMPAO, antigranulocyte antibodies, 99mTc/111In-human immunoglobulin,67 Ga-citrate and 99mTc-nanocelloids. Different methods after different answers. Radiological methods give detailed pathological answers, nuclear medicine methods answer questions of specificity such as leukocyte infiltration. If osteomyelitis is suspected, plain radiography should be the first, three phase bone scintigraphy the second and infection specific radiopharmaceuticals the third step of examination. Only in negative images with high clinical suspicion CT or MRI should be the final imaging procedure. In the diabetic foot imaging cascade should also start with plain radiography, followed by three phase bone scintigraphy or MRI. If clinically neuropathy is present specific nuclear medicine imaging should be performed

  8. Radiographic evaluation of the diabetic foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiographic evaluation of the foot in the patient with diabetes mellitus is discussed in this paper. According to the author, it can only be of value when the soft tissue and bony and joint pathologic conditions, which occur more frequently in the diabetic patient are also considered and understood. Although not pathognomic for diabetes mellitus, neuroarthopathy, osteomyelitis, soft tissue infection, and some rheumatic disorders are present with greater frequency in diabetic populations than in non-diabetic populations. Frequently, edema, erythema, hyperthermia, and tenderness are present as nonspecific clinical findings, in which case radiographic evaluation is called upon to define the specific etiology of a particular patient's pathology. Unfortunately, many radiographic, computerized tomographic, and radionuclide studies demonstrate less than optimal positive and negative predictive values unless interpreted in view of clinical history and examination and integrated with the results of other laboratory data. Radiographic evaluation of the diabetic foot may be utilized to establish the presence of disease, the extent of pedal involvement, and the response to therapy. The establishment of the nature of disease processes from radiographic findings alone, however, may be problematic. The diagnosis of osteomyelitis, for example, rests on the recovery of the offending microorganisms from bone aspiration or culture

  9. The diabetic foot: Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourteen diabetic patients with suspected foot infection and/or neuropathic joint (Charcot Joint) were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in an attempt to assess the extent of the infection and also to distinguish infection from the changes seen with neuroarthropathy. The majority of patients with infection had more than one site of involvement and the following diagnoses were made by MRI evaluation: Osteomyelitis (n=8), abscess (n=7), neuropathic joint (n=5), septic arthritis (n=4), and tenosynovitis (n=4). Clinical or surgical/pathological confirmation of the MRI diagnoses was obtained in all but nine sites of infection or cases of neuropathic joint. If the two diagnostic categories of septic arthritis and tenosynovitis are excluded, all but four of the MRI diagnoses were confirmed. A distinctive pattern for neuroarthropathy was identified in five cases, consisting of low signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted images within the bone marrow space adjacent to the involved joint. We conclude that MRI is a valuable adjunct in the evaluation of the diabetic foot, and that it provides accurate information regarding the presence and extent of infection in this subset of patients. MRI has proven particularly helpful in differentiating neuroarthropathy from osteomyelitis. (orig.)

  10. Nonlinear MHD waves in a Prominence Foot

    CERN Document Server

    Ofman, Leon; Kucera, Therese; Schmieder, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    We study nonlinear waves in a prominence foot using 2.5D MHD model motivated by recent high-resolution observations with Hinode/SOT in Ca~II emission of a prominence on October 10, 2012 showing highly dynamic small-scale motions in the prominence material. Observations of H$\\alpha$ intensities and of Doppler shifts show similar propagating fluctuations. However the optically thick nature of the emission lines inhibits unique quantitative interpretation in terms of density. Nevertheless, we find evidence of nonlinear wave activity in the prominence foot by examining the relative magnitude of the fluctuation intensity ($\\delta I/I\\sim \\delta n/n$). The waves are evident as significant density fluctuations that vary with height, and apparently travel upward from the chromosphere into the prominence material with quasi-periodic fluctuations with typical period in the range of 5-11 minutes, and wavelengths $\\sim <$2000 km. Recent Doppler shift observations show the transverse displacement of the propagating wav...

  11. Imaging osteomyelitis and the diabetic foot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, W. (Gottingen Univ. (Germany). Dep. of Nuclear Medicine)

    1999-03-01

    The clinical diagnosis of osteomyelitis and the diabetic foot is in most of the patients not possible without imaging the bone. The clinical problem is to diagnose infection as early, as reliable and as cheap as possible to prevent the possible longstanding and life-threatening complications. For imaging a lot of different radiological and nuclear medicine methods are available. This article focuses on the possible results of conventional plain radiography and tomography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging as radiological and on bone scan, autologous white blood cell scintigraphy with [sup 111]In-oxin or [sup 99m]Tc-HMPAO, antigranulocyte antibodies, [sup 99m]Tc/[sup 111]In-human immunoglobulin,[sup 67] Ga-citrate and [sup 99m]Tc-nanocelloids. Different methods after different answers. Radiological methods give detailed pathological answers, nuclear medicine methods answer questions of specificity such as leukocyte infiltration. If osteomyelitis is suspected, plain radiography should be the first, three phase bone scintigraphy the second and infection specific radiopharmaceuticals the third step of examination. Only in negative images with high clinical suspicion CT or MRI should be the final imaging procedure. In the diabetic foot imaging cascade should also start with plain radiography, followed by three phase bone scintigraphy or MRI. If clinically neuropathy is present specific nuclear medicine imaging should be performed.

  12. Phenotypic subregions within the split-hand/foot malformation 1 locus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Malene Bøgehus; Kreiborg, Sven; Jensen, Per;

    2016-01-01

    Split-hand/foot malformation 1 (SHFM1) is caused by chromosomal aberrations involving the region 7q21.3, DLX5 mutation, and dysregulation of DLX5/DLX6 expression by long-range position effects. SHFM1 can be isolated or syndromic with incomplete penetrance and a highly variable clinical expression......, possibly influenced by sex and imprinting. We report on a new family with five affected individuals with syndromic SHFM1 that includes split-hand/foot malformations, hearing loss, and craniofacial anomalies, and an inv(7)(q21.3q35) present both in the proband and her affected son. The proximal inversion...... breakpoint, identified by next generation mate-pair sequencing, truncates the SHFM1 locus within the regulatory region of DLX5/6 expression. Through genotype-phenotype correlations of 100 patients with molecularly characterized chromosomal aberrations from 32 SHFM1 families, our findings suggest three...

  13. Diagnosis and treatment of diabetic foot infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsky, Benjamin A; Berendt, Anthony R; Deery, H Gunner; Embil, John M; Joseph, Warren S; Karchmer, Adolf W; LeFrock, Jack L; Lew, Daniel P; Mader, Jon T; Norden, Carl; Tan, James S

    2006-06-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: 1. Foot infections in patients with diabetes cause substantial morbidity and frequent visits to health care professionals and may lead to amputation of a lower extremity. 2. Diabetic foot infections require attention to local (foot) and systemic (metabolic) issues and coordinated management, preferably by a multidisciplinary foot-care team (A-II). The team managing these infections should include, or have ready access to, an infectious diseases specialist or a medical microbiologist (B-II). 3. The major predisposing factor to these infections is foot ulceration, which is usually related to peripheral neuropathy. Peripheral vascular disease and various immunological disturbances play a secondary role. 4. Aerobic Gram-positive cocci (especially Staphylococcus aureus) are the predominant pathogens in diabetic foot infections. Patients who have chronic wounds or who have recently received antibiotic therapy may also be infected with Gram-negative rods, and those with foot ischemia or gangrene may have obligate anaerobic pathogens. 5. Wound infections must be diagnosed clinically on the basis of local (and occasionally systemic) signs and symptoms of inflammation. Laboratory (including microbiological) investigations are of limited use for diagnosing infection, except in cases of osteomyelitis (B-II). 6. Send appropriately obtained specimens for culture before starting empirical antibiotic therapy in all cases of infection, except perhaps those that are mild and previously untreated (B-III). Tissue specimens obtained by biopsy, ulcer curettage, or aspiration are preferable to wound swab specimens (A-I). 7. Imaging studies may help diagnose or better define deep, soft-tissue purulent collections and are usually needed to detect pathological findings in bone. Plain radiography may be adequate in many cases, but MRI (in preference to isotope scanning) is more sensitive and specific, especially for detection of soft-tissue lesions (A-I). 8. Infections

  14. Treatment for Common Running/Walking Foot Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Larry W.; Haar, Calin; Ihlers, Matt; Jackson, Allen; Gaudet, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Whether you are a weekend warrior or a serious athlete, most runners fear the possibility of being injured. For those who are physically active or stand on their feet all day, healthy feet are important Highly conditioned runners spend many hours performing foot maintenance to prevent unnecessary injuries. Some of the common foot injuries are:…

  15. 29 CFR 1926.96 - Occupational foot protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Occupational foot protection. 1926.96 Section 1926.96 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1926.96 Occupational foot protection. Safety-toe footwear for employees shall meet the requirements...

  16. Case 6: amputation site on an ulcerated diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, José Neves Paulos

    2016-03-01

    A patient presented with diabetic gangrene on four toes and a moderately infected ulcer on the dorsum of the foot. Following amputation of the gangrenous toes, it was possible to salvage the remaining foot using a combination of antibiotics, octenilin Wound Irrigation Solution and Octiset. PMID:26949850

  17. Diabetic foot syndrome--dermatological point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troskot, Nina; Duvancić, Tomislav; Kolić, Maja

    2013-03-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus often suffer from diabetic foot syndrome, a condition leading to foot ulceration or even amputation of lower extremity. Peripheral neuropathy combined with repetitive trauma to the foot and peripheral vascular disease are the main etiological factors in the development of foot ulcers. Other major contributive factors include the effects of callus, increased plantar pressures, and local infections. Patient education concerning their disease has a central role in the prevention of foot ulcers. Ordinary preventive measures taken by the patient include regular self-inspections, appropriate daily hygiene of the feet, appropriate footwear to reduce plantar pressures, and medical pedicure performed by a pedicurist experienced in diabetic foot patients. The importance of callus in diabetic patients has been shown in several studies by high predictability of subsequent ulcer development in patients with plantar calluses. For removing callus, urea based preparations are considered to be the treatment of choice. In case of local bacterial and fungal diabetic foot infections, systemic antibiotic and systemic antimycotic therapy is indicated, respectively. Wound dressings of various types are the mainstay in the treatment of chronic foot ulcers with avoidance of occlusive dressings in infected ulcers. Since the vast majority of ulcers and amputations can be prevented in diabetic patients, proper diagnosis and multidisciplinary approach are essential. PMID:23837279

  18. Veterinary realities: what is foot and mouth disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Law; A. Mol

    2011-01-01

    Veterinary science draws on different traditions for knowing and acting, and mobilises different kinds of materials and techniques. This article explores these differences and their tensions for the diagnosis of foot and mouth disease in the UK in 2001. It shows that when they talk of foot and mouth

  19. Efficient foot motor control by Neymar’s brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiichi eNaito

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available How very long-term (over many years motor skill training shapes internal motor representation remains poorly understood. We provide valuable evidence that the football brain of Neymar da Silva Santos Júnior (the Brasilian footballer recruits very limited neural resources in the motor-cortical foot regions during foot movements. We scanned his brain activity with a 3-tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI while he rotated his right ankle at 1Hz. We also scanned brain activity when three other age-controlled professional footballers, two top-athlete swimmers and one amateur footballer performed the identical task. A comparison was made between Neymar’s brain activity with that obtained from the others. We found activations in the left medial-wall foot motor regions during the foot movements consistently across all participants. However, the size and intensity of medial-wall activity was smaller in the four professional footballers than in the three other participants, despite no difference in amount of foot movement. Surprisingly, the reduced recruitment of medial-wall foot motor regions became apparent in Neymar. His medial-wall activity was smallest among all participants with absolutely no difference in amount of foot movement. Neymar may efficiently control given foot movements probably by largely conserving motor-cortical neural resources. We discuss this possibility in terms of over-years motor skill training effect, use-dependent plasticity, and efficient motor control.

  20. Foot Posture and Patellar Tendon Pain Among Adult Volleyball Players

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Reinier; Malliaras, Peter; Munteanu, Shannon; Payne, Craig; Morrissey, Dylan; Maffulli, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We hypothesized that individuals with a normal foot posture would be less likely to experience patellar tendon pain and pathology than those with a pronated or supinated foot. Design: Observational study. Setting: Field-based study among competing athletes. Participants: Volleyball player

  1. The Dynamic Stiffness of Surface Footings for Offshore Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vahdatirad, Mohammadjavad; Andersen, Lars; Clausen, Johan;

    2011-01-01

    This study concerns the dynamic stiffness of foundations for large offshore wind turbines. Especially, the purpose of the analysis is to quantify the uncertainties related to the first natural frequency of a turbine supported by a surface footing on layered soil. The dynamic properties of the...... uncertainties and discuss the utilization of reliability-based design of surface footings for wind turbines....

  2. Pentoxifylline: A New Armamentarium in Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    OpenAIRE

    Rewale, Venkatesh; Prabhakar, Kiran Ravi; Chitale, Anjali M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Diabetic foot ulcers are estimated to affect 15% of all diabetics and precede almost 85% of foot amputations. Pentoxyfylline a substituted xanthenes’ derivative has been reported to increase the blood flow to the microcirculation and enhances tissue oxygenation. It has been widely used in the treatment of intermittent claudication.

  3. Foot and ankle injuries in child and adolescent athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Yildirim, Yakup; Esemenli, Tanil

    2004-01-01

    Foot and ankle injuries are most commonly encountered in athletes. Of these, pediatric and adolescent injuries have unique characteristics because of the distinct growth potentials and their consequences specific to this age group. In this article, foot and ankle injuries in child and adolescent athletes are reviewed in the light of the literature.

  4. Behaviors Predicting Foot Lesions in Patients with Non-Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Suico, Jeffrey G.; Marriott, Deanna J; Vinicor, Frank; Litzelman, Debra K.

    1998-01-01

    Associations between specific foot-care behaviors and foot lesions in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus were prospectively investigated. Data from a randomized controlled trial for preventing diabetic foot lesions were analyzed as a prospective cohort using logistic regression. Independent variables included foot-care behaviors, patient self-foot examination, going barefoot, availability of foot-care assistance, and visits to health-care providers. The dependent variable w...

  5. The devil is in the detail: Prevention of diabetic foot ulceration in rural area is possible

    OpenAIRE

    Chia-Mou Lee; Chang-Cheng Chang; Chien-Ming Chen; Li-Ju Lai; Chyong-Fang Chang; Mei-Yen Chen

    2013-01-01

    Background: Foot self-care capability is an important factor in diabetic foot ulceration, especially in disadvantaged rural areas. Aim: To explore the causes of foot ulceration and practice foot self-care behaviors before and after diabetic foot ulceration. Method: A descriptive, retrospective design was conducted in a rural hospital in southern Taiwan. Results: A total of 49 participants with diabetic foot ulcers participated in this study. More than half were male (63.3%), still working in...

  6. The Modulation and Control of the Gecko's Foot Movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Ce; Dai Zhen-dong; Ji Ai-hong; Wang Wei-ying; Sun Jiu-rong

    2005-01-01

    The modulation and control of gecko's foot movements were studied electrophysiologically in order to design the motor control system of a gecko-mimic robot. In this study ( 1 ) the anatomy of the peripheral nerves controlling the gecko's foot movements was determined; (2) the relationship between the limb nerves of the gecko and its foot motor patterns was studied; (3) the afferent impulses of the nerves evoked by rubbing the gecko's toes and palm were recorded; (4) copying the natural patterns of movement of the gecko's foot (abduction, adduction, flexion, and revolution) and its limb nerve modulation and control mechanism, the nerves were stimulated under computer control, and the results recorded by CCD.Results suggest that gecko's foot movements can be successfully controlled by artificial electrical signals.

  7. Custom-Made Foot Orthoses Decrease Medial Foot Loading During Drop Jump in Individuals With Patellofemoral Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathleff, Michael S; Richter, Camilla; Brushøj, Christoffer;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of foot orthoses on medial-to-lateral plantar forces during drop jump and single leg squat, and second, to explore the self-reported change in symptoms after 12 weeks of wearing the orthoses in individuals with patellofemoral pain (PFP). DESIGN: Cohort study...... with 12 weeks of follow-up. SETTING: Hospital setting. PARTICIPANTS: 23 adults with PFP. INTERVENTIONS: Custom-made foot orthoses. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Foot loading (plantar pressure) was collected from the most painful side during drop jump and single leg squat using pressure sensitive Pedar insoles...... in peak medial-to-lateral force during drop jump. Individuals with a self-reported improvement after 12 weeks had a significant 4.2%-point larger reduction in medial-to-lateral foot loading during drop jump. CONCLUSIONS: This preliminary study showed that foot orthoses were associated with a decrease...

