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Sample records for chaperonin genes hsp60

  1. Identification of elements that dictate the specificity of mitochondrial Hsp60 for its co-chaperonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnas, Avital; Nisemblat, Shahar; Weiss, Celeste; Levy-Rimler, Galit; Pri-Or, Amir; Zor, Tsaffrir; Lund, Peter A; Bross, Peter; Azem, Abdussalam

    2012-01-01

    Type I chaperonins (cpn60/Hsp60) are essential proteins that mediate the folding of proteins in bacteria, chloroplast and mitochondria. Despite the high sequence homology among chaperonins, the mitochondrial chaperonin system has developed unique properties that distinguish it from the widely-studied bacterial system (GroEL and GroES). The most relevant difference to this study is that mitochondrial chaperonins are able to refold denatured proteins only with the assistance of the mitochondrial co-chaperonin. This is in contrast to the bacterial chaperonin, which is able to function with the help of co-chaperonin from any source. The goal of our work was to determine structural elements that govern the specificity between chaperonin and co-chaperonin pairs using mitochondrial Hsp60 as model system. We used a mutagenesis approach to obtain human mitochondrial Hsp60 mutants that are able to function with the bacterial co-chaperonin, GroES. We isolated two mutants, a single mutant (E321K) and a double mutant (R264K/E358K) that, together with GroES, were able to rescue an E. coli strain, in which the endogenous chaperonin system was silenced. Although the mutations are located in the apical domain of the chaperonin, where the interaction with co-chaperonin takes place, none of the residues are located in positions that are directly responsible for co-chaperonin binding. Moreover, while both mutants were able to function with GroES, they showed distinct functional and structural properties. Our results indicate that the phenotype of the E321K mutant is caused mainly by a profound increase in the binding affinity to all co-chaperonins, while the phenotype of R264K/E358K is caused by a slight increase in affinity toward co-chaperonins that is accompanied by an alteration in the allosteric signal transmitted upon nucleotide binding. The latter changes lead to a great increase in affinity for GroES, with only a minor increase in affinity toward the mammalian mitochondrial co-chaperonin

  2. Crystallization and structure determination of a symmetrical 'football' complex of the mammalian mitochondrial Hsp60-Hsp10 chaperonins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisemblat, Shahar; Parnas, Avital; Yaniv, Oren; Azem, Abdussalam; Frolow, Felix

    2014-01-01

    The mitochondrial Hsp60-Hsp10 complex assists the folding of various proteins impelled by ATP hydrolysis, similar to the bacterial chaperonins GroEL and GroES. The near-atomic structural details of the mitochondrial chaperonins are not known, despite the fact that almost two decades have passed since the structures of the bacterial chaperonins became available. Here, the crystallization procedure, diffraction experiments and structure determination by molecular replacement of the mammalian mitochondrial chaperonin HSP60 (E321K mutant) and its co-chaperonin Hsp10 are reported. PMID:24419632

  3. Crystallization and structure determination of a symmetrical ‘football’ complex of the mammalian mitochondrial Hsp60–Hsp10 chaperonins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisemblat, Shahar; Parnas, Avital; Yaniv, Oren; Azem, Abdussalam; Frolow, Felix

    2014-01-01

    The mitochondrial Hsp60–Hsp10 complex assists the folding of various proteins impelled by ATP hydrolysis, similar to the bacterial chaperonins GroEL and GroES. The near-atomic structural details of the mitochondrial chaperonins are not known, despite the fact that almost two decades have passed since the structures of the bacterial chaperonins became available. Here, the crystallization procedure, diffraction experiments and structure determination by molecular replacement of the mammalian mitochondrial chaperonin HSP60 (E321K mutant) and its co-chaperonin Hsp10 are reported. PMID:24419632

  4. Genomic structure of the human mitochondrial chaperonin genes: Hsp60 and Hsp10 are localised head to head on chromosome 2 separated by a bidirectional promoter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J.J.; Bross, P.; Westergaard, M.;

    2003-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor is a major proliferative and migratory stimulus for connective tissue cells during the initiation of skin repair processes. In response to injury, locally produced platelet-derived growth factor is secreted by a diversity of cutaneous cell types whereas target...... R) into epidermal keratinocytes using a retrovirus-derived vector. Successful gene transfer to primary cells was confirmed by immunofluorescence staining, southern blotting, and ligand-induced receptor autophosphorylation. By culturing a mixture of PDGF beta R-transduced and unmodified keratinocytes...... tissue cultured for 6 days and examined by immunofluorescence microscopy was shown to contain PDGF beta R-expressing keratinocytes distributed in all layers of living epidermis. By continued tissue culture in serum-containing medium, the epidermis became increasingly cornified although receptor...

  5. The Hsp60C gene in the 25F cytogenetic region in Drosophila melanogaster is essential for tracheal development and fertility

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Surajit Sarkar; Subhash C. Lakhotia

    2005-12-01

    Earlier studies have shown that of the four genes (Hsp60A, Hsp60B, Hsp60C, Hsp60D genes) predicted to encode the conserved Hsp60 family chaperones in Drosophila melanogaster, the Hsp60A gene (at the 10A polytene region) is expressed in all cell types of the organism and is essential from early embryonic stages, while the Hsp60B gene (at 21D region) is expressed only in testis, being essential for sperm individualization. In the present study, we characterized the Hsp60C gene (at 25F region), which shows high sequence homology with the other three Hsp60 genes of D. melanogaster. In situ hybridization of Hsp60C-specific riboprobe shows that expression of this gene begins in late embryonic stages (stage 14 onwards), particularly in the developing tracheal system and salivary glands; during larval and adult stages, it is widely expressed in many cell types but much more strongly in tracheae and in developing and differentiating germ cells. A P-insertion mutant (Hsp60C1) allele with the P transposon inserted at $-251$ position of the Hsp60C gene promoter was generated. This early larval recessive lethal mutation significantly reduces levels of Hsp60C transcripts in developing tracheae and this is associated with a variety of defects in the tracheal system, including lack of liquid clearance. About 10% of the homozygotes survive as weak, shortlived and completely sterile adults. Testes of the surviving mutant males are significantly smaller, with fewer spermatocytes, most of which do not develop beyond the round spermatid stage. In situ and Northern hybridizations show significantly reduced levels of the Hsp60C transcripts in Hsp60C1 homozygous adult males. The absence of early meiotic stages in the Hsp60C1 homozygous testes contrasts with the effect of testis-specific Hsp60B (21D) gene, whose mutation affects individualization of sperm bundles later in spermiogenesis. In view of the specific effects in tracheal development and in early stages of spermatogenesis, it is

  6. Serum antibodies from patients with ankylosing spondylitis and Reiter's syndrome are reactive with HLA-B27 cells transfected with the Mycobacterium tuberculosis hsp60 gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Kellner, H; Wen, J.; Wang, J; Raybourne, R B; Williams, K. M.; Yu, D T

    1994-01-01

    HLA-B27-related arthritis is probably mediated by an immune response against HLA-B27 complexed with peptides derived from proteins of arthritis-causing bacteria. Immunogenic proteins with a high degree of homology among bacteria, such as in the hsp60 family, are likely candidates. To create such complexes experimentally, we transfected an HLA-B27 cell line with the Mycobacterium tuberculosis hsp60 gene. Because of previous observations that HLA-B27-peptide complexes can be distinguished by an...

  7. Hsp60 response in experimental and human temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammazza, Antonella Marino; Colangeli, Roberto; Orban, Gergely; Pierucci, Massimo; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; Bello, Margherita Lo; D'Aniello, Alfredo; Bucchieri, Fabio; Pomara, Cristoforo; Valentino, Mario; Muscat, Richard; Benigno, Arcangelo; Zummo, Giovanni; de Macario, Everly Conway; Cappello, Francesco; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe; Macario, Alberto J. L.

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial chaperonin Hsp60 is a ubiquitous molecule with multiple roles, constitutively expressed and inducible by oxidative stress. In the brain, Hsp60 is widely distributed and has been implicated in neurological disorders, including epilepsy. A role for mitochondria and oxidative stress has been proposed in epileptogenesis of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Here, we investigated the involvement of Hsp60 in TLE using animal and human samples. Hsp60 immunoreactivity in the hippocampus, measured by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry, was increased in a rat model of TLE. Hsp60 was also increased in the hippocampal dentate gyrus neurons somata and neuropil and hippocampus proper (CA3, CA1) of the epileptic rats. We also determined the circulating levels of Hsp60 in epileptic animals and TLE patients using ELISA. The epileptic rats showed circulating levels of Hsp60 higher than controls. Likewise, plasma post-seizure Hsp60 levels in patients were higher than before the seizure and those of controls. These results demonstrate that Hsp60 is increased in both animals and patients with TLE in affected tissues, and in plasma in response to epileptic seizures, and point to it as biomarker of hippocampal stress potentially useful for diagnosis and patient management. PMID:25801186

  8. Hsp60 is actively secreted by human tumor cells.

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    Anna M Merendino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hsp60, a Group I mitochondrial chaperonin, is classically considered an intracellular chaperone with residence in the mitochondria; nonetheless, in the last few years it has been found extracellularly as well as in the cell membrane. Important questions remain pertaining to extracellular Hsp60 such as how generalized is its occurrence outside cells, what are its extracellular functions and the translocation mechanisms that transport the chaperone outside of the cell. These questions are particularly relevant for cancer biology since it is believed that extracellular chaperones, like Hsp70, may play an active role in tumor growth and dissemination. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Since cancer cells may undergo necrosis and apoptosis, it could be possible that extracellular Hsps are chiefly the result of cell destruction but not the product of an active, physiological process. In this work, we studied three tumor cells lines and found that they all release Hsp60 into the culture media by an active mechanism independently of cell death. Biochemical analyses of one of the cell lines revealed that Hsp60 secretion was significantly reduced, by inhibitors of exosomes and lipid rafts. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data suggest that Hsp60 release is the result of an active secretion mechanism and, since extracellular release of the chaperone was demonstrated in all tumor cell lines investigated, our observations most likely reflect a general physiological phenomenon, occurring in many tumors.

  9. Mitochondrial heat-shock protein hsp60 is essential for assembly of proteins imported into yeast mitochondria

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Ming Yuan; Hartl, Franz-Ulrich; Martin, Jörg; Pollock, Robert A.; Kalousek, Frantisek; Neupert, Walter; Hallberg, Elisabeth M.; Hallberg, Richard L.; Horwich, Arthur

    1989-01-01

    A nuclear encoded mitochondrial heat-shock protein hsp60 is required for the assembly into oligomeric complexes of proteins imported into the mitochondrial matrix. hsp60 is a member of the 'chaperonin' class of protein factors, which include the Escherichia coli groEL protein and the Rubisco subunit-binding protein of chloroplasts

  10. Chlamydia trachomatis infection and anti-Hsp60 immunity: the two sides of the coin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Cappello

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis (CT infection is one of the most common causes of reproductive tract diseases and infertility. CT-Hsp60 is synthesized during infection and is released in the bloodstream. As a consequence, immune cells will produce anti-CT-Hsp60 antibodies. Hsp60, a ubiquitous and evolutionarily conserved chaperonin, is normally sequestered inside the cell, particularly into mitochondria. However, upon cell stress, as well as during carcinogenesis, the chaperonin becomes exposed on the cell surface (sf-Hsp60 and/or is secreted from cells into the extracellular space and circulation. Reports in the literature on circulating Hsp and anti-Hsp antibodies are in many cases short on details about Hsp60 concentrations, and about the specificity spectra of the antibodies, their titers, and their true, direct, pathogenetic effects. Thus, more studies are still needed to obtain a definitive picture on these matters. Nevertheless, the information already available indicates that the concurrence of persistent CT infection and appearance of sf-Hsp60 can promote an autoimmune aggression towards stressed cells and the development of diseases such as autoimmune arthritis, multiple sclerosis, atherosclerosis, vasculitis, diabetes, and thyroiditis, among others. At the same time, immunocomplexes composed of anti-CT-Hsp60 antibodies and circulating Hsp60 (both CT and human may form deposits in several anatomical locations, e.g., at the glomerular basal membrane. The opposite side of the coin is that pre-tumor and tumor cells with sf-Hsp60 can be destroyed with participation of the anti-Hsp60 antibody, thus stopping cancer progression before it is even noticed by the patient or physician.

  11. Expression of the chaperonin 10 gene during zebrafish development

    OpenAIRE

    Cristofre Martin, C.; Tang, Pingtao; Barnardo, Georgina; Krone, Patrick H.

    2001-01-01

    We have isolated a cDNA encoding chaperonin 10 (cpn10) from the zebrafish. Using northern, western, and in situ hybridization analysis, we observed that the cpn10 gene is expressed uniformly and ubiquitously throughout embryonic development of the zebrafish. Upregulation of cpn10 expression was observed following exposure of zebrafish embryos to a heat shock of 1 hour at 37°C compared to control embryos raised at 27°C. The extracellular form of Cpn10 called early pregnancy factor (EPF), found...

  12. Antigen capture ELISA for the heat shock protein (hsp60) of Chlamydia trachomatis.

    OpenAIRE

    Horner, P J; Ali, M.; Parker, D.; Weber, J. N.; Taylor-Robinson, D.; McClure, M O

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: To develop an indirect ELISA using the heat shock protein (hsp60) of Chlamydia trachomatis as antigen. METHODS: The hsp60 gene was amplified by PCR, expressed in the vector pDEV-107 and transformed into Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein, expressed as a beta-galactosidase fusion product, was captured onto a solid phase using a monoclonal antibody directed against beta-galactosidase. Following incubation with goat anti-human antibody conjugated to peroxidase and colour development...

  13. 十二指肠钩虫热休克蛋白HSP60基因的克隆及重组表达%Cloning and expression of AduHSP60, a heat shock protein from Ancylostoma duodenale

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许琴英; 邵正; 邓莉; 何庆丰; 彭礼飞

    2013-01-01

    目的 克隆十二指肠钩虫(Anc ylostoma duodenale)热休克蛋白60(heat shock protein 60,HSP60)基因,并在大肠埃希菌中表达获得重组AduHSP60蛋白.方法 以十二肠钩虫成虫cDNA为模板,PCR扩增AduHSP60基因.将获得的目的基因编码序列连接至原核表达载体pETHF,构建重组表达质粒pETHF/AduHSP60.重组质粒转化大肠埃希菌BL21(DE3),经IPTG诱导表达、Ni-NTA亲和层析分离纯化重组蛋白,SDS-PAGE分析重组蛋白的表达及纯化情况.结果 成功扩增到AduHSP60全长编码序列,编码序列长度为1 701 bp,编码566个氨基酸.构建了重组表达质粒pETHF/AduHSP60,经诱导表达、分离纯化获得了分子质量单位为60 ku的可溶性重组AduHSP60蛋白.结论 本研究从十二指肠钩虫中分离获得了HSP60基因,构建的pETHF/AduHSP60重组质粒能在大肠埃希菌中表达重组蛋白,为进一步研究AduHSP60的生物学功能奠定了基础.%Objective To clone and express heat shock protein 60 (AduHSP60) of the hookworm Ancylostoma duodenale.Methods The nucleotide sequence encoding AduHSP60 was amplified by PCR from adult A.duodenale cDNA and ligated into vector pETHF to construct the recombinant plasmid pETHF/AduHSP60.The recombinant plasmid was transformed into E.coli BL21(DE3) and induced with IPTG.The recombinant AduHSP60 was purified with Ni-NTA affinity chromatography.Results Full-length cDNA encoding AduHSP60 was successfully amplified.AduHSP60 consisted of 1,701 nucleotides and encoded 566 amino acids.The recombinant plasmid pETHF/AduHSP60 was constructed and the recombinant protein was expressed with IPTG.A protein with a molecular weight of about 60 ku was obtained and mainly existed in a soluble form.Conclusion The HSP60 gene in A.duodenale was isolated in this study and the recombinant AduHSP60 was expressed and purified in E.coli.This work has laid a foundation for further study of the function of AduHSP60.

  14. Improved Metabolic Control in Diabetes, HSP60, and Proinflammatory Mediators

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    Claudio Blasi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The diabetes-atherosclerosis relationship remains to be fully defined. Repeated prolonged hyperglycemia, increased ROS production and endothelial dysfunction are important factors. One theory is that increased blood levels of heat shock protein (HSP60 are proinflammatory, through activation of innate immunity, and contribute to the progression of vascular disease. It was hypothesized that improvement of diabetes control in patients presenting with metabolic syndrome would lower HSP60, and anti-HSP60 antibody levels and decrease inflammatory markers. Paired sera of 17 Italian patients, before and after intensive treatment, were assayed for cytokines, HSP60 and anti-HSP60 antibodies. As expected, intensive treatment was associated with a decrease in HgbA1C (P<0.001 and BMI (P<0.001. After treatment, there was a significant decrease in IL-6 (P<0.05. HSP60 levels were before treatment −6.9+1.9, after treatment −7.1+2.0 ng/mL (P=ns. Overall HSP60 concentrations were lower than published reports. Anti-HSP60 antibody titers were high and did not decrease with treatment. In conclusion, improvement of diabetic control did not alter HSP60 concentrations or antiHSP60 antibody titers, but led to a reduction of IL-6 levels.

  15. Leptin regulation of Hsp60 impacts hypothalamic insulin signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Kleinridders, André; Lauritzen, Hans P.M.M.; Ussar, Siegfried; Christensen, Jane H.; Mori, Marcelo A.; Bross, Peter; Kahn, C. Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction in classical target tissues such as muscle, fat, and liver. Using a murine model of type 2 diabetes, we show that there is hypothalamic insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction due to downregulation of the mitochondrial chaperone HSP60. HSP60 reduction in obese, diabetic mice was due to a lack of proper leptin signaling and was restored by leptin treatment. Knockdown of Hsp60 in a mouse hypothalamic c...

  16. Evaluation of heat shock protein (HSP-60) induction on accumulation of carbohydrate in Isochrysis galbana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary levels of the marine food chain may play an important role in the fate of petroleum hydrocarbons in both chemically dispersed and un-dispersed oil spills. HSP-60 proteins, members of the chaperonin family of stress proteins, are induced in response to a wide variety of environmental agents, including UV light, heavy metals, and xenobiotics. Increased production and storage of carbohydrate in I. galbana has been associated with aging and stress. Thus, HSP-60 and carbohydrate storage were selected as sublethal endpoints of exposure to the primary producer, I. galbana, a golden brown, unicellular algae, and a significant component of the marine phytoplankton community. The authors have found that I. galbana cultures exposed to water-accommodated fractions (WAF) of Prudhoe Bay Crude Oil (PBCO), and PBCO/dispersant preparations efficiently induce HSP-60. Studies indicated that WAF produced a dose-related response in I. galbana, which increased as a function of time. Dispersant alone showed the greatest induction, while combined WAF-dispersant showed less induction, suggesting a possible competition between crude oil and algae for dispersant interaction. In addition, they have demonstrated that I. galbana accumulates carbohydrates in response to exposure to WAF and PBCO/dispersant preparations and therefore represents another index of stress in this organism. They were interested in determining if induction of stress proteins and HSP60 in particular represented an adaptive-mechanism, allowing this algae to better cope with exposure to petroleum hydrocarbons released in the marine environment during an oil spill. In an effort to determine if stress protein induction serves as a protective adaptive response to exposure to petroleum hydrocarbons they examined the effect of heat shock induction on the accumulation of carbohydrates by these organisms in response to exposure to WAF and dispersed oil preparations

  17. The MitCHAP-60 Disease Is Due to Entropic Destabilization of the Human Mitochondrial Hsp60 Oligomer*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnas, Avital; Nadler, Michal; Nisemblat, Shahar; Horovitz, Amnon; Mandel, Hanna; Azem, Abdussalam

    2009-01-01

    The 60-kDa heat shock protein (mHsp60) is a vital cellular complex that mediates the folding of many of the mitochondrial proteins. Its function is executed in cooperation with the co-chaperonin, mHsp10, and requires ATP. Recently, the discovery of a new mHsp60-associated neurodegenerative disorder, MitCHAP-60 disease, has been reported. The disease is caused by a point mutation at position 3 (D3G) of the mature mitochondrial Hsp60 protein, which renders it unable to complement the deletion of the homologous bacterial protein in Escherichia coli (Magen, D., Georgopoulos, C., Bross, P., Ang, D., Segev, Y., Goldsher, D., Nemirovski, A., Shahar, E., Ravid, S., Luder, A., Heno, B., Gershoni-Baruch, R., Skorecki, K., and Mandel, H. (2008) Am. J. Hum. Genet. 83, 30–42). The molecular basis of the MitCHAP-60 disease is still unknown. In this study, we present an in vitro structural and functional analysis of the purified wild-type human mHsp60 and the MitCHAP-60 mutant. We show that the D3G mutation leads to destabilization of the mHsp60 oligomer and causes its disassembly at low protein concentrations. We also show that the mutant protein has impaired protein folding and ATPase activities. An additional mutant that lacks the first three amino acids (N-del), including Asp-3, is similarly impaired in refolding activity. Surprisingly, however, this mutant exhibits profound stabilization of its oligomeric structure. These results suggest that the D3G mutation leads to entropic destabilization of the mHsp60 oligomer, which severely impairs its chaperone function, thereby causing the disease. PMID:19706612

  18. The MitCHAP-60 disease is due to entropic destabilization of the human mitochondrial Hsp60 oligomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnas, Avital; Nadler, Michal; Nisemblat, Shahar; Horovitz, Amnon; Mandel, Hanna; Azem, Abdussalam

    2009-10-01

    The 60-kDa heat shock protein (mHsp60) is a vital cellular complex that mediates the folding of many of the mitochondrial proteins. Its function is executed in cooperation with the co-chaperonin, mHsp10, and requires ATP. Recently, the discovery of a new mHsp60-associated neurodegenerative disorder, MitCHAP-60 disease, has been reported. The disease is caused by a point mutation at position 3 (D3G) of the mature mitochondrial Hsp60 protein, which renders it unable to complement the deletion of the homologous bacterial protein in Escherichia coli (Magen, D., Georgopoulos, C., Bross, P., Ang, D., Segev, Y., Goldsher, D., Nemirovski, A., Shahar, E., Ravid, S., Luder, A., Heno, B., Gershoni-Baruch, R., Skorecki, K., and Mandel, H. (2008) Am. J. Hum. Genet. 83, 30-42). The molecular basis of the MitCHAP-60 disease is still unknown. In this study, we present an in vitro structural and functional analysis of the purified wild-type human mHsp60 and the MitCHAP-60 mutant. We show that the D3G mutation leads to destabilization of the mHsp60 oligomer and causes its disassembly at low protein concentrations. We also show that the mutant protein has impaired protein folding and ATPase activities. An additional mutant that lacks the first three amino acids (N-del), including Asp-3, is similarly impaired in refolding activity. Surprisingly, however, this mutant exhibits profound stabilization of its oligomeric structure. These results suggest that the D3G mutation leads to entropic destabilization of the mHsp60 oligomer, which severely impairs its chaperone function, thereby causing the disease. PMID:19706612

  19. Advances of the roles of HSP60 in ocular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-Hui Chen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock protein(HSPis a kind of heat stress protein that widely exists in organism. Its expression will be significantly increased if the cells are under stress conditions(such as heat shock, pathogen infection, tissue injury, physiological stress, etc.. HSP60 is one of the families of HSPs, which can be induced by various stimuli, and may be released by stress or necrotic cells. HSP60 could play an important role in anti-infection, autoimmune, aging and apoptosis. The latest researches showed that HSP60 involved in the pathogenesis of a variety of eye diseases. Therefore, the effect and of HSP60 on the eyes and its molecular mechanism in related disease processes were reviewed in this study.

  20. Induction of heat shock protein (hsp)60 in Isochrysis galbana exposed to sublethal preparations of dispersant and Prudhoe Bay crude oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, M.F.; Olsen, H.E.; Gasuad, K.A.; Tjeerdema, R.S. [University of California, Santa Cruz (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Sowby, M.L. [California Dept. of Fish and Game, Sacramento (United States). Office of Spill Prevention and Response

    1999-11-01

    Adaptation to sublethal exposure to crude oil by phytoplankton is poorly understood. Use of chemical dispersants for oil spill remediation increases petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations in water, while exposing marine organisms to potentially toxic concentrations of dispersant. Heat shock proteins (hsps) have been found to serve as an adaptive and protective mechanism against environmental stresses. The objective of this project was to examine the induction of hsps in Isochrysis galbana, a golden-brown algae, following exposure to the water-accommodated fraction (WAF) of Prudhoe Bay crude oil (PBCO) and PBCO chemically dispersed with Corexit 9527 (dispersed oil: DO). Initial experiments using {sup 35}S-labelled amino acids and 2-dimensional electrophoresis with subsequent western blotting identified and confirmed hsp60, a member of the chaperonin family of stress proteins, as being efficiently induced by heat shock in this species. One-dimensional SDS PAGE and western blotting, with hsp60 antibodies and chemiluminescence detection, were used to quantitate hsp60 following exposure to a range of environmental temperatures and concentrations of WAF and DO preparations. Results of this study are consistent with previous studies in other species documenting increases in hsp60 levels with exposure to xenobiotics. Further studies are investigating the protective function of hsp60 against the toxic effects of exposure to WAF and DO preparations. (author)

  1. Neonatal Death and Heart Failure in Mouse with Transgenic HSP60 Expression

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    Tsung-Hsien Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial heat shock proteins, such as HSP60, are chaperones responsible for the folding, transport, and quality control of mitochondrial matrix proteins and are essential for maintaining life. Both prosurvival and proapoptotic roles have been proposed for HSP60, and HSP60 is reportedly involved in the initiation of autoimmune, metabolic, and cardiovascular diseases. The role of HSP60 in pathogenesis of these diseases remains unclear, partly because of the lack of mouse models expressing HSP60. In this study we generated HSP60 conditional transgenic mice suitable for investigating in vivo outcomes by expressing HSP60 at the targeted organ in disease models. Ubiquitous HSP60 induction in the embryonic stage caused neonatal death in mice at postnatal day 1. A high incidence of atrial septal defects was observed in HSP60-expressing mice, with increased apoptosis and myocyte degeneration that possibly contributed to massive hemorrhage and sponge-like cardiac muscles. Our results showed that neonatal heart failure through HSP60 induction likely involves developmental defects and excessive apoptosis. The conditional HSP60 mouse model is useful for studying crucial biological questions concerning HSP60.

  2. Elevata espressione di hsp-60 di Chlamydophila pneumoniae su placche aterosclerotiche carotidee a prognosi infausta

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    Rosario Cultrera

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Some difficult microorganisms, including Chlamydophila pneumoniae, are associated with the atherosclerotic tissue damage.The aim of this study was to evaluate the employment of culture together molecular techniques in order to define the possible role of C. pneumoniae in the atherosclerotic tissue damage. Atheromatous carotid plaques (ACP were obtained by endoarterectomies from 10 patients with severe stenosis of the internal carotid artery. Each specimen was divided in three parts: a proximal tract to heart, without stenosis, a medial tract, corresponding to the atheromatous plaque, and a distal tract, above the plaque.Aliquots were employed to perform cultures for C. pneumoniae on Hep - 2 cell line in DMEM. DNA and total RNA were extracted from 50-70 mg. of tissue sample and from Hep - 2 106 cultures to investigate 16S rRNA, momp and hsp60 genes.The PCR and RT-PCR resulted negative for momp gene of C. pneumoniae in all samples. PCR and RT-PCR resulted positive for 16S rRNA or hsp60 genes of C. pneumoniae in the proximal portion of two ACPs with hemorrhagic evolution in two patients, one of which complicated with a retinal tromboembolic outcome. Molecular analyses on C. pneumoniae growing from the cultures are in progress.The DNA and RNA amplification of different portions from ACP seems to be useful to evidence the effective localization of C. pneumoniae in the atheromatous arterial tissue. The highly gene expression of C. pneumoniae hsp60 in a patient with acute hemorrhagic evolution of the carotid plaque may suggest that C. pneumoniae might partecipate in the atherogenesis and induce atherosclerosis complications by inflammatory pathways (activation of cytokines, endothelial factors and matrix-degrading metalloproteinases.

  3. Does Hsp60 Provide a Link between Mitochondrial Stress and Inflammation in Diabetes Mellitus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The focus of this review is to summarise the known relationships between the expression of heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60) and its association with the pathogenesis of Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Hsp60 is a mitochondrial stress protein that is induced by mitochondrial impairment. It is known to be secreted from a number of cell types and circulating levels have been documented in both Types 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus patients. The biological significance of extracellular Hsp60, however, remains to be established. We will examine the links between Hsp60 and cellular anti- and proinflammatory processes and specifically address how Hsp60 appears to affect immune inflammation by at least two different mechanisms: as a ligand for innate immune receptors and as an antigen recognised by adaptive immune receptors. We will also look at the role of Hsp60 during immune cell activation in atherosclerosis, a significant risk factor during the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus. PMID:27478851

  4. Impact of seropositivity to Chlamydia pneumoniae and anti-hHSP60 on cardiovascular events in hemodialysis patients

    OpenAIRE

    Esposito, Pasquale; Tinelli, Carmine; Libetta, Carmelo; Gabanti, Elisa; Rampino, Teresa; Dal Canton, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Autoimmunity to heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) has been related to atherosclerosis. Chlamydia pneumoniae (CP), the most studied infectious agent implicated in promoting atherosclerosis, produces a form of HSP60, which can induce an autoimmune response, due to high antigenic homology with human HSP60 (hHSP60). In this study, we evaluated the correlations among anti-hHSP60 antibodies, CP infection, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in a high-risk population, such as patients undergoing hemodialys...

  5. Increased light intensity induces heat shock protein Hsp60 in coral species

    OpenAIRE

    Chow, Ari M.; Ferrier-Pagès, Christine; Khalouei, Sam; Reynaud, Stéphanie; Brown, Ian R.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of increased light intensity and heat stress on heat shock protein Hsp60 was examined in two coral species using a branched coral and a laminar coral, selected for their different resistance to environmental perturbation. Transient Hsp60 induction was observed in the laminar coral following either light or thermal stress. Sustained induction was observed when these stresses were combined. The branched coral exhibited comparatively weak transient Hsp60 induction after heat stress an...

  6. Cord blood CD4+ T cells respond to self heat shock protein 60 (HSP60.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joost A Aalberse

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To prevent harmful autoimmunity most immune responses to self proteins are controlled by central and peripheral tolerance. T cells specific for a limited set of self-proteins such as human heat shock protein 60 (HSP60 may contribute to peripheral tolerance. It is not known whether HSP60-specific T cells are present at birth and thus may play a role in neonatal tolerance. We studied whether self-HSP60 reactive T cells are present in cord blood, and if so, what phenotype these cells have. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMC of healthy, full term neonates (n = 21, were cultured with HSP60 and Tetanus Toxoid (TT to study antigen specific proliferation, cytokine secretion and up-regulation of surface markers. The functional capacity of HSP60-induced T cells was determined with in vitro suppression assays. Stimulation of CBMC with HSP60 led to CD4(+ T cell proliferation and the production of various cytokines, most notably IL-10, Interferon-gamma, and IL-6. HSP60-induced T cells expressed FOXP3 and suppressed effector T cell responses in vitro. CONCLUSION: Self-reactive HSP60 specific T cells are already present at birth. Upon stimulation with self-HSP60 these cells proliferate, produce cytokines and express FOXP3. These cells function as suppressor cells in vitro and thus they may be involved in the regulation of neonatal immune responses.

  7. STRESS AND ATHEROSCLEROSIS: MAY HSP60 BE THE MOLECULAR LINK?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Lipari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In last decades, incidence of cardiovascular diseases is increased. Among them, atherosclerosis is one of the most commons. It is a disorder of in- flammation and innate immunity following lipid accumulation. From a bio- logic perspective, the process of adhesion and transmigration of immune cells (monocytes and macrophages across the endothelium is a crucial step for atherogenesis and mature plaque rupture. Moreover, there is a relationship between inflammation, infection, autoimmunity and athero- sclerosis. Inflammation has received increasing attention in recent years as a cause of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. Autoimmune diseases are characterized by enhanced atherosclerosis. Humoral immune responses to mycobacterial Hsp65, as well as to human Hsp60 and oxLDL, have been established in a number of human autoimmune diseases and are considered to be significantly associated also with atherosclerosis.

  8. Increased levels of IgG antibodies against human HSP60 in patients with spondyloarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Hjelholt

    Full Text Available Spondyloarthritis (SpA comprises a heterogeneous group of inflammatory diseases, with strong association to human leukocyte antigen (HLA-B27. A triggering bacterial infection has been considered as the cause of SpA, and bacterial heat shock protein (HSP seems to be a strong T cell antigen. Since bacterial and human HSP60, also named HSPD1, are highly homologous, cross-reactivity has been suggested in disease initiation. In this study, levels of antibodies against bacterial and human HSP60 were analysed in SpA patients and healthy controls, and the association between such antibodies and disease severity in relation to HLA-B27 was evaluated.Serum samples from 82 patients and 50 controls were analysed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for immunoglobulin (IgG1, IgG2, IgG3 and IgG4 antibodies against human HSP60 and HSP60 from Chlamydia trachomatis, Salmonella enteritidis and Campylobacter jejuni. Disease severity was assessed by the clinical scorings Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI. Levels of IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies against human HSP60, but not antibodies against bacterial HSP60, were elevated in the SpA group compared with the control group. Association between IgG3 antibodies against human HSP60 and BASMI was shown in HLA-B27⁺ patients. Only weak correlation between antibodies against bacterial and human HSP60 was seen, and there was no indication of cross-reaction. These results suggest that antibodies against human HSP60 is associated with SpA, however, the theory that antibodies against human HSP60 is a specific part of the aetiology, through cross-reaction to bacterial HSP60, cannot be supported by results from this study. We suggest that the association between elevated levels of antibodies against human HSP60 and disease may reflect a general activation of the immune system and an increased

  9. Induction of hsp60 in the rotifer, Brachionus plicatilis exposed to dispersed and undispersed crude oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheelock, C.; Tjeerdema, R.; Wolfe, M. [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry

    1995-12-31

    The use of chemical dispersants to treat oil spills remains a controversial area. Questions arise as to whether the dispersed oil is in fact more toxic than the original spill, potentially increasing the exposure of organisms in the water column to the dispersed components. Stress proteins, including hsp60, are a group of highly conserved proteins that are induced in response to a wide variety of environmental agents, including UV light, heavy metals, and xenobiotics. They are constitutively expressed, but Brachionus plicatilis has been used to document increased hsp60 levels in response to different environmental stresses. Hsp60 was therefore selected as a sublethal endpoint for B. plicatilis exposed to a range of concentrations of a water accommodated fraction (WAF) of Prudhoe Bay Crude Oil (PBCO), a PCBO/dispersant (Corexit 9527) fraction and a mixture of Corexit 9527 alone. All exposures were done at concentrations below the no observable effect level (NOEL) and at two different salinities, 22 ppt and 34 ppt. Laemmli SDS-PAGE techniques followed by Western Blotting using hsp60 specific antibodies and chemiluminescent detection were used to isolate, identify and measure induced hsp60 as a percentage of control values. Hsp60 induction exhibited a biphasic response with maximal induction occurring at lower concentrations of all three different mixtures, WAF, PBCO/Corexit 9527, and Corexit 9527 alone. Preliminary data found that the dispersed oil is indeed more toxic in terms of hsp60 induction than both the undispersed oil and the dispersing agent alone.

  10. Increased Levels of IgG Antibodies against Human HSP60 in Patients with Spondyloarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Astrid Hjelholt; Carlsen, Thomas; Deleuran, Bent;

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Spondyloarthritis (SpA) comprises a heterogeneous group of inflammatory diseases, with strong association to human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27. SpA is suggested triggered by bacterial infection, and bacterial heat shock protein (HSP) seems to be a strong T cell antigen. Since...... severity in relation to HLA-B27 was evaluated. Material & Methods: Serum samples from 82 patients and 50 controls were analysed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for immunoglobulin (Ig)G1, IgG2, IgG3 and IgG4 antibodies against human HSP60 and HSP60 from Chlamydia trachomatis, Salmonella...... against human HSP60, but not antibodies against bacterial HSP60, were elevated in the SpA group compared with the control group. Association between IgG3 antibodies against human HSP60 and BASMI was shown in HLA-B27+ patients. Only weak correlation between antibodies against bacterial and human HSP60 was...

  11. Molecular cloning of heat shock protein 10 (Hsp10) and 60 (Hsp60) cDNAs and their expression analysis under thermal stress in the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dongxue; Sun, Lina; Liu, Shilin; Zhang, Libin; Ru, Xiaoshang; Zhao, Ye; Yang, Hongsheng

    2014-05-01

    Hsp10 and Hsp60 are important heat shock proteins (HSPs), which might be indispensable in the heat shock response and many other physiological processes. We obtained full-length cDNAs of genes hsp10 and hsp60 and classified their mRNA expression levels under thermal stress in the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus. Full-length hsp10 cDNA was 1528 bp containing a 5' untranslated region (UTR) of 83 bp, a 3' UTR of 1133 bp and an open reading frame (ORF) of 312 bp encoding 103 amino acid residues. Full-length hsp60 cDNA was 2560 bp containing a 118-bp 5' UTR, a 678-bp 3' UTR and a 1764-bp ORF encoding 586 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequences of Hsp10 and Hsp60 shared the highest identity with sequences of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, and phylogenetic trees showed that the evolution of Hsp10 and Hsp60 was almost in accord with the evolution of species. Further analysis by real-time PCR showed that the expression of hsp10 and hsp60 mRNA was highly up-regulated at 26 °C compared with other three groups (20, 22, 24 °C), and their expression in the intestine was in a time-dependent manner at 26 °C. The results suggested that hsp10 and hsp60 were involved in the heat-shock response in the sea cucumber A. japonicus. PMID:24721556

  12. Characterization and function analysis of Hsp60 and Hsp10 under different acute stresses in black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jinxuan; Fu, Mingjun; Zhao, Chao; Zhou, Falin; Yang, Qibin; Qiu, Lihua

    2016-03-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) are a class of highly conserved proteins produced in virtually all living organisms from bacteria to humans. Hsp60 and Hsp10, the most important mitochondrial chaperones, participate in environmental stress responses. In this study, the full-length complementary DNAs (cDNAs) of Hsp60 (PmHsp60) and Hsp10 (PmHsp10) were cloned from Penaeus monodon. Sequence analysis showed that PmHsp60 and PmHsp10 encoded polypeptides of 578 and 102 amino acids, respectively. The expression profiles of PmHsp60 and PmHsp10 were detected in the gills and hepatopancreas of the shrimps under pH challenge, osmotic stress, and heavy metal exposure, and results suggested that PmHsp60 and PmHsp10 were involved in the responses to these stimuli. ATPase and chaperone activity assay indicated that PmHsp60 could slow down protein denaturation and that Hsp60/Hsp10 may be combined to produce a chaperone complex with effective chaperone and ATPase activities. Overall, this study provides useful information to help further understand the functional mechanisms of the environmental stress responses of Hsp60 and Hsp10 in shrimp. PMID:26637414

  13. The expression of HSP60 and HSP10 in large bowel carcinomas with lymph node metastase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The involvement of Heat Shock Proteins (HSP) in cancer development and progression is a widely debated topic. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the presence and expression of HSP60 and HSP10 in a series of large bowel carcinomas and locoregional lymph nodes with and without metastases. 82 Astler and Coller's stage C2 colorectal cancers, of which 48 well-differentiated and 34 poorly-differentiated, were selected along with 661 lymph nodes, including 372 with metastases and 289 with reactive hyperplasia only, from the same tumours. Primitive tumours and both metastatic and reactive lymph nodes were studied; specifically, three different compartments of the lymph nodes, secondary follicle, paracortex and medullary sinus, were also analysed. An immunohistochemical research for HSP60 and HSP10 was performed and the semiquantitative results were analysed by statistical analysis to determine the correlation between HSPs expression and 1) tumour grading; 2) degree of inflammation; 3) number of lymph nodes involved; 4) lymph node compartment hyperplasia. Moreover, western blotting was performed on a smaller group of samples to confirm the immunohistochemical results. Our data show that the expression of HSP60, in both primary tumour and lymph node metastasis, is correlated with the tumoral grade, while the HSP10 expression is not. Nevertheless, the levels of HSP10 are commonly higher than the levels of HSP60. In addition, statistical analyses do not show any correlation between the degree of inflammation and the immunopositivity for both HSP60 and HSP10. Moreover, we find a significant correlation between the presence of lymph node metastases and the positivity for both HSP60 and HSP10. In particular, metastatic lymph nodes show a higher percentage of cells positive for both HSP60 and HSP10 in the secondary follicles, and for HSP10 in the medullary sinuses, when compared with hyperplastic lymph nodes. HSP60 and HSP10 may have diagnostic and prognostic

  14. Vanadyl ions binding to GroEL (HSP60) and inducing its depolymerization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Several vanadium compounds have been known for the hypoglycemic and anticancer effects. However, the mechanisms of the pharmacological and toxicological effects were not clear. In this work, we investigated the potential targets of vanadium in mitochondria. Vanadyl ions were found to bind to mitochondria from rat liver with a stoichiometry of 244±58 nmol/mg protein and an apparent dissocia- tion constant (Kd) of (2.0±0.8)×10-16 mol/L. Using size exclusion chromatography, a vanadium-binding protein was isolated and identified to be the 60-kDa heat shock protein (HSP60) by mass spectrometry analysis and immunoassays. Additionally, binding of vanadyl ions was found to result in depolymerization of homo-oligomeric HSP60 (GroEL). HSP60 is an indispensable molecular chaperone and involved in many kinds of pathogenesis of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, e.g. type 1 diabetes. Our results suggested that HSP60 could be a novel important target involved in the biological and/or toxicological effects of vanadium compounds.

  15. DECREASED SYNTHESIS AND INEFFICIENT MITOCHONDRIAL IMPORT OF HSP60 IN A PATIENT WITH A MITOCHONDRIAL ENCEPHALOMYOPATHY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HUCKRIEDE, A; AGSTERIBBE, E

    1994-01-01

    In a recent paper (Agsteribbe et al. (1993) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 193, 146-154) we suggested deficiency of heat shock protein 60 (hsp60) as the possible cause of a systemic mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with multiple deficiency of mitochondrial enzymes. In this paper we present new data w

  16. THE EXPRESSION OF HSP60 AND HSP10 IN LARGE BOWEL CARCINOMAS WITH LYMPH NODE METASTASE

    OpenAIRE

    Bartolotta Tommaso E; Marasà Lorenzo; Bucchieri Fabio; Rappa Francesca; David Sabrina; Cappello Francesco; Farina Felicia; Zummo Giovanni

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background The involvement of Heat Shock Proteins (HSP) in cancer development and progression is a widely debated topic. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the presence and expression of HSP60 and HSP10 in a series of large bowel carcinomas and locoregional lymph nodes with and without metastases. Methods 82 Astler and Coller's stage C2 colorectal cancers, of which 48 well-differentiated and 34 poorly-differentiated, were selected along with 661 lymph nodes, including...

  17. Concentration of circulating autoantibodies against HSP 60 is lowered through diving when compared to non-diving rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne B. Havnes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : Skin and ear infections, primarily caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa, are recurrent problems for saturation divers, whereas infections caused by P. aeruginosa are seldom observed in healthy people outside saturation chambers. Cystic fibrosis (CF patients suffer from pulmonary infections by P. aeruginosa, and it has been demonstrated that CF patients have high levels of autoantibodies against Heat shock protein 60 (HSP60 compared to controls, probably due to cross-reacting antibodies induced by P. aeruginosa. The present study investigated whether rats immunised with P. aeruginosa produced autoantibodies against their own HSP60 and whether diving influenced the level of circulating anti-HSP60 antibodies. Methods : A total of 24 rats were randomly assigned to one of three groups (‘immunised’, ‘dived’ and ‘immunised and dived’. The rats in group 1 and 3 were immunised with the bacteria P. aeruginosa, every other week. Groups 2 and 3 were exposed to simulated air dives to 400 kPa (4 ata with 45 min bottom time, every week for 7 weeks. Immediately after surfacing, the rats were anaesthetised and blood was collected from the saphenous vein. The amount of anti-HSP60 rat antibodies in the serum was analysed by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Results : The immunised rats (group 1 showed a significant increase in the level of autoantibodies against HSP60, whereas no autoantibodies were detected in the dived rats (group 2. The rats both immunised and dived (group 3 show no significant increase in circulating autoantibodies against HSP60. A possible explanation may be that HSP60 is expressed during diving and that cross-reacting antibodies are bound.

