WorldWideScience

Sample records for characterize competitive binding

  1. Characterization of competitive binding of Eu(III)/Cu(II) and Eu(III)/Ca(II) to Gorleben humic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marang, L.; Reiller, P.E. [CEA Saclay, Lab Speciat Radionucledies and Mol, DEN, DANS, DPC, SECR, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Marang, L.; Benedetti, M.F. [Univ Paris Diderot, Lab Geochim Eaux, IPGP, F-75251 Paris 05 (France); Marang, L.; Benedetti, M.F. [CNRS, UMR 71574, F-75251 Paris 05 (France); Eidner, S.; Kumke, M. [Univ Potsdam, Inst Chem, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    Complete text of publication follows: In an area that contains high concentrations of natural organic matter, it is expected to play an important role on the speciation of trivalent radionuclides. Competitive interactions with H{sup +} and major cations, e.g. Ca{sup 2+} or Mg{sup 2+}, could influence these metals transport and bioavailability. Competitive experiments between Eu{sup 3+} and cations which can bind differently to humic substances, would bring an improved understanding of the competitive mechanisms. The aim of this study is to acquire data for Eu(III)/Cu(II) and Eu(III)/Ca(II) competitive binding to a sedimentary-originated humic acid (Gorleben, Germany). The NICA-Donnan parameters [1] for Ca(II), Cu(II), and Eu(III) obtained from competitive binding experiments using Ca{sup 2+} or Cu{sup 2+} ion selective electrodes (ISE), were used to model time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy (TRLS) measurements. Then the TRL spectra and decay times were interpreted to check the consistency of the modelling. From ISE data, Eu(III) and Cu(II) are in direct competition for the same type of sites, whereas Ca(II) has an indirect influence through electrostatic binding. The spectroscopic interpretation of the competition experiments showed two strikingly different environments for the Eu(III)/Cu(II) and Eu(III)/Ca(II) systems. Cu(II) seems to expel more effectively Eu(III) into an aqueous like environment within the humic acid structure, i.e., the Donnan phase, and to the aqueous phase as free Eu{sup 3+}. This is evidenced both from the spectra as well as from the decrease in the luminescence decay times. Moreover, Ca(II) causes a slighter modification of the chemical environment of the humic-complexed Eu(III). [1] Kinniburgh et al. (1999) Colloids Surf. A 151, 147-166

  2. Spectroscopic characterization of the competitive binding of Eu(III), Ca(II), and Cu(II) to a sedimentary originated humic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marang, L.; Reiller, P.E. [CEA Saclay, Nucl Energy Div, DPC SECR, Lab Speciat Radionucleides and Mol, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Marang, L.; Benedetti, M.F. [Univ Paris 07, Lab Geochim Eaux, IPGP UMR CNRS 7154, F-75205 Paris 13 (France); Eidner, S.; Kumke, M.U. [Univ Potsdam, Inst Chem, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    The competition between REE, alkaline earth and d-transition metals for organic matter binding sites is still an open field of research; particularly, the mechanisms governing these phenomena need to be characterized in more detail. In this study, we examine spectroscopically the mechanisms of competitive binding of Eu(III)/Cu(II) and Eu(III)/Ca(II) pair to Gorleben humic acid (HA), as previously proposed in the framework of the NICA-Donnan model. The evolution of time-resolved laser induced luminescence spectra of humic-complexed Eu(Ill) showed two strikingly different environments for a comparable bound proportion for Cu(II) and Ca(II). Cu(II) seems to compete more effectively with Eu(III) inducing its release into the Donnan phase, and into the bulk solution as free Eu{sup 3+}. This is evidenced both by the shapes of the spectra and by the decrease in the luminescence decay times. In contrast with that, Ca(II) induces a modification of the HA structure, which enhances the luminescence of humic-bound Eu(III), and causes a minor modification of the chemical environment of the complexed rare earth ion. (authors)

  3. Competitive protein binding assay for piritrexim

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woolley, J.L. Jr.; Ringstad, J.L.; Sigel, C.W. (Wellcome Research Laboratories, Research Triangle Park, NC (USA))

    1989-09-01

    A competitive protein binding assay for piritrexim (PTX, 1) that makes use of a commercially available radioassay kit for methotrexate has been developed. After it is selectively extracted from plasma, PTX competes with ({sup 125}I)methotrexate for binding to dihydrofolate reductase isolated from Lactobacillus casei. Free drug is separated from bound drug by adsorption to dextran-coated charcoal. Piritrexim is measurable over a range of 0.01 to 10.0 micrograms/mL in plasma with a coefficient of variation less than 15%. The limit of sensitivity of the assay is approximately 2 ng/mL. An excellent correlation between this assay and a previously published HPLC method was found.

  4. Exploiting Receptor Competition to Enhance Nanoparticle Binding Selectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angioletti-Uberti, Stefano

    2017-02-01

    Nanoparticles functionalized with multiple ligands can be programed to bind biological targets depending on the receptors they express, providing a general mechanism exploited in various technologies, from selective drug delivery to biosensing. For binding to be highly selective, ligands should exclusively interact with specific targeted receptors, because the formation of bonds with other, untargeted ones would lead to nonspecific binding and potentially harmful behavior. This poses a particular problem for multivalent nanoparticles, because even very weak bonds can collectively lead to strong binding. A statistical mechanical model is used here to describe how competition between different receptors together with multivalent effects can be harnessed to design ligand-functionalized nanoparticles insensitive to the presence of untargeted receptors, preventing nonspecific binding.

  5. Evaluation of dissociation constants from competition binding experiments based on the relative binding ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozelka, Jiří

    2011-02-01

    Methods probing protein-DNA associations include direct binding titrations and competition binding experiments. For the latter, we present here a simple procedure allowing the quantitative evaluation of dissociation constants. We show that the ratio between the fraction of a DNA probe bound to protein in the absence of competitor and that in the presence of competitor is, at large competitor concentrations, a linear function of the competitor concentration, and we derive equations allowing the dissociation constant for the protein-competitor complex to be evaluated from the slope. We show further that a self-competition experiment, where the DNA probe and competitor are chemically the same species, can be used as a complement to a direct titration to determine the fraction of protein that is correctly folded for specific DNA binding. Thus, such a combination of direct and self-competition titration can be used as a check of the conformational purity of DNA binding proteins. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Using electrospray ionization FTICR mass spectrometry to study competitive binding of inhibitors to carbonic anhydrase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, X.; Chen, R.; Bruce, J.E.; Schwartz, B.L.; Anderson, G.A.; Hofstadler, S.A.; Gale, D.C.; Smith, R.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Gao, J.; Sigal, G.B.; Mammen, M.; Whitesides, G.M. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1995-08-30

    We report a method based on mass spectrometry for the characterization of noncovalent complexes of proteins with mixtures of ligands; this method is relevant to the study of drug leads and may be useful in screening libraries for tight-binding compounds. This study describes the competitive binding of inhibitors derived from para-substituted benzenesulfonamides to bovine carbonic anhydrase II (BCAII, EC 4.2.1.1) using this technique. Relative binding constants and structural information for a mixture of inhibitors can be obtained in a single experiment using ESI-FTICR-MS. The work demonstrates that ESI-MS has significant potential for measuring relative binding affinities and characterizing the structures of ligands associated noncovalently to proteins. We have detected noncovalent complexes in the gas phase for ligands having values of K{sub b} as low as 1.7 x 10{sup 6} M{sup -1} in solution. The technique also allowed identification of tightbinding ligands from small libraries. The structures of inhibitors having similar masses can be identified by the high-resolution and multistep dissociation mass spectrometry of which FTICR is uniquely capable. This range of capabilities for ESI-FTICR-MS should be widely useful in medicinal chemistry. 22 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Characterization of (/sup 3/H)paroxetine binding in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcusson, J.O.; Bergstroem, M.E.; Eriksson, K.; Ross, S.B.

    1988-06-01

    The binding of the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, serotonin) uptake inhibitor (3H)paroxetine to rat cortical homogenates has been characterized. The effect of tissue concentration was examined and, with 0.75 mg wet weight tissue/ml in a total volume of 1,600 microliter, the binding was optimized with an apparent dissociation constant (KD) of 0.03-0.05 nM. Competition experiments with 5-HT, citalopram, norzimeldine, and desipramine revealed a high (90%) proportion of displaceable binding that fitted a single-site binding model. Fluoxetine and imipramine revealed, in addition to a high-affinity (nanomolar) site, also a low-affinity (micromolar) site representing approximately 10% of the displaceable binding. The specificity of the (3H)paroxetine binding was emphasized by the fact that 5-HT was the only active neurotransmitter bound and that the serotonin S1 and S2 antagonist methysergide was without effect on the binding. Both 5-HT- and fluoxetine-sensitive (3H)paroxetine binding was completely abolished after protease treatment, suggesting that the binding site is of protein nature. Saturation studies with 5-HT (100 microM) sensitive (3H)paroxetine binding were also consistent with a single-site binding model, and the binding was competitively inhibited by 5-HT and imipramine. The number of binding sites (Bmax) for 5-HT-sensitive (3H)paroxetine and (3H)imipramine binding was the same, indicating that the radioligands bind to the same sites. Lesion experiments with p-chloroamphetamine resulted in a binding in frontal and parietal cortices becoming undetectable and a greater than 60% reduction in the striatum and hypothalamus, indicating a selective localization on 5-HT terminals. Together these findings suggest that (3H)paroxetine specifically and selectively labels the substrate recognition site for 5-HT uptake in rat brain.

  8. Competition from Cu(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) in Pb(II) binding to Suwannee River Fulvic Acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chakraborty, P.; Chakrabarti, C.L.

    2008-01-01

    This is a study of trace metal competition in the complexation of Pb(II) by well-characterized humic substances, namely Suwannee River Fulvic Acid (SRFA) in model solutions. It was found that Cu(II) seems to compete with Pb(II) for strong binding sites of SRFA when present at the same concentration

  9. The Role of Competitive Inhibition and Top-Down Feedback in Binding during Object Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatte, Dean; Herd, Seth; Mingus, Brian; O’Reilly, Randall

    2012-01-01

    How does the brain bind together visual features that are processed concurrently by different neurons into a unified percept suitable for processes such as object recognition? Here, we describe how simple, commonly accepted principles of neural processing can interact over time to solve the brain’s binding problem. We focus on mechanisms of neural inhibition and top-down feedback. Specifically, we describe how inhibition creates competition among neural populations that code different features, effectively suppressing irrelevant information, and thus minimizing illusory conjunctions. Top-down feedback contributes to binding in a similar manner, but by reinforcing relevant features. Together, inhibition and top-down feedback contribute to a competitive environment that ensures only the most appropriate features are bound together. We demonstrate this overall proposal using a biologically realistic neural model of vision that processes features across a hierarchy of interconnected brain areas. Finally, we argue that temporal synchrony plays only a limited role in binding – it does not simultaneously bind multiple objects, but does aid in creating additional contrast between relevant and irrelevant features. Thus, our overall theory constitutes a solution to the binding problem that relies only on simple neural principles without any binding-specific processes. PMID:22719733

  10. Competitive inhibition of the uptake of demethylphalloin by cholic acid in isolated hepatocytes. Evidence for a transport competition rather than a binding competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzinger, E

    1981-07-01

    Cholic acid inhibits the uptake of demethylphalloin (DMP), in a competitive manner. The bile acid increases the Michaelis constant but not Vmax of the inward transport. The inhibition constant Ki for cholate was found to be 8 microM. Cholate competes for the transport system but not for intracellular binding of phallotoxins. Various experimental data presented in this paper exclude an accumulation of phallotoxins in hepatocytes by intracellular binding only. Preincubation of hepatocytes with small concentration of either (3H)-demethylphalloin or (14C)-cholate and subsequent treatment with high concentrations of the non-labelled compounds reduces the intracellular concentration of both radioactive substrates. In accordance with earlier findings the above results suggest a common component needed for the transport of both phallotoxins and cholic acid.

  11. Fulvic acid-sulfide ion competition for mercury ion binding in the Florida everglades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, M.M.; Aiken, G.R.

    2001-01-01

    Negatively charged functional groups of fulvic acid compete with inorganic sulfide ion for mercury ion binding. This competition is evaluated here by using a discrete site-electrostatic model to calculate mercury solution speciation in the presence of fulvic acid. Model calculated species distributions are used to estimate a mercury-fulvic acid apparent binding constant to quantify fulvic acid and sulfide ion competition for dissolved inorganic mercury (Hg(II)) ion binding. Speciation calculations done with PHREEQC, modified to use the estimated mercury-fulvic acid apparent binding constant, suggest that mercury-fulvic acid and mercury-sulfide complex concentrations are equivalent for very low sulfide ion concentrations (about 10-11 M) in Everglades' surface water. Where measurable total sulfide concentration (about 10-7 M or greater) is present in Everglades' surface water, mercury-sulfide complexes should dominate dissolved inorganic mercury solution speciation. In the absence of sulfide ion (for example, in oxygenated Everglades' surface water), fulvic acid binding should dominate Everglades' dissolved inorganic mercury speciation.

  12. Selective Nitrate Binding in Competitive Hydrogen Bonding Solvents: Do Anion–π Interactions Facilitate Nitrate Selectivity?**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Michelle M.; Zakharov, Lev N.

    2013-01-01

    New tripodal urea receptors demonstrate preferential binding of anions over competitive hydrogen bonding solvents. 1H NMR titrations in 10% DMSO-d6/CDCl3 show a higher affinity for nitrate over the halides for the fluorinated receptor, which is lost when the fluorines are removed. An “anion–π” interaction between the nitrate and the π-system of the ethynyl-substituted arene is proposed as the source of this selectivity. PMID:23939999

  13. A competitive binding between O2 and epoxy with carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Jung Tsai

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Simulation and observation reveal a competitive binding between O2 and epoxy with carbon nanotubes. Air absorption limits tube-polymer interacting coverage and weakens the van der Waals forces. As O2 is removed the tube-polymer strongly couples and coupling is conformed in a parallel fashion. Electron microscopy verifies tubes to be weakly bonded with polymer and band-shifts of raman arise from air pressure acting on C-C bonds.

  14. A competitive binding between O2 and epoxy with carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsin-Jung; Su, Yu-Ying; Tseng, Chao-Chi; Hsu, Wen-Kuang

    2017-09-01

    Simulation and observation reveal a competitive binding between O2 and epoxy with carbon nanotubes. Air absorption limits tube-polymer interacting coverage and weakens the van der Waals forces. As O2 is removed the tube-polymer strongly couples and coupling is conformed in a parallel fashion. Electron microscopy verifies tubes to be weakly bonded with polymer and band-shifts of raman arise from air pressure acting on C-C bonds.

  15. Characterization of inhibitor binding to human kinesin spindle protein by site-directed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, C Gary; Torrent, Maricel; Williams, Olusegun; Hamilton, Kelly A; Buser, Carolyn A

    2009-04-01

    A number of inhibitors of kinesin spindle protein (KSP) have been described, which are known from X-ray crystallography studies to bind to an induced fit pocket defined by the L5 loop. We describe the characterization of eight mutant forms of KSP in which six residues that line this pocket have been altered. Mutants were analyzed by measuring rates of enzyme catalysis, in the presence and absence of six KSP inhibitors of four diverse structural classes and of varied ATP-competition status. Our analysis was in agreement with the model of binding established by the structural studies and suggests that binding energy is well distributed across functional groups in these molecules. The majority of the mutants retained significant enzymatic activity while diminishing inhibitor binding, indicating potential for the development of drug resistance. These data provide detailed information on interactions between inhibitor and binding pocket at the functional group level and enable the development of novel KSP inhibitors.

  16. Isolation and characterization of iron chelators from turmeric (Curcuma longa): selective metal binding by curcuminoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messner, Donald J; Surrago, Christine; Fiordalisi, Celia; Chung, Wing Yin; Kowdley, Kris V

    2017-10-01

    Iron overload disorders may be treated by chelation therapy. This study describes a novel method for isolating iron chelators from complex mixtures including plant extracts. We demonstrate the one-step isolation of curcuminoids from turmeric, the medicinal food spice derived from Curcuma longa. The method uses iron-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)-agarose, to which curcumin binds rapidly, specifically, and reversibly. Curcumin, demethoxycurcumin, and bisdemethoxycurcumin each bound iron-NTA-agarose with comparable affinities and a stoichiometry near 1. Analyses of binding efficiencies and purity demonstrated that curcuminoids comprise the primary iron binding compounds recovered from a crude turmeric extract. Competition of curcuminoid binding to the iron resin was used to characterize the metal binding site on curcumin and to detect iron binding by added chelators. Curcumin-Iron-NTA-agarose binding was inhibited by other metals with relative potency: (>90% inhibition) Cu2+ ~ Al3+ > Zn2+ ≥ Ca2+ ~ Mg2+ ~ Mn2+ (80% by addition of iron to the media; uptake was completely restored by desferoxamine. Ranking of metals by relative potencies for blocking curcumin uptake agreed with their relative potencies in blocking curcumin binding to iron-NTA-agarose. We conclude that curcumin can selectively bind toxic metals including iron in a physiological setting, and propose inhibition of curcumin binding to iron-NTA-agarose for iron chelator screening.

  17. Machine learning competition in immunology – Prediction of HLA class I binding peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Guang Lan; Ansari, Hifzur Rahman; Bradley, Phil

    2011-01-01

    Experimental studies of immune system and related applications such as characterization of immune responses against pathogens, vaccine design, or optimization of therapies are combinatorially complex, time-consuming and expensive. The main methods for large-scale identification of T-cell epitopes...... of peptide binding, therefore, determines the accuracy of the overall method. Computational predictions of peptide binding to HLA, both class I and class II, use a variety of algorithms ranging from binding motifs to advanced machine learning techniques ( [Brusic et al., 2004] and [Lafuente and Reche, 2009...

  18. Competition for DNA binding sites using Promega DNA IQ™ paramagnetic beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frégeau, Chantal J; De Moors, Anick

    2012-09-01

    The Promega DNA IQ™ system is easily amenable to automation and has been an integral part of standard operating procedures for many forensic laboratories including those of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) since 2004. Due to some failure to extract DNA from samples that should have produced DNA using our validated automated DNA IQ™-based protocol, the competition for binding sites on the DNA IQ™ magnetic beads was more closely examined. Heme from heavily blooded samples interfered slightly with DNA binding. Increasing the concentration of Proteinase K during lysis of these samples did not enhance DNA recovery. However, diluting the sample lysate following lysis prior to DNA extraction overcame the reduction in DNA yield and preserved portions of the lysates for subsequent manual or automated extraction. Dye/chemicals from black denim lysates competed for binding sites on the DNA IQ™ beads and significantly reduced DNA recovery. Increasing the size or number of black denim cuttings during lysis had a direct adverse effect on DNA yield from various blood volumes. The dilution approach was successful on these samples and permitted the extraction of high DNA yields. Alternatively, shortening the incubation time for cell lysis to 30 min instead of the usual overnight at 56 °C prevented competition from black denim dye/chemicals and increased DNA yields. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Spectral characterization and DNA binding properties of lanthanide(III)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... with CT-DNA was investigated using absorption spectrophotometry. Based on spectral changes, groove binding of complexes to DNA is suggested. KEY WORDS: Lanthanide(III) complexes, 2-Acetylpyridine isonicotinoylhydrazone, Spectral characterization, DNA binding. Bull. Chem. Soc. Ethiop. 2016, 30(2), 221-230.

  20. Characterizing Student Experiences in Physics Competitions: The Power of Emotions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Rachel F.; Nashon, S.; Anderson, D.

    2006-12-01

    Low enrolment and motivation are key issues in physics education and recently the affective dimension of learning is being studied for evidence of its influence on student attitudes towards physics. Physics Olympics competitions are a novel context for stimulating intense emotional experiences. In this study, one team of students and their teacher were interviewed and observed prior to and during the event to characterize their emotions and determine the connections between their experiences and learning and attitudes/motivation towards physics. Results showed that certain types of events stimulated strong emotions of frustration and ownership, and that students’ attitudes were that physics is fun, diverse and relevant. Analysis of these themes indicated that the nature of emotions generated was connected to their attitudes towards physics. This finding points to the potential and value of informal and novel contexts in creating strong positive emotions, which have a strong influence on student attitudes towards physics.

  1. Competitive binding assay using fluorescence resonance energy transfer for the identification of calmodulin antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Bethel; Deo, Sapna K; Bachas, Leonidas G; Daunert, Sylvia

    2005-01-01

    The ubiquitous calcium regulating protein calmodulin (CaM) has been utilized as a model drug target in the design of a competitive binding fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay for pharmacological screening. The protein was labeled by covalently attaching the thiol-reactive fluorophore, N-[2-(1-maleimidyl)ethyl]-7-(diethylamino)coumarin-3-carboxamide (MDCC) to an engineered C-terminal cysteine residue. Binding of the environmentally sensitive hydrophobic probe 2,6-anilinonaphthalene sulfonate (2,6-ANS) to CaM could be monitored by an increase in the fluorescence emission intensity of the 2,6-ANS. Evidence of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from 2,6-ANS (acting as a donor) to MDCC (the acceptor in this system) was also observed; fluorescence emission representative of MDCC could be seen after samples were excited at a wavelength specific for 2,6-ANS. The FRET signal was monitored as a function of the concentration of calmodulin antagonists in solution. Calibration curves for both a selection of small molecules and a series of peptides based upon known CaM-binding domains were obtained using this system. The assay demonstrated dose-dependent antagonism by analytes known to hinder the biological activity of CaM. These data indicate that the presence of molecules known to bind CaM interfere with the ability of FRET to occur, thus leading to a concentration-dependent decrease of the ratio of acceptor:donor fluorescence emission. This assay can serve as a general model for the development of other protein binding assays intended to screen for molecules with preferred binding activity.

  2. Characterization of ( sup 3 H)alprazolam binding to central benzodiazepine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCabe, R.T.; Mahan, D.R.; Smith, R.B.; Wamsley, J.K. (Neuropsychiatric Research Institute, Fargo, ND (USA))

    1990-10-01

    The binding of the triazolobenzodiazepine ({sup 3}H)alprazolam was studied to characterize the in vitro interactions with benzodiazepine receptors in membrane preparations of rat brain. Studies using nonequilibrium and equilibrium binding conditions for ({sup 3}H)alprazolam resulted in high specific to nonspecific (signal to noise) binding ratios. The binding of ({sup 3}H)alprazolam was saturable and specific with a low nanomolar affinity for benzodiazepine receptors in the rat brain. The Kd was 4.6 nM and the Bmax was 2.6 pmol/mg protein. GABA enhanced ({sup 3}H)alprazolam binding while several benzodiazepine receptor ligands were competitive inhibitors of this drug. Compounds that bind to other receptor sites had a very weak or negligible effect on ({sup 3}H)alprazolam binding. Alprazolam, an agent used as an anxiolytic and in the treatment of depression, acts in vitro as a selective and specific ligand for benzodiazepine receptors in the rat brain. The biochemical binding profile does not appear to account for the unique therapeutic properties which distinguish this compound from the other benzodiazepines in its class.

  3. Glucose Sensors Based on Microcapsules Containing an Orange/Red Competitive Binding Resonance Energy Transfer Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHINNAYELKA, SWETHA; McSHANE, and MICHAEL J.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent sensing systems offer the potential for noninvasive monitoring with implantable devices, but they require carrier technologies that provide suitable immobilization, accessibility, and biocompatibility while maintaining adequate response characteristics. A recent development towards this goal is a highly specific and sensitive competitive binding assay for glucose using apo-glucose oxidase (apo-GOx) as the recognition element and dextran as the competing ligand; this has been demonstrated as a glucose sensor system by encapsulating the competitive binding assay in semipermeable microcapsule carriers. This paper describes the extension of this sensor design to longer wavelengths in an attempt to increase the applicability to in vivo monitoring. The glucose sensitivity of the tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate-dextran (TD) and cyanine Cy5-apo-GOx (CAG) complexes showed five to 10 times greater specificity for β-D-glucose over other sugars. Microcapsules loaded with TD/CAG complexes exhibited a linear, totally reversible response in the range of 0–720 mg/dL, with a sensitivity (percent change in intensity ratio) of 0.06%/(mg/dL). The decrease in sensitivity observed with the use of longer-wavelength dyes is most likely to be compensated with the deeper penetration of light and reduced tissue scattering. These findings imply that the encapsulation of sensing assay elements in microcapsules is a simple and translatable method for the fabrication of stable biosensors, and optimization of resonance energy transfer pairs and assay component preparation will further improve the response to approach clinically relevant performance. PMID:16800748

  4. Evaluation of Cu(i) binding to the E2 domain of the amyloid precursor protein - a lesson in quantification of metal binding to proteins via ligand competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Tessa R; Wedd, Anthony G; Xiao, Zhiguang

    2018-01-24

    The extracellular domain E2 of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) features a His-rich metal-binding site (denoted as the M1 site). In conjunction with surrounding basic residues, the site participates in interactions with components of the extracellular matrix including heparins, a class of negatively charged polysaccharide molecules of varying length. This work studied the chemistry of Cu(i) binding to APP E2 with the probe ligands Bcs, Bca, Fz and Fs. APP E2 forms a stable Cu(i)-mediated ternary complex with each of these anionic ligands. The complex with Bca was selected for isolation and characterization and was demonstrated, by native ESI-MS analysis, to have the stoichiometry E2 : Cu(i) : Bca = 1 : 1 : 1. Formation of these ternary complexes is specific for the APP E2 domain and requires Cu(i) coordination to the M1 site. Mutation of the M1 site was consistent with the His ligands being part of the E2 ligand set. It is likely that interactions between the negatively charged probe ligands and a positively charged patch on the surface of APP E2 are one aspect of the generation of the stable ternary complexes. Their formation prevented meaningful quantification of the affinity of Cu(i) binding to the M1 site with these probe ligands. However, the ternary complexes are disrupted by heparin, allowing reliable determination of a picomolar Cu(i) affinity for the E2/heparin complex with the Fz or Bca probe ligands. This is the first documented example of the formation of stable ternary complexes between a Cu(i) binding protein and a probe ligand. The ready disruption of the complexes by heparin identified clear 'tell-tale' signs for diagnosis of ternary complex formation and allowed a systematic review of conditions and criteria for reliable determination of affinities for metal binding via ligand competition. This study also provides new insights into a potential correlation of APP functions regulated by copper binding and heparin interaction.

  5. Competition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bridoux, F.; Vodosek, M.; Den Hartog, D.N.; McNett, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Competition traditionally refers to the actions that firms take in a product market to outperform rivals in attracting customers and generating revenues. Yet, competition extends beyond product markets to other arenas such as factor markets, where firms compete for resources, and the political

  6. Computational fragment-based binding site identification by ligand competitive saturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olgun Guvench

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Fragment-based drug discovery using NMR and x-ray crystallographic methods has proven utility but also non-trivial time, materials, and labor costs. Current computational fragment-based approaches circumvent these issues but suffer from limited representations of protein flexibility and solvation effects, leading to difficulties with rigorous ranking of fragment affinities. To overcome these limitations we describe an explicit solvent all-atom molecular dynamics methodology (SILCS: Site Identification by Ligand Competitive Saturation that uses small aliphatic and aromatic molecules plus water molecules to map the affinity pattern of a protein for hydrophobic groups, aromatic groups, hydrogen bond donors, and hydrogen bond acceptors. By simultaneously incorporating ligands representative of all these functionalities, the method is an in silico free energy-based competition assay that generates three-dimensional probability maps of fragment binding (FragMaps indicating favorable fragment:protein interactions. Applied to the two-fold symmetric oncoprotein BCL-6, the SILCS method yields two-fold symmetric FragMaps that recapitulate the crystallographic binding modes of the SMRT and BCOR peptides. These FragMaps account both for important sequence and structure differences in the C-terminal halves of the two peptides and also the high mobility of the BCL-6 His116 sidechain in the peptide-binding groove. Such SILCS FragMaps can be used to qualitatively inform the design of small-molecule inhibitors or as scoring grids for high-throughput in silico docking that incorporate both an atomic-level description of solvation and protein flexibility.

  7. Competitive binding of phenylbutazone and colchicine to serum albumin in multidrug therapy: A spectroscopic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sułkowska, A.; Maciążek-Jurczyk, M.; Bojko, B.; Równicka, J.; Zubik-Skupień, I.; Temba, E.; Pentak, D.; Sułkowski, W. W.

    2008-06-01

    The binding sites for phenylbutazone and colchicine were identified in tertiary structure of bovine and human serum albumin with the use of spectrofluorescence analysis. It was found that phenylbutazone has two binding sites in both sera albumins (HSA and BSA), while colchicine has one binding site in BSA as well as in HSA. The comparison of the quenching effect of BSA and HSA fluorescence by phenylbutazone and colchicine allows us to identify subdomain IIA in protein as the binding site for these two drugs. In this subdomain tryptophan 214 is located. The participation of tyrosyl and tryptophanyl residues of protein was also estimated in the drug-albumin complex. The comparison of quenching of fluorescence of HSA and BSA excited at 280 nm with that at 295 nm allowed us to state that the participation of tyrosyl residues of albumin in the phenylbutazone-serum albumin interaction is significant. The analysis of quenching of fluorescence of BSA in the binary and ternary systems showed that phenylbutazone does not affect the complex formed between colchicine and BSA. Similarly, colchicine has no effect on the Phe-BSA complex. However marked differences were observed for the complex with HSA. On the basis of Ka and KQ values it was concluded that colchicine may probably cause displacement of phenylbutazone from its complex with serum albumin (SA). Static and dynamic quenching for the binary and ternary systems is also discussed. The competition of phenylbutazone and colchicine in binding to serum albumin should be taken into account in the multi-drug therapy.

  8. Studies on the competitive binding of cleviprex and flavonoids to plasma protein by multi-spectroscopic methods: A prediction of food-drug interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Guo, Xue-Yuan; Xu, Liang; Liu, Bin; Zhou, Ling-Ling; Wang, Xiao-Fang; Wang, Dan; Sun, Ting

    2017-10-01

    Cleviprex is a short-acting dihydropyridine calcium channel antagonist used as an antihypertensive drug. In this work, the binding characterization of cleviprex to human serum albumin (HSA) and the competitive binding to HSA between cleviprex and two flavonoids, baicalin and rutin, were studied using multi-spectroscopic techniques and molecular docking method. The fluorescence quenching of HSA by cleviprex was initiated by the formation of HSA-cleviprex complex, which was confirmed by UV-vis spectra measurements. The results of thermodynamic analysis and molecular docking revealed that the hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonding were the major acting forces in stabilizing HSA-cleviprex complex. The results of substitution experiments and molecular docking demonstrated that cleviprex was mainly situated within the site I of HSA. Baicalin and rutin could reduce the values of binding constant and enhance the values of binding distance of cleviprex binding to HSA because they bind to the same binding site. The results of synchronous fluorescence and CD spectra suggested that the binding reaction of cleviprex to HSA could give rise to the changes of protein conformation and the combined actions of cleviprex and flavonoids could cause further changes of HSA conformation. Consequently, the intakes of flavonoid-rich foods and beverages should be lessened under the treatment of cleviprex to avoid food-drug interactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Production and Characterization of Desmalonichrome Relative Binding Affinity for Uranyl Ions in Relation to Other Siderophores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mo, Kai-For; Dai, Ziyu; Wunschel, David S.

    2016-06-24

    Siderophores are Fe binding secondary metabolites that have been investigated for their uranium binding properties. Much of the previous work has focused on characterizing hydroxamate types of siderophores, such as desferrioxamine B, for their uranyl binding affinity. Carboxylate forms of these metabolites hold potential to be more efficient chelators of uranyl, yet they have not been widely studied and are more difficult to obtain. Desmalonichrome is a carboxylate siderophore which is not commercially available and so was obtained from the ascomycete fungus Fusarium oxysporum cultivated under Fe depleted conditions. The relative affinity for uranyl binding of desmalonichrome was investigated using a competitive analysis of binding affinities between uranyl acetate and different concentrations of iron(III) chloride using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). In addition to desmalonichrome, three other siderophores, including two hydroxamates (desferrioxamine B and desferrichrome) and one carboxylate (desferrichrome A) were studied to understand their relative affinities for the uranyl ion at two pH values. The binding affinities of hydroxymate siderophores to uranyl ion were found to decrease to a greater degree at lower pH as the concentration of Fe (III) ion increases. On the other hand, lowering pH has little impact on the binding affinities between carboxylate siderophores and uranyl ion. Desmalonichrome was shown to have the greatest relative affinity for uranyl at any pH and Fe(III) concentration. These results suggest that acidic functional groups in the ligands are critical for strong chelation with uranium at lower pH.

  10. Structural, Biochemical, and Biophysical Characterization of Idelalisib Binding to Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase δ*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somoza, John R.; Koditek, David; Villaseñor, Armando G.; Novikov, Nikolai; Wong, Melanie H.; Liclican, Albert; Xing, Weimei; Lagpacan, Leanna; Wang, Ruth; Schultz, Brian E.; Papalia, Giuseppe A.; Samuel, Dharmaraj; Lad, Latesh; McGrath, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    Idelalisib (also known as GS-1101, CAL-101, IC489666, and Zydelig) is a PI3Kδ inhibitor that has recently been approved for the treatment of several hematological malignancies. Given its use in human diseases, we needed a clear picture of how idelalisib binds to and inhibits PI3Kδ. Our data show that idelalisib is a potent and selective inhibitor of the kinase activity of PI3Kδ. A kinetic characterization clearly demonstrated ATP-competitive inhibition, and several additional biochemical and biophysical assays showed that the compound binds reversibly and noncovalently to the kinase. A crystal structure of idelalisib bound to the p110δ subunit of PI3Kδ furthers our understanding of the binding interactions that confer the potency and selectivity of idelalisib. PMID:25631052

  11. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy competitive binding biosensor development utilizing surface modification of silver nanocubes and a citrulline aptamer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Brian M.; Jackson, George W.; Deutz, Nicolaas; Cote, Gerard

    2017-07-01

    A point-of-care (PoC) device with the ability to detect biomarkers at low concentrations in bodily fluids would have an enormous potential for medical diagnostics outside the central laboratory. One method to monitor analytes at low concentrations is by using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). In this preliminary study toward using SERS for PoC biosensing, the surface of colloidal silver (Ag) nanocubes has been modified to test the feasibility of a competitive binding SERS assay utilizing aptamers against citrulline. Specifically, Ag nanocubes were functionalized with mercaptobenzoic acid, as well as a heterobifunctional polyethylene glycol linker that forms an amide bond with the amino acid citrulline. After the functionalization, the nanocubes were characterized by zeta-potential, transmission electron microscopy images, ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy, and by SERS. The citrulline aptamers were developed and tested using backscattering interferometry. The data show that our surface modification method does work and that the functionalized nanoparticles can be detected using SERS down to a 24.5 picomolar level. Last, we used microscale thermophoresis to show that the aptamers bind to citrulline with at least a 50 times stronger affinity than other amino acids.

  12. Competitive counterion complexation allows the true host : guest binding constants from a single titration by ionic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessêgo, Márcia; Basílio, Nuno; Muñiz, M Carmen; García-Río, Luis

    2016-07-06

    Counterion competitive complexation is a background process currently ignored by using ionic hosts. Consequently, guest binding constants are strongly affected by the design of the titration experiments in such a way that the results are dependent on the guest concentration and on the presence of added salts, usually buffers. In the present manuscript we show that these experimental difficulties can be overcome by just considering the counterion competitive complexation. Moreover a single titration allows us to obtain not only the true binding constants but also the stoichiometry of the complex showing the formation of 1 : 1 : 1 (host : guest : counterion) complexes. The detection of high stoichiometry complexes is not restricted to a single titration experiment but also to a displacement assay where both competitive and competitive-cooperative complexation models are taken into consideration.

  13. Surface structural ion adsorption modeling of competitive binding of oxyanions by metal (hydr)oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiemstra, T.; Riemsdijk, W.H. van [Wageningen Univ. and Research Centre (Netherlands)

    1999-02-01

    An important challenge in surface complexation models (SCM) is to connect the molecular microscopic reality to macroscopic adsorption phenomena. This study elucidates the primary factor controlling the adsorption process by analyzing the adsorption and competition of PO{sub 4}, AsO{sub 4}, and SeO{sub 3}. The authors show that the structure of the surface-complex acting in the dominant electrostatic field can be ascertained as the primary controlling adsorption factor. The surface species of arsenate are identical with those of phosphate and the adsorption behavior is very similar. On the basis of the selenite adsorption, The authors show that the commonly used 1pK models are incapable to incorporate in the adsorption modeling the correct bidentate binding mechanism found by spectroscopy. The use of the bidentate mechanism leads to a proton-oxyanion ratio and corresponding pH dependence that are too large. The inappropriate intrinsic charge attribution to the primary surface groups and the condensation of the inner sphere surface complex to a point charge are responsible for this behavior of commonly used 2pK models. Both key factors are differently defined in the charge distributed multi-site complexation (CD-MUSIC) model and are based in this model on a surface structural approach. The CD-MUSIC model can successfully describe the macroscopic adsorption phenomena using the surface speciation and binding mechanisms as found by spectroscopy. The model is also able to predict the anion competition well. The charge distribution in the interface is in agreement with the observed structure of surface complexes.

  14. Characterization of [3H]flunitrazepam binding to melanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testorf, M F; Kronstrand, R; Svensson, S P; Lundström, I; Ahlner, J

    2001-11-15

    In both clinical and forensic toxicology, the analysis of hair for drugs is an important tool to determine drug use in the past or to verify abstinence from illegal drugs during extended periods. Melanin is proposed as one of the factors that influences drug incorporation to hair and we have characterized the binding of the drug flunitrazepam to melanin in vitro. The drug was 3H labeled and melanin granules from cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis, were used according to the suggested standard for melanin studies. We observed a rapid Langmuir-like binding followed by a slower diffusion-limited binding that may be interpreted as an initial surface binding followed by deeper bulk binding. From three concentrations of melanin, with a 60-min incubation time, a mean saturation value of 180 +/- 20 pmol/mg was calculated. The binding of a group of benzodiazepines and tranquilizers was compared to the binding of [3H]flunitrazepam by means of displacement experiments. These drugs showed binding characteristics similar to [3H]flunitrazepam except phenobarbital, which had a lower affinity to melanin. The method presented in this study allowed measurements with low melanin and drug concentrations and it has the strength of directly measuring the amount of drug bound to melanin, in contrast to previous indirect methods. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  15. Characterization of Palytoxin Binding to HaCaT Cells Using a Monoclonal Anti-Palytoxin Antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Florio

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Palytoxin (PLTX is the reference compound for a group of potent marine biotoxins, for which the molecular target is Na+/K+-ATPase. Indeed, ouabain (OUA, a potent blocker of the pump, is used to inhibit some PLTX effects in vitro. However, in an effort to explain incomplete inhibition of PLTX cytotoxicity, some studies suggest the possibility of two different binding sites on Na+/K+-ATPase. Hence, this study was performed to characterize PLTX binding to intact HaCaT keratinocytes and to investigate the ability of OUA to compete for this binding. PLTX binding to HaCaT cells was demonstrated by immunocytochemical analysis after 10 min exposure. An anti-PLTX monoclonal antibody-based ELISA showed that the binding was saturable and reversible, with a Kd of 3 × 10−10 M. However, kinetic experiments revealed that PLTX binding dissociation was incomplete, suggesting an additional, OUA-insensitive, PLTX binding site. Competitive experiments suggested that OUA acts as a negative allosteric modulator against high PLTX concentrations (0.3–1.0 × 10−7 M and possibly as a non-competitive antagonist against low PLTX concentrations (0.1–3.0 × 10−9 M. Antagonism was supported by PLTX cytotoxicity inhibition at OUA concentrations that displaced PLTX binding (1 × 10−5 M. However, this inhibition was incomplete, supporting the existence of both OUA-sensitive and -insensitive PLTX binding sites.

  16. Estimation of single-nucleotide polymorphism allele frequency by alternately binding probe competitive polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Naohiro; Tani, Hidenori; Morita, Nao; Kurata, Shinya; Nakamura, Kazunori; Kanagawa, Takahiro; Tsuneda, Satoshi; Sekiguchi, Yuji

    2008-02-11

    Estimation of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) allele frequency in pooled DNA samples is a promising approach to clarify the relationships between SNPs and diseases. Here, we present a simple, accurate, and cost-effective method for estimating SNP allele frequency, called alternately binding probe (ABProbe) competitive polymerase chain reaction (ABC-PCR) that entails no expensive devices for real-time fluorescence measurement and complex post-PCR steps. We prepared DNA pools of PCR products derived from homozygous samples of three different SNPs (ALDH2, GNB3, and HTR2A) in different portions, and the allele frequencies of these samples were estimated by ABC-PCR. Two alleles were coamplified by PCR with a fluorescent probe that binds to either alleles, and then fluorescence intensity was measured using a simple fluorometer. The ratio of the two alleles was calculated from the fluorescence intensity of the probe at the end-point. The estimated allele frequencies strongly correlated to the expected ratios for all three SNPs with high accuracy. When the allele frequencies were more than 5%, the relative standard deviations (R.S.D.s) of ABC-PCR were less than 20%. Moreover, we also confirmed that this method was applicable to SNP genotyping.

  17. High-performance liquid chromatographic postcolumn reaction detection based on a competitive binding system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Przyjazny, A.; Kjellstroem, T.L.; Bachas, L.G. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington (USA))

    1990-12-01

    Postcolumn reactions are typically employed to improve detection in high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation techniques. This study proposes the use of competitive binding principles in designing novel postcolumn reaction schemes. The feasibility of this approach was tested by using the HPLC determination of biotin and biocytin as a model system. The effluent from the HPLC column was merged with a reagent stream containing avidin, whose bindings sites were occupied by the dye HABA (2-(4{prime}-hydroxyphenylazo)benzoic acid). HABA was displaced by the analytes from the avidin-HABA complex and the free dye was determined with a UV-vis detector at 345 nm. The procedure was optimized with respect to reactor design, reagent concentrations, and the flow rate of reagent solution. Analytical characteristics of the developed procedure were determined and compared with the direct detection of biotin and biocytin at 220 nm. The postcolumn reaction scheme improved the selectivity and sensitivity of the detection of biotin and biocytin while maintaining similar detection limits.

  18. Characterization of an aldolase-binding site in the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscaglia, Carlos A; Penesetti, Deepak; Tao, Mingyuan; Nussenzweig, Victor

    2006-01-20

    The thrombospondin-related anonymous protein (TRAP) is an essential transmembrane molecule in Plasmodium sporozoites. TRAP displays adhesive motifs on the extracellular portion, whereas its cytoplasmic tail connects to actin via aldolase, thus driving parasite motility and host cell invasion. The minimal requirements for the TRAP binding to aldolase were scanned here and found to be shared by different human proteins, including the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp) family members. In vitro and in vivo binding of WASp members to aldolase was characterized by biochemical, deletion mapping, mutagenesis, and co-immunoprecipitation studies. As in the case of TRAP, the binding of WASp to aldolase is competitively inhibited by the enzyme substrate/products. Furthermore, TRAP and WASp, but not other unrelated aldolase binders, compete for the binding to the enzyme in vitro. Together, our results define a conserved aldolase binding motif in the WASp family members and suggest that aldolase modulates the motility and actin dynamics of mammalian cells. These findings along with the presence of similar aldolase binding motifs in additional human proteins, some of which indeed interact with aldolase in pull-down assays, suggest supplementary, non-glycolytic roles for this enzyme.

  19. Further biochemical characterization of Mycobacterium leprae laminin-binding proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A.M. Marques

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that the alpha2 chain of laminin-2 present on the surface of Schwann cells is involved in the process of attachment of Mycobacterium leprae to these cells. Searching for M. leprae laminin-binding molecules, in a previous study we isolated and characterized the cationic proteins histone-like protein (Hlp and ribosomal proteins S4 and S5 as potential adhesins involved in M. leprae-Schwann cell interaction. Hlp was shown to bind alpha2-laminins and to greatly enhance the attachment of mycobacteria to ST88-14 Schwann cells. In the present study, we investigated the laminin-binding capacity of the ribosomal proteins S4 and S5. The genes coding for these proteins were PCR amplified and their recombinant products were shown to bind alpha2-laminins in overlay assays. However, when tested in ELISA-based assays and in adhesion assays with ST88-14 cells, in contrast to Hlp, S4 and S5 failed to bind laminin and act as adhesins. The laminin-binding property and adhesin capacity of two basic host-derived proteins were also tested, and only histones, but not cytochrome c, were able to increase bacterial attachment to ST88-14 cells. Our data suggest that the alanine/lysine-rich sequences shared by Hlp and eukaryotic H1 histones might be involved in the binding of these cationic proteins to laminin.

  20. Desethylamiodarone is a competitive inhibitor of the binding of thyroid hormone to the thyroid hormone alpha 1-receptor protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beeren, H. C.; Bakker, O.; Wiersinga, W. M.

    1995-01-01

    Desethylamiodarone (DEA), the major metabolite of the potent antiarrythmic drug amiodarone, is a non-competitive inhibitor of the binding of thyroid hormone (T3) to the beta 1-thyroid hormone receptor (T3R). In the present study, we investigated whether DEA acts in a similar way with respect to the

  1. Competition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

      The Staff Association is organising a competition from April 11 to 20. There are several Go Sport gift vouchers with a value of 50 € each to win. Try your luck! To participate, you just have to be a member of the Staff Association and take the online quiz: https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/content/jeu-concours. The winners will be drawn among the correct answers.

  2. Competition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

      The Staff Association is organising a competition from 13 to 21 December 2016. There are several Go Sport vouchers to win with a value of 50 € each. Try your luck! To participate, you just have to be a member of the Staff Association and take the online quiz: https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/content/jeu-concours-de-noel. The winners will be drawn among the correct answers.

  3. Competition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Get ready for the Easter Egg Hunt! The Staff Association is organising a competition from 10 to 21 April 2017. There are several Go Sport gift vouchers to win, with a value of 50 € each. Try your luck! Count the number of different eggs that we have hidden on our website. Then indicate your answer in the online form. To participate, you just need to be a member of the Staff Association. Winners will be randomly drawn among the correct answers.

  4. Binding of Signal Recognition Particle Gives Ribosome/Nascent Chain Complexes a Competitive Advantage in Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhof, Andrea; Rolls, Melissa M.; Jungnickel, Berit; Kalies, Kai-Uwe; Rapoport, Tom A.

    1998-01-01

    Most secretory and membrane proteins are sorted by signal sequences to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane early during their synthesis. Targeting of the ribosome-nascent chain complex (RNC) involves the binding of the signal sequence to the signal recognition particle (SRP), followed by an interaction of ribosome-bound SRP with the SRP receptor. However, ribosomes can also independently bind to the ER translocation channel formed by the Sec61p complex. To explain the specificity of membrane targeting, it has therefore been proposed that nascent polypeptide-associated complex functions as a cytosolic inhibitor of signal sequence- and SRP-independent ribosome binding to the ER membrane. We report here that SRP-independent binding of RNCs to the ER membrane can occur in the presence of all cytosolic factors, including nascent polypeptide-associated complex. Nontranslating ribosomes competitively inhibit SRP-independent membrane binding of RNCs but have no effect when SRP is bound to the RNCs. The protective effect of SRP against ribosome competition depends on a functional signal sequence in the nascent chain and is also observed with reconstituted proteoliposomes containing only the Sec61p complex and the SRP receptor. We conclude that cytosolic factors do not prevent the membrane binding of ribosomes. Instead, specific ribosome targeting to the Sec61p complex is provided by the binding of SRP to RNCs, followed by an interaction with the SRP receptor, which gives RNC–SRP complexes a selective advantage in membrane targeting over nontranslating ribosomes. PMID:9436994

  5. Comparison of three methods for competitive binding of monoclonal antibodies - The localization of antigenic sites for monoclonal antibodies on Panulirus interruptus hemocyanin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perton, FG; Dijkema, JH; Smilda, T; vanUffelen, BE; Beintema, JJ

    1996-01-01

    The competitive binding of a panel of monoclonal antibodies against hemocyanin of Panulirus interruptus hemocyanin was investigated with three different methods, A competitive-binding immunoassay method was more successful in the determination of ternary complexes than gel electrophoresis and gel

  6. Mapping the ADF/cofilin binding site on monomeric actin by competitive cross-linking and peptide array: evidence for a second binding site on monomeric actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannherz, Hans Georg; Ballweber, Edda; Galla, Marco; Villard, Sylvie; Granier, Claude; Steegborn, Clemens; Schmidtmann, Anja; Jaquet, Kornelia; Pope, Brian; Weeds, Alan G

    2007-02-23

    The binding sites for actin depolymerising factor (ADF) and cofilin on G-actin have been mapped by competitive chemical cross-linking using deoxyribonuclease I (DNase I), gelsolin segment 1 (G1), thymosin beta4 (Tbeta4), and vitamin D-binding protein (DbP). To reduce ADF/cofilin induced actin oligomerisation we used ADP-ribosylated actin. Both vitamin D-binding protein and thymosin beta4 inhibit binding by ADF or cofilin, while cofilin or ADF and DNase I bind simultaneously. Competition was observed between ADF or cofilin and G1, supporting the hypothesis that cofilin preferentially binds in the cleft between sub-domains 1 and 3, similar to or overlapping the binding site of G1. Because the affinity of G1 is much higher than that of ADF or cofilin, even at a 20-fold excess of the latter, the complexes contained predominantly G1. Nevertheless, cross-linking studies using actin:G1 complexes and ADF or cofilin showed the presence of low concentrations of ternary complexes containing both ADF or cofilin and G1. Thus, even with monomeric actin, it is shown for the first time that binding sites for both G1 and ADF or cofilin can be occupied simultaneously, confirming the existence of two separate binding sites. Employing a peptide array with overlapping sequences of actin overlaid by cofilin, we have identified five sequence stretches of actin able to bind cofilin. These sequences are located within the regions of F-actin predicted to bind cofilin in the model derived from image reconstructions of electron microscopical images of cofilin-decorated filaments. Three of the peptides map to the cleft region between sub-domains 1 and 3 of the upper actin along the two-start long-pitch helix, while the other two are in the DNase I loop corresponding to the site of the lower actin in the helix. In the absence of any crystal structures of ADF or cofilin in complex with actin, these studies provide further information about the binding sites on F-actin for these important actin

  7. Effect of dioxane on the binding of competitive inhibitor proflavin and catalytic activity of bovine pancreatic α-chymotrypsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirotkin, V. A.; Mukhametzyanov, T. A.; Karmanova, Yu. V.

    2007-07-01

    The binding of competitive inhibitor proflavin by α-chymotrypsin in water-dioxane mixtures over the entire range of thermodynamic activities of water a w was studied. The data on the degree of binding of proflavin were compared to the results on the catalytic activity of the enzyme preliminary incubated in water-dioxane mixtures. An analysis of the behavior of the concentration dependences of these characteristics demonstrated that, at low a w values, the behavior of the interprotein contacts in the enzyme formed during its drying largely governs its functional properties, while at high a w values, they are determined by the interaction of the enzyme with the organic solvent. Interplay of these two factors is responsible for the observed complex shape of the isotherm of binding of proflavin, with the maximum degree of binding being attained at moderate a w values.

  8. Fluorescence analysis of competition of phenylbutazone and methotrexate in binding to serum albumin in combination treatment in rheumatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciążek-Jurczyk, M.; Sułkowska, A.; Bojko, B.; Równicka, J.; Sułkowski, W. W.

    2009-04-01

    Combination of several drugs is often necessary especially during long-them therapy. The competition between drugs can cause a decrease of the amount of a drug bound to albumin. This results in an increase of the free, biological active fraction of the drug. The aim of the presented study was to describe the competition between phenylbutazone (Phe) and methotrexate (MTX), two drugs recommended for the treatment of rheumatology in binding to bovine (BSA) and human (HSA) serum albumin in the high affinity binding site. Fluorescence analysis was used to estimate the effect of drugs on the protein fluorescence and to define the binding and quenching properties of drugs-serum albumin complexes. The effect of the displacement of one drug from the complex of the other with serum albumin has been described on the basis of the comparison of the quenching curves and binding constants for the binary and ternary systems. The conclusion that both Phe and MTX form a binding site in the same subdomain (IIA) points to the necessity of using a monitoring therapy owning to the possible increase of the uncontrolled toxic effects.

  9. Competitive binding of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate and 5-fluorouracil to human serum albumin: A fluorescence and circular dichroism study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lixia; Liu, Min; Liu, Guiqin; Li, Dacheng; Wang, Zhengping; Wang, Bingquan; Han, Jun; Zhang, Min

    2017-02-01

    Combination therapy with more than one therapeutic agent can improve therapeutic efficiency and decrease drug resistance. In this study, the interactions of human serum albumin (HSA) with individual or combined anticancer drugs, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and 5-fluorouracil (FU), were investigated by fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The results demonstrated that the interaction of EGCG or FU with HSA is a process of static quenching and EGCG formed a more stable complex. The competitive experiments of site markers suggested that both anti-carcinogens mainly bound to site I (subdomain IIA). The interaction forces which play important roles in the binding process were discussed based on enthalpy and entropy changes. Moreover, the competition binding model for a ternary system was proposed so as to precisely calculate the binding parameters. The results demonstrated that one drug decreased the binding affinity of another drug with HSA, resulting in the increasing free drug concentration at the action sites. CD studies indicated that there was an alteration in HSA secondary structure due to the binding of EGCG and FU. It can be concluded that the combination of EGCG with FU may enhance anticancer efficacy. This finding may provide a theoretical basis for clinical treatments.

  10. Surface Epitope Coverage Affects Binding Characteristics of Bisphenol-A Functionalized Nanoparticles in a Competitive Inhibition Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Lu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The biomolecule interface is a key element in immunosensor fabrication, which can greatly influence the sensor performance. This paper explores the effects of surface epitope coverage of small molecule functionalized nanoparticle on the apparent affinity (avidity of antibody in a competitive inhibition assay using bisphenol-A (BPA as a model target. An unconventional two-antibody competitive inhibition ELISA (ci-ELISA using thiolated BPA modified gold nanoparticles (cysBPAv-AuNP as a competing reagent was devised for this study. It was shown that the antibody complexation with cysBPAv-AuNPs required a minimum number of surface epitopes on the nanoparticle to form a sufficiently strong interaction and reliable detection. The binding of cysBPAv-AuNP to anti-BPA antibodies, for limited antibody binding sites, was enhanced by a greater number of epitope-modified nanoparticles (cysBPAv-AuNP as well as with higher epitope coverage. Increasing the molar concentration of epitope present in an assay enhanced the binding between anti-BPA antibodies and cysBPAv-AuNP. This implies that, to increase the limit of detection of a competitive inhibition assay, a reduced molar concentration of epitope should be applied. This could be achieved by either lowering the epitope coverage on each cysBPAv-AuNP or the assay molar concentration of cysBPAv-AuNP or both of these factors.

  11. Unfair Competition and Ambush Marketing: Concept, Characterization and Polemic Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Vaz Dias

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available BSTRACT The objective of the present paper is to draw a brief analysis of the ambush marketing, which is a practice adopted by an enterprise that seeks to get an indirect association with a sport, social or cultural event, without being really involved with it, as a way of getting the benefits of exposure assured to the official sponsors. For this purpose, it was used the theoretical-conceptual and descriptive-interpretative methods, by means of the critical interpretation of the main observed aspects concerning the theme. From this point, it was possible to conclude that the referred theme has become more and more relevant because of the growing investments in sponsorship in the so-called "mega events". More than this, it was possible to notice that, regardless the necessity of a better delimitation of the requirements or elements that enable the configuration of "ambush marketing", under the legal perspective, nowadays, Brazil has rules to fight against this practice. As examples, can be mentioned the Civil Code of 2002, that in its article 884 prohibits the unjust enrichment, and the Industrial Property Law (Law nº9.279/96, which enables the protection of the industrial property rights by means of the registration of trade and the repression to unfair competition (article 2º and through the prevision of the crime of unfair competition (article 195. Doubt remains if, considering the uncertainties that surround the theme, the existing rules will be enough and adequate to restrain ambush marketing.

  12. Alpha conotoxin-BuIA globular isomer is a competitive antagonist for oleoyl-L-alpha-lysophosphatidic acid binding to LPAR6; A molecular dynamics study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saima Younis

    Full Text Available Lysophosphatidic acid receptor 6 (LPAR6 is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR involved in hair development and cytoskeleton formation in mammals. Its proliferation is implicated in several forms of cancer including liver cancer, squamous cell carcinoma and metastatic prostate cancer. Current study emphasizes the isolation of competitive non-lipid and stable peptide antagonists for Lysophosphatidic acid ligand. A total of 148 conotoxin structures were characterized for their binding abilities against LPAR6. Subsequently, top 10 conotoxins were selected on the basis of binding energy values, residual contributions and conformational cluster saturations. BuIA (a member of Alpha- conotoxins family, contryphan-R and contryphan-Lo (Synthetic class conotoxins, exhibiting efficient binding parameters were subjected to molecular dynamics simulation assays and topology analysis. We propose that BuIA might be a potent antagonist due to its predominant binding at the extracellular region of LPAR6. Current study provides a backbone for understanding structural and functional insights of LPAR6 and findings of this study may be helpful in designing novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of cancers caused by elevated LPAR6 expression.

  13. Competition between Ski and CREB-binding protein for binding to Smad proteins in transforming growth factor-beta signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weijun; Lam, Suvana S; Srinath, Hema; Schiffer, Celia A; Royer, William E; Lin, Kai

    2007-04-13

    The family of Smad proteins mediates transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) signaling in cell growth and differentiation. Smads repress or activate TGF-beta signaling by interacting with corepressors (e.g. Ski) or coactivators (e.g. CREB-binding protein (CBP)), respectively. Specifically, Ski has been shown to interfere with the interaction between Smad3 and CBP. However, it is unclear whether Ski competes with CBP for binding to Smads and whether they can interact with Smad3 at the same binding surface on Smad3. We investigated the interactions among purified constructs of Smad, Ski, and CBP in vitro by size-exclusion chromatography, isothermal titration calorimetry, and mutational studies. Here, we show that Ski-(16-192) interacted directly with a homotrimer of receptor-regulated Smad protein (R-Smad), e.g. Smad2 or Smad3, to form a hexamer; Ski-(16-192) interacted with an R-Smad.Smad4 heterotrimer to form a pentamer. CBP-(1941-1992) was also found to interact directly with an R-Smad homotrimer to form a hexamer and with an R-Smad.Smad4 heterotrimer to form a pentamer. Moreover, these domains of Ski and CBP competed with each other for binding to Smad3. Our mutational studies revealed that domains of Ski and CBP interacted with Smad3 at a portion of the binding surface of the Smad anchor for receptor activation. Our results suggest that Ski negatively regulates TGF-beta signaling by replacing CBP in R-Smad complexes. Our working model suggests that Smad protein activity is delicately balanced by Ski and CBP in the TGF-beta pathway.

  14. Small-Molecule Binding Aptamers: Selection Strategies, Characterization, and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscito, Annamaria; DeRosa, Maria

    2016-05-01

    Aptamers are single-stranded, synthetic oligonucleotides that fold into 3-dimensional shapes capable of binding non-covalently with high affinity and specificity to a target molecule. They are generated via an in vitro process known as the Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment, from which candidates are screened and characterized, and then applied in aptamer-based biosensors for target detection. Aptamers for small molecule targets such as toxins, antibiotics, molecular markers, drugs, and heavy metals will be the focus of this review. Their accurate detection is ultimately needed for the protection and wellbeing of humans and animals. However, issues such as the drastic difference in size of the aptamer and small molecule make it challenging to select, characterize, and apply aptamers for the detection of small molecules. Thus, recent (since 2012) notable advances in small molecule aptamers, which have overcome some of these challenges, are presented here, while defining challenges that still exist are discussed

  15. Small-Molecule Binding Aptamers: Selection Strategies, Characterization, and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria eRuscito

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are single-stranded, synthetic oligonucleotides that fold into 3-dimensional shapes capable of binding non-covalently with high affinity and specificity to a target molecule. They are generated via an in vitro process known as the Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment, from which candidates are screened and characterized, and then applied in aptamer-based biosensors for target detection. Aptamers for small molecule targets such as toxins, antibiotics, molecular markers, drugs, and heavy metals will be the focus of this review. Their accurate detection is ultimately needed for the protection and wellbeing of humans and animals. However, issues such as the drastic difference in size of the aptamer and small molecule make it challenging to select, characterize, and apply aptamers for the detection of small molecules. Thus, recent (since 2012 notable advances in small molecule aptamers, which have overcome some of these challenges, are presented here, while defining challenges that still exist are discussed

  16. Characterization of Aluminum-Binding Ligands in Pisolithus tinctorius

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, R. L.; Cumming, J.

    2009-12-01

    Highly abundant in soil, Al is found in non-toxic forms under neutral pH conditions. However, when the pH of the soil decreases, the presence of cationic Al increases, creating a toxic environment for plants and fungi. Certain plants and their ectomycorrhizal symbiotic fungi have higher tolerance for Al in the soil and surrounding media. A particular fungus, Pisolithus tinctorius, has been found to produce Al-binding pigments which chelate and detoxify cationic Al in the environment. The objectives of this study are to 1) determine the resistance of different ectomycorrhizal fungi species to Al, 2) characterize the production of Al binding compounds by fungi, and 3) quantify Al partitioning between free and bound forms in the environment. Pisolithus tinctorius, Amanita muscaria, Lacaria bicolor, and Rhizopogon rubescens were grown under varying Al concentration in vitro (0 and 200 µM for all species; 0, 100, 200, and 400 µM for P. tinctorius). Biomass was measured and media was analyzed for Al speciation and organic acid profiles post experiment. The Al-binding exudates of P. tinctorius were isolated using immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) and further separated with reverse phase HPLC (UV). All fungi were resistant to Al at the concentrations tested. Pisolithus was found to have a significantly higher mass than other ectomycorrhizae studied. Organic Al levels were found to increase with an increase in Al treatment for P. tinctorius. These techniques revealed at least eleven compounds active in the Al-binding IMAC fraction with seven peaks having brown pigmentation. These compounds may assist in Al detoxification by P. tinctorius.

  17. Characterization of auxin-binding proteins from zucchini plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, G. R.; Rice, M. S.; Lomax, T. L.

    1993-01-01

    We have previously identified two auxin-binding polypeptides in plasma membrane (PM) preparations from zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) (Hicks et al. 1989, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 86, 4948-4952). These polypeptides have molecular weights of 40 kDa and 42 kDa and label specifically with the photoaffinity auxin analog 5-N3-7-3H-IAA (azido-IAA). Azido-IAA permits both the covalent and radioactive tagging of auxin-binding proteins and has allowed us to characterize further the 40-kDa and 42-kDa polypeptides, including the nature of their attachment to the PM, their relationship to each other, and their potential function. The azido-IAA-labeled polypeptides remain in the pelleted membrane fraction following high-salt and detergent washes, which indicates a tight and possibly integral association with the PM. Two-dimensional electrophoresis of partially purified azido-IAA-labeled protein demonstrates that, in addition to the major isoforms of the 40-kDa and 42-kDa polypeptides, which possess isoelectric points (pIs) of 8.2 and 7.2, respectively, several less abundant isoforms that display unique pIs are apparent at both molecular masses. Tryptic and chymotryptic digestion of the auxin-binding proteins indicates that the 40-kDa and 42-kDa polypeptides are closely related or are modifications of the same polypeptide. Phase extraction with the nonionic detergent Triton X-114 results in partitioning of the azido-IAA-labeled polypeptides into the aqueous (hydrophilic) phase. This apparently paradoxical behavior is also exhibited by certain integral membrane proteins that aggregate to form channels. The results of gel filtration indicate that the auxin-binding proteins do indeed aggregate strongly and that the polypeptides associate to form a dimer or multimeric complex in vivo. These characteristics are consistent with the hypothesis that the 40-kDa and 42-kDa polypeptides are subunits of a multimeric integral membrane protein which has an auxin-binding site, and which may

  18. A general technique to rank protein-ligand binding affinities and determine allosteric versus direct binding site competition in compound mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annis, D Allen; Nazef, Naim; Chuang, Cheng-Chi; Scott, Margaret Porter; Nash, Huw M

    2004-12-01

    To realize the full potential of combinatorial chemistry-based drug discovery, generic and efficient tools must be developed that apply the strengths of diversity-oriented chemical synthesis to the identification and optimization of lead compounds for disease-associated protein targets. We report an affinity selection-mass spectrometry (AS-MS) method for protein-ligand affinity ranking and the classification of ligands by binding site. The method incorporates the following steps: (1) an affinity selection stage, where protein-binding compounds are selected from pools of ligands in the presence of varying concentrations of a competitor ligand, (2) a first chromatography stage to separate unbound ligands from protein-ligand complexes, and (3) a second chromatography stage to dissociate the ligands from the complexes for identification and quantification by MS. The ability of the competitor ligand to displace a target-bound library member, as measured by MS, reveals the binding site classification and affinity ranking of the mixture components. The technique requires no radiolabel incorporation or direct biochemical assay, no modification or immobilization of the compounds or target protein, and all reaction components, including any buffers or cofactors required for protein stability, are free in solution. We demonstrate the method for several compounds of wide structural variety against representatives of the most important protein classes in contemporary drug discovery, including novel ATP-competitive and allosteric inhibitors of the Akt-1 (PKB) and Zap-70 kinases, and previously undisclosed antagonists of the M(2) muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR). The theoretical basis of the technique is analyzed mathematically, allowing quantitative estimation of binding affinities and, in the case of allosteric interaction, absolute determination of binding cooperativity. The method is readily applicable to high-throughput screening hit

  19. Myocardin-Related Transcription Factor A Activation by Competition with WH2 Domain Proteins for Actin Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissbach, Julia; Schikora, Franziska; Weber, Anja; Kessels, Michael; Posern, Guido

    2016-05-15

    The myocardin-related transcription factors (MRTFs) are coactivators of serum response factor (SRF)-mediated gene expression. Activation of MRTF-A occurs in response to alterations in actin dynamics and critically requires the dissociation of repressive G-actin-MRTF-A complexes. However, the mechanism leading to the release of MRTF-A remains unclear. Here we show that WH2 domains compete directly with MRTF-A for actin binding. Actin nucleation-promoting factors, such as N-WASP and WAVE2, as well as isolated WH2 domains, including those of Spire2 and Cobl, activate MRTF-A independently of changes in actin dynamics. Simultaneous inhibition of Arp2-Arp3 or mutation of the CA region only partially reduces MRTF-A activation by N-WASP and WAVE2. Recombinant WH2 domains and the RPEL domain of MRTF-A bind mutually exclusively to cellular and purified G-actin in vitro The competition by different WH2 domains correlates with MRTF-SRF activation. Following serum stimulation, nonpolymerizable actin dissociates from MRTF-A, and de novo formation of the G-actin-RPEL complex is impaired by a transferable factor. Our work demonstrates that WH2 domains activate MRTF-A and contribute to target gene regulation by a competitive mechanism, independently of their role in actin filament formation. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. SNHG16 contributes to breast cancer cell migration by competitively binding miR-98 with E2F5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chang; Huo, Qiang; Wang, Xiaolong; Chen, Bing; Yang, Qifeng

    2017-04-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been proved to play important roles in cellular processes of cancer, including the development, proliferation, and migration of cancer cells. In the present study, we demonstrated small nucleolar RNA host gene 16 (SNHG16) as an oncogene on cell migration in breast cancer. Expression levels of SNHG16 were found to be frequently higher in breast cancer tissues than in the paired noncancerous tissues. Gain- and loss-of-function studies proved that SNHG16 significantly promoted breast cancer cell migration. We predicted SNHG16 as a competitive endogenous RNA (ceRNA) of E2F transcription factor 5 protein (E2F5) via competition for the shared miR-98 through bioinformatics analysis, and proved this regulation using relative quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), western blot, RNA immunoprecipitation (RIP) assay and luciferase reporter assay. In addition, we identified a positive correlation between SNHG16 and E2F5 in breast cancer tissues. Furthermore, we demonstrated that forced expression of miR-98 could partially abrogate SNHG16-mediated increase of breast cancer cells migration, suggesting that SNHG16 promoted cell migration in a miR-98 dependent manner. Taken together, our findings indicated that SNHG16 induces breast cancer cell migration by competitively binding miR-98 with E2F5, and SNHG16 can serve as a potential therapeutic target for breast cancer treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Competitive cation binding to phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate domains revealed by X-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graber, Z. T. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Kent State University; Kent; USA; Wang, W. [Ames Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy; Iowa State University; Ames; USA; Singh, G. [Department of Physics; Kent State University; Kent; USA; Kuzmenko, I. [X-ray Science Division; Advanced Photon Source; Argonne National Laboratory; Lemont; USA; Vaknin, D. [Ames Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy; Iowa State University; Ames; USA; Kooijman, E. E. [Department of Biological Sciences; Kent State University; Kent; USA

    2015-01-01

    Calcium ions bind strongly to PIP2at physiological concentrations, leading to condensation and decreased effective charge for PIP2. Calcium displaces the more numerous magnesium and potassium ions, but some potassium ions remain.

  2. Pharmacological characterization and binding modes of novel racemic and optically active phenylalanine-based antagonists of AMPA receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szymańska, Ewa; Nielsen, Birgitte; Johansen, Tommy Nørskov

    2017-01-01

    In order to map out molecular determinants for the competitive blockade of AMPA receptor subtypes, a series of racemic aryl-substituted phenylalanines was synthesized and pharmacologically characterized in vitro at native rat ionotropic glutamate receptors. Most of the compounds showed micromolar...... affinity and preference for AMPA receptors. Individual stereoisomers of selected compounds were further evaluated at recombinant homomeric rat GluA2 and GluA3 receptors. The most potent compound, (–)-2-amino-3-(6-chloro-2',5'-dihydroxy-5-nitro-[1,1'-biphenyl]-3-yl)propanoic acid, the expected R......-isomer showing Ki of 1.71 µM at the GluA2 subtype, was found to competitively antagonize GluA2(Q)i receptors in TEVC electrophysiological experiments (Kb = 2.13 µM). Molecular docking experiments allowed us to compare two alternative antagonist binding modes for the synthesized phenylalanines at the GluA2...

  3. Crl binds to domain 2 of σ(S) and confers a competitive advantage on a natural rpoS mutant of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteil, Véronique; Kolb, Annie; Mayer, Claudine; Hoos, Sylviane; England, Patrick; Norel, Françoise

    2010-12-01

    The RpoS sigma factor (σ(S)) is the master regulator of the bacterial response to a variety of stresses. Mutants in rpoS arise in bacterial populations in the absence of stress, probably as a consequence of a subtle balance between self-preservation and nutritional competence. We characterized here one natural rpoS mutant of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (Ty19). We show that the rpoS allele of Ty19 (rpoS(Ty19)) led to the synthesis of a σ(S)(Ty19) protein carrying a single glycine-to-valine substitution at position 282 in σ(S) domain 4, which was much more dependent than the wild-type σ(S) protein on activation by Crl, a chaperone-like protein that increases the affinity of σ(S) for the RNA polymerase core enzyme (E). We used the bacterial adenylate cyclase two-hybrid system to demonstrate that Crl bound to residues 72 to 167 of σ(S) domain 2 and that G282V substitution did not directly affect Crl binding. However, this substitution drastically reduced the ability of σ(S)(Ty19) to bind E in a surface plasmon resonance assay, a defect partially rescued by Crl. The modeled structure of the Eσ(S) holoenzyme suggested that substitution G282V could directly disrupt a favorable interaction between σ(S) and E. The rpoS(Ty19) allele conferred a competitive fitness when the bacterial population was wild type for crl but was outcompeted in Δcrl populations. Thus, these results indicate that the competitive advantage of the rpoS(Ty19) mutant is dependent on Crl and suggest that crl plays a role in the appearance of rpoS mutants in bacterial populations.

  4. Crl Binds to Domain 2 of σS and Confers a Competitive Advantage on a Natural rpoS Mutant of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteil, Véronique; Kolb, Annie; Mayer, Claudine; Hoos, Sylviane; England, Patrick; Norel, Françoise

    2010-01-01

    The RpoS sigma factor (σS) is the master regulator of the bacterial response to a variety of stresses. Mutants in rpoS arise in bacterial populations in the absence of stress, probably as a consequence of a subtle balance between self-preservation and nutritional competence. We characterized here one natural rpoS mutant of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (Ty19). We show that the rpoS allele of Ty19 (rpoSTy19) led to the synthesis of a σSTy19 protein carrying a single glycine-to-valine substitution at position 282 in σS domain 4, which was much more dependent than the wild-type σS protein on activation by Crl, a chaperone-like protein that increases the affinity of σS for the RNA polymerase core enzyme (E). We used the bacterial adenylate cyclase two-hybrid system to demonstrate that Crl bound to residues 72 to 167 of σS domain 2 and that G282V substitution did not directly affect Crl binding. However, this substitution drastically reduced the ability of σSTy19 to bind E in a surface plasmon resonance assay, a defect partially rescued by Crl. The modeled structure of the EσS holoenzyme suggested that substitution G282V could directly disrupt a favorable interaction between σS and E. The rpoSTy19 allele conferred a competitive fitness when the bacterial population was wild type for crl but was outcompeted in Δcrl populations. Thus, these results indicate that the competitive advantage of the rpoSTy19 mutant is dependent on Crl and suggest that crl plays a role in the appearance of rpoS mutants in bacterial populations. PMID:20935100

  5. Characterization and assessment of potential European and Japanese competition in photovoltaics. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-10-01

    This study is an assessment of the potential of European and Japanese firms to produce and market photovoltaic (PV) power systems internationally in competition with firms in the United States. It consists of three distinct parts: (1) an overview of worldwide export activity which describes the general posture of selected European countries and Japan; (2) an assessment of European competition focusing on Germany, France, and the United Kingdom; and (3) an assessment of Japanese competition. All research was conducted within the United States relying on published reports in the scientific, trade, and business press; a firm's annual reports; and telephone interviews with representatives of European and Japanese firms. European and Japanese government representatives were also contacted and government-sponsored programs evaluated. European competition is addressed in three areas: characterization of the PV industry; current and potential marketing activity; and the status of PV and related technological developments. The same areas are addressed for depicting Japanese competition except that greater emphasis is placed on past industrial experience and related semiconductor sales.