  8. MR imaging evaluation of diabetic foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourteen diabetic patients with suspected foot infection and/or neuropathic joint were evaluated with MR imaging to identify the presence and extent of infection and also to exclude coexistent infection in the neuropathic joint. Osteomyelitis (n = 8), abscess (n = 7), septic arthritis (n = 4), tenosynovitis (n = 4), and neuropathic joint (n = 5) were diagnosed with MR imaging. Osteomyelitis and/or abscess were excluded by MR findings in 13 instances. Most patients with infection had one more than one site of involvement. Clinical or surgical confirmation of the MR diagnoses was obtained in all but nine of the infection sites or cases of neuropathic joint. Only one false-negative diagnosis of osteomyelitis was made in this series. It is concluded that MR imaging provided accurate information regarding the presence and extent of infection and that this information was decisive in patient management

  9. Genomics and outbreaks: foot and mouth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freimanis, G L; Di Nardo, A; Bankowska, K; King, D J; Wadsworth, J; Knowles, N J; King, D P

    2016-04-01

    Foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) is an animal pathogen of global economic significance. Identifying the sources of outbreaks plays an important role in disease control; however, this can be confounded by the ease with which FMDV can spread via movement of infected livestock and animal products, aerosols or fomites, e.g. contaminated persons and objects. As sequencing technologies have advanced, this review highlights the uses of viral genomic data in helping to understand the global distribution and transboundary movements of FMDV, and the role that these approaches have played in control and surveillance programmes. The recent application of next-generation sequencing platforms to address important epidemiological and evolutionary challenges is discussed with particular reference to the advent of 'omics' technologies. PMID:27217177

  10. Pé diabético Diabetic foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nádia Duarte

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Os problemas do pé são uma complicação comum da diabetes, com uma prevalência de 23-42% para a neuropatia, 9-23% - para a doença vascular e 5-7% - para a ulceração do pé. Estes, resultam em importantes consequências médicas, sociais e económicas para os doentes, respectiva família e sociedade. A ulceração do pé diabético está associada à doença vascular periférica e neuropatia periférica, frequentemente em combinação. No entanto, os indivíduos com um risco elevado de ulceração podem ser facilmente identificados através de um exame clínico cuidadoso dos seus pés, estando a educação e follow-up periódicos indicados nestes casos. Quando a úlcera do pé é complicada por uma infecção, a combinação pode ser ameaçadora para o membro e até para a vida. A infecção é definida clinicamente, mas as culturas ajudam na identificação dos agentes patogénicos responsáveis. A terapêutica antimicrobiana deve ser guiada pelos resultados das culturas e, embora esta terapêutica possa curar a infecção isoladamente, não cicatriza a úlcera, carecendo de correcção de outros factores (focos de pressão anómala, isquémia do membro para lograr esta cicatrização.Diabetic foot problems are a common complication of diabetes, with a prevalence of - 23-42% for neuropathy, 9-23% for vascular disease and 5-7% for foot ulceration. It, results in major medical, social and economic consequences for the patients, their families, and society. Diabetic foot ulceration is associated with peripheral vascular disease and peripheral neuropathy, often in combination. Individuals with the greatest risk of ulceration can easily be identified by careful clinical examination of their feet. Education and frequent follow-up is indicated for these patients. When a foot ulcer is complicated by an infection, the combination can be limb-threatening, or life-threatening. Infection is defined clinically, but wound cultures assist in identifying

  11. Diagnostic imaging of the diabetic foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diabetic foot syndrome is a significant complication of diabetes. Diagnostic imaging is a crucial factor determining surgical decision and extent of surgical intervention. At present the gold standard is MRI scanning, whilst the role of bone scanning is decreasing, although in some cases it brings valuable information. In particular, in early stages of osteitis and Charcot neuro-osteoarthropathy, radionuclide imaging may be superior to MRI. Additionally, a significant contribution of inflammation-targeted scintigraphy should be noted. Probably the role of PET scanning will grow, although its high cost and low availability may be a limiting factor. In every case, vascular status should be determined, at least with Doppler ultrasound, with following conventional angiography or MR angiography. (authors)

  12. The diabetic foot; Der diabetische Fuss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vestring, T. [Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie, Univ. Muenster (Germany); Fiedler, R. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Technische Orthopaedie und Rehabilitation, Univ. Muenster (Germany); Greitemann, B. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Technische Orthopaedie und Rehabilitation, Univ. Muenster (Germany); Sciuk, J. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Univ. Muenster (Germany); Peters, P.E. [Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie, Univ. Muenster (Germany)

    1995-07-01

    Familiarity with the spectrum of findings in the different imaging modalities appears essential. Radiographically, significant changes include Charcot joints of the tarsus (destructive type) and bone absorption of the forefoot (mutilating type). In diabetic foot problems, magnetic resonance imaging and leukocyte scintigraphy appear to be the most effective tools for detection of osteomyelitis, and a negative study makes osteomyelitis unlikely. However, the findings of both techniques in active, noninfected neuropathic osteoarthropathy may be indistinguishable from those of osteomyelitis. (orig.) [Deutsch] Da der diabetische Fuss zu einer der haeufigsten Komplikationen der Grunderkrankung zaehlt, muss das Befundspektrum bei den verschiedenen bildgebenden Verfahren bekannt sein. Bei der diabetischen Osteoarthropathie werden uebersichtsradiographisch 2 Formen unterschieden: der destruierende Typ, der die Tarsalknochen bevorzugt, und der mutilierende Typ, welcher sich an den Roehrenknochen des Fusses manifestiert. Die Magnetresonanztomographie und die Leukozytenszintigraphie sind zum Nachweis bzw. Ausschluss einer Osteomyelitis am besten geeignet. Aber auch diese Methoden koennen nicht sicher eine nicht infizierte, aktive Osteoarthropathie von einer Osteomyelitis differenzieren. (orig.)

  13. Radiology of the foot in alcoholism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have reviewed the radiographic patterns of the foot in 28 patients affected by neuropathic joint disease complicating alcoholism, out of a series of 82 chronic ethylic patients. Sixteen of them were also affected by diabetes mellitus. On the basis of X-ray findings, lesion were divided into tree groups, reflecting the evolution of the disease: 1) early changes, especially affecting the soft tissue and joints;2) definite lesions, consisting of fractures, osteolysis, bone destruction and amputation, periarticulardebris; 3)''healing'' signs, simulating degenerative joint disease, which cause severe and weakening deformities. Tabe dorsalis and diabetic osteoarthropathy must be differentiated from alcohol-induced syndrome. Even though a correct differential diagnosis is often difficult to reach, it must be kept in mind that focal/diffuse osteopenia is the most characteristic manifestation of alcoholic osteopathy, whereas different radiographic findings simulate chronic degenerative arthropathies

  14. Hand, foot, and mouth disease: Current scenario and Indian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilendu Sarma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD, first reported in New Zealand in 1957 is caused by Coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16 and human enterovirus 71 (HEV71 and occasionally by Coxsackievirus A4-A7, A9, A10, B1-B3, and B5. This is characterized by erythematous papulo vesicular eruptions over hand, feet, perioral area, knees, buttocks and also intraorally mostly in the children. HFMD has been known for its self limiting course. Only small scale outbreaks have been reported from United States, Europe, Australia, Japan and Brazil for the first few decades. However, since 1997 the disease has conspicuously changed its behavior as noted in different Southeast Asian countries. There was sharp rise in incidence, severity, complications and even fatal outcomes that were almost unseen before that period. Following the near complete eradication of poliovirus, HEV71, the non-polio enterovirus, may become the greatest threat to cause significant neurological complications. This adds to the fact that effective therapy or vaccine is still a far reaching goal. There are reports of disease activity in different corners of India since 2004. Although of milder degree, continuous progress to affect larger parts of the country may indicate vulnerability of India from possible future fatal outbreaks. Low level of awareness among the health care providers may prove critical.

  15. Malformations of the first ray of the foot in children: diagnosis, clinical picture, treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Pavlovich Konyukhov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Malformations of the first ray of the foot vary widely and are divided into simple and complex. Complex malformations include abnormality of development of the first metatarsal or the main phalanx and refer to atypical adducted foot deformity. They are also characterized by varus location of the first ray of varying severity. The cause of deformation is a damage of longitudinal epiphyseal growth plate area of the first metatarsal - “longitudinal epiphyseal bracket” or the so-called delta phalanx. Over the past five years, we treated 37 patients (53 feet aged from 6 months to 17 years old with developmental disabilities of the first ray of the foot. The spectrum of pathology is very diverse. In the majority of cases surgical treatment was multi-staged. It was revealed that the removal of deformity at the first stage of treatment should be complete, with maximum use of the bone to restore the length and shape of the affected bone. In treating combined deformities the good effect is guaranteed only with the removal of all the elements, including excision of the fibrous bridle along the inner surface of the first ray.

  16. Screening of diabetic nephropathy patients prone to triggering factors of diabetic foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Coeli Vasques de Miranda Burneiko

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To survey the prevalence of diabetic paients in the hemodialysis unit, screening those prone to outbreak of neuropathy and signs and symptoms of diabetic foot. Methods: We conducted a survey of the number of diabetics in a hemodialysis unit to apply the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument Questionnaire in order to screen subjects with signs of sensory loss. Also, we observed variables related to the magnitude of the disease. The subjects were divided into two groups: Group A, no sensory deficit with a score of less than five and Group B with sensitive deficit with a score greater than or equal to six. Group B was submitted to examination, muscle strength testing, nerve palpation, and sensitivity testing of the feet. We applied the Mann-Whitney test to verify differences between groups (p <0.05. Results: Of the 168 participants of dialysis, 37 (22.02% were diabetic and of these 34 (20.24% joined in the study. To characterize the group B (n = 20, we did a frequency distribution and 4 (20% presented alterations related to nerve palpation, 11 (55% regarding muscle strength, 17 (85% to sensitivity testing, 11 (55% had neuropathy, 6 (30% had plantar ulcers, 4 (20% amputations and 100% were unaware of the diabetic foot syndrome. Conclusions: There was considerable percentage of diabetics in the hemodialysis unit, and more than half of them showed signs of neuropathy, decreased muscle strength and at least one of the signs and symptoms of diabetic foot.

  17. Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsy: A Recurrent and Bilateral Foot Drop Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipa Flor-de-Lima

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy is characterized by acute, painless, recurrent mononeuropathies secondary to minor trauma or compression. A 16-year-old boy had the first episode of right foot drop after minor motorcycle accident. Electromyography revealed conduction block and slowing velocity conduction of the right deep peroneal nerve at the fibular head. After motor rehabilitation, he fully recovered. Six months later he had the second episode of foot drop in the opposite site after prolonged squatting position. Electromyography revealed sensorimotor polyneuropathy of left peroneal, sural, posterior tibial, and deep peroneal nerves and also of ulnar, radial, and median nerves of both upper limbs. Histological examination revealed sensory nerve demyelination and focal thickenings of myelin fibers. The diagnosis of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy was confirmed by PMP22 deletion of chromosome 17p11.2. He started motor rehabilitation and avoidance of stressing factors with progressive recovery. After one-year followup, he was completely asymptomatic. Recurrent bilateral foot drop history, “sausage-like” swellings of myelin in histological examination, and the results of electromyography led the authors to consider the diagnosis despite negative family history. The authors highlight this rare disease in pediatric population and the importance of high index of clinical suspicion for its diagnosis.

  18. Staphylococcus aureus Toxins and Diabetic Foot Ulcers: Role in Pathogenesis and Interest in Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Dunyach-Remy

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Infection of foot ulcers is a common, often severe and costly complication in diabetes. Diabetic foot infections (DFI are mainly polymicrobial, and Staphylococcus aureus is the most frequent pathogen isolated. The numerous virulence factors and toxins produced by S. aureus during an infection are well characterized. However, some particular features could be observed in DFI. The aim of this review is to describe the role of S. aureus in DFI and the implication of its toxins in the establishment of the infection. Studies on this issue have helped to distinguish two S. aureus populations in DFI: toxinogenic S. aureus strains (harboring exfoliatin-, EDIN-, PVL- or TSST-encoding genes and non-toxinogenic strains. Toxinogenic strains are often present in infections with a more severe grade and systemic impact, whereas non-toxinogenic strains seem to remain localized in deep structures and bone involving diabetic foot osteomyelitis. Testing the virulence profile of bacteria seems to be a promising way to predict the behavior of S. aureus in the chronic wounds.

  19. Study on the prevalence of Foot and Mouth Disease in Borana and Guji Zones, Southern Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashenafi Feyisa and Fufa Abunna

    Full Text Available A cross sectional study was conducted on Borana plateau and Guji highlands of southern Ethiopia to determine the prevalence of Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD in bovine species. Seroprevalence investigation was performed using 3ABC- ELISA technique. The result indicated that the overall prevalence of Foot and Mouth Disease was 24.6 %(113/460. Significantly higher prevalence was recorded in Borana 53.6 % ( 82/153 compared to Guji 10.1 %( 31/307. From the various risk factors, geographical distribution (÷²=104.26, P<0.05 and age (÷²=6.68, P<0.05 were seen to be significantly associated with the seroprevalence. The result of this study indicated that FMD is highly prevalent in lowland area (Borana than highland (Guji due to contact of different origin cattle in search of feed and water. The presence of higher prevalence of Foot and Mouth Disease in pastoralists\\\\\\\\\\\\\\' cattle of the area warrants further investigation and characterization of the circulating virus serotype to apply effective control and prevention measures. [Vet. World 2011; 4(7.000: 293-296

  20. PATTERN OF AEROBIC B ACTERIAL INFECTION O F DIABETIC FOOT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parmeshwari

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diabetic foot ulcer is one of the commonest complications of longstanding diabetes. Diabetic foot is a common cause of hospital admission in diabetic patients in India. The trio of problems leading onto diabetic foot is neuropathy, vascular changes and infections, which constitute the diabetic foot syndrome. OBJECTIVES: To determine prevalence of aerobic pathogens in diabetic foot lesions. METHODS: Tissue samples were taken from the affected foot of 109 diabetic patients and processed by routine microbiological methods. RESULTS : A total of 244 aerobic organisms were isolated from 100 cases with an average of 2.5 organisms per case. Staphylococcus aureus was the predominant aerobe isolated (25.4% followed by Proteus mirabilis (21.3%. The other aerobes isolated were Pseudomonas aeruginosa (10.65%, Kleb siella pneumonia (8.6%, Escherichia coli (6.9%, Enterococcus faecalis (5.32%, Coagulase Negative Staphylococcus (4.5%, Proteus vulgaris (4.09%, Klebsiella oxytoca (3.27%, Citrobacter freudii (2.86%, Corynebacterium species (2.04%, Group A streptococci and Acinetobacter species (1.63%, and Enterobacter species (0.82%. MRSA was 17.8%. CONCLUSION : Diabetic foot infections are polymicrobial in nature. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common among gram - positive organisms, while P roteus mirabilis was the most frequent isolate among the gram - negative pathogens. Hence early identification of the risk factors and timely institution of appropriate treatment is indispensable to avoid amputations.

  1. Gait characteristics following Achilles tendon elongation: the foot rocker perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bober, Tadeusz; Dziuba, Alicja; Kobel-Buys, Krystyna; Kulig, Kornelia

    2008-01-01

    The action of three functional rockers, namely the heel, ankle and forefoot rocker, assist the progression of the leg over the supporting foot. The purpose of this case series was to analyze the occurrence of foot rockers during gait in three children with cerebral palsy (CP) who had undergone the tendo-Achilles lengthening (TAL), procedure followed by a clinic- or home-based intervention and in one child with CP without history of surgery. Self-selected gait was video-recorded in a laboratory during six testing sessions at half-year intervals rendering a 3 year period of observation. One child had pre- and post-surgical gait data and the other two had post surgical data only. Sagittal plane knee angular velocity, as well as foot to ground positions, and foot rocker occurrence were analyzed. In a child with history of CP, and without history of surgery, mean angular velocities of the 1st, 2nd and 3rd foot rocker were 3.7, 0.57 and 6.67 rad/s, respectively, and the step length and cadence were normal. In children who underwent TAL the 1st and 2nd rocker was absent, as the initial contact of the foot with the ground was either with foot-flat or forefoot. The mean velocity of the 3rd rocker in children who underwent TAL was lower by approximately 50-80% than that of the nonsurgical case. Furthermore, the characteristic pattern of the knee joint to foot-floor position during gait was not observed in these cases. Foot rocker analysis identified children with abnormal gait characteristics. Following surgery these gait characteristics remained abnormal. PMID:18634352

  2. The clinical assessment study of the foot (CASF: study protocol for a prospective observational study of foot pain and foot osteoarthritis in the general population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menz Hylton B

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Symptomatic osteoarthritis (OA affects approximately 10% of adults aged over 60 years. The foot joint complex is commonly affected by OA, yet there is relatively little research into OA of the foot, compared with other frequently affected sites such as the knee and hand. Existing epidemiological studies of foot OA have focussed predominantly on the first metatarsophalangeal joint at the expense of other joints. This three-year prospective population-based observational cohort study will describe the prevalence of symptomatic radiographic foot OA, relate its occurrence to symptoms, examination findings and life-style-factors, describe the natural history of foot OA, and examine how it presents to, and is diagnosed and managed in primary care. Methods All adults aged 50 years and over registered with four general practices in North Staffordshire, UK, will be invited to participate in a postal Health Survey questionnaire. Respondents to the questionnaire who indicate that they have experienced foot pain in the preceding twelve months will be invited to attend a research clinic for a detailed clinical assessment. This assessment will consist of: clinical interview; physical examination; digital photography of both feet and ankles; plain x-rays of both feet, ankles and hands; ultrasound examination of the plantar fascia; anthropometric measurement; and a further self-complete questionnaire. Follow-up will be undertaken in consenting participants by postal questionnaire at 18 months (clinic attenders only and three years (clinic attenders and survey participants, and also by review of medical records. Discussion This three-year prospective epidemiological study will combine survey data, comprehensive clinical, x-ray and ultrasound assessment, and review of primary care records to identify radiographic phenotypes of foot OA in a population of community-dwelling older adults, and describe their impact on symptoms, function and

  3. Ostectomy and Medial Plantar Artery Flap Reconstruction for Charcot Foot Ulceration Involving the Midfoot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tomoya; Ichioka, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Charcot foot is a serious complication of diabetes, characterized by deformity and overlying ulceration. The condition most commonly affects the midfoot. However, little information is available on the use of a medial plantar artery flap to treat diabetic midfoot ulceration. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the versatility of ostectomy and medial plantar flap reconstruction for midfoot plantar ulceration associated with rocker-bottom deformity secondary to Charcot foot. Four patients underwent ostectomy and medial plantar flap reconstruction. Before flap reconstruction, the devitalized soft tissues and bone were radically resected. After the infection had been controlled, the ulcerated portion was minimally excised, and the bony prominence underlying the ulcer was removed. A medial plantar artery flap was applied to the ulcer. The donor site was covered with a split-thickness skin graft or artificial dermis. In all patients, the ulcers healed and independent ambulation was achieved. However, 1 patient experienced ulcer recurrence, and subsequent infection necessitated a major amputation. Limb salvage is challenging in the setting of deformity and intractable plantar ulceration. The advantages of medial plantar artery flap reconstruction are that tissues with a rich blood supply are used to cover the exposed bone, and the flap can withstand the pressure and shear stress of the patient's body weight. However, a dominant artery in the foot is sacrificed. Therefore, the patency of the dorsalis pedis artery must be confirmed in every patient. The results of the present study have demonstrated that a medial plantar artery can be an effective alternative for diabetic patients with a plantar ulcer secondary to Charcot foot. PMID:26190780

  4. Imaging of soft tissue lesions of the foot and ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancroft, Laura W; Peterson, Jeffrey J; Kransdorf, Mark J

    2008-11-01

    Differential diagnosis of soft tissue lesions of the foot can be narrowed with imaging. The cystic nature of ganglia, synovial cysts, and bursitis can be confirmed with MR imaging or sonography. Location and signal characteristics of noncystic lesions can suggest Morton's neuroma, giant cell tumor of tendon sheath, and plantar fibromatosis. Synovial-based lesions of the foot and ankle can be differentiated based on presence or absence of mineralization, lesion density, signal intensity, and enhancement pattern. Knowledge of the incidence of specific neoplasms of the foot and ankle based on patient age aids in providing a limited differential diagnosis. PMID:19038615

  5. Assessment of Lumped-Parameter Models for Rigid Footings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars

    2010-01-01

    The quality of consistent lumped-parameter models of rigid footings is examined. Emphasis is put on the maximum response during excitation and the geometrical damping related to free vibrations. The optimal order of a lumped-parameter model is determined for each degree of freedom, i.e. horizontal...... and vertical translations as well as torsion and rocking, and the necessity of coupling between horizontal sliding and rocking is discussed. Most of the analyses are carried out for hexagonal footings; but in order to generalise the conclusions to a broader variety of footings, comparisons are made...