  18. Identification of a novel BBS gene (BBS12) highlights the major role of a vertebrate-specific branch of chaperonin-related proteins in Bardet-Biedl syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoetzel, Corinne; Muller, Jean; Laurier, Virginie; Davis, Erica E; Zaghloul, Norann A; Vicaire, Serge; Jacquelin, Cecile; Plewniak, Frederic; Leitch, Carmen C; Sarda, Pierre; Hamel, Christian; de Ravel, Thomy J L; Lewis, Richard Alan; Friederich, Evelyne; Thibault, Christelle; Danse, Jean-Marc; Verloes, Alain; Bonneau, Dominique; Katsanis, Nicholas; Poch, Olivier; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Dollfus, Helene

    2007-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is primarily an autosomal recessive ciliopathy characterized by progressive retinal degeneration, obesity, cognitive impairment, polydactyly, and kidney anomalies. The disorder is genetically heterogeneous, with 11 BBS genes identified to date, which account for ~70% of affected families. We have combined single-nucleotide-polymorphism array homozygosity mapping with in silico analysis to identify a new BBS gene, BBS12. Patients from two Gypsy families were homozygous and haploidentical in a 6-Mb region of chromosome 4q27. FLJ35630 was selected as a candidate gene, because it was predicted to encode a protein with similarity to members of the type II chaperonin superfamily, which includes BBS6 and BBS10. We found pathogenic mutations in both Gypsy families, as well as in 14 other families of various ethnic backgrounds, indicating that BBS12 accounts for approximately 5% of all BBS cases. BBS12 is vertebrate specific and, together with BBS6 and BBS10, defines a novel branch of the type II chaperonin superfamily. These three genes are characterized by unusually rapid evolution and are likely to perform ciliary functions specific to vertebrates that are important in the pathophysiology of the syndrome, and together they account for about one-third of the total BBS mutational load. Consistent with this notion, suppression of each family member in zebrafish yielded gastrulation-movement defects characteristic of other BBS morphants, whereas simultaneous suppression of all three members resulted in severely affected embryos, possibly hinting at partial functional redundancy within this protein family. PMID:17160889

  19. Impact of seropositivity to Chlamydia pneumoniae and anti-hHSP60 on cardiovascular events in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Pasquale; Tinelli, Carmine; Libetta, Carmelo; Gabanti, Elisa; Rampino, Teresa; Dal Canton, Antonio

    2011-03-01

    Autoimmunity to heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) has been related to atherosclerosis. Chlamydia pneumoniae (CP), the most studied infectious agent implicated in promoting atherosclerosis, produces a form of HSP60, which can induce an autoimmune response, due to high antigenic homology with human HSP60 (hHSP60). In this study, we evaluated the correlations among anti-hHSP60 antibodies, CP infection, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in a high-risk population, such as patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD). Thirty-two patients (67.9 ± 13.9 years; male/female, 23:9) on regular HD were enrolled. Global absolute cardiovascular risk (GCR) was assessed using the Italian CUORE Project's risk charts, which evaluate age, gender, smoking habits, diabetes, systolic blood pressure, and serum cholesterol. The occurrence of cardiovascular events during a 24-month follow-up was recorded. Seropositivity to CP and the presence of anti-hHSP60 antibodies were tested by specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Inflammation was assessed by measurement of C-reactive protein (CRP) serum levels. Fifteen healthy sex and age-matched (61.9 ± 9.5 years; male/female, 11:4) subjects were the control group. Fifteen of 32 patients resulted seropositive for CP. CP + patients were older than CP-, while they did not differ for GCR, CRP, and dialytic parameters. CVD incidence was significantly higher in CP+ (9 CP+ vs 2 CP-, p < 0.05). Cox analysis recognized that the incidence of CVD was independently correlated with seropositivity to CP (HR, 7.59; p = 0.01; 95% CI = 1.63-35.4). On the other hand, there were no significant differences in anti-hHSP60 levels among CP+, CP- and healthy subjects: 18.11 μg/mL (14.8-47.8), 31.4 μg/mL (23.2-75.3), and 24.72 μg/mL (17.7-41.1), respectively. Anti-hHSP60 did not correlate to GCR, CRP, and incidence of CVD. In conclusion, our data suggest that anti-hHSP60 autoimmune response is not related to CP infection and CP-related CVD risk

  20. Chaperonin GroEL Reassembly: An Effect of Protein Ligands and Solvent Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya Ryabova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Chaperonin GroEL is a complex oligomeric heat shock protein (Hsp60 assisting the correct folding and assembly of other proteins in the cell. An intriguing question is how GroEL folds itself. According to the literature, GroEL reassembly is dependent on chaperonin ligands and solvent composition. Here we demonstrate dependence of GroEL reassembly efficiency on concentrations of the essential factors (Mg2+, ADP, ATP, GroES, ammonium sulfate, NaCl and glycerol. Besides, kinetics of GroEL oligomerization in various conditions was monitored by the light scattering technique and proved to be two-exponential, which suggested accumulation of a certain oligomeric intermediate. This intermediate was resolved as a heptamer by nondenaturing blue electrophoresis of GroEL monomers during their assembly in the presence of both Mg-ATP and co-chaperonin GroES. Presumably, this intermediate heptamer plays a key role in formation of the GroEL tetradecameric particle. The role of co-chaperonin GroES (Hsp10 in GroEL assembly is also discussed.

  1. Role of CD1A and HSP60 in the antitumoral response of oesophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Zummo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Oesophageal cancer (OC is one of the most common and severe forms of tumor. A wider knowledge of molecular mechanisms which lead to a normal epithelium becoming a neoplasm may reveal new strategies to improve treatment and outcome of this disease. In this review, we report recent findings concerning molecular events which take place during carcinogenesis of the oesophagus. In particular, we focus on the role of two molecules, CD1a and Hsp60, which are overexpressed in oesophageal and many other types of tumor. Both molecules may present tumor antigens and promote in situ the stimulation of an antitumoral immune activity. We suggest there is a synergistic action between these molecules. Further knowledge about their intracellular pathways and extracellular roles may help develop new antitumoral tools for OC.

  2. Hsp60 expression profiles in the reef-building coral Seriatopora caliendrum subjected to heat and cold shock regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seveso, Davide; Montano, Simone; Strona, Giovanni; Orlandi, Ivan; Galli, Paolo; Vai, Marina

    2016-08-01

    Climate changes have increased the intensity/frequency of extreme thermal events, which represent serious threats to the health of reef-building corals. Since the vulnerability of corals exposed to thermal stresses are related to their ability to regulate Heat shock proteins (Hsps), we have analyzed together the time related expression profiles of the mitochondrial Hsp60 and the associated changes in tissue pigmentation in Seriatopora caliendrum subjected to 48 h of heat and cold treatments characterized by moderate (±2 °C) and severe (±6 °C) shocks. For the first time, an Hsp60 response was observed in a scleractinian coral exposed to cold stresses. Furthermore, the Hsp60 modulations and the changes in the tissue coloration were found to be specific for each treatment. A strong down-regulation at the end of the treatments was observed following both the severe shocks, but only the severe heat stress led to bleaching in concert with the lowest levels of Hsp60, suggesting that a severe heat shock can be more deleterious than an exposure to a severe cold temperature. On the contrary, a moderate cold stress seems to be more harmful than a moderate temperature increase, which could allow coral acclimation. Our results can provide a potential framework for understanding the physiological tolerance of corals under possible future climate changes. PMID:27183199

  3. ANTI-HSP60 and ANTI-HSP70 antibody levels and micro/ macrovascular complications in type 1 diabetes: the EURODIAB Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gruden, G.; Bruno, G.; Chaturvedi, N.;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The heat shock proteins 60 and 70 (HSP60, HSP70) play an important role in cytoprotection. Under stress conditions they are released into the circulation and elicit an immune response. Anti-HSP60 and anti-HSP70 antibody levels have been associated with cardiovascular disease. Type 1 d...

  4. IgG subclass antibodies to human and bacterial HSP60 are not associated with disease activity and progression over time in axial spondyloarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Thomas Gelsing; Hjelholt, Astrid; Jurik, Anne Grethe;

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Spondyloarthritis (SpA), an interrelated group of rheumatic diseases, has been suggested to be triggered by bacterial infections prior to the development of an autoimmune response that causes inflammation of the spinal and peripheral joints. Because human heat shock protein 60 (HSP60......), recently renamed HSPD1, and bacterial HSP60 are highly homologous, immunological cross-reactivity has been proposed as a mechanism of disease initiation. However, previous investigations of the humoral immune response to HSP60 in SpA patients have lacked determination of immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclasses...... HSP60 of three reactive arthritis-related bacteria; human HSP60; and the microorganisms Chlamydia trachomatis and C. pneumoniae were determined by ELISA. Serum samples collected from 2004 to 2006 and in 2010 and 2011 from 39 axial SpA patients were analyzed and compared with samples from 39 healthy...

  5. Chaperonin filaments: The archael cytoskeleton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trent, J.D.; Kagawa, H.K.; Yaoi, Takuro; Olle, E.; Zaluzec, N.J.

    1997-08-01

    Chaperonins are multi-subunit double-ring complexed composed of 60-kDa proteins that are believed to mediate protein folding in vivo. The chaperonins in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae are composed of the organism`s two most abundant proteins, which represent 4% of its total protein and have an intracellular concentration of {ge} 3.0 mg/ml. At concentrations of 1.0 mg/ml, purified chaperonin proteins aggregate to form ordered filaments. Filament formation, which requires Mg{sup ++} and nucleotide binding (not hydrolysis), occurs at physiological temperatures under conditions suggesting filaments may exist in vivo. If the estimated 4,600 chaperonins per cell, formed filaments in vivo, they could create a matrix of filaments that would span the diameter of an average S. shibatae cell 100 times. Direct observations of unfixed, minimally treated cells by intermediate voltage electron microscopy (300 kV) revealed an intracellular network of filaments that resembles chaperonin filaments produced in vitro. The hypothesis that the intracellular network contains chaperonins is supported by immunogold analyses. The authors propose that chaperonin activity may be regulated in vivo by filament formation and that chaperonin filaments may serve a cytoskeleton-like function in archaea and perhaps in other prokaryotes.

  6. Developmental and hyperthermia-induced expression of the heat shock proteins HSP60 and HSP70 in tissues of the housefly Musca domestica: an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita Sharma

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The expression pattern of two major chaperones, the heat shock proteins (HSPs HSP60 and HSP70 was studied in vitro in tissues of the housefly Musca domestica during larval and adult stages of development to identify their immunological relatives and understand their functional significance in normal cellular activities and during thermal stress. Fluorographs of labeled polypeptides and western blots demonstrated that both HSPs are expressed constitutively and heat-induced in all the larval and adult cell types examined. The pattern of whole tissue immunocytochemical staining using anti-HSP60 and anti-HSP70 antibodies corresponded well with the observations from western blots or fluorographs. In developing oocytes, both constitutive and heat inducible expression of HSP60 were regulated in an oocyte stage-specific manner. In unstressed ovaries the expression of these proteins was less pronounced in early stage oocytes (1st - 8th than at later stages (9th and onward. The heat shock, however, induced both HSP70 and HSP60 to a significantly high level in early stage oocytes (1st-8th as compared to their respective controls. Our findings indicate the involvement of the HSP60 and HSP70 proteins in the development, growth and differentiation of both somatic and germ line tissues. Furthermore, the enhanced co-expression of HSP70 and HSP60 upon heat shock in various larval and adult cell types suggests the possible role of HSP60 in thermoprotection.

  7. Phylogenetic relationships of organellar Hsp90 homologs reveal fundamental differences to organellar Hsp70 and Hsp60 evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emelyanov, Victor V

    2002-10-16

    In agreement with endosymbiont theory for the origin of organelles, mitochondria and chloroplasts (plastids) are universally accepted to have monophyletically arisen from within alpha-proteobacteria and cyanobacteria, respectively. Convincing particular evidence in support of this theory emerged from phylogenetic analysis of highly conserved, ubiquitous heat shock proteins (Hsps) chaperonin 60 and Hsp70. These apparently indispensable general chaperones have proven to be highly useful molecular tracers of organellar origin. Phylogenetic relationships of Hsp90--a less conserved and less widely distributed general chaperone--are reported here that are strikingly incongruent with canonical patterns of endosymbiotic ancestry. It appears that Hsp90 of chloroplasts derives from the endoplasmic reticulum-specific isoform while mitochondrial Hsp90 homologs affiliate with a eubacterial lineage other than alpha subdivision of proteobacteria. These data suggest that endosymbiont htpG genes, encoding Hsp90, have been either functionally displaced by pre-existing nuclear genes or completely lost during establishment of organelles and subsequently added to initial organellar complement. PMID:12459260

  8. Whey protein hydrolysate enhances HSP90 but does not alter HSP60 and HSP25 in skeletal muscle of rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Soares Moura

    Full Text Available Whey protein hydrolysate (WPH intake has shown to increase HSP70 expression. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether WPH intake would also influences HSP90, HSP60 and HSP25 expression, as well as associated parameters. Forty-eight male Wistar rats were divided into sedentary (unstressed and exercised (stressed groups, and were fed with three different sources of protein: whey protein (WP, whey protein hydrolysate (WPH and casein (CAS as a control, based on the AIN93G diet for 3 weeks. WPH intake increased HSP90 expression in both sedentary and exercised animals compared to WP or CAS, however no alteration was found from exercise or diet to HSP60 or HSP25. Co-chaperone Aha1 and p-HSF1 were also increased in the exercised animals fed with WPH in comparison with WP or CAS, consistent with enhanced HSP90 expression. VEGF and p-AKT were increased in the WPH exercised group. No alteration was found in BCKDH, PI3-Kinase (p85, GFAT, OGT or PGC for diet or exercise. The antioxidant system GPx, catalase and SOD showed different responses to diet and exercise. The data indicate that WPH intake enhanced factors related to cell survival, such as HSP90 and VEGF, but does not alter HSP60 or HSP25 in rat skeletal muscle.

  9. Cpn20: siamese twins of the chaperonin world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Celeste; Bonshtien, Anat; Farchi-Pisanty, Odelia; Vitlin, Anna; Azem, Abdussalam

    2009-02-01

    The chloroplast cpn20 protein is a functional homolog of the cpn10 co-chaperonin, but its gene consists of two cpn10-like units joined head-to-tail by a short chain of amino acids. This double protein is unique to plastids and was shown to exist in plants as well plastid-containing parasites. In vitro assays showed that this cpn20 co-chaperonin is a functional homolog of cpn10. In terms of structure, existing data indicate that the oligomer is tetrameric, yet it interacts with a heptameric cpn60 partner. Thus, the functional oligomeric structure remains a mystery. In this review, we summarize what is known about this distinctive chaperonin and use a bioinformatics approach to examine the expression of cpn20 in Arabidopsis thaliana relative to other chaperonin genes in this species. In addition, we examine the primary structure of the two homologous domains for similarities and differences, in comparison with cpn10 from other species. Lastly, we hypothesize as to the oligomeric structure and raison d'être of this unusual co-chaperonin homolog. PMID:19031045

  10. The complexity of chloroplast chaperonins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitlin Gruber, Anna; Nisemblat, Shahar; Azem, Abdussalam; Weiss, Celeste

    2013-12-01

    Type I chaperonins are large oligomeric protein ensembles that are involved in the folding and assembly of other proteins. Chloroplast chaperonins and co-chaperonins exist in multiple copies of two distinct isoforms that can combine to form a range of labile oligomeric structures. This complex system increases the potential number of chaperonin substrates and possibilities for regulation. The incorporation of unique subunits into the oligomer can modify substrate specificity. Some subunits are upregulated in response to heat shock and some show organ-specific expression, whereas others possess additional functions that are unrelated to their role in protein folding. Accumulating evidence suggests that specific subunits have distinct roles in biogenesis of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco). PMID:24035661

  11. CHAPERONIN 20 mediates iron superoxide dismutase (FeSOD) activity independent of its co-chaperonin role in Arabidopsis chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, W Y; Huang, C H; Liu, A C; Cheng, C P; Li, S H; Chang, W C; Weiss, C; Azem, A; Jinn, T L

    2013-01-01

    Iron superoxide dismutases (FeSODs; FSDs) are primary antioxidant enzymes in Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplasts. The stromal FSD1 conferred the only detectable FeSOD activity, whereas the thylakoid membrane- and nucleoid-co-localized FSD2 and FSD3 double mutant showed arrested chloroplast development. FeSOD requires cofactor Fe for its activity, but its mechanism of activation is unclear. We used reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), gel filtration chromatography, LC-MS/MS, protoplast transient expression and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) analyses to identify and characterize a factor involved in FeSOD activation. We identified the chloroplast-localized co-chaperonin CHAPERONIN 20 (CPN20) as a mediator of FeSOD activation by direct interaction. The relationship between CPN20 and FeSOD was confirmed by in vitro experiments showing that CPN20 alone could enhance FSD1, FSD2 and FSD3 activity. The in vivo results showed that CPN20-overexpressing mutants and mutants with defective co-chaperonin activity increased FSD1 activity, without changing the chaperonin CPN60 protein level, and VIGS-induced downregulation of CPN20 also led to decreased FeSOD activity. Our findings reveal that CPN20 can mediate FeSOD activation in chloroplasts, a role independent of its known function in the chaperonin system. PMID:23057508

  12. Allosteric Mechanisms in Chaperonin Machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Ranit; Horovitz, Amnon

    2016-06-01

    Chaperonins are nanomachines that facilitate protein folding by undergoing energy (ATP)-dependent movements that are coordinated in time and space owing to complex allosteric regulation. They consist of two back-to-back stacked oligomeric rings with a cavity at each end where protein substrate folding can take place. Here, we focus on the GroEL/GroES chaperonin system from Escherichia coli and, to a lesser extent, on the more poorly characterized eukaryotic chaperonin CCT/TRiC. We describe their various functional (allosteric) states and how they are affected by substrates and allosteric effectors that include ATP, ADP, nonfolded protein substrates, potassium ions, and GroES (in the case of GroEL). We also discuss the pathways of intra- and inter-ring allosteric communication by which they interconvert and the coupling between allosteric transitions and protein folding reactions. PMID:26726755

  13. Sperm sorting procedure induces a redistribution of Hsp70 but not Hsp60 and Hsp90 in boar spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinaci, Marcella; Volpe, Sara; Bernardini, Chiara; de Ambrogi, Marco; Tamanini, Carlo; Seren, Eraldo; Galeati, Giovanna

    2006-01-01

    Heat shock proteins, besides their protective function against stresses, have been recently indicated as key factors for sperm fertilizing ability. Since sexing sperm by high-speed flow-cytometry subjects them to different physical, mechanical, and chemical stresses, the present study was designed to verify, by immunofluorescence and Western blot, whether the sorting procedure induces any modification in the amount and cellular distribution of heat shock proteins 60, 70, and 90 (Hsp60, Hsp70, Hsp90). Immunolocalization and Western blot quantification of both Hsp60 and Hsp90 did not reveal differences between unsorted and sorted semen. On the contrary, a redistribution of Hsp70 immunoreactivity from the equatorial subsegment toward the equator of sperm cells was recorded after sorting; this relocation suggests capacitation-like changes of sperm membrane. This modification seems to be caused mainly by incubation with Hoechst 33342, while both passage of sperm through flow cytometer and laser beam represent only minor stimuli. A further Hsp70 redistribution seems to be due to the final steps of sperm sorting, charging, and deflection of drops, and to the dilution during collection. On the other hand, staining procedure and mechanical stress seem to be the factors most injurious to sperm viability. Moreover, Hsp70 relocation was deeply influenced by the storage method. In fact, storing sexed spermatozoa, after centrifugation, in a small volume in presence of seminal plasma induced a reversion of Hsp70 redistribution, while storage in the diluted catch fluid of collection tubes caused Hsp70 relocation in most sorted spermatozoa. PMID:16870948

  14. Chaperonin filaments: The archaeal cytoskeleton?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, Jonathan D.; Kagawa, Hiromi K.; Yaoi, Takuro; Olle, Eric; Zaluzec, Nestor J.

    1997-01-01

    Chaperonins are high molecular mass double-ring structures composed of 60-kDa protein subunits. In the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae the two chaperonin proteins represent ≈4% of its total protein and have a combined intracellular concentration of >30 mg/ml. At concentrations ≥ 0.5 mg/ml purified chaperonins form filaments in the presence of Mg2+ and nucleotides. Filament formation requires nucleotide binding (not hydrolysis), and occurs at physiological temperatures in biologically relevant buffers, including a buffer made from cell extracts. These observations suggest that chaperonin filaments may exist in vivo and the estimated 4600 chaperonins per cell suggest that such filaments could form an extensive cytostructure. We observed filamentous structures in unfixed, uranyl-acetate-stained S. shibatae cells, which resemble the chaperonin filaments in size and appearance. ImmunoGold (Janssen) labeling using chaperonin antibodies indicated that many chaperonins are associated with insoluble cellular structures and these structures appear to be filamentous in some areas, although they could not be uranyl-acetate-stained. The existence of chaperonin filaments in vivo suggests a mechanism whereby their protein-folding activities can be regulated. More generally, the filaments themselves may play a cytoskeletal role in Archaea. PMID:9144246

  15. Expression levels of hsc70 and hsp60 are developmentally regulated during B-cell maturation and not associated to childhood c-ALL at presentation or relapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wehner, Peder Skov; Nielsen, Bendt; Hokland, Marianne

    2003-01-01

    Heat shock proteins are potent regulators of apoptosis, and so they may also be involved in normal cellular differentiation and cancerogenesis. We used quantitative two-dimensional gel electrophoresis for determining whether either the constitutive chaperonic heat shock cognate protein 70 (hsc70)...... hsc70 and hsp60 expression during B-cell ontogenesis....

  16. HSP60, a protein downregulated by IGFBP7 in colorectal carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Lin Jie; Xing Xiaoming; Ma Yu; Wang Yinghong; Ruan Wenjing; Cui Jing; Lai Maode

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background In our previous study, it was well defined that IGFBP7 was an important tumor suppressor gene in colorectal cancer (CRC). We aimed to uncover the downstream molecules responsible for IGFBP7's behaviour in this study. Methods Differentially expressed protein profiles between PcDNA3.1(IGFBP7)-transfected RKO cells and the empty vector transfected controls were generated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry (MS) identification. The selected diff...

  17. Inside the chaperonin toolbox: theoretical and computational models for chaperonin mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite their immense importance to cellular function, the precise mechanism by which chaperonins aid in the folding of other proteins remains unknown. Experimental evidence seems to imply that there is some diversity in how chaperonins interact with their substrates and this has led to a number of different models for chaperonin mechanism. Computational methods have the advantage of accessing temporal and spatial resolutions that are difficult for experimental techniques; therefore, these methods have been applied to this problem for some time. Here we review the relevant computational models for chaperonin function. We propose that these models need not be mutually exclusive and in fact can be thought of as a set of tools the chaperonin may use to aid in the folding of a diverse array of substrate proteins. We conclude with a discussion of the role of water in the chaperonin mechanism, a factor that until recently has been largely neglected by most computational studies of chaperonin function

  18. Chloroplast β chaperonins from A. thaliana function with endogenous cpn10 homologs in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitlin, Anna; Weiss, Celeste; Demishtein-Zohary, Keren; Rasouly, Aviram; Levin, Doron; Pisanty-Farchi, Odelia; Breiman, Adina; Azem, Abdussalam

    2011-09-01

    The involvement of type I chaperonins in bacterial and organellar protein folding has been well-documented. In E. coli and mitochondria, these ubiquitous and highly conserved proteins form chaperonin oligomers of identical 60 kDa subunits (cpn60), while in chloroplasts, two distinct cpn60 α and β subunit types co-exist together. The primary sequence of α and β subunits is ~50% identical, similar to their respective homologies to the bacterial GroEL. Moreover, the A. thaliana genome contains two α and four β genes. The functional significance of this variability in plant chaperonin proteins has not yet been elucidated. In order to gain insight into the functional variety of the chloroplast chaperonin family members, we reconstituted β homo-oligomers from A. thaliana following their expression in bacteria and subjected them to a structure-function analysis. Our results show for the first time, that A. thaliana β homo-oligomers can function in vitro with authentic chloroplast co-chaperonins (ch-cpn10 and ch-cpn20). We also show that oligomers made up of different β subunit types have unique properties and different preferences for co-chaperonin partners. We propose that chloroplasts may contain active β homo-oligomers in addition to hetero-oligomers, possibly reflecting a variety of cellular roles. PMID:21633907

  19. Ordered biological nanostructures formed from chaperonin polypeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, Jonathan D. (Inventor); McMillan, R. Andrew (Inventor); Kagawa, Hiromi (Inventor); Paavola, Chad D. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The following application relates to nanotemplates, nanostructures, nanoarrays and nanodevices formed from wild-type and mutated chaperonin polypeptides, methods of producing such compositions, methods of using such compositions and particular chaperonin polypeptides that can be utilized in producing such compositions.

  20. Ordered Nanostructures Made Using Chaperonin Polypeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, Jonathan; McMillan, Robert; Paavola, Chad; Mogul, Rakesh; Kagawa, Hiromi

    2004-01-01

    A recently invented method of fabricating periodic or otherwise ordered nanostructures involves the use of chaperonin polypeptides. The method is intended to serve as a potentially superior and less expensive alternative to conventional lithographic methods for use in the patterning steps of the fabrication of diverse objects characterized by features of the order of nanometers. Typical examples of such objects include arrays of quantum dots that would serve as the functional building blocks of future advanced electronic and photonic devices. A chaperonin is a double-ring protein structure having a molecular weight of about 60 plus or minus 5 kilodaltons. In nature, chaperonins are ubiquitous, essential, subcellular structures. Each natural chaperonin molecule comprises 14, 16, or 18 protein subunits, arranged as two stacked rings approximately 16 to 18 nm tall by approximately 15 to 17 nm wide, the exact dimensions depending on the biological species in which it originates. The natural role of chaperonins is unknown, but they are believed to aid in the correct folding of other proteins, by enclosing unfolded proteins and preventing nonspecific aggregation during assembly. What makes chaperonins useful for the purpose of the present method is that under the proper conditions, chaperonin rings assemble themselves into higher-order structures. This method exploits such higher-order structures to define nanoscale devices. The higher-order structures are tailored partly by choice of chemical and physical conditions for assembly and partly by using chaperonins that have been mutated. The mutations are made by established biochemical techniques. The assembly of chaperonin polypeptides into such structures as rings, tubes, filaments, and sheets (two-dimensional crystals) can be regulated chemically. Rings, tubes, and filaments of some chaperonin polypeptides can, for example, function as nano vessels if they are able to absorb, retain, protect, and release gases or

  1. New GroEL-like chaperonin of bacteriophage OBP Pseudomonas fluorescens suppresses thermal protein aggregation in an ATP-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenyuk, Pavel I; Orlov, Victor N; Sokolova, Olga S; Kurochkina, Lidia P

    2016-08-01

    Recently, we discovered and studied the first virus-encoded chaperonin of bacteriophage EL Pseudomonas aeruginosa, gene product (gp) 146. In the present study, we performed bioinformatics analysis of currently predicted GroEL-like proteins encoded by phage genomes in comparison with cellular and mitochondrial chaperonins. Putative phage chaperonins share a low similarity and do not form a monophyletic group; nevertheless, they are closer to bacterial chaperonins in the phylogenetic tree. Experimental investigation of putative GroEL-like chaperonin proteins has been continued by physicochemical and functional characterization of gp246 encoded by the genome of Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteriophage OBP. Unlike the more usual double-ring architecture of chaperonins, including the EL gp146, the recombinant gp246 produced by Escherichia coli cells has been purified as a single heptameric ring. It possesses ATPase activity and does not require a co-chaperonin for its function. In vitro experiments demonstrated that gp246 is able to suppress the thermal protein inactivation and aggregation in an ATP-dependent manner, thus indicating chaperonin function. Single-particle electron microscopy analysis revealed the different conformational states of OBP chaperonin, depending on the bound nucleotide. PMID:27247423

  2. Cellular chaperonin CCTγ contributes to rabies virus replication during infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinyang; Wu, Xiaopeng; Zan, Jie; Wu, Yongping; Ye, Chengjin; Ruan, Xizhen; Zhou, Jiyong

    2013-07-01

    Rabies, as the oldest known infectious disease, remains a serious threat to public health worldwide. The eukaryotic cytosolic chaperonin TRiC/CCT complex facilitates the folding of proteins through ATP hydrolysis. Here, we investigated the expression, cellular localization, and function of neuronal CCTγ during neurotropic rabies virus (RABV) infection using mouse N2a cells as a model. Following RABV infection, 24 altered proteins were identified by using two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, including 20 upregulated proteins and 4 downregulated proteins. In mouse N2a cells infected with RABV or cotransfected with RABV genes encoding nucleoprotein (N) and phosphoprotein (P), confocal microscopy demonstrated that upregulated cellular CCTγ was colocalized with viral proteins N and P, which formed a hollow cricoid inclusion within the region around the nucleus. These inclusions, which correspond to Negri bodies (NBs), did not form in mouse N2a cells only expressing the viral protein N or P. Knockdown of CCTγ by lentivirus-mediated RNA interference led to significant inhibition of RABV replication. These results demonstrate that the complex consisting of viral proteins N and P recruits CCTγ to NBs and identify the chaperonin CCTγ as a host factor that facilitates intracellular RABV replication. This work illustrates how viruses can utilize cellular chaperonins and compartmentalization for their own benefit. PMID:23637400

  3. GroE chaperonins assisted functional expression of bacterial enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Peng-Fei; Zhang, Guo-Chang; Liu, Jing-Jing; Kwak, Suryang; Tsai, Ching-Sung; Kong, In Iok; Sung, Bong Hyun; Sohn, Jung-Hoon; Wang, Shu-Guang; Jin, Yong-Su

    2016-10-01

    Rapid advances in the capabilities of reading and writing DNA along with increasing understanding of microbial metabolism at the systems-level have paved an incredible path for metabolic engineering. Despite these advances, post-translational tools facilitating functional expression of heterologous enzymes in model hosts have not been developed well. Some bacterial enzymes, such as Escherichia coli xylose isomerase (XI) and arabinose isomerase (AI) which are essential for utilizing cellulosic sugars, cannot be functionally expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We hypothesized and demonstrated that the mismatching of the HSP60 chaperone systems between bacterial and eukaryotic cells might be the reason these bacterial enzymes cannot be functionally expressed in yeast. The results showed that the co-expression of E. coli GroE can facilitate the functional expression of E. coli XI and AI, as well as the Agrobacterium tumefaciens D-psicose epimerase in S. cerevisiae. The co-expression of bacterial chaperonins in S. cerevisiae is a promising post-translational strategy for the functional expression of bacterial enzymes in yeast. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2149-2155. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27003667

  4. Tolerogenic responses of CD206+, CD83+, FOXP3+, and CTLA-4 to sericin/polyvinyl alcohol/glycerin scaffolds relevant to IL-33 and HSP60 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampawong, Sumate; Aramwit, Pornanong

    2016-09-01

    Silk sericin-releasing (sericin/polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/glycerin) scaffolds have been designed for wound dressing applications using different fabrication techniques that influence scaffold antigenicity. The immunological tolerance of scaffolds depends on the balance of immunogenic and tolerogenic responses modulated by dendritic cells (DCs). An in vivo skin implantation model was used to compare the tolerogenic effect of sericin/PVA/glycerin scaffolds prepared by freeze-drying versus salt-leaching techniques, using an Allevyn® scaffold as a control. Immunohistochemical and histopathological studies were performed to evaluate tolerogenic DCs (CD206+), immunogenic DCs (CD83+), regulatory T-cells (FOXP3+ and CTLA-4), a proinflammatory cytokine (interleukin 33: IL-33), a stress marker (heat shock protein 60; HSP60), histopathological changes and related inflammatory cells. It was found that both sericin/PVA/glycerin scaffolds were tolerogenic and induced early activated Treg functions, while the Allevyn® scaffold was immunogenic. However, the tolerance of the freeze-dried sericin/PVA/glycerin scaffolds was not as consistent as the salt-leached sericin/PVA/glycerin scaffolds, indicated by the low level of CTLA-4 expression. This was probably due to molecular cross-linking and the morphological and mechanical properties of the freeze-drying technique, which would enhance the immune response. Severe inflammatory responses (including mast cell degranulation and foreign body giant cell accumulation) and histopathological changes (including fat infiltration and fibrosis formation) were mainly found with the Allevyn® scaffold, presumably from its architecture and chemical composition, especially polyurethane. The up-regulation of IL-33 and HSP60 with the Allevyn® scaffold was correlated with the inflammatory and pathological levels. Our findings suggested that salt-leached sericin/PVA/glycerin scaffolds were tolerogenic, induced a low inflammatory response and were

  5. Crystal structure of the human mitochondrial chaperonin symmetrical football complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisemblat, Shahar; Yaniv, Oren; Parnas, Avital; Frolow, Felix; Azem, Abdussalam

    2015-05-12

    Human mitochondria harbor a single type I chaperonin system that is generally thought to function via a unique single-ring intermediate. To date, no crystal structure has been published for any mammalian type I chaperonin complex. In this study, we describe the crystal structure of a football-shaped, double-ring human mitochondrial chaperonin complex at 3.15 Å, which is a novel intermediate, likely representing the complex in an early stage of dissociation. Interestingly, the mitochondrial chaperonin was captured in a state that exhibits subunit asymmetry within the rings and nucleotide symmetry between the rings. Moreover, the chaperonin tetradecamers show a different interring subunit arrangement when compared to GroEL. Our findings suggest that the mitochondrial chaperonins use a mechanism that is distinct from the mechanism of the well-studied Escherichia coli system. PMID:25918392

  6. The stress kit: A new method based on competitive reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction to quantify the expression of human αB-crystallin, Hsp27, and Hsp60

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bajramović, J.J.; Geutskens, S.B.; Bsibsi, M.; Boot, M.; Hassankhan, R.; Verhulst, K.C.; Noort, J.M. van

    2000-01-01

    We describe a reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction method for the semiquantitative detection of mRNAs encoding the human heat shock proteins αβ-crystallin, Hsp27, and Hsp60. The method involves the coamplification of cellular mRNA-derived cDNA with a dilution series of a competitor fragme

  7. In vitro interactions of the aphid endosymbiotic SymL chaperonin with barley yellow dwarf virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filichkin, S A; Brumfield, S; Filichkin, T P; Young, M J

    1997-01-01

    Barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV)-vector relationships suggest that there are specific interactions between BYDV virions and the aphid's cellular components. However, little is known about vector factors that mediate virion recognition, cellular trafficking, and accumulation within the aphid. Symbionins are molecular chaperonins produced by intracellular endosymbiotic bacteria and are the most abundant proteins found in aphids. To elucidate the potential role of symbionins in BYDV transmission, we have isolated and characterized two new symbionin symL genes encoded by the endosymbionts which are harbored by the BYDV aphid vectors Rhopalosiphum padi and Sitobion avenae. Endosymbiont symL-encoded proteins have extensive homology with the pea aphid SymL and Escherichia coli GroEL chaperonin. Recombinant and native SymL proteins can be assembled into oligomeric complexes which are similar to the GroEL oligomer. R. padi SymL protein demonstrates an in vitro binding affinity for BYDV and its recombinant readthrough polypeptide. In contrast to the R. padi SymL, the closely related GroEL does not exhibit a significant binding affinity either for BYDV or for its recombinant readthrough polypeptide. Comparative sequence analysis between SymL and GroEL was used to identify potential SymL-BYDV binding sites. Affinity binding of SymL to BYDV in vitro suggests a potential involvement of endosymbiotic chaperonins in interactions with virions during their trafficking through the aphid. PMID:8985385

  8. Ordered nanoparticle arrays formed on engineered chaperonin protein templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, R. Andrew; Paavola, Chad D.; Howard, Jeanie; Chan, Suzanne L.; Zaluzec, Nestor J.; Trent, Jonathan D.

    2002-01-01

    Traditional methods for fabricating nanoscale arrays are usually based on lithographic techniques. Alternative new approaches rely on the use of nanoscale templates made of synthetic or biological materials. Some proteins, for example, have been used to form ordered two-dimensional arrays. Here, we fabricated nanoscale ordered arrays of metal and semiconductor quantum dots by binding preformed nanoparticles onto crystalline protein templates made from genetically engineered hollow double-ring structures called chaperonins. Using structural information as a guide, a thermostable recombinant chaperonin subunit was modified to assemble into chaperonins with either 3 nm or 9 nm apical pores surrounded by chemically reactive thiols. These engineered chaperonins were crystallized into two-dimensional templates up to 20 microm in diameter. The periodic solvent-exposed thiols within these crystalline templates were used to size-selectively bind and organize either gold (1.4, 5 or 10nm) or CdSe-ZnS semiconductor (4.5 nm) quantum dots into arrays. The order within the arrays was defined by the lattice of the underlying protein crystal. By combining the self-assembling properties of chaperonins with mutations guided by structural modelling, we demonstrate that quantum dots can be manipulated using modified chaperonins and organized into arrays for use in next-generation electronic and photonic devices.

  9. Characterization of a natural mouse monoclonal antibody recognizing epitopes shared by oxidized low-density lipoprotein and chaperonin 60 of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunguang; Kankaanpää, Jari; Kummu, Outi; Turunen, S Pauliina; Akhi, Ramin; Bergmann, Ulrich; Pussinen, Pirkko; Remes, Anne M; Hörkkö, Sohvi

    2016-06-01

    Natural antibodies are predominantly antibodies of the IgM isotype present in the circulation of all vertebrates that have not been previously exposed to exogenous antigens. They are often directed against highly conserved epitopes and bind to ligands of varying chemical composition with low affinity. In this study we cloned and characterized a natural mouse monoclonal IgM antibody selected by binding to malondialdehyde acetaldehyde epitopes on low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Interestingly, the IgM antibody cross-reacted with Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) bacteria, a key pathogenic microbe in periodontitis reported to be associated with risk factor for atherosclerosis, thus being named as Aa_Mab. It is more intriguing that the binding molecule of Aa to Aa_Mab IgM was found to be Aa chaperonin 60 or HSP60, a member of heat-shock protein family, behaving not only as a chaperone for correct protein folding but also as a powerful virulence factor of the bacteria for inducing bone resorption and as a putative pathogenic factor in atherosclerosis. The findings will highlight the question of whether molecular mimicry between pathogen components and oxidized LDL could lead to atheroprotective immune activity, and also would be of great importance in potential application of immune response-based preventive and therapeutic strategies against atherosclerosis and periodontal disease. PMID:26786003

  10. Chaperonin Polymers in Archaea: The Cytoskeleton of Prokaryotes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, J. D.; Kagawa, H. K.; Zaluzec, N. J.

    1997-07-01

    Chaperonins are protein complexes that play a critical role in folding nascent polypeptides under normal conditions and refolding damaged proteins under stress conditions. In all organisms these complexes are composed of evolutionarily conserved 60-kDa proteins arranged in double-ring structures with between 7 and 9 protein subunits per ring. These double ring structures are assumed to be the functional units in vivo, although they have never been observed inside cells. Here the authors show that the purified chaperonin from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae, which is closely related to chaperonins in eukaryotes, has a double ring structure at low concentrations (0.1 mg/ml), but at more physiological concentrations, the rings stack end to end to form polymers. The polymers are stable at physiological temperatures (75 C) and closely resemble structures observed inside unfixed S. shibatae cells. The authors suggest that in vivo chaperonin activity may be regulated by polymerization and that chaperonin polymers may act as a cytoskeleton-like structure in archaea and bacteria.

  11. Chaperonin filaments : their formation and an evaluation of methods for studying them.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaoi, T.; Kagawa, K. H.; Trent, J. D.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology

    1998-08-01

    Chaperonins are multisubunit protein complexes that can be isolated from cells as high-molecular-weight structures that appear as double rings in the electron microscope. We recently discovered that chaperonin double rings isolated from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae, when incubated at physiological temperatures in the presence of ATP and Mg{sup 2+}, stacked into filaments; we hypothesized that these filaments are related to filaments seen inside S. shibatae cells and that chaperonins exist as filaments in vivo. This paper elucidates the conditions under which we have observed S. shibatae chaperonins to form filaments and evaluates native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), TEM, spectrophotometry, and centrifugation as methods for studying these filaments. We observed that in the presence of Mg{sup 2+} combined with ATP, ADP, ATP{gamma}S, or GTP, native PAGE indicated that chaperonin subunits assembled into double rings and that the conformation of these double rings was effected by nucleotide binding, but we saw no indication of chaperonin filament formation. Under these same conditions, however, TEM, spectroscopy, and centrifugation methods indicated that chaperonin subunits and double rings had assembled into filaments. We determined that this discrepancy in the representation of the chaperonin structure was due to the native PAGE method itself. When we exposed chaperonin filaments to the electrophoretic field used in native PAGE, the filaments dissociated into double rings. This suggests that TEM, spectrophotometry, and centrifugation are the preferred methods for studying the higher-order structures of chaperonins, which are likely to be of biological significance.

  12. Difference in the distribution pattern of substrate enzymes in the metabolic network of Escherichia coli, according to chaperonin requirement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niwa Tatsuya

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chaperonins are important in living systems because they play a role in the folding of proteins. Earlier comprehensive analyses identified substrate proteins for which folding requires the chaperonin GroEL/GroES (GroE in Escherichia coli, and they revealed that many chaperonin substrates are metabolic enzymes. This result implies the importance of chaperonins in metabolism. However, the relationship between chaperonins and metabolism is still unclear. Results We investigated the distribution of chaperonin substrate enzymes in the metabolic network using network analysis techniques as a first step towards revealing this relationship, and found that as chaperonin requirement increases, substrate enzymes are more laterally distributed in the metabolic. In addition, comparative genome analysis showed that the chaperonin-dependent substrates were less conserved, suggesting that these substrates were acquired later on in evolutionary history. Conclusions This result implies the expansion of metabolic networks due to this chaperonin, and it supports the existing hypothesis of acceleration of evolution by chaperonins. The distribution of chaperonin substrate enzymes in the metabolic network is inexplicable because it does not seem to be associated with individual protein features such as protein abundance, which has been observed characteristically in chaperonin substrates in previous works. However, it becomes clear by considering this expansion process due to chaperonin. This finding provides new insights into metabolic evolution and the roles of chaperonins in living systems.

  13. Chaperonin Structure - The Large Multi-Subunit Protein Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Roterman

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The multi sub-unit protein structure representing the chaperonins group is analyzed with respect to its hydrophobicity distribution. The proteins of this group assist protein folding supported by ATP. The specific axial symmetry GroEL structure (two rings of seven units stacked back to back - 524 aa each and the GroES (single ring of seven units - 97 aa each polypeptide chains are analyzed using the hydrophobicity distribution expressed as excess/deficiency all over the molecule to search for structure-to-function relationships. The empirically observed distribution of hydrophobic residues is confronted with the theoretical one representing the idealized hydrophobic core with hydrophilic residues exposure on the surface. The observed discrepancy between these two distributions seems to be aim-oriented, determining the structure-to-function relation. The hydrophobic force field structure generated by the chaperonin capsule is presented. Its possible influence on substrate folding is suggested.

  14. Cellular Chaperonin CCTγ Contributes to Rabies Virus Replication during Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jinyang; Wu, Xiaopeng; Zan, Jie; Wu, Yongping; YE, CHENGJIN; Ruan, Xizhen; Zhou, Jiyong

    2013-01-01

    Rabies, as the oldest known infectious disease, remains a serious threat to public health worldwide. The eukaryotic cytosolic chaperonin TRiC/CCT complex facilitates the folding of proteins through ATP hydrolysis. Here, we investigated the expression, cellular localization, and function of neuronal CCTγ during neurotropic rabies virus (RABV) infection using mouse N2a cells as a model. Following RABV infection, 24 altered proteins were identified by using two-dimensional electrophoresis and ma...

