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Sample records for chaperonins

  1. Chaperonin filaments: The archael cytoskeleton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trent, J.D.; Kagawa, H.K.; Yaoi, Takuro; Olle, E.; Zaluzec, N.J.

    1997-08-01

    Chaperonins are multi-subunit double-ring complexed composed of 60-kDa proteins that are believed to mediate protein folding in vivo. The chaperonins in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae are composed of the organism`s two most abundant proteins, which represent 4% of its total protein and have an intracellular concentration of {ge} 3.0 mg/ml. At concentrations of 1.0 mg/ml, purified chaperonin proteins aggregate to form ordered filaments. Filament formation, which requires Mg{sup ++} and nucleotide binding (not hydrolysis), occurs at physiological temperatures under conditions suggesting filaments may exist in vivo. If the estimated 4,600 chaperonins per cell, formed filaments in vivo, they could create a matrix of filaments that would span the diameter of an average S. shibatae cell 100 times. Direct observations of unfixed, minimally treated cells by intermediate voltage electron microscopy (300 kV) revealed an intracellular network of filaments that resembles chaperonin filaments produced in vitro. The hypothesis that the intracellular network contains chaperonins is supported by immunogold analyses. The authors propose that chaperonin activity may be regulated in vivo by filament formation and that chaperonin filaments may serve a cytoskeleton-like function in archaea and perhaps in other prokaryotes.

  2. The complexity of chloroplast chaperonins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitlin Gruber, Anna; Nisemblat, Shahar; Azem, Abdussalam; Weiss, Celeste

    2013-12-01

    Type I chaperonins are large oligomeric protein ensembles that are involved in the folding and assembly of other proteins. Chloroplast chaperonins and co-chaperonins exist in multiple copies of two distinct isoforms that can combine to form a range of labile oligomeric structures. This complex system increases the potential number of chaperonin substrates and possibilities for regulation. The incorporation of unique subunits into the oligomer can modify substrate specificity. Some subunits are upregulated in response to heat shock and some show organ-specific expression, whereas others possess additional functions that are unrelated to their role in protein folding. Accumulating evidence suggests that specific subunits have distinct roles in biogenesis of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco). PMID:24035661

  3. Allosteric Mechanisms in Chaperonin Machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Ranit; Horovitz, Amnon

    2016-06-01

    Chaperonins are nanomachines that facilitate protein folding by undergoing energy (ATP)-dependent movements that are coordinated in time and space owing to complex allosteric regulation. They consist of two back-to-back stacked oligomeric rings with a cavity at each end where protein substrate folding can take place. Here, we focus on the GroEL/GroES chaperonin system from Escherichia coli and, to a lesser extent, on the more poorly characterized eukaryotic chaperonin CCT/TRiC. We describe their various functional (allosteric) states and how they are affected by substrates and allosteric effectors that include ATP, ADP, nonfolded protein substrates, potassium ions, and GroES (in the case of GroEL). We also discuss the pathways of intra- and inter-ring allosteric communication by which they interconvert and the coupling between allosteric transitions and protein folding reactions. PMID:26726755

  4. Chaperonin filaments: The archaeal cytoskeleton?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, Jonathan D.; Kagawa, Hiromi K.; Yaoi, Takuro; Olle, Eric; Zaluzec, Nestor J.

    1997-01-01

    Chaperonins are high molecular mass double-ring structures composed of 60-kDa protein subunits. In the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae the two chaperonin proteins represent ≈4% of its total protein and have a combined intracellular concentration of >30 mg/ml. At concentrations ≥ 0.5 mg/ml purified chaperonins form filaments in the presence of Mg2+ and nucleotides. Filament formation requires nucleotide binding (not hydrolysis), and occurs at physiological temperatures in biologically relevant buffers, including a buffer made from cell extracts. These observations suggest that chaperonin filaments may exist in vivo and the estimated 4600 chaperonins per cell suggest that such filaments could form an extensive cytostructure. We observed filamentous structures in unfixed, uranyl-acetate-stained S. shibatae cells, which resemble the chaperonin filaments in size and appearance. ImmunoGold (Janssen) labeling using chaperonin antibodies indicated that many chaperonins are associated with insoluble cellular structures and these structures appear to be filamentous in some areas, although they could not be uranyl-acetate-stained. The existence of chaperonin filaments in vivo suggests a mechanism whereby their protein-folding activities can be regulated. More generally, the filaments themselves may play a cytoskeletal role in Archaea. PMID:9144246

  5. Inside the chaperonin toolbox: theoretical and computational models for chaperonin mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite their immense importance to cellular function, the precise mechanism by which chaperonins aid in the folding of other proteins remains unknown. Experimental evidence seems to imply that there is some diversity in how chaperonins interact with their substrates and this has led to a number of different models for chaperonin mechanism. Computational methods have the advantage of accessing temporal and spatial resolutions that are difficult for experimental techniques; therefore, these methods have been applied to this problem for some time. Here we review the relevant computational models for chaperonin function. We propose that these models need not be mutually exclusive and in fact can be thought of as a set of tools the chaperonin may use to aid in the folding of a diverse array of substrate proteins. We conclude with a discussion of the role of water in the chaperonin mechanism, a factor that until recently has been largely neglected by most computational studies of chaperonin function

  6. Ordered biological nanostructures formed from chaperonin polypeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, Jonathan D. (Inventor); McMillan, R. Andrew (Inventor); Kagawa, Hiromi (Inventor); Paavola, Chad D. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The following application relates to nanotemplates, nanostructures, nanoarrays and nanodevices formed from wild-type and mutated chaperonin polypeptides, methods of producing such compositions, methods of using such compositions and particular chaperonin polypeptides that can be utilized in producing such compositions.

  7. Ordered Nanostructures Made Using Chaperonin Polypeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, Jonathan; McMillan, Robert; Paavola, Chad; Mogul, Rakesh; Kagawa, Hiromi

    2004-01-01

    A recently invented method of fabricating periodic or otherwise ordered nanostructures involves the use of chaperonin polypeptides. The method is intended to serve as a potentially superior and less expensive alternative to conventional lithographic methods for use in the patterning steps of the fabrication of diverse objects characterized by features of the order of nanometers. Typical examples of such objects include arrays of quantum dots that would serve as the functional building blocks of future advanced electronic and photonic devices. A chaperonin is a double-ring protein structure having a molecular weight of about 60 plus or minus 5 kilodaltons. In nature, chaperonins are ubiquitous, essential, subcellular structures. Each natural chaperonin molecule comprises 14, 16, or 18 protein subunits, arranged as two stacked rings approximately 16 to 18 nm tall by approximately 15 to 17 nm wide, the exact dimensions depending on the biological species in which it originates. The natural role of chaperonins is unknown, but they are believed to aid in the correct folding of other proteins, by enclosing unfolded proteins and preventing nonspecific aggregation during assembly. What makes chaperonins useful for the purpose of the present method is that under the proper conditions, chaperonin rings assemble themselves into higher-order structures. This method exploits such higher-order structures to define nanoscale devices. The higher-order structures are tailored partly by choice of chemical and physical conditions for assembly and partly by using chaperonins that have been mutated. The mutations are made by established biochemical techniques. The assembly of chaperonin polypeptides into such structures as rings, tubes, filaments, and sheets (two-dimensional crystals) can be regulated chemically. Rings, tubes, and filaments of some chaperonin polypeptides can, for example, function as nano vessels if they are able to absorb, retain, protect, and release gases or

  8. Crystal structure of the human mitochondrial chaperonin symmetrical football complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisemblat, Shahar; Yaniv, Oren; Parnas, Avital; Frolow, Felix; Azem, Abdussalam

    2015-05-12

    Human mitochondria harbor a single type I chaperonin system that is generally thought to function via a unique single-ring intermediate. To date, no crystal structure has been published for any mammalian type I chaperonin complex. In this study, we describe the crystal structure of a football-shaped, double-ring human mitochondrial chaperonin complex at 3.15 Å, which is a novel intermediate, likely representing the complex in an early stage of dissociation. Interestingly, the mitochondrial chaperonin was captured in a state that exhibits subunit asymmetry within the rings and nucleotide symmetry between the rings. Moreover, the chaperonin tetradecamers show a different interring subunit arrangement when compared to GroEL. Our findings suggest that the mitochondrial chaperonins use a mechanism that is distinct from the mechanism of the well-studied Escherichia coli system. PMID:25918392

  9. Ordered nanoparticle arrays formed on engineered chaperonin protein templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, R. Andrew; Paavola, Chad D.; Howard, Jeanie; Chan, Suzanne L.; Zaluzec, Nestor J.; Trent, Jonathan D.

    2002-01-01

    Traditional methods for fabricating nanoscale arrays are usually based on lithographic techniques. Alternative new approaches rely on the use of nanoscale templates made of synthetic or biological materials. Some proteins, for example, have been used to form ordered two-dimensional arrays. Here, we fabricated nanoscale ordered arrays of metal and semiconductor quantum dots by binding preformed nanoparticles onto crystalline protein templates made from genetically engineered hollow double-ring structures called chaperonins. Using structural information as a guide, a thermostable recombinant chaperonin subunit was modified to assemble into chaperonins with either 3 nm or 9 nm apical pores surrounded by chemically reactive thiols. These engineered chaperonins were crystallized into two-dimensional templates up to 20 microm in diameter. The periodic solvent-exposed thiols within these crystalline templates were used to size-selectively bind and organize either gold (1.4, 5 or 10nm) or CdSe-ZnS semiconductor (4.5 nm) quantum dots into arrays. The order within the arrays was defined by the lattice of the underlying protein crystal. By combining the self-assembling properties of chaperonins with mutations guided by structural modelling, we demonstrate that quantum dots can be manipulated using modified chaperonins and organized into arrays for use in next-generation electronic and photonic devices.

  10. Cpn20: siamese twins of the chaperonin world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Celeste; Bonshtien, Anat; Farchi-Pisanty, Odelia; Vitlin, Anna; Azem, Abdussalam

    2009-02-01

    The chloroplast cpn20 protein is a functional homolog of the cpn10 co-chaperonin, but its gene consists of two cpn10-like units joined head-to-tail by a short chain of amino acids. This double protein is unique to plastids and was shown to exist in plants as well plastid-containing parasites. In vitro assays showed that this cpn20 co-chaperonin is a functional homolog of cpn10. In terms of structure, existing data indicate that the oligomer is tetrameric, yet it interacts with a heptameric cpn60 partner. Thus, the functional oligomeric structure remains a mystery. In this review, we summarize what is known about this distinctive chaperonin and use a bioinformatics approach to examine the expression of cpn20 in Arabidopsis thaliana relative to other chaperonin genes in this species. In addition, we examine the primary structure of the two homologous domains for similarities and differences, in comparison with cpn10 from other species. Lastly, we hypothesize as to the oligomeric structure and raison d'être of this unusual co-chaperonin homolog. PMID:19031045

  11. Chaperonin Polymers in Archaea: The Cytoskeleton of Prokaryotes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, J. D.; Kagawa, H. K.; Zaluzec, N. J.

    1997-07-01

    Chaperonins are protein complexes that play a critical role in folding nascent polypeptides under normal conditions and refolding damaged proteins under stress conditions. In all organisms these complexes are composed of evolutionarily conserved 60-kDa proteins arranged in double-ring structures with between 7 and 9 protein subunits per ring. These double ring structures are assumed to be the functional units in vivo, although they have never been observed inside cells. Here the authors show that the purified chaperonin from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae, which is closely related to chaperonins in eukaryotes, has a double ring structure at low concentrations (0.1 mg/ml), but at more physiological concentrations, the rings stack end to end to form polymers. The polymers are stable at physiological temperatures (75 C) and closely resemble structures observed inside unfixed S. shibatae cells. The authors suggest that in vivo chaperonin activity may be regulated by polymerization and that chaperonin polymers may act as a cytoskeleton-like structure in archaea and bacteria.

  12. CHAPERONIN 20 mediates iron superoxide dismutase (FeSOD) activity independent of its co-chaperonin role in Arabidopsis chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, W Y; Huang, C H; Liu, A C; Cheng, C P; Li, S H; Chang, W C; Weiss, C; Azem, A; Jinn, T L

    2013-01-01

    Iron superoxide dismutases (FeSODs; FSDs) are primary antioxidant enzymes in Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplasts. The stromal FSD1 conferred the only detectable FeSOD activity, whereas the thylakoid membrane- and nucleoid-co-localized FSD2 and FSD3 double mutant showed arrested chloroplast development. FeSOD requires cofactor Fe for its activity, but its mechanism of activation is unclear. We used reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), gel filtration chromatography, LC-MS/MS, protoplast transient expression and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) analyses to identify and characterize a factor involved in FeSOD activation. We identified the chloroplast-localized co-chaperonin CHAPERONIN 20 (CPN20) as a mediator of FeSOD activation by direct interaction. The relationship between CPN20 and FeSOD was confirmed by in vitro experiments showing that CPN20 alone could enhance FSD1, FSD2 and FSD3 activity. The in vivo results showed that CPN20-overexpressing mutants and mutants with defective co-chaperonin activity increased FSD1 activity, without changing the chaperonin CPN60 protein level, and VIGS-induced downregulation of CPN20 also led to decreased FeSOD activity. Our findings reveal that CPN20 can mediate FeSOD activation in chloroplasts, a role independent of its known function in the chaperonin system. PMID:23057508

  13. Chaperonin filaments : their formation and an evaluation of methods for studying them.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaoi, T.; Kagawa, K. H.; Trent, J. D.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology

    1998-08-01

    Chaperonins are multisubunit protein complexes that can be isolated from cells as high-molecular-weight structures that appear as double rings in the electron microscope. We recently discovered that chaperonin double rings isolated from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae, when incubated at physiological temperatures in the presence of ATP and Mg{sup 2+}, stacked into filaments; we hypothesized that these filaments are related to filaments seen inside S. shibatae cells and that chaperonins exist as filaments in vivo. This paper elucidates the conditions under which we have observed S. shibatae chaperonins to form filaments and evaluates native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), TEM, spectrophotometry, and centrifugation as methods for studying these filaments. We observed that in the presence of Mg{sup 2+} combined with ATP, ADP, ATP{gamma}S, or GTP, native PAGE indicated that chaperonin subunits assembled into double rings and that the conformation of these double rings was effected by nucleotide binding, but we saw no indication of chaperonin filament formation. Under these same conditions, however, TEM, spectroscopy, and centrifugation methods indicated that chaperonin subunits and double rings had assembled into filaments. We determined that this discrepancy in the representation of the chaperonin structure was due to the native PAGE method itself. When we exposed chaperonin filaments to the electrophoretic field used in native PAGE, the filaments dissociated into double rings. This suggests that TEM, spectrophotometry, and centrifugation are the preferred methods for studying the higher-order structures of chaperonins, which are likely to be of biological significance.

  14. Difference in the distribution pattern of substrate enzymes in the metabolic network of Escherichia coli, according to chaperonin requirement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niwa Tatsuya

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chaperonins are important in living systems because they play a role in the folding of proteins. Earlier comprehensive analyses identified substrate proteins for which folding requires the chaperonin GroEL/GroES (GroE in Escherichia coli, and they revealed that many chaperonin substrates are metabolic enzymes. This result implies the importance of chaperonins in metabolism. However, the relationship between chaperonins and metabolism is still unclear. Results We investigated the distribution of chaperonin substrate enzymes in the metabolic network using network analysis techniques as a first step towards revealing this relationship, and found that as chaperonin requirement increases, substrate enzymes are more laterally distributed in the metabolic. In addition, comparative genome analysis showed that the chaperonin-dependent substrates were less conserved, suggesting that these substrates were acquired later on in evolutionary history. Conclusions This result implies the expansion of metabolic networks due to this chaperonin, and it supports the existing hypothesis of acceleration of evolution by chaperonins. The distribution of chaperonin substrate enzymes in the metabolic network is inexplicable because it does not seem to be associated with individual protein features such as protein abundance, which has been observed characteristically in chaperonin substrates in previous works. However, it becomes clear by considering this expansion process due to chaperonin. This finding provides new insights into metabolic evolution and the roles of chaperonins in living systems.

  15. Identification of elements that dictate the specificity of mitochondrial Hsp60 for its co-chaperonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnas, Avital; Nisemblat, Shahar; Weiss, Celeste; Levy-Rimler, Galit; Pri-Or, Amir; Zor, Tsaffrir; Lund, Peter A; Bross, Peter; Azem, Abdussalam

    2012-01-01

    Type I chaperonins (cpn60/Hsp60) are essential proteins that mediate the folding of proteins in bacteria, chloroplast and mitochondria. Despite the high sequence homology among chaperonins, the mitochondrial chaperonin system has developed unique properties that distinguish it from the widely-studied bacterial system (GroEL and GroES). The most relevant difference to this study is that mitochondrial chaperonins are able to refold denatured proteins only with the assistance of the mitochondrial co-chaperonin. This is in contrast to the bacterial chaperonin, which is able to function with the help of co-chaperonin from any source. The goal of our work was to determine structural elements that govern the specificity between chaperonin and co-chaperonin pairs using mitochondrial Hsp60 as model system. We used a mutagenesis approach to obtain human mitochondrial Hsp60 mutants that are able to function with the bacterial co-chaperonin, GroES. We isolated two mutants, a single mutant (E321K) and a double mutant (R264K/E358K) that, together with GroES, were able to rescue an E. coli strain, in which the endogenous chaperonin system was silenced. Although the mutations are located in the apical domain of the chaperonin, where the interaction with co-chaperonin takes place, none of the residues are located in positions that are directly responsible for co-chaperonin binding. Moreover, while both mutants were able to function with GroES, they showed distinct functional and structural properties. Our results indicate that the phenotype of the E321K mutant is caused mainly by a profound increase in the binding affinity to all co-chaperonins, while the phenotype of R264K/E358K is caused by a slight increase in affinity toward co-chaperonins that is accompanied by an alteration in the allosteric signal transmitted upon nucleotide binding. The latter changes lead to a great increase in affinity for GroES, with only a minor increase in affinity toward the mammalian mitochondrial co-chaperonin

  16. Chaperonin Structure - The Large Multi-Subunit Protein Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Roterman

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The multi sub-unit protein structure representing the chaperonins group is analyzed with respect to its hydrophobicity distribution. The proteins of this group assist protein folding supported by ATP. The specific axial symmetry GroEL structure (two rings of seven units stacked back to back - 524 aa each and the GroES (single ring of seven units - 97 aa each polypeptide chains are analyzed using the hydrophobicity distribution expressed as excess/deficiency all over the molecule to search for structure-to-function relationships. The empirically observed distribution of hydrophobic residues is confronted with the theoretical one representing the idealized hydrophobic core with hydrophilic residues exposure on the surface. The observed discrepancy between these two distributions seems to be aim-oriented, determining the structure-to-function relation. The hydrophobic force field structure generated by the chaperonin capsule is presented. Its possible influence on substrate folding is suggested.

  17. Cellular Chaperonin CCTγ Contributes to Rabies Virus Replication during Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jinyang; Wu, Xiaopeng; Zan, Jie; Wu, Yongping; YE, CHENGJIN; Ruan, Xizhen; Zhou, Jiyong

    2013-01-01

    Rabies, as the oldest known infectious disease, remains a serious threat to public health worldwide. The eukaryotic cytosolic chaperonin TRiC/CCT complex facilitates the folding of proteins through ATP hydrolysis. Here, we investigated the expression, cellular localization, and function of neuronal CCTγ during neurotropic rabies virus (RABV) infection using mouse N2a cells as a model. Following RABV infection, 24 altered proteins were identified by using two-dimensional electrophoresis and ma...

  18. Preparation and characterization of polyclonal antibodies against human chaperonin 10

    OpenAIRE

    Somodevilla-Torres, Maria J.; Hillyard, Narelle C.; Morton, Halle; Alewood, Dianne; Halliday, Judy A.; Alewood, Paul F.; Vesey, David A; Walsh, Michael D.; Cavanagh, Alice C.

    2000-01-01

    Abstract Early pregnancy factor (EPF) has been identified as an extracellular homologue of chaperonin 10 (Cpn10), a heat shock protein that functions within the cell as a molecular chaperone. Here, we report the production of polyclonal antibodies directed against several different regions of the human Cpn10 molecule and their application to specific protein quantitation and localization techniques. These antibodies will be valuable tools in further studies to elucidate the mechanisms underly...

  19. Cellular chaperonin CCTγ contributes to rabies virus replication during infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinyang; Wu, Xiaopeng; Zan, Jie; Wu, Yongping; Ye, Chengjin; Ruan, Xizhen; Zhou, Jiyong

    2013-07-01

    Rabies, as the oldest known infectious disease, remains a serious threat to public health worldwide. The eukaryotic cytosolic chaperonin TRiC/CCT complex facilitates the folding of proteins through ATP hydrolysis. Here, we investigated the expression, cellular localization, and function of neuronal CCTγ during neurotropic rabies virus (RABV) infection using mouse N2a cells as a model. Following RABV infection, 24 altered proteins were identified by using two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, including 20 upregulated proteins and 4 downregulated proteins. In mouse N2a cells infected with RABV or cotransfected with RABV genes encoding nucleoprotein (N) and phosphoprotein (P), confocal microscopy demonstrated that upregulated cellular CCTγ was colocalized with viral proteins N and P, which formed a hollow cricoid inclusion within the region around the nucleus. These inclusions, which correspond to Negri bodies (NBs), did not form in mouse N2a cells only expressing the viral protein N or P. Knockdown of CCTγ by lentivirus-mediated RNA interference led to significant inhibition of RABV replication. These results demonstrate that the complex consisting of viral proteins N and P recruits CCTγ to NBs and identify the chaperonin CCTγ as a host factor that facilitates intracellular RABV replication. This work illustrates how viruses can utilize cellular chaperonins and compartmentalization for their own benefit. PMID:23637400

  20. Chaperonins fight aminoglycoside-induced protein misfolding and promote short-term tolerance in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goltermann, Lise; Good, Liam; Bentin, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    survival, whereas inhibition of chaperonin expression sensitized bacteria. Overexpression of the DnaK/DnaJ/GrpE chaperone system similarly facilitated survival but did not promote growth of aminoglycoside-treated bacteria. Inhibition of chaperonin expression sensitized bacteria to aminoglycosides as...

  1. Crystallization and structure determination of a symmetrical 'football' complex of the mammalian mitochondrial Hsp60-Hsp10 chaperonins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisemblat, Shahar; Parnas, Avital; Yaniv, Oren; Azem, Abdussalam; Frolow, Felix

    2014-01-01

    The mitochondrial Hsp60-Hsp10 complex assists the folding of various proteins impelled by ATP hydrolysis, similar to the bacterial chaperonins GroEL and GroES. The near-atomic structural details of the mitochondrial chaperonins are not known, despite the fact that almost two decades have passed since the structures of the bacterial chaperonins became available. Here, the crystallization procedure, diffraction experiments and structure determination by molecular replacement of the mammalian mitochondrial chaperonin HSP60 (E321K mutant) and its co-chaperonin Hsp10 are reported. PMID:24419632

  2. Expression of the chaperonin 10 gene during zebrafish development

    OpenAIRE

    Cristofre Martin, C.; Tang, Pingtao; Barnardo, Georgina; Krone, Patrick H.

    2001-01-01

    We have isolated a cDNA encoding chaperonin 10 (cpn10) from the zebrafish. Using northern, western, and in situ hybridization analysis, we observed that the cpn10 gene is expressed uniformly and ubiquitously throughout embryonic development of the zebrafish. Upregulation of cpn10 expression was observed following exposure of zebrafish embryos to a heat shock of 1 hour at 37°C compared to control embryos raised at 27°C. The extracellular form of Cpn10 called early pregnancy factor (EPF), found...

  3. Dataset concerning GroEL chaperonin interaction with proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Marchenkov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available GroEL chaperonin is well-known to interact with a wide variety of polypeptide chains. Here we show the data related to our previous work (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pep.2015.11.020 [1], and concerning the interaction of GroEL with native (lysozyme, α-lactalbumin and denatured (lysozyme, α-lactalbumin and pepsin proteins in solution. The use of affinity chromatography on the base of denatured pepsin for GroEL purification from fluorescent impurities is represented as well.

  4. Alteration of chaperonin60 and pancreatic enzyme in pancreatic acinar cell under pathological condition

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yong-Yu; Bendayan, Moise

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the changes of chaperonin60 (Cpn60) and pancreatic enzymes in pancreatic acinar cells, and to explore their roles in the development of experimental diabetes and acute pancreatitis (AP).

  5. Chloroplast β chaperonins from A. thaliana function with endogenous cpn10 homologs in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitlin, Anna; Weiss, Celeste; Demishtein-Zohary, Keren; Rasouly, Aviram; Levin, Doron; Pisanty-Farchi, Odelia; Breiman, Adina; Azem, Abdussalam

    2011-09-01

    The involvement of type I chaperonins in bacterial and organellar protein folding has been well-documented. In E. coli and mitochondria, these ubiquitous and highly conserved proteins form chaperonin oligomers of identical 60 kDa subunits (cpn60), while in chloroplasts, two distinct cpn60 α and β subunit types co-exist together. The primary sequence of α and β subunits is ~50% identical, similar to their respective homologies to the bacterial GroEL. Moreover, the A. thaliana genome contains two α and four β genes. The functional significance of this variability in plant chaperonin proteins has not yet been elucidated. In order to gain insight into the functional variety of the chloroplast chaperonin family members, we reconstituted β homo-oligomers from A. thaliana following their expression in bacteria and subjected them to a structure-function analysis. Our results show for the first time, that A. thaliana β homo-oligomers can function in vitro with authentic chloroplast co-chaperonins (ch-cpn10 and ch-cpn20). We also show that oligomers made up of different β subunit types have unique properties and different preferences for co-chaperonin partners. We propose that chloroplasts may contain active β homo-oligomers in addition to hetero-oligomers, possibly reflecting a variety of cellular roles. PMID:21633907

  6. Trivalent arsenic inhibits the functions of chaperonin complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xuewen; Reissman, Stefanie; Douglas, Nick R; Huang, Zhiwei; Yuan, Daniel S; Wang, Xiaoling; McCaffery, J Michael; Frydman, Judith; Boeke, Jef D

    2010-10-01

    The exact molecular mechanisms by which the environmental pollutant arsenic works in biological systems are not completely understood. Using an unbiased chemogenomics approach in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we found that mutants of the chaperonin complex TRiC and the functionally related prefoldin complex are all hypersensitive to arsenic compared to a wild-type strain. In contrast, mutants with impaired ribosome functions were highly arsenic resistant. These observations led us to hypothesize that arsenic might inhibit TRiC function, required for folding of actin, tubulin, and other proteins postsynthesis. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found that arsenic treatment distorted morphology of both actin and microtubule filaments. Moreover, arsenic impaired substrate folding by both bovine and archaeal TRiC complexes in vitro. These results together indicate that TRiC is a conserved target of arsenic inhibition in various biological systems. PMID:20660648

  7. Arabidopsis chloroplast chaperonin 10 is a calmodulin-binding protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    Calcium regulates diverse cellular activities in plants through the action of calmodulin (CaM). By using (35)S-labeled CaM to screen an Arabidopsis seedling cDNA expression library, a cDNA designated as AtCh-CPN10 (Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast chaperonin 10) was cloned. Chloroplast CPN10, a nuclear-encoded protein, is a functional homolog of E. coli GroES. It is believed that CPN60 and CPN10 are involved in the assembly of Rubisco, a key enzyme involved in the photosynthetic pathway. Northern analysis revealed that AtCh-CPN10 is highly expressed in green tissues. The recombinant AtCh-CPN10 binds to CaM in a calcium-dependent manner. Deletion mutants revealed that there is only one CaM-binding site in the last 31 amino acids of the AtCh-CPN10 at the C-terminal end. The CaM-binding region in AtCh-CPN10 has higher homology to other chloroplast CPN10s in comparison to GroES and mitochondrial CPN10s, suggesting that CaM may only bind to chloroplast CPN10s. Furthermore, the results also suggest that the calcium/CaM messenger system is involved in regulating Rubisco assembly in the chloroplast, thereby influencing photosynthesis. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  8. Crystallization and structure determination of a symmetrical ‘football’ complex of the mammalian mitochondrial Hsp60–Hsp10 chaperonins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisemblat, Shahar; Parnas, Avital; Yaniv, Oren; Azem, Abdussalam; Frolow, Felix

    2014-01-01

    The mitochondrial Hsp60–Hsp10 complex assists the folding of various proteins impelled by ATP hydrolysis, similar to the bacterial chaperonins GroEL and GroES. The near-atomic structural details of the mitochondrial chaperonins are not known, despite the fact that almost two decades have passed since the structures of the bacterial chaperonins became available. Here, the crystallization procedure, diffraction experiments and structure determination by molecular replacement of the mammalian mitochondrial chaperonin HSP60 (E321K mutant) and its co-chaperonin Hsp10 are reported. PMID:24419632

  9. Differential effects of co-chaperonin homologs on cpn60 oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonshtien, Anat L; Parnas, Avital; Sharkia, Rajach; Niv, Adina; Mizrahi, Itzhak; Azem, Abdussalam; Weiss, Celeste

    2009-09-01

    In this study, we have investigated the relationship between chaperonin/co-chaperonin binding, ATP hydrolysis, and protein refolding in heterologous chaperonin systems from bacteria, chloroplast, and mitochondria. We characterized two types of chloroplast cpn60 oligomers, ch-cpn60 composed of alpha and beta subunits (alpha(7)beta(7) ch-cpn60) and one composed of all beta subunits (beta(14) ch-cpn60). In terms of ATPase activity, the rate of ATP hydrolysis increased with protein concentration up to 60 microM, reflecting a concentration at which the oligomers are stable. At high concentrations of cpn60, all cpn10 homologs inhibited ATPase activity of alpha(7)beta(7) ch-cpn60. In contrast, ATPase of beta(14) ch-cpn60 was inhibited only by mitochondrial cpn10, supporting previous reports showing that beta(14) is functional only with mitochondrial cpn10 and not with other cpn10 homologs. Surprisingly, direct binding assays showed that both ch-cpn60 oligomer types bind to bacterial, mitochondrial, and chloroplast cpn10 homologs with an equal apparent affinity. Moreover, mitochondrial cpn60 binds chloroplast cpn20 with which it is not able to refold denatured proteins. Protein refolding experiments showed that in such instances, the bound protein is released in a conformation that is not able to refold. The presence of glycerol, or subsequent addition of mitochondrial cpn10, allows us to recover enzymatic activity of the substrate protein. Thus, in our systems, the formation of co-chaperonin/chaperonin complexes does not necessarily lead to protein folding. By using heterologous oligomer systems, we are able to separate the functions of binding and refolding in order to better understand the chaperonin mechanism. PMID:19224397

  10. GroEL-Assisted Protein Folding: Does It Occur Within the Chaperonin Inner Cavity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennady V. Semisotnov

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The folding of protein molecules in the GroEL inner cavity under the co-chaperonin GroES lid is widely accepted as a crucial event of GroEL-assisted protein folding. This review is focused on the data showing that GroEL-assisted protein folding may proceed out of the complex with the chaperonin. The models of GroEL-assisted protein folding assuming ligand-controlled dissociation of nonnative proteins from the GroEL surface and their folding in the bulk solution are also discussed.

  11. P. falciparum cpn20 is a bona fide co-chaperonin that can replace GroES in E. coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Vitlin Gruber

    Full Text Available Human malaria is among the most ubiquitous and destructive tropical, parasitic diseases in the world today. The causative agent, Plasmodium falciparum, contains an unusual, essential organelle known as the apicoplast. Inhibition of this degenerate chloroplast results in second generation death of the parasite and is the mechanism by which antibiotics function in treating malaria. In order to better understand the biochemistry of this organelle, we have cloned a putative, 20 kDa, co-chaperonin protein, Pf-cpn20, which localizes to the apicoplast. Although this protein is homologous to the cpn20 that is found in plant chloroplasts, its ability to function as a co-chaperonin was questioned in the past. In the present study, we carried out a structural analysis of Pf-cpn20 using circular dichroism and analytical ultracentrifugation and then used two different approaches to investigate the ability of this protein to function as a co-chaperonin. In the first approach, we purified recombinant Pf-cpn20 and tested its ability to act as a co-chaperonin for GroEL in vitro, while in the second, we examined the ability of Pf-cpn20 to complement an E. coli depletion of the essential bacterial co-chaperonin GroES. Our results demonstrate that Pf-cpn20 is fully functional as a co-chaperonin in vitro. Moreover, the parasitic co-chaperonin is able to replace GroES in E. coli at both normal and heat-shock temperatures. Thus, Pf-cpn20 functions as a co-chaperonin in chaperonin-mediated protein folding. The ability of the malarial protein to function in E. coli suggests that this simple system can be used as a tool for further analyses of Pf-cpn20 and perhaps other chaperone proteins from P. falciparum.