  6. An overview of foot ulceration in older people with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moakes, Helen

    2012-09-01

    A patient's whole body is affected by diabetes but in particular this chronic disease can cause foot complications. Damage to the nerve and blood supply to the feet as a result of diabetes causes lack of sensation and ischaemia. These problems can lead to diabetic foot ulceration, which, if left untreated, can result in amputation or even death. An essential part of nurses' role in caring for older patients with diabetes in community, acute and residential settings is learning to recognise the signs of a high-risk diabetic foot, and when and where to get help for its treatment. PMID:23008915

  7. A Rare Cause of Foot Pain With Golf Swing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrera, Massimo; Dwyer, Tim; Ogilvie-Harris, Darrell J.

    2013-01-01

    The os vesalianum is an uncommon accessory bone of the foot, located proximally to the base of the fifth metatarsal. It is usually asymptomatic and detected incidentally on radiographs. This is a case of bilateral os vesalianum, symptomatic only in the right foot, in a golf player. After a failed nonoperative treatment, the os vesalianum in the symptomatic foot was excised and the peroneus brevis tendon reattached using a suture anchor. The functional outcome was excellent, and the patient returned to golf 8 weeks after surgery. PMID:24459554

  8. Imaging of Soft Tissue Lesions of the Foot and Ankle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hassan Mostafavi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Differential diagnosis of soft tissue lesions of the foot may be narrowed with imaging. The cystic nature of ganglia, synovial cysts, and bursitis can be confirmed with MR imaging or sonography. Location and signal characteristics of noncystic lesions may suggest Morton's neuroma, giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath and plantar fibromatosis. Synovial-based lesions of the foot and ankle can be differentiated based on presence or absence of mineralization, lesion density, signal intensity, and the enhancement pattern. Knowledge of the incidence of specific neoplasms of the foot and ankle based on patient age aids in providing a limited differential diagnosis

  9. Ultrasound-guided interventions of the foot and ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yablon, Corrie M

    2013-02-01

    Ultrasound (US) provides excellent delineation of tendons and ligaments in the foot and ankle and provides real-time visualization of a needle during interventions, yielding greater accuracy and efficacy than the traditional blind approach using anatomical landmarks. For this reason, US is rapidly gaining acceptance as the preferred modality for guiding interventions in the foot and ankle where the anatomy is complex, neurovascular structures should be identified, and precise technique is demanded. In the foot and ankle, US is especially useful to guide tendon sheath, bursal, and Achilles paratenon injections, Morton neuroma injections, plantar fascial injections, and joint aspirations and injections. PMID:23487336

  10. Studies on drying kinetics of olive foot cake

    OpenAIRE

    Hamlat, M. S.; Kadi, H.

    2002-01-01

    The olive foot cake is a very important by-product of olive oil industry since it can contain until 12 % of oil which can be extracted using solvent. The used solvent is often immiscible with water. This is the reason why its effect is limited by the moisture of olive foot cake making its drying imperative. In this paper, we present the behaviour of olive foot cake subjected to convective drying. The experimental results show that the drying rate versus moisture presents only one period of de...

  11. Co-therapy using lytic bacteriophage and linezolid: effective treatment in eliminating methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA from diabetic foot infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Chhibber

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus remains the predominant pathogen in diabetic foot infections and prevalence of methicillin resistant S.aureus (MRSA strains further complicates the situation. The incidence of MRSA in infected foot ulcers is 15-30% and there is an alarming trend for its increase in many countries. Diabetes acts as an immunosuppressive state decreasing the overall immune functioning of body and to worsen the situation, wounds inflicted with drug resistant strains represent a morbid combination in diabetic patients. Foot infections caused by MRSA are associated with an increased risk of amputations, increased hospital stay, increased expenses and higher infection-related mortality. Hence, newer, safer and effective treatment strategies are required for treating MRSA mediated diabetic foot infections. The present study focuses on the use of lytic bacteriophage in combination with linezolid as an effective treatment strategy against foot infection in diabetic population. METHODOLOGY: Acute hindpaw infection with S.aureus ATCC 43300 was established in alloxan induced diabetic BALB/c mice. Therapeutic efficacy of a well characterized broad host range lytic bacteriophage, MR-10 was evaluated alone as well as in combination with linezolid in resolving the course of hindpaw foot infection in diabetic mice. The process of wound healing was also investigated. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: A single administration of phage exhibited efficacy similar to linezolid in resolving the course of hindpaw infection in diabetic animals. However, combination therapy using both the agents was much more effective in arresting the entire infection process (bacterial load, lesion score, foot myeloperoxidase activity and histopathological analysis. The entire process of tissue healing was also hastened. Use of combined agents has been known to decrease the frequency of emergence of resistant mutants, hence this approach can serve as an effective strategy in

  12. Protocol for the Foot in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis trial (FiJIA: a randomised controlled trial of an integrated foot care programme for foot problems in JIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendry Gordon J

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foot and ankle problems are a common but relatively neglected manifestation of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Studies of medical and non-medical interventions have shown that clinical outcome measures can be improved. However existing data has been drawn from small non-randomised clinical studies of single interventions that appear to under-represent the adult population suffering from juvenile idiopathic arthritis. To date, no evidence of combined therapies or integrated care for juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients with foot and ankle problems exists. Methods/design An exploratory phase II non-pharmacological randomised controlled trial where patients including young children, adolescents and adults with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and associated foot/ankle problems will be randomised to receive integrated podiatric care via a new foot care programme, or to receive standard podiatry care. Sixty patients (30 in each arm including children, adolescents and adults diagnosed with juvenile idiopathic arthritis who satisfy the inclusion and exclusion criteria will be recruited from 2 outpatient centres of paediatric and adult rheumatology respectively. Participants will be randomised by process of minimisation using the Minim software package. The primary outcome measure is the foot related impairment measured by the Juvenile Arthritis Disability Index questionnaire's impairment domain at 6 and 12 months, with secondary outcomes including disease activity score, foot deformity score, active/limited foot joint counts, spatio-temporal and plantar-pressure gait parameters, health related quality of life and semi-quantitative ultrasonography score for inflammatory foot lesions. The new foot care programme will comprise rapid assessment and investigation, targeted treatment, with detailed outcome assessment and follow-up at minimum intervals of 3 months. Data will be collected at baseline, 6 months and 12 months from baseline

  13. A Comparison of Two Injection Locations in Obese Patients Having Lower Leg/Foot Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-13

    Strain of Muscle and/or Tendon of Lower Leg; Fracture of Lower Leg; Crushing Injury of Lower Leg; Fracture Malunion - Ankle and/ or Foot; Complete Tear, Ankle and/or Foot Ligament; Pathological Fracture - Ankle and/or Foot; Loose Body in Joint of Ankle and/or Foot

  14. 38 CFR 4.63 - Loss of use of hand or foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... foot. 4.63 Section 4.63 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE... foot. Loss of use of a hand or a foot, for the purpose of special monthly compensation, will be held to... determination will be made on the basis of the actual remaining function of the hand or foot, whether the...

  15. [Diabetic foot syndrome: modern approaches to its treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilenko, S Iu; Plekhanov, A N; Markevich, P A

    2012-01-01

    Recent data on the results of treatment of diabetic foot syndrome are reported with special reference to its conservative therapy, surgical and endovascular methods. Modern dressing materials are described. PMID:22690559

  16. Ascending infection of foot tendons in diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mismar, Ayman; Yousef, Mohammad; Badran, Darwish; Younes, Nidal

    2013-12-01

    Bone and soft tissue infection in the foot of diabetic patients is a well-described issue in the literature. A sound anatomical knowledge of the foot anatomy and compartments is mandatory to understand the mechanisms of infection spread. We describe four cases of diabetic foot infection complicated by long ascending infection. All did not respond initially to antibiotic treatment and the usual surgical debridement and were cured only after excision of the infected tendons. We highlight a rare but serious complication of the diabetic foot disease not commonly seen by the surgical community. We hope that this report raises the awareness of this condition so that a prompt diagnosis is made and appropriate treatment started, thereby reducing the risk of major lower limb amputations. PMID:24043670

  17. Foot-and-mouth disease virus L peptidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), equine rhinitis A virus (ERAV) and bovine rhinitis B virus (BRBV) comprise the genus Aphthovirus of the Picornaviridae family. Seven genera within this family, Aphthoviruses, Cardioviruses, Erboviruses (ERBV), Kobuviruses, Senecaviruses, Sapeloviruses, and Tescho...

  18. Monotonic Loading of Circular Surface Footings on Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Barari, Amin

    2011-01-01

    Appropriate modeling of offshore foundations under monotonic loading is a significant challenge in geotechnical engineering. This paper reports experimental and numerical analyses, specifically investigating the response of circular surface footings during monotonic loading and elastoplastic...

  19. Foote Brook Macroinvertebrate Biomonitoring-Phase I in Johnson, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The Foote Brook Biomonitoring Project, Phase I geospatial dataset consists of data from the biomonitoring of benthic macroinvertebrates at three sites located along...

  20. Overuse injuries of the foot: imaging presentations of common pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, Michael; Stock, Harlan

    2013-01-01

    Overuse injuries of the foot are common, resulting in frequent visits to the primary care physician and orthopaedic surgeon. Radiologic workup often ensues. Morton's neuroma, plantar fasciitis and Haglund's syndrome are three such entities with classic MRI appearances. PMID:24367843

  1. Insights into the Capabilities of Tactile-Foot Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramiro Velázquez

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel wearable interface for the foot: a shoe‐integrated tactile display that enables users to obtain information through the sense of touch via their feet. A 16‐point array of actuators stimulates the sole of the foot by inducing different vibration frequencies. A series of experiments were conducted with 20 sighted and 5 blind voluntary subjects to evaluate the role of tactile perception by the human foot and the tactile sensitivity of the plantar surface. Tests evaluated the perception of simple shapes, patterns and directional instructions. The results showed that some information is discriminable and that tactile‐foot stimulation could be used for a wide number of applications in human‐machine interaction. Furthermore, the results also suggested that the blind perform better in some key tasks and support the feasibility of footwear providing tactile feedback for situational awareness, mobility and the navigation assistance of the blind.

  2. Minimally invasive surgery for diabetic plantar foot ulcerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caio Nery

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Complications of diabetes mellitus constitute the most common indications for hospitalization and non-traumatic amputations in the USA. The most important risk factors for the development of diabetic foot ulcerations include the presence of peripheral neuropathy, vasculopathy, limited joint mobility, and pre-existing foot deformities. In our study, 500 diabetic patients treated for plantar forefoot ulcerations were enrolled in a prospective study from 2000 to 2008 at the Federal University of São Paulo, Brazil. Fifty-two patients in the study met the criteria and underwent surgical treatment consisting of percutaneous Achilles tendon lengthening to treat plantar forefoot ulcerations. The postoperative follow-up demonstrated prevention of recurrent foot ulcerations in 92% of these diabetic patients that maintained an improved foot function. In conclusion, our study supports that identification and treatment of ankle equinus in the diabetic population may potentially lead to decreased patient morbidity, including reduced risk for both reulceration, and potential lower extremity amputation.

  3. LIPOMA ON THE SOLE OF FOOT: A RARE LOCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Kumar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Lipomas are benign soft tissue tumors that can occur at any age and frequently on the upper back, neck, shoulder and abdomen. We present a case of lipoma over sole of foot which is an uncommon location.

  4. Clinical cure of fungal madura foot with oral itraconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paugam, A; Tourte-Schaefer, C; Keïta, A; Chemla, N; Chevrot, A

    1997-10-01

    We report the case of a 26-year-old Malian patient who presented with mycetoma of the foot and frank bone involvement caused by Madurella mycetomatis. Long-term itraconazole therapy was clinically effective and well tolerated. PMID:9347233

  5. Guidelines for taking and interpreting radiographs of the bovine foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This step-by-step guide to radiographing the bovine foot tells you how to 1) obtain the radiograph you need, 2) allow for normal variations when assessing the findings, and 3) interpret abnormalities accurately by following a systematic approach

  6. LIPOMA ON THE SOLE OF FOOT: A RARE LOCATION

    OpenAIRE

    Ramesh Kumar; Gautham Reddy; Murali Krishna; Phaniteja; Sreeram Reddy

    2015-01-01

    Lipomas are benign soft tissue tumors that can occur at any age and frequently on the upper back, neck, shoulder and abdomen. We present a case of lipoma over sole of foot which is an uncommon location.

  7. Foote Brook Macroinvertebrate Biomonitoring - Phase 2 in Johnson, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — In 2000, Foote Brook was identified as a high priority site for restoration after the extensive countywide stream stability study, Stream Stability Assessment of...

  8. Peripheral arterial angiography and interventional treatment in diabetic foot ulcers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To assess the changes of peripheral arteries and choice of interventional treatment in diabetic foot ulcers. Methods: Thirty-six diabetic patients with foot ulcers were examined by lower extremity DSA with simultaneous ultrasonic Doppler examination for correlative study and interventional treatment carried out in 17 segmental stenotic cases. Among them, 12 patients were treated by PTA and 5 patients by intravascular stenting. Results: Irregular stenoses and obstruction were observed in all patients with peripheral foot ulcers. DSA examination was more reliable comparing with Doppler examination for demonstration of the arterial injury above the level of popliteal artery. PTA and primary stenting were effective in all of these subjects outcoming with promotion of the lower extremity arterial blood perfusion and foreseen curing efficacy. Conclusions: Peripheral arterial stenoses were common in diabetic patients with foot ulcers. In clinical practice, DSA examination and interventional treatment could give a fertile prognosis and reduce disabling

  9. Foot Care in Diabetes Mellitus (Beyond the Basics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... foot problems Poor circulation — Some simple clues can point to circulatory problems. Poor pulses, cold feet, thin ... the laws and in the state and federal courts of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, USA. This Agreement ...

  10. Foot posture in people with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feller Julian A

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foot posture has long been considered to contribute to the development of lower limb musculoskeletal conditions as it may alter the mechanical alignment and dynamic function of the lower limb. This study compared foot posture in people with and without medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA using a range of clinical foot measures. The reliability of the foot measures was also assessed. Methods The foot posture of 32 patients with clinically and radiographically-confirmed OA predominantly in the medial compartment of the knee and 28 asymptomatic age-matched healthy controls was investigated using the foot posture index (FPI, vertical navicular height and drop, and the arch index. Independent t tests and effect size (Cohen's d were used to investigate the differences between the groups in the foot posture measurements. Results Significant differences were found between the control and the knee OA groups in relation to the FPI (1.35 ± 1.43 vs. 2.46 ± 2.18, p = 0.02; d = 0.61, medium effect size, navicular drop (0.02 ± 0.01 vs. 0.03 ± 0.01, p = 0.01; d = 1.02, large effect size and the arch index (0.22 ± 0.04 vs. 0.26 ± 0.04, p = 0.04; d = 1.02, large effect size. No significant difference was found for vertical navicular height (0.24 ± 0.03 vs. 0.23 ± 0.03, p = 0.54; d = 0.04, negligible effect size. Conclusion People with medial compartment knee OA exhibit a more pronated foot type compared to controls. It is therefore recommended that the assessment of patients with knee OA in clinical practice should include simple foot measures, and that the potential influence of foot structure and function on the efficacy of foot orthoses in the management of medial compartment knee OA be further investigated.

  11. Bacteriocin from Bacillus subtilis as a novel drug against diabetic foot ulcer bacterial pathogens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baby Joseph; Berlina Dhas; Vimalin Hena; Justin Raj

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To isolate and identify Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) from soil and to characterize and partially purify the bacteriocin. To evaluate the antimicrobial activity against four diabetic foot ulcer bacterial pathogens. Methods:Genotypic identification was done based on Bergey’s manual of systemic bacteriology. Antimicrobial susceptibility test was done by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Colonies were identified by colony morphology and biochemical characterization and also compared with MTCC 121 strain. Further identification was done by 16S rRNA sequencing. Inhibitory activities of partially purified bacteriocin on all the DFU isolates were done by agar well diffusion method. The strain was identified to produce bacteriocin by stab overlay assay. Bacteriocin was extracted by organic solvent extraction using chloroform, further purified by HPLC and physical, and chemical characterization was performed. Results: The four isolates showed high level of resistance to amoxyclav and sensitivity to ciprofloxacin. HPLC purification revealed that the extracts are bacteriocin. The phylogenetic tree analysis results showed that the isolate was 99%related to B. subtilis BSF01. The results reveled activity to all the four isolates and high level of activity was seen in case of Klebsiella sp. Conclusions:Partially purified bacteriocin was found to have antimicrobial activity against the four diabetic foot ulcer bacterial pathogens, which can thus be applied as a better drug molecule on further studies. The strain B. subtilis are found to be safe for use and these antimicrobial peptides can be used as an antimicrobial in humans to treat DFU bacterial pathogens.

  12. Stress Fractures of the Foot and Ankle in Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Mayer, Stephanie W.; Joyner, Patrick W.; Almekinders, Louis C.; Parekh, Selene G.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Stress fractures of the foot and ankle are a common problem encountered by athletes of all levels and ages. These injuries can be difficult to diagnose and may be initially evaluated by all levels of medical personnel. Clinical suspicion should be raised with certain history and physical examination findings. Evidence Acquisition: Scientific and review articles were searched through PubMed (1930-2012) with search terms including stress fractures and 1 of the following: foot ankle, me...