  15. Preparation and characterization of polyclonal antibodies against human chaperonin 10

    OpenAIRE

    Somodevilla-Torres, Maria J.; Hillyard, Narelle C.; Morton, Halle; Alewood, Dianne; Halliday, Judy A.; Alewood, Paul F.; Vesey, David A; Walsh, Michael D.; Cavanagh, Alice C.

    2000-01-01

    Abstract Early pregnancy factor (EPF) has been identified as an extracellular homologue of chaperonin 10 (Cpn10), a heat shock protein that functions within the cell as a molecular chaperone. Here, we report the production of polyclonal antibodies directed against several different regions of the human Cpn10 molecule and their application to specific protein quantitation and localization techniques. These antibodies will be valuable tools in further studies to elucidate the mechanisms underly...

  16. Chaperonins fight aminoglycoside-induced protein misfolding and promote short-term tolerance in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goltermann, Lise; Good, Liam; Bentin, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    survival, whereas inhibition of chaperonin expression sensitized bacteria. Overexpression of the DnaK/DnaJ/GrpE chaperone system similarly facilitated survival but did not promote growth of aminoglycoside-treated bacteria. Inhibition of chaperonin expression sensitized bacteria to aminoglycosides as...

  17. The composition, structure and stability of a group II chaperonin are temperature regulated in a hyperthermophilic archaeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Hiromi K; Yaoi, Takuro; Brocchieri, Luciano; McMillan, R Andrew; Alton, Thomas; Trent, Jonathan D

    2003-04-01

    The hyperthermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae contains group II chaperonins, known as rosettasomes, which are two nine-membered rings composed of three different 60 kDa subunits (TF55 alpha, beta and gamma). We sequenced the gene for the gamma subunit and studied the temperature-dependent changes in alpha, beta and gamma expression, their association into rosettasomes and their phylogenetic relationships. Alpha and beta gene expression was increased by heat shock (30 min, 86 degrees C) and decreased by cold shock (30 min, 60 degrees C). Gamma expression was undetectable at heat shock temperatures and low at normal temperatures (75-79 degrees C), but induced by cold shock. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated that in vitro alpha and beta subunits form homo-oligomeric rosettasomes, and mixtures of alpha, beta and gamma form hetero-oligomeric rosettasomes. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that beta homo-oligomeric rosettasomes and all hetero-oligomeric rosettasomes associate into filaments. In vivo rosettasomes were hetero-oligomeric with an average subunit ratio of 1alpha:1beta:0.1gamma in cultures grown at 75 degrees C, a ratio of 1alpha:3beta:1gamma in cultures grown at 60 degrees C and a ratio of 2alpha:3beta:0gamma after 86 degrees C heat shock. Using differential scanning calorimetry, we determined denaturation temperatures (Tm) for alpha, beta and gamma subunits of 95.7 degrees C, 96.7 degrees C and 80.5 degrees C, respectively, and observed that rosettasomes containing gamma were relatively less stable than those with alpha and/or beta only. We propose that, in vivo, the rosettasome structure is determined by the relative abundance of subunits and not by a fixed geometry. Furthermore, phylogenetic analyses indicate that archaeal chaperonin subunits underwent multiple duplication events within species (paralogy). The independent evolution of these paralogues raises the possibility that chaperonins have functionally diversified between

  18. Enhanced expression of soluble human papillomavirus L1 through coexpression of molecular chaperonin in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Dong; Zha, Xiao; Yu, Xianghui; Wu, Yuqing

    2016-04-01

    The major recombinant capsid protein L1 of human papillomavirus (HPV) is widely used to produce HPV prophylactic vaccines. However, the quality of soluble and active expression of L1 in Escherichia coli was below the required amount. Coexpression with the chaperonin GroEL/ES enhanced L1 expression. Overexpressing GroEL/ES increased the soluble expression level of glutathione S-transferase-fused L1 (GST-L1) by approximately ∼3 fold. The yield of HPV type 16 L1 pentamer (L1-p) was ∼2 fold higher than that in a single expression system after purification through size-exclusion chromatograph. The expression and purification conditions were then optimized. The yield of L1-p was enhanced by ∼5 fold, and those of HPV types 18 and 58 L1-p increased by ∼3 and ∼2 folds, respectively, compared with that in the single expression system. Coexpressing the mono-site mutant HPV16 L1 L469A with GroEL/ES increased L1-p yield by ∼7 fold compared with strains expressing the wild-type L1 gene. L1-p was then characterized using circular dichroism spectra, UV-vis cloud point, dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscope analyses. Results indicated that the conformation and biological characteristics of L1-p were identical to that of native L1. Hence, overexpressing chaperonin in E. coli can increase the expression level of GST-L1 and L1-p production after purification. This finding may contribute to the development of a platform for prophylactic HPV vaccines. PMID:26732286

  19. Dataset concerning GroEL chaperonin interaction with proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Marchenkov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available GroEL chaperonin is well-known to interact with a wide variety of polypeptide chains. Here we show the data related to our previous work (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pep.2015.11.020 [1], and concerning the interaction of GroEL with native (lysozyme, α-lactalbumin and denatured (lysozyme, α-lactalbumin and pepsin proteins in solution. The use of affinity chromatography on the base of denatured pepsin for GroEL purification from fluorescent impurities is represented as well.

  20. Alteration of chaperonin60 and pancreatic enzyme in pancreatic acinar cell under pathological condition

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yong-Yu; Bendayan, Moise

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the changes of chaperonin60 (Cpn60) and pancreatic enzymes in pancreatic acinar cells, and to explore their roles in the development of experimental diabetes and acute pancreatitis (AP).

  1. Trivalent arsenic inhibits the functions of chaperonin complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xuewen; Reissman, Stefanie; Douglas, Nick R; Huang, Zhiwei; Yuan, Daniel S; Wang, Xiaoling; McCaffery, J Michael; Frydman, Judith; Boeke, Jef D

    2010-10-01

    The exact molecular mechanisms by which the environmental pollutant arsenic works in biological systems are not completely understood. Using an unbiased chemogenomics approach in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we found that mutants of the chaperonin complex TRiC and the functionally related prefoldin complex are all hypersensitive to arsenic compared to a wild-type strain. In contrast, mutants with impaired ribosome functions were highly arsenic resistant. These observations led us to hypothesize that arsenic might inhibit TRiC function, required for folding of actin, tubulin, and other proteins postsynthesis. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found that arsenic treatment distorted morphology of both actin and microtubule filaments. Moreover, arsenic impaired substrate folding by both bovine and archaeal TRiC complexes in vitro. These results together indicate that TRiC is a conserved target of arsenic inhibition in various biological systems. PMID:20660648

  2. Arabidopsis chloroplast chaperonin 10 is a calmodulin-binding protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    Calcium regulates diverse cellular activities in plants through the action of calmodulin (CaM). By using (35)S-labeled CaM to screen an Arabidopsis seedling cDNA expression library, a cDNA designated as AtCh-CPN10 (Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast chaperonin 10) was cloned. Chloroplast CPN10, a nuclear-encoded protein, is a functional homolog of E. coli GroES. It is believed that CPN60 and CPN10 are involved in the assembly of Rubisco, a key enzyme involved in the photosynthetic pathway. Northern analysis revealed that AtCh-CPN10 is highly expressed in green tissues. The recombinant AtCh-CPN10 binds to CaM in a calcium-dependent manner. Deletion mutants revealed that there is only one CaM-binding site in the last 31 amino acids of the AtCh-CPN10 at the C-terminal end. The CaM-binding region in AtCh-CPN10 has higher homology to other chloroplast CPN10s in comparison to GroES and mitochondrial CPN10s, suggesting that CaM may only bind to chloroplast CPN10s. Furthermore, the results also suggest that the calcium/CaM messenger system is involved in regulating Rubisco assembly in the chloroplast, thereby influencing photosynthesis. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  3. Differential effects of co-chaperonin homologs on cpn60 oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonshtien, Anat L; Parnas, Avital; Sharkia, Rajach; Niv, Adina; Mizrahi, Itzhak; Azem, Abdussalam; Weiss, Celeste

    2009-09-01

    In this study, we have investigated the relationship between chaperonin/co-chaperonin binding, ATP hydrolysis, and protein refolding in heterologous chaperonin systems from bacteria, chloroplast, and mitochondria. We characterized two types of chloroplast cpn60 oligomers, ch-cpn60 composed of alpha and beta subunits (alpha(7)beta(7) ch-cpn60) and one composed of all beta subunits (beta(14) ch-cpn60). In terms of ATPase activity, the rate of ATP hydrolysis increased with protein concentration up to 60 microM, reflecting a concentration at which the oligomers are stable. At high concentrations of cpn60, all cpn10 homologs inhibited ATPase activity of alpha(7)beta(7) ch-cpn60. In contrast, ATPase of beta(14) ch-cpn60 was inhibited only by mitochondrial cpn10, supporting previous reports showing that beta(14) is functional only with mitochondrial cpn10 and not with other cpn10 homologs. Surprisingly, direct binding assays showed that both ch-cpn60 oligomer types bind to bacterial, mitochondrial, and chloroplast cpn10 homologs with an equal apparent affinity. Moreover, mitochondrial cpn60 binds chloroplast cpn20 with which it is not able to refold denatured proteins. Protein refolding experiments showed that in such instances, the bound protein is released in a conformation that is not able to refold. The presence of glycerol, or subsequent addition of mitochondrial cpn10, allows us to recover enzymatic activity of the substrate protein. Thus, in our systems, the formation of co-chaperonin/chaperonin complexes does not necessarily lead to protein folding. By using heterologous oligomer systems, we are able to separate the functions of binding and refolding in order to better understand the chaperonin mechanism. PMID:19224397

  4. GroEL-Assisted Protein Folding: Does It Occur Within the Chaperonin Inner Cavity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennady V. Semisotnov

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The folding of protein molecules in the GroEL inner cavity under the co-chaperonin GroES lid is widely accepted as a crucial event of GroEL-assisted protein folding. This review is focused on the data showing that GroEL-assisted protein folding may proceed out of the complex with the chaperonin. The models of GroEL-assisted protein folding assuming ligand-controlled dissociation of nonnative proteins from the GroEL surface and their folding in the bulk solution are also discussed.

  5. P. falciparum cpn20 is a bona fide co-chaperonin that can replace GroES in E. coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Vitlin Gruber

    Full Text Available Human malaria is among the most ubiquitous and destructive tropical, parasitic diseases in the world today. The causative agent, Plasmodium falciparum, contains an unusual, essential organelle known as the apicoplast. Inhibition of this degenerate chloroplast results in second generation death of the parasite and is the mechanism by which antibiotics function in treating malaria. In order to better understand the biochemistry of this organelle, we have cloned a putative, 20 kDa, co-chaperonin protein, Pf-cpn20, which localizes to the apicoplast. Although this protein is homologous to the cpn20 that is found in plant chloroplasts, its ability to function as a co-chaperonin was questioned in the past. In the present study, we carried out a structural analysis of Pf-cpn20 using circular dichroism and analytical ultracentrifugation and then used two different approaches to investigate the ability of this protein to function as a co-chaperonin. In the first approach, we purified recombinant Pf-cpn20 and tested its ability to act as a co-chaperonin for GroEL in vitro, while in the second, we examined the ability of Pf-cpn20 to complement an E. coli depletion of the essential bacterial co-chaperonin GroES. Our results demonstrate that Pf-cpn20 is fully functional as a co-chaperonin in vitro. Moreover, the parasitic co-chaperonin is able to replace GroES in E. coli at both normal and heat-shock temperatures. Thus, Pf-cpn20 functions as a co-chaperonin in chaperonin-mediated protein folding. The ability of the malarial protein to function in E. coli suggests that this simple system can be used as a tool for further analyses of Pf-cpn20 and perhaps other chaperone proteins from P. falciparum.

  6. P. falciparum cpn20 is a bona fide co-chaperonin that can replace GroES in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitlin Gruber, Anna; Nisemblat, Shahar; Zizelski, Gal; Parnas, Avital; Dzikowski, Ron; Azem, Abdussalam; Weiss, Celeste

    2013-01-01

    Human malaria is among the most ubiquitous and destructive tropical, parasitic diseases in the world today. The causative agent, Plasmodium falciparum, contains an unusual, essential organelle known as the apicoplast. Inhibition of this degenerate chloroplast results in second generation death of the parasite and is the mechanism by which antibiotics function in treating malaria. In order to better understand the biochemistry of this organelle, we have cloned a putative, 20 kDa, co-chaperonin protein, Pf-cpn20, which localizes to the apicoplast. Although this protein is homologous to the cpn20 that is found in plant chloroplasts, its ability to function as a co-chaperonin was questioned in the past. In the present study, we carried out a structural analysis of Pf-cpn20 using circular dichroism and analytical ultracentrifugation and then used two different approaches to investigate the ability of this protein to function as a co-chaperonin. In the first approach, we purified recombinant Pf-cpn20 and tested its ability to act as a co-chaperonin for GroEL in vitro, while in the second, we examined the ability of Pf-cpn20 to complement an E. coli depletion of the essential bacterial co-chaperonin GroES. Our results demonstrate that Pf-cpn20 is fully functional as a co-chaperonin in vitro. Moreover, the parasitic co-chaperonin is able to replace GroES in E. coli at both normal and heat-shock temperatures. Thus, Pf-cpn20 functions as a co-chaperonin in chaperonin-mediated protein folding. The ability of the malarial protein to function in E. coli suggests that this simple system can be used as a tool for further analyses of Pf-cpn20 and perhaps other chaperone proteins from P. falciparum. PMID:23326533

  7. Cloning, characterization and sub-cellular localization of gamma subunit of T-complex protein-1 (chaperonin) from Leishmania donovani

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The study presents cloning and characterization of TCP1γ gene from L. donovani. ► TCP1γ is a subunit of T-complex protein-1 (TCP1), a chaperonin class of protein. ► LdTCPγ exhibited differential expression in different stages of promastigotes. ► LdTCPγ co-localized with actin, a cytoskeleton protein. ► The data suggests that this gene may have a role in differentiation/biogenesis. ► First report on this chapronin in Leishmania. -- Abstract: T-complex protein-1 (TCP1) complex, a chaperonin class of protein, ubiquitous in all genera of life, is involved in intracellular assembly and folding of various proteins. The gamma subunit of TCP1 complex (TCP1γ), plays a pivotal role in the folding and assembly of cytoskeleton protein(s) as an individual or complexed with other subunits. Here, we report for the first time cloning, characterization and expression of the TCP1γ of Leishmania donovani (LdTCP1γ), the causative agent of Indian Kala-azar. Primary sequence analysis of LdTCP1γ revealed the presence of all the characteristic features of TCP1γ. However, leishmanial TCP1γ represents a distinct kinetoplastid group, clustered in a separate branch of the phylogenic tree. LdTCP1γ exhibited differential expression in different stages of promastigotes. The non-dividing stationary phase promastigotes exhibited 2.5-fold less expression of LdTCP1γ as compared to rapidly dividing log phase parasites. The sub-cellular distribution of LdTCP1γ was studied in log phase promastigotes by employing indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. The protein was present not only in cytoplasm but it was also localized in nucleus, peri-nuclear region, flagella, flagellar pocket and apical region. Co-localization of LdTCP1γ with actin suggests that, this gene may have a role in maintaining the structural dynamics of cytoskeleton of parasite.

  8. Cloning, characterization and sub-cellular localization of gamma subunit of T-complex protein-1 (chaperonin) from Leishmania donovani

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhaskar,; Kumari, Neeti [Division of Biochemistry, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Chattar Manzil Palace, PO Box 173, Lucknow (India); Goyal, Neena, E-mail: neenacdri@yahoo.com [Division of Biochemistry, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Chattar Manzil Palace, PO Box 173, Lucknow (India)

    2012-12-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The study presents cloning and characterization of TCP1{gamma} gene from L. donovani. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TCP1{gamma} is a subunit of T-complex protein-1 (TCP1), a chaperonin class of protein. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LdTCP{gamma} exhibited differential expression in different stages of promastigotes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LdTCP{gamma} co-localized with actin, a cytoskeleton protein. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The data suggests that this gene may have a role in differentiation/biogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First report on this chapronin in Leishmania. -- Abstract: T-complex protein-1 (TCP1) complex, a chaperonin class of protein, ubiquitous in all genera of life, is involved in intracellular assembly and folding of various proteins. The gamma subunit of TCP1 complex (TCP1{gamma}), plays a pivotal role in the folding and assembly of cytoskeleton protein(s) as an individual or complexed with other subunits. Here, we report for the first time cloning, characterization and expression of the TCP1{gamma} of Leishmania donovani (LdTCP1{gamma}), the causative agent of Indian Kala-azar. Primary sequence analysis of LdTCP1{gamma} revealed the presence of all the characteristic features of TCP1{gamma}. However, leishmanial TCP1{gamma} represents a distinct kinetoplastid group, clustered in a separate branch of the phylogenic tree. LdTCP1{gamma} exhibited differential expression in different stages of promastigotes. The non-dividing stationary phase promastigotes exhibited 2.5-fold less expression of LdTCP1{gamma} as compared to rapidly dividing log phase parasites. The sub-cellular distribution of LdTCP1{gamma} was studied in log phase promastigotes by employing indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. The protein was present not only in cytoplasm but it was also localized in nucleus, peri-nuclear region, flagella, flagellar pocket and apical region. Co-localization of LdTCP1{gamma} with actin suggests

  9. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YML064C, YOR020C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available th this bait as prey (0) YOR020C HSP10 Mitochondrial matrix co-chaperonin that inhibits the ATPase activity of Hsp60p, a mitochondri... YOR020C Prey gene name HSP10 Prey description Mitochondrial matrix co-chaperonin that...ure on prey (YPD) 15 Literature shared by bait and prey 3 Literature shari...YML064C TEM1 GTP-binding protein of the ras superfamily involved in termination of M-phase; contr...a; 10 kD heat shock protein with similarity to E. coli groES Rows with this prey as prey (3)

  10. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15138-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available iciarum heat shock protein 60 ... 56 1e-14 4 ( AY116642 ) Bartonella schoenbuchensis heat shock protein Hsp....=60 kDa chaperonin; AltName: Full=Protein ... 257 4e-67 M82975_2( M82975 |pid:none) Brucella abo...252 1e-65 B43827( B43827 ) chaperonin groEL - Brucella abortus (strain S19) ... 252 1e-65 ( P19882 ) RecName: Full... 9e-09 3 ( AF299357 ) Bartonella alsatica HSP60 gene, partial cds. 56 1e-08 3 ( CP000590 ) Ostreococcus luci...CP001393_2046( CP001393 |pid:none) Anaerocellum thermophilum DSM 6... 228 2e-58 AY328549_2( AY328549 |pid:none) Enterococcus fla

  11. Plastid chaperonin proteins Cpn60α and Cpn60β are required for plastid division in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osteryoung Katherine W

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plastids arose from a free-living cyanobacterial endosymbiont and multiply by binary division as do cyanobacteria. Plastid division involves nucleus-encoded homologs of cyanobacterial division proteins such as FtsZ, MinD, MinE, and ARC6. However, homologs of many other cyanobacterial division genes are missing in plant genomes and proteins of host eukaryotic origin, such as a dynamin-related protein, PDV1 and PDV2 are involved in the division process. Recent identification of plastid division proteins has started to elucidate the similarities and differences between plastid division and cyanobacterial cell division. To further identify new proteins that are required for plastid division, we characterized previously and newly isolated plastid division mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. Results Leaf cells of two mutants, br04 and arc2, contain fewer, larger chloroplasts than those of wild type. We found that ARC2 and BR04 are identical to nuclear genes encoding the plastid chaperonin 60α (ptCpn60α and chaperonin 60β (ptCpn60β proteins, respectively. In both mutants, plastid division FtsZ ring formation was partially perturbed though the level of FtsZ2-1 protein in plastids of ptcpn60β mutants was similar to that in wild type. Phylogenetic analyses showed that both ptCpn60 proteins are derived from ancestral cyanobacterial proteins. The A. thaliana genome encodes two members of ptCpn60α family and four members of ptCpn60β family respectively. We found that a null mutation in ptCpn60α abolished greening of plastids and resulted in an albino phenotype while a weaker mutation impairs plastid division and reduced chlorophyll levels. The functions of at least two ptCpn60β proteins are redundant and the appearance of chloroplast division defects is dependent on the number of mutant alleles. Conclusion Our results suggest that both ptCpn60α and ptCpn60β are required for the formation of a normal plastid division apparatus, as

  12. Circular Permutation of a Chaperonin Protein: Biophysics and Application to Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paavola, Chad; Chan, Suzanne; Li, Yi-Fen; McMillan, R. Andrew; Trent, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    We have designed five circular permutants of a chaperonin protein derived from the hyperthermophilic organism Sulfolobus shibatae. These permuted proteins were expressed in E. coli and are well-folded. Furthermore, all the permutants assemble into 18-mer double rings of the same form as the wild-type protein. We characterized the thermodynamics of folding for each permutant by both guanidine denaturation and differential scanning calorimetry. We also examined the assembly of chaperonin rings into higher order structures that may be used as nanoscale templates. The results show that circular permutation can be used to tune the thermodynamic properties of a protein template as well as facilitating the fusion of peptides, binding proteins or enzymes onto nanostructured templates.

  13. Single-molecule fluorescence polarization study of conformational change in archaeal group II chaperonin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Iizuka

    Full Text Available Group II chaperonins found in archaea and in eukaryotic cytosol mediate protein folding without a GroES-like cofactor. The function of the cofactor is substituted by the helical protrusion at the tip of the apical domain, which forms a built-in lid on the central cavity. Although many studies on the change in lid conformation coupled to the binding and hydrolysis of nucleotides have been conducted, the molecular mechanism of lid closure remains poorly understood. Here, we performed a single-molecule polarization modulation to probe the rotation of the helical protrusion of a chaperonin from a hyperthermophilic archaeum, Thermococcus sp. strain KS-1. We detected approximately 35° rotation of the helical protrusion immediately after photorelease of ATP. The result suggests that the conformational change from the open lid to the closed lid state is responsible for the approximately 35° rotation of the helical protrusion.

  14. Structural and Functional Insights into the Evolution and Stress Adaptation of Type II Chaperonins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaston, Jessica J; Smits, Callum; Aragão, David; Wong, Andrew S W; Ahsan, Bilal; Sandin, Sara; Molugu, Sudheer K; Molugu, Sanjay K; Bernal, Ricardo A; Stock, Daniela; Stewart, Alastair G

    2016-03-01

    Chaperonins are essential biological complexes assisting protein folding in all kingdoms of life. Whereas homooligomeric bacterial GroEL binds hydrophobic substrates non-specifically, the heterooligomeric eukaryotic CCT binds specifically to distinct classes of substrates. Sulfolobales, which survive in a wide range of temperatures, have evolved three different chaperonin subunits (α, β, γ) that form three distinct complexes tailored for different substrate classes at cold, normal, and elevated temperatures. The larger octadecameric β complexes cater for substrates under heat stress, whereas smaller hexadecameric αβ complexes prevail under normal conditions. The cold-shock complex contains all three subunits, consistent with greater substrate specificity. Structural analysis using crystallography and electron microscopy reveals the geometry of these complexes and shows a novel arrangement of the α and β subunits in the hexadecamer enabling incorporation of the γ subunit. PMID:26853941

  15. Significance of the N-terminal domain for the function of chloroplast cpn20 chaperonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonshtien, Anat L; Weiss, Celeste; Vitlin, Anna; Niv, Adina; Lorimer, George H; Azem, Abdussalam

    2007-02-16

    Chaperonins cpn60 and cpn10 are essential proteins involved in cellular protein folding. Plant chloroplasts contain a unique version of the cpn10 co-chaperonin, cpn20, which consists of two homologous cpn10-like domains (N-cpn20 and C-cpn20) that are connected by a short linker region. Although cpn20 seems to function like other single domain cpn10 oligomers, the structure and specific functions of the domains are not understood. We mutated amino acids in the "mobile loop" regions of N-cpn20, C-cpn20 or both: a highly conserved glycine, which was shown to be important for flexibility of the mobile loop, and a leucine residue shown to be involved in binding of co-chaperonin to chaperonin. The mutant proteins were purified and their oligomeric structure validated by gel filtration, native gel electrophoresis, and circular dichroism. Functional assays of protein refolding and inhibition of GroEL ATPase both showed (i) mutation of the conserved glycine reduced the activity of cpn20, whether in N-cpn20 (G32A) or C-cpn20 (G130A). The same mutation in the bacterial cpn10 (GroES G24A) had no effect on activity. (ii) Mutations in the highly conserved leucine of N-cpn20 (L35A) and in the corresponding L27A of GroES resulted in inactive protein. (iii) In contrast, mutant L133A, in which the conserved leucine of C-cpn20 was altered, retained 55% activity. We conclude that the structure of cpn20 is much more sensitive to alterations in the mobile loop than is the structure of GroES. Moreover, only N-cpn20 is necessary for activity of cpn20. However, full and efficient functioning requires both domains. PMID:17178727

  16. In vitro interactions of the aphid endosymbiotic SymL chaperonin with barley yellow dwarf virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Filichkin, S A; Brumfield, S; Filichkin, T P; Young, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    Barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV)-vector relationships suggest that there are specific interactions between BYDV virions and the aphid's cellular components. However, little is known about vector factors that mediate virion recognition, cellular trafficking, and accumulation within the aphid. Symbionins are molecular chaperonins produced by intracellular endosymbiotic bacteria and are the most abundant proteins found in aphids. To elucidate the potential role of symbionins in BYDV transmission...

  17. On the assembly of dodecameric glutamine synthetase from stable chaperonin complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, M T

    1993-07-01

    For many in vitro protein-folding reactions, the fraction of correctly folded product declines as the initial protein concentration increases due primarily to misfolding and aggregation reactions. Under optimal conditions and in the presence of ATP, chaperonins (groEL and groES) enhanced the renaturation of dodecameric glutamine synthetase (GS) with yields of active enzyme between 75 and 85% of the original activity (Fisher, M.T. (1992) Biochemistry 31, 3955-3963). In spite of this enhancement, a concentration-dependent decline in recoverable activity was observed when increasing concentrations of unfolded GS were rapidly mixed with renaturation buffer containing a 2-fold molar excess (GS subunits:groEL oligomer) of chaperonins. When a stable groEL-GS complex, formed under optimal conditions, was concentrated 4-fold by centrifugal ultrafiltration prior to ATP addition, the amount of total active GS (percent of the original activity) recovered remained at optimal levels and no longer showed a concentration-dependent decline. The GS subunits that are initially bound and then released from groEL by ATP are assembly-competent. It is proposed that the subunits are no longer able to kinetically equilibrate with folding intermediates that misfold or aggregate. If a stable groEL-protein substrate complex can be amassed without loss of activity, this will facilitate studies on molecular aspects of chaperonin release mechanisms and oligomeric protein assembly. PMID:8100224

  18. A Versatile Platform for Nanotechnology Based on Circular Permutation of a Chaperonin Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paavola, Chad; McMillan, Andrew; Trent, Jonathan; Chan, Suzanne; Mazzarella, Kellen; Li, Yi-Fen

    2004-01-01

    A number of protein complexes have been developed as nanoscale templates. These templates can be functionalized using the peptide sequences that bind inorganic materials. However, it is difficult to integrate peptides into a specific position within a protein template. Integrating intact proteins with desirable binding or catalytic activities is an even greater challenge. We present a general method for modifying protein templates using circular permutation so that additional peptide sequence can be added in a wide variety of specific locations. Circular permutation is a reordering of the polypeptide chain such that the original termini are joined and new termini are created elsewhere in the protein. New sequence can be joined to the protein termini without perturbing the protein structure and with minimal limitation on the size and conformation of the added sequence. We have used this approach to modify a chaperonin protein template, placing termini at five different locations distributed across the surface of the protein complex. These permutants are competent to form the double-ring structures typical of chaperonin proteins. The permuted double-rings also form the same assemblies as the unmodified protein. We fused a fluorescent protein to two representative permutants and demonstrated that it assumes its active structure and does not interfere with assembly of chaperonin double-rings.

  19. Molecular diagnostic tools for detection and differentiation of phytoplasmas based on chaperonin-60 reveal differences in host plant infection patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim J Dumonceaux

    Full Text Available Phytoplasmas ('Candidatus Phytoplasma' spp. are insect-vectored bacteria that infect a wide variety of plants, including many agriculturally important species. The infections can cause devastating yield losses by inducing morphological changes that dramatically alter inflorescence development. Detection of phytoplasma infection typically utilizes sequences located within the 16S-23S rRNA-encoding locus, and these sequences are necessary for strain identification by currently accepted standards for phytoplasma classification. However, these methods can generate PCR products >1400 bp that are less divergent in sequence than protein-encoding genes, limiting strain resolution in certain cases. We describe a method for accessing the chaperonin-60 (cpn60 gene sequence from a diverse array of 'Ca.Phytoplasma' spp. Two degenerate primer sets were designed based on the known sequence diversity of cpn60 from 'Ca.Phytoplasma' spp. and used to amplify cpn60 gene fragments from various reference samples and infected plant tissues. Forty three cpn60 sequences were thereby determined. The cpn60 PCR-gel electrophoresis method was highly sensitive compared to 16S-23S-targeted PCR-gel electrophoresis. The topology of a phylogenetic tree generated using cpn60 sequences was congruent with that reported for 16S rRNA-encoding genes. The cpn60 sequences were used to design a hybridization array using oligonucleotide-coupled fluorescent microspheres, providing rapid diagnosis and typing of phytoplasma infections. The oligonucleotide-coupled fluorescent microsphere assay revealed samples that were infected simultaneously with two subtypes of phytoplasma. These tools were applied to show that two host plants, Brassica napus and Camelina sativa, displayed different phytoplasma infection patterns.

  20. Molecular diagnostic tools for detection and differentiation of phytoplasmas based on chaperonin-60 reveal differences in host plant infection patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumonceaux, Tim J; Green, Margaret; Hammond, Christine; Perez, Edel; Olivier, Chrystel

    2014-01-01

    Phytoplasmas ('Candidatus Phytoplasma' spp.) are insect-vectored bacteria that infect a wide variety of plants, including many agriculturally important species. The infections can cause devastating yield losses by inducing morphological changes that dramatically alter inflorescence development. Detection of phytoplasma infection typically utilizes sequences located within the 16S-23S rRNA-encoding locus, and these sequences are necessary for strain identification by currently accepted standards for phytoplasma classification. However, these methods can generate PCR products >1400 bp that are less divergent in sequence than protein-encoding genes, limiting strain resolution in certain cases. We describe a method for accessing the chaperonin-60 (cpn60) gene sequence from a diverse array of 'Ca.Phytoplasma' spp. Two degenerate primer sets were designed based on the known sequence diversity of cpn60 from 'Ca.Phytoplasma' spp. and used to amplify cpn60 gene fragments from various reference samples and infected plant tissues. Forty three cpn60 sequences were thereby determined. The cpn60 PCR-gel electrophoresis method was highly sensitive compared to 16S-23S-targeted PCR-gel electrophoresis. The topology of a phylogenetic tree generated using cpn60 sequences was congruent with that reported for 16S rRNA-encoding genes. The cpn60 sequences were used to design a hybridization array using oligonucleotide-coupled fluorescent microspheres, providing rapid diagnosis and typing of phytoplasma infections. The oligonucleotide-coupled fluorescent microsphere assay revealed samples that were infected simultaneously with two subtypes of phytoplasma. These tools were applied to show that two host plants, Brassica napus and Camelina sativa, displayed different phytoplasma infection patterns. PMID:25551224

  1. Cloning, expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the co-chaperonin XoGroES from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacterial blight, an infectious disease caused by X. oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), causes huge rice-production losses in most rice-cultivating countries. The co-chaperonin of Xoo, XoGroES, an important protein for protein folding, was cloned from Xoo, purified and crystallized for atomic resolution structure determination. Bacterial blight (BB), a devastating disease caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), causes serious production losses of rice in Asian countries. Protein misfolding may interfere with the function of proteins in all living cells and must be prevented to avoid cellular disaster. All cells naturally contain molecular chaperones that assist the unfolded proteins in folding into the native structure. One of the well characterized chaperone complexes is GroEL–GroES. GroEL, which consists of two chambers, captures misfolded proteins and refolds them. GroES is a co-chaperonin protein that assists the GroEL protein as a lid that temporarily closes the chamber during the folding process. Xoo4289, the GroES gene from Xoo, was cloned and expressed for X-ray crystallographic study. The purified protein (XoGroES) was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and a crystal diffracted to 2.0 Å resolution. The crystal belonged to the hexagonal space group P61, with unit-cell parameters a = 64.4, c = 36.5 Å. The crystal contains a single molecule in the asymmetric unit, with a corresponding VM of 2.05 Å3 Da−1 and a solvent content of 39.9%

  2. A Mutant Chaperonin That Is Functional at Lower Temperatures Enables Hyperthermophilic Archaea To Grow under Cold-Stress Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Le; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Fujiwara, Shinsuke

    2015-01-01

    Thermococcus kodakarensis grows optimally at 85°C and possesses two chaperonins, cold-inducible CpkA and heat-inducible CpkB, which are involved in adaptation to low and high temperatures, respectively. The two chaperonins share a high sequence identity (77%), except in their C-terminal regions. CpkA, which contains tandem repeats of a GGM motif, shows its highest ATPase activity at 60°C to 70°C, whereas CpkB shows its highest activity at temperatures higher than 90°C. To clarify the effects ...

  3. Stress-responsive accumulation of plastid chaperonin 60 during seedling development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plastid chaperonin 60 (cpn60) is a chloroplast protein, presumed to assist in assembly and folding of plastid proteins. Although molecular chaperones often accumulate significantly in response to stress, this has never been demonstrated for cpn60. In this study, the accumulation of cpn60 in Nicotiana seedlings during their development was followed under different stress conditions. It was found that cpn60 accumulates markedly in developing seedlings in response to tentoxin and several other (but not all) stresses. Cpn60 accumulates only during a narrow period of seedling development. It is proposed that cpn60 accumulation under stress is developmentally regulated. (author)

  4. Adsorption of a model protein, the GroEL chaperonin, on surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, Carl; Palmer, Richard E [Nanoscale Physics Research Laboratory, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)], E-mail: carl.leung@kcl.ac.uk

    2008-09-03

    Understanding and controlling protein adsorption on surfaces is fundamental to many biological processes ranging from cell adhesion to the fabrication of protein biochips. In general, proteins need to retain their 3D conformation to perform their intended functions. However, when they are presented with a solid surface, complex interactions ranging from weak non-covalent binding to strong covalent bonding may occur, which can potentially induce conformational changes within the adsorbed protein. To investigate the surface adsorption process and its effects on a model protein, the chaperonin GroEL, we have applied contact mode atomic force microscopy, in buffer solution to probe the interactions between single proteins and surfaces in real space. We will discuss the adsorption of GroEL molecules on planar surfaces (mica, graphite and gold) and specifically tailored nanostructured surfaces, which present structural features on the size scale of individual biological molecules. (topical review)

  5. Adsorption of a model protein, the GroEL chaperonin, on surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding and controlling protein adsorption on surfaces is fundamental to many biological processes ranging from cell adhesion to the fabrication of protein biochips. In general, proteins need to retain their 3D conformation to perform their intended functions. However, when they are presented with a solid surface, complex interactions ranging from weak non-covalent binding to strong covalent bonding may occur, which can potentially induce conformational changes within the adsorbed protein. To investigate the surface adsorption process and its effects on a model protein, the chaperonin GroEL, we have applied contact mode atomic force microscopy, in buffer solution to probe the interactions between single proteins and surfaces in real space. We will discuss the adsorption of GroEL molecules on planar surfaces (mica, graphite and gold) and specifically tailored nanostructured surfaces, which present structural features on the size scale of individual biological molecules. (topical review)

  6. HSP10 selective preference for myeloid and megakaryocytic precursors in normal human bone marrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Cappello

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock proteins (HSPs constitute a heterogeneous family of proteins involved in cell homeostasis. During cell life they are involved in harmful insults, as well as in immune and inflammatory reactions. It is known that they regulate gene expression, and cell proliferation, differentiation and death. HSP60 is a mitochondrial chaperonin, highly preserved during evolution, responsible of protein folding. Its function is strictly dependent on HSP10 in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic elements. We investigated the presence and the expression of HSP60 and HSP10 in a series of 20 normal human bone marrow specimens (NHBM by the means of immunohistochemistry. NHBM showed no expression of HSP60, probably due to its being below the detectable threshold, as already demonstrated in other normal human tissues. By contrast, HSP10 showed a selective positivity for myeloid and megakaryocytic lineages. The positivity was restricted to precursor cells, while mature elements were constantly negative.We postulate that HSP10 plays a role in bone marrow cell differentiation other than being a mitochondrial co-chaperonin. The present data emphasize the role of HSP10 during cellular homeostasis and encourage further investigations in this field.

  7. Recombinant EPF/chaperonin 10 promotes the survival of O4-positive pro-oligodendrocytes prepared from neonatal rat brain

    OpenAIRE

    McCombe, P.A

    2008-01-01

    Chaperonin 10 (cpn 10) is a small heat-shock protein that is usually intracellular. Early pregnancy factor (EPF), a biologically active protein that was first described in the serum of pregnant mammals, is homologous to cpn 10. EPF/cpn 10 has been reported to have effects on immunomodulation and cell survival and to inhibit activation of toll-like receptors by lipopolysaccharide. We found that recombinant EPF/cpn 10 was able to suppress experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an anim...

  8. Chaperonin containing T-complex polypeptide subunit eta (CCT-eta is a specific regulator of fibroblast motility and contractility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latha Satish

    Full Text Available Integumentary wounds in mammalian fetuses heal without scar; this scarless wound healing is intrinsic to fetal tissues and is notable for absence of the contraction seen in postnatal (adult wounds. The precise molecular signals determining the scarless phenotype remain unclear. We have previously reported that the eta subunit of the chaperonin containing T-complex polypeptide (CCT-eta is specifically reduced in healing fetal wounds in a rabbit model. In this study, we examine the role of CCT-eta in fibroblast motility and contractility, properties essential to wound healing and scar formation. We demonstrate that CCT-eta (but not CCT-beta is underexpressed in fetal fibroblasts compared to adult fibroblasts. An in vitro wound healing assay demonstrated that adult fibroblasts showed increased cell migration in response to epidermal growth factor (EGF and platelet derived growth factor (PDGF stimulation, whereas fetal fibroblasts were unresponsive. Downregulation of CCT-eta in adult fibroblasts with short inhibitory RNA (siRNA reduced cellular motility, both basal and growth factor-induced; in contrast, siRNA against CCT-beta had no such effect. Adult fibroblasts were more inherently contractile than fetal fibroblasts by cellular traction force microscopy; this contractility was increased by treatment with EGF and PDGF. CCT-eta siRNA inhibited the PDGF-induction of adult fibroblast contractility, whereas CCT-beta siRNA had no such effect. In each of these instances, the effect of downregulating CCT-eta was to modulate the behavior of adult fibroblasts so as to more closely approximate the characteristics of fetal fibroblasts. We next examined the effect of CCT-eta modulation on alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA expression, a gene product well known to play a critical role in adult wound healing. Fetal fibroblasts were found to constitutively express less alpha-SMA than adult cells. Reduction of CCT-eta with siRNA had minimal effect on cellular

  9. [Effect of ADP and GroES on interaction of molecular chaperonin GroEL with non-native lysozyme].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchenko, N Iu; Marchenkov, V V; Kotova, N V; Semisotnov, G V; Bulankina, N I; Kaliman, P A

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of the molecular chaperonin GroEL with fluorescein-labeled lysozyme in the presence of high concentrations of thiol reagent--dithiothreitol (DTT) has been studied. In case of high concentrations of DTT lysozyme loses the native conformation due to the disruption of the intramolecular disulfide bonds stabilizing its structure and effectively aggregates. It has been shown that in the presence of high concentrations of DTT and two-fold molar excess of GroEL the lysozyme tightly interacts with GroEL that essentially decreases the efficiency of its aggregation. The addition of ADP to the complex of GroEL with nonnative lysozyme noticeably decreases the interaction of the chaperonin with nonnative protein target resulting in some increase of the efficiency of its aggregation. However, the addition of the co-chaperonin GroES together with ADP (i.e. the formation of the complex of GroEL with GroES) leads to drastic weakness of the interaction of GroEL with nonnative lysozyme and the efficiency of its aggregation becomes comparable with that in the absence of GroEL. PMID:14577157

  10. Misfolding, degradation, and aggregation of variant proteins. The molecular pathogenesis of short chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD) deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christina Bak; Bross, P.; Winter, V.S.; Corydon, Thomas Juhl; Bolund, Lars; Bartlett, K.; Vockley, J.; Gregersen, N.

    2003-01-01

    type, associate with mitochondrial hsp60 chaperonins; however, the variant SCAD proteins remained associated with hsp60 for prolonged periods of time. Biogenesis experiments at two temperatures revealed that some of the variant proteins (R22W, G68C, W153R, and R359C) caused severe misfolding, whereas......Short chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD) deficiency is an inborn error of the mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism caused by rare variations as well as common susceptibility variations in the SCAD gene. Earlier studies have shown that a common variant SCAD protein (R147W) was impaired in folding...... SCAD proteins either triggered proteolytic degradation by mitochondrial proteases or, especially at elevated temperature, aggregation of non-native conformers. The latter finding may indicate that accumulation of aggregated SCAD proteins may play a role in the pathogenesis of SCAD deficiency....

  11. Probing the Kinetic Stabilities of Friedreich’s Ataxia Clinical Variants Using a Solid Phase GroEL Chaperonin Capture Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana R. Correia

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Numerous human diseases are caused by protein folding defects where the protein may become more susceptible to degradation or aggregation. Aberrant protein folding can affect the kinetic stability of the proteins even if these proteins appear to be soluble in vivo. Experimental discrimination between functional properly folded and misfolded nonfunctional conformers is not always straightforward at near physiological conditions. The differences in the kinetic behavior of two initially folded frataxin clinical variants were examined using a high affinity chaperonin kinetic trap approach at 25 °C. The kinetically stable wild type frataxin (FXN shows no visible partitioning onto the chaperonin. In contrast, the clinical variants FXN-p.Asp122Tyr and FXN-p.Ile154Phe kinetically populate partial folded forms that tightly bind the GroEL chaperonin platform. The initially soluble FXN-p.Ile154Phe variant partitions onto GroEL more rapidly and is more kinetically liable. These differences in kinetic stability were confirmed using differential scanning fluorimetry. The kinetic and aggregation stability differences of these variants may lead to the distinct functional impairments described in Friedreich’s ataxia, the neurodegenerative disease associated to frataxin functional deficiency. This chaperonin platform approach may be useful for identifying small molecule stabilizers since stabilizing ligands to frataxin variants should lead to a concomitant decrease in chaperonin binding.

  12. Allosteric transitions of supramolecular systems explored by network models: application to chaperonin GroEL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Yang

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Identification of pathways involved in the structural transitions of biomolecular systems is often complicated by the transient nature of the conformations visited across energy barriers and the multiplicity of paths accessible in the multidimensional energy landscape. This task becomes even more challenging in exploring molecular systems on the order of megadaltons. Coarse-grained models that lend themselves to analytical solutions appear to be the only possible means of approaching such cases. Motivated by the utility of elastic network models for describing the collective dynamics of biomolecular systems and by the growing theoretical and experimental evidence in support of the intrinsic accessibility of functional substates, we introduce a new method, adaptive anisotropic network model (aANM, for exploring functional transitions. Application to bacterial chaperonin GroEL and comparisons with experimental data, results from action minimization algorithm, and previous simulations support the utility of aANM as a computationally efficient, yet physically plausible, tool for unraveling potential transition pathways sampled by large complexes/assemblies. An important outcome is the assessment of the critical inter-residue interactions formed/broken near the transition state(s, most of which involve conserved residues.