  6. Chemical probes for drug-resistance assessment by binding competition (RABC): oseltamivir susceptibility evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ting-Jen R; Wang, Shi-Yun; Wen, Wen-Hsien; Su, Ching-Yao; Lin, Mengi; Huang, Wen-I; Liu, Ming-Tsan; Wu, Ho-Sheng; Wang, Nung-Sen; Cheng, Chung-Kai; Chen, Chun-Lin; Ren, Chien-Tai; Wu, Chung-Yi; Fang, Jim-Min; Cheng, Yih-Shyun E; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2013-01-02

    The wizard of OS (resistance): the binding difference of neuraminidase inhibitors (zanamivir versus oseltamivir (OS)) was used to establish an assay to identify the influenza subtypes that are resistant to OS but still sensitive to zanamivir. This assay used a zanamivir-biotin conjugate to determine the OS susceptibility of a wide range of influenza viruses and over 200 clinical isolates. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. A single-step competitive binding assay for mapping of single DNA molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyberg, Lena K; Persson, Fredrik; Berg, Johan; Bergström, Johanna; Fransson, Emelie; Olsson, Linnea; Persson, Moa; Stålnacke, Antti; Wigenius, Jens; Tegenfeldt, Jonas O; Westerlund, Fredrik

    2012-01-06

    Optical mapping of genomic DNA is of relevance for a plethora of applications such as scaffolding for sequencing and detection of structural variations as well as identification of pathogens like bacteria and viruses. For future clinical applications it is desirable to have a fast and robust mapping method based on as few steps as possible. We here demonstrate a single-step method to obtain a DNA barcode that is directly visualized using nanofluidic devices and fluorescence microscopy. Using a mixture of YOYO-1, a bright DNA dye, and netropsin, a natural antibiotic with very high AT specificity, we obtain a DNA map with a fluorescence intensity profile along the DNA that reflects the underlying sequence. The netropsin binds to AT-tetrads and blocks these binding sites from YOYO-1 binding which results in lower fluorescence intensity from AT-rich regions of the DNA. We thus obtain a DNA barcode that is dark in AT-rich regions and bright in GC-rich regions with kilobasepair resolution. We demonstrate the versatility of the method by obtaining a barcode on DNA from the phage T4 that captures its circular permutation and agrees well with its known sequence. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterization of high affinity (/sup 3/H)triazolam binding in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Earle, M.; Concas, A.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1986-03-01

    The hypnotic Triazolam (TZ), a triazolo (1,4)-benzodiazepine, displays a short physiological half life and has been used for the treatment of insomnia related to anxiety states. Specific binding properties of this recently tritiated TZ were characterized. The authors major objectives were the direct measurement of the temperature dependence and the GABA effect on (/sup 3/H)TZ binding. Saturation studies showed a shift to lower affinity at 37/sup 0/C (K/sub d/ = 0.25 +/- 0.01 nM at O/sup 0/C; K/sub d/ = 1.46 +/- 0.03 nM at 37/sup 0/C) while the B/sub max/ values remained unchanged (1003 +/- 37 fmoles/mg prot. at 0/sup 0/C and 1001 +/- 43 fmoles/mg prot. at 37/sup 0/C). Inhibition studies showed that (/sup 3/H)TZ binding displayed no GABA shift at 0/sup 0/C(K/sub i/ 0.37 +/- 0.03 nM/- GABA and K/sub i/ = 0.55 +/- 0.13 nM/+GABA) but a nearly two-fold shift was apparent at 37/sup 0/C (K/sub i/ = 2.92 +/- 0.2 nM/-GABA; K/sub i/ = 1.37 +/- 0.11 mM/+GABA). These results were also confirmed by saturation studies in the presence or absence of GABA showing a shift to higher affinity in the presence of GABA only at 37/sup 0/C. In Ro 15-1788/(/sup 3/H)TZ competition experiments the presence of GABA did not affect the inhibitory potency of Ro 15-1788 on (/sup 3/H)TZ binding at both temperatures. In conclusion (/sup 3/H)TZ binding showed an extremely high affinity for benzodiazepine receptors. In contrast to reported literature, the findings suggest that TZ interacts with benzodiazepine receptors similar to other benzodiazepine agonists.

  9. New silver(I) complex with diazafluorene based ligand: Synthesis, characterization, investigation of in vitro DNA binding and antimicrobial studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movahedi, Elaheh; Rezvani, Ali Reza

    2017-07-01

    A novel diazafluorene based complex with silver, [Ag(dian)2 ] NO3 , where dian is N-(4,5-diazafluoren-9-ylidene)aniline, has been prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, 1HNMR, UV-Vis spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. In order to explore the relationship between the structure and biological properties, DNA binding propensity and in vitro antibacterial property have also been studied. The mode of DNA-complex interaction has been investigated by electronic absorption titration, luminescence titration, competitive binding experiment, effect of ionic strength, thermodynamic studies, viscometric evaluation, circular dichroism spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The results reveal that the complex binds to CT-DNA in a moderate intercalation capability with the partial insertion of a planar dian ligand between the base stacks of double-stranded DNA with binding constant (Kb) of 2.4 × 105 M-1. The viscosities and CD spectra of the DNA provide strong evidence for the intercalation. An in vitro antibacterial efficacy of the Ag(I) complex on a series of Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis) and Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) indicates that the complex exhibits a marked antibacterial activity. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of the complex indicate that it exhibits much higher antibacterial effect on standard bacterial strains of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus than those of silver nitrate, silver sulfadiazine. The bacterial inhibitions of the silver(I) complex are closely agreed to its DNA binding affinities.

  10. Discovery and biochemical characterization of selective ATP competitive inhibitors of the human mitotic kinesin KSP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickert, Keith W; Schaber, Michael; Torrent, Maricel; Neilson, Lou Anne; Tasber, Edward S; Garbaccio, Robert; Coleman, Paul J; Harvey, Diane; Zhang, Yun; Yang, Yi; Marshall, Gary; Lee, Ling; Walsh, Eileen S; Hamilton, Kelly; Buser, Carolyn A

    2008-01-15

    The kinesin spindle protein (KSP, also known as Eg5) is essential for the proper separation of spindle poles during mitosis, and inhibition results in mitotic arrest and the formation of characteristic monoaster spindles. Several distinct classes of KSP inhibitors have been described previously in the public and patent literature. However, most appear to share a common induced-fit allosteric binding site, suggesting a common mechanism of inhibition. In a high-throughput screen for inhibitors of KSP, a novel class of thiazole-containing inhibitors was identified. Unlike the previously described allosteric KSP inhibitors, the thiazoles described here show ATP competitive kinetic behavior, consistent with binding within the nucleotide binding pocket. Although they bind to a pocket that is highly conserved across kinesins, these molecules exhibit significant selectivity for KSP over other kinesins and other ATP-utilizing enzymes. Several of these compounds are active in cells and produce a phenotype similar to that observed with previously published allosteric inhibitors of KSP.

  11. Characterizing Product Lifecycle in Online Marketing: Sales, Trust, Revenue, and Competition Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    C, Santosh K; Mukherjee, Arjun

    2017-01-01

    Recent researches have seen an upsurge in the analysis of consumer reviews. Although, several dimensions have been explored, less is known on the temporal dynamics of events that happen over the lifecycle of online products. What are the dominant sales patterns? How are they affected by review count, rating, helpfulness and sentiment? How is trust characterized and what are its effects on sales and revenue? What happens during a market competition? When does a takeover/recovery happen and by ...

  12. DNA binding and cleavage activity of a structurally characterized Ni ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The binding constant (Kb) and the linear Stern-Volmer quenching constant (Ksv) of the complex have been determined as 9.23 × 10 4 M−1 and 2.0 × 10 4 M−1, respectively. Spectroscopic and hydrodynamic investigations revealed groove or electrostatic nature of binding of 1 with DNA. 1 is also found to induce oxidative ...

  13. Magnetic levitation as a platform for competitive protein-ligand binding assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Nathan D; Soh, Siowling; Mirica, Katherine A; Whitesides, George M

    2012-07-17

    This paper describes a method based on magnetic levitation (MagLev) that is capable of indirectly measuring the binding of unlabeled ligands to unlabeled protein. We demonstrate this method by measuring the affinity of unlabeled bovine carbonic anhydrase (BCA) for a variety of ligands (most of which are benzene sulfonamide derivatives). This method utilizes porous gel beads that are functionalized with a common aryl sulfonamide ligand. The beads are incubated with BCA and allowed to reach an equilibrium state in which the majority of the immobilized ligands are bound to BCA. Since the beads are less dense than the protein, protein binding to the bead increases the overall density of the bead. This change in density can be monitored using MagLev. Transferring the beads to a solution containing no protein creates a situation where net protein efflux from the bead is thermodynamically favorable. The rate at which protein leaves the bead for the solution can be calculated from the rate at which the levitation height of the bead changes. If another small molecule ligand of BCA is dissolved in the solution, the rate of protein efflux is accelerated significantly. This paper develops a reaction-diffusion (RD) model to explain both this observation, and the physical-organic chemistry that underlies it. Using this model, we calculate the dissociation constants of several unlabeled ligands from BCA, using plots of levitation height versus time. Notably, although this method requires no electricity, and only a single piece of inexpensive equipment, it can measure accurately the binding of unlabeled proteins to small molecules over a wide range of dissociation constants (K(d) values within the range from ~10 nM to 100 μM are measured easily). Assays performed using this method generally can be completed within a relatively short time period (20 min-2 h). A deficiency of this system is that it is not, in its present form, applicable to proteins with molecular weight greater

  14. Lynx1 and Aβ1-42 bind competitively to multiple nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten S; Arvaniti, Maria; Jensen, Majbrit M

    2016-01-01

    are decreased in a transgenic mouse model with concomitant β-amyloid and tau pathology. Our data suggest that Lynx1 binds to multiple nAChR subtypes in the brain and that this interaction might have functional and pathophysiological implications in relation to Alzheimer's disease....... to demonstrate that a water-soluble variant of human Lynx1 (Ws-Lynx1) isolates α3, α4, α5, α6, α7, β2, and β4 nAChR subunits from human and rat cortical extracts, and rat midbrain and olfactory bulb extracts, suggesting that Lynx1 forms complexes with multiple nAChR subtypes in the human and rodent brain...

  15. Determination of acidic sites and binding toxic metal ions on cumin surface using nonideal competitive adsorption model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komy, Zanaty Rady

    2004-02-15

    A fundamental study of the application of cumin biomass in the recovery of Cu and Zn metal ion uptake from food and drinks is carried out at different pH's and at fixed ionic strength. The chemical characteristics of protein in cumin seeds were investigated. Results showed that cumin contains 18.25% crude protein, which includes 18 amino acids. The main reactive groups on protein cumin are amino and carboxylic groups of dicarboxylic amino acids, leading to a pH-dependent charge. Therefore, the cumin surface is considered as a heterogeneous system. To describe protonation behavior in a heterogeneous cumin biomass (cumin/0.1 M NaNO(3)) system, acid-base titrations have been performed with conductometric and potentiometric titration. Measurement of the reactivity of cumin surface in the adsorption of Cu and Zn metal ions and determination of metal binding at different pH's were also carried out. To solve broad and ill-defined titration curves, a simplified version of nonideal competitive analysis (NICA) by Plette et al.) was applied. The results show that the sorption of the bivalent metal ions onto the whole surface of cumin could be attributed to a monodentate binding to one site mainly carboxylic-type site.

  16. Mononuclear Pd(II) complex as a new therapeutic agent: Synthesis, characterization, biological activity, spectral and DNA binding approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeidifar, Maryam; Mirzaei, Hamidreza; AhmadiNasab, Navid; Mansouri-Torshizi, Hassan

    2017-11-01

    The binding ability between a new water-soluble palladium(II) complex [Pd(bpy)(bez-dtc)]Cl (where bpy is 2,2‧-bipyridine and bez-dtc is benzyl dithiocarbamate), as an antitumor agent, and calf thymus DNA was evaluated using various physicochemical methods, such as UV-Vis absorption, Competitive fluorescence studies, viscosity measurement, zeta potential and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The Pd(II) complex was synthesized and characterized using elemental analysis, molar conductivity measurements, FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and electronic spectra studies. The anticancer activity against HeLa cell lines demonstrated lower cytotoxicity than cisplatin. The binding constants and the thermodynamic parameters were determined at different temperatures (300 K, 310 K and 320 K) and shown that the complex can bind to DNA via electrostatic forces. Furthermore, this result was confirmed by the viscosity and zeta potential measurements. The CD spectral results demonstrated that the binding of Pd(II) complex to DNA induced conformational changes in DNA. We hope that these results will provide a basis for further studies and practical clinical use of anticancer drugs.

  17. Characterization of salivary alpha-amylase binding to Streptococcus sanguis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scannapieco, F.A.; Bergey, E.J.; Reddy, M.S.; Levine, M.J. (State Univ. of New York, Buffalo (USA))

    1989-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the major salivary components which interact with oral bacteria and to determine the mechanism(s) responsible for their binding to the bacterial surface. Strains of Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus mutans, and Actinomyces viscosus were incubated for 2 h in freshly collected human submandibular-sublingual saliva (HSMSL) or parotid saliva (HPS), and bound salivary components were eluted with 2% sodium dodecyl sulfate. By sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western transfer, alpha-amylase was the prominent salivary component eluted from S. sanguis. Studies with {sup 125}I-labeled HSMSL or {sup 125}I-labeled HPS also demonstrated a component with an electrophoretic mobility identical to that of alpha-amylase which bound to S. sanguis. Purified alpha-amylase from human parotid saliva was radiolabeled and found to bind to strains of S. sanguis genotypes 1 and 3 and S. mitis genotype 2, but not to strains of other species of oral bacteria. Binding of ({sup 125}I)alpha-amylase to streptococci was saturable, calcium independent, and inhibitable by excess unlabeled alpha-amylases from a variety of sources, but not by secretory immunoglobulin A and the proline-rich glycoprotein from HPS. Reduced and alkylated alpha-amylase lost enzymatic and bacterial binding activities. Binding was inhibited by incubation with maltotriose, maltooligosaccharides, limit dextrins, and starch.

  18. Surface plasmon resonance and circular dichroism characterization of cucurbitacins binding to serum albumins for early pharmacokinetic profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabini, Edoardo; Fiori, Giovana Maria Lanchoti; Tedesco, Daniele; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; Bertucci, Carlo

    2016-04-15

    Cucurbitacins are a group of tetracyclic triterpenoids, known for centuries for their anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties, which are being actively investigated over the past decades in order to elucidate their mechanism of action. In perspective of being used as therapeutic molecules, a pharmacokinetic characterization is crucial to assess the affinity toward blood carrier proteins and extrapolate distribution volumes. Usually, pharmacokinetic data are first collected on animal models and later translated to humans; therefore, an early characterization of the interaction with carrier proteins from different species is highly desirable. In the present study, the interactions of cucurbitacins E and I with human and rat serum albumins (HSA and RSA) were investigated by means of surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based optical biosensing and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Active HSA and RSA sensor chip surfaces were prepared through an amine coupling reaction protocol, and the equilibrium dissociation constants (Kd) for the different cucurbitacins-serum albumins complexes were then determined by SPR analysis. Further information on the binding of cucurbitacins to serum albumins was obtained by CD competition experiments with biliverdin, a specific marker binding to subdomain IB of HSA. SPR data unveiled a previously unreported binding event between CucI and HSA; the determined binding affinities of both compounds were slightly higher for RSA with respect to HSA, even though all the compounds can be ranked as high-affinity binders for both carriers. CD analysis showed that the two cucurbitacins modify the binding of biliverdin to serum albumins through opposite allosteric modulation (positive for HSA, negative for RSA), confirming the need for caution in the translation of pharmacokinetic data across species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Myosin Binding Protein C Interaction with Actin: CHARACTERIZATION AND MAPPING OF THE BINDING SITE*

    OpenAIRE

    Rybakova, Inna N.; Greaser, Marion L.; Moss, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    Myosin binding protein C (MyBPC) is a multidomain protein associated with the thick filaments of striated muscle. Although both structural and regulatory roles have been proposed for MyBPC, its interactions with other sarcomeric proteins remain obscure. The current study was designed to examine the actin-binding properties of MyBPC and to define MyBPC domain regions involved in actin interaction. Here, we have expressed full-length mouse cardiac MyBPC (cMyBPC) in a baculovirus system and show...

  20. Characterization of binding mode of action of a blocking anti-platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-B monoclonal antibody, MOR8457, reveals conformational flexibility and avidity needed for PDGF-BB to bind PDGF receptor-β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuai, Jun; Mosyak, Lidia; Brooks, Jon; Cain, Michael; Carven, Gregory J; Ogawa, Shinji; Ishino, Tetsuya; Tam, May; Lavallie, Edward R; Yang, Zhiyong; Ponsel, Dirk; Rauchenberger, Robert; Arch, Robert; Pullen, Nick

    2015-03-17

    Platelet derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) is an important mitogen and cell survival factor during development. PDGF-BB binds PDGF receptor-β (PDGFRβ) to trigger receptor dimerization and tyrosine kinase activation. We present the pharmacological and biophysical characterization of a blocking PDGF-BB monoclonal antibody, MOR8457, and contrast this to PDGFRβ. MOR8457 binds to PDGF-BB with high affinity and selectivity, and prevents PDGF-BB induced cell proliferation competitively and with high potency. The structural characterization of the MOR8457-PDGF-BB complex indicates that MOR8457 binds with a 2:1 stoichiometry, but that binding of a single MOR8457 moiety is sufficient to prevent binding to PDGFRβ. Comparison of the MOR8457-PDGF-BB structure with that of the PDGFRβ-PDGF-BB complex suggested the potential reason for this was a substantial bending and twisting of PDGF-BB in the MOR8457 structure, relative to the structures of PDGF-BB alone, bound to a PDGF-BB aptamer or PDGFRβ, which makes it nonpermissive for PDGFRβ binding. These biochemical and structural data offer insights into the permissive structure of PDGF-BB needed for agonism as well as strategies for developing specific PDGF ligand antagonists.

  1. Characterization of the carbohydrate binding specificity and kinetic parameters of lectins by using surface plasmon resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Haseley, S.R.; Talaga, P.; Kamerling, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    An accurate, rapid, and sensitive method for characterizing the carbohydrate binding properties of lectins using a BIAcore apparatus and the detection method of surface plasmon resonance is described. As a model study, the sialic acid binding lectins from Sambucus nigra and Maackia amurensis, which

  2. Isolation and characterization of a new mannose-binding lectin gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper, we report the cloning and characterization of the first mannose-binding lectin gene from a gymnosperm plant species, Taxus media. ... Phylogenetic tree analyses showed that TMA belonged to the structurally and evolutionarily closely related monocot mannose-binding lectin superfamily. This study ...

  3. Theoretical and Instrumental Studies of the Competitive Interaction Between Aromatic α-Aminobisphosphonates with DNA Using Binding Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholivand, M B; Peyman, H; Gholivand, Kh; Roshanfekr, H; Taherpour, A A; Yaghobi, R

    2017-07-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, viscometry, cyclic voltammetry (CV), and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) were applied to investigate the competitive interaction of DNA with two aromatic α-aminobisphosphonates and neutral red dye (NR, intercalator) and Hoechst (Ho, groove binder) as spectroscopic probes, in a Tris-hydrogen chloride buffer solution (pH 7.4). The principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to determine the number of chemical components presented in complexation equilibrium of DNA with the aromatic α-aminobisphosphonates (B1 and B2). The spectroscopic and voltammetric studies showed that the groove binding mode of interaction is predominant in the solution containing DNA and α-aminobisphosphonates. Furthermore, the results indicated that α-aminobisphosphonate with the lengthy N-alkyl chains had a stronger interaction. The PCA and theoretical quantum mechanical and molecular mechanic methods were also utilized to determine the structure of DNA with the two α-aminobisphosphonates (B1 and B2).

  4. Characterization of Binding Epitopes of CA125 Monoclonal Antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcos-Silva, Lara; Narimatsu, Yoshiki; Halim, Adnan

    2014-01-01

    analysis of N- and O-glycosylation sites of a MUC16 TR expressed in CHO cells and demonstrate that neither N- nor O-glycosylation appear to substantially influence binding of OC125 and M11 mAbs. A series of successive N- and C-terminal truncations of a MUC16 TR construct expressed in E. coli narrowed down...... constructs with and without aberrant glycosylation now opens the way for vaccine studies....

  5. Kinetic characterization of 4,4'-biphenylsulfonamides as selective non-zinc binding MMP inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria, Salvatore; Nuti, Elisa; Cercignani, Giovanni; La Regina, Giuseppe; Silvestri, Romano; Supuran, Claudiu T; Rossello, Armando

    2015-12-01

    We describe the characterisation of a series of 4,4'-biphenylsulfonamides as selective inhibitors of matrix metalloproteases MMP-2 and -13, two enzymes involved in cell invasion and angiogenesis. Double-inhibitor studies in the presence of acetohydroxamic acid show that these molecules do not bind the catalytic zinc. Moreover, two of the characterised inhibitors (11 and 19) act as non-competitive inhibitors, whereas the para-methyl ester derivative 13 behaves as a competitive inhibitor. This finding suggests that this class of molecules binds to a catalytic subsite, possibly the S1'-pocket. Moreover, since these compounds also act as inhibitors of carbonic anhydrases (CAs), another family of enzymes involved in cell invasion, they could be potentially useful as CA/MMP dual target inhibitors with increased efficacy as anticancer agents.

  6. Set Theory Applied to the Mathematical Characterization of HLA Class II Binding Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Rodríguez Velásquez, MD, esp.1

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Antigen presentation contains the molecularbasis for antigenic identification and immuneresponses. The set theory and experimental datawere used in order to develop an union core regionmathematic characterization through the definitionof 8 laws associated to HLA class II binding.The laws were applied to 4 promiscuous peptides,25 natural peptides sequences of core region: 13binding peptides and 12 no binding peptides; and19 synthetic peptides looking to differentiate peptides.Only one peptide was not rightly characterized.This methodology may be used to choose keypeptides in the development of vaccine.

  7. Molecular characterization of the microsomal tamoxifen binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedjouar, Blandine; de Médina, Philippe; Oulad-Abdelghani, Mustapha; Payré, Bruno; Silvente-Poirot, Sandrine; Favre, Gilles; Faye, Jean-Charles; Poirot, Marc

    2004-08-06

    Tamoxifen is a selective estrogen receptor modulator widely used for the prophylactic treatment of breast cancer. In addition to the estrogen receptor (ER), tamoxifen binds with high affinity to the microsomal antiestrogen binding site (AEBS), which is involved in ER-independent effects of tamoxifen. In the present study, we investigate the modulation of the biosynthesis of cholesterol in tumor cell lines by AEBS ligands. As a consequence of the treatment with the antitumoral drugs tamoxifen or PBPE, a selective AEBS ligand, we show that tumor cells produced a significant concentration- and time-dependent accumulation of cholesterol precursors. Sterols have been purified by HPLC and gas chromatography, and their chemical structures determined by mass spectrometric analysis. The major metabolites identified were 5alpha-cholest-8-en-3beta-ol for tamoxifen treatment and 5alpha-cholest-8-en-3beta-ol and cholesta-5,7-dien-3beta-ol, for PBPE treatment, suggesting that these AEBS ligands affect at least two enzymatic steps: the 3beta-hydroxysterol-Delta8-Delta7-isomerase and the 3beta-hydroxysterol-Delta7-reductase. Steroidal antiestrogens such as ICI 182,780 and RU 58,668 did not affect these enzymatic steps, because they do not bind to the AEBS. Transient co-expression of human 3beta-hydroxysterol-Delta8-Delta7-isomerase and 3beta-hydroxysterol-Delta7-reductase and immunoprecipitation experiments showed that both enzymes were required to reconstitute the AEBS in mammalian cells. Altogether, these data provide strong evidence that the AEBS is a hetero-oligomeric complex including 3beta-hydroxysterol-Delta8-Delta7-isomerase and the 3beta-hydroxysterol-Delta7-reductase as subunits that are necessary and sufficient for tamoxifen binding in mammary cells. Furthermore, because selective AEBS ligands are antitumoral compounds, these data suggest a link between cholesterol metabolism at a post-lanosterol step and tumor growth control. These data afford both the identification

  8. Characterization of microtubule-binding and dimerization activity of Giardia lamblia end-binding 1 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Juri; Nagami, Sara; Lee, Kyu-Ho; Park, Soon-Jung

    2014-01-01

    End-binding 1 (EB1) proteins are evolutionarily conserved components of microtubule (MT) plus-end tracking protein that regulate MT dynamics. Giardia lamblia, with two nuclei and cytoskeletal structures, requires accurate MT distribution for division. In this study, we show that a single EB1 homolog gene of G. lamblia regulates MT dynamics in mitosis. The haemagglutinin-tagged G. lamblia EB1 (GlEB1) localizes to the nuclear envelopes and median bodies, and is transiently present in mitotic spindles of dividing cells. Knockdown of GlEB1 expression using the morpholinos-based anti-EB1 oligonucleotides, resulted in a significant defect in mitosis of Giardia trophozoites. The MT-binding assays using recombinant GlEB1 (rGlEB1) proteins demonstrated that rGlEB1102-238, but not rGlEB11-184, maintains an MT-binding ability comparable with that of the full length protein, rGlEB11-238. Size exclusion chromatography showed that rGlEB1 is present as a dimer formed by its C-terminal domain and a disulfide bond. In vitro-mutagenesis of GlEB1 indicated that an intermolecular disulfide bond is made between cysteine #13 of the two monomers. Complementation assay using the BIM1 knockout mutant yeast, the yeast homolog of mammalian EB1, indicated that expression of the C13S mutant GlEB1 protein cannot rescue the mitotic defect of the BIM1 mutant yeast. These results suggest that dimerization of GlEB1 via the 13th cysteine residues plays a role during mitosis in Giardia.

  9. Characterization of Microtubule-Binding and Dimerization Activity of Giardia lamblia End-Binding 1 Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Juri; Nagami, Sara; Lee, Kyu-Ho; Park, Soon-Jung

    2014-01-01

    End-binding 1 (EB1) proteins are evolutionarily conserved components of microtubule (MT) plus-end tracking protein that regulate MT dynamics. Giardia lamblia, with two nuclei and cytoskeletal structures, requires accurate MT distribution for division. In this study, we show that a single EB1 homolog gene of G. lamblia regulates MT dynamics in mitosis. The haemagglutinin-tagged G. lamblia EB1 (GlEB1) localizes to the nuclear envelopes and median bodies, and is transiently present in mitotic spindles of dividing cells. Knockdown of GlEB1 expression using the morpholinos-based anti-EB1 oligonucleotides, resulted in a significant defect in mitosis of Giardia trophozoites. The MT-binding assays using recombinant GlEB1 (rGlEB1) proteins demonstrated that rGlEB1102–238, but not rGlEB11–184, maintains an MT-binding ability comparable with that of the full length protein, rGlEB11–238. Size exclusion chromatography showed that rGlEB1 is present as a dimer formed by its C-terminal domain and a disulfide bond. In vitro-mutagenesis of GlEB1 indicated that an intermolecular disulfide bond is made between cysteine #13 of the two monomers. Complementation assay using the BIM1 knockout mutant yeast, the yeast homolog of mammalian EB1, indicated that expression of the C13S mutant GlEB1 protein cannot rescue the mitotic defect of the BIM1 mutant yeast. These results suggest that dimerization of GlEB1 via the 13th cysteine residues plays a role during mitosis in Giardia. PMID:24828878

  10. Characterization of the binding specificity of Anguilla anguilla agglutinin (AAA) in comparison to Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldus, S E; Thiele, J; Park, Y O; Hanisch, F G; Bara, J; Fischer, R

    1996-08-01

    Using immunochemical and immunohistochemical methods, the binding site of Anguilla anguilla agglutinin (AAA) was characterized and compared with the related fucose-specific lectin from Ulex europaeus (UEA-I). In solid-phase enzyme-linked immunoassays, the two lectins recognized Fuc alpha 1-2Gal beta-HSA. AAA additionally cross-reacted with neoglycolipids bearing lacto-N-fucopentaose (LNFP) I [H type 1] and II [Le(a)] and lactodifucotetraose (LDFT) as glycan moieties. UEA-I, on the other hand, bound to a LDFT-derived neoglycolipid but not to the other neoglycolipids tested. Binding of AAA to gastric mucin was competitively neutralized by Le(a)-specific monoclonal antibodies. UEA-I binding, on the other hand, was reduced after co-incubation with H type 2- and Le(y)-specific monoclonal antibodies. According to our results, AAA reacts with fucosylated type 1 chain antigens, whereas UEA-I binds only to the alpha 1-2-fucosylated LDFT-derived neoglycolipid. In immunohistochemical studies, the reactivity of AAA and UEA-I in normal pyloric mucosa from individuals with known Lewis and secretor status was analysed. AAA showed a broad reaction in the superficial pyloric mucosa from secretors and non-secretors, but AAA reactivity was more pronounced in Le(a+b-) individuals. On the other hand, UEA-I stained the superficial pyloric mucosa only from secretor individuals. A staining of deep mucous glands by the lectins was found in all specimens. Both reacted with most human carcinomas of different origin. Slight differences in their binding pattern were observed and may be explained by the different fine-specificities of the lectins.

  11. Characterization of Helicobacter pylori sigma54 promoter-binding activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Lara E; Brahmachary, Priyanka; Hoover, Timothy R

    2006-06-01

    Several Helicobacter pylori flagellar genes require sigma(54) for their transcription. Predicted H. pylori sigma(54)-dependent promoters display a preference for A at position -23 instead of C or T as occurs in promoters from most other bacteria. Substitution of the A at position -23 of the H. pylori flaB promoter with a C did not effect expression of a flaB'-'xylE reporter gene in H. pylori, whereas T or G substitutions at this position drastically reduced expression. Results of gel mobility shift assays that used DNA probes corresponding to core promoter sequences and a H. pylori sigma(54) protein fused to the Escherichia coli maltose-binding protein suggested that H. pylori sigma(54) has a higher affinity for promoters with an A at the -23 position. The failure to observe an effect on expression for the flaB mutant promoter with the A to C substitution at the -23 position indicates that sequences flanking the core promoter region may assist binding of H. pylori sigma(54) to the mutant flaB promoter. Alternatively, H. pylori RNA polymerase or the sigma(54)-dependent activator FlgR may compensate for the reduced affinity of sigma(54) for the mutant flaB promoter.

  12. Characterization of a cadmium-binding complex of cabbage leaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, G.J.

    1984-11-01

    The chemical nature of a principle, inducible cadmium-binding complex which accumulates in cabbage leaves was studied and compared with that of animal metallothionein and copper-binding proteins isolated from various organisms. The apparent molecular weight of native cabbage complex and carboxymethylated ligand of the complex under native conditions as determined by gel filtration was about 10,000 daltons. Under denaturing conditions their apparent molecular weights were about 2000 daltons. Ligand of native complex contained 37, 28, and 9 residue per cent of glutamic acid-glutamine, cysteine, and glycine, respectively, and low aromatic residue, serine and lysine content. The high acidic and low hydrophobic residue content explain the behavior of complex on electrophoresis in the presence and absence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. Its isoelectric point was below 4.0 and it bound 4 to 6 moles cadmium per mole ligand in what appear to be cadmium-mercaptide chromophores. The complex was found to be heat stable, relatively protease insensitive, and lacking in disulfide bonds. Attempts to determine the primary sequence of reduced native complex and carboxymethylated, cleaved ligand using the Edman degradation procedure were unsuccessful. An electrophoretic procedure is described for preparative isolation of purified complex and a method is described for monitoring ligand of complex as its fluorescent dibromobimane adduct. 31 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  13. STRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE RNA BINDING DOMAIN OF HUMAN STEM LOOP BINDING PROTEIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maruthi Kashyap

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A gene encoding the RNA binding domain (RBD of human stem loop binding protein (SLBP was cloned in pET 28a vector and over-expressed in E. coli codon plus cells. The over-expressed SLBP-RBD carried no tag and aggregated as inclusion bodies in the cell lysate. Inclusion bodies were semi-purified to >85% purity by establishing a method involving detergent washing and subsequently denatured in 8 M urea. Refolding of the denatured RBD was carried out by step dialysis in decreasing concentrations of urea and L-arginine. Refolded SLBP-RBD was analyzed using size exclusion chromatography that revealed its monomeric nature and folded state. Uniformly 15N and 15N,13C labeled SLBP-RBD was prepared at concentrations for solution NMR studies. Approximately, 60% of the sequence specific backbone resonance assignments have been achieved through standard triple resonance NMR experiments. Analyses of secondary chemical shifts reveal presence of a small helical secondary structural elements and large intrinsically disordered regions.

  14. Characterization of a transporting system in rat hepatocytes. Studies with competitive and non-competitive inhibitors of phalloidin transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münter, K; Mayer, D; Faulstich, H

    1986-08-07

    Primary cultures of rat hepatocytes were used for assaying several drugs not previously known for inhibiting the transport of phalloidin. In order to have 50% inhibition (IC50) of the entrance of a tritiated phallotoxin derivative ([3H]demethylphalloin, 1 microM) from the medium into the cells the following concentrations (microM) of the various inhibitors were determined: cyclolinopeptide (0.5), Nocloprost (5.0), Nileprost (7.0), beta-estradiol (42), Verapamil (70). For comparison, the corresponding IC50 values of some known antagonists of phalloidin toxicity were determined by the same method. Moreover, we studied several natural and synthetic phallotoxins and alpha-amanitin for their ability to displace [3H]demethylphalloin from the transporting system. Lineweaver-Burk plots made it obvious that two groups of inhibitors exist. Competitive inhibitors are, for example, antamanide, beta-estradiol, silybin, Nileprost, taurocholate, and the cyclic somatostatin analog cyclo[Phe-Thr-Lys-Trp-Phe-D-Pro], whereas Verapamil and monensin inhibit phallotoxin uptake in a non-competitive way. Considering the very different chemical features of the competitive inhibitors, we tentatively conclude that the phallotoxin transport system selects compounds not on the basis of their chemical features, but rather their physical properties. The physical properties of a typical substrate are low molecular mass, lipophilic nature, and, possibly the presence of rigid ring structures. Negative charges accelerate the transport of a substrate, while positive charges have the opposite effect. The phalloidin-transporting system may represent part of a hepatic equipment which clears portal blood from, for example, bile acids, lipophilic hormones, or xenobiotics. By chance, the transporting system incorporates phallotoxins into the hepatocytes leading to the death of these cells.

  15. Synthesis, Characterization, and DNA Binding Studies of Nanoplumbagin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheik Dawood Shahida Parveen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional anticancer medicine plumbagin (PLN was prepared as nanostructured material (nanoplumbagin, NPn1 from its commercial counterparts, simultaneously coencapsulating with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide or cyclodextrin as stabilizers using ultrasonication technique. Surface morphology of NPn analysed from atomic force microscopy (AFM indicates that NPn has tunable size between 75 nm and 100 nm with narrow particle size distribution. Its binding efficiency with herring sperm DNA was studied using spectral and electrochemical techniques and its efficiency was found to be more compared to the commercial microcrystalline plumbagin (PLN. DNA cleavage was also studied by gel electrophoresis. The observed results indicate that NPn1 has better solubility in aqueous medium and hence showed better bioavailability compared to its commercial counterparts.

  16. Spectroscopic Characterization of HOONO and its Binding Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Marsha

    2004-03-01

    The atmospheric conversion of OH and NO2 radicals into stable nitric acid (HONO_2) by a three-body association reaction is of fundamental importance because it terminates several significant catalytic cycles that destroy ozone in the stratosphere as well as chain reactions that produce smog in the troposphere. Several groups have suggested that peroxynitrous acid (HOONO), a less stable isomer of HONO_2, may be a significant secondary product of this reaction under atmospheric conditions. We have recently identified the trans-perp (tp) conformer of HOONO by infrared action spectroscopy in the OH overtone region after photolytically generating HOONO a pulsed supersonic expansion. Rotational structure associated with the OH overtone band of tp-HOONO has been observed at 6971.4(1) cm-1 (origin) and assigned by simulating its band structure using a transition dipole moment and rotational constants derived from ab initio theory. Additional weaker features have been observed in this spectral region, at least some of which involve torsional motion about the peroxide bond of tp-HOONO. Information about the dissociation dynamics of tp-HOONO (2ν_OH) is obtained from homogenous line broadening, which greatly exceeds the laser bandwidth (0.02 cm-1), and the nascent quantum state distribution of the OH (v=0) products. In particular, the highest observed OH product state, OH ^2Π_3/2 (v=0, J=17/2), sets a new upper limit for the tp-HOONO binding energy of 16.1 kcal/mol. When combined with the computed 3.4 kcal/mol increase in stability for the cis-cis (cc) conformer, we also obtain an upper limit for the cc-HOONO binding energy of 19.5 kcal/mol, confirming previous estimates for the O-O bond energy of HOONO.

  17. Spectroscopic characterization of effective components anthraquinones in Chinese medicinal herbs binding with serum albumins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Shuyun; Song, Daqian; Kan, Yuhe; Xu, Dong; Tian, Yuan; Zhou, Xin; Zhang, Hanqi

    2005-11-01

    The interactions of serum albumins such as human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) with emodin, rhein, aloe-emodin and aloin were assessed employing fluorescence quenching and absorption spectroscopic techniques. The results obtained revealed that there are relatively strong binding affinity for the four anthraquinones with HSA and BSA and the binding constants for the interactions of anthraquinones with HSA or BSA at 20 °C were obtained. Anthraquinone-albumin interactions were studied at different temperatures and in the presence of some metal ions. And the competition binding of anthraquinones with serum albumins was also discussed. The Stern-Volmer curves suggested that the quenching occurring in the reactions was the static quenching process. The binding distances and transfer efficiencies for each binding reactions were calculated according to the Föster theory of non-radiation energy transfer. Using thermodynamic equations, the main action forces of these reactions were also obtained. The reasons of the different binding affinities for different anthraquinone-albumin reactions were probed from the point of view of molecular structures.

  18. Characterization of the Organic Component of Low-Molecular-Weight Chromium-Binding Substance and Its Binding of Chromium123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuan; Watson, Heather M.; Gao, Junjie; Sinha, Sarmistha Halder; Cassady, Carolyn J.; Vincent, John B.

    2011-01-01

    Chromium was proposed to be an essential element over 50 y ago and was shown to have therapeutic potential in treating the symptoms of type 2 diabetes; however, its mechanism of action at a molecular level is unknown. One chromium-binding biomolecule, low-molecular weight chromium-binding substance (LMWCr or chromodulin), has been found to be biologically active in in vitro assays and proposed as a potential candidate for the in vivo biologically active form of chromium. Characterization of the organic component of LMWCr has proven difficult. Treating bovine LMWCr with trifluoroacetic acid followed by purification on a graphite powder micro-column generates a heptapeptide fragment of LMWCr. The peptide sequence of the fragment was analyzed by MS and tandem MS (MS/MS and MS/MS/MS) using collision-induced dissociation and post-source decay. Two candidate sequences, pEEEEGDD and pEEEGEDD (where pE is pyroglutamate), were identified from the MS/MS experiments; additional tandem MS suggests the sequence is pEEEEGDD. The N-terminal glutamate residues explain the inability to sequence LMWCr by the Edman method. Langmuir isotherms and Hill plots were used to analyze the binding constants of chromic ions to synthetic peptides similar in composition to apoLMWCr. The sequence pEEEEGDD was found to bind 4 chromic ions per peptide with nearly identical cooperativity and binding constants to those of apoLMWCr. This work should lead to further studies elucidating or eliminating a potential role for LMWCr in treating the symptoms of type 2 diabetes and other conditions resulting from improper carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. PMID:21593351

  19. Thrombin-Binding Aptamer Quadruplex Formation: AFM and Voltammetric Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Constantin Diculescu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption and the redox behaviour of thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA and extended TBA (eTBA were studied using atomic force microscopy and voltammetry at highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and glassy carbon. The different adsorption patterns and degree of surface coverage were correlated with the sequence base composition, presence/absence of K+, and voltammetric behaviour of TBA and eTBA. In the presence of K+, only a few single-stranded sequences present adsorption, while the majority of the molecules forms stable and rigid quadruplexes with no adsorption. Both TBA and eTBA are oxidized and the only anodic peak corresponds to guanine oxidation. Upon addition of K+ ions, TBA and eTBA fold into a quadruplex, causing the decrease of guanine oxidation peak and occurrence of a new peak at a higher potential due to the oxidation of G-quartets. The higher oxidation potential of G-quartets is due to the greater difficulty of electron transfer from the inside of the quadruplex to the electrode surface than electron transfer from the more flexible single strands.

  20. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE BINDING OF SULFONYLUREA DRUGS TO HSA BY HIGH-PERFORMANCE AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, K.S.; Hage, David S.

    2010-01-01

    Sulfonylurea drugs are often prescribed as a treatment for type II diabetes to help lower blood sugar levels by stimulating insulin secretion. These drugs are believed to primarily bind in blood to human serum albumin (HSA). This study used high-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) to examine the binding of sulfonylureas to HSA. Frontal analysis with an immobilized HSA column was used to determine the association equilibrium constants (Ka) and number of binding sites on HSA for the sulfonylurea drugs acetohexamide and tolbutamide. The results from frontal analysis indicated HSA had a group of relatively high affinity binding regions and weaker binding sites for each drug, with average Ka values of 1.3 (± 0.2) × 105 M−1 and 3.5 (± 3.0) × 102 M−1 for acetohexamide and values of 8.7 (± 0.6) × 104 and 8.1 (± 1.7) × 103 M−1 for tolbutamide. Zonal elution and competition studies with site-specific probes were used to further examine the relatively high affinity interactions of these drugs by looking directly at the interactions that were occurring at Sudlow sites I and II of HSA (i.e., the major drug binding sites on this protein). It was found that acetohexamide was able to bind at both Sudlow sites I and II, with Ka values of 1.3 (± 0.1) × 105 and 4.3 (± 0.3) × 104 M−1, respectively, at 37°C. Tolbutamide also appeared to interact with both Sudlow sites I and II, with Ka values of 5.5 (± 0.2) × 104 and 5.3 (± 0.2) × 104 M−1, respectively. The results provide a more quantitative picture of how these drugs bind with HSA and illustrate how HPAC and related tools can be used to examine relatively complex drug-protein interactions. PMID:20435530

  1. Characterization of the binding of Photobacterium phosphoreum P-flavin by Vibrio harveyi Luciferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, C J; Lei, B; Tu, S C

    2001-12-15

    The isolated Photobacterium phosphoreum luciferase is associated with a bound flavin designated P-flavin and tentatively identified as 6-(3"-myristic acid)-FMN. Since FMN and myristic acid are products of the normal luciferase reaction, we explored the possibility that P-flavin can also be bound by luciferase from other luminous bacteria and serve as an active site probe. P-flavin has never been detected in Vibrio harveyi cells. We found that the V. harveyi luciferase binds P. phosphoreum P-flavin, at a ratio of 1 P-flavin per luciferase alphabeta dimer, and with concomitant absorption spectral perturbation of P-flavin, fluorescence quenching of P-flavin and luciferase, and activity inhibition of luciferase. Isolated P-flavin can be fully reduced photochemically. V. harveyi luciferase bound the oxidized P-flavin with a K(d) (or K(i) competitively against decanal) of 0.1-0.16 microM, which is three orders of magnitude lower than the K(d) for FMN binding but similar to that of reduced FMN binding. The reduced P-flavin exhibited a K(i) (competitively against the reduced FMN substrate) of 0.16 microM, also similar to the K(d) for reduced FMN. Hence, the covalent attachment of myristic acid to FMN greatly and preferentially enhanced the binding of oxidized P-flavin. The dissociation of P-flavin was slow in comparison with the binding of reduced FMN and decanal substrates. Modification of the alphaCys106 near the active site by N-ethylmaleimide can be retarded by P-flavin. These findings indicate that P-flavin is potentially a superb active site probe for luciferase. We hypothesize that P-flavin is a by-product of luciferase generated by a side reaction which is trivial with the V. harveyi luciferase but significant in the P. phosphoreum luciferase-catalyzed reaction. (c)2001 Elsevier Science.

  2. Prediction and experimental characterization of nsSNPs altering human PDZ-binding motifs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gfeller

    Full Text Available Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are a major contributor to genetic and phenotypic variation within populations. Non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs modify the sequence of proteins and can affect their folding or binding properties. Experimental analysis of all nsSNPs is currently unfeasible and therefore computational predictions of the molecular effect of nsSNPs are helpful to guide experimental investigations. While some nsSNPs can be accurately characterized, for instance if they fall into strongly conserved or well annotated regions, the molecular consequences of many others are more challenging to predict. In particular, nsSNPs affecting less structured, and often less conserved regions, are difficult to characterize. Binding sites that mediate protein-protein or other protein interactions are an important class of functional sites on proteins and can be used to help interpret nsSNPs. Binding sites targeted by the PDZ modular peptide recognition domain have recently been characterized. Here we use this data to show that it is possible to computationally identify nsSNPs in PDZ binding motifs that modify or prevent binding to the proteins containing the motifs. We confirm these predictions by experimentally validating a selected subset with ELISA. Our work also highlights the importance of better characterizing linear motifs in proteins as many of these can be affected by genetic variations.

  3. Phenotypic characterization of the binding of tetracycline to human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Zhenxing; Liu, Rutao

    2011-01-10

    Because of the widely usage of the veterinary drug tetracycline (TC), its residue exist extensively in the environment (e.g., animal food, soils, surface water, and groundwater) and can enter human body, being potential harmful. Human serum albumin (HSA) is a major transporter for endogenous and exogenous compounds in vivo. The aim of this study was to examine the interaction of HSA with TC through spectroscopic and molecular modeling methods. The inner filter effect was eliminated to get accurate binding parameters. The site marker competition experiments revealed that TC binds to site II (subdomain IIIA) of HSA mainly through electrostatic interaction, illustrated by the calculated negative ΔH° and ΔS°. Furthermore, molecular docking was applied to define the specific binding sites, the results of which show that TC mainly interacts with the positively charged amino acid residues Arg 410 and Lys 414 predominately through electrostatic force, in accordance with the conclusion of thermodynamic analysis. The binding of TC can cause conformational and some microenvironmental changes of HSA, revealed by UV-visible absorption, synchronous fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) results. The accurate and full basic data in the work is beneficial to clarifying the binding mechanism of TC with HSA in vivo and understanding its effect on protein function during the blood transportation process.

  4. Characterization of human follicle-stimulating hormone binding to human granulosa cells by an immunoenzymological method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrotin, F; Royere, D; Roussie, M; Combarnous, Y; Lansac, J; Müh, J P

    1992-04-01

    An original, nonradiometric method has been developed for studying the binding parameters of native follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) to its specific receptors in human ovarian granulosa cells. After binding and washing of the cells, hFSH was desorbed from its receptors and quantitatively measured by a specific enzyme immunoassay (EIA) in which nonspecific binding was estimated in the presence of an excess of equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG/PMSG), which binds to human FSH receptors but does not interfere in the hFSH EIA. This method makes use of native nonmodified hFSH molecules (in contrast to radiometric methods) and permits direct estimation of the binding parameters (Kd and total number of sites). The Kd of hFSH for its human granulosa receptors measured by this technique (4.8 +/- 0.3 x 10(-10) M) is close to that determined by other methods. However, we found a total number of specific FSH receptors per granulosa cell (1 to 6 x 10(4) higher than that reported by others by Scatchard analysis of competition dose-response curves in radioreceptor assays. The method is also sensitive enough to measure the in vivo occupancy of receptors by endogenous hFSH, which was found to be less than 6% in women undergoing hormonal treatment for in vitro fertilization.

  5. Characterization of TPP-binding proteins in Methanococci archaeal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Laura K

    2016-01-01

    Acetolactate synthase (ALS) is a highly conserved protein family responsible for producing branched chain amino acids. In Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, two ALS proteins, MJ0277 and MJ0663 exist though variations in features between them are noted. Researchers are quick to examine MJ0277 homologs due to their increased function and close relationship, but few have characterized MJ0663 homologs. This study identified homologs for both MJ0277 and MJ0663 in all 15 Methanococci species with fully sequenced genomes. EggNOG database does not define four of the MJ0663 homologs, JH146_1236, WP_004591614, WP_018154400, and EHP89635. BLASTP comparisons suggest these four proteins had around 30% identity to MJ0277 homologs, close to the identity similarities between other MJ0663 homologs to the MJ0277 homologous group. ExPASY physiochemical characterization shows a statistically significant difference in molecular weight and grand average hydropathy between homologous groups. CDD-BLAST showed distinct domains between homologous groups. MJ0277 homologs had TPP_AHAS and PRL06276 while MJ0663 homologs had TPP_enzymes super family and IlvB domains instead. Multiple sequence alignment using PROMALS3D showed the MJ0277 homologs a tighter group than MJ0663 and its homologs. PHYLIP showed these homologous groups as evolutionarily distinct yet equal distance from bacterial ALS proteins of established structure. The four proteins EggNOG did not define had the same features as other MJ0663 homologs. This indicates that JH146_1236, WP_004591614, WP_018154400, and EHP89635, should be included in EggNOG database cluster arCOG02000 with the other MJ0663 homologs.

  6. Different sensitivities to competitive inhibition of benzodiazepine receptor binding of {sup 11}C-iomazenil and {sup 11}C-flumazenil in rhesus monkey brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Osamu; Hosoi, Rie; Kobayashi, Kaoru [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Medical School; Itoh, Takashi; Gee, A.; Suzuki, Kazutoshi

    2001-04-01

    The in vivo binding kinetics of {sup 11}C-iomazenil were compared with those of {sup 11}C-flumazenil binding in rhesus monkey brain. The monkey was anesthetized with ketamine and intravenously injected with either {sup 11}C-iomazenil or {sup 11}C-flumazenil in combination with the coadministration of different doses of non-radioactive flumazenil (0, 5 and 20 {mu}g/kg). The regional distribution of {sup 11}C-iomazenil in the brain was similar to that of {sup 11}C-flumazenil, but the sensitivity of {sup 11}C-iomazenil binding to competitive inhibition by non-radioactive flumazenil was much less than that of {sup 11}C-flumazenil binding. A significant reduction in {sup 11}C-flumazenil binding in the cerebral cortex was observed with 20 {mu}g/kg of flumazenil, whereas a relatively smaller inhibition of {sup 11}C-iomazenil binding in the same region was observed with the same dose of flumazenil. These results suggest that {sup 11}C-flumazenil may be a superior radiotracer for estimating benzodiazepine receptor occupancy in the intact brain. (author)

  7. Characterization and DNA-binding specificities of Ralstonia TAL-like effectors

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Lixin

    2013-07-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) from Xanthomonas sp. have been used as customizable DNA-binding modules for genome-engineering applications. Ralstonia solanacearum TALE-like proteins (RTLs) exhibit similar structural features to TALEs, including a central DNA-binding domain composed of 35 amino acid-long repeats. Here, we characterize the RTLs and show that they localize in the plant cell nucleus, mediate DNA binding, and might function as transcriptional activators. RTLs have a unique DNA-binding architecture and are enriched in repeat variable di-residues (RVDs), which determine repeat DNA-binding specificities. We determined the DNA-binding specificities for the RVD sequences ND, HN, NP, and NT. The RVD ND mediates highly specific interactions with C nucleotide, HN interacts specifically with A and G nucleotides, and NP binds to C, A, and G nucleotides. Moreover, we developed a highly efficient repeat assembly approach for engineering RTL effectors. Taken together, our data demonstrate that RTLs are unique DNA-targeting modules that are excellent alternatives to be tailored to bind to user-selected DNA sequences for targeted genomic and epigenomic modifications. These findings will facilitate research concerning RTL molecular biology and RTL roles in the pathogenicity of Ralstonia spp. © 2013 The Author.

  8. The location of the high- and low-affinity bilirubin-binding sites on serum albumin: ligand-competition analysis investigated by circular dichroism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharova, Iryna; Orlov, Sergey; Urbanová, Marie

    2013-01-01

    The locations of three bilirubin (BR)-binding sites with different affinities were identified as subdomains IB, IIA and IIIA for five mammalian serum albumins (SAs): human (HSA), bovine (BSA), rat, (RSA), rabbit (RbSA) and sheep (SSA). The stereoselectivity of a high-affinity BR-binding site was identified in the BR/SA=1/1 system by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, the sites with low affinity to BR were analyzed using difference CD. Site-specific ligand-competition experiments with ibuprofen (marker for subdomain IIIA) and hemin (marker for subdomain IB) did not reveal any changes for the BR/SA=1/1 system and showed a decrease of the bound BR at BR/SA=3/1. Both sites were identified as sites with low affinity to BR. The correlation between stereoselectivity and the arrangement of Arg-Lys residues indicated similarity between the BR-binding sites in subdomain IIIA for all of the SAs studied. Subdomain IB in HSA, BSA, SSA and RbSA has P-stereoselectivity while in RSA it has M-selectivity toward BR. A ligand-competition experiment with gossypol shows a decrease of the CD signal of bound BR for the BR/SA=1/1 system as well as for BR/SA=3/1. Subdomain IIA was assigned as a high-affinity BR-binding site. The P-stereoselectivity of this site in HSA (and RSA, RbSA) was caused by the right-hand localization of charged residues R257/R218-R222, whereas the left-hand orientation of R257/R218-R199 led to the M-stereoselectivity of the primary binding site in BSA (and SSA). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of competitive red blood cell binding and reduced hematocrit on the blood and plasma levels of (/sup 14/C)Indapamide in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lettieri, J.T.; Portelli, S.T.

    1983-02-01

    The effects of chlorthalidone and acetazolamide on the red blood cell binding of indapamide were investigated. Both drugs caused a substantial decrease in the amount of indapamide bound to the erythrocytes in vitro. This effect was demonstrated by a change in the indapamide blood/plasma ratio from approximately 6 in control samples, to a value of 1 when either of the displacing agents was added. Coadministration of acetazolamide with /sup 14/C-labeled indapamide to rats, resulted in a 5-fold drop in the blood levels of total radioactivity, relative to rats dosed with (/sup 14/C)indapamide alone. Concomitantly, there was a 2-fold increase in the plasma levels of total radioactivity after acetazolamide coadministration. In rats whose hematocrits had been reduced by extensive bleeding, there were only minor alterations in the blood/plasma partitioning of (/sup 14/C)indapamide. Thus, chlorthalidone and acetazolamide were able to displace indapamide from erythrocytes in vitro and in vivo, possibly by competition at a carbonic anhydrase binding site. The pharmacokinetics of drugs which are extensively bound to erythrocytes may be significantly altered by the presence of other agents capable of competitive binding.

  10. DNA binding and cleavage activity of a structurally characterized Ni(II)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1375–1381. c Indian Academy of Sciences. DOI 10.1007/s12039-015-0900-4. DNA binding and cleavage activity of a structurally characterized Ni(II). Schiff base complex. SARAT CHANDRA KUMARa, ABHIJIT PALa, MERRY MITRAa,. V M MANIKANDAMATHAVANb, CHIA -HER LINc, BALACHANDRAN UNNI NAIRb,∗.

  11. Revised domain structure of ulvan lyase and characterization of the first ulvan binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcher, Rebecca L J; Neumann, Marten; Fuenzalida Werner, Juan Pablo; Gröhn, Franziska; Moerschbacher, Bruno M

    2017-03-22

    Biomass waste products from green algae have recently been given new life, as these polysaccharides have potential applications in industry, agriculture, and medicine. One such polysaccharide group called ulvans displays many different, potentially useful properties that arise from their structural versatility. Hence, performing structural analyses on ulvan is crucial for future applications. However, chemical reaction-based analysis methods cannot fully characterize ulvan and tend to alter its structure. Thus, better methods require well-characterized ulvan-degrading enzymes. Therefore, we analysed a previously sequenced ulvan lyase (Genebank TM reference number JN104480) and characterized its domains. We suggest that the enzyme consists of a shorter than previously described catalytic domain, a newly identified substrate binding domain, and a C-terminal type 9 secretion system signal peptide. By separately expressing the two domains in E. coli, we confirmed that the binding domain is ulvan specific, having higher affinity for ulvan than most lectins for their ligands (affinity constant: 10 5  M -1 ). To our knowledge, this is the first description of an ulvan-binding domain. Overall, identifying this new binding domain is one step towards engineering ulvan enzymes that can be used to characterize ulvan, e.g. through enzymatic/mass spectrometric fingerprinting analyses, and help unlock its full potential.

  12. Identification and characterization of a heme periplasmic-binding protein in Haemophilus ducreyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Denis, Melissa; Sonier, Brigitte; Robinson, Renée; Scott, Fraser W; Cameron, D William; Lee, B Craig

    2011-08-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi, a gram-negative and heme-dependent bacterium, is the causative agent of chancroid, a genital ulcer sexually transmitted infection. Heme acquisition in H. ducreyi proceeds via a receptor mediated process in which the initial event involves binding of hemoglobin and heme to their cognate outer membrane proteins, HgbA and TdhA, respectively. Following this specific interaction, the fate of the periplasmic deposited heme is unclear. Using protein expression profiling of the H. ducreyi periplasmic proteome, a periplasmic-binding protein, termed hHbp, was identified whose expression was enhanced under heme-limited conditions. The gene encoding this protein was situated in a locus displaying genetic characteristics of an ABC transporter. The purified protein bound heme in a dose-dependent and saturable manner and this binding was specifically competitively inhibited by heme. The hhbp gene functionally complemented an Escherichia coli heme uptake mutant. Expression of the heme periplasmic-binding protein was detected in a limited survey of H. ducreyi and H. influenzae clinical strains. These results indicate that the passage of heme into the cytoplasm of H. ducreyi involves a heme dedicated ABC transporter.

  13. Pharmacological characterization of intracellular, membrane, and plasma binding sites for corticosterone in house sparrows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuner, Creagh W; Orchinik, Miles

    2009-09-01

    The diversity and specificity of glucocorticoid effects are dependent on cell-specific receptor mechanisms. Three known corticosteroid receptors mediate tissue effects of glucocorticoids in vertebrates: two intracellular receptors that act primarily as ligand-activated transcription factors, and a membrane-associated receptor. The intracellular receptor sub-types have been well characterized in mammals, however relatively little is known about them across non-mammalian vertebrates. The membrane-associated receptors are poorly characterized in most vertebrate taxa. To explore the basis for glucocorticoid action in birds, we pharmacologically characterized the three putative corticosteroid receptors in the brain, as well as a plasma corticosterone binding globulin, in the house sparrow (Passer domesticus). We found that house sparrow brain cytosol contained two distinguishable binding sites for corticosterone. A high affinity, mineralocorticoid-like receptor had subnanomolar affinity for corticosterone (K(d) approximately 0.2 nM). However, this 'MR-like' high-affinity receptor did not bind RU28318 or canrenoic acid, two compounds that bind mammalian MR with high affinity. A lower-affinity, glucocorticoid-like receptor in brain cytosol bound corticosterone with an average K(d)=5.61 nM. This GR-like receptor showed subnanomolar affinity for RU 486. MR- and GR-like receptors were found in equal numbers in whole brain assays (average B(max)=69 and 62 fmol/mg protein, respectively). House sparrow brain membranes contain a single binding site specific for glucocorticoids, with characteristics consistent with a steroid/receptor interaction. Corticosterone affinity for this putative membrane receptor was approximately 24 nM, with apparent B(max)=177 fmol/mg protein. House sparrow plasma contained a single binding site for [(3)H]corticosterone. Specific binding to plasma sites was inhibited by glucocorticoids, progesterone, and testosterone. Testosterone binding to this

  14. Identification and characterization of DC-SIGN-binding glycoproteins in allergenic foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalakannan, M; Chang, L M; Grishina, G; Sampson, H A; Masilamani, M

    2016-08-01

    DC-SIGN (dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing nonintegrin) is a C-type lectin receptor expressed on macrophages and dendritic cells. DC-SIGN has high affinity for fucosylated glycans in several plant glycoproteins and pathogens. DC-SIGN is thought to be crucial for the development of allergic sensitization. However, the precise role of DC-SIGN in food allergy pathogenesis is not yet understood. We sought to characterize DC-SIGN-binding glycoproteins in a panel of allergenic and non-allergenic foods. Fluorescent-labeled peanut and soy extracts were used to test protein binding to human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) by flow cytometry. DC-SIGN-blocking assays were performed by incubating DCs with food extracts followed by staining with anti-DC-SIGN antibody. Using a DC-SIGN-Fc chimera, food extracts were tested for binding by ELISA and autoradiography. IgE immunoblotting was performed with pooled sera from food-allergic subjects. DC activation and maturation were assessed by flow cytometry. We demonstrate that peanut agglutinin, a minor peanut allergen, is a novel ligand for DC-SIGN. Peanut agglutinin activates DCs to induce the expression of costimulatory molecules in vitro. We present a comprehensive report on the characterization of DC-SIGN-binding proteins in common allergenic foods such as peanut, soy, tree nuts, egg, and milk. Foods that rarely induce allergy, such as pine nuts, chickpea, and corn, showed no binding to DC-SIGN. Several DC-SIGN-binding proteins show reactivity in serum IgE immunoblots. We have also identified novel non-IgE-binding proteins that interact with DC-SIGN; these proteins may be important for regulating immune responses to these foods. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Minor groove binding of the food colorant carmoisine to DNA: spectroscopic and calorimetric characterization studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Anirban; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh

    2014-01-08

    The interaction of the food additive carmoisine with herring testes DNA was studied by multifaceted biophysical techniques. Carmoisine exhibited hypochromic effects in absorbance, whereas in fluorescence the intensity enhanced upon complexation with DNA. Energy transfer from the DNA base pairs to carmoisine molecules occurred upon complexation. A groove binding model of interaction was envisaged for carmoisine-DNA complexation from 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and Hoechst displacement studies. The binding of carmoisine stabilized the DNA structure against thermal denaturation. The binding induced moderate conformational perturbations in the B-form structure of DNA. The binding affinity (10(4) M(-1)) values, calculated from absorbance and fluorescence data, and calorimetry titrations were in close agreement with each other. The binding was characterized to be exothermic and favored by small negative enthalpic and large positive entropic contributions. Salt-dependent calorimetric studies revealed that the binding reaction was dominated by nonpolyelectrolytic forces. The negative heat capacity value suggested the role of hydrophobic effect in the interaction.

  16. Characterization of the Adeno-Associated Virus 1 and 6 Sialic Acid Binding Site

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Lin-Ya; Patel, Ami; Ng, Robert; Miller, Edward Blake; Halder, Sujata; McKenna, Robert; Asokan, Aravind; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2016-01-01

    The adeno-associated viruses (AAVs), which are being developed as gene delivery vectors, display differential cell surface glycan binding and subsequent tissue tropisms. For AAV serotype 1 (AAV1), the first viral vector approved as a gene therapy treatment, and its closely related AAV6, sialic acid (SIA) serves as their primary cellular surface receptor. Toward characterizing the SIA binding site(s), the structure of the AAV1-SIA complex was determined by X-ray crystallography to 3.0 Å. Densi...

  17. Synthesis, characterization, X-ray crystal structure, DFT calculation, DNA binding, and antimicrobial assays of two new mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimipour, S. Yousef; Sheikhshoaie, Iran; Mohamadi, Maryam; Suarez, Sebastian; Baggio, Ricardo; Khaleghi, Moj; Torkzadeh-Mahani, Masoud; Mostafavi, Ali

    2015-05-01

    Two new Cu(II) complexes, [Cu(L)(phen)] (1), [Cu(L)(bipy)] (2), where L2- = (3-methoxy-2oxidobenzylidene)benzohydrazidato, phen = 1,10 phenanthroline, and bipy = 2,2‧ bipyridine, were prepared and fully characterized using elemental analyses, FT-IR, molar conductivity, and electronic spectra. The structures of both complexes were also determined by X-ray diffraction. It was found that, both complexes possessed square pyramidal coordination environment in which, Cu(II) ions were coordinated by donor atoms of HL and two nitrogens of heterocyclic bases. Computational studies were performed using DFT calculations at B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level of theory. DNA binding activities of these complexes were also investigated using electronic absorption, competitive fluorescence titration and cyclic voltammetry studies. The obtained results indicated that binding of the complexes to DNA was of intercalative mode. Furthermore, antimicrobial activities of these compounds were screened against microorganisms.

  18. Characterization of DNA binding sites of the ComE response regulator from Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, David C I; Downey, Jennifer S; Ayala, Eduardo A; Kreth, Jens; Mair, Richard; Senadheera, Dilani B; Qi, Fengxia; Cvitkovitch, Dennis G; Shi, Wenyuan; Goodman, Steven D

    2011-07-01

    In Streptococcus mutans, both competence and bacteriocin production are controlled by ComC and the ComED two-component signal transduction system. Recent studies of S. mutans suggested that purified ComE binds to two 11-bp direct repeats in the nlmC-comC promoter region, where ComE activates nlmC and represses comC. In this work, quantitative binding studies and DNase I footprinting analysis were performed to calculate the equilibrium dissociation constant and further characterize the binding site of ComE. We found that ComE protects sequences inclusive of both direct repeats, has an equilibrium dissociation constant in the nanomolar range, and binds to these two direct repeats cooperatively. Furthermore, similar direct repeats were found upstream of cslAB, comED, comX, ftf, vicRKX, gtfD, gtfB, gtfC, and gbpB. Quantitative binding studies were performed on each of these sequences and showed that only cslAB has a similar specificity and high affinity for ComE as that seen with the upstream region of comC. A mutational analysis of the binding sequences showed that ComE does not require both repeats to bind DNA with high affinity, suggesting that single site sequences in the genome may be targets for ComE-mediated regulation. Based on the mutational analysis and DNase I footprinting analysis, we propose a consensus ComE binding site, TCBTAAAYSGT.

  19. Characterization of the Copper(II) Binding Sites in Human Carbonic Anhydrase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, Whitnee L.; Song, He; Farquhar, Erik R.; Fitzkee, Nicholas C.; Emerson, Joseph P.

    2015-01-01

    Human carbonic anhydrase (CA) is a well-studied, robust, mononuclear Zn-containing metalloprotein that serves as an excellent biological ligand system to study the thermodynamics associated with metal ion coordination chemistry in aqueous solution. The apo-form of human carbonic anhydrase II (CA) binds two equivalents of copper(II) with high affinity. The Cu2+ ions bind independently forming two non-coupled type-II copper centers in CA (CuA and CuB). However, the location and coordination mode of the CuA site in solution is unclear, compared to the CuB site that has been well characterized. Using paramagnetic NMR techniques and X-ray absorption spectroscopy we have identified an N-terminal Cu2+ binding location and collected information on the coordination mode of the CuA site in CA, which is consistent with a four to five coordinate N-terminal Cu2+ binding site reminiscent to a number of N-terminal copper(II) binding sites including the copper(II)-ATCUN and copper(II)-beta-amyloid complexes. Additionally, we report a more detailed analysis of the thermodynamics associated with copper(II) binding to CA. Although we are still unable to fully deconvolute Cu2+ binding data to the high-affinity CuA site, we have derived pH- and buffer-independent values for the thermodynamics parameters K and ΔH associated with Cu2+ binding to the CuB site of CA to be 2 × 109 and −17.4 kcal/mol, respectively. PMID:26010488

  20. Characterization of the Adeno-Associated Virus 1 and 6 Sialic Acid Binding Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lin-Ya; Patel, Ami; Ng, Robert; Miller, Edward Blake; Halder, Sujata; McKenna, Robert; Asokan, Aravind; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2016-06-01

    The adeno-associated viruses (AAVs), which are being developed as gene delivery vectors, display differential cell surface glycan binding and subsequent tissue tropisms. For AAV serotype 1 (AAV1), the first viral vector approved as a gene therapy treatment, and its closely related AAV6, sialic acid (SIA) serves as their primary cellular surface receptor. Toward characterizing the SIA binding site(s), the structure of the AAV1-SIA complex was determined by X-ray crystallography to 3.0 Å. Density consistent with SIA was observed in a pocket located at the base of capsid protrusions surrounding icosahedral 3-fold axes. Site-directed mutagenesis substitution of the amino acids forming this pocket with structurally equivalent residues from AAV2, a heparan sulfate binding serotype, followed by cell binding and transduction assays, further mapped the critical residues conferring SIA binding to AAV1 and AAV6. For both viruses five of the six binding pocket residues mutated (N447S, V473D, N500E, T502S, and W503A) abolished SIA binding, whereas S472R increased binding. All six mutations abolished or decreased transduction by at least 50% in AAV1. Surprisingly, the T502S substitution did not affect transduction efficiency of wild-type AAV6. Furthermore, three of the AAV1 SIA binding site mutants-S472R, V473D, and N500E-escaped recognition by the anti-AAV1 capsid antibody ADK1a. These observations demonstrate that common key capsid surface residues dictate both virus binding and entry processes, as well as antigenic reactivity. This study identifies an important functional capsid surface "hot spot" dictating receptor attachment, transduction efficiency, and antigenicity which could prove useful for vector engineering. The adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector gene delivery system has shown promise in several clinical trials and an AAV1-based vector has been approved as the first gene therapy treatment. However, limitations still exist with respect to transduction efficiency and

  1. Recombinant expression, purification, and characterization of an acyl-CoA binding protein from Aspergillus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Qing; Liu, Xiaoguang; Zhao, Guozhong; Jiang, Lu; Li, Ming; Zeng, Bin

    2016-03-01

    To characterize biochemically the lipid metabolism-regulating acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) from the industrially-important fungus Aspergillus oryzae. A full-length cDNA encoding a candidate ACBP from A. oryzae (AoACBP) was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli as a maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusion protein. The MBP-AoACBP protein was purified by an amylose resin chromatography column. SDS-PAGE showed that MBP-AoACBP has an estimated molecular weight of 82 kDa. Microscale thermophoresis binding assay showed that the recombinant AoACBP displayed much greater affinity for palmitoyl-CoA (K d = 80 nM) than for myristoyl-CoA (K d = 510 nM), thus demonstrating the preference of AoACBP for long-chain acyl-CoA. The data support the identification of AoACBP as a long-chain ACBP in A. oryzae.

  2. Purification and characterization of a new type lactose-binding Ulex europaeus lectin by affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konami, Y; Yamamoto, K; Osawa, T

    1991-02-01

    A new type lactose-binding lectin was purified from extracts of Ulex europaeus seeds by affinity chromatography on a column of galactose-Sepharose 4B, followed by gel filtration on Sephacryl S-300. This lectin, designated as Ulex europaeus lectin III (UEA-III), was found to be inhibited by lactose. The dimeric lectin is a glycoprotein with a molecular mass of 70,000 Da; it consists of two apparently identical subunits of a molecular mass of 34,000 Da. Compositional analysis showed that this lectin contains 30% carbohydrate and a large amount of aspartic acid, serine and valine, but no sulfur-containing amino acids. The N-terminal amino-acid sequences of L-fucose-binding Ulex europaeus lectin I (UEA-I) and di-N-acetylchitobiose-binding Ulex europaeus lectin II (UEA-II), both of which we have already purified and characterized, and that of UEA-III were determined and compared.

  3. Competitive binding-based optical DNA mapping for fast identification of bacteria--multi-ligand transfer matrix theory and experimental applications on Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Adam N; Emilsson, Gustav; Nyberg, Lena K; Noble, Charleston; Stadler, Liselott Svensson; Fritzsche, Joachim; Moore, Edward R B; Tegenfeldt, Jonas O; Ambjörnsson, Tobias; Westerlund, Fredrik

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate a single DNA molecule optical mapping assay able to resolve a specific Escherichia coli strain from other strains. The assay is based on competitive binding of the fluorescent dye YOYO-1 and the AT-specific antibiotic netropsin. The optical map is visualized by stretching the DNA molecules in nanofluidic channels. We optimize the experimental conditions to obtain reproducible barcodes containing as much information as possible. We implement a multi-ligand transfer matrix method for calculating theoretical barcodes from known DNA sequences. Our method extends previous theoretical approaches for competitive binding of two types of ligands to many types of ligands and introduces a recursive approach that allows long barcodes to be calculated with standard computer floating point formats. The identification of a specific E. coli strain (CCUG 10979) is based on mapping of 50-160 kilobasepair experimental DNA fragments onto the theoretical genome using the developed theory. Our identification protocol introduces two theoretical constructs: a P-value for a best experiment-theory match and an information score threshold. The developed methods provide a novel optical mapping toolbox for identification of bacterial species and strains. The protocol does not require cultivation of bacteria or DNA amplification, which allows for ultra-fast identification of bacterial pathogens. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. Competitive binding-based optical DNA mapping for fast identification of bacteria - multi-ligand transfer matrix theory and experimental applications on Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Adam N.; Emilsson, Gustav; Nyberg, Lena K.; Noble, Charleston; Stadler, Liselott Svensson; Fritzsche, Joachim; Moore, Edward R. B.; Tegenfeldt, Jonas O.; Ambjörnsson, Tobias; Westerlund, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a single DNA molecule optical mapping assay able to resolve a specific Escherichia coli strain from other strains. The assay is based on competitive binding of the fluorescent dye YOYO-1 and the AT-specific antibiotic netropsin. The optical map is visualized by stretching the DNA molecules in nanofluidic channels. We optimize the experimental conditions to obtain reproducible barcodes containing as much information as possible. We implement a multi-ligand transfer matrix method for calculating theoretical barcodes from known DNA sequences. Our method extends previous theoretical approaches for competitive binding of two types of ligands to many types of ligands and introduces a recursive approach that allows long barcodes to be calculated with standard computer floating point formats. The identification of a specific E. coli strain (CCUG 10979) is based on mapping of 50–160 kilobasepair experimental DNA fragments onto the theoretical genome using the developed theory. Our identification protocol introduces two theoretical constructs: a P-value for a best experiment-theory match and an information score threshold. The developed methods provide a novel optical mapping toolbox for identification of bacterial species and strains. The protocol does not require cultivation of bacteria or DNA amplification, which allows for ultra-fast identification of bacterial pathogens. PMID:25013180

  5. A novel method to measure HLA-DM-susceptibility of peptides bound to MHC class II molecules based on peptide binding competition assay and differential IC50 determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Liusong; Stern, Lawrence J.