  13. A possible Madura foot from medieval Estremoz, southern Portugal

    OpenAIRE

    Curto, Ana; Fernandes, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Maduromycosis, commonly called Madura foot, is an infectious pathology caused by fungi or bacteria, and it is native of the tropical, subtropical and equatorial areas. This paper presents a well preserved male skeleton, between 23 and 57 years old from a medieval necropolis (13th-15th centuries) in Estremoz, Portugal.The left foot of this individual showed marked alterations on the morphology of the calcaneus and cuboid that are ankylosed, which led to arthrosis of the calcaneous and talus. T...

  14. Neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers – evidence-to-practice

    OpenAIRE

    Ndip, Agbor; Ebah, Leonard; Mbako, Aloysius

    2012-01-01

    Foot ulcers and their attendant complications are disquietingly high in people with diabetes, a majority of whom have underlying neuropathy. This review examines the evidence base underpinning the prevention and management of neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers in order to inform best clinical practice. Since it may be impractical to ask patients not to weight-bear at all, relief of pressure through the use of offloading casting devices remains the mainstay for management of neuropathic ulcers, ...

  15. Partial amputations of the foot for diabetic gangrene.

    OpenAIRE

    Turnbull, A. R.; Chester, J. F.

    1988-01-01

    Over a 5-year period 68 diabetic patients underwent 102 primary partial amputations of the foot for infected diabetic gangrene. Seventy (69%) of these operations healed without further local surgery, but five patients needed seven femoropopliteal bypass grafts (two bilateral) to achieve healing. In total, 32 primary operations needed revision by further surgery to the foot or by leg amputation. Of the original operations 31% were carried out by a consultant surgeon; the rest (69%) were perfor...

  16. Neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers – evidence-to-practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ndip A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Agbor Ndip1–3, Leonard Ebah3,4, Aloysius Mbako51Department of Diabetes and Medicine, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Central Manchester Foundation Trust, UK; 2Department of Medicine, Royal Bolton Hospital, Bolton, UK; 3Cardiovascular Research Group, School of Biomedicine, University of Manchester, UK; 4Department of Renal Medicine, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Central Manchester Foundation Trust, UK; 5Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Wrexham Maelor Hospital, Wales, UKAbstract: Foot ulcers and their attendant complications are disquietingly high in people with diabetes, a majority of whom have underlying neuropathy. This review examines the evidence base underpinning the prevention and management of neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers in order to inform best clinical practice. Since it may be impractical to ask patients not to weight-bear at all, relief of pressure through the use of offloading casting devices remains the mainstay for management of neuropathic ulcers, whilst provision of appropriate footwear is essential in ulcer prevention. Simple non-surgical debridement and application of hydrogels are both effective in preparing the wound bed for healthy granulation and therefore enhancing healing. Initial empirical antibiotic therapy for infected ulcers should cover the most common bacterial flora. There is limited evidence supporting the use of adjunctive therapies such as hyperbaric oxygen and cytokines or growth factors. In selected cases, recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor has been shown to enhance healing; however, its widespread use cannot be advised due to the availability of more cost-effective approaches. While patient education may be beneficial, the evidence base remains thin and conflicting. In conclusion, best management of foot ulcers is achieved by what is taken out of the foot (pressure, callus, infection, and slough rather than what is put on the foot (adjuvant treatment.Keywords: diabetic foot ulcers, neuropathic

  17. Prolonged Use of Ertapenem to Treat Infected Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    OpenAIRE

    Fareeduddin Ahmad; Hilary Tindall; Gidon Ellis; Ashwin Algudkar

    2010-01-01

    We present the case of a diabetic man who was successfully treated with ertapenem for over 4 months for severe infection of his foot ulcers. After initial unsuccessful treatment with empirical intravenous antibiotics, ertapenem was started on microbiology advice and led to a marked improvement in the soft-tissue infection. Ertapenem was continued for a total of 137 days under close clinical and biochemical monitoring and produced a complete resolution of the foot infection. This is the first ...

  18. Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease: Changing Indian Scenario

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, Prasanna Kumar; Veena, KM; H. Jagadishchandra; Sham S Bhat; Shetty, Shishir Ram

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Hand, foot and mouth disease usually affect infants and children. Although seen worldwide, it is not common in India. It is moderately contagious and is spread through direct contact with the mucus, saliva, or feces of an infected person. It typically occurs in small epidemics, usually during the summer and autumn months. The incidence of hand, foot and mouth disease has recently been on the rise in India due to the probable mass immunization programs. This report describes a case of...

  19. The role of autonomic neuropathy in diabetic foot ulceration.

    OpenAIRE

    M.E. Ahmed; Delbridge, L; Le Quesne, L P

    1986-01-01

    Five standard, non-invasive tests of cardiovascular, autonomic function were performed in each of four groups of 30 subjects: controls, group 1, diabetics without clinical evidence of neuropathy; group 2, diabetics with neuropathy, but without foot ulceration; group 3, diabetics with neuropathic ulceration of the foot. The results showed a significant impairment of autonomic function in diabetics without clinically demonstrable somatic neuropathy compared with controls diabetics with somatic ...

  20. Assessing diabetic foot ulcer development risk with hyperspectral tissue oximetry

    OpenAIRE

    Yudovsky, Dmitry; Nouvong, Aksone; Schomacker, Kevin; Pilon, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Foot ulceration remains a serious health concern for diabetic patients and has a major impact on the cost of diabetes treatment. Early detection and preventive care, such as offloading or improved hygiene, can greatly reduce the risk of further complications. We aim to assess the use of hyperspectral tissue oximetry in predicting the risk of diabetic foot ulcer formation. Tissue oximetry measurements are performed during several visits with hyperspectral imaging of the feet in type 1 and 2 di...

  1. Imaging of Soft Tissue Lesions of the Foot and Ankle

    OpenAIRE

    Seyed Hassan Mostafavi

    2010-01-01

    Differential diagnosis of soft tissue lesions of the foot may be narrowed with imaging. The cystic nature of ganglia, synovial cysts, and bursitis can be confirmed with MR imaging or sonography. Location and signal characteristics of noncystic lesions may suggest Morton's neuroma, giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath and plantar fibromatosis. Synovial-based lesions of the foot and ankle can be differentiated based on presence or absence of mineralization, lesion density, signal intensit...

  2. Prevent Wounds by Conducting a Comprehensive Foot Examination and Intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Michele Shelly Burdette-Taylor

    2015-01-01

    Lower extremity wounds and falls are on the rise with the demographics and projected aging population. Diabetes and heart disease supersede cancer deaths. A basic foot exam—performed routinely on patients identified as high risk allows time for early intervention and prevention. A Certified Foot and Nail Care Nurse (CFCN) who evaluates clients on a regular basis, conducts a comprehensive lower extremity exam for loss of protective sensation (LOPS) and compromised peripheral blood flow is more...

  3. Stereophotogrammetry and relief photography in the assessment of foot disorders.

    OpenAIRE

    Craxford, A D; Rutherford, A.; Evans, M S; Park, C.

    1981-01-01

    Expanded polyethylene foam (Plastazote) is used in the treatment of rheumatoid, diabetic, and leprotic foot disorders. This paper describes a diagnostic use for this material. Two photographic techniques combine to give vivid and quantitative representations of foot deformities which are easily applicable to clinical use. Relief photography uses illumination to create an illusion of solidity in a 2-dimensional photography. Stereophotogrammetry produces contour plots from stereopairs of photog...

  4. Diabetic foot complicated by vertebral osteomyelitis and epidural abscess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombetta, Maddalena; Imbriaco, Chiara; Rigolon, Riccardo; Mingolla, Lucia; Zamboni, Federica; Dal Molin, Francesca; Cioccoloni, Dario; Sanga, Viola; Bruti, Massimiliano; Brocco, Enrico; Conti, Michela; Ravenna, Giorgio; Perrone, Fabrizia; Stoico, Vincenzo; Bonora, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Vertebral osteomyelitis (or spondylodiscitis) is steadily increasing in Western countries and often results from hematogenous seeding, direct inoculation during spinal surgery, or contiguous spread from an infection in the adjacent soft tissue. We present the case of a 67-year-old white patient with type 2 diabetes who went to Hospital for high fever, back pain, and worsening of known infected ulcers in the left foot. Despite intravenous antibiotic treatment and surgical debridement of the foot infection, high fever and lower back pain continued. Bone biopsy and two consecutive blood cultures were positive for Staphylococcus aureus. A spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed, revealing serious osteomyelitis in L4 and L5 complicated by an epidural abscess. Contiguous or other distant focuses of infection were not identified. In this case, diabetic foot could be considered as a primary distant focus for vertebral osteomyelitis. Clinicians should consider vertebral osteomyelitis as a ‘possible’ diagnosis in patients with type 2 diabetes complicated by foot infection that is associated with fever and lower back pain. Learning points Vertebral osteomyelitis is increasing in Western countries, especially in patients with type 2 diabetes. The primary focus of infection is the genitourinary tract followed by skin, soft tissue, endocarditis, bursitis, septic arthritis, and intravascular access. Diabetic foot could be a rare primary focus of infection for vertebral osteomyelitis, and, however, vertebral osteomyelitis could be a serious, albeit rare, complication of diabetic foot. Clinicians should keep in mind the many potential complications of diabetic foot ulcerations and consider vertebral osteomyelitis as a “possible” diagnosis in patients with type 2 diabetes and foot ulcers associated with nonspecific symptoms such as lower back pain. Early diagnosis and correct management of vertebral osteomyelitis are crucial to improve clinical outcomes

  5. Contemporary Evaluation and Management of the Diabetic Foot

    OpenAIRE

    Sumpio, Bauer E.

    2012-01-01

    Foot problems in patients with diabetes remain a major public health issue and are the commonest reason for hospitalization of patients with diabetes with prevalence as high as 25%. Ulcers are breaks in the dermal barrier with subsequent erosion of underlying subcutaneous tissue that may extend to muscle and bone, and superimposed infection is a frequent and costly complication. The pathophysiology of diabetic foot disease is multifactorial and includes neuropathy, infection, ischemia, and ab...

  6. Foot-and-mouth disease: past, present and future

    OpenAIRE

    Jamal, Syed Muhammad; Belsham, Graham

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals including cattle, pigs, sheep and many wildlife species. It can cause enormous economic losses when incursions occur into countries which are normally disease free. In addition, it has long-term effects within countries where the disease is endemic due to reduced animal productivity and the restrictions on international trade in animal products. The disease is caused by infection with foot-and-mouth...

  7. Automatic presser-foot force control for industrial sewing machines

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, Helder; Silva, Luís F.; A. M. Rocha; Monteiro, João L.

    2012-01-01

    To develop and test control methods for real-time automatic presser-foot force control in industrial sewing machines. In this work, a closed-loop controller that controls presser-foot maximum vertical displacement is presented and compared to existing solutions that adjust force depending on sewing speed. Automatic force control can reduce problems such as stitch irregularity, stitch distortions and material damage, besides making material handling easier. Design/methodology/approach ...

  8. Ultrasound-guided intervention in the ankle and foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakonaki, Eleni E; Allen, Gina M; Watura, Roland

    2016-01-01

    In this comprehensive review, we discuss the main interventions performed in the foot and ankle for Achilles tendinopathy, Morton's neuromas and Plantar fasciitis as well as techniques for intra-articular and peritendinous injections. We present the different imaging techniques and injectable agents that can be used in clinical practice, trying to help the reader decide the most appropriate way of managing the patient with a problem in the ankle and foot. PMID:26537692

  9. Does Foot Massage Relieve Acute Postoperative Pain? A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanif Chanif

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study aimed to examine the current state of knowledge regarding foot massageto determine if foot massage has an effect on relieving acute postoperative pain.Method: The following questions were used to guide this review: How does pain occur?What is the pain management modalities used in relieving acute postoperative pain? Does footmassage relieve acute postoperative pain? A comprehensive systematic search of publishedliterature and journal articles from Science Direct, CINAHL, PubMed, ProQuest and fromrelevant textbooks was conducted. The universal case entry website, Google-scholar was usedas well. The following keywords were used: foot massage, pain management, andpostoperative pain. Eight studies on foot massage and more than thirty related articles werereviewed.Result: Postoperative pain is caused by tissue damage that induces release of chemicalmediators from the surgical wound. The four processes of pain are transduction, transmission,perception and modulation. Pain medication is the goal standard for acute postoperative painrelief. In addition, foot massage is a modality that can be used in relieving acute postoperativepain. Massage stimulates large nerve fibers and dermatome layers which contain tactile andpressure receptors. The receptors subsequently transmit the nerve impulse to the centralnervous system. The gate control system in the dorsal horn is activated through the inhibitoryinterneuron, thus closing the gate. Subsequently, the brain does not receive the pain message.Eight reviewed studies demonstrated that foot massage relieves acute postoperative pain.However, there were some methodological limitations of these studies.Conclusion: It is recommended to examine the effect of foot massage on acute postoperativepain with high homogenous samples using various duration of massage and range of time forpain measurement at different settings.Key words: foot massage, pain management and postoperative pain.

  10. Becaplermin gel in the treatment of diabetic neuropathic foot ulcers

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolaos Papanas; Efstratios Maltezos

    2008-01-01

    Nikolaos Papanas, Efstratios MaltezosOutpatient Clinic of Obesity, Diabetes and Metabolism at the Second Department of Internal Medicine, Democritus University of Thrace, GreeceAbstract: Diabetic foot ulcers remain a major cause of morbidity. Significant progress has been accomplished in ulcer healing by improved management of both ischemia and neuropathy in the diabetic foot. Nevertheless, there is a vital need for further improvement. Becaplermin gel represents an important therapeutic adva...

  11. Diabetic foot disease is associated with reduced erythrocyte deformability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahn, Avivit; Livshits, Leonid; Srulevich, Ariel; Raz, Itamar; Yedgar, Shaul; Barshtein, Gregory

    2016-08-01

    The pathogenesis of diabetic foot disease is multifactorial and encompasses microvascular and macrovascular pathologies. Abnormal blood rheology may also play a part in its development. Using a cell flow analyser (CFA), we examined the association between erythrocyte deformability and diabetic foot disease. Erythrocytes from diabetic patients with no known microvascular complications (n = 11) and patients suffering from a diabetic foot ulcer (n = 11) were isolated and their average elongation ratio (ER) as well as the ER distribution curve were measured. Average ER was decreased in the diabetic foot patients compared with the patients with diabetes and no complications (1·64 ± 0·07 versus 1·71 ± 0·1; P = 0·036). A significant rise in the percentage of minimally deformable red blood cells RBCs in diabetic foot patients compared with the patients with no complications was observed (37·89% ± 8·12% versus 30·61% ± 10·17%; P = 0·039) accompanied by a significant decrease in the percentage of highly deformable RBCs (12·47% ± 4·43% versus 17·49% ± 8·17% P = 0·046). Reduced erythrocyte deformability may slow capillary flow in the microvasculature and prolong wound healing in diabetic foot patients. Conversely, it may be the low-grade inflammatory state imposed by diabetic foot disease that reduces erythrocyte deformability. Further study of the rheological changes associated with diabetic foot disease may enhance our understanding of its pathogenesis and aid in the study of novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:26018868

  12. Epidemiology and outcome in patients of diabetic foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The aim of study was detailed analysis of the presentation of diabetic foot ulcers, characteristics and predictors of outcome (incidence of amputation in neuropathic, ischemic, neuro ischemic) in patients presenting with diabetic foot at our hospital. Methods: This prospective analytic study was conducted from January 2009-August 2010 at POF Hospital Wah Cantt. Diabetic patients who presented with foot ulcers were enrolled in this study. Demographics of patients along with ulcer size, type, site and Grade according to Wagner Classification were recorded. Wounds were managed with daily dressings, nursing care and de-sloughing of necrotic tissue along with appropriate antibiotic cover. Patients were followed over period until wound healed completely or a lower limb amputation performed, the outcome noted and patient was deemed to have completed study. Results: One hundred and fifteen patients with mean age 55.46 +- 8.23 years, both male and female were included in this study. Out of 115 patients 111 patients had Type-II diabetes while only 4 presented with Type-I. Mean Duration of diabetes was 14.61 +- 2.17 years. With respect to underlying causes 18.3% foot ulcers were ischemic, 22.6% were neuropathic and 59% were neuro-ischemic. Median ulcer size was 74% of ulcer classified as Wagner grade-II and III while 24% were of Grade-V. Lower limb amputation were performed in 25% of patients whereas limb salvage achieved in 75% of patients with wounds healed (median healing time 5 (3-10 weeks). Conclusion: Preservation of the limb function without endangering the patient must be a goal of treating diabetic foot. Once foot amputation is successful, rehabilitation with orthotic or prosthetic devices may allow years of a functional extremity along with preventive measures like cessation of smoking, daily foot hygiene and foot inspection. (author)

  13. Rehabilitation of Ankle and Foot Injuries in Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Chinn, Lisa; Hertel, Jay

    2010-01-01

    Foot and ankle injuries are extremely common among athletes and other physically active individuals. Rehabilitation programs that emphasize the use of therapeutic exercise to restore joint range of motion, muscle strength, neuromuscular coordination, and gait mechanics have been shown to have clinical success for patients suffering various foot and ankle pathologies. Rehabilitation programs are discussed for ankle sprains, plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendonitis, and turf toe.

  14. Smart Diabetic Socks: Embedded device for diabetic foot prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Perrier, Antoine; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Luboz, Vincent; Bucki, Marek; Cannard, Francis; Diot, Bruno; Colin, Denis; Rin, Delphine; Bourg, Jean-Philippe; Payan, Yohan

    2014-01-01

    International audience 1) Objectives Most foot ulcers are the consequence of a trauma (repetitive high stress, ill-fitting footwear, or an object inside the shoe) associated to diabetes. They are often followed by amputation and shorten life expectancy. This paper describes the prototype of the Smart Diabetic Socks that has been developed in the context of the French ANR TecSan project. The objective is to prevent pressure foot ulcers for diabetic persons. 2) Material and methods A fully w...