  13. The mRNA Expression Proifles of Five Heat Shock Protein Genes from Frankliniella occidentalis at Different Stages and Their Responses to Temperatures and Insecticides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hai-hong; Stuart RReitz; WANG Li-xia; WANG Shuai-yu; LI Xue; LEI Zhong-ren

    2014-01-01

    The western lfower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) is a highly invasive pest that is able to exploit many crops across a wide range of environmental conditions. Five full-length cDNAs of heat shock protein (HSP) genes (Fo-HSP90, Fo-HSP70, Fo-HSP60, Fo-HSP40 and Fo-HSP28.9) were cloned from F. occidentalis, and their expression proifles were investigated under conditions of thermal stress and insecticide exposure, and at different stages during development, using real-time quantitative PCR. All ifve gene sequences showed high similarity to homologs in other species, indicating the conserved function of this gene family. HSP60 represents an informative phylogenetic marker at the ordinal taxonomic level within Insecta, but HSP90, which has two homologous copies in Hymenoptera, was not informative. The expression of Fo-HSPs under thermal stress suggests that Fo-HSP90, Fo-HSP70, and Fo-HSP28.9 are inducible by both cold and heat stress, Fo-HSP40 is only heat-inducible, and Fo-HSP60 is thermally insensitive. There were two patterns of cold induction of Fo-HSPs:one is from 0 to 4°C and the other is around-8°C. All ifve Fo-HSPs genes were induced by exposure to sublethal concentrations of the insecticide avermectin. The expression of the ifve Fo-HSPs during different developmental stages suggests that they all play a role in development of F. occidentalis.

  14. The Cpn10(1 co-chaperonin of A. thaliana functions only as a hetero-oligomer with Cpn20.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Vitlin Gruber

    Full Text Available The A. thaliana genome encodes five co-chaperonin homologs, three of which are destined to the chloroplast. Two of the proteins, Cpn10(2 and Cpn20, form functional homo-oligomers in vitro. In the current work, we present data on the structure and function of the third A. thaliana co-chaperonin, which exhibits unique properties. We found that purified recombinant Cpn10(1 forms inactive dimers in solution, in contrast to the active heptamers that are formed by canonical Cpn10s. Additionally, our data demonstrate that Cpn10(1 is capable of assembling into active hetero-oligomers together with Cpn20. This finding was reinforced by the formation of active co-chaperonin species upon mixing an inactive Cpn20 mutant with the inactive Cpn10(1. The present study constitutes the first report of a higher plant Cpn10 subunit that is able to function only upon formation of hetero-oligomers with other co-chaperonins.

  15. The Cpn10(1) co-chaperonin of A. thaliana functions only as a hetero-oligomer with Cpn20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitlin Gruber, Anna; Zizelski, Gal; Azem, Abdussalam; Weiss, Celeste

    2014-01-01

    The A. thaliana genome encodes five co-chaperonin homologs, three of which are destined to the chloroplast. Two of the proteins, Cpn10(2) and Cpn20, form functional homo-oligomers in vitro. In the current work, we present data on the structure and function of the third A. thaliana co-chaperonin, which exhibits unique properties. We found that purified recombinant Cpn10(1) forms inactive dimers in solution, in contrast to the active heptamers that are formed by canonical Cpn10s. Additionally, our data demonstrate that Cpn10(1) is capable of assembling into active hetero-oligomers together with Cpn20. This finding was reinforced by the formation of active co-chaperonin species upon mixing an inactive Cpn20 mutant with the inactive Cpn10(1). The present study constitutes the first report of a higher plant Cpn10 subunit that is able to function only upon formation of hetero-oligomers with other co-chaperonins. PMID:25419702

  16. Chaperonin-Based Biolayer Interferometry To Assess the Kinetic Stability of Metastable, Aggregation-Prone Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, Wendy A; O'Neil, Pierce T; Machen, Alexandra J; Naik, Subhashchandra; Chaudhri, Tapan; McGinn-Straub, Wesley; Tischer, Alexander; Auton, Matthew T; Burns, Joshua R; Baldwin, Michael R; Khar, Karen R; Karanicolas, John; Fisher, Mark T

    2016-09-01

    Stabilizing the folded state of metastable and/or aggregation-prone proteins through exogenous ligand binding is an appealing strategy for decreasing disease pathologies caused by protein folding defects or deleterious kinetic transitions. Current methods of examining binding of a ligand to these marginally stable native states are limited because protein aggregation typically interferes with analysis. Here, we describe a rapid method for assessing the kinetic stability of folded proteins and monitoring the effects of ligand stabilization for both intrinsically stable proteins (monomers, oligomers, and multidomain proteins) and metastable proteins (e.g., low Tm) that uses a new GroEL chaperonin-based biolayer interferometry (BLI) denaturant pulse platform. A kinetically controlled denaturation isotherm is generated by exposing a target protein, immobilized on a BLI biosensor, to increasing denaturant concentrations (urea or GuHCl) in a pulsatile manner to induce partial or complete unfolding of the attached protein population. Following the rapid removal of the denaturant, the extent of hydrophobic unfolded/partially folded species that remains is detected by an increased level of GroEL binding. Because this kinetic denaturant pulse is brief, the amplitude of binding of GroEL to the immobilized protein depends on the duration of the exposure to the denaturant, the concentration of the denaturant, wash times, and the underlying protein unfolding-refolding kinetics; fixing all other parameters and plotting the GroEL binding amplitude versus denaturant pulse concentration result in a kinetically controlled denaturation isotherm. When folding osmolytes or stabilizing ligands are added to the immobilized target proteins before and during the denaturant pulse, the diminished population of unfolded/partially folded protein manifests as a decreased level of GroEL binding and/or a marked shift in these kinetically controlled denaturation profiles to higher denaturant

  17. Folding of newly translated membrane protein CCR5 is assisted by the chaperonin GroEL-GroES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Haixia; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Li, Jiqiang; Ren, Hao; Huang, Fang

    2015-11-01

    The in vitro folding of newly translated human CC chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5), which belongs to the physiologically important family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), has been studied in a cell-free system supplemented with the surfactant Brij-35. The freshly synthesized CCR5 can spontaneously fold into its biologically active state but only slowly and inefficiently. However, on addition of the GroEL-GroES molecular chaperone system, the folding of the nascent CCR5 was significantly enhanced, as was the structural stability and functional expression of the soluble form of CCR5. The chaperonin GroEL was partially effective on its own, but for maximum efficiency both the GroEL and its GroES lid were necessary. These results are direct evidence for chaperone-assisted membrane protein folding and therefore demonstrate that GroEL-GroES may be implicated in the folding of membrane proteins.

  18. Heat shock genes – integrating cell survival and death

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Richa Arya; Moushami Mallik; Subhash C Lakhotia

    2007-04-01

    Heat shock induced gene expression and other cellular responses help limit the damage caused by stress and thus facilitate cellular recovery. Cellular damage also triggers apoptotic cell death through several pathways. This paper briefly reviews interactions of the major heat shock proteins with components of the apoptotic pathways. Hsp90, which acts as a chaperone for unstable signal transducers to keep them poised for activation, interacts with RIP and Akt and promotes NF-B mediated inhibition of apoptosis; in addition it also blocks some steps in the apoptotic pathways. Hsp70 is mostly anti-apoptotic and acts at several levels like inhibition of translocation of Bax into mitochondria, release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, formation of apoptosome and inhibition of activation of initiator caspases. Hsp70 also modulates JNK, NF-B and Akt signaling pathways in the apoptotic cascade. In contrast, Hsp60 has both anti- and pro-apoptotic roles. Cytosolic Hsp60 prevents translocation of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax into mitochondria and thus promotes cell survival but it also promotes maturation of procaspase-3, essential for caspase mediated cell death. Our recent in vivo studies show that RNAi for the Hsp60D in Drosophila melanogaster prevents induced apoptosis. Hsp27 exerts its anti-apoptotic influence by inhibiting cytochrome c and TNF-mediated cell death. crystallin suppresses caspase-8 and cytochrome c mediated activation of caspase-3. Studies in our laboratory also reveal that absence or reduced levels of the developmentally active as well as stress induced non-coding hsr transcripts, which are known to sequester diverse hnRNPs and related nuclear RNA-binding proteins, block induced apoptosis in Drosophila. Modulation of the apoptotic pathways by Hsps reflects their roles as ``weak links” between various ``hubs” in cellular networks. On the other hand, non-coding RNAs, by virtue of their potential to bind with multiple proteins, can act as ``hubs” in

  19. Chaperonin-Assisted Protein Folding: Relative Population of Asymmetric and Symmetric GroEL:GroES Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, Shubhasis; Gupta, Amit J; Yan, Xiao; Miličić, Goran; Hartl, F Ulrich; Hayer-Hartl, Manajit

    2015-06-19

    The chaperonin GroEL, a cylindrical complex consisting of two stacked heptameric rings, and its lid-like cofactor GroES form a nano-cage in which a single polypeptide chain is transiently enclosed and allowed to fold unimpaired by aggregation. GroEL and GroES undergo an ATP-regulated interaction cycle that serves to close and open the folding cage. Recent reports suggest that the presence of non-native substrate protein alters the GroEL/ES reaction by shifting it from asymmetric to symmetric complexes. In the asymmetric reaction mode, only one ring of GroEL is GroES bound and the two rings function sequentially, coupled by negative allostery. In the symmetric mode, both GroEL rings are GroES bound and are folding active simultaneously. Here, we find that the results of assays based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer recently used to quantify symmetric complexes depend strongly on the fluorophore pair used. We therefore developed a novel assay based on fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy to accurately measure GroEL:GroES stoichiometry. This assay avoids fluorophore labeling of GroEL and the use of GroEL cysteine mutants. Our results show that symmetric GroEL:GroES2 complexes are substantially populated only in the presence of non-foldable model proteins, such as α-lactalbumin and α-casein, which "over-stimulate" the GroEL ATPase and uncouple the negative GroEL inter-ring allostery. In contrast, asymmetric complexes are dominant both in the absence of substrate and in the presence of foldable substrate proteins. Moreover, uncoupling of the GroEL rings and formation of symmetric GroEL:GroES2 complexes is suppressed at physiological ATP:ADP concentration. We conclude that the asymmetric GroEL:GroES complex represents the main folding active form of the chaperonin. PMID:25912285

  20. Prenylation differentially inhibits insulin-dependent immediate early gene mRNA expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, J Lee; Amsler, Maggie O; Messina, Joseph L

    2016-06-01

    Increased activity of prenyl transferases is observed in pathological states of insulin resistance, diabetes, and obesity. Thus, functional inhibitors of farnesyl transferase (FTase) and geranylgeranyl transferase (GGTase) may be promising therapeutic treatments. We previously identified insulin responsive genes from a rat H4IIE hepatoma cell cDNA library, including β-actin, EGR1, Pip92, c-fos, and Hsp60. In the present study, we investigated whether acute treatment with FTase and GGTase inhibitors would alter insulin responsive gene initiation and/or elongation rates. We observed differential regulation of insulin responsive gene expression, suggesting a differential sensitivity of these genes to one or both of the specific protein prenylation inhibitors. PMID:27086854

  1. Investigating hsp Gene Expression in Liver of Channa striatus under Heat Stress for Understanding the Upper Thermal Acclimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal Krishna Purohit

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in hsp gene expression profiles in murrel Channa striatus experimentally exposed to temperature stress (36°C for 4, 15, and 30 days were investigated; fish collected from aquaculture ponds and maintained in laboratory at the pond temperature (25 ± 1°C served as control. Channa collected from a hot spring runoff (36°C was included in the study to examine the hsp profiles beyond 30 days of exposure. Gene expression analyses of a battery of hsps in liver tissues were carried out by quantitative RT-PCR and protein expressions were analyzed by immunoblotting. hsps could be grouped into three clusters based on similarity in response to heat stress: hsp70, hsp78, and hsp60, whose transcript level continued to increase with duration of exposure; hsp90 and hsp110 that increased to a much higher level and then decreased; hsp27 and hsp47 that did not significantly vary as compared to control. The results suggest that Hsp70, Hsp78, and Hsp60 are involved in thermal acclimation and long term survival at high temperature. Fish living in the hot spring runoff appears to continuously express hsps that can be approximated by long term induction of hsps in farmed fish if temperature of their environment is raised to 36°C.

  2. The interaction of β2-glycoprotein I domain V with chaperonin GroEL: The similarity with the domain V and membrane interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Gozu, Masayo; Hoshino, Masaru; Higurashi, Takashi; Kato, Hisao; Goto, Yuji

    2002-01-01

    To clarify the mechanism of interaction between chaperonin GroEL and substrate proteins, we studied the conformational changes; of the fifth domain of human β2-glycoprotein I upon binding to GroEL. The fifth domain has a large flexible loop, containing several hydrophobic residues surrounded by positively charged residues, which has been proposed to be responsible for the binding of β2-glycoprotein I to negatively charged phospholipid membranes. The reduction by dithiothreitol of the three in...

  3. A Direct Regulatory Interaction between Chaperonin TRiC and Stress-Responsive Transcription Factor HSF1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel W. Neef

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1 is an evolutionarily conserved transcription factor that protects cells from protein-misfolding-induced stress and apoptosis. The mechanisms by which cytosolic protein misfolding leads to HSF1 activation have not been elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that HSF1 is directly regulated by TRiC/CCT, a central ATP-dependent chaperonin complex that folds cytosolic proteins. A small-molecule activator of HSF1, HSF1A, protects cells from stress-induced apoptosis, binds TRiC subunits in vivo and in vitro, and inhibits TRiC activity without perturbation of ATP hydrolysis. Genetic inactivation or depletion of the TRiC complex results in human HSF1 activation, and HSF1A inhibits the direct interaction between purified TRiC and HSF1 in vitro. These results demonstrate a direct regulatory interaction between the cytosolic chaperone machine and a critical transcription factor that protects cells from proteotoxicity, providing a mechanistic basis for signaling perturbations in protein folding to a stress-protective transcription factor.

  4. Location and Flexibility of the Unique C-Terminal Tail of Aquifex aeolicus Co-Chaperonin Protein 10 as Derived by Cryo-Electron Microscopy and Biophysical Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Dong-Hua; Luke, Kathryn; Zhang, Junjie; Chiu, Wah; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2008-01-01

    Co-chaperonin protein 10 (cpn10, GroES in Escherichia coli) is a ring-shaped heptameric protein that facilitates substrate folding when in complex with cpn60 (GroEL in E. coli). The cpn10 from the hyperthermophilic, ancient bacterium Aquifex aeolicus (Aacpn10) has a 25-residue C-terminal extension in each monomer not found in any other cpn10 protein. Earlier in vitro work has shown that this tail is not needed for heptamer assembly or protein function. Without the tail, however, the heptamers...

  5. The role of the Chaperonin containing t-complex polypeptide 1, subunit 8 (CCT8) in B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Haibing; Miao, Xiaobing; Wu, Yaxun; Wei, Yingze; Zong, Guijuan; Yang, Shuyun; Chen, Xudong; Zheng, Guihua; Zhu, Xinghua; Guo, Yan; Li, Chunsun; Chen, Yali; Wang, Yuchan; He, Song

    2016-06-01

    The chaperonin containing t-complex polypeptide 1 (CCT) is known to mediate folding of proteins. CCT, subunit 8 (CCT8), is the θ subunit of CCT complex chaperonin. CCT8 has been reported to be dysregulated in several tumor tissues. In this study, we investigated the role of CCT8 in B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Clinically, the expression levels of CCT8 in reactive lymphoid hyperplasia (RLH) and B-cell NHL specimens were investigated using immunohistochemical analysis. We found that CCT8 was highly expressed in proliferating germinal center cells compared with the quiescent cells of the follicular mantle zone. Furthermore, CCT8 was highly expressed in progressive lymphomas than in indolent lymphomas. Kaplan-Meier curve showed that high expression of CCT8 was significantly associated with shorter overall survival in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Moreover, we demonstrated that CCT8 could promote the proliferation of B-cell NHL cells. In addition, we found that CCT8 could accelerate the G1/S transition in B-cell NHL. Finally, we demonstrated that overexpression of CCT8 could reverse cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) phenotype. Our study may shed new insights into the important role of CCT8 in cancer development. PMID:27101149

  6. Purification of Mitochondrial Proteins HSP60 and ATP Synthase from Ascidian Eggs: Implications for Antibody Specificity

    OpenAIRE

    Chenevert, Janet; Pruliere, Gerard; Ishii, Hirokazu; Sardet, Christian; Nishikata, Takahito

    2013-01-01

    Use of antibodies is a cornerstone of biological studies and it is important to identify the recognized protein with certainty. Generally an antibody is considered specific if it labels a single band of the expected size in the tissue of interest, or has a strong affinity for the antigen produced in a heterologous system. The identity of the antibody target protein is rarely confirmed by purification and sequencing, however in many cases this may be necessary. In this study we sought to chara...

  7. The Cyclic Di-GMP Phosphodiesterase Gene Rv1357c/BCG1419c Affects BCG Pellicle Production and In Vivo Maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Valdez, Mario Alberto; Aceves-Sánchez, Michel de Jesús; Pedroza-Roldán, César; Vega-Domínguez, Perla Jazmín; Prado-Montes de Oca, Ernesto; Bravo-Madrigal, Jorge; Laval, Françoise; Daffé, Mamadou; Koestler, Ben; Waters, Christopher M

    2015-02-01

    Bacteria living in a surface-attached community that contains a heterogeneous population, coated with an extracellular matrix, and showing drug tolerance (biofilms) are often linked to chronic infections. In mycobacteria, the pellicle mode of growth has been equated to an in vitro biofilm and meets several of the criteria mentioned above, while tuberculosis infection presents a chronic (latent) phase of infection. As mycobacteria lack most genes required to control biofilm production by other microorganisms, we deleted or expressed from the hsp60 strong promoter the only known c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) gene in Mycobacterium bovis BCG. We found changes in pellicle production, cellular protein profiles, lipid production, resistance to nitrosative stress and maintenance in lungs and spleens of immunocompetent BALB/mice. Our results show that pellicle production and capacity to remain within the host are linked in BCG. PMID:25865678

  8. Sequence Classification: 892661 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ecameric mitochondrial chaperonin required for ATP-dependent folding of precursor polypeptides and complex assembly; prevents aggrega...tion and mediates protein refolding after heat shock; role in mtDNA transmission; similarity to groEL; Hsp60p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/6323288 ...

  9. SwissProt search result: AK120234 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK120234 J013043L17 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 1e-13 ...

  10. SwissProt search result: AK069617 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069617 J023019K12 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 0.0 ...

  11. SwissProt search result: AK109517 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK109517 002-109-A02 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 0.0 ...

  12. SwissProt search result: AK101537 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK101537 J033048E22 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 1e-151 ...

  13. SwissProt search result: AK063576 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK063576 001-117-H02 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 3e-85 ...

  14. SwissProt search result: AK108892 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK108892 002-152-E06 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 1e-139 ...

  15. SwissProt search result: AK068277 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK068277 J013146G10 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 2e-77 ...

  16. SwissProt search result: AK062098 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK062098 001-045-A02 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 1e-137 ...

  17. SwissProt search result: AK061410 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK061410 006-306-B08 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 2e-63 ...

  18. SwissProt search result: AK101334 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK101334 J033034I03 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 1e-142 ...

  19. SwissProt search result: AK060117 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK060117 006-308-E09 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 2e-71 ...

  20. SwissProt search result: AK101042 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK101042 J033003J10 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 2e-20 ...

  1. SwissProt search result: AK073999 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK073999 J033073C08 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 1e-177 ...

  2. SwissProt search result: AK061901 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK061901 001-041-H05 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 7e-75 ...

  3. SwissProt search result: AK119623 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK119623 002-117-H08 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 0.0 ...

  4. SwissProt search result: AK070603 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK070603 J023059D06 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 1e-150 ...

  5. SwissProt search result: AK060773 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK060773 001-033-B08 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 2e-53 ...

  6. SwissProt search result: AK070127 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK070127 J023045O03 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 1e-157 ...

  7. SwissProt search result: AK119217 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK119217 001-046-E10 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 1e-113 ...

  8. SwissProt search result: AK068562 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK068562 J013152E19 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 1e-127 ...

  9. SwissProt search result: AK100602 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK100602 J023107D12 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 1e-108 ...

  10. SwissProt search result: AK119223 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK119223 001-100-D06 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 5e-71 ...

  11. SwissProt search result: AK120503 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK120503 J013122K17 (P35635) 60 kDa chaperonin (Protein Cpn60) (groEL protein) (Immunoreactive... protein Bb65) (Immunoreactive protein Bb63) (Heat shock protein 60) (HSP 60) CH60_BARBA 1e-141 ...

  12. Gene

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene integrates information from a wide range of species. A record may include nomenclature, Reference Sequences (RefSeqs), maps, pathways, variations, phenotypes,...

  13. The chaperonin-60 universal target is a barcode for bacteria that enables de novo assembly of metagenomic sequence data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew G Links

    Full Text Available Barcoding with molecular sequences is widely used to catalogue eukaryotic biodiversity. Studies investigating the community dynamics of microbes have relied heavily on gene-centric metagenomic profiling using two genes (16S rRNA and cpn60 to identify and track Bacteria. While there have been criteria formalized for barcoding of eukaryotes, these criteria have not been used to evaluate gene targets for other domains of life. Using the framework of the International Barcode of Life we evaluated DNA barcodes for Bacteria. Candidates from the 16S rRNA gene and the protein coding cpn60 gene were evaluated. Within complete bacterial genomes in the public domain representing 983 species from 21 phyla, the largest difference between median pairwise inter- and intra-specific distances ("barcode gap" was found from cpn60. Distribution of sequence diversity along the ∼555 bp cpn60 target region was remarkably uniform. The barcode gap of the cpn60 universal target facilitated the faithful de novo assembly of full-length operational taxonomic units from pyrosequencing data from a synthetic microbial community. Analysis supported the recognition of both 16S rRNA and cpn60 as DNA barcodes for Bacteria. The cpn60 universal target was found to have a much larger barcode gap than 16S rRNA suggesting cpn60 as a preferred barcode for Bacteria. A large barcode gap for cpn60 provided a robust target for species-level characterization of data. The assembly of consensus sequences for barcodes was shown to be a reliable method for the identification and tracking of novel microbes in metagenomic studies.

  14. Heritable variation in heat shock gene expression: a potential mechanism for adaptation to thermal stress in embryos of sea turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedeschi, J N; Kennington, W J; Tomkins, J L; Berry, O; Whiting, S; Meekan, M G; Mitchell, N J

    2016-01-13

    The capacity of species to respond adaptively to warming temperatures will be key to their survival in the Anthropocene. The embryos of egg-laying species such as sea turtles have limited behavioural means for avoiding high nest temperatures, and responses at the physiological level may be critical to coping with predicted global temperature increases. Using the loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) as a model, we used quantitative PCR to characterise variation in the expression response of heat-shock genes (hsp60, hsp70 and hsp90; molecular chaperones involved in cellular stress response) to an acute non-lethal heat shock. We show significant variation in gene expression at the clutch and population levels for some, but not all hsp genes. Using pedigree information, we estimated heritabilities of the expression response of hsp genes to heat shock and demonstrated both maternal and additive genetic effects. This is the first evidence that the heat-shock response is heritable in sea turtles and operates at the embryonic stage in any reptile. The presence of heritable variation in the expression of key thermotolerance genes is necessary for sea turtles to adapt at a molecular level to warming incubation environments. PMID:26763709

  15. Affinity chromatography of GroEL chaperonin based on denatured proteins: role of electrostatic interactions in regulation of GroEL affinity for protein substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchenko, N Iu; Marchenkov, V V; Kaĭsheva, A L; Kashparov, I A; Kotova, N V; Kaliman, P A; Semisotnov, G V

    2006-12-01

    The chaperonin GroEL of the heat shock protein family from Escherichia coli cells can bind various polypeptides lacking rigid tertiary structure and thus prevent their nonspecific association and provide for acquisition of native conformation. In the present work we studied the interaction of GroEL with six denatured proteins (alpha-lactalbumin, ribonuclease A, egg lysozyme in the presence of dithiothreitol, pepsin, beta-casein, and apocytochrome c) possessing negative or positive total charge at neutral pH values and different in hydrophobicity (affinity for a hydrophobic probe ANS). To prevent the influence of nonspecific association of non-native proteins on their interaction with GroEL and make easier the recording of the complexing, the proteins were covalently attached to BrCN-activated Sepharose. At low ionic strength (lower than 60 mM), tight binding of the negatively charged denatured proteins with GroEL (which is also negatively charged) needed relatively low concentrations (approximately 10 mM) of bivalent cations Mg2+ or Ca2+. At the high ionic strength (approximately 600 mM), a tight complex was produced also in the absence of bivalent cations. In contrast, positively charged denatured proteins tightly interacted with GroEL irrespectively of the presence of bivalent cations and ionic strength of the solution (from 20 to 600 mM). These features of GroEL interaction with positively and negatively charged denatured proteins were confirmed by polarized fluorescence (fluorescence anisotropy). The findings suggest that the affinity of GroEL for denatured proteins can be determined by the balance of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. PMID:17223789

  16. Perspectives on the origin of microfilaments, microtubules, the relevant chaperonin system and cytoskeletal motors--a commentary on the spirochaete origin of flagella

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JING YAN LI; CHUAN FEN WU

    2003-01-01

    The origin of cytoskeleton and the origin of relevant intracellular transportation system are big problems for understanding the emergence of eukaryotic cells. The present article summarized relevant information of evidences and molecular traces on the origin of actin, tubulin, the chaperonin system for folding them,myosins, kinesins, axonemal dyneins and cytoplasmic dyneins. On this basis the authors proposed a series of works, which should be done in the future, and indicated the ways for reaching the targets. Thesetargets are mainly: 1) the reconstruction of evolutionary path from MreB protein of archaeal ancestor of eukaryotic cells to typical actin; 2) the finding of the MreB or MreB-related proteins in crenarchaea and using them to examine J. A. Lake's hypothesis on the origin of eukaryote from "eocytes" crenarchaea);3) the examinations of the existence and distribution of cytoskeleton made of MreB-related protein within coccoid archaea, especially in amoeboid archaeon Thermoplasm acidophilum; 4) using Thermoplasma as a model of archaeal ancestor of eukaryotic cells; 5) the searching for the homolog of ancestral dynein in present-day living archaea. During the writing of this article, Margulis' famous spirochaete hypothesis on the origin of flagella and cilia was unexpectedly involved and analyzed from aspects of tubulins, dyneins and spirochaetes. Actually, spirochaete cannot be reasonably assumed as the ectosymbiotic ancestor of eukaryotic flagella and cilia, since their swing depends upon large amount of bacterial flagella beneath the flexible outer wall, but not depends upon their intracellular tubules and the assumed dyneins. In this case,if they had "evolved" into cilia and lost their bacterial flagella, they would immediately become immobile!In fact, tubulin and dynein-like proteins have not been found in any spirochaete.

  17. Molecular Characterization of Heterologous HIV-1gp120 Gene Expression Disruption in Mycobacterium bovis BCG Host Strain: A Critical Issue for Engineering Mycobacterial Based-Vaccine Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG as a live vector of recombinant bacterial vaccine is a promising system to be used. In this study, we evaluate the disrupted expression of heterologous HIV-1gp120 gene in BCG Pasteur host strain using replicative vectors pMV261 and pJH222. pJH222 carries a lysine complementing gene in BCG lysine auxotrophs. The HIV-1 gp120 gene expression was regulated by BCG hsp60 promoter (in plasmid pMV261 and Mycobacteria spp. α-antigen promoter (in plasmid pJH222. Among 14 rBCG:HIV-1gp120 (pMV261 colonies screened, 12 showed a partial deletion and two showed a complete deletion. However, deletion was not observed in all 10 rBCG:HIV-1gp120 (pJH222 colonies screened. In this study, we demonstrated that E. coli/Mycobacterial expression vectors bearing a weak promoter and lysine complementing gene in a recombinant lysine auxotroph of BCG could prevent genetic rearrangements and disruption of HIV 1gp120 gene expression, a key issue for engineering Mycobacterial based vaccine vectors.

  18. Assessing the expression of HsP60 in scleractinian corals subjected to biotic and abiotic stresses

    OpenAIRE

    Seveso,

    2013-01-01

    The reef health worldwide is seriously threatened by a multitude of factors such as abnormally elevated and low ocean temperatures, high UV radiations, changes in salinity, pollution and increasing incidence of diseases. Under adverse circumstances the equilibrium between the partners of the coral holobiont may be compromised and can lead to coral bleaching events. Bleaching refers to the loss in the coloration of the coral colony induced by the dissociation of the symbiosis between corals an...

  19. Genes and Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  20. Identification of genes associated with regenerative success of Xenopus laevis hindlimbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barker Donna

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epimorphic regeneration is the process by which complete regeneration of a complex structure such as a limb occurs through production of a proliferating blastema. This type of regeneration is rare among vertebrates but does occur in the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis, traditionally a model organism for the study of early development. Xenopus tadpoles can regenerate their tails, limb buds and the lens of the eye, although the ability of the latter two organs to regenerate diminishes with advancing developmental stage. Using a heat shock inducible transgene that remains silent unless activated, we have established a stable line of transgenic Xenopus (strain N1 in which the BMP inhibitor Noggin can be over-expressed at any time during development. Activation of this transgene blocks regeneration of the tail and limb of Xenopus tadpoles. Results In the current study, we have taken advantage of the N1 transgenic line to directly compare morphology and gene expression in same stage regenerating vs. BMP signalling deficient non-regenerating hindlimb buds. The wound epithelium of N1 transgenic hindlimb buds, which forms over the cut surface of the limb bud after amputation, does not transition normally into the distal thickened apical epithelial cap. Instead, a basement membrane and dermis form, indicative of mature skin. Furthermore, the underlying mesenchyme remains rounded and does not expand to form a cone shaped blastema, a normal feature of successful regeneration. Using Affymetrix Gene Chip analysis, we have identified genes linked to regenerative success downstream of BMP signalling, including the BMP inhibitor Gremlin and the stress protein Hsp60 (no blastema in zebrafish. Gene Ontology analysis showed that genes involved in embryonic development and growth are significantly over-represented in regenerating early hindlimb buds and that successful regeneration in the Xenopus hindlimb correlates with the induction of

  1. Interferences of Silica Nanoparticles in Green Fluorescent Protein Folding Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Géraldine; Devineau, Stéphanie; Aude, Jean Christophe; Boulard, Yves; Pasquier, Hélène; Labarre, Jean; Pin, Serge; Renault, Jean Philippe

    2016-01-12

    We investigated the relationship between unfolded proteins, silica nanoparticles and chaperonin to determine whether unfolded proteins could stick to silica surfaces and how this process could impair heat shock protein activity. The HSP60 catalyzed green fluorescent protein (GFP) folding was used as a model system. The adsorption isotherms and adsorption kinetics of denatured GFP were measured, showing that denaturation increases GFP affinity for silica surfaces. This affinity is maintained even if the surfaces are covered by a protein corona and allows silica NPs to interfere directly with GFP folding by trapping it in its unstructured state. We determined also the adsorption isotherms of HSP60 and its chaperonin activity once adsorbed, showing that SiO2 NP can interfere also indirectly with protein folding through chaperonin trapping and inhibition. This inhibition is specifically efficient when NPs are covered first with a layer of unfolded proteins. These results highlight for the first time the antichaperonin activity of silica NPs and ask new questions about the toxicity of such misfolded proteins/nanoparticles assembly toward cells. PMID:26649773

  2. Peroral administration of mycobacterial HSP60 adn HSP70 prevents severe forms of DSS-induced intestinal inflammation in Balb/c mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kverka, Miloslav; Zákostelská, Zuzana; Van der Zee, R.; Van Eden, W.; Tlaskalová, Helena

    Dresden: Springer, 2007, s. 29-29. [Falk Workshop – Mechanims of Intestinal Inflammation. Dresden (DE), 09.10.2007-10.10.2007] R&D Projects: GA ČR GD310/03/H147 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : colonic inflammation Subject RIV: EC - Immunology

  3. Quantitative real-time PCR study on persistence of pDNA vaccine pVax-Hsp60 TM814 in beef muscles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Orság, P.; Kvardová, V.; Raška, M.; Miller, A. D.; Ledvina, Miroslav; Turánek, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 11 (2008), s. 1-11. ISSN 1479-0556 R&D Projects: GA MZe QF3115 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : DNA vaccine * real-time PCR * liposomes Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  4. Pitfalls of homozygosity mapping: an extended consanguineous Bardet-Biedl syndrome family with two mutant genes (BBS2, BBS10), three mutations, but no triallelism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurier, Virginie; Stoetzel, Corinne; Muller, Jean; Thibault, Christelle; Corbani, Sandra; Jalkh, Nadine; Salem, Nabiha; Chouery, Eliane; Poch, Olivier; Licaire, Serge; Danse, Jean-Marc; Amati-Bonneau, Patricia; Bonneau, Dominique; Mégarbané, André; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Dollfus, Hélène

    2006-11-01

    The extensive genetic heterogeneity of Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is documented by the identification, by classical linkage analysis complemented recently by comparative genomic approaches, of nine genes (BBS1-9) that account cumulatively for about 50% of patients. The BBS genes appear implicated in cilia and basal body assembly or function. In order to find new BBS genes, we performed SNP homozygosity mapping analysis in an extended consanguineous family living in a small Lebanese village. This uncovered an unexpectedly complex pattern of mutations, and led us to identify a novel BBS gene (BBS10). In one sibship of the pedigree, a BBS2 homozygous mutation was identified, while in three other sibships, a homozygous missense mutation was identified in a gene encoding a vertebrate-specific chaperonine-like protein (BBS10). The single patient in the last sibship was a compound heterozygote for the above BBS10 mutation and another one in the same gene. Although triallelism (three deleterious alleles in the same patient) has been described in some BBS families, we have to date no evidence that this is the case in the present family. The analysis of this family challenged linkage analysis based on the expectation of a single locus and mutation. The very high informativeness of SNP arrays was instrumental in elucidating this case, which illustrates possible pitfalls of homozygosity mapping in extended families, and that can be explained by the rather high prevalence of heterozygous carriers of BBS mutations (estimated at one in 50 in Europeans). PMID:16823392

  5. The mitochondrial 60-kDa heat shock protein in marine invertebrates: biochemical purification and molecular characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choresh, Omer; Loya, Yossi; Müller, Werner E.G.; Wiedenmann, Jörg; Azem, Abdussalam

    2004-01-01

    Sessile marine invertebrates undergo constant direct exposure to the surrounding environmental conditions, including local and global environmental fluctuations that may lead to fatal protein damage. Induction of heat shock proteins (Hsps) constitutes an important defense mechanism that protects these organisms from deleterious stress conditions. In a previous study, we reported the immunological detection of a 60-kDa Hsp (Hsp60) in the sea anemone Anemonia viridis (formerly called Anemonia sulcata) and studied its expression under a variety of stress conditions. In the present study, we show that the sponge Tetilla sp. from tidal habitats with a highly variable temperature regime is characterized by an increased level of Hsp60. Moreover, we show the expression of Hsp60 in various species among Porifera and Cnidaria, suggesting a general importance of this protein among marine invertebrates. We further cloned the hsp60 gene from A viridis, using a combination of conventional protein isolation methods and screening of a complementary deoxyribonucleic acid library by polymerase chain reaction. The cloned sequence (1764 bp) encodes for a protein of 62.8 kDa (588 amino acids). The 62.8-kDa protein, which contains an amino terminal extension that may serve as a mitochondrial targeting signal, shares a significant identity with mitochondrial Hsp60s from several animals but less identity with Hsp60s from either bacteria or plants. PMID:15270076

  6. Genotypic Diversity of Haemophilus parasuis Field Strains

    OpenAIRE

    Olvera, A.; Calsamiglia, M.; Aragon, V. (V.)

    2006-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis is the cause of Glässer's disease and other clinical disorders in pigs. It can also be isolated from the upper respiratory tracts of healthy pigs, and isolates can have significant differences in virulence. In this work, a partial sequence from the 60-kDa heat shock protein (Hsp60) gene was assessed as an epidemiological marker. We analyzed partial sequences of hsp60 and 16S rRNA genes from 103 strains of H. parasuis and other related species to obtain a better classifica...

  7. Sequence polymorphism of GroEL gene in natural population of Bacillus and Brevibacillus spp. that showed variation in thermal tolerance capacity and mRNA expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, R; Tripathy, S; Padhi, S K; Mohanty, S; Maiti, N K

    2014-10-01

    GroEL, a class I chaperonin, plays an important role in the thermal adaptation of the cell and helps to maintain the viability of the cell under heat shock condition. Function of groEL in vivo depends on the maintenance of proper structure of the protein which in turn depends on the nucleotide and amino acid sequence of the gene. In this study, we investigated the changes in nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the partial groEL gene that may affect the thermotolerance capacity as well as mRNA expression of bacterial isolates. Sequences among the same species having differences in the amino acid level were identified as different alleles. The effect of allelic variation on the groEL gene expression was analyzed by comparison and relative quantification in each allele under thermal shock condition by RT-PCR. Evaluation of K a/K s ratio among the strains of same species showed that the groEL gene of all the species had undergone similar functional constrain during evolution. The strains showing similar thermotolerance capacity was found to carry same allele of groEL gene. The isolates carrying allele having amino acid substitution inside the highly ATP/ADP or Mg(2+)-binding region could not tolerate thermal stress and showed lower expression of the groEL gene. Our results indicate that during evolution of these bacterial species the groEL gene has undergone the process of natural selection, and the isolates have evolved with the groEL allelic sequences that help them to withstand the thermal stress during their interaction with the environment. PMID:24894903

  8. Detection of Campylobacter species and Arcobacter butzleri in stool samples by use of real-time multiplex PCR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.F. de Boer (Richard); A. Ott (Alewijn); P. Güren (Pinar); E. van Zanten; A.F. van Belkum (Alex); A.M.D. Kooistra-Smid

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe presence of Campylobacter (or Campylobacter-like) species in stools from patients suspected of infectious gastroenteritis (n = 493) was investigated using real-time PCR for detection of Arcobacter butzleri (hsp60 gene), Campylobacter coli (ceuE gene), Campylobacter jejuni (mapA), fiv

  9. Gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We prepared probes for isolating functional pieces of the metallothionein locus. The probes enabled a variety of experiments, eventually revealing two mechanisms for metallothionein gene expression, the order of the DNA coding units at the locus, and the location of the gene site in its chromosome. Once the switch regulating metallothionein synthesis was located, it could be joined by recombinant DNA methods to other, unrelated genes, then reintroduced into cells by gene-transfer techniques. The expression of these recombinant genes could then be induced by exposing the cells to Zn2+ or Cd2+. We would thus take advantage of the clearly defined switching properties of the metallothionein gene to manipulate the expression of other, perhaps normally constitutive, genes. Already, despite an incomplete understanding of how the regulatory switch of the metallothionein locus operates, such experiments have been performed successfully

  10. Gene therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    2005147 CNHK200-hA-a gene-viral therapeutic system and its antitumor effect on lung cancer. WANG Wei-guo(王伟国),et al. Viral & Gene Ther Center, Eastern Hepatobilli Surg Instit 2nd Milit Univ, Shanghai 200438. Chin J Oncol,2005:27(2):69-72. Objective: To develop a novel vector system, which combines the advantages of the gene therapy,

  11. Gene therapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Mota Biosca, Anna

    1992-01-01

    Applications of gene therapy have been evaluated in virtually every oral tissue, and many of these have proved successful at least in animal models. While gene therapy will not be used routinely in the next decade, practitioners of oral medicine should be aware of the potential of this novel type of treatment that doubtless will benefit many patients with oral diseases.

  12. Trichoderma genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Pamela; Goedegebuur, Frits; Van Solingen, Pieter; Ward, Michael

    2012-06-19

    Described herein are novel gene sequences isolated from Trichoderma reesei. Two genes encoding proteins comprising a cellulose binding domain, one encoding an arabionfuranosidase and one encoding an acetylxylanesterase are described. The sequences, CIP1 and CIP2, contain a cellulose binding domain. These proteins are especially useful in the textile and detergent industry and in pulp and paper industry.

  13. [Language gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2006-11-01

    The human capacity for acquiring speech and language must derive, at least in part, from the genome. Recent advance in the field of molecular genetics finally discovered 'Language Gene'. Disruption of FOXP2 gene, the firstly identified 'language gene' causes severe speech and language disorder. To elucidate the anatomical basis of language processing in the brain, we examined the expression pattern of FOXP2/Foxp2 genes in the monkey and rat brains through development. We found the preferential expression of FOXP2/Foxp2 in the striosomal compartment of the developing striatum. Thus, we suggest the striatum, particularly striosomal system may participate in neural information processing for language and speech. Our suggestion is consistent with the declarative/ procedural model of language proposed by Ullman (1997, 2001), which the procedural memory-dependent mental grammar is rooted in the basal ganglia and the frontal cortex, and the declarative memory-dependent mental lexicon is rooted in the temporal lobe. PMID:17432197

  14. Gene Silencing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kertbundit, Sunee; Juříček, Miloslav; Hall, T.C.

    Dordrecht : Springer, 2010 - (Jain, S.; Brar, D.), s. 631-652 ISBN 978-90-481-2966-9 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Gene Silencing * RISC complex Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  15. 唐鱼热休克蛋白60基因cDNA克隆及表达%Cloning and expression of heat shock protein 60 cDNA of Tanichtys albonubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘海超; 陈辉辉; 覃剑晖; 马徐发

    2011-01-01

    Heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) functions as a molecular chaperon and plays an important role in protein folding,maintenance of structural integrity and proper regulation of a subset of cytosolic proteins. To identify a sensitive biomarker of freshwater monitoring,the full-length cDNA of Tanichthys albonubes HSP60 (designated TaHSP60) was cloned by RT-PCR and RACE techniques. It was of 2 486 bp, including 5'UTR of 102 bp and 3'UTR of 656 bp. Its open reading frame contained 1 728 nucleotides which encoded a 575 amino acid peptide. The deduced amino acid sequence of T. Albonubes HSP60 had the highest similarity with Danio rerio (96. 2%). The similarity between T. Albonubes and Carassiusau-ratus,Paralichthys olivaceus, Salmo salari and Xenopus tropicalis was 93. 2%, 89. 7%, 88. 3% and 83. 8%, respectively. Clustal X analysis confirmed the existence of the typical mitochondrial signature sequence, ATP binding region and conserved GGM repeat motif at the C-terminal in T. Albonubes HSP60. Phylogenetic analysis placed T. Albonubes and the putative D. Rerio HSP60 into one separate cluster. The results from real-time PCR showed that the T. Albonubes HSP60 was ubiquitously expressed in different tissues such as liver,muscle,gill,fin clips,eye,ovary,intestine and brain. HSP60 expression levels in liver were the highest while extremely low in gill and fin clips. Statistical analysis indicated that the transcription of HSP60 in liver was significantly higher (P<0. 05) than in any other organs. After copper exposed,mRNA expression level of TaHSP60 in liver were significantly higher than those in control group in 48 h and 96 h(P<0. 05). The data would help design nucleotide probes for detecting HSP60 gene expressions as a biomarker in environmental monitoring.%采用RT-PCR和RACE技术,成功克隆了唐鱼(Tanichth ys albonubes)热休克蛋白60基因cDNA全长序列,命名为TaHSP60(GenBank登录号:HM234132).研究表明:该基因序列全长为2 486 bp,5

  16. Genes and Psoriasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diet Tips" to find out more! Email * Zipcode Genes and Psoriasis Genes hold the key to understanding ... is responsible for causing psoriatic disease. How do genes work? Genes control everything from height to eye ...

  17. Genes and Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Meeting Calendar Find an ENT Doctor Near You Genes and Hearing Loss Genes and Hearing Loss Patient ... mutation may only have dystopia canthorum. How Do Genes Work? Genes are a road map for the ...