  12. P. falciparum cpn20 is a bona fide co-chaperonin that can replace GroES in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitlin Gruber, Anna; Nisemblat, Shahar; Zizelski, Gal; Parnas, Avital; Dzikowski, Ron; Azem, Abdussalam; Weiss, Celeste

    2013-01-01

    Human malaria is among the most ubiquitous and destructive tropical, parasitic diseases in the world today. The causative agent, Plasmodium falciparum, contains an unusual, essential organelle known as the apicoplast. Inhibition of this degenerate chloroplast results in second generation death of the parasite and is the mechanism by which antibiotics function in treating malaria. In order to better understand the biochemistry of this organelle, we have cloned a putative, 20 kDa, co-chaperonin protein, Pf-cpn20, which localizes to the apicoplast. Although this protein is homologous to the cpn20 that is found in plant chloroplasts, its ability to function as a co-chaperonin was questioned in the past. In the present study, we carried out a structural analysis of Pf-cpn20 using circular dichroism and analytical ultracentrifugation and then used two different approaches to investigate the ability of this protein to function as a co-chaperonin. In the first approach, we purified recombinant Pf-cpn20 and tested its ability to act as a co-chaperonin for GroEL in vitro, while in the second, we examined the ability of Pf-cpn20 to complement an E. coli depletion of the essential bacterial co-chaperonin GroES. Our results demonstrate that Pf-cpn20 is fully functional as a co-chaperonin in vitro. Moreover, the parasitic co-chaperonin is able to replace GroES in E. coli at both normal and heat-shock temperatures. Thus, Pf-cpn20 functions as a co-chaperonin in chaperonin-mediated protein folding. The ability of the malarial protein to function in E. coli suggests that this simple system can be used as a tool for further analyses of Pf-cpn20 and perhaps other chaperone proteins from P. falciparum. PMID:23326533

  13. Chaperonin GroEL Reassembly: An Effect of Protein Ligands and Solvent Composition

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    Nataliya Ryabova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Chaperonin GroEL is a complex oligomeric heat shock protein (Hsp60 assisting the correct folding and assembly of other proteins in the cell. An intriguing question is how GroEL folds itself. According to the literature, GroEL reassembly is dependent on chaperonin ligands and solvent composition. Here we demonstrate dependence of GroEL reassembly efficiency on concentrations of the essential factors (Mg2+, ADP, ATP, GroES, ammonium sulfate, NaCl and glycerol. Besides, kinetics of GroEL oligomerization in various conditions was monitored by the light scattering technique and proved to be two-exponential, which suggested accumulation of a certain oligomeric intermediate. This intermediate was resolved as a heptamer by nondenaturing blue electrophoresis of GroEL monomers during their assembly in the presence of both Mg-ATP and co-chaperonin GroES. Presumably, this intermediate heptamer plays a key role in formation of the GroEL tetradecameric particle. The role of co-chaperonin GroES (Hsp10 in GroEL assembly is also discussed.

  14. New GroEL-like chaperonin of bacteriophage OBP Pseudomonas fluorescens suppresses thermal protein aggregation in an ATP-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenyuk, Pavel I; Orlov, Victor N; Sokolova, Olga S; Kurochkina, Lidia P

    2016-08-01

    Recently, we discovered and studied the first virus-encoded chaperonin of bacteriophage EL Pseudomonas aeruginosa, gene product (gp) 146. In the present study, we performed bioinformatics analysis of currently predicted GroEL-like proteins encoded by phage genomes in comparison with cellular and mitochondrial chaperonins. Putative phage chaperonins share a low similarity and do not form a monophyletic group; nevertheless, they are closer to bacterial chaperonins in the phylogenetic tree. Experimental investigation of putative GroEL-like chaperonin proteins has been continued by physicochemical and functional characterization of gp246 encoded by the genome of Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteriophage OBP. Unlike the more usual double-ring architecture of chaperonins, including the EL gp146, the recombinant gp246 produced by Escherichia coli cells has been purified as a single heptameric ring. It possesses ATPase activity and does not require a co-chaperonin for its function. In vitro experiments demonstrated that gp246 is able to suppress the thermal protein inactivation and aggregation in an ATP-dependent manner, thus indicating chaperonin function. Single-particle electron microscopy analysis revealed the different conformational states of OBP chaperonin, depending on the bound nucleotide. PMID:27247423

  15. Circular Permutation of a Chaperonin Protein: Biophysics and Application to Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paavola, Chad; Chan, Suzanne; Li, Yi-Fen; McMillan, R. Andrew; Trent, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    We have designed five circular permutants of a chaperonin protein derived from the hyperthermophilic organism Sulfolobus shibatae. These permuted proteins were expressed in E. coli and are well-folded. Furthermore, all the permutants assemble into 18-mer double rings of the same form as the wild-type protein. We characterized the thermodynamics of folding for each permutant by both guanidine denaturation and differential scanning calorimetry. We also examined the assembly of chaperonin rings into higher order structures that may be used as nanoscale templates. The results show that circular permutation can be used to tune the thermodynamic properties of a protein template as well as facilitating the fusion of peptides, binding proteins or enzymes onto nanostructured templates.

  16. Single-molecule fluorescence polarization study of conformational change in archaeal group II chaperonin.

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    Ryo Iizuka

    Full Text Available Group II chaperonins found in archaea and in eukaryotic cytosol mediate protein folding without a GroES-like cofactor. The function of the cofactor is substituted by the helical protrusion at the tip of the apical domain, which forms a built-in lid on the central cavity. Although many studies on the change in lid conformation coupled to the binding and hydrolysis of nucleotides have been conducted, the molecular mechanism of lid closure remains poorly understood. Here, we performed a single-molecule polarization modulation to probe the rotation of the helical protrusion of a chaperonin from a hyperthermophilic archaeum, Thermococcus sp. strain KS-1. We detected approximately 35° rotation of the helical protrusion immediately after photorelease of ATP. The result suggests that the conformational change from the open lid to the closed lid state is responsible for the approximately 35° rotation of the helical protrusion.

  17. Structural and Functional Insights into the Evolution and Stress Adaptation of Type II Chaperonins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaston, Jessica J; Smits, Callum; Aragão, David; Wong, Andrew S W; Ahsan, Bilal; Sandin, Sara; Molugu, Sudheer K; Molugu, Sanjay K; Bernal, Ricardo A; Stock, Daniela; Stewart, Alastair G

    2016-03-01

    Chaperonins are essential biological complexes assisting protein folding in all kingdoms of life. Whereas homooligomeric bacterial GroEL binds hydrophobic substrates non-specifically, the heterooligomeric eukaryotic CCT binds specifically to distinct classes of substrates. Sulfolobales, which survive in a wide range of temperatures, have evolved three different chaperonin subunits (α, β, γ) that form three distinct complexes tailored for different substrate classes at cold, normal, and elevated temperatures. The larger octadecameric β complexes cater for substrates under heat stress, whereas smaller hexadecameric αβ complexes prevail under normal conditions. The cold-shock complex contains all three subunits, consistent with greater substrate specificity. Structural analysis using crystallography and electron microscopy reveals the geometry of these complexes and shows a novel arrangement of the α and β subunits in the hexadecamer enabling incorporation of the γ subunit. PMID:26853941

  18. Significance of the N-terminal domain for the function of chloroplast cpn20 chaperonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonshtien, Anat L; Weiss, Celeste; Vitlin, Anna; Niv, Adina; Lorimer, George H; Azem, Abdussalam

    2007-02-16

    Chaperonins cpn60 and cpn10 are essential proteins involved in cellular protein folding. Plant chloroplasts contain a unique version of the cpn10 co-chaperonin, cpn20, which consists of two homologous cpn10-like domains (N-cpn20 and C-cpn20) that are connected by a short linker region. Although cpn20 seems to function like other single domain cpn10 oligomers, the structure and specific functions of the domains are not understood. We mutated amino acids in the "mobile loop" regions of N-cpn20, C-cpn20 or both: a highly conserved glycine, which was shown to be important for flexibility of the mobile loop, and a leucine residue shown to be involved in binding of co-chaperonin to chaperonin. The mutant proteins were purified and their oligomeric structure validated by gel filtration, native gel electrophoresis, and circular dichroism. Functional assays of protein refolding and inhibition of GroEL ATPase both showed (i) mutation of the conserved glycine reduced the activity of cpn20, whether in N-cpn20 (G32A) or C-cpn20 (G130A). The same mutation in the bacterial cpn10 (GroES G24A) had no effect on activity. (ii) Mutations in the highly conserved leucine of N-cpn20 (L35A) and in the corresponding L27A of GroES resulted in inactive protein. (iii) In contrast, mutant L133A, in which the conserved leucine of C-cpn20 was altered, retained 55% activity. We conclude that the structure of cpn20 is much more sensitive to alterations in the mobile loop than is the structure of GroES. Moreover, only N-cpn20 is necessary for activity of cpn20. However, full and efficient functioning requires both domains. PMID:17178727

  19. In vitro interactions of the aphid endosymbiotic SymL chaperonin with barley yellow dwarf virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Filichkin, S A; Brumfield, S; Filichkin, T P; Young, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    Barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV)-vector relationships suggest that there are specific interactions between BYDV virions and the aphid's cellular components. However, little is known about vector factors that mediate virion recognition, cellular trafficking, and accumulation within the aphid. Symbionins are molecular chaperonins produced by intracellular endosymbiotic bacteria and are the most abundant proteins found in aphids. To elucidate the potential role of symbionins in BYDV transmission...

  20. On the assembly of dodecameric glutamine synthetase from stable chaperonin complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, M T

    1993-07-01

    For many in vitro protein-folding reactions, the fraction of correctly folded product declines as the initial protein concentration increases due primarily to misfolding and aggregation reactions. Under optimal conditions and in the presence of ATP, chaperonins (groEL and groES) enhanced the renaturation of dodecameric glutamine synthetase (GS) with yields of active enzyme between 75 and 85% of the original activity (Fisher, M.T. (1992) Biochemistry 31, 3955-3963). In spite of this enhancement, a concentration-dependent decline in recoverable activity was observed when increasing concentrations of unfolded GS were rapidly mixed with renaturation buffer containing a 2-fold molar excess (GS subunits:groEL oligomer) of chaperonins. When a stable groEL-GS complex, formed under optimal conditions, was concentrated 4-fold by centrifugal ultrafiltration prior to ATP addition, the amount of total active GS (percent of the original activity) recovered remained at optimal levels and no longer showed a concentration-dependent decline. The GS subunits that are initially bound and then released from groEL by ATP are assembly-competent. It is proposed that the subunits are no longer able to kinetically equilibrate with folding intermediates that misfold or aggregate. If a stable groEL-protein substrate complex can be amassed without loss of activity, this will facilitate studies on molecular aspects of chaperonin release mechanisms and oligomeric protein assembly. PMID:8100224

  1. A Versatile Platform for Nanotechnology Based on Circular Permutation of a Chaperonin Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paavola, Chad; McMillan, Andrew; Trent, Jonathan; Chan, Suzanne; Mazzarella, Kellen; Li, Yi-Fen

    2004-01-01

    A number of protein complexes have been developed as nanoscale templates. These templates can be functionalized using the peptide sequences that bind inorganic materials. However, it is difficult to integrate peptides into a specific position within a protein template. Integrating intact proteins with desirable binding or catalytic activities is an even greater challenge. We present a general method for modifying protein templates using circular permutation so that additional peptide sequence can be added in a wide variety of specific locations. Circular permutation is a reordering of the polypeptide chain such that the original termini are joined and new termini are created elsewhere in the protein. New sequence can be joined to the protein termini without perturbing the protein structure and with minimal limitation on the size and conformation of the added sequence. We have used this approach to modify a chaperonin protein template, placing termini at five different locations distributed across the surface of the protein complex. These permutants are competent to form the double-ring structures typical of chaperonin proteins. The permuted double-rings also form the same assemblies as the unmodified protein. We fused a fluorescent protein to two representative permutants and demonstrated that it assumes its active structure and does not interfere with assembly of chaperonin double-rings.

  2. In vitro interactions of the aphid endosymbiotic SymL chaperonin with barley yellow dwarf virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filichkin, S A; Brumfield, S; Filichkin, T P; Young, M J

    1997-01-01

    Barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV)-vector relationships suggest that there are specific interactions between BYDV virions and the aphid's cellular components. However, little is known about vector factors that mediate virion recognition, cellular trafficking, and accumulation within the aphid. Symbionins are molecular chaperonins produced by intracellular endosymbiotic bacteria and are the most abundant proteins found in aphids. To elucidate the potential role of symbionins in BYDV transmission, we have isolated and characterized two new symbionin symL genes encoded by the endosymbionts which are harbored by the BYDV aphid vectors Rhopalosiphum padi and Sitobion avenae. Endosymbiont symL-encoded proteins have extensive homology with the pea aphid SymL and Escherichia coli GroEL chaperonin. Recombinant and native SymL proteins can be assembled into oligomeric complexes which are similar to the GroEL oligomer. R. padi SymL protein demonstrates an in vitro binding affinity for BYDV and its recombinant readthrough polypeptide. In contrast to the R. padi SymL, the closely related GroEL does not exhibit a significant binding affinity either for BYDV or for its recombinant readthrough polypeptide. Comparative sequence analysis between SymL and GroEL was used to identify potential SymL-BYDV binding sites. Affinity binding of SymL to BYDV in vitro suggests a potential involvement of endosymbiotic chaperonins in interactions with virions during their trafficking through the aphid. PMID:8985385

  3. A Mutant Chaperonin That Is Functional at Lower Temperatures Enables Hyperthermophilic Archaea To Grow under Cold-Stress Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Le; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Fujiwara, Shinsuke

    2015-01-01

    Thermococcus kodakarensis grows optimally at 85°C and possesses two chaperonins, cold-inducible CpkA and heat-inducible CpkB, which are involved in adaptation to low and high temperatures, respectively. The two chaperonins share a high sequence identity (77%), except in their C-terminal regions. CpkA, which contains tandem repeats of a GGM motif, shows its highest ATPase activity at 60°C to 70°C, whereas CpkB shows its highest activity at temperatures higher than 90°C. To clarify the effects ...

  4. Stress-responsive accumulation of plastid chaperonin 60 during seedling development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plastid chaperonin 60 (cpn60) is a chloroplast protein, presumed to assist in assembly and folding of plastid proteins. Although molecular chaperones often accumulate significantly in response to stress, this has never been demonstrated for cpn60. In this study, the accumulation of cpn60 in Nicotiana seedlings during their development was followed under different stress conditions. It was found that cpn60 accumulates markedly in developing seedlings in response to tentoxin and several other (but not all) stresses. Cpn60 accumulates only during a narrow period of seedling development. It is proposed that cpn60 accumulation under stress is developmentally regulated. (author)

  5. Adsorption of a model protein, the GroEL chaperonin, on surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, Carl; Palmer, Richard E [Nanoscale Physics Research Laboratory, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)], E-mail: carl.leung@kcl.ac.uk

    2008-09-03

    Understanding and controlling protein adsorption on surfaces is fundamental to many biological processes ranging from cell adhesion to the fabrication of protein biochips. In general, proteins need to retain their 3D conformation to perform their intended functions. However, when they are presented with a solid surface, complex interactions ranging from weak non-covalent binding to strong covalent bonding may occur, which can potentially induce conformational changes within the adsorbed protein. To investigate the surface adsorption process and its effects on a model protein, the chaperonin GroEL, we have applied contact mode atomic force microscopy, in buffer solution to probe the interactions between single proteins and surfaces in real space. We will discuss the adsorption of GroEL molecules on planar surfaces (mica, graphite and gold) and specifically tailored nanostructured surfaces, which present structural features on the size scale of individual biological molecules. (topical review)

  6. Adsorption of a model protein, the GroEL chaperonin, on surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding and controlling protein adsorption on surfaces is fundamental to many biological processes ranging from cell adhesion to the fabrication of protein biochips. In general, proteins need to retain their 3D conformation to perform their intended functions. However, when they are presented with a solid surface, complex interactions ranging from weak non-covalent binding to strong covalent bonding may occur, which can potentially induce conformational changes within the adsorbed protein. To investigate the surface adsorption process and its effects on a model protein, the chaperonin GroEL, we have applied contact mode atomic force microscopy, in buffer solution to probe the interactions between single proteins and surfaces in real space. We will discuss the adsorption of GroEL molecules on planar surfaces (mica, graphite and gold) and specifically tailored nanostructured surfaces, which present structural features on the size scale of individual biological molecules. (topical review)

  7. Enhanced expression of soluble human papillomavirus L1 through coexpression of molecular chaperonin in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Dong; Zha, Xiao; Yu, Xianghui; Wu, Yuqing

    2016-04-01

    The major recombinant capsid protein L1 of human papillomavirus (HPV) is widely used to produce HPV prophylactic vaccines. However, the quality of soluble and active expression of L1 in Escherichia coli was below the required amount. Coexpression with the chaperonin GroEL/ES enhanced L1 expression. Overexpressing GroEL/ES increased the soluble expression level of glutathione S-transferase-fused L1 (GST-L1) by approximately ∼3 fold. The yield of HPV type 16 L1 pentamer (L1-p) was ∼2 fold higher than that in a single expression system after purification through size-exclusion chromatograph. The expression and purification conditions were then optimized. The yield of L1-p was enhanced by ∼5 fold, and those of HPV types 18 and 58 L1-p increased by ∼3 and ∼2 folds, respectively, compared with that in the single expression system. Coexpressing the mono-site mutant HPV16 L1 L469A with GroEL/ES increased L1-p yield by ∼7 fold compared with strains expressing the wild-type L1 gene. L1-p was then characterized using circular dichroism spectra, UV-vis cloud point, dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscope analyses. Results indicated that the conformation and biological characteristics of L1-p were identical to that of native L1. Hence, overexpressing chaperonin in E. coli can increase the expression level of GST-L1 and L1-p production after purification. This finding may contribute to the development of a platform for prophylactic HPV vaccines. PMID:26732286

  8. Recombinant EPF/chaperonin 10 promotes the survival of O4-positive pro-oligodendrocytes prepared from neonatal rat brain

    OpenAIRE

    McCombe, P.A

    2008-01-01

    Chaperonin 10 (cpn 10) is a small heat-shock protein that is usually intracellular. Early pregnancy factor (EPF), a biologically active protein that was first described in the serum of pregnant mammals, is homologous to cpn 10. EPF/cpn 10 has been reported to have effects on immunomodulation and cell survival and to inhibit activation of toll-like receptors by lipopolysaccharide. We found that recombinant EPF/cpn 10 was able to suppress experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an anim...

  9. [Effect of ADP and GroES on interaction of molecular chaperonin GroEL with non-native lysozyme].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchenko, N Iu; Marchenkov, V V; Kotova, N V; Semisotnov, G V; Bulankina, N I; Kaliman, P A

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of the molecular chaperonin GroEL with fluorescein-labeled lysozyme in the presence of high concentrations of thiol reagent--dithiothreitol (DTT) has been studied. In case of high concentrations of DTT lysozyme loses the native conformation due to the disruption of the intramolecular disulfide bonds stabilizing its structure and effectively aggregates. It has been shown that in the presence of high concentrations of DTT and two-fold molar excess of GroEL the lysozyme tightly interacts with GroEL that essentially decreases the efficiency of its aggregation. The addition of ADP to the complex of GroEL with nonnative lysozyme noticeably decreases the interaction of the chaperonin with nonnative protein target resulting in some increase of the efficiency of its aggregation. However, the addition of the co-chaperonin GroES together with ADP (i.e. the formation of the complex of GroEL with GroES) leads to drastic weakness of the interaction of GroEL with nonnative lysozyme and the efficiency of its aggregation becomes comparable with that in the absence of GroEL. PMID:14577157

  10. Probing the Kinetic Stabilities of Friedreich’s Ataxia Clinical Variants Using a Solid Phase GroEL Chaperonin Capture Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana R. Correia

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Numerous human diseases are caused by protein folding defects where the protein may become more susceptible to degradation or aggregation. Aberrant protein folding can affect the kinetic stability of the proteins even if these proteins appear to be soluble in vivo. Experimental discrimination between functional properly folded and misfolded nonfunctional conformers is not always straightforward at near physiological conditions. The differences in the kinetic behavior of two initially folded frataxin clinical variants were examined using a high affinity chaperonin kinetic trap approach at 25 °C. The kinetically stable wild type frataxin (FXN shows no visible partitioning onto the chaperonin. In contrast, the clinical variants FXN-p.Asp122Tyr and FXN-p.Ile154Phe kinetically populate partial folded forms that tightly bind the GroEL chaperonin platform. The initially soluble FXN-p.Ile154Phe variant partitions onto GroEL more rapidly and is more kinetically liable. These differences in kinetic stability were confirmed using differential scanning fluorimetry. The kinetic and aggregation stability differences of these variants may lead to the distinct functional impairments described in Friedreich’s ataxia, the neurodegenerative disease associated to frataxin functional deficiency. This chaperonin platform approach may be useful for identifying small molecule stabilizers since stabilizing ligands to frataxin variants should lead to a concomitant decrease in chaperonin binding.

  11. Allosteric transitions of supramolecular systems explored by network models: application to chaperonin GroEL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Yang

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Identification of pathways involved in the structural transitions of biomolecular systems is often complicated by the transient nature of the conformations visited across energy barriers and the multiplicity of paths accessible in the multidimensional energy landscape. This task becomes even more challenging in exploring molecular systems on the order of megadaltons. Coarse-grained models that lend themselves to analytical solutions appear to be the only possible means of approaching such cases. Motivated by the utility of elastic network models for describing the collective dynamics of biomolecular systems and by the growing theoretical and experimental evidence in support of the intrinsic accessibility of functional substates, we introduce a new method, adaptive anisotropic network model (aANM, for exploring functional transitions. Application to bacterial chaperonin GroEL and comparisons with experimental data, results from action minimization algorithm, and previous simulations support the utility of aANM as a computationally efficient, yet physically plausible, tool for unraveling potential transition pathways sampled by large complexes/assemblies. An important outcome is the assessment of the critical inter-residue interactions formed/broken near the transition state(s, most of which involve conserved residues.

  12. GroE chaperonins assisted functional expression of bacterial enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Peng-Fei; Zhang, Guo-Chang; Liu, Jing-Jing; Kwak, Suryang; Tsai, Ching-Sung; Kong, In Iok; Sung, Bong Hyun; Sohn, Jung-Hoon; Wang, Shu-Guang; Jin, Yong-Su

    2016-10-01

    Rapid advances in the capabilities of reading and writing DNA along with increasing understanding of microbial metabolism at the systems-level have paved an incredible path for metabolic engineering. Despite these advances, post-translational tools facilitating functional expression of heterologous enzymes in model hosts have not been developed well. Some bacterial enzymes, such as Escherichia coli xylose isomerase (XI) and arabinose isomerase (AI) which are essential for utilizing cellulosic sugars, cannot be functionally expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We hypothesized and demonstrated that the mismatching of the HSP60 chaperone systems between bacterial and eukaryotic cells might be the reason these bacterial enzymes cannot be functionally expressed in yeast. The results showed that the co-expression of E. coli GroE can facilitate the functional expression of E. coli XI and AI, as well as the Agrobacterium tumefaciens D-psicose epimerase in S. cerevisiae. The co-expression of bacterial chaperonins in S. cerevisiae is a promising post-translational strategy for the functional expression of bacterial enzymes in yeast. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2149-2155. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27003667

  13. The composition, structure and stability of a group II chaperonin are temperature regulated in a hyperthermophilic archaeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Hiromi K; Yaoi, Takuro; Brocchieri, Luciano; McMillan, R Andrew; Alton, Thomas; Trent, Jonathan D

    2003-04-01

    The hyperthermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae contains group II chaperonins, known as rosettasomes, which are two nine-membered rings composed of three different 60 kDa subunits (TF55 alpha, beta and gamma). We sequenced the gene for the gamma subunit and studied the temperature-dependent changes in alpha, beta and gamma expression, their association into rosettasomes and their phylogenetic relationships. Alpha and beta gene expression was increased by heat shock (30 min, 86 degrees C) and decreased by cold shock (30 min, 60 degrees C). Gamma expression was undetectable at heat shock temperatures and low at normal temperatures (75-79 degrees C), but induced by cold shock. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated that in vitro alpha and beta subunits form homo-oligomeric rosettasomes, and mixtures of alpha, beta and gamma form hetero-oligomeric rosettasomes. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that beta homo-oligomeric rosettasomes and all hetero-oligomeric rosettasomes associate into filaments. In vivo rosettasomes were hetero-oligomeric with an average subunit ratio of 1alpha:1beta:0.1gamma in cultures grown at 75 degrees C, a ratio of 1alpha:3beta:1gamma in cultures grown at 60 degrees C and a ratio of 2alpha:3beta:0gamma after 86 degrees C heat shock. Using differential scanning calorimetry, we determined denaturation temperatures (Tm) for alpha, beta and gamma subunits of 95.7 degrees C, 96.7 degrees C and 80.5 degrees C, respectively, and observed that rosettasomes containing gamma were relatively less stable than those with alpha and/or beta only. We propose that, in vivo, the rosettasome structure is determined by the relative abundance of subunits and not by a fixed geometry. Furthermore, phylogenetic analyses indicate that archaeal chaperonin subunits underwent multiple duplication events within species (paralogy). The independent evolution of these paralogues raises the possibility that chaperonins have functionally diversified between

  14. The Cpn10(1 co-chaperonin of A. thaliana functions only as a hetero-oligomer with Cpn20.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Vitlin Gruber

    Full Text Available The A. thaliana genome encodes five co-chaperonin homologs, three of which are destined to the chloroplast. Two of the proteins, Cpn10(2 and Cpn20, form functional homo-oligomers in vitro. In the current work, we present data on the structure and function of the third A. thaliana co-chaperonin, which exhibits unique properties. We found that purified recombinant Cpn10(1 forms inactive dimers in solution, in contrast to the active heptamers that are formed by canonical Cpn10s. Additionally, our data demonstrate that Cpn10(1 is capable of assembling into active hetero-oligomers together with Cpn20. This finding was reinforced by the formation of active co-chaperonin species upon mixing an inactive Cpn20 mutant with the inactive Cpn10(1. The present study constitutes the first report of a higher plant Cpn10 subunit that is able to function only upon formation of hetero-oligomers with other co-chaperonins.

  15. The Cpn10(1) co-chaperonin of A. thaliana functions only as a hetero-oligomer with Cpn20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitlin Gruber, Anna; Zizelski, Gal; Azem, Abdussalam; Weiss, Celeste

    2014-01-01

    The A. thaliana genome encodes five co-chaperonin homologs, three of which are destined to the chloroplast. Two of the proteins, Cpn10(2) and Cpn20, form functional homo-oligomers in vitro. In the current work, we present data on the structure and function of the third A. thaliana co-chaperonin, which exhibits unique properties. We found that purified recombinant Cpn10(1) forms inactive dimers in solution, in contrast to the active heptamers that are formed by canonical Cpn10s. Additionally, our data demonstrate that Cpn10(1) is capable of assembling into active hetero-oligomers together with Cpn20. This finding was reinforced by the formation of active co-chaperonin species upon mixing an inactive Cpn20 mutant with the inactive Cpn10(1). The present study constitutes the first report of a higher plant Cpn10 subunit that is able to function only upon formation of hetero-oligomers with other co-chaperonins. PMID:25419702

  16. Chaperonin-Based Biolayer Interferometry To Assess the Kinetic Stability of Metastable, Aggregation-Prone Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, Wendy A; O'Neil, Pierce T; Machen, Alexandra J; Naik, Subhashchandra; Chaudhri, Tapan; McGinn-Straub, Wesley; Tischer, Alexander; Auton, Matthew T; Burns, Joshua R; Baldwin, Michael R; Khar, Karen R; Karanicolas, John; Fisher, Mark T

    2016-09-01

    Stabilizing the folded state of metastable and/or aggregation-prone proteins through exogenous ligand binding is an appealing strategy for decreasing disease pathologies caused by protein folding defects or deleterious kinetic transitions. Current methods of examining binding of a ligand to these marginally stable native states are limited because protein aggregation typically interferes with analysis. Here, we describe a rapid method for assessing the kinetic stability of folded proteins and monitoring the effects of ligand stabilization for both intrinsically stable proteins (monomers, oligomers, and multidomain proteins) and metastable proteins (e.g., low Tm) that uses a new GroEL chaperonin-based biolayer interferometry (BLI) denaturant pulse platform. A kinetically controlled denaturation isotherm is generated by exposing a target protein, immobilized on a BLI biosensor, to increasing denaturant concentrations (urea or GuHCl) in a pulsatile manner to induce partial or complete unfolding of the attached protein population. Following the rapid removal of the denaturant, the extent of hydrophobic unfolded/partially folded species that remains is detected by an increased level of GroEL binding. Because this kinetic denaturant pulse is brief, the amplitude of binding of GroEL to the immobilized protein depends on the duration of the exposure to the denaturant, the concentration of the denaturant, wash times, and the underlying protein unfolding-refolding kinetics; fixing all other parameters and plotting the GroEL binding amplitude versus denaturant pulse concentration result in a kinetically controlled denaturation isotherm. When folding osmolytes or stabilizing ligands are added to the immobilized target proteins before and during the denaturant pulse, the diminished population of unfolded/partially folded protein manifests as a decreased level of GroEL binding and/or a marked shift in these kinetically controlled denaturation profiles to higher denaturant

  17. Folding of newly translated membrane protein CCR5 is assisted by the chaperonin GroEL-GroES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Haixia; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Li, Jiqiang; Ren, Hao; Huang, Fang

    2015-11-01

    The in vitro folding of newly translated human CC chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5), which belongs to the physiologically important family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), has been studied in a cell-free system supplemented with the surfactant Brij-35. The freshly synthesized CCR5 can spontaneously fold into its biologically active state but only slowly and inefficiently. However, on addition of the GroEL-GroES molecular chaperone system, the folding of the nascent CCR5 was significantly enhanced, as was the structural stability and functional expression of the soluble form of CCR5. The chaperonin GroEL was partially effective on its own, but for maximum efficiency both the GroEL and its GroES lid were necessary. These results are direct evidence for chaperone-assisted membrane protein folding and therefore demonstrate that GroEL-GroES may be implicated in the folding of membrane proteins.

  18. Chaperonin-Assisted Protein Folding: Relative Population of Asymmetric and Symmetric GroEL:GroES Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, Shubhasis; Gupta, Amit J; Yan, Xiao; Miličić, Goran; Hartl, F Ulrich; Hayer-Hartl, Manajit

    2015-06-19

    The chaperonin GroEL, a cylindrical complex consisting of two stacked heptameric rings, and its lid-like cofactor GroES form a nano-cage in which a single polypeptide chain is transiently enclosed and allowed to fold unimpaired by aggregation. GroEL and GroES undergo an ATP-regulated interaction cycle that serves to close and open the folding cage. Recent reports suggest that the presence of non-native substrate protein alters the GroEL/ES reaction by shifting it from asymmetric to symmetric complexes. In the asymmetric reaction mode, only one ring of GroEL is GroES bound and the two rings function sequentially, coupled by negative allostery. In the symmetric mode, both GroEL rings are GroES bound and are folding active simultaneously. Here, we find that the results of assays based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer recently used to quantify symmetric complexes depend strongly on the fluorophore pair used. We therefore developed a novel assay based on fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy to accurately measure GroEL:GroES stoichiometry. This assay avoids fluorophore labeling of GroEL and the use of GroEL cysteine mutants. Our results show that symmetric GroEL:GroES2 complexes are substantially populated only in the presence of non-foldable model proteins, such as α-lactalbumin and α-casein, which "over-stimulate" the GroEL ATPase and uncouple the negative GroEL inter-ring allostery. In contrast, asymmetric complexes are dominant both in the absence of substrate and in the presence of foldable substrate proteins. Moreover, uncoupling of the GroEL rings and formation of symmetric GroEL:GroES2 complexes is suppressed at physiological ATP:ADP concentration. We conclude that the asymmetric GroEL:GroES complex represents the main folding active form of the chaperonin. PMID:25912285

  19. The interaction of β2-glycoprotein I domain V with chaperonin GroEL: The similarity with the domain V and membrane interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Gozu, Masayo; Hoshino, Masaru; Higurashi, Takashi; Kato, Hisao; Goto, Yuji

    2002-01-01

    To clarify the mechanism of interaction between chaperonin GroEL and substrate proteins, we studied the conformational changes; of the fifth domain of human β2-glycoprotein I upon binding to GroEL. The fifth domain has a large flexible loop, containing several hydrophobic residues surrounded by positively charged residues, which has been proposed to be responsible for the binding of β2-glycoprotein I to negatively charged phospholipid membranes. The reduction by dithiothreitol of the three in...

  20. Cloning, characterization and sub-cellular localization of gamma subunit of T-complex protein-1 (chaperonin) from Leishmania donovani

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The study presents cloning and characterization of TCP1γ gene from L. donovani. ► TCP1γ is a subunit of T-complex protein-1 (TCP1), a chaperonin class of protein. ► LdTCPγ exhibited differential expression in different stages of promastigotes. ► LdTCPγ co-localized with actin, a cytoskeleton protein. ► The data suggests that this gene may have a role in differentiation/biogenesis. ► First report on this chapronin in Leishmania. -- Abstract: T-complex protein-1 (TCP1) complex, a chaperonin class of protein, ubiquitous in all genera of life, is involved in intracellular assembly and folding of various proteins. The gamma subunit of TCP1 complex (TCP1γ), plays a pivotal role in the folding and assembly of cytoskeleton protein(s) as an individual or complexed with other subunits. Here, we report for the first time cloning, characterization and expression of the TCP1γ of Leishmania donovani (LdTCP1γ), the causative agent of Indian Kala-azar. Primary sequence analysis of LdTCP1γ revealed the presence of all the characteristic features of TCP1γ. However, leishmanial TCP1γ represents a distinct kinetoplastid group, clustered in a separate branch of the phylogenic tree. LdTCP1γ exhibited differential expression in different stages of promastigotes. The non-dividing stationary phase promastigotes exhibited 2.5-fold less expression of LdTCP1γ as compared to rapidly dividing log phase parasites. The sub-cellular distribution of LdTCP1γ was studied in log phase promastigotes by employing indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. The protein was present not only in cytoplasm but it was also localized in nucleus, peri-nuclear region, flagella, flagellar pocket and apical region. Co-localization of LdTCP1γ with actin suggests that, this gene may have a role in maintaining the structural dynamics of cytoskeleton of parasite.