  15. Radiologic changes of ulcerated foot in leprosy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jung Hyun; Ahn, Eun Joo; Chung, Eun Chul; Rhee, Chung Sik [Ewha Woman' s University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sung Jun [Institute for Leprosy Research, KLCA, Uiwang (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-12-15

    There are radiologically characteristic bone changes on the foot and tarsus in leprosy. The bone changes are primarily due to Mycobacterium leprae infection and secondarily to the injurious effect, such as trauma, and infection on the denervated tissue. 117 bone changes of 100 leprosy patients with plantar ulcerations from Jan. 1984 to Oct. 1989 in the Korean Leprosy Control Center were analyzed. Male to female ratio was about 2 : 1 and the most prevalent age was 41 to 60 years, and according to Ridley-Jopling's classification. L-type was most common (46%). One hundred and eleven cases (94.9%) showed bone changes, suggesting high incidence of bone changes in patients with plantar ulcers. Specific findings were observed in two cases(1.7%). One hundred and nine cases showed nonspecific bone changes, which were osteomyelitis(23.1%), neurotrophic changes(39.3%), periostitis(5.1%) and arthritis(12.8%). Extensive bone involvement was seen in neurotrophic changes involving forefoot and metatarsal in 22 of 46 cases, and in secondary changes involving metatarsal bone in 23, tarsus in 20 of 49 cases.

  16. Radiologic changes of ulcerated foot in leprosy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are radiologically characteristic bone changes on the foot and tarsus in leprosy. The bone changes are primarily due to Mycobacterium leprae infection and secondarily to the injurious effect, such as trauma, and infection on the denervated tissue. 117 bone changes of 100 leprosy patients with plantar ulcerations from Jan. 1984 to Oct. 1989 in the Korean Leprosy Control Center were analyzed. Male to female ratio was about 2 : 1 and the most prevalent age was 41 to 60 years, and according to Ridley-Jopling's classification. L-type was most common (46%). One hundred and eleven cases (94.9%) showed bone changes, suggesting high incidence of bone changes in patients with plantar ulcers. Specific findings were observed in two cases(1.7%). One hundred and nine cases showed nonspecific bone changes, which were osteomyelitis(23.1%), neurotrophic changes(39.3%), periostitis(5.1%) and arthritis(12.8%). Extensive bone involvement was seen in neurotrophic changes involving forefoot and metatarsal in 22 of 46 cases, and in secondary changes involving metatarsal bone in 23, tarsus in 20 of 49 cases

  17. Socioeconomic profile of diabetic patients with and without foot problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Nather

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To identify the differences in a socioeconomic profile between two cohorts of diabetic patients – one with diabetic foot problems and another without diabetic foot problems. Materials and methods: The cohort with diabetic foot problems (including cellulitis, abscess, osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, gangrene, ulcers, or Charcot joint disease consisted of 122 diabetic patients, while the other cohort without foot problems consisted of 112 diabetic patients. Both were seen at the National University Hospital from January to April 2007. A detailed protocol was designed and the factors studied included patient profile, average monthly household income, education, compliance to diabetic medication, attendance at clinics for diabetic treatment, exercise, smoking, alcohol consumption, gender, and glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1C level. These were studied for significant differences using univariate and stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results: With multivariate analysis, Malay ethnicity (p<0.001, education of up to secondary school only (p=0.021, low average monthly household income of less than SGD $2,000 (p=0.030, lack of exercise (at least once a week, p=0.04, and elevated HbA1C level (>7.0%; p=0.015 were found to be significantly higher in the cohort with diabetic foot problems than the cohort without. Conclusions: There are significant differences in the socioeconomic factors between diabetic patients with diabetic foot problems and those without.

  18. Reconstructive foot and ankle surgeries in diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajit Kumar Varma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic foot and ankle deformities are secondary to long-standing diabetes and neglected foot care. The concept of surgical correction for these deformities is quite recent. The primary objective of reconstructive foot and ankle surgery is the reduction of increased plantar pressures, reduction of pain and the restoration of function, stability and proper appearance. Foot and ankle deformities can result in significant disability, loss of life style, employment and even the loss of the lower limb. Therefore, restoration of normal, problem free foot function and activities will have a significant impact on peoples′ lives. Reconstructive surgical procedures are complex and during reconstruction, internal and external fixation devices, including pins, compression screws, staples, and wires, may be used for repair and stabilization. The surgeries performed depend on the type and severity of the condition. Surgery can involve any part of the foot and ankle, and may involve tendon, bone, joint, tissue or skin repair. Corrective surgeries can at times be performed on an outpatient basis with minimally invasive techniques. Recovery time depends on the type of condition being treated.

  19. Risk factors for major amputation in hospitalised diabetic foot patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namgoong, Sik; Jung, Suyoung; Han, Seung-Kyu; Jeong, Seong-Ho; Dhong, Eun-Sang; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2016-03-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers are the main cause of non-traumatic lower extremity amputation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the risk factors for major amputation in diabetic foot patients. Eight hundred and sixty diabetic patients were admitted to the diabetic wound centre of the Korea University Guro Hospital for foot ulcers between January 2010 and December 2013. Among them, 837 patients were successfully monitored until complete healing. Ulcers in 809 patients (96·7%) healed without major amputation and those in 28 patients (3·3%) healed with major amputation. Data of 88 potential risk factors including demographics, ulcer condition, vascularity, bioburden, neurology and serology were collected from patients in the two groups and compared. Among the 88 potential risk factors, statistically significant differences between the two groups were observed in 26 risk factors. In the univariate analysis, which was carried out for these 26 risk factors, statistically significant differences were observed in 22 risk factors. In a stepwise multiple logistic analysis, six of the 22 risk factors remained statistically significant. Multivariate-adjusted odds ratios were 11·673 for ulcers penetrating into the bone, 8·683 for dialysis, 6·740 for gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, 6·158 for hind foot ulcers, 0·641 for haemoglobin levels and 1·007 for fasting blood sugar levels. The risk factors for major amputation in diabetic foot patients were bony invasions, dialysis, GI disorders, hind foot locations, low levels of haemoglobin and elevated fasting blood sugar levels. PMID:26478562

  20. Ultrasound Findings of the Painful Ankle and Foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suheil Artul

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To document the prevalence and spectrum of musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSKUS findings at different parts of the foot. Materials and Methods: All MSKUS studies conducted on the foot during a 2-year period (2012-2013 at the Department of Radiology were reviewed. Demographic parameters including age, gender, and MSKUS findings were documented. Results: Three hundred and sixty-four studies had been conducted in the 2-year period. Ninety-three MSKUS evaluations were done for the ankle, 30 studies for the heel, and 241 for the rest of the foot. The most common MSKUS finding at the ankle was tenosynovitis, mostly in female patients; at the heel it was Achilles tendonitis, also mostly in female patients; and for the rest of the foot it was fluid collection and presence of foreign body, mainly in male patients. The number of different MSKUS abnormalities that were reported was 9 at the ankle, 9 at the heel, and 21 on the rest of the foot. Conclusions: MSKUS has the potential for revealing a huge spectrum of abnormalities. The most common finding was collection/hematoma and foreign bodies at the foot, tenosynovitis at the ankle, and Achilles tendinitis at the heel.

  1. Hemodynamic study of ischemic limb by velocity measurement in foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By means of a tracer technique with 99mTc-pertechnetate, provided with seven zonal regions of interest, 6 mm in width, placed at equal spaces of 18 mm, from the toe tip to the midfoot at a right angle to the long axis of the foot, arterial flow velocity in the foot during reactive hyperemia was measured. The mean velocity in the foot was 5.66 +/- 1.78 cm/sec in 14 normal limbs, 1.58 +/- 1.07 cm/sec in 29 limbs with distal thromboangiitis obliterans (TAO), 0.89 +/- 0.61 cm/sec in 13 limbs with proximal TAO, and 0.97 +/- 0.85 cm/sec in 15 limbs with arteriosclerosis obliterans (ASO). The velocity returned to normal in all 12 limbs after successful arterial reconstruction, whereas the foot or toe blood pressure remained pathologic in 9 of the 12 limbs postoperatively; the velocity reverted to normal in 4 of 13 limbs after lumbar sympathectomy. When the velocity was normalized after operation, the ulceration healed favorably, and the ischemic limb was salvaged. The most characteristic feature of peripheral arterial occlusive disease of the lower extremity was a stagnation of arterial circulation in the foot, and the flow velocity in the foot was a sensitive predictive index of limb salvage

  2. Contemporary Evaluation and Management of the Diabetic Foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bauer E. Sumpio

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Foot problems in patients with diabetes remain a major public health issue and are the commonest reason for hospitalization of patients with diabetes with prevalence as high as 25%. Ulcers are breaks in the dermal barrier with subsequent erosion of underlying subcutaneous tissue that may extend to muscle and bone, and superimposed infection is a frequent and costly complication. The pathophysiology of diabetic foot disease is multifactorial and includes neuropathy, infection, ischemia, and abnormal foot structure and biomechanics. Early recognition of the etiology of these foot lesions is essential for good functional outcome. Managing the diabetic foot is a complex clinical problem requiring a multidisciplinary collaboration of health care workers to achieve limb salvage. Adequate off-loading, frequent debridement, moist wound care, treatment of infection, and revascularization of ischemic limbs are the mainstays of therapy. Even when properly managed, some of the foot ulcers do not heal and are arrested in a state of chronic inflammation. These wounds can frequently benefit from various adjuvants, such as aggressive debridement, growth factors, bioactive skin equivalents, and negative pressure wound therapy. While these, increasingly expensive, therapies have shown promising results in clinical trials, the results have yet to be translated into widespread clinical practice leaving a huge scope for further research in this field.

  3. Development and evaluation of ultra-small nanostructured lipid carriers: novel topical delivery system for athlete's foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Samipta; Singh, Mahendra; Tripathi, Chandra Bhushan; Arya, Malti; Saraf, Shubhini A

    2016-02-01

    Athlete's foot is a fungal infection of the foot which causes dry, itchy, flaky condition of the skin caused by Trichophyton species. In this study, the potential of ultra-small nanostructured lipid carrier (usNLC)-based topical gel of miconazole nitrate for the treatment of athlete's foot was evaluated. Nanostructure lipid carriers (NLCs) prepared by melt emulsification and sonication technique were characterized for particle size, drug entrapment, zeta potential and drug release. The optimized usNLC revealed particle size 53.79 nm, entrapment efficiency 86.77%, zeta potential -12.9 mV and polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.27. The drug release studies of usNLC showed initial fast release followed by sustained release with 91.99% drug released in 24 h. Optimized usNLCs were incorporated into carbopol-934 gel and evaluated for pH (6.8), viscosity (36,400 mPa s) and texture analysis. Antifungal activity against Trichophyton mentagrophytes exhibited wider zone of inhibition, 6.6 ± 1.5 mm for optimized usNLC3 gel viz-à-viz marketed gel formulation (3.7 ± 1.2 mm). Hen's egg test-chorioallantoic membrane (HET-CAM) irritation test confirmed optimized usNLC gel to be non-irritant to chorioallantoic membrane. Improved dermal delivery of miconazole by usNLC gel could be achieved for treatment of athlete's foot. PMID:26542152

  4. Deformity or dysfunction? Osteopathic manipulation of the idiopathic cavus foot: A clinical suggestion.

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Christopher Kevin; Gidali, Adi; Harris, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    Observed gait abnormalities are often related to a variety of foot deformities such as the cavus foot, also known as pes cavus, cavovarus, uncompensated varus, and the high arched foot. When gait abnormalities related to cavus foot deformities produce symptoms or contribute to dysfunctional movement of the lower extremity, foot orthotics are commonly used to accommodate the deformity and optimize the function of the lower extremity. In more severe cases, surgical intervention is common. Hypom...

  5. Beyond dualism: Multisegmented labor markets in Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    Heintz, James; Slonimczyk, Fabian

    2007-01-01

    Using estimates of earnings functions in Ghana, this paper examines patterns of labor market segmentation with regard to formal and informal employment. Persistent earnings differentials are used as indicators of limited mobility across segments of the employed labor force. We find evidence of labor market segmentation between formal and informal employment and between different categories of informal employment which cannot be fully explained by human capital, physical asset, or credit marke...

  6. Monoclonal and Polyclonal Antibodies Specific for Foot and Mouth Disease Virus Type A and Type O VP1

    OpenAIRE

    CHO, JIN GU; Jo, Yeong Joon; Sung, Jong-Hyuk; Hong, Jang-Kwan; Hwang, Ji-Hyeon; Park, Jong-Hyeon; Lee, Kwang-Nyeong; Park, Sang Gyu

    2012-01-01

    The foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) is an RNA virus composed of single stranded positive sense RNA. FMDV has been known to infect cloven-hoofed animals, including pigs, cattle, and sheep. FMDV is rapidly spreading outward to neighboring regions, often leading to a high mortality rate. Thus, early diagnosis of FMDV is critical to suppress propagation of FMDV and minimize economic losses. In this study, we report the generation and characterization of polyclonal and six monoclonal antibodie...

  7. Update on epidemiology and control of Foot and Mouth Disease - A menace to international trade and global animal enterprise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. M. Depa

    Full Text Available Foot and mouth disease (FMD is one of the most economically and socially devastating disease affecting animal agriculture throughout the world. This review describes economic impact of disease outbreaks, an update of recent findings in epidemiology of FMD both at International and national level and control of this disease. The etiological agent (FMD virus is examined in detail at genetic and molecular characterization level and in terms of antigenic diversity. [Vet World 2012; 5(11.000: 694-704

  8. Routine MRI findings of the asymptomatic foot in diabetic patients with unilateral Charcot foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poll Ludger W

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Imaging studies of bones in patients with sensory deficits are scarce. Aim To investigate bone MR images of the lower limb in diabetic patients with severe sensory polyneuropathy, and in control subjects without sensory deficits. Methods Routine T1 weighted and T2-fat-suppressed-STIR-sequences without contrast media were performed of the asymptomatic foot in 10 diabetic patients with polyneuropathy and unilateral inactive Charcot foot, and in 10 matched and 10 younger, non-obese unmatched control subjects. Simultaneously, a Gadolinium containing phantom was also assessed for reference. T1 weighted signal intensity (SI was recorded at representative regions of interest at the peritendineal soft tissue, the tibia, the calcaneus, and at the phantom. Any abnormal skeletal morphology was also recorded. Results Mean SI at the soft tissue, the calcaneus, and the tibia, respectively, was 105%, 105% and 84% of that at the phantom in the matched and unmatched control subjects, compared to 102% (soft tissue, 112% (calcaneus and 64% (tibia in the patients; differences of tibia vs. calcaneus or soft tissue were highly significant (p Conclusion MR imaging did not reveal grossly abnormal bone marrow signalling in the limbs with severe sensory polyneuropathy, but occult sequelae of previous traumatic injuries.

  9. Risk Factors for Foot Amputation in Patients Hospitalized for Diabetic Foot Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrone Quilici, Maria Teresa; Del Fiol, Fernando de Sá; Franzin Vieira, Alexandre Eduardo; Toledo, Maria Inês

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and quantify risk factors for amputation in diabetic patients hospitalized for foot infections. This cross-sectional study comprised 100 patients with diabetic infectious complications in the lower limbs. The variables investigated were related to diabetes, infection, and treatment compliance. Multiple Cox regression analysis was performed to identify the variables independently associated with the outcome of amputation. The most prevalent chronic complications were neuropathy and hypertension. Most patients presented with a neuroischemic foot (86%). The Morisky test showed that 72% were not compliant with diabetes treatment. Regarding patient outcome, 61% progressed to amputation, 14% to debridement, and 9% to revascularization. The results showed a 42% higher risk for progression to amputation in patients with previous use of antimicrobials. Also, the amputation risk was 26% higher for those less compliant with diabetes treatment. An increase of one point in the Wagner ulcer classification criteria corresponded to a 65% increase in the risk of amputation. Undergoing conservative, nonsurgical procedures prior to admission provided a 63% reduction in the risk of amputation. Knowledge of these factors is critical to enable multidisciplinary teams to develop treatment plans for these patients so as to prevent the need for amputation. PMID:26998493

  10. Estimation of foot trajectory during human walking by a wearable inertial measurement unit mounted to the foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Naoki; Ogihara, Naomichi

    2016-03-01

    To establish a supportive technology for reducing the risk of falling in older people, it is essential to clarify gait characteristics in elderly individuals that are possibly linked to the risk of falling during actual daily activities. In this study, we developed a system to monitor human gait in an outdoor environment using an inertial measurement unit consisting of a tri-axial accelerometer and tri-axial gyroscope. Step-by-step foot trajectories were estimated from the sensor unit attached to the dorsum of the foot. Specifically, stride length and foot clearance were calculated by integrating the gravity-compensated translational acceleration over time during the swing phase. Zero vertical velocity and displacement corrections were applied to obtain the final trajectory, assuming the slope of the walking surface is negligible. Short, normal, and long stride-length walking of 10 healthy participants was simultaneously measured using the proposed system and a conventional motion capture system to evaluate the accuracy of the estimated foot trajectory. Mean accuracy and precision were approximately 20 ± 50 mm, for stride length, and 2 ± 7 mm for foot clearance, indicating that the swing phase trajectory of the sensor unit attached to the foot was reconstructed more accurately and precisely using the proposed system than with previously published methods owing to the flat floor assumption. Although some methodological limitations certainly apply, this system will serve as a useful tool to monitor human walking during daily activities. PMID:26979891

  11. Persistent foot-and-mouth disease virus infection in the nasopharynx of cattle: tissue-specific distribution and local cytokine expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissues obtained post-mortem from cattle persistently infected with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) were analyzed to characterize the tissue-specific localization of FMDV and partial transcriptome profiles for selected immunoregulatory cytokines. Analysis of 28 distinct anatomic sites from 21 st...

  12. Transcriptomic analysis of persistent infection with foot-and-mouth disease virus in cattle suggests impairment of cell-mediated immunity in the nasopharynx

    Science.gov (United States)

    In order to investigate the mechanisms of persistent foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection in cattle, transcriptome alterations associated with the FMDV carrier state were characterized using a bovine whole-transcriptome microarray. Eighteen cattle (8 vaccinated with a recombinant FMDV A vac...

  13. Infection with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) induces a natural killer (NK) cell response in cattle that is lacking following vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a role in innate antiviral immunity by directly lysing virus-infected cells and producing antiviral cytokines such as interferon gamma (IFNgamma). We developed a system for characterizing the bovine NK response to foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), which causes a dis...