  18. Role of Helicobacter pylori specific heat shock protein-60 antibodies in the aetiology of coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aruneshwari Dayal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of chronic infections in causing coronary artery disease (CAD has been investigated for the past several years. Among them, the role of Helicobacter pylori has stimulated keen interest. Though initial results were conflicting, there are growing data to support the role of H. pylori in CAD. The main mechanism of endothelial damage is hypothesized to be through molecular mimicry involving heat shock proteins. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of H.pylori and cytotoxin associated gene A (cagA positive H.pylori infection in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG and the potential role of anti-H. pylori specific heat shock protein-60 (Hp-HSP-60 antibody response in these patients, for cardiac events. One hundred patients undergoing CABG and 100 controls were studied. The H.pylori infection and cagA status were determined serologically by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Hp-HSP-60 Immunoglobulin G (IgG antibodies were estimated by using an in house ELISA. Although there was no difference in the prevalence of H.pylori infection in patients and controls (74% vs 70%, 58% of patients were infected with cagA positive H.pylori compared to 36% of controls (P=0.002. Mean systemic levels of Hp-HSP-60 IgG were also higher in patients than in controls (27.9 vs 18.7, P=0.0001. These antibody levels were also significantly higher in H.pylori positive patients (P=0.0001. There was a strong correlation between Hp-HSP-60 antibody levels and occurrence of myocardial infarction (P=0.003. CagA positive H.pylori infection may be associated with the development of CAD. High levels of Hp-HSP-60 antibodies may constitute a marker and/or concomitant pathogenic factor of the disease.

  19. Gene gymnastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayachandran, Lakshmi S; Thimiri Govinda Raj, Deepak B; Edelweiss, Evelina; Gupta, Kapil; Maier, Josef; Gordeliy, Valentin; Fitzgerald, Daniel J; Berger, Imre

    2013-01-01

    Most essential activities in eukaryotic cells are catalyzed by large multiprotein assemblies containing up to ten or more interlocking subunits. The vast majority of these protein complexes are not easily accessible for high resolution studies aimed at unlocking their mechanisms, due to their low cellular abundance and high heterogeneity. Recombinant overproduction can resolve this bottleneck and baculovirus expression vector systems (BEVS) have emerged as particularly powerful tools for the provision of eukaryotic multiprotein complexes in high quality and quantity. Recently, synthetic biology approaches have begun to make their mark in improving existing BEVS reagents by de novo design of streamlined transfer plasmids and by engineering the baculovirus genome. Here we present OmniBac, comprising new custom designed reagents that further facilitate the integration of heterologous genes into the baculovirus genome for multiprotein expression. Based on comparative genome analysis and data mining, we herein present a blueprint to custom design and engineer the entire baculovirus genome for optimized production properties using a bottom-up synthetic biology approach. PMID:23328086

  20. Principles of gene therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Mammen Biju; Ramakrishnan T; Sudhakar Uma; Vijayalakshmi

    2007-01-01

    Genes are specific sequences of bases that encode instructions to make proteins. When genes are altered so that encoded proteins are unable to carry out their normal functions, genetic disorders can result. Gene therapy is designed to introduce genetic material into cells to compensate for abnormal genes or to make a beneficial protein. This article reviews the fundamentals in gene therapy and its various modes of administration with an insight into the role of gene therapy in Periodontics an...

  1. Recombinant DNA repair genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a gene transfer system with Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells to identify, characterize, and potentially isolate functionally homologous human or CHO genes regulating repair initiation

  2. Imaging gene expression in gene therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiebe, Leonard I. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton (Canada). Noujaim Institute for Pharmaceutical Oncology Research

    1997-12-31

    Full text. Gene therapy can be used to introduce new genes, or to supplement the function of indigenous genes. At the present time, however, there is non-invasive test to demonstrate efficacy of the gene transfer and expression processes. It has been postulated that scintigraphic imaging can offer unique information on both the site at which the transferred gene is expressed, and the degree of expression, both of which are critical issue for safety and clinical efficacy. Many current studies are based on `suicide gene therapy` of cancer. Cells modified to express these genes commit metabolic suicide in the presence of an enzyme encoded by the transferred gene and a specifically-convertible pro drug. Pro drug metabolism can lead to selective metabolic trapping, required for scintigraphy. Herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (H S V-1 t k{sup +}) has been use for `suicide` in vivo tumor gene therapy. It has been proposed that radiolabelled nucleosides can be used as radiopharmaceuticals to detect H S V-1 t k{sup +} gene expression where the H S V-1 t k{sup +} gene serves a reporter or therapeutic function. Animal gene therapy models have been studied using purine-([{sup 18} F]F H P G; [{sup 18} F]-A C V), and pyrimidine- ([{sup 123}/{sup 131} I]I V R F U; [{sup 124}/{sup 131I}]) antiviral nucleosides. Principles of gene therapy and gene therapy imaging will be reviewed and experimental data for [{sup 123}/{sup 131I}]I V R F U imaging with the H S V-1 t k{sup +} reporter gene will be presented

  3. Imaging gene expression in gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text. Gene therapy can be used to introduce new genes, or to supplement the function of indigenous genes. At the present time, however, there is non-invasive test to demonstrate efficacy of the gene transfer and expression processes. It has been postulated that scintigraphic imaging can offer unique information on both the site at which the transferred gene is expressed, and the degree of expression, both of which are critical issue for safety and clinical efficacy. Many current studies are based on 'suicide gene therapy' of cancer. Cells modified to express these genes commit metabolic suicide in the presence of an enzyme encoded by the transferred gene and a specifically-convertible pro drug. Pro drug metabolism can lead to selective metabolic trapping, required for scintigraphy. Herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (H S V-1 t k+) has been use for 'suicide' in vivo tumor gene therapy. It has been proposed that radiolabelled nucleosides can be used as radiopharmaceuticals to detect H S V-1 t k+ gene expression where the H S V-1 t k+ gene serves a reporter or therapeutic function. Animal gene therapy models have been studied using purine-([18 F]F H P G; [18 F]-A C V), and pyrimidine- ([123/131 I]I V R F U; [124/131I]) antiviral nucleosides. Principles of gene therapy and gene therapy imaging will be reviewed and experimental data for [123/131I]I V R F U imaging with the H S V-1 t k+ reporter gene will be presented

  4. Identifying Gene Interaction Enrichment for Gene Expression Data

    OpenAIRE

    Jigang Zhang; Jian Li; Hong-Wen Deng

    2009-01-01

    Gene set analysis allows the inclusion of knowledge from established gene sets, such as gene pathways, and potentially improves the power of detecting differentially expressed genes. However, conventional methods of gene set analysis focus on gene marginal effects in a gene set, and ignore gene interactions which may contribute to complex human diseases. In this study, we propose a method of gene interaction enrichment analysis, which incorporates knowledge of predefined gene sets (e.g. gene ...

  5. Autism and Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Institutes of Health, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This document defines and discusses autism and how genes play a role in the condition. Answers to the following questions are covered: (1) What are genes? (2) What is autism? (3) What causes autism? (4) Why study genes to learn about autism? (5) How do researchers look for the genes involved in autism? (screen the whole genome; conduct cytogenetic…

  6. Principles of gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mammen Biju

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Genes are specific sequences of bases that encode instructions to make proteins. When genes are altered so that encoded proteins are unable to carry out their normal functions, genetic disorders can result. Gene therapy is designed to introduce genetic material into cells to compensate for abnormal genes or to make a beneficial protein. This article reviews the fundamentals in gene therapy and its various modes of administration with an insight into the role of gene therapy in Periodontics and future percepts and the technical and ethical issues of using gene therapy.

  7. Gene therapy in periodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Anirban Chatterjee; Nidhi Singh; Mini Saluja

    2013-01-01

    GENES are made of DNA - the code of life. They are made up of two types of base pair from different number of hydrogen bonds AT, GC which can be turned into instruction. Everyone inherits genes from their parents and passes them on in turn to their children. Every person′s genes are different, and the changes in sequence determine the inherited differences between each of us. Some changes, usually in a single gene, may cause serious diseases. Gene therapy is ′the use of genes as medicine′. It...

  8. Human Gene Therapy: Genes without Frontiers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Eric J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the latest advancements and setbacks in human gene therapy to provide reference material for biology teachers to use in their science classes. Focuses on basic concepts such as recombinant DNA technology, and provides examples of human gene therapy such as severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome, familial hypercholesterolemia, and…

  9. Does Gene Translocation Accelerate the Evolution of Laterally Transferred Genes?

    OpenAIRE

    Hao, Weilong; Golding, G. Brian

    2009-01-01

    Lateral gene transfer (LGT) and gene rearrangement are essential for shaping bacterial genomes during evolution. Separate attention has been focused on understanding the process of lateral gene transfer and the process of gene translocation. However, little is known about how gene translocation affects laterally transferred genes. Here we have examined gene translocations and lateral gene transfers in closely related genome pairs. The results reveal that translocated genes undergo elevated ra...

  10. Essential Bacillus subtilis genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobayashi, K.; Ehrlich, S.D.; Albertini, A.;

    2003-01-01

    To estimate the minimal gene set required to sustain bacterial life in nutritious conditions, we carried out a systematic inactivation of Bacillus subtilis genes. Among approximate to4,100 genes of the organism, only 192 were shown to be indispensable by this or previous work. Another 79 genes were...... predicted to be essential. The vast majority of essential genes were categorized in relatively few domains of cell metabolism, with about half involved in information processing, one-fifth involved in the synthesis of cell envelope and the determination of cell shape and division, and one-tenth related to...... cell energetics. Only 4% of essential genes encode unknown functions. Most essential genes are present throughout a wide range of Bacteria, and almost 70% can also be found in Archaea and Eucarya. However, essential genes related to cell envelope, shape, division, and respiration tend to be lost from...

  11. Bifidobacterium actinocoloniiforme sp nov and Bifidobacterium bohemicum sp nov., from the bumblebee digestive tract

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Killer, Jiří; Kopečný, Jan; Mrázek, Jakub; Koppová, Ingrid; Havlík, J.; Benada, Oldřich; Kott, T.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 6 (2011), s. 1315-1321. ISSN 1466-5026 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA523/08/1091; GA ČR GD525/08/H060 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : ACID HOMOLOGY RELATIONSHIPS * HAMSTER DENTAL PLAQUE * HSP60 GENE-SEQUENCES Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.268, year: 2011

  12. Genes underlying altruism

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Graham J.; Hurd, Peter L.; Crespi, Bernard J.

    2013-01-01

    William D. Hamilton postulated the existence of ‘genes underlying altruism’, under the rubric of inclusive fitness theory, a half-century ago. Such genes are now poised for discovery. In this article, we develop a set of intuitive criteria for the recognition and analysis of genes for altruism and describe the first candidate genes affecting altruism from social insects and humans. We also provide evidence from a human population for genetically based trade-offs, underlain by oxytocin-system ...

  13. Cochlear Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Lustig, Lawrence R.; Akil, Omar

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight recent advances in cochlear gene therapy over the past several years. Cochlear gene therapy has undergone tremendous advances over the past decade. Beginning with some groundbreaking work in 2005 documenting hair cell regeneration using virallymediated delivery of the mouse atonal 1 gene, gene therapy is now being explored as a possible treatment for a variety of causes of hearing loss.

  14. Supervised clustering of genes

    OpenAIRE

    Dettling, Marcel; Bühlmann, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Background We focus on microarray data where experiments monitor gene expression in different tissues and where each experiment is equipped with an additional response variable such as a cancer type. Although the number of measured genes is in the thousands, it is assumed that only a few marker components of gene subsets determine the type of a tissue. Here we present a new method for finding such groups of genes by directly incorporating the response variables into the grouping process, yiel...

  15. Discovering genes underlying QTL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A map-based approach has allowed scientists to discover few genes at a time. In addition, the reproductive barrier between cultivated rice and wild relatives has prevented us from utilizing the germ plasm by a map-based approach. Most genetic traits important to agriculture or human diseases are manifested as observable, quantitative phenotypes called Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL). In many instances, the complexity of the phenotype/genotype interaction and the general lack of clearly identifiable gene products render the direct molecular cloning approach ineffective, thus additional strategies like genome mapping are required to identify the QTL in question. Genome mapping requires no prior knowledge of the gene function, but utilizes statistical methods to identify the most likely gene location. To completely characterize genes of interest, the initially mapped region of a gene location will have to be narrowed down to a size that is suitable for cloning and sequencing. Strategies for gene identification within the critical region have to be applied after the sequencing of a potentially large clone or set of clones that contains this gene(s). Tremendous success of positional cloning has been shown for cloning many genes responsible for human diseases, including cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy as well as plant disease resistance genes. Genome and QTL mapping, positional cloning: the pre-genomics era, comparative approaches to gene identification, and positional cloning: the genomics era are discussed in the report. (M. Suetake)

  16. Discovering genes underlying QTL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanavichit, Apichart [Kasetsart University, Kamphaengsaen, Nakorn Pathom (Thailand)

    2002-02-01

    A map-based approach has allowed scientists to discover few genes at a time. In addition, the reproductive barrier between cultivated rice and wild relatives has prevented us from utilizing the germ plasm by a map-based approach. Most genetic traits important to agriculture or human diseases are manifested as observable, quantitative phenotypes called Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL). In many instances, the complexity of the phenotype/genotype interaction and the general lack of clearly identifiable gene products render the direct molecular cloning approach ineffective, thus additional strategies like genome mapping are required to identify the QTL in question. Genome mapping requires no prior knowledge of the gene function, but utilizes statistical methods to identify the most likely gene location. To completely characterize genes of interest, the initially mapped region of a gene location will have to be narrowed down to a size that is suitable for cloning and sequencing. Strategies for gene identification within the critical region have to be applied after the sequencing of a potentially large clone or set of clones that contains this gene(s). Tremendous success of positional cloning has been shown for cloning many genes responsible for human diseases, including cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy as well as plant disease resistance genes. Genome and QTL mapping, positional cloning: the pre-genomics era, comparative approaches to gene identification, and positional cloning: the genomics era are discussed in the report. (M. Suetake)

  17. A Pilot Study of Gene/Gene and Gene/Environment Interactions in Alzheimer Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ghebranious, Nader; Mukesh, Bickol; Giampietro, Philip F.; Glurich, Ingrid; Mickel, Susan F.; Waring, Stephen C.; Catherine A McCarty

    2011-01-01

    Background: Although some genes associated with increased risk of Alzheimer Disease (AD) have been identified, few data exist related to gene/gene and gene/environment risk of AD. The purpose of this pilot study was to explore gene/gene and gene/environment associations in AD and to obtain data for sample size estimates for larger, more definitive studies of AD.

  18. Modelling prokaryote gene content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Susko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The patchy distribution of genes across the prokaryotes may be caused by multiple gene losses or lateral transfer. Probabilistic models of gene gain and loss are needed to distinguish between these possibilities. Existing models allow only single genes to be gained and lost, despite the empirical evidence for multi-gene events. We compare birth-death models (currently the only widely-used models, in which only one gene can be gained or lost at a time to blocks models (allowing gain and loss of multiple genes within a family. We analyze two pairs of genomes: two E. coli strains, and the distantly-related Archaeoglobus fulgidus (archaea and Bacillus subtilis (gram positive bacteria. Blocks models describe the data much better than birth-death models. Our models suggest that lateral transfers of multiple genes from the same family are rare (although transfers of single genes are probably common. For both pairs, the estimated median time that a gene will remain in the genome is not much greater than the time separating the common ancestors of the archaea and bacteria. Deep phylogenetic reconstruction from sequence data will therefore depend on choosing genes likely to remain in the genome for a long time. Phylogenies based on the blocks model are more biologically plausible than phylogenies based on the birth-death model.

  19. Gene therapy: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudip Indu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy "the use of genes as medicine" involves the transfer of a therapeutic or working copy of a gene into specific cells of an individual in order to repair a faulty gene copy. The technique may be used to replace a faulty gene, or to introduce a new gene whose function is to cure or to favorably modify the clinical course of a condition. The objective of gene therapy is to introduce new genetic material into target cells while causing no damage to the surrounding healthy cells and tissues, hence the treatment related morbidity is decreased. The delivery system includes a vector that delivers a therapeutic gene into the patient′s target cell. Functional proteins are created from the therapeutic gene causing the cell to return to a normal stage. The vectors used in gene therapy can be viral and non-viral. Gene therapy, an emerging field of biomedicine, is still at infancy and much research remains to be done before this approach to the treatment of condition will realize its full potential.

  20. Evaluating gene × gene and gene × smoking interaction in rheumatoid arthritis using candidate genes in GAW15

    OpenAIRE

    Mei Ling; Li Xiaohui; Yang Kai; Cui Jinrui; Fang Belle; Guo Xiuqing; Rotter Jerome I

    2007-01-01

    Abstract We examined the potential gene × gene interactions and gene × smoking interactions in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) using the candidate gene data sets provided by Genetic Analysis Workshop 15 Problem 2. The multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) method was used to test gene × gene interactions among candidate genes. The case-only sample was used to test gene × smoking interactions. The best predictive model was the single-locus model with single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs247660...

  1. Cancer gene therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Mitrović Tatjana; Radulović Siniša

    2005-01-01

    Cancer gene therapy can be defined as transfer of nucleic acids into tumor or normal cells with aim to eradicate or reduce tumor mass by direct killing of cells, immunomodulation or correction of genetic errors, and reversion of malignant status. Initially started with lots of optimism and enthusiasm, cancer gene therapy has shown limited success in treatment of patients. This review highlights current limitations and almost endless possibilities of cancer gene therapy. The major difficulty i...

  2. Regulation of gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to define in molecular terms the mechanisms controlling expression of specific genes in mammalian cells, how gene expression is activated, how tissue-specific expression is effected, how expression is modulated by hormones and other specific effectors, and how genetic control mechanisms are altered in the dysfunction of gene expression in cells transformed to malignancy were studied. Much of this work has focused on expression of the rat liver enzyme tyrosine aminotransferase

  3. Identification of MHCII variants associated with chlamydial disease in the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quintin Lau

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydiosis, the most common infectious disease in koalas, can cause chronic urogenital tract fibrosis and infertility. High titres of serum immunoglobulin G against 10 kDa and 60 kDa chlamydial heat-shock proteins (c-hsp10 and c-hsp60 are associated with fibrous occlusion of the koala uterus and uterine tube. Murine and human studies have identified associations between specific major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII alleles or genotypes, and higher c-hsp 60 antibody levels or chlamydia-associated disease and infertility. In this study, we characterised partial MHCII DAB and DBB genes in female koalas (n = 94 from a single geographic population, and investigated associations among antibody responses to c-hsp60 quantified by ELISA, susceptibility to chlamydial infection, or age. The identification of three candidate MHCII variants provides additional support for the functional role of MHCII in the koala, and will inform more focused future studies. This is the first study to investigate an association between MHC genes with chlamydial pathogenesis in a non-model, free-ranging species.

  4. [The gene or genes of allergic asthma?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoly, P; Bousquet, J; Godard, P; Michel, F B

    1993-05-15

    Asthma is a multifactorial disease in which the hereditary component has been demonstrated by familial and identical twin studies. Allergy is important in the aetiology of asthma and is characterized by a hyperreaction to allergens triggering predominantly the immunoglobulines E. The levels of these antibodies are found to be elevated even in non allergic asthmatics. The majority of genetic research in this area is focused on either the genes of the specific immune response or that of the non allergic response. These are the genes of the class II MHC, and the APY gene on chromosome 11q respectively. The modern techniques of molecular genetics and in particular those of inverse genetics have recently contributed to a more comprehensive understanding of this disease. PMID:8316547

  5. Delivery Systems in Gene Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Hu; Anas El-Aneed; Cui Guohui

    2005-01-01

    1 Gene therapy Gene therapy includes the treatment of both genetically based and infectious diseases by introducing genetic materials which have therapeutic effects[1~3]. In its simplest terms, a wild type gene (which is non-functional in the cell leading to disease development) is introduced into the somatic cell lacking this gene to restore the normal gene function in this cell. Many gene therapy strategies, however, utilize genes to destroy specific cells.

  6. Gene Conversion and Evolution of Gene Families: An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Tomoko Ohta

    2010-01-01

    The importance of gene conversion for the evolution of gene families is reviewed. Four problems concerning gene conversion, i.e., concerted evolution, generation of useful variation, deleterious effects, and relation to neofunctionalization, are discussed by surveying reported examples of evolving gene families. Emphasis is given toward understanding interactive effects of gene conversion and natural selection.

  7. Your Genes, Your Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Table of Contents Your Genes, Your Choices describes the Human Genome Project, the science behind it, and the ethical, legal, and social issues that are ... Nothing could be further from the truth. Your Genes, Your Choices points out how the progress of ...

  8. The GeneMANIA prediction server: biological network integration for gene prioritization and predicting gene function

    OpenAIRE

    Warde-Farley, David; Sylva L. Donaldson; Comes, Ovi; Zuberi, Khalid; Badrawi, Rashad; Chao, Pauline; Franz, Max; Grouios, Chris; Kazi, Farzana; Lopes, Christian Tannus; Maitland, Anson; Mostafavi, Sara; Montojo, Jason; Shao, Quentin; Wright, George

    2010-01-01

    GeneMANIA (http://www.genemania.org) is a flexible, user-friendly web interface for generating hypotheses about gene function, analyzing gene lists and prioritizing genes for functional assays. Given a query list, GeneMANIA extends the list with functionally similar genes that it identifies using available genomics and proteomics data. GeneMANIA also reports weights that indicate the predictive value of each selected data set for the query. Six organisms are currently supported (Arabidopsis t...

  9. Adenovirus Vectors for Gene Therapy, Vaccination and Cancer Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Wold, William S.M.; Toth, Karoly

    2013-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors are the most commonly employed vector for cancer gene therapy. They are also used for gene therapy and as vaccines to express foreign antigens. Adenovirus vectors can be replication-defective; certain essential viral genes are deleted and replaced by a cassette that expresses a foreign therapeutic gene. Such vectors are used for gene therapy, as vaccines, and for cancer therapy. Replication-competent (oncolytic) vectors are employed for cancer gene therapy. Oncolytic vector...

  10. Pharmacological Effects of Erythropoietin and its Derivative Carbamyl erythropoietin in Cerebral White Matter Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei

    with translational potential for PVL, which is the primary injury underlying cerebral palsy. After confirming the neuroprotective effects of EPO and CEPO on PVL mice, we continued to study the mechanisms relating to their functions. As we learned from our lab's previous study, microglia play an important role in the pathogenesis of PVL, linking multiple effectors downstream of hypoxia-ischemia and inflammation. We found that EPO and CEPO inhibit microglial activation and reduced the severity of injury. Furthermore, we found that EPO and CEPO decreased the activity of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) in activated microglia. PARP-1 activity increases in response to many insults, such as infection, ischemia and toxicity. Therefore, we hypothesized that EPO and CEPO decrease microglial activation by inhibiting PARP-1 activity, and thus leading to protection against inflammation and cell death. Besides pharmacological studies of EPO and CEPO on PVL, we also investigated other endogenous factors that may affect neonatal white matter injury. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are important chaperones that facilitate appropriate protein folding and modification. HSP60, a chaperonin located in the mitochondria, is one of these important molecules that promote appropriate protein folding. HSP60 expression levels increased significantly in the brains of PVL mice compared with control animals. In microglial cell culture, we found that after LPS treatment, HSP60 expression levels increased both inside microglial cells and in the extracellular medium. In addition, we noted enhanced HSP60 immunoreactivity in the brains of PVL mice, which localized inside activated microglial cells and extracellularly. The rise in HSP60 activity after hypoxia-ischemia and LPS administration implies that it potentially functions as one of the triggers of microglial activation and central nervous system inflammation.

  11. Methanogenesis and methane genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview of the pathways leading to methane biosynthesis is presented. The steps investigated to date by gene cloning and DNA sequencing procedures are identified and discussed. The primary structures of component C of methyl coenzyme M reductase encoded by mcr operons in different methanogens are compared. Experiments to detect the primary structure of the genes encoding F420 reducing hydrogenase (frhABG) and methyl hydrogen reducing hydrogenase (mvhDGA) in methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum strain H are compared with each other and with eubacterial hydrogenase encoding genes. A biotechnological use for hydrogenases from hypermorphillic archaebacteria is suggested. (author)

  12. Antisense gene silencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Troels T; Nielsen, Jørgen E

    2013-01-01

    Since the first reports that double-stranded RNAs can efficiently silence gene expression in C. elegans, the technology of RNA interference (RNAi) has been intensively exploited as an experimental tool to study gene function. With the subsequent discovery that RNAi could also be applied to...... mammalian cells, the technology of RNAi expanded from being a valuable experimental tool to being an applicable method for gene-specific therapeutic regulation, and much effort has been put into further refinement of the technique. This review will focus on how RNAi has developed over the years and how the...

  13. Endurance performance: genes or gene combinations?

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez Gallego, Félix; Santiago Dorrego, Catalina; González-Freire, Marta; Muniesa Ferrero, Carlos Alberto; Fernández del Valle, María; Pérez Ruiz, Margarita; Foster, Carl; Lucía Mulas, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    We assessed the possible association between variants of the genes encoding for the angiotensin-converting enzyme ( ACE) and alpha-actinin-3 ( ACTN3) (both individually and combined) and several endurance phenotypic traits, e.g., peak power output (PPO), ventilatory (VT) and respiratory compensation threshold (RCT), among others, in professional road cyclists and sedentary controls (n = 46 each). We applied an ANCOVA test using the aforementioned phenotype traits as dependent variables, ACE a...

  14. Gene Therapy of Cancerous Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Valenčáková, A.; Dziaková, A.; Hatalová, E.

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy of cancerous diseases provides new means of curing patients with oncologic illnesses. There are several approaches in treating cancer by gene therapy. Most commonly used methods are: cancer immunogene therapy, suicide gene therapy, application of tumor-suppressor genes, antiangiogenic therapy, mesenchymal stem cells used as vectors, gene directed enzyme/prodrug therapy and bacteria used as anti-cancer agents. Cancer gene immunotherapy uses several immunologic agents for the purp...

  15. Genes underlying altruism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Graham J; Hurd, Peter L; Crespi, Bernard J

    2013-01-01

    William D. Hamilton postulated the existence of 'genes underlying altruism', under the rubric of inclusive fitness theory, a half-century ago. Such genes are now poised for discovery. In this article, we develop a set of intuitive criteria for the recognition and analysis of genes for altruism and describe the first candidate genes affecting altruism from social insects and humans. We also provide evidence from a human population for genetically based trade-offs, underlain by oxytocin-system polymorphisms, between alleles for altruism and alleles for non-social cognition. Such trade-offs between self-oriented and altruistic behaviour may influence the evolution of phenotypic diversity across all social animals. PMID:24132092

  16. What Is a Gene?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Quizzes Kids' Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Back-to-School Butterflies? ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes What Is a Gene? KidsHealth > For Kids > What Is ...

  17. Terplex Gene Delivery System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Wan

    2005-01-01

    Polymeric gene delivery systems have been developed to overcome problems caused by viral carriers. They are low cytotoxic, have no size limit, are convenient in handling, of low cost and reproducible. A Terplex gene delivery system consisting of plasmid DNA, low density lipoprotein and hydropholized poly-L-lysine was designed and characterized. The plasmid DNA, when formulated with stearyl PLL and LDL, forms a stable and hydrophobicity/charge-balanced Terplex system of optimal size for efficient cellular uptake. DNA is still intact after the Terplex formation. This information is expected to be utilized for the development of improved transfection vector for in vivo gene therapy. Terplex DNA complex showed significantly longer retention in the vascular space than naked DNA. This system was used in the augmentation of myocardial transfection at an infarction site with the VEGF gene. PMID:16243067

  18. Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene Expression Omnibus is a public functional genomics data repository supporting MIAME-compliant submissions of array- and sequence-based data. Tools are provided...

  19. Metastasis Suppressor Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Jinchun; Yang, Qin; Huang, Qihong

    2013-01-01

    Metastasis is a major cause of cancer mortality. Metastasis is a complex process that requires the regulation of both metastasis-promoting and metastasis suppressor genes. The discovery of metastasis suppressor genes contributes significantly to our understanding of metastasis mechanisms and provides prognostic markers and therapeutic targets in clinical cancer management. In this review, we summarize the methods that have been used to identify metastasis suppressors and the potential clinica...

  20. Genes and Vocal Learning

    OpenAIRE

    White, Stephanie A.

    2009-01-01

    Could a mutation in a single gene be the evolutionary lynchpin supporting the development of human language? A rare mutation in the molecule known as FOXP2 discovered in a human family seemed to suggest so, and its sequence phylogeny reinforced a Chomskian view that language emerged wholesale in humans. Spurred by this discovery, research in primates, rodents and birds suggests that FoxP2 and other language-related genes are interactors in the neuromolecular networks that underlie subsystems ...

  1. Evidence for homosexuality gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pool, R.

    1993-07-16

    A genetic analysis of 40 pairs of homosexual brothers has uncovered a region on the X chromosome that appears to contain a gene or genes for homosexuality. When analyzing the pedigrees of homosexual males, the researcheres found evidence that the trait has a higher likelihood of being passed through maternal genes. This led them to search the X chromosome for genes predisposing to homosexuality. The researchers examined the X chromosomes of pairs of homosexual brothers for regions of DNA that most or all had in common. Of the 40 sets of brothers, 33 shared a set of five markers in the q28 region of the long arm of the X chromosome. The linkage has a LOD score of 4.0, which translates into a 99.5% certainty that there is a gene or genes in this area that predispose males to homosexuality. The chief researcher warns, however, that this one site cannot explain all instances of homosexuality, since there were some cases where the trait seemed to be passed paternally. And even among those brothers where there was no evidence that the trait was passed paternally, seven sets of brothers did not share the Xq28 markers. It seems likely that homosexuality arises from a variety of causes.

  2. Gene-gene, gene-environment, gene-nutrient interactionsand single nucleotide polymorphisms of inflammatorycytokines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation plays a significant role in the etiologyof type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The rise in thepro-inflammatory cytokines is the essential step inglucotoxicity and lipotoxicity induced mitochondrialinjury, oxidative stress and beta cell apoptosis inT2DM. Among the recognized markers are interleukin(IL)-6, IL-1, IL-10, IL-18, tissue necrosis factor-alpha(TNF-α), C-reactive protein, resistin, adiponectin, tissueplasminogen activator, fibrinogen and heptoglobins.Diabetes mellitus has firm genetic and very strongenvironmental influence; exhibiting a polygenic modeof inheritance. Many single nucleotide polymorphisms(SNPs) in various genes including those of pro and antiinflammatorycytokines have been reported as a riskfor T2DM. Not all the SNPs have been confirmed byunifying results in different studies and wide variationshave been reported in various ethnic groups. Theinter-ethnic variations can be explained by the factthat gene expression may be regulated by gene-gene,gene-environment and gene-nutrient interactions. Thisreview highlights the impact of these interactions ondetermining the role of single nucleotide polymorphismof IL-6, TNF-α, resistin and adiponectin in pathogenesisof T2DM.

  3. The Mycoplasma hominis vaa gene displays a mosaic gene structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Thomas; Emmersen, Jeppe M. G.; Jensen, Lise T.;

    1998-01-01

    Mycoplasma hominis contains a variable adherence-associated (vaa) gene. To classify variants of the vaa genes, we examined 42 M. hominis isolated by PCR, DNA sequencing and immunoblotting. This uncovered the existence of five gene categories. Comparison of the gene types revealed a modular...

  4. Hox genes and study of Hox genes in crustacean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Lin; CHEN Zhijuan; XU Mingyu; LIN Shengguo; WANG Lu

    2004-01-01

    Homeobox genes have been discovered in many species. These genes are known to play a major role in specifying regional identity along the anterior-posterior axis of animals from a wide range of phyla.The products of the homeotic genes are a set of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors that control elaborate developmental processes and specify cell fates in metazoans. Crustacean, presenting a variety of body plans not encountered in any other class or phylum of the Metazoa, has been shown to possess a single set of homologous Hox genes like insect. The ancestral crustacean Hox gene complex comprised ten genes: eight homologous to the hometic Hox genes and two related to nonhomeotic genes presented within the insect Hox complexes. The crustacean in particular exhibits an abundant diversity segment specialization and tagmosis. This morphological diversity relates to the Hox genes. In crustacean body plan, different Hox genes control different segments and tagmosis.

  5. GeneCards Version 3: the human gene integrator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safran, Marilyn; Dalah, Irina; Alexander, Justin; Rosen, Naomi; Iny Stein, Tsippi; Shmoish, Michael; Nativ, Noam; Bahir, Iris; Doniger, Tirza; Krug, Hagit; Sirota-Madi, Alexandra; Olender, Tsviya; Golan, Yaron; Stelzer, Gil; Harel, Arye; Lancet, Doron

    2010-01-01

    GeneCards (www.genecards.org) is a comprehensive, authoritative compendium of annotative information about human genes, widely used for nearly 15 years. Its gene-centric content is automatically mined and integrated from over 80 digital sources, resulting in a web-based deep-linked card for each of >73,000 human gene entries, encompassing the following categories: protein coding, pseudogene, RNA gene, genetic locus, cluster and uncategorized. We now introduce GeneCards Version 3, featuring a speedy and sophisticated search engine and a revamped, technologically enabling infrastructure, catering to the expanding needs of biomedical researchers. A key focus is on gene-set analyses, which leverage GeneCards' unique wealth of combinatorial annotations. These include the GeneALaCart batch query facility, which tabulates user-selected annotations for multiple genes and GeneDecks, which identifies similar genes with shared annotations, and finds set-shared annotations by descriptor enrichment analysis. Such set-centric features address a host of applications, including microarray data analysis, cross-database annotation mapping and gene-disorder associations for drug targeting. We highlight the new Version 3 database architecture, its multi-faceted search engine, and its semi-automated quality assurance system. Data enhancements include an expanded visualization of gene expression patterns in normal and cancer tissues, an integrated alternative splicing pattern display, and augmented multi-source SNPs and pathways sections. GeneCards now provides direct links to gene-related research reagents such as antibodies, recombinant proteins, DNA clones and inhibitory RNAs and features gene-related drugs and compounds lists. We also portray the GeneCards Inferred Functionality Score annotation landscape tool for scoring a gene's functional information status. Finally, we delineate examples of applications and collaborations that have benefited from the GeneCards suite. Database

  6. Introns in higher plant genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The intron is an important component of eukaryotic gene. Extensive studies have been conducted to get a better understanding of its structure and function. This paper presents a brief review of the structure and function of introns in higher plant genes. It is shown that higher plant introns possess structural properties shared by all eukaryotic introns, however, they also exhibit a striking degree of diversity. The process of intron splicing in higher plant genes involves interaction between multiple cis-acting elements and trans-acting factors, such as 5′ splicing site, 3′ splicing site and many protein factors. The process of intron splicing is an important level at which gene expression is regulated. Especially alternative splicing of intron can regulate time and space of gene expression. In addition, some introns in higher plant genes also regulate gene expression by affecting the pattern of gene expression, enhancing the level of gene expression and driving the gene expression.

  7. Adipocytes from New Zealand Obese Mice Exhibit Aberrant Proinflammatory Reactivity to the Stress Signal Heat Shock Protein 60

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Märker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipocytes release immune mediators that contribute to diabetes-associated inflammatory processes. As the stress protein heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60 induces proinflammatory adipocyte activities, we hypothesized that adipocytes of diabetes-predisposed mice exhibit an increased proinflammatory reactivity to Hsp60. Preadipocytes and mature adipocytes from nonobese diabetic (NOD, New Zealand obese (NZO, and C57BL/6J mice were analyzed for Hsp60 binding, Hsp60-activated signaling pathways, and Hsp60-induced release of the chemokine CXCL-1 (KC, interleukin 6 (IL-6, and macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1. Hsp60 showed specific binding to (pre-adipocytes of NOD, NZO, and C57BL/6J mice. Hsp60 binding involved conserved binding structure(s and Hsp60 epitopes and was strongest to NZO mouse-derived mature adipocytes. Hsp60 exposure induced KC, IL-6, and MCP-1 release from (pre-adipocytes of all mouse strains with a pronounced increase of IL-6 release from NZO mouse-derived adipocytes. Compared to NOD and C57BL/6J mouse derived cells, Hsp60-induced formation of IL-6, KC, and MCP-1 from NZO mouse-derived (pre-adipocytes strongly depended on NFκB-activation. Increased Hsp60 binding and Hsp60-induced IL-6 release by mature adipocytes of NZO mice suggest that enhanced adipocyte reactivity to the stress signal Hsp60 contributes to inflammatory processes underlying diabetes associated with obesity and insulin resistance.

  8. Radionuclide reporter gene imaging for cardiac gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the field of cardiac gene therapy, angiogenic gene therapy has been most extensively investigated. The first clinical trial of cardiac angiogenic gene therapy was reported in 1998, and at the peak, more than 20 clinical trial protocols were under evaluation. However, most trials have ceased owing to the lack of decisive proof of therapeutic effects and the potential risks of viral vectors. In order to further advance cardiac angiogenic gene therapy, remaining open issues need to be resolved: there needs to be improvement of gene transfer methods, regulation of gene expression, development of much safer vectors and optimisation of therapeutic genes. For these purposes, imaging of gene expression in living organisms is of great importance. In radionuclide reporter gene imaging, ''reporter genes'' transferred into cell nuclei encode for a protein that retains a complementary ''reporter probe'' of a positron or single-photon emitter; thus expression of the reporter genes can be imaged with positron emission tomography or single-photon emission computed tomography. Accordingly, in the setting of gene therapy, the location, magnitude and duration of the therapeutic gene co-expression with the reporter genes can be monitored non-invasively. In the near future, gene therapy may evolve into combination therapy with stem/progenitor cell transplantation, so-called cell-based gene therapy or gene-modified cell therapy. Radionuclide reporter gene imaging is now expected to contribute in providing evidence on the usefulness of this novel therapeutic approach, as well as in investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying neovascularisation and safety issues relevant to further progress in conventional gene therapy. (orig.)

  9. Radionuclide reporter gene imaging for cardiac gene therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inubushi, Masayuki [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Molecular Imaging, Sapporo (Japan); Tamaki, Nagara [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)

    2007-06-15

    In the field of cardiac gene therapy, angiogenic gene therapy has been most extensively investigated. The first clinical trial of cardiac angiogenic gene therapy was reported in 1998, and at the peak, more than 20 clinical trial protocols were under evaluation. However, most trials have ceased owing to the lack of decisive proof of therapeutic effects and the potential risks of viral vectors. In order to further advance cardiac angiogenic gene therapy, remaining open issues need to be resolved: there needs to be improvement of gene transfer methods, regulation of gene expression, development of much safer vectors and optimisation of therapeutic genes. For these purposes, imaging of gene expression in living organisms is of great importance. In radionuclide reporter gene imaging, ''reporter genes'' transferred into cell nuclei encode for a protein that retains a complementary ''reporter probe'' of a positron or single-photon emitter; thus expression of the reporter genes can be imaged with positron emission tomography or single-photon emission computed tomography. Accordingly, in the setting of gene therapy, the location, magnitude and duration of the therapeutic gene co-expression with the reporter genes can be monitored non-invasively. In the near future, gene therapy may evolve into combination therapy with stem/progenitor cell transplantation, so-called cell-based gene therapy or gene-modified cell therapy. Radionuclide reporter gene imaging is now expected to contribute in providing evidence on the usefulness of this novel therapeutic approach, as well as in investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying neovascularisation and safety issues relevant to further progress in conventional gene therapy. (orig.)

  10. Gene therapy: progress and predictions

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, Mary; Thrasher, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    The first clinical gene delivery, which involved insertion of a marker gene into lymphocytes from cancer patients, was published 25 years ago. In this review, we describe progress since then in gene therapy. Patients with some inherited single-gene defects can now be treated with their own bone marrow stem cells that have been engineered with a viral vector carrying the missing gene. Patients with inherited retinopathies and haemophilia B can also be treated by local or systemic injection of ...

  11. Correlating Expression Data with Gene Function Using Gene Ontology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU,Qi; DENG,Yong; WANG,Chuan; SHI,Tie-Liu; LI,Yi-Xue

    2006-01-01

    Clustering is perhaps one of the most widely used tools for microarray data analysis. Proposed roles for genes of unknown function are inferred from clusters of genes similarity expressed across many biological conditions.However, whether function annotation by similarity metrics is reliable or not and to what extent the similarity in gene expression patterns is useful for annotation of gene functions, has not been evaluated. This paper made a comprehensive research on the correlation between the similarity of expression data and of gene functions using Gene Ontology. It has been found that although the similarity in expression patterns and the similarity in gene functions are significantly dependent on each other, this association is rather weak. In addition, among the three categories of Gene Ontology, the similarity of expression data is more useful for cellular component annotation than for biological process and molecular function. The results presented are interesting for the gene functions prediction research area.

  12. The gene tree delusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Mark S; Gatesy, John

    2016-01-01

    Higher-level relationships among placental mammals are mostly resolved, but several polytomies remain contentious. Song et al. (2012) claimed to have resolved three of these using shortcut coalescence methods (MP-EST, STAR) and further concluded that these methods, which assume no within-locus recombination, are required to unravel deep-level phylogenetic problems that have stymied concatenation. Here, we reanalyze Song et al.'s (2012) data and leverage these re-analyses to explore key issues in systematics including the recombination ratchet, gene tree stoichiometry, the proportion of gene tree incongruence that results from deep coalescence versus other factors, and simulations that compare the performance of coalescence and concatenation methods in species tree estimation. Song et al. (2012) reported an average locus length of 3.1 kb for the 447 protein-coding genes in their phylogenomic dataset, but the true mean length of these loci (start codon to stop codon) is 139.6 kb. Empirical estimates of recombination breakpoints in primates, coupled with consideration of the recombination ratchet, suggest that individual coalescence genes (c-genes) approach ∼12 bp or less for Song et al.'s (2012) dataset, three to four orders of magnitude shorter than the c-genes reported by these authors. This result has general implications for the application of coalescence methods in species tree estimation. We contend that it is illogical to apply coalescence methods to complete protein-coding sequences. Such analyses amalgamate c-genes with different evolutionary histories (i.e., exons separated by >100,000 bp), distort true gene tree stoichiometry that is required for accurate species tree inference, and contradict the central rationale for applying coalescence methods to difficult phylogenetic problems. In addition, Song et al.'s (2012) dataset of 447 genes includes 21 loci with switched taxonomic names, eight duplicated loci, 26 loci with non-homologous sequences that are

  13. Vertebrate gene predictions and the problem of large genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jun; Li, ShengTing; Zhang, Yong;

    2003-01-01

    To find unknown protein-coding genes, annotation pipelines use a combination of ab initio gene prediction and similarity to experimentally confirmed genes or proteins. Here, we show that although the ab initio predictions have an intrinsically high false-positive rate, they also have a consistently...... low false-negative rate. The incorporation of similarity information is meant to reduce the false-positive rate, but in doing so it increases the false-negative rate. The crucial variable is gene size (including introns)--genes of the most extreme sizes, especially very large genes, are most likely to...