  1. Plastid chaperonin proteins Cpn60α and Cpn60β are required for plastid division in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osteryoung Katherine W

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plastids arose from a free-living cyanobacterial endosymbiont and multiply by binary division as do cyanobacteria. Plastid division involves nucleus-encoded homologs of cyanobacterial division proteins such as FtsZ, MinD, MinE, and ARC6. However, homologs of many other cyanobacterial division genes are missing in plant genomes and proteins of host eukaryotic origin, such as a dynamin-related protein, PDV1 and PDV2 are involved in the division process. Recent identification of plastid division proteins has started to elucidate the similarities and differences between plastid division and cyanobacterial cell division. To further identify new proteins that are required for plastid division, we characterized previously and newly isolated plastid division mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. Results Leaf cells of two mutants, br04 and arc2, contain fewer, larger chloroplasts than those of wild type. We found that ARC2 and BR04 are identical to nuclear genes encoding the plastid chaperonin 60α (ptCpn60α and chaperonin 60β (ptCpn60β proteins, respectively. In both mutants, plastid division FtsZ ring formation was partially perturbed though the level of FtsZ2-1 protein in plastids of ptcpn60β mutants was similar to that in wild type. Phylogenetic analyses showed that both ptCpn60 proteins are derived from ancestral cyanobacterial proteins. The A. thaliana genome encodes two members of ptCpn60α family and four members of ptCpn60β family respectively. We found that a null mutation in ptCpn60α abolished greening of plastids and resulted in an albino phenotype while a weaker mutation impairs plastid division and reduced chlorophyll levels. The functions of at least two ptCpn60β proteins are redundant and the appearance of chloroplast division defects is dependent on the number of mutant alleles. Conclusion Our results suggest that both ptCpn60α and ptCpn60β are required for the formation of a normal plastid division apparatus, as

  2. Cloning, characterization and sub-cellular localization of gamma subunit of T-complex protein-1 (chaperonin) from Leishmania donovani

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhaskar,; Kumari, Neeti [Division of Biochemistry, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Chattar Manzil Palace, PO Box 173, Lucknow (India); Goyal, Neena, E-mail: neenacdri@yahoo.com [Division of Biochemistry, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Chattar Manzil Palace, PO Box 173, Lucknow (India)

    2012-12-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The study presents cloning and characterization of TCP1{gamma} gene from L. donovani. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TCP1{gamma} is a subunit of T-complex protein-1 (TCP1), a chaperonin class of protein. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LdTCP{gamma} exhibited differential expression in different stages of promastigotes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LdTCP{gamma} co-localized with actin, a cytoskeleton protein. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The data suggests that this gene may have a role in differentiation/biogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First report on this chapronin in Leishmania. -- Abstract: T-complex protein-1 (TCP1) complex, a chaperonin class of protein, ubiquitous in all genera of life, is involved in intracellular assembly and folding of various proteins. The gamma subunit of TCP1 complex (TCP1{gamma}), plays a pivotal role in the folding and assembly of cytoskeleton protein(s) as an individual or complexed with other subunits. Here, we report for the first time cloning, characterization and expression of the TCP1{gamma} of Leishmania donovani (LdTCP1{gamma}), the causative agent of Indian Kala-azar. Primary sequence analysis of LdTCP1{gamma} revealed the presence of all the characteristic features of TCP1{gamma}. However, leishmanial TCP1{gamma} represents a distinct kinetoplastid group, clustered in a separate branch of the phylogenic tree. LdTCP1{gamma} exhibited differential expression in different stages of promastigotes. The non-dividing stationary phase promastigotes exhibited 2.5-fold less expression of LdTCP1{gamma} as compared to rapidly dividing log phase parasites. The sub-cellular distribution of LdTCP1{gamma} was studied in log phase promastigotes by employing indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. The protein was present not only in cytoplasm but it was also localized in nucleus, peri-nuclear region, flagella, flagellar pocket and apical region. Co-localization of LdTCP1{gamma} with actin suggests

  3. A Direct Regulatory Interaction between Chaperonin TRiC and Stress-Responsive Transcription Factor HSF1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel W. Neef

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1 is an evolutionarily conserved transcription factor that protects cells from protein-misfolding-induced stress and apoptosis. The mechanisms by which cytosolic protein misfolding leads to HSF1 activation have not been elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that HSF1 is directly regulated by TRiC/CCT, a central ATP-dependent chaperonin complex that folds cytosolic proteins. A small-molecule activator of HSF1, HSF1A, protects cells from stress-induced apoptosis, binds TRiC subunits in vivo and in vitro, and inhibits TRiC activity without perturbation of ATP hydrolysis. Genetic inactivation or depletion of the TRiC complex results in human HSF1 activation, and HSF1A inhibits the direct interaction between purified TRiC and HSF1 in vitro. These results demonstrate a direct regulatory interaction between the cytosolic chaperone machine and a critical transcription factor that protects cells from proteotoxicity, providing a mechanistic basis for signaling perturbations in protein folding to a stress-protective transcription factor.

  4. Location and Flexibility of the Unique C-Terminal Tail of Aquifex aeolicus Co-Chaperonin Protein 10 as Derived by Cryo-Electron Microscopy and Biophysical Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Dong-Hua; Luke, Kathryn; Zhang, Junjie; Chiu, Wah; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2008-01-01

    Co-chaperonin protein 10 (cpn10, GroES in Escherichia coli) is a ring-shaped heptameric protein that facilitates substrate folding when in complex with cpn60 (GroEL in E. coli). The cpn10 from the hyperthermophilic, ancient bacterium Aquifex aeolicus (Aacpn10) has a 25-residue C-terminal extension in each monomer not found in any other cpn10 protein. Earlier in vitro work has shown that this tail is not needed for heptamer assembly or protein function. Without the tail, however, the heptamers...

  5. Molecular diagnostic tools for detection and differentiation of phytoplasmas based on chaperonin-60 reveal differences in host plant infection patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim J Dumonceaux

    Full Text Available Phytoplasmas ('Candidatus Phytoplasma' spp. are insect-vectored bacteria that infect a wide variety of plants, including many agriculturally important species. The infections can cause devastating yield losses by inducing morphological changes that dramatically alter inflorescence development. Detection of phytoplasma infection typically utilizes sequences located within the 16S-23S rRNA-encoding locus, and these sequences are necessary for strain identification by currently accepted standards for phytoplasma classification. However, these methods can generate PCR products >1400 bp that are less divergent in sequence than protein-encoding genes, limiting strain resolution in certain cases. We describe a method for accessing the chaperonin-60 (cpn60 gene sequence from a diverse array of 'Ca.Phytoplasma' spp. Two degenerate primer sets were designed based on the known sequence diversity of cpn60 from 'Ca.Phytoplasma' spp. and used to amplify cpn60 gene fragments from various reference samples and infected plant tissues. Forty three cpn60 sequences were thereby determined. The cpn60 PCR-gel electrophoresis method was highly sensitive compared to 16S-23S-targeted PCR-gel electrophoresis. The topology of a phylogenetic tree generated using cpn60 sequences was congruent with that reported for 16S rRNA-encoding genes. The cpn60 sequences were used to design a hybridization array using oligonucleotide-coupled fluorescent microspheres, providing rapid diagnosis and typing of phytoplasma infections. The oligonucleotide-coupled fluorescent microsphere assay revealed samples that were infected simultaneously with two subtypes of phytoplasma. These tools were applied to show that two host plants, Brassica napus and Camelina sativa, displayed different phytoplasma infection patterns.

  6. Molecular diagnostic tools for detection and differentiation of phytoplasmas based on chaperonin-60 reveal differences in host plant infection patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumonceaux, Tim J; Green, Margaret; Hammond, Christine; Perez, Edel; Olivier, Chrystel

    2014-01-01

    Phytoplasmas ('Candidatus Phytoplasma' spp.) are insect-vectored bacteria that infect a wide variety of plants, including many agriculturally important species. The infections can cause devastating yield losses by inducing morphological changes that dramatically alter inflorescence development. Detection of phytoplasma infection typically utilizes sequences located within the 16S-23S rRNA-encoding locus, and these sequences are necessary for strain identification by currently accepted standards for phytoplasma classification. However, these methods can generate PCR products >1400 bp that are less divergent in sequence than protein-encoding genes, limiting strain resolution in certain cases. We describe a method for accessing the chaperonin-60 (cpn60) gene sequence from a diverse array of 'Ca.Phytoplasma' spp. Two degenerate primer sets were designed based on the known sequence diversity of cpn60 from 'Ca.Phytoplasma' spp. and used to amplify cpn60 gene fragments from various reference samples and infected plant tissues. Forty three cpn60 sequences were thereby determined. The cpn60 PCR-gel electrophoresis method was highly sensitive compared to 16S-23S-targeted PCR-gel electrophoresis. The topology of a phylogenetic tree generated using cpn60 sequences was congruent with that reported for 16S rRNA-encoding genes. The cpn60 sequences were used to design a hybridization array using oligonucleotide-coupled fluorescent microspheres, providing rapid diagnosis and typing of phytoplasma infections. The oligonucleotide-coupled fluorescent microsphere assay revealed samples that were infected simultaneously with two subtypes of phytoplasma. These tools were applied to show that two host plants, Brassica napus and Camelina sativa, displayed different phytoplasma infection patterns. PMID:25551224

  7. The role of the Chaperonin containing t-complex polypeptide 1, subunit 8 (CCT8) in B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Haibing; Miao, Xiaobing; Wu, Yaxun; Wei, Yingze; Zong, Guijuan; Yang, Shuyun; Chen, Xudong; Zheng, Guihua; Zhu, Xinghua; Guo, Yan; Li, Chunsun; Chen, Yali; Wang, Yuchan; He, Song

    2016-06-01

    The chaperonin containing t-complex polypeptide 1 (CCT) is known to mediate folding of proteins. CCT, subunit 8 (CCT8), is the θ subunit of CCT complex chaperonin. CCT8 has been reported to be dysregulated in several tumor tissues. In this study, we investigated the role of CCT8 in B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Clinically, the expression levels of CCT8 in reactive lymphoid hyperplasia (RLH) and B-cell NHL specimens were investigated using immunohistochemical analysis. We found that CCT8 was highly expressed in proliferating germinal center cells compared with the quiescent cells of the follicular mantle zone. Furthermore, CCT8 was highly expressed in progressive lymphomas than in indolent lymphomas. Kaplan-Meier curve showed that high expression of CCT8 was significantly associated with shorter overall survival in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Moreover, we demonstrated that CCT8 could promote the proliferation of B-cell NHL cells. In addition, we found that CCT8 could accelerate the G1/S transition in B-cell NHL. Finally, we demonstrated that overexpression of CCT8 could reverse cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) phenotype. Our study may shed new insights into the important role of CCT8 in cancer development. PMID:27101149

  8. Chaperonin containing T-complex polypeptide subunit eta (CCT-eta is a specific regulator of fibroblast motility and contractility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latha Satish

    Full Text Available Integumentary wounds in mammalian fetuses heal without scar; this scarless wound healing is intrinsic to fetal tissues and is notable for absence of the contraction seen in postnatal (adult wounds. The precise molecular signals determining the scarless phenotype remain unclear. We have previously reported that the eta subunit of the chaperonin containing T-complex polypeptide (CCT-eta is specifically reduced in healing fetal wounds in a rabbit model. In this study, we examine the role of CCT-eta in fibroblast motility and contractility, properties essential to wound healing and scar formation. We demonstrate that CCT-eta (but not CCT-beta is underexpressed in fetal fibroblasts compared to adult fibroblasts. An in vitro wound healing assay demonstrated that adult fibroblasts showed increased cell migration in response to epidermal growth factor (EGF and platelet derived growth factor (PDGF stimulation, whereas fetal fibroblasts were unresponsive. Downregulation of CCT-eta in adult fibroblasts with short inhibitory RNA (siRNA reduced cellular motility, both basal and growth factor-induced; in contrast, siRNA against CCT-beta had no such effect. Adult fibroblasts were more inherently contractile than fetal fibroblasts by cellular traction force microscopy; this contractility was increased by treatment with EGF and PDGF. CCT-eta siRNA inhibited the PDGF-induction of adult fibroblast contractility, whereas CCT-beta siRNA had no such effect. In each of these instances, the effect of downregulating CCT-eta was to modulate the behavior of adult fibroblasts so as to more closely approximate the characteristics of fetal fibroblasts. We next examined the effect of CCT-eta modulation on alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA expression, a gene product well known to play a critical role in adult wound healing. Fetal fibroblasts were found to constitutively express less alpha-SMA than adult cells. Reduction of CCT-eta with siRNA had minimal effect on cellular

  9. Identification of a novel BBS gene (BBS12) highlights the major role of a vertebrate-specific branch of chaperonin-related proteins in Bardet-Biedl syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoetzel, Corinne; Muller, Jean; Laurier, Virginie; Davis, Erica E; Zaghloul, Norann A; Vicaire, Serge; Jacquelin, Cecile; Plewniak, Frederic; Leitch, Carmen C; Sarda, Pierre; Hamel, Christian; de Ravel, Thomy J L; Lewis, Richard Alan; Friederich, Evelyne; Thibault, Christelle; Danse, Jean-Marc; Verloes, Alain; Bonneau, Dominique; Katsanis, Nicholas; Poch, Olivier; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Dollfus, Helene

    2007-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is primarily an autosomal recessive ciliopathy characterized by progressive retinal degeneration, obesity, cognitive impairment, polydactyly, and kidney anomalies. The disorder is genetically heterogeneous, with 11 BBS genes identified to date, which account for ~70% of affected families. We have combined single-nucleotide-polymorphism array homozygosity mapping with in silico analysis to identify a new BBS gene, BBS12. Patients from two Gypsy families were homozygous and haploidentical in a 6-Mb region of chromosome 4q27. FLJ35630 was selected as a candidate gene, because it was predicted to encode a protein with similarity to members of the type II chaperonin superfamily, which includes BBS6 and BBS10. We found pathogenic mutations in both Gypsy families, as well as in 14 other families of various ethnic backgrounds, indicating that BBS12 accounts for approximately 5% of all BBS cases. BBS12 is vertebrate specific and, together with BBS6 and BBS10, defines a novel branch of the type II chaperonin superfamily. These three genes are characterized by unusually rapid evolution and are likely to perform ciliary functions specific to vertebrates that are important in the pathophysiology of the syndrome, and together they account for about one-third of the total BBS mutational load. Consistent with this notion, suppression of each family member in zebrafish yielded gastrulation-movement defects characteristic of other BBS morphants, whereas simultaneous suppression of all three members resulted in severely affected embryos, possibly hinting at partial functional redundancy within this protein family. PMID:17160889

  10. Cloning, expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the co-chaperonin XoGroES from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacterial blight, an infectious disease caused by X. oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), causes huge rice-production losses in most rice-cultivating countries. The co-chaperonin of Xoo, XoGroES, an important protein for protein folding, was cloned from Xoo, purified and crystallized for atomic resolution structure determination. Bacterial blight (BB), a devastating disease caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), causes serious production losses of rice in Asian countries. Protein misfolding may interfere with the function of proteins in all living cells and must be prevented to avoid cellular disaster. All cells naturally contain molecular chaperones that assist the unfolded proteins in folding into the native structure. One of the well characterized chaperone complexes is GroEL–GroES. GroEL, which consists of two chambers, captures misfolded proteins and refolds them. GroES is a co-chaperonin protein that assists the GroEL protein as a lid that temporarily closes the chamber during the folding process. Xoo4289, the GroES gene from Xoo, was cloned and expressed for X-ray crystallographic study. The purified protein (XoGroES) was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and a crystal diffracted to 2.0 Å resolution. The crystal belonged to the hexagonal space group P61, with unit-cell parameters a = 64.4, c = 36.5 Å. The crystal contains a single molecule in the asymmetric unit, with a corresponding VM of 2.05 Å3 Da−1 and a solvent content of 39.9%

  11. Characterization of a natural mouse monoclonal antibody recognizing epitopes shared by oxidized low-density lipoprotein and chaperonin 60 of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunguang; Kankaanpää, Jari; Kummu, Outi; Turunen, S Pauliina; Akhi, Ramin; Bergmann, Ulrich; Pussinen, Pirkko; Remes, Anne M; Hörkkö, Sohvi

    2016-06-01

    Natural antibodies are predominantly antibodies of the IgM isotype present in the circulation of all vertebrates that have not been previously exposed to exogenous antigens. They are often directed against highly conserved epitopes and bind to ligands of varying chemical composition with low affinity. In this study we cloned and characterized a natural mouse monoclonal IgM antibody selected by binding to malondialdehyde acetaldehyde epitopes on low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Interestingly, the IgM antibody cross-reacted with Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) bacteria, a key pathogenic microbe in periodontitis reported to be associated with risk factor for atherosclerosis, thus being named as Aa_Mab. It is more intriguing that the binding molecule of Aa to Aa_Mab IgM was found to be Aa chaperonin 60 or HSP60, a member of heat-shock protein family, behaving not only as a chaperone for correct protein folding but also as a powerful virulence factor of the bacteria for inducing bone resorption and as a putative pathogenic factor in atherosclerosis. The findings will highlight the question of whether molecular mimicry between pathogen components and oxidized LDL could lead to atheroprotective immune activity, and also would be of great importance in potential application of immune response-based preventive and therapeutic strategies against atherosclerosis and periodontal disease. PMID:26786003

  12. Affinity chromatography of GroEL chaperonin based on denatured proteins: role of electrostatic interactions in regulation of GroEL affinity for protein substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchenko, N Iu; Marchenkov, V V; Kaĭsheva, A L; Kashparov, I A; Kotova, N V; Kaliman, P A; Semisotnov, G V

    2006-12-01

    The chaperonin GroEL of the heat shock protein family from Escherichia coli cells can bind various polypeptides lacking rigid tertiary structure and thus prevent their nonspecific association and provide for acquisition of native conformation. In the present work we studied the interaction of GroEL with six denatured proteins (alpha-lactalbumin, ribonuclease A, egg lysozyme in the presence of dithiothreitol, pepsin, beta-casein, and apocytochrome c) possessing negative or positive total charge at neutral pH values and different in hydrophobicity (affinity for a hydrophobic probe ANS). To prevent the influence of nonspecific association of non-native proteins on their interaction with GroEL and make easier the recording of the complexing, the proteins were covalently attached to BrCN-activated Sepharose. At low ionic strength (lower than 60 mM), tight binding of the negatively charged denatured proteins with GroEL (which is also negatively charged) needed relatively low concentrations (approximately 10 mM) of bivalent cations Mg2+ or Ca2+. At the high ionic strength (approximately 600 mM), a tight complex was produced also in the absence of bivalent cations. In contrast, positively charged denatured proteins tightly interacted with GroEL irrespectively of the presence of bivalent cations and ionic strength of the solution (from 20 to 600 mM). These features of GroEL interaction with positively and negatively charged denatured proteins were confirmed by polarized fluorescence (fluorescence anisotropy). The findings suggest that the affinity of GroEL for denatured proteins can be determined by the balance of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. PMID:17223789

  13. Perspectives on the origin of microfilaments, microtubules, the relevant chaperonin system and cytoskeletal motors--a commentary on the spirochaete origin of flagella

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JING YAN LI; CHUAN FEN WU

    2003-01-01

    The origin of cytoskeleton and the origin of relevant intracellular transportation system are big problems for understanding the emergence of eukaryotic cells. The present article summarized relevant information of evidences and molecular traces on the origin of actin, tubulin, the chaperonin system for folding them,myosins, kinesins, axonemal dyneins and cytoplasmic dyneins. On this basis the authors proposed a series of works, which should be done in the future, and indicated the ways for reaching the targets. Thesetargets are mainly: 1) the reconstruction of evolutionary path from MreB protein of archaeal ancestor of eukaryotic cells to typical actin; 2) the finding of the MreB or MreB-related proteins in crenarchaea and using them to examine J. A. Lake's hypothesis on the origin of eukaryote from "eocytes" crenarchaea);3) the examinations of the existence and distribution of cytoskeleton made of MreB-related protein within coccoid archaea, especially in amoeboid archaeon Thermoplasm acidophilum; 4) using Thermoplasma as a model of archaeal ancestor of eukaryotic cells; 5) the searching for the homolog of ancestral dynein in present-day living archaea. During the writing of this article, Margulis' famous spirochaete hypothesis on the origin of flagella and cilia was unexpectedly involved and analyzed from aspects of tubulins, dyneins and spirochaetes. Actually, spirochaete cannot be reasonably assumed as the ectosymbiotic ancestor of eukaryotic flagella and cilia, since their swing depends upon large amount of bacterial flagella beneath the flexible outer wall, but not depends upon their intracellular tubules and the assumed dyneins. In this case,if they had "evolved" into cilia and lost their bacterial flagella, they would immediately become immobile!In fact, tubulin and dynein-like proteins have not been found in any spirochaete.

  14. Association of activase with chaperonin-60 beta: a possible mechanism for protecting photosynthesis during heat stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous studies have shown that inhibition of photosynthesis by moderate heat stress is a consequence of Rubisco deactivation, caused in part by the thermal instability of activase. This involvement of activase was confirmed in heat stress and recovery experiments using transgenic Arabidopsis plan...

  15. Study of cilia assembly in Tetrahymena and the role of cytosolic chaperonin CCT

    OpenAIRE

    Seixas, Ana Cecília Fernandes, 1974-

    2008-01-01

    Os cílios são organelos conservados evolutivamente que são requeridos num vasto número de processos celulares tais como locomoção, quimiotaxia, movimento de fluídos e transdução de sinais. Nos últimos anos, um grande número de publicações tem demonstrado o impacto que pequenas alterações no correcto funcionamento dos cílios tem no Homem. Várias doenças humanas que se caracterizam por quadros clínicos complexos, como o síndrome de Bardet-Biedl (BBS) e o síndrome de Meckel-Gruber (MKS) foram re...

  16. Physical immobilization of 60 kDa chaperonin linked lipase from pseudomonas aeruginosa BN-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abstract: The 60 kDa chaperone linked lipase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was subjected to physical adsorption on silica 60 and acrylic beads. It was found that higher enzyme loading was achieved on silica gel than acrylic bead. The half life of immobilized enzyme was greater compared to the free enzyme. The adsorption of the enzyme onto a solid phase also resulted in increased thermo and solvent stability. It was observed that soluble enzyme showed maximum stability at 70 degree C while immobilized enzyme showed stability up to 80 degree C for 45 minutes. The stability of immobilized enzyme increased up to 48 hours from 24 hours against different organic solvent at 1.0 M concentration. It was noted that enzyme immobilized on acrylic beads have greater reusability compared to silica immobilized enzyme. (author)

  17. Single-molecule detection of chaperonin dynamics through polarization rotation modulation of CdSe QD luminescence imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report our recent trials examining the single-molecule three-dimensional (3D) detection of protein conformational dynamics at room temperature. Using molecular chaperones as model proteins and cadmium selenide (CdSe) semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) as nanometer-scale probes, we monitored the temporal evolution of ATP-induced conformation changes with a total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy imaging technique in buffer solutions. The two-dimensional (2D) degenerate nature of the emission dipoles of the QDs, due to the uniaxial wurtzite crystal structure, made it possible to capture the 3D orientation using a polarization modulation technique in real time. The temporal resolution was half the period of analyzer rotation. Although still insufficient, the obtained signals suggest possible 3D detection of specific motions, which supports the two-step conformational changes triggered by ATP attachment. - Highlights: • We report our recent trials examining the single-molecule three-dimensional (3D) detection of protein conformational dynamics at room temperature. • Using molecular chaperones as model proteins and cadmium selenide (CdSe) semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) as nanometer-scale probes, we monitored the temporal evolution of ATP-induced conformation changes with a total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy imaging technique in buffer solutions. • The two-dimensional (2D) degenerate nature of the emission dipoles of the QDs, due to the uniaxial wurtzite crystal structure, made it possible to capture the 3D orientation using a polarization modulation technique in real time. • The temporal resolution was half the period of analyzer rotation. • Although still insufficient, the obtained signals suggest possible 3D detection of specific motions, which supports the two-step conformational changes triggered by ATP attachment

  18. The chaperonin-60 universal target is a barcode for bacteria that enables de novo assembly of metagenomic sequence data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew G Links

    Full Text Available Barcoding with molecular sequences is widely used to catalogue eukaryotic biodiversity. Studies investigating the community dynamics of microbes have relied heavily on gene-centric metagenomic profiling using two genes (16S rRNA and cpn60 to identify and track Bacteria. While there have been criteria formalized for barcoding of eukaryotes, these criteria have not been used to evaluate gene targets for other domains of life. Using the framework of the International Barcode of Life we evaluated DNA barcodes for Bacteria. Candidates from the 16S rRNA gene and the protein coding cpn60 gene were evaluated. Within complete bacterial genomes in the public domain representing 983 species from 21 phyla, the largest difference between median pairwise inter- and intra-specific distances ("barcode gap" was found from cpn60. Distribution of sequence diversity along the ∼555 bp cpn60 target region was remarkably uniform. The barcode gap of the cpn60 universal target facilitated the faithful de novo assembly of full-length operational taxonomic units from pyrosequencing data from a synthetic microbial community. Analysis supported the recognition of both 16S rRNA and cpn60 as DNA barcodes for Bacteria. The cpn60 universal target was found to have a much larger barcode gap than 16S rRNA suggesting cpn60 as a preferred barcode for Bacteria. A large barcode gap for cpn60 provided a robust target for species-level characterization of data. The assembly of consensus sequences for barcodes was shown to be a reliable method for the identification and tracking of novel microbes in metagenomic studies.

  19. Genomic structure of the human mitochondrial chaperonin genes: Hsp60 and Hsp10 are localised head to head on chromosome 2 separated by a bidirectional promoter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J.J.; Bross, P.; Westergaard, M.;

    2003-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor is a major proliferative and migratory stimulus for connective tissue cells during the initiation of skin repair processes. In response to injury, locally produced platelet-derived growth factor is secreted by a diversity of cutaneous cell types whereas target...... R) into epidermal keratinocytes using a retrovirus-derived vector. Successful gene transfer to primary cells was confirmed by immunofluorescence staining, southern blotting, and ligand-induced receptor autophosphorylation. By culturing a mixture of PDGF beta R-transduced and unmodified keratinocytes...... tissue cultured for 6 days and examined by immunofluorescence microscopy was shown to contain PDGF beta R-expressing keratinocytes distributed in all layers of living epidermis. By continued tissue culture in serum-containing medium, the epidermis became increasingly cornified although receptor...

  20. EST Table: BP126232 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available BP126232 ps4M0346 10/09/28 96 %/161 aa ref|NP_001040108.1| chaperonin subunit 6a ze...ta [Bombyx mori] gb|ABD36094.1| chaperonin subunit 6a zeta [Bombyx mori] 10/08/29 75 %/161 aa FBpp0229150|DvirT-cp1

  1. EST Table: BP181916 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available BP181916 ovS334F04f 10/09/28 100 %/117 aa ref|NP_001040108.1| chaperonin subunit 6a... zeta [Bombyx mori] gb|ABD36094.1| chaperonin subunit 6a zeta [Bombyx mori] 10/08/29 77 %/117 aa FBpp0229150|DvirT-cp1

  2. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U14978-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 72 6e-31 6 ( BC064254 ) Xenopus tropicalis chaperonin containing TCP1, su... 60 3e-30 7 ( AF494044 ) Physarum polycephalum chaperoni...t epsilon; ... 720 0.0 BC124890_1( BC124890 |pid:none) Xenopus laevis chaperonin containi...5 AF494043_1( AF494043 |pid:none) Physarum polycephalum chaperonin c... 218 6e-55 AM920428_1398( AM920428 |pid:none) Peni...e) Caenorhabditis elegans chaperonin CCT-... 187 2e-45 AF442546_1( AF442546 |pid:none) Physarum polycep...thaliana genomic DNA, ... 175 5e-42 AF494046_1( AF494046 |pid:none) Physarum polycephalum chaperoni

  3. AcEST: DK945817 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available u... 49 2e-05 sp|Q46J69|CH10_PROMT 10 kDa chaperonin OS=Prochlorococcus marinu... 49 2e-05 sp|A2C4I3|CH10_PR...IKLGSDEYVLLSEK-DILAVV 102 >sp|A2C4I3|CH10_PROM1 10 kDa chaperonin OS=Prochlorococcus marinus (strain NATL1A)

  4. The TCP1γ subunit of Leishmania donovani forms a biologically active homo-oligomeric complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskar; Mitra, Kalyan; Kuldeep, Jitendra; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Goyal, Neena

    2015-12-01

    Chaperonins are a class of molecular chaperons that encapsulate nascent or stress-denatured proteins and assist their intracellular assembly and folding in an ATP-dependent manner. The ubiquitous eukaryotic chaperonin, TCP1 ring complex is a hetero-oligomeric complex comprising two rings, each formed of eight subunits that may have distinct substrate recognition and ATP hydrolysis properties. In Leishmania, only the TCP1γ subunit has been cloned and characterized. It exhibited differential expression at various growth stages of promastigotes. In the present study, we expressed the TCP1γ subunit in Escherichia coli to investigate whether it forms chaperonin-like complexes and plays a role in protein folding. LdTCP1γ formed high-molecular-weight complexes within E. coli cells as well as in Leishmania cell lysates. The recombinant protein is arranged into two back-to-back rings of seven subunits each, as predicted by homology modelling and observed by negative staining electron microscopy. This morphology is consistent with that of the oligomeric double-ring group I chaperonins found in mitochondria. The LdTCP1γ homo-oligomeric complex hydrolysed ATP, and was active as assayed by luciferase refolding. Thus, the homo-oligomer performs chaperonin reactions without partner subunit(s). Further, co-immunoprecipitation studies revealed that LdTCP1γ interacts with actin and tubulin proteins, suggesting that the complex may have a role in maintaining the structural dynamics of the cytoskeleton of parasites. PMID:26395202

  5. Structural features of the GroEL-GroES nano-cage required for rapid folding of encapsulated protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Sheila Tuyet; Chang, HC; Roeben, A; Wischnewski, D; Wischnewski, N; Kerner, MJ; Hartl, FU; Hayer-Hartl, M

    2006-01-01

    . Additionally, interactions with the C-terminal, mildly hydrophobic Gly-Gly-Met repeat sequences of GroEL protruding into the cavity, and repulsion effects from the negatively charged cavity wall were required for rapid folding of some proteins. We suggest that by combining these features, the chaperonin cage......GroEL and GroES form a chaperonin nano-cage for proteins up to similar to 60 kDa to fold in isolation. Here we explored the structural features of the chaperonin cage critical for rapid folding of encapsulated substrates. Modulating the volume of the GroEL central cavity affected folding speed in...... accordance with confinement theory. Small proteins (similar to 30 kDa) folded more rapidly as the size of the cage was gradually reduced to a point where restriction in space slowed folding dramatically. For larger proteins (similar to 40-50 kDa), either expanding or reducing cage volume decelerated folding...

  6. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U09219-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MT7_04k03_T7 S. ratti mixed stage pAMP Stron... 52 1e-16 6 ( AF494043 ) Physarum polycephalum chaperonin con...3 |pid:none) Physarum polycephalum chaperonin c... 273 e-125 AM451055_3( AM451055 |pid:none) Vitis vinifera ...peron... 108 2e-37 CP001140_1030( CP001140 |pid:none) Desulfurococcus kamchatkensis 1... 120... mRNA for hyp... 154 1e-35 CP001140_1258( CP001140 |pid:none) Desulfurococcus kamchatkensis 1... 109 2e-3...is chaperonin su... 129 2e-28 AF442546_1( AF442546 |pid:none) Physarum polycephalum CCT cha

  7. Los complejos Chaperonina(MSP63inducen anticuerpos de reacciones cruzadas, bactericidas y opsonofagocítica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Marzoa

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Alteration of the native structure of antigens can lead to the loss of protective epitopes. Our previous results showed that separation of the meningococcal outer membrane proteins in native conditions revealed the existence of protein complexes that could be relevant for the development of new vaccine formulations. The aim of this work was to analyse the immunogenic characteristics of a highly conserved 700 kDa chaperonin complex (CxChap detected and purified by using high resolution clear native electrophoresis. Analysis of the anti-CxChap serum by Western-blotting revealed the presence of antibodies against the MSP63 but also against the macrophage infectivity potentiator-like protein (MIP, which is coopurified with the chaperonin complex. Antibodies raised by immunisation with CxChap chaperonin complex show bactericidal and opsonophagocytic activity.