  14. Direct inpatient burden caused by foot-related conditions: a multisite point-prevalence study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzarini, Peter A; Hurn, Sheree E; Kuys, Suzanne S; Kamp, Maarten C; Ng, Vanessa; Thomas, Courtney; Jen, Scott; Kinnear, Ewan M; d'Emden, Michael C; Reed, Lloyd

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aims of this point-prevalence study were to investigate a representative inpatient population to determine the prevalence of people admitted to hospital for the reason of a foot-related condition, and identify associated independent factors. Methods Participants were adult inpatients in 5 different representative hospitals, admitted for any reason on the day of data collection. Maternity, mental health and cognitively impaired inpatients were excluded. Participants were surveyed on a range of self-reported demographic, social determinant, medical history, foot disease history, self-care, footwear, past foot treatment prior to hospitalisation and reason for admission variables. Physical examinations were performed to clinically diagnose a range of foot disease and foot risk factor variables. Independent factors associated with being admitted to hospital for the primary or secondary reason of a foot-related condition were analysed using multivariate logistic regression. Results Overall, 733 participants were included; mean (SD) age 62 (19) years, male 55.8%. Foot-related conditions were the primary reason for admission in 54 participants (7.4% (95% CI 5.7% to 9.5%)); 36 for foot disease (4.9%), 15 foot trauma (2.1%). Being admitted for the primary reason of a foot-related condition was independently associated with foot infection, critical peripheral arterial disease, foot trauma and past foot treatment by a general practitioner and surgeon (pFoot-related conditions were a secondary reason for admission in 28 participants (3.8% (2.6% to 5.6%)), and were independently associated with diabetes and current foot ulcer (pfoot-related conditions is significantly higher than previously appreciated. Findings indicate 1 in every 13 inpatients was primarily admitted because of a foot-related condition with most due to foot disease or foot trauma. Future strategies are recommended to investigate and intervene in the considerable inpatient burden caused by foot

  15. Imaging features of foot osteoid osteoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla, Satyen; Clarke, Andrew W.; Saifuddin, Asif [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-15

    We performed a retrospective review of the imaging of nine patients with a diagnosis of foot osteoid osteoma (OO). Radiographs, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) had been performed in all patients. Radiographic features evaluated were the identification of a nidus and cortical thickening. CT features noted were nidus location (affected bone - intramedullary, intracortical, subarticular) and nidus calcification. MRI features noted were the presence of an identifiable nidus, presence and grade of bone oedema and whether a joint effusion was identified. Of the nine patients, three were female and six male, with a mean age of 21 years (range 11-39 years). Classical symptoms of OO (night pain, relief with aspirin) were identified in five of eight (62.5%) cases (in one case, the medical records could not be retrieved). In five patients the lesion was located in the hindfoot (four calcaneus, one talus), while four were in the mid- or forefoot (two metatarsal and two phalangeal). Radiographs were normal in all patients with hindfoot OO. CT identified the nidus in all cases (89%) except one terminal phalanx lesion, while MRI demonstrated a nidus in six of nine cases (67%). The nidus was of predominantly intermediate signal intensity on T1-weighted (T1W) sequences, with intermediate to high signal intensity on T2-weighted (T2W) sequences. High-grade bone marrow oedema, limited to the affected bone and adjacent soft tissue oedema was identified in all cases. In a young patient with chronic hindfoot pain and a normal radiograph, MRI features suggestive of possible OO include extensive bone marrow oedema limited to one bone, with a possible nidus demonstrated in two-thirds of cases. The presence or absence of a nidus should be confirmed with high-resolution CT. (orig.)

  16. Diabetic foot: prevalence, knowledge, and foot self-care practices among diabetic patients in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania – a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Chiwanga, Faraja S.; Njelekela, Marina A

    2015-01-01

    Background At the time of diagnosis, more than 10 % of people with type 2 diabetes mellitus have one or two risk factors for a foot ulceration and a lifetime risk of 15 %. Diabetic foot ulcers can be prevented through well-coordinated foot care services. The objective of this study was to determine knowledge of foot care and reported practice of foot self-care among diabetic patients with the aim of identifying and addressing barriers to preventing amputations among diabetic patients. Methods...

  17. Nonplantigrade Foot Posture: A Constraint on Dinosaur Body Size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai Kubo

    Full Text Available Dinosaurs had functionally digitigrade or sub-unguligrade foot postures. With their immediate ancestors, dinosaurs were the only terrestrial nonplantigrades during the Mesozoic. Extant terrestrial mammals have different optimal body sizes according to their foot posture (plantigrade, digitigrade, and unguligrade, yet the relationship of nonplantigrade foot posture with dinosaur body size has never been investigated, even though the body size of dinosaurs has been studied intensively. According to a large dataset presented in this study, the body sizes of all nonplantigrades (including nonvolant dinosaurs, nonvolant terrestrial birds, extant mammals, and extinct Nearctic mammals are above 500 g, except for macroscelid mammals (i.e., elephant shrew, a few alvarezsauroid dinosaurs, and nondinosaur ornithodirans (i.e., the immediate ancestors of dinosaurs. When nonplantigrade tetrapods evolved from plantigrade ancestors, lineages with nonplantigrade foot posture exhibited a steady increase in body size following Cope's rule. In contrast, contemporaneous plantigrade lineages exhibited no trend in body size evolution and were largely constrained to small body sizes. This evolutionary pattern of body size specific to foot posture occurred repeatedly during both the Mesozoic and the Cenozoic eras. Although disturbed by the end-Cretaceous extinction, species of mid to large body size have predominantly been nonplantigrade animals from the Jurassic until the present; conversely, species with small body size have been exclusively composed of plantigrades in the nonvolant terrestrial tetrapod fauna.

  18. Nonplantigrade Foot Posture: A Constraint on Dinosaur Body Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Tai; Kubo, Mugino O

    2016-01-01

    Dinosaurs had functionally digitigrade or sub-unguligrade foot postures. With their immediate ancestors, dinosaurs were the only terrestrial nonplantigrades during the Mesozoic. Extant terrestrial mammals have different optimal body sizes according to their foot posture (plantigrade, digitigrade, and unguligrade), yet the relationship of nonplantigrade foot posture with dinosaur body size has never been investigated, even though the body size of dinosaurs has been studied intensively. According to a large dataset presented in this study, the body sizes of all nonplantigrades (including nonvolant dinosaurs, nonvolant terrestrial birds, extant mammals, and extinct Nearctic mammals) are above 500 g, except for macroscelid mammals (i.e., elephant shrew), a few alvarezsauroid dinosaurs, and nondinosaur ornithodirans (i.e., the immediate ancestors of dinosaurs). When nonplantigrade tetrapods evolved from plantigrade ancestors, lineages with nonplantigrade foot posture exhibited a steady increase in body size following Cope's rule. In contrast, contemporaneous plantigrade lineages exhibited no trend in body size evolution and were largely constrained to small body sizes. This evolutionary pattern of body size specific to foot posture occurred repeatedly during both the Mesozoic and the Cenozoic eras. Although disturbed by the end-Cretaceous extinction, species of mid to large body size have predominantly been nonplantigrade animals from the Jurassic until the present; conversely, species with small body size have been exclusively composed of plantigrades in the nonvolant terrestrial tetrapod fauna. PMID:26790003

  19. Imaging of Charcot foot; Bildgebung des Charcot-Fusses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erlemann, Rainer; Schmitz, Annette [Helios Klinikum Duisburg, Helios St. Johannes Klinik, Duisburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    2014-03-15

    The onset of a Charcot foot ist a feared complication of a long lasting diabetes mellitus. A peripheral neuropathy and continuous weight bearing of the foot subsequent to repeated traumas depict the conditions. There exist three types of a Charcot foot, an atrophic, a hypertophic and a mixed type. In early stages a differentiation from osteoarthritis is difficult. Subluxation or luxation within the Lisfranc's joint is typical. The joints of the foot could rapidly and extensively be destroyed or may present the morphology of a 'superosteoarthritis'. Often, soft tissue infections or osteomyelitis evolve from ulcers of the skin as entry points. Diagnosis of osteomyelitis necessitate MR imaging as plain radiography offers only low sensitivity for detection of an osteomyelitis. The existence of periosteal reactions is not a proof for osteomyelitis. Bone marrow edema and soft tissue edema also appear in a non infected Charcot foot. The range of soft tissue infections goes from cellulitis over phlegmon to abscesses. The ghost sign is the most suitable diagnostic criterion for osteomyelitis. In addition, the penumbra sign or the existence of a sinus tract between a skin ulcer and the affected bone may be helpful. (orig.)

  20. MR imaging features of foot involvement in patients with psoriasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine alterations of the soft tissues, tendons, cartilage, joint spaces, and bones of the foot using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in patients with psoriasis. Materials and methods: Clinical and MR examination of the foot was performed in 26 consecutive patients (52 ft) with psoriasis. As a control group, 10 healthy volunteers (20 ft) were also studied. Joint effusion/synovitis, retrocalcaneal bursitis, retroachilles bursitis, Achilles tendonitis, soft-tissue edema, para-articular enthesophytes, bone marrow edema, sinus tarsi syndrome, enthesopathy at the Achilles attachment and at the plantar fascia attachment, plantar fasciitis, tenosynovitis, subchondral cysts, and bone erosions, joint space narrowing, subchondral signal changes, osteolysis, luxation, and sub-luxation were examined. Results: Clinical signs and symptoms (pain and swelling) due to foot involvement were present in none of the patients while frequency of involvement was 92% (24/26) by MR imaging. The most common MR imaging findings were Achilles tendonitis (acute and peritendinitis) (57%), retrocalcaneal bursitis (50%), joint effusion/synovitis (46%), soft-tissue edema (46%), and para-articular enthesophytes (38%). The most commonly involved anatomical region was the hindfoot (73%). Conclusion: Our data showed that the incidence of foot involvement was very high in asymptomatic patients with psoriasis on MR imaging. Further MR studies are needed to confirm these data. We conclude that MR imaging may be of importance especially in early diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory changes in the foot

  1. Nociception at the diabetic foot, an uncharted territory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ernst A Chantelau

    2015-01-01

    The diabetic foot is characterised by painless footulceration and/or arthropathy; it is a typical complicationof painless diabetic neuropathy. Neuropathy depletesthe foot skin of intraepidermal nerve fibre endings of theafferent A-delta and C-fibres, which are mostly nociceptorsand excitable by noxious stimuli only. However, someof them are cold or warm receptors whose functionsin diabetic neuropathy have frequently been reported.Hence, it is well established by quantitative sensory testingthat thermal detection thresholds at the foot skin increaseduring the course of painless diabetic neuropathy. Painperception (nociception), by contrast, has rarely beenstudied. Recent pilot studies of pinprick pain at plantardigital skinfolds showed that the perception thresholdwas always above the upper limit of measurement of 512mN (equivalent to 51.2 g) at the diabetic foot. However,deep pressure pain perception threshold at musculus abductor hallucis was beyond 1400 kPa (equivalent to 14 kg; limit of measurement) only in every fifth case. These discrepancies of pain perception between forefoot and hindfoot, and between skin and muscle, demand further study. Measuring nociception at the feet in diabetes opens promising clinical perspectives. A critical nociception threshold may be quantified (probably corresponding to a critical number of intraepidermal nerve fibre endings), beyond which the individual risk of a diabetic foot rises appreciably. Staging of diabetic neuropathy according to nociception thresholds at the feet is highly desirable as guidance to an individualised injury prevention strategy.

  2. Smart Diabetic Socks: Embedded device for diabetic foot prevention

    CERN Document Server

    Perrier, Antoine; Luboz, Vincent; Bucki, Marek; Cannard, Francis; Diot, Bruno; Colin, Denis; Rin, Delphine; Bourg, Jean-Philippe; Payan, Yohan

    2014-01-01

    1) Objectives Most foot ulcers are the consequence of a trauma (repetitive high stress, ill-fitting footwear, or an object inside the shoe) associated to diabetes. They are often followed by amputation and shorten life expectancy. This paper describes the prototype of the Smart Diabetic Socks that has been developed in the context of the French ANR TecSan project. The objective is to prevent pressure foot ulcers for diabetic persons. 2) Material and methods A fully wireless, customizable and washable "smart sock" has been designed. It is made of a textile which fibers are knitted in a way they provide measurements of the pressure exerted under and all around the foot in real-life conditions. This device is coupled with a subject-specific Finite Element foot model that simulates the internal strains within the soft tissues of the foot. 3) Results A number of derived stress indicators can be computed based on that analysis, such as the accumulated stress dose, high internal strains or peak pressures near bony p...

  3. MR imaging features of foot involvement in patients with psoriasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdem, C. Zuhal [Department of Radiology, Zonguldak Karaelmas University, School of Medicine, Zonguldak (Turkey)], E-mail: sunarerdem@yahoo.com; Tekin, Nilgun Solak [Department of Dermatology, Zonguldak Karaelmas University, School of Medicine, Zonguldak (Turkey); Sarikaya, Selda [Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, Zonguldak Karaelmas University, School of Medicine, Zonguldak (Turkey); Erdem, L. Oktay; Gulec, Sezen [Department of Radiology, Zonguldak Karaelmas University, School of Medicine, Zonguldak (Turkey)

    2008-09-15

    Objective: To determine alterations of the soft tissues, tendons, cartilage, joint spaces, and bones of the foot using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in patients with psoriasis. Materials and methods: Clinical and MR examination of the foot was performed in 26 consecutive patients (52 ft) with psoriasis. As a control group, 10 healthy volunteers (20 ft) were also studied. Joint effusion/synovitis, retrocalcaneal bursitis, retroachilles bursitis, Achilles tendonitis, soft-tissue edema, para-articular enthesophytes, bone marrow edema, sinus tarsi syndrome, enthesopathy at the Achilles attachment and at the plantar fascia attachment, plantar fasciitis, tenosynovitis, subchondral cysts, and bone erosions, joint space narrowing, subchondral signal changes, osteolysis, luxation, and sub-luxation were examined. Results: Clinical signs and symptoms (pain and swelling) due to foot involvement were present in none of the patients while frequency of involvement was 92% (24/26) by MR imaging. The most common MR imaging findings were Achilles tendonitis (acute and peritendinitis) (57%), retrocalcaneal bursitis (50%), joint effusion/synovitis (46%), soft-tissue edema (46%), and para-articular enthesophytes (38%). The most commonly involved anatomical region was the hindfoot (73%). Conclusion: Our data showed that the incidence of foot involvement was very high in asymptomatic patients with psoriasis on MR imaging. Further MR studies are needed to confirm these data. We conclude that MR imaging may be of importance especially in early diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory changes in the foot.

  4. Increased healing in diabetic toe ulcers in a multidisciplinary foot clinic—An observational cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almdal, Thomas Peter; Nielsen, A.A.; Nielsen, K.E.;

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study toe ulcer healing in patients with diabetic foot ulcers attending a multidisciplinary foot clinic over a 10 years period. METHODS: The study was retrospective, consecutive and observational during 2001 through 2011. The patients were treated according to the International Consensus on...... the Diabetic Foot. During the period the chiropodist staffing in the foot clinic was doubled; new offloading material and orthopedic foot corrections for recalcitrant ulcers were introduced. Healing was investigated in toe ulcers in Cox regression models. RESULTS: 2634 patients developed foot ulcers...

  5. Relationships between the Foot Posture Index and foot kinematics during gait in individuals with and without patellofemoral pain syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crossley Kay M

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foot posture assessment is commonly undertaken in clinical practice for the evaluation of individuals with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS, particularly when considering prescription of foot orthoses. However, the validity of static assessment to provide insight into dynamic function in individuals with PFPS is unclear. This study was designed to evaluate the extent to which a static foot posture measurement tool (the Foot Posture Index - FPI can provide insight into kinematic variables associated with foot pronation during level walking in individuals with PFPS and asymptomatic controls. Methods Twenty-six individuals (5 males, 21 females with PFPS aged 25.1 ± 4.6 years and 20 control participants (4 males, 16 females aged 23.4 ± 2.3 years were recruited into the study. Each participant underwent clinical evaluation of the FPI and kinematic analysis of the rearfoot and forefoot during walking using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. The association of the FPI score with rearfoot eversion, forefoot dorsiflexion, and forefoot abduction kinematic variables (magnitude, timing of peak and range of motion were evaluated using partial correlation coefficient statistics with gait velocity entered as a covariate. Results A more pronated foot type as measured by the FPI was associated with greater peak forefoot abduction (r = 0.502, p = 0.013 and earlier peak rearfoot eversion relative to the laboratory (r = -0.440, p = 0.031 in the PFPS group, and greater rearfoot eversion range of motion relative to the laboratory (r = 0.614, p = 0.009 in the control group. Conclusion In both individuals with and without PFPS, there was fair to moderate association between the FPI and some parameters of dynamic foot function. Inconsistent findings between the PFPS and control groups indicate that pathology may play a role in the relationship between static foot posture and dynamic function. The fair association between pronated foot

  6. Modelling and measurement of a wireless foot plantar pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khwaja Ramizuddin

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Foot plantar pressure is the pressure fields that act between the foot skin and its supporting surface that humans experience during daily activities. Information derived from such pressure is important for diagnosing lower limb problems, footwear design, sport biomechanics performance and injury prevention. This paper presents the design and implementation of a wireless data acquisition (DAQ for foot plantar pressure sensors. The system is intended for an in-shoe wireless pressure measurement system. The objective of this DAQ is to be a system which can be integrated into a shoe with the ability of wireless transmission to an external on body receiver. Such device provides low power consumption, convenient and comfortable testing system simulating a range of normal daily life activities.

  7. Comparative evaluations on dynamic simulation of foot traffic flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evaluation and optimization of emergency route systems can be accomplished with different engineering methods. These methods are based on two different principles: the macroscopic and the microscopic approach. Both allow forecasting of evacuation times for various settings. In the work presented simple settings are investigated, consisting of rooms, corridor and stairs with regard to evacuation times and foot traffic flows. These calculations use current computer simulation programs, based on microscopic models, and the macroscopic method of Predtechenskii and Milinskii. For the computer simulation we use ASERI 3.4c, buildingEXODUS V4.0 Level 2, PedGo Version 2.1.1 and Simulex 11.1.3. The comparison of the results shows that even for the simplest systems the evacuation times and foot traffic flows vary considerably with different simulation programs and deviate from experimental results. Furthermore we investigate the effects of the boundary conditions on the foot traffic flow. (orig.)