  14. Suicide genes or p53 gene and p53 target genes as targets for cancer gene therapy by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy has some disadvantages due to the severe side-effect on the normal tissues at a curative dose of ionizing radiation (IR). Similarly, as a new developing approach, gene therapy also has some disadvantages, such as lack of specificity for tumors, limited expression of therapeutic gene, potential biological risk. To certain extent, above problems would be solved by the suicide genes or p53 gene and its target genes therapies targeted by ionizing radiation. This strategy not only makes up the disadvantage from radiotherapy or gene therapy alone, but also promotes success rate on the base of lower dose. By present, there have been several vectors measuring up to be reaching clinical trials. This review focused on the development of the cancer gene therapy through suicide genes or p53 and its target genes mediated by IR. (authors)

  15. Association Between a Prognostic Gene Signature and Functional Gene Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Manuela; Metzeler, Klaus H.; Buske, Christian; Bohlander, Stefan K.; Mansmann, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Background The development of expression-based gene signatures for predicting prognosis or class membership is a popular and challenging task. Besides their stringent validation, signatures need a functional interpretation and must be placed in a biological context. Popular tools such as Gene Set Enrichment have drawbacks because they are restricted to annotated genes and are unable to capture the information hidden in the signature’s non-annotated genes. Methodology We propose concepts to relate a signature with functional gene sets like pathways or Gene Ontology categories. The connection between single signature genes and a specific pathway is explored by hierarchical variable selection and gene association networks. The risk score derived from an individual patient’s signature is related to expression patterns of pathways and Gene Ontology categories. Global tests are useful for these tasks, and they adjust for other factors. GlobalAncova is used to explore the effect on gene expression in specific functional groups from the interaction of the score and selected mutations in the patient’s genome. Results We apply the proposed methods to an expression data set and a corresponding gene signature for predicting survival in Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML). The example demonstrates strong relations between the signature and cancer-related pathways. The signature-based risk score was found to be associated with development-related biological processes. Conclusions Many authors interpret the functional aspects of a gene signature by linking signature genes to pathways or relevant functional gene groups. The method of gene set enrichment is preferred to annotating signature genes to specific Gene Ontology categories. The strategies proposed in this paper go beyond the restriction of annotation and deepen the insights into the biological mechanisms reflected in the information given by a signature. PMID:19812786

  16. Old genes experience stronger translational selection than young genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hongyan; Ma, Lina; Wang, Guangyu; Li, Mengwei; Zhang, Zhang

    2016-09-15

    Selection on synonymous codon usage for translation efficiency and/or accuracy has been identified as a widespread mechanism in many living organisms. However, it remains unknown whether translational selection associates closely with gene age and acts differentially on genes with different evolutionary ages. To address this issue, here we investigate the strength of translational selection acting on different aged genes in human. Our results show that old genes present stronger translational selection than young genes, demonstrating that translational selection correlates positively with gene age. We further explore the difference of translational selection in duplicates vs. singletons and in housekeeping vs. tissue-specific genes. We find that translational selection acts comparably in old singletons and old duplicates and stronger translational selection in old genes is contributed primarily by housekeeping genes. For young genes, contrastingly, singletons experience stronger translational selection than duplicates, presumably due to redundant function of duplicated genes during their early evolutionary stage. Taken together, our results indicate that translational selection acting on a gene would not be constant during all stages of evolution, associating closely with gene age. PMID:27259662

  17. Inferring horizontal gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Ravenhall

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal or Lateral Gene Transfer (HGT or LGT is the transmission of portions of genomic DNA between organisms through a process decoupled from vertical inheritance. In the presence of HGT events, different fragments of the genome are the result of different evolutionary histories. This can therefore complicate the investigations of evolutionary relatedness of lineages and species. Also, as HGT can bring into genomes radically different genotypes from distant lineages, or even new genes bearing new functions, it is a major source of phenotypic innovation and a mechanism of niche adaptation. For example, of particular relevance to human health is the lateral transfer of antibiotic resistance and pathogenicity determinants, leading to the emergence of pathogenic lineages. Computational identification of HGT events relies upon the investigation of sequence composition or evolutionary history of genes. Sequence composition-based ("parametric" methods search for deviations from the genomic average, whereas evolutionary history-based ("phylogenetic" approaches identify genes whose evolutionary history significantly differs from that of the host species. The evaluation and benchmarking of HGT inference methods typically rely upon simulated genomes, for which the true history is known. On real data, different methods tend to infer different HGT events, and as a result it can be difficult to ascertain all but simple and clear-cut HGT events.

  18. GENES BEHIND SMOKE ACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilmos Soós

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Smoke can break dormancy and promote seed germination of many plant species. We investigated changes in the gene expression changes after imbibition of light-sensitive Lactuca sativa L. cv. Grand Rapids achenes with dilute smoke water compared to water control samples kept in dark or continuous light. Although no difference was detected in the smoke water vs. water control samples germinated in light, smoke water treatment resulted in the differential display of several expressed sequence tags (ESTs when compared to water control samples kept in dark. The most pronounced fragments isolated correspond to known genes with functions related to cell wall expansion, abscisic acid regulation, regulation of translation, the cell division cycle, carbohydrate metabolism and desiccation tolerance. These data clearly indicate that the smoke water, which stimulates germination of light-sensitive Grand Rapids lettuce seeds in the dark, rapidly affects genes that are essential for cell division, cell wall expansion and mobilization and utilization of nutrients for the resumption of embryo growth. Although the master genes remained unknown, our hope is that the using of maize microarray will reveal the whole molecular background of smoke action.

  19. Ultrasound mediated gene transfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Rene G.; Apfel, Robert E.; Brandsma, Janet L.

    2002-05-01

    Gene therapy is a promising modality for the treatment of a variety of human diseases both inherited and acquired, such as cystic fibrosis and cancer. The lack of an effective, safe method for the delivery of foreign genes into the cells, a process known as transfection, limits this effort. Ultrasound mediated gene transfection is an attractive method for gene delivery since it is a noninvasive technique, does not introduce any viral particles into the host and can offer very good temporal and spatial control. Previous investigators have shown that sonication increases transfection efficiency with and without ultrasound contrast agents. The mechanism is believed to be via a cavitation process where collapsing bubble nuclei permeabilize the cell membrane leading to increased DNA transfer. The research is focused on the use of pulsed wave high frequency focused ultrasound to transfect DNA into mammalian cells in vitro and in vivo. A better understanding of the mechanism behind the transfection process is also sought. A summary of some in vitro results to date will be presented, which includes the design of a sonication chamber that allows us to model the in vivo case more accurately.

  20. Searching for speciation genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt, Benjamin George; Côté, Isabelle M; Emerson, Brent C

    2011-01-01

    Closely related species that show clear phenotypic divergence, but without obvious geographic barriers, can provide opportunities to study how diversification can occur when opportunities for allopatric speciation are limited. We examined genetic divergence in the coral reef fish genus Hypoplectr...... evidence for genes that may be associated with colour morphotype in the genus Hypoplectrus....

  1. Cloning of genes encoding nonhost hypersensitive response-inducing elicitors from Phytophthora boehmeriae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun; ZHANG HaiFeng; ZHANG ZhengGuang; WANG YuanChao; ZHENG XiaoBo

    2007-01-01

    We have devised a high-throughput functional cloning method to isolate cDNAs from Phytophthora boehmeriae of which the products elicit a hypersensitive response (HR) in tobacco. The cDNAs were cloned into a binary potato virus X (PVX)-based expression vector and transformed into Agrobacterium tumefeciens (Mog101). 4100 colonies were individually toothpick-inoculated onto leaflets of Nicotiana benthamiana. 12 cDNAs were identified whose expression induced formation of a necrotic lesion around the inoculation site. 7 of these clones have different sequences. One of these clones PBC43 encodes specific elicitin. Clone PBC163 encodes a protein highly homologous to Rab; PBC241 encodes a prohibitin protein; PBN62 encodes a Heat Shock Protein 60 (HSP60). The other five cDNAs reveal no homology to known protein and are thus considered novel. These observations suggest that this functional screening method is a versatile strategy to identify cDNAs of pathogens that encode elicitors and other HR-inducing proteins.

  2. Genes contributing to prion pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamgüney, Gültekin; Giles, Kurt; Glidden, David V;

    2008-01-01

    incubation times, indicating that the conversion reaction may be influenced by other gene products. To identify genes that contribute to prion pathogenesis, we analysed incubation times of prions in mice in which the gene product was inactivated, knocked out or overexpressed. We tested 20 candidate genes...... show that many genes previously implicated in prion replication have no discernible effect on the pathogenesis of prion disease. While most genes tested did not significantly affect survival times, ablation of the amyloid beta (A4) precursor protein (App) or interleukin-1 receptor, type I (Il1r1), and...

  3. Entrez Gene: gene-centered information at NCBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglott, Donna; Ostell, Jim; Pruitt, Kim D; Tatusova, Tatiana

    2007-01-01

    Entrez Gene (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=gene) is NCBI's database for gene-specific information. Entrez Gene includes records from genomes that have been completely sequenced, that have an active research community to contribute gene-specific information or that are scheduled for intense sequence analysis. The content of Entrez Gene represents the result of both curation and automated integration of data from NCBI's Reference Sequence project (RefSeq), from collaborating model organism databases and from other databases within NCBI. Records in Entrez Gene are assigned unique, stable and tracked integers as identifiers. The content (nomenclature, map location, gene products and their attributes, markers, phenotypes and links to citations, sequences, variation details, maps, expression, homologs, protein domains and external databases) is provided via interactive browsing through NCBI's Entrez system, via NCBI's Entrez programing utilities (E-Utilities), and for bulk transfer by ftp. PMID:17148475

  4. Tumor-specific gene expression patterns with gene expression profiles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RUAN; Xiaogang; LI; Yingxin; LI; Jiangeng; GONG; Daoxiong

    2006-01-01

    Gene expression profiles of 14 common tumors and their counterpart normal tissues were analyzed with machine learning methods to address the problem of selection of tumor-specific genes and analysis of their differential expressions in tumor tissues. First, a variation of the Relief algorithm, "RFE_Relief algorithm" was proposed to learn the relations between genes and tissue types. Then, a support vector machine was employed to find the gene subset with the best classification performance for distinguishing cancerous tissues and their counterparts. After tissue-specific genes were removed, cross validation experiments were employed to demonstrate the common deregulated expressions of the selected gene in tumor tissues. The results indicate the existence of a specific expression fingerprint of these genes that is shared in different tumor tissues, and the hallmarks of the expression patterns of these genes in cancerous tissues are summarized at the end of this paper.

  5. Dominance from the perspective of gene-gene and gene-chemical interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladki, Arkadiusz; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr; Kaczanowski, Szymon

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we used genetic interaction (GI) and gene-chemical interaction (GCI) data to compare mutations with different dominance phenotypes. Our analysis focused primarily on Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where haploinsufficient genes (HI; genes with dominant loss-of-function mutations) were found to be participating in gene expression processes, namely, the translation and regulation of gene transcription. Non-ribosomal HI genes (mainly regulators of gene transcription) were found to have more GIs and GCIs than haplosufficient (HS) genes. Several properties seem to lead to the enrichment of interactions, most notably, the following: importance, pleiotropy, gene expression level and gene expression variation. Importantly, after these properties were appropriately considered in the analysis, the correlation between dominance and GI/GCI degrees was still observed. Strikingly, for the GCIs of heterozygous strains, haploinsufficiency was the only property significantly correlated with the number of GCIs. We found ribosomal HI genes to be depleted in GIs/GCIs. This finding can be explained by their high variation in gene expression under different genetic backgrounds and environmental conditions. We observed the same distributions of GIs among non-ribosomal HI, ribosomal HI and HS genes in three other species: Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Drosophila melanogaster and Homo sapiens. One potentially interesting exception was the lack of significant differences in the degree of GIs between non-ribosomal HI and HS genes in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. PMID:26613610

  6. Gene doping in modern sport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAREK SAWCZUK

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The subject of this paper is gene doping, which should be understood as "he non-therapeutic use of cells, genes, genetic elements, or of the modulation of gene expression, having the capacity to improve athletic performance". The authors of this work, based on the review of literature and previous research, make an attempt at wider characterization of gene doping and the discussion of related potential threats.Methods: This is a comprehensive survey of literature on the latest applications of molecular biology in medicine. The analysis involves a dozen scientific databases examined in order to find genes used in gene therapy and potentially useful in gene doping. Results: The obtained results enable better recognition of gene doping and indicate genes used in medicine that could be used in gene doping. This paper describes potential effects of their use and associated risk, and predicts the possible developments of gene doping in the future. Conclusion: Gene doping is undoubtedly a part of modern sport. Although WADA included gene doping on the list of banned methods as early as 2004, as previously stated above, it has not managed to develop efficient methods of detection.

  7. A protein-based set of reference markers for liver tissues and hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the last decade, investigations have focused on revealing genes or proteins that are involved in HCC carcinogenesis using either genetic or proteomic techniques. However, these studies are overshadowed by a lack of good internal reference standards. The need to identify 'housekeeping' markers, whose expression is stable in various experimental and clinical conditions, is therefore of the utmost clinical relevance in quantitative studies. This is the first study employed 2-DE analysis to screen for potential reference markers and aims to correlate the abundance of these proteins with their level of transcript expression. A Chinese cohort of 224 liver tissues samples (105 cancerous, 103 non-tumourous cirrhotic, and 16 normal) was profiled using 2-DE analysis. Expression of the potential reference markers was confirmed by western blot, immunohistochemistry and real-time quantitative PCR. geNorm algorithm was employed for gene stability measure of the identified reference markers. The expression levels of three protein markers beta-actin (ACTB), heat shock protein 60 (HSP60), and protein disulphide isomerase (PDI) were found to be stable using p-values (p > 0.99) as a ranking tool in all 224 human liver tissues examined by 2-DE analysis. Of high importance, ACTB and HSP 60 were successfully validated at both protein and mRNA levels in human hepatic tissues by western blot, immunohistochemistry and real-time quantitative PCR. In addition, no significant correlation of these markers with any clinicopathological features of HCC and cirrhosis was found. Gene stability measure of these two markers with other conventionally applied housekeeping genes was assessed by the geNorm algorithm, which ranked ACTB and HSP60 as the most stable genes among this cohort of clinical samples. Our findings identified 2 reference markers that exhibited stable expression across human liver tissues with different conditions thus should be regarded as reliable reference

  8. Eukaryotic gene prediction using GeneMark.hmm-E and GeneMark-ES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodovsky, Mark; Lomsadze, Alex

    2011-09-01

    This unit describes how to use the gene-finding programs GeneMark.hmm-E and GeneMark-ES for finding protein-coding genes in the genomic DNA of eukaryotic organisms. These bioinformatics tools have been demonstrated to have state-of-the-art accuracy for many fungal, plant, and animal genomes, and have frequently been used for gene annotation in novel genomic sequences. An additional advantage of GeneMark-ES is that the problem of algorithm parameterization is solved automatically, with parameters estimated by iterative self-training (unsupervised training). PMID:21901742

  9. Genes, stress, and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurtman, Richard J

    2005-05-01

    A relationship between genetic makeup and susceptibility to major depressive disorder (MDD) has long been suspected on the basis of family and twin studies. A metaanalysis of reports on the basis of twin studies has estimated MDD's degree of heritability to be 0.33 (confidence interval, 0.26-0.39). Among families exhibiting an increased prevalence of MDD, risk of developing the illness was enhanced in members exposed to a highly stressful environment. Aberrant genes can predispose to depression in a number of ways, for example, by diminishing production of growth factors that act during brain development. An aberrant gene could also increase or decrease a neurotransmitter's release into synapses, its actions, or its duration of activity. The gene products of greatest interest at present are those involved in the synthesis and actions of serotonin; among them, the serotonin-uptake protein localized within the terminals and dendrites of serotonin-releasing neurons. It has been found that the Vmax of platelet serotonin uptake is low in some patients with MDD; also, Vmax is highly correlated in twins. Antidepressant drugs such as the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors act on this uptake protein. The specific genetic locus causing serotonin uptake to be lower in some patients with major depression involves a polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) in the promoter region of the gene for the uptake protein. The gene itself exists as several alleles, the short "S" allele and the long "L" allele. The S variant is associated with less, and the L variant with more, of the uptake protein. The effect of stressful life events on depressive symptoms in young adults was found to be significantly stronger among SS or SL subjects than among LL subjects. Neuroimaging studies showed that people with the SS or SL alleles exhibited a greater activation of the amygdala in response to fearful stimuli than those with LL. It has been reported recently that mutations in the gene that controls

  10. On atavisms and atavistic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantú, J M; Ruiz, C

    1985-01-01

    The authors propose the term atavistic to designate a gene producing an ancestral phenotype (atavism). Several examples are presented, and the possible origin of atavistic genes, as well as their pathological implications discussed. PMID:3879145

  11. Gene Testing for Hereditary Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    FAQ NATIONAL ATAXIA FOUNDATION FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT... Gene Testing for Hereditary Ataxia This fact sheet provides an overview of gene testing for ataxia. It also addresses commonly asked ...

  12. Genes and human brain evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Geschwind, Daniel H.; Konopka, Genevieve

    2012-01-01

    Several genes were duplicated during human evolution. It seems that one such duplication gave rise to a gene that may have helped to make human brains bigger and more adaptable than those of our ancestors.

  13. Genes That Influence Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Matters NIH Research Matters September 26, 2011 Genes that Influence Blood Pressure In one of the ... 16 previously unknown variations. Six were found in genes already suspected of regulating blood pressure. The remaining ...

  14. Gene therapy of liver cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Hernandez-Alcoceba, R. (Rubén); B. Sangro; Prieto, J.

    2006-01-01

    The application of gene transfer technologies to the treatment of cancer has led to the development of new experimental approaches like gene directed enzyme/pro-drug therapy (GDEPT), inhibition of oncogenes and restoration of tumor-suppressor genes. In addition, gene therapy has a big impact on other fields like cancer immunotherapy, anti-angiogenic therapy and virotherapy. These strategies are being evaluated for the treatment of primary and metastatic liver cancer and some of them have reac...

  15. Gene doping in modern sport.

    OpenAIRE

    MAREK SAWCZUK; AGNIESZKA MACIEJEWSKA; PAWEL CIESZCZYK,

    2009-01-01

    Background: The subject of this paper is gene doping, which should be understood as "he non-therapeutic use of cells, genes, genetic elements, or of the modulation of gene expression, having the capacity to improve athletic performance". The authors of this work, based on the review of literature and previous research, make an attempt at wider characterization of gene doping and the discussion of related potential threats.Methods: This is a comprehensive survey of literature on the latest app...

  16. Human housekeeping genes are compact

    OpenAIRE

    Eisenberg, Eli; Erez Y. Levanon

    2003-01-01

    We identify a set of 575 human genes that are expressed in all conditions tested in a publicly available database of microarray results. Based on this common occurrence, the set is expected to be rich in "housekeeping" genes, showing constitutive expression in all tissues. We compare selected aspects of their genomic structure with a set of background genes. We find that the introns, untranslated regions and coding sequences of the housekeeping genes are shorter, indicating a selection for co...

  17. Gene therapy in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Chang-tai; Guo Xue-gang; Pan Bo-rong

    2003-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction We have reviewed the gene therapy in gastrointestinal diseases[1]. Gastric cancer is common in China[2~20] ,and its early diagnosis andtreatment are still difficult up to now[13~36]. The expression of anexogenous gene introduced by gene therapy into patients with gliomascan be monitored non- invasively by positron- emission tomography[4]. In recent years, gene study in cancer is a hotspot, and great progress hasbeen achieved[33~41].

  18. Circulating heat shock proteins and inflammatory markers in patients with idiopathic left ventricular dysfunction: their relationships with myocardial and microvascular impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Giannessi, Daniela; Colotti, Chiara; Maltinti, Maristella; Del Ry, Silvia; Prontera, Concetta; Turchi, Stefano; L'Abbate, Antonio; Neglia, Danilo

    2007-01-01

    Little information is available on peripheral levels of Hsp72, Hsp60, and anti-Hsp60 antibodies in patients with left ventricular (LV) dysfunction due to non-atherosclerotic cardiac disease. In this study, serum Hsp72, Hsp60 and anti-Hsp60 antibodies, IL-6, and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured in 44 healthy controls and in 82 patients with angiographically normal coronary arteries (LV ejection fraction [EF] ≥ 50%, n = 22; ≥35% to

  19. Genes y especies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Sáez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available La posibilidad de secuenciar y manipular los genes sigue abriendo fronteras en el estudio de las especies y la especiación. En tiempos recientes particularmente en dos direcciones. Por un lado, la secuenciación del gen COI (y otros en miles de muestras de forma sistemática y masiva, el llamado "DNA barcoding", está revelando una gran cantidad de biodiversidad, en buena medida previamente no sospechada y correspondiente a especies crípticas (morfológicamente irreconocibles. En segundo lugar, el estudio de los genes responsables de los cambios morfológicos nos está haciendo volver a dar una creciente importancia a la selección como motor de la especiación y de la evolución, incluso en presencia de dosis importantes de flujo génico.

  20. Gene and Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DD Farhud

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available "nCollection of multiple processes that increase the chronological age of an organism leading to death is defined as aging, and even though important, it is poorly understood. Recent research has shown that aging is due to biochemical and genetic changes, in interaction with environmental effects, including diet and nutrition. Most knowledge on aging is based on ge­netic model system, but its molecular mechanisms are still not very clear. Discoveries in molecular biology have made way to look for candidate genes influencing lifespan. Furthermore, new investigations have stressed on the roles of mitochondria as the major generators and direct targets of reactive oxygen species. This paper reviews some recent literature on genes and ag­ing in model system, then discusses the role of mitochondria and nutrients in human aging.

  1. Gene therapy of cancer and development of therapeutic target gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We applied HSV-tk/GCV strategy to orthotopic rat hepatoma model and showed anticancer effects of hepatoma. The increased expression of Lac Z gene after adenovirus-mediated gene delivery throughout hepatic artery was thought that is increased the possibility of gene therapy for curing hepatoma. With the construction of kGLP-laboratory, it is possible to produce a good quantity and quality of adenovirus in lage-scale production and purification of adenovirus vector. Also, the analysis of hepatoma related genes by PCR-LOH could be used for the diagnosis of patients and the development of therapeutic gene

  2. Gene therapy of cancer and development of therapeutic target gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Min; Kwon, Hee Chung

    1998-04-01

    We applied HSV-tk/GCV strategy to orthotopic rat hepatoma model and showed anticancer effects of hepatoma. The increased expression of Lac Z gene after adenovirus-mediated gene delivery throughout hepatic artery was thought that is increased the possibility of gene therapy for curing hepatoma. With the construction of kGLP-laboratory, it is possible to produce a good quantity and quality of adenovirus in lage-scale production and purification of adenovirus vector. Also, the analysis of hepatoma related genes by PCR-LOH could be used for the diagnosis of patients and the development of therapeutic gene.

  3. The Perils of Gene Patents

    OpenAIRE

    Salzberg, SL

    2012-01-01

    I argue here that gene patents, and patented genetic tests based on them, are a very bad idea. First, I discuss whether genes can reasonably be the subject of patents in the first place; I maintain that the answer is no. Second, I explain how gene patents interfere with scientific progress, slowing down the development of new cures and treatments for genetic diseases.

  4. Globin genes on the move

    OpenAIRE

    Hardison, Ross C.

    2008-01-01

    Recent data published in BMC Biology from the globin gene clusters in platypus, together with data from other species, show that β-globin genes transposed from one chromosomal location to another. This resolves some controversies about vertebrate globin gene evolution but ignites new ones.

  5. Independent Gene Discovery and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palsule, Vrushalee; Coric, Dijana; Delancy, Russell; Dunham, Heather; Melancon, Caleb; Thompson, Dennis; Toms, Jamie; White, Ashley; Shultz, Jeffry

    2010-01-01

    A clear understanding of basic gene structure is critical when teaching molecular genetics, the central dogma and the biological sciences. We sought to create a gene-based teaching project to improve students' understanding of gene structure and to integrate this into a research project that can be implemented by instructors at the secondary level…

  6. Ascidian gene-expression profiles

    OpenAIRE

    William R Jeffery

    2002-01-01

    With the advent of gene-expression profiling, a large number of genes can now be investigated simultaneously during critical stages of development. This approach will be particularly informative in studies of ascidians, basal chordates whose genomes and embryology are uniquely suited for mapping developmental gene networks.

  7. Gene therapy for thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gene therapy for thyroid cancer include immunotherapy, suicide gene therapy, tumor suppressor replacement, 131I therapy by sodium/iodide symporter and antisense therapy and so on. Gene therapy has wide perspectives, but there are many problems need to be solved for clinical application

  8. Compositional gradients in Gramineae genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Wang, Jun; Tao, Lin;

    2002-01-01

    In this study, we describe a property of Gramineae genes, and perhaps all monocot genes, that is not observed in eudicot genes. Along the direction of transcription, beginning at the junction of the 5'-UTR and the coding region, there are gradients in GC content, codon usage, and amino-acid usage...

  9. Gene therapy for mucopolysaccharidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ponder, Katherine P.; Haskins, Mark E.

    2007-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) are due to deficiencies in activities of lysosomal enzymes that degrade glycosaminoglycans. Some attempts at gene therapy for MPS in animal models have involved intravenous injection of vectors derived from an adeno-associated virus (AAV), adenovirus, retrovirus or a plasmid, which primarily results in expression in liver and secretion of the relevant enzyme into blood. Most vectors can correct disease in liver and spleen, although correction in other organs includ...

  10. Gene Porter Bridwell

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Gene Porter Bridwell served as the director of the Marshall Space Flight Center from January 6, 1994 until February 3, 1996, when he retired from NASA after thirty-four years service. Bridwell, a Marshall employee since 1962, had been Marshall's Space Shuttle Projects Office Director and Space Station Redesign Team deputy manager. Under Bridwell, Marshall worked to develop its role as a Center of Excellence for propulsion and for providing access to space.

  11. Engineering prokaryotic gene circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Michalodimitrakis, Konstantinos; Isalan, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Engineering of synthetic gene circuits is a rapidly growing discipline, currently dominated by prokaryotic transcription networks, which can be easily rearranged or rewired to give different output behaviours. In this review, we examine both a rational and a combinatorial design of such networks and discuss progress on using in vitro evolution techniques to obtain functional systems. Moving beyond pure transcription networks, more and more networks are being implemented at the level of RNA, t...

  12. Hidden genes in birds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hron, Tomáš; Pajer, Petr; Pačes, Jan; Bartůněk, Petr; Elleder, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 16, August 18 (2015). ISSN 1465-6906 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LK11215; GA MŠk LO1419 Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010005 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : REPETITIVE SEQUENCES * G/C stretches * avian genes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 10.810, year: 2014

  13. The ank gene story

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, Lawrence M

    2000-01-01

    The underlying molecular defect resulting in the abnormal calcification observed in ank/ank mice has been identified. The responsible nonsense mutation affects the protein product of ank, resulting in diminished production of extracellular inorganic pyrophosphate, an important inhibitor of nucleation and of the growth of apatite crystals. The ank gene product is one of several cell membrane proteins, including ectonucleoside triphosphate pyrophosphohydrolase enzymes and alkaline phosphatase, ...

  14. nanosheets for gene therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Zhongyang; Wang, Xin; Yuan, Renshun; Chen, Huabin; Zhi, Qiaoming; Gao, Ling; Wang, Bin; Guo, Zhaoji; Xue, Xiaofeng; Cao, Wei; Guo, Liang

    2014-10-01

    A new class of two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterial, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) such as MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, and WSe2 which have fantastic physical and chemical properties, has drawn tremendous attention in different fields recently. Herein, we for the first time take advantage of the great potential of MoS2 with well-engineered surface as a novel type of 2D nanocarriers for gene delivery and therapy of cancer. In our system, positively charged MoS2-PEG-PEI is synthesized with lipoic acid-modified polyethylene glycol (LA-PEG) and branched polyethylenimine (PEI). The amino end of positively charged nanomaterials can bind to the negatively charged small interfering RNA (siRNA). After detection of physical and chemical characteristics of the nanomaterial, cell toxicity was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) was investigated as a well-known oncogene, which was a critical regulator of cell cycle transmission at multiple levels. Through knockdown of PLK1 with siRNA carried by novel nanovector, qPCR and Western blot were used to measure the interfering efficiency; apoptosis assay was used to detect the transfection effect of PLK1. All results showed that the novel nanocarrier revealed good biocompatibility, reduced cytotoxicity, as well as high gene-carrying ability without serum interference, thus would have great potential for gene delivery and therapy.

  15. Extracting gene-gene interactions through curve fitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Ranajit; Mitra, Sushmita; Murthy, C A

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a simple and novel curve fitting approach for generating simple gene regulatory subnetworks from time series gene expression data. Microarray experiments simultaneously generate massive data sets and help immensely in the large-scale study of gene expression patterns. Initial biclustering reduces the search space in the high-dimensional microarray data. The least-squares error between fitting of gene pairs is minimized to extract a set of gene-gene interactions, involving transcriptional regulation of genes. The higher error values are eliminated to retain only the strong interacting gene pairs in the resultant gene regulatory subnetwork. Next the algorithm is extended to a generalized framework to enhance its capability. The methodology takes care of the higher-order dependencies involving multiple genes co-regulating a single gene, while eliminating the need for user-defined parameters. It has been applied to the time-series Yeast data, and the experimental results biologically validated using standard databases and literature. PMID:22997274

  16. Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG secreting functional interleukin-2 enhances gamma interferon production by splenocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    O'Donnell, M A; Aldovini, A; Duda, R B; Yang, H; Szilvasi, A; Young, R A; DeWolf, W C

    1994-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis BCG was genetically engineered to express and secrete mouse interleukin-2 (IL-2) and rat IL-2. Genes encoding IL-2 were inserted into an Escherichia coli-BCG shuttle plasmid under the control of the BCG HSP60 promoter. To facilitate study of proteins produced in this system, the IL-2 gene product was expressed (i) alone, (ii) with the mycobacterial alpha-antigen secretion signal sequence at the amino terminus, (iii) with an influenza virus hemagglutinin epitope tag at the ...

  17. Campylobacter ureolyticus: an emerging gastrointestinal pathogen?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bullman, Susan

    2011-03-01

    A total of 7194 faecal samples collected over a 1-year period from patients presenting with diarrhoea were screened for Campylobacter spp. using EntericBio(®) , a multiplex-PCR system. Of 349 Campylobacter-positive samples, 23.8% were shown to be Campylobacter ureolyticus, using a combination of 16S rRNA gene analysis and highly specific primers targeting the HSP60 gene of this organism. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first report of C. ureolyticus in the faeces of patients presenting with gastroenteritis and may suggest a role for this organism as an emerging enteric pathogen.

  18. Identification of Significant Association and Gene-Gene Interaction of GABA Receptor Subunit Genes in Autism

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, D Q; Whitehead, P. L.; Menold, M M; Martin, E. R.; Ashley-Koch, A. E.; Mei, H; Ritchie, M. D.; Delong, G R; Abramson, R.K.; Wright, H. H.; Cuccaro, M. L.; Hussman, J. P.; Gilbert, J.R.; Pericak-Vance, M A

    2005-01-01

    Autism is a common neurodevelopmental disorder with a significant genetic component. Existing research suggests that multiple genes contribute to autism and that epigenetic effects or gene-gene interactions are likely contributors to autism risk. However, these effects have not yet been identified. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult brain, has been implicated in autism etiology. Fourteen known autosomal GABA receptor subunit genes were studied...

  19. Gene Network Biological Validity Based on Gene-Gene Interaction Relevance

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco Gómez-Vela; Norberto Díaz-Díaz

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, gene networks have become one of the most useful tools for modeling biological processes. Many inference gene network algorithms have been developed as techniques for extracting knowledge from gene expression data. Ensuring the reliability of the inferred gene relationships is a crucial task in any study in order to prove that the algorithms used are precise. Usually, this validation process can be carried out using prior biological knowledge. The metabolic pathways stored in...

  20. Gene electrotransfer in clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gehl, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Electroporation is increasingly being used for delivery of chemotherapy to tumors. Likewise, gene delivery by electroporation is rapidly gaining momentum for both vaccination purposes and for delivery of genes coding for other therapeutic molecules, such as chronic diseases or cancer. This chapte...... describes how gene therapy may be performed using electric pulses to enhance uptake and expression.......Electroporation is increasingly being used for delivery of chemotherapy to tumors. Likewise, gene delivery by electroporation is rapidly gaining momentum for both vaccination purposes and for delivery of genes coding for other therapeutic molecules, such as chronic diseases or cancer. This chapter...

  1. Gene therapy of liver cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruben Hernandez-Alcoceba; Bruno Sangro; Jesus Prieto

    2006-01-01

    The application of gene transfer technologies to the treatment of cancer has led to the development of new experimental approaches like gene directed enzyme/prodrug therapy (GDEPT), inhibition of oncogenes and restoration of tumor-suppressor genes. In addition,gene therapy has a big impact on other fields like cancer immunotherapy, anti-angiogenic therapy and virotherapy.These strategies are being evaluated for the treatment of primary and metastatic liver cancer and some of them have reached clinical phases. We present a review on the basis and the actual status of gene therapy approaches applied to liver cancer.

  2. Heat shock protein 60 stimulates the migration of vascular smooth muscle cells via Toll-like receptor 4 and ERK MAPK activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ying; Zhang, Chenxu; Wei, Xuge; Li, Pei; Cui, Ying; Qin, Yuanhua; Wei, Xiaoqing; Jin, Minli; Kohama, Kazuhiro; Gao, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that heat shock protein (HSP) 60 is strongly associated with the pathology of atherosclerosis (AS). However, the precise mechanisms by which HSP60 promotes atherosclerosis remain unclear. In the present study, we found that HSP60 mRNA and protein expression levels in the thoracic aorta are enhanced not only in a mouse model of AS but also in high-fat diet (HFD) mice. HSP60 expression and secretion was activated by platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) and interleukin (IL)-8 in both human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). HSP60 was found to induce VSMC migration, and exposure to HSP60 activated ERK MAPK signaling. U0126, an inhibitor of ERK, reduced VSMC migration. The HSP60-stimulated VSMCs were found to express TLR4 mRNA but not TLR2 mRNA. Knockdown of TLR4 by siRNA reduced HSP60-induced VSMC migration and HSP60-induced ERK activation. Finally, HSP60 induced IL-8 secretion in VSMCs. Together these results suggest that HSP60 is involved in the stimulation of VSMC migration, via TLR4 and ERK MAPK activation. Meanwhile, activation of HSP60 is one of the most powerful methods of sending a ‘danger signal’ to the immune system to generate IL-8, which assists in the management of an infection or disease. PMID:26477505

  3. MORPHOLOGY OF THE MITOCHONDRIA IN HEAT-SHOCK-PROTEIN-60 DEFICIENT FIBROBLASTS FROM MITOCHONDRIAL MYOPATHY PATIENTS - EFFECTS OF STRESS CONDITIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HUCKRIEDE, A; HEIKEMA, A; SJOLLEMA, K; BRIONES, P; AGSTERIBBE, E

    1995-01-01

    We have described two mitochondrial (mt) myopathy patients with reduced activities of various mt enzymes associated with significantly decreased amounts of heat shock protein 60 (hsp60). Experimental evidence suggested that the lack of hsp60 was the primary defect. Since hsp60 is essential for the p

  4. Gene finding in novel genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korf Ian

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computational gene prediction continues to be an important problem, especially for genomes with little experimental data. Results I introduce the SNAP gene finder which has been designed to be easily adaptable to a variety of genomes. In novel genomes without an appropriate gene finder, I demonstrate that employing a foreign gene finder can produce highly inaccurate results, and that the most compatible parameters may not come from the nearest phylogenetic neighbor. I find that foreign gene finders are more usefully employed to bootstrap parameter estimation and that the resulting parameters can be highly accurate. Conclusion Since gene prediction is sensitive to species-specific parameters, every genome needs a dedicated gene finder.

  5. American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Clinical Trials Information Gene Therapy and Cell Therapy Terminology Gene Therapy & Cell Therapy Breakthroughs FAQs Gene Therapy and Cell Therapy Defined Gene Therapy and Cell Therapy for Diseases Sites of ...

  6. Gene Therapy and Children (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Gene Therapy and Children KidsHealth > For Parents > Gene Therapy ... that don't respond to conventional therapies. About Genes Our genes help make us unique. Inherited from ...

  7. Genes and Disease: Prader-Willi Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MD): National Center for Biotechnology Information (US); 1998-. Genes and Disease [Internet]. Show details National Center for ... Willi syndrome. PDF version of this page (220K) Gene sequence Genome view see gene locations Entrez Gene ...

  8. Our Blue Gene Experience

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakl, Ondřej; Starý, Jiří

    Ostrava : Ústav geoniky AV ČR, 2009 - (Blaheta, R.; Starý, J.), s. 50-54 ISBN 978-80-86407-60-9. [SNA '09 - Seminar on numerical analysis: modelling and simulation of challenging engineering problems. Ostrava (CZ), 02.02.2009-06.02.2009] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA105/09/1830 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : IBM Blue Gene/P * finite element solver * parallel scalability Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  9. Computation in gene networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Hur, Asa; Siegelmann, Hava T.

    2004-03-01

    Genetic regulatory networks have the complex task of controlling all aspects of life. Using a model of gene expression by piecewise linear differential equations we show that this process can be considered as a process of computation. This is demonstrated by showing that this model can simulate memory bounded Turing machines. The simulation is robust with respect to perturbations of the system, an important property for both analog computers and biological systems. Robustness is achieved using a condition that ensures that the model equations, that are generally chaotic, follow a predictable dynamics.

  10. Genes and species

    OpenAIRE

    Sáez, Alberto G.

    2009-01-01

    La posibilidad de secuenciar y manipular los genes sigue abriendo fronteras en el estudio de las especies y la especiación. En tiempos recientes particularmente en dos direcciones. Por un lado, la secuenciación del gen COI (y otros) en miles de muestras de forma sistemática y masiva, el llamado "DNA barcoding", está revelando una gran cantidad de biodiversidad, en buena medida previamente no sospechada y correspondiente a especies crípticas (morfológicamente irreconocibles). En segundo lug...

  11. MUTATIONS IN CALMODULIN GENES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to an isolated polynucleotide encoding at least a part of calmodulin and an isolated polypeptide comprising at least a part of a calmodulin protein, wherein the polynucleotide and the polypeptide comprise at least one mutation associated with a cardiac disorder. The ...... binding of calmodulin to ryanodine receptor 2 and use of such compound in a treatment of an individual having a cardiac disorder. The invention further provides a kit that can be used to detect specific mutations in calmodulin encoding genes....

  12. The GeneMANIA prediction server: biological network integration for gene prioritization and predicting gene function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warde-Farley, David; Donaldson, Sylva L; Comes, Ovi; Zuberi, Khalid; Badrawi, Rashad; Chao, Pauline; Franz, Max; Grouios, Chris; Kazi, Farzana; Lopes, Christian Tannus; Maitland, Anson; Mostafavi, Sara; Montojo, Jason; Shao, Quentin; Wright, George; Bader, Gary D; Morris, Quaid

    2010-07-01

    GeneMANIA (http://www.genemania.org) is a flexible, user-friendly web interface for generating hypotheses about gene function, analyzing gene lists and prioritizing genes for functional assays. Given a query list, GeneMANIA extends the list with functionally similar genes that it identifies using available genomics and proteomics data. GeneMANIA also reports weights that indicate the predictive value of each selected data set for the query. Six organisms are currently supported (Arabidopsis thaliana, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Mus musculus, Homo sapiens and Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and hundreds of data sets have been collected from GEO, BioGRID, Pathway Commons and I2D, as well as organism-specific functional genomics data sets. Users can select arbitrary subsets of the data sets associated with an organism to perform their analyses and can upload their own data sets to analyze. The GeneMANIA algorithm performs as well or better than other gene function prediction methods on yeast and mouse benchmarks. The high accuracy of the GeneMANIA prediction algorithm, an intuitive user interface and large database make GeneMANIA a useful tool for any biologist. PMID:20576703

  13. Suppression of Cpn10 increases mitochondrial fission and dysfunction in neuroblastoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Jung Park

    Full Text Available To date, several regulatory proteins involved in mitochondrial dynamics have been identified. However, the precise mechanism coordinating these complex processes remains unclear. Mitochondrial chaperones regulate mitochondrial function and structure. Chaperonin 10 (Cpn10 interacts with heat shock protein 60 (HSP60 and functions as a co-chaperone. In this study, we found that down-regulation of Cpn10 highly promoted mitochondrial fragmentation in SK-N-MC and SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. Both genetic and chemical inhibition of Drp1 suppressed the mitochondrial fragmentation induced by Cpn10 reduction. Reactive oxygen species (ROS generation in 3-NP-treated cells was markedly enhanced by Cpn10 knock down. Depletion of Cpn10 synergistically increased cell death in response to 3-NP treatment. Furthermore, inhibition of Drp1 recovered Cpn10-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction in 3-NP-treated cells. Moreover, an ROS scavenger suppressed cell death mediated by Cpn10 knockdown in 3-NP-treated cells. Taken together, these results showed that down-regulation of Cpn10 increased mitochondrial fragmentation and potentiated 3-NP-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction in neuroblastoma cells.

  14. Gene Therapy of Cancerous Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valenčáková, A.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy of cancerous diseases provides new means of curing patients with oncologic illnesses. There are several approaches in treating cancer by gene therapy. Most commonly used methods are: cancer immunogene therapy, suicide gene therapy, application of tumor-suppressor genes, antiangiogenic therapy, mesenchymal stem cells used as vectors, gene directed enzyme/prodrug therapy and bacteria used as anti-cancer agents. Cancer gene immunotherapy uses several immunologic agents for the purpose of explaining effective anti-tumor immune response. Another method is suicide gene therapy, based on introducing viral or bacterial agents to tumor cells, allowing the conversion of a non-toxic compound to a lethal medication. The application of intact suppressor genes to cancer cells will avert their neoplastic behavior and will induce tumor regression. Inhibition of angiogenesis is also a promising strategy for treating oncologic patients. Mesenchymal stem cells can also be used as vectors in targeted gene therapy. An increasing list of experimental evidence shows, that therapeutically modified mesenchymal stem cells in “gene directed enzyme/prodrug therapy” can attack cancer tissue can kill tumor cells, cancer stem cells included. Bacteria are used as anti-cancer agents independently of in combination with conventional therapeutic methods.

  15. PROAPOPTOTIC FUNCTION OF FHIT GENE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Zhe-fu; HAN De-min; ZHANG Luo; ZHANG Wei

    2006-01-01

    Tumor suppressor gene plays an important role in maintaining the homeostasis between cell loss and growth. Fragile in maintaining the homeostasis between cell loss and growth. Fragile histidine triad (FHIT) gene found recently was studied in a deep going way; it becomes the focus as a result of its roleof ep going way; it becomes the focus as a result of its roleof anti-tumor in human various type of tissue. Due to the high efficiency of FHIT gene benefiting the anti-tumor, it is proposed gh efficiency of FHIT gene benefiting the anti-tumor, it is proposed as a candidate of tumor suppressor gene though there are several opposite opinions.several opposite opinions. We stress the summary of some properties of FHIT gene on proapoptosis according to the published data which showed gene on proapoptosis according to the published data which showed the stronger proapoptotic function of FHIT gene; the apoptosis induced by FHIT depends on the expression level and status of ene; the apoptosis induced by FHIT depends on the expression level and status of FHIT; and FHIT gene can alternate the cell cycling properties and reduce the tumorigenic potential; the apoptotic process e can alternate the cell cycling properties and reduce the tumorigenic potential; the apoptotic process induced by FHIT has no relation to p53 gene. In a ward, in consideration of its multiple functions against malignancies, FHIT in consideration of its multiple functions against malignancies, FHIT gene deserves attention and exploration as a selective target for searching the mechanism of tumorigenesis and clinical et for searching the mechanism of tumorigenesis and clinical therapeutic applications in further.le histidine triad (FHIT) gene; Apoptosis; Tumorigenesis; Tumor suppressor gene deserves attention and exploration as a selective target for searching the mechanism of tumorigenesis and clinical therapeutic applications in further.