  8. Dicty_cDB: CFF579 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available o sapiens cDNA, FLJ79296 comple... 271 3e-71 BC153468_1( BC153468 |pid:none) Danio rerio chaperonin containin...g ... 271 3e-71 BC059558_1( BC059558 |pid:none) Danio rerio chaperonin containing...lkn*vslnhlklnnkf *ylltkplkxs*eliylkscsktek*sstlk Homology vs CSM-cDNA Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bi... Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value (Q54ES9) RecName: Full=T-complex protein 1 subuni...ology vs DNA Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value N AF442546 |

  9. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YML064C, YOR020C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available th this bait as prey (0) YOR020C HSP10 Mitochondrial matrix co-chaperonin that inhibits the ATPase activity of Hsp60p, a mitochondri... YOR020C Prey gene name HSP10 Prey description Mitochondrial matrix co-chaperonin that...ure on prey (YPD) 15 Literature shared by bait and prey 3 Literature shari...YML064C TEM1 GTP-binding protein of the ras superfamily involved in termination of M-phase; contr...a; 10 kD heat shock protein with similarity to E. coli groES Rows with this prey as prey (3)

  10. AcEST: DK953940 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available TST39A01NGRL0019_B20 655 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: TST39A01NGRL0019_B20. 5' end seq ... 9Z7C9|CH602_CHLPN 60 kDa chaperonin 2 OS=Chlamydia pneumonia ... 31 6.5 sp|Q8EBE6|CLPB_SHEON Chaperone protein c ... 9Z7C9|CH602_CHLPN 60 kDa chaperonin 2 OS=Chlamydia pneumonia e GN=groL2 PE=3 SV=2 Length = 526 Score = 30.8 bits ...

  11. AcEST: DK953481 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available TST39A01NGRL0017_O03 512 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: TST39A01NGRL0017_O03. 5' end seq ... n sp|A6UM48|CH605_SINMW 60 kDa chaperonin 5 OS=Sinorhizobium ... medicae (strain WSM419) Align length 153 Score (bi ... e sp|A6UM48|CH605_SINMW 60 kDa chaperonin 5 OS=Sinorhizobium ... medic... 211 2e-54 sp|P30779|CH60_AGRT5 60 kDa cha ...

  12. Sequence Classification: 892661 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ecameric mitochondrial chaperonin required for ATP-dependent folding of precursor polypeptides and complex assembly; prevents aggrega...tion and mediates protein refolding after heat shock; role in mtDNA transmission; similarity to groEL; Hsp60p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/6323288 ...

  13. Mitochondrial heat-shock protein hsp60 is essential for assembly of proteins imported into yeast mitochondria

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Ming Yuan; Hartl, Franz-Ulrich; Martin, Jörg; Pollock, Robert A.; Kalousek, Frantisek; Neupert, Walter; Hallberg, Elisabeth M.; Hallberg, Richard L.; Horwich, Arthur

    1989-01-01

    A nuclear encoded mitochondrial heat-shock protein hsp60 is required for the assembly into oligomeric complexes of proteins imported into the mitochondrial matrix. hsp60 is a member of the 'chaperonin' class of protein factors, which include the Escherichia coli groEL protein and the Rubisco subunit-binding protein of chloroplasts

  14. TISSUE-SPECIFIC DIFFERENCES IN ACCUMULATION OF STRESS PROTEINS IN MYTILUS EDULIS EXPOSED TO A RANGE OF COPPER CONCENTRATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study examines the expression and accumulation of two major stress proteins, stress70 and chaperonin60 (cpn60), in the gill and mantle of blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, which were exposed to a range of Cu concentrations for 7 days. cope-for-growth (SFG), mortality, and Cu acc...

  15. Rasamsonia, a new genus comprising thermotolerant and thermophilic Talaromyces and Geosmithia species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houbraken, J.; Spierenburg, H.; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2012-01-01

    ) and Cct8 (putative chaperonin complex component TCP-1) gene sequences. The results showed that these species form a distinct clade within the Trichocomaceae and Trichocoma paradoxa is phylogenetically most closely related. Based on phenotypic and physiological characters and molecular data, we propose...

  16. Cmr1/WDR76 defines a nuclear genotoxic stress body linking genome integrity and protein quality control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallina, Irene; Colding, Camilla Skettrup; Henriksen, Peter;

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication stress is a source of genomic instability. Here we identify changed mutation rate 1 (Cmr1) as a factor involved in the response to DNA replication stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and show that Cmr1-together with Mrc1/Claspin, Pph3, the chaperonin containing TCP1 (CCT) and 25...

  17. Proteomic analysis of embryonic axis of Pisum sativum seeds during germination and identification of proteins associated with loss of desiccation tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Wei-Qing; Møller, Ian Max; Song, Song-Quan

    2012-01-01

    these seeds to identify the candidate proteins associated with the loss of desiccation tolerance and found a total of seven proteins – tubulin alpha-1 chain, seed biotin-containing protein SBP65, P54 protein, vicilin, vicilin-like antimicrobial peptides 2–3, convicilin and TCP-1/cpn60 chaperonin family...

  18. Sequence Classification: 390088 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Non-TMB Non-TMH Non-TMB Non-TMB TMB Non-TMB >gi|31794599|ref|NP_857092.1| 10 KDA CHAPERONIN GROE ... S (PROTEIN CPN10) (PROTEIN GROES) (BCG -A HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN) (10 KDA ANTIGEN) || http://w ...

  19. Sequence Classification: 399859 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Non-TMB Non-TMH Non-TMB Non-TMB TMB Non-TMB >gi|15610554|ref|NP_217935.1| 10 KDA CHAPERONIN GROE ... S (PROTEIN CPN10) (PROTEIN GROES) (BCG -A HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN) (10 KDA ANTIGEN) || http://w ...

  20. AcEST: BP920452 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000137_C05 516 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000137_C05. BP920452 - Show ... 41|HSP83_LEIAM Heat shock protein 83 OS=Leishmania amazon ... 30 5.1 sp|Q0I0F1|HSLO_SHESR 33 kDa chaperonin O ...

  1. SwissProt search result: AK120234 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK120234 J013043L17 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 1e-13 ...

  2. SwissProt search result: AK069617 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069617 J023019K12 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 0.0 ...

  3. SwissProt search result: AK109517 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK109517 002-109-A02 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 0.0 ...

  4. SwissProt search result: AK101537 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK101537 J033048E22 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 1e-151 ...

  5. SwissProt search result: AK063576 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK063576 001-117-H02 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 3e-85 ...

  6. SwissProt search result: AK108892 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK108892 002-152-E06 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 1e-139 ...

  7. SwissProt search result: AK068277 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK068277 J013146G10 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 2e-77 ...

  8. SwissProt search result: AK062098 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK062098 001-045-A02 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 1e-137 ...

  9. SwissProt search result: AK061410 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK061410 006-306-B08 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 2e-63 ...

  10. SwissProt search result: AK101334 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK101334 J033034I03 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 1e-142 ...

  11. SwissProt search result: AK060117 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK060117 006-308-E09 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 2e-71 ...

  12. SwissProt search result: AK101042 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK101042 J033003J10 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 2e-20 ...

  13. SwissProt search result: AK073999 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK073999 J033073C08 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 1e-177 ...

  14. SwissProt search result: AK061901 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK061901 001-041-H05 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 7e-75 ...

  15. SwissProt search result: AK119623 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK119623 002-117-H08 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 0.0 ...

  16. SwissProt search result: AK070603 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK070603 J023059D06 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 1e-150 ...

  17. SwissProt search result: AK060773 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK060773 001-033-B08 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 2e-53 ...

  18. SwissProt search result: AK070127 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK070127 J023045O03 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 1e-157 ...

  19. SwissProt search result: AK119217 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK119217 001-046-E10 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 1e-113 ...

  20. SwissProt search result: AK068562 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK068562 J013152E19 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 1e-127 ...

  1. SwissProt search result: AK100602 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK100602 J023107D12 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 1e-108 ...

  2. SwissProt search result: AK119223 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK119223 001-100-D06 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 5e-71 ...

  3. SwissProt search result: AK120503 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK120503 J013122K17 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 1e-141 ...

  4. Sequence Classification: 891682 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Non-TMB TMH Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB >gi|6320834|ref|NP_010913.1| Subunit ... of the heterohe ... osolic chaperonin and transfers target proteins to it ; Gim4p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/6320 ...

  5. Sequence Classification: 891926 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available TMB Non-TMH Non-TMB TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB >gi|6323544|ref|NP_013616.1| Subunit ... of the heterohexame ... osolic chaperonin and transfers target proteins to it ; Gim5p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/6323 ...

  6. Sequence Classification: 893026 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available TMB Non-TMH Non-TMB TMB TMB Non-TMB >gi|6324176|ref|NP_014246.1| Subunit ... of the heterohexameric ... osolic chaperonin and transfers target proteins to it ; Gim3p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/6324 ...

  7. Hypothesis of demodicidosis rosacea flushing etiopathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robledo, Mary Ann; Orduz, Mariana

    2015-04-01

    Most of the patients with erythematotelangiectatic rosacea are characterized by flushing, oedema and telangiectasia. The etiopathogenesis of the flushing in rosacea patients is unknown. Clinically the flushing in rosacea is similar to the "Asian flushing syndrome". Most Asians have an overactive alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) that tends to break down alcohol into acetaldehyde faster. People with "Asians flushing syndrome" have a genetic disorder with the Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2(∗)2 (ALDH2(∗)2) allele. This is the reason why they do not metabolize very well the acetaldehyde that comes from the alcohol, which means that acetaldehyde takes much longer to clear from their blood. ALDH2 enzyme is primarily responsible for oxidation of acetaldehyde derived from ethanol metabolism, as well as oxidation of various other endogenous and exogenous aldehydes. Acetaldehyde produces the vasodilatation in the "Asian flushing syndrome". The antibodies against the GroEl chaperonin protein, a 62-kDa heat shock protein were found in the Bacillus oleronius isolated from Demodex mites, in rosacea patients. The GroEl chaperonin protein is a protein that plays a key role in normal folding of ALDH2. If the GroEl chaperonin antibodies found in patients with rosacea, cross react with the human GroEl chaperonin protein, they will not fold normally the ALDH2, and then the enzyme will not metabolize the acetaldehyde. Many of the patients with rosacea have a concomitant infection with Helicobacter pylori in their stomach. The H.pylori produces high amounts of acetaldehyde, which comes from their metabolism of ethanol or carbohydrates. As a result, high amounts of acetaldehyde will circulate for longer time in the blood, until the liver CYP2E1(p450) enzyme system finally metabilizes the acetaldehyde, during that period of time the patients will experience a flushing as well as the people with the "Asian flushing syndrome" suffer when they drink ethanol. To prove the hypothesis it is necessary

  8. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15138-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available iciarum heat shock protein 60 ... 56 1e-14 4 ( AY116642 ) Bartonella schoenbuchensis heat shock protein Hsp....=60 kDa chaperonin; AltName: Full=Protein ... 257 4e-67 M82975_2( M82975 |pid:none) Brucella abo...252 1e-65 B43827( B43827 ) chaperonin groEL - Brucella abortus (strain S19) ... 252 1e-65 ( P19882 ) RecName: Full... 9e-09 3 ( AF299357 ) Bartonella alsatica HSP60 gene, partial cds. 56 1e-08 3 ( CP000590 ) Ostreococcus luci...CP001393_2046( CP001393 |pid:none) Anaerocellum thermophilum DSM 6... 228 2e-58 AY328549_2( AY328549 |pid:none) Enterococcus fla

  9. Dicty_cDB: VFC553 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nce. 42 2e-05 3 AF136446 |AF136446.1 Tetrahymena pyriformis chaperonin-containing-TCP1 theta subunit (CCTtheta) gene, com.... 222 8e-57 BC050492_1( BC050492 |pid:none) Danio rerio chaperonin containing ... 214 2e-54 (Q6EE31) RecName: Full=T-complex protein... 3' end partial sequence, similar to ddbj:Z37164 M.musculus Cctq mRNA encoding cytosolic chaperone containing TCP-1, theta subuni...AFASKLFAIK LATNTANTVLRVDQIIMSKPAGVQNHQKWVQ Homology vs CSM-cDNA Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bi... cytosolic chaperone containing TCP-1, theta subunit (CCTtheta). 52 0.009 1 AV364477 |AV364477.1 Mus muscul

  10. Dicty_cDB: [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VF (Link to library) VFB833 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U15138-1 VFB833Z (Link... to Original site) - - VFB833Z 192 - - - - Show VFB833 Library VF (Link to library) Clone ID VFB833 (Link to dict...yBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig Contig-U15138-1 Original site URL http://dict...nces producing significant alignments: (bits) Value N U72247 |U72247.1 Dictyostelium discoideum chaperonin 6...0 (hspA) mRNA, complete cds. 351 2e-93 1 AF359268 |AF359268.1 Dictyostelium discoideum chaperonin 60 gene, c

  11. Markov propagation of allosteric effects in biomolecular systems: application to GroEL–GroES

    OpenAIRE

    Chennubhotla, Chakra; Bahar, Ivet

    2006-01-01

    We introduce a novel approach for elucidating the potential pathways of allosteric communication in biomolecular systems. The methodology, based on Markov propagation of ‘information' across the structure, permits us to partition the network of interactions into soft clusters distinguished by their coherent stochastics. Probabilistic participation of residues in these clusters defines the communication patterns inherent to the network architecture. Application to bacterial chaperonin complex ...

  12. AcEST: DK960920 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 5 sp|Q46J69|CH10_PROMT 10 kDa chaperonin OS=Prochlorococcus marinu... 49 2e-05 sp|A2C4I3|CH10_PROM1 10 kDa c...YEVNLGTKERLCFCKAGDLLAFV 474 +++ V+ G KVL+S ++ LG+ E + + D+LA V Sbjct: 60 GSRQSPEVSVGDKVLYSKYAGTDIKLGSDEYVLLSEK-DILAVV 102 >sp|A2C4I

  13. Immune Response to an 18-Kilodalton Outer Membrane Antigen Identifies Lipoprotein 20 as a Helicobacter pylori Vaccine Candidate

    OpenAIRE

    Keenan, Jacqueline; Oliaro, Jane; Domigan, Neil; Potter, Howard; Aitken, Geoff; Allardyce, Randall; Roake, Justin

    2000-01-01

    Experiments were performed using the standardized murine model of Helicobacter pylori infection to determine the immunogenicity of H. pylori outer membrane vesicles in immune protection. These vesicles, which are naturally shed from the surface of the bacterium, induce a protective response when administered intragastrically to mice in the presence of cholera holotoxin, despite the absence of the urease enzyme and associated Hsp54 chaperonin. Immunoblotting identified a specific serum immunog...

  14. Plant genetic and molecular responses to water deficit

    OpenAIRE

    Silvio Salvi; Antonella Leone; Immacolata Coraggio; Luigi Cattivelli; Antonio Blanco; Stefania Grillo

    2011-01-01

    Plant productivity is severely affected by unfavourable environmental conditions (biotic and abiotic stresses). Among others, water deficit is the plant stress condition which mostly limits the quality and the quantity of plant products. Tolerance to water deficit is a polygenic trait strictly dependent on the coordinated expression of a large set of genes coding for proteins directly involved in stress-induced protection/repair mechanisms (dehydrins, chaperonins, enzymes for the synthesis of...

  15. Mitochondrial unfolded protein response controls matrix pre-RNA processing and translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münch, Christian; Harper, J Wade

    2016-06-30

    The mitochondrial matrix is unique in that it must integrate the folding and assembly of proteins derived from the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) senses matrix protein misfolding and induces a program of nuclear gene expression, including mitochondrial chaperonins, to promote mitochondrial proteostasis. While misfolded mitochondrial-matrix-localized ornithine transcarbamylase induces chaperonin expression, our understanding of mammalian UPRmt is rudimentary, reflecting a lack of acute triggers for UPRmt activation. This limitation has prevented analysis of the cellular responses to matrix protein misfolding and the effects of UPRmt on mitochondrial translation to control protein folding loads. Here we combine pharmacological inhibitors of matrix-localized HSP90/TRAP1 (ref. 8) or LON protease, which promote chaperonin expression, with global transcriptional and proteomic analysis to reveal an extensive and acute response of human cells to UPRmt. This response encompasses widespread induction of nuclear genes, including matrix-localized proteins involved in folding, pre-RNA processing and translation. Functional studies revealed rapid but reversible translation inhibition in mitochondria occurring concurrently with defects in pre-RNA processing caused by transcriptional repression and LON-dependent turnover of the mitochondrial pre-RNA processing nuclease MRPP3 (ref. 10). This study reveals that acute mitochondrial protein folding stress activates both increased chaperone availability within the matrix and reduced matrix-localized protein synthesis through translational inhibition, and provides a framework for further dissection of mammalian UPRmt. PMID:27350246

  16. A Model for the Molecular Mechanism of an Engineered Light-Driven Protein Machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoersch, Daniel; Kortemme, Tanja

    2016-04-01

    Controllable protein-based machines and materials are of considerable interest for diverse biotechnological applications. We previously re-engineered an ATP-driven protein machine, a group II chaperonin, to function as a light-gated nanocage. Here we develop and test a model for the molecular mechanism of the re-engineered chaperonin, which undergoes a large-scale closed to open conformational change triggered by reversible photo-isomerization of a site-specifically attached azobenzene crosslinker. In silico experiments using all-atom simulations suggest that rigid body motions of protein subdomains couple the length changes of the crosslinker to rearrangements of the nucleotide-binding pocket, leading to cage opening. We tested this model by designing a mutant for which the orientation of the two protein subdomains forming the nucleotide-binding pocket is directly controlled by the crosslinker, and confirmed successful reversible photoswitching in vitro. The model probes the conformational cycle of group II chaperonins and offers a design principle for engineering other light-driven protein-based molecular machines. PMID:27021162

  17. GroEL and CCT are catalytic unfoldases mediating out-of-cage polypeptide refolding without ATP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priya, Smriti; Sharma, Sandeep Kumar; Sood, Vishal; Mattoo, Rayees U H; Finka, Andrija; Azem, Abdussalam; De Los Rios, Paolo; Goloubinoff, Pierre

    2013-04-30

    Chaperonins are cage-like complexes in which nonnative polypeptides prone to aggregation are thought to reach their native state optimally. However, they also may use ATP to unfold stably bound misfolded polypeptides and mediate the out-of-cage native refolding of large proteins. Here, we show that even without ATP and GroES, both GroEL and the eukaryotic chaperonin containing t-complex polypeptide 1 (CCT/TRiC) can unfold stable misfolded polypeptide conformers and readily release them from the access ways to the cage. Reconciling earlier disparate experimental observations to ours, we present a comprehensive model whereby following unfolding on the upper cavity, in-cage confinement is not needed for the released intermediates to slowly reach their native state in solution. As over-sticky intermediates occasionally stall the catalytic unfoldase sites, GroES mobile loops and ATP are necessary to dissociate the inhibitory species and regenerate the unfolding activity. Thus, chaperonin rings are not obligate confining antiaggregation cages. They are polypeptide unfoldases that can iteratively convert stable off-pathway conformers into functional proteins. PMID:23584019

  18. Interferences of Silica Nanoparticles in Green Fluorescent Protein Folding Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Géraldine; Devineau, Stéphanie; Aude, Jean Christophe; Boulard, Yves; Pasquier, Hélène; Labarre, Jean; Pin, Serge; Renault, Jean Philippe

    2016-01-12

    We investigated the relationship between unfolded proteins, silica nanoparticles and chaperonin to determine whether unfolded proteins could stick to silica surfaces and how this process could impair heat shock protein activity. The HSP60 catalyzed green fluorescent protein (GFP) folding was used as a model system. The adsorption isotherms and adsorption kinetics of denatured GFP were measured, showing that denaturation increases GFP affinity for silica surfaces. This affinity is maintained even if the surfaces are covered by a protein corona and allows silica NPs to interfere directly with GFP folding by trapping it in its unstructured state. We determined also the adsorption isotherms of HSP60 and its chaperonin activity once adsorbed, showing that SiO2 NP can interfere also indirectly with protein folding through chaperonin trapping and inhibition. This inhibition is specifically efficient when NPs are covered first with a layer of unfolded proteins. These results highlight for the first time the antichaperonin activity of silica NPs and ask new questions about the toxicity of such misfolded proteins/nanoparticles assembly toward cells. PMID:26649773

  19. A Robust and Engineerable Self-Assembling Protein Template for the Synthesis and Patterning of Ordered Nanoparticle Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, R. Andrew; Howard, Jeanie; Zaluzec, Nestor J.; Kagawa, Hiromi K.; Li, Yi-Fen; Paavola, Chad D.; Trent, Jonathan D.

    2004-01-01

    Self-assembling biomolecules that form highly ordered structures have attracted interest as potential alternatives to conventional lithographic processes for patterning materials. Here we introduce a general technique for patterning materials on the nanoscale using genetically modified protein cage structures called chaperonins that self-assemble into crystalline templates. Constrained chemical synthesis of transition metal nanoparticles is specific to templates genetically functionalized with poly-Histidine sequences. These arrays of materials are ordered by the nanoscale structure of the crystallized protein. This system may be easily adapted to pattern a variety of materials given the rapidly growing list of peptide sequences selected by screening for specificity for inorganic materials.

  20. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U07030-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 35 1.1 CP000879_1206( CP000879 |pid:none) Petrotoga mobilis SJ95, complet... 35 1...A000031 |pid:none) Vibrio parahaemolyticus RIMD 22... 40 0.025 CP000930_1178( CP000930 |pid:none) Heliobacterium mo....36 H72655( H72655 )protein secretion chaperonin APE0675 [similarity] ... 36 0.36 AL445067_54( AL445067 |pid:none) Thermo..............................................done Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) V...some 8 c... 77 2e-13 AM494953_116( AM494953 |pid:none) Leishmania braziliensis chromoso..

  1. TCP1 complex proteins interact with phosphorothioate oligonucleotides and can co-localize in oligonucleotide-induced nuclear bodies in mammalian cells

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Xue-hai; Shen, Wen; Sun, Hong; Prakash, Thazha P.; Crooke, Stanley T.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorothioate (PS) antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) have been successfully developed as drugs to reduce the expression of disease-causing genes. PS-ASOs can be designed to induce degradation of complementary RNAs via the RNase H pathway and much is understood about that process. However, interactions of PS-ASOs with other cellular proteins are not well characterized. Here we report that in cells transfected with PS-ASOs, the chaperonin T-complex 1 (TCP1) proteins interact with PS-ASOs and...

  2. Analysis of Chaperone Complexes by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Geels, R.B.J.

    2008-01-01

    Investigation of methodologies for analyses of noncovalently bound protein assemblies using Fourier transformation ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) and quadrupole Time-of-Flight (qToF) mass spectrometry. Specifically, the co-chaperonins GroEL and gp31 are used to perform activation measurements on in the gas-phase and in the solution-phase. Both protein complexes are noncovalently bound homoheptamers of 72kDa and 84kDa respectively. They have a slight functional differenc...

  3. Increased CCT-eta expression is a marker of latent and active disease and a modulator of fibroblast contractility in Dupuytren’s contracture

    OpenAIRE

    Satish, Latha; O’Gorman, David B; Johnson, Sandra; Raykha, Christina; Gan, Bing Siang; Wang, James H-C.; Kathju, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    Dupuytren’s contracture (DC) is a fibroproliferative disorder of unknown etiology characterized by a scar-like contracture that develops in the palm and/or digits. We have previously reported that the eta subunit of the chaperonin containing T-complex polypeptide (CCT-eta) is increased in fibrotic wound healing, and is essential for the accumulation of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in fibroblasts. The purpose of this study was to determine if CCT-eta is similarly implicated in the aberrant fi...

  4. Cross-Reactivity between Chlamydia trachomatis Heat Shock Protein 10 and Early Pregnancy Factor

    OpenAIRE

    Betsou, Fotini; Borrego, Maria José; Guillaume, Nicolas; Catry, Maria Anjos; Romão, Sandra; J.A. Machado-Caetano; Sueur, Jean Marie; Mention, Jacques; Faille, Nicole; Orfila, Jeanne

    2003-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis heat shock protein 10 (Chsp10) is associated with chronic genital tract infection with C. trachomatis. Chsp10 is homologous to human chaperonin 10 (Cpn10) and early pregnancy factor (EPF), a form of human Cpn10 that is specifically secreted at the start of pregnancy. We investigated cross-reactions between serum anti-Chsp10 antibodies and anti-EPF antibodies in pregnant and nonpregnant patients. Pregnancy was found to be associated with the presence of anti-EPF antibodie...

  5. Non-structural proteins P17 and P33 are involved in the assembly of the internal membrane-containing virus PRD1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karttunen, Jenni; Mäntynen, Sari [Centre of Excellence in Biological Interactions, Department of Biological and Environmental Science and Nanoscience Center, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35, 40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); Ihalainen, Teemu O. [Stem Cells in Neurological Applications Group, BioMediTech, University of Tampere, Tampere (Finland); Bamford, Jaana K.H. [Centre of Excellence in Biological Interactions, Department of Biological and Environmental Science and Nanoscience Center, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35, 40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); Oksanen, Hanna M., E-mail: hanna.oksanen@helsinki.fi [Institute of Biotechnology and Department of Biosciences, University of Helsinki, Biocenter 2, P.O. Box 56 (Viikinkaari 5), FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland)

    2015-08-15

    Bacteriophage PRD1, which has been studied intensively at the structural and functional levels, still has some gene products with unknown functions and certain aspects of the PRD1 assembly process have remained unsolved. In this study, we demonstrate that the phage-encoded non-structural proteins P17 and P33, either individually or together, complement the defect in a temperature-sensitive GroES mutant of Escherichia coli for host growth and PRD1 propagation. Confocal microscopy of fluorescent fusion proteins revealed co-localisation between P33 and P17 as well as between P33 and the host chaperonin GroEL. A fluorescence recovery after photobleaching assay demonstrated that the diffusion of the P33 fluorescent fusion protein was substantially slower in E. coli than theoretically calculated, presumably resulting from intermolecular interactions. Our results indicate that P33 and P17 function in procapsid assembly, possibly in association with the host chaperonin complex GroEL/GroES. - Highlights: • Two non-structural proteins of PRD1 are involved in the virus assembly. • P17 and P33 complement the defect in GroES of Escherichia coli. • P33 co-localises with GroEL and P17 in the bacterium. • Slow motion of P33 in the bacterium suggests association with cellular components.

  6. Identification of Proteins that Modify Cataract of the Eye Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Tang, Yajun; Ackermann, Renate; Pleissner, Klaus-Peter; Schmid, Monika; Stein, Robert; Zimny-Arndt, Ursula; Kumar, Nalin M.; Jungblut, Peter R.

    2010-01-01

    The occurrence of a nuclear cataract in the eye lens due to disruption of theα3Cx46 connexin gene, Gja3, is dependent on strain background in a mouse model, implicating factors that modify the pathology. The differences upon cataractogenesis in the urea soluble proteins of the lens of two mouse strains, C57BL/6J and 129/SvJ, were analyzed by a comparative proteomics approach. Determination of the complete proteome of an organ offers the opportunity to characterize at a molecular level, differences in gene expression and post-translational modifications occurring during pathology and between individuals. The abundance of 63 protein species was altered between the strains. A unique aspect of this study is the identification of chaperonin subunit 6A, mortalin, ERp29 and syntaxin binding protein 6 in the eye lens. DNA polymorphisms resulting in non-conservative amino acid changes that led to altered physicochemical properties of the proteins were detected for mortalin, chaperonin subunit 6A, annexin A1 and possibly gamma N crystallin. The results show HSP27/25 and/or ERp29 are the likely major modifying factors for cataractogenesis. Extension of the results suggests that small heat shock proteins have a major role for influencing cataract formation in humans. PMID:19003866

  7. HSP10 selective preference for myeloid and megakaryocytic precursors in normal human bone marrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Cappello

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock proteins (HSPs constitute a heterogeneous family of proteins involved in cell homeostasis. During cell life they are involved in harmful insults, as well as in immune and inflammatory reactions. It is known that they regulate gene expression, and cell proliferation, differentiation and death. HSP60 is a mitochondrial chaperonin, highly preserved during evolution, responsible of protein folding. Its function is strictly dependent on HSP10 in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic elements. We investigated the presence and the expression of HSP60 and HSP10 in a series of 20 normal human bone marrow specimens (NHBM by the means of immunohistochemistry. NHBM showed no expression of HSP60, probably due to its being below the detectable threshold, as already demonstrated in other normal human tissues. By contrast, HSP10 showed a selective positivity for myeloid and megakaryocytic lineages. The positivity was restricted to precursor cells, while mature elements were constantly negative.We postulate that HSP10 plays a role in bone marrow cell differentiation other than being a mitochondrial co-chaperonin. The present data emphasize the role of HSP10 during cellular homeostasis and encourage further investigations in this field.

  8. Non-structural proteins P17 and P33 are involved in the assembly of the internal membrane-containing virus PRD1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacteriophage PRD1, which has been studied intensively at the structural and functional levels, still has some gene products with unknown functions and certain aspects of the PRD1 assembly process have remained unsolved. In this study, we demonstrate that the phage-encoded non-structural proteins P17 and P33, either individually or together, complement the defect in a temperature-sensitive GroES mutant of Escherichia coli for host growth and PRD1 propagation. Confocal microscopy of fluorescent fusion proteins revealed co-localisation between P33 and P17 as well as between P33 and the host chaperonin GroEL. A fluorescence recovery after photobleaching assay demonstrated that the diffusion of the P33 fluorescent fusion protein was substantially slower in E. coli than theoretically calculated, presumably resulting from intermolecular interactions. Our results indicate that P33 and P17 function in procapsid assembly, possibly in association with the host chaperonin complex GroEL/GroES. - Highlights: • Two non-structural proteins of PRD1 are involved in the virus assembly. • P17 and P33 complement the defect in GroES of Escherichia coli. • P33 co-localises with GroEL and P17 in the bacterium. • Slow motion of P33 in the bacterium suggests association with cellular components

  9. Misfolding, degradation, and aggregation of variant proteins. The molecular pathogenesis of short chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD) deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christina Bak; Bross, P.; Winter, V.S.; Corydon, Thomas Juhl; Bolund, Lars; Bartlett, K.; Vockley, J.; Gregersen, N.

    2003-01-01

    type, associate with mitochondrial hsp60 chaperonins; however, the variant SCAD proteins remained associated with hsp60 for prolonged periods of time. Biogenesis experiments at two temperatures revealed that some of the variant proteins (R22W, G68C, W153R, and R359C) caused severe misfolding, whereas......Short chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD) deficiency is an inborn error of the mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism caused by rare variations as well as common susceptibility variations in the SCAD gene. Earlier studies have shown that a common variant SCAD protein (R147W) was impaired in folding...... SCAD proteins either triggered proteolytic degradation by mitochondrial proteases or, especially at elevated temperature, aggregation of non-native conformers. The latter finding may indicate that accumulation of aggregated SCAD proteins may play a role in the pathogenesis of SCAD deficiency....

  10. Markov state models of protein misfolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirur, Anshul; De Sancho, David; Best, Robert B.

    2016-02-01

    Markov state models (MSMs) are an extremely useful tool for understanding the conformational dynamics of macromolecules and for analyzing MD simulations in a quantitative fashion. They have been extensively used for peptide and protein folding, for small molecule binding, and for the study of native ensemble dynamics. Here, we adapt the MSM methodology to gain insight into the dynamics of misfolded states. To overcome possible flaws in root-mean-square deviation (RMSD)-based metrics, we introduce a novel discretization approach, based on coarse-grained contact maps. In addition, we extend the MSM methodology to include "sink" states in order to account for the irreversibility (on simulation time scales) of processes like protein misfolding. We apply this method to analyze the mechanism of misfolding of tandem repeats of titin domains, and how it is influenced by confinement in a chaperonin-like cavity.

  11. Invariant chain induces B cell maturation in a process that is independent of its chaperonic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matza, Didi; Lantner, Frida; Bogoch, Yoel; Flaishon, Liat; Hershkoviz, Rami; Shachar, Idit

    2002-01-01

    Early stages of B cell development take place in the bone marrow, resulting in formation of immature B cells, which migrate to the spleen for their final differentiation into mature cells. This final maturation step is essential for B cells to become responsive to antigens and to participate in the immune response. Previously, we showed that the MHC class II chaperone, invariant chain (Ii), controls the differentiation of B cells from the immature to the mature stage. In this study, by generating transgenic mice expressing truncated Ii lacking its luminal domain, we could dissect the chaperonin activity of Ii from its role in B cell maturation. We demonstrate in vivo that Ii N-terminal domain is directly involved in the maturation of B cells and is sufficient to promote B cell differentiation. PMID:11867743

  12. 26 S proteasomes function as stable entities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendil, Klavs B; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Tanaka, Keiji

    2002-01-01

    Most proteins in eukaryotic cells are degraded by 26-S proteasomes, usually after being conjugated to ubiquitin. In the absence of ATP, 26-S proteasomes fall apart into their two sub-complexes, 20-S proteasomes and PA700, which reassemble upon addition of ATP. Conceivably, 26-S proteasomes...... dissociate and reassemble during initiation of protein degradation in a ternary complex with the substrate, as in the dissociation-reassembly cycles found for ribosomes and the chaperonin GroEL/GroES. Here we followed disassembly and assembly of 26-S proteasomes in cell extracts as the exchange of PA700...... subunits between mouse and human 26-S proteasomes. Compared to the rate of proteolysis in the same extract, the disassembly-reassembly cycle was much too slow to present an obligatory step in a degradation cycle. It has been suggested that subunit S5a (Mcb1, Rpn10), which binds poly-ubiquitin substrates...