    2014-01-01

    HLA-DM (DM) functions as a peptide editor that mediates the exchange of peptides loaded onto MHCII molecules by accelerating peptide dissociation and association kinetics. The relative DM-susceptibility of peptides bound to MHCII molecules correlates with antigen presentation and immunodominance hierarchy, and measurement of DM-susceptibility has been a key effort in this field. Current assays of DM-susceptibility, based on differential peptide dissociation rates measured for individually labeled peptides over a long time base, are difficult and cumbersome. Here, we present a novel method to measure DM-susceptibility based on peptide binding competition assays performed in the presence and absence of DM, reported as a delta-IC50 (change in 50% inhibition concentration) value. We simulated binding competition reactions of peptides with various intrinsic and DM-catalyzed kinetic parameters and found that under a wide range of conditions the delta-IC50 value is highly correlated with DM-susceptibility as measured in off-rate assay. We confirmed experimentally that DM-susceptibility measured by delta-IC50 is comparable to that measured by traditional off-rate assay for peptides with known DM-susceptibility hierarchy. The major advantage of this method is that it allows simple, fast and high throughput measurement of DM-susceptibility for a large set of unlabeled peptides in studies of the mechanism of DM action and for identification of CD4+ T cell epitopes. PMID:24583195

  6. A novel method to measure HLA-DM-susceptibility of peptides bound to MHC class II molecules based on peptide binding competition assay and differential IC(50) determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Liusong; Stern, Lawrence J

    2014-04-01

    HLA-DM (DM) functions as a peptide editor that mediates the exchange of peptides loaded onto MHCII molecules by accelerating peptide dissociation and association kinetics. The relative DM-susceptibility of peptides bound to MHCII molecules correlates with antigen presentation and immunodominance hierarchy, and measurement of DM-susceptibility has been a key effort in this field. Current assays of DM-susceptibility, based on differential peptide dissociation rates measured for individually labeled peptides over a long time base, are difficult and cumbersome. Here, we present a novel method to measure DM-susceptibility based on peptide binding competition assays performed in the presence and absence of DM, reported as a delta-IC(50) (change in 50% inhibition concentration) value. We simulated binding competition reactions of peptides with various intrinsic and DM-catalyzed kinetic parameters and found that under a wide range of conditions the delta-IC(50) value is highly correlated with DM-susceptibility as measured in off-rate assay. We confirmed experimentally that DM-susceptibility measured by delta-IC(50) is comparable to that measured by traditional off-rate assay for peptides with known DM-susceptibility hierarchy. The major advantage of this method is that it allows simple, fast and high throughput measurement of DM-susceptibility for a large set of unlabeled peptides in studies of the mechanism of DM action and for identification of CD4+ T cell epitopes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Regulation of Bacterial DNA Packaging in Early Stationary Phase by Competitive DNA Binding of Dps and IHF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sin Yi; Lim, Ci Ji; Dröge, Peter; Yan, Jie

    2015-12-14

    The bacterial nucleoid, a bacterial genome packed by nucleoid binding proteins, forms the physical basis for cellular processes such as gene transcription and DNA replication. Bacteria need to dynamically modulate their nucleoid structures at different growth phases and in response to environmental changes. At the nutrients deficient stationary phase, DNA-binding proteins from starved cells (Dps) and Integration host factors (IHF) are the two most abundant nucleoid associated proteins in E. coli. Yet, it remains unclear how the nucleoid architecture is controlled by the interplay between these two proteins, as well as the nucleoid's response to environmental changes. This question is addressed here using single DNA manipulation approach. Our results reveal that the two proteins are differentially selected for DNA binding, which can be tuned by changing environmental factors over physiological ranges including KCl (50-300 mM), MgCl2 (0-10 mM), pH (6.5-8.5) and temperature (23-37 °C). Increasing pH and MgCl2 concentrations switch from Dps-binding to IHF-binding. Stable Dps-DNA and IHF-DNA complexes are insensitive to temperature changes for the range tested. The environment dependent selection between IHF and Dps results in different physical organizations of DNA. Overall, our findings provide important insights into E. coli nucleoid architecture.

  8. Characterization of the comparative drug binding to intra- (liver fatty acid binding protein) and extra- (human serum albumin) cellular proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Andrew; Hallifax, David; Nussio, Matthew R; Shapter, Joseph G; Mackenzie, Peter I; Brian Houston, J; Knights, Kathleen M; Miners, John O

    2015-01-01

    1. This study compared the extent, affinity, and kinetics of drug binding to human serum albumin (HSA) and liver fatty acid binding protein (LFABP) using ultrafiltration and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). 2. Binding of basic and neutral drugs to both HSA and LFABP was typically negligible. Binding of acidic drugs ranged from minor (fu > 0.8) to extensive (fu transport mechanisms for drugs bound moderately or extensively to HSA and LFABP.

  9. Characterization of critical reagents in ligand-binding assays: enabling robust bioanalytical methods and lifecycle management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Brian J; Egan, Adrienne Clements; Yang, Tong-Yuan; Dong, Yuxin; Shankar, Gopi

    2013-01-01

    The effective management of validated ligand-binding assays used for PK, PD and immunogenicity assessments of biotherapeutics is vital to ensuring robust and consistent assay performance throughout the lifetime of the method. The structural integrity and functional quality of critical reagents is often linked to ligand-binding assay performance; therefore, physicochemical and biophysical characterization coupled with assessment of assay performance can enable the highest degree of reagent quality. The implementation of a systematic characterization process for monitoring critical reagent attributes, utilizing detailed analytical techniques such as LC-MS, can expedite assay troubleshooting and identify deleterious trends. In addition, this minimizes the potential for costly delays in drug development due to reagent instability or batch-to-batch variability. This article provides our perspectives on a proactive critical reagent QC process. Case studies highlight the analytical techniques used to identify chemical and molecular factors and the interdependencies that can contribute to protein heterogeneity and integrity.

  10. Dopamine transporter; solubilization and characterization of ( sup 3 H) GBR-12935 binding in canine caudate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sallee, F.R.

    1988-01-01

    The dopamine (DA) transporter protein, as indexed by ({sup 3}H)GBR-12935 binding, was solubilized from canine striatal membranes with the detergent digitonin. This solubilized protein retained the same pharmacological characteristics as membrane attached uptake sites. The binding of ({sup 3}H)GBR-12935 to solubilized preparations was specific, saturable and reversible with an equilibrium dissociation constant of approximately 3 nM and a maximum ligand binding (B{sub max}) of 3.4 pmol/mg protein. ({sup 3}H)GBR-12935 also bound to solubilized sites in a sodium-independent manner with a K{sub D} of approximately 6 nM and a B{sub max} of 1.2 {plus minus} 0.2 pmol/mg protein. Dopamine uptake inhibitors and substrates of DA uptake inhibited ({sup 3}H)GBR-12935 binding in a stereoselective and concentration dependent manner. For these compounds rank order of potency for inhibition of ({sup 3}H)GBR-12935 binding correlated with their potency for inhibition of dopamine uptake. K{sub D} values for DA uptake inhibitors in solubilized preparations correlated with those obtained on ({sup 3}H)GBR-12935 binding in the native state. The dopamine transporter appears to be a transmembrane glycoprotein by virtue of its absorption and specific elution from wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)-lectin column. Solubilization of the putative dopamine transporter with full retention of binding activity now allows for the purification and biochemical characterization of this important membrane protein.

  11. Characterization of an atypical lipoprotein-binding protein in human aortic media membranes by ligand blotting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmenko, Y S; Bochkov, V N; Philippova, M P; Tkachuk, V A; Resink, T J

    1994-01-01

    By use of ligand-blotting techniques, this study investigated lipoprotein-binding proteins in human aortic smooth muscle. PAGE was performed under non-reducing conditions, and, using low-density lipoprotein (LDL) as ligand, with rabbit anti-apolipoprotein (apo) B and 125I-labelled goat anti-rabbit IgG as primary and secondary antibodies respectively, we demonstrate that membranes from human aortic media (and cultured human smooth-muscle cells) contain a major lipoprotein-binding protein with an apparent molecular mass of 105 kDa. Anionized preparations (carbamoyl- and acetyl-) of LDL, which did not displace 125I-LDL bound to the apo B,E receptor of cultured fibroblasts, were also recognized as ligands for the 105 kDa protein in aortic media membranes. LDL binding to 105 kDa protein was decreased in the presence of high density lipoprotein (HDL), although more than 100-fold molar excess of HDL was required to achieve 50% displacement of bound LDL. The LDL-binding activity of 105 kDa protein was inhibited by EDTA, and was also significantly decreased when samples were reduced by beta-mercaptoethanol before electrophoresis. Monoclonal antibodies against apo B,E receptor reacted with partially purified bovine adrenal apo B,E receptor, but not with 105 kDa protein of human aortic media membranes. The spectrum of properties of this vascular smooth-muscle lipoprotein-binding protein binding are clearly distinct from those of other previously characterized lipoprotein-binding molecules. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 8 PMID:7945254

  12. Characterization of GTP binding and hydrolysis in plasma membranes of zucchini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdue, D. O.; Lomax, T. L.

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the possibility that G-protein-like entities may be present in the plasma membrane (PM) of zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) hypocotyls by examining a number of criteria common to animal and yeast G-proteins. The GTP binding and hydrolysis characteristics of purified zucchini PM are similar to the characteristics of a number of known G-proteins. Our results demonstrate GTP binding to a single PM site having a Kd value between 16-31 nM. This binding has a high specificity for guanine nucleotides, and is stimulated by Mg2+, detergents, and fluoride or aluminium ions. The GTPase activity (Km = 0.49 micromole) of zucchini PM shows a sensitivity to NaF similar to that seen for other G-proteins. Localization of GTP mu 35S binding to nitrocellulose blots of proteins separated by SDS-PAGE indicates a 30-kDa protein as the predominant GTP-binding species in zucchini PM. Taken together, these data indicate that plant PM contains proteins which are biochemically similar to previously characterized G-proteins.

  13. An Alix fragment potently inhibits HIV-1 budding: characterization of binding to retroviral YPXL late domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munshi, Utpal M; Kim, Jaewon; Nagashima, Kunio; Hurley, James H; Freed, Eric O

    2007-02-09

    The retroviral structural protein, Gag, contains small peptide motifs known as late domains that promote efficient virus release from the infected cell. In addition to the well characterized PTAP late domain, the p6 region of HIV-1 Gag contains a binding site for the host cell protein Alix. To better understand the functional role of the Gag/Alix interaction, we overexpressed an Alix fragment composed of residues 364-716 (Alix 364-716) and examined the effect on release of wild type (WT) and Alix binding site mutant HIV-1. We observed that Alix 364-716 expression significantly inhibited WT virus release and Gag processing and that mutation of the Alix binding site largely relieved this inhibition. Furthermore, Alix 364-716 expression induced a severe defect on WT but not mutant particle morphology. Intriguingly, the impact of Alix 364-716 expression on HIV-1 release and Gag processing was markedly different from that induced by mutation of the Alix binding site in p6. The association of Alix 364-716 with HIV-1 and equine infectious anemia virus late domains was quantitatively evaluated by isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance techniques, and the effects of mutations in these viral sequences on Alix 364-716 binding was determined. This study identifies a novel Alix-derived dominant negative inhibitor of HIV-1 release and Gag processing and provides quantitative information on the interaction between Alix and viral late domains.

  14. Polyethyleneimine anchored copper(II) complexes: synthesis, characterization, in vitro DNA binding studies and cytotoxicity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmipraba, Jagadeesan; Arunachalam, Sankaralingam; Riyasdeen, Anvarbatcha; Dhivya, Rajakumar; Akbarsha, Mohammad Abdulkader

    2015-01-01

    The water soluble polyethyleneimine-copper(II) complexes, [Cu(phen)(L-tyr)BPEI]ClO4 (where phen=1,10-phenanthroline, L-tyr=L-tyrosine and BPEI=branched polyethyleneimine) with various degree of copper(II) complex units in the polymer chain were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis and electronic, FT-IR, EPR spectroscopic techniques. The binding of these complexes with CT-DNA was studied using UV-visible absorption titration, thermal denaturation, emission, circular dichroism spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetric methods. The changes observed in the physicochemcial properties indicated that the binding between the polymer-copper complexes and DNA was mostly through electrostatic mode of binding. Among these complexes, the polymer-copper(II) complex with the highest degrees of copper(II) complex units (higher degrees of coordination) showed higher binding constant than those with lower copper(II) complex units (lower degrees of coordination) complexes. The complex with the highest number of metal centre bound strongly due to the cooperative binding effect. Therefore, anticancer study was carried out using this complex. The cytotoxic activity for this complex on MCF-7 breast cancer cell line was determined adopting MTT assay, acridine orange/ethidium bromide (AO/EB) staining and comet assay techniques, which revealed that the cells were committed to specific mode of cell death either apoptosis or necrosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Agrobacterium uses a unique ligand-binding mode for trapping opines and acquiring a competitive advantage in the niche construction on plant host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Julien; Vigouroux, Armelle; Planamente, Sara; El Sahili, Abbas; Blin, Pauline; Aumont-Nicaise, Magali; Dessaux, Yves; Moréra, Solange; Faure, Denis

    2014-10-01

    By modifying the nuclear genome of its host, the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens induces the development of plant tumours in which it proliferates. The transformed plant tissues accumulate uncommon low molecular weight compounds called opines that are growth substrates for A. tumefaciens. In the pathogen-induced niche (the plant tumour), a selective advantage conferred by opine assimilation has been hypothesized, but not experimentally demonstrated. Here, using genetics and structural biology, we deciphered how the pathogen is able to bind opines and use them to efficiently compete in the plant tumour. We report high resolution X-ray structures of the periplasmic binding protein (PBP) NocT unliganded and liganded with the opine nopaline (a condensation product of arginine and α-ketoglurate) and its lactam derivative pyronopaline. NocT exhibited an affinity for pyronopaline (K(D) of 0.6 µM) greater than that for nopaline (KD of 3.7 µM). Although the binding-mode of the arginine part of nopaline/pyronopaline in NocT resembled that of arginine in other PBPs, affinity measurement by two different techniques showed that NocT did not bind arginine. In contrast, NocT presented specific residues such as M117 to stabilize the bound opines. NocT relatives that exhibit the nopaline/pyronopaline-binding mode were only found in genomes of the genus Agrobacterium. Transcriptomics and reverse genetics revealed that A. tumefaciens uses the same pathway for assimilating nopaline and pyronopaline. Fitness measurements showed that NocT is required for a competitive colonization of the plant tumour by A. tumefaciens. Moreover, even though the Ti-plasmid conjugal transfer was not regulated by nopaline, the competitive advantage gained by the nopaline-assimilating Ti-plasmid donors led to a preferential horizontal propagation of this Ti-plasmid amongst the agrobacteria colonizing the plant-tumour niche. This work provided structural and genetic evidences to support the niche

  16. Agrobacterium uses a unique ligand-binding mode for trapping opines and acquiring a competitive advantage in the niche construction on plant host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Lang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available By modifying the nuclear genome of its host, the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens induces the development of plant tumours in which it proliferates. The transformed plant tissues accumulate uncommon low molecular weight compounds called opines that are growth substrates for A. tumefaciens. In the pathogen-induced niche (the plant tumour, a selective advantage conferred by opine assimilation has been hypothesized, but not experimentally demonstrated. Here, using genetics and structural biology, we deciphered how the pathogen is able to bind opines and use them to efficiently compete in the plant tumour. We report high resolution X-ray structures of the periplasmic binding protein (PBP NocT unliganded and liganded with the opine nopaline (a condensation product of arginine and α-ketoglurate and its lactam derivative pyronopaline. NocT exhibited an affinity for pyronopaline (K(D of 0.6 µM greater than that for nopaline (KD of 3.7 µM. Although the binding-mode of the arginine part of nopaline/pyronopaline in NocT resembled that of arginine in other PBPs, affinity measurement by two different techniques showed that NocT did not bind arginine. In contrast, NocT presented specific residues such as M117 to stabilize the bound opines. NocT relatives that exhibit the nopaline/pyronopaline-binding mode were only found in genomes of the genus Agrobacterium. Transcriptomics and reverse genetics revealed that A. tumefaciens uses the same pathway for assimilating nopaline and pyronopaline. Fitness measurements showed that NocT is required for a competitive colonization of the plant tumour by A. tumefaciens. Moreover, even though the Ti-plasmid conjugal transfer was not regulated by nopaline, the competitive advantage gained by the nopaline-assimilating Ti-plasmid donors led to a preferential horizontal propagation of this Ti-plasmid amongst the agrobacteria colonizing the plant-tumour niche. This work provided structural and genetic evidences to

  17. Characterization of a novel /sup 3/H-5-hydroxytryptamine binding site subtype in bovine brain membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heuring, R.E.; Peroutka, S.J.

    1987-03-01

    /sup 3/H-5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) binding sites were analyzed in bovine brain membranes. The addition of either the 5-HT1A-selective drug 8-OH-DPAT (100 nM) or the 5-HT1C-selective drug mesulergine (100 nM) to the assay resulted in a 5-10% decrease in specific /sup 3/H-5-HT binding. Scatchard analysis revealed that the simultaneous addition of both drugs decreased the Bmax of /sup 3/H-5-HT binding by 10-15% without affecting the KD value (1.8 +/- 0.3 nM). Competition studies using a series of pharmacologic agents revealed that the sites labeled by /sup 3/H-5-HT in bovine caudate in the presence of 100 nM 8-OH-DPAT and 100 nM mesulergine appear to be homogeneous. 5-HT1A selective agents such as 8-OH-DPAT, ipsapirone, and buspirone display micromolar affinities for these sites. RU 24969 and (-)pindolol are approximately 2 orders of magnitude less potent at these sites than at 5-HT1B sites which have been identified in rat brain. Agents displaying nanomolar potencies for 5-HT1C sites such as mianserin and mesulergine are 2-3 orders of magnitude less potent at the /sup 3/H-5-HT binding sites in bovine caudate. In addition, both 5-HT2- and 5-HT3-selective agents are essentially inactive at these binding sites. These /sup 3/H-5-HT sites display nanomolar affinity for 5-carboxyamidotryptamine, 5-methoxytryptamine, metergoline, and 5-HT. Apparent Ki values of 10-100 nM are obtained for d-LSD, RU 24969, methiothepin, tryptamine, methysergide, and yohimbine, whereas I-LSD and corynanthine are significantly less potent. In addition, these /sup 3/H-5-HT labeled sites are regulated by guanine nucleotides and calcium. Regional studies indicate that this class of sites is most dense in the basal ganglia but exists in all regions of bovine brain. These data therefore demonstrate the presence of a homogeneous class of 5-HT1 binding sites in bovine caudate that is pharmacologically distinct from previously defined 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT1C, 5-HT2, and 5-HT3 receptor subtypes

  18. Cyclic AMP Inhibits the Activity and Promotes the Acetylation of Acetyl-CoA Synthetase through Competitive Binding to the ATP/AMP Pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaobiao; Shen, Liqiang; Wang, Qijun; Cen, Xufeng; Wang, Jin; Wu, Meng; Li, Peng; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Yu; Zhao, Guoping

    2017-01-27

    The high-affinity biosynthetic pathway for converting acetate to acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) is catalyzed by the central metabolic enzyme acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase (Acs), which is finely regulated both at the transcriptional level via cyclic AMP (cAMP)-driven trans-activation and at the post-translational level via acetylation inhibition. In this study, we discovered that cAMP directly binds to Salmonella enterica Acs (SeAcs) and inhibits its activity in a substrate-competitive manner. In addition, cAMP binding increases SeAcs acetylation by simultaneously promoting Pat-dependent acetylation and inhibiting CobB-dependent deacetylation, resulting in enhanced SeAcs inhibition. A crystal structure study and site-directed mutagenesis analyses confirmed that cAMP binds to the ATP/AMP pocket of SeAcs, and restrains SeAcs in an open conformation. The cAMP contact residues are well conserved from prokaryotes to eukaryotes, suggesting a general regulatory mechanism of cAMP on Acs. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Crystallographic and thermodynamic characterization of phenylaminopyridine bisphosphonates binding to human farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaeok Park

    Full Text Available Human farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase (hFPPS catalyzes the production of the 15-carbon isoprenoid farnesyl pyrophosphate. The enzyme is a key regulator of the mevalonate pathway and a well-established drug target. Notably, it was elucidated as the molecular target of nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates, a class of drugs that have been widely successful against bone resorption disorders. More recently, research has focused on the anticancer effects of these inhibitors. In order to achieve increased non-skeletal tissue exposure, we created phenylaminopyridine bisphosphonates (PNP-BPs that have bulky hydrophobic side chains through a structure-based approach. Some of these compounds have proven to be more potent than the current clinical drugs in a number of antiproliferation assays using multiple myeloma cell lines. In the present work, we characterized the binding of our most potent PNP-BPs to the target enzyme, hFPPS. Co-crystal structures demonstrate that the molecular interactions designed to elicit tighter binding are indeed established. We carried out thermodynamic studies as well; the newly introduced protein-ligand interactions are clearly reflected in the enthalpy of binding measured, which is more favorable for the new PNP-BPs than for the lead compound. These studies also indicate that the affinity of the PNP-BPs to hFPPS is comparable to that of the current drug risedronate. Risedronate forms additional polar interactions via its hydroxyl functional group and thus exhibits more favorable binding enthalpy; however, the entropy of binding is more favorable for the PNP-BPs, owing to the greater desolvation effects resulting from their large hydrophobic side chains. These results therefore confirm the overall validity of our drug design strategy. With a distinctly different molecular scaffold, the PNP-BPs described in this report represent an interesting new group of future drug candidates. Further investigation should follow to

  20. p53 binding sites in normal and cancer cells are characterized by distinct chromatin context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Feifei; LoVerso, Peter R; Fisk, Jeffrey N; Zhurkin, Victor B; Cui, Feng

    2017-08-18

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 interacts with DNA in a sequence-dependent manner. Thousands of p53 binding sites have been mapped genome-wide in normal and cancer cells. However, the way p53 selectively binds its cognate sites in different types of cells is not fully understood. Here, we performed a comprehensive analysis of 25 published p53 cistromes and identified 3,551 and 6,039 'high-confidence' binding sites in normal and cancer cells, respectively. Our analysis revealed 2 distinct epigenetic features underlying p53-DNA interactions in vivo. First, p53 binding sites are associated with transcriptionally active histone marks (H3K4me3 and H3K36me3) in normal-cell chromatin, but with repressive histone marks (H3K27me3) in cancer-cell chromatin. Second, p53 binding sites in cancer cells are characterized by a lower level of DNA methylation than their counterparts in normal cells, probably related to global hypomethylation in cancers. Intriguingly, regardless of the cell type, p53 sites are highly enriched in the endogenous retroviral elements of the ERV1 family, highlighting the importance of this repeat family in shaping the transcriptional network of p53. Moreover, the p53 sites exhibit an unusual combination of chromatin patterns: high nucleosome occupancy and, at the same time, high sensitivity to DNase I. Our results suggest that p53 can access its target sites in a chromatin environment that is non-permissive to most DNA-binding transcription factors, which may allow p53 to act as a pioneer transcription factor in the context of chromatin.

  1. Quantitative characterization of glycan-receptor binding of H9N2 influenza A virus hemagglutinin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karunya Srinivasan

    Full Text Available Avian influenza subtypes such as H5, H7 and H9 are yet to adapt to the human host so as to establish airborne transmission between humans. However, lab-generated reassorted viruses possessing hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA genes from an avian H9 isolate and other genes from a human-adapted (H3 or H1 subtype acquired two amino acid changes in HA and a single amino acid change in NA that confer respiratory droplet transmission in ferrets. We previously demonstrated for human-adapted H1, H2 and H3 subtypes that quantitative binding affinity of their HA to α2→6 sialylated glycan receptors correlates with respiratory droplet transmissibility of the virus in ferrets. Such a relationship remains to be established for H9 HA. In this study, we performed a quantitative biochemical characterization of glycan receptor binding properties of wild-type and mutant forms of representative H9 HAs that were previously used in context of reassorted viruses in ferret transmission studies. We demonstrate here that distinct molecular interactions in the glycan receptor-binding site of different H9 HAs affect the glycan-binding specificity and affinity. Further we show that α2→6 glycan receptor-binding affinity of a mutant H9 HA carrying Thr-189→Ala amino acid change correlates with the respiratory droplet transmission in ferrets conferred by this change. Our findings contribute to a framework for monitoring the evolution of H9 HA by understanding effects of molecular changes in HA on glycan receptor-binding properties.

  2. Structure and characterization of a novel chicken biotin-binding protein A (BBP-A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Mark S

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chicken genome contains a BBP-A gene showing similar characteristics to avidin family genes. In a previous study we reported that the BBP-A gene may encode a biotin-binding protein due to the high sequence similarity with chicken avidin, especially at regions encoding residues known to be located at the ligand-binding site of avidin. Results Here, we expand the repertoire of known macromolecular biotin binders by reporting a novel biotin-binding protein A (BBP-A from chicken. The BBP-A recombinant protein was expressed using two different expression systems and purified with affinity chromatography, biochemically characterized and two X-ray structures were solved – in complex with D-biotin (BTN and in complex with D-biotin D-sulfoxide (BSO. The BBP-A protein binds free biotin with high, "streptavidin-like" affinity (Kd ~ 10-13 M, which is about 50 times lower than that of chicken avidin. Surprisingly, the affinity of BBP-A for BSO is even higher than the affinity for BTN. Furthermore, the solved structures of the BBP-A – BTN and BBP-A – BSO complexes, which share the fold with the members of the avidin and lipocalin protein families, are extremely similar to each other. Conclusion BBP-A is an avidin-like protein having a β-barrel fold and high affinity towards BTN. However, BBP-A differs from the other known members of the avidin protein family in thermal stability and immunological properties. BBP-A also has a unique ligand-binding property, the ability to bind BTN and BSO at comparable affinities. BBP-A may have use as a novel material in, e.g. modern bio(nanotechnological applications.

  3. AGO2 Negatively Regulates Type I Interferon Signaling Pathway by Competition Binding IRF3 with CBP/p300

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengyu Wang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Viral infection triggers a series of signaling cascades and host innate immune responses, including interferon (IFN production, which depends on coordinated activity of multiple transcription factors. IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3 and transcriptional coactivator CREB binding protein (CBP and/or p300 are core factors that participate in transcriptional complex formation in the nucleus. In general, cells balance the production of IFNs through suppressive and stimulative mechanisms, but viral infections can disrupt such equilibrium. This study determined that H5N1 viral infection reduced the distribution of human argonaute 2 (AGO2 in A549 cell nucleus. AGO2 did not block phosphorylation, nuclear translocation, and DNA binding ability of IRF3 but inhibited its association with CBP. Therefore, this newly revealed mechanism shows that cellular response leads to transfer of AGO2 from cell nucleus and promotes IFN-β expression to increase host survival during viral infection.

  4. Competitive binding to plasma thyroid hormone transport proteins and thyroid disruption by phenylbutazone used as a probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayrard, Véronique; Picard-Hagen, Nicole; Viguié, Catherine; Toutain, Pierre-Louis

    2011-11-01

    A model of thyroidectomized sheep intravenously supplemented with thyroid hormone (TH) was developed to mimic endogenous TH exposure and to analyze the impact on plasma TH homeostasis of xenobiotic interference with TH binding to plasma proteins. TH was displaced from plasma protein binding sites by using phenylbutazone (PBZ) as a test xenobiotic, to compare the effect of PBZ on steady state free and total plasma TH concentrations between the in vivo situation and an in vitro system. While PBZ increased free TH in vitro, PBZ administration in vivo produced an immediate reduction in both total and free plasma TH. The decrease in the total TH was consistent with a PBZ-induced displacement of TH from its plasma binding proteins, leading to an increase in total TH plasma clearance. However, this reduction in total TH was not expected to be accompanied by a parallel decrease in free plasma TH since the free TH is determined by the clearance of the free plasma TH. This suggested that PBZ may also have interfered with the clearance mechanisms of free TH. It can be concluded that our thyroidectomized sheep model enables a dual action of a xenobiotic on plasma TH to be distinguished, namely a displacement of TH from its binding proteins leading to a decrease in the total plasma concentration, which is not relevant to thyroid function versus an interference with the intrinsic TH clearance leading to a change in the free plasma TH, which has a major impact in terms of thyroid disruption. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization of a human coagulation factor Xa-binding site on Viperidae snake venom phospholipases A2 by affinity binding studies and molecular bioinformatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gowda Veerabasappa T

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The snake venom group IIA secreted phospholipases A2 (SVPLA2, present in the Viperidae snake family exhibit a wide range of toxic and pharmacological effects. They exert their different functions by catalyzing the hydrolysis of phospholipids (PL at the membrane/water interface and by highly specific direct binding to: (i presynaptic membrane-bound or intracellular receptors; (ii natural PLA2-inhibitors from snake serum; and (iii coagulation factors present in human blood. Results Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR protein-protein interaction measurements and an in vitro biological test of inhibition of prothrombinase activity, we identify a number of Viperidae venom SVPLA2s that inhibit blood coagulation through direct binding to human blood coagulation factor Xa (FXa via a non-catalytic, PL-independent mechanism. We classify the SVPLA2s in four groups, depending on the strength of their binding. Molecular electrostatic potentials calculated at the surface of 3D homology-modeling models show a correlation with inhibition of prothrombinase activity. In addition, molecular docking simulations between SVPLA2 and FXa guided by the experimental data identify the potential FXa binding site on the SVPLA2s. This site is composed of the following regions: helices A and B, the Ca2+ loop, the helix C-β-wing loop, and the C-terminal fragment. Some of the SVPLA2 binding site residues belong also to the interfacial binding site (IBS. The interface in FXa involves both, the light and heavy chains. Conclusion We have experimentally identified several strong FXa-binding SVPLA2s that disrupt the function of the coagulation cascade by interacting with FXa by the non-catalytic PL-independent mechanism. By theoretical methods we mapped the interaction sites on both, the SVPLA2s and FXa. Our findings may lead to the design of novel, non-competitive FXa inhibitors.

  6. Characterization of a human coagulation factor Xa-binding site on Viperidae snake venom phospholipases A2 by affinity binding studies and molecular bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, Grazyna; Gowda, Veerabasappa T; Maroun, Rachid C

    2007-12-06

    The snake venom group IIA secreted phospholipases A2 (SVPLA2), present in the Viperidae snake family exhibit a wide range of toxic and pharmacological effects. They exert their different functions by catalyzing the hydrolysis of phospholipids (PL) at the membrane/water interface and by highly specific direct binding to: (i) presynaptic membrane-bound or intracellular receptors; (ii) natural PLA2-inhibitors from snake serum; and (iii) coagulation factors present in human blood. Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) protein-protein interaction measurements and an in vitro biological test of inhibition of prothrombinase activity, we identify a number of Viperidae venom SVPLA2s that inhibit blood coagulation through direct binding to human blood coagulation factor Xa (FXa) via a non-catalytic, PL-independent mechanism. We classify the SVPLA2s in four groups, depending on the strength of their binding. Molecular electrostatic potentials calculated at the surface of 3D homology-modeling models show a correlation with inhibition of prothrombinase activity. In addition, molecular docking simulations between SVPLA2 and FXa guided by the experimental data identify the potential FXa binding site on the SVPLA2s. This site is composed of the following regions: helices A and B, the Ca2+ loop, the helix C-beta-wing loop, and the C-terminal fragment. Some of the SVPLA2 binding site residues belong also to the interfacial binding site (IBS). The interface in FXa involves both, the light and heavy chains. We have experimentally identified several strong FXa-binding SVPLA2s that disrupt the function of the coagulation cascade by interacting with FXa by the non-catalytic PL-independent mechanism. By theoretical methods we mapped the interaction sites on both, the SVPLA2s and FXa. Our findings may lead to the design of novel, non-competitive FXa inhibitors.

  7. Multifunctional Nutrient-Binding Proteins Adapt Human Symbiotic Bacteria for Glycan Competition in the Gut by Separately Promoting Enhanced Sensing and Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Elizabeth A.; Kwiatkowski, Kurt J.; Lee, Byung-Hoo; Hamaker, Bruce R.; Koropatkin, Nicole M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT To compete for the dynamic stream of nutrients flowing into their ecosystem, colonic bacteria must respond rapidly to new resources and then catabolize them efficiently once they are detected. The Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron starch utilization system (Sus) is a model for nutrient acquisition by symbiotic gut bacteria, which harbor thousands of related Sus-like systems. Structural investigation of the four Sus outer membrane proteins (SusD, -E, -F, and -G) revealed that they contain a total of eight starch-binding sites that we demonstrated, using genetic and biochemical approaches, to play distinct roles in starch metabolism in vitro and in vivo in gnotobiotic mice. SusD, whose homologs are abundant in the human microbiome, is critical for the initial sensing of available starch, allowing sus transcriptional activation at much lower concentrations than without this function. In contrast, seven additional binding sites across SusE, -F, and -G are dispensable for sus activation. However, they optimize the rate of growth on starch in a manner dependent on the expression of the bacterial polysaccharide capsule, suggesting that they have evolved to offset the diffusion barrier created by this structure. These findings demonstrate how proteins with similar biochemical behavior can serve orthogonal functions during different stages of cellular adaptation to nutrients. Finally, we demonstrated in gnotobiotic mice fed a starch-rich diet that the Sus binding sites confer a competitive advantage to B. thetaiotaomicron in vivo in a manner that is dependent on other colonizing microbes. This study reveals how numerically dominant families of carbohydrate-binding proteins in the human microbiome fulfill separate and sometimes cooperative roles to optimize gut commensal bacteria for nutrient acquisition. PMID:25205092

  8. Nonspecific DNA Binding and Bending by HUαβ: Interfaces of the Three Binding Modes Characterized by Salt Dependent Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Junseock; Shkel, Irina; Saecker, Ruth M.; Record, M. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Previous ITC and FRET studies demonstrated that Escherichia coli HUαβ binds nonspecifically to duplex DNA in three different binding modes: a tighter-binding 34 bp mode which interacts with DNA in large (>34 bp) gaps between bound proteins, reversibly bending it 140° and thereby increasing its flexibility, and two weaker, modestly cooperative small-site-size modes (10 bp, 6 bp) useful for filling gaps between bound proteins shorter than 34 bp. Here we use ITC to determine the thermodynamics of these binding modes as a function of salt concentration, and deduce that DNA in the 34 bp mode is bent around but not wrapped on the body of HU, in contrast to specific binding of IHF. Analyses of binding isotherms (8, 15, 34 bp DNA) and initial binding heats (34, 38, 160 bp DNA) reveal that all three modes have similar log-log salt concentration derivatives of the binding constants (Ski) even though their binding site sizes differ greatly; most probable values of Ski on 34 bp or larger DNA are − 7.5 ± 0.5. From the similarity of Ski values, we conclude that binding interfaces of all three modes involve the same region of the arms and saddle of HU. All modes are entropy-driven, as expected for nonspecific binding driven by the polyelectrolyte effect. The bent-DNA 34 bp mode is most endothermic, presumably because of the cost of HU-induced DNA bending, while the 6 bp mode is modestly exothermic at all salt concentrations examined. Structural models consistent with the observed Ski values are proposed. PMID:21513716

  9. Synthesis, characterization, DNA binding and cleavage studies of mixed-ligand copper (II complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sunita

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available New two copper complexes of type [Cu(Bzimpy(LH2O]SO4 (where L = 2,2′ bipyridine (bpy, and ethylene diamine (en, Bzimpy = 2,6-bis(benzimidazole-2ylpyridine have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductance measurements, magnetic susceptibility measurements, mass, IR, electronic and EPR spectral studies. Based on elemental and spectral studies six coordinated geometries were assigned to the two complexes. DNA-binding properties of these metal complexes were investigated using absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, viscosity measurements and thermal denaturation methods. Experimental studies suggest that the complexes bind to DNA through intercalation. These complexes also promote the cleavage of plasmid pBR322, in the presence of H2O2.

  10. Multimodal chromatography: Characterization of protein binding and selectivity enhancement through mobile phase modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Leslie S; Barringer, Cartney P; Mostafa, Sigma S; Shukla, Abhinav A

    2014-05-02

    The unique selectivity of mixed mode chromatography resins is driving increasing utilization of these novel selectivities into bioprocess applications. There is a need for improved fundamental understanding of protein binding to these stationary phases to enable the development of efficient and robust purification processes. A panel of four monoclonal antibodies and two model proteins were employed to characterize protein interaction with a mixed-mode chromatographic resin comprising a hydrophobic ligand with cation-exchange functionality. Binding of these proteins was studied as a function of salt concentration and pH in the presence of various mobile phase modulators. This knowledge was applied towards screening mobile phase modulators that could selectively decrease host cell protein levels during monoclonal antibody purification. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Characterization of 6-mercaptopurine binding to bovine serum albumin and its displacement from the binding sites by quercetin and rutin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehteshami, Mehdi [Nutrition Research Center, School of Health and Nutrition, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 51644-14766 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rasoulzadeh, Farzaneh [Drug Applied Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 51644-14766 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahboob, Soltanali [Nutrition Research Center, School of Health and Nutrition, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 51644-14766 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rashidi, Mohammad-Reza, E-mail: rashidi@tbzmed.ac.ir [Research Center for Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 51644-14766 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    Binding of a drug to the serum albumins as major serum transport proteins can be influenced by other ligands leading to alteration of its pharmacological properties. In the present study, binding characteristics of 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) together with its displacement from its binding site by quercetin and rutin have been investigated by the spectroscopic method. According to the binding parameters, a static quenching component in overall dynamic quenching process is operative in the interaction between 6-MP and BSA. The binding of 6-MP to BSA occurred spontaneously due to entropy-driven hydrophobic interactions. The synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy study revealed that the secondary structure of BSA is changed in the presence of 6-MP and both Tyr and Trp residues participate in the interaction between 6-MP and BSA with the later one being more dominant. The binding constant value of 6-MP-BSA in the presence of quercetin and rutin increased. 6-MP was displaced by ibuprofen indicating that the binding site of 6-MP on albumin is site II. Therefore, the change of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of 6-MP by quercetin and rutin through alteration of binding capacity of 6-MP to the serum albumin cannot be ruled out. In addition, the displacement study showed that 6-MP is located in site II of BSA. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Participation of both Tyr and particularly Trp residues in the interaction between 6-MP and BSA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Involvement of a static quenching component in an overall dynamic quenching process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ability of quercetin and rutin to change the binding constants of 6-MP-BSA complex. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Binding of 6-MP to BSA through entropy-driven hydrophobic interactions.

  12. Synthesis, characterization, DNA-binding and cleavage studies of polypyridyl copper(II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubendran, Ammavasi; Rajesh, Jegathalaprathaban; Anitha, Kandasamy; Athappan, Periyakaruppan

    2014-10-01

    Six new mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes were synthesized namely [Cu(phen)2OAc]ClO4ṡH2O(1), [Cu(bpy)2OAc]ClO4ṡH2O(2), [Cu(o-ampacac)(phen)]ClO4(3), [Cu(o-ampbzac)(phen)]ClO4(4), [Cu(o-ampacac)(bpy)]ClO4(5), and [Cu(o-ampbzac)(bpy)]ClO4(6) (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, bpy = 2, 2‧-bipyridine, o-ampacac = (Z)-4-(2-hydroxylamino)pent-3-ene-2-one,o-ampbzac = (Z)-4-(2-hydroxylamino)-4-phenylbut-3-ene-2-one)and characterized by UV-Vis, IR, EPR and cyclic voltammetry. Ligands were characterized by NMR spectra. Single crystal X-ray studies of the complex 1 shows Cu(II) ions are located in a highly distorted octahedral environment. Absorption spectral studies reveal that the complexes 1-6 exhibit hypochromicity during the interaction with DNA and binding constant values derived from spectral and electrochemical studies indicate that complexes 1, 2 and 3 bind strongly with DNA possibly by an intercalative mode. Electrochemical studies reveal that the complexes 1-4 prefer to bind with DNA in Cu(I) rather than Cu(II) form. The shift in the formal potentials E1/2 and CD spectral studies suggest groove or electrostatic binding mode for the complexes 4-6. Complex 1 can cleave supercoiled (SC) pUC18 DNA efficiently into nicked form II under photolytic conditions and into an open circular form (form II) and linear form (form III) in the presence of H2O2 at pH 8.0 and 37 °C, while the complex 2 does not cleave DNA under similar conditions.

  13. Albumin-coated SPIONs: an experimental and theoretical evaluation of protein conformation, binding affinity and competition with serum proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Siming; Perálvarez-Marín, Alex; Minelli, Caterina; Faraudo, Jordi; Roig, Anna; Laromaine, Anna

    2016-08-14

    The variety of nanoparticles (NPs) used in biological applications is increasing and the study of their interaction with biological media is becoming more important. Proteins are commonly the first biomolecules that NPs encounter when they interact with biological systems either in vitro or in vivo. Among NPs, super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) show great promise for medicine. In this work, we study in detail the formation, composition, and structure of a monolayer of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on SPIONs. We determine, both by molecular simulations and experimentally, that ten molecules of BSA form a monolayer around the outside of the SPIONs and their binding strength to the SPIONs is about 3.5 × 10(-4) M, ten times higher than the adsorption of fetal bovine serum (FBS) on the same SPIONs. We elucidate a strong electrostatic interaction between BSA and the SPIONs, although the secondary structure of the protein is not affected. We present data that supports the strong binding of the BSA monolayer on SPIONs and the properties of the BSA layer as a protein-resistant coating. We believe that a complete understanding of the behavior and morphology of BSA-SPIONs and how the protein interacts with SPIONs is crucial for improving NP surface design and expanding the potential applications of SPIONs in nanomedicine.

  14. Isolation and characterization of allergen-binding cells from normal and allergic donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irsch, J; Hunzelmann, N; Tesch, H; Merk, H; Maggi, E; Ruffilli, A; Radbruch, A

    1995-08-01

    Flow cytometry of the immune system so far has been limited to the analysis of subpopulations according to lineage markers. The cells involved in a particular immune response could not be assayed due to their low frequency. Here we show the potential of antigen-specific high gradient magnetic cell sorting to enrich cells for visualisation in multiparameter cytometry, functional studies and immortalization. The aim of this study was the development of an efficient technology for staining and isolation of antigen-binding cells from human peripheral blood. In particular, allergen-specific cells from normal and allergic donors should be analysed and compared to develop a cellular diagnosis of allergy. The rare antigen-specific cells were sorted by high-gradient magnetic cell sorting with MACS. Haptenized phospholipase A2 (PLA2), the major allergen of bee venom, or haptenized ParoI, the major allergenic component of Parietaria officinalis, were used as antigens. The cells from normal and allergic donors, binding to the allergen were characterized phenotypically by immuno-fluorescence. Allergen-specific B-cells were immortalized by EBV transformation. Allergen-specific cells can be enriched from blood of both allergic and normal donors to purities of up to 75%, by high gradient magnetic cell sorting. The specificity of labelling with allergen was confirmed by establishing allergen-specific EBV-transformed B-cell lines from the sorted cells. Clear differences exist in the cellular composition of allergen-binding cells from normal compared to allergic donors. In normal donors the allergen-binding cells are B-cells expressing CD19 and CD21. In allergic donors, in addition to allergen-binding B-cells, occurring in about equal absolute numbers as in normal donors, basophilic granulocytes are labeled by allergen. These cells express CD38, CD9 and CD25 on their surface, and stain for IgE.

  15. Proteomic identification of galectin-3 binding ligands and characterization of galectin-3 proteolytic cleavage in human prostasomes

    OpenAIRE

    Kovak, Matthew R.; Saraswati, Sarika; Goddard, Sabrina; Diekman, Alan B.

    2013-01-01

    Galectin-3 is a multi-functional carbohydrate binding protein that was previously characterized as a proteolytic substrate for prostate specific antigen (PSA) and was shown to be associated with prostasomes in human semen. Prostasomes are exosome-like vesicles that are secreted by the prostatic epithelium and have multiple proposed functions in normal reproduction and prostate cancer. In the current study, galectin-3 binding ligands in human prostasomes were identified and characterized with ...

  16. Characterization of the binding of a novel nonxanthine adenosine antagonist radioligand, ( sup 3 H)CGS 15943, to multiple affinity states of the adenosine A1 receptor in the rat cortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvis, M.F.; Williams, M.; Do, U.H.; Sills, M.A. (CIBA-GEIGY Corp., Summit, NJ (USA))

    1991-01-01

    The triazoloquinazoline CGS 15943 is the first reported nonxanthine adenosine antagonist that has high affinity for brain adenosine receptors. In the present study, the binding of (3H) CGS 15943 to recognition sites in rat cortical membranes was characterized. Saturation experiments revealed that (3H)CGS 15943 labeled a single class of recognition sites with high affinity and limited capacity. Competition studies revealed that the binding of (3H)CGS 15943 was consistent with the labeling of brain adenosine A1 receptors. Adenosine agonists inhibited 1 nM (3H)CGS 15943 binding with the following order of activity N6-cyclopentyladenosine (IC50 = 15 nM) greater than 2-chloroadenosine greater than (R)-N6-phenylisopropyladenosine greater than 5'-N6-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine greater than (S)N6-phenylisopropyladenosine greater than CGS 21680 greater than CV 1808 (IC50 greater than 10,000 nM). The potency order for adenosine antagonists was CGS 15943 (IC50 = 5 nM) greater than 8-phenyltheophylline greater than 1,3-dipropyl-8-(4-amino-2-chloro)phenylxanthine greater than 1,3-diethyl-8-phenylxanthine greater than theophylline = caffeine (IC50 greater than 10,000 nM). Antagonist inhibition curves were steep and best described by a one-site binding model. In contrast, adenosine A1 agonist competition curves were shallow, as indicated by Hill coefficients less than unity. Computer analysis revealed that these inhibition curves were best described by a two-site binding model. Agonist competition curves generated in the presence of 1 mM GTP resulted in a rightward shift and steepening of the inhibition-concentration curves, whereas antagonist binding was not altered in the presence of GTP. The complex binding interactions found with adenosine agonists indicate that (3H)CGS 15943 labels both high and low affinity components of the adenosine A1 receptor in the rat cortex.

  17. Development and Characterization of a Potent Free Fatty Acid Receptor 1 (FFA1) Fluorescent Tracer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Elisabeth; Hudson, Brian D; Hansen, Anders Højgaard

    2016-01-01

    of a homogeneous BRET-based binding assay suitable for both detailed kinetic studies and high throughput competition binding studies. Using 4 as a tracer demonstrated that the compound acts fully competitively with selected synthetic agonists but not with lauric acid and allowed for the characterization of binding...

  18. Characterization of a Single-Stranded DNA-Binding-Like Protein from Nanoarchaeum equitans--A Nucleic Acid Binding Protein with Broad Substrate Specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Olszewski

    Full Text Available SSB (single-stranded DNA-binding proteins play an essential role in all living cells and viruses, as they are involved in processes connected with ssDNA metabolism. There has recently been an increasing interest in SSBs, since they can be applied in molecular biology techniques and analytical methods. Nanoarchaeum equitans, the only known representative of Archaea phylum Nanoarchaeota, is a hyperthermophilic, nanosized, obligatory parasite/symbiont of Ignicoccus hospitalis.This paper reports on the ssb-like gene cloning, gene expression and characterization of a novel nucleic acid binding protein from Nanoarchaeum equitans archaeon (NeqSSB-like protein. This protein consists of 243 amino acid residues and one OB fold per monomer. It is biologically active as a monomer like as SSBs from some viruses. The NeqSSB-like protein displays a low sequence similarity to the Escherichia coli SSB, namely 10% identity and 29% similarity, and is the most similar to the Sulfolobus solfataricus SSB (14% identity and 32% similarity. The NeqSSB-like protein binds to ssDNA, although it can also bind mRNA and, surprisingly, various dsDNA forms, with no structure-dependent preferences as evidenced by gel mobility shift assays. The size of the ssDNA binding site, which was estimated using fluorescence spectroscopy, is 7 ± 1 nt. No salt-dependent binding mode transition was observed. NeqSSB-like protein probably utilizes a different model for ssDNA binding than the SSB proteins studied so far. This protein is highly thermostable; the half-life of the ssDNA binding activity is 5 min at 100 °C and melting temperature (T(m is 100.2 °C as shown by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC analysis.NeqSSB-like protein is a novel highly thermostable protein which possesses a unique broad substrate specificity and is able to bind all types of nucleic acids.

  19. Multifunctional nutrient-binding proteins adapt human symbiotic bacteria for glycan competition in the gut by separately promoting enhanced sensing and catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Elizabeth A; Kwiatkowski, Kurt J; Lee, Byung-Hoo; Hamaker, Bruce R; Koropatkin, Nicole M; Martens, Eric C

    2014-09-09

    To compete for the dynamic stream of nutrients flowing into their ecosystem, colonic bacteria must respond rapidly to new resources and then catabolize them efficiently once they are detected. The Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron starch utilization system (Sus) is a model for nutrient acquisition by symbiotic gut bacteria, which harbor thousands of related Sus-like systems. Structural investigation of the four Sus outer membrane proteins (SusD, -E, -F, and -G) revealed that they contain a total of eight starch-binding sites that we demonstrated, using genetic and biochemical approaches, to play distinct roles in starch metabolism in vitro and in vivo in gnotobiotic mice. SusD, whose homologs are abundant in the human microbiome, is critical for the initial sensing of available starch, allowing sus transcriptional activation at much lower concentrations than without this function. In contrast, seven additional binding sites across SusE, -F, and -G are dispensable for sus activation. However, they optimize the rate of growth on starch in a manner dependent on the expression of the bacterial polysaccharide capsule, suggesting that they have evolved to offset the diffusion barrier created by this structure. These findings demonstrate how proteins with similar biochemical behavior can serve orthogonal functions during different stages of cellular adaptation to nutrients. Finally, we demonstrated in gnotobiotic mice fed a starch-rich diet that the Sus binding sites confer a competitive advantage to B. thetaiotaomicron in vivo in a manner that is dependent on other colonizing microbes. This study reveals how numerically dominant families of carbohydrate-binding proteins in the human microbiome fulfill separate and sometimes cooperative roles to optimize gut commensal bacteria for nutrient acquisition. Our intestinal tract harbors trillions of symbiotic microbes. A critical function contributed by this microbial community is the ability to degrade most of the complex

  20. Characterization of a mitochondrially targeted single-stranded DNA-binding protein in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, Andrew C; Song, Daqing; Alvarez, Luis A; Wall, Melisa K; Almond, David; McClellan, David A; Maxwell, Anthony; Nielsen, Brent L

    2005-04-01

    A gene encoding a predicted mitochondrially targeted single-stranded DNA binding protein (mtSSB) was identified in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence. This gene (At4g11060) codes for a protein of 201 amino acids, including a 28-residue putative mitochondrial targeting transit peptide. Protein sequence alignment shows high similarity between the mtSSB protein and single-stranded DNA binding proteins (SSB) from bacteria, including residues conserved for SSB function. Phylogenetic analysis indicates a close relationship between this protein and other mitochondrially targeted SSB proteins. The predicted targeting sequence was fused with the GFP coding region, and the organellar localization of the expressed fusion protein was determined. Specific targeting to mitochondria was observed in in-vitro import experiments and by transient expression of a GFP fusion construct in Arabidopsis leaves after microprojectile bombardment. The mature mtSSB coding region was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and the protein was purified for biochemical characterization. The purified protein binds single-stranded, but not double-stranded, DNA. MtSSB stimulates the homologous strand-exchange activity of E. coli RecA. These results indicate that mtSSB is a functional homologue of the E. coli SSB, and that it may play a role in mitochondrial DNA recombination.

  1. Central serotonergic receptors: evidence for heterogeneity and characterization by ligand-binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, D.L.

    Evidence has accumulated which suggests that receptors for serotonin exist in multiple forms both in the central nervous system and the periphery. This has come from the use of a variety of techniques and a number of different tissues. In the central nervous system the ligand-binding technique has proven particularly useful for characterizing different types of serotonin receptors, and two major classes of central serotonin receptors have been proposed on the basis of studies using this procedure. The first group (5-HT1 receptors) is defined by the high-affinity binding of /sup 3/H-serotonin in the brain, and the second (5-HT2 receptors) is defined by the high-affinity binding of /sup 3/H-spiperone in the frontal cortex. The 5-HT1 sites have themselves been shown to be a heterogeneous group, and recent studies suggest that it is possible to synthesize tryptamine analogues which can discriminate between the different types of 5-HT1 receptors. Such studies suggest the possibility of designing new selective serotonin agonists and antagonists for the study of the effects of specific receptor subtypes on behavioral and physiological activities.

  2. Synthesis, characterization, anti-microbial, DNA binding and cleavage studies of Schiff base metal complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poomalai Jayaseelan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A novel Schiff base ligand has been prepared by the condensation between butanedione monoxime with 3,3′-diaminobenzidine. The ligand and metal complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, UV, IR, 1H NMR, conductivity measurements, EPR and magnetic studies. The molar conductance studies of Cu(II, Ni(II, Co(II and Mn(II complexes showed non-electrolyte in nature. The ligand acts as dibasic with two N4-tetradentate sites and can coordinate with two metal ions to form binuclear complexes. The spectroscopic data of metal complexes indicated that the metal ions are complexed with azomethine nitrogen and oxyimino nitrogen atoms. The binuclear metal complexes exhibit octahedral arrangements. DNA binding properties of copper(II metal complex have been investigated by electronic absorption spectroscopy. Results suggest that the copper(II complex bind to DNA via an intercalation binding mode. The nucleolytic cleavage activities of the ligand and their complexes were assayed on CT-DNA using gel electrophoresis in the presence and absence of H2O2. The ligand showed increased nuclease activity when administered as copper complex and copper(II complex behave as efficient chemical nucleases with hydrogen peroxide activation. The anti-microbial activities and thermal studies have also been studied. In anti-microbial activity all complexes showed good anti-microbial activity higher than ligand against gram positive, gram negative bacteria and fungi.

  3. Competitive cation binding computations of proton balance for reactions of the phosphagen and glycolytic energy systems within skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robergs, Robert Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Limited research and data has been published for the H+ coefficients for the metabolites and reactions involved in non-mitochondrial energy metabolism. The purpose of this investigation was to compute the fractional binding of H+, K+, Na+ and Mg2+ to 21 metabolites of skeletal muscle non-mitochondrial energy metabolism, resulting in 104 different metabolite-cation complexes. Fractional binding of H+ to these metabolite-cation complexes were applied to 17 reactions of skeletal muscle non-mitochondrial energy metabolism, and 8 conditions of the glycolytic pathway based on the source of substrate (glycogen vs. glucose), completeness of glycolytic flux, and the end-point of pyruvate vs. lactate. For pH conditions of 6.0 and 7.0, respectively, H+ coefficients (-'ve values = H+ release) for the creatine kinase, adenylate kinase, AMP deaminase and ATPase reactions were 0.8 and 0.97, -0.13 and -0.02, 1.2 and 1.09, and -0.01 and -0.66, respectively. The glycolytic pathway is net H+ releasing, regardless of lactate production, which consumes 1 H+. For glycolysis fueled by glycogen and ending in either pyruvate or lactate, H+ coefficients for pH 6.0 and 7.0 were -3.97 and -2.01 (pyruvate), and -1.96 and -0.01 (lactate), respectively. When starting with glucose, the same conditions result in H+ coefficients of -3.98 and -2.67, and -1.97 and -0.67, respectively. The most H+ releasing reaction of glycolysis is the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase reaction, with H+ coefficients for pH 6.0 and 7.0 of -1.58 and -0.76, respectively. Incomplete flux of substrate through glycolysis would increase net H+ release due to the absence of the pyruvate kinase and lactate dehydrogenase reactions, which collectively result in H+ coefficients for pH 6.0 and 7.0 of 1.35 and 1.88, respectively. The data presented provide an extensive reference source for academics and researchers to accurately profile the balance of protons for all metabolites and reactions of non-mitochondrial energy

  4. Competitive cation binding computations of proton balance for reactions of the phosphagen and glycolytic energy systems within skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Andrew Robergs

    Full Text Available Limited research and data has been published for the H+ coefficients for the metabolites and reactions involved in non-mitochondrial energy metabolism. The purpose of this investigation was to compute the fractional binding of H+, K+, Na+ and Mg2+ to 21 metabolites of skeletal muscle non-mitochondrial energy metabolism, resulting in 104 different metabolite-cation complexes. Fractional binding of H+ to these metabolite-cation complexes were applied to 17 reactions of skeletal muscle non-mitochondrial energy metabolism, and 8 conditions of the glycolytic pathway based on the source of substrate (glycogen vs. glucose, completeness of glycolytic flux, and the end-point of pyruvate vs. lactate. For pH conditions of 6.0 and 7.0, respectively, H+ coefficients (-'ve values = H+ release for the creatine kinase, adenylate kinase, AMP deaminase and ATPase reactions were 0.8 and 0.97, -0.13 and -0.02, 1.2 and 1.09, and -0.01 and -0.66, respectively. The glycolytic pathway is net H+ releasing, regardless of lactate production, which consumes 1 H+. For glycolysis fueled by glycogen and ending in either pyruvate or lactate, H+ coefficients for pH 6.0 and 7.0 were -3.97 and -2.01 (pyruvate, and -1.96 and -0.01 (lactate, respectively. When starting with glucose, the same conditions result in H+ coefficients of -3.98 and -2.67, and -1.97 and -0.67, respectively. The most H+ releasing reaction of glycolysis is the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase reaction, with H+ coefficients for pH 6.0 and 7.0 of -1.58 and -0.76, respectively. Incomplete flux of substrate through glycolysis would increase net H+ release due to the absence of the pyruvate kinase and lactate dehydrogenase reactions, which collectively result in H+ coefficients for pH 6.0 and 7.0 of 1.35 and 1.88, respectively. The data presented provide an extensive reference source for academics and researchers to accurately profile the balance of protons for all metabolites and reactions of non

  5. ADF/cofilin regulates actomyosin assembly through competitive inhibition of myosin II binding to F-actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggan, O'Neil; Shaw, Alisa E; DeLuca, Jennifer G; Bamburg, James R

    2012-03-13

    The contractile actin cortex is important for diverse fundamental cell processes, but little is known about how the assembly of F-actin and myosin II motors is regulated. We report that depletion of actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin proteins in human cells causes increased contractile cortical actomyosin assembly. Remarkably, our data reveal that the major cellular defects resulting from ADF/cofilin depletion, including cortical F-actin accumulation, were largely due to excessive myosin II activity. We identify that ADF/cofilins from unicellular organisms to humans share a conserved activity to inhibit myosin II binding to F-actin, indicating a mechanistic rationale for our cellular results. Our study establishes an essential requirement for ADF/cofilin proteins in the control of normal cortical contractility and in processes such as mitotic karyokinesis. We propose that ADF/cofilin proteins are necessary for controlling actomyosin assembly and intracellular contractile force generation, a function of equal physiological importance to their established roles in mediating F-actin turnover. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. NDR1 protein kinase promotes IL-17- and TNF-α-mediated inflammation by competitively binding TRAF3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chunmei; Lin, Wenlong; Liu, Zhiyong; Tang, Wei; Gautam, Rahul; Li, Hui; Qian, Youcun; Huang, He; Wang, Xiaojian

    2017-04-01

    Interleukin 17 (IL-17) is an important inducer of tissue inflammation and is involved in numerous autoimmune diseases. However, how its signal transduction is regulated is not well understood. Here, we report that nuclear Dbf2-related kinase 1 (NDR1) functions as a positive regulator of IL-17 signal transduction and IL-17-induced inflammation. NDR1 deficiency or knockdown inhibits the IL-17-induced phosphorylation of p38, ERK1/2, and p65 and the expression of chemokines and cytokines, whereas the overexpression of NDR1 promotes IL-17-induced signaling independent of its kinase activity. Mechanistically, NDR1 interacts with TRAF3 and prevents its binding to IL-17R, which promotes the formation of an IL-17R-Act1-TRAF6 complex and downstream signaling. Consistent with this, IL-17-induced inflammation is significantly reduced in NDR1-deficient mice, and NDR1 deficiency significantly protects mice from MOG-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis likely by its inhibition of IL-17-mediated signaling pathway. NDR1 expression is increased in the colons of ulcerative colitis (UC) patients. Taken together, these findings suggest that NDR1 is involved in the development of autoimmune diseases. © 2017 The Authors.

  7. Isolation, expression and immunological characterization of a calcium-binding protein from Parietaria pollen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonura, A; Gulino, L; Trapani, A; Di Felice, G; Tinghino, R; Amoroso, S; Geraci, D; Valenta, R; Westritschnig, K; Scala, E; Mari, A; Colombo, P

    2008-05-01

    The diagnosis and therapy of allergic disorders are usually performed with crude extracts which are a heterogeneous mixture of proteins with different allergenic potency. The knowledge of the allergenic composition is a key step for diagnostic and therapeutic options. Parietaria judaica pollen represents one of the main sources of allergens in the Mediterranean area and its major allergens have already been identified (Par j 1 and Par j 2). In addition, inhibition studies performed using a calcium-binding protein (CBP) from grass pollen (Phl p 7) showed the presence of a homologue of this cross-reactive allergen in the Parietaria extract. Screening of a cDNA library allowed us to isolate a 480bp cDNA containing the information for an 87 AA long protein with high level of homology to calcium-binding proteins from other allergenic sources. It was expressed as a recombinant allergen in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography. Its expression allowed us to study the prevalence of this allergen in a population of allergic patients in southern Europe. Immunoblotting and inhibition studies showed that this allergen shares a pattern of IgE epitopes in common with other 2-EF-hand calcium-binding proteins from botanically non-related species. The immunological properties of the Pj CBP were investigated by CD63 activation assay and CFDA-SE staining. In conclusion, DNA recombinant technology allowed the isolation, expression and immunological characterization of a cross-reactive calcium-binding protein allergen from Parietaria judaica pollen.

  8. Characterization of the PB2 Cap Binding Domain Accelerates Inhibitor Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda E. Constantinides

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available X-ray crystallographic structural determinations of the PB2 cap binding domain (PB2cap have improved the conformational characterization of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase machinery (PA, PB2, and PB1 of the influenza virus. Geometrically, the catalytic PB1 subunit resembles the palm of a human hand. PA lies near the thumb region, and PB2 lies near the finger region. PB2 binds the cap moiety in the pre-mRNA of the host cell, while the endonuclease of PA cleaves the pre-mRNA 10–13 nucleotides downstream. The truncated RNA piece performs as a primer for PB1 to synthesize the viral mRNA. Precisely targeting PB2cap with a small molecule inhibitor will halt viral proliferation via interference of the cap-snatching activity. Wild-type and mutant PB2cap from A/California/07/2009 H1N1 were expressed in Escherichia coli, purified by nickel affinity and size exclusion chromatography, crystallized, and subjected to X-ray diffraction experiments. The crystal of mutant PB2cap liganded with m7GTP was prepared by co-crystallization. Structures were solved by the molecular replacement method, refined, and deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB. Structural determination and comparative analyses of these structures revealed the functions of Glu361, Lys376, His357, Phe404, Phe323, Lys339, His432, Asn429, Gln406, and Met401 in PB2cap, and the dissociation of the influenza A PB2cap C-terminal subdomain (residues 446–479 upon ligand binding. Understanding the role of these residues will aid in the ultimate development of a small-molecule inhibitor that binds both Influenza A and B virus PB2cap.

  9. Molecular Characterization of abLIM, a Novel Actin-binding and Double Zinc Finger Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roof, Dorothy J.; Hayes, Annmarie; Adamian, Michael; Chishti, Athar H.; Li, Tiansen

    1997-01-01

    Molecules that couple the actin-based cytoskeleton to intracellular signaling pathways are central to the processes of cellular morphogenesis and differentiation. We have characterized a novel protein, the actin-binding LIM (abLIM) protein, which could mediate such interactions between actin filaments and cytoplasmic targets. abLIM protein consists of a COOH-terminal cytoskeletal domain that is fused to an NH2-terminal domain consisting of four double zinc finger motifs. The cytoskeletal domain is ∼50% identical to erythrocyte dematin, an actin-bundling protein of the red cell membrane skeleton, while the zinc finger domains conform to the LIM motif consensus sequence. In vitro expression studies demonstrate that abLIM protein can bind to F-actin through the dematin-like domain. Transcripts corresponding to three distinct isoforms have a widespread tissue distribution. However, a polypeptide corresponding to the full-length isoform is found exclusively in the retina and is enriched in biochemical extracts of retinal rod inner segments. abLIM protein also undergoes extensive phosphorylation in light-adapted retinas in vivo, and its developmental expression in the retina coincides with the elaboration of photoreceptor inner and outer segments. Based on the composite primary structure of abLIM protein, actin-binding capacity, potential regulation via phosphorylation, and isoform expression pattern, we speculate that abLIM may play a general role in bridging the actin-based cytoskeleton with an array of potential LIM protein-binding partners. The developmental time course of abLIM expression in the retina suggests that the retina-specific isoform may have a specialized role in the development or elaboration of photoreceptor inner and outer segments. PMID:9245787

  10. Synthesis and characterization of a new zinc(II) complex with tetradentate azo-thioether ligand: X-ray structure, DNA binding study and DFT calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Apurba Sau; Pramanik, Ajoy Kumar; Patra, Lakshman; Manna, Chandan Kumar; Mondal, Tapan Kumar

    2017-10-01

    A new zinc(II) complex, [Zn(L)(H2O)](ClO4) (1) with azo-thioether containing NSNO donor ligand, 3-(2-(2-((pyridin-2-ylmethyl)thio)phenyl)hydrazono)pentane-2,4-dione (HL) is synthesized and characterized by several spectroscopic techniques. The distorted square based pyramidal (DSBP) geometry is confirmed by single crystal X-ray structure. The ability of the complex to bind with CT DNA is investigated by UV-vis method and the binding constant is found to be 4.16 × 104 M-1. Competitive binding study with ethidium bromide (EB) by fluorescence method suggests that the zinc(II) complex efficiently displaces EB from EB-DNA. The Stern-Volmer dynamic quenching constant, Ksv is found to be 1.2 × 104 M-1. Theoretical calculations by DFT and TDDFT/CPCM methods are used to interpret the electronic structure and UV-vis spectrum of the complex.

  11. Sonochemical Synthesis and Characterization of the Copper(II) Nanocomplex: DNA- and BSA-Binding, Cell Imaging, and Cytotoxicity Against the Human Carcinoma Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjomshoa, Marzieh; Torkzadeh-Mahani, Masoud; Dashtrazmi, Ebrahim; Adeli-Sardou, Mahboubeh

    2016-03-01

    The focus of the present work is the preparation of new metal-based nanodrug to overcome limitations of chemotherapy such as poor water solubility of most common chemotherapeutic drugs. The copper(II) complex of 1,2,4-triazine derivatives, [Cu(dppt)2(H2O)2](2+) (dppt is 5,6-diphenyl- 3- (2-pyridyl)-1,2,4-triazine), has been synthesized at nano-size by sonochemical method and characterized by FTIR, zetasizer, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The interaction of the complex and nanocomplex with fish sperm DNA (FS-DNA) and BSA have been investigated under physiological conditions by a series of experimental methods. The results have indicated that the complex binds to FS-DNA by two biding modes, viz., electrostatic and intercalates into the base pairs of DNA. The competitive study with ethidium bromide (EB) shows that the complex and nanocomplex competes for the DNA-binding sites with EB. Protein binding studies show that the complex and nanocomplex could bind with BSA. The results of synchronous fluorescence of BSA show that additions of the complex affect the microenvironment of both tyrosine and tryptophan residues during the binding process. The in vitro cytotoxicity of the complex (solution in DMSO) and nanocomplex (colloid in H2O) against the human carcinoma cell lines (MCF-7 and A-549) was evaluated by MTT assay. The results of in vitro cytotoxicity indicate that the complex and nanocomplex have excellent cytotoxicity activity against MCF-7 and A-549. Results of the microscopic analyses of the cancer cells confirm the results of the cytotoxicity.

  12. Thermodynamic Characterization of New Positive Allosteric Modulators Binding to the Glutamate Receptor A2 Ligand-Binding Domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørholm, Ann-Beth; Francotte, Pierre; Goffin, Eric

    2014-01-01

    , and combined with the shorter total simulation time, we found the OSP method to be more effective for this setup. Furthermore, from the molecular dynamics simulations, we extracted the enthalpies and entropies, and along with the ITC data, this suggested that the differences in binding free energies......, and 5a (5-F) and 5b (6-F) are entropy driven. For 5d (8-F), both quantities were equal in size. Thermodynamic integration (TI) and one-step perturbation (OSP) were used to calculate the relative binding affinity of the modulators. The OSP calculations had a higher predictive power than those from TI...

  13. Localization, characterization, and quantification of insulin-like growth factor-I-binding sites in the ewe ovary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monget, P.; Monniaux, D.; Durand, P. (INRA, Station de Physiologie de la Reproduction, Nouzilly (France))

    1989-11-01

    To assess a potential role of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) in the ewe ovary, the presence of IGF-I receptors and IGF-I-binding proteins was studied by binding assays performed on granulosa cell suspensions, in follicular fluid, and on ovarian sections. On the ovarian sections, labeling was quantified after autoradiography by microphotometry. Competition studies with IGF-I and insulin allowed us to estimate the relative proportions of binding proteins and type I receptors in the different compartments of the ewe ovary. Our results clearly show that saturable, specific, and high affinity IGF-I receptors are present on the ovine granulosa cells. At equilibrium for both granulosa cell suspensions and frozen sections, the Kd value was close to 2 nM. IGF-I binding proteins were also present in follicular fluid and stroma, thecal, and granulosa cells. At equilibrium for follicular fluid, the Kd value was 0.91 +/- 0.27 nM (mean +/- SE). Moreover, on frozen sections, it was shown that atresia of small follicles (less than 2 mm) was accompanied by a decrease in the number of IGF-I receptors and an increase in the number of IGF-I-binding proteins on granulosa cells. By contrast, this phenomenon was not observed in large follicles. These data indicate that granulosa cells of ewe ovary possess type I receptors, and IGF-I-binding proteins may modulate IGF-I action in the process of follicular growth and atresia.

  14. Competitive Binding Between Id1 and E2F1 to Cdc20 Regulates E2F1 Degradation and Thymidylate Synthase Expression to Promote Esophageal Cancer Chemoresistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Xu, Wen Wen; Guan, Xin Yuan; Qin, Yan Ru; Law, Simon; Lee, Nikki Pui Yue; Chan, Kin Tak; Tam, Pui Ying; Li, Yuk Yin; Chan, Kwok Wah; Yuen, Hiu Fung; Tsao, Sai Wah; He, Qing Yu; Cheung, Annie L M

    2016-03-01

    Chemoresistance is a major obstacle in cancer therapy. We found that fluorouracil (5-FU)-resistant esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell lines, established through exposure to increasing concentrations of 5-FU, showed upregulation of Id1, IGF2, and E2F1. We hypothesized that these genes may play an important role in cancer chemoresistance. In vitro and in vivo functional assays were performed to study the effects of Id1-E2F1-IGF2 signaling in chemoresistance. Quantitative real-time PCR, Western blotting, immunoprecipitation, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and dual-luciferase reporter assays were used to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which Id1 regulates E2F1 and by which E2F1 regulates IGF2. Clinical specimens, tumor tissue microarray, and Gene Expression Omnibus datasets were used to analyze the correlations between gene expressions and the relationships between expression profiles and patient survival outcomes. Id1 conferred 5-FU chemoresistance through E2F1-dependent induction of thymidylate synthase expression in esophageal cancer cells and tumor xenografts. Mechanistically, Id1 protects E2F1 protein from degradation and increases its expression by binding competitively to Cdc20, whereas E2F1 mediates Id1-induced upregulation of IGF2 by binding directly to the IGF2 promoter and activating its transcription. The expression level of E2F1 was positively correlated with that of Id1 and IGF2 in human cancers. More importantly, concurrent high expression of Id1 and IGF2 was associated with unfavorable patient survival in multiple cancer types. Our findings define an intricate E2F1-dependent mechanism by which Id1 increases thymidylate synthase and IGF2 expressions to promote cancer chemoresistance. The Id1-E2F1-IGF2 regulatory axis has important implications for cancer prognosis and treatment. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. 23Na multiple quantum filtered NMR characterisation of Na+ binding and dynamics in animal cells: a comparative study and effect of Na+/Li + competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Carla P; Fonseca, Luís L; Montezinho, Liliana P; Alves, Paula M; Santos, Helena; Castro, M Margarida C A; Geraldes, Carlos F G C

    2013-07-01

    Double quantum and triple quantum filtered (23)Na nuclear magnetic resonance techniques were used to characterise in detail the isotropic and anisotropic binding and dynamics of intra- and extracellular Na(+) in different cellular systems, in the absence and presence of Li(+). The kinetics of Li(+) influx by different cell types was evaluated. At steady state, astrocytes accumulated more Li(+) than red blood cells (RBCs), while a higher intracellular Li(+) concentration was found in chromaffin than in SH-SY5Y cells. Anisotropic and isotropic motions were detected for extracellular Na(+) in all cellular systems studied. Isotropic intracellular Na(+) motions were observed in all types of cells, while anisotropic Na(+) motions in the intracellular compartment were only detected in RBCs. (23)Na triple quantum signal efficiency for intracellular Na(+) was SH-SY5Y > chromaffin > RBCs, while the reverse order was observed for the extracellular ions. (23)Na double quantum signal efficiency for intracellular Na(+) was non-zero only in RBCs, and for extracellular Na(+) the order RBCs > chromaffin > SH-SY5Y cells was observed. Li(+) loading generally decreased intracellular Na(+) isotropic movements in the cells, except for astrocytes incubated with a low Li(+) concentration and increased anisotropic intracellular Na(+) movements in RBCs. Li(+) effects on the extracellular signals were more complex, reflecting Li(+)/Na(+) competition for isotropic and anisotropic binding sites at the extracellular surface of cell membranes and also at the surface of the gel used for cell immobilisation. These results are relevant and contribute to the interpretation of the in vivo pharmacokinetics and sites of Li(+) action.

  16. Characterizing N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and N-acetylcysteine amide (NACA) binding for lead poisoning treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weiqing; Ercal, Nuran; Huynh, Tien; Volkov, Anatoliy; Chusuei, Charles C

    2012-04-01

    Using antioxidants is an important means of treating lead poisoning. Prior in vivo studies showed marked differences between various chelator antioxidants in their ability to decrease both blood Pb(II) levels and oxidative stress resulting from lead poisoning. The comparative abilities of NAC and NACA to Pb(II) were studied in vitro, for the first time, to examine the role of the -OH/-NH(2) functional group in antioxidant binding behavior. To assay the antioxidant-divalent metal interaction, the antioxidants were probed as solid surfaces, adsorbing Pb(II) onto them. Surface characterization was carried out using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis to quantify Pb(II) in the resulting adducts. XPS of the Pb 4f orbitals showed that more Pb(II) was chemically bound to NACA than NAC. In addition, the antioxidant surfaces probed via point-of-zero charge (PZC) measurements of NAC and NACA were obtained to gain further insight into the Pb-NAC and Pb-NACA binding, showing that Coulombic interactions played a partial role in facilitating complex formation. The data correlated well with solution analysis of metal-ligand complexation. UV-vis spectroscopy was used to probe complexation behavior. NACA was found to have the higher binding affinity as shown by free Pb(II) available in the solution after complexation from HPLC data. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) was applied to delineate the structures of Pb-antioxidant complexes. Experimental results were further supported by density functional theory (DFT) calculations of supermolecular interaction energies (E(inter)) showing a greater interaction of Pb(II) with NACA than NAC. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Characterization of human platelet binding of recombinant T cell receptor ligand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meza-Romero Roberto

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recombinant T cell receptor ligands (RTLs are bio-engineered molecules that may serve as novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of neuroinflammatory conditions such as multiple sclerosis (MS. RTLs contain membrane distal α1 plus β1 domains of class II major histocompatibility complex linked covalently to specific peptides that can be used to regulate T cell responses and inhibit experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. The mechanisms by which RTLs impede local recruitment and retention of inflammatory cells in the CNS, however, are not completely understood. Methods We have recently shown that RTLs bind strongly to B cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells, but not to T cells, in an antigenic-independent manner, raising the question whether peripheral blood cells express a distinct RTL-receptor. Our study was designed to characterize the molecular mechanisms by which RTLs bind human blood platelets, and the ability of RTL to modulate platelet function. Results Our data demonstrate that human blood platelets support binding of RTL. Immobilized RTL initiated platelet intracellular calcium mobilization and lamellipodia formation through a pathway dependent upon Src and PI3 kinases signaling. The presence of RTL in solution reduced platelet aggregation by collagen, while treatment of whole blood with RTL prolonged occlusive thrombus formation on collagen. Conclusions Platelets, well-known regulators of hemostasis and thrombosis, have been implicated in playing a major role in inflammation and immunity. This study provides the first evidence that blood platelets express a functional RTL-receptor with a putative role in modulating pathways of neuroinflammation.