  16. Identifying Driver Genes in Cancer by Triangulating Gene Expression, Gene Location, and Survival Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouam, Sigrid; Miller, Lance D; Karuturi, R Krishna Murthy

    2014-01-01

    Driver genes are directly responsible for oncogenesis and identifying them is essential in order to fully understand the mechanisms of cancer. However, it is difficult to delineate them from the larger pool of genes that are deregulated in cancer (ie, passenger genes). In order to address this problem, we developed an approach called TRIAngulating Gene Expression (TRIAGE through clinico-genomic intersects). Here, we present a refinement of this approach incorporating a new scoring methodology to identify putative driver genes that are deregulated in cancer. TRIAGE triangulates – or integrates – three levels of information: gene expression, gene location, and patient survival. First, TRIAGE identifies regions of deregulated expression (ie, expression footprints) by deriving a newly established measure called the Local Singular Value Decomposition (LSVD) score for each locus. Driver genes are then distinguished from passenger genes using dual survival analyses. Incorporating measurements of gene expression and weighting them according to the LSVD weight of each tumor, these analyses are performed using the genes located in significant expression footprints. Here, we first use simulated data to characterize the newly established LSVD score. We then present the results of our application of this refined version of TRIAGE to gene expression data from five cancer types. This refined version of TRIAGE not only allowed us to identify known prominent driver genes, such as MMP1, IL8, and COL1A2, but it also led us to identify several novel ones. These results illustrate that TRIAGE complements existing tools, allows for the identification of genes that drive cancer and could perhaps elucidate potential future targets of novel anticancer therapeutics. PMID:25949096

  17. Immunity-related genes and gene families in Anopheles gambiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christophides, George K; Zdobnov, Evgeny; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Birney, Ewan; Blandin, Stephanie; Blass, Claudia; Brey, Paul T; Collins, Frank H; Danielli, Alberto; Dimopoulos, George; Hetru, Charles; Hoa, Ngo T; Hoffmann, Jules A; Kanzok, Stefan M; Letunic, Ivica; Levashina, Elena A; Loukeris, Thanasis G; Lycett, Gareth; Meister, Stephan; Michel, Kristin; Moita, Luis F; Müller, Hans-Michael; Osta, Mike A; Paskewitz, Susan M; Reichhart, Jean-Marc; Rzhetsky, Andrey; Troxler, Laurent; Vernick, Kenneth D; Vlachou, Dina; Volz, Jennifer; von Mering, Christian; Xu, Jiannong; Zheng, Liangbiao; Bork, Peer; Kafatos, Fotis C

    2002-10-01

    We have identified 242 Anopheles gambiae genes from 18 gene families implicated in innate immunity and have detected marked diversification relative to Drosophila melanogaster. Immune-related gene families involved in recognition, signal modulation, and effector systems show a marked deficit of orthologs and excessive gene expansions, possibly reflecting selection pressures from different pathogens encountered in these insects' very different life-styles. In contrast, the multifunctional Toll signal transduction pathway is substantially conserved, presumably because of counterselection for developmental stability. Representative expression profiles confirm that sequence diversification is accompanied by specific responses to different immune challenges. Alternative RNA splicing may also contribute to expansion of the immune repertoire. PMID:12364793

  18. Association of activase with chaperonin-60 beta: a possible mechanism for protecting photosynthesis during heat stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous studies have shown that inhibition of photosynthesis by moderate heat stress is a consequence of Rubisco deactivation, caused in part by the thermal instability of activase. This involvement of activase was confirmed in heat stress and recovery experiments using transgenic Arabidopsis plan...

  19. Study of cilia assembly in Tetrahymena and the role of cytosolic chaperonin CCT

    OpenAIRE

    Seixas, Ana Cecília Fernandes, 1974-

    2008-01-01

    Os cílios são organelos conservados evolutivamente que são requeridos num vasto número de processos celulares tais como locomoção, quimiotaxia, movimento de fluídos e transdução de sinais. Nos últimos anos, um grande número de publicações tem demonstrado o impacto que pequenas alterações no correcto funcionamento dos cílios tem no Homem. Várias doenças humanas que se caracterizam por quadros clínicos complexos, como o síndrome de Bardet-Biedl (BBS) e o síndrome de Meckel-Gruber (MKS) foram re...

  20. Physical immobilization of 60 kDa chaperonin linked lipase from pseudomonas aeruginosa BN-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abstract: The 60 kDa chaperone linked lipase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was subjected to physical adsorption on silica 60 and acrylic beads. It was found that higher enzyme loading was achieved on silica gel than acrylic bead. The half life of immobilized enzyme was greater compared to the free enzyme. The adsorption of the enzyme onto a solid phase also resulted in increased thermo and solvent stability. It was observed that soluble enzyme showed maximum stability at 70 degree C while immobilized enzyme showed stability up to 80 degree C for 45 minutes. The stability of immobilized enzyme increased up to 48 hours from 24 hours against different organic solvent at 1.0 M concentration. It was noted that enzyme immobilized on acrylic beads have greater reusability compared to silica immobilized enzyme. (author)

  1. Horizontal gene transfer in fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzpatrick, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is frequently observed in prokaryotes and until recently was assumed to be of limited importance to eukaryotes. However, there is an increasing body of evidence to suggest that HGT is an important mechanism in eukaryotic genome evolution, particularly in unicellular organisms. The transfer of individual genes, gene clusters or entire chromosomes can have significant impacts on niche specification, disease emergence or shift in metabolic capabil...

  2. Gene expression in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtroder, Karin; Christensen, Lise Lotte; Olesen, Sanne Harder;

    2002-01-01

    Understanding molecular alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) is needed to define new biomarkers and treatment targets. We used oligonucleotide microarrays to monitor gene expression of about 6,800 known genes and 35,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) on five pools (four to six samples in each...... high frequency of loss of heterozygosity. The genes and ESTs presented in this study encode new potential tumor markers as well as potential novel therapeutic targets for prevention or therapy of CRC....

  3. Gene therapy in pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Si-Xue; Xia, Zhong-Sheng; Zhong, Ying-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a highly lethal disease and notoriously difficult to treat. Only a small proportion of PC patients are eligible for surgical resection, whilst conventional chemoradiotherapy only has a modest effect with substantial toxicity. Gene therapy has become a new widely investigated therapeutic approach for PC. This article reviews the basic rationale, gene delivery methods, therapeutic targets and developments of laboratory research and clinical trials in gene therapy of PC...

  4. Hormones, genes, and behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Pfaff, Donald W.

    1997-01-01

    With assays of hormone-sensitive behaviors, it is possible to demonstrate both direct and indirect actions of genes on mammalian social behaviors. Direct effects of estrogen receptor gene expression and progesterone receptor gene expression figure prominently in well analyzed neuroendocrine mechanisms for sex behavior, operating through a neural circuit that has been delineated. Indirect effects, notably the consequences of sexual differentiation, display complex d...

  5. Gene therapy for psychiatric disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Thome, Johannes; HÄSSLER, FRANK; ZACHARIOU, VANNA

    2011-01-01

    There is no indication that gene therapy can be applied in psychiatric patients any time soon. However, there are several promising developments on the level of experimental neuroscience indicating that gene therapy approaches have an effect in animal models of several psychiatric disorders including drug addiction, affective disorders, psychoses and dementia, modifying behavioural parameters via interventions on the molecular and cellular level. However, before gene therapy in psychiatric di...

  6. Combinatorial approaches to gene recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roytberg, M A; Astakhova, T V; Gelfand, M S

    1997-01-01

    Recognition of genes via exon assembly approaches leads naturally to the use of dynamic programming. We consider the general graph-theoretical formulation of the exon assembly problem and analyze in detail some specific variants: multicriterial optimization in the case of non-linear gene-scoring functions; context-dependent schemes for scoring exons and related procedures for exon filtering; and highly specific recognition of arbitrary gene segments, oligonucleotide probes and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers. PMID:9440930

  7. Gene set analysis for GWAS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debrabant, Birgit; Soerensen, Mette

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We discuss the use of modified Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) statistics in the context of gene set analysis and review corresponding null and alternative hypotheses. Especially, we show that, when enhancing the impact of highly significant genes in the calculation of the test statistic, the...... parameter and the genesis and distribution of the gene-level statistics, and illustrate the effects of differential weighting in a real-life example....

  8. Gene therapy for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawlor, Patricia A; During, Matthew J

    2004-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a debilitating neurodegenerative disorder arising from loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta and subsequent depletion of striatal dopamine levels, which results in distressing motor symptoms. The current standard pharmacological treatment for PD is direct replacement of dopamine by treatment with its precursor, levodopa (L-dopa). However, this does not significantly alter disease progression and might contribute to the ongoing pathology. Several features of PD make this disease one of the most promising targets for clinical gene therapy of any neurological disease. The confinement of the major pathology to a compact, localised neuronal population and the anatomy of the basal ganglia circuitry mean that global gene transfer is not required and there are well-defined sites for gene transfer. The multifactorial aetiology of idiopathic PD means that it is unlikely any single gene will cure the disease, and as a result at least three separate gene-transfer strategies are currently being pursued: transfer of genes for enzymes involved in dopamine production; transfer of genes for growth factors involved in dopaminergic cell survival and regeneration; and transfer of genes to reset neuronal circuitry by switching cellular phenotype. The merits of these strategies are discussed here, along with remaining hurdles that might impede transfer of gene therapy technology to the clinic as a treatment for PD. PMID:15000692

  9. ERGDB: Estrogen Responsive Genes Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Suisheng; Han, Hao; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2004-01-01

    ERGDB is an integrated knowledge database dedicated to genes responsive to estrogen. Genes included in ERGDB are those whose expression levels are experimentally proven to be either up-regulated or down-regulated by estrogen. Genes included are identified based on publications from the PubMed database and each record has been manually examined, evaluated and selected for inclusion by biologists. ERGDB aims to be a unified gateway to store, search, retrieve and update information about estrogen responsive genes. Each record contains links to relevant databases, such as GenBank, LocusLink, Refseq, PubMed and ATCC. The unique feature of ERGDB is that it contains information on the dependence of gene reactions on experimental conditions. In addition to basic information about the genes, information for each record includes gene functional description, experimental methods used, tissue or cell type, gene reaction, estrogen exposure time and the summary of putative estrogen response elements if the gene's promoter sequence was available. Through a web interface at http://sdmc.i2r.a-star.edu.sg/ergdb/ cgi-bin/explore.pl users can either browse or query ERGDB. Access is free for academic and non-profit users. PMID:14681475

  10. Gene expression analysis identifies global gene dosage sensitivity in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; Karjalainen, Juha M.; Krajewska, Malgorzata;

    2015-01-01

    expression. We reanalyzed 77,840 expression profiles and observed a limited set of 'transcriptional components' that describe well-known biology, explain the vast majority of variation in gene expression and enable us to predict the biological function of genes. On correcting expression profiles for these...

  11. LSL_(gene) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia [Gene Wiki

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available LSL (gene) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaLSL (gene)From Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaJump ... n-bound leptin from subcutaneous adipose tissue of lean ... and obese women". J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab. 87 ( ... et al. (2003). "Serum leptin activity in obese and lean ... patients". Regul. Pept. 111 (1–3): 77–82. doi:10.1 ...

  12. BBX_(gene) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia [Gene Wiki

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available BBX (gene) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaBBX (gene)From Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaJump ... of disease to interested scientists.[12][13][14]Male an d female an imals underwent a standardized phenotyp ... while mutants of both sexes showed a reduction in lean ... body mass. Radiography found that males had abnorm ...

  13. Are TMEM genes potential candidate genes for panic disorder?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Noomi O; Buttenschøn, Henriette Nørmølle; Hedemand, Anne;

    2014-01-01

    We analysed single nucleotide polymorphisms in two transmembrane genes (TMEM98 and TMEM132E) in panic disorder (PD) patients and control individuals from the Faroe Islands, Denmark and Germany. The genes encode single-pass membrane proteins and are located within chromosome 17q11.2-q12, a...

  14. STATE-OF-THE-ART HUMAN GENE THERAPY: PART I. GENE DELIVERY TECHNOLOGIES

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Dan; Gao, Guangping

    2014-01-01

    Safe and effective gene delivery is a prerequisite for successful gene therapy. In the early age of human gene therapy, setbacks due to problematic gene delivery vehicles plagued the exciting therapeutic outcome. However, gene delivery technologies rapidly evolved ever since. With the advancement of gene delivery techniques, gene therapy clinical trials surged during the past decade. As the first gene therapy product has obtained regulatory approval and reached clinic, human gene therapy fina...

  15. Classifying genes to the correct Gene Ontology Slim term in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using neighbouring genes with classification learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsatsoulis Costas

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing evidence that gene location and surrounding genes influence the functionality of genes in the eukaryotic genome. Knowing the Gene Ontology Slim terms associated with a gene gives us insight into a gene's functionality by informing us how its gene product behaves in a cellular context using three different ontologies: molecular function, biological process, and cellular component. In this study, we analyzed if we could classify a gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to its correct Gene Ontology Slim term using information about its location in the genome and information from its nearest-neighbouring genes using classification learning. Results We performed experiments to establish that the MultiBoostAB algorithm using the J48 classifier could correctly classify Gene Ontology Slim terms of a gene given information regarding the gene's location and information from its nearest-neighbouring genes for training. Different neighbourhood sizes were examined to determine how many nearest neighbours should be included around each gene to provide better classification rules. Our results show that by just incorporating neighbour information from each gene's two-nearest neighbours, the percentage of correctly classified genes to their correct Gene Ontology Slim term for each ontology reaches over 80% with high accuracy (reflected in F-measures over 0.80 of the classification rules produced. Conclusions We confirmed that in classifying genes to their correct Gene Ontology Slim term, the inclusion of neighbour information from those genes is beneficial. Knowing the location of a gene and the Gene Ontology Slim information from neighbouring genes gives us insight into that gene's functionality. This benefit is seen by just including information from a gene's two-nearest neighbouring genes.

  16. Advancement and prospects of tumor gene therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Chao; Wang, Qing-Tao; Liu, He; Zhang, Zhen-Zhu; Huang, Wen-Lin

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy is one of the most attractive fields in tumor therapy. In past decades, significant progress has been achieved. Various approaches, such as viral and non-viral vectors and physical methods, have been developed to make gene delivery safer and more efficient. Several therapeutic strategies have evolved, including gene-based (tumor suppressor genes, suicide genes, antiangiogenic genes, cytokine and oxidative stress-based genes) and RNA-based (antisense oligonucleotides and RNA inter...

  17. Evidence Based Selection of Housekeeping Genes

    OpenAIRE

    de Jonge, Hendrik J.M.; Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; Eveline S. J. M. de Bont; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; Gerbens, Frans; Kamps, Willem A.; Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; van der Zee, Ate G.J.; te Meerman, Gerard J.; ter Elst, Arja

    2007-01-01

    For accurate and reliable gene expression analysis, normalization of gene expression data against housekeeping genes (reference or internal control genes) is required. It is known that commonly used housekeeping genes (e.g. ACTB, GAPDH, HPRT1, and B2M) vary considerably under different experimental conditions and therefore their use for normalization is limited. We performed a meta-analysis of 13,629 human gene array samples in order to identify the most stable expressed genes. Here we show n...

  18. A Combinatorial Approach to Detecting Gene-Gene and Gene-Environment Interactions in Family Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Lou, Xiang-Yang; Chen, Guo-Bo; Yan, Lei; Ma, Jennie Z.; Mangold, Jamie E.; Zhu, Jun; Elston, Robert C.; Li, Ming D.

    2008-01-01

    Widespread multifactor interactions present a significant challenge in determining risk factors of complex diseases. Several combinatorial approaches, such as the multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) method, have emerged as a promising tool for better detecting gene-gene (G × G) and gene-environment (G × E) interactions. We recently developed a general combinatorial approach, namely the generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction (GMDR) method, which can entertain both qualitative ...

  19. Gene-Gene and Gene-Environment Interactions in Ulcerative Colitis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ming-Hsi; FIOCCHI, CLAUDIO; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Ripke, Stephan; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Rebert, Nancy; Duerr, Richard H.; Achkar, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified at least 133 ulcerative colitis (UC) associated loci. The role of genetic factors in clinical practice is not clearly defined. The relevance of genetic variants to disease pathogenesis is still uncertain because of not characterized gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. We examined the predictive value of combining the 133 UC risk loci with genetic interactions in an ongoing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) GWAS. The Wellcome Trust...

  20. Sensitive detection of gene expression in mycobacteria under replicating and non-replicating conditions using optimized far-red reporters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Carroll

    Full Text Available Fluorescent reporter proteins have proven useful for imaging techniques in many organisms. We constructed optimized expression systems for several fluorescent proteins from the far-red region of the spectrum and analyzed their utility in several mycobacterial species. Plasmids expressing variants of the Discosoma Red fluorescent protein (DsRed from the Mycobacterium bovis hsp60 promoter were unstable; in contrast expression from the Mycobacterium smegmatis rpsA promoter was stable. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis expression of several of the far-red reporters was readily visualised by eye and three reporters (mCherry, tdTomato, and Turbo-635 fluoresced at a high intensity. Strains expressing mCherry showed no fitness defects in vitro or in macrophages. Treatment of cells with antibiotics demonstrated that mCherry could also be used as a reporter for cell death, since fluorescence decreased in the presence of a bactericidal compound, but remained stable in the presence of a bacteriostatic compound. mCherry was functional under hypoxic conditions; using mCherry we demonstrated that the P(mtbB is expressed early in hypoxia and progressively down-regulated. mCherry and other far-red fluorescent proteins will have multiple uses in investigating the biology of mycobacteria, particularly under non-replicating, or low cell density conditions, as well as providing a novel means of detecting cell death rapidly.

  1. Candidate genes for behavioural ecology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fitzpatrick, M.J.; Ben-Sahar, Y.; Smid, H.M.; Vet, L.E.M.; Robinson, G.E.; Sokolowski, M.B.

    2005-01-01

    In spite of millions of years of evolutionary divergence, the conservation of gene function is common across distant lineages. As such, genes that are known to influence behaviour in one organism are likely to influence similar behaviours in other organisms. Recent studies of the evolution of behavi

  2. HOX genes in ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Zoë L

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The HOX genes are a family of homeodomain-containing transcription factors that determine cellular identity during development. Here we review a number of recent studies showing that HOX genes are strongly expressed in ovarian cancer, and that in some cases the expression of specific HOX genes is sufficient to confer a particular identity and phenotype upon cancer cells. We also review the recent advances in elucidating the different functions of HOX genes in ovarian cancer. A literature search was performed using the search terms HOX genes (including specific HOX genes, ovarian cancer and oncogenesis. Articles were accessed through searches performed in ISI Web of Knowledge, PubMed and ScienceDirect. Taken together, these studies have shown that HOX genes play a role in the oncogenesis of ovarian cancer and function in the inhibition of apoptosis, DNA repair and enhanced cell motility. The function of HOX genes in ovarian cancer oncogenesis supports their potential role as prognostic and diagnostic markers, and as therapeutic targets in this disease.

  3. Candidate gene prioritization with Endeavour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranchevent, Léon-Charles; Ardeshirdavani, Amin; ElShal, Sarah; Alcaide, Daniel; Aerts, Jan; Auboeuf, Didier; Moreau, Yves

    2016-07-01

    Genomic studies and high-throughput experiments often produce large lists of candidate genes among which only a small fraction are truly relevant to the disease, phenotype or biological process of interest. Gene prioritization tackles this problem by ranking candidate genes by profiling candidates across multiple genomic data sources and integrating this heterogeneous information into a global ranking. We describe an extended version of our gene prioritization method, Endeavour, now available for six species and integrating 75 data sources. The performance (Area Under the Curve) of Endeavour on cross-validation benchmarks using 'gold standard' gene sets varies from 88% (for human phenotypes) to 95% (for worm gene function). In addition, we have also validated our approach using a time-stamped benchmark derived from the Human Phenotype Ontology, which provides a setting close to prospective validation. With this benchmark, using 3854 novel gene-phenotype associations, we observe a performance of 82%. Altogether, our results indicate that this extended version of Endeavour efficiently prioritizes candidate genes. The Endeavour web server is freely available at https://endeavour.esat.kuleuven.be/. PMID:27131783

  4. On meme--gene coevolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, L; Holland, O; Blackmore, S

    2000-01-01

    In this article we examine the effects of the emergence of a new replicator, memes, on the evolution of a pre-existing replicator, genes. Using a version of the NKCS model we examine the effects of increasing the rate of meme evolution in relation to the rate of gene evolution, for various degrees of interdependence between the two replicators. That is, the effects of memes' (suggested) more rapid rate of evolution in comparison to that of genes is investigated using a tunable model of coevolution. It is found that, for almost any degree of interdependence between the two replicators, as the rate of meme evolution increases, a phase transition-like dynamic occurs under which memes have a significantly detrimental effect on the evolution of genes, quickly resulting in the cessation of effective gene evolution. Conversely, the memes experience a sharp increase in benefit from increasing their rate of evolution. We then examine the effects of enabling genes to reduce the percentage of gene-detrimental evolutionary steps taken by memes. Here a critical region emerges as the comparative rate of meme evolution increases, such that if genes cannot effectively select memes a high percentage of the time, they suffer from meme evolution as if they had almost no selective capability. PMID:11224917

  5. Phytochrome-regulated Gene Expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter H. Quail

    2007-01-01

    Identification of all genes involved in the phytochrome (phy)-mediated responses of plants to their light environment is an important goal in providing an overall understanding of light-regulated growth and development. This article highlights and integrates the central findings of two recent comprehensive studies in Arabidopsis that have identified the genome-wide set of phy-regulated genes that respond rapidly to red-light signals upon first exposure of dark-grown seedlings, and have tested the functional relevance to normal seedling photomorphogenesis of an initial subset of these genes. The data: (a) reveal considerable complexity in the channeling of the light signals through the different phy-family members (phyA to phyE) to responsive genes; (b) identify a diversity of transcription-factor-encoding genes as major early, if not primary, targets of phy signaling, and, therefore, as potentially important regulators in the transcriptional-network hierarchy; and (c) identify auxin-related genes as the dominant class among rapidly-regulated, hormone-related genes. However, reverse-genetic functional profiling of a selected subset of these genes reveals that only a limited fraction are necessary for optimal phy-induced seedling deetiolation.

  6. Multifunctional nanorods for gene delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Aliasger K.; Searson, Peter C.; Leong, Kam W.

    2003-10-01

    The goal of gene therapy is to introduce foreign genes into somatic cells to supplement defective genes or provide additional biological functions, and can be achieved using either viral or synthetic non-viral delivery systems. Compared with viral vectors, synthetic gene-delivery systems, such as liposomes and polymers, offer several advantages including ease of production and reduced risk of cytotoxicity and immunogenicity, but their use has been limited by the relatively low transfection efficiency. This problem mainly stems from the difficulty in controlling their properties at the nanoscale. Synthetic inorganic gene carriers have received limited attention in the gene-therapy community, the only notable example being gold nanoparticles with surface-immobilized DNA applied to intradermal genetic immunization by particle bombardment. Here we present a non-viral gene-delivery system based on multisegment bimetallic nanorods that can simultaneously bind compacted DNA plasmids and targeting ligands in a spatially defined manner. This approach allows precise control of composition, size and multifunctionality of the gene-delivery system. Transfection experiments performed in vitro and in vivo provide promising results that suggest potential in genetic vaccination applications.

  7. FunGeneClusterS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesth, Tammi Camilla; Brandl, Julian; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    2016-01-01

    Secondary metabolites of fungi are receiving an increasing amount of interest due to their prolific bioactivities and the fact that fungal biosynthesis of secondary metabolites often occurs from co-regulated and co-located gene clusters. This makes the gene clusters attractive for synthetic biology...

  8. Delivery systems for gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrikant Mali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure of DNA was unraveled by Watson and Crick in 1953, and two decades later Arber, Nathans and Smith discovered DNA restriction enzymes, which led to the rapid growth in the field of recombinant DNA technology. From expressing cloned genes in bacteria to expressing foreign DNA in transgenic animals, DNA is now slated to be used as a therapeutic agent to replace defective genes in patients suffering from genetic disorders or to kill tumor cells in cancer patients. Gene therapy provides modern medicine with new perspectives that were unthinkable two decades ago. Progress in molecular biology and especially, molecular medicine is now changing the basics of clinical medicine. A variety of viral and non-viral possibilities are available for basic and clinical research. This review summarizes the delivery routes and methods for gene transfer used in gene therapy.

  9. CNS Genes Implicated in Relapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willard M. Freeman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug abuse is a condition that impacts not only the individual drug user, but society as a whole. Although prevention of initial drug use is the most effective way to prevent addiction, avoiding relapse is a crucial component of drug addiction recovery. Recent studies suggest that there is a set of genes whose expression is robustly and stably altered following drug use and ensuing abstinence. Such stable changes in gene expression correlate with ultrastructural changes in brain as well as alterations in behavior. As persistent molecular changes, these genes may provide targets for the development of therapeutics. Developing a list of well-characterized candidate genes and examining the effect of manipulating these genes will contribute to the ultimate goal of developing effective treatments to prevent relapse to drug use.

  10. Function analysis of unknown genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogowska-Wrzesinska, A.

    2002-01-01

      This thesis entitled "Function analysis of unknown genes" presents the use of proteome analysis for the characterisation of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) genes and their products (proteins especially those of unknown function). This study illustrates that proteome analysis can be used to...... describe different aspects of molecular biology of the cell, to study changes that occur in the cell due to overexpression or deletion of a gene and to identify various protein modifications. The biological questions and the results of the described studies show the diversity of the information that can be...... characterising yeast genes and proteins. It reports the first global proteome database collecting 36 yeast single gene deletion mutants and selecting over 650 differences between analysed mutants and the wild type strain. The obtained results show that two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry...

  11. GeneMANIA Prediction Server 2013 Update

    OpenAIRE

    Zuberi, Khalid; Franz, Max; Rodriguez, Harold; Montojo, Jason; Lopes, Christian Tannus; Bader, Gary D.; Morris, Quaid

    2013-01-01

    GeneMANIA (http://www.genemania.org) is a flexible user-friendly web interface for generating hypotheses about gene function, analyzing gene lists and prioritizing genes for functional assays. Given a query gene list, GeneMANIA extends the list with functionally similar genes that it identifies using available genomics and proteomics data. GeneMANIA also reports weights that indicate the predictive value of each selected data set for the query. GeneMANIA can also be used in a function predict...

  12. Endothelial cells' activation and apoptosis induced by a subset of antibodies against human cytomegalovirus: relevance to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Lunardi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human cytomegalovirus (hCMV is involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. We have previously shown in patients with atherosclerosis that antibodies directed against the hCMV-derived proteins US28 and UL122 are able to induce endothelial cell damage and apoptosis of non-stressed endothelial cells through cross-rection with normally expressed surface molecules. Our aim was to dissect the molecular basis of such interaction and to investigate mechanisms linking innate immunity to atherosclerosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analysed the gene expression profiles in endothelial cells stimulated with antibodies affinity-purified against either the UL122 or the US28 peptides using the microarray technology. Microarray results were validated by quantitative PCR and by detection of proteins in the medium. Supernatant of endothelial cells incubated with antibodies was analysed also for the presence of Heat Shock Protein (HSP60 and was used to assess stimulation of Toll-Like Receptor-4 (TLR4. Antibodies against UL122 and US28 induced the expression of genes encoding for adhesion molecules, chemokines, growth factors and molecules involved in the apoptotis process together with other genes known to be involved in the initiation and progression of the atherosclerotic process. HSP60 was released in the medium of cells incubated with anti-US28 antibodies and was able to engage TLR4. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Antibodies directed against hCMV modulate the expression of genes coding for molecules involved in activation and apoptosis of endothelial cells, processes known to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Moreover, endothelial cells exposed to such antibodies express HSP60 on the cell surface and release HSP60 in the medium able to activate TLR4. These data confirm that antibodies directed against hCMV-derived proteins US28 and UL122 purified from patients with coronary artery disease induce endothelial cell

  13. Virulence, Immunogenicity, and Protective Efficacy of Two Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin Strains Expressing the Antigen ESAT-6 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Bao, Lang; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Huidong; Wang, Xiaoying

    2003-01-01

    We constructed two recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG (rBCG) strains expressing ESAT-6 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, named rBCG-1 and rBCG-2. rBCG-1 contained the ESAT-6 gene linked to BCG hsp60 and expressed a fusion protein, while rBCG-2, with a secretory sequence, could secret ESAT-6 into the culture medium. There was no evidence for increased virulence of the two rBCG strains when we made a comparison between them and BCG with regard to organ bacterial loads, lung histology, and surviva...

  14. Gene expression profiling: can we identify the right target genes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Loyd

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression profiling allows the simultaneous monitoring of the transcriptional behaviour of thousands of genes, which may potentially be involved in disease development. Several studies have been performed in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, which aim to define genetic links to the disease in an attempt to improve the current understanding of the underlying pathogenesis of the disease and target pathways for intervention. Expression profiling has shown a clear difference in gene expression between IPF and normal lung tissue, and has identified a wide range of candidate genes, including those known to encode for proteins involved in extracellular matrix formation and degradation, growth factors and chemokines. Recently, familial pulmonary fibrosis cohorts have been examined in an attempt to detect specific genetic mutations associated with IPF. To date, these studies have identified families in which IPF is associated with mutations in the gene encoding surfactant protein C, or with mutations in genes encoding components of telomerase. Although rare and clearly not responsible for the disease in all individuals, the nature of these mutations highlight the importance of the alveolar epithelium in disease pathogenesis and demonstrate the potential for gene expression profiling in helping to advance the current understanding of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

  15. Genes and gene networks implicated in aggression related behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malki, Karim; Pain, Oliver; Du Rietz, Ebba; Tosto, Maria Grazia; Paya-Cano, Jose; Sandnabba, Kenneth N; de Boer, Sietse; Schalkwyk, Leonard C; Sluyter, Frans

    2014-10-01

    Aggressive behaviour is a major cause of mortality and morbidity. Despite of moderate heritability estimates, progress in identifying the genetic factors underlying aggressive behaviour has been limited. There are currently three genetic mouse models of high and low aggression created using selective breeding. This is the first study to offer a global transcriptomic characterization of the prefrontal cortex across all three genetic mouse models of aggression. A systems biology approach has been applied to transcriptomic data across the three pairs of selected inbred mouse strains (Turku Aggressive (TA) and Turku Non-Aggressive (TNA), Short Attack Latency (SAL) and Long Attack Latency (LAL) mice and North Carolina Aggressive (NC900) and North Carolina Non-Aggressive (NC100)), providing novel insight into the neurobiological mechanisms and genetics underlying aggression. First, weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) was performed to identify modules of highly correlated genes associated with aggression. Probe sets belonging to gene modules uncovered by WGCNA were carried forward for network analysis using ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA). The RankProd non-parametric algorithm was then used to statistically evaluate expression differences across the genes belonging to modules significantly associated with aggression. IPA uncovered two pathways, involving NF-kB and MAPKs. The secondary RankProd analysis yielded 14 differentially expressed genes, some of which have previously been implicated in pathways associated with aggressive behaviour, such as Adrbk2. The results highlighted plausible candidate genes and gene networks implicated in aggression-related behaviour. PMID:25142712

  16. Progress of gene targeting in mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Gene targeting is a powerful approach of study- ing the genefunction in vivo. Specific genetic modifications, including simple gene disruption, point mutations, large chromosomal deletions and rearrangements, targeted incor- poration of foreign genes, could be introduced into the mouse genome by gene targeting. Recent studies make it possible to do the gene targeting with temporal and spatial control.

  17. Genes and equality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrelly, C

    2004-12-01

    The way people think about equality as a value will influence how they think genetic interventions should be regulated. In this paper the author uses the taxonomy of equality put forth by Derek Parfit and applies this to the issue of genetic interventions. It is argued that telic egalitarianism is untenable and that deontic egalitarianism collapses into prioritarianism. The priority view maintains that it is morally more important to benefit the people who are worse off. Once this precision has been given to the concerns egalitarians have, a number of diverse issues must be considered before determining what the just regulation of genetic interventions would be. Consideration must be given to the current situation of the least advantaged, the fiscal realities behind genetic interventions, the budget constraints on other social programmes egalitarians believe should receive scarce public funds, and the interconnected nature of genetic information. These considerations might lead egalitarians to abandon what they take to be the obvious policy recommendations for them to endorse regarding the regulation of gene therapies and enhancements. PMID:15574450

  18. Rasamsonia, a new genus comprising thermotolerant and thermophilic Talaromyces and Geosmithia species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houbraken, J.; Spierenburg, H.; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2012-01-01

    ) and Cct8 (putative chaperonin complex component TCP-1) gene sequences. The results showed that these species form a distinct clade within the Trichocomaceae and Trichocoma paradoxa is phylogenetically most closely related. Based on phenotypic and physiological characters and molecular data, we propose...

  19. Visual gene developer: a fully programmable bioinformatics software for synthetic gene optimization

    OpenAIRE

    McDonald Karen; Jung Sang-Kyu

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Direct gene synthesis is becoming more popular owing to decreases in gene synthesis pricing. Compared with using natural genes, gene synthesis provides a good opportunity to optimize gene sequence for specific applications. In order to facilitate gene optimization, we have developed a stand-alone software called Visual Gene Developer. Results The software not only provides general functions for gene analysis and optimization along with an interactive user-friendly interfac...

  20. GeneNet: a database on structure and functional organisation of gene networks

    OpenAIRE

    Ananko, E A; Podkolodny, N. L.; Stepanenko, I. L.; Ignatieva, E. V.; Podkolodnaya, O. A.; Kolchanov, N. A.

    2002-01-01

    The GeneNet database is designed for accumulation of information on gene networks. Original technology applied in GeneNet enables description of not only a gene network structure and functional relationships between components, but also metabolic and signal transduction pathways. Specialised software, GeneNet Viewer, automatically displays the graphical diagram of gene networks described in the database. Current release 3.0 of GeneNet database contains descriptions of 25 gene networks, 945 pr...

  1. Induction of the Chemokines CCL3α, CCL3α and CCL5 in Atherosclerotic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyaa Mousa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines recruit immune cells to inflammatory sites and promote the process of inflammation. The role of these mediators in the disease process in atherosclerosis is not fully studied. The spontaneous mRNA expression and intracellular protein production of the potential inflammatory chemokines CCL3 and CCL3 (macrophage- inflammatory protein-1and ; CCR3 ligand and CCL5 (regulated upon activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES; CCR5 ligand in atherosclerotic patients was examined together with the effects of the chlamydial antigen HSP60 and LPS on the gene expression and protein induction of these mediators. Detection of chemokine mRNA and protein levels was assessed by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry respectively. The examined chemokines were detected at significantly high levels on atherosclerotic patients compared to healthy controls at both mRNA and protein levels. Stimulation with HSP60 and LPS from Chlamydia pneumoniae (C. pneumoniae and E. coli showed increased numbers of CCL3, CCL3 and CCL5 mRNA expressing cells in patients compared to health controls. Protein translation of these chemokines was depicted in correspondence to the mRNA gene expression for all examined chemokines spontaneously and after stimulation with chlamydial HSP60 and LPS and E. coli LPS. Thus, the herein data demonstrate the induction of potential inflammatory chemokines in atherosclerotic patients and that bacterial antigens play a role in the immunopathologic events in this disease by generating more inflammatory mediators.

  2. Genes: an Open Access Journal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Peter W. Young

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Genes have been in the scientific vocabulary for a hundred years. The term "gene" was proposed by the Danish plant scientist Wilhelm Johannsen in the first decade of the 20th century. For Johannsen, the gene remained an abstract concept, "free of any hypothesis" [1], but others were already pointing to chromosomes as the likely location of genes. The science of genetics was born at that time, and genes were rapidly connected with mutations, with patterns of inheritance, with development, with quantitative traits, with evolution and with biochemical pathways. All this was achieved without knowledge of the physical nature of genes, but this changed in mid-century with the discoveries of molecular biology. DNA was revealed as the genetic material, and the mechanisms were elucidated by which the information was encoded, and propagated, and linked to the phenotype. However, the concept of a "gene" did not become clearer. Quite the reverse, as the units of mutation, of recombination, of inheritance, of expression, of regulation, etc. did not necessarily coincide. [...

  3. Gene Electrotransfer: A Mechanistic Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosazza, Christelle; Meglic, Sasa Haberl; Zumbusch, Andreas; Rols, Marie-Pierre; Miklavcic, Damijan

    2016-01-01

    Gene electrotransfer is a powerful method of DNA delivery offering several medical applications, among the most promising of which are DNA vaccination and gene therapy for cancer treatment. Electroporation entails the application of electric fields to cells which then experience a local and transient change of membrane permeability. Although gene electrotransfer has been extensively studied in in vitro and in vivo environments, the mechanisms by which DNA enters and navigates through cells are not fully understood. Here we present a comprehensive review of the body of knowledge concerning gene electrotransfer that has been accumulated over the last three decades. For that purpose, after briefly reviewing the medical applications that gene electrotransfer can provide, we outline membrane electropermeabilization, a key process for the delivery of DNA and smaller molecules. Since gene electrotransfer is a multipart process, we proceed our review in describing step by step our current understanding, with particular emphasis on DNA internalization and intracellular trafficking. Finally, we turn our attention to in vivo testing and methodology for gene electrotransfer. PMID:27029943

  4. Gene expression profiles in skeletal muscle after gene electrotransfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hojman, Pernille; Zibert, John R; Gissel, Hanne;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gene transfer by electroporation (DNA electrotransfer) to muscle results in high level long term transgenic expression, showing great promise for treatment of e.g. protein deficiency syndromes. However little is known about the effects of DNA electrotransfer on muscle fibres. We have...... therefore investigated transcriptional changes through gene expression profile analyses, morphological changes by histological analysis, and physiological changes by force generation measurements. DNA electrotransfer was obtained using a combination of a short high voltage pulse (HV, 1000 V/cm, 100 mus......) followed by a long low voltage pulse (LV, 100 V/cm, 400 ms); a pulse combination optimised for efficient and safe gene transfer. Muscles were transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and excised at 4 hours, 48 hours or 3 weeks after treatment. RESULTS: Differentially expressed genes were...

  5. BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    The BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene test is a blood test that can tell you if you have a higher ... BRCA1 and BRCA2 are genes that suppress malignant tumors (cancer) in humans. When these genes change (become ...

  6. Gene Therapy for Diseases and Genetic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mentor Submit Your Press Release Donate Home ASGCT Gene Therapy for Diseases Gene Therapy has made important ... Among the most notable advancements are the following: Gene Therapy for Genetic Disorders Severe Combined Immune Deficiency ( ...

  7. Genes Might Explain Hispanics' Added Longevity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160528.html Genes Might Explain Hispanics' Added Longevity Differences in 'genetic ... Services, or federal policy. More Health News on: Genes and Gene Therapy Hispanic American Health Recent Health ...

  8. Personalized Medicine: Matching Treatments to Your Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disclaimer . Subscribe Personalized Medicine Matching Treatments to Your Genes You’re one of a kind. It’s not ... personalized medicine begins with the unique set of genes you inherited from your parents. Genes are stretches ...

  9. Basics on Genes and Genetic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Help a Friend Who Cuts? The Basics on Genes and Genetic Disorders KidsHealth > For Teens > The Basics ... such as treating health problems. What Is a Gene? To understand how genes work, let's review some ...

  10. Correction of gene expression data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darbani Shirvanehdeh, Behrooz; Stewart, C. Neal, Jr.; Noeparvar, Shahin;

    2014-01-01

    This report investigates for the first time the potential inter-treatment bias source of cell number for gene expression studies. Cell-number bias can affect gene expression analysis when comparing samples with unequal total cellular RNA content or with different RNA extraction efficiencies. For...... maximal reliability of analysis, therefore, comparisons should be performed at the cellular level. This could be accomplished using an appropriate correction method that can detect and remove the inter-treatment bias for cell-number. Based on inter-treatment variations of reference genes, we introduce an...

  11. Gene networks controlling petal organogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tengbo; Irish, Vivian F

    2016-01-01

    One of the biggest unanswered questions in developmental biology is how growth is controlled. Petals are an excellent organ system for investigating growth control in plants: petals are dispensable, have a simple structure, and are largely refractory to environmental perturbations that can alter their size and shape. In recent studies, a number of genes controlling petal growth have been identified. The overall picture of how such genes function in petal organogenesis is beginning to be elucidated. This review will focus on studies using petals as a model system to explore the underlying gene networks that control organ initiation, growth, and final organ morphology. PMID:26428062

  12. The Ensembl gene annotation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aken, Bronwen L; Ayling, Sarah; Barrell, Daniel; Clarke, Laura; Curwen, Valery; Fairley, Susan; Fernandez Banet, Julio; Billis, Konstantinos; García Girón, Carlos; Hourlier, Thibaut; Howe, Kevin; Kähäri, Andreas; Kokocinski, Felix; Martin, Fergal J; Murphy, Daniel N; Nag, Rishi; Ruffier, Magali; Schuster, Michael; Tang, Y Amy; Vogel, Jan-Hinnerk; White, Simon; Zadissa, Amonida; Flicek, Paul; Searle, Stephen M J

    2016-01-01

    The Ensembl gene annotation system has been used to annotate over 70 different vertebrate species across a wide range of genome projects. Furthermore, it generates the automatic alignment-based annotation for the human and mouse GENCODE gene sets. The system is based on the alignment of biological sequences, including cDNAs, proteins and RNA-seq reads, to the target genome in order to construct candidate transcript models. Careful assessment and filtering of these candidate transcripts ultimately leads to the final gene set, which is made available on the Ensembl website. Here, we describe the annotation process in detail.Database URL: http://www.ensembl.org/index.html. PMID:27337980

  13. A Gene Score Test for Disease Association with Multiple Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Changchun Xie

    2011-01-01

    The traditional method for creating a gene score to predict a given outcome is to use the most statistically significant single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from all SNPs which were tested. There are several disadvantages of this approach such as excluding SNPs that do not have strong single effects when tested on their own but do have strong joint effects when tested together with other SNPs. The interpretation of results from the traditional gene score may lack biological insight since t...

  14. Gene therapy of cancer by vaccines carrying inserted immunostimulatory genes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 3 (2007), s. 71-73. ISSN 0015-5500 Grant ostatní: EU-FP6 NoE Clinigene(XE) 018933; Liga proti rakovině, Praha(CZ) XX Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : gene therapy * immunostimulatory genes * vaccine Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.596, year: 2007

  15. Parsimonious selection of useful genes in microarray gene expression data

    OpenAIRE

    González Navarro, Félix Fernando; Belanche Muñoz, Luis Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Machine Learning methods have of late made significant efforts to solving multidisciplinary problems in the field of cancer classification in microarray gene expression data. These tasks are characterized by a large number of features and a few observations, making the modeling a non-trivial undertaking. In this work we apply entropic filter methods for gene selection, in combination with several off-the-shelf classifiers. The introduction of bootstrap resampling techniques permits the achiev...

  16. Viral vectors for vascular gene therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Lukas; Preis, Meir; Weisz, Anat; Koren, Belly; Lewis, Basil S; Flugelman, Moshe Y

    2002-01-01

    Vascular gene therapy is the focus of multiple experimental and clinical research efforts. While several genes with therapeutic potential have been identified, the best method of gene delivery is unknown. Viral vectors have the capacity to transfer genes at high efficiency rates. Several viral-based vectors have been used in experimental vascular gene therapy for in vivo and ex vivo gene transfer. Adenoviral-based vectors are being used for the induction of angiogenesis in phase 1 and 2 clini...

  17. Vector development for suicide gene therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Aints, Alar

    2002-01-01

    Gene therapy is used to treat conditions that arise from errors in the genetic makeup of cells either congenital diseases resulting from a deletion or mutation in a gene or malignant diseases where genetic regulation mechanisms have been deranged. Suicide gene therapy is one of several gene therapeutic approaches to treat cancer. A suicide gene is a gene encoding a protein, frequently an enzyme, that in itself is non-toxic to the genetically modified cell. However, when ...

  18. Evolution of the nuclear receptor gene superfamily.

    OpenAIRE

    Laudet, V; Hänni, C; Coll, J.; F. Catzeflis; Stéhelin, D

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear receptor genes represent a large family of genes encoding receptors for various hydrophobic ligands such as steroids, vitamin D, retinoic acid and thyroid hormones. This family also contains genes encoding putative receptors for unknown ligands. Nuclear receptor gene products are composed of several domains important for transcriptional activation, DNA binding (C domain), hormone binding and dimerization (E domain). It is not known whether these genes have evolved through gene duplica...

  19. Evolution of alternative splicing after gene duplication

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Zhixi; Wang, Jianmin; Yu, Jun; Huang, Xiaoqiu; Gu, Xun

    2006-01-01

    Alternative splicing and gene duplication are two major sources of proteomic function diversity. Here, we study the evolutionary trend of alternative splicing after gene duplication by analyzing the alternative splicing differences between duplicate genes. We observed that duplicate genes have fewer alternative splice (AS) forms than single-copy genes, and that a negative correlation exists between the mean number of AS forms and the gene family size. Interestingly, we found that the loss of ...

  20. The evolution of resistance gene in plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BEN Haiyan; LIU Xuemin; LI Lijun; LIU Li

    2007-01-01

    Resistance genes enable plants to fight against plant pathogens. Plant resistance genes (R gene) are organized complexly in genome. Some resistance gene sequence data enable an insight into R gene structure and gene evolution. Some sites like Leucine-Rich Repeat (LRR) are of specific interest since homologous recombination can happen. Crossing over, transposon insertion and excision and mutation can produce new specificity. Three models explaining R gene evolution were discussed. More information needed for dissection of R gene evolution though some step can be inferred from genetic and sequence analysis.