  13. Markov state models of protein misfolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirur, Anshul; De Sancho, David; Best, Robert B

    2016-02-21

    Markov state models (MSMs) are an extremely useful tool for understanding the conformational dynamics of macromolecules and for analyzing MD simulations in a quantitative fashion. They have been extensively used for peptide and protein folding, for small molecule binding, and for the study of native ensemble dynamics. Here, we adapt the MSM methodology to gain insight into the dynamics of misfolded states. To overcome possible flaws in root-mean-square deviation (RMSD)-based metrics, we introduce a novel discretization approach, based on coarse-grained contact maps. In addition, we extend the MSM methodology to include "sink" states in order to account for the irreversibility (on simulation time scales) of processes like protein misfolding. We apply this method to analyze the mechanism of misfolding of tandem repeats of titin domains, and how it is influenced by confinement in a chaperonin-like cavity. PMID:26897000

  14. Complex formation of CdSe/ZnS/TOPO nanocrystal vs. molecular chaperone in aqueous solution by hydrophobic interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feasibilities to stabilize CdSe/ZnS/trioctylphosphineoxide (TOPO) nanocrystals (quantum dots, QDs) in aqueous solutions with prefoldin macromolecules in their bioactive states are reported. Prefoldin is a jellyfish-shaped hexameric co-chaperone of the group II chaperonins. As a protein folding intermediate is captured within its central cavity, so CdSe/ZnS/TOPO QDs would also be included within this cavity. It is also found the QDs can be much more dispersed in aqueous solutions and suspended for certain period of time by adding trace amount of t-butanol in the buffer prior to the mixing of the QDs mother solution. While biochemical procedures are evaluated with ordinary fluorescence measurements, possible complex formations are also evaluated with TIRFM single-molecule detection techniques

  15. Two novel variants of human medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD). K364R, a folding mutation, and R256T, a catalytic-site mutation resulting in a well-folded but totally inactive protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Reilly, Linda P; Andresen, Brage S; Engel, Paul C

    2005-01-01

    protein was again totally inactive. Neither mutant showed marked depletion of FAD. The pure K364R protein was considerably less thermostable than wild-type MCAD. Western blots indicated that, although the R256T mutant protein is less thermostable than normal MCAD, it is much more stable than K364R. Though......Two novel rare mutations, MCAD approximately 842G-->C (R256T) and MCAD approximately 1166A-->G (K364R), have been investigated to assess how far the biochemical properties of the mutant proteins correlate with the clinical phenotype of medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency. When the...... gene for K364R was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, the synthesized mutant protein only exhibited activity when the gene for chaperonin GroELS was co-overexpressed. Levels of activity correlated with the amounts of native MCAD protein visible in western blots. The R256T mutant, by contrast, displayed...

  16. Dicty_cDB: CHE274 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ary, clone:8230402C21, 3' end partial sequence, similar to ddbj:Z37164 M.musculus Cctq mRNA encoding cytosolic chaperone containing...M.musculus Cctq mRNA encoding cytosolic chaperone containing TCP-1, theta subunit (CCTtheta). 52 0.012 1 CD1... chaperonin containing ... 255 9e-67 AY823273_1( AY823273 |pid:none) Notothenia coriiceps...s CSM-cDNA Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value CHE274 (CHE274Q) /CSM/CH/CHE2-D/...eq.d/ 1419 0.0 own update 2002. 9.27 Homology vs DNA Score E Sequences producing signi

  17. Oxidative modification of the molecular chaperone family in a PC12 cell model of Parkinson's disease induced by Z-lle-Glu(OtBu)-Ala-Leucinal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Zhang; Yimin Yang; Jing Bai; Ming Chang; Linsen Hu

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that ubiquitin-proteasome system function is significantly decreased in the substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease patients.In the present study, proteasome inhibitor Z-Ile-Glu(OtBu)-Ala-Leucinal (PSI) was used to inhibit the function of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in PC12 cells to simulate Parkinson's disease.Oxidatively modified proteins were identified to determine pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease.Results demonstrated that 24 hours of 10 μmol/L PSI-treatment in PC12 cells simulated pathological characteristics of Parkinson's disease: neuronal degeneration and eosinophilic inclusion formation in neurons.In PSI-treated PC12 cells, three oxidative proteins and a molecular chaperone family member were detected: chaperonin containing t-complex polypeptide 1 subunit 3, glucose-regulated protein 58,and heat shock protein 70.This is the first study to demonstrate oxidative modification of a molecule family in a cell model of Parkinson's disease induced with PSI.

  18. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U13884-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available id:none) Mus musculus adult male thymus cDN... 280 1e-73 BC077927_1( BC077927 |pi...-70 (Q32L40) RecName: Full=T-complex protein 1 subunit alpha; ... 268 5e-70 AF494043_1( AF494043 |pid:none) Physarum polycephalum cha...CP001140_1258( CP001140 |pid:none) Desulfurococcus kamchatkensis 1... 304 7e-81 CP001014_1491( CP001014 |pid...; AltName: Full=T... 288 4e-76 AF494046_1( AF494046 |pid:none) Physarum polycephalum chaperonin c...001140 |pid:none) Desulfurococcus kamchatkensis 1... 272 2e-71 CP000594_27( CP000594 |pid:none) Ostreococcus

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of tubulin-folding cofactor A from Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubulin-folding cofactor A from A. thaliana has been crystallized and preliminarily analyzed using X-ray diffraction. Tubulin-folding cofactor A (TFC A) is a molecular post-chaperonin that is involved in the β-tubulin-folding pathway. It has been identified in many organisms including yeasts, humans and plants. In this work, Arabidopsis thaliana TFC A was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. After thrombin cleavage, a well diffracting crystal was obtained by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method at 289 K. The crystal diffracted to 1.6 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation and belonged to space group I41, with unit-cell parameters a = 55.0, b = 55.0, c = 67.4 Å

  20. Engineered Protein Machines: Emergent Tools for Synthetic Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasscock, Cameron J; Lucks, Julius B; DeLisa, Matthew P

    2016-01-21

    Nature has evolved an array of intricate protein assemblies that work together to perform the chemistry that maintains life. These protein machines function with exquisite specificity and coordination to accomplish their tasks, from DNA and RNA synthesis to protein folding and post-translational modifications. Despite their complexity, synthetic biologists have succeeded in redesigning many aspects of these molecular machines. For example, natural DNA polymerases have now been engineered to catalyze the synthesis of alternative genetic polymers called XNAs, orthogonal RNA polymerases and ribosomes have been engineered to enable the construction of genetic logic gates, and protein biogenesis machinery such as chaperonins and protein translocons have been repurposed to improve folding and expression of recombinant proteins. In this Review, we highlight the progress made in understanding, engineering, and repurposing bacterial protein machines for use in synthetic biology and biotechnology. PMID:26933735

  1. Proteomic analysis and identification of cell surface-associated proteins of Clostridium chauvoei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaramaiah, Usharani; Singh, Neetu; Thankappan, Sabarinath; Mohanty, Ashok Kumar; Chaudhuri, Pallab; Singh, Vijendra Pal; Nagaleekar, Viswas Konasagara

    2016-06-01

    Blackleg is a highly fatal disease of cattle and sheep, caused by Clostridium chauvoei, a Gram positive, anaerobic, spore forming bacteria. Cell surface-associated proteins play a major role in inducing the protective immunity. However, the identity of a majority of cell surface-associated proteins of C. chauvoei is not known. In the present investigation, we have used SDS-PAGE, 2D-gel electrophoresis and Western blotting followed by mass spectrometry to identify cell surface-associated proteins of C. chauvoei. Among the identified proteins, which have shown to offer protective antigencity in other bacteria, Enolase, Chaperonin, Ribosomal protein L10, Glycosyl Hydrolase and Flavoprotein were characterized by sequencing and their overexpression in Escherichia coli. In conclusion, cell surface-associated proteins were identified using proteomic approach and the genes for the immunoreactive proteins were expressed, which may prove to be potential diagnostic or vaccine candidates. PMID:26971466

  2. ATP binding to a multisubunit enzyme: statistical thermodynamics analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yunxin

    2012-01-01

    Due to inter-subunit communication, multisubunit enzymes usually hydrolyze ATP in a concerted fashion. However, so far the principle of this process remains poorly understood. In this study, from the viewpoint of statistical thermodynamics, a simple model is presented. In this model, we assume that the binding of ATP will change the potential of the corresponding enzyme subunit, and the degree of this change depends on the state of its adjacent subunits. The probability of enzyme in a given state satisfies the Boltzmann's distribution. Although it looks much simple, this model can fit the recent experimental data of chaperonin TRiC/CCT well. From this model, the dominant state of TRiC/CCT can be obtained. This study provided a new way to understand biophysical processes by statistical thermodynamics analysis.

  3. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U13897-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available :none) Pyrobaculum arsenaticum DSM 135... 169 3e-69 CP000561_1748( CP000561 |pid:none) Pyrobaculum calid... containi... 315 e-144 BC080140_1( BC080140 |pid:none) Xenopus tropicalis cct8 protein, m... 311 e-144 BC097574_1( BC097574 |pid...:none) Xenopus tropicalis finished cDNA, ... 147 7e-62 AM114193_2942( AM114193 |pid:none)...:none) Xenopus tropicalis chaperonin cont... 132 4e-52 AK150160_1( AK150160 |pid:none) Mus musculus bo...) Babesia odocoilei CCTeta gene for ... 125 1e-46 BC075536_1( BC075536 |pid:none) Xenopus tropicalis chapero

  4. Defects in Protein Folding Machinery Affect Cell Wall Integrity and Reduce Ethanol Tolerance in S. cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Aswathy; Pullepu, Dileep; Reddy, Praveen Kumar; Uddin, Wasim; Kabir, M Anaul

    2016-07-01

    The chaperonin complex CCT/TRiC (chaperonin containing TCP-1/TCP-1 ring complex) participates in the folding of many crucial proteins including actin and tubulin in eukaryotes. Mutations in genes encoding its subunits can affect protein folding and in turn, the physiology of the organism. Stress response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is important in fermentation reactions and operates through overexpression and underexpression of genes, thus altering the protein profile. Defective protein folding machinery can disturb this process. In this study, the response of cct mutants to stress conditions in general and ethanol in specific was investigated. CCT1 mutants showed decreased resistance to different conditions tested including osmotic stress, metal ions, surfactants, reducing and oxidising agents. Cct1-3 mutant with the mutation in the conserved ATP-binding region showed irreversible defects than other mutants. These mutants were found to have inherent cell wall defects and showed decreased ethanol tolerance. This study reveals that cell wall defects and ethanol sensitivity are linked. Genetic and proteomic analyses showed that the yeast genes RPS6A (ribosomal protein), SCL1 (proteasomal subunit) and TDH3 (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) on overexpression, improved the growth of cct1-3 mutant on ethanol. We propose the breakdown of common stress response pathways caused by mutations in CCT complex and the resulting scarcity of functional stress-responsive proteins, affecting the cell's defence against different stress agents in cct mutants. Defective cytoskeleton and perturbed cell wall integrity reduce the ethanol tolerance in the mutants which are rescued by the extragenic suppressors. PMID:26992923

  5. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression analysis of a heat shock protein 10 (Hsp10) from Pennisetum glaucum (L.), a C4 cereal plant from the semi-arid tropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitnavare, Rahul B; Yeshvekar, Richa K; Sharma, Kiran K; Vadez, Vincent; Reddy, Malireddy K; Reddy, Palakolanu Sudhakar

    2016-08-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsp10) belong to the ubiquitous family of heat-shock molecular chaperones found in the organelles of both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Chaperonins assist the folding of nascent and stress-destabilized proteins. A cDNA clone encoding a 10 kDa Hsp was isolated from pearl millet, Pennisetum glaucum (L.) by screening a heat stress cDNA library. The fulllength PgHsp10 cDNA consisted of 297 bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a 98 amino acid polypeptide with a predicted molecular mass of 10.61 kDa and an estimated isoelectric point (pI) of 7.95. PgHsp10 shares 70-98 % sequence identity with other plant homologs. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that PgHsp10 is evolutionarily close to the maize Hsp10 homolog. The predicted 3D model confirmed a conserved eight-stranded ß-barrel with active site between the ß-barrel comprising of eight-strands, with conserved domain VLLPEYGG sandwiched between two ß-sheets. The gene consisted of 3 exons and 2 introns, while the position and phasing of these introns were conserved similar to other plant Hsp10 family genes. In silico analysis of the promoter region of PgHsp10 presented several distinct set of cis-elements and transcription factor binding sites. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that PgHsp10 gene was differentially expressed in response to abiotic stresses with the highest level of expression under heat stress conditions. Results of this study provide useful information regarding the role of chaperonins in stress regulation and generated leads for further elucidation of their function in plant stress tolerance. PMID:27206926

  6. Chlamydia trachomatis infection and anti-Hsp60 immunity: the two sides of the coin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Cappello

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis (CT infection is one of the most common causes of reproductive tract diseases and infertility. CT-Hsp60 is synthesized during infection and is released in the bloodstream. As a consequence, immune cells will produce anti-CT-Hsp60 antibodies. Hsp60, a ubiquitous and evolutionarily conserved chaperonin, is normally sequestered inside the cell, particularly into mitochondria. However, upon cell stress, as well as during carcinogenesis, the chaperonin becomes exposed on the cell surface (sf-Hsp60 and/or is secreted from cells into the extracellular space and circulation. Reports in the literature on circulating Hsp and anti-Hsp antibodies are in many cases short on details about Hsp60 concentrations, and about the specificity spectra of the antibodies, their titers, and their true, direct, pathogenetic effects. Thus, more studies are still needed to obtain a definitive picture on these matters. Nevertheless, the information already available indicates that the concurrence of persistent CT infection and appearance of sf-Hsp60 can promote an autoimmune aggression towards stressed cells and the development of diseases such as autoimmune arthritis, multiple sclerosis, atherosclerosis, vasculitis, diabetes, and thyroiditis, among others. At the same time, immunocomplexes composed of anti-CT-Hsp60 antibodies and circulating Hsp60 (both CT and human may form deposits in several anatomical locations, e.g., at the glomerular basal membrane. The opposite side of the coin is that pre-tumor and tumor cells with sf-Hsp60 can be destroyed with participation of the anti-Hsp60 antibody, thus stopping cancer progression before it is even noticed by the patient or physician.

  7. Enhancement of solubility in Escherichia coli and purification of an aminotransferase from Sphingopyxis sp. MTA144 for deamination of hydrolyzed fumonisin B1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartinger Doris

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fumonisin B1 is a cancerogenic mycotoxin produced by Fusarium verticillioides and other fungi. Sphingopyxis sp. MTA144 can degrade fumonisin B1, and a key enzyme in the catabolic pathway is an aminotransferase which removes the C2-amino group from hydrolyzed fumonisin B1. In order to study this aminotransferase with respect to a possible future application in enzymatic fumonisin detoxification, we attempted expression of the corresponding fumI gene in E. coli and purification of the enzyme. Since the aminotransferase initially accumulated in inclusion bodies, we compared the effects of induction level, host strain, expression temperature, solubility enhancers and a fusion partner on enzyme solubility and activity. Results When expressed from a T7 promoter at 30°C, the aminotransferase accumulated invariably in inclusion bodies in DE3 lysogens of the E. coli strains BL21, HMS174, Rosetta 2, Origami 2, or Rosetta-gami. Omission of the isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG used for induction caused a reduction of expression level, but no enhancement of solubility. Likewise, protein production but not solubility correlated with the IPTG concentration in E. coli Tuner(DE3. Addition of the solubility enhancers betaine and sorbitol or the co-enzyme pyridoxal phosphate showed no effect. Maltose-binding protein, used as an N-terminal fusion partner, promoted solubility at 30°C or less, but not at 37°C. Low enzyme activity and subsequent aggregation in the course of purification and cleavage indicated that the soluble fusion protein contained incorrectly folded aminotransferase. Expression in E. coli ArcticExpress(DE3, which co-expresses two cold-adapted chaperonins, at 11°C finally resulted in production of appreciable amounts of active enzyme. Since His tag-mediated affinity purification from this strain was hindered by co-elution of chaperonin, two steps of chromatography with optimized imidazole concentration in the

  8. Protective Response Mechanisms to Heat Stress in Interaction with High [CO2] Conditions in Coffea spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Madlles Q.; Rodrigues, Weverton P.; Fortunato, Ana S.; Leitão, António E.; Rodrigues, Ana P.; Pais, Isabel P.; Martins, Lima D.; Silva, Maria J.; Reboredo, Fernando H.; Partelli, Fábio L.; Campostrini, Eliemar; Tomaz, Marcelo A.; Scotti-Campos, Paula; Ribeiro-Barros, Ana I.; Lidon, Fernando J. C.; DaMatta, Fábio M.; Ramalho, José C.

    2016-01-01

    Modeling studies have predicted that coffee crop will be endangered by future global warming, but recent reports highlighted that high [CO2] can mitigate heat impacts on coffee. This work aimed at identifying heat protective mechanisms promoted by CO2 in Coffea arabica (cv. Icatu and IPR108) and Coffea canephora cv. Conilon CL153. Plants were grown at 25/20°C (day/night), under 380 or 700 μL CO2 L−1, and then gradually submitted to 31/25, 37/30, and 42/34°C. Relevant heat tolerance up to 37/30°C for both [CO2] and all coffee genotypes was observed, likely supported by the maintenance or increase of the pools of several protective molecules (neoxanthin, lutein, carotenes, α-tocopherol, HSP70, raffinose), activities of antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), glutathione reductase (GR), catalase (CAT), and the upregulated expression of some genes (ELIP, Chaperonin 20). However, at 42/34°C a tolerance threshold was reached, mostly in the 380-plants and Icatu. Adjustments in raffinose, lutein, β-carotene, α-tocopherol and HSP70 pools, and the upregulated expression of genes related to protective (ELIPS, HSP70, Chape 20, and 60) and antioxidant (CAT, CuSOD2, APX Cyt, APX Chl) proteins were largely driven by temperature. However, enhanced [CO2] maintained higher activities of GR (Icatu) and CAT (Icatu and IPR108), kept (or even increased) the Cu,Zn-SOD, APX, and CAT activities, and promoted a greater upregulation of those enzyme genes, as well as those related to HSP70, ELIPs, Chaperonins in CL153, and Icatu. These changes likely favored the maintenance of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at controlled levels and contributed to mitigate of photosystem II photoinhibition at the highest temperature. Overall, our results highlighted the important role of enhanced [CO2] on the coffee crop acclimation and sustainability under predicted future global warming scenarios. PMID:27446174

  9. Hsp60 is actively secreted by human tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M Merendino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hsp60, a Group I mitochondrial chaperonin, is classically considered an intracellular chaperone with residence in the mitochondria; nonetheless, in the last few years it has been found extracellularly as well as in the cell membrane. Important questions remain pertaining to extracellular Hsp60 such as how generalized is its occurrence outside cells, what are its extracellular functions and the translocation mechanisms that transport the chaperone outside of the cell. These questions are particularly relevant for cancer biology since it is believed that extracellular chaperones, like Hsp70, may play an active role in tumor growth and dissemination. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Since cancer cells may undergo necrosis and apoptosis, it could be possible that extracellular Hsps are chiefly the result of cell destruction but not the product of an active, physiological process. In this work, we studied three tumor cells lines and found that they all release Hsp60 into the culture media by an active mechanism independently of cell death. Biochemical analyses of one of the cell lines revealed that Hsp60 secretion was significantly reduced, by inhibitors of exosomes and lipid rafts. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data suggest that Hsp60 release is the result of an active secretion mechanism and, since extracellular release of the chaperone was demonstrated in all tumor cell lines investigated, our observations most likely reflect a general physiological phenomenon, occurring in many tumors.

  10. Molecular and histological characterization of primary (betaproteobacteria) and secondary (gammaproteobacteria) endosymbionts of three mealybug species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatehouse, Laurence N; Sutherland, Paul; Forgie, Shaun A; Kaji, Ryohei; Christeller, John T

    2012-02-01

    Microscopic localization of endosymbiotic bacteria in three species of mealybug (Pseudococcus longispinus, the long-tailed mealybug; Pseudococcus calceolariae, the citrophilus mealybug; and Pseudococcus viburni, the obscure mealybug) showed these organisms were confined to bacteriocyte cells within a bacteriome centrally located within the hemocoel. Two species of bacteria were present, with the secondary endosymbiont, in all cases, living within the primary endosymbiont. DNA from the dissected bacteriomes of all three species of mealybug was extracted for analysis. Sequence data from selected 16S rRNA genes confirmed identification of the primary endosymbiont as "Candidatus Tremblaya princeps," a betaproteobacterium, and the secondary endosymbionts as gammaproteobacteria closely related to Sodalis glossinidius. A single 16S rRNA sequence of the primary endosymbiont was found in all individuals of each mealybug species. In contrast, the presence of multiple divergent strains of secondary endosymbionts in each individual mealybug suggests different evolutionary and transmission histories of the two endosymbionts. Mealybugs are known vectors of the plant pathogen Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 3. To examine the possible role of either endosymbiont in virus transmission, an extension of the model for interaction of proteins with bacterial chaperonins, i.e., GroEL protein homologs, based on mobile-loop amino acid sequences of their GroES homologs, was developed and used for analyses of viral coat protein interactions. The data from this model are consistent with a role for the primary endosymbiont in mealybug transmission of Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 3. PMID:22156418

  11. Phylogenetic relationships of organellar Hsp90 homologs reveal fundamental differences to organellar Hsp70 and Hsp60 evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emelyanov, Victor V

    2002-10-16

    In agreement with endosymbiont theory for the origin of organelles, mitochondria and chloroplasts (plastids) are universally accepted to have monophyletically arisen from within alpha-proteobacteria and cyanobacteria, respectively. Convincing particular evidence in support of this theory emerged from phylogenetic analysis of highly conserved, ubiquitous heat shock proteins (Hsps) chaperonin 60 and Hsp70. These apparently indispensable general chaperones have proven to be highly useful molecular tracers of organellar origin. Phylogenetic relationships of Hsp90--a less conserved and less widely distributed general chaperone--are reported here that are strikingly incongruent with canonical patterns of endosymbiotic ancestry. It appears that Hsp90 of chloroplasts derives from the endoplasmic reticulum-specific isoform while mitochondrial Hsp90 homologs affiliate with a eubacterial lineage other than alpha subdivision of proteobacteria. These data suggest that endosymbiont htpG genes, encoding Hsp90, have been either functionally displaced by pre-existing nuclear genes or completely lost during establishment of organelles and subsequently added to initial organellar complement. PMID:12459260

  12. Induction of heat shock protein (hsp)60 in Isochrysis galbana exposed to sublethal preparations of dispersant and Prudhoe Bay crude oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, M.F.; Olsen, H.E.; Gasuad, K.A.; Tjeerdema, R.S. [University of California, Santa Cruz (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Sowby, M.L. [California Dept. of Fish and Game, Sacramento (United States). Office of Spill Prevention and Response

    1999-11-01

    Adaptation to sublethal exposure to crude oil by phytoplankton is poorly understood. Use of chemical dispersants for oil spill remediation increases petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations in water, while exposing marine organisms to potentially toxic concentrations of dispersant. Heat shock proteins (hsps) have been found to serve as an adaptive and protective mechanism against environmental stresses. The objective of this project was to examine the induction of hsps in Isochrysis galbana, a golden-brown algae, following exposure to the water-accommodated fraction (WAF) of Prudhoe Bay crude oil (PBCO) and PBCO chemically dispersed with Corexit 9527 (dispersed oil: DO). Initial experiments using {sup 35}S-labelled amino acids and 2-dimensional electrophoresis with subsequent western blotting identified and confirmed hsp60, a member of the chaperonin family of stress proteins, as being efficiently induced by heat shock in this species. One-dimensional SDS PAGE and western blotting, with hsp60 antibodies and chemiluminescence detection, were used to quantitate hsp60 following exposure to a range of environmental temperatures and concentrations of WAF and DO preparations. Results of this study are consistent with previous studies in other species documenting increases in hsp60 levels with exposure to xenobiotics. Further studies are investigating the protective function of hsp60 against the toxic effects of exposure to WAF and DO preparations. (author)

  13. Suppression of Cpn10 increases mitochondrial fission and dysfunction in neuroblastoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Jung Park

    Full Text Available To date, several regulatory proteins involved in mitochondrial dynamics have been identified. However, the precise mechanism coordinating these complex processes remains unclear. Mitochondrial chaperones regulate mitochondrial function and structure. Chaperonin 10 (Cpn10 interacts with heat shock protein 60 (HSP60 and functions as a co-chaperone. In this study, we found that down-regulation of Cpn10 highly promoted mitochondrial fragmentation in SK-N-MC and SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. Both genetic and chemical inhibition of Drp1 suppressed the mitochondrial fragmentation induced by Cpn10 reduction. Reactive oxygen species (ROS generation in 3-NP-treated cells was markedly enhanced by Cpn10 knock down. Depletion of Cpn10 synergistically increased cell death in response to 3-NP treatment. Furthermore, inhibition of Drp1 recovered Cpn10-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction in 3-NP-treated cells. Moreover, an ROS scavenger suppressed cell death mediated by Cpn10 knockdown in 3-NP-treated cells. Taken together, these results showed that down-regulation of Cpn10 increased mitochondrial fragmentation and potentiated 3-NP-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction in neuroblastoma cells.

  14. ATP-dependent molecular chaperones in plastids--More complex than expected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trösch, Raphael; Mühlhaus, Timo; Schroda, Michael; Willmund, Felix

    2015-09-01

    Plastids are a class of essential plant cell organelles comprising photosynthetic chloroplasts of green tissues, starch-storing amyloplasts of roots and tubers or the colorful pigment-storing chromoplasts of petals and fruits. They express a few genes encoded on their organellar genome, called plastome, but import most of their proteins from the cytosol. The import into plastids, the folding of freshly-translated or imported proteins, the degradation or renaturation of denatured and entangled proteins, and the quality-control of newly folded proteins all require the action of molecular chaperones. Members of all four major families of ATP-dependent molecular chaperones (chaperonin/Cpn60, Hsp70, Hsp90 and Hsp100 families) have been identified in plastids from unicellular algae to higher plants. This review aims not only at giving an overview of the most current insights into the general and conserved functions of these plastid chaperones, but also into their specific plastid functions. Given that chloroplasts harbor an extreme environment that cycles between reduced and oxidized states, that has to deal with reactive oxygen species and is highly reactive to environmental and developmental signals, it can be presumed that plastid chaperones have evolved a plethora of specific functions some of which are just about to be discovered. Here, the most urgent questions that remain unsolved are discussed, and guidance for future research on plastid chaperones is given. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chloroplast Biogenesis. PMID:25596449

  15. Constructing Optimal Coarse-Grained Sites of Huge Biomolecules by Fluctuation Maximization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Zhang, John Zenghui; Xia, Fei

    2016-04-12

    Coarse-grained (CG) models are valuable tools for the study of functions of large biomolecules on large length and time scales. The definition of CG representations for huge biomolecules is always a formidable challenge. In this work, we propose a new method called fluctuation maximization coarse-graining (FM-CG) to construct the CG sites of biomolecules. The defined residual in FM-CG converges to a maximal value as the number of CG sites increases, allowing an optimal CG model to be rigorously defined on the basis of the maximum. More importantly, we developed a robust algorithm called stepwise local iterative optimization (SLIO) to accelerate the process of coarse-graining large biomolecules. By means of the efficient SLIO algorithm, the computational cost of coarse-graining large biomolecules is reduced to within the time scale of seconds, which is far lower than that of conventional simulated annealing. The coarse-graining of two huge systems, chaperonin GroEL and lengsin, indicates that our new methods can coarse-grain huge biomolecular systems with up to 10 000 residues within the time scale of minutes. The further parametrization of CG sites derived from FM-CG allows us to construct the corresponding CG models for studies of the functions of huge biomolecular systems. PMID:26930392

  16. Proteome Analysis of the Adaptation of a Phenol-Degrading Bacterium Acinetobacter sp. EDP3 to the Variation of Phenol Loadings%蛋白质组学方法分析不同苯酚浓度下菌株Acinetobacter sp.EDP3的应激机理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Strain EDP3 was isolated from an industrial-activated sludge. It belonged to the gamma group of Proteobacteria with an identity of 97.0% to Acinetobacter calcoaceticus according to the 1 6S rRNA gene sequences. It can tolerate up to 1000mg.L-1 phenol at room temperature with a much longer lag phase. This indicates that higher phenol concentration has induced some physiological and genotypic changes in the bacterium. The aim of this study is,therefore,to investigate these responses to phenol concentration variations in strain EDP3. Proteome analysis is conducted by means of a two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D PAGE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) was conducted to obtain a deeper insight into the adaptive responses inside the bacterium. Comparative analysis of the proteome profiles of strain EDp3 the higher phenol concentration,oxidative stress proteins were dominant. The synthesis of a heat shock protein,600O0 chaperonin GroEL,was also amplified. In addition,the expression of one membrane protein,adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) type sugar transporter,was found up-regulated. The inhibition of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) and RNA/protein synthesis was also observed.

  17. Pitfalls of homozygosity mapping: an extended consanguineous Bardet-Biedl syndrome family with two mutant genes (BBS2, BBS10), three mutations, but no triallelism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurier, Virginie; Stoetzel, Corinne; Muller, Jean; Thibault, Christelle; Corbani, Sandra; Jalkh, Nadine; Salem, Nabiha; Chouery, Eliane; Poch, Olivier; Licaire, Serge; Danse, Jean-Marc; Amati-Bonneau, Patricia; Bonneau, Dominique; Mégarbané, André; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Dollfus, Hélène

    2006-11-01

    The extensive genetic heterogeneity of Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is documented by the identification, by classical linkage analysis complemented recently by comparative genomic approaches, of nine genes (BBS1-9) that account cumulatively for about 50% of patients. The BBS genes appear implicated in cilia and basal body assembly or function. In order to find new BBS genes, we performed SNP homozygosity mapping analysis in an extended consanguineous family living in a small Lebanese village. This uncovered an unexpectedly complex pattern of mutations, and led us to identify a novel BBS gene (BBS10). In one sibship of the pedigree, a BBS2 homozygous mutation was identified, while in three other sibships, a homozygous missense mutation was identified in a gene encoding a vertebrate-specific chaperonine-like protein (BBS10). The single patient in the last sibship was a compound heterozygote for the above BBS10 mutation and another one in the same gene. Although triallelism (three deleterious alleles in the same patient) has been described in some BBS families, we have to date no evidence that this is the case in the present family. The analysis of this family challenged linkage analysis based on the expectation of a single locus and mutation. The very high informativeness of SNP arrays was instrumental in elucidating this case, which illustrates possible pitfalls of homozygosity mapping in extended families, and that can be explained by the rather high prevalence of heterozygous carriers of BBS mutations (estimated at one in 50 in Europeans). PMID:16823392

  18. Quantitative proteomic analysis of the rice (Oryza sativa L. salt response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianwen Xu

    Full Text Available Salt stress is one of most serious limiting factors for crop growth and production. An isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation (iTRAQ approach was used to analyze proteomic changes in rice shoots under salt stress in this study. A total of 56 proteins were significantly altered and 16 of them were enriched in the pathways of photosynthesis, antioxidant and oxidative phosphorylation. Among these 16 proteins, peroxiredoxin Q and photosystem I subunit D were up-regulated, while thioredoxin M-like, thioredoxin x, thioredoxin peroxidase, glutathione S-transferase F3, PSI subunit H, light-harvesting antenna complex I subunits, chloroplast chaperonin, vacuolar ATP synthase subunit H, and ATP synthase delta chain were down-regulated. Moreover, physiological data including total antioxidant capacity, peroxiredoxin activity, chlorophyll a/b content, glutathione S-transferase activity, reduced glutathione content and ATPase activity were consistent with changes in the levels of these proteins. The levels of the mRNAs encoding these proteins were also analyzed by real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR, and approximately 86% of the results were consistent with the iTRAQ data. Importantly, our data suggest the important role of PSI in balancing energy supply and ROS generation under salt stress. This study provides information for an improved understanding of the function of photosynthesis and PSI in the salt-stress response of rice.

  19. Dynamics of the entropic insertion of a large sphere into a cylindrical vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Ryohei; Amano, Ken-ichi; Kinoshita, Masahiro; Yoshimori, Akira

    2016-03-01

    Insertion of a solute into a vessel comprising biopolymers is a fundamental function in a biological system. The entropy originating from the translational displacement of solvent particles plays an essential role in the insertion. Here we study the dynamics of entropic insertion of a large spherical solute into a cylindrical vessel. The solute and the vessel are immersed in small spheres forming the solvent. We develop a theoretical method formulated using the Fokker-Planck equation. The spatial distribution of solute-vessel entropic potential, which is calculated by the three-dimensional integral equation theory combined with rigid-body models, serves as input data. The key quantity analyzed is the density of the probability of finding the solute at any position at any time. It is found that the solute is inserted along the central axis of the vessel cavity and trapped at a position where the entropic potential takes a local minimum value. The solute keeps being trapped without touching the vessel inner surface. In a significantly long time τ, the solute transfers to the position in contact with the vessel bottom possessing the global potential minimum along the central axis. As the solute size increases, τ becomes remarkably longer. We also discuss the relevance of our result to the functional expression of a chaperonin/cochaperonin in the assistance of protein folding.