  18. Characterization of Fatty Acid Binding Protein 7 (FABP7) in the Murine Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xinyi; Tan, Queenie S W; Parikh, Bhav H; Tan, Alison; Mehta, Milan N; Sia Wey, Yeo; Tun, Sai Bo Bo; Li, Ling-Jun; Han, Xiao-Yan; Wong, Tien Y; Hunziker, Walter; Luu, Chi D; Owada, Yuji; Barathi, Veluchamy A; Zhang, Samuel S; Chaurasia, Shyam S

    2016-06-01

    To characterize the mouse retina lacking fatty acid binding protein (FABP7-/-). Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed in 8-week-old mice to localize FABP7 in the retina. Retinal thickness was measured using image-guided spectral-domain optical coherence topography images. Electroretinography was carried out to assess retinal function. Fundus photography and fundus fluorescein angiography were performed on FABP7-/- and littermate wild-type (WT) mice, and retinal vascular changes were calculated using Singapore I Vessel Assessment (SIVA) analysis. Blood glucose levels were measured in the 8-week-old WT and FABP7-/- mice. In addition, retina was processed for trypsin digestion and retinal flat mounts for isolectin staining. Transcript levels of FABP7, VEGF, GFAP, and Na+K+ATPase were quantified using real-time PCR, and protein expression was analyzed by IHC and Western blot. Fatty acid binding protein 7 is expressed in the inner nuclear layer, outer plexiform layer, and photoreceptor inner segments. No significant difference in retinal thickness and ERG responses was observed between FABP7-deficient and WT retinas. FABP7-/- mice have significantly decreased retinal venular caliber retinal arteriolar fractal dimension compared with WT littermates. FABP7-/- mice showed significant increased areas of fluorescein leakage in the retina. FABP7-/- mice exhibited elevated high blood glucose levels compared with WT mice. Trypsin digested FABP7-/- mice retina showed increased acellular strands and endothelial cell drop outs, and reduced microvasculature branching compared with WT retina. FABP7-/- mice retina also have increased GFAP and VEGF expression. Fatty acid binding protein 7 is expressed in the retina and might play an important role in maintaining retinal vasculature.

  19. Functional characterization of a conserved archaeal viral operon revealing single-stranded DNA binding, annealing and nuclease activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Yang; Kragelund, Birthe Brandt; White, Malcolm F.

    2015-01-01

    encoding proteins of unknown function and forming an operon with ORF207 (gp19). SIRV2 gp17 was found to be a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein different in structure from all previously characterized ssDNA binding proteins. Mutagenesis of a few conserved basic residues suggested a U......-shaped binding path for ssDNA. The recombinant gp18 showed an ssDNA annealing activity often associated with helicases and recombinases. To gain insight into the biological role of the entire operon, we characterized SIRV2 gp19 and showed it to possess a 5'→3' ssDNA exonuclease activity, in addition...... for rudiviruses and the close interaction among the ssDNA binding, annealing and nuclease proteins strongly point to a role of the gene operon in genome maturation and/or DNA recombination that may function in viral DNA replication/repair....

  20. Novel Pt(II) complexes containing pyrrole oxime; synthesis, characterization and DNA binding studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Deniz Altunoz; Özalp-Yaman, Şeniz

    2014-05-01

    Since the discovery of anticancer activity and subsequent clinical success of cisplatin (cis-[PtCl2(NH3)2]), platinum-based compounds have since been widely synthesized and studied as potential chemotherapeutic agents. In this sense, three novel nuclease active Pt(II) complexes with general formula; [Pt(NH3)Cl(L)] (1), [Pt(L)2] (2), and K[PtCl2(L)] (3) in which L is 1-H-pyrrole-2-carbaldehyde oxime were synthesized. Characterization of complexes was performed by elemental analysis, FT-IR, 1H NMR and mass spectroscopy measurements. Interaction of complexes (1-3) with calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid (ct-DNA) was investigated by using electrochemical, spectroelectrochemical methods and cleavage studies. The hyperchromic change in the electronic absorption spectrum of the Pt(II) complexes indicates an electrostatic interaction between the complexes and ct-DNA. Binding constant values between 4.42 × 103 and 5.09 × 103 M-1 and binding side size values between 2 and 3 base pairs were determined from cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) studies.

  1. Characterization of metal-binding bioflocculants produced by the cyanobacterial component of mixed microbial mats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, J; Rodriguez-Eaton, S; Ekanemesang, U M; Phillips, P

    1994-07-01

    Mixed-species microbial mats that were dominated by the cyanobacterium Oscillatoria sp. and contained heterotrophic and purple autotrophic bacteria were constructed for specific bioremediation applications. When the mats were challenged with metals, production and secretion of metal-binding extracellular polysaccharide bioflocculants were observed. The concentration of these negatively charged polysaccharides was correlated with the removal of manganese from the water column beneath a surface microbial mat. Bioflocculants from an Oscillatoria sp. that was isolated from the mat were collected and concentrated for characterization. A chromatographic analysis revealed a heterogeneous population of polysaccharides with respect to charge density and molecular size. The subpopulation of polysaccharides which exhibited the highest level of flocculating activity was polyanionic and had a molecular weight of more than 200,000. A glycosyl analysis of the bioflocculants revealed the presence of galacturonic acid (2.2%) and glucuronic acid (1.86%). The presence of these components, which were negatively charged at the pH levels generated by the mats during photosynthesis (pH > 7.5), may account for the metal-binding properties of the mats.

  2. Heparin-binding proteins of human seminal plasma: purification and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vijay; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Kashav, Tara; Singh, Tej P; Yadav, Savita

    2008-12-01

    Human seminal plasma (HuSP) contains several proteins that bind heparin and related glycosaminoglycans. Heparin binding proteins (HBPs) from seminal plasma have been shown to participate in modulation of capacitation or acrosome reaction and thus have been correlated with fertility in some species. However, these have not been studied in detail in human. The objective of this study was to purify major HBPs from HuSP in order to characterize these proteins. HBPs were isolated by affinity-chromatography on Heparin-Sepharose column, purified by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and Size-exclusion chromatography and checked for purity on sodium-dodecyl PAGE (SDS-PAGE). Identification of HBPs was done by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Here we report the purification and identification of seven HBPs in seminal fluid. The major HBPs are lactoferrin and its fragments, semenogelin I fragments, semenogelin II, prostate specific antigen, homolog of bovine seminal plasma-proteins (BSP), zinc finger protein (Znf 169) and fibronectin fragments. In this study we are reporting for the first time the purification and identification of BSP-homolog and Znf 169 from HuSP and classified them as HBPs. Here we report the purification of seven clinically important proteins from human seminal fluid through heparin affinity chromatography and RP-HPLC, in limited steps with higher yield. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Development of a cell permeable competitive antagonist of RhoA and CRMP4 binding, TAT-C4RIP, to promote neurite outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaei, Mohammad R; Montcalm, Samuel; Di Polo, Adriana; Fournier, Alyson E; Durocher, Yves; Ong Tone, Stephan

    2015-02-01

    Neurons fail to re-extend their processes within the central nervous system environment in vivo, and this is partly because of inhibitory proteins expressed within myelin debris and reactive astrocytes that actively signal to the injured nerve cells to limit their growth. The ability of the trans-acting activator of transcription (TAT) protein transduction domain (PTD) to transport macromolecules across biological membranes raises the possibility of developing it as a therapeutic delivery tool for nerve regeneration. Most studies have produced TAT PTD fusion protein in bacteria, which can result in problems such as protein solubility, the formation of inclusion bodies and the lack of eukaryotic posttranslational modifications. While some groups have investigated the production of TAT PTD fusion protein in mammalian cells, these strategies are focused on generating TAT PTD fusions that are targeted to the secretory pathway, where furin protease as well as other proteases can cleave the TAT PTD. As an alternative to mutating the furin cleavage site in the TAT PTD, we describe a novel method to generate cytosolic TAT PTD fusion proteins and purify them from cell lysates. Here, we use this method to generate TAT-C4RIP, a cell permeable competitive antagonist of binding between the small GTPase RhoA and the cytosolic phosphoprotein Collapsin response mediator protein 4 (CRMP4). We demonstrate that TAT-C4RIP transduces cells in vitro and in vivo and retains its biological activity to attenuate myelin inhibition in an in vitro neurite outgrowth assay.

  4. Characterization of Antibodies and Development of an Indirect Competitive Immunoassay for Detection of Deamidated Gluten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranquet, Olivier; Lupi, Roberta; Echasserieau-Laporte, Valerie; Pietri, Manon; Larré, Colette; Denery-Papini, Sandra

    2015-06-10

    Diversification of gluten applications in the food and cosmetics industries was achieved through the production of water-soluble gluten that can be obtained by deamidation. Current analytical methods dedicated to gluten detection failed to detect deamidated gluten. After immunizing mice with the peptide LQPEEPFPE conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin, five mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were produced and sequences of bound epitopes were determined as XPXEPFPE, where X is Q or E. The mAbs exhibited high specificity for deamidated gliadins and low molecular weight glutenin subunits. A competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on INRA-DG1 mAb was developed with an IC50% of 85 ng/mL and a limit of detection of 25 ng/mL. The intra- and interassay coefficients of variation (CV) were <10% except for the interassay CV of the low-level control (40 ng/mL), which was 20%. This assay was capable of detecting three of the four deamidated gluten samples spiked in rice flour at 20 mg/kg.

  5. Molecular and Functional Characterization of ssDNA Aptamers that Specifically Bind Leishmania infantum PABP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-Pérez, Natalia; Ramos, Edurne; García-Hernández, Marta; Pinto, Celia; Soto, Manuel; Martín, M. Elena; González, Víctor M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary A poly (A)-binding protein from Leishmania infantum (LiPABP) has been recently cloned and characterized in our laboratory. Although this protein shows a very high homology with PABPs from other eukaryotic organisms including mammals and other parasites, exist divergences along the sequence that convert them in potential diagnostic markers and/or therapeutics targets. Aptamers are oligonucleotide ligands that are selected in vitro by their affinity and specificity for the target as a consequence of the particular tertiary structure that they are able to acquire depending on their sequence. Development of high-affinity molecules with the ability to recognize specifically Leishmania proteins is essential for the progress of this kind of study. Results We have selected a ssDNA aptamer population against a recombinant 6xHIS–LiPABP protein (rLiPABP) that is able to recognize the target with a low Kd. Cloning, sequencing and in silico analysis of the aptamers obtained from the population yielded three aptamers (ApPABP#3, ApPABP#7 and ApPABP#11) that significantly bound to PABP with higher affinity than the naïve population. These aptamers were analyzed by ELONA and slot blot to establish affinity and specificity for rLiPABP. Results demonstrated that the three aptamers have high affinity and specificity for the target and that they are able to detect an endogenous LiPABP (eLiPABP) protein amount corresponding to 2500 L. infantum promastigotes in a significant manner. The functional analysis of the aptamers also revealed that ApPABP#11 disrupts the binding of both Myc-LiPABP and eLiPABP to poly (A) in vitro. On the other hand, these aptamers are able to bind and purify LiPABP from complex mixes. Conclusion Results presented here demonstrate that aptamers represent new reagents for characterization of LiPABP and that they can affect LiPABP activity. At this respect, the use of these aptamers as therapeutic tool affecting the physiological role of PABP has to be

  6. Biological characterization of a new radioactive labeling reagent for bacterial penicillin-binding proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preston, D.A.; Wu, C.Y.; Blaszczak, L.C.; Seitz, D.E.; Halligan, N.G. (Eli Lilly and Co., Indianapolis, IN (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Radiolabeled penicillin G is widely used as the imaging agent in penicillin-binding protein (PBP) assays. The disadvantages of most forms of labeled penicillin G are instability on storage and the long exposure times usually required for autoradiography or fluorography of electrophoretic gels. We investigated the utility of radioiodinated penicillin V as an alternative reagent. Radioiodination of p-(trimethylstannyl)penicillin V with ({sup 125}I)Na, using a modification of the chloramine-T method, is simple, high yielding, and site specific. We demonstrated the general equivalence of commercially obtained ({sup 3}H)penicillin G and locally synthesized ({sup 125}I)penicillin V (IPV) in their recognition of bacterial PBPs. Profiles of PBPs in membranes from Bacteroides fragilis, Escherichia coli, Providencia rettgeri, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Enterococcus faecalis, and Enterococcus faecium labeled with IPV or (3H)penicillin G were virtually identical. Use of IPV as the imaging agent in competition experiments for determination of the affinities of various beta-lactam antibiotics for the PBPs of E. coli yielded results similar to those obtained in experiments with ({sup 3}H)penicillin G. Dried electrophoretic gels from typical PBP experiments, using IPV at 37.3 Ci/mmol and 30 micrograms/ml, exposed X-ray film in 8 to 24 h. The stability of IPV on storage at 4{degrees}C was inversely proportional to specific activity. At 37.3 Ci/mmol and 60 micrograms/ml, IPV retained useful activity for at least 60 days at 4{degrees}C. IPV represents a practical and stable reagent for rapid PBP assays.

  7. The development and characterization of a competitive ELISA for measuring active ADAMTS-4 in a bovine cartilage ex vivo model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Yi; Zheng, Qinlong; Simonsen, Ole

    2013-01-01

    a monoclonal antibody against this neoepitope of active ADAMTS-4. Furthermore, we established and characterized a competitive ELISA for measuring active ADAMTS-4 form applying the specific antibody. We used this assay to profile the presence of active ADAMTS-4 and its aggrecan degradation product (NITEGE(373......)) in a bovine cartilage ex vivo model. We found that after stimulation with catabolic factors, the cartilage initially released high levels of aggrecanase-derived aggrecan fragments into supernatant but subsequently decreased to background levels. The level of active ADAMTS-4 released into the supernatant...... of osteoarthritis stained strongly for active ADAMTS-4 where surface fibrillation and clustered chondrocytes were observed. This assay could be an effective tool for studying ADAMTS-4 activity and for screening drugs regulating ADAMTS-4 activation. Moreover, it could be a potential biomarker for degenerative joint...

  8. Takifugu rubripes cation independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor: Cloning, expression and functional characterization of the IGF-II binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A, Ajith Kumar; Nadimpalli, Siva Kumar

    2018-01-31

    Mannose 6-phosphate/IGF-II receptor mediated lysosomal clearance of insulin-like growth factor-II is significantly associated with the evolution of placental mammals. The protein is also referred to as the IGF-II receptor. Earlier studies suggested relatively low binding affinity between the receptor and ligand in prototherian and metatherian mammals. In the present study, we cloned the IGF-II binding domain of the early vertebrate fugu fish and expressed it in bacteria. A 72000Da truncated receptor containing the IGF-II binding domain was obtained. Analysis of this protein (covering domains 11-13 of the CIMPR) for its affinity to fish and human IGF-II by ligand blot assays and ELISA showed that the expressed receptor can specifically bind to both fish and human IGF-II. Additionally, a peptide-specific antibody raised against the region of the IGF-II binding domain also was able to recognize the IGF-II binding regions of mammalian and non-mammalian cation independent MPR protein. These interactions were further characterized by Surface Plasma resonance support that the receptor binds to fish IGF-II, with a dissociation constant of 548nM. Preliminary analysis suggests that the binding mechanism as well as the affinity of the fish and human receptor for IGF-II may have varied according to different evolutionary pressures. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Novel water soluble morpholine substituted Zn(II) phthalocyanine: Synthesis, characterization, DNA/BSA binding, DNA photocleavage and topoisomerase I inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barut, Burak; Demirbaş, Ümit; Özel, Arzu; Kantekin, Halit

    2017-07-15

    In this study, novel peripherally tetra 3-morpholinophenol substituted zinc(II) phthalocyanine (4) and its water soluble form quaternized zinc(II) phthalocyanine (ZnQ) were synthesized for the first time. These novel compounds were characterized by a combination of different spectroscopic techniques such as FT-IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, UV-vis and mass. The DNA binding of ZnQ was investigated using UV-vis absorption titration, competitive ethidium bromide, thermal denaturation and viscosity experiments that the ZnQ bound to CT-DNA via intercalation mode. ZnQ indicated photocleavage activity on supercoiled pBR322 plasmid DNA via formation of singlet oxygen under irradiation at 700nm. Besides, the topoisomerase I inhibitory effect experiments showed that ZnQ inhibited topoisomerase I enzyme in a concentration-dependent manner. The bovine serum albumin (BSA) binding experiments indicated that ZnQ bound to proteins through a static quenching mechanism. All of these results claim that ZnQ has potential agent for photodynamic therapy owing to its nucleic acid interactions and photobiological or photochemical properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Overexpression and enzymatic characterization of Neisseria gonorrhoeae penicillin-binding protein 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanova, Miglena E; Tomberg, Joshua; Davies, Christopher; Nicholas, Robert A; Gutheil, William G

    2004-01-01

    The penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) are ubiquitous bacterial enzymes involved in cell wall biosynthesis, and are the targets of the beta-lactam antibiotics. The low molecular mass Neisseria gonorrhoeae PBP 4 (NG PBP 4) is the fourth PBP revealed in the gonococcal genome. NG PBP 4 was cloned, overexpressed, purified, and characterized for beta-lactam binding, DD-carboxypeptidase activity, acyl-donor substrate specificity, transpeptidase activity, inhibition by a number of active site directed reagents, and pH profile. NG PBP 4 was efficiently acylated by penicillin (30,000 m-1.s-1). Against a set of five alpha- and epsilon-substituted l-Lys-D-Ala-D-Ala substrates, NG PBP 4 exhibited wide variation in specificity with a preference for N epsilon-acylated substrates, suggesting a possible preference for crosslinked pentapeptide substrates in the cell wall. Substrates with an N epsilon-Cbz group demonstrated pronounced substrate inhibition. NG PBP 4 showed 30-fold higher activity against the depsipeptide Lac-ester substrate than against the analogous peptide substrate, an indication that k2 (acylation) is rate determining for carboxypeptidase activity. No transpeptidase activity was apparent in a model transpeptidase reaction. Among a number of active site-directed agents, N-chlorosuccinimide, elastinal, iodoacetamide, iodoacetic acid, and phenylglyoxal gave substantial inhibition, and methyl boronic acid gave modest inhibition. The pH profile for activity against Ac2-l-Lys-D-Ala-d-Ala (kcat/Km) was bell-shaped, with pKa values at 6.9 and 10.1. Comparison of the enzymatic properties of NG PBP 4 with other DD-carboxypeptidases highlights both similarities and differences within these enzymes, and suggests the possibility of common mechanistic roles for the two highly conserved active site lysines in Class A and C low molecular mass PBPs.

  11. Structural characterization of a therapeutic anti-methamphetamine antibody fragment: oligomerization and binding of active metabolites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric C Peterson

    Full Text Available Vaccines and monoclonal antibodies (mAb for treatment of (+-methamphetamine (METH abuse are in late stage preclinical and early clinical trial phases, respectively. These immunotherapies work as pharmacokinetic antagonists, sequestering METH and its metabolites away from sites of action in the brain and reduce the rewarding and toxic effects of the drug. A key aspect of these immunotherapy strategies is the understanding of the subtle molecular interactions important for generating antibodies with high affinity and specificity for METH. We previously determined crystal structures of a high affinity anti-METH therapeutic single chain antibody fragment (scFv6H4, K(D = 10 nM in complex with METH and the (+ stereoisomer of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, or "ecstasy". Here we report the crystal structure of scFv6H4 in homo-trimeric unbound (apo form (2.60Å, as well as monomeric forms in complex with two active metabolites; (+-amphetamine (AMP, 2.38Å and (+-4-hydroxy methamphetamine (p-OH-METH, 2.33Å. The apo structure forms a trimer in the crystal lattice and it results in the formation of an intermolecular composite beta-sheet with a three-fold symmetry. We were also able to structurally characterize the coordination of the His-tags with Ni(2+. Two of the histidine residues of each C-terminal His-tag interact with Ni(2+ in an octahedral geometry. In the apo state the CDR loops of scFv6H4 form an open conformation of the binding pocket. Upon ligand binding, the CDR loops adopt a closed formation, encasing the drug almost completely. The structural information reported here elucidates key molecular interactions important in anti-methamphetamine abuse immunotherapy.

  12. Identification and Characterization of an ATP Binding Cassette l-Carnitine Transporter in Listeria monocytogenes

    OpenAIRE

    Fraser, Katy R.; Harvie, Duncan; Coote, Peter J.; O'Byrne, Conor P.

    2000-01-01

    We identified an operon in Listeria monocytogenes EGD with high levels of sequence similarity to the operons encoding the OpuC and OpuB compatible solute transporters from Bacillus subtilis, which are members of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) substrate binding protein-dependent transporter superfamily. The operon, designated opuC, consists of four genes which are predicted to encode an ATP binding protein (OpuCA), an extracellular substrate binding protein (OpuCC), and two membrane-associated...

  13. Identification and characterization of the human lactoferrin-binding protein from Neisseria meningitidis.

    OpenAIRE

    Schryvers, A B; Morris, L J

    1988-01-01

    Lactoferrin-binding activity in Neisseria meningitidis was detected by a solid-phase binding assay with horseradish peroxidase-conjugated human lactoferrin (HRP-lactoferrin). Expression of lactoferrin-binding activity was regulated by the level of iron in the medium, so that growth in the presence of the iron chelator EDDA (ethylenediamine di-ortho-hydroxyphenylacetic acid) resulted in a greater than 350-fold increase in binding activity, which was reversed by addition of excess iron. A maxim...

  14. Molecular and Functional Characterization of pheromone binding protein 1 from the Oriental Fruit Moth, Grapholita molesta (Busck).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guohui; Chen, Jian; Yu, Haili; Tian, Xiaoli; Wu, Junxiang

    2018-02-02

    Pheromone binding protein (PBP) is thought primarily to bind and transport the sex pheromone in moths. The accumulated studies suggest that three PBPs were identified in moth species. In Grapholita molesta, the functions of GmolPBP2 and GmolPBP3 have been previously studied. However, the function of GmolPBP1 is still unclear. Furthermore, the Cydia pomonella sex pheromone Codlemone can act as a sex pheromone synergist of G. molesta. In C. pomonella, CpomPBP1 specifically bind the Codlemone. CpomPBP1 displays high identity with GmolPBP1 (70%), indicating that the two PBPs may share a similar 3D structure thus can bind the similar or same ligands. In this study, we explored the molecular and functional characterization of GmolPBP1. GmolPBP1, bearing the typical characteristics of Lepidopteran odorant binding proteins, was closest phylogenetically to CpomPBP1. Binding studies demonstrated that GmolPBP1 exhibited strong binding affinities with (Z)-8-dodecenyl alcohol, 1-dodecanol and Codlemone. Molecular docking showed that GmolPBP1 has different ligand recognition mechanism for the three ligands. Our results suggest that GmolPBP1 functions as recognizer of (Z)-8-dodecenyl alcohol and 1-dodecanol of the female sex pheromone blend, and may be the potential transporter of Codlemone, which contributes to the synergism of the pheromone response of G. molesta by Codlemone.

  15. Molecular and functional characterization of cold-responsive C-repeat binding factors from Brachypodium distachyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Adverse environmental conditions severely influence various aspects of plant growth and developmental processes, causing worldwide reduction of crop yields. The C-repeat binding factors (CBFs) are critical transcription factors constituting the gene regulatory network that mediates the acclimation process to low temperatures. They regulate a large number of cold-responsive genes, including COLD-REGULATED (COR) genes, via the CBF-COR regulon. Recent studies have shown that the CBF transcription factors also play a role in plant responses to drought and salt stresses. Putative CBF gene homologues and their downstream genes are also present in the genome of Brachypodium distachyon, which is perceived as a monocot model in recent years. However, they have not been functionally characterized at the molecular level. Results Three CBF genes that are responsive to cold were identified from Brachypodium, designated BdCBF1, BdCBF2, and BdCBF3, and they were functionally characterized by molecular biological and transgenic approaches in Brachypodium and Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results demonstrate that the BdCBF genes contribute to the tolerance response of Brachypodium to cold, drought, and salt stresses by regulating downstream targets, such as DEHYDRIN5.1 (Dhn5.1) and COR genes. The BdCBF genes are induced under the environmental stress conditions. The BdCBF proteins possess transcriptional activation activity and bind directly to the promoters of the target genes. Transgenic Brachypodium plants overexpressing the BdCBF genes exhibited enhanced resistance to drought and salt stresses as well as low temperatures, and accordingly endogenous contents of proline and soluble sugars were significantly elevated in the transgenic plants. The BdCBF transcription factors are also functional in the heterologous system Arabidopsis. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing the BdCBF genes were also tolerant to freezing, drought, and salt stresses, and a set of stress

  16. Exporting Culture: a Requirement for Competitive Internationalization*

    OpenAIRE

    Sierra G., Jaime H.

    2005-01-01

    his paper proposes a concept of “culture for internationalization” and “exporting culture” –a highly relevant concept for developing countries’ firms that are likely to follow a gradualinternationalization process– based on the strong relationship binding the concept proposed to strategy and systemic competitiveness. These three items are paramount to Understand the conditions underlying internationalizationas it is characterized by particular traits that make it a key alternative for a firm...

  17. Discovery and information-theoretic characterization of transcription factor binding sites that act cooperatively

    CERN Document Server

    Clifford, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factor binding to the surface of DNA regulatory regions is one of the primary causes of regulating gene expression levels. A probabilistic approach to model protein-DNA interactions at the sequence level is through Position Weight Matrices (PWMs) that estimate the joint probability of a DNA binding site sequence by assuming positional independence within the DNA sequence. Here we construct conditional PWMs that depend on the motif signatures in the flanking DNA sequence, by conditioning known binding site loci on the presence or absence of additional binding sites in the flanking sequence of each site's locus. Pooling known sites with similar flanking sequence patterns allows for the estimation of the conditional distribution function over the binding site sequences. We apply our model to the Dorsal transcription factor binding sites active in patterning the Dorsal-Ventral axis of Drosophila development. We find that those binding sites that cooperate with nearby Twist sites on average contain a...

  18. High molecular weight kininogen binds to laminin--characterization and kinetic analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, Inger; Nystrøm, Birthe

    2009-01-01

    proteins laminin, but not to vitronectin or fibronectin coated on microtiter plates. The binding to laminin was Zn2+ independent. However, at low but not at high concentrations of albumin, Zn2+ increased the affinity for the binding by abolishing an inhibitory effect of Ca2+. Recombinant human kininostatin...... encompassing the amino acid sequence, Arg439-Ser532 but not the endothelial cell binding peptide sequence (His479-His498; HKH20) within kininostatin inhibited the binding of HKa to laminin. This established that the amino acid sequence Arg439-Lys478 in domain 5 of HK is of importance for its binding to laminin....... Extensive proteolytic cleavage of HK and HKa with kallikrein abolished the binding to laminin, releasing a 12 kDa anti-kininostatin reacting peptide. On the basis of these results, we propose that the binding of HK to laminin is a primary event, which secures proper localization of the cleavage products...

  19. Characterization of αX I-Domain Binding to Receptors for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyannemekh, Dolgorsuren; Nham, Sang-Uk

    2017-05-31

    The β2 integrins are cell surface transmembrane proteins regulating leukocyte functions, such as adhesion and migration. Two members of β2 integrin, αMβ2 and αXβ2, share the leukocyte distribution profile and integrin αXβ2 is involved in antigen presentation in dendritic cells and transendothelial migration of monocytes and macrophages to atherosclerotic lesions. Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), a member of cell adhesion molecules, plays an important role in chronic inflammation and atherosclerosis. Although RAGE and αXβ2 play an important role in inflammatory response and the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, the nature of their interaction and structure involved in the binding remain poorly defined. In this study, using I-domain as a ligand binding motif of αXβ2, we characterize the binding nature and the interacting moieties of αX I-domain and RAGE. Their binding requires divalent cations (Mg 2+ and Mn 2+ ) and shows an affinity on the sub-micro molar level: the dissociation constant of αX I-domains binding to RAGE being 0.49 μM. Furthermore, the αX I-domains recognize the V-domain, but not the C1 and C2-domains of RAGE. The acidic amino acid substitutions on the ligand binding site of αX I-domain significantly reduce the I-domain binding activity to soluble RAGE and the alanine substitutions of basic amino acids on the flat surface of the V-domain prevent the V-domain binding to αX I-domain. In conclusion, the main mechanism of αX I-domain binding to RAGE is a charge interaction, in which the acidic moieties of αX I-domains, including E244, and D249, recognize the basic residues on the RAGE V-domain encompassing K39, K43, K44, R104, and K107.

  20. Cloning and characterization of giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) IL-18 binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yue; Deng, Jiabo; Niu, Lili; Wang, Qiang; Yu, Jianqiu; Shao, Huanhuan; Cao, Qinghua; Zhang, Yizheng; Tan, Xuemei

    2016-06-01

    The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is an endangered species. Interleukin-18 (IL-18) plays an important role in the innate and adaptive immune responses by inducing IFN-γ. IL-18 has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various diseases. IL-18 binding protein (IL-18BP) is an intrinsic inhibitor of IL-18 that possesses higher affinity to IL-18. In this study, we cloned and characterized IL-18BP in giant panda (AmIL-18BP) from the spleen. The amino acid sequence of giant panda IL-18BP ORF shared about 65% identities with other species. To evaluate the effects of AmIL-18BP on the immune responses, we expressed the recombinant AmIL-18BP in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3).The fusing protein PET-AmIL-18BP was purified by nickel affinity column chromatography. The biological function of purified PET-AmIL-18BP was determined on mice splenocyte by qRT-PCR. The results showed that AmIL-18BP was functional and could significantly reduce IFN-γ production in murine splenocytes. These results will facilitate the study of protecting giant panda on etiology and immunology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of novel 2, 2'-bipyrimidine fluorescent derivative for protein binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padalkar Vikas S

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluorescent dyes with biocompatible functional group and good fluorescence behavior are used as biosensor for monitoring different biological processes as well as detection of protein assay. All reported fluorophore used as sensors are having high selectivity and sensitivity but till there is more demand to synthesized new fluorophore which have improved fluorescence properties and good biocompatibility. Results Novel 4, 4'-(1, 1'-(5-(2-methoxyphenoxy-[2, 2'-bipyrimidine]-4, 6-diylbis(1H-pyrazol-3, 1-diyl dianiline fluorescent dye was synthesized by multistep synthesis from 2-phenylacetonitrile, 2-chloropyrimidine and 2-methoxyphenol. This dye has absorption at 379 nm with intense single emission at 497 nm having fairly good quantum yield (0.375 and Stokes shift. The intermediates and dye were characterized by FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and Mass spectral analysis. The pyrazole bipyrimidine based fluorescent dye possessing two amino groups suitable for binding with protein is reported. Its utility as a biocompatible conjugate was explained by conjugation with bovine serum albumin. The method is based on direct fluorescence detection of fluorophore-labelled protein before and after conjugation. Purified fluorescent conjugate was subsequently analyzed by fluorimetry. The analysis showed that the tested conjugation reaction yielded fluorescent conjugates of the dye through carbodiimide chemistry. Conclusion In summery synthesized fluorophore pyrazole-bipyrimidine has very good interaction towards protein bovine serum albumin and it acts as good candidate for protein assay.

  2. Molecular Characterization of LjABCG1, an ATP-Binding Cassette Protein in Lotus japonicus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akifumi Sugiyama

    Full Text Available LjABCG1, a full-size ABCG subfamily of ATP-binding cassette proteins of a model legume, Lotus japonicus, was reported as a gene highly expressed during the early stages of nodulation, but have not been characterized in detail. In this study we showed that the induction of LjABCG1 expression was remarkable by methyl jasmonate treatment, and reporter gene experiments indicated that LjABCG1 was strongly expressed in the nodule parenchyma and cell layers adjacent to the root vascular tissue toward the nodule. LjABCG1 was suggested to be localized at the plasma membrane based on the fractionation of microsomal membranes as well as separation via aqueous two-phase partitioning. The physiological functions of LjABCG1 in symbiosis and pathogenesis were analyzed in homologous and heterologous systems. LjABCG1 knock-down L. japonicus plants did not show clear phenotypic differences in nodule formation, and not in defense against Pseudomonas syringae, either. In contrast, when LjABCG1 was expressed in the Arabidopsis pdr8-1 mutant, the penetration frequency of Phytophthora infestans, a potato late blight pathogen, was significantly reduced in LjABCG1/pdr8-1 than in pdr8-1 plants. This finding indicated that LjABCG1, at least partially, complemented the phenotype of pdr8 in Arabidopsis, suggesting the multiple roles of this protein in plant-microbe interactions.

  3. Characterization of dFOXO binding sites upstream of the Insulin Receptor P2 promoter across the Drosophila phylogeny.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorcas J Orengo

    Full Text Available The insulin/TOR signal transduction pathway plays a critical role in determining such important traits as body and organ size, metabolic homeostasis and life span. Although this pathway is highly conserved across the animal kingdom, the affected traits can exhibit important differences even between closely related species. Evolutionary studies of regulatory regions require the reliable identification of transcription factor binding sites. Here we have focused on the Insulin Receptor (InR expression from its P2 promoter in the Drosophila genus, which in D. melanogaster is up-regulated by hypophosphorylated Drosophila FOXO (dFOXO. We have finely characterized this transcription factor binding sites in vitro along the 1.3 kb region upstream of the InR P2 promoter in five Drosophila species. Moreover, we have tested the effect of mutations in the characterized dFOXO sites of D. melanogaster in transgenic flies. The number of experimentally established binding sites varies across the 1.3 kb region of any particular species, and their distribution also differs among species. In D. melanogaster, InR expression from P2 is differentially affected by dFOXO binding sites at the proximal and distal halves of the species 1.3 kb fragment. The observed uneven distribution of binding sites across this fragment might underlie their differential contribution to regulate InR transcription.

  4. Phosphate-binding protein from Polaromonas JS666: purification, characterization, crystallization and sulfur SAD phasing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pegos, Vanessa R.; Hey, Louis; LaMirande, Jacob; Pfeffer, Rachel; Lipsh, Rosalie; Amitay, Moshe; Gonzalez, Daniel; Elias, Mikael (JCT-Israel); (UMM); (CNRS-UMR)

    2017-05-25

    Phosphate-binding proteins (PBPs) are key proteins that belong to the bacterial ABC-type phosphate transporters. PBPs are periplasmic (or membrane-anchored) proteins that capture phosphate anions from the environment and release them to the transmembrane transporter. Recent work has suggested that PBPs have evolved for high affinity as well as high selectivity. In particular, a short, unique hydrogen bond between the phosphate anion and an aspartate residue has been shown to be critical for selectivity, yet is not strictly conserved in PBPs. Here, the PBP fromPolaromonasJS666 is focused on. Interestingly, this PBP is predicted to harbor different phosphate-binding residues to currently known PBPs. Here, it is shown that the PBP fromPolaromonasJS666 is capable of binding phosphate, with a maximal binding activity at pH 8. Its structure is expected to reveal its binding-cleft configuration as well as its phosphate-binding mode. Here, the expression, purification, characterization, crystallization and X-ray diffraction data collection to 1.35 Å resolution of the PBP fromPolaromonasJS666 are reported.

  5. Selection and characterization of DNA aptamers with binding selectivity to Campylobacter jejuni using whole-cell SELEX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Hari P; Smiley, R Derike; Jaykus, Lee-Ann

    2010-08-01

    The need for pre-analytical sample processing prior to the application of rapid molecular-based detection of pathogens in food and environmental samples is well established. Although immunocapture has been applied in this regard, alternative ligands such as nucleic acid aptamers have advantages over antibodies such as low cost, ease of production and modification, and comparable stability. To identify DNA aptamers demonstrating binding specificity to Campylobacter jejuni cells, a whole-cell Systemic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment (SELEX) method was applied to a combinatorial library of FAM-labeled single-stranded DNA molecules. FAM-labeled aptamer sequences with high binding affinity to C. jejuni A9a as determined by flow cytometric analysis were identified. Aptamer ONS-23, which showed particularly high binding affinity in preliminary studies, was chosen for further characterization. This aptamer displayed a dissociation constant (K(d) value) of 292.8 +/- 53.1 nM with 47.27 +/- 5.58% cells fluorescent (bound) in a 1.48-microM aptamer solution. Binding assays to assess the specificity of aptamer ONS-23 showed high binding affinity (25-36%) for all other C. jejuni strains screened (inclusivity) and low apparent binding affinity (1-5%) with non-C. jejuni strains (exclusivity). Whole-cell SELEX is a promising technique to design aptamer-based molecular probes for microbial pathogens without tedious isolation and purification of complex markers or targets.

  6. Biophysical characterization of Ca2+-binding of S100A5 and Ca2+-induced interaction with RAGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Iktae; Lee, Ko On; Yun, Young-Joo; Jeong, Jea Yeon; Kim, Eun-Hee; Cheong, Haekap; Ryu, Kyoung-Seok; Kim, Nak-Kyoon; Suh, Jeong-Yong

    2017-01-29

    S100A5 is a calcium-binding protein of S100 family, which represents a major ligand to the receptor for advanced glycation end product (RAGE), a pattern recognition receptor engaged in diverse pathological processes. Here we have characterized calcium binding of S100A5 and the complex formation between S100A5 and RAGE using calorimetry and NMR spectroscopy. S100A5 binds to calcium ions in a sequential manner with the equilibrium dissociation constants (K D ) of 1.3 μM and 3.5 μM, which corresponds to the calcium-binding at the C-terminal and N-terminal EF-hands. Upon calcium binding, S100A5 interacts with the V domain of RAGE (RAGE-v) to form a heterotrimer (K D ∼5.9 μM) that is distinct among the S100 family proteins. Chemical shift perturbation data from NMR titration experiments indicates that S100A5 employs the periphery of the dimer interface to interact with RAGE-v. Distinct binding mode and stoichiometry of RAGE against different S100 family proteins could be important to modulate diverse RAGE signaling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Characterization of the single stranded DNA binding protein SsbB encoded in the Gonoccocal Genetic Island.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samta Jain

    Full Text Available Most strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae carry a Gonococcal Genetic Island which encodes a type IV secretion system involved in the secretion of ssDNA. We characterize the GGI-encoded ssDNA binding protein, SsbB. Close homologs of SsbB are located within a conserved genetic cluster found in genetic islands of different proteobacteria. This cluster encodes DNA-processing enzymes such as the ParA and ParB partitioning proteins, the TopB topoisomerase, and four conserved hypothetical proteins. The SsbB homologs found in these clusters form a family separated from other ssDNA binding proteins.In contrast to most other SSBs, SsbB did not complement the Escherichia coli ssb deletion mutant. Purified SsbB forms a stable tetramer. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and fluorescence titration assays, as well as atomic force microscopy demonstrate that SsbB binds ssDNA specifically with high affinity. SsbB binds single-stranded DNA with minimal binding frames for one or two SsbB tetramers of 15 and 70 nucleotides. The binding mode was independent of increasing Mg(2+ or NaCl concentrations. No role of SsbB in ssDNA secretion or DNA uptake could be identified, but SsbB strongly stimulated Topoisomerase I activity.We propose that these novel SsbBs play an unknown role in the maintenance of genetic islands.

  8. D-fructose-binding proteins in bull seminal plasma: Isolation and characterization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Liberda, J.; Kraus, Marek; Ryšlavá, H.; Vlasáková, M.; Jonáková, Věra; Tichá, M.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 4 (2001), s. 113-119 ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA303/99/0357; GA ČR GV524/96/K162 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : bull seminal plasma * non-heparin-binding and heparin-binding proteins * D-fructose-binding proteins Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.519, year: 2001

  9. Characterization of an intracellular hyaluronic acid binding site in isolated rat hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frost, S.J.; Raja, R.H.; Weigel, P.H. (Univ. of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston (USA))

    1990-11-13

    125I-HA, prepared by chemical modification at the reducing sugar, specifically binds to rat hepatocytes in suspension or culture. Intact hepatocytes have relatively few surface 125I-HA binding sites and show low specific binding. However, permeabilization of hepatocytes with the nonionic detergent digitonin results in increased specific 125I-HA binding (45-65%) and a very large increase in the number of specific 125I-HA binding sites. Scatchard analysis of equilibrium 125I-HA binding to permeabilized hepatocytes in suspension at 4 degrees C indicates a Kd = 1.8 x 10(-7) M and 1.3 x 10(6) molecules of HA (Mr approximately 30,000) bound per cell at saturation. Hepatocytes in primary culture for 24 h show the same affinity but the total number of HA molecules bound per cell at saturation decreases to approximately 6.2 x 10(5). Increasing the ionic strength above physiologic concentrations decreases 125I-HA binding to permeable cells, whereas decreasing the ionic strength above causes an approximately 4-fold increase. The divalent cation chelator EGTA does not prevent binding nor does it release 125I-HA bound in the presence of 2 mM CaCl2, although higher divalent cation concentrations stimulate 125I-HA binding. Ten millimolar CaCl2 or MnCl2 increases HA binding 3-6-fold compared to EGTA-treated cells. Ten millimolar MgCl2, SrCl2, or BaCl2 increased HA binding by 2-fold. The specific binding of 125I-HA to digitonin-treated hepatocytes at 4{degrees}C increased greater than 10-fold at pH 5.0 as compared to pH 7.

  10. Identification and characterization of porcine mannan-binding lectin A (pMBL-A), and determination of serum concentration heritability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul-Madsen, Helle R.; Krogh-Meibom, Thomas; Heryon, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) is an innate immune collectin present in the serum of humans and many farm animals. This oligomeric pattern-recognition protein effectively binds to the glycoconjugate arrays present on the surfaces of microorganisms and activates the complement system to enhance...... pathogen killing and clearance. MBL deficiency is often associated with immunodeficiency in humans. Although two MBLs (MBL-A and MBL-C) have been characterized in various species, the identity of porcine MBL (pMBL) was not clearly defined. In this study, we purified an MBL from porcine serum by mannose...

  11. Discovery and information-theoretic characterization of transcription factor binding sites that act cooperatively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Jacob; Adami, Christoph

    2015-10-01

    Transcription factor binding to the surface of DNA regulatory regions is one of the primary causes of regulating gene expression levels. A probabilistic approach to model protein-DNA interactions at the sequence level is through position weight matrices (PWMs) that estimate the joint probability of a DNA binding site sequence by assuming positional independence within the DNA sequence. Here we construct conditional PWMs that depend on the motif signatures in the flanking DNA sequence, by conditioning known binding site loci on the presence or absence of additional binding sites in the flanking sequence of each site's locus. Pooling known sites with similar flanking sequence patterns allows for the estimation of the conditional distribution function over the binding site sequences. We apply our model to the Dorsal transcription factor binding sites active in patterning the Dorsal-Ventral axis of Drosophila development. We find that those binding sites that cooperate with nearby Twist sites on average contain about 0.5 bits of information about the presence of Twist transcription factor binding sites in the flanking sequence. We also find that Dorsal binding site detectors conditioned on flanking sequence information make better predictions about what is a Dorsal site relative to background DNA than detection without information about flanking sequence features.

  12. Functional characterization and immunolocalization of odorant binding protein 1 in the lucerne plant bug, Adelphocoris lineolatus (GOEZE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Shao-Hua; Wang, Wei-Xuan; Wang, Gui-Rong; Zhang, Xue-Ying; Guo, Yu-Yuan; Zhang, Ziding; Zhou, Jing-Jiang; Zhang, Yong-Jun

    2011-06-01

    In the insect phylum, the relationships between individuals and their environment are often modulated by chemical communication. Odorant binding proteins (OBPs) are widely and robustly expressed in insect olfactory organs and play a key role in chemosensing and transporting hydrophobic odorants across the sensillum lymph to the olfactory receptor neuron. In this study, a novel OBP gene (AlinOBP1) in the lucerne plant bug, Adelphocoris lineolatus was identified, cloned and expressed. Real-time PCR results indicated that the expression level of AlinOBP1 gene differed in each developmental stage (from first instar to adult) and was predominantly expressed in the antennae of adults. The expression level of AlinOBP1 was 1.91 times higher in male antennae than in female antennae. The binding properties of AlinOBP1 with 114 odorants were measured using a fluorescence probe, N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine (1-NPN), with fluorescence competitive binding. The results revealed that AlinOBP1 exhibits high binding abilities with two major putative pheromone components, ethyl butyrate and trans-2-hexenyl butyrate. In addition, it was observed that six volatiles released from cotton, octanal, nonanal, decanal, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, β-caryophyllene and β-ionone also bind to AlinOBP1. Immunocytochemistry analysis showed that AlinOBP1 was expressed in the sensillum lymph of sensilla trichodica and sensilla basiconca. Our results demonstrate that AlinOBP1 may function as a carrier in the chemoperception of the lucerne plant bug. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Characterization of DNA Binding Sites of the ComE Response Regulator from Streptococcus mutans▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, David C. I.; Downey, Jennifer S.; Ayala, Eduardo A.; Kreth, Jens; Mair, Richard; Senadheera, Dilani B.; Qi, Fengxia; Cvitkovitch, Dennis G.; Shi, Wenyuan; Goodman, Steven D.

    2011-01-01

    In Streptococcus mutans, both competence and bacteriocin production are controlled by ComC and the ComED two-component signal transduction system. Recent studies of S. mutans suggested that purified ComE binds to two 11-bp direct repeats in the nlmC-comC promoter region, where ComE activates nlmC and represses comC. In this work, quantitative binding studies and DNase I footprinting analysis were performed to calculate the equilibrium dissociation constant and further characterize the binding site of ComE. We found that ComE protects sequences inclusive of both direct repeats, has an equilibrium dissociation constant in the nanomolar range, and binds to these two direct repeats cooperatively. Furthermore, similar direct repeats were found upstream of cslAB, comED, comX, ftf, vicRKX, gtfD, gtfB, gtfC, and gbpB. Quantitative binding studies were performed on each of these sequences and showed that only cslAB has a similar specificity and high affinity for ComE as that seen with the upstream region of comC. A mutational analysis of the binding sequences showed that ComE does not require both repeats to bind DNA with high affinity, suggesting that single site sequences in the genome may be targets for ComE-mediated regulation. Based on the mutational analysis and DNase I footprinting analysis, we propose a consensus ComE binding site, TCBTAAAYSGT. PMID:21602345

  14. Interaction of leukotriene C4 and Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts (V79A03 cells). 1. Characterization of binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitz, T A; Contois, D F; Liu, Y X; Watt, D S; Walden, T L

    1990-10-01

    A novel, specific, and potent biological action of leukotriene C4 (LTC4) was demonstrated in the Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cell line V79A03 (V79 cells), namely the confirment of protection against subsequent gamma-irradiation. Consequently, studies were conducted to determine whether LTC4-conferred radioprotection could be attributed to a receptor-mediated phenomenon. Specific binding sites for leukotriene C4 (LTC4) were identified and characterized using intact V79 cells incubated at 4 degrees C in the presence of serine-borate, during which time conversion of LTC4 to LTD4 or LTE4 was undetectable. Binding was maximal in a broad region between pH 6.2 and 8.8. Ca2+, Mg2+, and Na+ were not required for binding, and binding was not altered by GTP, ATP, or cAMP, by leukotrienes B4, D4, or E4, or by the leukotriene end point antagonists LY 171883, FPL 55712, or Revlon 5901-5. Scatchard analyses and kinetic experiments indicated the presence of high-affinity [Kd = 2.5 +/- 0.63 nM, approximately 9.9 x 10(5) sites/cell] and low-affinity [Kd = 350 +/- 211 nM, approximately 2.7 x 10(6) sites/cell] binding sites. The observed binding characteristics of LTC4 to V79 cells are consistent with a receptor-mediated phenomenon. In a companion communication which follows this report, we report the subcellular distribution of LTC4 binding to V79 cells and demonstrate that this binding is unlikely to be attributed principally to interaction with glutathione-S-transferase.

  15. Competitive binding experiments can reduce the false positive results of affinity-based ultrafiltration-HPLC: A case study for identification of potent xanthine oxidase inhibitors from Perilla frutescens extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Kwon, Shin Hwa; Hwang, Seung Hwan; Kang, Young-Hee; Lee, Jae-Yong; Lim, Soon Sung

    2017-03-24

    The purpose of this study was to assess the possibility of using competitive binding experiments with ultrafiltration-HPLC analysis to identify potent xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitors from the Perilla frutescens extract as an attempt to reduce the number of false positive results. To isolate the enzyme-ligand complex from unbound compounds, the P. frutescens extract was either incubated in the absence of XO, in the presence of XO, or with the active site blocked XO before the ultrafiltration was performed. Allopurinaol was used as the XO active site blocker. The unbound compounds were subjected to HPLC analysis. The degree of total binding (TBD) and degree of specific binding (SBD) of each compound were calculated using the peak areas. TBD represents the binding affinities of compounds from the P. frutescens extract for the XO binding site. SBD represents the XO competitive binding between allopurinol and ligands from the extract samples. Two criteria were applied to select putative targets that could help avoid false positives. These include TBD>30% and SBD>10%. Using that approach, kaempferol-3-O-rutinoside, rosmarinic acid, methyl-rosmarinic acid, apigenin, and 4',5,7-trimethoxyflavone were identified, from total 11 compounds, as potent XO inhibitors. Finally, apigenin, 4',5,7-trimethoxyflavone, and luteolin were XO inhibitors verified through an XO inhibition assay and structural simulation of the complex. These results showed that the newly developed strategy has the advantage that the number of targets identified via ultrafiltration-HPLC can be narrowed from many false positives. However, not all false positives can be eliminated with this approach. Some potent inhibitors might also be excluded with the use of this method. The limitations of this method are also discussed herein. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Isolation and characterization of porcine mannan-binding proteins of different size and ultrastructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, P; Nielsen, EH; Andersen, Ove

    1996-01-01

    to mouse and rat MBP-C (41-45% identity). Both pMBPs exhibited Ca2+-dependent binding to D-mannose immobilized on agarose but no significant binding to N-acetyl-D-glucosamine- or fucose-agarose. The results further suggested the presence of a third pMBP which copurified with pMBP-27 but this protein...

  17. Identification and Characterization of Single-Chain Antibodies that Specifically Bind GI Noroviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy M Hurwitz

    Full Text Available Norovirus infections commonly lead to outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis and spread quickly, resulting in many health and economic challenges prior to diagnosis. Rapid and reliable diagnostic tests are therefore essential to identify infections and to guide the appropriate clinical responses at the point-of-care. Existing tools, including RT-PCR and enzyme immunoassays, pose several limitations based on the significant time, equipment and expertise required to elicit results. Immunochromatographic assays available for use at the point-of-care have poor sensitivity and specificity, especially for genogroup I noroviruses, thus requiring confirmation of results with more sensitive testing methods. Therefore, there is a clear need for novel reagents to help achieve quick and reliable results. In this study, we have identified two novel single-chain antibodies (scFvs-named NJT-R3-A2 and NJT-R3-A3-that effectively detect GI.1 and GI.7 virus-like particles (VLPs through selection of a phage display library against the P-domain of the GI.1 major capsid protein. The limits of detection by each scFv for GI.1 and GI.7 are 0.1 and 0.2 ng, and 6.25 and 25 ng, respectively. They detect VLPs with strong specificity in multiple diagnostic formats, including ELISAs and membrane-based dot blots, and in the context of norovirus-negative stool suspensions. The scFvs also detect native virions effectively in norovirus-positive clinical stool samples. Purified scFvs bind to GI.1 and GI.7 VLPs with equilibrium constant (KD values of 27 nM and 49 nM, respectively. Overall, the phage-based scFv reagents identified and characterized here show utility for detecting GI.1 and GI.7 noroviruses in multiple diagnostic assay formats with strong specificity and sensitivity, indicating promise for integration into existing point-of-care tests to improve future diagnostics.

  18. Characterization and localization of metal-responsive-element-binding transcription factors from tilapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Andrew Pok-Lap; Au, Candy Yee-Man; Chan, William Wai-Lun [Department of Biochemistry, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Sha Tin, N.T., Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Chan, King Ming, E-mail: kingchan@cuhk.edu.hk [Department of Biochemistry, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Sha Tin, N.T., Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2010-08-01

    Two isoforms of MTF-1, MTF-1L (long form) and MTF-1S (short form), were cloned in tilapia (Ti) and characterized in a tilapia liver cell line, Hepa-T1. The cloned tiMTF-1L has the characteristics of all of the tiMTF-1S identified so far with the zinc finger domain having six fingers, the acidic-rich, proline-rich, and serine/threonine-rich domains; however, the short form encodes for the zinc finger domain with five zinc fingers only and no other domains. The transient transfection of tiMTF-1L into human HepG2 cells showed both constitutive and zinc-induced metal-responsive-element (MRE)-driven reporter gene expression. However, the transfection of tiMTF-1S (which lacks all three transactivation domains) into a human cell line showed reduced transcriptional activities compared with an endogenous control in both basal- and Zn{sup 2+}-induced conditions. The tiMTF-1 isoforms were tagged with GFP and transfected into Hepa-T1 cells (tilapia hepatocytes). The nuclear translocation of tiMTF-1L was observed when the cells were exposed to a sufficient concentration of metals for 6 h. However, tiMTF-1S, was localized in the nucleus with or without metal treatment. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) confirmed that both of the isoforms were able to bind to the MRE specifically in vitro. Tissue distribution studies showed that tiMTF-1L was more abundant than tiMTF-1S in all of the tissues tested.

  19. Identification and Characterization of Single-Chain Antibodies that Specifically Bind GI Noroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Amy M; Huang, Wanzhi; Kou, Baijun; Estes, Mary K; Atmar, Robert L; Palzkill, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    Norovirus infections commonly lead to outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis and spread quickly, resulting in many health and economic challenges prior to diagnosis. Rapid and reliable diagnostic tests are therefore essential to identify infections and to guide the appropriate clinical responses at the point-of-care. Existing tools, including RT-PCR and enzyme immunoassays, pose several limitations based on the significant time, equipment and expertise required to elicit results. Immunochromatographic assays available for use at the point-of-care have poor sensitivity and specificity, especially for genogroup I noroviruses, thus requiring confirmation of results with more sensitive testing methods. Therefore, there is a clear need for novel reagents to help achieve quick and reliable results. In this study, we have identified two novel single-chain antibodies (scFvs)-named NJT-R3-A2 and NJT-R3-A3-that effectively detect GI.1 and GI.7 virus-like particles (VLPs) through selection of a phage display library against the P-domain of the GI.1 major capsid protein. The limits of detection by each scFv for GI.1 and GI.7 are 0.1 and 0.2 ng, and 6.25 and 25 ng, respectively. They detect VLPs with strong specificity in multiple diagnostic formats, including ELISAs and membrane-based dot blots, and in the context of norovirus-negative stool suspensions. The scFvs also detect native virions effectively in norovirus-positive clinical stool samples. Purified scFvs bind to GI.1 and GI.7 VLPs with equilibrium constant (KD) values of 27 nM and 49 nM, respectively. Overall, the phage-based scFv reagents identified and characterized here show utility for detecting GI.1 and GI.7 noroviruses in multiple diagnostic assay formats with strong specificity and sensitivity, indicating promise for integration into existing point-of-care tests to improve future diagnostics.

  20. Characterization and Expression of the Lucina pectinata Oxygen and Sulfide Binding Hemoglobin Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Garriga, Juan; Cadilla, Carmen L.

    2016-01-01

    The clam Lucina pectinata lives in sulfide-rich muds and houses intracellular symbiotic bacteria that need to be supplied with hydrogen sulfide and oxygen. This clam possesses three hemoglobins: hemoglobin I (HbI), a sulfide-reactive protein, and hemoglobin II (HbII) and III (HbIII), which are oxygen-reactive. We characterized the complete gene sequence and promoter regions for the oxygen reactive hemoglobins and the partial structure and promoters of the HbI gene from Lucina pectinata. We show that HbI has two mRNA variants, where the 5’end had either a sequence of 96 bp (long variant) or 37 bp (short variant). The gene structure of the oxygen reactive Hbs is defined by having 4-exons/3-introns with conservation of intron location at B12.2 and G7.0 and the presence of pre-coding introns, while the partial gene structure of HbI has the same intron conservation but appears to have a 5-exon/ 4-intron structure. A search for putative transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) was done with the promoters for HbII, HbIII, HbI short and HbI long. The HbII, HbIII and HbI long promoters showed similar predicted TFBSs. We also characterized MITE-like elements in the HbI and HbII gene promoters and intronic regions that are similar to sequences found in other mollusk genomes. The gene expression levels of the clam Hbs, from sulfide-rich and sulfide-poor environments showed a significant decrease of expression in the symbiont-containing tissue for those clams in a sulfide-poor environment, suggesting that the sulfide concentration may be involved in the regulation of these proteins. Gene expression evaluation of the two HbI mRNA variants indicated that the longer variant is expressed at higher levels than the shorter variant in both environments. PMID:26824233

  1. Characterization of selective binding of alkali cations with carboxylate by x-ray absorption spectroscopy of liquid microjets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saykally, Richard J; Uejio, Janel S.; Schwartz, Craig P.; Duffin, Andrew M.; Drisdell, Walter S.; Cohen, Ronald C.; Saykally, Richard J.

    2008-01-08

    We describe an approach for characterizing selective binding between oppositely charged ionic functional groups under biologically relevant conditions. Relative shifts in K-shell x-ray absorption spectra of aqueous cations and carboxylate anions indicate the corresponding binding strengths via perturbations of carbonyl antibonding orbitals. XAS spectra measured for aqueous formate and acetate solutions containing lithium, sodium, and potassium cations reveal monotonically stronger binding of the lighter metals, supporting recent results from simulations and other experiments. The carbon K-edge spectra of the acetate carbonyl feature centered near 290 eV clearly indicate a preferential interaction of sodium versus potassium, which was less apparent with formate. These results are in accord with the Law of Matching Water Affinities, relating relative hydration strengths of ions to their respective tendencies to form contact ion pairs. Density functional theory calculations of K-shell spectra support the experimental findings.

  2. Plasma protein binding in uremia: extraction and characterization of an inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depner, T A; Gulyassy, P F

    1980-07-01

    The impairment of binding drugs and other substances to serum albumin in patients with uremia can be restored to normal or near normal levels by adsorption with charcoal or synthetic polymers at pH 3. We used a nonionic poly-styrene-divinylbenzene copolymer to treat uremic plasma at pH 3. We observed a marked improvement of binding. Subsequent elution of this resin with ethanol produced a substance that, when dried and recombined with normal plasma, caused dose-dependent impairment of phenytoin and tryptophan binding. Restoration of normal binding affinity occurred after retreatment of this abnormalized plasma with resin at pH 3. Plasma and pleural fluid exudate from patients with uremia yielded, after extraction by the above technique, and inhibitor(s) of phenytoin binding in amounts averaging five times that extracted from equal volumes of normal plasma. This inhibitor (IX) is water soluble, heat stable, and dialyzable across cellophane membranes. Unlike fatty acids, which can also interfere with binding, IX partitions primarily in the water phase in solvent partition studies but undergoes a sharp transition in th pH 4 to 5 range, suggesting the presence of carboxyl group. These findings lend further support to the hypothesis that a retained ligand(s) is responsible for impaired plasma binding associated with uremia and suggests a role for organic acids known to accumulate in renal failure.

  3. Characterization of Dnmt1 Binding and DNA Methylation on Nucleosomes and Nucleosomal Arrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Schrader

    Full Text Available The packaging of DNA into nucleosomes and the organisation into higher order structures of chromatin limits the access of sequence specific DNA binding factors to DNA. In cells, DNA methylation is preferentially occuring in the linker region of nucleosomes, suggesting a structural impact of chromatin on DNA methylation. These observations raise the question whether DNA methyltransferases are capable to recognize the nucleosomal substrates and to modify the packaged DNA. Here, we performed a detailed analysis of nucleosome binding and nucleosomal DNA methylation by the maintenance DNA methyltransferase Dnmt1. Our binding studies show that Dnmt1 has a DNA length sensing activity, binding cooperatively to DNA, and requiring a minimal DNA length of 20 bp. Dnmt1 needs linker DNA to bind to nucleosomes and most efficiently recognizes nucleosomes with symmetric DNA linkers. Footprinting experiments reveal that Dnmt1 binds to both DNA linkers exiting the nucleosome core. The binding pattern correlates with the efficient methylation of DNA linkers. However, the enzyme lacks the ability to methylate nucleosomal CpG sites on mononucleosomes and nucleosomal arrays, unless chromatin remodeling enzymes create a dynamic chromatin state. In addition, our results show that Dnmt1 functionally interacts with specific chromatin remodeling enzymes to enable complete methylation of hemi-methylated DNA in chromatin.

  4. Characterization of the modes of binding between human sweet taste receptor and low-molecular-weight sweet compounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuyoshi Masuda

    Full Text Available One of the most distinctive features of human sweet taste perception is its broad tuning to chemically diverse compounds ranging from low-molecular-weight sweeteners to sweet-tasting proteins. Many reports suggest that the human sweet taste receptor (hT1R2-hT1R3, a heteromeric complex composed of T1R2 and T1R3 subunits belonging to the class C G protein-coupled receptor family, has multiple binding sites for these sweeteners. However, it remains unclear how the same receptor recognizes such diverse structures. Here we aim to characterize the modes of binding between hT1R2-hT1R3 and low-molecular-weight sweet compounds by functional analysis of a series of site-directed mutants and by molecular modeling-based docking simulation at the binding pocket formed on the large extracellular amino-terminal domain (ATD of hT1R2. We successfully determined the amino acid residues responsible for binding to sweeteners in the cleft of hT1R2 ATD. Our results suggest that individual ligands have sets of specific residues for binding in correspondence with the chemical structures and other residues responsible for interacting with multiple ligands.

  5. NMR characterizations of the ice binding surface of an antifreeze protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Hong

    Full Text Available Antifreeze protein (AFP has a unique function of reducing solution freezing temperature to protect organisms from ice damage. However, its functional mechanism is not well understood. An intriguing question concerning AFP function is how the high selectivity for ice ligand is achieved in the presence of free water of much higher concentration which likely imposes a large kinetic barrier for protein-ice recognition. In this study, we explore this question by investigating the property of the ice binding surface of an antifreeze protein using NMR spectroscopy. An investigation of the temperature gradient of amide proton chemical shift and its correlation with chemical shift deviation from random coil was performed for CfAFP-501, a hyperactive insect AFP. A good correlation between the two parameters was observed for one of the two Thr rows on the ice binding surface. A significant temperature-dependent protein-solvent interaction is found to be the most probable origin for this correlation, which is consistent with a scenario of hydrophobic hydration on the ice binding surface. In accordance with this finding, rotational correlation time analyses combined with relaxation dispersion measurements reveals a weak dimer formation through ice binding surface at room temperature and a population shift of dimer to monomer at low temperature, suggesting hydrophobic effect involved in dimer formation and hence hydrophobic hydration on the ice binding surface of the protein. Our finding of hydrophobic hydration on the ice binding surface provides a test for existing simulation studies. The occurrence of hydrophobic hydration on the ice binding surface is likely unnecessary for enhancing protein-ice binding affinity which is achieved by a tight H-bonding network. Subsequently, we speculate that the hydrophobic hydration occurring on the ice binding surface plays a role in facilitating protein-ice recognition by lowering the kinetic barrier as suggested by

  6. Synthesis and characterization of (3-naphthalene-1-yl)-di-thiourea-ethylene and preliminary binding study with metal cations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakariah, Emma Izzati; Ahyak, Hafizi; Heng, Lee Yook; Hasbullah, Siti Aishah

    2016-11-01

    A new thiourea derivative, (3-naphthalene-1-yl)-di-thiourea-ethylene has been synthesized by refluxing a mixture of ethylenediamine and 1-naphthyl isothiocyanate. The product was characterized by 1H and 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and FT-Infrared spectroscopic techniques. The molecular weight of the compound was determined by Mass Spectrometry. Preliminary binding study of the thiourea with metal cations shows good affinity towards Fe2+, Hg2+, Ag+, Cu2+.

  7. Identification and characterization of preferred DNA-binding sites for the Thermus thermophilus transcriptional regulator FadR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minwoo Lee

    Full Text Available One of the primary transcriptional regulators of fatty acid homeostasis in many prokaryotes is the protein FadR. To better understand its biological function in the extreme thermophile Thermus thermophilus HB8, we sought to first determine its preferred DNA-binding sequences in vitro using the combinatorial selection method Restriction Endonuclease Protection, Selection, and Amplification (REPSA and then use this information to bioinformatically identify potential regulated genes. REPSA determined a consensus FadR-binding sequence 5´-TTRNACYNRGTNYAA-3´, which was further characterized using quantitative electrophoretic mobility shift assays. With this information, a search of the T. thermophilus HB8 genome found multiple operons potentially regulated by FadR. Several of these were identified as encoding proteins involved in fatty acid biosynthesis and degradation; however, others were novel and not previously identified as targets of FadR. The role of FadR in regulating these genes was validated by physical and functional methods, as well as comparative genomic approaches to further characterize regulons in related organisms. Taken together, our study demonstrates that a systematic approach involving REPSA, biophysical characterization of protein-DNA binding, and bioinformatics can be used to postulate biological roles for potential transcriptional regulators.

  8. Quantitative characterization of conformational-specific protein-DNA binding using a dual-spectral interferometric imaging biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xirui; Daaboul, George G.; Spuhler, Philipp S.; Dröge, Peter; Ünlü, M. Selim

    2016-03-01

    DNA-binding proteins play crucial roles in the maintenance and functions of the genome and yet, their specific binding mechanisms are not fully understood. Recently, it was discovered that DNA-binding proteins recognize specific binding sites to carry out their functions through an indirect readout mechanism by recognizing and capturing DNA conformational flexibility and deformation. High-throughput DNA microarray-based methods that provide large-scale protein-DNA binding information have shown effective and comprehensive analysis of protein-DNA binding affinities, but do not provide information of DNA conformational changes in specific protein-DNA complexes. Building on the high-throughput capability of DNA microarrays, we demonstrate a quantitative approach that simultaneously measures the amount of protein binding to DNA and nanometer-scale DNA conformational change induced by protein binding in a microarray format. Both measurements rely on spectral interferometry on a layered substrate using a single optical instrument in two distinct modalities. In the first modality, we quantitate the amount of binding of protein to surface-immobilized DNA in each DNA spot using a label-free spectral reflectivity technique that accurately measures the surface densities of protein and DNA accumulated on the substrate. In the second modality, for each DNA spot, we simultaneously measure DNA conformational change using a fluorescence vertical sectioning technique that determines average axial height of fluorophores tagged to specific nucleotides of the surface-immobilized DNA. The approach presented in this paper, when combined with current high-throughput DNA microarray-based technologies, has the potential to serve as a rapid and simple method for quantitative and large-scale characterization of conformational specific protein-DNA interactions.DNA-binding proteins play crucial roles in the maintenance and functions of the genome and yet, their specific binding mechanisms are

  9. Synthesis, characterization and binding affinities of rhenium(I) thiosemicarbazone complexes for the estrogen receptor (α/β).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez-Montenegro, Ara; Carballo, Rosa; Vázquez-López, Ezequiel M

    2014-11-01

    The binding affinities towards estrogen receptors (ERs) α and β of a set of thiosemicarbazone ligands (HL(n)) and their rhenium(I) carbonyl complexes [ReX(HL(n))(CO)3] (X=Cl, Br) were determined by a competitive standard radiometric assay with [(3)H]-estradiol. The ability of the coordinated thiosemicarbazone ligands to undergo deprotonation and the lability of the ReX bond were used as a synthetic strategy to obtain [Re(hpy)(L(n))(CO)3] (hpy=3- or 4-hydroxypyridine). The inclusion of the additional hpy ligand endows the new thiosemicarbazonate complexes with an improved affinity towards the estrogen receptors and, consequently, the values of the inhibition constant (Ki) could be determined for some of them. In general, the values of Ki for both ER subtypes suggest an appreciable selectivity towards ERα. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Production of Alexa Fluor 488-labeled reovirus and characterization of target cell binding, competence, and immunogenicity of labeled virions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fecek, Ronald J; Busch, Ryan; Lin, Hong; Pal, Kasturi; Cunningham, Cynthia A; Cuff, Christopher F

    2006-07-31

    Respiratory enteric orphan virus (reovirus) has been used to study many aspects of the biology and genetics of viruses, viral infection, pathogenesis, and the immune response to virus infection. This report describes the functional activity of virus labeled with Alexa Fluor 488, a stable fluorescent dye. Matrix assisted laser desorption-time of flight analysis indicated that Alexa Fluor 488 labeled the outer capsid proteins of reovirus. Labeled virus bound to murine L929 fibroblasts as determined by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy, and the specificity of binding were demonstrated by competitive inhibition with non-labeled virus. Labeled reovirus induced apoptosis and cytopathic effect in infected L929 cells. Mice infected with labeled virus mounted robust serum antibody and CD8(+) T-cell responses, indicating that labeled virus retained immunogenicity in vivo. These results indicate that Alexa Fluor 488-labeled virus provides a powerful new tool to analyze reovirus infection in vitro and in vivo.

  11. Preparation and characterization of magnetic polymer nanospheres with high protein binding capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianqiao; Guan, Yueping; Liu, Huizhou; Ma, Zhiya; Yang, Yu; Wu, Xiaobing

    2005-05-01

    A novel magnetic support with high protein binding capacity was prepared by mini-emulsion polymerization. The magnetic poly(methacrylate-divinylbenzene) nanospheres prepared are 390 nm in diameter with narrow size distribution and star-like external morphology which leads to a large increase in specific surface area. Experimental results indicate that the maximum protein binding capacity is 316 mg bovine hemoglobin (BHb)/g support.

  12. Preparation and characterization of magnetic polymer nanospheres with high protein binding capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Xianqiao [Laboratory of Separation Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 353, Beijing, 100080 (China); Guan Yueping [Laboratory of Separation Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 353, Beijing, 100080 (China); Liu Huizhou [Laboratory of Separation Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 353, Beijing, 100080 (China)]. E-mail: hzliu@home.ipe.ac.cn; Ma Zhiya [Laboratory of Separation Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 353, Beijing, 100080 (China); Yang Yu [AGTC Gene Technology Company Ltd., Beijing 100176 (China); Wu Xiaobing [AGTC Gene Technology Company Ltd., Beijing 100176 (China)

    2005-05-15

    A novel magnetic support with high protein binding capacity was prepared by mini-emulsion polymerization. The magnetic poly(methacrylate-divinylbenzene) nanospheres prepared are 390 nm in diameter with narrow size distribution and star-like external morphology which leads to a large increase in specific surface area. Experimental results indicate that the maximum protein binding capacity is 316 mg bovine hemoglobin (BHb)/g support.

  13. Linear and circular dichroism characterization of thionine binding mode with DNA polynucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuite, Eimer Mary; Nordén, Bengt

    2018-01-01

    The binding mode of thionine (3,7-diamino-5-phenothiazinium) with alternating and non-alternating DNA polynucleotides at low binding ratios was conclusively determined using linear and circular dichroism spectroscopies. The binding to [poly(dG-dC)]2 and poly(dG)·poly(dC) was purely intercalative and was insensitive to ionic strength. Intercalative binding to [poly(dA-dT)]2 is observed at low ionic strength, but a shift of some dye to an non-intercalative mode is observed as the background salt concentration increases. With poly(dA)·poly(dT), intercalative binding is unfavourable, although some dye molecules may intercalate at low ionic strength, and groove binding is strongly promoted with increasing concentration of background salt. However, stacking with bases is observed with single-stranded poly(dA) and with triplex poly(dT)*poly(dA)·poly(dT) which suggests that the unusual structure of poly(dA)·poly(dT) precludes intercalation. Thionine behaves similarly to the related dye methylene blue, and small differences may be attributed either to the ability of thionine to form H-bonds that stabilize intercalation or to its improved stacking interactions in the basepair pocket on steric grounds.

  14. Characterization and copper binding of humic and nonhumic organic matter isolated from the South Platte River: Evidence for the presence of nitrogenous binding site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croue, J.-P.; Benedetti, M.F.; Violleau, D.; Leenheer, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Humic substances typically constitute 40-60% of the dissolved organic matter (DOM) in surface waters. However, little information is available regarding the metal binding properties of the nonhumic hydrophilic portion of the DOM. In this study, humic and nonhumic DOM samples were isolated from the South Platte River (Colorado, DOC = 2.6 mg??L-1, SUVA254 = 2.4 L/mg??m) using a two-column array of XAD-8 and XAD-4 resins. The three major isolated fractions of DOM, which accounted for 57% of the bulk DOM, were characterized using a variety of analytical tools. Proton and copper binding properties were studied for each fraction. The main objective of this work was to compare the structural and chemical characteristics of the isolated fractions and test models describing DOM reactivity toward metal ions. The characterization work showed significant structural differences between the three isolated fractions of DOM. The hydrophobic acid fraction (i.e., humic substances isolated from the XAD-8 resin) gave the largest C/H, C/O, and C/N ratios and aromatic carbon content among the three isolated fractions. The transphilic acid (TPHA) fraction ("transphilic" meaning fraction of intermediate polarity isolated from the XAD-4 resin) was found to incorporate the highest proportion of polysaccharides, whereas the transphilic neutral (TPHN) fraction was almost entirely proteinaceous. The gradual increase of the charge with pH for the three DOM fractions is most likely caused by a large distribution of proton affinity constants for the carboxylic groups, as well as a second type of group more generally considered to be phenolic. In the case of the DOM fraction enriched in proteinaceous material (i.e., TPHN fraction), the results showed that the amino groups are reponsible for the charge reversal. For low copper concentrations, nitrogen-containing functional groups similar to those of amino acids are likely to be involved in complexation, in agreement with previously published data.