  8. Effects of Water Temperature during Foot Bath in Young Females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Masahiro; Tatsuya Saito, Tatsuya Saito; Kato, Toshiaki; Onodera, Sho

    2013-09-01

    We examined the effects of environmental and water temperatures of foot baths on pulse rate, blood pressure, mean skin temperature, salivary amylase (SA) activity, relaxation level and thermal sensation during winter. Five females participated in the study. The subjects rested in a chair for 20 min and the above-noted physiological reactions during the last 5 min of the resting period were recorded as baseline (BASE) values. Next, the subjects received a 15-min foot bath in water at 40 °C (WT40) or 45 °C (WT45), with a 15-min recovery period. Although SA is thought to be an indicator of stress via the sympathetic nervous system, we did not find a correlation between SA activity and relaxation state. We considered the possible effect of seasonal variation on the physiological reaction to foot bathing. PMID:24174706

  9. Translation-Invariant Representation for Cumulative Foot Pressure Images

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Shuai; Tan, Tieniu

    2010-01-01

    Human can be distinguished by different limb movements and unique ground reaction force. Cumulative foot pressure image is a 2-D cumulative ground reaction force during one gait cycle. Although it contains pressure spatial distribution information and pressure temporal distribution information, it suffers from several problems including different shoes and noise, when putting it into practice as a new biometric for pedestrian identification. In this paper, we propose a hierarchical translation-invariant representation for cumulative foot pressure images, inspired by the success of Convolutional deep belief network for digital classification. Key contribution in our approach is discriminative hierarchical sparse coding scheme which helps to learn useful discriminative high-level visual features. Based on the feature representation of cumulative foot pressure images, we develop a pedestrian recognition system which is invariant to three different shoes and slight local shape change. Experiments are conducted on...

  10. Hyperbaric oxygen in the treatment of a diabetic foot ulcer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davenport, Colin

    2012-02-01

    Although simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplant improves most complications of type 1 diabetes, suppression of the immune system increases the risk for infection. The authors report the case of a patient who, despite receiving a simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplant, subsequently developed neuro-ischemic ulcers of his right foot requiring repeated amputations. He then developed an infected ulcer of his remaining right big toe, with significant implications for his mobility. This ulcer proved resistant to multiple courses of antibiotics and care in a specialist foot clinic but resolved completely following a course of hyperbaric oxygen therapy. The role of hyperbaric oxygen in diabetic foot ulcers is not yet fully established but should be considered in resistant cases with vascular insufficiency and a significant infective component.

  11. Hyperbaric oxygen in the treatment of a diabetic foot ulcer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davenport, Colin

    2011-02-01

    Although simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplant improves most complications of type 1 diabetes, suppression of the immune system increases the risk for infection. The authors report the case of a patient who, despite receiving a simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplant, subsequently developed neuro-ischemic ulcers of his right foot requiring repeated amputations. He then developed an infected ulcer of his remaining right big toe, with significant implications for his mobility. This ulcer proved resistant to multiple courses of antibiotics and care in a specialist foot clinic but resolved completely following a course of hyperbaric oxygen therapy. The role of hyperbaric oxygen in diabetic foot ulcers is not yet fully established but should be considered in resistant cases with vascular insufficiency and a significant infective component.

  12. A rational recognition of interventional teatment for diabetic foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to program of vascular examination of diabetic foot, the first choice is vascular ultrasonography as the general survey, followed by CTA and MRA for assessment of bilateral lower extremities arterial morphological changes. Lastly, arterial angiography including DSA still remain as the gold standard for estimation. The main pathologic changes of diabetic foot including arteriolar and microvascular disorders induce the extremely important interventional treatment especially the local thrombolytic infusion to be the real practical management besides local PTA and stenting are furthermore in consideration. As a general metabolic disease, the serial treatment should also include promoting blood flow, removing blood stasis and improving microcirculation. Evaluation of interventional treatment for diabetic foot should undertake not only the vascular stenosis and restenosis, but also the relief of clinical symptom and improvement of amputation level. (authors)

  13. Progress in detailed modelling of low foot and high foot implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D. S.; Weber, C. R.; Eder, D. C.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Jones, O. S.; Kritcher, A. L.; Marinak, M. M.; Milovich, J. L.; Patel, P. K.; Robey, H. F.; Salmonson, J. D.; Sepke, S. M.

    2016-05-01

    Several dozen high convergence inertial confinement fusion ignition experiments have now been completed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These include both “low foot” experiments from the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) and more recent “high foot” experiments. At the time of the NIC, there were large discrepancies between simulated implosion performance and experimental data. In particular, simulations over predicted neutron yields by up to an order of magnitude, and some experiments showed clear evidence of mixing of ablator material deep into the hot spot that could not be explained at the time. While the agreement between data and simulation improved for high foot implosion experiments, discrepancies nevertheless remain. This paper describes the state of detailed modelling of both low foot and high foot implosions using 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D radiation hydrodynamics simulations with HYDRA. The simulations include a range of effects, in particular, the impact of the plastic membrane used to support the capsule in the hohlraum, as well as low-mode radiation asymmetries tuned to match radiography measurements. The same simulation methodology is applied to low foot NIC implosion experiments and high foot implosions, and shows a qualitatively similar level of agreement for both types of implosions. While comparison with the experimental data remains imperfect, a reasonable level of agreement is emerging and shows a growing understanding of the high-convergence implosions being performed on NIF.

  14. Virological investigation of hand, foot, and mouth disease in a tertiary care center in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavithra M Vijayaraghavan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD remains a common problem in India, yet its etiology is largely unknown as diagnosis is based on clinical characteristics. There are very few laboratory-based molecular studies on HFMD outbreaks. Aim: The aim of this study was to characterize HFMD-related isolates by molecular techniques. Settings and Design: Between 2005 and 2008, during two documented HFMD outbreaks, 30 suspected HFMD cases presented at the Outpatient Unit of the Department of Dermatology, Christian Medical College (CMC, Vellore. Seventy-eight clinical specimens (swabs from throat, mouth, rectum, anus, buttocks, tongue, forearm, sole, and foot were received from these patients at the Department of Clinical Virology, CMC, for routine diagnosis of hand, foot, and mouth disease. Materials and Methods: Samples from these patients were cultured in Vero and rhabdomyosarcoma (RD cell lines. Isolates producing enterovirus-like cytopathogenic effect (CPE in cell culture were identified by a nested reverse transcription-based polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and sequenced. The nucleotide sequences were analyzed using the BioEdit sequence program. Homology searches were performed using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST algorithm. Statistical Analysis used: The statistical analysis was performed using Epi Info version 6.04b and Microsoft Excel 2002 (Microsoft Office XP. Results: Of the 30 suspected HFMD cases, only 17 (57% were laboratory confirmed and Coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16 was identified as the etiological agent in all these cases. Conclusions: Coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16 was identified as the virus that caused the HFMD outbreaks in Vellore between 2005 and 2008. Early confirmation of HFMD helps to initiate control measures to interrupt virus transmission. In the laboratory, classical diagnostic methods, culture and serological tests are being replaced by molecular techniques. Routine surveillance systems will help understand the

  15. Three-dimensional measurement of foot arch in preschool children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Hsun-Wen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of flexible flatfoot is high among preschool-aged children, but the effects of treatment are inconclusive due to the unclear definitions of normal flatfoot. To date, a universally accepted evaluation method of the foot arch in children has not been completely established. Our aims of this study were to establish a new method to evaluate the foot arch from a three dimensional perspective and to investigate the flexibility of the foot arch among children aged from two to six. Methods A total of 44 children aged from two to six years of age were put into five age groups in this study. The navicular height was measured with one leg standing, and both feet were scanned separately in both sitting and one leg standing positions to compute the foot arch volume. The arch volume index, which represents the ratio of the difference in volume between sitting and one leg standing positions to the volume when sitting was calculated to demonstrate the flexibility of the foot arch. The differences of measured parameters between each aged group were analyzed by one-way ANOVA. Results The arch volumes when sitting and standing were highly correlated with the navicular height. The navicular height ranged from 15.75 to 27 mm, the arch volume when sitting ranged from 6,223 to 11,630 mm3, and the arch volume when standing from 3,111 to 7,848 mm3 from two to six years of age. The arch volume index showed a declining trend as age increased. Conclusion This study is the first to describe the foot arch with volume perspective in preschool-aged children. The foot arch volume was highly correlated with the navicular height. Research results show both navicular height index and arch volume index gradually increase with age from two to six. At the same time the arch also becomes rigid with age from two to six. These results could be applied for clinical evaluation of the foot arch and post-treatment evaluation.

  16. How To Prevent Foot Ulcers In Diabetic Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ghada Morshed

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of development of foot ulcers in diabetic patients is 4% to 10%, these ulcers may be infected, cause morbidity and may lead to lower extremity amputation.Objective: Prevention of diabetic foot ulcers in patients known to be diabetics by fasting blood sugar (FBS), HbA1C tests.Material and Methods: The study was done on 120 patients between March 2010 and July 2011 diagnosed as diabetics and they performed simple screening tests for peripheral neuropathy (Semmes-Weinstein monofil...

  17. Disaster in agriculture: or foot and mouth mobilities

    OpenAIRE

    John Law

    2006-01-01

    This paper is an exploration of the dynamics of the outbreak of foot and mouth disease in the United Kingdom in 2001. Following Perrow’s analysis of the catastrophic breakdown of technological systems, the author treats the UK agricultural system as a set of flows that are both tightly coupled and complex. This suggests that the stability of the agricultural system is precarious, and that when it is disrupted (as it was with the arrival of the foot and mouth virus) the consequences may be lar...

  18. Foot-printing of Protein Interactions by Tritium Labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new foot-printing method for mapping protein interactions has been developed, using tritium as a radioactive label. As residues involved in an interaction are less labeled when the complex is formed, they can be identified via comparison of the tritium incorporation of each residue of the bound protein with that of the unbound one. Application of this foot-printing method to the complex formed by the histone H3 fragment H3122-135 and the protein hAsflA1-156 afforded data in good agreement with NMR results. (authors)

  19. Effects of Water Temperature during Foot Bath in Young Females

    OpenAIRE

    Nishimura, Masahiro; Saito, Tatsuya; Kato, Toshiaki; Onodera, Sho

    2013-01-01

    We examined the effects of environmental and water temperatures of foot baths on pulse rate, blood pressure, mean skin temperature, salivary amylase (SA) activity, relaxation level and thermal sensation during winter. Five females participated in the study. The subjects rested in a chair for 20 min and the above-noted physiological reactions during the last 5 min of the resting period were recorded as baseline (BASE) values. Next, the subjects received a 15-min foot bath in water at 40 °C (WT...

  20. Stereophotogrammetry and relief photography in the assessment of foot disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craxford, A D; Rutherford, A; Evans, M S; Park, C

    1981-01-01

    Expanded polyethylene foam (Plastazote) is used in the treatment of rheumatoid, diabetic, and leprotic foot disorders. This paper describes a diagnostic use for this material. Two photographic techniques combine to give vivid and quantitative representations of foot deformities which are easily applicable to clinical use. Relief photography uses illumination to create an illusion of solidity in a 2-dimensional photography. Stereophotogrammetry produces contour plots from stereopairs of photographs of the Plastazote footprint. After use the impressions are trimmed and slipped into the patient's shoes in the same way as any other foam insole. Images PMID:7469529

  1. Ankle-foot orthosis function in low-level myelomeningocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hullin, M G; Robb, J E; Loudon, I R

    1992-01-01

    Six children with low-level myelomeningocele underwent gait analysis. All showed excessive ankle dorsiflexion and knee flexion when walking barefoot. A rigid thermoplastic ankle-foot orthosis (AFO) improved gait by preventing ankle dorsiflexion and reducing knee flexion. Biomechanically, the AFO caused a reduction in external knee moment by aligning the knee with the ground reaction force. Small changes in the foot-shank angle of the orthosis had profound effects on knee mechanics. Knee hyperextension could be controlled by a rocker sole. Kinetic gait analysis permits understanding of the biomechanical effects of orthoses. PMID:1613099

  2. Type 2 diabetes–related foot care knowledge and foot self-care practice interventions in the United States: a systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timethia Bonner

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this systematic literature review is to review published studies on foot care knowledge and foot care practice interventions as part of diabetic foot care self-management interventions. Methods: Medline, CINAHL, CENTRAL, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases were searched. References from the included studies were reviewed to identify any missing studies that could be included. Only foot care knowledge and foot care practice intervention studies that focused on the person living with type 2 diabetes were included in this review. Author, study design, sample, intervention, and results were extracted. Results: Thirty studies met the inclusion criteria and were classified according to randomized controlled trial (n=9, survey design (n=13, cohort studies (n=4, cross-sectional studies (n=2, qualitative studies (n=2, and case series (n=1. Improving lower extremity complications associated with type 2 diabetes can be done through effective foot care interventions that include foot care knowledge and foot care practices. Conclusion: Preventing these complications, understanding the risk factors, and having the ability to manage complications outside of the clinical encounter is an important part of a diabetes foot self-care management program. Interventions and research studies that aim to reduce lower extremity complications are still lacking. Further research is needed to test foot care interventions across multiple populations and geographic locations.

  3. Type 2 diabetes–related foot care knowledge and foot self-care practice interventions in the United States: a systematic review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, Timethia; Foster, Margaret; Spears-Lanoix, Erica

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this systematic literature review is to review published studies on foot care knowledge and foot care practice interventions as part of diabetic foot care self-management interventions. Methods Medline, CINAHL, CENTRAL, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases were searched. References from the included studies were reviewed to identify any missing studies that could be included. Only foot care knowledge and foot care practice intervention studies that focused on the person living with type 2 diabetes were included in this review. Author, study design, sample, intervention, and results were extracted. Results Thirty studies met the inclusion criteria and were classified according to randomized controlled trial (n=9), survey design (n=13), cohort studies (n=4), cross-sectional studies (n=2), qualitative studies (n=2), and case series (n=1). Improving lower extremity complications associated with type 2 diabetes can be done through effective foot care interventions that include foot care knowledge and foot care practices. Conclusion Preventing these complications, understanding the risk factors, and having the ability to manage complications outside of the clinical encounter is an important part of a diabetes foot self-care management program. Interventions and research studies that aim to reduce lower extremity complications are still lacking. Further research is needed to test foot care interventions across multiple populations and geographic locations. PMID:26899439

  4. Protocol for the Foot in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis trial (FiJIA): a randomised controlled trial of an integrated foot care programme for foot problems in JIA

    OpenAIRE

    Hendry Gordon J; Turner Deborah E; McColl John; Lorgelly Paula K; Sturrock Roger D; Watt Gordon F; Browne Michael; Gardner-Medwin Janet; Friel Lorraine; Woodburn Jim

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Foot and ankle problems are a common but relatively neglected manifestation of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Studies of medical and non-medical interventions have shown that clinical outcome measures can be improved. However existing data has been drawn from small non-randomised clinical studies of single interventions that appear to under-represent the adult population suffering from juvenile idiopathic arthritis. To date, no evidence of combined therapies or integrated ...

  5. Effectiveness of foot care education among people with type 2 diabetes in rural Puducherry, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Saurabh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The burden of diabetes and its foot complications is increasing in India. Prevention of these complications through foot care education should be explored. The objective of our study was to assess the risk factors of poor diabetic foot care and to find the effectiveness of health education in improving foot care practice among diabetes patients. Materials and Methods: A structured pre-tested questionnaire was administered to the outpatients of a rural health center with type 2 diabetes. Awareness regarding diabetes, care of diabetes and foot care practice ware assessed and scored. Individual and group health education focusing on foot care was performed. Foot care practice was reassessed after 2 weeks of education. Results: Only 54% were aware that diabetes could lead to reduced foot sensation and foot ulcers. Nearly 53% and 41% of the patients had good diabetes awareness and good diabetes care respectively. Only 22% of the patients had their feet examined by a health worker or doctor. The patients with poor, satisfactory and good practice scores were 44.7%, 35.9% and 19.4% respectively. Low education status, old age and low awareness regarding diabetes were the risk factors for poor practice of foot care. Average score for practice of foot care improved from 5.90 ± 1.82 to 8.0 ± 1.30 after 2 weeks of health education. Practice related to toe space examination, foot inspection and foot wear inspection improved maximally. Conclusion: Foot care education for diabetics in a primary care setting improves their foot care practice and is likely to be effective in reducing the burden of diabetic foot ulcer.

  6. An analysis of movement of 40 foot containers in a theater of operations

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, David K.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to analyze the United States Army doctrine regarding the movement of 40 foot containers in a contingency theater of operations. This thesis provides an overview of past challenges presented when shipping 40 foot containers to military operations, as well as current force development trends that are applicable to the movement of 40 foot containers. It examines the effects of employing 40 foot containers on the tactical maneuver units as well as the combat service ...

  7. Comparison of dynamic balance ability in healthy university students according to foot shape

    OpenAIRE

    Hyong, In Hyouk; Kang, Jong Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to compare dynamic balance ability according to foot shape, defined as normal, pronated, or supinated on the basis of the height of the medial arch. [Subjects] In this study, 14 subjects for the pronated foot group, 14 for the supinated foot group, and 14 for the normal foot group were selected from among 162 healthy university students by using the navicular drop test proposed by Brody. To measure dynamic balance ability, a star excursion balance test (SEBT) was co...

  8. Brachymetatarsia with accessory navicular in right foot: A rare coincidental finding

    OpenAIRE

    Pandey, Praveen Kumar; Pawar, Inder; Beniwal, Sandeep Kumar; Verma, Raaghav R.

    2016-01-01

    A 33 years old female patient presented with posttraumatic pain in the right foot for which radiographs of the right foot was advised. No fracture was detected on radiographs and patient was managed conservatively on medications and posterior splint immobilization. We found coincidentally a short fourth metatarsal and an accessory navicular bone in the right foot radiographs. After 3 weeks of immobilization, she underwent mobilization of the right foot, weight bearing and intensive physiother...

  9. Assessing the welfare impact of foot disorders in dairy cattle by a modeling approach

    OpenAIRE

    Bruijnis, M.R.N.; Beerda, B.; Hogeveen, H; Stassen, E.N.

    2012-01-01

    Foot disorders are the main cause of dairy cow lameness and are considered to have a major impact on the welfare of dairy cattle. This study adopts a modeling approach, using a dynamic stochastic model, to provide more insight into the welfare impact of different types of foot disorders, both clinical and subclinical. The impact of specific foot disorders on welfare was assessed by simulating the incidence and duration of foot disorders and the pain associated with them. Pain assessment was b...