  20. Biophysical principles predict fitness landscapes of drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, João V; Bershtein, Shimon; Li, Anna; Lozovsky, Elena R; Hartl, Daniel L; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2016-03-15

    Fitness landscapes of drug resistance constitute powerful tools to elucidate mutational pathways of antibiotic escape. Here, we developed a predictive biophysics-based fitness landscape of trimethoprim (TMP) resistance for Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). We investigated the activity, binding, folding stability, and intracellular abundance for a complete set of combinatorial DHFR mutants made out of three key resistance mutations and extended this analysis to DHFR originated from Chlamydia muridarum and Listeria grayi We found that the acquisition of TMP resistance via decreased drug affinity is limited by a trade-off in catalytic efficiency. Protein stability is concurrently affected by the resistant mutants, which precludes a precise description of fitness from a single molecular trait. Application of the kinetic flux theory provided an accurate model to predict resistance phenotypes (IC50) quantitatively from a unique combination of the in vitro protein molecular properties. Further, we found that a controlled modulation of the GroEL/ES chaperonins and Lon protease levels affects the intracellular steady-state concentration of DHFR in a mutation-specific manner, whereas IC50 is changed proportionally, as indeed predicted by the model. This unveils a molecular rationale for the pleiotropic role of the protein quality control machinery on the evolution of antibiotic resistance, which, as we illustrate here, may drastically confound the evolutionary outcome. These results provide a comprehensive quantitative genotype-phenotype map for the essential enzyme that serves as an important target of antibiotic and anticancer therapies. PMID:26929328

  1. Immunoproteomic profiling of Rickettsia parkeri and Rickettsia amblyommii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pornwiroon, Walairat; Bourchookarn, Apichai; Paddock, Christopher D; Macaluso, Kevin R

    2015-09-01

    Rickettsia parkeri is an Amblyomma-associated, spotted fever group Rickettsia species that causes an eschar-associated, febrile illness in multiple countries throughout the Western Hemisphere. Many other rickettsial species of known or uncertain pathogenicity have been detected in Amblyomma spp. ticks in the Americas, including Rickettsia amblyommii, "Candidatus Rickettsia andeanae" and Rickettsia rickettsii. In this study, we utilized an immunoproteomic approach to compare antigenic profiles of low-passage isolates of R. parkeri and R. amblyommii with serum specimens from patients with PCR- and culture-confirmed infections with R. parkeri. Five immunoreactive proteins of R. amblyommii and nine immunoreactive proteins of R. parkeri were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Four of these, including the outer membrane protein (Omp) A, OmpB, translation initiation factor IF-2, and cell division protein FtsZ, were antigens common to both rickettsiae. Serum specimens from patients with R. parkeri rickettsiosis reacted specifically with cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase, DNA-directed RNA polymerase subunit alpha, putative sigma (54) modulation protein, chaperonin GroEL, and elongation factor Tu of R. parkeri which have been reported as virulence factors in other bacterial species. Unique antigens identified in this study may be useful for further development of the better serological assays for diagnosing infection caused by R. parkeri. PMID:26234571

  2. GroEL from the endosymbiont Buchnera aphidicola betrays the aphid by triggering plant defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Ritu; Atamian, Hagop S; Shen, Zhouxin; Briggs, Steven P; Kaloshian, Isgouhi

    2014-06-17

    Aphids are sap-feeding plant pests and harbor the endosymbiont Buchnera aphidicola, which is essential for their fecundity and survival. During plant penetration and feeding, aphids secrete saliva that contains proteins predicted to alter plant defenses and metabolism. Plants recognize microbe-associated molecular patterns and induce pattern-triggered immunity (PTI). No aphid-associated molecular pattern has yet been identified. By mass spectrometry, we identified in saliva from potato aphids (Macrosiphum euphorbiae) 105 proteins, some of which originated from Buchnera, including the chaperonin GroEL. Because GroEL is a widely conserved bacterial protein with an essential function, we tested its role in PTI. Applying or infiltrating GroEL onto Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves induced oxidative burst and expression of PTI early marker genes. These GroEL-induced defense responses required the known coreceptor BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE 1-ASSOCIATED RECEPTOR KINASE 1. In addition, in transgenic Arabidopsis plants, inducible expression of groEL activated PTI marker gene expression. Moreover, Arabidopsis plants expressing groEL displayed reduced fecundity of the green peach aphid (Myzus persicae), indicating enhanced resistance against aphids. Furthermore, delivery of GroEL into tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) or Arabidopsis through Pseudomonas fluorescens, engineered to express the type III secretion system, also reduced potato aphid and green peach aphid fecundity, respectively. Collectively our data indicate that GroEL is a molecular pattern that triggers PTI. PMID:24927572

  3. Effect of trans-cinnamaldehyde on reducing resistance to environmental stresses in Cronobacter sakazakii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amalaradjou, Mary Anne Roshni; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2011-03-01

    Cronobacter sakazakii is an emerging foodborne pathogen transmitted exclusively through contaminated infant formula (IFM), and associated with life-threatening infections in infants. C. sakazakii has the ability to tolerate a variety of environmental stress conditions, including heat stress, acidity, high osmotic pressure, and desiccation. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of a subinhibitory concentration (750 μM) of trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC), an ingredient in cinnamon, for reducing C. sakazakii's tolerance to these environmental stresses. Three strains of TC-treated C. sakazakii were separately subjected to high temperature (50°C, 55°C, and 60°C), acidic pH (3.3), high osmotic pressure (a(w) 0.81), and desiccation. TC (750 μM) substantially (p < 0.05) compromised stress tolerance of C. sakazakii compared to C. sakazakii cells not exposed to TC. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction results revealed that TC significantly (p < 0.05) downregulated C. sakazakii genes critical for stress tolerance and survival, including rpoS, chaperonins, phoP/Q, outer membrane porins, and osmolyte transporter genes. The efficacy of TC in reducing C. sakazakii stress tolerance underscores its potential use for controlling the pathogen by increasing its susceptibility to commonly applied hurdles in food processing. PMID:21114424

  4. Hsp60 response in experimental and human temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammazza, Antonella Marino; Colangeli, Roberto; Orban, Gergely; Pierucci, Massimo; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; Bello, Margherita Lo; D'Aniello, Alfredo; Bucchieri, Fabio; Pomara, Cristoforo; Valentino, Mario; Muscat, Richard; Benigno, Arcangelo; Zummo, Giovanni; de Macario, Everly Conway; Cappello, Francesco; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe; Macario, Alberto J. L.

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial chaperonin Hsp60 is a ubiquitous molecule with multiple roles, constitutively expressed and inducible by oxidative stress. In the brain, Hsp60 is widely distributed and has been implicated in neurological disorders, including epilepsy. A role for mitochondria and oxidative stress has been proposed in epileptogenesis of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Here, we investigated the involvement of Hsp60 in TLE using animal and human samples. Hsp60 immunoreactivity in the hippocampus, measured by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry, was increased in a rat model of TLE. Hsp60 was also increased in the hippocampal dentate gyrus neurons somata and neuropil and hippocampus proper (CA3, CA1) of the epileptic rats. We also determined the circulating levels of Hsp60 in epileptic animals and TLE patients using ELISA. The epileptic rats showed circulating levels of Hsp60 higher than controls. Likewise, plasma post-seizure Hsp60 levels in patients were higher than before the seizure and those of controls. These results demonstrate that Hsp60 is increased in both animals and patients with TLE in affected tissues, and in plasma in response to epileptic seizures, and point to it as biomarker of hippocampal stress potentially useful for diagnosis and patient management. PMID:25801186

  5. Dynamics of the entropic insertion of a large sphere into a cylindrical vessel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Ryohei; Amano, Ken-ichi; Kinoshita, Masahiro; Yoshimori, Akira

    2016-03-14

    Insertion of a solute into a vessel comprising biopolymers is a fundamental function in a biological system. The entropy originating from the translational displacement of solvent particles plays an essential role in the insertion. Here we study the dynamics of entropic insertion of a large spherical solute into a cylindrical vessel. The solute and the vessel are immersed in small spheres forming the solvent. We develop a theoretical method formulated using the Fokker-Planck equation. The spatial distribution of solute-vessel entropic potential, which is calculated by the three-dimensional integral equation theory combined with rigid-body models, serves as input data. The key quantity analyzed is the density of the probability of finding the solute at any position at any time. It is found that the solute is inserted along the central axis of the vessel cavity and trapped at a position where the entropic potential takes a local minimum value. The solute keeps being trapped without touching the vessel inner surface. In a significantly long time τ, the solute transfers to the position in contact with the vessel bottom possessing the global potential minimum along the central axis. As the solute size increases, τ becomes remarkably longer. We also discuss the relevance of our result to the functional expression of a chaperonin/cochaperonin in the assistance of protein folding. PMID:26979707

  6. Proteomic analysis of Brucella abortus cell envelope and identification of immunogenic candidate proteins for vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Joseph P; Comerci, Diego; Alefantis, Timothy G; Walz, Alexander; Quan, Marian; Chafin, Ryan; Grewal, Paul; Mujer, Cesar V; Ugalde, Rodolfo A; DelVecchio, Vito G

    2006-07-01

    Brucella abortus is the etiologic agent of bovine brucellosis and causes a chronic disease in humans known as undulant fever. In livestock the disease is characterized by abortion and sterility. Live, attenuated vaccines such as S19 and RB51 have been used to control the spread of the disease in animals; however, they are considered unsafe for human use and they induce abortion in pregnant cattle. For the development of a safer and equally efficacious vaccine, immunoproteomics was utilized to identify novel candidate proteins from B. abortus cell envelope (CE). A total of 163 proteins were identified using 2-DE with MALDI-TOF MS and LC-MS/MS. Some of the major protein components include outer-membrane protein (OMP) 25, OMP31, Omp2b porin, and 60 kDa chaperonin GroEL. 2-DE Western blot analyses probed with antiserum from bovine and a human patient infected with Brucella identified several new immunogenic proteins such as fumarate reductase flavoprotein subunit, F0F1-type ATP synthase alpha subunit, and cysteine synthase A. The elucidation of the immunome of B. abortus CE identified a number of candidate proteins for developing vaccines against Brucella infection in bovine and humans. PMID:16739129

  7. Reprogramming an ATP-driven protein machine into a light-gated nanocage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoersch, Daniel; Roh, Soung-Hun; Chiu, Wah; Kortemme, Tanja

    2013-12-01

    Natural protein assemblies have many sophisticated architectures and functions, creating nanoscale storage containers, motors and pumps. Inspired by these systems, protein monomers have been engineered to self-assemble into supramolecular architectures including symmetrical, metal-templated and cage-like structures. The complexity of protein machines, however, has made it difficult to create assemblies with both defined structures and controllable functions. Here we report protein assemblies that have been engineered to function as light-controlled nanocontainers. We show that an adenosine-5'-triphosphate-driven group II chaperonin, which resembles a barrel with a built-in lid, can be reprogrammed to open and close on illumination with different wavelengths of light. By engineering photoswitchable azobenzene-based molecules into the structure, light-triggered changes in interatomic distances in the azobenzene moiety are able to drive large-scale conformational changes of the protein assembly. The different states of the assembly can be visualized with single-particle cryo-electron microscopy, and the nanocages can be used to capture and release non-native cargos. Similar strategies that switch atomic distances with light could be used to build other controllable nanoscale machines. PMID:24270642

  8. Bi-allelic CLPB mutations cause cataract, renal cysts, nephrocalcinosis and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, a novel disorder of mitochondrial protein disaggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanabus, Marta; Shahni, Rojeen; Saldanha, José W; Murphy, Elaine; Plagnol, Vincent; Hoff, William Van't; Heales, Simon; Rahman, Shamima

    2015-03-01

    Whole exome sequencing was used to investigate the genetic cause of mitochondrial disease in two siblings with a syndrome of congenital lamellar cataracts associated with nephrocalcinosis, medullary cysts and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. Autosomal recessive inheritance in a gene encoding a mitochondrially targeted protein was assumed; the only variants which satisfied these criteria were c.1882C>T (p.Arg628Cys) and c.1915G>A (p.Glu639Lys) in the CLPB gene, encoding a heat shock protein/chaperonin responsible for disaggregating mitochondrial and cytosolic proteins. Functional studies, including quantitative PCR (qPCR) and Western blot, support pathogenicity of these mutations. Furthermore, molecular modelling suggests that the mutations disrupt interactions between subunits so that the CLPB hexamer cannot form or is unstable, thus impairing its role as a protein disaggregase. We conclude that accumulation of protein aggregates underlies the development of cataracts and nephrocalcinosis in CLPB deficiency, which is a novel genetic cause of 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. A common mitochondrial cause for 3-methylglutaconic aciduria appears to be disruption of the architecture of the mitochondrial membranes, as in Barth syndrome (tafazzin deficiency), Sengers syndrome (acylglycerol kinase deficiency) and MEGDEL syndrome (impaired remodelling of the mitochondrial membrane lipids because of SERAC1 mutations). We now propose that perturbation of the mitochondrial membranes by abnormal protein aggregates leads to 3-methylglutaconic aciduria in CLPB deficiency. PMID:25595726

  9. AcEST: DK963429 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available te... 32 2.5 sp|Q8TXI4|RAD50_METKA DNA double-strand break repair rad50 ATPas... 32 2.5 sp|Q15643|TRIPB_HUMAN Thyroi...sp|A5GAT3|CNPD_GEOUR 2',3'-cyclic-nucleotide 2'-phosphodiesteras... 31 5.6 sp|Q9UPV0|CE164_HUMAN Centro...tein homo... 32 3.3 sp|Q8VDC1|FYCO1_MOUSE FYVE and coiled-coil domain-containing pro... 32 3.3 sp|P46869|FLA10_CHLRE Kines...Q8N8X6|GG2L4_HUMAN Golgin subfamily A member 2-like protein 4... 30 9.6 sp|A6LQ86|CH10_CLOB8 10 kDa chaperonin OS=Clostr...t (release 56.9) Link to BlastX Result : Swiss-Prot sp_hit_id Q86YS3 Definition sp|Q86YS3|RFIP4_HUMAN Rab11 family-interacting pro

  10. AcEST: DK952312 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Hom... 32 2.1 sp|Q8C963|YS023_MOUSE Coiled-coil domain-containing protein LOC1... 32 2.7 sp|Q9FJB5|RP8L3_ARATH Disease resist...S3|B8BKS3_ORYSI Putative uncharacterized protein OS=Oryza... 37 1.3 tr|Q5CTJ8|Q5CTJ8_CRYPV Brf1p like coiled coil pro... prote... 34 0.55 sp|Q8TXI4|RAD50_METKA DNA double-strand break repair rad50 ATPas......n homo... 32 3.5 sp|O94488|MBO1_SCHPO Microtubule organizer protein 1 OS=Schizosa... 32 3.5 sp|Q8VDC1|FYCO1_MOUSE FYVE and coil...CH10_CLONN 10 kDa chaperonin OS=Clostridium novyi (str... 31 6.1 sp|O76329|ACTNB_DICDI Interaptin OS=Dictyostelium discoi

  11. Protein translation machinery holds a key for transition of planktonic cells to biofilm state in Enterococcus faecalis: A proteomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qayyum, Shariq; Sharma, Divakar; Bisht, Deepa; Khan, Asad U

    2016-06-10

    Enterococcus faecalis is a member of human gut microflora causing nosocomial infection involving biofilm formation. Ethyl methyl sulfonate induced mutants were analysed using crystal violet assay, SEM and CLSM microscopy which confirmed AK-E12 as biofilm efficient and AK-F6 as biofilm deficient mutants. Growth curve pattern revealed AK-E12 was fast growing whereas, AK-F6 was found slow growing mutant. 2D-Electrophorosis and MALDI-TOF analysis revealed over and underexpression of many translation-elongation associated proteins in mutants compared to wild type. Protein translation elongation factor G, translation elongation factor Tu and ribosomal subunit interface proteins were underexpressed and UTP-glucose-1-phosphate uridylyl transferase and cell division protein divIVA were overexpressed in AK-E12 as compared to wild type. In AK-F6, except 10 kDa chaperonin which was over-expressed other selected proteins were found to be suppressed. RT-PCR confirmed proteomic data except for the translation elongation factor G which showed contradictory data of proteome expression in AK-E12. Protein-protein interaction networks were constructed using STRING 10.0 which demonstrated strong connection of translation-elongation proteins with other proteins. Hence, it concludes from the data that translation elongation factors are important in transition of planktonic cells to biofilm cells in Enterococcus faecalis. PMID:27144316

  12. The solution structure of the N-terminal domain of human tubulin binding cofactor C reveals a platform for tubulin interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Flor Garcia-Mayoral

    Full Text Available Human Tubulin Binding Cofactor C (TBCC is a post-chaperonin involved in the folding and assembly of α- and β-tubulin monomers leading to the release of productive tubulin heterodimers ready to polymerize into microtubules. In this process it collaborates with other cofactors (TBC's A, B, D, and E and forms a supercomplex with TBCD, β-tubulin, TBCE and α-tubulin. Here, we demonstrate that TBCC depletion results in multipolar spindles and mitotic failure. Accordingly, TBCC is found at the centrosome and is implicated in bipolar spindle formation. We also determine by NMR the structure of the N-terminal domain of TBCC. The TBCC N-terminal domain adopts a spectrin-like fold topology composed of a left-handed 3-stranded α-helix bundle. Remarkably, the 30-residue N-terminal segment of the TBCC N-terminal domain is flexible and disordered in solution. This unstructured region is involved in the interaction with tubulin. Our data lead us to propose a testable model for TBCC N-terminal domain/tubulin recognition in which the highly charged N-terminus as well as residues from the three helices and the loops interact with the acidic hypervariable regions of tubulin monomers.

  13. Simultaneous profiling of seed-associated bacteria and fungi reveals antagonistic interactions between microorganisms within a shared epiphytic microbiome on Triticum and Brassica seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Links, Matthew G; Demeke, Tigst; Gräfenhan, Tom; Hill, Janet E; Hemmingsen, Sean M; Dumonceaux, Tim J

    2014-04-01

    In order to address the hypothesis that seeds from ecologically and geographically diverse plants harbor characteristic epiphytic microbiota, we characterized the bacterial and fungal microbiota associated with Triticum and Brassica seed surfaces. The total microbial complement was determined by amplification and sequencing of a fragment of chaperonin 60 (cpn60). Specific microorganisms were quantified by qPCR. Bacteria and fungi corresponding to operational taxonomic units (OTU) that were identified in the sequencing study were isolated and their interactions examined. A total of 5477 OTU were observed from seed washes. Neither total epiphytic bacterial load nor community richness/evenness was significantly different between the seed types; 578 OTU were shared among all samples at a variety of abundances. Hierarchical clustering revealed that 203 were significantly different in abundance on Triticum seeds compared with Brassica. Microorganisms isolated from seeds showed 99-100% identity between the cpn60 sequences of the isolates and the OTU sequences from this shared microbiome. Bacterial strains identified as Pantoea agglomerans had antagonistic properties toward one of the fungal isolates (Alternaria sp.), providing a possible explanation for their reciprocal abundances on both Triticum and Brassica seeds. cpn60 enabled the simultaneous profiling of bacterial and fungal microbiota and revealed a core seed-associated microbiota shared between diverse plant genera. PMID:24444052

  14. Energy transfer in hybrid CdSe quantum dots vs. labelled molecular chaperone systems by imaging microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tani, Toshiro; Oda, Masaru [Institute of Symbiotic Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Horiuchi, Hiromi; Usukura, Eiji; Sakai, Hiroshi [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Ohtaki, Akashi [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Yohda, Masafumi [Institute of Symbiotic Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)

    2009-04-15

    Resonant energy transfer in hybrid CdSe quantum dot (QD) conjugated with Cy5-labelled molecular chaperone systems is observed with single molecule imaging technique. Photonic QDs are the core-shell type nanocrystals covered with organic surfactants on the outermost surfaces, i.e. CdSe/ZnS/TOPO's, and prefoldin (PFD) is used as prototype molecular chaperons. PFD is a jellyfish-shaped hexameric co-chaperone of group II chaperonins, which recognize hydrophobic portion of denatured proteins and encapsulate them within its central cavity. So the CdSe/ZnS/TOPO QDs can also be captured be cause of its surface similarity to the denatured proteins. We have found one possible reaction pathway to get such artificial complex in aqueous solutions with keeping bioactivities of the proteins. Performance of the complex is evaluated by TIRF imaging microscopy. As the proteins are transparent in visible wavelength region, labeling dyes, Cy5, which also work as acceptors, are connected to detect their behaviors microscopically. Foerster type energy transfer is observed from the QD donors to Cy5-labeled PFD acceptors in single molecule level, which can be a distinct evidence for the complex formation. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. Proteomic signatures implicate cAMP in light and temperature responses in Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Thomas, Ludivine

    2013-05-01

    The second messenger 3\\'-5\\'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and adenylyl cyclases (ACs), enzymes that catalyse the formation of cAMP from ATP, are increasingly recognized as important signaling molecules in a number of physiological responses in higher plants. Here we used proteomics to identify cAMP-dependent protein signatures in Arabidopsis thaliana and identify a number of differentially expressed proteins with a role in light- and temperature-dependent responses, notably photosystem II subunit P-1, plasma membrane associated cation-binding protein and chaperonin 60 β. Based on these proteomics results we conclude that, much like in cyanobacteria, algae and fungi, cAMP may have a role in light signaling and the regulation of photosynthesis as well as responses to temperature and we speculate that ACs could act as light and/or temperature sensors in higher plants. Biological significance: This current study is significant since it presents the first proteomic response to cAMP, a novel and key second messenger in plants. It will be relevant to researchers in plant physiology and in particular those with an interest in second messengers and their role in biotic and abiotic stress responses. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  16. Root exudate-induced alterations in Bacillus cereus cell wall contribute to root colonization and plant growth promotion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swarnalee Dutta

    Full Text Available The outcome of an interaction between plant growth promoting rhizobacteria and plants may depend on the chemical composition of root exudates (REs. We report the colonization of tobacco, and not groundnut, roots by a non-rhizospheric Bacillus cereus (MTCC 430. There was a differential alteration in the cell wall components of B. cereus in response to the REs from tobacco and groundnut. Attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy revealed a split in amide I region of B. cereus cells exposed to tobacco-root exudates (TRE, compared to those exposed to groundnut-root exudates (GRE. In addition, changes in exopolysaccharides and lipid-packing were observed in B. cereus grown in TRE-amended minimal media that were not detectable in GRE-amended media. Cell-wall proteome analyses revealed upregulation of oxidative stress-related alkyl hydroperoxide reductase, and DNA-protecting protein chain (Dlp-2, in response to GRE and TRE, respectively. Metabolism-related enzymes like 2-amino-3-ketobutyrate coenzyme A ligase and 2-methylcitrate dehydratase and a 60 kDa chaperonin were up-regulated in response to TRE and GRE. In response to B. cereus, the plant roots altered their exudate-chemodiversity with respect to carbohydrates, organic acids, alkanes, and polyols. TRE-induced changes in surface components of B. cereus may contribute to successful root colonization and subsequent plant growth promotion.

  17. Gut commensal microvesicles reproduce parent bacterial signals to host immune and enteric nervous systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nedawi, Khalid; Mian, M Firoz; Hossain, Nazia; Karimi, Khalil; Mao, Yu-Kang; Forsythe, Paul; Min, Kevin K; Stanisz, Andrew M; Kunze, Wolfgang A; Bienenstock, John

    2015-02-01

    Ingestion of a commensal bacteria, Lactobacillus rhamnosus JB-1, has potent immunoregulatory effects, and changes nerve-dependent colon migrating motor complexes (MMCs), enteric nerve function, and behavior. How these alterations occur is unknown. JB-1 microvesicles (MVs) are enriched for heat shock protein components such as chaperonin 60 heat-shock protein isolated from Escherichia coli (GroEL) and reproduce regulatory and neuronal effects in vitro and in vivo. Ingested labeled MVs were detected in murine Peyer's patch (PP) dendritic cells (DCs) within 18 h. After 3 d, PP and mesenteric lymph node DCs assumed a regulatory phenotype and increased functional regulatory CD4(+)25(+)Foxp3+ T cells. JB-1, MVs, and GroEL similarly induced phenotypic change in cocultured DCs via multiple pathways including C-type lectin receptors specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing non-integrin-related 1 and Dectin-1, as well as TLR-2 and -9. JB-1 and MVs also decreased the amplitude of neuronally dependent MMCs in an ex vivo model of peristalsis. Gut epithelial, but not direct neuronal application of, MVs, replicated functional effects of JB-1 on in situ patch-clamped enteric neurons. GroEL and anti-TLR-2 were without effect in this system, suggesting the importance of epithelium neuron signaling and discrimination between pathways for bacteria-neuron and -immune communication. Together these results offer a mechanistic explanation of how Gram-positive commensals and probiotics may influence the host's immune and nervous systems. PMID:25392266

  18. Optimizing immobilized enzyme performance in cell-free environments to produce liquid fuels.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Sanat

    2015-02-05

    The overall goal of this project was to optimize enzyme performance for the production of bio-diesel fuel. Enzyme immobilization has attracted much attention as a means to increase productivity. Mesorporous silica materials have been known to be best suited for immobilizing enzymes. A major challenge is to ensure that the enzymatic activity is retained after immobilization. Two major factors which drive enzymatic deactivation are protein-surface and inter-protein interactions. Previously, we studied protein stability inside pores and how to optimize protein-surface interactions to minimize protein denaturation. In this work we studied eh effect of surface curvature and chemistry on inter-protein interactions. Our goal was to find suitable immobilization supports which minimize these inter-protein interactions. Our studies carried out in the frame work of Hydrophobic-Polar (HP) model showed that enzymes immobilized inside hydrophobic pores of optimal sizes are best suited to minimize these inter-protein interactions. Besides, this study is also of biological importance to understand the role of chaperonins in protein disaggregation. Both of these aspects profited immensely with collaborations with our experimental colleague, Prof. Georges Belfort (RPI), who performed the experimental analog of our theoretical works.

  19. ADPase activity of recombinantly expressed thermotolerant ATPases may be caused by copurification of adenylate kinase of Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Baoyu; Sysoeva, Tatyana A.; Chowdhury, Saikat; Guo, Liang; Nixon, B.Tracy; (IIT); (Penn)

    2009-10-06

    Except for apyrases, ATPases generally target only the {gamma}-phosphate of a nucleotide. Some non-apyrase ATPases from thermophilic microorganisms are reported to hydrolyze ADP as well as ATP, which has been described as a novel property of the ATPases from extreme thermophiles. Here, we describe an apparent ADP hydrolysis by highly purified preparations of the AAA+ ATPase NtrC1 from an extremely thermophilic bacterium, Aquifex aeolicus. This activity is actually a combination of the activities of the ATPase and contaminating adenylate kinase (AK) from Escherichia coli, which is present at 1/10 000 of the level of the ATPase. AK catalyzes conversion of two molecules of ADP into AMP and ATP, the latter being a substrate for the ATPase. We raise concern that the observed thermotolerance of E. coli AK and its copurification with thermostable proteins by commonly used methods may confound studies of enzymes that specifically catalyze hydrolysis of nucleoside diphosphates or triphosphates. For example, contamination with E. coli AK may be responsible for reported ADPase activities of the ATPase chaperonins from Pyrococcus furiosus, Pyrococcus horikoshii, Methanococcus jannaschii and Thermoplasma acidophilum; the ATP/ADP-dependent DNA ligases from Aeropyrum pernix K1 and Staphylothermus marinus; or the reported ATP-dependent activities of ADP-dependent phosphofructokinase of P. furiosus. Purification methods developed to separate NtrC1 ATPase from AK also revealed two distinct forms of the ATPase. One is tightly bound to ADP or GDP and able to bind to Q but not S ion exchange matrixes. The other is nucleotide-free and binds to both Q and S ion exchange matrixes.

  20. Structure and dynamics in Photosystem I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolley, Craig Charles

    -ray crystallography. This method is tested on computationally-generated density maps of adenylate kinase and lactoferrin as well as previously-published cryo-EM snaps of the bacterial chaperonin GroEL.

  1. Congenital Chloride-Losing Diarrhea in a Mexican child with the novel homozygous SLC26A3 mutation G393W

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian R. Reimold

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Congenital chloride diarrhea is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the intestinal lumenal membrane Cl-/HCO3- exchanger, SLC26A3.We report here the novel SLC26A3 mutation G393W in a Mexican child, the first such report in a patient from Central America. SLC26A3 G393W expression in Xenopus oocytes exhibits a mild hypomorphic phenotype, with normal surface expression and moderately reduced anion transport function. However, expression of HA-SLC26A3 in HEK-293 cells reveals intracellular retention and greatly decreased steady-state levels of the mutant polypeptide, in contrast to peripheral membrane expression of the wildtype protein. Whereas wildtype HA-SLC26A3 is apically localized in polarized monolayers of filter-grown MDCK cells and Caco2 cells, mutant HA-SLC26A3 G393W exhibits decreased total polypeptide abundance, with reduced or absent surface expression and sparse punctate (or absent intracellular distribution. The WT protein is similarly localized in LLCPK1 cells, but the mutant fails to accumulate to detectable levels. We conclude that the chloride-losing diarrhea phenotype associated with homozygous expression of SLC26A3 G393W likely reflects lack of apical surface expression in enterocytes, secondary to combined abnormalities in polypeptide trafficking and stability. Future progress in development of general or target-specific folding chaperonins and correctors may hold promise for pharmacological rescue of this and similar genetic defects in membrane protein targeting.