  15. Isolation and characterization of gelatin-binding proteins from goat seminal plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazure Claude

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A family of proteins designated BSP-A1, BSP-A2, BSP-A3 and BSP-30 kDa (collectively called BSP proteins for Bovine Seminal Plasma proteins constitute the major protein fraction in the bull seminal plasma. These proteins interact with choline phospholipids on the sperm surface and play a role in the membrane stabilization (decapacitation and destabilization (capacitation process. Homologous proteins have been isolated from boar and stallion seminal plasma. In the current study we report the isolation and preliminary characterization of homologous proteins from goat seminal plasma. Frozen semen (-80°C was thawed and centrifuged to remove sperm. The proteins in the supernatant were precipitated by the addition of cold ethanol. The precipitates were dissolved in ammonium bicarbonate and lyophilised. The lyophilised proteins were dissolved in phosphate buffer and loaded onto a gelatin-agarose column, which was previously equilibrated with the same buffer. The column was successively washed with phosphate buffer, with phosphate buffer saline and with 0.5 M urea in phosphate buffer saline to remove unadsorbed proteins, and the adsorbed proteins were eluted with 5 M urea in phosphate buffer saline. Analysis of pooled, dialysed and lyophilised gelatin-agarose adsorbed protein fraction by SDS-PAGE indicated the presence of four protein bands that were designated GSP-14 kDa, GSP-15 kDa, GSP-20 kDa and GSP-22 kDa (GSP, Goat Seminal Plasma proteins. Heparin-affinity chromatography was then used for the separation of GSP-20 and -22 kDa from GSP-14 and -15 kDa. Finally, HPLC separation permitted further isolation of each one from the other. Amino acid sequence analysis of these proteins indicated that they are homologous to BSP proteins. In addition, these BSP homologs bind to hen's egg-yolk low-density lipoproteins. These results together with our previous data indicate that BSP family proteins are ubiquitous in mammalian seminal plasma, exist in

  16. Characterization of Streptococcus sanguis molecular receptors for Streptococcus mutans binding molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deby Kania Tri Putri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental caries is a major problem in oral cavity. If dental caries causes cavity, the structure of dental hard tissue will not be reversible because of damage in the structure of the hard tissue. The early pathogenesis mechanism of dental caries is an adhesion interaction between cariogenic Streptococcus mutans microorganisms and tooth surface pellicles. The attachment involves a specific molecular component interaction between the bacterial complement molecules and the surface of the host. Streptococcus sanguis as a dominant ecology at the beginning of bacterial plaque aggregation will colonize the tooth surface earlier than S. mutans. The surface of bacterial cells can express some adesin. The bacteria also can express receptors for adhesins of other bacteria. Specific receptors for adhesions of S. Mutans bacteria are not only found in the pellicles, but also present in pioneer bacteria, such as S. sanguis. Adhesion between those bacteria is called as coagregation. Purpose: This study aimed to analyze the characterization of Streptococcus sanguis molecular receptors for Streptococcus mutans binding molecules. Method: This study used a sonication method for protein isolation of S. mutans and S. sanguis bacterial biofilms, as well as electrophoresis method using 12 % SDS-PAGE gel and Western Blot analysis. Result: Results of the protein profile analysis of S. mutans biofilms using 12% SDS-PAGE showed that there were 17 bands, each of which molecular weights was 212, 140, 81, 65, 61, 48, 45, 44, 40, 39, 33 , 25, 23, 19, 17, 12, and 11 kDa. On the other hand, results of the protein profile analysis of S. sanguis biofilms using 12% SDS-PAGE showed that there were 15 bands, each of which molecular weight was 130, 85, 65, 61, 48, 46, 40, 37, 29, 25, 23, 21, 17, 15, and 12 kDa. And, results of the analysis of S. sanguis receptor molecules using Western blot showed that there were three bands, each of which molecular weight was 130, 85, and

  17. Characterization of glycan binding specificities of influenza B viruses with correlation with hemagglutinin genotypes and clinical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-Fang; Chang, Chuan-Fa; Chi, Chia-Yu; Wang, Hsuan-Chen; Wang, Jen-Ren; Su, Ih-Jen

    2012-04-01

    The carbohydrate binding specificities are different among avian and human influenza A viruses and may affect the tissue tropism and transmission of these viruses. The glycan binding biology for influenza B, however, has not been systematically characterized. Glycan binding specificities of influenza B viral isolates were analyzed and correlated to hemagglutinin (HA) genotypes and clinical manifestations. A newly developed solution glycan array was applied to characterize the receptor binding specificities of influenza B virus clinical isolates from 2001 to 2007 in Taiwan. Thirty oligosaccharides which include α-2,3 and α-2,6 linkage glycans were subjected to analysis. The glycan binding patterns of 53 influenza B isolates could be categorized into three groups and were well correlated to their HA genotypes. The Yamagata-like strains predominantly bound to α-2,6-linkage glycan (24:29, 83%) while Victoria-like strains preferentially bound to both α-2,3- and α-2,6-linkage glycans (13:24, 54%). A third group of viruses bound to sulfated glycans and these all belonged to Victoria-like strains. Based on the HA sequences, Asn-163, Glu-198, Ala-202, and Lys-203 were conserved among Victoria-like strains which may influence their carbohydrate recognition. The viruses bound to dual type glycans were more likely to be associated with the development of bronchopneumonia and gastrointestinal illness than those bound only to α-2,6 sialyl glycans (P B viruses, and will contribute to virus surveillance and vaccine strain selection. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Characterization of interactions of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase with its binding protein in the human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yun-Hee [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States); Patel, Mulchand S., E-mail: mspatel@buffalo.edu [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States)

    2010-05-07

    Unlike pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes (PDCs) from prokaryotes, PDCs from higher eukaryotes have an additional structural component, E3-binding protein (BP), for binding of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3) in the complex. Based on the 3D structure of the subcomplex of human (h) E3 with the di-domain (L3S1) of hBP, the amino acid residues (H348, D413, Y438, and R447) of hE3 for binding to hBP were substituted singly by alanine or other residues. These substitutions did not have large effects on hE3 activity when measured in its free form. However, when these hE3 mutants were reconstituted in the complex, the PDC activity was significantly reduced to 9% for Y438A, 20% for Y438H, and 18% for D413A. The binding of hE3 mutants with L3S1 determined by isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that the binding affinities of the Y438A, Y438H, and D413A mutants to L3S1 were severely reduced (1019-, 607-, and 402-fold, respectively). Unlike wild-type hE3 the binding of the Y438A mutant to L3S1 was accompanied by an unfavorable enthalpy change and a large positive entropy change. These results indicate that hE3-Y438 and hE3-D413 play important roles in binding of hE3 to hBP.

  19. Proteomic identification of galectin-3 binding ligands and characterization of galectin-3 proteolytic cleavage in human prostasomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovak, M R; Saraswati, S; Goddard, S D; Diekman, A B

    2013-09-01

    Galectin-3 is a multifunctional carbohydrate-binding protein that was previously characterized as a proteolytic substrate for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and was shown to be associated with prostasomes in human semen. Prostasomes are exosome-like vesicles that are secreted by the prostatic epithelium and have multiple proposed functions in normal reproduction and prostate cancer. In the current study, galectin-3 binding ligands in human prostasomes were identified and characterized with the goal to investigate galectin-3 function in prostasomes. Galectin-3 binding proteins were isolated by affinity column chromatography. Candidate ligands identified by MS/MS were PSA, prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP), zinc alpha-2-glycoprotein (ZAG), dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (CD26), aminopeptidase N (CD13), neprilysin, clusterin, antibacterial protein (FALL-39) and alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (ORM1). Biochemical methods were used to characterize the ability of galectin-3 to bind to selected ligands, and galectin-3 cleavage assays were utilized to investigate the protease(s) in prostasomes that cleaves galectin-3. CD26, CD13, PSA, PAP and ZAG immunoreactivity were detected in extracts of purified prostasomes. One-dimensional electroblot analysis of prostasomes demonstrated that CD26, PAP and CD13 immunoreactivity co-migrated with galectin-3-reactive protein bands. PSA and ZAG were found to be associated with the surface of prostasomes. Both intact and cleaved galectin-3 were detected in prostate and prostasome extracts. Cleavage and inhibition assays indicated that PSA in prostasomes proteolytically cleaves galectin-3. The identification of these glycoproteins as galectin-3 ligands lays the groundwork for future studies of galectin-3 and prostasome function in reproduction and prostate cancer. © 2013 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  20. Binding mechanism of PicoGreen to DNA characterized by magnetic tweezers and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Schellenberg, Helene; Walhorn, Volker; Toensing, Katja; Anselmetti, Dario

    2017-09-01

    Fluorescent dyes are broadly used in many biotechnological applications to detect and visualize DNA molecules. However, their binding to DNA alters the structural and nanomechanical properties of DNA and, thus, interferes with associated biological processes. In this work we employed magnetic tweezers and fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate the binding of PicoGreen to DNA at room temperature in a concentration-dependent manner. PicoGreen is an ultrasensitive quinolinium nucleic acid stain exhibiting hardly any background signal from unbound dye molecules. By means of stretching and overwinding single, torsionally constrained, nick-free double-stranded DNA molecules, we acquired force-extension and supercoiling curves which allow quantifying DNA contour length, persistence length and other thermodynamical binding parameters, respectively. The results of our magnetic tweezers single-molecule binding study were well supported through analyzing the fluorescent spectra of stained DNA. On the basis of our work, we could identify a concentration-dependent bimodal binding behavior, where, apparently, PicoGreen associates to DNA as an intercalator and minor-groove binder simultaneously.

  1. Bacteriophage endolysin Lyt μ1/6: characterization of the C-terminal binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tišáková, Lenka; Vidová, Barbora; Farkašovská, Jarmila; Godány, Andrej

    2014-01-01

    The gene product of orf50 from actinophage μ1/6 of Streptomyces aureofaciens is a putative endolysin, Lyt μ1/6. It has a two-domain modular structure, consisting of an N-terminal catalytic and a C-terminal cell wall binding domain (CBD). Comparative analysis of Streptomyces phage endolysins revealed that they all have a modular structure and contain functional C-terminal domains with conserved amino acids, probably associated with their binding function. A blast analysis of Lyt μ1/6 in conjunction with secondary and tertiary structure prediction disclosed the presence of a PG_binding_1 domain within the CBD. The sequence of the C-terminal domain of lyt μ1/6 and truncated forms of it were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The ability of these CBD variants fused to GFP to bind to the surface of S. aureofaciens NMU was shown by specific binding assays. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Characterization of two heparan sulphate-binding sites in the mycobacterial adhesin Hlp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Previato Jose O

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The histone-like Hlp protein is emerging as a key component in mycobacterial pathogenesis, being involved in the initial events of host colonization by interacting with laminin and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs. In the present study, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR was used to map the binding site(s of Hlp to heparan sulfate and identify the nature of the amino acid residues directly involved in this interaction. Results The capacity of a panel of 30 mer synthetic peptides covering the full length of Hlp to bind to heparin/heparan sulfate was analyzed by solid phase assays, NMR, and affinity chromatography. An additional active region between the residues Gly46 and Ala60 was defined at the N-terminal domain of Hlp, expanding the previously defined heparin-binding site between Thr31 and Phe50. Additionally, the C-terminus, rich in Lys residues, was confirmed as another heparan sulfate binding region. The amino acids in Hlp identified as mediators in the interaction with heparan sulfate were Arg, Val, Ile, Lys, Phe, and Thr. Conclusion Our data indicate that Hlp interacts with heparan sulfate through two distinct regions of the protein. Both heparan sulfate-binding regions here defined are preserved in all mycobacterial Hlp homologues that have been sequenced, suggesting important but possibly divergent roles for this surface-exposed protein in both pathogenic and saprophic species.

  3. Histone acetylation characterizes chromatin presetting by NF1 and Oct1 and enhances glucocorticoid receptor binding to the MMTV promoter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astrand, Carolina, E-mail: ca340@cam.ac.uk [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Belikov, Sergey, E-mail: Sergey.Belikov@ki.se [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Wrange, Orjan, E-mail: Orjan.Wrange@ki.se [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2009-09-10

    Transcription from the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter is induced by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). This switch was reconstituted in Xenopus oocytes. Previously, we showed that Nuclear Factor 1 (NF1) and Octamer Transcription Factor 1 (Oct1) bind constitutively to the MMTV promoter and thereby induce translational nucleosome positioning representing an intermediary, i.e. preset, state of nucleosome organization. Here we further characterize this NF1 and Oct1 induced preset chromatin in relation to the inactive and the hormone-activated state. The preset chromatin exhibits increased histone acetylation but does not cause dissociation of histone H1 as oppose to the hormone-activated state. Furthermore, upon hormone induction the preset MMTV chromatin displays an enhanced and prolonged GR binding capacity and transcription during an intrinsic and time-dependent silencing of the injected template. The silencing process correlates with a reduced histone acetylation. However, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, trichostatin A (TSA), does not counteract silencing in spite of its distinct stimulation of GR-DNA binding. The latter indicates the importance of histone acetylation to maintain DNA access for inducible factor binding. We discuss how constitutively bound factors such as NF1 and Oct1 may participate in the maintenance of tissue specificity of hormone responsive genes.

  4. Interaction of leukotriene C4 and Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts (V79A03 cells). 1. Characterization of binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitz, T.A.; Contois, D.F.; Liu, Y.X.; Watt, D.S.; Walden, T.L.

    1990-10-01

    A novel, specific, and potent biological action of leukotriene C4 (LTC4) was demonstrated in the Chinese Hamster lung fibroblast cell line V79A03 (V79 cells), namely the conferment of protection against subsequent irradiation. Consequently, studies were conducted to determine whether LTC4-conferred radioprotection could be attributed to a receptor-mediated phenomenon. Specific binding sites for leukotriene C4 (LTC4) were identified and characterized using intact V79 cells incubated at 4 C in the presence of serine-borate, during which time conversion of LTC4 to LTD4 or LTE4 was undetectable. Binding was maximal in a broad region between pH 6.2 and 8.8. Ca2+, Mg2+, and Na+ were not required for binding, and binding was not altered by GTP, ATP, cAMP, by leukotrienes B4, D4, or E4, or by the leukotriene end point antagonists LY 171883, FPL 55712, or Revlon 5901-5.

  5. Thermodynamic characterization of OsGID1-gibberellin binding using calorimetry and docking simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Hongyu; Takeuchi, Hiromi; Tsunoda, Yuki; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Murata, Katsuyoshi; Ueguchi-Tanaka, Miyako; Kidokoro, Shun-ichi; Kezuka, Yuichiro; Nonaka, Takamasa; Matsuoka, Makoto; Katoh, Etsuko

    2011-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are phytohormones regulating various developmental processes in plants. In rice, the initial GA-signaling events involve the binding of a GA to the soluble GA receptor protein, GID1. Although X-ray structures for certain GID1/GA complexes have recently been determined, an examination of the complexes does not fully clarify how GID1s discriminate among different GAs. Herein, we present a study aimed at defining the types of forces important to binding via a combination of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and computational docking studies that employed rice GID1 (OsGID1), OsGID1 mutants, which were designed to have a decreased possible number of hydrogen bonds with bound GA, and GA variants. We find that, in general, GA binding is enthalpically driven and that a hydrogen bond between the phenolic hydroxyl of OsGID1 Tyr134 and the C-3 hydroxyl of a GA is a defining structural element. A hydrogen-bond network that involves the C-6 carboxyl of a GA that directly hydrogen bonds the hydroxyl of Ser198 and indirectly, via a two-water-molecule network, the phenolic hydroxyl of Tyr329 and the NH of the amide side-chain of Asn255 is also important for GA binding. The binding of OsGID1 by GA(1) is the most enthalpically driven association found for the biologically active GAs evaluated in this study. This observation might be a consequence of a hydrogen bond formed between the hydroxyl at the C-13 position of GA(1) and the main chain carbonyl of OsGID1 Phe245. Our results demonstrate that by combining ITC experiments and computational methods much can be learned about the thermodynamics of ligand/protein binding. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Characterization of the novel progestin gestodene by receptor binding studies and transactivation assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrmann, U; Slater, E P; Fritzemeier, K H

    1995-01-01

    Gestodene is a novel progestin used in oral contraceptives with an increased separation of progestogenic versus androgenic activity and a distinct antimineralocorticoid activity. This specific pharmacological profile of gestodene is defined by its pattern of binding affinities to a variety of steroid hormone receptors. In the present study the affinity of gestodene to the progesterone receptor (PR), the androgen receptor (AR), the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the estrogen receptor (ER) was re-evaluated by steroid binding assays and compared to those obtained for 3-keto-desogestrel and progesterone. The two synthetic progestins displayed identical high affinity to rabbit PR and similar marked binding to rat AR and GR, while progesterone showed high affinity to PR but only low binding to AR and GR. Furthermore, 3-keto-desogestrel exhibited almost no binding to MR, whereas gestodene, similar to progesterone, showed marked affinity to this receptor. In addition to receptor binding studies, transactivation assays were carried out to investigate the effects of gestodene on AR-, GR- and MR-mediated induction of transcription. In contrast to progesterone, which showed antiandrogenic activity, gestodene and 3-keto-desogestrel both exhibited androgenic activity. Furthermore, all three progestins exhibited weak GR-mediated antagonistic activity. In contrast to progesterone, which showed almost no glucocorticoid activity, gestodene and 3-keto-desogestrel showed weak glucocorticoid action. In addition, gestodene inhibited the aldosterone-induced reporter gene transcription, similar to progesterone, whereas unlike progesterone, gestodene did not induce reporter gene transcription. 3-Keto-desogestrel showed neither antimineralocorticoid nor mineralocorticoid action.

  7. Computational Characterization and Prediction of Estrogen Receptor Coactivator Binding Site Inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennion, B J; Kulp, K S; Cosman, M; Lightstone, F C

    2005-08-26

    Many carcinogens have been shown to cause tissue specific tumors in animal models. The mechanism for this specificity has not been fully elucidated and is usually attributed to differences in organ metabolism. For heterocyclic amines, potent carcinogens that are formed in well-done meat, the ability to either bind to the estrogen receptor and activate or inhibit an estrogenic response will have a major impact on carcinogenicity. Here we describe our work with the human estrogen receptor alpha (hERa) and the mutagenic/carcinogenic heterocyclic amines PhIP, MeIQx, IFP, and the hydroxylated metabolite of PhIP, N2-hydroxy-PhIP. We found that PhIP, in contrast to the other heterocyclic amines, increased cell-proliferation in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and activated the hERa receptor. We show mechanistic data supporting this activation both computationally by homology modeling and docking, and by NMR confirmation that PhIP binds with the ligand binding domain (LBD). This binding competes with estradiol (E2) in the native E2 binding cavity of the receptor. We also find that other heterocyclic amines and N2-hydroxy-PhIP inhibit ER activation presumably by binding into another cavity on the LBD. Moreover, molecular dynamics simulations of inhibitory heterocyclic amines reveal a disruption of the surface of the receptor protein involved with protein-protein signaling. We therefore propose that the mechanism for the tissue specific carcinogenicity seen in the rat breast tumors and the presumptive human breast cancer associated with the consumption of well-done meat maybe mediated by this receptor activation.

  8. Differential Effects of Structural Modifications on the Competition of Chalcones for the PIB Amyloid Imaging Ligand-Binding Site in Alzheimer's Disease Brain and Synthetic Aβ Fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosso, Marina Y; McCarty, Katie; Head, Elizabeth; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie; LeVine, Harry

    2016-02-17

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex brain disorder that still remains ill defined. In order to understand the significance of binding of different clinical in vivo imaging ligands to the polymorphic pathological features of AD brain, the molecular characteristics of the ligand interacting with its specific binding site need to be defined. Herein, we observed that tritiated Pittsburgh Compound B ((3)H-PIB) can be displaced from synthetic Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) fibrils and from the PIB binding complex purified from human AD brain (ADPBC) by molecules containing a chalcone structural scaffold. We evaluated how substitution on the chalcone scaffold alters its ability to displace (3)H-PIB from the synthetic fibrils and ADPBC. By comparing unsubstituted core chalcone scaffolds along with the effects of bromine and methyl substitution at various positions, we found that attaching a hydroxyl group on the ring adjacent to the carbonyl group (ring I) of the parent member of the chalcone family generally improved the binding affinity of chalcones toward ADPBC and synthetic fibrils F40 and F42. Furthermore, any substitution on ring I at the ortho-position of the carbonyl group greatly decreases the binding affinity of the chalcones, potentially as a result of steric hindrance. Together with the finding that neither our chalcones nor PIB interact with the Congo Red/X-34 binding site, these molecules provide new tools to selectively probe the PIB binding site that is found in human AD brain, but not in brains of AD pathology animal models. Our chalcone derivatives also provide important information on the effects of fibril polymorphism on ligand binding.

  9. Isolation and characterization of a new mannose-binding lectin gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    and is a kind of valuable medicinal plant of family Tax- aceae in gymnosperms. Up to now, there is no report on the molecular cloning of lectin gene from T. .... important role in sugar-binding activity and thus are pre- served in evolution. As shown in figure 3B, it was very noteworthy that β-sheets occurred predominantly and ...

  10. Isolation and characterization of calcium binding glycoproteins of cardiac sarcolemmal vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalak, M.; Fliegel, L.; Wlasichuk, K. (Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada))

    1990-04-05

    Two major Ca2(+)-binding glycoproteins Mr 120,000 and 100,000 were isolated from 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio)-1-propanesulfonic acid -solubilized bovine heart sarcolemma membrane. Peroxidase-conjugated concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin lectins bind strongly to the isolated 120- and 100-kDa glycoproteins. Treatment with endoglycosidase F resulted in conversion of the 120-kDa glycoprotein to a form migrating at about 97 kDa. Treatment of the 100-kDa band with endoglycosidase F produced form of about 80 kDa. Endoglycosidase H digestion removes only 5% of the mass of both glycoproteins. the carbohydrate structure of both glycoproteins, is therefore, predicted to be at least 75% complex structure and 25% high mannose or hybrid structure. The 120- and 100-kDa glycoproteins are the major Ca2(+)-binding proteins in the sarcolemma membranes. Intact and endoglycosidase-treated glycoproteins bind 45Ca2+ as analyzed by a 45Ca2+ overlay technique. Using polyclonal antibodies, the 120- and 100-kDa glycoproteins were identified in muscle plasma membranes (ventricles, atria, and uterus smooth muscle). They were, however, not present in non-muscle tissues such as pancreas, liver, and kidney. The 120- and 100-kDa glycoproteins appear to be homologous molecules as judged by their similar V8 protease peptide maps, cross-reactivity with polyclonal antibody, and other physicochemical properties.

  11. NMR characterization of the DNA binding properties of a novel Hoechst 33258 analogue peptide building block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunkenborg, Jakob; Behrens, Carsten; Jacobsen, Jens Peter

    2002-01-01

    A novel aryl-bis-benzimidazole amino acid analogue of the DNA-binding compound Hoechst 33258 has recently been designed for incorporation in peptide combinatorial libraries by replacing the N-methylpiperazine group with a carboxyl group and the hydroxy group with an amino-methyl group. The DNA......-binding properties of the aryl-bis-benzimidazole monomer with the C-terminus derivatized with 3-(dimethylamino)-propylamine has been investigated in this paper by (1)H NMR studies of two different complexes with two different DNA sequences: A(5) d(5'-GCCA(5)CG-3'):d(5'-CGT(5)GGC-3') and A(3)T(3) d(5'-CGA(3)T(3)CG-3......')(2). Chemical shift footprinting shows that the ligand binds at the center of the A(3)T(3) sequence but at the 3'-end of A(5). A large number of NOEs show a well-defined complex with the ligand situated at the center of the palindromic A(3)T(3) but with the asymmetric A(5) the ligand binds with an orientational...

  12. Expression and purification of Nod factor receptors - Initial characterization of ligand binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broghammer, Angelique

    chemical composition, Man3XylFucGlcNAc4. In an early attempt to investigate the Nod factor perception mechanism, direct binding of Nod factor was visualized in a bead assay with fluorescently labeled Nod factor and GFP-tagged fusion protein purified from the membrane fraction of leaf material, expressing...

  13. cDNA cloning and characterization of a mannose-binding lectin from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Using RNA extracted from Zingiber officinale rhizomes and primers designed according to the conservative regions of monocot mannose-binding lectins, the full-length cDNA of Z. officinale agglutinin (ZOA) was cloned by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The full-length cDNA of zoa was 746 bp and contained a ...

  14. Isolation, cloning and characterization of a novel phosphomannan-binding lectin from porcine serum

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yong Ma, B.; Nakamura, N.; Dlabač, Vladimír; Naito, H.; Yamaguchi, S.; Ishikawa, M.; Nonaka, M.; Ishiguro, M.; Kawasaki, N.; Oka, S.; Kawasaki, T.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 282, č. 17 (2007), s. 12963-12975 ISSN 0021-9258 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : phosphomannan-binding lectin * porcine serum * cloning Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 5.581, year: 2007

  15. Biochemical characterization of DNA-binding proteins from Pyrobaculum aerophilum and Aeropyrum pernix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Christine D; Martin, Patrick K

    2008-03-01

    Several representatives of the Crenarchaeal branch of the Archaea contain highly abundant, small, positively charged proteins exemplified by the Sso7d protein from Sulfolobus solfataricus. These proteins bind to DNA in a non-sequence-specific manner. Using publicly available genomic sequence information, we identified a second class of small Crenarchaeal DNA-binding proteins represented by the Pyrobaculum aerophilum open reading frame 3192-encoded (Pae3192) protein and its paralogs. We investigated the biochemical properties of the Pae3192 protein and an orthologous protein (Ape1322b) from Aeropyrum pernix in side-by-side experiments with the Sso7d protein. We demonstrate that the recombinant Ape1322b, Pae3192 and Sso7d proteins bind to DNA and that the DNA-protein complexes formed are slightly different for each protein. We show that like Sso7d, Pae3192 constrains negative supercoils in DNA. In addition, we show that all three proteins raise the melting temperature of duplex DNA upon binding. Finally, we present the equilibrium affinity constants and kinetic association constants of each protein for single-stranded and double-stranded DNA.

  16. Characterization of [3H] oxymorphone binding sites in mouse brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoo, Ji Hoon; Borsodi, Anna; Tóth, Géza

    2017-01-01

    Oxymorphone, one of oxycodone's metabolic products, is a potent opioid receptor agonist which is thought to contribute to the analgesic effect of its parent compound and may have high potential abuse liability. Nonetheless, the in vivo pharmacological binding profile of this drug is still unclear...

  17. Characterization of a Calmodulin-binding Transcription Factor from Strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangpeng Leng

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Calmodulin-binding transcription activator (CAMTA is a calmodulin-binding transcription factor that has a broad range of functions from sensory mechanisms to regulating many growth and developmental processes. In this study, we isolated four strawberry ( genes using HMMER and BLAST analysis. The chromosome scaffold locations of these genes in the strawberry genome were determined and the protein domain and motif organization [CG-1, transcription factor immunoglobulin, ankyrin (ANK repeats, calmodulin-binding IQ motif of FaCAMTAs were also assessed. All FaCAMTAs were predicted to be Ca- and calmodulin-binding proteins. The expression profiles of genes were measured in different tissues and revealed distinct gene expression patterns under heat, cold, and salt stress. These data not only contribute to a better understanding of the complex regulation of the gene family but also provide evidence supporting the role of in multiple signaling pathways involved in stress responses. This investigation can provide useful information for further study.

  18. Characterization of Two Metal Binding Lipoproteins as Vaccine Candidates for Enterococcal Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Saavedra, Felipe; Laverde, Diana; Budin-Verneuil, Aurélie; Muller, Cécile; Bernay, Benoit; Benachour, Abdellah; Hartke, Axel; Huebner, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Enterococcus faecium and faecalis are Gram-positive opportunistic pathogens that have become leading causes of nosocomial infections over the last decades. Especially multidrug resistant enterococci have become a challenging clinical problem worldwide. Therefore, new treatment options are needed and the identification of alternative targets for vaccine development has emerged as a feasible alternative to fight the infections caused by these pathogens. We extrapolate the transcriptomic data from a mice peritonitis infection model in E. faecalis to identify putative up-regulated surface proteins under infection conditions in E. faecium. After the bionformatic analyses two metal binding lipoproteins were identified to have a high homology (>72%) between the two species, the manganese ABC transporter substrate-binding lipoprotein (PsaAfm,) and the zinc ABC transporter substrate-binding lipoprotein (AdcAfm). These candidate lipoproteins were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The recombinant proteins were used to produce rabbit polyclonal antibodies that were able to induce specific opsonic antibodies that mediated killing of the homologous strain E. faecium E155 as well as clinical strains E. faecium E1162, Enterococcus faecalis 12030, type 2 and type 5. Mice were passively immunized with the antibodies raised against recombinant lipoproteins, showing significant reduction of colony counts in mice livers after the bacterial challenge and demonstrating the efficacy of these metal binding lipoproteins as promising vaccine candidates to treat infections caused by these enterococcal pathogens. Overall, our results demonstrate that these two metal binding lipoproteins elicited specific, opsonic and protective antibodies, with an extensive cross-reactivity and serotype-independent coverage among these two important nocosomial pathogens. Pointing these two protein antigens as promising immunogens, that can be used as single components or as carrier proteins

  19. Cloning and characterization of a plasminogen-binding surface-associated enolase from Schistosoma bovis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre-Escudero, Eduardo; Manzano-Román, Raúl; Pérez-Sánchez, Ricardo; Siles-Lucas, Mar; Oleaga, Ana

    2010-10-11

    Schistosoma bovis is a ruminant parasite able to survive prolonged periods in the vasculature of its host without either being cleared by the host defensive systems or inducing thrombotic or coagulation disturbances. This suggests that the parasite modulates both the immune and haemostatic host responses. Previous studies have shown that host plasminogen binds to the surface of S. bovis adult worms, and that a tegument extract from S. bovis fixes and activates host plasminogen, generating plasmin, which in turn could both inhibit blood clotting and dissolve clots. Enolase has been identified among the tegumental proteins that bind plasminogen. The aim of the present study is to determine the physiological role of the enolase found in the tegument of S. bovis adult worms as regards plasminogen-binding and activation, and to confirm its surface exposure on the parasite. The study included the cloning and sequencing of S. bovis enolase cDNA, collection of the corresponding recombinant protein and evaluation of its plasminogen-binding and activation activity, and an exploration of the expression and localization of native enolase in adult worms and lung schistosomulae. Here we show that S. bovis male adult worms express enolase on their tegumental surface and that this protein binds host plasminogen and increases its activation in the presence of host tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA). This suggests that the surface-associated enolase found here is a physiological receptor of plasminogen that plays a role in the activation of the host fibrinolytic system, most probably to avoid blood clot formation on the worm's surface. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization of Two Metal Binding Lipoproteins as Vaccine Candidates for Enterococcal Infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Romero-Saavedra

    Full Text Available Enterococcus faecium and faecalis are Gram-positive opportunistic pathogens that have become leading causes of nosocomial infections over the last decades. Especially multidrug resistant enterococci have become a challenging clinical problem worldwide. Therefore, new treatment options are needed and the identification of alternative targets for vaccine development has emerged as a feasible alternative to fight the infections caused by these pathogens.We extrapolate the transcriptomic data from a mice peritonitis infection model in E. faecalis to identify putative up-regulated surface proteins under infection conditions in E. faecium. After the bionformatic analyses two metal binding lipoproteins were identified to have a high homology (>72% between the two species, the manganese ABC transporter substrate-binding lipoprotein (PsaAfm, and the zinc ABC transporter substrate-binding lipoprotein (AdcAfm. These candidate lipoproteins were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The recombinant proteins were used to produce rabbit polyclonal antibodies that were able to induce specific opsonic antibodies that mediated killing of the homologous strain E. faecium E155 as well as clinical strains E. faecium E1162, Enterococcus faecalis 12030, type 2 and type 5. Mice were passively immunized with the antibodies raised against recombinant lipoproteins, showing significant reduction of colony counts in mice livers after the bacterial challenge and demonstrating the efficacy of these metal binding lipoproteins as promising vaccine candidates to treat infections caused by these enterococcal pathogens.Overall, our results demonstrate that these two metal binding lipoproteins elicited specific, opsonic and protective antibodies, with an extensive cross-reactivity and serotype-independent coverage among these two important nocosomial pathogens. Pointing these two protein antigens as promising immunogens, that can be used as single components or as carrier

  1. Characterization of saturable binding sites for circulating pancreatic polypeptide in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitcomb, D.C.; Taylor, I.L.; Vigna, S.R. (Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Pancreatic polypeptide (PP) inhibits pancreatic exocrine secretion by indirect mechanisms that may be centrally mediated. The central site of action of PP that results in inhibition of pancreatic secretion has not been identified. Using autoradiography to identify 125I-PP binding to frozen sections of rat brain, we have identified saturable, high-affinity PP receptors in high concentrations in the interpenduncular nucleus, area postrema (AP), nucleus tractus solitarius, and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus. The PP receptor differs from neuropeptide Y and peptide YY receptors in its binding specificity and location. Because PP is not produced in the brain, and the blood-brain barrier (BBB) excludes circulating peptides from most areas in the brain, we employed an in vivo radioreceptor assay to determine whether circulating PP binds to areas such as the AP that has both an incomplete BBB and a high concentration of PP receptors. 125I-PP and 131I-bovine serum albumin were infused simultaneously into rats through a peripheral vein with or without excess unlabeled PP. After 10 min, rats were killed and the brains were removed and cut into eight regions based on the autoradiographic localization of PP receptors. There was a significant (P less than 0.02) increase in saturable radiolabeled PP accumulation in the region that included the AP, demonstrating that circulating PP can bind to this area of the brain in vivo. PP is released into the circulation after a meal via mechanisms that exhibit vagal and cholinergic dependence. We speculate that PP completes a feedback loop by binding to receptors in the AP and interacting with the adjacent vagal nuclei to inhibit vagal activity.

  2. Characterization and functional analysis of the calmodulin-binding domain of Rac1 GTPase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Xu

    Full Text Available Rac1, a member of the Rho family of small GTPases, has been shown to promote formation of lamellipodia at the leading edge of motile cells and affect cell migration. We previously demonstrated that calmodulin can bind to a region in the C-terminal of Rac1 and that this interaction is important in the activation of platelet Rac1. Now, we have analyzed amino acid residue(s in the Rac1-calmodulin binding domain that are essential for the interaction and assessed their functional contribution in Rac1 activation. The results demonstrated that region 151-164 in Rac1 is essential for calmodulin binding. Within the 151-164 region, positively-charged amino acids K153 and R163 were mutated to alanine to study impact on calmodulin binding. Mutant form of Rac1 (K153A demonstrated significantly reduced binding to calmodulin while the double mutant K153A/R163A demonstrated complete lack of binding to calmodulin. Thrombin or EGF resulted in activation of Rac1 in CHRF-288-11 or HeLa cells respectively and W7 inhibited this activation. Immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that higher amount of CaM was associated with Rac1 during EGF dependent activation. In cells expressing mutant forms of Rac1 (K153A or K153A/R163A, activation induced by EGF was significantly decreased in comparison to wild type or the R163A forms of Rac1. The lack of Rac1 activation in mutant forms was not due to an inability of GDP-GTP exchange or a change in subcelllular distribution. Moreover, Rac1 activation was decreased in cells where endogenous level of calmodulin was reduced using shRNA knockdown and increased in cells where calmodulin was overexpressed. Docking analysis and modeling demonstrated that K153 in Rac1 interacts with Q41 in calmodulin. These results suggest an important role for calmodulin in the activation of Rac1 and thus, in cytoskeleton reorganization and cell migration.

  3. Characterization of the sterol and phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate binding properties of Golgi-associated OSBP-related protein 9 (ORP9.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinwei Liu

    Full Text Available Oxysterol binding protein (OSBP and OSBP-related proteins (ORPS have a conserved lipid-binding fold that accommodates cholesterol, oxysterols and/or phospholipids. The diversity of OSBP/ORPs and their potential ligands has complicated the analysis of transfer and signalling properties of this mammalian gene family. In this study we explored the use of the fluorescent sterol cholestatrienol (CTL to measure sterol binding by ORP9 and competition by other putative ligands. Relative to cholesterol, CTL and dehydroergosterol (DHE were poor ligands for OSBP. In contrast, both long (ORP9L and short (ORP9S variants of ORP9 rapidly extracted CTL, and to a lesser extent DHE, from liposomes. ORP9L and ORP9S also extracted [32P]phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI-4P from liposomes, which was inhibited by mutating two conserved histidine residues (HH488,489AA at the entrance to the binding pocket but not by a mutation in the lid region that inhibited cholesterol binding. Results of direct binding and competition assays showed that phosphatidylserine was poorly extracted from liposomes by ORP9 compared to CTL and PI-4P. ORP9L and PI-4P did not co-localize in the trans-Golgi/TGN of HeLa cells, and siRNA silencing of ORP9L expression did not affect PI-4P distribution in the Golgi apparatus. However, transient overexpression of ORP9L or ORP9S in CHO cells, but not the corresponding PI-4P binding mutants, prevented immunostaining of Golgi-associated PI-4P. The apparent sequestration of Golgi PI-4P by ORP9S was identified as a possible mechanism for its growth inhibitory effects. These studies identify ORP9 as a dual sterol/PI-4P binding protein that could regulate PI-4P in the Golgi apparatus.

  4. Specificity Characterization of SLA Class I Molecules Binding to Swine-Origin Viral Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Epitope Peptides in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caixia Gao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Swine leukocyte antigen (SLA class I molecules play a crucial role in generating specific cellular immune responses against viruses and other intracellular pathogens. They mainly bind and present antigens of intracellular origin to circulating MHC I-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs. Binding of an appropriate epitope to an SLA class I molecule is the single most selective event in antigen presentation and the first step in the killing of infected cells by CD8+ CTLs. Moreover, the antigen epitopes are strictly restricted to specific SLA molecules. In this study, we constructed SLA class I complexes in vitro comprising viral epitope peptides, the extracellular region of the SLA-1 molecules, and β2-microglobulin (β2m using splicing overlap extension polymerase chain reaction (SOE-PCR. The protein complexes were induced and expressed in an Escherichia coli prokaryotic expression system and subsequently purified and refolded. Specific binding of seven SLA-1 proteins to one classical swine fever virus (CSFV and four porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV epitope peptides was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA-based method. The SLA-1∗13:01, SLA-1∗11:10, and SLA-1∗11:01:02 proteins were able to bind specifically to different CTL epitopes of CSFV and PRRSV and the MHC restrictions of the five epitopes were identified. The fixed combination of Asn151Val152 residues was identified as the potentially key amino acid residues influencing the binding of viral several CTL epitope peptides to SLA-1∗13:01 and SLA-1∗04:01:01 proteins. The more flexible pocket E in the SLA-1∗13:01 protein might have fewer steric limitations and therefore be able to accommodate more residues of viral CTL epitope peptides, and may thus play a critical biochemical role in determining the peptide-binding motif of SLA-1∗13:01. Characterization of the binding specificity of peptides to SLA class I molecules provides an

  5. Novel serotonin receptors in Fasciola. Characterization by studies on adenylate cyclase activation and [3H]LSD binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNall, S J; Mansour, T E

    1984-09-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) receptors coupled to adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1] in the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica have been characterized by adenylate cyclase activation studies and by direct binding studies using [3H]-d-lysergic acid diethylamide ([3H]LSD) as a radioligand. Inhibition of 5-HT stimulation of adenylate cyclase by a series of 5-HT antagonists revealed a potency order of LSD = 2-bromo-LSD greater than methiothepin greater than metergoline = cyproheptadine greater than methysergide greater than spiroperidol. [3H]LSD binding to a cell-free fluke particle preparation was rapid, stereospecific, and proportional to protein concentration. Scatchard analysis indicated multiple binding sites which, when resolved into two components, gave for the high affinity site an apparent dissociation constant of 25 nM and a receptor concentration of 160 fmoles/mg protein. The ability of a series of compounds to compete for [3H]LSD binding sites correlated closely with their ability to inhibit 5-HT stimulation of adenylate cyclase. [3H]LSD binding sites were most concentrated in the anterior region of the fluke which was consistent with the higher levels of 5-HT activated adenylate cyclase found in this region. GTP and 5'-guanylyl imidophosphate, a poorly hydrolyzable GTP analog, decreased the affinity of the agonist 5-HT for the binding sites but had little effect on the affinity of the antagonist 2-bromo-LSD. Calcium at concentrations above 300 microM significantly reduced both [3H]LSD binding and 5-HT activation of adenylate cyclase. The results indicate that [3H]LSD can be used to label the 5-HT receptors coupled to adenylate cyclase activity. The pharmacological specificity and other characteristics of the fluke receptors appear to differ from the properties of reported mammalian 5-HT receptors. As a result, serotonin receptors in the fluke represent sites that may be amenable to selective manipulation by new chemotherapeutic agents

  6. Identification and further characterization of the specific cell binding fragment from sponge aggregation factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramzow, M; Bachmann, M; Uhlenbruck, G; Dorn, A; Müller, W E

    1986-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) were raised against the aggregation factor (AF) from the marine sponge Geodia cydonium. Two clones were identified that secrete McAbs against the cell binding protein of the AF complex. Fab fragments of McAbs: 5D2-D11 completely abolished the activity of the AF to form secondary aggregates from single cells. The McAbs were determined to react with the AF in vitro; this interaction was prevented by addition of the aggregation receptor, isolated and purified from the same species. After dissociation of the AF by sodium dodecyl sulfate and 2-mercaptoethanol, followed by electrophoretical fractionation, a 47-kD protein was identified by immunoblotting which interacted with the McAbs: 5D2-D11. During this dissociation procedure, the sunburst structure of the AF was destroyed. In a second approach, the 47-kD protein was isolated by immunoprecipitation; 12 molecules of this protein species were calculated to be associated with the intact AF particle. The 47-kD AF fragment bound to dissociated Geodia cells with a high affinity (Ka of 7 X 10(8) M-1) even in the absence of Ca++ ions; the number of binding sites was approximately 4 X 10(6)/cell. This interaction was prevented by addition of the aggregation receptor to the 47-kD protein in the homologous cell system. Moreover, it was established that this binding occurs species-specifically. The 47-kD fragment of the AF was localized only extracellularly by indirect immunofluorescence staining in cryostat slices. These data suggest that the 47-kD protein is the cell binding molecule of the AF from Geodia.

  7. Characterization of the Carbohydrate Binding Module 18 gene family in the amphibian pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Stajich, Jason E

    2015-04-01

    Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) is the causative agent of chytridiomycosis responsible for worldwide decline in amphibian populations. Previous analysis of the Bd genome revealed a unique expansion of the carbohydrate-binding module family 18 (CBM18) predicted to be a sub-class of chitin recognition domains. CBM expansions have been linked to the evolution of pathogenicity in a variety of fungal species by protecting the fungus from the host. Based on phylogenetic analysis and presence of additional protein domains, the gene family can be classified into 3 classes: Tyrosinase-, Deacetylase-, and Lectin-like. Examination of the mRNA expression levels from sporangia and zoospores of nine of the cbm18 genes found that the Lectin-like genes had the highest expression while the Tyrosinase-like genes showed little expression, especially in zoospores. Heterologous expression of GFP-tagged copies of four CBM18 genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae demonstrated that two copies containing secretion signal peptides are trafficked to the cell boundary. The Lectin-like genes cbm18-ll1 and cbm18-ll2 co-localized with the chitinous cell boundaries visualized by staining with calcofluor white. In vitro assays of the full length and single domain copies from CBM18-LL1 demonstrated chitin binding and no binding to cellulose or xylan. Expressed CBM18 domain proteins were demonstrated to protect the fungus, Trichoderma reeseii, in vitro against hydrolysis from exogenously added chitinase, likely by binding and limiting exposure of fungal chitin. These results demonstrate that cbm18 genes can play a role in fungal defense and expansion of their copy number may be an important pathogenicity factor of this emerging infectious disease of amphibians. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Identification and partial characterization of cytosolic progesterone-binding sites in the filamentous fungus Rhizopus nigricans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenasi, H; Hudnik-Plevnik, T

    1996-06-01

    Progesterone and some other steroids have been shown to induce a steroid 11alpha-hydroxylating enzyme system requiring cytochrome P450 in the filamentous fungus Rhizopus nigricans. In the present work, we attempted to find out whether the mycelial cytosol contained progesterone-binding sites (PBS) which could function as receptors for P450-inducing steroids and might, therefore, be included in the induction process. Two types of constitutive PBS, PBS-I and PBS-II, were identified in the cytosol pretreated with dextran-coated charcoal which removed the endogenous ligand. The protein nature of these binding activities was indicated by their susceptibility to trypsin and proteinase K digestion, heat denaturation, and their resistance to DNase. Progesterone binding was rapid, the maximal level being reached after 45 min of incubation at 22 degrees C. At this temperature, dissociation of progesterone from PBS-I proceeded with a t1/2 of 17 min and that from PBS-II with a t1/2 of 133 min. The apparent Kd of PBS-I determined by Scatchard analysis was 2.1-7.0 x 10(-9)M, and Bmax 36-218 fmol/mg protein. Bmax for PBS-II was >400 fmol/mg protein, whereas the value of Kd could not be determined accurately due to the sigmoidal nature of the association kinetics. The biological role of PBS-I in transcriptional regulation is suggested by the observation that this receptor-like protein contains a functional DNA-binding domain. A specific function of PBS-I in the induction of 11alpha-hydroxylase seems to be, however, questionable because of poor correlation between the affinity and the inducing capability of corresponding steroids.

  9. Characterizing the cargo binding and regulatory function of the tail domain in Ncd motor protein

    OpenAIRE

    Lonergan, Natalie Elaine

    2009-01-01

    Non-claret disjunctional (Ncd) is a kinesin-14 microtubule motor protein involved in the assembly and stability of meiotic and mitotic spindles in Drosophila oocytes and early embryos, respectively. Ncd functions by cross-linking microtubules through the tail and motor domains. It was originally believed that the role of the Ncd tail domain was to only statically bind microtubules. However, the Ncd tail domain has recently been shown to have properties that stabilize and bundle...

  10. Characterization of metal-binding bioflocculants produced by the cyanobacterial component of mixed microbial mats.

    OpenAIRE

    Bender, J; Rodriguez-Eaton, S; Ekanemesang, U M; Phillips, P

    1994-01-01

    Mixed-species microbial mats that were dominated by the cyanobacterium Oscillatoria sp. and contained heterotrophic and purple autotrophic bacteria were constructed for specific bioremediation applications. When the mats were challenged with metals, production and secretion of metal-binding extracellular polysaccharide bioflocculants were observed. The concentration of these negatively charged polysaccharides was correlated with the removal of manganese from the water column beneath a surface...

  11. Characterization of Δ7/11, a functional prolactin-binding protein

    OpenAIRE

    Fleming, JM; Ginsburg, E.; McAndrew, CW; Heger, CD; Cheston, L; Rodriguez-Canales, J; Vonderhaar, BK; Goldsmith, P.

    2012-01-01

    Prolactin is essential for normal mammary gland development and differentiation, and has been shown to promote tumor cell proliferation and chemotherapeutic resistance. Soluble isoforms of the prolactin receptor have been reported to regulate prolactin bioavailability by functioning as “prolactin binding proteins.” Included in this category is Δ7/11, a product of alternate splicing of the prolactin receptor primary transcript. However, the direct interactions of prolactin withΔ7/11, and the r...

  12. Characterization of erythrosine B binding to bovine serum albumin and bilirubin displacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathavan, Vinodaran M K; Boh, Boon Kim; Tayyab, Saad

    2009-08-01

    The interaction of crythrosine B (ErB), a commonly used dye for coloring foods and drinks, with bovine scrum albumin (BSA) was investigated both in the absence and presence of bilirubin (BR) using absorption and absorption difference spectroscopy. ErB binding to BSA was reflected from a significant red shift of 11 nm in the absorption maximum of ErB (527 nm) with the change in absorbance at lamdamax. Analysis of absorption difference spectroscopic titration results of BSA with increasing concentrations of ErB3 using Benesi-Hildebrand equation gave the association constant, K as 6.9 x 10(4) M(-1). BR displacing action of ErB was revealed by a significant blue shift in the absorption maximum, accompanied by a decrease in absorbance difference at lamdamax in the difference spectrum of BR-BSA complex upon addition of increasing concentrations of ErB. This was further substantiated by fluorescence spectroscopy, as addition of increasing concentrations of ErB to BR-BSA complex caused a significant decrease in fluoresccnce at 510 nm. The results suggest that ErB binds to a site in the vicinity of BR binding site on BSA. Therefore, intake of ErB may increase the risk of hyperbilirubinemia in the healthy subjects.

  13. Characterization and DNA binding studies of unexplored imidazolidines by electronic absorption spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Afzal; Nosheen, Erum; Munir, Shamsa; Badshah, Amin; Qureshi, Rumana; Rehman, Zia-Ur-; Muhammad, Niaz; Hussain, Hidayat

    2013-03-05

    UV-Vis spectroscopic behavior of four imidazolidine derivatives i.e., [5-benzylideneimidazolidine-2,4-dione (NBI), 5-(2-hydroxybenzylidene)imidazolidine-2,4-dione (HBI), 5-(4-methoxybenzylidene)imidazolidine-2,4-dione (MBI) and 5-(3,4-di-methoxybenzylidene)imidazolidine-2,4-dione (DBI)] was studied in a wide pH range. Spectroscopic response of the studied compounds was found sensitive to pH and the attached substituents. Incited by anti-tumor activity, structural miscellany and biological applications of imidazolidines, the DNA binding affinity of some novel derivatives of this class of compounds was examined by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and UV-Vis spectroscopy at pH values of blood (7.4) and lysosomes (4.5). The CV results showed the following order of binding strength: KNBI (6.40×10(6)M(-1))>KHBI (1.77×10(5)M(-1))>KMBI (2.06×10(4)M(-1))>KDBI (1.01×10(4)M(-1)) at pH 7.4. The same order was also obtained from UV-Vis spectroscopy. The greater affinity of NBI justified its preferred candidature as an effective anti-cancer drug. The DNA binding propensity of these compounds was found comparable or greater than most of the clinically used anticancer drugs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Binding of hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers with human serum albumin: Spectroscopic characterization and molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lulu; Yang, Wu; Wu, Zhiwei; Yi, Zhongsheng

    2017-09-01

    Three hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (OH-PBDEs), 3-OH-BDE-47, 5-OH-BDE-47, and 6-OH-BDE-47, were selected to investigate the interactions between OH-PBDEs with human serum albumin (HSA) under physiological conditions. The observed fluorescence quenching can be attributed to the formation of complexes between HSA and OH-PBDEs. The thermodynamic parameters at different temperatures indicate that the binding was caused by hydrophobic forces and hydrogen bonds. Molecular modeling and three-dimensional fluorescence spectrum showed conformational and microenvironmental changes in HSA. Circular dichroism analysis showed that the addition of OH-PBDEs changed the conformation of HSA with a minor reduction in α-helix content and increase in β-sheet content. Furthermore, binding distance r between the donor (HSA) and acceptor (three OH-PBDEs) calculated using Förster's nonradiative energy transfer theory was molecular dynamics simulations, the binding free energies (ΔGbind ) were calculated using molecular mechanics/Poisson - Boltzmann surface area method, and the crucial residues in HSA were identified. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Crystal structure and pharmacological characterization of a novel N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist at the GluN1 glycine binding site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, Trine; Steffensen, Thomas Bielefeldt; Greenwood, Jeremy R

    2013-01-01

    glycine site antagonist, 1-thioxo-1,2-dihydro-[1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-4(5H)-one (TK40). Here, we show by Schild analysis that TK40 is a potent competitive antagonist with Kb values of 21-63 nm at the GluN1 glycine-binding site of the four recombinant GluN1/N2A-D receptors. In addition, TK40...

  16. Preformulation Characterization, Stabilization, and Formulation Design for the Acrylodan-Labeled Glucose-Binding Protein SM4-AC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahni, Neha; Chaudhuri, Rajoshi; Hickey, John M; Manikwar, Prakash; D'Souza, Ajit; Metters, Andrew; Joshi, Sangeeta B; Middaugh, C Russell; Volkin, David B

    2017-05-01

    This study describes the physicochemical characterization, stabilization, and formulation design of SM4-AC, an acrylodan-labeled glucose/galactose-binding protein for use in a continuous glucose monitoring device. The physical stability profile of SM4-AC as a function of pH and temperature was monitored using a combination of biophysical techniques and the resulting physical stability profile was visualized using an empirical phase diagram. Forced degradation chemical stability studies (Asn deamidation, Met oxidation) of SM4-AC were performed using a combination of capillary isoelectric focusing, peptide mapping, and reversed-phase HPLC. Differential scanning fluorimetry was then employed to screen various pharmaceutical excipients for their ability to physically stabilize SM4-AC. An optimized formulation of 20% sucrose and 2.5 mM calcium chloride in 10 mM MES buffer, 150 mM NaCl at pH 6.0 increased the conformational stability of SM4-AC by 15°C. Accelerated and real-time stability studies were setup to compare the SM4-AC protein's physicochemical stability and glucose-binding activity in 2 formulations for up to 12 months. SM4-AC in an optimized formulation (vs the original formulation) showed improved physical stability, and similar chemical stability and glucose binding activity profiles during storage up to 52 weeks at various temperatures. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Biological Impact of Pd (II Complexes: Synthesis, Spectral Characterization, In Vitro Anticancer, CT-DNA Binding, and Antioxidant Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Kumar Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A new series of Pd (II complexes of methyl substituted benzylamine ligands (BLs has been synthesized and characterized via spectroscopic techniques such as UV/Vis. FTIR, LCMS, 1H, and 13C NMR. The UV/Vis study in DMSO, DMSO + water, and DMSO + PBS buffer (pH = 7.2 confirmed their molecular sustainability in liquids. Their in vitro anticancer activity against breast cancer cell lines such as MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 makes them interesting for in vivo analysis. Their stronger DNA binding activity (DBA compared with free ligand suggested them as a good DNA binder. DBA was further confirmed by physicochemical studies such as surface tension and viscosity of complex + DNA which inferred the disruption of DNA and intercalation of complexes, respectively. Their % binding activity, % disruption of DNA base pairs (DNABP, and % intercalating strength are reported in this paper for the first time for better understanding of DNA binding mechanism. Along with this, their scavenging activity (SA determined through DPPH free radical and the results indicate good antioxidant behaviour of complexes.

  18. Structural characterization of the DNA-binding mechanism underlying the copper(II)-sensing MarR transcriptional regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Rongfeng; Hao, Ziyang; Lou, Hubing; Song, Yanqun; Zhao, Jingyi; Chen, Yuqing; Zhu, Jiuhe; Chen, Peng R

    2017-07-01

    Multiple antibiotic resistance regulator (MarR) family proteins are widely conserved transcription factors that control bacterial resistance to antibiotics, environmental stresses, as well as the regulation of virulence determinants. Escherichia coli MarR, the prototype member of this family, has recently been shown to undergo copper(II)-catalyzed inter-dimer disulfide bond formation via a unique cysteine residue (Cys80) residing in its DNA-binding domain. However, despite extensive structural characterization of the MarR family proteins, the structural mechanism for DNA binding of this copper(II)-sensing MarR factor remains elusive. Here, we report the crystal structures of DNA-bound forms of MarR, which revealed a unique, concerted generation of two new helix-loop-helix motifs that facilitated MarR's DNA binding. Structural analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) show that the flexibility of Gly116 in the center of helix α5 and the extensive hydrogen-bonding interactions at the N-terminus of helix α1 together assist the reorientation of the wHTH domains and stabilize MarR's DNA-bound conformation.

  19. Despite irreversible binding, PET tracer [C-11]-SA5845 is suitable for imaging of drug competition at sigma receptors - The cases of ketamine and haloperidol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortekaas, Rudie; Maguire, R. Paul; van Waarde, Aren; Leenders, Klaus L.; Elsinga, Philip H.

    Many psychotropic compounds bind to sigma receptors and several new sigma ligands are in development for psychiatric indications such as anxiety, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, depression and psychosis. Of special interest for drug development are tomographic methods that can quantify the

  20. Characterization of 5-HT receptors on human pulmonary artery and vein: functional and binding studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortijo, Julio; Martí-Cabrera, Miguel; Bernabeu, Eva; Domènech, Teresa; Bou, Josep; Fernández, Andrés G; Beleta, Jorge; Palacios, José M; Morcillo, Esteban J

    1997-01-01

    presumably not involved in the contractile response to these agonists.Binding studies using selective radioligands for different 5-HT receptors could not detect the presence of 5-HT1A receptor binding in human pulmonary blood vessels whereas the 5-HT1B/1D radioligand [3H]-5-CT significantly labelled a population of specific binding sites in both vessel types. The presence of 5-HT2A receptors could also be inferred from the level of binding of [3H]-ketanserin to membranes obtained from human pulmonary vessels, although significance could not be reached for arteries. 5-HT4 specific receptor binding was scarce in veins and absent in the case of arteries.These findings indicate that the human pulmonary artery and vein have a mixed functional population of 5-HT1B/1D and 5-HT2A receptors mediating the contractile response to 5-HT which is consistent with results of the binding studies. PMID:9421295

  1. Identification of the full set of Listeria monocytogenes penicillin-binding proteins and characterization of PBPD2 (Lmo2812

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayala Juan A

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs can be visualized by their ability to bind radiolabeled or fluorescent β-lactam derivatives both whole cells and membrane/cell enriched fractions. Analysis of the Listeria monocytogenes genome sequence predicted ten genes coding for putative PBPs, but not all of their products have been detected in studies using radiolabeled antibiotics, thus hindering their characterization. Here we report the positive identification of the full set of L. monocytogenes PBPs and the characteristics of the hitherto undescribed PBPD2 (Lmo2812. Results Eight L. monocytogenes PBPs were identified by the binding of fluorescent β-lactam antibiotic derivatives Boc-FL, Boc-650 and Amp-Alexa430 to proteins in whole cells or membrane/cell wall extracts. The gene encoding a ninth PBP (Lmo2812 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli as a His-tagged protein. The affinity purified recombinant protein had DD-carboxypeptidase activity and preferentially degraded low-molecular-weight substrates. L. monocytogenes mutants lacking the functional Lmo2812 enzyme were constructed and, compared to the wild-type, the cells were longer and slightly curved with bent ends. Protein Lmo1855, previously designated PBPD3, did not bind any of the antibiotic derivatives tested, similarly to the homologous enterococcal protein VanY. Conclusions Nine out of the ten putative L. monocytogenes PBP genes were shown to encode proteins that bind derivatives of β-lactam antibiotics, thus enabling their positive identification. PBPD2 (Lmo2812 was not visualized in whole cell extracts, most probably due to its low abundance, but it was shown to bind Boc-FL after recombinant overexpression and purification. Mutants lacking Lmo2812 and another low molecular mass (LMM PBP, PBP5 (PBPD1 - both with DD-carboxypeptidase activity - displayed only slight morphological alterations, demonstrating that they are dispensable for cell survival and

  2. Structural characterization of natural nickel and copper binding ligands along the US GEOTRACES Eastern Pacific Zonal transect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene M Boiteau

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Organic ligands form strong complexes with many trace elements in seawater. Various metals can compete for the same ligand chelation sites, and the final speciation of bound metals is determined by relative binding affinities, concentrations of binding sites, uncomplexed metal concentrations, and association/dissociation kinetics. Different ligands have a wide range of metal affinities and specificities. However, the chemical composition of these ligands in the marine environment remains poorly constrained, which has hindered progress in modeling marine metal speciation. In this study, we detected and characterized natural ligands that bind copper (Cu and nickel (Ni in the eastern South Pacific Ocean with liquid chromatography tandem inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LC-ICPMS, and high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESIMS. Dissolved Cu, Ni, and ligand concentrations were highest near the coast. Chromatographically unresolved polar compounds dominated ligands isolated near the coast by solid phase extraction. Offshore, metal and ligand concentrations decreased, but several new ligands appeared. One major ligand was detected that bound both Cu2+ and Ni2+. Based on accurate mass and fragmentation measurements, this compound has a molecular formula of C20H21N4O8S2 + M+ (M = metal isotope and contains several azole-like metal binding groups. Additional lipophilic Ni complexes were also present only in oligotrophic waters, with masses of 649, 698, and 712 m/z (corresponding to the 58Ni metal complex. Molecular formulae of C32H54N3O6S2Ni+ and C33H56N3O6S2Ni+ were determined for two of these compounds. Addition of Cu and Ni to the samples also revealed the presence of additional compounds that can bind both Ni and Cu. Although these specific compounds represent a small fraction of the total dissolved Cu and Ni pool, they highlight the compositional diversity and spatial heterogeneity of marine Ni and Cu ligands, as

  3. Dengue virus induces expression of CXC chemokine ligand 10/IFN-gamma-inducible protein 10, which competitively inhibits viral binding to cell surface heparan sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia-Perng; Lu, Hsin-Lin; Lai, Szu-Liang; Campanella, Gabriele S; Sung, Jui-Ming; Lu, Mei-Yi; Wu-Hsieh, Betty A; Lin, Yi-Ling; Lane, Thomas E; Luster, Andrew D; Liao, Fang

    2006-09-01

    Dengue virus is an arthropod-borne flavivirus that causes a mild febrile illness, dengue fever, or a potentially fatal syndrome, dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome. Chemokines primarily orchestrate leukocyte recruitment to the areas of viral infection, which makes them critical mediators of immune and inflammatory responses. In the present study, we investigated the induction and function of chemokines in mice early after infection with dengue virus in vivo. We found that CXCL10/IFN-gamma-inducible protein 10 (IP-10) expression was rapidly and transiently induced in liver following infection. The expressed CXCL10/IP-10 likely mediates the recruitment of activated NK cells, given that anti-CXCL10/IP-10-treated mice showed diminished NK cell infiltration and reduced hepatic expression of effector molecules in activated NK cells after dengue virus infection. Of particular interest, we found that CXCL10/IP-10 also was able to inhibit viral binding to target cells in vitro. Further investigation revealed that various CXCL10/IP-10 mutants, in which the residues that mediate the interaction between the chemokine and heparan sulfate were substituted, failed to exert the inhibitory effect on dengue binding, which suggests that CXCL10/IP-10 competes with dengue virus for binding to heparan sulfate on the cell surface. Moreover, subsequent plaque assays showed that this inhibition of dengue binding blocked viral uptake and replication. The inhibitory effect of CXCL10/IP-10 on the binding of dengue virus to cells may represent a novel contribution of this chemokine to the host defense against viral infection.

  4. Transport and binding characterization of a novel hybrid particle impregnated membrane material for bioseparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herigstad, M Omon; Gurgel, Patrick V; Carbonell, Ruben G

    2011-01-01

    The transport and binding properties of a novel hybrid particle-nonwoven membrane medium are described. In this construct, a polymeric chromatographic resin is entrapped between two layers of a nonwoven polypropylene membrane. The membrane-supported resin medium offers the advantage of increased interstitial pore diameter to allow passage of cells and other debris in the feed, while providing sufficiently high surface area for product capture within the resin particles. Columns packed with PIM displayed excellent flow distribution and had interstitial porosities of 0.48 ± 0.01, 25-60% larger than those typical of a packed bed. These columns were able to pass over 95% of E. coli cells and human red blood cell concentrate in 30 column volumes while maintaining a pressure drop significantly lower than that of a packed bed with a similar amount of resin. The dynamic binding capacity of bovine serum albumin (BSA) to the chromatographic resin entrapped in the PIM packed column was essentially the same as that observed with the same volume of resin in a packed bed. The General Rate (GR) model of chromatography was used to analyze experiments indicating the breakthrough behavior of the PIM columns is predictable, and very similar to those of a normal packed bed. These results suggest that PIM constructs can be designed to process viscous mobile phases containing particulates while retaining the desirable binding characteristics of the embedded chromatographic resin and could find uses in adsorption separation processes from complex feed streams such as whole blood, cell culture, and food processing. Copyright © 2010 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  5. Structural Characterization of the Dual Glycan Binding Adeno-Associated Virus Serotype 6▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Robert; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Gurda, Brittney L.; McKenna, Robert; Kozyreva, Olga G.; Samulski, R. Jude; Parent, Kristin N.; Baker, Timothy S.; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2010-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotype 6 (AAV6) was determined using cryo-electron microscopy and image reconstruction and using X-ray crystallography to 9.7- and 3.0-Å resolution, respectively. The AAV6 capsid contains a highly conserved, eight-stranded (βB to βI) β-barrel core and large loop regions between the strands which form the capsid surface, as observed in other AAV structures. The loops show conformational variation compared to other AAVs, consistent with previous reports that amino acids in these loop regions are involved in differentiating AAV receptor binding, transduction efficiency, and antigenicity properties. Toward structure-function annotation of AAV6 with respect to its unique dual glycan receptor (heparan sulfate and sialic acid) utilization for cellular recognition, and its enhanced lung epithelial transduction compared to other AAVs, the capsid structure was compared to that of AAV1, which binds sialic acid and differs from AAV6 in only 6 out of 736 amino acids. Five of these residues are located at or close to the icosahedral 3-fold axis of the capsid, thereby identifying this region as imparting important functions, such as receptor attachment and transduction phenotype. Two of the five observed amino acids are located in the capsid interior, suggesting that differential AAV infection properties are also controlled by postentry intracellular events. Density ordered inside the capsid, under the 3-fold axis in a previously reported, conserved AAV DNA binding pocket, was modeled as a nucleotide and a base, further implicating this capsid region in AAV genome recognition and/or stabilization. PMID:20861247

  6. Structural characterization of the dual glycan binding adeno-associated virus serotype 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Robert; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Gurda, Brittney L; McKenna, Robert; Kozyreva, Olga G; Samulski, R Jude; Parent, Kristin N; Baker, Timothy S; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2010-12-01

    The three-dimensional structure of adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotype 6 (AAV6) was determined using cryo-electron microscopy and image reconstruction and using X-ray crystallography to 9.7- and 3.0-Å resolution, respectively. The AAV6 capsid contains a highly conserved, eight-stranded (βB to βI) β-barrel core and large loop regions between the strands which form the capsid surface, as observed in other AAV structures. The loops show conformational variation compared to other AAVs, consistent with previous reports that amino acids in these loop regions are involved in differentiating AAV receptor binding, transduction efficiency, and antigenicity properties. Toward structure-function annotation of AAV6 with respect to its unique dual glycan receptor (heparan sulfate and sialic acid) utilization for cellular recognition, and its enhanced lung epithelial transduction compared to other AAVs, the capsid structure was compared to that of AAV1, which binds sialic acid and differs from AAV6 in only 6 out of 736 amino acids. Five of these residues are located at or close to the icosahedral 3-fold axis of the capsid, thereby identifying this region as imparting important functions, such as receptor attachment and transduction phenotype. Two of the five observed amino acids are located in the capsid interior, suggesting that differential AAV infection properties are also controlled by postentry intracellular events. Density ordered inside the capsid, under the 3-fold axis in a previously reported, conserved AAV DNA binding pocket, was modeled as a nucleotide and a base, further implicating this capsid region in AAV genome recognition and/or stabilization.

  7. Characterization of the flavonoid-responsive regulator FrrA and its binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, Mandy; Lang, Kathrin; Günther, Tobias; Bhandari, Anita; Weiss, Andy; Lulchev, Pavel; Szentgyörgyi, Erik; Kranzusch, Bianca; Göttfert, Michael

    2012-05-01

    Previous microarray analyses revealed that in Bradyrhizobium japonicum, about 100 genes are induced by genistein, an isoflavonoid secreted by soybean. This includes the three genes freC, freA, and freB (systematic designations bll4319, bll4320, and bll4321), which are likely to form a genistein-, daidzein-, and coumestrol-inducible operon and to encode a multidrug efflux system. Upstream of freCAB and in the opposite orientation, FrrA (systematic designation Blr4322), which has similarity to TetR-type regulators, is encoded. A deletion of frrA leads to increased expression of freB in the absence of an inducer. We identified the correct translational start codon of frrA and showed that the gene is inducible by genistein and daidzein. The protein, which was heterologously expressed and purified from Escherichia coli, binds to two palindrome-like DNA elements (operator A and operator B), which are located in the intergenic region between freC and frrA. The replacement of several nucleotides or the insertion of additional spacer nucleotides prevented binding. Binding of FrrA was also affected by the addition of genistein. By mapping the transcription start sites, we found that operator A covers the transcriptional start site of freC and operator B is probably located between the -35 regions of the two divergently oriented genes. Operator A seems to be conserved in a few similar gene constellations in other proteobacteria. Our data indicate that in B. japonicum, besides NodD1 (the LysR family) and NodVW (a two-component response regulator), a third regulator type (a TetR family member) which responds to the plant signal molecules genistein and daidzein exists.

  8. Characterization of Lactic Acid Bacteria as Poultry Probiotic Candidates with Aflatoxin B1 Binding Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damayanti, E.; Istiqomah, L.; Saragih, J. E.; Purwoko, T.; Sardjono

    2017-12-01

    Our previous studies have selected lactic acid bacteria (LAB) with antifungal activities from traditional fermented foods made from cassava (G7) and silage feed palm leaf (PDS5 and PDS3). In this study we evaluated their ability to bind aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) and probiotic characteristic. The probiotic characteristic assays of LAB consisted of resistance to acidic conditions (pH 3), gastric juice and bile salts 0.3%. We also carried out an in vitro evaluation of LAB aflatoxin binding ability in viable and non-viable cell for 24 and 48 hours of incubation. The measurement of aflatoxin content was performed by ELISA method using AgraQuant Total Aflatoxin Assay kit. The results showed that all isolates were potential as probiotics and the G7 isolate had the highest viability among other isolates in pH 3 (92.61 %) and the bile salts assay (97.71 %). The percentage of aflatoxin reduction between viable and non-viable cell from each LAB isolate were different. The highest aflatoxin reduction in viable cell assay was performed by G7 isolate (69.11 %) whereas in non-viable cell assay was performed by PDS3 isolate (73.75 %) during incubation time 48 hours. In this study, G7 isolate performed the best probiotic characteristics with the highest viability in acid pH assay, bile salt 0.3% assay and percentage of aflatoxin B1 reduction in viable cell condition. Molecular identification using 16S rRNA sequence analysis showed that G7 isolate had homology with Lactobacillus plantarum (99.9%). It was concluded that Lactobacillus plantarum G7 was potential as probiotic with aflatoxin binding activities.

  9. In silico characterization of binding mode of CCR8 inhibitor: homology modeling, docking and membrane based MD simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadhe, Changdev G; Balupuri, Anand; Cho, Seung Joo

    2015-01-01

    Human CC-chemokine receptor 8 (CCR8) is a crucial drug target in asthma that belongs to G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily, which is characterized by seven transmembrane helices. To date, there is no X-ray crystal structure available for CCR8; this hampers active research on the target. Molecular basis of interaction mechanism of antagonist with CCR8 remains unclear. In order to provide binding site information and stable binding mode, we performed modeling, docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of CCR8. Docking study of biaryl-ether-piperidine derivative (13C) was performed inside predefined CCR8 binding site to get the representative conformation of 13C. Further, MD simulations of receptor and complex (13C-CCR8) inside dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers were performed to explore the effect of lipids. Results analyses showed that the Gln91, Tyr94, Cys106, Val109, Tyr113, Cys183, Tyr184, Ser185, Lys195, Thr198, Asn199, Met202, Phe254, and Glu286 were conserved in both docking and MD simulations. This indicated possible role of these residues in CCR8 antagonism. However, experimental mutational studies on these identified residues could be effective to confirm their importance in CCR8 antagonism. Furthermore, calculated Coulombic interactions represented the crucial roles of Glu286, Lys195, and Tyr113 in CCR8 antagonism. Important residues identified in this study overlap with the previous non-peptide agonist (LMD-009) binding site. Though, the non-peptide agonist and currently studied inhibitor (13C) share common substructure, but they differ in their effects on CCR8. So, to get more insight into their agonist and antagonist effects, further side-by-side experimental studies on both agonist (LMD-009) and antagonist (13C) are suggested.

  10. Identification and further characterization of the specific cell binding fragment from sponge aggregation factor

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) were raised against the aggregation factor (AF) from the marine sponge Geodia cydonium. Two clones were identified that secrete McAbs against the cell binding protein of the AF complex. Fab fragments of McAbs: 5D2-D11 completely abolished the activity of the AF to form secondary aggregates from single cells. The McAbs were determined to react with the AF in vitro; this interaction was prevented by addition of the aggregation receptor, isolated and purified from t...

  11. Computational identification and experimental characterization of substrate binding determinants of nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parrill Abby L

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 7 (NPP7 is the only member of the mammalian NPP enzyme family that has been confirmed to act as a sphingomyelinase, hydrolyzing sphingomyelin (SM to form phosphocholine and ceramide. NPP7 additionally hydrolyzes lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC, a substrate preference shared with the NPP2/autotaxin(ATX and NPP6 mammalian family members. This study utilizes a synergistic combination of molecular modeling validated by experimental site-directed mutagenesis to explore the molecular basis for the unique ability of NPP7 to hydrolyze SM. Results The catalytic function of NPP7 against SM, LPC, platelet activating factor (PAF and para-nitrophenylphosphorylcholine (pNPPC is impaired in the F275A mutant relative to wild type NPP7, but different impacts are noted for mutations at other sites. These results are consistent with a previously described role of F275 to interact with the choline headgroup, where all substrates share a common functionality. The L107F mutation showed enhanced hydrolysis of LPC, PAF and pNPPC but reduced hydrolysis of SM. Modeling suggests this difference can be explained by the gain of cation-pi interactions with the choline headgroups of all four substrates, opposed by increased steric crowding against the sphingoid tail of SM. Modeling also revealed that the long and flexible hydrophobic tails of substrates exhibit considerable dynamic flexibility in the binding pocket, reducing the entropic penalty that might otherwise be incurred upon substrate binding. Conclusions Substrate recognition by NPP7 includes several important contributions, ranging from cation-pi interactions between F275 and the choline headgroup of all substrates, to tail-group binding pockets that accommodate the inherent flexibility of the lipid hydrophobic tails. Two contributions to the unique ability of NPP7 to hydrolyze SM were identified. First, the second hydrophobic tail of SM occupies a second

  12. Discovery and Characterization of a Cell-Permeable, Small-Molecule c-Abl Kinase Activator that Binds to the Myristoyl Binding Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jingsong; Campobasso, Nino; Biju, Mangatt P.; Fisher, Kelly; Pan, Xiao-Qing; Cottom, Josh; Galbraith, Sarah; Ho, Thau; Zhang, Hong; Hong, Xuan; Ward, Paris; Hofmann, Glenn; Siegfried, Brett; Zappacosta, Francesca; Washio, Yoshiaki; Cao, Ping; Qu, Junya; Bertrand, Sophie; Wang, Da-Yuan; Head, Martha S.; Li, Hu; Moores, Sheri; Lai, Zhihong; Johanson, Kyung; Burton, George; Erickson-Miller, Connie; Simpson, Graham; Tummino, Peter; Copeland, Robert A.; Oliff, Allen (GSKPA)

    2014-10-02

    c-Abl kinase activity is regulated by a unique mechanism involving the formation of an autoinhibited conformation in which the N-terminal myristoyl group binds intramolecularly to the myristoyl binding site on the kinase domain and induces the bending of the {alpha}I helix that creates a docking surface for the SH2 domain. Here, we report a small-molecule c-Abl activator, DPH, that displays potent enzymatic and cellular activity in stimulating c-Abl activation. Structural analyses indicate that DPH binds to the myristoyl binding site and prevents the formation of the bent conformation of the {alpha}I helix through steric hindrance, a mode of action distinct from the previously identified allosteric c-Abl inhibitor, GNF-2, that also binds to the myristoyl binding site. DPH represents the first cell-permeable, small-molecule tool compound for c-Abl activation.