  10. Healing times and prediction of wound healing in neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimny, S; Pfohl, M

    2005-02-01

    Time line of wound healing and prediction of healing times in diabetic foot ulcers is an important issue. Usually, the percentage of wounds healed within a defined period is used for characterization of wound healing. R=sqrtA/pi (R, radius; A, planimetric wound area; pi, constant 3.14), and the wound radius reduction was 0.39 mm/week which was previously established. The initial average wound area was 96.9+/-13.1 mm2 (mean+/-SEM), and 3.61+/-1.6 mm 2 after ten weeks with an average healing time of 75.9 (95 %-CI 71-81) days. Using the equation mentioned above and the calculated weekly wound radius reduction, the predicted healing time in the test group was 86.9 (95 %-CI 73-101) days. The predicted and the observed healing times were significantly correlated with each other (r=0.55, p=0.0002). Providing standard care, the time needed for wound healing can reliably be predicted in neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers. This may be a useful tool in daily clinical practice to predict wound healing and recognize ulcers who do not respond adequately to the treatment. PMID:15772900

  11. Venous velocity increase with a pneumatic foot compression garment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilgenfritz, F M; Meier, J R

    1994-11-01

    Intermittent compression garments have been widely accepted for prophylaxis of deep venous thrombosis. They have broad applicability in both elective and emergent situations. Development of a new type of garment that acts to compress the plantar plexus of the foot provides a potential method of prophylaxis for patients with contraindications to the traditional calf- or thigh-high garments. Evaluation of the ability of the foot compression garment demonstrates a statistically significant increase in peak femoral venous velocity (40.6 cm/sec) as compared with the resting state (25.9 cm/sec). This increase in femoral venous velocity is comparable to that seen with single-cell compression socks. The authors conclude that the recently introduced foot garment produces increases in peak femoral venous velocity similar to those produced by existing garments and that use of the foot compression garment may provide deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis in patients who previously have not been candidates for a compression garment. PMID:7978509

  12. Effect of Foot Massage on Physiological Edema During Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Rahimikian

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the most common and annoying problems during pregnancy is physiological foot edema that may cause activity restrictions during pregnancy for pregnant women. Present study aimed to determine the effect of foot massage on physiological edema during pregnancy. Methods: This study was non-randomized clinical trial and performed in 2012. 120 pregnant women aged 20 to 35 years were non randomly assigned to treatment and control groups. Treatment group, received 20 minutes daily foot massage during 5 days. Data were analyzes using SPSS statistical software, independent t-test and Mann-Whitney U test. Foot edema measured by using a measuring non- elastic tape on the leg. Results: The results indicates a statistically significant difference between the average of the feet environments (around the ankle, heel and metatarsal joints between the finger bones in both treatment and control groups (P<0.001. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that massage therapy is effective in reducing physiological edema during pregnancy. Therefor the lower limb massage can be performed by trained midwives and as a useful, low risk and low cost method in prenatal clinics or pregnant women homes.

  13. Foot-and-mouth disease: Host range and pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandersen, Søren; Mowat, N.

    In this chapter the host range of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) under natural and experimental conditions is reviewed. The routes and sites of infection, incubation periods and clinical and pathological findings are described and highlighted in relation to progress in understanding the pathogenesis...

  14. The Perceptual Experience of Slope by Foot and by Finger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajnal, Alen; Abdul-Malak, Daniel T.; Durgin, Frank H.

    2011-01-01

    Historically, the bodily senses have often been regarded as impeccable sources of spatial information and as being the teacher of vision. Here, the authors report that the haptic perception of slope by means of the foot is greatly exaggerated. The exaggeration is present in verbal as well as proprioceptive judgments. It is shown that this…

  15. Contact allergens in shoe leather among patients with foot eczema

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Coevorden, AM; Coenraads, PJ; Pas, HH; van der Valk, PGM

    2002-01-01

    Some patients with relapsing foot eczema and a shoe leather allergy, who fail to show positive results with standard series and shoe wear screening tray patch testing, do not respond to the use of hypoallergenic shoe leather. We assume that relevant allergens are present in hypoallergenic shoe leath

  16. The diabetic foot syndrome - fundamentals of infected wound treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risse, Alexander

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The unremittingly high percentage (50% of major amputations in diabetic foot syndrome remains an unsolved problem in the German health-care system. This article sheds light on the causes, considering somatological, psychiatric, and philosophical aspects. The fundamentals of treatment are presented: wound treatment, surgery, angiosurgery, etc., as well as problems of interdisciplinary cooperation.

  17. CASE STUDY OF LEECH APPLICATION IN DIABETIC FOOT ULCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarprakash P. Dwivedi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In diabetes, slight injury to the glucose laden tissue may cause chronic infection and ulcer formation. About 15% of all diabetic patients develops foot ulcer in their life time. The etiological factors include increased sugar level, diabetic micro angiopathy and peripheral neuropathy.Mainstay of treatment includes antibiotics, debridement, and local wound care and footwear improvisation. In spite of all advances in health sciences, statistics reveals that about 3% patients yet have to undergo lower limb amputation.In Sushrut samhita, we get the most scientific description of wound and its management. Similarly, Sushrut has given the utmost importance to Bloodletting therapy and considered Leech as the most unique and effective method of bloodletting even in infected wounds and abscesses.Aforesaid description led us to try Leech therapy in Diabetic foot ulcer. Patient with Diabetic foot ulcer was advised to continue anti diabetic medicine along with weekly application of Leech around the ulcer which was followed by dressing with Nimb-Haridra oil.This Leech therapy proved very effective and the ulcer healed completely within 30 days.However, further evaluation is required to be done by taking a large sample size to prove its significance in treating Diabetic foot ulcer and avoiding lower limb amputation.

  18. The diabetic foot syndrome - fundamentals of infected wound treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Risse, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    The unremittingly high percentage (50%) of major amputations in diabetic foot syndrome remains an unsolved problem in the German health-care system. This article sheds light on the causes, considering somatological, psychiatric, and philosophical aspects. The fundamentals of treatment are presented: wound treatment, surgery, angiosurgery, etc., as well as problems of interdisciplinary cooperation.

  19. Scenarios for eradicating foot-and-mouth disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, E.J.; Leeuwen, van M.G.A.; Vlieger, de J.J.

    2001-01-01

    Research project commissioned by the Ministery of Agriculture, Nature Management and Fisheries. With the help of desk-research and input-output analysis quantitative information is assembled about the differences in cost for agribusiness and tourism of two eradication scenarios for foot-and-mouth di

  20. Carriers of foot-and-mouth disease virus: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moonen, P.; Schrijver, R.

    2000-01-01

    This review describes current knowledge about persistent foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infections, the available methods to detect carrier animals, the properties of persisting virus, the immunological mechanisms, and the risk of transmission. In particular, knowledge about the carrier state,

  1. Mosaic Structure Of Foot-And-Mouth Disease Virus Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report the results of a simple pairwise scanning analysis designed to identify inter-serotype recombination events applied to genome data from 144 isolates of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) representing all seven serotypes. We identify large numbers of candidate recombinant fragments from a...

  2. Foot-and-mouth Disease Transmission in Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tekleghiorghis, T.; Moormann, R.J.M.; Weerdmeester, K.; Dekker, A.

    2016-01-01

    In Africa, for the control of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), more information is needed on the spread of the disease at local, regional and inter-regional level. The aim of this review is to identify the role that animal husbandry, trade and wildlife have on the transmission of FMD and to provide

  3. BigFoot: Bayesian alignment and phylogenetic footprinting with MCMC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miklós István

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously combined statistical alignment and phylogenetic footprinting to detect conserved functional elements without assuming a fixed alignment. Considering a probability-weighted distribution of alignments removes sensitivity to alignment errors, properly accommodates regions of alignment uncertainty, and increases the accuracy of functional element prediction. Our method utilized standard dynamic programming hidden markov model algorithms to analyze up to four sequences. Results We present a novel approach, implemented in the software package BigFoot, for performing phylogenetic footprinting on greater numbers of sequences. We have developed a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC approach which samples both sequence alignments and locations of slowly evolving regions. We implement our method as an extension of the existing StatAlign software package and test it on well-annotated regions controlling the expression of the even-skipped gene in Drosophila and the α-globin gene in vertebrates. The results exhibit how adding additional sequences to the analysis has the potential to improve the accuracy of functional predictions, and demonstrate how BigFoot outperforms existing alignment-based phylogenetic footprinting techniques. Conclusion BigFoot extends a combined alignment and phylogenetic footprinting approach to analyze larger amounts of sequence data using MCMC. Our approach is robust to alignment error and uncertainty and can be applied to a variety of biological datasets. The source code and documentation are publicly available for download from http://www.stats.ox.ac.uk/~satija/BigFoot/

  4. Metabolic Foot- and Fingerprinting of Lactobacillus paracasei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jäpelt, Kristina Bak

    the metabolome, and an increased understanding of bile response mechanisms could be obtained by analysis of the response by tools within metabolomics. Therefore, the aim of this PhD thesis was to develop a platform for metabolic foot- and fingerprinting of L. paracasei subsp. paracasei strain (L...

  5. Dorsalis pedis arterialized venous flap for hand and foot reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Guang; LEI Hong-yu; GUO Shuang; HUANG Jian-hua; YU Hao

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To report the results of repair of skin defects in the extremities with arterialized venous flap harvested from the lateral aspect of the dorsum of the foot.Methods:Six cases of skin and soft tissue defects over the foot and hands were resurfaced by free arterialized venous flaps,including five patients with skin defects of the hands,and one with defects at the dorsum of the foot.The flaps were harvested from the lateral aspect of the dorsum of the foot with the sizes ranging from 2 cm×5.5 cm to 6 cm×11 cm.Two veins at the proximal margin of the flap were retained,one of which was anastomosed to a recipient bed artery to provide arterial inflow and the other was anastomosed to a recipient bed vein for venous outflow.Results:All flaps demonstrated mild edema and survived completely.Blisters appeared on four flaps.Using this technique,we achieved good functional and cosmetic results in this series.Conclusions:Dorsalis pedis arterialized venous flap with rich vascular communications could enhance peripheral perfusion and decrease congestion of venous flaps,thereby improves reliability and utility for extremity reconstruction.

  6. Defying Death at the Foot of the Great Wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    ON August 15, 2002, world famousescapologist Robert Gallup gave a free performance at the foot of the Badaling Great Wall. It was for the benefit of young people from China’s western regions who cannot afford to continue their education."Defying death" is Gallup’s specialty. With the help of an assistant, he is tied up, and sus-

  7. Lumped-Parameter Models for Windturbine Footings on Layered Ground

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars

    lumped-parameter model to the results of a rigorous model or experimental results. In this paper, guidelines are given for the formulation of such lumped-parameter models and examples are given in which the models are utilised for the analysis of a wind turbine supported by a surface footing on a layered...

  8. Interdigital foot infections: Corynebacterium minutissimum and agents of superficial mycoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sariguzel, Fatma Mutlu; Koc, A. Nedret; Yagmur, Gülhan; Berk, Elife

    2014-01-01

    Interdigital foot infections are mostly caused initially by dermatophytes, yeasts and less frequently by bacteria. Erythrasma caused by Corynebacterium minutissimum can be confused with superficial mycoses. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of the etiologic agents of superficial mycoses and the frequency of Corynebacterium minutissimum in interdigital foot infections. All the samples obtained from the 121 patients with interdigital foot infections were examined directly with the use of 20% potassium hydroxide mounts and Gram stain under the microscope and cultured on Sabouraud’s dextrose agar plates. In identification of superficial mycoses, the rate was found to be 14% with the cultural method and 14% with direct microscopic examination. Using a combination of direct microscopic examination and culture, a 33.8% ratio was achieved. In the culture of these samples, the most isolated factor was Trichophyton rubrum (33.7%). In 24 of the patients (19.8%) Corynebacterium minutissimum was detected by Gram staining, in 6 of these patients Trichophyton rubrum was found, Trichophyton mentagrophytes was found in 2 and Trichosporon spp. was found in 1. The examination of interdigital foot lesions in the laboratory, the coexistence of erythrasma with dermatophytes and yeast should be considered. PMID:25477907

  9. Interdigital foot infections: Corynebacterium minutissimum and agents of superficial mycoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Mutlu Sariguzel

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Interdigital foot infections are mostly caused initially by dermatophytes, yeasts and less frequently by bacteria. Erythrasma caused by Corynebacterium minutissimum can be confused with superficial mycoses. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of the etiologic agents of superficial mycoses and the frequency of Corynebacterium minutissimum in interdigital foot infections. All the samples obtained from the 121 patients with interdigital foot infections were examined directly with the use of 20% potassium hydroxide mounts and Gram stain under the microscope and cultured on Sabouraud's dextrose agar plates. In identification of superficial mycoses, the rate was found to be 14% with the cultural method and 14% with direct microscopic examination. Using a combination of direct microscopic examination and culture, a 33.8% ratio was achieved. In the culture of these samples, the most isolated factor was Trichophyton rubrum (33.7%. In 24 of the patients (19.8% Corynebacterium minutissimum was detected by Gram staining, in 6 of these patients Trichophyton rubrum was found, Trichophyton mentagrophytes was found in 2 and Trichosporon spp. was found in 1. The examination of interdigital foot lesions in the laboratory, the coexistence of erythrasma with dermatophytes and yeast should be considered.

  10. The correction of complex foot deformities using Ilizarov's distraction osteotomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paley, D

    1993-08-01

    Twenty-five very complex foot deformities were treated by Ilizarov distraction osteotomies. The osteotomy types included supramalleolar, U, V, posterior calcaneal, talocalcaneal neck, midfoot, and metatarsal osteotomies. In addition, the leg was lengthened and widened in most cases. The mean treatment time was 6.4 months. There were 20 minor or major complications related to the foot osteotomies in 18 feet, including deep pin-tract infection in three, failure of osteotomy separation in nine, acute postoperative tarsal tunnel syndrome in two, toe contractures in three, wire breakage or cutout in two, and buckle fracture in one. Nineteen secondary procedures were required in 13 patients to treat these complications. The final result was a plantigrade foot in 22 in late follow-up evaluation. The three nonplantigrade feet were attributable to unrecognized heel varus in one, ball and socket ankle joint in one, and partial growth arrest progressive deformity in one. Gait was improved in all cases. Pain was eliminated in all but two patients. Based on these criteria, the results were judged to be satisfactory in 22 and unsatisfactory in three. The Ilizarov method can successfully correct complex foot deformities despite complications. PMID:8339516

  11. Foot Loading Characteristics of Different Graduations of Partial Weight Bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusinde, Johannes; Pauser, Johannes; Swoboda, Bernd; Gelse, Kolja; Carl, Hans-Dieter

    2011-01-01

    Limited weight bearing of the lower extremity is a commonly applied procedure in orthopaedic rehabilitation after reconstructive forefoot surgery, trauma surgery and joint replacement. The most frequent limitations are given as percentage of body weight (BW) and represent 10 or 50% BW. The extent of foot loading under these graduations of partial…

  12. Onate's Foot: Remembering and Dismembering in Northern New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Michael L.

    2008-01-01

    This essay analyzes the historical construction of "Spanish" icons in northern New Mexico and the complex Hispanic and Chicano identities they both evoke and mask. It focuses on the January 1998 vandalism of a statue depicting New Mexico's first Spanish colonial governor, Don Juan de Onate. The removal of the Onate statue's foot references a…

  13. Novel antiviral therapeutics to control foot-and-mouth disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes a highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals. Vaccines require approximately 7 days to induce protection, thus prior to this time vaccinated animals are still susceptible to the disease. Our group has previously shown that swine inoculated with 1x10...

  14. Copper Sulfate Foot Baths on Dairies and Crop Toxicities

    Science.gov (United States)

    A rising concern with the application of dairy wastes to agricultural fields is the accumulation of copper (Cu) in the soil. Copper sulfate (CuSO4) from cattle foot baths are washed out of dairy barns and into wastewater lagoons. The addition of CuSO4 baths has been reported to increase Cu concent...

  15. [The benefits of foot reflexology in nursing homes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonnet, Karine

    2012-01-01

    Massages, following the foot reflexology method, were given to patients in a nursing home suffering from Alzheimer's disease or related disorders. A methodical assessment, on a small sample of patients, showed a significant reduction in neuropsychiatric manifestations, opening up new perspectives for non-medication based therapy for the care of elderly dependent people. PMID:23301302

  16. Patient education for preventing diabetic foot ulceration (Review)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorresteijn, J.A.; Kriegsman, D.M.; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Valk, G.D.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ulceration of the feet, which can result in loss of limbs and even death, is one of the major health problems for people with diabetes mellitus. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of patient education on the prevention of foot ulcers in patients with diabetes mellitus. SEARCH METHODS: Eli

  17. Recurring hand foot mouth disease in a child

    OpenAIRE

    Edwin Dias; Meena Dias

    2012-01-01

    Hand Foot Mouth Disease (HFMD) is a viral infection of children caused by Coxsackie virus A-16, a type of enterovirus. Individual cases and outbreaks of HFMD occur worldwide. There are reports of HFMD epidemics from India. Recurrence of HFMD is very rare. We report here, a sporadic case of recurrent HFMD.

  18. ONYCHOMADESIS IN A CHILD - SEQUELAE OF HAND - FOOT - MOUTH DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    Adhikrishnan; Poornima; Murugan; Mahalakshmi; Sudha

    2015-01-01

    Hand – Foot – Mouth disease of coxsackie a virus and Enteroviruses. With symptoms like fever, sore throat, followed by Maculopapular and vesicular lesions around the oral cavity, palms and soles and recently adding to the list is onychomadesis. As a result of nail matrix function arrest, there is transverse ridging (beau’s lines), tempo...

  19. Infrared thermal imaging for automated detection of diabetic foot complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Netten, van Jaap J.; Baal, van Jeff G.; Liu, Chanjuan; Heijden, van der Ferdi; Bus, Sicco A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although thermal imaging can be a valuable technology in the prevention and management of diabetic foot disease, it is not yet widely used in clinical practice. Technological advancement in infrared imaging increases its application range. The aim was to explore the first steps in the ap

  20. Novel approaches to foot-and-mouth disease vaccine development

    Science.gov (United States)

    The need for better Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccines is not new, a report from the Research Commission on FMD, authored by F. Loeffler and P. Frosch in 1897, highlighted the need for developing a vaccine against FMD and qualified this as a devastating disease causing “severe economic damage to ...