  2. Extracellular Vesicles Originate from the Conceptus and Uterus During Early Pregnancy in Sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Gregory W; Brooks, Kelsey E; Spencer, Thomas E

    2016-03-01

    Cells release diverse types of membrane-bound vesicles of endosomal and plasma membrane origin, termed exosomes and microvesicles, respectively. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) represent an important mode of intercellular communication by transferring select RNAs, proteins, and lipids between cells. The present studies tested the hypothesis that the elongating ovine conceptus and uterus produces EVs that mediate conceptus-maternal interactions during early pregnancy. In Study 1, EVs were purified from uterine luminal fluid of Day 14 cyclic sheep. The EVs were fluorescently labeled with PKH67 dye and infused into the uterine lumen of pregnant sheep for 6 days using an osmotic pump. On Day 14, labeled EVs were observed in the conceptus trophectoderm and uterine epithelia, but not in the uterine stroma or myometrium. In Study 2, Day 14 conceptuses were cultured ex vivo for 24 h and found to release EVs into the culture medium. Proteomics analysis of the Day 14 conceptus-derived EVs identified 231 proteins that were enriched for extracellular space and several protein classes, including proteases, protease inhibitors, chaperones and chaperonins. RNA sequencing of Day 14 conceptus-derived EVs detected expression of 512 mRNAs. The top-expressed genes were overrepresented in ribosomal functions and components. Isolated EVs from conceptuses were fluorescently labeled with PKH67 and infused into the uterine lumen of cyclic sheep for 6 days using an osmotic pump. On Day 14, labeled EVs were observed in the uterine epithelia, but not in the uterine stroma or myometrium. Labeled EVs were not observed in the ovary or in other maternal tissues. These studies support the ideas that EVs emanate from both the conceptus trophectoderm and uterine epithelia, and are involved in intercellular communication between those cells during the establishment of pregnancy in sheep. PMID:26819476

  3. Early pregnancy factor treatment suppresses the inflammatory response and adhesion molecule expression in the spinal cord of SJL/J mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and the delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction to trinitrochlorobenzene in normal BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bing; Walsh, Michael D; Nguyen, Kim B; Hillyard, Narelle C; Cavanagh, Alice C; McCombe, Pamela A; Morton, Halle

    2003-08-15

    Early pregnancy factor (EPF) is a secreted protein, present in serum during early pregnancy and essential for maintaining viability of the embryo. It is a homologue of chaperonin 10 (Cpn10) but, unlike Cpn10, it has an extracellular role. EPF has immunosuppressive and growth regulatory properties. Previously we have reported the preparation of recombinant EPF (rEPF) and shown that treatment with rEPF will suppress clinical signs of MBP-EAE in Lewis rats and PLP-EAE in SJL/J mice. In the present study, these findings have been extended to investigate possible mechanisms involved in the action of EPF. Following treatment of mice with rEPF from the day of inoculation, there were fewer infiltrating CD3+ and CD4+ cells in the parenchyma of the spinal cord during the onset of disease and after the initial episode, compared with mice treated with vehicle. Expression of the integrins LFA-1, VLA-4 and Mac-1 and of members of the immunoglobulin superfamily of adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 was suppressed in the central nervous system (CNS) following rEPF treatment. The expression of PECAM-1 was not affected. To determine if rEPF suppressed T cell activation in the periphery, the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction of normal BALB/c mice to trinitrochlorobenzene (TNCB) following treatment with rEPF was studied. The results showed that treatment with rEPF suppressed the DTH reaction, demonstrating the ability of EPF to downregulate the cell-mediated immune response. These results indicate that suppression of immunological mechanisms by rEPF plays a major role in the reduction of clinical signs of disease in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). PMID:12809997

  4. Sequence polymorphism of GroEL gene in natural population of Bacillus and Brevibacillus spp. that showed variation in thermal tolerance capacity and mRNA expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, R; Tripathy, S; Padhi, S K; Mohanty, S; Maiti, N K

    2014-10-01

    GroEL, a class I chaperonin, plays an important role in the thermal adaptation of the cell and helps to maintain the viability of the cell under heat shock condition. Function of groEL in vivo depends on the maintenance of proper structure of the protein which in turn depends on the nucleotide and amino acid sequence of the gene. In this study, we investigated the changes in nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the partial groEL gene that may affect the thermotolerance capacity as well as mRNA expression of bacterial isolates. Sequences among the same species having differences in the amino acid level were identified as different alleles. The effect of allelic variation on the groEL gene expression was analyzed by comparison and relative quantification in each allele under thermal shock condition by RT-PCR. Evaluation of K a/K s ratio among the strains of same species showed that the groEL gene of all the species had undergone similar functional constrain during evolution. The strains showing similar thermotolerance capacity was found to carry same allele of groEL gene. The isolates carrying allele having amino acid substitution inside the highly ATP/ADP or Mg(2+)-binding region could not tolerate thermal stress and showed lower expression of the groEL gene. Our results indicate that during evolution of these bacterial species the groEL gene has undergone the process of natural selection, and the isolates have evolved with the groEL allelic sequences that help them to withstand the thermal stress during their interaction with the environment. PMID:24894903

  5. DnaK-Dependent Accelerated Evolutionary Rate in Prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadibalban, A Samer; Bogumil, David; Landan, Giddy; Dagan, Tal

    2016-01-01

    Many proteins depend on an interaction with molecular chaperones in order to fold into a functional tertiary structure. Previous studies showed that protein interaction with the GroEL/GroES chaperonine and Hsp90 chaperone can buffer the impact of slightly deleterious mutations in the protein sequence. This capacity of GroEL/GroES to prevent protein misfolding has been shown to accelerate the evolution of its client proteins. Whether other bacterial chaperones have a similar effect on their client proteins is currently unknown. Here, we study the impact of DnaK (Hsp70) chaperone on the evolution of its client proteins. Evolutionary parameters were derived from comparison of the Escherichia coli proteome to 1,808,565 orthologous proteins in 1,149 proteobacterial genomes. Our analysis reveals a significant positive correlation between protein binding frequency with DnaK and evolutionary rate. Proteins with high binding affinity to DnaK evolve on average 4.3-fold faster than proteins in the lowest binding affinity class at the genus resolution. Differences in evolutionary rates of DnaK interactor classes are still significant after adjusting for possible effects caused by protein expression level. Furthermore, we observe an additive effect of DnaK and GroEL chaperones on the evolutionary rates of their common interactors. Finally, we found pronounced similarities in the physicochemical profiles that characterize proteins belonging to DnaK and GroEL interactomes. Our results thus implicate DnaK-mediated folding as a major component in shaping protein evolutionary dynamics in bacteria and supply further evidence for the long-term manifestation of chaperone-mediated folding on genome evolution. PMID:27189986

  6. Environmental adaptability and stress tolerance of Laribacter hongkongensis: a genome-wide analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lau Susanna KP

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Laribacter hongkongensis is associated with community-acquired gastroenteritis and traveler's diarrhea and it can reside in human, fish, frogs and water. In this study, we performed an in-depth annotation of the genes in its genome related to adaptation to the various environmental niches. Results L. hongkongensis possessed genes for DNA repair and recombination, basal transcription, alternative σ-factors and 109 putative transcription factors, allowing DNA repair and global changes in gene expression in response to different environmental stresses. For acid stress, it possessed a urease gene cassette and two arc gene clusters. For alkaline stress, it possessed six CDSs for transporters of the monovalent cation/proton antiporter-2 and NhaC Na+:H+ antiporter families. For heavy metals acquisition and tolerance, it possessed CDSs for iron and nickel transport and efflux pumps for other metals. For temperature stress, it possessed genes related to chaperones and chaperonins, heat shock proteins and cold shock proteins. For osmotic stress, 25 CDSs were observed, mostly related to regulators for potassium ion, proline and glutamate transport. For oxidative and UV light stress, genes for oxidant-resistant dehydratase, superoxide scavenging, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, exclusion and export of redox-cycling antibiotics, redox balancing, DNA repair, reduction of disulfide bonds, limitation of iron availability and reduction of iron-sulfur clusters are present. For starvation, it possessed phosphorus and, despite being asaccharolytic, carbon starvation-related CDSs. Conclusions The L. hongkongensis genome possessed a high variety of genes for adaptation to acid, alkaline, temperature, osmotic, oxidative, UV light and starvation stresses and acquisition of and tolerance to heavy metals.

  7. The MitCHAP-60 Disease Is Due to Entropic Destabilization of the Human Mitochondrial Hsp60 Oligomer*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnas, Avital; Nadler, Michal; Nisemblat, Shahar; Horovitz, Amnon; Mandel, Hanna; Azem, Abdussalam

    2009-01-01

    The 60-kDa heat shock protein (mHsp60) is a vital cellular complex that mediates the folding of many of the mitochondrial proteins. Its function is executed in cooperation with the co-chaperonin, mHsp10, and requires ATP. Recently, the discovery of a new mHsp60-associated neurodegenerative disorder, MitCHAP-60 disease, has been reported. The disease is caused by a point mutation at position 3 (D3G) of the mature mitochondrial Hsp60 protein, which renders it unable to complement the deletion of the homologous bacterial protein in Escherichia coli (Magen, D., Georgopoulos, C., Bross, P., Ang, D., Segev, Y., Goldsher, D., Nemirovski, A., Shahar, E., Ravid, S., Luder, A., Heno, B., Gershoni-Baruch, R., Skorecki, K., and Mandel, H. (2008) Am. J. Hum. Genet. 83, 30–42). The molecular basis of the MitCHAP-60 disease is still unknown. In this study, we present an in vitro structural and functional analysis of the purified wild-type human mHsp60 and the MitCHAP-60 mutant. We show that the D3G mutation leads to destabilization of the mHsp60 oligomer and causes its disassembly at low protein concentrations. We also show that the mutant protein has impaired protein folding and ATPase activities. An additional mutant that lacks the first three amino acids (N-del), including Asp-3, is similarly impaired in refolding activity. Surprisingly, however, this mutant exhibits profound stabilization of its oligomeric structure. These results suggest that the D3G mutation leads to entropic destabilization of the mHsp60 oligomer, which severely impairs its chaperone function, thereby causing the disease. PMID:19706612

  8. The MitCHAP-60 disease is due to entropic destabilization of the human mitochondrial Hsp60 oligomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnas, Avital; Nadler, Michal; Nisemblat, Shahar; Horovitz, Amnon; Mandel, Hanna; Azem, Abdussalam

    2009-10-01

    The 60-kDa heat shock protein (mHsp60) is a vital cellular complex that mediates the folding of many of the mitochondrial proteins. Its function is executed in cooperation with the co-chaperonin, mHsp10, and requires ATP. Recently, the discovery of a new mHsp60-associated neurodegenerative disorder, MitCHAP-60 disease, has been reported. The disease is caused by a point mutation at position 3 (D3G) of the mature mitochondrial Hsp60 protein, which renders it unable to complement the deletion of the homologous bacterial protein in Escherichia coli (Magen, D., Georgopoulos, C., Bross, P., Ang, D., Segev, Y., Goldsher, D., Nemirovski, A., Shahar, E., Ravid, S., Luder, A., Heno, B., Gershoni-Baruch, R., Skorecki, K., and Mandel, H. (2008) Am. J. Hum. Genet. 83, 30-42). The molecular basis of the MitCHAP-60 disease is still unknown. In this study, we present an in vitro structural and functional analysis of the purified wild-type human mHsp60 and the MitCHAP-60 mutant. We show that the D3G mutation leads to destabilization of the mHsp60 oligomer and causes its disassembly at low protein concentrations. We also show that the mutant protein has impaired protein folding and ATPase activities. An additional mutant that lacks the first three amino acids (N-del), including Asp-3, is similarly impaired in refolding activity. Surprisingly, however, this mutant exhibits profound stabilization of its oligomeric structure. These results suggest that the D3G mutation leads to entropic destabilization of the mHsp60 oligomer, which severely impairs its chaperone function, thereby causing the disease. PMID:19706612

  9. Evaluation of heat shock protein (HSP-60) induction on accumulation of carbohydrate in Isochrysis galbana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary levels of the marine food chain may play an important role in the fate of petroleum hydrocarbons in both chemically dispersed and un-dispersed oil spills. HSP-60 proteins, members of the chaperonin family of stress proteins, are induced in response to a wide variety of environmental agents, including UV light, heavy metals, and xenobiotics. Increased production and storage of carbohydrate in I. galbana has been associated with aging and stress. Thus, HSP-60 and carbohydrate storage were selected as sublethal endpoints of exposure to the primary producer, I. galbana, a golden brown, unicellular algae, and a significant component of the marine phytoplankton community. The authors have found that I. galbana cultures exposed to water-accommodated fractions (WAF) of Prudhoe Bay Crude Oil (PBCO), and PBCO/dispersant preparations efficiently induce HSP-60. Studies indicated that WAF produced a dose-related response in I. galbana, which increased as a function of time. Dispersant alone showed the greatest induction, while combined WAF-dispersant showed less induction, suggesting a possible competition between crude oil and algae for dispersant interaction. In addition, they have demonstrated that I. galbana accumulates carbohydrates in response to exposure to WAF and PBCO/dispersant preparations and therefore represents another index of stress in this organism. They were interested in determining if induction of stress proteins and HSP60 in particular represented an adaptive-mechanism, allowing this algae to better cope with exposure to petroleum hydrocarbons released in the marine environment during an oil spill. In an effort to determine if stress protein induction serves as a protective adaptive response to exposure to petroleum hydrocarbons they examined the effect of heat shock induction on the accumulation of carbohydrates by these organisms in response to exposure to WAF and dispersed oil preparations

  10. Proteomic analysis reveals metabolic and regulatory systems involved the syntrophic and axenic lifestyle of Syntrophomonas wolfei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Rhea Sieber

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Microbial syntrophy is a vital metabolic interaction necessary for the complete oxidation of organic biomass to methane in all-anaerobic ecosystems. However, this process is thermodynamically constrained and represents an ecosystem-level metabolic bottleneck. To gain insight into the physiology of this process, a shotgun proteomic approach was used to quantify the protein landscape of the model syntrophic metabolizer, Syntrophomonas wolfei, grown axenically and syntrophically with Methanospirillum hungatei. Remarkably, the abundance of most proteins as represented by normalized spectral abundance factor (NSAF value changed very little between the pure and coculture growth conditions. Among the most abundant proteins detected were GroEL and GroES chaperonins, a small heat shock protein, and proteins involved in electron transfer, beta-oxidation, and ATP synthesis. Several putative energy conservation enzyme systems that utilize NADH and ferredoxin were present. The abundance of an EtfAB2 and the membrane-bound iron-sulfur oxidoreductase (Swol_0698 gene product delineated a potential conduit for electron transfer between acyl-CoA dehydrogenases and membrane redox carriers. Proteins detected only when S. wolfei was grown with M. hungatei included a zinc-dependent dehydrogenase with a GroES domain, whose gene is present in genomes in many organisms capable of syntrophy, and transcriptional regulators responsive to environmental stimuli or the physiological status of the cell. The proteomic analysis revealed an emphasis macromolecular stability and energy metabolism to S. wolfei and presence of regulatory mechanisms responsive to external stimuli and cellular physiological status.

  11. Molecular interactions between the specialist herbivore Manduca sexta (lepidoptera, sphingidae) and its natural host Nicotiana attenuata: V. microarray analysis and further characterization of large-scale changes in herbivore-induced mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Dequan; Iqbal, Javeed; Lehmann, Katja; Gase, Klaus; Saluz, Hans Peter; Baldwin, Ian T

    2003-04-01

    We extend our analysis of the transcriptional reorganization that occurs when the native tobacco, Nicotiana attenuata, is attacked by Manduca sexta larvae by cloning 115 transcripts by mRNA differential display reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and subtractive hybridization using magnetic beads (SHMB) from the M. sexta-responsive transcriptome. These transcripts were spotted as cDNA with eight others, previously confirmed to be differentially regulated by northern analysis on glass slide microarrays, and hybridized with Cy3- and Cy5-labeled probes derived from plants after 2, 6, 12, and 24 h of continuous attack. Microarray analysis proved to be a powerful means of verifying differential expression; 73 of the cloned genes (63%) were differentially regulated (in equal proportions from differential display reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and SHMB procedures), and of these, 24 (32%) had similarity to known genes or putative proteins (more from SHMB). The analysis provided insights into the signaling and transcriptional basis of direct and indirect defenses used against herbivores, suggesting simultaneous activation of salicylic acid-, ethylene-, cytokinin-, WRKY-, MYB-, and oxylipin-signaling pathways and implicating terpenoid-, pathogen-, and cell wall-related transcripts in defense responses. These defense responses require resources that could be made available by decreases in four photosynthetic-related transcripts, increases in transcripts associated with protein and nucleotide turnover, and increases in transcripts associated with carbohydrate metabolism. This putative up-regulation of defense-associated and down-regulation of growth-associated transcripts occur against a backdrop of altered transcripts for RNA-binding proteins, putative ATP/ADP translocators, chaperonins, histones, and water channel proteins, responses consistent with a major metabolic reconfiguration that underscores the complexity of response to herbivore attack

  12. Alterations of proteins in MDCK cells during acute potassium deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peerapen, Paleerath; Ausakunpipat, Nardtaya; Chanchaem, Prangwalai; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2016-06-01

    Chronic K(+) deficiency can cause hypokalemic nephropathy associated with metabolic alkalosis, polyuria, tubular dilatation, and tubulointerstitial injury. However, effects of acute K(+) deficiency on the kidney remained unclear. This study aimed to explore such effects by evaluating changes in levels of proteins in renal tubular cells during acute K(+) deficiency. MDCK cells were cultivated in normal K(+) (NK) (K(+)=5.3mM), low K(+) (LK) (K(+)=2.5mM), or K(+) depleted (KD) (K(+)=0mM) medium for 24h and then harvested. Cellular proteins were resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and visualized by SYPRO Ruby staining (5 gels per group). Spot matching and quantitative intensity analysis revealed a total 48 protein spots that had significantly differential levels among the three groups. Among these, 46 and 30 protein spots had differential levels in KD group compared to NK and LK groups, respectively. Comparison between LK and NK groups revealed only 10 protein spots that were differentially expressed. All of these differentially expressed proteins were successfully identified by Q-TOF MS and/or MS/MS analyses. The altered levels of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), ezrin, lamin A/C, tubulin, chaperonin-containing TCP1 (CCT1), and calpain 1 were confirmed by Western blot analysis. Global protein network analysis showed three main functional networks, including 1) cell growth and proliferation, 2) cell morphology, cellular assembly and organization, and 3) protein folding in which the altered proteins were involved. Further investigations on these networks may lead to better understanding of pathogenic mechanisms of low K(+)-induced renal injury. PMID:26976750

  13. Fusion Proteins Cpn10-Erns with Properties of Generating CSFV-Neutralized Antibodies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    When pigs are infected with classical swine fever virus (CSFV), the antibody primarily targets the structural glycoprotein E rns of the virus. Previous investigations have demonstrated that E rns has low or no virus neutralizing capacity. In this study, candidate subunit marker vaccine, chaperonin 10(Cpn10)-Erns, which possess the property of generating neutralized antibodies against lethal challenge of virulent CSFV was developed. The gene of E rns was isolated from Hog cholera lapinized virus (HCLV)-infected spleen cells of rabbits via RT-PCR method and fused to the downstream region of the cpn10 gene; the products of recombinant fusion protein (cpn10-Erns) induced expression in Escherichia coli, and the products were purified by affinity chromatography. During the course of vaccination, the candidate vaccines cpn10-E rns were used for the immunization of guinea pigs, and they induced a strong antibody response against cpn10-Erns. The antibodies can be immobilized by coating inactivated CSFV particles, indicating that these antibodies can recognize CSFV. Neutralization assay was carried out on rabbits according to National Regulations on Veterinary Drug. The results clearly indicate that the typical fever of rabbits induced by the live attenuated HCLV could be inhibited by preincubation with the antisera (dilution 1:4) induced by cpn10-Erns, but not inhibited by preincubation with the antisera induced only by Erns. Analogous results were observed for the group of the rabbits immunized with cpn10-Erns, which were protected against the typical fever induced by the challenge with HCLV. The findings of this study formed the basis of a new means for developing subunit marker vaccine against CSFV.

  14. Complete genome sequence of Bradyrhizobium sp. S23321: insights into symbiosis evolution in soil oligotrophs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Takashi; Tsukui, Takahiro; Maita, Hiroko; Okamoto, Shinobu; Oshima, Kenshiro; Fujisawa, Takatomo; Saito, Akihiro; Futamata, Hiroyuki; Hattori, Reiko; Shimomura, Yumi; Haruta, Shin; Morimoto, Sho; Wang, Yong; Sakai, Yoriko; Hattori, Masahira; Aizawa, Shin-Ichi; Nagashima, Kenji V P; Masuda, Sachiko; Hattori, Tsutomu; Yamashita, Akifumi; Bao, Zhihua; Hayatsu, Masahito; Kajiya-Kanegae, Hiromi; Yoshinaga, Ikuo; Sakamoto, Kazunori; Toyota, Koki; Nakao, Mitsuteru; Kohara, Mitsuyo; Anda, Mizue; Niwa, Rieko; Jung-Hwan, Park; Sameshima-Saito, Reiko; Tokuda, Shin-Ichi; Yamamoto, Sumiko; Yamamoto, Syuji; Yokoyama, Tadashi; Akutsu, Tomoko; Nakamura, Yasukazu; Nakahira-Yanaka, Yuka; Takada Hoshino, Yuko; Hirakawa, Hideki; Mitsui, Hisayuki; Terasawa, Kimihiro; Itakura, Manabu; Sato, Shusei; Ikeda-Ohtsubo, Wakako; Sakakura, Natsuko; Kaminuma, Eli; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2012-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium sp. S23321 is an oligotrophic bacterium isolated from paddy field soil. Although S23321 is phylogenetically close to Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA110, a legume symbiont, it is unable to induce root nodules in siratro, a legume often used for testing Nod factor-dependent nodulation. The genome of S23321 is a single circular chromosome, 7,231,841 bp in length, with an average GC content of 64.3%. The genome contains 6,898 potential protein-encoding genes, one set of rRNA genes, and 45 tRNA genes. Comparison of the genome structure between S23321 and USDA110 showed strong colinearity; however, the symbiosis islands present in USDA110 were absent in S23321, whose genome lacked a chaperonin gene cluster (groELS3) for symbiosis regulation found in USDA110. A comparison of sequences around the tRNA-Val gene strongly suggested that S23321 contains an ancestral-type genome that precedes the acquisition of a symbiosis island by horizontal gene transfer. Although S23321 contains a nif (nitrogen fixation) gene cluster, the organization, homology, and phylogeny of the genes in this cluster were more similar to those of photosynthetic bradyrhizobia ORS278 and BTAi1 than to those on the symbiosis island of USDA110. In addition, we found genes encoding a complete photosynthetic system, many ABC transporters for amino acids and oligopeptides, two types (polar and lateral) of flagella, multiple respiratory chains, and a system for lignin monomer catabolism in the S23321 genome. These features suggest that S23321 is able to adapt to a wide range of environments, probably including low-nutrient conditions, with multiple survival strategies in soil and rhizosphere. PMID:22452844

  15. Selection, phenotyping and identification of acid and hydrogen peroxide producing bacteria from vaginal samples of Canadian and East African women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J Schellenberg

    Full Text Available The common but poorly understood condition known as bacterial vaginosis (BV increases vulnerability to HIV infection and is associated with the absence of H(2O(2-producing Lactobacillus. Vaginal lactic acid bacteria (LAB produce anti-HIV factors such as organic acids and hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2, and may bind and inactivate HIV particles during scavenging of mannose. These factors define potential criteria for initial selection of candidate probiotics to block heterosexual transmission of HIV. Therefore, the primary goal of this study was to characterize acid production on mannose and H(2O(2 production in vaginal isolates from Canadian adolescents (192 isolates, 16 individuals and commercial sex workers in Nairobi, Kenya (576 isolates, 96 individuals. Selection of isolates from H(2O(2-detecting media suggested an idiosyncratic individual-level profile and extensive phenotypic diversity, including the identification of a subset of "double-strong" acid- and H(2O(2-producers with phenotypes similar to well-characterized probiotic strains. Molecular fingerprinting of all isolates by capillary electrophoresis of 16S-23S rRNA interspacer amplicons was coupled with chaperonin-60 universal target (cpn60 UT sequencing in a subset, tentatively identifying 96% of isolates although only 19% were sequenced. Most isolates belonged to Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, Bifidobacterium or Gardnerella, with a total of 37 species in 15 genera, as well as 5 potentially novel organisms, identified in this study. This sensitivity was likely enhanced by phenotype-based selection on two chromogenic media formulations. Identification of double-strong isolates may provide a rational basis for selection and further characterization of vaginal probiotics, with potential application as part of HIV prevention initiatives in western Canada and East Africa.

  16. A Study of the Vaginal Microbiome in Healthy Canadian Women Utilizing cpn60-Based Molecular Profiling Reveals Distinct Gardnerella Subgroup Community State Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Arianne Y K; Chaban, Bonnie; Wagner, Emily C; Schellenberg, John J; Links, Matthew G; van Schalkwyk, Julie; Reid, Gregor; Hemmingsen, Sean M; Hill, Janet E; Money, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    The vaginal microbiota is important in women's reproductive and overall health. However, the relationships between the structure, function and dynamics of this complex microbial community and health outcomes remain elusive. The objective of this study was to determine the phylogenetic range and abundance of prokaryotes in the vaginal microbiota of healthy, non-pregnant, ethnically diverse, reproductive-aged Canadian women. Socio-demographic, behavioural and clinical data were collected and vaginal swabs were analyzed from 310 women. Detailed profiles of their vaginal microbiomes were generated by pyrosequencing of the chaperonin-60 universal target. Six community state types (CST) were delineated by hierarchical clustering, including three Lactobacillus-dominated CST (L. crispatus, L. iners, L. jensenii), two Gardnerella-dominated (subgroups A and C) and an "intermediate" CST which included a small number of women with microbiomes dominated by seven other species or with no dominant species but minority populations of Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, Peptoniphilus, E. coli and various Proteobacteria in co-dominant communities. The striking correspondence between Nugent score and deep sequencing CST continues to reinforce the basic premise provided by the simpler Gram stain method, while additional analyses reveal detailed cpn60-based phylogeny and estimated abundance in microbial communities from vaginal samples. Ethnicity was the only demographic or clinical characteristic predicting CST, with differences in Asian and White women (p = 0.05). In conclusion, this study confirms previous work describing four cpn60-based subgroups of Gardnerella, revealing previously undescribed CST. The data describe the range of bacterial communities seen in Canadian women presenting with no specific vaginal health concerns, and provides an important baseline for future investigations of clinically important cohorts. PMID:26266808

  17. Gardnerella vaginalis Subgroups Defined by cpn60 Sequencing and Sialidase Activity in Isolates from Canada, Belgium and Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, John J; Paramel Jayaprakash, Teenus; Withana Gamage, Niradha; Patterson, Mo H; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Hill, Janet E

    2016-01-01

    Increased abundance of Gardnerella vaginalis and sialidase activity in vaginal fluid is associated with bacterial vaginosis (BV), a common but poorly understood clinical entity associated with poor reproductive health outcomes. Since most women are colonized with G. vaginalis, its status as a normal member of the vaginal microbiota or pathogen causing BV remains controversial, and numerous classification schemes have been described. Since 2005, sequencing of the chaperonin-60 universal target (cpn60 UT) has distinguished four subgroups in isolate collections, clone libraries and deep sequencing datasets. To clarify potential clinical and diagnostic significance of cpn60 subgroups, we undertook phenotypic and molecular characterization of 112 G. vaginalis isolates from three continents. A total of 36 subgroup A, 33 B, 35 C and 8 D isolates were identified through phylogenetic analysis of cpn60 sequences as corresponding to four "clades" identified in a recently published study, based on sequencing 473 genes across 17 isolates. cpn60 subgroups were compared with other previously described molecular methods for classification of Gardnerella subgroups, including amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) and real-time PCR assays designed to quantify subgroups in vaginal samples. Although two ARDRA patterns were observed in isolates, each was observed in three cpn60 subgroups (A/B/D and B/C/D). Real-time PCR assays corroborated cpn60 subgroups overall, but 13 isolates from subgroups A, B and D were negative in all assays. A putative sialidase gene was detected in all subgroup B, C and D isolates, but only in a single subgroup A isolate. In contrast, sialidase activity was observed in all subgroup B isolates, 3 (9%) subgroup C isolates and no subgroup A or D isolates. These observations suggest distinct roles for G. vaginalis subgroups in BV pathogenesis. We conclude that cpn60 UT sequencing is a robust approach for defining G. vaginalis subgroups within the

  18. A Study of the Vaginal Microbiome in Healthy Canadian Women Utilizing cpn60-Based Molecular Profiling Reveals Distinct Gardnerella Subgroup Community State Types.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianne Y K Albert

    Full Text Available The vaginal microbiota is important in women's reproductive and overall health. However, the relationships between the structure, function and dynamics of this complex microbial community and health outcomes remain elusive. The objective of this study was to determine the phylogenetic range and abundance of prokaryotes in the vaginal microbiota of healthy, non-pregnant, ethnically diverse, reproductive-aged Canadian women. Socio-demographic, behavioural and clinical data were collected and vaginal swabs were analyzed from 310 women. Detailed profiles of their vaginal microbiomes were generated by pyrosequencing of the chaperonin-60 universal target. Six community state types (CST were delineated by hierarchical clustering, including three Lactobacillus-dominated CST (L. crispatus, L. iners, L. jensenii, two Gardnerella-dominated (subgroups A and C and an "intermediate" CST which included a small number of women with microbiomes dominated by seven other species or with no dominant species but minority populations of Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, Peptoniphilus, E. coli and various Proteobacteria in co-dominant communities. The striking correspondence between Nugent score and deep sequencing CST continues to reinforce the basic premise provided by the simpler Gram stain method, while additional analyses reveal detailed cpn60-based phylogeny and estimated abundance in microbial communities from vaginal samples. Ethnicity was the only demographic or clinical characteristic predicting CST, with differences in Asian and White women (p = 0.05. In conclusion, this study confirms previous work describing four cpn60-based subgroups of Gardnerella, revealing previously undescribed CST. The data describe the range of bacterial communities seen in Canadian women presenting with no specific vaginal health concerns, and provides an important baseline for future investigations of clinically important cohorts.

  19. Gardnerella vaginalis Subgroups Defined by cpn60 Sequencing and Sialidase Activity in Isolates from Canada, Belgium and Kenya.

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    John J Schellenberg

    Full Text Available Increased abundance of Gardnerella vaginalis and sialidase activity in vaginal fluid is associated with bacterial vaginosis (BV, a common but poorly understood clinical entity associated with poor reproductive health outcomes. Since most women are colonized with G. vaginalis, its status as a normal member of the vaginal microbiota or pathogen causing BV remains controversial, and numerous classification schemes have been described. Since 2005, sequencing of the chaperonin-60 universal target (cpn60 UT has distinguished four subgroups in isolate collections, clone libraries and deep sequencing datasets. To clarify potential clinical and diagnostic significance of cpn60 subgroups, we undertook phenotypic and molecular characterization of 112 G. vaginalis isolates from three continents. A total of 36 subgroup A, 33 B, 35 C and 8 D isolates were identified through phylogenetic analysis of cpn60 sequences as corresponding to four "clades" identified in a recently published study, based on sequencing 473 genes across 17 isolates. cpn60 subgroups were compared with other previously described molecular methods for classification of Gardnerella subgroups, including amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA and real-time PCR assays designed to quantify subgroups in vaginal samples. Although two ARDRA patterns were observed in isolates, each was observed in three cpn60 subgroups (A/B/D and B/C/D. Real-time PCR assays corroborated cpn60 subgroups overall, but 13 isolates from subgroups A, B and D were negative in all assays. A putative sialidase gene was detected in all subgroup B, C and D isolates, but only in a single subgroup A isolate. In contrast, sialidase activity was observed in all subgroup B isolates, 3 (9% subgroup C isolates and no subgroup A or D isolates. These observations suggest distinct roles for G. vaginalis subgroups in BV pathogenesis. We conclude that cpn60 UT sequencing is a robust approach for defining G. vaginalis

  20. Native globular actin has a thermodynamically unstable quasi-stationary structure with elements of intrinsic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Irina M; Povarova, Olga I; Uversky, Vladimir N; Turoverov, Konstantin K

    2016-02-01

    The native form of globular actin, G-actin, is formed in vivo as a result of complex post-translational folding processes that require ATP energy expenditure and are assisted by the 70 kDa heat shock protein, prefoldin and chaperonin containing TCP-1. G-actin is stabilized by the binding of one ATP molecule and one Ca(2+) ion (or Mg(2+) in vivo). Chemical denaturants, heating or Ca(2+) removal transform native actin (N) into 'inactivated actin' (I), a compact oligomer comprising 14-16 subunits. Viscogenic and crowding agents slow this process but do not stop it. The lack of calcium in the solution accelerates the spontaneous N → I transition. Thus, native G-actin has a kinetically stable (as a result of the high free energy barrier between the N and I states) but thermodynamically unstable structure, which, in the absence of Ca(2+) or other bivalent metal ions, spontaneously converts to the thermodynamically stable I state. It was noted that native actin has much in common with intrinsically disordered proteins: it has functionally important disordered regions; it is constantly in complex with one of its numerous partners; and it plays key roles in many cellular processes, in a manner similar to disordered hub proteins. By analyzing actin folding in vivo and unfolding in vitro, we advanced the hypothesis that proteins in a native state may have a thermodynamically unstable quasi-stationary structure. The kinetically stable native state of these proteins appears forcibly under the influence of intracellular folding machinery. The denaturation of such proteins is always irreversible because the inactivated state, for which the structure is determined by the amino acid sequence of a protein, comprises the thermodynamically stable state under physiological conditions. PMID:26460158

  1. Characterization and Dynamics of Aggresome Formation by a Cytosolic Gfp-Chimera✪

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    García-Mata, Rafael; Bebök, Zsuzsa; Sorscher, Eric J.; Sztul, Elizabeth S.