  13. Characterization and quantification of corticosteroid-binding globulin in a southern toad, Bufo terrestris, exposed to coal-combustion-waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, C.K.; Fontes, C.; Breuner, C.W.; Mendonca, M.T. [Auburn University, Auburn, AL (USA). Dept. of Biological Science

    2007-05-15

    Corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) is a plasma protein that binds corticosterone and may regulate access of hormone to tissues. The role of CBG during a stress response is not clear. In this study, southern toads, Bufo terrestris, were exposed to a chronic pollutant (coal-combustion-waste), to determine changes in CBG and free corticosterone levels. Since toads exposed to chronic pollutants in previous studies did not exhibit the predicted changes in metabolic rate and mass, but did experience a significant elevation in total corticosterone, we hypothesized that CBG would likewise increase and thus, mitigate the effects of a chronic (i.e. 2 months) pollutant stressor. To conduct this study, we first characterized the properties of CBG in southern toads. After characterization, we monitored the changes in CBG, total corticosterone, and free corticosterone in male toads that were exposed to either coal-combustion-waste or control conditions. CBG increased in all groups throughout the experiment. Total corticosterone, on the other hand, was only significantly elevated at four weeks of exposure to coal-combustion-waste. The increase in CBG did not parallel the increase in total corticosterone; as a result, free corticosterone levels were not buffered by CBG, but showed a peak at four weeks similar to total corticosterone. This finding indicates that, in this species, CBG may not provide a protective mechanism during long-term pollution exposure.

  14. Fabrication and characterization of a sialoside-based carbohydrate microarray biointerface for protein binding analysis with surface plasmon resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linman, Matthew J; Yu, Hai; Chen, Xi; Cheng, Quan

    2009-08-01

    Monitoring multiple biological interactions in a multiplexed array format has numerous advantages. However, converting well-developed surface chemistry for spectroscopic measurements to array-based high-throughput screening is not a trivial process and often proves to be the bottleneck in method development. This paper reports the fabrication and characterization of a new carbohydrate microarray with synthetic sialosides for surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) analysis of lectin-carbohydrate interactions. Contact printing of functional sialosides on neutravidin-coated surfaces was carried out and the properties of the resulting elements were characterized by fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA) was deposited on four different carbohydrate functionalized surfaces and differential binding was analyzed to reveal affinity variation as a function of headgroup sialic acid structures and linking bonds. SPRi studies indicated that this immobilization method could result in high quality arrays with RSD 15%. Multiplexed detection of SNA/biotinylated sialoside interactions on arrays up to 400 elements has been performed with good data correlation, demonstrating the effectiveness of the biotin-neutravidin-based biointerface to control probe orientation for reproducible and efficient protein binding to take place. Additionally, the regeneration of the array surface was demonstrated with a glycine stripping buffer, rendering this interface reusable. This in-depth study of array surface chemistry offers useful insight into experimental conditions that can be optimized for better performance, allowing many different protein-based biointeractions to be monitored in a similar manner.

  15. Competitive Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Pierrette; Hiller, Christine A.

    2002-01-01

    Reviews the evolution of competitive intelligence since 1994, including terminology and definitions and analytical techniques. Addresses the issue of ethics; explores how information technology supports the competitive intelligence process; and discusses education and training opportunities for competitive intelligence, including core competencies…

  16. Characterization of the retinoblastoma binding proteins RBP1 and RBP2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fattaey, A R; Helin, K; Dembski, M S

    1993-01-01

    The retinoblastoma gene product, pRB, regulates cell proliferation by binding to and inhibiting the activity of key growth promoting proteins. Several cellular proteins have been shown to bind directly to pRB and the genes encoding a number of them have been isolated. The protein product of one...... of these genes is the transcription factor E2F. We have now isolated cDNA clones that contain the full-length coding sequence of two other proteins, RBP1 and RBP2, cloned originally by their interaction with pRB. The products of the RBP1 and RBP2 genes are ubiquitously expressed, large (200 kDa for RBP1 and 195...... kDa for RBP2) nuclear phosphoproteins with structural motifs that suggest a role in transcriptional regulation. In addition we have been able to identify complexes of pRB and RBP1 in vivo that are dissociated in the presence of purified human papillomavirus E7 protein....

  17. The Characterization And Role of Zinc Binding in Yeast Cox4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coyne, H.J., III; Ciofi-Baffoni, S.; Banci, L.; Bertini, I.; Zhang, L.; George, G.N.; Winge, D.R.; /Utah U. /Florence U. /Saskatchewan U.

    2007-07-09

    Yeast Cox4 is a zinc binding subunit of cytochrome c oxidase. Cox4 is the only cofactor-containing subunit that is not directly part of the catalytic core of the enzyme located in the mitochondrial inner membrane. The Zn(II) site is shown to be distinct from the bovine ortholog, as it results from the x-ray structure of the entire cytochrome c oxidase in having a single histidyl residue and three conserved cysteines residues in the coordination sphere. Substitutions at the Cys ligand positions result in non-functional Cox4 proteins that fail to lead to cytochrome oxidase assembly. Limited function exists in His-119 mutants when overexpressed. Zn(II) binding in Cox4 is, therefore, important for the stability of the complex. The solution structure of yeast Cox4 elucidated by multidimensional NMR reveals a C-terminal globular domain consisting of two {beta} sheets analogous to the bovine ortholog except the loop containing the coordinating His in the yeast protein and the fourth Cys in the bovine protein are in different positions in the two structures. The conformation of this loop is dictated by the different sequence position of the fourth coordinating zinc ligand. The Zn(II) ion is buried within the domain, consistent with its role in structural stability. Potential functions of this matrix-facing subunit are discussed.

  18. Synthesis, characterization, biological activity, DNA and BSA binding study: novel copper(ii) complexes with 2-hydroxy-4-aryl-4-oxo-2-butenoate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joksimović, Nenad; Baskić, Dejan; Popović, Suzana; Zarić, Milan; Kosanić, Marijana; Ranković, Branislav; Stanojković, Tatjana; Novaković, Sladjana B; Davidović, Goran; Bugarčić, Zorica; Janković, Nenad

    2016-09-27

    A serie of novel square pyramidal copper(ii) complexes [Cu(L) 2 H 2 O] (3a-d) with O,O-bidentate ligands [L = ethyl-2-hydroxy-4-aryl-4-oxo-2-butenoate; aryl = 3-methoxyphenyl-2a, (E)-2-phenylvinyl-2b, (E)-2-(4'-hydroxy-3'-methoxyphenyl)vinyl-2c, 3-nitrophenyl-2d, 2-thienyl-2e] were synthesized and characterized by spectral (UV-Vis, IR, ESI-MS and EPR), elemental and X-ray analysis. The antimicrobial activity was estimated by the determination of the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) using the broth microdilution method. The most active antibacterial compounds were 3c and 3d, while the best antifungal activity was showed by complexes 3b and 3e. The lowest MIC value (0.048 mg mL -1 ) was measured for 3c against Proteus mirabilis. The cytotoxic activity was tested using the MTT method on human epithelial carcinoma HeLa cells, human lung carcinoma A549 cells and human colon carcinoma LS174 cells. All complexes showed extremely better cytotoxic activity compared to cisplatin at all tested concentrations. Compound 3d expressed the best activity against all tested cell lines with IC 50 values ranging from 7.45 to 7.91 μg mL -1 . The type of cell death and the impact on the cell cycle for 3d and 3e were evaluated by flow cytometry. Both compounds induced apoptosis and S phase cell cycle arrest. The interactions between selected complexes (3d and 3e) and CT-DNA or bovine serum albumin (BSA) were investigated by the fluorescence spectroscopic method. Competitive experiments with ethidium bromide (EB) indicated that 3d and 3e have a propensity to displace EB from the EB-DNA complex through intercalation suggesting strong competition with EB [K sv = (1.4 ± 0.2) and (2.9 ± 0.1) × 10 4 M -1 , respectively]. K sv values indicate that these complexes bind to DNA covalently and non-covalently. The achieved results in the fluorescence titration of BSA with 3d and 3e [K a = (2.9 ± 0.2) × 10 6 and (2.5 ± 0.2) × 10 5 M, respectively] showed that the fluorescence quenching

  19. Biotype Characterization, Developmental Profiling, Insecticide Response and Binding Property of Bemisia tabaci Chemosensory Proteins: Role of CSP in Insect Defense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoxia Liu

    Full Text Available Chemosensory proteins (CSPs are believed to play a key role in the chemosensory process in insects. Sequencing genomic DNA and RNA encoding CSP1, CSP2 and CSP3 in the sweet potato whitefly Bemisia tabaci showed strong variation between B and Q biotypes. Analyzing CSP-RNA levels showed not only biotype, but also age and developmental stage-specific expression. Interestingly, applying neonicotinoid thiamethoxam insecticide using twenty-five different dose/time treatments in B and Q young adults showed that Bemisia CSP1, CSP2 and CSP3 were also differentially regulated over insecticide exposure. In our study one of the adult-specific gene (CSP1 was shown to be significantly up-regulated by the insecticide in Q, the most highly resistant form of B. tabaci. Correlatively, competitive binding assays using tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular docking demonstrated that CSP1 protein preferentially bound to linoleic acid, while CSP2 and CSP3 proteins rather associated to another completely different type of chemical, i.e. α-pentyl-cinnamaldehyde (jasminaldehyde. This might indicate that some CSPs in whiteflies are crucial to facilitate the transport of fatty acids thus regulating some metabolic pathways of the insect immune response, while some others are tuned to much more volatile chemicals known not only for their pleasant odor scent, but also for their potent toxic insecticide activity.

  20. Biotype Characterization, Developmental Profiling, Insecticide Response and Binding Property of Bemisia tabaci Chemosensory Proteins: Role of CSP in Insect Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guoxia; Ma, Hongmei; Xie, Hongyan; Xuan, Ning; Guo, Xia; Fan, Zhongxue; Rajashekar, Balaji; Arnaud, Philippe; Offmann, Bernard; Picimbon, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Chemosensory proteins (CSPs) are believed to play a key role in the chemosensory process in insects. Sequencing genomic DNA and RNA encoding CSP1, CSP2 and CSP3 in the sweet potato whitefly Bemisia tabaci showed strong variation between B and Q biotypes. Analyzing CSP-RNA levels showed not only biotype, but also age and developmental stage-specific expression. Interestingly, applying neonicotinoid thiamethoxam insecticide using twenty-five different dose/time treatments in B and Q young adults showed that Bemisia CSP1, CSP2 and CSP3 were also differentially regulated over insecticide exposure. In our study one of the adult-specific gene (CSP1) was shown to be significantly up-regulated by the insecticide in Q, the most highly resistant form of B. tabaci. Correlatively, competitive binding assays using tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular docking demonstrated that CSP1 protein preferentially bound to linoleic acid, while CSP2 and CSP3 proteins rather associated to another completely different type of chemical, i.e. α-pentyl-cinnamaldehyde (jasminaldehyde). This might indicate that some CSPs in whiteflies are crucial to facilitate the transport of fatty acids thus regulating some metabolic pathways of the insect immune response, while some others are tuned to much more volatile chemicals known not only for their pleasant odor scent, but also for their potent toxic insecticide activity. PMID:27167733

  1. Characterizing and measuring endocytosis of lipid-binding effectors in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Helen R; Hayes, Tristan A; Kale, Shiv D

    2014-01-01

    Pathogen-host interactions are mediated in part by secreted microbial proteins capable of exploiting host cells for their survival. Several of these manipulations involve, but are not limited to, suppression of defense responses, alterations in host vesicular trafficking, and manipulation of gene expression. The delivery of such molecules from microbe to host has been of intense interest in several microbe-host systems. Several well-studied bacterial effectors are delivered directly into host cells through a needle injection apparatus. Conversely, there have been several examples of secreted effectors and protein toxins from bacteria and eukaryotic microbes, such as fungi and oomycetes, being internalized into host cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis. In the following chapter, we discuss various techniques utilized to measure these endocytosed lipid-binding effectors that can be delivered in the absence of the pathogen. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Discovery and characterization of surface binding sites in polysaccharide converting enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilkens, Casper

    Enzymes that act on various polysaccharides are widespread in any domain of life and they play a role in degradation, modification, and synthesis of carbohydrates. These carbohydrate active enzymes interact with their substrate (the polysaccharide) at the active site and often at so called subsites...... polysaccharide binding interactions to also occur at a distance from the active site. AnAbf62A-m2,3’s preferred substrate is wheat arabinoxylan having kcat and KM of 178 ± 26 s-1 and 4.90 ± 0.91 mg ml-1, respectively. While AnAbf62A-m2,3 from singly substituted xylose releases 1,2-linked at threefold higher rate...

  3. Proto-oncogene FBI-1 (Pokemon/ZBTB7A) Represses Transcription of the Tumor Suppressor Rb Gene via Binding Competition with Sp1 and Recruitment of Co-repressors*S⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Bu-Nam; Yoo, Jung-Yoon; Choi, Won-Il; Lee, Choong-Eun; Yoon, Ho-Geun; Hur, Man-Wook

    2008-01-01

    FBI-1 (also called Pokemon/ZBTB7A) is a BTB/POZ-domain Krüppel-like zinc-finger transcription factor. Recently, FBI-1 was characterized as a proto-oncogenic protein, which represses tumor suppressor ARF gene transcription. The expression of FBI-1 is increased in many cancer tissues. We found that FBI-1 potently represses transcription of the Rb gene, a tumor suppressor gene important in cell cycle arrest. FBI-1 binds to four GC-rich promoter elements (FREs) located at bp –308 to –188 of the Rb promoter region. The Rb promoter also contains two Sp1 binding sites: GC-box 1 (bp –65 to –56) and GC-box 2 (bp –18 to –9), the latter of which is also bound by FBI-1. We found that FRE3 (bp –244 to –236) is also a Sp1 binding element. FBI-1 represses transcription of the Rb gene not only by binding to the FREs, but also by competing with Sp1 at the GC-box 2 and the FRE3. By binding to the FREs and/or the GC-box, FBI-1 represses transcription of the Rb gene through its POZ-domain, which recruits a co-repressor-histone deacetylase complex and deacetylates histones H3 and H4 at the Rb gene promoter. FBI-1 inhibits C2C12 myoblast cell differentiation by repressing Rb gene expression. PMID:18801742

  4. Characterization of Annexin V Fusion with the Superfolder GFP in Liposomes Binding and Apoptosis Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Qader Abbady

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Programed cell death is a critical and unavoidable part of life. One of the most widely used markers for dying cells, by apoptosis or pyroptosis, is the redistribution of phosphatidylserine (PS from the inner to the outer plasma membrane leaflet. Annexin V protein is a sensitive and specific probe to mark this event because of its high affinity to the exposed PS. Beyond that, annexin V can bind to any PS-containing phospholipid bilayer of almost all tiny forms of membranous vesicles like blood platelets, exosomes, or even nanostructured liposomes. In this work, recombinant human annexin V was produced as a fusion with a highly fluorescent superfolder derivative of the green fluorescent protein (sfGFP in Escherichia coli. The fusion protein(sfGFP-ANXV, 64 kDa, annexin V (ANXV, 40 kDa, and sfGFP (27 kDa were separately produced after cloning their encoding genes in pRSET plasmid, and all proteins were expressed in a soluble form, then purified in high yields because of their N-terminal 6× His tag (~150 mg of pure protein per 1 L culture. Superiority of this fluorescent fusion protein over fluorescein-conjugated annexin V was demonstrated in binding to phospholipids (and their liposomes, prepared from natural sources (soya bean and egg yolk that have different content of PS, by using different methods including ELISA, dot-blotting, surface plasmon resonance, and flow cytometry. We also applied fluorescent annexin V in the detection of apoptotic cells by flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy. Interestingly, sfGFP-ANXV fusion was more sensitive to early apoptotic stressed HeLa cells than fluorescein-conjugated-ANXV. This highly expressed and functional sfGFP-ANXV fusion protein provides a promising ready-to-use molecular tool for quantifying liposomes (or similarly exosomes and detecting apoptosis in cells.

  5. Crystallization and preliminary characterization of a novel haem-binding protein of Streptomyces reticuli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Peijian [EMBL Outstation Hamburg, c/o DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Institute of Structural Biology, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Groves, Matthew R. [EMBL Outstation Hamburg, c/o DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Viale-Bouroncle, Sandra D.; Ortiz de Orué Lucana, Darío, E-mail: ortiz@biologie.uni-osnabrueck.de [Universität Osnabrück, FB Biologie/Chemie, Angewandte Genetik der Mikroorganismen, Barbarastrasse 13, 49069 Osnabrück (Germany); EMBL Outstation Hamburg, c/o DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2008-05-01

    The haem-binding protein HbpS from Streptomyces reticuli was crystallized and diffraction data were collected to a maximal resolution of 2.25 Å. Streptomyces reticuli is a soil-growing Gram-positive bacteria that has been shown to secrete a novel haem-binding protein known as HbpS. Sequence analysis reveals that homologues of HbpS are found in a wide variety of bacteria, including different Actinobacteria and the Gram-negative Vibrio cholera and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The in vivo production of HbpS is greatly increased when S. reticuli is cultured in the presence of the natural antibiotic haemin (Fe{sup 3+} oxidized form of haem). Mutational analysis demonstrated that HbpS significantly increases the resistance of S. reticuli to toxic concentrations of haemin. Previous data show that the presence of the newly identified two-component sensor system SenS–SenR also considerably enhances the resistance of S. reticuli to haemin and the redox-cycling compound plumbagin, suggesting a role in the sensing of redox changes. Specific interaction between HbpS and SenS–SenR, which regulates the expression of the catalase–peroxidase CpeB, as well as HbpS, has been demonstrated in vitro. HbpS has been recombinantly overexpressed, purified and crystallized in space group P2{sub 1}3, with a cell edge of 152.5 Å. Diffraction data were recorded to a maximal resolution of 2.25 Å and phases were obtained using the SAD method from crystals briefly soaked in high concentrations of sodium bromide.

  6. Characterization of VCAM-1-binding peptide-functionalized quantum dots for molecular imaging of inflamed endothelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Chen

    Full Text Available Inflammation-induced activation of endothelium constitutes one of the earliest changes during atherogenesis. New imaging techniques that allow detecting activated endothelial cells can improve the identification of persons at high cardiovascular risk in early stages. Quantum dots (QDs have attractive optical properties such as bright fluorescence and high photostability, and have been increasingly studied and developed for bio-imaging and bio-targeting applications. We report here the development of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 binding peptide (VCAM-1 binding peptide functionalized QDs (VQDs from amino QDs. It was found that the QD fluorescence signal in tumor necrosis factor [Formula: see text] (TNF-[Formula: see text] treated endothelial cells in vitro was significantly higher when these cells were labeled with VQDs than amino QDs. The VQD labeling of TNF-[Formula: see text]-treated endothelial cells was VCAM-1 specific since pre-incubation with recombinant VCAM-1 blocked cells' uptake of VQDs. Our ex vivo and in vivo experiments showed that in the inflamed endothelium, QD fluorescence signal from VQDs was also much stronger than that of amino QDs. Moreover, we observed that the QD fluorescence peak was significantly blue-shifted after VQDs interacted with aortic endothelial cells in vivo and in vitro. A similar blue-shift was observed after VQDs were incubated with recombinant VCAM-1 in tube. We anticipate that the specific interaction between VQDs and VCAM-1 and the blue-shift of the QD fluorescence peak can be very useful for VCAM-1 detection in vivo.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of low viscosity carbon dioxide binding organic liquids for flue gas clean up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koech, Phillip K.; Malhotra, Deepika; Heldebrant, David J.; Cantu Cantu, David; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Rousseau, Roger J.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is partly attributed to global anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emission to the atmosphere. These environmental effects can be mitigated by CO2 capture, utilization and storage. Alkanolamine solvents, such as monoethanolamine (MEA), which bind CO2 as carbamates or bicarbonate salts are used for CO2 capture in niche applications. These solvents consist of approximately 30 wt% of MEA in water, exhibiting a low, CO2-rich viscosity, fast kinetics and favorable thermodynamics. However, these solvents have low CO2 capacity and high heat capacity of water, resulting in prohibitively high costs of thermal solvent regeneration. Effective capture of the enormous amounts of CO2 produced by coal-fired plants requires a material with high CO2 capacity and low regeneration energy requirements. To this end, several water-lean transformational solvents systems have been developed in order to reduce these energy penalties. These technologies include nano-material organic hybrids (NOHMs), task-specific, protic and conventional ionic liquids, phase change solvents. As part of an ongoing program in our group, we have developed new water lean transformational solvents known as CO2 binding organic liquids (CO2BOLs) which have the potential to be energy efficient CO2 capture solvents. These solvents, also known as switchable ionic liquids meaning, are organic solvents that can reversibly transform from non- ionic to ionic form and back. The zwitterionic state in these liquids is formed when low polarity non-ionic alkanolguanidines or alkanolamidines react with CO2 or SO2 to form ionic liquids with high polarity. These polar ionic liquids can be thermally converted to the less polar non-ionic solvent by releasing CO2.

  8. Discovery and Characterization of a Potent Interleukin-6 Binding Peptide with Neutralizing Activity In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Ranganath

    Full Text Available Interleukin-6 (IL-6 is an important member of the cytokine superfamily, exerting pleiotropic actions on many physiological processes. Over-production of IL-6 is a hallmark of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases such as Castleman's Disease (CD and rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Antagonism of the interleukin IL-6/IL-6 receptor (IL-6R/gp130 signaling complex continues to show promise as a therapeutic target. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs directed against components of this complex have been approved as therapeutics for both CD and RA. To potentially provide an additional modality to antagonize IL-6 induced pathophysiology, a peptide-based antagonist approach was undertaken. Using a combination of molecular design, phage-display, and medicinal chemistry, disulfide-rich peptides (DRPs directed against IL-6 were developed with low nanomolar potency in inhibiting IL-6-induced pSTAT3 in U937 monocytic cells. Targeted PEGylation of IL-6 binding peptides resulted in molecules that retained their potency against IL-6 and had a prolongation of their pharmacokinetic (PK profiles in rodents and monkeys. One such peptide, PN-2921, contained a 40 kDa polyethylene glycol (PEG moiety and inhibited IL-6-induced pSTAT3 in U937 cells with sub-nM potency and possessed 23, 36, and 59 h PK half-life values in mice, rats, and cynomolgus monkeys, respectively. Parenteral administration of PN-2921 to mice and cynomolgus monkeys potently inhibited IL-6-induced biomarker responses, with significant reductions in the acute inflammatory phase proteins, serum amyloid A (SAA and C-reactive protein (CRP. This potent, PEGylated IL-6 binding peptide offers a new approach to antagonize IL-6-induced signaling and associated pathophysiology.

  9. Characterization of Annexin V Fusion with the Superfolder GFP in Liposomes Binding and Apoptosis Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbady, Abdul Qader; Twair, Aya; Ali, Bouthaina; Murad, Hossam

    2017-01-01

    Programed cell death is a critical and unavoidable part of life. One of the most widely used markers for dying cells, by apoptosis or pyroptosis, is the redistribution of phosphatidylserine (PS) from the inner to the outer plasma membrane leaflet. Annexin V protein is a sensitive and specific probe to mark this event because of its high affinity to the exposed PS. Beyond that, annexin V can bind to any PS-containing phospholipid bilayer of almost all tiny forms of membranous vesicles like blood platelets, exosomes, or even nanostructured liposomes. In this work, recombinant human annexin V was produced as a fusion with a highly fluorescent superfolder derivative of the green fluorescent protein (sfGFP) in Escherichia coli. The fusion protein(sfGFP-ANXV, 64 kDa), annexin V (ANXV, 40 kDa), and sfGFP (27 kDa) were separately produced after cloning their encoding genes in pRSET plasmid, and all proteins were expressed in a soluble form, then purified in high yields because of their N-terminal 6× His tag (~150 mg of pure protein per 1 L culture). Superiority of this fluorescent fusion protein over fluorescein-conjugated annexin V was demonstrated in binding to phospholipids (and their liposomes), prepared from natural sources (soya bean and egg yolk) that have different content of PS, by using different methods including ELISA, dot-blotting, surface plasmon resonance, and flow cytometry. We also applied fluorescent annexin V in the detection of apoptotic cells by flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy. Interestingly, sfGFP-ANXV fusion was more sensitive to early apoptotic stressed HeLa cells than fluorescein-conjugated-ANXV. This highly expressed and functional sfGFP-ANXV fusion protein provides a promising ready-to-use molecular tool for quantifying liposomes (or similarly exosomes) and detecting apoptosis in cells.

  10. Characterization of Δ7/11, a functional prolactin-binding protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, JM; Ginsburg, E; McAndrew, CW; Heger, CD; Cheston, L; Rodriguez-Canales, J; Vonderhaar, BK; Goldsmith, P

    2012-01-01

    Prolactin is essential for normal mammary gland development and differentiation, and has been shown to promote tumor cell proliferation and chemotherapeutic resistance. Soluble isoforms of the prolactin receptor have been reported to regulate prolactin bioavailability by functioning as “prolactin binding proteins.” Included in this category is Δ7/11, a product of alternate splicing of the prolactin receptor primary transcript. However, the direct interactions of prolactin withΔ7/11, and the resulting effect on cell behavior, have not been investigated. Herein, we demonstrate the ability of Δ7/11 to bind prolactin using a novel proximity ligation assay and traditional immunoprecipitation techniques. Biochemical analyses demonstrated that Δ7/11 was heavily glycosylated, similar to the extracellular domain of the primary prolactin receptor, and that glycosylation regulated the cellular localization and secretion of Δ7/11. Low levels of Δ7/11 were detected in serum samples of healthy volunteers, but were undetectable in human milk samples. Expression of Δ7/11 was also detected in six of the 62 primary breast tumor biopsies analyzed; however, no correlation was found with Δ7/11 expression and tumor histotype or other patient demographics. Functional analysis demonstrated the ability of Δ7/11 to inhibit prolactin-induced cell proliferation as well as alter prolactin-induced rescue of cell cycle arrest/early senescence events in breast epithelial cells. Collectively, these data demonstrate that Δ7/11 is a novel regulatory mechanism of prolactin bioavailability and signaling. PMID:23048206

  11. Characterization of binding specificities of bovine leucocyte class I molecules: impacts for rational epitope discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Andreas M.; Rasmussen, Michael; Svitek, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    . Using this strategy, we characterized eight BoLA-I molecules, and found the peptide specificity to resemble that of human MHC-I molecules with primary anchors most often at P2 and P9, and occasional auxiliary P1/P3/P5/P6 anchors. We analyzed nine reported CTL epitopes from Theileria parva, and in eight...

  12. Characterization of a benzyl-phenoxy-ethanamine binding protein in Trypanosoma equiperdum and the possible relation between binding affinity and trypanocidal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betbeder, D; Perie, J J; Baltz, T; Poirot, M; Faye, J C

    1993-04-01

    A new family of benzyl-phenoxy-ethanamine derivatives has been assayed for trypanocidal activity. Using tritiated morpholino-benzyl-phenoxy-ethanamine as a probe, it is shown that this ligand is able to bind specifically to a protein contained in extracts of Trypanosoma equiperdum. The binding is saturable and of high affinity (KD = 4 nM: Bmax = 200 fmol (mg protein)-1). The in vitro activities of the investigated compounds against this parasite correlate with their affinities to the putative binding site. Moreover, using an azido functionalized morpholino-benzyl-phenoxyethanamine as photoprobe a major M(r) = 40,000 protein was specifically revealed by sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This molecular weight corresponds with the previously observed value determined for the antioestrogen binding site protein of rat liver which has been shown to specifically bind antioestrogens of the triphenylethylene family and phenoxyethanamine derivatives.

  13. Characterization of a Plasmodium falciparum Orthologue of the Yeast Ubiquinone-Binding Protein, Coq10p.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethany J Jenkins

    Full Text Available Coenzyme Q (CoQ, ubiquinone is a central electron carrier in mitochondrial respiration. CoQ is synthesized through multiple steps involving a number of different enzymes. The prevailing view that the CoQ used in respiration exists as a free pool that diffuses throughout the mitochondrial inner membrane bilayer has recently been challenged. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, deletion of the gene encoding Coq10p results in respiration deficiency without inhibiting the synthesis of CoQ, suggesting that the Coq10 protein is critical for the delivery of CoQ to the site(s of respiration. The precise mechanism by which this is achieved remains unknown at present. We have identified a Plasmodium orthologue of Coq10 (PfCoq10, which is predominantly expressed in trophozoite-stage parasites, and localizes to the parasite mitochondrion. Expression of PfCoq10 in the S. cerevisiae coq10 deletion strain restored the capability of the yeast to grow on respiratory substrates, suggesting a remarkable functional conservation of this protein over a vast evolutionary distance, and despite a relatively low level of amino acid sequence identity. As the antimalarial drug atovaquone acts as a competitive inhibitor of CoQ, we assessed whether over-expression of PfCoq10 altered the atovaquone sensitivity in parasites and in yeast mitochondria, but found no alteration of its activity.

  14. Characterization of Metal Binding in the Active Sites of acireductone dioxygenase Isoforms from Klebsiella ATCC 8724

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S Chai; T Ju; M Dang; R Goldsmith; M Maroney; T Pochapsky

    2011-12-31

    The two acireductone dioxygenase (ARD) isozymes from the methionine salvage pathway of Klebsiella ATCC 8724 present an unusual case in which two enzymes with different structures and distinct activities toward their common substrates (1,2-dihydroxy-3-oxo-5-(methylthio)pent-1-ene and dioxygen) are derived from the same polypeptide chain. Structural and functional differences between the two isozymes are determined by the type of M{sup 2+} metal ion bound in the active site. The Ni{sup 2+}-bound NiARD catalyzes an off-pathway shunt from the methionine salvage pathway leading to the production of formate, methylthiopropionate, and carbon monoxide, while the Fe{sup 2+}-bound FeARD catalyzes the on-pathway formation of methionine precursor 2-keto-4-methylthiobutyrate and formate. Four potential protein-based metal ligands were identified by sequence homology and structural considerations. Based on the results of site-directed mutagenesis experiments, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and isothermal calorimetry measurements, it is concluded that the same four residues, His96, His98, Glu102 and His140, provide the protein-based ligands for the metal in both the Ni- and Fe-containing forms of the enzyme, and subtle differences in the local backbone conformations trigger the observed structural and functional differences between the FeARD and NiARD isozymes. Furthermore, both forms of the enzyme bind their respective metals with pseudo-octahedral geometry, and both may lose a histidine ligand upon binding of substrate under anaerobic conditions. However, mutations at two conserved nonligand acidic residues, Glu95 and Glu100, result in low metal contents for the mutant proteins as isolated, suggesting that some of the conserved charged residues may aid in transfer of metal from in vivo sources or prevent the loss of metal to stronger chelators. The Glu100 mutant reconstitutes readily but has low activity. Mutation of Asp101 results in an active enzyme that incorporates

  15. Characterization of Thermobifida fusca Cutinase-Carbohydrate-Binding Module Fusion Proteins and Their Potential Application in Bioscouring▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yao; Chen, Sheng; Xu, Meng; Cavoco-Paulo, Artur; Wu, Jing; Chen, Jian

    2010-01-01

    Cutinase from Thermobifida fusca is thermally stable and has potential application in the bioscouring of cotton in the textile industry. In the present study, the carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) from T. fusca cellulase Cel6A (CBMCel6A) and Cellulomonas fimi cellulase CenA (CBMCenA) were fused, separately, to the carboxyl terminus of T. fusca cutinase. Both fusion enzymes, cutinase-CBMCel6A and cutinase-CBMCenA, were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Enzyme characterization showed that both displayed similar catalytic properties and pH stabilities in response to T. fusca cutinase. In addition, both fusion proteins displayed an activity half-life of 53 h at their optimal temperature of 50°C. Compared to T. fusca cutinase, in the absence of pectinase, the binding activity on cotton fiber was enhanced by 2% for cutinase-CBMCel6A and by 28% for cutinase-CBMCenA, whereas in the presence of pectinase, the binding activity was enhanced by 40% for the former and 45% for the latter. Notably, a dramatic increase of up to 3-fold was observed in the amount of released fatty acids from cotton fiber by both cutinase-CBM fusion proteins when acting in concert with pectinase. This is the first report of improving the scouring efficiency of cutinase by fusing it with CBM. The improvement in activity and the strong synergistic effect between the fusion proteins and pectinase suggest that they may have better applications in textile bioscouring than the native cutinase. PMID:20729325

  16. High Affinity Binders to EphA2 Isolated from Abdurin Scaffold Libraries; Characterization, Binding and Tumor Targeting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Ullman

    Full Text Available Abdurins are a novel antibody-like scaffold derived from the engineering of a single isolated CH2 domain of human IgG. Previous studies established the prolonged serum half-life of Abdurins, the result of a retained FcRn binding motif. Here we present data on the construction of large, diverse, phage-display and cell-free DNA display libraries and the isolation of high affinity binders to the cancer target, membrane-bound ephrin receptor tyrosine kinase class A2 (EphA2. Antigen binding regions were created by designing combinatorial libraries into the structural loops and Abdurins were selected using phage display methods. Initial binders were reformatted into new maturation libraries and low nanomolar binders were isolated using cell-free DNA display, CIS display. Further characterization confirmed binding of the Abdurins to both human and murine EphA2 proteins and exclusively to cell lines that expressed EphA2, followed by rapid internalization. Two different EphA2 binders were labeled with 64Cu, using a bifunctional MeCOSar chelator, and administered to mice bearing tumors from transplanted human prostate cancer cells, followed by PET/CT imaging. The anti-EphA2 Abdurins localized in the tumors as early as 4 hours after injection and continued to accumulate up to 48 hours when the imaging was completed. These data demonstrate the ability to isolate high affinity binders from the engineered Abdurin scaffold, which retain a long serum half-life, and specifically target tumors in a xenograft model.

  17. Molecular characterization of senescence marker protein-30 gene promoter: Identification of repressor elements and functional nuclear factor binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maruyama Naoki

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Senescence marker protein-30 (SMP30, whose expression declines during aging in rat liver, has been proposed as an important aging marker. Besides apoptosis, SMP30 also protects cells against various other injuries by enhancement of membrane calcium-pump activity. The mechanism of this differential gene expression mechanism is not known. DNA-protein interactions, mutation analysis and luciferase reporter assay studies have been performed to elucidate the mechanism of transcriptional regulation of SMP30 gene. Results We have characterized up to -2750 bp of the promoter by DNA-protein interactions studies. Twenty eight transcription factor binding sites have been identified by DNase I footprinting and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA. Transient transfection of 5' and 3' -deleted promoter-reporter constructs and luciferase assay illustrated the region between -128/+157 bp is sufficient to drive promoter activity. We have mapped an essential regulatory region between -513 to -352 bp which causes a drastic decline of reporter activity. This region contains CdxA, GATA2 and SRY transcription factor binding sites. Individual mutation of these three sites showed increase in reporter activity. Mutation in SRY site (-403/-368 showed maximum increase in reporter activity among these three sites. Therefore, we suggest that SRY like protein may be acting as a strong repressor of SMP30 gene along with CdxA and GATA-2. We also report that mutation of both Sp1 (172/-148 bp and a C/EBPβ (-190/-177 bp transcription binding site located adjacent to each other on SMP30 gene promoter, causes a significant enhancement in reporter activity than individual mutation, thus may be causing the repression of SMP30 promoter activity. Conclusion These studies provide novel insights into the mechanism that regulate SMP30 gene expression.

  18. Characterization of exceptionally thermostable single-stranded DNA-binding proteins from Thermotoga maritima and Thermotoga neapolitana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mickiewicz Małgorzata

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in SSBs because they find numerous applications in diverse molecular biology and analytical methods. Results We report the characterization of single-stranded DNA binding proteins (SSBs from the thermophilic bacteria Thermotoga maritima (TmaSSB and Thermotoga neapolitana (TneSSB. They are the smallest known bacterial SSB proteins, consisting of 141 and 142 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 16.30 and 16.58 kDa, respectively. The similarity between amino acid sequences of these proteins is very high: 90% identity and 95% similarity. Surprisingly, both TmaSSB and TneSSB possess a quite low sequence similarity to Escherichia coli SSB (36 and 35% identity, 55 and 56% similarity, respectively. They are functional as homotetramers containing one single-stranded DNA binding domain (OB-fold in each monomer. Agarose mobility assays indicated that the ssDNA-binding site for both proteins is salt independent, and fluorescence spectroscopy resulted in a size of 68 ± 2 nucleotides. The half-lives of TmaSSB and TneSSB were 10 h and 12 h at 100°C, respectively. When analysed by differential scanning microcalorimetry (DSC the melting temperature (Tm was 109.3°C and 112.5°C for TmaSSB and TneSSB, respectively. Conclusion The results showed that TmaSSB and TneSSB are the most thermostable SSB proteins identified to date, offering an attractive alternative to TaqSSB and TthSSB in molecular biology applications, especially with using high temperature e. g. polymerase chain reaction (PCR.

  19. Pomegranate ( Punica granatum L.) expresses several nsLTP isoforms characterized by different immunoglobulin E-binding properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolla, Michela; Zenoni, Sara; Scheurer, Stephan; Vieths, Stefan; San Miguel Moncin, Maria Del Mar; Olivieri, Mario; Antico, Andrea; Ferrer, Marta; Berroa, Felicia; Enrique, Ernesto; Avesani, Linda; Marsano, Francesco; Zoccatelli, Gianni

    2014-01-01

    Pomegranate allergy is associated with sensitization to non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs). Our aim was to identify and characterize the non-specific nsLTPs expressed in pomegranate at the molecular level and to study their allergenic properties in terms of immunoglobulin E (IgE)-binding and cross-reactivity with peach nsLTP (Pru p 3). A non-equilibrium two-dimensional (2-D) electrophoretic approach based on acid-urea PAGE and sodium dodecyl sulfate PAGE was set up to separate pomegranate nsLTPs. Their immunoreactivity was tested by immunoblotting carried out with anti-Pru p 3 polyclonal antibodies and sera from pomegranate-allergic patients. For final identification, pomegranate nsLTPs were purified by chromatography and subjected to trypsin digestion and mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. For this purpose, the sequences obtained by cDNA cloning of three pomegranate nsLTPs were integrated in the database that was subsequently searched for MS data interpretation. Four nsLTPs were identified by 2-D immunoblotting. The detected proteins showed different IgE-binding capacity and partial cross-reactivity with Pru p 3. cDNA cloning and MS analyses led to the identification of three nsLTP isoforms with 66-68% amino acid sequence identity named Pun g 1.0101, Pun g 1.0201 and Pun g 1.0301. By 2-D electrophoresis, we could separate different nsLTP isoforms possessing different IgE-binding properties, which might reflect peculiar allergenic potencies. The contribution of Pru p 3 to prime sensitization is not central as in other plant nsLTPs. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Production and characterization of polyclonal and monoclonal Abs against the RNA-binding protein QKI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Huang, Bo; Yu, Fang; Wei, Mengying; Yang, Guodong; Fu, Haiyan; Jin, Liang; Bai, Liyuan; He, Xianli; Lu, Zifan

    2011-06-01

    RNA-binding protein QKI, a member of the Signal Transduction and Activation of RNA family, is found to be essential in the blood vessel development and postnatal myelination in central nervous system (Woo et al., Oncogene 28:1176-1186, 2009; Lu et al., Nucleic Acids Res 31(15):4616-4624, 2003; Bohnsack et al., Genesis 44(2):93-104, 2006). However, its wide expression pattern suggests other fundamental roles in vivo (Kondo et al., Mamm Genome 10(7):662-669, 1999). To facilitate the understanding of QKI function in various systems, we prepared the polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies against QKI. To obtain the antigen, recombinant His-tagged QKI was expressed in Escherichia coli and highly purified by Ni(2+)-chelated column combined with hydrophobic and ion exchange methods. Following three types of immunizations with different adjuvants, including Freund's, PAGE gel, and nitrocellulose membrane, only the antiserum produced with Freund's adjuvant is effective for Western blot detection. Several McAb clones are able to recognize both endogenous and over-expressed QKI with high affinity in Western blot and immunofluorescence. The specificity of Ab was validated as weakening, and no specific signals were observed in cells with QKI knocking down. Immunohistochemistry analysis further showed positive staining of QKI in kidney where QKI mRNA was abundantly expressed, ensuring the wide applications of the QKI Abs in the ongoing mechanistic studies.

  1. Characterization of atrazine binding to dissolved organic matter of soil under different types of land use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Long-Ji; Zhao, Yue; Chen, Yan-Ni; Cui, Hong-Yang; Wei, Yu-Quan; Liu, Hai-Long; Chen, Xiao-Meng; Wei, Zi-Min

    2018-01-01

    Atrazine is widely used in agriculture. In this study, dissolved organic matter (DOM) from soils under four types of land use (forest (F), meadow (M), cropland (C) and wetland (W)) was used to investigate the binding characteristics of atrazine. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix-parallel factor (EEM-PARAFAC) analysis, two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS) and Stern-Volmer model were combined to explore the complexation between DOM and atrazine. The EEM-PARAFAC indicated that DOM from different sources had different structures, and humic-like components had more obvious quenching effects than protein-like components. The Stern-Volmer model combined with correlation analysis showed that log K values of PARAFAC components had a significant correlation with the humification of DOM, especially for C3 component, and they were all in the same order as follows: meadow soil (5.68)>wetland soil (5.44)>cropland soil (5.35)>forest soil (5.04). The 2D-COS further confirmed that humic-like components firstly combined with atrazine followed by protein-like components. These findings suggest that DOM components can significantly influence the bioavailability, mobility and migration of atrazine in different land uses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Generation and characterization of conditional heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor knockout mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Oyagi

    Full Text Available Recently, neurotrophic factors and cytokines have been shown to be associated in psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and depression. Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF is a member of the EGF family, serves as a neurotrophic molecular and plays a significant role in the brain. We generated mice in which HB-EGF activity is disrupted specifically in the ventral forebrain. These knockout mice showed (a behavioral abnormalities similar to those described in psychiatric disorders, which were ameliorated by typical or atypical antipsychotics, (b altered dopamine and serotonin levels in the brain, (c decreases in spine density in neurons of the prefrontal cortex, (d reductions in the protein levels of the NR1 subunit of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor and post-synaptic protein-95 (PSD-95, (e decreases in the EGF receptor, and in the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II signal cascade. These results suggest the alterations affecting HB-EGF signaling could comprise a contributing factor in psychiatric disorder.

  3. Characterization of Spbhp-37, a haemoglobin-binding protein of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Elena eRomero-Espejel

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is a Gram-positive microorganism that is the cause of bacterial pneumonia, sinusitis and otitis media. This human pathogen also can cause invasive diseases such as meningitis, bacteremia and septicemia. Haemoglobin (Hb and haem can support the growth and viability of S. pneumoniae as sole iron sources. Unfortunately, the acquisition mechanism of Hb and haem in this bacterium has been poorly studied. Previously we identified two proteins of 37 and 22 kDa as putative Hb- and haem-binding proteins (Spbhp-37 and Spbhp-22, respectively. The sequence of Spbhp-37 protein was database annotated as lipoprotein without any function or localization. Here it was immunolocalized in the surface cell by transmission electron microscopy using specific antibodies produced against the recombinant protein. The expression of Spbhp-37 was increased when bacteria were grown in media culture supplied with Hb. In addition, the affinity of Sphbp-37 for Hb was determined. Thus, in this work we are presenting new findings that attempt to explain the mechanism involved in iron acquisition of this pathogen. In the future these results could help to develop new therapy targets in order to avoid the secondary effects caused by the traditional therapies.

  4. Synthesis, structural characterization, cytotoxic properties and DNA binding of a dinuclear copper(II) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, B J M Leite; Brandão, P; Meireles, M; Martel, Fátima; Correia-Branco, Ana; Fernandes, Diana M; Santos, T M; Félix, V

    2016-08-01

    In this study a novel dinuclear copper(II) complex with adenine and phenanthroline has been synthesized and its structure determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. In the dinuclear complex [Cu₂(μ-adenine)₂(phen)₂(H2O)2](NO3)4·0.5H2O (phen=1,10-phenanthroline) (1) the two Cu(II) centres exhibit a distorted square pyramidal coordination geometry linked by two nitrogen donors from adenine bridges leading to a Cu-Cu distance of 3.242(3)Å. Intramolecular and intermolecular π⋯π interactions as well as an H-bonding network were observed. The antitumor capacity of the complex has been tested in vitro against human cancer cell lines, cervical carcinoma (HeLa) and colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2), by metabolic tests, using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide as reagent. The complex 1 has remarkable low IC50 values of 0.87±0.06μM (HeLa) and 0.44±0.06μM (Caco-2), when compared with values for cisplatin against the same cell lines. The interaction of complex 1 with calf thymus DNA (CT DNA) was further investigated by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic methods. A binding constant of 5.09×10(5)M(-1) was obtained from UV-vis absorption studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of duck nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huilin; Jin, Hui; Li, Yaqian; Liu, Dejian; Foda, Mohamed Frahat; Jiang, Yunbo; Luo, Rui

    2017-09-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1) is an imperative cytoplasmic pattern recognition receptor (PRR) and considered as a key member of the NOD-like receptor (NLR) family which plays a critical role in innate immunity through sensing microbial components derived from bacterial peptidoglycan. In the current study, the full-length of duck NOD1 (duNOD1) cDNA from duck embryo fibroblasts (DEFs) was cloned. Multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that duNOD1 exhibited a strong evolutionary relationship with chicken and rock pigeon NOD1. Tissue-specific expression analysis showed that duNOD1 was widely distributed in various organs, with the highest expression observed in the liver. Furthermore, duNOD1 overexpression induced NF-κB activation in DEFs and the CARD domain is crucial for duNOD1-mediated NF-κB activation. In addition, silencing the duNOD1 decreased the activity of NF-κB in DEFs stimulated by iE-DAP. Overexpression of duNOD1 significantly increased the expression of TNF-α, IL-6, and RANTES in DEFs. These findings highlight the crucial role of duNOD1 as an intracellular sensor in duck innate immune system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Molecular characterization of a genetic variant of the steroid hormone-binding globulin gene in heterozygous subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, D.O.; Catterall, J.F. [Population Council, New York, NY (United States); Carino, C. [Instituto National de la Nutricion, Mexico City, MX (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-01

    Steroid hormone-binding globulin in human serum displays different isoelectric focusing (IEF) patterns among individuals, suggesting genetic variation in the gene for this extracellular steroid carrier protein. Analysis of allele frequencies and family studies suggested the existence of two codominant alleles of the gene. Subsequent determination of the molecular basis of a variant of the gene was carried out using DNA from homozygous individuals from a single Belgian family. It was of interest to characterize other variant individuals to determine whether all variants identified by IEF phenotyping were caused by the same mutation or whether other mutations occurred in the gene in different populations. Previous studies identified Mexican subjects who were heterozygous for the variant IEF phenotype. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was used to localize the mutation in these subjects and to purify the variant allele for DNA sequence analysis. The results show that the mutation in this population is identical to that identified in the Belgian family, and no other mutations were detected in the gene. These data represent the first analysis of steroid hormone-binding globulin gene variation in heterozygous subjects and further support the conclusion of biallelism of the gene worldwide. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Synthesis, characterization, DNA-Binding, enzyme inhibition and antioxidant studies of new N-methylated derivatives of pyridinium amine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Muhammad Naveed; Perveen, Fouzia; Nazar, Muhammad Faizan; Mughal, Ehsan Ullah; Rafique, Humera; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Akbar, Muhammad Sharif; Zahra, Sabeen

    2017-06-01

    A series of novel N-methylated derivatives of pyridinium amine, [L1][Tf]-[L5][Tf], were synthesized and characterized by FTIR, NMR, MS and XRD analyses. Preliminary biological screening of these compounds including antioxidant, enzyme inhibition and DNA (salmon sperm) interaction studies were also carried out. The targeted compounds were synthesized by a melt reaction between 4-chloro-N-methyl pyridinium triflate and corresponding amines (1-naphthyl amine, o-ansidine, 2-nitroaniline, p-ansidine and cyclohexyl amine) at temperature of 230 °C. The DPPH radical antioxidant scavenging activities of these compounds at maximum concentration of 50 μg/mL were observed in the range of 60-70%. Acetylcholine esterase (AChE) and Butylcholine esterase (BChE) inhibitory activities of synthesized compounds at 2 mM concentration were also measured to be at maximum of 79 and 71% respectively. The spectral behavior of ligand-DNA obtained from photo-luminescent measurements showed that all ligands bind with DNA via non-covalent interactions. The binding constant values were determined by UV-visible and fluorescence spectroscopy and were quite close to that obtained from molecular docking studies.

  8. Application of Lectin Array Technology for Biobetter Characterization: Its Correlation with FcγRIII Binding and ADCC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roucka, Markus; Zimmermann, Klaus; Fido, Markus; Nechansky, Andreas

    2016-12-24

    Lectin microarray technology was applied to compare the glycosylation pattern of the monoclonal antibody MB311 expressed in SP2.0 cells to an antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxic effector function (ADCC)-optimized variant (MB314). MB314 was generated by a plant expression system that uses genetically modified moss protoplasts (Physcomitrella patens) to generate a de-fucosylated version of MB311. In contrast to MB311, no or very low interactions of MB314 with lectins Aspergillus oryzae l-fucose (AOL), Pisum sativum agglutinin (PSA), Lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA), and Aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL) were observed. These lectins are specific for mono-/biantennary N-glycans containing a core fucose residue. Importantly, this fucose indicative lectin-binding pattern correlated with increased MB314 binding to CD16 (FcγRIII; receptor for the constant region of an antibody)-whose affinity is mediated through core fucosylation-and stronger ADCC. In summary, these results demonstrate that lectin microarrays are useful orthogonal methods during antibody development and for characterization.

  9. Application of Lectin Array Technology for Biobetter Characterization: Its Correlation with FcγRIII Binding and ADCC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Roucka

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Lectin microarray technology was applied to compare the glycosylation pattern of the monoclonal antibody MB311 expressed in SP2.0 cells to an antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxic effector function (ADCC-optimized variant (MB314. MB314 was generated by a plant expression system that uses genetically modified moss protoplasts (Physcomitrella patens to generate a de-fucosylated version of MB311. In contrast to MB311, no or very low interactions of MB314 with lectins Aspergillus oryzae l-fucose (AOL, Pisum sativum agglutinin (PSA, Lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA, and Aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL were observed. These lectins are specific for mono-/biantennary N-glycans containing a core fucose residue. Importantly, this fucose indicative lectin-binding pattern correlated with increased MB314 binding to CD16 (FcγRIII; receptor for the constant region of an antibody—whose affinity is mediated through core fucosylation—and stronger ADCC. In summary, these results demonstrate that lectin microarrays are useful orthogonal methods during antibody development and for characterization.

  10. Characterization of the interaction forces in a drug carrier complex of doxorubicin with a drug-binding peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gocheva, Gergana; Ilieva, Nina; Peneva, Kalina; Ivanova, Anela

    2017-11-22

    Polypeptide-based materials are used as building blocks for drug delivery systems aimed at toxicity decrease of chemotherapeutics. A molecular-level approach is adopted for investigating the non-covalent interactions between doxorubicin and a recently synthesized drug-binging peptide as a key part of a system for delivery to neoplastic cells. MD simulations in aqueous solution at room and body temperature are applied to investigate the structure and the binding modes within the drug-peptide complex. The tryptophans are outlined as the main chemotherapeutic adsorption sites and the importance of their placement in the peptide sequence is highlighted. The drug-peptide binging energy is evaluated by DFT calculations. PCA reveals comparable importance of several types of interaction for the binding strength. π-Stacking is dominant but other factors are also significant: intercalation, peptide backbone stacking, electrostatics, dispersion, and solvation. Intra- and intermolecular H-bonding also stabilizes the complexes. The influence of solvent molecules is mild. The obtained data characterize the drug-to-peptide attachment as a mainly attractive collective process with interactions spanning a broad range of values. These results explain with atomistic detail the experimentally registered doxorubicin-binging ability of the peptide and outline the complex as a prospective carrying unit that can be employed in design of drug-delivery systems. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Copper(II) complexes with 4-hydroxyacetophenone-derived acylhydrazones: Synthesis, characterization, DNA binding and cleavage properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gup, Ramazan; Gökçe, Cansu; Aktürk, Selçuk

    2015-01-01

    Two new Cu(II) complexes of Schiff base-hydrazone ligands, hydroxy-N‧-[(1Z)-1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethylidene]benzohydrazide [H3L1] and ethyl 2-(4-(1-(2-(4-(2-ethoxy-2-oxoethoxy)benzoyl)hydrazono)ethyl)phenoxy)acetate (HL2) have been synthesized and then characterized by microcopy and spectral studies. X-ray powder diffraction illustrates that [Cu(L2)2] complex is crystalline in nature whereas [Cu(H2L1)2]·2H2O has an amorphous structure. Binding of the copper complexes with Calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) has been investigated by UV-visible spectra, exhibiting non-covalent binding to CT-DNA. DNA cleavage experiments have been also investigated by agarose gel electrophoresis in the presence and absence of an oxidative agent (H2O2). The effect of complex concentration on the DNA cleavage reaction has been also studied. Both copper complexes show nuclease activity, which significantly depends on concentrations of the complexes, in the presence of H2O2 through oxidative mechanism whereas they slightly cleavage DNA in the absence an oxidative agent.

  12. Structural and Kinetic Characterization of Diazabicyclooctanes as Dual Inhibitors of Both Serine-β-Lactamases and Penicillin-Binding Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Andrew M; King, Dustin T; French, Shawn; Brouillette, Eric; Asli, Abdelhamid; Alexander, J Andrew N; Vuckovic, Marija; Maiti, Samarendra N; Parr, Thomas R; Brown, Eric D; Malouin, François; Strynadka, Natalie C J; Wright, Gerard D

    2016-04-15

    Avibactam is a diazabicyclooctane β-lactamase inhibitor possessing outstanding but incomplete efficacy against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens in combination with β-lactam antibiotics. Significant pharmaceutical investment in generating derivatives of avibactam warrants a thorough characterization of their activity. We show here through structural and kinetic analysis that select diazabicyclooctane derivatives display effective but varied inhibition of two clinically important β-lactamases (CTX-M-15 and OXA-48). Furthermore, these derivatives exhibit considerable antimicrobial activity (MIC ≤ 2 μg/mL) against clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Enterobacter spp. Imaging of cell phenotype along with structural and biochemical experiments unambiguously demonstrate that this activity, in E. coli, is a result of targeting penicillin-binding protein 2. Our results suggest that structure-activity relationship studies for the purpose of drug discovery must consider both β-lactamases and penicillin-binding proteins as targets. We believe that this approach will yield next-generation combination or monotherapies with an expanded spectrum of activity against currently untreatable Gram-negative pathogens.

  13. Identification and Characterization of Noncovalent Interactions That Drive Binding and Specificity in DD-Peptidases and β-Lactamases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargis, Jacqueline C; Vankayala, Sai Lakshmana; White, Justin K; Woodcock, H Lee

    2014-02-11

    Bacterial resistance to standard (i.e., β-lactam-based) antibiotics has become a global pandemic. Simultaneously, research into the underlying causes of resistance has slowed substantially, although its importance is universally recognized. Key to unraveling critical details is characterization of the noncovalent interactions that govern binding and specificity (DD-peptidases, antibiotic targets, versus β-lactamases, the evolutionarily derived enzymes that play a major role in resistance) and ultimately resistance as a whole. Herein, we describe a detailed investigation that elicits new chemical insights into these underlying intermolecular interactions. Benzylpenicillin and a novel β-lactam peptidomimetic complexed to the Stremptomyces R61 peptidase are examined using an arsenal of computational techniques: MD simulations, QM/MM calculations, charge perturbation analysis, QM/MM orbital analysis, bioinformatics, flexible receptor/flexible ligand docking, and computational ADME predictions. Several key molecular level interactions are identified that not only shed light onto fundamental resistance mechanisms, but also offer explanations for observed specificity. Specifically, an extended π-π network is elucidated that suggests antibacterial resistance has evolved, in part, due to stabilizing aromatic interactions. Additionally, interactions between the protein and peptidomimetic substrate are identified and characterized. Of particular interest is a water-mediated salt bridge between Asp217 and the positively charged N-terminus of the peptidomimetic, revealing an interaction that may significantly contribute to β-lactam specificity. Finally, interaction information is used to suggest modifications to current β-lactam compounds that should both improve binding and specificity in DD-peptidases and their physiochemical properties.

  14. Cloning and characterization of cold, salt and drought inducible C-repeat binding factor gene from a highly cold adapted ecotype of Lepidium latifolium L.

    OpenAIRE

    Akhtar, M.; Jaiswal, A.; Jaiswal, J. P.; Qureshi, M. I.; Tufchi, M.; Singh, N. K.

    2013-01-01

    The dehydration-responsive element-binding (DREB) protein/C-Repeat Binding Factors (CBFs) belongs to APETALA2 (AP2) family transcription factors that binds to DRE/CRT cis-element in cold-responsive (COR) genes and induce COR genes. CBFs have been isolated and characterized from evolutionarily diverse plant species. CBF pathway is conserved by CBF regulon and the size or the number and kind of target genes vary among freezing sensitive and tolerant plants. Hence, cloning of CBFs from highly fr...

  15. Characterization of the binding of Actinomyces naeslundii (ATCC 12104) and Actinomyces viscosus (ATCC 19246) to glycosphingolipids, using a solid-phase overlay approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroemberg, N.K.; Karlsson, K.A. (Univ. of Goeteborg (Sweden))

    1990-07-05

    Actinomyces naeslundii (ATCC 12104) and Actinomyces viscosus (ATCC 19246) were radiolabeled externally (125I) or metabolically (35S) and analyzed for their ability to bind glycosphingolipids separated on thin layer chromatograms or coated in microtiter wells. Two binding properties were found and characterized in detail. (i) Both bacteria showed binding to lactosylceramide (LacCer) in a fashion similar to bacteria characterized earlier. The activity of free LacCer was dependent on the ceramide structure; species with 2-hydroxy fatty acid and/or a trihydroxy base were positive, while species with nonhydroxy fatty acid and a dihydroxy base were negative binders. Several glycolipids with internal lactose were active but only gangliotriaosylceramide and gangliotetraosylceramide were as active as free LacCer. The binding to these three species was half-maximal at about 200 ng of glycolipid and was not blocked by preincubation of bacteria with free lactose or lactose-bovine serum albumin. (ii) A. naeslundii, unlike A. viscosus, showed a superimposed binding concluded to be to terminal or internal GalNAc beta and equivalent to a lactose-inhibitable specificity previously analyzed by other workers. Terminal Gal beta was not recognized in several glycolipids, although free Gal and lactose were active as soluble inhibitors. The binding was half-maximal at about 10 ng of glycolipid. A glycolipid mixture prepared from a scraping of human buccal epithelium contained an active glycolipid with sites for both binding specificities.

  16. Characterization and identification of a steroid receptor-binding protein, SRB-RGS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Mitsunori; Inoue, Satoshi; Muramatsu, Masami; Minatogawa, Yohsuke

    2007-06-01

    We cloned the cDNA of a novel steroid receptor-binding protein, SRB-RGS, which suppressed the estrogen receptor (ER)alpha-mediated and other promoter-driven transcriptional activities. This study revealed the interaction between the full-length SRB-RGS and full-length ERalpha or ERbeta by a coimmunoprecipitation assay. The full-length SRB-RGS and full-length ERalpha interacted in COS-7 cell by a mammalian two-hybrid system. The interaction between intrinsic SRB-RGS and ERs in the nuclear ER extract from the rat uteri was observed by the gel-shift assay. These results strongly suggested that SRB-RGS interacts with ERs bound to DNA (estrogen response element) in the nuclei of the cells. SRB-RGS suppressed very efficiently the ERalpha-, ERbeta-, and ERalpha+ERbeta-mediated transcriptional activities. Green fluorescence of enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP)-tagged SRB-RGS was localized both in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm. Intrinsic SRB-RGS was immunostained in the nucleus and the cytoplasm of HeLa cells. The putative SRB-RGS deduced from cDNA sequence was identified by the immunostaining and Western blotting by using the anti-SRB-RGS antibody. Overexpression of SRB-RGS induced the cell death in the HeLa cells. The nucleotide sequence of SRB-RGS cDNA that we cloned previously is identical with that of the newly isolated RGS3 cDNA. SRB-RGS could interact with ERs bound DNA in the nuclei of the cells and suppressed the ERs-mediated transcriptional activities.

  17. Single molecule characterization of DNA binding and strand displacement reactions on lithographic DNA origami microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheible, Max B; Pardatscher, Günther; Kuzyk, Anton; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2014-03-12

    The combination of molecular self-assembly based on the DNA origami technique with lithographic patterning enables the creation of hierarchically ordered nanosystems, in which single molecules are positioned at precise locations on multiple length scales. Based on a hybrid assembly protocol utilizing DNA self-assembly and electron-beam lithography on transparent glass substrates, we here demonstrate a DNA origami microarray, which is compatible with the requirements of single molecule fluorescence and super-resolution microscopy. The spatial arrangement allows for a simple and reliable identification of single molecule events and facilitates automated read-out and data analysis. As a specific application, we utilize the microarray to characterize the performance of DNA strand displacement reactions localized on the DNA origami structures. We find considerable variability within the array, which results both from structural variations and stochastic reaction dynamics prevalent at the single molecule level.

  18. Selective Competition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Dubovik (Andrei); A. Parakhonyak (Alexei)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractWe consider a dynamic (differential) game with three players competing against each other. Each period each player can allocate his resources so as to direct his competition towards particular rivals -- we call such competition selective. The setting can be applied to a wide variety of

  19. Competitive intelligence

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a competitive edge and also ensure that companies develop an external focus to their business.2. In 2001/02, a team of researchers from both the academic world and the business sector in .... strategic and tactical decisions may be made.15 Much work has been done in ..... could be used to create a competitive advantage;.

  20. In Silico Characterization of the Binding Affinity of Dendrimers to Penicillin-Binding Proteins (PBPs): Can PBPs be Potential Targets for Antibacterial Dendrimers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shaimaa; Vepuri, Suresh B; Ramesh, Muthusamy; Kalhapure, Rahul; Suleman, Nadia; Govender, Thirumala

    2016-04-01

    We have shown that novel silver salts of poly (propyl ether) imine (PETIM) dendron and dendrimers developed in our group exhibit preferential antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus aureus. This led us to examine whether molecular modeling methods could be used to identify the key structural design principles for a bioactive lead molecule, explore the mechanism of binding with biological targets, and explain their preferential antibacterial activity. The current article reports the conformational landscape as well as mechanism of binding of generation 1 PETIM dendron and dendrimers to penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) in order to understand the antibacterial activity profiles of their silver salts. Molecular dynamics at different simulation protocols and conformational analysis were performed to elaborate on the conformational features of the studied dendrimers, as well as to create the initial structure for further binding studies. The results showed that for all compounds, there were no significant conformational changes due to variation in simulation conditions. Molecular docking calculations were performed to investigate the binding theme between the studied dendrimers and PBPs. Interestingly, in significant accordance with the experimental data, dendron and dendrimer with aliphatic cores were found to show higher activity against S. aureus than the dendrimer with an aromatic core. The latter showed higher activity against MRSA. The findings from this computational and molecular modeling report together with the experimental results serve as a road map toward designing more potent antibacterial dendrimers against resistant bacterial strains.

  1. Biophysical characterization data of the artificial protein Octarellin V.1 and binding test with its X-ray helpers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximiliano Figueroa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The artificial protein Octarellin V.1 (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsb.2016.05.004 [1] was obtained through a direct evolution process over the de novo designed Octarellin V (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0022-2836(0201206-8 [2]. The protein has been characterized by circular dichroism and fluorescence techniques, in order to obtain data related to its thermo and chemical stability. Moreover, the data for the secondary structure content studied by circular dichroism and infra red techniques is reported for the Octarellin V and V.1. Two crystallization helpers, nanobodies (http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nprot.2014.039 [3] and αRep (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmb.2010.09.048 [4], have been used to create stable complexes. Here we present the data obtained of the binding characterization of the Octarellin V.1 with the crystallization helpers by isothermal titration calorimetry.

  2. Ligand binding assays in the 21st century laboratory: recommendations for characterization and supply of critical reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Denise M; Theobald, Valerie; Egan, Adrienne Clements; Usansky, Joel; Krishna, Murli; TerWee, Julie; Maia, Mauricio; Spriggs, Frank P; Kenney, John; Safavi, Afshin; Keefe, Jeannine

    2012-06-01

    Critical reagents are essential components of ligand binding assays (LBAs) and are utilized throughout the process of drug discovery, development, and post-marketing monitoring. Successful lifecycle management of LBA critical reagents minimizes assay performance problems caused by declining reagent activity and can mitigate the risk of delays during preclinical and clinical studies. Proactive reagent management assures adequate supply. It also assures that the quality of critical reagents is appropriate and consistent for the intended LBA use throughout all stages of the drug development process. This manuscript summarizes the key considerations for the generation, production, characterization, qualification, documentation, and management of critical reagents in LBAs, with recommendations for antibodies (monoclonal and polyclonal), engineered proteins, peptides, and their conjugates. Recommendations are given for each reagent type on basic and optional characterization profiles, expiration dates and storage temperatures, and investment in a knowledge database system. These recommendations represent a consensus among the authors and should be used to assist bioanalytical laboratories in the implementation of a best practices program for critical reagent life cycle management.

  3. New bimetallic dicyanidoargentate(I)-based coordination compounds: Synthesis, characterization, biological activities and DNA-BSA binding affinities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Nesrin; Aydın, Ali; Karadağ, Ahmet; Yanar, Yusuf; Maaşoğlu, Yelis; Şahin, Ertan; Tekin, Şaban

    2017-02-01

    Four compounds -two (2 and 3) completely new- of composition [Ni(edbea)Ag3(CN)5] (1), [Cu(edbea)Ag2(CN)4]·H2O (2), [Cd(edbea)Ag3(CN)5]·H2O (3) and [Cd(edbea)2] [Ag(CN)2]2·H2O (4) {edbea; 2,2‧-(ethylenedioxy)bis (ethylamine)}, were synthesized and characterized using elemental, FT-IR, X-Ray (4), thermal, variable temperature magnetic measurement (1 and 2) and biological techniques. The DNA/BSA binding affinities of 2 and 3 were evaluated by UV-Vis spectrophotometric titrations, ethidium bromide exchange experiments and electrophoretic mobility measurements. Compounds 1 and 4 have previously been characterized and shown to reduce the proliferation and migration of tumor cells. For the sake of clarity, 1 precise mechanism of action on microbial organisms and temperature magnetic measurement were determined. The crystallographic analyses showed that 4 was built up of [Cd(edbea)2]II cations and [Ag2(CN)4]II anions. Complexes demonstrated a remarkable antibacterial (1-4), antifungal (1-4) and antiproliferative activities (2 and 3) to ten human bacterial pathogens, four plant pathogenic fungi or three tumor cells (HeLa, HT29, and C6), respectively. Therefore, our results strongly confirm that cell proliferation, cell morphology, Bcl-2, P53 changes and apoptosis can be related to the pharmacological effects of the complexes as suitable candidate for clinical trials.

  4. Rapid characterization of binding specificity and cross-reactivity of antibodies using recombinant human protein arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijanka, Gregor; Ipcho, Simon; Baars, Sabine; Chen, Hong; Hadley, Katie; Beveridge, Allan; Gould, Edith; Murphy, Derek

    2009-01-30

    Antibodies are routinely used as research tools, in diagnostic assays and increasingly as therapeutics. Ideally, these applications require antibodies with high sensitivity and specificity; however, many commercially available antibodies are limited in their use as they cross-react with non-related proteins. Here we describe a novel method to characterize antibody specificity. Six commercially available monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies were screened on high-density protein arrays comprising of ~10,000 recombinant human proteins (Imagenes). Two of the six antibodies examined; anti-pICln and anti-GAPDH, bound exclusively to their target antigen and showed no cross-reactivity with non-related proteins. However, four of the antibodies, anti-HSP90, anti-HSA, anti-bFGF and anti-Ro52, showed strong cross-reactivity with other proteins on the array. Antibody-antigen interactions were readily confirmed using Western immunoblotting. In addition, the redundant nature of the protein array used, enabled us to define the epitopic region within HSP90 of the anti-HSP90 antibody, and identify possible shared epitopes in cross-reacting proteins. In conclusion, high-density protein array technology is a fast and effective means for determining the specificity of antibodies and can be used to further improve the accuracy of antibody applications.

  5. Kinetic analysis of ligand binding to the Ehrlich cell nucleoside transporter: Pharmacological characterization of allosteric interactions with the sup 3 Hnitrobenzylthioinosine binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammond, J.R. (Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Western Ontario, London (Canada))

    1991-06-01

    Kinetic analysis of the binding of {sup 3}Hnitrobenzylthioinosine ({sup 3}H NBMPR) to Ehrlich ascites tumor cell plasma membranes was conducted in the presence and absence of a variety of nucleoside transport inhibitors and substrates. The association of {sup 3}H NBMPR with Ehrlich cell membranes occurred in two distinct phases, possibly reflecting functional conformation changes in the {sup 3}HNBMPR binding site/nucleoside transporter complex. Inhibitors of the equilibrium binding of {sup 3}HNBMPR, tested at submaximal inhibitory concentrations, generally decreased the rate of association of {sup 3}HNBMPR, but the magnitude of this effect varied significantly with the agent tested. Adenosine and diazepam had relatively minor effects on the association rate, whereas dipyridamole and mioflazine slowed the rate dramatically. Inhibitors of nucleoside transport also decreased the rate of dissociation of {sup 3}HNBMPR, with an order of potency significantly different from their relative potencies as inhibitors of the equilibrium binding of {sup 3}HNBMPR. Dilazep, dipyridamole, and mioflazine were effective inhibitors of both {sup 3}HNBMPR dissociation and equilibrium binding. The lidoflazine analogue R75231, on the other hand, had no effect on the rate of dissociation of {sup 3}HNBMPR at concentrations below 300 microM, even though it was one of the most potent inhibitors of {sup 3}HNBMPR binding tested (Ki less than 100 nM). In contrast, a series of natural substrates for the nucleoside transport system enhanced the rate of dissociation of {sup 3}HNBMPR with an order of effectiveness that paralleled their relative affinities for the permeant site of the transporter. The most effective enhancers of {sup 3}HNBMPR dissociation, however, were the benzodiazepines diazepam, chlordiazepoxide, and triazolam.

  6. Isolation and Characterization of Vitreous Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jeffery L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Previous studies from this laboratory revealed that vitreous insulin-like growth factor (IGF) biological activity increases in proliferative diabetic retinopathy and that this activity is normally attenuated by IGFBPs. The goal of this study was to identify and characterize the species involved. Methods. Human and porcine vitreous, plasma, recombinant IGFBP-2, and IGFBP-3 were separated by gel electrophoresis. Functional IGFBPs were detected in Western ligand blots with biotinylated IGF-II. IGFBPs were identified using IGFBP-specific antibodies. Results. Western ligand blots of normal vitreous and plasma detected two major proteins at ∼35 kDa and ∼29 kDa. Western blot analysis of human and porcine vitreous and plasma confirmed the identity of the ∼35-kDa band as IGFBP-2 and the ∼29-kDa band as a fragment of IGFBP-3. Western blot and Western ligand blot analyses of vitreous and plasma proteins separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed that the IGFBP-3 fragments in vitreous and plasma have virtually identical profiles. Lyase digestion revealed that the ∼29-kDa IGFBP-3 fragment is a glycoprotein with a peptide core of ∼25 kDa. N-terminal sequence data obtained from vitreous IGFBP-3 revealed that the protein is proteolytically truncated at the C terminus. Conclusions. Normal human and porcine vitreous contain two major IGFBPs, IGFBP-2 and an ∼29-kDa fragment of IGFBP-3. Both IGFBPs retain biological activity, and IGFBP-3 has one or more glycosylation sites with a protein core of ∼25 kDa. Systematic comparisons indicate that the vitreous IGFBP-3 is similar to and perhaps identical with a previously described IGFBP-3 fragment in plasma with reduced growth factor affinities. PMID:20811046

  7. Identification and Characterization of Botulinum Neurotoxin A Substrate Binding Pockets and Their Re-Engineering for Human SNAP-23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorra, Stefan; Litschko, Christa; Müller, Carina; Thiel, Nadine; Galli, Thierry; Eichner, Timo; Binz, Thomas

    2016-01-29

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are highly potent bacterial proteins that block neurotransmitter release at the neuromuscular junction by cleaving SNAREs (soluble N-ethyl maleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptors). However, their serotype A (BoNT/A) that cleaves SNAP-25 (synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa) has also been an established pharmaceutical for treatment of medical conditions that rely on hyperactivity of cholinergic nerve terminals for 25 years. The expansion of its use to a variety of further medical conditions associated with hypersecretion components is prevented partly because the involved SNARE isoforms are not cleaved. Therefore, we examined by mutational analyses the reason for the resistance of human SNAP-23, an isoform of SNAP-25. We show that replacement of 10 SNAP-23 residues with their SNAP-25 counterparts effects SNAP-25-like cleavability. Conversely, transfer of each of the replaced SNAP-23 residues to SNAP-25 drastically decreased the cleavability of SNAP-25. By means of the existing SNAP-25-toxin co-crystal structure, molecular dynamics simulations, and corroborative mutagenesis studies, the appropriate binding pockets for these residues in BoNT/A were characterized. Systematic mutagenesis of two major BoNT/A binding pockets was conducted in order to adapt these pockets to corresponding amino acids of human SNAP-23. Human SNAP-23 cleaving mutants were isolated using a newly established yeast-based screening system. This method may be useful for engineering novel BoNT/A pharmaceuticals for the treatment of diseases that rely on SNAP-23-mediated hypersecretion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Purification and characterization of CRISP-3 from human seminal plasma and its real-time binding kinetics with PSP94.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anklesaria, Jenifer H; Pandya, Rushika R; Pathak, Bhakti R; Mahale, Smita D

    2016-12-15

    Cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs) have been postulated to have a role in male reproduction and prostate pathophysiology. Of the mammalian CRISPs, CRISP-3 levels in particular have been shown to be upregulated in prostate cancer. Efforts have been made to obtain highly pure CRISP-3 for gaining structure-function information of this protein. However, well characterized and highly pure protein is not available yet. CRISPs from snake venom have been purified using prostate secretory protein of 94 amino acids (PSP94) has been reported earlier. In the present study, CRISP-3 was purified to homogeneity from human seminal plasma using human PSP94-immnobilized affinity column. The molecular mass of the purified protein was determined by SDS-PAGE followed by immunoblotting and found to be ∼26kDa and ∼28kDa. The purity was further verified using MALDI-TOF MS analysis, where two peaks at m/z 25509 and 27715 were obtained. The lower molecular weight peak corresponds to the calculated molecular mass of CRISP-3 (∼26kDa); whereas the higher molecular weight peak was confirmed to be the glycosylated form (∼28kDa) from the deglycosylation experiment. Binding of PSP94 in increasing concentrations to purified CRISP-3 immobilized chip was further validated using surface plasmon resonance. The kinetics data suggested that purified CRISP-3 binds specifically and with high affinity to PSP94. In conclusion, a homogeneous preparation of highly pure CRISP-3 protein is obtained from human seminal plasma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Lectin binding studies on murine peritoneal cells: physicochemical characterization of the binding of lectins from Datura stramonium, Evonymus europaea, and Griffonia simplicifolia to murine peritoneal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petryniak, J; Huard, T K; Nordblom, G D; Goldstein, I J

    1986-01-01

    Purified 125I-labeled lectins from Datura stramonium, Evonymus europaea, and Griffonia simplicifolia (I-B4 isolectin) were used to analyze changes in the expression of carbohydrates on the surface of resident (PC) and thioglycollate-stimulated murine (C57B/6J) peritoneal exudate cells (PEC). The lectins from D. stramonium, E. europaea, and G. simplicifolia I-B4 bind specifically to PEC with relatively high affinity (Kd = 5.65 +/- 1.08 X 10(-7) M, 1.08 +/- 0.12 X 10(-8) M, and 1.33 +/- 0.15 X 10(-7) M, respectively). Assuming a single lectin molecule binds to each cell surface saccharide, the number of receptor sites per cell ranged for different cell samples from 22.3 to 50.0 X 10(6), from 3.8 to 4.8 X 10(6), and from 2.0 to 16.8 X 10(6) for D. stramonium, E. europaea, and G. simplicifolia I-B4 lectins, respectively. There were approximately 3- to 7-fold, 16- to 20-fold, and 2- to 20-fold increases in binding capacity for D. stramonium, E. europaea and G. simplicifolia I-B4, respectively, compared to the binding to resident, peritoneal cells. Scatchard plots of the binding of all three lectins to PEC were linear, suggesting that the receptor sites for these lectins are homogeneous and noninteracting. The binding capacity of these lectins to PEC was unchanged after trypsin digestion of cells. The expression of carbohydrates on the surface of PEC was also monitored by an agglutination assay. PEC were agglutinated by all three lectins whereas PC either were not agglutinated or were agglutinated only at high lectin concentrations. On the basis of our knowledge of the carbohydrate binding specificity of the D. stramonium and G. simplicifolia I-B4 lectins, we postulate that, parallel with thioglycolate stimulation, there is an increase in the number of N-acetyllactosamine residues and terminal alpha-D-galactosyl end groups. The blood group B, and H type 1 determinants--DGa1 alpha 1,3[LFuc alpha 1,2]DGa1 beta 1,3(or 4)DGlcNAc and LFuc alpha 1,2DGa1 beta 1,3DG1c

  10. Characterization of in vivo DNA-binding events of plant transcription factors by ChIP-seq

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourik, Van Hilda; Muiño, J.M.; Pajoro, Alice; Angenent, G.C.; Kaufmann, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next-generation sequencing (ChIP-seq) is a powerful technique for genome-wide identification of in vivo binding sites of DNA-binding proteins. The technique had been used to study many DNA-binding proteins in a broad variety of species. The basis of the

  11. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of an ATP-binding cassette transporter OtrC from Streptomyces rimosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Lan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The otrC gene of Streptomyces rimosus was previously annotated as an oxytetracycline (OTC resistance protein. However, the amino acid sequence analysis of OtrC shows that it is a putative ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter with multidrug resistance function. To our knowledge, none of the ABC transporters in S. rimosus have yet been characterized. In this study, we aimed to characterize the multidrug exporter function of OtrC and evaluate its relevancy to OTC production. Results In order to investigate OtrC’s function, otrC is cloned and expressed in E. coli The exporter function of OtrC was identified by ATPase activity determination and ethidium bromide efflux assays. Also, the susceptibilities of OtrC-overexpressing cells to several structurally unrelated drugs were compared with those of OtrC-non-expressing cells by minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC assays, indicating that OtrC functions as a drug exporter with a broad range of drug specificities. The OTC production was enhanced by 1.6-fold in M4018 (P = 0.000877 and 1.4-fold in SR16 (P = 0.00973 duplication mutants, while it decreased to 80% in disruption mutants (P = 0.0182 and 0.0124 in M4018 and SR16, respectively. Conclusions The results suggest that OtrC is an ABC transporter with multidrug resistance function, and plays an important role in self-protection by drug efflux mechanisms. This is the first report of such a protein in S. rimosus, and otrC could be a valuable target for genetic manipulation to improve the production of industrial antibiotics.