    1999-01-01

    Formation of a novel structure, the aggresome, has been proposed to represent a general cellular response to the presence of misfolded proteins (Johnston, J.A., C.L. Ward, and R.R. Kopito. 1998. J. Cell Biol. 143:1883–1898; Wigley, W.C., R.P. Fabunmi, M.G. Lee, C.R. Marino, S. Muallem, G.N. DeMartino, and P.J. Thomas. 1999. J. Cell Biol. 145:481–490). To test the generality of this finding and characterize aspects of aggresome composition and its formation, we investigated the effects of overexpressing a cytosolic protein chimera (GFP-250) in cells. Overexpression of GFP-250 caused formation of aggresomes and was paralleled by the redistribution of the intermediate filament protein vimentin as well as by the recruitment of the proteasome, and the Hsp70 and the chaperonin systems of chaperones. Interestingly, GFP-250 within the aggresome appeared not to be ubiquitinated. In vivo time-lapse analysis of aggresome dynamics showed that small aggregates form within the periphery of the cell and travel on microtubules to the MTOC region where they remain as distinct but closely apposed particulate structures. Overexpression of p50/dynamitin, which causes the dissociation of the dynactin complex, significantly inhibited the formation of aggresomes, suggesting that the minus-end–directed motor activities of cytoplasmic dynein are required for aggresome formation. Perinuclear aggresomes interfered with correct Golgi localization and disrupted the normal astral distribution of microtubules. However, ER-to-Golgi protein transport occurred normally in aggresome containing cells. Our results suggest that aggresomes can be formed by soluble, nonubiquitinated proteins as well as by integral transmembrane ubiquitinated ones, supporting the hypothesis that aggresome formation might be a general cellular response to the presence of misfolded proteins. PMID:10491388

  2. Characterization and dynamics of aggresome formation by a cytosolic GFP-chimera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Mata, R; Bebök, Z; Sorscher, E J; Sztul, E S

    1999-09-20

    Formation of a novel structure, the aggresome, has been proposed to represent a general cellular response to the presence of misfolded proteins (Johnston, J.A., C.L. Ward, and R.R. Kopito. 1998. J. Cell Biol. 143:1883-1898; Wigley, W.C., R.P. Fabunmi, M.G. Lee, C.R. Marino, S. Muallem, G.N. DeMartino, and P.J. Thomas. 1999. J. Cell Biol. 145:481-490). To test the generality of this finding and characterize aspects of aggresome composition and its formation, we investigated the effects of overexpressing a cytosolic protein chimera (GFP-250) in cells. Overexpression of GFP-250 caused formation of aggresomes and was paralleled by the redistribution of the intermediate filament protein vimentin as well as by the recruitment of the proteasome, and the Hsp70 and the chaperonin systems of chaperones. Interestingly, GFP-250 within the aggresome appeared not to be ubiquitinated. In vivo time-lapse analysis of aggresome dynamics showed that small aggregates form within the periphery of the cell and travel on microtubules to the MTOC region where they remain as distinct but closely apposed particulate structures. Overexpression of p50/dynamitin, which causes the dissociation of the dynactin complex, significantly inhibited the formation of aggresomes, suggesting that the minus-end-directed motor activities of cytoplasmic dynein are required for aggresome formation. Perinuclear aggresomes interfered with correct Golgi localization and disrupted the normal astral distribution of microtubules. However, ER-to-Golgi protein transport occurred normally in aggresome containing cells. Our results suggest that aggresomes can be formed by soluble, nonubiquitinated proteins as well as by integral transmembrane ubiquitinated ones, supporting the hypothesis that aggresome formation might be a general cellular response to the presence of misfolded proteins. PMID:10491388

  3. Proteome-wide Identification of Novel Ceramide-binding Proteins by Yeast Surface cDNA Display and Deep Sequencing.

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    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Ha, Kevin; Lee, Nam-Kyung; Su, Yang; Liu, Bin

    2016-04-01

    Although the bioactive sphingolipid ceramide is an important cell signaling molecule, relatively few direct ceramide-interacting proteins are known. We used an approach combining yeast surface cDNA display and deep sequencing technology to identify novel proteins binding directly to ceramide. We identified 234 candidate ceramide-binding protein fragments and validated binding for 20. Most (17) bound selectively to ceramide, although a few (3) bound to other lipids as well. Several novel ceramide-binding domains were discovered, including the EF-hand calcium-binding motif, the heat shock chaperonin-binding motif STI1, the SCP2 sterol-binding domain, and the tetratricopeptide repeat region motif. Interestingly, four of the verified ceramide-binding proteins (HPCA, HPCAL1, NCS1, and VSNL1) and an additional three candidate ceramide-binding proteins (NCALD, HPCAL4, and KCNIP3) belong to the neuronal calcium sensor family of EF hand-containing proteins. We used mutagenesis to map the ceramide-binding site in HPCA and to create a mutant HPCA that does not bind to ceramide. We demonstrated selective binding to ceramide by mammalian cell-produced wild type but not mutant HPCA. Intriguingly, we also identified a fragment from prostaglandin D2synthase that binds preferentially to ceramide 1-phosphate. The wide variety of proteins and domains capable of binding to ceramide suggests that many of the signaling functions of ceramide may be regulated by direct binding to these proteins. Based on the deep sequencing data, we estimate that our yeast surface cDNA display library covers ∼60% of the human proteome and our selection/deep sequencing protocol can identify target-interacting protein fragments that are present at extremely low frequency in the starting library. Thus, the yeast surface cDNA display/deep sequencing approach is a rapid, comprehensive, and flexible method for the analysis of protein-ligand interactions, particularly for the study of non-protein ligands. PMID

  4. Plant genetic and molecular responses to water deficit

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    Silvio Salvi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant productivity is severely affected by unfavourable environmental conditions (biotic and abiotic stresses. Among others, water deficit is the plant stress condition which mostly limits the quality and the quantity of plant products. Tolerance to water deficit is a polygenic trait strictly dependent on the coordinated expression of a large set of genes coding for proteins directly involved in stress-induced protection/repair mechanisms (dehydrins, chaperonins, enzymes for the synthesis of osmoprotectants and detoxifying compounds, and others as well as genes involved in transducing the stress signal and regulating gene expression (transcription factors, kinases, phosphatases. Recently, research activities in the field evolved from the study of single genes directly involved in cellular stress tolerance (functional genes to the identification and characterization of key regulatory genes involved in stress perception and transduction and able to rapidly and efficiently activate the complex gene network involved in the response to stress. The complexity of the events occurring in response to stress have been recently approached by genomics tools; in fact the analysis of transcriptome, proteome and metabolome of a plant tissue/cell in response to stress already allowed to have a global view of the cellular and molecular events occurring in response to water deficit, by the identification of genes activated and co-regulated by the stress conditions and the characterization of new signalling pathways. Moreover the recent application of forward and reverse genetic approaches, trough mutant collection development, screening and characterization, is giving a tremendous impulse to the identification of gene functions with key role in stress tolerance. The integration of data obtained by high-throughput genomic approaches, by means of powerful informatic tools, is allowing nowadays to rapidly identify of major genes/QTLs involved in stress tolerance

  5. 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' proteins orthologous with pSymA-encoded proteins of Sinorhizobium meliloti: hypothetical roles in plant host interaction.

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    L David Kuykendall

    Full Text Available Sinorhizobium meliloti strain 1021, a nitrogen-fixing, root-nodulating bacterial microsymbiont of alfalfa, has a 3.5 Mbp circular chromosome and two megaplasmids including 1.3 Mbp pSymA carrying nonessential 'accessory' genes for nitrogen fixation (nif, nodulation and host specificity (nod. A related bacterium, psyllid-vectored 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus,' is an obligate phytopathogen with a reduced genome that was previously analyzed for genes orthologous to genes on the S. meliloti circular chromosome. In general, proteins encoded by pSymA genes are more similar in sequence alignment to those encoded by S. meliloti chromosomal orthologs than to orthologous proteins encoded by genes carried on the 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' genome. Only two 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' proteins were identified as having orthologous proteins encoded on pSymA but not also encoded on the chromosome of S. meliloti. These two orthologous gene pairs encode a Na(+/K+ antiporter (shared with intracellular pathogens of the family Bartonellacea and a Co++, Zn++ and Cd++ cation efflux protein that is shared with the phytopathogen Agrobacterium. Another shared protein, a redox-regulated K+ efflux pump may regulate cytoplasmic pH and homeostasis. The pSymA and 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' orthologs of the latter protein are more highly similar in amino acid alignment compared with the alignment of the pSymA-encoded protein with its S. meliloti chromosomal homolog. About 182 pSymA encoded proteins have sequence similarity (≤ E-10 with 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' proteins, often present as multiple orthologs of single 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' proteins. These proteins are involved with amino acid uptake, cell surface structure, chaperonins, electron transport, export of bioactive molecules, cellular homeostasis, regulation of gene expression, signal transduction and synthesis of amino acids and metabolic cofactors. The presence of multiple orthologs defies mutational

  6. A monoclonal antibody toolkit for C. elegans.

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    Gayla Hadwiger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antibodies are critical tools in many avenues of biological research. Though antibodies can be produced in the research laboratory setting, most research labs working with vertebrates avail themselves of the wide array of commercially available reagents. By contrast, few such reagents are available for work with model organisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report the production of monoclonal antibodies directed against a wide range of proteins that label specific subcellular and cellular components, and macromolecular complexes. Antibodies were made to synaptobrevin (SNB-1, a component of synaptic vesicles; to Rim (UNC-10, a protein localized to synaptic active zones; to transforming acidic coiled-coil protein (TAC-1, a component of centrosomes; to CENP-C (HCP-4, which in worms labels the entire length of their holocentric chromosomes; to ORC2 (ORC-2, a subunit of the DNA origin replication complex; to the nucleolar phosphoprotein NOPP140 (DAO-5; to the nuclear envelope protein lamin (LMN-1; to EHD1 (RME-1 a marker for recycling endosomes; to caveolin (CAV-1, a marker for caveolae; to the cytochrome P450 (CYP-33E1, a resident of the endoplasmic reticulum; to beta-1,3-glucuronyltransferase (SQV-8 that labels the Golgi; to a chaperonin (HSP-60 targeted to mitochondria; to LAMP (LMP-1, a resident protein of lysosomes; to the alpha subunit of the 20S subcomplex (PAS-7 of the 26S proteasome; to dynamin (DYN-1 and to the alpha-subunit of the adaptor complex 2 (APA-2 as markers for sites of clathrin-mediated endocytosis; to the MAGUK, protein disks large (DLG-1 and cadherin (HMR-1, both of which label adherens junctions; to a cytoskeletal linker of the ezrin-radixin-moesin family (ERM-1, which localized to apical membranes; to an ERBIN family protein (LET-413 which localizes to the basolateral membrane of epithelial cells and to an adhesion molecule (SAX-7 which localizes to the plasma membrane at cell-cell contacts. In addition to

  7. Use of a Chimeric Hsp70 to Enhance the Quality of Recombinant Plasmodium falciparum S-Adenosylmethionine Decarboxylase Protein Produced in Escherichia coli.

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    Xolani Henry Makhoba

    Full Text Available S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (PfAdoMetDC from Plasmodium falciparum is a prospective antimalarial drug target. The production of recombinant PfAdoMetDC for biochemical validation as a drug target is important. The production of PfAdoMetDC in Escherichia coli has been reported to result in unsatisfactory yields and poor quality product. The co-expression of recombinant proteins with molecular chaperones has been proposed as one way to improve the production of the former in E. coli. E. coli heat shock proteins DnaK, GroEL-GroES and DnaJ have previously been used to enhance production of some recombinant proteins. However, the outcomes were inconsistent. An Hsp70 chimeric protein, KPf, which is made up of the ATPase domain of E. coli DnaK and the substrate binding domain of P. falciparum Hsp70 (PfHsp70 has been previously shown to exhibit chaperone function when it was expressed in E. coli cells whose resident Hsp70 (DnaK function was impaired. We proposed that because of its domain constitution, KPf would most likely be recognised by E. coli Hsp70 co-chaperones. Furthermore, because it possesses a substrate binding domain of plasmodial origin, KPf would be primed to recognise recombinant PfAdoMetDC expressed in E. coli. First, using site-directed mutagenesis, followed by complementation assays, we established that KPf with a mutation in the hydrophobic residue located in its substrate binding cavity was functionally compromised. We further co-expressed PfAdoMetDC with KPf, PfHsp70 and DnaK in E. coli cells either in the absence or presence of over-expressed GroEL-GroES chaperonin. The folded and functional status of the produced PfAdoMetDC was assessed using limited proteolysis and enzyme assays. PfAdoMetDC co-expressed with KPf and PfHsp70 exhibited improved activity compared to protein co-expressed with over-expressed DnaK. Our findings suggest that chimeric KPf may be an ideal Hsp70 co-expression partner for the production of recombinant

  8. Analysis of intracellular expressed proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates

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    Singhal Neelja

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculosis (TB is the most threatening infectious disease globally. Although progress has been made to reduce global incidence of TB, emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR TB threatens to undermine these advances. To combat the disease, novel intervention strategies effective against drug resistant and sensitive subpopulations of M. tuberculosis are urgently required as adducts in the present treatment regimen. Using THP-1 cells we have analyzed and compared the global protein expression profile of broth-cultured and intraphagosomally grown drug resistant and sensitive M.tuberculosis clinical isolates. Results On comparing the two dimensional (2-DE gels, many proteins were found to be upregulated/expressed during intracellular state which were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS. Four proteins (adenosylhomocysteinase, aspartate carbomyltransferase, putatitive thiosulfate sulfurtransferase and universal stress protein were present in both intracellular MDR and sensitive isolates and three of these belonged to intermediary metabolism and respiration category. Two proteins (alanine dehydrogenase and adenosine kinase of intracellular MDR isolate and two (glucose-6-phosphate isomerase and ATP synthase epsilon chain of intracellular sensitive isolate belonged to intermediary metabolism and respiration category. One protein (Peroxidase/Catalase of intracellular MDR and three (HSPX, 14 kDa antigen and 10 kDa chaperonin of sensitive isolate belonged to virulence, detoxification and adaptation category. ESAT-6 of intracellular MDR belonged to cell wall and cell processes category. Two proteins (Antigen 85-C and Antigen 85-A of intracellular sensitive isolate were involved in lipid metabolism while probable peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase A was involved in information pathways. Four (Rv0635, Rv1827, Rv0036c and Rv2032 of intracellular MDR and two proteins (Rv2896c and Rv2558c of

  9. Bend-twist-stretch model for coarse elastic network simulation of biomolecular motion

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    Stember, Joseph N.; Wriggers, Willy

    2009-08-01

    The empirical harmonic potential function of elastic network models (ENMs) is augmented by three- and four-body interactions as well as by a parameter-free connection rule. In the new bend-twist-stretch (BTS) model the complexity of the parametrization is shifted from the spatial level of detail to the potential function, enabling an arbitrary coarse graining of the network. Compared to distance cutoff-based Hookean springs, the approach yields a more stable parametrization of coarse-grained ENMs for biomolecular dynamics. Traditional ENMs give rise to unbounded zero-frequency vibrations when (pseudo)atoms are connected to fewer than three neighbors. A large cutoff is therefore chosen in an ENM (about twice the average nearest-neighbor distance), resulting in many false-positive connections that reduce the spatial detail that can be resolved. More importantly, the required three-neighbor connectedness also limits the coarse graining, i.e., the network must be dense, even in the case of low-resolution structures that exhibit few spatial features. The new BTS model achieves such coarse graining by extending the ENM potential to include three-and four-atom interactions (bending and twisting, respectively) in addition to the traditional two-atom stretching. Thus, the BTS model enables reliable modeling of any three-dimensional graph irrespective of the atom connectedness. The additional potential terms were parametrized using continuum elastic theory of elastic rods, and the distance cutoff was replaced by a competitive Hebb connection rule, setting all free parameters in the model. We validate the approach on a carbon-alpha representation of adenylate kinase and illustrate its use with electron microscopy maps of E. coli RNA polymerase, E. coli ribosome, and eukaryotic chaperonin containing T-complex polypeptide 1, which were difficult to model with traditional ENMs. For adenylate kinase, we find excellent reproduction (>90% overlap) of the ENM modes and B factors

  10. Increased CCT-eta expression is a marker of latent and active disease and a modulator of fibroblast contractility in Dupuytren's contracture.

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    Satish, Latha; O'Gorman, David B; Johnson, Sandra; Raykha, Christina; Gan, Bing Siang; Wang, James H-C; Kathju, Sandeep

    2013-07-01

    Dupuytren's contracture (DC) is a fibroproliferative disorder of unknown etiology characterized by a scar-like contracture that develops in the palm and/or digits. We have previously reported that the eta subunit of the chaperonin containing T-complex polypeptide (CCT-eta) is increased in fibrotic wound healing, and is essential for the accumulation of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in fibroblasts. The purpose of this study was to determine if CCT-eta is similarly implicated in the aberrant fibrosis seen in DC and to investigate the role of CCT-eta in the behavior of myo/fibroblasts in DC. Fibroblasts were obtained from DC-affected palmar fascia, from adjacent phenotypically normal palmar fascia in the same DC patients (PF), and from non-DC palmar fascial tissues in patients undergoing carpal tunnel (CT) release. Inherent contractility in these three populations was examined using fibroblast-populated collagen lattices (FPCLs) and by cell traction force microscopy. Expression of CCT-eta and α-SMA protein was determined by Western blot. The effect of CCT-eta inhibition on the contractility of DC cells was determined by deploying an siRNA versus CCT-eta. DC cells were significantly more contractile than both matching palmar fascial (PF) cells and CT cells in both assays, with PF cells demonstrating an intermediate contractility in the FPCL assay. Whereas α-SMA protein was significantly increased only in DC cells compared to PF and CT cells, CCT-eta protein was significantly increased in both PF and DC cells compared to CT cells. siRNA-mediated depletion of CCT-eta inhibited the accumulation of both CCT-eta and α-SMA protein in DC cells, and also significantly decreased the contractility of treated DC cells. These observations suggest that increased expression of CCT-eta appears to be a marker for latent and active disease in these patients and to be essential for the increased contractility exhibited by these fibroblasts. PMID:23292503

  11. Sex differences in the response of the alveolar macrophage proteome to treatment with exogenous surfactant protein-A

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    Phelps David S

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Male wild type (WT C57BL/6 mice are less capable of clearing bacteria and surviving from bacterial pneumonia than females. However, if an oxidative stress (acute ozone exposure occurs before infection, the advantage shifts to males who then survive at higher rates than females. We have previously demonstrated that survival in surfactant protein-A (SP-A knockout (KO mice compared to WT was significantly reduced. Because the alveolar macrophage (AM is pivotal in host defense we hypothesized that SP-A and circulating sex hormones are responsible for these sex differences. We used 2D-DIGE to examine the relationship of sex and SP-A on the AM proteome. The role of SP-A was investigated by treating SP-A KO mice with exogenous SP-A for 6 and 18 hr and studying its effects on the AM proteome. Results We found: 1 less variance between KO males and females than between the WT counterparts by principal component analysis, indicating that SP-A plays a role in sex differences; 2 fewer changes in females when the total numbers of significantly changing protein spots or identified whole proteins in WT or 18 hr SP-A-treated males or females were compared to their respective KO groups; 3 more proteins with functions related to chaperones or protease balance and Nrf2-regulated proteins changed in response to SP-A in females than in males; and 4 the overall pattern of SP-A induced changes in actin-related proteins were similar in both sexes, although males had more significant changes. Conclusions Although there seems to be an interaction between sex and the effect of SP-A, it is unclear what the responsible mechanisms are. However, we found that several of the proteins that were expressed at significantly higher levels in females than in males in WT and/or in KO mice are known to interact with the estrogen receptor and may thus play a role in the SP-A/sex interaction. These include major vault protein, chaperonin subunit 2 (beta (CCT2, and Rho

  12. The response of human skin commensal bacteria as a reflection of UV radiation: UV-B decreases porphyrin production.

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    Yanhan Wang

    Full Text Available Recent global radiation fears reflect the urgent need for a new modality that can simply determine if people are in a radiation risk of developing cancer and other illnesses. Ultraviolet (UV radiation has been thought to be the major risk factor for most skin cancers. Although various biomarkers derived from the responses of human cells have been revealed, detection of these biomarkers is cumbersome, probably requires taking live human tissues, and varies significantly depending on human immune status. Here we hypothesize that the reaction of Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes, a human resident skin commensal, to UV radiation can serve as early surrogate markers for radiation risk because the bacteria are immediately responsive to radiation. In addition, the bacteria can be readily accessible and exposed to the same field of radiation as human body. To test our hypothesis, P. acnes was exposed to UV-B radiation. The production of porphyrins in P. acnes was significantly reduced with increasing doses of UV-B. The porphyrin reduction can be detected in both P. acnes and human skin bacterial isolates. Exposure of UV-B to P. acnes- inoculated mice led to a significant decrease in porphyrin production in a single colony of P. acnes and simultaneously induced the formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD in the epidermal layers of mouse skin. Mass spectrometric analysis via a linear trap quadrupole (LTQ-Orbitrap XL showed that five peptides including an internal peptide (THLPTGIVVSCQNER of a peptide chain release factor 2 (RF2 were oxidized by UV-B. Seven peptides including three internal peptides of 60 kDa chaperonin 1 were de-oxidized by UV-B. When compared to UV-B, gamma radiation also decreased the porphyrin production of P. acnes in a dose-dependent manner, but induced a different signature of protein oxidation/de-oxidation. We highlight that uncovering response of skin microbiome to radiation will facilitate the development of pre

  13. Interaction of spirochetes with the host.

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    Hindersson, P; Thomas, D; Stamm, L; Penn, C; Norris, S; Joens, L A

    1992-01-01

    The success of an invading organism must depend on several cytoplasmic, surface-associated and secreted factors. The technical difficulties in handling pathogenic spirochetes like Treponema pallidum and Borrelia burgdorferi have made it difficult to define specific factors involved in entry and long-term survival. The problem of defining virulence factors has been attacked by several strategies: T. pallidum secretes a number of immunogenic low molecular mass proteins. The most predominant are of molecular weight 15.5 and 22 kDa. Preliminary data suggest that antibodies against these proteins induce protective immunity in rabbits experimentally infected with T. pallidum. Many potentially important surface-associated antigens of T. pallidum have now been cloned and characterized. Two of these, TpD and TpE, are lipoproteins which exhibit characteristic size heterogeneity. The apparent molecular weight of TpE from T. pallidum and T. pertenue are different. The clinical symptoms in syphilis and yaws are very different, but sequence analysis of TpE has shown that the TpE proteins are indeed very similar in the two strains. This observation makes it unlikely that heterogeneity of TpE can account for the different clinical symptoms of syphilis and yaws. Sequence data for another newly sequenced surface-associated antigen of T. pallidum (molecular weight 41 kDa) indicate that this protein is involved in glucose transport and chemotaxis/motility. Intracellular factors like the molecular chaperonin GroEL have been documented both in treponemes and borreliae. This stress protein is involved in cellular repair processes and folding/assembly of protein subunits. Indirect evidence suggests that GroEL affects the ability of spirochetes to survive in the stressful environment of the infected host. Several lines of evidence suggest that the Osp proteins of Borrelia are important for host/parasite interaction. Further support for this idea has come from studies of a series of

  14. Molecular mechanism of glucocorticoid resistance in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sara De Iudicibus; Raffaella Franca; Stefano Martelossi; Alessandro Ventura; Giuliana Decorti

    2011-01-01

    Natural and synthetic glucocorticoids (GCs) are widely employed in a number of inflammatory, autoimmune and neoplastic diseases, and, despite the introduction of novel therapies, remain the first-line treatment for inducing remission in moderate to severe active Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Despite their extensive therapeutic use and the proven effectiveness, consider-able clinical evidence of wide inter-individual differences in GC efficacy among patients has been reported, in particular when these agents are used in inflammatory diseases. In recent years, a detailed knowledge of the GC mechanism of action and of the genetic variants affecting GC activity at the molecular level has arisen from several studies. GCs interact with their cytoplasmic receptor, and are able to repress inflammatory gene expression through several distinct mechanisms. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is therefore crucial for the effects of these agents: mutations in the GR gene (NR3C1, nuclear re-ceptor subfamily 3, group C, member 1) are the primary cause of a rare, inherited form of GC resistance; in ad-dition, several polymorphisms of this gene have been described and associated with GC response and toxicity. However, the GR is not self-standing in the cell and the receptor-mediated functions are the result of a complex interplay of GR and many other cellular partners. The latter comprise several chaperonins of the large coopera-tive hetero-oligomeric complex that binds the hormone-free GR in the cytosol, and several factors involved in the transcriptional machinery and chromatin remodeling, that are critical for the hormonal control of target genes transcription in the nucleus. Furthermore, variants in the principal effectors of GCs (e.g. cytokines and their regulators) have also to be taken into account for a com-prehensive evaluation of the variability in GC response. Polymorphisms in genes involved in the transport and/or metabolism of these hormones have also been

  15. Interaction between four rice proteins and P7-2, an unstructural viral protein encoded by Rice black streaked dwarf virus S7%四种水稻蛋白与水稻黑条矮缩病毒编码非结构蛋白 P7-2的互作分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张上林; 孙丽英; 陈剑平

    2013-01-01

    Rice black streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV), a member of the genus Fijivirus, infects maize and rice plants and causes significant yield losses in Asia .RBSDV has a genome of 10 dsRNAs and encodes 12 proteins.Six of these proteins (P1, P2, P3, P4, P8 and P10) are structural components of the viral particle .There are six non-structural proteins, P5, P6, P7-1, P7-2, P9-1, and P9-2.Among those non-structural proteins, P5, P6 and P9-1 have been shown to involve in viroplasm formation and P 7-1 has been identified to form the cytoplasmic tubular-like structures that serve as a conduit for virion movement between cells .The function of P7-2 and P9-2 is still unknow . In this study , we utilized protein Pull-Down assay and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry ( LC-MS/MS) techniques to identify the proteins from rice ( Oryza sativa) that interact with P7-2.Four proteins were found to bind P7-2 by Pull-Down assay.Two of them are transcription-associated proteins, one is an aminotransferase and the other one is a putative chaperonin 60 beta precursor .Using real-time quantitative PCR , the transcript expression lev-els of transcription-associated protein and putative chaperonin 60 beta precursor were up-regulated by RBSDV infec-tion.In contrast , the transcript expression of aminotransferase protein was suppressed by RBSDV infection .%水稻黑条矮缩病毒( RBSDV)是斐济病毒属的成员之一,可侵染玉米和水稻等作物,给亚洲地区的田间生产带来严重的损失。 RBSDV有10条双链RNA(double strand RNA, dsRNA)基因组,编码12个蛋白。其中6个蛋白是病毒粒子的结构成分(P1,P2,P3,P4,P8,P10),6个非结构蛋白分别为P5,P6,P7-1,P7-2,P9-1, P9-2。在非结构蛋白中,P5,P6和P9-1已被证实参与形成毒质结构,P7-1被认为可在细胞质中形成类似管状的结构作为病毒胞间扩散的通道,P7-2和P9-2的功能目前尚不明确。

  16. Pharmacological Effects of Erythropoietin and its Derivative Carbamyl erythropoietin in Cerebral White Matter Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei

    with translational potential for PVL, which is the primary injury underlying cerebral palsy. After confirming the neuroprotective effects of EPO and CEPO on PVL mice, we continued to study the mechanisms relating to their functions. As we learned from our lab's previous study, microglia play an important role in the pathogenesis of PVL, linking multiple effectors downstream of hypoxia-ischemia and inflammation. We found that EPO and CEPO inhibit microglial activation and reduced the severity of injury. Furthermore, we found that EPO and CEPO decreased the activity of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) in activated microglia. PARP-1 activity increases in response to many insults, such as infection, ischemia and toxicity. Therefore, we hypothesized that EPO and CEPO decrease microglial activation by inhibiting PARP-1 activity, and thus leading to protection against inflammation and cell death. Besides pharmacological studies of EPO and CEPO on PVL, we also investigated other endogenous factors that may affect neonatal white matter injury. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are important chaperones that facilitate appropriate protein folding and modification. HSP60, a chaperonin located in the mitochondria, is one of these important molecules that promote appropriate protein folding. HSP60 expression levels increased significantly in the brains of PVL mice compared with control animals. In microglial cell culture, we found that after LPS treatment, HSP60 expression levels increased both inside microglial cells and in the extracellular medium. In addition, we noted enhanced HSP60 immunoreactivity in the brains of PVL mice, which localized inside activated microglial cells and extracellularly. The rise in HSP60 activity after hypoxia-ischemia and LPS administration implies that it potentially functions as one of the triggers of microglial activation and central nervous system inflammation.

  17. PREFACE Protein folding: lessons learned and new frontiers Protein folding: lessons learned and new frontiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappu, Rohit V.; Nussinov, Ruth

    2009-03-01

    multi-scale dynamical problem when one considers the synergies between protein expression, spontaneous folding, chaperonin-assisted folding, protein targeting, the kinetics of post-translational modifications, protein degradation, and of course the drive to avoid aggregation. Further, there is growing recognition that cells not only tolerate but select for proteins that are intrinsically disordered. These proteins are essential for many crucial activities, and yet their inability to fold in isolation makes them prone to proteolytic processing and aggregation. In the series of papers that make up this special focus on protein folding in physical biology, leading researchers provide insights into diverse cross-sections of problems in protein folding. Barrick provides a concise review of what we have learned from the study of two-state folders and draws attention to how several unanswered questions are being approached using studies on large repeat proteins. Dissecting the contribution of hydration-mediated interactions to driving forces for protein folding and assembly has been extremely challenging. There is renewed interest in using hydrostatic pressure as a tool to access folding intermediates and decipher the role of partially hydrated states in folding, misfolding, and aggregation. Silva and Foguel review many of the nuances that have been uncovered by perturbing hydrostatic pressure as a thermodynamic parameter. As noted above, protein folding in vivo is expected to be considerably more complex than the folding of two-state proteins in dilute solutions. Lucent et al review the state-of-the-art in the development of quantitative theories to explain chaperonin-assisted folding in vivo. Additionally, they highlight unanswered questions pertaining to the processing of unfolded/misfolded proteins by the chaperone machinery. Zhuang et al present results that focus on the effects of surface tethering on transition state ensembles and folding mechanisms of a model two

  18. Using the Proteomic Method to Research the Interaction between Brassica napus and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Wen; Ying Chen; Jiabin Shu; Tailong Tan; Qiuping Zhang; Mingzhi Yin; Chunyun Guan

    2012-01-01

    immediately in liquid nitrogen and stored at-80℃.Proteins were extracted and separated by 2DE,and then all the 43 differentially expressed spots were analyzed by MALD-TOF/TOF MS,which 42 were identified as certain proteins.Among those identified proteins,22 proteins involved in antioxidation,response to stimulus,material and energy metabolism,biological regulation and transcription etc.were up-regulated or only expressed in the resistant line.It seemed reasonable to infer that the increase or presence of those proteins in resistant line leaves might relate to the disease-resistance of S.sclerotiorum.qRT-PCR analysis was conducted to verify some of the proteomic data.The expressions of 8 proteins were found the consistency in RNA and protein levels,they were a thiol methyltransferase,a trypsin inhibitor propeptide,a chaperonin,a cytosolic triose phosphate isomerase,a heat stress-induced protein,an L-ascorbate peroxidase,an alpha/beta-hydrolase domain-containing protein and a putative protein.The activities of some enzymes,i.e.superoxide dismutase (SOD),catalase (CAT),peroxidase (POD) and polyphenol oxidase (PPO),and the contents of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde (MDA),which involved in antioxidation were also detected to investigate the relationship between the disease-resistance and the antioxidation.We found that the activities of the enzymes involved in antioxidation in the resistant line were higher than those in the susceptible line,and the contents of ROS and MDA in the resistant line were lower than those in the susceptible line.Therefore we suggested that the expressions of some proteins involved in antioxidation and the elimination of ROS were induced after inoculation of S.sclerotiorum,and this caused the higher resistance in the resistant line.However those proteins were absent or decreased in susceptible lines,leading to the weak ability of elimination of ROS and disease-resistance.Further studies are needed to validate the relationship between

  19. Structural and Functional Proteomic Analysis of a Developing Energy Transducing Membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niederman, Robert A

    2012-06-04

    function, correlated with increasing LH2 levels. RC-LH1-containing CNE gel bands from the UPB were enriched in cytoplasmic membrane (CM) markers, including electron transfer and transport proteins, as well as general membrane assembly factors relative to chromatophore bands. This confirms the origin of the UPB from both peripheral respiratory membrane and sites of CM invagination. Significant levels of preprotein translocases YidC, YajC and SecY, bacterial type 1 signal peptidase and twin arg translocation subunit TatA were found. Such general membrane assembly factors were significantly enriched in the UPB RC-LH1 gel bands, confirming the active role of membrane invagination sites in pigment-protein complex assembly. Functional correlates of proteomics approaches were provided by near-IR fluorescence induction/relaxation transients arising from LH-BChl components. A linear relation was found between increasing functional absorption cross-section and slowing of RC electron transfer turnover rate, thought to arise from the imposition of constraints upon free UQ diffusion between the RC and cytochrome bc1 complex as the membrane became saturated with new LH2 rings. In cells undergoing ICM induction in which generation of the electrochemical proton gradient was uncoupled with CCCP, blockage in membrane insertion of the LH and RC polypetides was demonstrated. This was reflected in a diminution of quantum yield of the primary charge separation, a cessation in expansion of functional absorption cross-section and a >4-fold slowing in RC electron transfer turnover. The ICM insertion of ATP synthase and transhydrogenase was also significantly diminished. Importantly, for the UPB fraction, CCCP treatment resulted in accumulation of ~2-fold greater levels of the preprotein translocase SecY, the SecA translocation ATPase, Sec D and SecF insertion components, and chaperonins DnaJ and DnaK, suggesting that these general membrane assembly factors had accumulated in association with

  20. 蛋白组学技术研究有氧运动影响C57BL/6小鼠骨骼肌代谢系列报道之四——有氧运动对胰岛素抵抗小鼠骨骼肌蛋白折叠/降解通路相关蛋白的影响%"Effects of Aerobic Exercise on Skeletal Muscle Metabolism in C57BL/6 Mice with Proteome Analysis" Serial Report 4: Effects of Aerobic Exercise on the Fold / Degradation Protein in Skeletal Muscle of C57BL/6 Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    褚晓蕾; 牛燕媚; 袁海瑞; 刘效磊; 尹苗苗; 黄雯; 傅力

    2011-01-01

    Precursor)运动后下降38%,β型蛋白酶体7前体(Proteasome Subunit Beta Type-7 Precursor)运动后增加3.27倍,α型蛋白酶体1(Proteasome Subunit Alpha Type-1)运动后增加1.67倍,伴侣素β亚基(Chaperonin Containing Tcp-1 Beta Subunit,CCTβ)、Ester Hydrolase ClIOrf54 Homolog为运动后新增蛋白.结论:6周有氧运动可通过调节IR小鼠骨骼肌蛋白折叠/降解通路相关蛋白的表达,改善高脂饮食诱导的IR.%Objective The aim of this study was to explore the role of fold / degradation proteins involved in aerobic exercise ameliorating insulin resistance (IR) by identifying the differentially expressed proteins in the skeletal muscle of mice after exercise. Methods Eighty male C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into IR model group (IR, n = 60) and normal diet group (NC, n = 60) . Rats in IR group were fed with high-fat diet for 10 weeks. The IR was confirmed by fasting serum insulin level (FIN) and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) . Then the IR group was randomly subdivided into a high-fat-diet exercise group (HE) and a high-fat-diet control group (HC) . The HE group was required to run on a treadmill for 6 weeks with the intensity of 75%VO2 max. After the completion of the 6-week exercise, the proteins extracted from the quadriceps femoris were quantified with Bradford and then separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) . The result was analyzed by ImageMas-ter 2D Platinum V5.0. The selected differentially expressed proteins were analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS ) and Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC/LC-MS/MS) . The differentially expressed proteins were identified using Mascot software and NCBI nr database. Results Compared with the NC group, FIN of 10-week high-fat-diet group increased by 50%, and time point of OGTT peak shifted backward obviously with a platform stage. After 6-week aerobic exercise, the FIN in HE group decreased by 17.2% as compared