  12. Mutational Mapping and Modeling of the Binding Site for (S)-Citalopram in the Human Serotonin Transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jacob; Olsen, Lars; Hansen, Kasper B.

    2010-01-01

    , and (S)-citalopram, which are competitive inhibitors of the transport function. Knowledge of the molecular details of the antidepressant binding sites in SERT has been limited due to lack of structural data on SERT. Here, we present a characterization of the (S)-citalopram binding pocket in human SERT (h...... is functionally relevant from studying the effects of 64 point mutations around the putative substrate binding site. The mutational mapping also identify novel hSERT residues that are crucial for (S)-citalopram binding. The model defines the molecular determinants for (S)-citalopram binding to h...

  13. Characterization of Plasminogen Binding to NB4 Promyelocytic Cells Using Monoclonal Antibodies against Receptor-Induced Binding Sites in Cell-Bound Plasminogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercè Jardí

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The NB4 promyelocytic cell line exhibits many of the characteristics of acute promyelocytic leukemia blast cells, including the translocation (15 : 17 that fuses the PML gene on chromosome 15 to the RARα gene on chromosome 17. These cells have a very high fibrinolytic capacity. In addition to a high secretion of urokinase, NB4 cells exhibit a 10-fold higher plasminogen binding capacity compared with other leukemic cell lines. When tissue-type plasminogen activator was added to acid-treated cells, plasmin generation was 20–26-fold higher than that generated by U937 cells or peripheral blood neutrophils, respectively. We found that plasminogen bound to these cells can be detected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting using an antiplasminogen monoclonal antibody that specifically reacts with this antigen when it is bound to cell surfaces. All-trans retinoid acid treatment of NB4 cells markedly decreased the binding of this monoclonal antibody. This cell line constitutes a unique model to explore plasminogen binding and activation on cell surfaces that can be modulated by all-trans retinoid acid treatment.

  14. Characterization of sperm surface protein patterns of ejaculated and capacitated boar sperm, with the detection of ZP binding candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigo, Michal; Jonáková, Věra; Šulc, Miroslav; Maňásková-Postlerová, Pavla

    2013-10-01

    Complementary molecules on the surface of both gametes are responsible for the interaction of sperm protein receptors with zona pellucida (ZP) saccharide structures, and many primary sperm receptors for ZP glycoproteins have been disclosed in various mammals. For our study, proteins were obtained from the surface of ejaculated and in vitro capacitated boar sperm. The isolated proteins were characterized by 1D- and 2D-electrophoretic protein profiles, and by glycoprotein staining. Our results show quantitative and qualitative differences in protein and glycoprotein patterns between ejaculated and capacitated sperm. Far-western blotting with ZP glycoproteins identified 17 interactions in the subproteome of the ejaculated sperm and 14 interactions in the subproteome of the capacitated sperm. High-molecular-mass proteins, coincident with binding to ZP, were sequence-identified. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), polycystic kidney disease receptor and egg jelly receptor (PKDREJ), and acrosin precursor were successfully identified. This is the first time PKDREJ has been identified on the surface of boar spermatozoa. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Characterization of human GTPBP3, a GTP-binding protein involved in mitochondrial tRNA modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarroya, Magda; Prado, Silvia; Esteve, Juan M; Soriano, Miguel A; Aguado, Carmen; Pérez-Martínez, David; Martínez-Ferrandis, José I; Yim, Lucía; Victor, Victor M; Cebolla, Elvira; Montaner, Asunción; Knecht, Erwin; Armengod, M-Eugenia

    2008-12-01

    Human GTPBP3 is an evolutionarily conserved, multidomain protein involved in mitochondrial tRNA modification. Characterization of its biochemical properties and the phenotype conferred by GTPBP3 inactivation is crucial to understanding the role of this protein in tRNA maturation and its effects on mitochondrial respiration. We show that the two most abundant GTPBP3 isoforms exhibit moderate affinity for guanine nucleotides like their bacterial homologue, MnmE, although they hydrolyze GTP at a 100-fold lower rate. This suggests that regulation of the GTPase activity, essential for the tRNA modification function of MnmE, is different in GTPBP3. In fact, potassium-induced dimerization of the G domain leads to stimulation of the GTPase activity in MnmE but not in GTPBP3. The GTPBP3 N-terminal domain mediates a potassium-independent dimerization, which appears as an evolutionarily conserved property of the protein family, probably related to the construction of the binding site for the one-carbon-unit donor in the modification reaction. Partial inactivation of GTPBP3 by small interfering RNA reduces oxygen consumption, ATP production, and mitochondrial protein synthesis, while the degradation of these proteins slightly increases. It also results in mitochondria with defective membrane potential and increased superoxide levels. These phenotypic traits suggest that GTPBP3 defects contribute to the pathogenesis of some oxidative phosphorylation diseases.

  16. Characterization of specific /sup 125/I-bolton hunter (BH)-CCK-8 binding in guinea pig stomach muscle membranes - similar to pancreas but different from gastric glands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, R.S.L.; Lotti, V.J.; Chen, T.B.; Kunkel, K.K.

    1986-03-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a gastrointestinal hormone which regulates gastric motility. The authors have characterized specific /sup 125/I-BH-CCK-8 binding in guinea pig stomach muscle membranes. The relative potencies of various CCK related peptides to inhibit specific /sup 125/I-CCK-8 binding in stomach muscle membranes resembled their rank order determined for pancreatic CCK receptor binding (CCK-8>> CCK-8-desulfate = gastrin CCK-4). The specific peripheral CCK antagonist, asperlicin and other non- selective CCK antagonists including proglumide, CBZ-CCK (26-32) amide, dibutyrylcyclic GMP and benzotript effectively inhibited /sup 125/I-CCK-8 binding in gastric muscle membranes with IC/sub 50/'s comparable to those for pancreatic CCK receptors. In contrast, specific /sup 125/I-CCK-8 binding in guinea pig gastric glands was inhibited equally well by gastrin and CCK-8. Moreover, asperlicin did not inhibit /sup 125/I-CCK-8 binding in guinea gastric glands. These results indicate CCK receptors in the stomach muscle membranes are similar to pancreatic CCK receptors but different from brain CCK or gastrin receptors.

  17. Characterization of the SUMO-binding activity of the myeloproliferative and mental retardation (MYM-type zinc fingers in ZNF261 and ZNF198.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M Guzzo

    Full Text Available SUMO-binding proteins interact with SUMO modified proteins to mediate a wide range of functional consequences. Here, we report the identification of a new SUMO-binding protein, ZNF261. Four human proteins including ZNF261, ZNF198, ZNF262, and ZNF258 contain a stretch of tandem zinc fingers called myeloproliferative and mental retardation (MYM-type zinc fingers. We demonstrated that MYM-type zinc fingers from ZNF261 and ZNF198 are necessary and sufficient for SUMO-binding and that individual MYM-type zinc fingers function as SUMO-interacting motifs (SIMs. Our binding studies revealed that the MYM-type zinc fingers from ZNF261 and ZNF198 interact with the same surface on SUMO-2 recognized by the archetypal consensus SIM. We also present evidence that MYM-type zinc fingers in ZNF261 contain zinc, but that zinc is not required for SUMO-binding. Immunofluorescence microscopy studies using truncated fragments of ZNF198 revealed that MYM-type zinc fingers of ZNF198 are necessary for localization to PML-nuclear bodies (PML-NBs. In summary, our studies have identified and characterized the SUMO-binding activity of the MYM-type zinc fingers in ZNF261 and ZNF198.

  18. Receptor binding characterization of the benzodiazepine radioligand sup 125 I-Ro16-0154: Potential probe for SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography) brain imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, E.W.; Woods, S.W.; Zoghbi, S.; Baldwin, R.M.; Innis, R.B. (Yale Univ., West Haven, CT (USA)); McBride, B.J. (Medi-Physics, Inc., Emeryville, CA (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The binding of an iodinated benzodiazepine (BZ) radioligand has been characterized, particularly in regard to its potential use as a neuroreceptor brain imaging agent with SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography). Ro16-0154 is an iodine-containing BZ antagonist and a close analog of Ro15-1788. In tissue homogenates prepared from human and monkey brain, the binding of {sup 125}I-labeled Ro16-0154 was saturable, of high affinity, and had high ratios of specific to non-specific binding. Physiological concentrations of NaCl enhanced specific binding approximately 15% compared to buffer without this salt. Kinetic studies of association and dissociation demonstrated a temperature dependent decrease in affinity with increasing temperature. Drug displacement studies confirmed that {sup 125}I-Ro16-0154 binds to the central type BZ receptor: binding is virtually identical to that of {sup 3}H-Ro15-1788 except that {sup 125}I-Ro16-0154 shows an almost 10 fold higher affinity at 37{degree}C. These in vitro results suggest that {sup 123}I-labeled Ro16-0154 shows promise as a selective, high affinity SPECT probe of the brain's BZ receptor.

  19. 20-125Iodo-14,15-epoxyeicosa-5(Z)-enoic acid: a high-affinity radioligand used to characterize the epoxyeicosatrienoic acid antagonist binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuenmu; Falck, John R; Tuniki, Venugopal R; Campbell, William B

    2009-12-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are endothelium-derived metabolites of arachidonic acid. They relax vascular smooth muscle by membrane hyperpolarization. These actions are inhibited by the EET antagonist, 14,15-epoxyeicosa-5(Z)-enoic acid (14,15-EE5ZE). We synthesized 20-(125)iodo-14,15-EE5ZE (20-(125)I-14,15-EE5ZE), a radiolabeled EET antagonist, and characterized its binding to cell membranes. 14,15-EET (10(-9)-10(-5)M) caused a concentration-related relaxation of the preconstricted bovine coronary artery and phosphorylation of p38 in U937 cells that were inhibited by 20-(125)I-14,15-EE5ZE. Specific 20-(125)I-14,15-EE5ZE binding to U937 cell membranes reached equilibrium within 5 min and remained unchanged for 30 min. The binding was saturable and reversible, and it exhibited K(D) and B(max) values of 1.11 +/- 0.13 nM and 1.13 +/- 0.04 pmol/mg protein, respectively. Guanosine 5'-O-(3-thio)triphosphate (10 muM) did not change the binding, indicating antagonist binding of the ligand. Various EETs and EET analogs (10(-10)-10(-5)M) competed for 20-(125)I-14,15-EE5ZE binding with an order of potency of 11,12-EET = 14,15-EET > 8,9-EET = 14,15-EE5ZE > 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid = 14,15-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid. 8,9-Dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid and 11-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid did not compete for binding. The soluble and microsomal epoxide hydrolase inhibitors (1-cyclohexyl-3-dodecyl-urea, elaidamide, and 12-hydroxyl-elaidamide) and cytochrome P450 inhibitors (sulfaphenazole and proadifen) did not compete for the binding. However, two cytochrome P450 inhibitors, N-methylsulfonyl-6-(2-propargyloxyphenyl)hexanamide (MS-PPOH) and miconazole competed for binding with K(i) of 1558 and 315 nM, respectively. Miconazole and MS-PPOH, but not proadifen, inhibited 14,15-EET-induced relaxations. These findings define an EET antagonist's binding site and support the presence of an EET receptor. The inhibition of binding by some cytochrome P450 inhibitors suggests an

  20. WISP-1 binds to decorin and biglycan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desnoyers, L; Arnott, D; Pennica, D

    2001-12-14

    Wnt-1-induced secreted protein 1 (WISP-1) is a member of the CCN (connective tissue growth factor, Cyr61, NOV) family of growth factors. Structural and experimental evidence suggests that CCN family member activities are modulated by their interaction with sulfated glycoconjugates. To elucidate the mechanism of action for WISP-1, we characterized the specificity of its tissue and cellular interaction and identified binding factors. WISP-1 binding was restricted to the stroma of colon tumors and to cells with a fibroblastic phenotype. By using a solid phase assay, we showed that human skin fibroblast conditioned media contained WISP-1 binding factors. Competitive inhibition with different glycosaminoglycans and treatment with glycosaminoglycan lyases and proteases demonstrated that binding to the conditioned media was mediated by dermatan sulfate proteoglycans. Mass spectrometric analysis identified the isolated binding factors as decorin and biglycan. Decorin and biglycan interacted directly with WISP-1 and inhibited its binding to components in the conditioned media. Similarly, WISP-1 interaction with human skin fibroblasts was inhibited by dermatan sulfate, decorin, and biglycan or by treatment of the cell surface with dermatan sulfate-specific lyases. Together these results demonstrate that decorin and biglycan are WISP-1 binding factors that can mediate and modulate its interaction with the surface of fibroblasts. We propose that this specific interaction plays a role in the regulation of WISP-1 function.

  1. Endogenous, Imperfectly Competitive Business Cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whitta-Jacobsen, Hans Jørgen

    We investigate how imperfect competition affects the occurrence and the properties of endogenous, rational expectations business cycles in an overlapping generations model with constant returns to scale in production. The model has explicit product and labor markets all characterized...

  2. Characterizations of heparin-binding proteins in human urine by affinity purification-mass spectrometry and defining "L-x(2,3)-A-x(0,1)-L" as a novel heparin-binding motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manissorn, Juthatip; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2016-06-16

    Heparin-binding proteins (HBPs) are considered as potential modulators of kidney stone formation. However, HBPs had not been characterized in the urine previously. In this study, we applied affinity purification-mass spectrometry (AP-MS) using cellufine sulfate column chromatography and liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (LC-Q-TOF MS/MS) to identify HBPs in normal human urine. Using this approach, 83 HBPs were identified, including those involved in metabolic process, cellular process, immune system, developmental process, response to stimuli, cell communication, transport, cell adhesion and others. The AP-MS data were confirmed by Western blot analysis and chemico-protein interactions analysis using STITCH tool. In addition, 59, 55 and 51 identified HBPs had the known heparin-binding motifs "XBBXnBX", "XBXnBBX" and "XBBBnX", respectively. Moreover, a novel heparin-binding motif "L-x(2,3)-A-x(0,1)-L" was found in 58 identified HBPs using PRATT tool. The sensitivity and specificity of this novel motif were 85% and 100%, respectively, by validation using 20 known HBPs and 11 non-HBPs. We report herein for the first time a large number of HBPs in normal human urine and defined "L-x(2,3)-A-x(0,1)-L" as a novel heparin-binding motif. These findings will be useful to further understand the renal physiology and may also lead to identification of novel modulators of kidney stone formation. Heparin-binding proteins (HBPs) have several important roles in various biological processes, including kidney stone formation. However, HBPs had not been characterized in the urine. Our present work using affinity purification coupled to mass spectrometry (AP-MS) is the first large-scale study on HBPs in human urine. In addition to the three known heparin-binding motifs, "XBBXnBX", "XBXnBBX", and "XBBBnX", we successfully defined the amino acid pattern "L-x(2,3)-A-x(0,1)-L" as a novel heparin-binding motif. These findings will be useful to further

  3. Pharmacological characterization of LY233053: A structurally novel tetrazole-substituted competitive N-methyl-D-aspartic acid antagonist with a short duration of action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoepp, D.D.; Ornstein, P.L.; Leander, J.D.; Lodge, D.; Salhoff, C.R.; Zeman, S.; Zimmerman, D.M. (Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN (USA))

    1990-12-01

    This study reports the activity of a structurally novel excitatory amino acid receptor antagonist, LY233053 (cis-(+-)-4-((2H-tetrazol-5-yl)methyl)piperidine-2-carboxylic acid), the first tetrazole-containing competitive N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) antagonist. LY233053 potently inhibited NMDA receptor binding to rat brain membranes as shown by the in vitro displacement of (3H) CGS19755 (IC50 = 107 +/- 7 nM). No appreciable affinity in (3H)alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) or (3H)kainate binding assays was observed (IC50 values greater than 10,000 nM). In vitro NMDA receptor antagonist activity was further demonstrated by selective inhibition of NMDA-induced depolarization in cortical wedges (IC50 = 4.2 +/- 0.4 microM vs. 40 microM NMDA). LY233053 was effective after in vivo systemic administration in a number of animal models. In neonatal rats, LY233053 selectively blocked NMDA-induced convulsions (ED50 = 14.5 mg/kg i.p.) with a relatively short duration of action (2-4 hr). In pigeons, LY233053 potently antagonized (ED50 = 1.3 mg/kg i.m.) the behavioral suppressant effects of 10 mg/kg of NMDA. However, a dose of 160 mg/kg, i.m., was required to produce phencyclidine-like catalepsy in pigeons. In mice, LY233053 protected against maximal electroshock-induced seizures at lower doses (ED50 = 19.9 mg/kg i.p.) than those that impaired horizontal screen performance (ED50 = 40.9 mg/kg i.p.). Cholinergic and GABAergic neuronal degenerations after striatal infusion of NMDA were prevented by single or multiple i.p. doses of LY233053. In summary, the antagonist activity of LY233053 after systemic administration demonstrates potential therapeutic value in conditions of neuronal cell loss due to NMDA receptor excitotoxicity.

  4. Public healthcare interests require strict competition enforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loozen, Edith M H

    2015-07-01

    Several countries have introduced competition in their health systems in order to maintain the supply of high quality health care in a cost-effective manner. The introduction of competition triggers competition enforcement. Since healthcare is characterized by specific market failures, many favor healthcare-specific competition enforcement in order not only to account for the competition interest, but also for the healthcare interests. The question is whether healthcare systems based on competition can succeed when competition enforcement deviates from standard practice. This paper analyzes whether healthcare-specific competition enforcement is theoretically sound and practically effective. This is exemplified by the Dutch system that is based on regulated competition and thus crucially depends on getting competition enforcement right. Governments are responsible for correcting market failures. Markets are responsible for maximizing the public healthcare interests. By securing sufficient competitive pressure, competition enforcement makes sure they do. When interpreted according to welfare-economics, competition law takes into account both costs and benefits specific market behavior may have for healthcare. Competition agencies and judiciary are not legitimized to deviate from standard evidentiary requirements. Dutch case law shows that healthcare-specific enforcement favors the healthcare undertakings concerned, but to the detriment of public health care. Healthcare-specific competition enforcement is conceptually flawed and counterproductive. In order for healthcare systems based on competition to succeed, competition enforcement should be strict. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The characterization of a novel S100A1 binding site in the N-terminus of TRPM1

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirků, M.; Lánský, Z.; Bednárová, Lucie; Šulc, M.; Monincová, Lenka; Majer, Pavel; Vyklický, L.; Vondrášek, Jiří; Teisinger, J.; Boušová, Kristýna

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 78, Sep (2016), s. 186-193 ISSN 1357-2725 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : TRPM1 channel * binding site * calcium-binding protein S100A1 * steady-state fluorescence anisotropy * molecular modeling * circular dichroism Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.505, year: 2016

  6. Characterization and expression analysis of an intelectin gene from Megalobrama amblycephala with excellent bacterial binding and agglutination activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhujin; Zhao, Xiaoheng; Zhan, Qifeng; Cui, Lei; Sun, Qianhui; Lin, Li; Wang, Weimin; Liu, Hong

    2017-02-01

    Intelectin is a recently discovered lectin that plays vital roles in the innate immune response, iron metabolism and early embryogenesis. The structure, expression pattern and function of intelectin in mammals and amphibians have been well studied, while not well known in fish. In this study, we cloned a intelectin (MamINTL) gene from blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala), examined its expression patterns and explored its roles in innate immune response. The MamINTL cDNA encoded 312 amino acids, with a pro-protein of 34 kDa. Sequence analysis revealed the presence of a fibrinogen-related domain and eight conserved cysteine residues in the MamINTL. The MamINTL mRNA was detectable at various developmental stages, while it increased significantly post hatching. In healthy adult M. amblycephala, MamINTL was detected in various tissues with the highest expression in the liver. Upon challenge with Aeromonas hydrophila, significantly up-regulated expression of the MamINTL mRNA was observed in the liver, spleen, kidney, intestine and gill. In addition, increased level of MamINTL protein detected by Western Blotting was also observed in the liver, kidney and spleen, indicating the participation of MamINTL in the immune response. Immunohistochemistry analysis of the M. amblycephala liver sections showed significant changes in expression and location post infection. In addition, the recombinant MamINTL showed excellent binding and agglutination activity against GFP-expressed E. coli in a Ca2+-dependent manner. Generally, the present study provides clues for a better understanding of the characterization, expression patterns and functions of fish intelectins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Identification and characterization of two general odorant binding protein genes from the oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta (busck).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guo-Hui; Li, Yi-Ping; Xu, Xiang-Li; Chen, Hao; Wu, Jun-Xiang

    2012-04-01

    Two novel general odorant-binding protein (GOBP) cDNAs (GmolGOBP1 and GmolGOBP2) were cloned and characterized from female antennal tissue of the oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta. We focused our investigation on this olfactory protein family by using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends-PCR (RACE-PCR). The full-length open reading frames of GmolGOBP1 and GmolGOBP2 were 492 and 483 nucleotides long, which encode 164 and 161 amino acid residue peptides, respectively. Protein signature analyses revealed that they each contained six conserved cysteines with an N-terminal signal sequence of 20 amino acids. The alignment of the two deduced protein sequences with other Lepidoptera GOBPs showed high sequence similarity (70-80%) with other full-length sequences from GenBank. Sequence similarity between the two GOBPs was only 48%, suggesting that the two proteins belong to different classes of lepidopteran GOBPs. RT-PCR analysis revealed that the two GOBP genes were expressed only in antennae of both sexes. Real-time PCR analysis further indicated that the transcript level of GmolGOBP1 was higher in males than in females, whereas the transcript level of GmolGOBP2 was higher in females than in males. Temporally, the two GOBP genes were expressed during the complete photoperiod (15L:9D). The highest transcript levels of GmolGOBP1 in both sexes and GmolGOBP2 in females were detected at the end of photophase and during scotophase. The expression of GmolGOBP2 in males remained at similar levels during the complete photoperiod. Based on these results, the possible physiological functions of GmolGOBPs are discussed.

  8. Functional characterization of the ER stress induced X-box-binding protein-1 (Xbp-1 in the porcine system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Dong-Il

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The unfolded protein response (UPR is an evolutionary conserved adaptive reaction for increasing cell survival under endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress conditions. X-box-binding protein-1 (Xbp1 is a key transcription factor of UPR that activates genes involved in protein folding, secretion, and degradation to restore ER function. The UPR induced by ER stress was extensively studied in diseases linked to protein misfolding and aggregations. However, in the porcine system, genes in the UPR pathway were not investigated. In this study, we isolated and characterized the porcine Xbp1 (pXbp1 gene in ER stress using porcine embryonic fibroblast (PEF cells and porcine organs. ER stress was induced by the treatment of tunicamycin and cell viability was investigated by the MTT assay. For cloning and analyzing the expression pattern of pXbp1, RT-PCR analysis and Western blot were used. Knock-down of pXbp1 was performed by the siRNA-mediated gene silencing. Results We found that the pXbp1 mRNA was the subject of the IRE1α-mediated unconventional splicing by ER stress. Knock-down of pXbp1 enhanced ER stress-mediated cell death in PEF cells. In adult organs, pXbp1 mRNA and protein were expressed and the spliced forms were detected. Conclusions It was first found that the UPR mechanisms and the function of pXbp1 in the porcine system. These results indicate that pXbp1 plays an important role during the ER stress response like other animal systems and open a new opportunity for examining the UPR pathway in the porcine model system.

  9. Identification and Characterization of Porphyromonas gingivalis Client Proteins That Bind to Streptococcus oralis Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Hideki; Kuboniwa, Masae; Ojima, Miki; Osaki, Tsukasa; Minamino, Naoto; Amano, Atsuo

    2013-01-01

    Coaggregation of Porphyromonas gingivalis and oral streptococci is thought to play an important role in P. gingivalis colonization. Previously, we reported that P. gingivalis major fimbriae interacted with Streptococcus oralis glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and that amino acid residues 166 to 183 of GAPDH exhibited strong binding activity toward P. gingivalis fimbriae (H. Nagata, M. Iwasaki, K. Maeda, M. Kuboniwa, E. Hashino, M. Toe, N. Minamino, H. Kuwahara, and S. Shizukuishi, Infect. Immun. 77:5130–5138, 2009). The present study aimed to identify and characterize P. gingivalis components other than fimbriae that interact with S. oralis GAPDH. A pulldown assay was performed to detect potential interactions between P. gingivalis client proteins and S. oralis recombinant GAPDH with amino acid residues 166 to 183 deleted by site-directed mutagenesis. Seven proteins, namely, tonB-dependent receptor protein (RagA4), arginine-specific proteinase B, 4-hydroxybutyryl-coenzyme A dehydratase (AbfD), lysine-specific proteinase, GAPDH, NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), and malate dehydrogenase (MDH), were identified by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by proteomic analysis using tandem mass spectrometry. Interactions between these client proteins and S. oralis GAPDH were analyzed with a biomolecular interaction analysis system. S. oralis GAPDH showed high affinity for five of the seven client proteins (RagA4, AbfD, GAPDH, GDH, and MDH). Interactions between P. gingivalis and S. oralis were measured by a turbidimetric method and fluorescence microscopy. RagA4, AbfD, and GDH enhanced coaggregation, whereas GAPDH and MDH inhibited coaggregation. Furthermore, the expression of luxS in P. gingivalis was upregulated by RagA4, AbfD, and GDH but was downregulated by MDH. These results indicate that the five P. gingivalis client proteins function as regulators in P. gingivalis biofilm formation with oral streptococci. PMID:23264054

  10. Characterization of two forms of mouse salivary androgen-binding protein (ABP): implications for evolutionary relationships and ligand-binding function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karn, Robert C; Laukaitis, Christina M

    2003-06-17

    Mouse salivary androgen-binding protein (ABP) is a member of the secretoglobin family produced in the submaxillary glands of house mice (Mus musculus). We report the cDNA sequences and amino acid sequences of the beta and gamma subunits of ABP from a mouse cDNA library, identifying the two subunits by their pIs and molecular weights. An anomalously high molecular weight of the alpha subunit is likely due to glycosylation at a single site. A phylogenetic comparison of the three subunits of ABP with the chains of other mammalian secretoglobins shows that ABP is most closely related to mouse lachrymal protein and to the major cat allergen Fel dI. An evaluation of the most conserved residues in ABP and the other secretoglobins, in light of structural data reported by others [Callebaut, I., Poupon, A., Bally, R., Demaret, J.-P., Housset, D., Delettre, J., Hossenlopp, P., and Mornon, J.-P. (2000) Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 923, 90-112; Pattabiraman, N., Matthews, J., Ward, K., Mantile-Selvaggi, G., Miele, L., and Mukherjee, A. (2000) Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 923, 113-127], allows us to draw conclusions about the critical residues important in ligand binding by the two different ABP dimers and to assess the importance of ligand binding in the function of the molecule. In addition to the cDNAs, which represent those of the musculus subspecies of Mus musculus, we also report the coding regions of the beta and gamma subunit cDNAs from two other mouse inbred strains which represent the other two subspecies: M. musculus domesticus and M. musculus castaneus. The high nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution rate ratios (K(a)/K(s)) for both the beta and gamma subunits suggest that these two proteins are evolving under strong directional selection, as has been reported for the alpha subunit [Hwang, J., Hofstetter, J., Bonhomme, F., and Karn, R. (1997) J. Hered. 88, 93-97; Karn, R., and Clements, M. (1999) Biochem. Genet. 37, 187-199].

  11. Identification, characterization and expression of novel Sex Hormone Binding Globulin alternative first exons in the human prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Torres Inés

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG gene, located at 17p13.1, comprises, at least, two different transcription units regulated by two different promoters. The first transcription unit begins with the exon 1 sequence and is responsible for the production of plasma SHBG by the hepatocytes, while the second begins with an alternative exon 1 sequence, which replaces the exon 1 present in liver transcripts. Alternative exon 1 transcription and translation has only been demonstrated in the testis of transgenic mice containing an 11-kb human SHBG transgene and in the human testis. Our goal has been to further characterize the 5' end of the SHBG gene and analyze the presence of the SHBG alternative transcripts in human prostate tissue and derived cell lines. Results Using a combination of in silico and in vitro studies, we have demonstrated that the SHBG gene, along with exon 1 and alternative exon 1 (renamed here exon 1A, contains four additional alternative first exons: the novel exons 1B, 1C, and 1E, and a previously identified exon 1N, which has been further characterized and renamed as exon 1D. We have shown that these four alternative first exons are all spliced to the same 3' splice site of SHBG exon 2, and that exon 1A and the novel exon 1B can be spliced to exon 1. We have also demonstrated the presence of SHBG transcripts beginning with exons 1B, 1C and 1D in prostate tissues and cell lines, as well as in several non-prostatic cell lines. Finally, the alignment of the SHBG mammalian sequences revealed that, while exons 1C, 1D and 1E are very well conserved phylogenetically through non-primate mammal species, exon 1B probably aroused in apes due to a single nucleotide change that generated a new 5' splice site in exon 1B. Conclusion The identification of multiple transcription start sites (TSS upstream of the annotated first exon of human SHBG, and the detection of the alternative transcripts in human prostate

  12. Partial chemical characterization of cyclopyrrolones ((/sup 3/H) suriclone) and benzodiazepines ((/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam) binding site: Differences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zundel, J.L.; Blanchard, J.C.; Julou, L.

    1985-06-10

    Rat hippocampus membranes were treated with several protein modifying reagents (iodoacetamide, N-ethylmaleimide, tetranitromethane and N-acetylimidazole). The effects of these treatments on the binding sites of cyclopyrrolones ((/sup 3/H) suriclone), a new chemical family of minor tranquilizers, and benzodiazepines ((/sup 3/H) flunitrazepam) were investigated. Here the authors show that both ligands are similarly sensitive to cysteine alkylation: (/sup 3/H) suriclone and (/sup 3/H) flunitrazepam binding are reduced by iodoacetamide and slightly increased by N-ethylmaleimide. On the contrary they are clearly differentiated by tyrosine modification: (/sup 3/H) suriclone binding is not changed whereas (/sup 3/H) flunitrazepam binding is increased by tetranitromethane and decreased by N-acetylimidazole. The present findings and published evidence suggest cyclopyrrolones and benzodiazepines bind to distinct sites or to different allosteric forms of the benzodiazepine receptor. 28 references, 6 figures.

  13. Characterization of the Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP binding pocket: NMR-based screening identifies small-molecule ligands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne N Shemon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP, also known as phoshaptidylethanolamine binding protein (PEBP, has been shown to inhibit Raf and thereby negatively regulate growth factor signaling by the Raf/MAP kinase pathway. RKIP has also been shown to suppress metastasis. We have previously demonstrated that RKIP/Raf interaction is regulated by two mechanisms: phosphorylation of RKIP at Ser-153, and occupation of RKIP's conserved ligand binding domain with a phospholipid (2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine; DHPE. In addition to phospholipids, other ligands have been reported to bind this domain; however their binding properties remain uncharacterized. METHODS/FINDINGS: In this study, we used high-resolution heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy to screen a chemical library and assay a number of potential RKIP ligands for binding to the protein. Surprisingly, many compounds previously postulated as RKIP ligands showed no detectable binding in near-physiological solution conditions even at millimolar concentrations. In contrast, we found three novel ligands for RKIP that specifically bind to the RKIP pocket. Interestingly, unlike the phospholipid, DHPE, these newly identified ligands did not affect RKIP binding to Raf-1 or RKIP phosphorylation. One out of the three ligands displayed off target biological effects, impairing EGF-induced MAPK and metabolic activity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This work defines the binding properties of RKIP ligands under near physiological conditions, establishing RKIP's affinity for hydrophobic ligands and the importance of bulky aliphatic chains for inhibiting its function. The common structural elements of these compounds defines a minimal requirement for RKIP binding and thus they can be used as lead compounds for future design of RKIP ligands with therapeutic potential.

  14. Characterization of little skate (Leucoraja erinacea) recombinant transthyretin: Zinc-dependent 3,3',5-triiodo-l-thyronine binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shunsuke; Kasai, Kentaro; Yamauchi, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) diverged from an ancestral 5-hydroxyisourate hydrolase (HIUHase) by gene duplication at some early stage of chordate evolution. To clarify how TTR had participated in the thyroid system as an extracellular thyroid hormone (TH) binding protein, TH binding properties of recombinant little skate Leucoraja erinacea TTR was investigated. At the amino acid level, skate TTR showed 37-46% identities with the other vertebrate TTRs. Because the skate TTR had a unique histidine-rich segment in the N-terminal region, it could be purified by Ni-affinity chromatography. The skate TTR was a 46-kDa homotetramer of 14.5kDa subunits, and had one order of magnitude higher affinity for 3,3',5-triiodo-l-thyronine (T3) and some halogenated phenols than for l-thyroxine. However, the skate TTR had no HIUHase activity. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) treatment inhibited [(125)I]T3 binding activity whereas the addition of Zn(2+) to the EDTA-treated TTR recovered [(125)I]T3 binding activity in a Zn(2+) concentration-dependent manner. Scatchard analysis revealed the presence of two classes of binding site for T3, with dissociation constants of 0.24 and 17nM. However, the high-affinity sites were completely abolished with 1mM EDTA, whereas the remaining low-affinity sites decreased binding capacity. The number of zinc per TTR was quantified to be 4.5-6.3. Our results suggest that skate TTR has tight Zn(2+)-binding sites, which are essential for T3 binding to at least the high-affinity sites. Zn(2+) binding to the N-terminal histidine-rich segment may play an important role in acquisition or reinforcement of TH binding ability during early evolution of TTR. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Case competitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjoldager, Anne Gram

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents and discusses a teaching project with case competitions for MA students of specialised translation at the Aarhus School of Business, Aarhus University. Drawing on a series of online questionnaires, the paper ascertains how the project was evaluated by the participating students...

  16. EDITORIAL: Physics competitions Physics competitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordens, H.; Mathelitsch, L.

    2009-11-01

    1. Physics competitions: aims and realizations One aim of physics competitions is to increase the interest of young students, primarily at upper secondary level, to physics and natural sciences in general. A competition has motivational aspects known usually from sports events or games—comparing one's own ability with others, of course with the desire to be better and to win. If competitions reach nationwide and even international levels, additional stimulation is created. Competitions provide greatest attraction to possible winners, to the group of gifted people in a particular field. This implies that science contests are excellent tools for the promotion of talented students. Traditional teaching has been shown to have problems in supporting this group of students. Very often teachers are overstretched with the demands of teaching both low- and high-level students. Extracurricular activities are therefore a good chance to relieve the teacher, and to give talented students the opportunity for appropriate training and challenge. The competitions, however, have a broader impact and address more young people than one might guess from the statements above. Training courses and selection at school level give a larger group of students extra and, to some extent, complimentary education in physics. The degree of complexity of the tasks corresponds very often to the standards of the next level of education in the school system. Interestingly, many physics competitions have their origin in countries beyond the former Iron Curtain. They started as regional and national tournaments, were joined by neighbouring countries and have grown, in some cases, to events with participants from more than 80 countries. Although the features mentioned above are common to the different competitions, there are distinct differences between them [1]. The International Physics Olympiad (IPhO) is the oldest international physics competition for students at upper secondary level [2]. It dates

  17. The common equine class I molecule Eqca-1*00101 (ELA-A3.1) is characterized by narrow peptide binding and T cell epitope repertoires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Tobias; Moore, Carrie; Sidney, John; Miller, Donald; Tallmadge, Rebecca; Harman, Rebecca M; Oseroff, Carla; Wriston, Amanda; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Peters, Bjoern; Antczak, Douglas F; Sette, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    Here we describe a detailed quantitative peptide-binding motif for the common equine leukocyte antigen (ELA) class I allele Eqca-1*00101, present in roughly 25 % of Thoroughbred horses. We determined a preliminary binding motif by sequencing endogenously bound ligands. Subsequently, a positional scanning combinatorial library (PSCL) was used to further characterize binding specificity and derive a quantitative motif involving aspartic acid in position 2 and hydrophobic residues at the C-terminus. Using this motif, we selected and tested 9- and 10-mer peptides derived from the equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) proteome for their capacity to bind Eqca-1*00101. PSCL predictions were very efficient, with an receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve performance of 0.877, and 87 peptides derived from 40 different EHV-1 proteins were identified with affinities of 500 nM or higher. Quantitative analysis revealed that Eqca-1*00101 has a narrow peptide-binding repertoire, in comparison to those of most human, non-human primate, and mouse class I alleles. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from six EHV-1-infected, or vaccinated but uninfected, Eqca-1*00101-positive horses were used in IFN-γ enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays. When we screened the 87 Eqca-1*00101-binding peptides for T cell reactivity, only one Eqca-1*00101 epitope, derived from the intermediate-early protein ICP4, was identified. Thus, despite its common occurrence in several horse breeds, Eqca-1*00101 is associated with a narrow binding repertoire and a similarly narrow T cell response to an important equine viral pathogen. Intriguingly, these features are shared with other human and macaque major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules with a similar specificity for D in position 2 or 3 in their main anchor motif.

  18. 2-((E)-(6-fluorobenzo[d]thiazol-2-ylimino) methyl)-4-chlorophenol; synthesis, characterization, crystal structure, Hirshfeld surface analysis and BSA binding studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Savithri; Basappa Chidananda, Vasantha Kumar; Hosakere Doddarevanna, Revanasiddappa; Hamse Kameshwar, Vivek; Kaur, Manpreet; Jasinski, Jerry P.

    2017-08-01

    A new imine-based molecule 2-((E)-(6-fluorobenzo[d]thiazol-2-ylimino) methyl)-4-chlorophenol (FBt) was synthesized by microwave and conventional method. It was structurally characterized by spectral techniques (NMR, FT-IR, LC-MS and electronic absorption), elemental analysis and single-crystal X-ray diffraction methods. Hirshfeld surface analysis was employed to ensure the existence of intermolecular interactions in FBt structure. A preliminary in vitro susceptibility test against two pathogenic fungi with respect to standard has shown that the ligand is proved to be a potent antifungal agent. Since the carrying of a drug by BSA may effect on its structure and action, the investigation on the interaction between model protein BSA and FBt was carried out by employing UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The characteristics of the binding, i.e., binding constant, number of binding sites, and nature of binding were determined. Besides, the Förster's parameters associated with the binding process were calculated. Molecular docking was also carried on interaction study of the FBt with BSA.

  19. Localization of serotoni (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) with partial purification and characterization of a serotonin binding protein in the intestinal tissue of the nematode Ascaris suum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    An intracellular 5-HT binding protein (SBP) from intestinal tissue was partially purified and characterized. Binding of ({sup 3}H) 5-HT to the protein appeared to be Fe{sup +2}-sensitive and maximal (20.8pmol/mg protein) at 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}M Fe{sup +2} and 10{sup {minus}7}M ({sup 3}H) 5-HT. There were two 5-HT binding sites present at optimum Fe{sup +2} concentrations. The Bmax values of these sites were more sensitive to Fe{sup +2} than Kd values. Sulfhydryl reducing agents, cation chelators, Fe{sup +3}, Ca{sup +2} and antagonists of 5-HT uptake and storage inhibited binding of 5-HT to SBP. Gel exclusion chromatography indicated the presence of a 45Kda SBP that in 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}M Fe{sup +2} may form aggregates ranging in size from approximately 80 to >1000Kda. The data indicate these in vitro aggregates may correspond to the electron-opaque patches observed in situ. Ascaris suum may provide a model system to further elucidate the physiological role of analogous serotonin binding proteins that have been identified in mammalian systems.

  20. Dominating IgE-binding epitope of Bet v 1, the major allergen of birch pollen, characterized by X-ray crystallography and site-directed mutagenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spangfort, Michael D; Mirza, Osman; Ipsen, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    approach to the engineering of allergen molecules with reduced IgE binding. In this study, we describe the identification and modification of a human IgE-binding epitope based on the crystal structure of Bet v 1 in complex with the BV16 Fab' fragment. The epitope occupies approximately 10% of the molecular...... surface area of Bet v 1 and is clearly conformational. A synthetic peptide representing a sequential motif in the epitope (11 of 16 residues) did not inhibit the binding of mAb BV16 to Bet v 1, illustrating limitations in the use of peptides for B cell epitope characterization. The single amino acid...... substitution, Glu(45)-Ser, was introduced in the epitope and completely abolished the binding of mAb BV16 to the Bet v 1 mutant within a concentration range 1000-fold higher than wild type. The mutant also showed up to 50% reduction in the binding of human polyclonal IgE, demonstrating that glutamic acid 45...

  1. Characterization of /sup 125/I-lysergic acid diethylamide binding to serotonin receptors in rat frontal cortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadan, M.J.; Krohn, A.M.; Evans, M.J.; Waltz, R.L.; Hartig, P.R.

    1984-09-01

    /sup 125/I-Lysergic acid diethylamide (/sup 125/I-LSD) is the first /sup 125/I-labeled ligand for serotonin receptor studies. Its binding to rat frontal cortex membranes is saturable, reversible, and stereospecific. Specific binding is linearly dependent on tissue concentration and represents 70-80% of the total binding. Scatchard plots of the binding data are linear with a KD of 1.5 nM, a Bmax of 12.4 fmol/mg wet weight tissue, and a Hill slope of 1.02. The binding kinetics are highly temperature-dependent. At 37 degrees C the bimolecular association rate constant is 1.28 X 10(8) min-1 M-1 and the dissociation rate constant is 0.087 min-1 (t 1/2 . 8.0 min). At 0 degrees C less than 4% dissociation occurs over 40 min and the association rate is similarly depressed. Inhibition of /sup 125/I-LSD binding by a variety of serotonergic, dopaminergic, and adrenergic ligands reveals a 5-hydroxytryptamine2 (5-HT2) serotonergic profile for this binding site. Regional distribution studies of /sup 125/I-LSD binding in rat brain show that areas with the highest levels of binding include the cortex and striatum. Iodinated radioligands can be synthesized with specific activities exceeding 2,000 Ci/mmol, which makes them approximately 75-fold more sensitive than tritiated radioligands. This high specific activity, coupled with the selectivity of /sup 125/I-LSD for 5-HT2 sites, makes this ligand a sensitive new probe for 5-HT2 serotonin receptors.

  2. Chemical and physicochemical characterization of vermicompost from bovine manure and evaluation of competitive adsorption of cadmium and lead; Caracterizacao quimica e fisico-quimica de vermicomposto de esterco bovino e avaliacao da adsorcao competitiva por cadmio e chumbo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamim, Soraida Sozzi Miguel [Juiz de Fora Univ., MG (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Jordao, Claudio Pereira; Brune, Walter; Pereira, Jose Luis [Vicosa Univ., MG (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    1996-09-01

    The chemical and physicochemical characterization of vermicompost from bovine manure has been studied. It was examined the pH and cation exchangeable capacity (CTC), moistness, ash, organic carbon, total nitrogen, lignin, cellulose and metal concentrations, among other characteristics. The vermicompost was then applied to the retention and competition of metal pollutants (Cd and Pb) from metal nitrate solutions. The retention was affected by both the pH and time of adsorption, while the competitive character of these metals for the substrate was not relevant to each pH examined. (author) 46 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. EDITORIAL: Physics competitions Physics competitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordens, H.; Mathelitsch, L.

    2010-07-01

    This editorial opens the second special section on physics competitions in European Journal of Physics. In the first section last year, we asked for feedback on the idea of such a section and on the content of the articles. We received no answer whatsoever, which can be interpreted in two ways: the section is not interesting enough to raise motivation for feedback, or the reader is satisfied. Having no indication which scenario is the correct one, we are optimistic and favour the second. The section at hand contains three articles. Again, as last year, the organizer of the annual Olympiad reports on tasks and outcomes of this competition. The Olympiad took place in Merida, Mexico, and was by far the largest event with 316 contestants from 68 countries. Again, the predominance of Asian/Chinese students was manifest, showing how serious the training is taken by both their authorities and students. Unfortunately, the winners of the last International Young Physicists' Tournament (IYPT), the team from Korea, did not accept the offer to report on their prize-winning contribution. We are thankful that two students from Austria, who achieved second place with their team, took over and reported on the task which they presented in the finals of the competition. It connects the fields of sport and physics and explains a special move in skateboarding. The third contribution introduces a different competition, 'International Conference of Young Scientists'. On one hand, as in the Olympiad, it addresses individuals, not teams. On the other, as in the IYPT, students have several months to prepare and also the quality of the presentation is an important element of the judgment. In fact, this competition comes closer to real scientific research compared to the other events. Finally and again, we hope that this section will serve several purposes: To show the competitions as a very important tool in the support of gifted students. To raise awareness amongst university teachers, and

  4. Characterization of the Igf-II Binding Site of the IGF-II/MAN-6-P Receptor Extracellular Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmroudi, Farideh

    1995-01-01

    In mammals, insulin-like growth factor II (IGF -II) and glycoproteins bearing the mannose 6-phosphate (Man -6-P) recognition marker bind with high affinity to the same receptor. The functional consequences of IGF-II binding to the receptor at the cell surface are not clear. In these studies, we sought to broaden our understanding of the functional regions of the receptor regarding its IGF -II binding site. The IGF-II binding/cross-linking domain of the IGF-II/Man-6-P receptor was mapped by sequencing receptor fragments covalently attached to IGF-II. Purified rat placental or bovine liver receptors were affinity-labeled, with ^{125}I-IGF-II and digested with endoproteinase Glu-C. Analysis of digests by gel electrophoresis revealed a major radiolabeled band of 18 kDa, which was purified by gel filtration chromatography followed by reverse-phase HPLC and electroblotting. Sequence analysis revealed that, the peptide S(H)VNSXPMF, located within extracellular repeat 10 and beginning with serine 1488 of the bovine receptor, was the best candidate for the IGF-II cross-linked peptide. These data indicated that residues within repeats 10-11 were important for IGF -II binding. To define the location of the IGF-II binding site further, a nested set of six human receptor cDNA constructs was designed to produce epitope-tagged fusion proteins encompassing the region between repeats 8 and 11 of the human IGF-II/Man-6-P receptor extracellular domain. These truncated receptors were transiently expressed in COS-7 cells, immunoprecipitated and analyzed for their abilities to bind and cross-link to IGF-II. All of the constructs were capable of binding/cross-linking to IGF-II, except for the 9.0-11 construct. Displacement curve analysis indicated that the truncated receptors were approximately equivalent in IGF-II binding affinity, but were of 5- to 10-fold lower affinity than full-length receptors. Sequencing of the 9.0-11 construct indicated the presence of a point mutation

  5. Proteomic Characterization of Pig Sperm Anterior Head Plasma Membrane Reveals Roles of Acrosomal Proteins in ZP3 Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongmanas, Kessiri; Kruevaisayawan, Hathairat; Saewu, Arpornrad; Sugeng, Clarissa; Fernandes, Jason; Souda, Puneet; Angel, Jonathan B; Faull, Kym F; Aitken, R John; Whitelegge, Julian; Hardy, Daniel; Berger, Trish; Baker, Mark A; Tanphaichitr, Nongnuj

    2015-02-01

    The sperm anterior head plasma membrane (APM) is the site where sperm first bind to the zona pellucida (ZP). This binding reaches the maximum following the sperm capacitation process. To gain a better understanding of the sperm-ZP binding mechanisms, we compared protein profiles obtained from mass spectrometry of APM vesicles isolated from non-capacitated and capacitated sperm. The results revealed that ZP-binding proteins were the most abundant group of proteins, with a number of them showing increased levels in capacitated sperm. Blue native gel electrophoresis and far-western blotting revealed presence of high molecular weight (HMW) protein complexes in APM vesicles of both non-capacitated and capacitated sperm, but the complexes (∼750-1300 kDa) from capacitated sperm possessed much higher binding capacity to pig ZP3 glycoprotein. Proteomic analyses indicated that a number of proteins known for their acrosome localization, including zonadhesin, proacrosin/acrosin and ACRBP, were components of capacitated APM HMW complexes, with zonadhesin being the most enriched protein. Our immunofluorescence results further demonstrated that a fraction of these acrosomal proteins was transported to the surface of live acrosome-intact sperm during capacitation. Co-immunoprecipitation indicated that zonadhesin, proacrosin/acrosin and ACRBP interacted with each other and they may traffic as a complex from the acrosome to the sperm surface. Finally, the significance of zonadhesin in the binding of APM HMW complexes to pig ZP3 was demonstrated; the binding ability was decreased following treatment of the complexes with anti-zonadhesin antibody. Our results suggested that acrosomal proteins, especially zonadhesin, played roles in the initial sperm-ZP binding during capacitation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Structural and biochemical characterization of two heme binding sites on α1-microglobulin using site directed mutagenesis and molecular simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutardottir, Sigurbjörg; Karnaukhova, Elena; Nantasenamat, Chanin; Songtawee, Napat; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Rajabi, Mohsen; Rosenlöf, Lena Wester; Alayash, Abdu I; Åkerström, Bo

    2016-01-01

    α1-Microglobulin (A1M) is a reductase and radical scavenger involved in physiological protection against oxidative damage. These functions were previously shown to be dependent upon cysteinyl-, C34, and lysyl side-chains, K(92, 118,130). A1M binds heme and the crystal structure suggests that C34 and H123 participate in a heme binding site. We have investigated the involvement of these five residues in the interactions with heme. Four A1M-variants were expressed: with cysteine to serine substitution in position 34, lysine to threonine substitutions in positions (92, 118, 130), histidine to serine substitution in position 123 and a wt without mutations. Heme binding was investigated by tryptophan fluorescence quenching, UV-Vis spectrophotometry, circular dichroism, SPR, electrophoretic migration shift, gel filtration, catalase-like activity and molecular simulation. All A1M-variants bound to heme. Mutations in C34, H123 or K(92, 118, 130) resulted in significant absorbance changes, CD spectral changes, and catalase-like activity, suggesting involvement of these side-groups in coordination of the heme-iron. Molecular simulation support a model with two heme-binding sites in A1M involving the mutated residues. Binding of the first heme induces allosteric stabilization of the structure predisposing for a better fit of the second heme. The results suggest that one heme-binding site is located in the lipocalin pocket and a second binding site between loops 1 and 4. Reactions with the hemes involve the side-groups of C34, K(92, 118, 130) and H123. The model provides a structural basis for the functional activities of A1M: heme binding activity of A1M. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Identification and characterization of porcine mannan-binding lectin A (pMBL-A), and determination of serum concentration heritability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul-Madsen, H. R.; Krogh-Meibom, T.; Henryon, M.

    2006-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) is an innate immune collectin present in the serum of humans and many farm animals. This oligomeric pattern-recognition protein effectively binds to the glycoconjugate arrays present on the surfaces of microorganisms and activates the complement system to enhance...... in the Landrace (h(2)=0.8) but not in the Duroc breed (h(2)=0.15). These genetic differences may be useful in selecting breeding pigs for improved disease resistance....

  8. Logo competition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Award of the prizes The price ceremony for the Staff Association’s new logo competition which took place on Friday 1st March at 5 p.m. was a big success. The first prize, an Ezee Suisse electric bike, was won by Paulo Rios, from Portugal. In his absence, the bike was handed to his brother Vitor. The other five winners of the competition also received their prize: Go Sport vouchers. A peize draw was then organized to award 22 other participants with prizes offered by our commercial partners (Aquaparc, BCGE, L’Occitane, Passeport Gourmand, Sephora, Theater La Comédie de Genève), whom we would like to warmly thank. After all prices were distributed the evening continued with discussions around a friendly drink.

  9. Optimal Competition : A Benchmark for Competition Policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper introduces optimal competition: the best form of competition in an industry that a competition authority can achieve under the information constraint that it cannot observe firms' effciency levels.We show that the optimal competition outcome in an industry becomes more competitive as more

  10. Binding affinity of tea catechins for HSA: characterization by high-performance affinity chromatography with immobilized albumin column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Takeshi; Minoda, Kanako; Bae, Min-Jung; Mori, Taiki; Uekusa, Yoshinori; Ichikawa, Tatsuya; Aihara, Yoshiyuki; Furuta, Takumi; Wakimoto, Toshiyuki; Kan, Toshiyuki; Nakayama, Tsutomu

    2010-06-01

    Catechins are the major polyphenols in green tea leaves. Recent studies have suggested that the catechins form complexes with HSA for transport in human blood, and their binding affinity for albumin is believed to modulate their bioavailability. In this study, the binding affinities of catechins and their analogs were evaluated and the relationship between the chemical structure of each catechin and its binding property were investigated. Comparing these catechins by HPLC analysis with the HSA column, we showed that galloylated catechins have higher binding affinities with HSA than non-galloylated catechins. In addition, pyrogallol-type catechins have a high affinity compared to catechol-type catechins. Furthermore, the binding affinity of the catechin with 2,3-trans structure was higher than those of the catechin with 2,3-cis structure. The importance of the hydroxyl group on the galloyl group and B-ring was confirmed using methylated catechins. These results indicate that the most important structural element contributing to HSA binding of tea catechins is the galloyl group, followed by the number of hydroxyl groups on the B-ring and the galloyl group or the configuration at C-2. Our findings provide fundamental information on the relationship between the chemical structure of tea catechins and its biological activity.

  11. Structural and thermodynamic characterization of metal binding in Vps29 from Entamoeba histolytica: implication in retromer function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Vijay Kumar; Yadav, Rupali; Watanabe, Natsuki; Tomar, Priya; Mukherjee, Madhumita; Gourinath, Samudrala; Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Datta, Sunando

    2017-11-01

    Vps29 is the smallest subunit of retromer complex with metallo-phosphatase fold. Although the role of metal in Vps29 is in quest, its metal binding mutants has been reported to affect the localization of the retromer complex in human cells. In this study, we report the structural and thermodynamic consequences of these mutations in Vps29 from the protozoan parasite, Entamoeba histolytica (EhVps29). EhVps29 is a zinc binding protein as revealed by X-ray crystallography and isothermal titration calorimetry. The metal binding pocket of EhVps29 exhibits marked differences in its 3-dimensional architecture and metal coordination in comparison to its human homologs and other metallo-phosphatases. Alanine substitutions of the metal-coordinating residues showed significant alteration in the binding affinity of EhVps29 for zinc. We also determined the crystal structures of metal binding defective mutants (D62A and D62A/H86A) of EhVps29. Based on our results, we propose that the metal atoms or the bound water molecules in the metal binding site are important for maintaining the structural integrity of the protein. Further cellular studies in the amoebic trophozoites showed that the overexpression of wild type EhVps29 leads to reduction in intracellular cysteine protease activity suggesting its crucial role in secretion of the proteases. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. In silico cloning and characterization of the TGA (TGACG MOTIF-BINDING FACTOR) transcription factors subfamily in Carica papaya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrovo Espín, Fabio Marcelo; Peraza-Echeverria, Santy; Fuentes, Gabriela; Santamaría, Jorge M

    2012-05-01

    The TGA transcription factors belong to the subfamily of bZIP group D that play a major role in disease resistance and development. Most of the TGA identified in Arabidopsis interact with the master regulator of SAR, NPR1 that controls the expression of PR genes. As a first approach to determine the possible involvement of these transcription factors in papaya defense, we characterized Arabidopsis TGA orthologs from the genome of Carica papaya cv. SunUp. Six orthologs CpTGA1 to CpTGA6, were identified. The predicted CpTGA proteins were highly similar to AtTGA sequences and probably share the same DNA binding properties and transcriptional regulation features. The protein sequences alignment evidenced the presence of conserved domains, characteristic of this group of transcription factors. The phylogeny showed that CpTGA evolved into three different subclades associated with defense and floral development. This is the first report of basal expression patterns assessed by RT-PCR, from the whole subfamily of CpTGA members in different tissues from papaya cv. Maradol mature plants. Overall, CpTGA1, CpTGA3 CpTGA6 and CpTGA4 showed a basal expression in all tissues tested; CpTGA2 expressed strongly in all tissues except in petioles while CpTGA5 expressed only in petals and to a lower extent in petioles. Although more detailed studies in anthers and other floral structures are required, we suggest that CpTGA5 might be tissue-specific, and it might be involved in papaya floral development. On the other hand, we report here for the first time, the expression of the whole family of CpTGA in response to salicylic acid (SA). The expression of CpTGA3, CpTGA4 and CpTGA6 increased in response to SA, what would suggest its involvement in the SAR response in papaya. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Cloning and characterization of TaMBD6 homeologues encoding methyl-CpG-binding domain proteins in wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ruijie; Zhang, Jiahui; Li, Jingyuan; Wang, Ketao; Jia, Haiying; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Putong; Yin, Jun; Meng, Fanrong; Li, Yongchun

    2016-12-01

    DNA methylation is a major epigenetic marker in plants that plays a crucial role in transcriptional and developmental regulation. The DNA methylation 'code' is thought to be 'read' by a set of proteins containing methyl-CpG-binding domain (MBD). However, little is known about MBD genes in common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Here, we report the isolation and characterization of TaMBD6 and its homeologues (TaMBD6_A, TaMBD6_B, and TaMBD6_D) in hexaploid wheat. The cDNA was quite different among the three homeologues and InDel mutations were detected in 5'-UTR and coding region. Two types of TRs (tandem repeats) -- TR1 (57 bp) and TR2 (39 bp) -- occurred in the coding region. TaMBD6_B harbored five copies of TR1 and two copies of TR2. In contrast, TaMBD6_A lacked 30 bp between the 2nd and 3rd copy of TR1, while TaMBD6_D was missing two copies of TR1 but had three copies of TR2. TaMBD6_A, TaMBD6_B, and TaMBD6_D encoded 435, 446, and 420 amino acids, respectively. Structural analysis of TaMBD6 protein indicated that each of the three homeologues had an identical MBD domain at the N-terminal, as well as a typical nuclear localization signal. Although genomics analysis showed that two introns were included, the length of the first intron varied from 3100 bp to 3471 bp and their sequences were very different. Expression analysis demonstrated that the transcription level of TaMBD6 began to increase gradually in developing grains at 15 days after pollination while decreasing significantly in endosperm and embryo tissues during germination. Expression of TaMBD6 appeared to be positively correlated with starch metabolism in the endosperm but was negatively correlated with embryo formation and sprouting. We were also interested to learn that TaMBD6 homeologues were differentially expressed in developing wheat plants and that their expression patterns were variously affected by vernalization treatment. Further investigation revealed that TaMBD6 was induced by prolonged chilling

  14. Synthesis and characterization of molybdenum/phenolic resin composites binding with aluminum nitride particles for diamond cutters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chun-Te [Department of Polymer Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, 43, Sec 4, Keelung Rd, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Lee, Hsun-Tsing [R and D Center for the Applications of Nanomaterials and Electro-information Technology, Vanung University, Chung-Li, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Chen, Jem-Kun, E-mail: jkchen@mail.ntust.edu.tw [Department of Polymer Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, 43, Sec 4, Keelung Rd, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2013-11-01

    Novolac-type bisphenol-F based molybdenum–phenolic resins/silane-modified aluminum nitride (Mo–BPF/m-AlN) composites were successfully prepared. In the preparation process, molybdate reacted with bisphenol-F based phenolic resins (BPF) to form a low cross-linked Mo–BPF with new Mo-O bonds which were confirmed by the FTIR and XPS spectra. Simultaneously, a special silane-modified aluminum nitride (m-AlN) was prepared with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) modifier. Then, this m-AlN was fully mixed with Mo–BPF to form Mo–BPF/m-AlN which can be further cured with hexamethylenetetramine at 200 °C. The structure and characterization of BPF, Mo–BPF and Mo–BPF/m-AlN were determined by using FTIR, DSC, DMA, TGA, SEM, mechanical properties and contact angle measurements. SEM photographs show that m-AlN particles are uniformly distributed in the Mo–BPF/m-AlN composites. Also there are no gaps or void between m-AlN and Mo–BPF phases, which implies a strong physical bonding between the two phases. The glass transition temperature, thermal resistance, flexural strength, and hardness of Mo–BPF are respectively higher than those of BPF. This is due to the presence of Mo-O cross-linking bonds in Mo–BPF. When the m-AlN was additionally incorporated into Mo–BPF, the well-dispersed and well-adhered m-AlN can further promote all the above-mentioned properties of the composites. Typically, the glass transition temperature, decomposition temperature at 5% weight loss and flexural strength of Mo–BPF/m-AlN are 245 °C, 428 °C and 82.7 MPa respectively, which are much higher than the corresponding values of 184 °C, 358 °C and 58.2 MPa for BPF. In addition, the hygroscopic nature of BPF can be inhibited by treating with molybdate or incorporating with m-AlN. This is due to that the m-AlN is hydrophobic and Mo-O groups in Mo–BPF are more hydrophobic than OH groups in BPF. Furthermore, Mo–BPF/m-AlN was compared with BPF in the performance as a binder for

  15. Formation and characterization of iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen as a potential iron supplement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Jianjun; Chen, Fei; Fan, Daidi, E-mail: fandaidi@nwu.edu.cn; Zhu, Chenhui; Ma, Xiaoxuan; Xue, Wenjiao

    2013-10-01

    Iron incorporated into food can induce precipitation and unwanted interaction with other components in food. Iron-binding proteins represent a possibility to avoid these problems and other side effects, as the iron is protected. However, there are several technical problems associated with protein–iron complex formation. In this paper, the iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen (Fe-G6P-HLC) was prepared under physiological conditions through phosphorylated modification. One molecule of Fe-G6P-HLC possesses about 24 atoms of Fe. Spectroscopy analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and equilibrium dialysis techniques were employed to investigate the characteristics of the Fe-G6P-HLC. The binding sites (n{sub b}) and apparent association constant (K{sub app}) between iron and phosphorylated HLC were measured at n{sub b} = 23.7 and log K{sub app} = 4.57, respectively. The amount of iron (Fe{sup 2+} sulfate) binding to phosphorylated HLC was found to be a function of pH and phosphate content. In addition, the solubility and thermal stability of HLC were not significantly affected. The results should facilitate the utilization of HLC as a bioactive iron supplement in the food and medical industry and provide an important theoretical evidence for the application of HLC chelates. - Highlights: • The iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen (Fe-G6P-HLC) was prepared. • One molecule of Fe-G6P-HLC possesses about 24 atoms of Fe. • The binding properties could be modulated through alterations in pH and phosphate content presented in HLC. • A novel strategy for preparing iron-binding proteins was provided.

  16. Structural characterization of interactions between the double-stranded RNA-binding zinc finger protein JAZ and nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burge, Russell G; Martinez-Yamout, Maria A; Dyson, H Jane; Wright, Peter E

    2014-03-11

    The interactions of the human double-stranded RNA-binding zinc finger protein JAZ with RNA or DNA were investigated using electrophoretic mobility-shift assays, isothermal calorimetry, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Consistent with previous reports, JAZ has very low affinity for duplex DNA or single-stranded RNA, but it binds preferentially to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) with no detectable sequence specificity. The affinity of JAZ for dsRNA is unaffected by local structural features such as loops, overhangs, and bulges, provided a sufficient length of reasonably well-structured A-form RNA (about 18 bp for a single zinc finger) is present. Full-length JAZ contains four Cys2His2 zinc fingers (ZF1-4) and has the highest apparent affinity for dsRNA; two-finger constructs ZF12 and ZF23 have lower affinity, and ZF34 binds even more weakly. The fourth zinc finger, ZF4, has no measurable RNA-binding affinity. Single zinc finger constructs ZF1, ZF2, and ZF3 show evidence for multiple-site binding on the minimal RNA. Fitting of quantitative NMR titration and isothermal calorimetry data to a two-site binding model gave Kd1 ∼ 10 μM and Kd2 ∼ 100 μM. Models of JAZ-RNA complexes were generated using the high-ambiguity-driven biomolecular docking (HADDOCK) program. Single zinc fingers bind to the RNA backbone without sequence specificity, forming complexes with contacts between the RNA minor groove and residues in the N-terminal β strands and between the major groove and residues in the helix-kink-helix motif. We propose that the non-sequence-specific interaction between the zinc fingers of JAZ with dsRNA is dependent only on the overall shape of the A-form RNA.

  17. Characterization of hyaluronate binding proteins isolated from 3T3 and murine sarcoma virus transformed 3T3 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turley, E.A.; Moore, D.; Hayden, L.J.

    1987-06-02

    A hyaluronic acid binding fraction was purified from the supernatant media of both 3T3 and murine sarcoma virus (MSV) transformed 3T3 cultures by hyaluronate and immunoaffinity chromatography. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis resolved the hyaluronate affinity-purified fraction into three major protein bands of estimated molecular weight (M/sub r,e/) 70K, 66K, and 56K which contained hyaluronate binding activity and which were termed hyaluronate binding proteins (HABP). Hyaluronate affinity chromatography combined with immunoaffinity chromatography, using antibody directed against the larger HABP, allowed a 20-fold purification of HABP. Fractions isolated from 3T3 supernatant medium also contained additional binding molecules in the molecular weight range of 20K. This material was present in vanishingly small amounts and was not detected with a silver stain or with (/sup 35/S)methionine label. The three protein species isolated by hyaluronate affinity chromatography (M/sub r,e/ 70K, 66K, and 56K) were related to one another since they shared antigenic determinants and exhibited similar pI values. In isocratic conditions, HABP occurred as aggregates of up to 580 kilodaltons. Their glycoprotein nature was indicated by their incorporation of /sup 3/H-sugars. Enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay showed they were antigenically distinct from other hyaluronate binding proteins such as fibronectin, cartilage link protein, and the hyaluronate binding region of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan. The results are discussed with regard both to the functional significance of hyaluronate-cell surface interactions in transformed as well as normal cells and to the relationship of HABP to other reported hyaluronate binding proteins.

  18. Multiplexed silicon photonic sensor arrays enable facile characterization of coagulation protein binding to nanodiscs with variable lipid content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehl, Ellen M; Gajsiewicz, Joshua M; Medfisch, Sara M; Wiersma, Zachary S B; Morrissey, James H; Bailey, Ryan C

    2017-09-29

    Interactions of soluble proteins with the cell membrane are critical within the blood coagulation cascade. Of particular interest are the interactions of γ-carboxyglutamic acid-rich domain-containing clotting proteins with lipids. Variability among conventional analytical methods presents challenges for comparing clotting protein-lipid interactions. Most previous studies have investigated only a single clotting protein and lipid composition and have yielded widely different binding constants. Herein, we demonstrate that a combination of lipid bilayer nanodiscs and a multiplexed silicon photonic analysis technology enables high-throughput probing of many protein-lipid interactions among blood-clotting proteins. This approach allowed direct comparison of the binding constants of prothrombin, factor X, activated factor VII, and activated protein C to seven different binary lipid compositions. In a single experiment, the binding constants of one protein interacting with all lipid compositions were simultaneously determined. A simple surface regeneration then facilitated similar binding measurements for three other coagulation proteins. As expected, our results indicated that all proteins exhibit tighter binding (lower K d ) as the proportion of anionic lipid increases. Interestingly, at high proportions of phosphatidylserine, the K d values of all four proteins began to converge. We also found that although k off values for all four proteins followed trends similar to those observed for the K d values, the variation among the proteins was much lower, indicating that much of the variation came from the kinetic binding ( k on ) of the proteins. These findings indicate that the combination of silicon photonic microring resonator arrays and nanodiscs enables rapid interrogation of biomolecular binding interactions at model cell membrane interfaces. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Structural and functional characterization of Caenorhabditis elegans α-catenin reveals constitutive binding to β-catenin and F-actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyunook; Bang, Injin; Jin, Kyeong Sik; Lee, Boyun; Lee, Junho; Shao, Xiangqiang; Heier, Jonathon A; Kwiatkowski, Adam V; Nelson, W James; Hardin, Jeff; Weis, William I; Choi, Hee-Jung

    2017-04-28

    Intercellular epithelial junctions formed by classical cadherins, β-catenin, and the actin-binding protein α-catenin link the actin cytoskeletons of adjacent cells into a structural continuum. These assemblies transmit forces through the tissue and respond to intracellular and extracellular signals. However, the mechanisms of junctional assembly and regulation are poorly understood. Studies of cadherin-catenin assembly in a number of metazoans have revealed both similarities and unexpected differences in the biochemical properties of the cadherin·catenin complex that likely reflect the developmental and environmental requirements of different tissues and organisms. Here, we report the structural and biochemical characterization of HMP-1, the Caenorhabditis elegans α-catenin homolog, and compare it with mammalian α-catenin. HMP-1 shares overall similarity in structure and actin-binding properties, but displayed differences in conformational flexibility and allosteric regulation from mammalian α-catenin. HMP-1 bound filamentous actin with an affinity in the single micromolar range, even when complexed with the β-catenin homolog HMP-2 or when present in a complex of HMP-2 and the cadherin homolog HMR-1, indicating that HMP-1 binding to F-actin is not allosterically regulated by the HMP-2·HMR-1 complex. The middle (i.e. M) domain of HMP-1 appeared to be less conformationally flexible than mammalian α-catenin, which may underlie the dampened effect of HMP-2 binding on HMP-1 actin-binding activity compared with that of the mammalian homolog. In conclusion, our data indicate that HMP-1 constitutively binds β-catenin and F-actin, and although the overall structure and function of HMP-1 and related α-catenins are similar, the vertebrate proteins appear to be under more complex conformational regulation. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Characterization and immunohistochemical localization of rat salivary cobalamin-binding protein and comparison with human salivary haptocorrin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nexø, Ebba; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1985-01-01

    Rat saliva contains a cobalamin-binding protein that binds cobalamin as well as cobinamide. The protein binds cobalamin with an affinity constant of 8 X 10(10) l X mol-1, and it binds cobalamin over a more narrow pH range (pH 7.5-10) than does human haptocorrin. It has a Stokes radius of 2.45 nm...... as compared to the Stokes radius of 4.50 nm for human haptocorrin. Upon isoelectricfocusing it dissociates into four strong bands with pI between 7 and 8, while human haptocorrin dissociates into acid isoproteins. Since human haptocorrin binds to concanavalin A while rat haptocorrin does not, we suggest...... that rat haptocorrin lacks carbohydrate. The substance concentration of rat saliva haptocorrin is 0.04-12.9 nmol X l-1 (median 7.5 nmol X l-1, n = 9) for control animals. After stimulation with isoproterenol, a beta-adrenergic agent, the substance concentration is 46.4-96.6 nmol X l-1 (median 69.7 nmol X l...

  1. [Isolation and characterization of a DRE-binding transcription factor from Yinxin poplar (Populus alba x P. alba var. pyramidalis)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hong-Xia; Jia, Zhi-Ping; Zhang, Hai-Chao; Liu, Jing-Mei; Song, Yu-Xia

    2005-11-01

    Dehydration-Responsive Element Binding ( DREB) transcription factors, specifically binding with dehydration reponsive element (DRE), activate a variety of stress-responsive genes in plants under abiotic stresses (dehydration, high salt and low temperature). Using PCR and homologous EST search, we isolated a DREB-like gene from Yinxin poplar (Populus alba x P. alba var. pyramidalis) named PaDREB2. Yeast One-hybrid experiment demonstrated that PaDREB2 protein could function as a DREB transcription factor activating target gene expression by specifically binding to DRE cis-element. To study the expression pattern of PaDREB2, RT-PCR was carried out. And the results showed that PaDREB2 is induced by low temperature, drought and high salt.

  2. Synthesis, characterization, crystal structure, DNA/BSA binding ability and antibacterial activity of asymmetric europium complex based on 1,10- phenanthroline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfi, Nafiseh; Khorasani-Motlagh, Mozhgan; Rezvani, Ali Reza; Noroozifar, Meissam; Molčanov, Krešimir

    2017-06-01

    A heteroleptic europium coordination compound formulated as [Eu(phen)2(OH2)2(Cl)2](Cl)(H2O) (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline), has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR spectroscopy, and single-crystal X-ray diffractometer. Crystal structure analysis reveals the complex is crystallized in orthorhombic system with Pca21 space group. Electronic absorption and various emission methods for investigation of the binding system of europium(III) complex to Fish Salmon deoxyribonucleic acid (FS-DNA) and Bovamin Serum Albumin (BSA) have been explored. Furthermore, the binding constants, binding sites and the corresponding thermodynamic parameters of the interaction system based on the van't Hoff equation for FS-DNA and BSA were calculated. The thermodynamic parameters reflect the exothermic nature of emission process (ΔH°DNA by non-intercalative mode which the groove binding is preferable mode. Also, the complex exhibits a brilliant antimicrobial activity in vitro against standard bacterial strains.

  3. Characterization of chicken octamer-binding proteins demonstrates that POU domain-containing homeobox transcription factors have been highly conserved during vertebrate evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petryniak, B.; Postema, C.E.; McCormack, W.T.; Thompson, C.B. (Univ. of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor (USA)); Staudt, L.M. (National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-02-01

    The DNA sequence motif ATTTGCAT (octamer) or its inverse complement has been identified as an evolutionarily conserved element in the promoter region of immunoglobulin genes. Two major DNA-binding proteins that bind in a sequence-specific manner to the octamer DNA sequence have been identified in mammalian species--a ubiquitously expressed protein (Oct-1) and a lymphoid-specific protein (Oct-2). During characterization of the promoter region of the chicken immunoglobulin light chain gene, the authors identified two homologous octamer-binding proteins in chicken B cells. when the cloning of the human gene for Oct-2 revealed it to be a member of a distinct family of homeobox genes, they sought to determine if the human Oct-2 cDNA could be used to identify homologous chicken homeobox genes. Using a human Oct-2 homeobox-specific DNA probe, they were able to identify 6-10 homeobox-containing genes in the chicken genome, demonstrating that the Oct-2-related subfamily of homeobox genes exists in avian species. DNA sequence analysis revealed it to be the chicken homologue of the human Oct-1 gene. Together, the data show that the POU-containing subfamily of homeobox genes have been highly conserved during vertebrate evolution, apparently as a result of selection for their DNA-binding and transcriptional regulatory properties.

  4. Pharmacologic characterization and autoradiographic distribution of binding sites for iodinated tachykinins in the rat central nervous system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, S.H.; Helke, C.J.; Burcher, E.; Shults, C.W.; O' Donohue, T.L.

    1986-11-01

    P-type, E-type, and K-type tachykinin binding sites have been identified in the mammalian CNS. These sites may be tachykinin receptors for which the mammalian neuropeptides substance P, neuromedin K, and substance K are the preferred natural agonists, respectively. In the present investigation, we have compared the pharmacology and the autoradiographic distribution of CNS binding sites for the iodinated (/sup 125/I-Bolton-Hunter reagent) tachykinins substance P, eledoisin, neuromedin K, and substance K. Iodinated eledoisin and neuromedin K exhibited an E-type binding pattern in cortical membranes. Iodinated eledoisin, neuromedin K, and substance K each labeled sites that had a similar distribution but one that was considerably different from that of sites labeled by iodinated substance P. CNS regions where there were detectable densities of binding sites for iodinated eledoisin, neuromedin K, and substance K and few or no sites for iodinated substance P included cortical layers IV-VI, mediolateral septum, supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei, interpeduncular nucleus, ventral tegmental area, and substantia nigra pars compacta. Binding sites for SP were generally more widespread in the CNS. CNS regions where there was a substantial density of binding sites for iodinated substance P and few or no sites for iodinated eledoisin, neuromedin K, and substance K included cortical layers I and II, olfactory tubercle, nucleus accumbens, caudate-putamen, globus pallidus, medial and lateral septum, endopiriform nucleus, rostral thalamus, medial and lateral preoptic nuclei, arcuate nucleus, dorsal raphe nucleus, dorsal parabrachial nucleus, parabigeminal nucleus, cerebellum, inferior olive, nucleus ambiguus, retrofacial and reticular nuclei, and spinal cord autonomic and somatic motor nuclei.

  5. Identification and Functional Characterization of a Novel Acetylcholine-binding Protein from the Marine Annelid Capitella teleta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormack, T.; Petrovich,; Mercier, K; DeRose, E; Cuneo, M; Williams, J; Johnson, K; Lamb, P; London, R; Yakel, J

    2010-01-01

    We identified a homologue of the molluscan acetylcholine-binding protein (AChBP) in the marine polychaete Capitella teleta, from the annelid phylum. The amino acid sequence of C. teleta AChBP (ct-AChBP) is 21-30% identical with those of known molluscan AChBPs. Sequence alignments indicate that ct-AChBP has a shortened Cys loop compared to other Cys loop receptors, and a variation on a conserved Cys loop triad, which is associated with ligand binding in other AChBPs and nicotinic ACh receptor (nAChR) {alpha} subunits. Within the D loop of ct-AChBP, a conserved aromatic residue (Tyr or Trp) in nAChRs and molluscan AChBPs, which has been implicated directly in ligand binding, is substituted with an isoleucine. Mass spectrometry results indicate that Asn122 and Asn216 of ct-AChBP are glycosylated when expressed using HEK293 cells. Small-angle X-ray scattering data suggest that the overall shape of ct-AChBP in the apo or unliganded state is similar to that of homologues with known pentameric crystal structures. NMR experiments show that acetylcholine, nicotine, and {alpha}-bungarotoxin bind to ct-AChBP with high affinity, with KD values of 28.7 {micro}M, 209 nM, and 110 nM, respectively. Choline bound with a lower affinity (K{sub D} = 163 {micro}M). Our finding of a functional AChBP in a marine annelid demonstrates that AChBPs may exhibit variations in hallmark motifs such as ligand-binding residues and Cys loop length and shows conclusively that this neurotransmitter binding protein is not limited to the phylum Mollusca.

  6. COMPETITIVE INTELLIGENCE

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandru Govoreanu; Andreea Mora; Anca Serban

    2010-01-01

    There are many challenges to face in this century. It’s an era of information. Those who have the best information are going to win the race for supremacy on the market. More and more managers are aware of the fact that they have to do something to remain on the market and to be successful. They have to adapt and to try to gain an advantage over the competitors. Nowadays, the only thing that makes the difference is the company’s competitiveness. The times when the one who had the capacity to ...

  7. The characterization of a novel S100A1 binding site in the N-terminus of TRPM1

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirků, Michaela; Lánský, Zdeněk; Bednárová, L.; Šulc, Miroslav; Monincová, L.; Majer, P.; Vyklický ml., Ladislav; Vondrášek, J.; Teisinger, Jan; Boušová, Kristýna

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 78, Sep 2016 (2016), s. 186-193 ISSN 1357-2725 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-17488S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 ; RVO:61388971 ; RVO:86652036 Keywords : TRPM1 channel * binding site * calcium-binding protein S100A1 * steady-state fluorescence anisotropy * molecular modeling * circular dichroism Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry ; EE - Microbiology, Virology (MBU-M); EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology (BTO-N) Impact factor: 3.505, year: 2016

  8. EDITORIAL: Physics competitions Physics competitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordens, H.; Mathelitsch, L.

    2011-07-01

    International tests on competences, such as TIMSS or PISA, and knowledge of young students have revealed low average scores in many countries, often unexpectedly. One effective measure to increase the average standard of a population is to bring the last third of the group to a higher level. Therefore, many nations put some effort into this activity. This brings the danger that not enough attention is paid to students at the other end, those who are talented. Indeed, it is a very difficult task for a teacher to support the less able and at the same time challenge the gifted students, to lead them to the limits of their abilities and provide for a smooth transition to university study. Physics competitions have been proven to fulfil these last demands to a large degree, and therefore are an important additional and, to some extent, complementary tool for the promotion of talented students. This third special section on physics competitions in European Journal of Physics contains three papers, each dealing with a different form of science contest. The first continues the series of presentations of tasks performed at the International Young Physicists' Tournament, which was held in Vienna in 2011. First place went to the team from Singapore, and they have put their investigation on vertical oscillations of coupled magnets into written form (not required by the tournament, where an oral presentation and a defence and discussion are the central aspects). Their paper shows how rich in physics this problem is, and what level of solutions high-school students can already achieve. Sadly, those responsible for the organization of last year's International Physics Olympiad did not provide us with a report on this competition. This is unfortunate, since the Olympiad in Zagreb was very successful and, in particular, the experimental tasks were creative and demanding. Very similar to the aims and the execution of the Physics Olympiad is the International Olympiad on Astronomy

  9. Incorporation of metals (Pt-Ni-Ru) in the zeolite ZSM-5 through ion exchange competitive: synthesis and characterization; Incorporacao de metais (Pt-Ni-Ru) na zeolita ZSM-5 atraves da troca ionica competitiva: sintese e caracterizacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, A.S.; Rodrigues, M.G.F., E-mail: antusiasb@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Quimica; Grau, J.M. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Catalisis y Petroquimica (INCAPE/FIQ/UNL-CONICET), Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2012-07-01

    Zeolites are very important materials due to their high specific surface area. Moreover, they are suitable for use as catalyst support. Noble metals supported on zeolites have been widely used as catalysts in the petrochemical industry. This paper was prepared and characterized, a powder aiming its use in heterogeneous catalysis. Support was used as ZSM-5 and the method of incorporation of the metals (Ru-PtNi) was competitive ion exchange. The materials (ZSM-5 and Pt-Ni-Ru/ZSM-5) were characterized by spectrophotometry Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and nitrogen physisorption (BET method). Based on the results of X-ray diffraction, it is possible to demonstrate the preservation of the structure of zeolite ZSM-5 after the competitive ion Exchange with metals (Ru-Pt-Ni) and calcination. The dispersion of metals on ZSM-5 did not change the textural characteristics of the zeolite. (author)

  10. RAFT-based tri-component fluorescent glycopolymers: synthesis, characterization and application in lectin-mediated bacterial binding study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Chance, Deborah L; Mossine, Valeri V; Mawhinney, Thomas P

    2014-02-01

    A group of fluorescent statistical glycopolymers, prepared via reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT)-based polymerizations, were successfully employed in lectin-mediated bacterial binding studies. The resultant glycopolymers contained three different monomers: N-(2-hydroxyethyl) acrylamide (HEAA), N-(2-aminoethyl) methacrylamide (AEMA) and N-(2-glyconamidoethyl)-methacrylamides possessing different pendant sugars. Low dispersities (≤1.32) and predictable degrees of polymerization were observed among the products. After the polymerization, the glycopolymers were further modified by different succinimidyl ester fluorophores targeting the primary amine groups on AEMA. With their binding specificities being confirmed by testing with lectin coated agarose beads, the glycopolymers were employed in bacterial binding studies, where polymers containing α-galactose or β-galactose as the pendant sugar were specifically bound by two clinically important pathogens Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, respectively. This is the first report of using RAFT-based glycopolymers in bacterial binding studies, and the ready access to tri-component statistical glycopolymers also warrants further exploration of their utility in other glycobiological applications.

  11. Characterization of Zika virus binding and enhancement potential of a large panel of flavivirus murine monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Elinor; Hensley, Scott E

    2017-08-01

    Zika viruses (ZIKVs) are circulating in parts of the world endemic for other flavivirus infections. Some cross-reactive antibodies (Abs) elicited by prior flavivirus exposures can bind to ZIKV and enhance infection of Fc receptor-bearing cells. Here, we measured ZIKV binding of 54 murine monoclonal Abs (mAbs) elicited by exposure with Dengue virus and West Nile virus antigens. We found that 8 of 54 mAbs recognized the envelope protein of ZIKV in conventional binding assays. These 8 cross-reactive mAbs have different specificities; most recognize the DI/II region of the envelope protein but one mAb recognized the DIII lateral ridge of the envelope protein. Interestingly, only 3 of these cross-reactive mAbs were able to enhance ZIKV infection in vitro, and enhancing potential was not strictly correlated with relative binding ability. These data suggest that the ability of flavivirus Abs to enhance ZIKV is dependent on multiple factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Characterization of mercury binding onto a novel brominated biomass ash sorbent by X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisson, Teresa M; MacLean, Lachlan C W; Hu, Yongfeng; Xu, Zhenghe

    2012-11-06

    Recent laboratory and field-scale experiments demonstrated the potential for brominated industrial solid waste from biomass combustion (Br-Ash) to be an efficient, cost-effective alternative to activated carbon for capturing mercury from coal-fired power plants. To develop this attractive alternative technology to a commercially sustainable level, a better understanding of mercury capture mechanisms by Br-Ash is required. For this purpose, X-ray absorption fine-structure (XAFS) spectra of Br-Ash were collected at the Hg L(III)-edge, Br K-edge and S K-edge, and analyzed to determine the local bonding environment of mercury atoms. The coordination environment of Hg was compared with that on a commercial brominated activated carbon. Our results indicate that the mercury was captured by chemisorption on both the commercial and biomass ash sorbents; however, the mercury binding environment was different for each sorbent. Mercury was found to bind to the reduced sulfur by the commercial brominated activated carbon, in contrast to mercury binding with carbon and bromine on the brominated biomass ash. Based on the results obtained, a mechanism of Hg capture involving oxidation of elemental Hg followed by binding of the oxidized mercury on the surface of the sorbent near Br was proposed for the brominated biomass ash.

  13. Structural characterization of amorphous calcium carbonate-binding protein: an insight into the mechanism of amorphous calcium carbonate formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jingtan; Liang, Xiao; Zhou, Qiang; Zhang, Guiyou; Wang, Hongzhong; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2013-07-15

    ACC (amorphous calcium carbonate) plays an important role in biomineralization process for its function as a precursor for calcium carbonate biominerals. However, it is unclear how biomacromolecules regulate the formation of ACC precursor in vivo. In the present study, we used biochemical experiments coupled with bioinformatics approaches to explore the mechanisms of ACC formation controlled by ACCBP (ACC-binding protein). Size-exclusion chromatography, chemical cross-linking experiments and negative staining electron microscopy reveal that ACCBP is a decamer composed of two adjacent pentamers. Sequence analyses and fluorescence quenching results indicate that ACCBP contains two Ca²⁺-binding sites. The results of in vitro crystallization experiments suggest that one Ca²⁺-binding site is critical for ACC formation and the other site affects the ACC induction efficiency. Homology modelling demonstrates that the Ca²⁺-binding sites of pentameric ACCBP are arranged in a 5-fold symmetry, which is the structural basis for ACC formation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the structural basis for protein-induced ACC formation and it will significantly improve our understanding of the amorphous precursor pathway.

  14. Characterization of antibody-containing vesicles shed from B-lymphoma cell lines: exposure of annexin V binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Rosana B; Abu-Asab, Mones; Tsokos, Maria; Mattes, M Jules

    2006-11-01

    Antibodies (Abs) to CD20 or HLA-DR, after binding to the B-lymphoma cell line RL following an overnight incubation at 37 degrees C, accumulate in the form of shed vesicles, which develop in the center of the cell clusters that are spontaneously formed by this cell line. These vesicles coalesce into fairly stable large structures, which we refer to as conglomerates of shed vesicles (CSVs). In the present study, we have extended our previous investigations into the nature of this material. Electron microscopy revealed a conglomerate of heterogeneous vesicles, which looked like pinched-off cytoplasmic projections. CSVs developed similarly either with or without Ab, demonstrating that CSV production is a spontaneous process that incorporates bound Abs if they are present. Before delivery to CSVs, the Abs capped on the cell surface. CSVs had high expression of annexin V binding sites, which are phagocytic signals that are exposed on damaged cells. For CSVs that were cell bound, which are frequently observed, the annexin V binding sites were only in the CSVs, and not on the surface of the intact cell. Although all CSVs contained both Abs and annexin V binding sites, the precise distribution of these two ligands was generally different. Annexin V binding sites were present on caps as well as on CSVs, and appear as soon as caps are formed. In cells incubated with anti-HLA-DR, CD20 was delivered to the CSVs together with HLA-DR, suggesting an association between these two molecules. CSVs prepared with anti-HLA-DR, but not CSVs prepared with anti-CD20, contained considerable numbers of nuclear fragments, identified by propidium iodide staining.

  15. Characterization of the N-Acetyl-5-neuraminic Acid-binding Site of the Extracytoplasmic Solute Receptor (SiaP) of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Strain 2019

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, Jason W.; Coussens, Nathan P.; Allen, Simon; Houtman, Jon C.D.; Turner, Keith H.; Zaleski, Anthony; Ramaswamy, S.; Gibson, Bradford W.; Apicella, Michael A. (Iowa); (Buck Inst.)

    2012-11-14

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae is an opportunistic human pathogen causing otitis media in children and chronic bronchitis and pneumonia in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The outer membrane of nontypeable H. influenzae is dominated by lipooligosaccharides (LOS), many of which incorporate sialic acid as a terminal nonreducing sugar. Sialic acid has been demonstrated to be an important factor in the survival of the bacteria within the host environment. H. influenzae is incapable of synthesizing sialic acid and is dependent on scavenging free sialic acid from the host environment. To achieve this, H. influenzae utilizes a tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic transporter. In this study, we characterize the binding site of the extracytoplasmic solute receptor (SiaP) from nontypeable H. influenzae strain 2019. A crystal structure of N-acetyl-5-neuraminic acid (Neu5Ac)-bound SiaP was determined to 1.4 {angstrom} resolution. Thermodynamic characterization of Neu5Ac binding shows this interaction is enthalpically driven with a substantial unfavorable contribution from entropy. This is expected because the binding of SiaP to Neu5Ac is mediated by numerous hydrogen bonds and has several buried water molecules. Point mutations targeting specific amino acids were introduced in the putative binding site. Complementation with the mutated siaP constructs resulted either in full, partial, or no complementation, depending on the role of specific residues. Mass spectrometry analysis of the O-deacylated LOS of the R127K point mutation confirmed the observation of reduced incorporation of Neu5Ac into the LOS. The decreased ability of H. influenzae to import sialic acid had negative effects on resistance to complement-mediated killing and viability of biofilms in vitro, confirming the importance of sialic acid transport to the bacterium.

  16. Specific binding of a naturally occurring amyloidogenic fragment of Streptococcus mutans adhesin P1 to intact P1 on the cell surface characterized by solid state NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Wenxing; Bhatt, Avni [University of Florida, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine (United States); Smith, Adam N. [University of Florida, Department of Chemistry, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (United States); Crowley, Paula J.; Brady, L. Jeannine, E-mail: jbrady@dental.ufl.edu [University of Florida, Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry (United States); Long, Joanna R., E-mail: jrlong@ufl.edu [University of Florida, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The P1 adhesin (aka Antigen I/II or PAc) of the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans is a cell surface-localized protein involved in sucrose-independent adhesion and colonization of the tooth surface. The immunoreactive and adhesive properties of S. mutans suggest an unusual functional quaternary ultrastructure comprised of intact P1 covalently attached to the cell wall and interacting with non-covalently associated proteolytic fragments thereof, particularly the ∼57-kDa C-terminal fragment C123 previously identified as Antigen II. S. mutans is capable of amyloid formation when grown in a biofilm and P1 is among its amyloidogenic proteins. The C123 fragment of P1 readily forms amyloid fibers in vitro suggesting it may play a role in the formation of functional amyloid during biofilm development. Using wild-type and P1-deficient strains of S. mutans, we demonstrate that solid state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy can be used to (1) globally characterize cell walls isolated from a Gram-positive bacterium and (2) characterize the specific binding of heterologously expressed, isotopically-enriched C123 to cell wall-anchored P1. Our results lay the groundwork for future high-resolution characterization of the C123/P1 ultrastructure and subsequent steps in biofilm formation via ssNMR spectroscopy, and they support an emerging model of S. mutans colonization whereby quaternary P1-C123 interactions confer adhesive properties important to binding to immobilized human salivary agglutinin.

  17. Specific binding of a naturally occurring amyloidogenic fragment of Streptococcus mutans adhesin P1 to intact P1 on the cell surface characterized by solid state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wenxing; Bhatt, Avni; Smith, Adam N; Crowley, Paula J; Brady, L Jeannine; Long, Joanna R

    2016-02-01

    The P1 adhesin (aka Antigen I/II or PAc) of the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans is a cell surface-localized protein involved in sucrose-independent adhesion and colonization of the tooth surface. The immunoreactive and adhesive properties of S. mutans suggest an unusual functional quaternary ultrastructure comprised of intact P1 covalently attached to the cell wall and interacting with non-covalently associated proteolytic fragments thereof, particularly the ~57-kDa C-terminal fragment C123 previously identified as Antigen II. S. mutans is capable of amyloid formation when grown in a biofilm and P1 is among its amyloidogenic proteins. The C123 fragment of P1 readily forms amyloid fibers in vitro suggesting it may play a role in the formation of functional amyloid during biofilm development. Using wild-type and P1-deficient strains of S. mutans, we demonstrate that solid state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy can be used to (1) globally characterize cell walls isolated from a Gram-positive bacterium and (2) characterize the specific binding of heterologously expressed, isotopically-enriched C123 to cell wall-anchored P1. Our results lay the groundwork for future high-resolution characterization of the C123/P1 ultrastructure and subsequent steps in biofilm formation via ssNMR spectroscopy, and they support an emerging model of S. mutans colonization whereby quaternary P1-C123 interactions confer adhesive properties important to binding to immobilized human salivary agglutinin.

  18. Characterization of epoxyeicosatrienoic acid binding site in U937 membranes using a novel radiolabeled agonist, 20-125i-14,15-epoxyeicosa-8(Z)-enoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenqi; Tuniki, Venugopal Raju; Anjaiah, Siddam; Falck, J R; Hillard, Cecilia J; Campbell, William B

    2008-03-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are important regulators of vascular tone and homeostasis. Whether they initiate signaling through membrane receptors is unclear. We developed 20-iodo-14,15-epoxyeicosa-8(Z)-enoic acid (20-I-14,15-EE8ZE), a radiolabeled EET agonist, to characterize EET binding to membranes of U937 cells. 20-I-14,15-EE8ZE stimulated cAMP production in U937 cells with similar potency, but it decreased efficacy compared with 11,12-EET. Maximum cAMP production increased 4.2-fold, with an EC(50) value of 9 muM. Like 14,15-EET, 20-I-14,15-EE8ZE relaxed bovine coronary arteries, with a similar EC(50) value. Both 20-I-14,15-EE8ZE agonist activities were blocked by the EET antagonist 14,15-epoxyeicosa-5(Z)enoic acid (14,15-EE5ZE). Specific 20-(125)I-14,15-EE8ZE binding to U937 membranes reached equilibrium within 10 min and remained unchanged for 30 min at 4 degrees C. The binding was saturable, reversible, and exhibited K(D) and B(max) values of 11.8 +/- 1.1 nM and 5.8 +/- 0.2 pmol/mg protein, respectively. Pretreatment of the membranes with guanosine 5'-O-(3-thio)triphosphate reduced the B(max) in a concentration-related manner. 20-(125)I-14,15-EE8ZE binding was inhibited by eicosanoids with potency order of 11,12-EET >14,15-EE5ZE approximately 14,15-EET > 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid > 14,15-EET-thiirane >14,15-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid. This order is in agreement with the efficacy and potency of cAMP production. In summary, 20-(125)I-14,15-EE8ZE is a radiolabeled EET agonist that is useful to study binding and metabolism. Using this radioligand, we have identified a specific high-affinity and high-abundance EET binding site in U937 cell membranes. This binding site could represent a specific EET receptor, which is probably a G protein-coupled receptor.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of 1-(3-aminophenyl)-3-(naphthalen-1-yl)thiourea and preliminary study towards binding with metal ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngah, Fatimatul Akma Awang; Heng, Lee Yook; Hassan, Nurul Izzaty; Hasbullah, Siti Aishah

    2016-11-01

    New mono-thiourea derivative, 1-(3-aminophenyl)-3-(naphthalen-1-yl)thiourea (3) has been synthesized from the reaction of 1-naphthyl isothiocyanate (1) and 1,3-phenylenediamine (2) using conventional method. The percentage yield of compound 3 was 82%. The compound 3 was characterized using FT-Infrared (FT-IR), 1H and 1C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopies and Mass Spectrometry. An application of chemical sensor on this compound was prepared and examined by UV-vis spectrometer to study the binding interaction between metal ions and compound 3.

  20. Characterization of Aromatase Binding Agents from the Dichloromethane Extract of Corydalis yanhusuo Using Ultrafiltration and Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Shi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Aromatase represents an important target for the treatment of hormone-dependent breast cancer. In the present study, nine alkaloids from the dichloromethane extract of Corydalis yanhusuo were identified by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS and tested for their aromatase binding activities using an ultrafiltration LC-MS method by investigating the differences of peak areas of compounds before and after incubations with aromatase. It was demonstrated that the quaternary protoberberine alkaloids and the tertiary protoberberine alkaloids exhibited potent aromatase binding activities. The quaternary ammonium group and the methyl group at C-13 position of tertiary protoberberine alkaloids might be necessary for the activity. The findings should provide guidance for the discovery of potential aromatase inhibitors from natural products.

  1. New perspectives on the computational characterization of the kinetics of binding-unbinding in drug design: implications for novel therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana M. Moreno-Vargas

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency and the propensity of a drug to be bound to its target protein have been inseparable concepts for decades now. The correlation between the pharmacological activity and the binding affinity has been the first rule to design and optimize a new drug rationally. However, this argument does not prove to be infallible when the results of in vivo assays have to be confronted. Only recently, we understand that other magnitudes as the kinetic rates of binding and unbinding, or the mean residence time of the complex drug-protein, are equally relevant to draw a more accurate model of the mechanism of action of a drug. It is in this scenario where new computational techniques to simulate the all-atom dynamics of the biomolecular system find its valuable place on the challenge of designing new molecules for more effective and less toxic therapies.

  2. Molecular characterization of a novel human hybrid-type receptor that binds the alpha2-macroglobulin receptor-associated protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Linda; Madsen, P; Moestrup, S K

    1996-01-01

    The 39-40-kDa receptor-associated protein (RAP) binds to the members of the low density lipoprotein receptor gene family and functions as a specialized endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi chaperone. Using RAP affinity chromatography, we have purified a novel approximately 250-kDa brain protein and isolated...... the corresponding cDNA. The gene, designated SORL1, maps to chromosome 11q 23/24 and encodes a 2214-residue type 1 receptor containing a furin cleavage site immediately preceding the N terminus determined in the purified protein. The receptor, designated sorLA-1, has a short cytoplasmic tail containing a tyrosine......-based internalization signal and a large external part containing (from the N-terminal): 1) a segment homologous to domains in the yeast vacuolar protein sorting 10 protein, Vps10p, that binds carboxypeptidase Y, 2) five tandemly arranged YWTD repeats and a cluster of 11 class A repeats characteristic of the low...

  3. Small Molecule Binding, Docking, and Characterization of the Interaction between Pth1 and Peptidyl-tRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary C. Hames

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial Pth1 is essential for viability. Pth1 cleaves the ester bond between the peptide and nucleotide of peptidyl-tRNA generated from aborted translation, expression of mini-genes, and short ORFs. We have determined the shape of the Pth1:peptidyl-tRNA complex using small angle neutron scattering. Binding of piperonylpiperazine, a small molecule constituent of a combinatorial synthetic library common to most compounds with inhibitory activity, was mapped to Pth1 via NMR spectroscopy. We also report computational docking results, modeling piperonylpiperazine binding based on chemical shift perturbation mapping. Overall these studies promote Pth1 as a novel antibiotic target, contribute to understanding how Pth1 interacts with its substrate, advance the current model for cleavage, and demonstrate feasibility of small molecule inhibition.

  4. Simultaneous purification of biotin-binding proteins-I and -II from chicken egg yolk and their characterization.

    OpenAIRE

    Subramanian, N; Adiga, P R

    1995-01-01

    Chicken egg yolk biotin-binding protein-I (BBP-I) has been purified to homogeneity along with the tetrameric BBP-II by a common protocol. The purification includes delipidation of egg yolk by butanol extraction, DEAE-Sephacel chromatography, treatment with guanidinium chloride and biotin-aminohexyl-Sepharose affinity chromatography. The identity of purified BBP-I was ascertained by its physicochemical properties as well as by its immunological cross-reactivity and precursor-product relationsh...

  5. Ligand Binding Assays in the 21st Century Laboratory: Recommendations for Characterization and Supply of Critical Reagents

    OpenAIRE

    O’Hara, Denise M.; Theobald, Valerie; Egan, Adrienne Clements; Usansky, Joel; Krishna, Murli; TerWee, Julie; Maia, Mauricio; Spriggs, Frank P.; Kenney, John; Safavi, Afshin; Keefe, Jeannine

    2012-01-01

    Critical reagents are essential components of ligand binding assays (LBAs) and are utilized throughout the process of drug discovery, development, and post-marketing monitoring. Successful lifecycle management of LBA critical reagents minimizes assay performance problems caused by declining reagent activity and can mitigate the risk of delays during preclinical and clinical studies. Proactive reagent management assures adequate supply. It also assures that the quality of critical reagents is ...

  6. Structural characterization of copper(II) binding to α-synuclein: Insights into the bioinorganic chemistry of Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Rasia, R.; Bertoncini, C.; Marsh, D; Hoyer, W.; Cherny, D; Zweckstetter, M.; Griesinger, C; Jovin, T.; Fernandez, C.

    2005-01-01

    The aggregation of α -synuclein (AS) is characteristic of Parkinson’s disease and other neurodegenerative synucleinopathies. We demonstrate here that Cu(II) ions are effective in accelerating AS aggregation at physiologically relevant concentrations without altering the resultant fibrillar structures. By using numerous spectroscopic techniques (absorption, CD, EPR, and NMR), we have located the primary binding for Cu(II) to a specific site in the N terminus, involving His-50 as the anchoring ...

  7. Characterization of novel bangle lectin from Photorhabdus asymbiotica with dual sugar-binding specificity and its effect on host immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gita Jančaříková

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Photorhabdus asymbiotica is one of the three recognized species of the Photorhabdus genus, which consists of gram-negative bioluminescent bacteria belonging to the family Morganellaceae. These bacteria live in a symbiotic relationship with nematodes from the genus Heterorhabditis, together forming a complex that is highly pathogenic for insects. Unlike other Photorhabdus species, which are strictly entomopathogenic, P. asymbiotica is unique in its ability to act as an emerging human pathogen. Analysis of the P. asymbiotica genome identified a novel fucose-binding lectin designated PHL with a strong sequence similarity to the recently described P. luminescens lectin PLL. Recombinant PHL exhibited high affinity for fucosylated carbohydrates and the unusual disaccharide 3,6-O-Me2-Glcβ1-4(2,3-O-Me2Rhaα-O-(p-C6H4-OCH2CH2NH2 from Mycobacterium leprae. Based on its crystal structure, PHL forms a seven-bladed β-propeller assembling into a homo-dimer with an inter-subunit disulfide bridge. Investigating complexes with different ligands revealed the existence of two sets of binding sites per monomer-the first type prefers l-fucose and its derivatives, whereas the second type can bind d-galactose. Based on the sequence analysis, PHL could contain up to twelve binding sites per monomer. PHL was shown to interact with all types of red blood cells and insect haemocytes. Interestingly, PHL inhibited the production of reactive oxygen species induced by zymosan A in human blood and antimicrobial activity both in human blood, serum and insect haemolymph. Concurrently, PHL increased the constitutive level of oxidants in the blood and induced melanisation in haemolymph. Our results suggest that PHL might play a crucial role in the interaction of P. asymbiotica with both human and insect hosts.

  8. Structural characterization of copper(II) binding to alpha-synuclein: Insights into the bioinorganic chemistry of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasia, Rodolfo M; Bertoncini, Carlos W; Marsh, Derek; Hoyer, Wolfgang; Cherny, Dmitry; Zweckstetter, Markus; Griesinger, Christian; Jovin, Thomas M; Fernández, Claudio O

    2005-03-22

    The aggregation of alpha-synuclein (AS) is characteristic of Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative synucleinopathies. We demonstrate here that Cu(II) ions are effective in accelerating AS aggregation at physiologically relevant concentrations without altering the resultant fibrillar structures. By using numerous spectroscopic techniques (absorption, CD, EPR, and NMR), we have located the primary binding for Cu(II) to a specific site in the N terminus, involving His-50 as the anchoring residue and other nitrogen/oxygen donor atoms in a square planar or distorted tetragonal geometry. The carboxylate-rich C terminus, originally thought to drive copper binding, is able to coordinate a second Cu(II) equivalent, albeit with a 300-fold reduced affinity. The NMR analysis of AS-Cu(II) complexes reveals the existence of conformational restrictions in the native state of the protein. The metallobiology of Cu(II) in Parkinson's disease is discussed by a comparative analysis with other Cu(II)-binding proteins involved in neurodegenerative disorders.

  9. Characterization and heterologous expression of a new matrix attachment region binding protein from the unicellular green alga Dunaliella salina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianyun; Hou, Guiqin; Wang, Yafeng; Xue, Lexun

    2010-12-01

    Although interactions between the nuclear matrix and special regions of chromosomal DNA called matrix attachment regions (MARs) are implicated in various nuclear functions, the understanding of the regulatory mechanism of MARs is still poor. A few MAR-binding proteins (MARBP) have been isolated from some plants and animals, but not from the unicellular algae. Here, we identify a novel MAR-binding protein, namely DMBP-1, from the halotolerant alga Dunaliella salina. The cDNA of DMBP-1 is 2322-bp long and contains a 1626 bp of an open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 542 amino acids (59 kDa). The DMBP-1 expressed in Escherichia coli specifically binds A/T-rich MAR DNA. The DMBP-1 fused to green fluorescent protein appears only inside the nuclei of Chinese hamster ovarian cells transfected with the pEGFP-MBP, indicating that the protein is located in the nuclei. The findings mentioned above may contribute to better understanding of the nuclear matrix-MAR interactions.

  10. Genome-wide identification and characterization of Notch transcription complex-binding sequence-paired sites in leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severson, Eric; Arnett, Kelly L; Wang, Hongfang; Zang, Chongzhi; Taing, Len; Liu, Hudan; Pear, Warren S; Shirley Liu, X; Blacklow, Stephen C; Aster, Jon C

    2017-05-02

    Notch transcription complexes (NTCs) drive target gene expression by binding to two distinct types of genomic response elements, NTC monomer-binding sites and sequence-paired sites (SPSs) that bind NTC dimers. SPSs are conserved and have been linked to the Notch responsiveness of a few genes. To assess the overall contribution of SPSs to Notch-dependent gene regulation, we determined the DNA sequence requirements for NTC dimerization using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay and applied insights from these in vitro studies to Notch-"addicted" T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells. We found that SPSs contributed to the regulation of about a third of direct Notch target genes. Although originally described in promoters, SPSs are present mainly in long-range enhancers, including an enhancer containing a newly described SPS that regulates HES5 expression. Our work provides a general method for identifying SPSs in genome-wide data sets and highlights the widespread role of NTC dimerization in Notch-transformed leukemia cells. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. Synthesis, Characterization and DNA-Binding Properties of The Novel Mononuclear Zn(II, Cd(II, and Mn(II Complexes with Pantoprazole.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wessam N. El-Sayed

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A   novel   mononuclear   Mn(II,   Zn(II   and   Cd(II   complexes of pantoprazole   (PA   was synthesized  and characterized  by elemental analysis,  molar conductivity,  magnetic susceptibility   measurements,   IR,  UV-visible  spectral  studies,  and  thermal  analysis.  The electronic spectra along with magnetic data suggest octahedral geometry for Mn(II, Zn(II and Cd(II complexes.  PA acts as an anionic bi-dentate ligand being coordinated by (S=O oxygen and benzimdazolyl nitrogen atoms. The interaction of the complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA was monitored by blue shift and hyperchromism in the UV-vis spectra. The observed  intrinsic  binding  constants  together  with  structural  analysis  of  the  complexes indicate  the groove  binding. The binding constants were determined at 303°K, 308°K and 313°K.  A thermodynamic analysis showed that the reaction is spontaneous with ΔG being negative. The enthalpy ΔH and the entropy ΔS of reactions were all determined.

  12. Synthesis, characterization, in silico ADMET prediction, and protein binding analysis of a novel zinc(II) Schiff-base complex: Application of multi-spectroscopic and computational techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahraki, Somaye; Shiri, Fereshteh; Saeidifar, Maryam

    2017-06-22

    By reaction of 1,2-diaminocyclohexane with the 2,3-butanedione monoxime in the presence of ZnCl2, a new Schiff base complex was obtained. This complex was characterized by elemental analyses, FT-IR, (1)H NMR, UV-Vis, and conductivity measurements. The reactivity of this complex to human serum albumin (HSA) under simulative physiological conditions was studied by spectroscopic and molecular docking analysis. Experimental results at various temperatures indicated that the intrinsic fluorescence of protein was quenched through a static quenching mechanism. The negative value of enthalpy change and positive value of entropy change indicated that both hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic forces played a major role in the binding of Zn(II) complex to HSA. FT-IR, three-dimensional fluorescence, and UV-Vis absorption results showed that the secondary structure of HSA changed after Zn(II) complex bound to protein. The binding distance was calculated to be 4.96 nm, according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Molecular docking results confirmed the spectroscopic results and showed that above complex is embedded into subdomain IIA of protein. All these experimental and computational results clarified that Zn(II) complex could bind with HSA effectively, which could be a useful guideline for efficient Schiff-base drug design.

  13. Spectral characterization, optical band gap calculations and DNA binding of some binuclear Schiff-base metal complexes derived from 2-amino-ethanoic acid and acetylacetone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussien, Mostafa A.; Nawar, Nagwa; Radwan, Fatima M.; Hosny, Nasser Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Bi-nuclear metal complexes derived from the reaction of Cu(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) acetates with the Schiff-base ligand (H2L) resulted from the condensation of 2-amino-ethanoic acid (glycine) and acetylacetone have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, Raman spectra, FT-IR, ES-MS, UV-Vis., 1H NMR, ESR, thermal analyses (TG, DTG and DTA) and magnetic measurements. The results showed that, the Schiff base ligand can bind two metal ions in the same time. It coordinates to the first metal ion as mono-negative bi-dentate through azomethine nitrogen and enolic carbonyl after deprotonation. At the same time, it binds to the second metal ion via carboxylate oxygen after deprotonation. The thermodynamic parameters E∗, ΔH∗, ΔG∗ and ΔS∗ have been calculated by Coats-Redfern (CR) and Horowitz-Metzger (HM) methods. The optical band gaps of the isolated complexes have been calculated from absorption spectra and the results indicated semi-conducting nature of the investigated complexes. The interactions between the copper (II) complex and calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) have been studied by UV spectra. The results confirm that the Cu(II) complex binds to CT-DNA.

  14. Competitive advantage and competitive dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milisavljević Momčilo

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding competitors means locating and defining their main elements. The first element is participants - companies that compete and create a network of rivalry. Apart from our company it includes other participants in the market (investors, consumers, distributors, providers and producers of substitute and complementary products. The other element is additional value - net profit and loss which every competitor brings to the others. Measuring of additional value requires measurement of value for every single company, and then comparing it with situation without that company. The third element is the rules which create a structure and a system in which the battle is proceeded. The rules may be written (laws, contracts or non-written (habits, culture, spoken deals. The forth element is tactics - maneuvers of the company in creating profit and competitive advantage. Four main tactics are prevent, attack, discourage and react. The fifth element is the bounders of the market competitors.

  15. Accident prevention in competitive cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLennan, J G; McLennan, J C; Ungersma, J

    1988-01-01

    A prospective study of risk factors and injury patterns of competitive cyclists in 10 races at altitudes over 1,500 meters was carried out over 4 years. In 1986, 1,500 licensed racers were compared to a similar group of over 3,900 racers in the 3 previous years to determine if the incidence and severity of injury could be lessened. Factors addressed were the use of helmets, binding-type pedals, equipment inspection, improved medical coverage, and the prevention of acute mountain sickness and exposure. The injury rate and injuries per 100 hours of racing competition were half of that seen in prior years. Severity of injury was lessened as over 80% of the injured racers returned to competition within 1 week in contrast to only 66% during the period from 1983 to 1985. A successful program for injury prevention and the lessening of the severity of injury at altitudes is proposed.

  16. Purification and characterization of a long-acting ciliary neurotrophic factor via genetically fused with an albumin-binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Longfu; Zhang, Chun; Liu, Liping; Zhang, Yao; Wang, Qi; Wang, Jian; Liu, Yongdong; Su, Zhiguo

    2017-11-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is a promising candidate for the treatment of neurodegenerative or metabolic diseases, but suffers rapid clearance in body. Herein we constructed a new long-acting recombinant human CNTF (rhCNTF) by genetic fusion with an albumin-binding domain (ABD) through a flexible peptide linker, hoping to endow the new molecule prolonged serum circulation time by binding with endogenous human serum albumin (HSA) and then utilizing the naturally long-half-life property of HSA. This fused protein rhCNTF-ABD was expressed in Escherichia coli mainly in the soluble form and purified through a two-step chromatography, with purity of 95% and a high yield of 90-100 mg/L culture. The in vitro binding ability of rhCNTF-ABD with HSA was firstly verified by incubation of the two components together followed by HP-SEC analysis. ABD-fused rhCNTF showed similar secondary and tertiary structure as the parent protein. It retained approximately 94.1% of the native bioactivity as demonstrated via CCK-8 cell viability assay analysis. In vivo studies in SD rats were performed and the terminal half-life of 483.89 min for rhCNTF-ABD was determined, which is about 14 folds longer than that of rhCNTF (34.28 min) and comparable with 20 k-40 kDa PEGylated rhCNTFs. The new constructed rhCNTF-ABD represents a potential therapeutic modality, and the proposed strategy may also have useful applications for other long-lasting biopharmaceutics' design. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Purification, characterization, cloning and structural analysis of Crocodylus siamensis ovotransferrin for insight into functions of iron binding and autocleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaipayang, Sukanya; Songsiriritthigul, Chomphunuch; Chen, Chun-Jung; Palacios, Philip M; Pierce, Brad S; Jangpromma, Nisachon; Klaynongsruang, Sompong

    2017-10-01

    Ovotransferrin (OTf), the major protein constituent of egg white, is of great interest due to its pivotal role in biological iron transport and storage processes and its spontaneous autocleavage into peptidic fragments with alternative biological properties, such as antibacterial and antioxidant activities. However, despite being well-investigated in avian, a detailed elucidation of the structure-function relationship of ovotransferrins in the closely related order of Crocodilia has not been reported to date. In this study, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) confirmed the presence of two spectroscopically distinct ferric iron binding sites in Crocodylus siamensis OTf (cOTf), but implied a five-fold lower quantity of bound iron than in hen OTf (hOTf). In addition, quantitative estimation of free sulfhydryl groups revealed slight differences to hOTf. To gain a better structural understanding of cOTf, we found a cOTf gene consisting of an open reading frame of 2040bp and encoding a protein of 679 amino acids. In silico prediction of the three-dimensional structure of cOTf and comparison with hOTf revealed four evolutionarily conserved iron-binding sites in both N- and C-lobes, as well as the presence of only 13 of the 15 disulfide bonds in hOTf. This evolutionary loss of disulfide linkages in conjunction with the lack of hydrogen bonding from a dilysine trigger in the C-lobe are presumed to affect the iron binding and autocleavage character of cOTf. As a result, cOTf may be capable of exerting a more diverse array of functions compared to its avian counterparts; for instance, ion buffering, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Characterization of the differences in the cyclopiazonic acid binding mode to mammalian and P. Falciparum Ca2+ pumps: a computational study.

    KAUST Repository

    Di Marino, Daniele

    2015-03-01

    Despite the investments in malaria research, an effective vaccine has not yet been developed and the causative parasites are becoming increasingly resistant to most of the available drugs. PfATP6, the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pump (SERCA) of P. falciparum, has been recently genetically validated as a potential antimalarial target and cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) has been found to be a potent inhibitor of SERCAs in several organisms, including P. falciparum. In position 263, PfATP6 displays a leucine residue, whilst the corresponding position in the mammalian SERCA is occupied by a glutamic acid. The PfATP6 L263E mutation has been studied in relation to the artemisinin inhibitory effect on P. falciparum and recent studies have provided evidence that the parasite with this mutation is more susceptible to CPA. Here, we characterized, for the first time, the interaction of CPA with PfATP6 and its mammalian counterpart to understand similarities and differences in the mode of binding of the inhibitor to the two Ca2+ pumps. We found that, even though CPA does not directly interact with the residue in position 263, the presence of a hydrophobic residue in this position in PfATP6 rather than a negatively charged one, as in the mammalian SERCA, entails a conformational arrangement of the binding pocket which, in turn, determines a relaxation of CPA leading to a different binding mode of the compound. Our findings highlight differences between the plasmodial and human SERCA CPA-binding pockets that may be exploited to design CPA derivatives more selective toward PfATP6.

  19. Structural characterization, spectroscopic signatures, nonlinear optical response, and antioxidant property of 4-benzyloxybenzaldehyde and its binding activity with microtubule-associated tau protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbu, V.; Vijayalakshmi, K. A.; Karthick, T.; Tandon, Poonam; Narayana, B.

    2017-09-01

    In the proposed work, the non-linear optical response, spectroscopic signature and binding activity of 4-Benzyloxybenzaldehyde (4BB) has been investigated. In order to find the vibrational contribution of functional groups in mixed or coupled modes in the experimental FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra, the potential energy distribution (PED) based on the internal coordinates have been computed. Since the molecule exists in the form of dimer in solid state, the electronic structure of dimer has been proposed in order to explain the intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions via aldehyde group. The experimental and simulated powder X-ray diffraction data was compared and the miller indices which define the crystallographic planes in the crystal lattices were identified. Optical transmittance and absorbance measurement were taken at ambient temperature in order to investigate the transparency and optical band gap. For screening the material for nonlinear applications, theoretical second order hyperpolarizability studies were performed and compared with the standard reference urea. To validate the theoretical results, powder second harmonic generation (SHG) studies were carried out using Kurtz and Perry technique. The results show that the molecule studied in this work exhibit considerable non-linear optical (NLO) response. In addition to the characterization and NLO studies, we also claimed based on the experimental and theoretical data that the molecule shows antioxidant property and inhibition capability. Since the title molecule shows significant binding with Tau protein that helps to stabilize microtubules in the nervous system, the molecular docking investigation was performed to find the inhibition constant, binding affinity and active binding residues.

  20. Cloning and characterization of cold, salt and drought inducible C-repeat binding factor gene from a highly cold adapted ecotype of Lepidium latifolium L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, M; Jaiswal, A; Jaiswal, J P; Qureshi, M I; Tufchi, M; Singh, N K

    2013-04-01

    The dehydration-responsive element-binding (DREB) protein/C-Repeat Binding Factors (CBFs) belongs to APETALA2 (AP2) family transcription factors that binds to DRE/CRT cis-element in cold-responsive (COR) genes and induce COR genes. CBFs have been isolated and characterized from evolutionarily diverse plant species. CBF pathway is conserved by CBF regulon and the size or the number and kind of target genes vary among freezing sensitive and tolerant plants. Hence, cloning of CBFs from highly freezing tolerant plants such as Lepidium latifolium L. will be useful in understanding the freezing tolerance of this species. In this study, LlCBF, a CBF1 family gene from L. Latifolium L., was cloned using RT-PCR and RACE-PCR. The full length mRNA of LlCBF is 948 bp with an open reading frame of 642 bp, encoding a protein of 213 amino acids with a molecular weight of 23.92 kDa and a theoretical isoelectric point of 4.80. Amino acid sequence analysis showed that LlCBF has an AP2 DNA binding domain, a potential CBF type nuclear localization signal (NLS) and C-terminal acidic domain. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis of LlCBF revealed that this gene is up-regulated by high salt, dehydration and low temperature stresses. The investigation is therefore successful in cloning of a gene having strong homology with CBF transcription factors and responsive to low temperature, high salt and dehydration conditions.

  1. Simultaneous purification of biotin-binding proteins-I and -II from chicken egg yolk and their characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, N; Adiga, P R

    1995-06-01

    Chicken egg yolk biotin-binding protein-I (BBP-I) has been purified to homogeneity along with the tetrameric BBP-II by a common protocol. The purification includes delipidation of egg yolk by butanol extraction, DEAE-Sephacel chromatography, treatment with guanidinium chloride and biotin-aminohexyl-Sepharose affinity chromatography. The identity of purified BBP-I was ascertained by its physicochemical properties as well as by its immunological cross-reactivity and precursor-product relationship with BBP-II.

  2. Characterization of dacC, which encodes a new low-molecular-weight penicillin-binding protein in Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lotte Bang; Murray, T; Popham, D L

    1998-01-01

    The pbp gene (renamed dacC), identified by the Bacillus subtilis genome sequencing project, encodes a putative 491-residue protein with sequence homology to low-molecular-weight penicillin-binding proteins. Use of a transcriptional dacC-lacZ fusion revealed that dacC expression (i) is initiated...... at the end of stationary phase; (ii) depends strongly on transcription factor sigmaH; and (iii) appears to be initiated from a promoter located immediately upstream of yoxA, a gene of unknown function located upstream of dacC on the B. subtilis chromosome. A B. subtilis dacC insertional mutant grew...

  3. Identification and characterization of PhbF: A DNA binding protein with regulatory role in the PHB metabolism of Herbaspirillum seropedicae SmR1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedrosa Fabio O

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herbaspirillum seropedicae SmR1 is a nitrogen fixing endophyte associated with important agricultural crops. It produces polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB which is stored intracellularly as granules. However, PHB metabolism and regulatory control is not yet well studied in this organism. Results In this work we describe the characterization of the PhbF protein from H. seropedicae SmR1 which was purified and characterized after expression in E. coli. The purified PhbF protein was able to bind to eleven putative promoters of genes involved in PHB metabolism in H. seropedicae SmR1. In silico analyses indicated a probable DNA-binding sequence which was shown to be protected in DNA footprinting assays using purified PhbF. Analyses using lacZ fusions showed that PhbF can act as a repressor protein controlling the expression of PHB metabolism-related genes. Conclusions Our results indicate that H. seropedicae SmR1 PhbF regulates expression of phb-related genes by acting as a transcriptional repressor. The knowledge of the PHB metabolism of this plant-associated bacterium may contribute to the understanding of the plant-colonizing process and the organism's resistance and survival in planta.

  4. An improved SELEX-Seq strategy for characterizing DNA-binding specificity of transcription factor: NF-κB as an example.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangming Gu

    Full Text Available SELEX-Seq is now the optimal high-throughput technique for characterizing DNA-binding specificities of transcription factors. In this study, we introduced an improved EMSA-based SELEX-Seq strategy with several advantages. The improvements of this strategy included: (1 using a FAM-labeled probe to track protein-DNA complex in polyacrylamide gel for rapidly recovering the protein-bound dsDNA without relying on traditional radioactive labeling or ethidium bromide staining; (2 monitoring the specificity of SELEX selection by detecting a positive and negative sequence doped into the input DNAs used in each round with PCR amplification; (3 using nested PCR to ensure the specificity of PCR amplification of the selected DNAs after each round; (4 using the nucleotides added at the 5' end of the nested PCR primers as the split barcode to code DNAs from various rounds for multiplexing sequencing samples. The split barcode minimized selection times and thus greatly simplified the current SELEX-Seq procedure. The reliability of the strategy was demonstrated by performing a successful SELEX-Seq of a well-known transcription factor, NF-κB. Therefore, this study provided a useful SELEX-Seq strategy for characterizing DNA-binding specificities of transcription factors.

  5. Isolation and characterization of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter system genes from loofah witches' broom phytoplasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chun-Lin; Ho, Kuo-Chieh

    2007-10-01

    A clone containing a 3903 bp EcoRI-restriction fragment was obtained from a lambda(ZAP) genomic library of loofah witches' broom (LfWB) phytoplasma by plaque hybridization using a PCR fragment as a probe. Sequence analysis revealed that this fragment contained three open reading frames (ORFs). The deduced amino acid sequences of ORF 1 and ORF 2 showed a high homology with the ATP-binding proteins of the ABC transporter system genes of prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and encoded proteins with a molecular mass of 36 and 30 kDa, respectively. Based on amino acid sequence similarity, secondary structure, hydrophilicity and a signal peptide sequence at the N-terminus, we predicted that ORF 3 might encode a specific solute-binding prolipoprotein of the ABC transporter system with a molecular mass of 62 kDa. The cleavage site of this prolipoprotein signal peptide was similar to those of gram-positive bacteria. In addition to nutrient uptake, ABC transporter systems of bacteria also play a role in signal transduction, drug-resistance and perhaps virulence. The possible implications of the system to the survival and the pathogenesis of phytoplasma were discussed.

  6. Identification and Characterization of Hyphantria cunea Aminopeptidase N as a Binding Protein of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab35 Toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakun Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The fall webworm, Hyphantria cunea (Drury is a major invasive pest in China. Aminopeptidase N (APN isoforms in lepidopteran larvae midguts are known for their involvement in the mode of action of insecticidal crystal (Cry proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis. In the present work, we identified a putative Cry1Ab toxin-binding protein, an APN isoform designated HcAPN3, in the midgut of H. cunea by ligand blot and mass spectrometry. HcAPN3 was highly expressed throughout all larval developmental stages and was abundant in the midgut and hindgut tissues. HcAPN3 was down-regulated at 6 h, then was up-regulated significantly at 12 h and 24 h after Cry1Ab toxin treatment. We expressed HcAPN3 in insect cells and detected its interaction with Cry1Ab toxin by ligand blot assays. Furthermore, RNA interference (RNAi against HcAPN3 using oral delivery and injection of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA resulted in a 61–66% decrease in transcript level. Down-regulating of the expression of HcAPN3 was closely associated with reduced susceptibility of H. cunea to Cry1Ab. In addition, the HcAPN3E fragment peptide expressed in Escherichia coli enhanced Cry1Ab toxicity against H. cunea larvae. This work represents the first evidence to suggest that an APN in H. cunea is a putative binding protein involved in Cry1Ab susceptibility.

  7. Characterization of a novel cell wall binding domain-containing Staphylococcus aureus endolysin LysSA97.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yoonjee; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2017-01-01

    Endolysin from Staphylococcus aureus phage SA97 (LysSA97) was cloned and investigated. LysSA97 specifically lyse the staphylococcal strains and effectively disrupted staphylococcal biofilms. Bioinformatic analysis of LysSA97 revealed a novel putative cell wall binding domain (CBD) as well as two enzymatically active domains (EADs) containing cysteine, histidine-dependent amidohydrolases/peptidases (CHAP, PF05257) and N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase (Amidase-3, PF01520) domains. Comparison of 98 endolysin genes of S. aureus phages deposited in GenBank showed that they can be classified into six groups based on their domain composition. Interestingly, approximately 80.61 % of the staphylococcal endolysins have a src-homology 3 (SH3, PF08460) domain as CBD, but the remaining 19.39 %, including LysSA97, has a putative C-terminal CBD with no homology to the known CBD. The fusion protein containing green fluorescent protein and the putative CBD of LysSA97 showed a specific binding spectrum against staphylococcal cells comparable to SH3 domain (PF08460), suggesting that the C-terminal domain of LysSA97 is a novel CBD of staphylococcal endolysins.

  8. Synthesis, structure characterization, DNA binding, and cleavage properties of mononuclear and tetranuclear cluster of copper(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafazadeh, Rasoul; Hasanzade, Naime; Heidari, Mohammad Mehdi; Willis, Anthony C

    2015-01-01

    Two copper(II) complexes, cluster 1, and mononuclear 2, have been synthesized by reacting acetylacetone and benzohydrazide (1:1 ratio for 1 and 1:2 ratio for 2) with CuCl(2) in a methanol solution. In 2, which is a new complex, the ligand acts as a tetradentate which binds the metal ion via two amide-O atoms and two imine-N atoms providing an N(2)O(2) square-planar around the copper(II) ion. The absorption spectra data evidence strongly suggested that the two copper(II) compounds could interact with CT-DNA (intrinsic binding constant, K(b) = 0.45×10(4) M-1 for 1 and K(b) = 2.39×10(4) M-1 for 2). The super coiled plasmid pBR322 DNA cleavage ability was studied with 1 and 2 in the presence and absence of H(2)O(2) as an oxidant. In both the absence and the presence of an oxidizing agent, complex 2 exhibited no nuclease activity. However, even in the absence of an oxidant, complex 1 exhibited significant DNA cleavage activity.

  9. The Scientific Competitiveness of Nations

    CERN Document Server

    Cimini, Giulio; Labini, Francesco Sylos

    2014-01-01

    We use citation data of scientific articles produced by individual nations in different scientific domains to determine the structure and efficiency of national research systems. We characterize the scientific fitness of each nation$-$that is, the competitiveness of its research system$-$and the complexity of each scientific domain by means of a non-linear iterative algorithm able to assess quantitatively the advantage of scientific diversification. We find that technological leading nations, beyond having the largest production of scientific papers and the largest number of citations, do not specialize in a few scientific domains. Rather, they diversify as much as possible their research system. On the other side, less developed nations are competitive only in scientific domains where also many other nations are present. Diversification thus represents the key element that correlates with scientific and technological competitiveness. A remarkable implication of this structure of the scientific competition is...

  10. Lunabotics Mining Competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Rob; Murphy, Gloria

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation describes a competition to design a lunar robot (lunabot) that can be controlled either remotely or autonomously, isolated from the operator, and is designed to mine a lunar aggregate simulant. The competition is part of a systems engineering curriculum. The 2010 competition winners in five areas of the competition were acknowledged, and the 2011 competition was announced.

  11. Competitive spirit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Leicester University will host the 65 international teams of students who will assemble in July for this year's International Physics Olympiad . The last time the Olympiad came to the UK was in 1986 in London, and it was the notable enthusiasm of the Leicester Physics and Astronomy department which persuaded the Olympiad Committee to give them the chance of organizing the prestigious event. The students taking part from all over the world are studying physics at A-level or an equivalent standard and they will take part in an intellectual marathon of theoretical and practical examinations. Each national team comprises five students selected from three rounds of competition and the teams will receive an official welcome from the city, as well as opportunities to visit some of the important educational and cultural centres of the surrounding region. The finalists will also be able to test their skills and initiative at the Challenger Learning Centre, which forms part of Leicester's new National Space Science Centre. Specific information on the event can be found on the Olympiad-2000 website at www.star.le.ac.uk/IphO-2000 . The Rudolf Ortvay problem solving contest in physics, which takes place in November, is a tradition of Eötvös University in Budapest, Hungary. The competition was first opened to international participants in 1998, enabling students from universities around the world to show their knowledge, ingenuity, problem-solving skills and physical insight into problems that are far beyond routine level. The problems (30 - 35 each year) are chosen from different branches of theoretical as well as applied physics. They have varying levels of difficulty, and every contestant can send solutions for ten problems. The focus is not on school-level problem-solving routines but rather on the `physical' way of thinking, recognition of the heart of the problem and an appropriate choice of mathematics. The majority of the assigned problems are original, few having

  12. Competition, Competitiveness and Development: Lessons from ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    competitive or restrictive business practices. As evidenced by the rapidly growing number of countries involved in the preparation, adoption and implementation of competition laws and policies, there is growing awareness among developing ...

  13. Peripheral and integral membrane binding of peptides characterized by time-dependent fluorescence shifts: focus on antimicrobial peptide LAH₄.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macháň, Radek; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Olżyńska, Agnieszka; Olšinová, Marie; Cebecauer, Marek; Marquette, Arnaud; Bechinger, Burkhard; Hof, Martin

    2014-06-03

    Positioning of peptides with respect to membranes is an important parameter for biological and biophysical studies using model systems. Our experiments using five different membrane peptides suggest that the time-dependent fluorescence shift (TDFS) of Laurdan can help when distinguishing between peripheral and integral membrane binding and can be a useful, novel tool for studying the impact of transmembrane peptides (TMP) on membrane organization under near-physiological conditions. This article focuses on LAH4, a model α-helical peptide with high antimicrobial and nucleic acid transfection efficiencies. The predominantly helical peptide has been shown to orient in supported model membranes parallel to the membrane surface at acidic and, in a transmembrane manner, at basic pH. Here we investigate its interaction with fully hydrated large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) by TDFS and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). TDFS shows that at acidic pH LAH4 does not influence the glycerol region while at basic pH it makes acyl groups at the glycerol level of the membrane less mobile. TDFS experiments with antimicrobial peptides alamethicin and magainin 2, which are known to assume transmembrane and peripheral orientations, respectively, prove that changes in acyl group mobility at the glycerol level correlate with the orientation of membrane-associated peptide molecules. Analogous experiments with the TMPs LW21 and LAT show similar effects on the mobility of those acyl groups as alamethicin and LAH4 at basic pH. FCS, on the same neutral lipid bilayer vesicles, shows that the peripheral binding mode of LAH4 is more efficient in bilayer permeation than the transmembrane mode. In both cases, the addition of LAH4 does not lead to vesicle disintegration. The influence of negatively charged lipids on the bilayer permeation is also addressed.

  14. Computational De Novo Design and Characterization of a Protein that Selectively Binds a Highly Hyperpolarizable Abiological Chromophore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, H. Christopher; Lehmann, Andreas; Sinks, Louise E.; Asselberghs, Inge; Tronin, Andrey; Krishnan, Venkata; Blasie, J. Kent; Clays, Koen; DeGrado, William F.; Saven, Jeffrey G.; Therien, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    This work reports the first example of a single-chain protein computationally designed to contain four α-helical segments and fold to form a 4-helix bundle encapsulating a supramolecular abiological chromophore that possesses exceptional nonlinear optical properties. The 109-residue protein designated SCRPZ-1, binds and disperses an insoluble hyperpolarizable chromophore, ruthenium(II) [5-(4′-ethynyl-(2,2′;6′,2″-terpyridinyl))-10,20-bis(phenyl)porphinato]zinc(II)-(2,2′;6′,2″-terpyridine)2+ (RuPZn) in aqueous buffer solution at a 1:1 stoichiometry. A 1:1 binding stoichiometry of the holoprotein is supported by electronic absorption and CD spectra, as well as equilibrium analytical ultracentrifugation and size exclusion chromatography. SCRPZ-1 readily dimerizes at μM concentrations, and an empirical redesign of the protein exterior produced a stable monomeric protein, SCRPZ-2, that also displayed a 1:1 protein:cofactor stoichiometry. For both proteins in aqueous buffer, the encapsulated cofactor displays photophysical properties resembling those exhibited by the dilute RuPZn cofactor in organic solvent: femtosecond-, nanosecond-, and microsecond-timescale pump-probe transient absorption spectroscopic data evince intensely absorbing holoprotein excited states having large spectral bandwidth that penetrate deep in the near-infrared (NIR) energy regime; the holoprotein electronically excited triplet state exhibits a microsecond timescale lifetime characteristic of the RuPZn chromophore. Hyper-Rayleigh light scattering (HRS) measurements carried out at an incident irradiation wavelength (λinc) of 1340 nm for these holoproteins demonstrate an exceptional dynamic hyperpolarizabilty (β1340 = 3100 × 10−30 esu). X-ray reflectivity measurements establish that this de novo designed hyperpolarizable protein can be covalently attached with high surface density to a silicon surface without loss of the cofactor, indicating that these assemblies provide a new

  15. Characterization of the CD55 (DAF)-binding site on the seven-span transmembrane receptor CD97

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamann, J. [=Jörg; Stortelers, C.; Kiss-Toth, E.; Vogel, B.; Eichler, W.; van Lier, R. A.

    1998-01-01

    CD97 is an activation-induced antigen on leukocytes which belongs to a new group of seven-span transmembrane (7-TM) molecules, designated EGF-TM7 family. Family members, including EMR1 and F4/80, are characterized by an extended extracellular region with several N-terminal epidermal growth

  16. Competitive balance in national European soccer competitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, M.A.; Koning, R.H.; van Witteloostuijn, A.; Albert, Jim; Koning, Ruud H.

    2007-01-01

    According to popular belief, competitive balance in national soccer competitions in Europe has decreased due to the Bosman ruling and the introduction of the Champions League. We test this hypothesis using data from 7 national competitions, for a host of indicators. We find some evidence for

  17. Molecular cloning, characterization and analysis of the intracellular localization of a water-soluble chlorophyll-binding protein (WSCP) from Virginia pepperweed (Lepidium virginicum), a unique WSCP that preferentially binds chlorophyll b in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Shigekazu; Yanai, Haruna; Oka-Takayama, Yuko; Zanma-Sohtome, Aya; Fujiyama, Kosaku; Uchida, Akira; Nakayama, Katsumi; Satoh, Hiroyuki

    2013-12-01

    Various plants possess non-photosynthetic, hydrophilic chlorophyll (Chl) proteins called water-soluble Chl-binding proteins (WSCPs). WSCPs are categorized into two classes; Class I (photoconvertible type) and Class II (non-photoconvertible type). Among Class II WSCPs, only Lepidium virginicum WSCP (LvWSCP) exhibits a low Chl a/b ratio compared with that found in the leaf. Although the physicochemical properties of LvWSCP have been characterized, its molecular properties have not yet been documented. Here, we report the characteristics of the LvWSCP gene, the biochemical properties of a recombinant LvWSCP, and the intracellular localization of LvWSCP. The cloned LvWSCP gene possesses a 669-bp open reading frame. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the precursor of LvWSCP contains both N- and C-terminal extension peptides. RT-PCR analysis revealed that LvWSCP was transcribed in various tissues, with the levels being higher in developing tissues. A recombinant LvWSCP and hexa-histidine fusion protein (LvWSCP-His) could remove Chls from the thylakoid in aqueous solution and showed an absorption spectrum identical to that of native LvWSCP. Although LvWSCP-His could bind both Chl a and Chl b, it bound almost exclusively to Chl b when reconstituted in 40 % methanol. To clarify the intracellular targeting functions of the N- and C-terminal extension peptides, we constructed transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana lines expressing the Venus protein fused with the LvWSCP N- and/or C-terminal peptides, as well as Venus fused at the C-terminus of LvWSCP. The results showed that the N-terminal peptide functioned in ER body targeting, while the C-terminal sequence did not act as a trailer peptide.

  18. An ATP Binding Cassette Transporter Mediates the Uptake of α-(1,6)-Linked Dietary Oligosaccharides in Bifidobacterium and Correlates with Competitive Growth on These Substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Ejby; Fredslund, Folmer; Andersen, Joakim Mark

    2016-01-01

    The molecular details and impact of oligosaccharide uptake by distinct human gut microbiota (HGM) are currently not well understood. Non-digestible dietary galacto- and gluco--(1,6)-oligosaccharides from legumes and starch, respectively, are preferentially fermented by mainly bifidobacteria...... and lactobacilli in the human gut. Here we show that the solute binding protein (BlG16BP) associated with an ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter from the probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bl-04 binds -(1,6)-linked glucosides and galactosides of varying size, linkage, and monosaccharide...

  19. HDAC Inhibitors without an Active Site Zn2+-Binding Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vickers, Chris J.; Olsen, Christian Adam; Leman, Luke J.

    2012-01-01

    Natural and synthetic histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors generally derive their strong binding affinity and high potency from a key functional group that binds to the Zn2+ ion within the enzyme active site. However, this feature is also thought to carry the potential liability of undesirable off......-target interactions with other metalloenzymes. As a step toward mitigating this issue, here, we describe the design, synthesis, and structure−activity characterizations of cyclic α3β-tetrapeptide HDAC inhibitors that lack the presumed indispensable Zn2+-binding group. The lead compounds (e.g., 15 and 26) display good...... potency against class 1 HDACs and are active in tissue culture against various human cancer cell lines. Importantly, enzymological analysis of 26 indicates that the cyclic α3β-tetrapeptide is a fast-on/ off competitive inhibitor of HDACs 1−3 with Ki values of 49, 33, and 37 nM, respectively. Our proof...

  20. Flexible Acyclic Polyol-Chloride Anion Complexes and Their Characterization by Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Variable Temperature Binding Constant Determinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokri, Alireza; Wang, Xue B.; Wang, Yangping; O' Doherty, George A.; Kass, Steven R.

    2016-03-17

    Flexible acyclic alcohols with 1–5 hydroxyl groups were bound to chloride anion and these complexes were interrogated by negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy and companion density functional theory computations. The resulting vertical detachment energies are reproduced on average to 0.10 eV by M06-2X/aug-cc-pVTZ predictions and range from 4.45 – 5.96 eV. These values are 0.84 – 2.35 eV larger than the adiabatic detachment energy of Cl– as a result of the larger hydrogen bond networks in the bigger polyols. Adiabatic detachment energies of the alcohol–Cl– clusters are more difficult to determine both experimentally and computationally. This is due to the large geometry changes that occur upon photodetachment and the large bond dissociation energy of H–Cl which enables the resulting chlorine atom to abstract a hydrogen from any of the methylene (CH2) or methine (CH) positions. Both ionic and non-ionic hydrogen bonds (i.e., OH•••Cl– and OH•••OH•••Cl–) form in the larger polyols complexes, and are found to be energetically comparable. Subtle structural differences, consequently can lead to the formation of different types of hydrogen bonds and maximizing the ionic ones is not always preferred. Solution equilibrium binding constants between the alcohols and tetrrabuylammonium chloride (TBACl) in acetonitrile at -24.2, 22.0, and 53.6 °C were also determined. The free energies of association are nearly identical for all of the substrates (i.e., ΔG° = -2.8 ± 0.7 kcal mol–1). Compensating enthalpy and entropy values reveal, contrary to expectation and the intrinsic gas-phase preferences, that the bigger systems with more hydroxyl groups are entropically favored and enthalpically disfavored relative to the smaller species. This suggests that more solvent molecules are released upon binding TBACl to alcohols with more hydroxyl groups and is consistent with the measured negative heat capacities. These quantities increase with

  1. Oxytocin binding sites in bovine mammary tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Xin.

    1989-01-01

    Oxytocin binding sites were identified and characterized in bovine mammary tissue. ({sup 3}H)-oxytocin binding reached equilibrium by 50 min at 20{degree}C and by 8 hr at 4{degree}C. The half-time of displacement at 20{degree}C was approximately 1 hr. Thyrotropin releasing hormone, adrenocorticotropin, angiotensin I, angiotensin II, pentagastrin, bradykinin, xenopsin and L-valyl-histidyl-L-leucyl-L-threonyl-L-prolyl-L-valyl-L-glutamyl-L-lysine were not competitive. In the presence of 10 nM LiCl, addition of oxytocin to dispersed bovine mammary cells, in which phosphatidylinositol was pre-labelled, caused a time and dose-dependent increase in radioactive inositiol monophosphate incorporation. The possibility that there are distinct vasopressin receptors in bovine mammary tissue was investigated. ({sup 3}H)-vasopressin binding reached equilibrium by 40 min at 20{degree}. The half-time of displacement at 20{degree}C was approximately 1 hr. The ability of the peptides to inhibit ({sup 3}H)-vasopressin binding was: (Thr{sup 4},Gly{sup 7})-oxytocin > Arg{sup 8}-vasopressin > (lys{sup 8})-vasopressin > (Deamino{sup 1},D-arg{sup 8})-vasopressin > oxytocin > d (CH{sub 2}){sub 5}Tyr(Me)AVP.

  2. Identification and characterization of C106R, a novel mutation in the DNA-binding domain of GCMB, in a family with autosomal-dominant hypoparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Hyon-Seung; Eom, Young Sil; Park, Ie Byung; Lee, Sangho; Hong, Suntaek; Jüppner, Harald; Mannstadt, Michael; Lee, Sihoon

    2012-05-01

    Glial cells missing B (GCMB) is a transcription factor that is expressed in the parathyroid hormone (PTH)-secreting cells of the parathyroid glands. Several mutations in GCMB have been reported to cause hypoparathyroidism (HP). We identified a family with two individuals in two generations (mother and son), who are affected by autosomal-dominant hypoparathyroidism (AD-HP). A novel heterozygous mutation in exon 2 of GCMB was identified in both affected individuals that changes cysteine at position 106 of the putative DNA-binding domain of GCMB to arginine (C106R). We performed mutational analysis of the genes encoding GCMB, pre-pro PTH, GATA3 and CaSR using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified genomic DNA. The identified GCMB mutant was characterized by functional studies including nuclear localization, electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) and luciferase reporter assays, and homology modelling was performed to generate a three-dimensional structural model for the DNA-binding domain of GCMB to predict the structural consequences of the identified mutation. The C106R mutant of GCMB failed to interact with the DNA consensus recognition motif, as determined by EMSA. Furthermore, in comparison with wild-type GCMB, the C106R mutant demonstrated reduced transactivation in luciferase reporter assays; however, the mutant GCMB failed to reduce the activity of the wild-type protein. Consistent with the EMSA findings, homology modelling analysis suggested that replacement of cysteine 106 with arginine would interfere with DNA binding. We have identified a novel GCMB mutation that may explain AD-HP in our family. However, the exact mechanism by which this heterozygous mutation leads to the disease in the described family remains to be elucidated. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. CopK from Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 binds Cu(I) in a tetrathioether site: characterization by X-ray absorption and NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarret, Géraldine; Favier, Adrien; Covès, Jacques; Hazemann, Jean-Louis; Mergeay, Max; Bersch, Beate

    2010-03-24

    Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 is a bacterium that is resistant to high metal concentrations in the environment. Increased copper resistance is associated with the cop cluster on the large plasmid pMOL30 that is composed of at least 21 genes. The copK gene encodes a 74 residue periplasmic protein whose expression is strongly upregulated in the presence of copper. CopK was previously shown to cooperatively bind Cu(I) and Cu(II) in distinct, specific sites. The solution structure of Cu(I)-CopK and the characterization of the Cu(I) site by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and NMR are reported here. EXAFS spectra are in agreement with a tetrathioether Cu(I) site, providing so far unique spectral information on a 4S-coordinated Cu(I) in a protein. The methionine residues forming the Cu(I) site, M28, M38, M44, and M54, are identified by NMR. We propose the chemical shift of the methionine C(epsilon) as a new and sensitive probe for the detection of Cu(I) bound to thioether groups. The solution structure of Cu(I)-CopK demonstrates that Cu(I) binding induces a complete structural modification with the disruption of the second beta-sheet and a rotation of the C-terminal part of nearly 180 degrees around a hinge formed by asparagine 57. This conformational change is directly related to the loss of the dimer interface and most probably to the formation of the Cu(II) site involving histidine 70. The solution structure of Cu(I)-CopK therefore provides the molecular basis for the understanding of the Cu(I)/Cu(II) binding cooperativity.

  4. Physicochemical characterization of 3,6-diHydroxyflavone binding BSA immobilized on PEG-coated silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voicescu, Mariana, E-mail: voicescu@icf.ro [Institute of Physical Chemistry “Ilie Murgulescu” of the Romanian Academy (Romania); Ionescu, Sorana [University of Bucharest, Department of Physical Chemistry (Romania); Calderon-Moreno, Jose M. [Institute of Physical Chemistry “Ilie Murgulescu” of the Romanian Academy (Romania); Nistor, Cristina L. [National R& D Institute for Chemistry and Petrochemistry ICECHIM, Polymer Department (Romania)