  1. Gene discovery in Triatoma infestans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Burgos Nelia

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Triatoma infestans is the most relevant vector of Chagas disease in the southern cone of South America. Since its genome has not yet been studied, sequencing of Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs is one of the most powerful tools for efficiently identifying large numbers of expressed genes in this insect vector. Results In this work, we generated 826 ESTs, resulting in an increase of 47% in the number of ESTs available for T. infestans. These ESTs were assembled in 471 unique sequences, 151 of which represent 136 new genes for the Reduviidae family. Conclusions Among the putative new genes for the Reduviidae family, we identified and described an interesting subset of genes involved in development and reproduction, which constitute potential targets for insecticide development.

  2. Gene Therapy for Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Denyer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Current pharmacological and surgical treatments for Parkinson's disease offer symptomatic improvements to those suffering from this incurable degenerative neurological disorder, but none of these has convincingly shown effects on disease progression. Novel approaches based on gene therapy have several potential advantages over conventional treatment modalities. These could be used to provide more consistent dopamine supplementation, potentially providing superior symptomatic relief with fewer side effects. More radically, gene therapy could be used to correct the imbalances in basal ganglia circuitry associated with the symptoms of Parkinson's disease, or to preserve or restore dopaminergic neurons lost during the disease process itself. The latter neuroprotective approach is the most exciting, as it could theoretically be disease modifying rather than simply symptom alleviating. Gene therapy agents using these approaches are currently making the transition from the laboratory to the bedside. This paper summarises the theoretical approaches to gene therapy for Parkinson's disease and the findings of clinical trials in this rapidly changing field.

  3. Homeobox gene expression in Brachiopoda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altenburger, Andreas; Martinez, Pedro; Wanninger, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    . Not is a homeobox containing gene that regulates the formation of the notochord in chordates, while Cdx (caudal) is a ParaHox gene involved in the formation of posterior tissues of various animal phyla. The T. transversa homolog, TtrNot, is expressed in the ectoderm from the beginning of gastrulation until...... (ectoderm) specification with co-opted functions in notochord formation in chordates and left/right determination in ambulacrarians and vertebrates. The caudal ortholog, TtrCdx, is first expressed in the ectoderm of the gastrulating embryo in the posterior region of the blastopore. Its expression stays...... metazoans, where genes belonging to the Cdx/caudal family are predominantly localized in posterior domains during gastrulation. Later in development this gene will play a fundamental role in the formation of posterior tissues....

  4. EGAN: exploratory gene association networks

    OpenAIRE

    Paquette, Jesse; Tokuyasu, Taku

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Exploratory Gene Association Networks (EGAN) is a Java desktop application that provides a point-and-click environment for contextual graph visualization of high-throughput assay results. By loading the entire network of genes, pathways, interactions, annotation terms and literature references directly into memory, EGAN allows a biologist to repeatedly query and interpret multiple experimental results without incurring additional delays for data download/integration. Other compelling...

  5. Shuffling Yeast Gene Expression Data

    OpenAIRE

    Bilke, Sven

    2000-01-01

    A new method to sort gene expression patterns into functional groups is presented. The method is based on a sorting algorithm using a non-local similarity score, which takes all other patterns in the dataset into account. The method is therefore very robust with respect to noise. Using the expression data for yeast, we extract information about functional groups. Without prior knowledge of parameters the cell cycle regulated genes in yeast can be identified. Furthermore a second, independent ...

  6. Gemini surfactants as gene carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Piskorska

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Gemini surfactants are a new class of amphiphilic compounds built from two classic surfactant moieties bound together by a special spacer group. These compounds appear to be excellent for creating complexes with DNA and are effective in mediating transfection. Thanks to their construction, DNA carrier molecules built from gemini surfactants are able to deliver genes to cells of almost any DNA molecule size, unattainable when using viral gene delivery systems. Moreover, they are much safer for living organisms.

  7. CNS Genes Implicated in Relapse

    OpenAIRE

    Freeman, Willard M; Kuntz-Melcavage, Kara L; Vrana, Kent E.

    2008-01-01

    Drug abuse is a condition that impacts not only the individual drug user, but society as a whole. Although prevention of initial drug use is the most effective way to prevent addiction, avoiding relapse is a crucial component of drug addiction recovery. Recent studies suggest that there is a set of genes whose expression is robustly and stably altered following drug use and ensuing abstinence. Such stable changes in gene expression correlate with ultrastructural changes in brain as well as al...

  8. Rice's Salt Tolerance Gene Cloned

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ In cooperation with US colleagues, CAS researchers have made significant progress in their studies into functional genes for key agronomic traits by cloning SKC1, a salt-tolerant functional gene of rice and making clear its biological functions and mechanisms. This pioneering work,which was reported in the Oct. issue of Nature Genetics (37:1141-1146), is believed to hold promise to increase the output of the crop plant in this country.

  9. Gene therapy in lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Masaaki; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2006-08-01

    Lung transplantation is effective life-saving therapy for the treatment of a variety of end-stage lung diseases. However, the application of lung transplantation is hindered by multiple factors such as the shortage of organ donors, early graft failure and chronic graft dysfunction. These problems are related to various lung injuries before and after transplantation including donor brain-death-related lung injury, ischemia, reperfusion and immune-mediated injuries. Gene transfection presents a potential molecular therapeutic solution to modify the transplanted organ such that it is better able to deal with these obstacles. In fact, in many ways lung transplantation is an ideal situation for gene therapy in that: 1) the targeted injuries are predictable (e.g. IR injury), 2) only transient gene expression is needed in many instances, 3) the immunosuppressive regimen necessary to prevent rejection of the transplanted organ attenuates vector-induced inflammation and the immune response to the vectors or the transgene products, and thus effectively augments and prolongs gene expression; 4) the anatomical structure of the lung enables trans-airway access and local gene delivery - as well as re-transfection. A number of issues need to be considered to develop a strategy of gene delivery in lung transplantation: administration route (intra-airway, trans-vascular, intravenous, intramuscular), timing (donor in-vivo, ex-vivo organ transfection or recipient), vector selection and gene selection. Based on our work and the work of others, over the last decade, we present the state of art of in gene therapy in lung transplantation and exciting future directions in the field. PMID:16918334

  10. Vascular gene expression: a hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Navarro, Angélica C.; Galván-Gordillo, Santiago V.; Xoconostle-Cázares, Beatriz; Ruiz-Medrano, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The phloem is the conduit through which photoassimilates are distributed from autotrophic to heterotrophic tissues and is involved in the distribution of signaling molecules that coordinate plant growth and responses to the environment. Phloem function depends on the coordinate expression of a large array of genes. We have previously identified conserved motifs in upstream regions of the Arabidopsis genes, encoding the homologs of pumpkin phloem sap mRNAs, displaying expression in vascular ti...

  11. Zipf's Law in Gene Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Furusawa, Chikara; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2002-01-01

    Using data from gene expression databases on various organisms and tissues, including yeast, nematodes, human normal and cancer tissues, and embryonic stem cells, we found that the abundances of expressed genes exhibit a power-law distribution with an exponent close to -1, i.e., they obey Zipf's law. Furthermore, by simulations of a simple model with an intra-cellular reaction network, we found that Zipf's law of chemical abundance is a universal feature of cells where such a network optimize...

  12. Gene therapy in clinical medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Selkirk, S

    2004-01-01

    Although the field of gene therapy has experienced significant setbacks and limited success, it is one of the most promising and active research fields in medicine. Interest in this therapeutic modality is based on the potential for treatment and cure of some of the most malignant and devastating diseases affecting humans. Over the next decade, the relevance of gene therapy to medical practices will increase and it will become important for physicians to understand the basic principles and st...

  13. Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferl, Robert; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) investigation is one in a pair of investigations that use the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) facility. TAGES uses Arabidopsis thaliana, thale cress, with sensor promoter-reporter gene constructs that render the plants as biomonitors (an organism used to determine the quality of the surrounding environment) of their environment using real-time nondestructive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) imagery and traditional postflight analyses.

  14. Information-processing genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are an estimated 100,000 genes in the human genome of which 97% is non-coding. On the other hand, bacteria have little or no non-coding DNA. Non-coding region includes introns, ALU sequences, satellite DNA, and other segments not expressed as proteins. Why it exists? Why nature has kept non-coding during the long evolutionary period if it has no role in the development of complex life forms? Does complexity of a species somehow correlated to the existence of apparently useless sequences? What kind of capability is encoded within such nucleotide sequences that is a necessary, but not a sufficient condition for the evolution of complex life forms, keeping in mind the C-value paradox and the omnipresence of non-coding segments in higher eurkaryotes and also in many archea and prokaryotes. The physico-chemical description of biological processes is hardware oriented and does not highlight algorithmic or information processing aspect. However, an algorithm without its hardware implementation is useless as much as hardware without its capability to run an algorithm. The nature and type of computation an information-processing hardware can perform depends only on its algorithm and the architecture that reflects the algorithm. Given that enormously difficult tasks such as high fidelity replication, transcription, editing and regulation are all achieved within a long linear sequence, it is natural to think that some parts of a genome are involved is these tasks. If some complex algorithms are encoded with these parts, then it is natural to think that non-coding regions contain processing-information algorithms. A comparison between well-known automatic sequences and sequences constructed out of motifs is found in all species proves the point: noncoding regions are a sort of ''hardwired'' programs, i.e., they are linear representations of information-processing machines. Thus in our model, a noncoding region, e.g., an intron contains a program (or equivalently, it is

  15. Gene-gene, gene-environment, gene-nutrient interactions and single nucleotide polymorphisms of inflammatory cytokines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeem, Amina; Mumtaz, Sadaf; Naveed, Abdul Khaliq; Aslam, Muhammad; Siddiqui, Arif; Lodhi, Ghulam Mustafa; Ahmad, Tausif

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation plays a significant role in the etiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The rise in the pro-inflammatory cytokines is the essential step in glucotoxicity and lipotoxicity induced mitochondrial injury, oxidative stress and beta cell apoptosis in T2DM. Among the recognized markers are interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1, IL-10, IL-18, tissue necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), C-reactive protein, resistin, adiponectin, tissue plasminogen activator, fibrinogen and heptoglobins. Diabetes mellitus has firm genetic and very strong environmental influence; exhibiting a polygenic mode of inheritance. Many single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in various genes including those of pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines have been reported as a risk for T2DM. Not all the SNPs have been confirmed by unifying results in different studies and wide variations have been reported in various ethnic groups. The inter-ethnic variations can be explained by the fact that gene expression may be regulated by gene-gene, gene-environment and gene-nutrient interactions. This review highlights the impact of these interactions on determining the role of single nucleotide polymorphism of IL-6, TNF-α, resistin and adiponectin in pathogenesis of T2DM. PMID:25987962

  16. Cationic Bolaamphiphiles for Gene Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Amelia Li Min; Lim, Alisa Xue Ling; Zhu, Yiting; Yang, Yi Yan; Khan, Majad

    2014-05-01

    Advances in medical research have shed light on the genetic cause of many human diseases. Gene therapy is a promising approach which can be used to deliver therapeutic genes to treat genetic diseases at its most fundamental level. In general, nonviral vectors are preferred due to reduced risk of immune response, but they are also commonly associated with low transfection efficiency and high cytotoxicity. In contrast to viral vectors, nonviral vectors do not have a natural mechanism to overcome extra- and intracellular barriers when delivering the therapeutic gene into cell. Hence, its design has been increasingly complex to meet challenges faced in targeting of, penetration of and expression in a specific host cell in achieving more satisfactory transfection efficiency. Flexibility in design of the vector is desirable, to enable a careful and controlled manipulation of its properties and functions. This can be met by the use of bolaamphiphile, a special class of lipid. Unlike conventional lipids, bolaamphiphiles can form asymmetric complexes with the therapeutic gene. The advantage of having an asymmetric complex lies in the different purposes served by the interior and exterior of the complex. More effective gene encapsulation within the interior of the complex can be achieved without triggering greater aggregation of serum proteins with the exterior, potentially overcoming one of the great hurdles faced by conventional single-head cationic lipids. In this review, we will look into the physiochemical considerations as well as the biological aspects of a bolaamphiphile-based gene delivery system.

  17. Origin and evolution of new genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xin; YANG Shuang; PENG Lixin; CHEN Hong; WANG Wen

    2004-01-01

    Organisms have variable genome sizes andcontain different numbers of genes. This difference demonstrates that new gene origination is a fundamental process in evolutionary biology. Though the study of the origination of new genes dated back more than half a century ago, it is not until the 1990s when the first young genejingwei was found that empirical investigation of the molecular mechanisms of origination of new genes became possible. In the recent years,several young genes were identified and the studies on these genes have greatly enriched the knowledge of this field. Yet more details in a general picture of new genes origination are to be clarified. We have developed a systematic approach to searching for young genes at the genomic level, in the hope to summarize a general pattern of the origination and evolution of new genes, such as the rate of new gene appearance, impact of new genes on their host genomes, etc.

  18. Newer Gene Editing Technologies toward HIV Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premlata Shankar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite the great success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in ameliorating the course of HIV infection, alternative therapeutic approaches are being pursued because of practical problems associated with life-long therapy. The eradication of HIV in the so-called “Berlin patient” who received a bone marrow transplant from a CCR5-negative donor has rekindled interest in genome engineering strategies to achieve the same effect. Precise gene editing within the cells is now a realistic possibility with recent advances in understanding the DNA repair mechanisms, DNA interaction with transcription factors and bacterial defense mechanisms. Within the past few years, four novel technologies have emerged that can be engineered for recognition of specific DNA target sequences to enable site-specific gene editing: Homing Endonuclease, ZFN, TALEN, and CRISPR/Cas9 system. The most recent CRISPR/Cas9 system uses a short stretch of complementary RNA bound to Cas9 nuclease to recognize and cleave target DNA, as opposed to the previous technologies that use DNA binding motifs of either zinc finger proteins or transcription activator-like effector molecules fused to an endonuclease to mediate sequence-specific DNA cleavage. Unlike RNA interference, which requires the continued presence of effector moieties to maintain gene silencing, the newer technologies allow permanent disruption of the targeted gene after a single treatment. Here, we review the applications, limitations and future prospects of novel gene-editing strategies for use as HIV therapy.

  19. Sequencing and Gene Expression Analysis of Leishmania tropica LACK Gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nour Hammoudeh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania Homologue of receptors for Activated C Kinase (LACK antigen is a 36-kDa protein, which provokes a very early immune response against Leishmania infection. There are several reports on the expression of LACK through different life-cycle stages of genus Leishmania, but only a few of them have focused on L.tropica.The present study provides details of the cloning, DNA sequencing and gene expression of LACK in this parasite species. First, several local isolates of Leishmania parasites were typed in our laboratory using PCR technique to verify of Leishmania parasite species. After that, LACK gene was amplified and cloned into a vector for sequencing. Finally, the expression of this molecule in logarithmic and stationary growth phase promastigotes, as well as in amastigotes, was evaluated by Reverse Transcription-PCR (RT-PCR technique.The typing result confirmed that all our local isolates belong to L.tropica. LACK gene sequence was determined and high similarity was observed with the sequences of other Leishmania species. Furthermore, the expression of LACK gene in both promastigotes and amastigotes forms was confirmed.Overall, the data set the stage for future studies of the properties and immune role of LACK gene products.

  20. The biology of novel animal genes: Mouse APEX gene knockout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacInnes, M.; Altherr, M.R.; Ludwig, D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Pedersen, R.; Mold, C. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1997-07-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The controlled breeding of novel genes into mice, including the gene knockout (KO), or conversely by adding back transgenes provide powerful genetic technologies that together suffice to determine in large part the biological role(s) of novel genes. Inbred mouse remains the best understood and most useful mammalian experimental system available for tackling the biology of novel genes. The major mammalian apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease (APE), is involved in a key step in the repair of spontaneous and induced AP sites in DNA. Efficient repair of these lesions is imperative to prevent the stable incorporation of mutations into the cellular genome which may lead to cell death or transformation. Loss or modulation of base excison repair activity in vivo may elevate the spontaneous mutation rate in cells, and may lead to a substantial increase in the incidence of cancer. Despite extensive biochemical analysis, however, the significance of these individual APE functions in vivo has not been elucidated. Mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells heterozygous for a deletion mutation in APE have been generated and whole animals containing the APE mutation have been derived from these ES cells. Animals homozygous for the APE null mutation die early in gestation, underscoring the biological significance of this DNA repair gene.

  1. Noninvasive tracking of gene transcript and neuroprotection after gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, J; Chen, Y I; Liu, C H; Chen, P-C; Prentice, H; Wu, J-Y; Liu, P K

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy holds exceptional potential for translational medicine by improving the products of defective genes in diseases and/or providing necessary biologics from endogenous sources during recovery processes. However, validating methods for the delivery, distribution and expression of the exogenous genes from such therapy can generally not be applicable to monitor effects over the long term because they are invasive. We report here that human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) complimentary DNA (cDNA) encoded in self-complementary adeno-associated virus-type 2 adeno-associated virus, as delivered through eye drops at multiple time points after cerebral ischemia using bilateral carotid occlusion for 60 min (BCAO-60) led to significant reduction in mortality rates, cerebral atrophy and neurological deficits in C57black6 mice. Most importantly, we validated hG-CSF cDNA expression using translatable magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in living brains. This noninvasive approach for monitoring exogenous gene expression in the brains has potential for great impact in the area of experimental gene therapy in animal models of heart attack, stroke, Alzheimer's dementia, Parkinson's disorder and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and the translation of such techniques to emergency medicine. PMID:26207935

  2. Divergence of Gene Body DNA Methylation and Evolution of Plant Duplicate Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jun; Marowsky, Nicholas C.; Fan, Chuanzhu

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that gene body DNA methylation is associated with gene expression. However, whether and how deviation of gene body DNA methylation between duplicate genes can influence their divergence remains largely unexplored. Here, we aim to elucidate the potential role of gene body DNA methylation in the fate of duplicate genes. We identified paralogous gene pairs from Arabidopsis and rice (Oryza sativa ssp. japonica) genomes and reprocessed their single-base resolution methylome data....

  3. A gene sets approach for identifying prognostic gene signatures for outcome prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Kim Yong Sung; Kim Seon-Young

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Gene expression profiling is a promising approach to better estimate patient prognosis; however, there are still unresolved problems, including little overlap among similarly developed gene sets and poor performance of a developed gene set in other datasets. Results We applied a gene sets approach to develop a prognostic gene set from multiple gene expression datasets. By analyzing 12 independent breast cancer gene expression datasets comprising 1,756 tissues with 2,411 pr...

  4. Virus-induced gene silencing of Arabidopsis thaliana gene homologues in wheat identifies genes conferring improved drought tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Manmathan, Harish; Shaner, Dale; Snelling, Jacob; Tisserat, Ned; Lapitan, Nora

    2013-01-01

    In a non-model staple crop like wheat (Triticum aestivumI L.), functional validation of potential drought stress responsive genes identified in Arabidopsis could provide gene targets for breeding. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of genes of interest can overcome the inherent problems of polyploidy and limited transformation potential that hamper functional validation studies in wheat. In this study, three potential candidate genes shown to be involved in abiotic stress response pathways i...

  5. Integrating heterogeneous gene expression data for gene regulatory network modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sîrbu, Alina; Ruskin, Heather J; Crane, Martin

    2012-06-01

    Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) are complex biological systems that have a large impact on protein levels, so that discovering network interactions is a major objective of systems biology. Quantitative GRN models have been inferred, to date, from time series measurements of gene expression, but at small scale, and with limited application to real data. Time series experiments are typically short (number of time points of the order of ten), whereas regulatory networks can be very large (containing hundreds of genes). This creates an under-determination problem, which negatively influences the results of any inferential algorithm. Presented here is an integrative approach to model inference, which has not been previously discussed to the authors' knowledge. Multiple heterogeneous expression time series are used to infer the same model, and results are shown to be more robust to noise and parameter perturbation. Additionally, a wavelet analysis shows that these models display limited noise over-fitting within the individual datasets. PMID:21948152

  6. How Gene Patents May Inhibit Scientific Research

    OpenAIRE

    Campo-Engelstein, Lisa; Chan, Tiffany

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we point out three possible ways gene patents could impede scientific research. First, gene patent laws might exacerbate the culture of secrecy ubiquitous in science. Second, gene patents may limit researchers’ ability to study poly or multigenic diseases without access to all genetic etiologies. Third, gene patents could result in a “patent thicket”.

  7. How Gene Patents May Inhibit Scientific Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campo-Engelstein, Lisa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we point out three possible ways gene patents could impede scientific research. First, gene patent laws might exacerbate the culture of secrecy ubiquitous in science. Second, gene patents may limit researchers’ ability to study poly or multigenic diseases without access to all genetic etiologies. Third, gene patents could result in a “patent thicket”.

  8. Deregulated genes in sporadic vestibular schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Helweg-Larsen, Rehannah Holga Andrea; Stangerup, Sven-Eric;

    2010-01-01

    In search of genes associated with vestibular schwannoma tumorigenesis, this study examines the gene expression in human vestibular nerve versus vestibular schwannoma tissue samples using microarray technology.......In search of genes associated with vestibular schwannoma tumorigenesis, this study examines the gene expression in human vestibular nerve versus vestibular schwannoma tissue samples using microarray technology....

  9. Application of Fluorescent Protein Expressing Strains to Evaluation of Anti-Tuberculosis Therapeutic Efficacy In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ying; Yang, Dong; Cirillo, Suat L G; Li, Shaoji; Akin, Ali; Francis, Kevin P; Maloney, Taylor; Cirillo, Jeffrey D

    2016-01-01

    The slow growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), hinders development of new diagnostics, therapeutics and vaccines. Using non-invasive real-time imaging technologies to monitor the disease process in live animals would facilitate TB research in all areas. We developed fluorescent protein (FP) expressing Mycobacterium bovis BCG strains for in vivo imaging, which can be used to track bacterial location, and to quantify bacterial load in live animals. We selected an optimal FP for in vivo imaging, by first cloning six FPs: tdTomato, mCherry, mPlum, mKate, Katushka and mKeima, into mycobacteria under either a mycobacterial Hsp60 or L5 promoter, and compared their fluorescent signals in vitro and in vivo. Fluorescence from each FP-expressing strain was measured with a multimode reader using the optimal excitation and emission wavelengths for the FP. After normalizing bacterial numbers with optical density, the strain expressing L5-tdTomato displayed the highest fluorescence. We used the tdTomato-labeled M. bovis BCG to obtain real-time images of pulmonary infections in living mice and rapidly determined the number of bacteria present. Further comparison between L5-tdTomato and Hsp60-tdTomato revealed that L5-tdTomato carried four-fold more tdTomato gene copies than Hsp60-tdTomato, which eventually led to higher protein expression of tdTomato. Evaluating anti-TB efficacy of rifampicin and isoniazid therapy in vitro and in vivo using the L5-tdTomato strain demonstrated that this strain can be used to identify anti-TB therapeutic efficacy as quickly as 24 h post-treatment. These M. bovis BCG reporter strains represent a valuable new tool for evaluation of therapeutics, vaccines and virulence. PMID:26934495

  10. Application of Fluorescent Protein Expressing Strains to Evaluation of Anti-Tuberculosis Therapeutic Efficacy In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Kong

    Full Text Available The slow growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB, hinders development of new diagnostics, therapeutics and vaccines. Using non-invasive real-time imaging technologies to monitor the disease process in live animals would facilitate TB research in all areas. We developed fluorescent protein (FP expressing Mycobacterium bovis BCG strains for in vivo imaging, which can be used to track bacterial location, and to quantify bacterial load in live animals. We selected an optimal FP for in vivo imaging, by first cloning six FPs: tdTomato, mCherry, mPlum, mKate, Katushka and mKeima, into mycobacteria under either a mycobacterial Hsp60 or L5 promoter, and compared their fluorescent signals in vitro and in vivo. Fluorescence from each FP-expressing strain was measured with a multimode reader using the optimal excitation and emission wavelengths for the FP. After normalizing bacterial numbers with optical density, the strain expressing L5-tdTomato displayed the highest fluorescence. We used the tdTomato-labeled M. bovis BCG to obtain real-time images of pulmonary infections in living mice and rapidly determined the number of bacteria present. Further comparison between L5-tdTomato and Hsp60-tdTomato revealed that L5-tdTomato carried four-fold more tdTomato gene copies than Hsp60-tdTomato, which eventually led to higher protein expression of tdTomato. Evaluating anti-TB efficacy of rifampicin and isoniazid therapy in vitro and in vivo using the L5-tdTomato strain demonstrated that this strain can be used to identify anti-TB therapeutic efficacy as quickly as 24 h post-treatment. These M. bovis BCG reporter strains represent a valuable new tool for evaluation of therapeutics, vaccines and virulence.

  11. Gene therapy and radiotherapy in malignant tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor treatment is one of the most important fields in medical research. Nowadays, a novel method which is combined gene therapy with radiotherapy plays an important role in the field of cancer research, and mainly includes immune gene therapy combined with radiotherapy, suicide gene therapy or tumor suppressor gene therapy combined with radiotherapy, antiangiogenesis gene therapy combined with radiotherapy and protective gene therapy combined with radiotherapy based on the technical features. This review summarized the current status of combined therapies of gene therapy and radiotherapy and possible mechanism. (authors)

  12. The early stages of duplicate gene evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Richard C; Purugganan, Michael D.

    2003-01-01

    Gene duplications are one of the primary driving forces in the evolution of genomes and genetic systems. Gene duplicates account for 8–20% of the genes in eukaryotic genomes, and the rates of gene duplication are estimated at between 0.2% and 2% per gene per million years. Duplicate genes are believed to be a major mechanism for the establishment of new gene functions and the generation of evolutionary novelty, yet very little is known about the early stages of the evolution of duplicated gen...

  13. FINDING GENERIFS VIA GENE ONTOLOGY ANNOTATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Zhiyong; Cohen, K Bretonnel; Hunter, Lawrence

    2006-01-01

    A Gene Reference Into Function (GeneRIF) is a concise phrase describing a function of a gene in the Entrez Gene database. Applying techniques from the area of natural language processing known as automatic summarization, it is possible to link the Entrez Gene database, the Gene Ontology, and the biomedical literature. A system was implemented that automatically suggests a sentence from a PubMed/MEDLINE abstract as a candidate GeneRIF by exploiting a gene’s GO annotations along with location f...

  14. Integrones: los coleccionistas de genes Integrons: gene collectors

    OpenAIRE

    J. A. Di Conza; Gutkind, G. O.

    2010-01-01

    Los integrones son estructuras genéticas que han despertado gran interés, debido a que algunos de ellos vehiculizan genes de resistencia a los antimicrobianos. Están formados por un fragmento que codifica una integrasa (intI) y, a continuación, una secuencia attI a la que se unen los genes en casetes que codifican diferentes mecanismos de resistencia. Dentro de intI, en su extremo 3´, hay una secuencia promotora Pc a partir de la cual se transcriben los casetes de resistencia integrados, ya q...

  15. The KCNE genes in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a candidate gene study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedley, Paula L; Haundrup, Ole; Andersen, Paal S;

    2011-01-01

    The gene family KCNE1-5, which encode modulating β-subunits of several repolarising K+-ion channels, has been associated with genetic cardiac diseases such as long QT syndrome, atrial fibrillation and Brugada syndrome. The minK peptide, encoded by KCNE1, is attached to the Z-disc of the sarcomere...... as well as the T-tubules of the sarcolemma. It has been suggested that minK forms part of an "electro-mechanical feed-back" which links cardiomyocyte stretching to changes in ion channel function. We examined whether mutations in KCNE genes were associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a...

  16. Advancement and prospects of tumor gene therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Zhang; Qing-Tao Wang; He Liu; Zhen-Zhu Zhang; Wen-Lin Huang

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy is one of the most attractive fields in tumor therapy. In past decades, significant progress has been achieved. Various approaches, such as viral and non-viral vectors and physical methods, have been developed to make gene delivery safer and more efficient. Several therapeutic strategies have evolved, including gene-based (tumor suppressor genes, suicide genes, antiangiogenic genes, cytokine and oxidative stress-based genes) and RNA-based (antisense oligonucieotides and RNA interference) approaches. In addition, immune response-based strategies (dendritic cell- and T cell-based therapy) are also under investigation in tumor gene therapy. This review highlights the progress and recent developments in gene delivery systems, therapeutic strategies, and possible clinical directions for gene therapy.

  17. Transcriptional stochasticity in gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipniacki, Tomasz; Paszek, Pawel; Marciniak-Czochra, Anna; Brasier, Allan R; Kimmel, Marek

    2006-01-21

    Due to the small number of copies of molecular species involved, such as DNA, mRNA and regulatory proteins, gene expression is a stochastic phenomenon. In eukaryotic cells, the stochastic effects primarily originate in regulation of gene activity. Transcription can be initiated by a single transcription factor binding to a specific regulatory site in the target gene. Stochasticity of transcription factor binding and dissociation is then amplified by transcription and translation, since target gene activation results in a burst of mRNA molecules, and each mRNA copy serves as a template for translating numerous protein molecules. In the present paper, we explore a mathematical approach to stochastic modeling. In this approach, the ordinary differential equations with a stochastic component for mRNA and protein levels in a single cells yield a system of first-order partial differential equations (PDEs) for two-dimensional probability density functions (pdf). We consider the following examples: Regulation of a single auto-repressing gene, and regulation of a system of two mutual repressors and of an activator-repressor system. The resulting PDEs are approximated by a system of many ordinary equations, which are then numerically solved. PMID:16039671

  18. Molecular Studies on Preproinsulin Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabir Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin plays an important role in maintaining the blood glucose level of the body. The β-cells of pancreas produce insulin in the form of precursor that is preproinsulin. The gene of preproinsulin provides an interesting system for addressing question related to molecular evolution. Recombinant DNA technology has made it possible to isolate and sequence the chromosomal genes coding for unique protein products. Although preproinsulin of various organism has been isolated and cloned, but there is no report from buffalo (Bubalus bubalis that is our major livestock. The genomic DNA of buffalo was isolated using Laura-Lee-Boodram method. The part of preproinsulin gene (596bp and 520bp using BPPI-UPS and bpiful_F as forward and BC1-C as reverse primer was amplified. Cloning of amplified fragments of gene were performed in pCR 2.1 vector. Positive clones were screened on the basis of blue white selection. The band obtained on 596bp and 520bp after colony PCR confirmed the successful cloning of preproinsulin gene in pCR 2.1 vector.

  19. Melatonin Receptor Genes in Vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Dong Yin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin receptors are members of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR family. Three genes for melatonin receptors have been cloned. The MT1 (or Mel1a or MTNR1A and MT2 (or Mel1b or MTNR1B receptor subtypes are present in humans and other mammals, while an additional melatonin receptor subtype, Mel1c (or MTNR1C, has been identified in fish, amphibians and birds. Another melatonin related orphan receptor, GPR50, which does not bind melatonin, is found exclusively in mammals. The hormone melatonin is secreted primarily by the pineal gland, with highest levels occurring during the dark period of a circadian cycle. This hormone acts systemically in numerous organs. In the brain, it is involved in the regulation of various neural and endocrine processes, and it readjusts the circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. This article reviews recent studies of gene organization, expression, evolution and mutations of melatonin receptor genes of vertebrates. Gene polymorphisms reveal that numerous mutations are associated with diseases and disorders. The phylogenetic analysis of receptor genes indicates that GPR50 is an outgroup to all other melatonin receptor sequences. GPR50 may have separated from a melatonin receptor ancestor before the split between MTNR1C and the MTNR1A/B ancestor.

  20. Gene amplification during myogenic differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Ulrike; Ludwig, Nicole; Raslan, Abdulrahman; Meier, Carola; Meese, Eckart

    2016-01-01

    Gene amplifications are mostly an attribute of tumor cells and drug resistant cells. Recently, we provided evidence for gene amplifications during differentiation of human and mouse neural progenitor cells. Here, we report gene amplifications in differentiating mouse myoblasts (C2C12 cells) covering a period of 7 days including pre-fusion, fusion and post-fusion stages. After differentiation induction we found an increase in copy numbers of CDK4 gene at day 3, of NUP133 at days 4 and 7, and of MYO18B at day 4. The amplification process was accompanied by gamma-H2AX foci that are indicative of double stand breaks. Amplifications during the differentiating process were also found in primary human myoblasts with the gene CDK4 and NUP133 amplified both in human and mouse myoblasts. Amplifications of NUP133 and CDK4 were also identified in vivo on mouse transversal cryosections at stage E11.5. In the course of myoblast differentiation, we found amplifications in cytoplasm indicative of removal of amplified sequences from the nucleus. The data provide further evidence that amplification is a fundamental mechanism contributing to the differentiation process in mammalians. PMID:26760505

  1. Genes Contributing to the Development of Alcoholism

    OpenAIRE

    Edenberg, Howard J

    2012-01-01

    Genetic factors (i.e., variations in specific genes) account for a substantial portion of the risk for alcoholism. However, identifying those genes and the specific variations involved is challenging. Researchers have used both case–control and family studies to identify genes related to alcoholism risk. In addition, different strategies such as candidate gene analyses and genome-wide association studies have been used. The strongest effects have been found for specific variants of genes that...

  2. Microarray Data Analysis of Gene Expression Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Honghuang Lin

    2009-01-01

    Microarrays are becoming a widely used tool to study gene expression evolution. A recent paper by Wang and Rekaya describes a comprehensive study of gene expression evolution by microarray.1 The work provides a perspective to study gene expression evolution in terms of functional enrichment and promoter conservation. It was found that gene expression patterns are highly conserved in some biological processes, but the correlation between promoter and gene expression is insignificant. This scop...

  3. Concerted evolution of human amylase genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Gumucio, D L; Wiebauer, K; Caldwell, R M; Samuelson, L C; Meisler, M H

    1988-01-01

    Cosmid clones containing 250 kilobases of genomic DNA from the human amylase gene cluster have been isolated. These clones contain seven distinct amylase genes which appear to comprise the complete multigene family. By sequence comparison with the cDNAs, we have identified two pancreatic amylase genes and three salivary amylase genes. Two truncated pseudogenes were also recovered. Intergenic distances of 17 to 22 kilobases separate the amylase gene copies. Within the past 10 million years, du...

  4. GENE THERAPY AND ITS IMPLICATIONS IN SPORTS

    OpenAIRE

    Biljana Vitošević

    2011-01-01

    Thanks to the very successful Human Genome Project and the identification of genes involved in genetic disease, we now have the ability to treat many conditions. However, the identification of the genes which code certain phenotype characteristics has opened the way for abuse in the fields of sport and physical exercise. The principles of gene therapy and the ways in which genes are transferred have completely been copied from gene therapy and are now being used to increase the physical abili...

  5. Progress in Gene Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    KamranAliAhmed; BrianJamesDavis; TorrenceMWilson; GregoryAWiseman; MarkJFederspiel; JohnCMorris

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy has held promise to correct various disease processes. Prostate cancer represents the second leading cause of cancer death in American men. A number of clinical trials involving gene therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer have been reported. The ability to efficiently transduce tumors with effective levels of therapeutic genes has been identified as a fundamental barrier to effective cancer gene therapy. The approach utilizing gene therapy in prostate cancer patients at our...

  6. Gene Therapy in Human Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Abaan, Ogan D.

    2002-01-01

    Gene therapy, being a novel treatment for many diseases, is readily applicable for the treatment of cancer patients. Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. There are many clinical protocols for the treatment of breast cancer, and gene therapy is now being considered within current protocols. This review will focus on the basic concepts of cancer gene therapy strategies (suicide gene, tumor suppressor gene, anti-angiogenesis, immunotherapy, oncolytic viruses and ribozyme/antisens...

  7. Novel algorithms for in vitro gene synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Thachuk, Chris

    2007-01-01

    Methods for reliable synthesis of long genes offer great promise for novel protein synthesis via expression of synthetic genes. Current technologies use computational methods for design of short oligos, which can then be reliably synthesized and assembled into the desired target gene. A precursor to this process is optimization of the gene sequence for improved protein expression. In this thesis, we provide the first results on the computational complexity of oligo design for gene synthesis. ...

  8. Improving gene annotation of complete viral genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Mills, Ryan; Rozanov, Michael; Lomsadze, Alexandre; Tatusova, Tatiana; Borodovsky, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Gene annotation in viruses often relies upon similarity search methods. These methods possess high specificity but some genes may be missed, either those unique to a particular genome or those highly divergent from known homologs. To identify potentially missing viral genes we have analyzed all complete viral genomes currently available in GenBank with a specialized and augmented version of the gene finding program GeneMarkS. In particular, by implementing genome-specific self-training protoc...

  9. Activities of Human Gene Nomenclature Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-16

    The objective of this project, shared between NIH and DOE, has been and remains to enable the medical genetics communities to use common names for genes that are discovered by different gene hunting groups, in different species. This effort provides consistent gene nomenclature and approved gene symbols to the community at large. This contributes to a uniform and consistent understanding of genomes, particularly the human as well as functional genomics based on comparisons between homologous genes in related species (human and mice).

  10. Gene networks and haloperidol-induced catalepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Iancu, O. D.; Darakjian, P.; Malmanger, B.; Walter, N. A. R.; McWeeney, S.; Hitzemann, R

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined the changes in striatal gene network structure induced by short-term selective breeding from a heterogeneous stock for haloperidol response. Brain (striatum) gene expression data were obtained using the Illumina WG 8.2 array, and the datasets from responding and non-responding selected lines were independently interrogated using a weighted gene coexpression network analysis (WGCNA). We detected several gene modules (groups of coexpressed genes) in each dataset; the ...

  11. Switching on the Lights for Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandra Winkeler; Miguel Sena-Esteves; Paulis, Leonie E.M.; Hongfeng Li; Yannic Waerzeggers; Benedikt Rückriem; Uwe Himmelreich; Markus Klein; Parisa Monfared; Rueger, Maria A.; Michael Heneka; Stefan Vollmar; Mathias Hoehn; Cornel Fraefel; Rudolf Graf

    2007-01-01

    Strategies for non-invasive and quantitative imaging of gene expression in vivo have been developed over the past decade. Non-invasive assessment of the dynamics of gene regulation is of interest for the detection of endogenous disease-specific biological alterations (e.g., signal transduction) and for monitoring the induction and regulation of therapeutic genes (e.g., gene therapy). To demonstrate that non-invasive imaging of regulated expression of any type of gene after in vivo transductio...

  12. Gene functional similarity search tool (GFSST)

    OpenAIRE

    Russo James J; Sheng Huitao; Zhang Jinghui; Zhang Peisen; Osborne Brian; Buetow Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background With the completion of the genome sequences of human, mouse, and other species and the advent of high throughput functional genomic research technologies such as biomicroarray chips, more and more genes and their products have been discovered and their functions have begun to be understood. Increasing amounts of data about genes, gene products and their functions have been stored in databases. To facilitate selection of candidate genes for gene-disease research, genetic as...

  13. Repetitive sequence environment distinguishes housekeeping genes

    OpenAIRE

    Eller, C. Daniel; Regelson, Moira; Merriman, Barry; Nelson, Stan,; Horvath, Steve; Marahrens, York

    2006-01-01

    Housekeeping genes are expressed across a wide variety of tissues. Since repetitive sequences have been reported to influence the expression of individual genes, we employed a novel approach to determine whether housekeeping genes can be distinguished from tissue-specific genes their repetitive sequence context. We show that Alu elements are more highly concentrated around housekeeping genes while various longer (>400-bp) repetitive sequences ("repeats"), including Long Interspersed Nuclear E...

  14. Modelling Nonstationary Gene Regulatory Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Grzegorcyzk

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available An important objective in systems biology is to infer gene regulatory networks from postgenomic data, and dynamic Bayesian networks have been widely applied as a popular tool to this end. The standard approach for nondiscretised data is restricted to a linear model and a homogeneous Markov chain. Recently, various generalisations based on changepoint processes and free allocation mixture models have been proposed. The former aim to relax the homogeneity assumption, whereas the latter are more flexible and, in principle, more adequate for modelling nonlinear processes. In our paper, we compare both paradigms and discuss theoretical shortcomings of the latter approach. We show that a model based on the changepoint process yields systematically better results than the free allocation model when inferring nonstationary gene regulatory processes from simulated gene expression time series. We further cross-compare the performance of both models on three biological systems: macrophages challenged with viral infection, circadian regulation in Arabidopsis thaliana, and morphogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster.

  15. Homeobox genes and melatonin synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Kristian; Møller, Morten; Rath, Martin Fredensborg

    2014-01-01

    Nocturnal synthesis of melatonin in the pineal gland is controlled by a circadian rhythm in arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) enzyme activity. In the rodent, Aanat gene expression displays a marked circadian rhythm; release of norepinephrine in the gland at night causes a c......AMP-based induction of Aanat transcription. However, additional transcriptional control mechanisms exist. Homeobox genes, which are generally known to encode transcription factors controlling developmental processes, are also expressed in the mature rodent pineal gland. Among these, the cone-rod homeobox (CRX......) transcription factor is believed to control pineal-specific Aanat expression. Based on recent advances in our understanding of Crx in the rodent pineal gland, we here suggest that homeobox genes play a role in adult pineal physiology both by ensuring pineal-specific Aanat expression and by facilitating c...

  16. Gene Therapy for Bone Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmayor, Elizabeth Rosado; van Griensven, Martijn

    2015-01-01

    Bone has an intrinsic healing capacity that may be exceeded when the fracture gap is too big or unstable. In that moment, osteogenic measures need to be taken by physicians. It is important to combine cells, scaffolds and growth factors, and the correct mechanical conditions. Growth factors are clinically administered as recombinant proteins. They are, however, expensive and needed in high supraphysiological doses. Moreover, their half-life is short when administered to the fracture. Therefore, gene therapy may be an alternative. Cells can constantly produce the protein of interest in the correct folding, with the physiological glycosylation and in the needed amounts. Genes can be delivered in vivo or ex vivo by viral or non-viral methods. Adenovirus is mostly used. For the non-viral methods, hydrogels and recently sonoporation seem to be promising means. This review will give an overview of recent advancements in gene therapy approaches for bone regeneration strategies. PMID:25699253

  17. Novel genes in LDL metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mette; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    transporters G5 and G8, Niemann-Pick C1-Like protein 1, sortilin-1, ABO blood-group glycosyltransferases, myosin regulatory light chain-interacting protein and cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase have all consistently been associated with LDL cholesterol levels and/or coronary artery disease in GWAS. Whole......-exome sequencing and 'exome chip' studies have additionally suggested several novel genes in LDL metabolism including insulin-induced gene 2, signal transducing adaptor family member 1, lysosomal acid lipase A, patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein 5 and transmembrane 6 superfamily member 2. Most of...... cholesterol. Novel genes in LDL metabolism will improve our understanding of mechanisms in LDL metabolism, and may lead to the identification of new drug targets to reduce LDL cholesterol levels....

  18. GeneMANIA prediction server 2013 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuberi, Khalid; Franz, Max; Rodriguez, Harold; Montojo, Jason; Lopes, Christian Tannus; Bader, Gary D; Morris, Quaid

    2013-07-01

    GeneMANIA (http://www.genemania.org) is a flexible user-friendly web interface for generating hypotheses about gene function, analyzing gene lists and prioritizing genes for functional assays. Given a query gene list, GeneMANIA extends the list with functionally similar genes that it identifies using available genomics and proteomics data. GeneMANIA also reports weights that indicate the predictive value of each selected data set for the query. GeneMANIA can also be used in a function prediction setting: given a query gene, GeneMANIA finds a small set of genes that are most likely to share function with that gene based on their interactions with it. Enriched Gene Ontology categories among this set can sometimes point to the function of the gene. Seven organisms are currently supported (Arabidopsis thaliana, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Mus musculus, Homo sapiens, Rattus norvegicus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae), and hundreds of data sets have been collected from GEO, BioGRID, IRefIndex and I2D, as well as organism-specific functional genomics data sets. Users can customize their search by selecting specific data sets to query and by uploading their own data sets to analyze. PMID:23794635

  19. Gene Therapy for Coagulation Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swystun, Laura L; Lillicrap, David

    2016-04-29

    Molecular genetic details of the human coagulation system were among the first successes of the genetic revolution in the 1980s. This information led to new molecular diagnostic strategies for inherited disorders of hemostasis and the development of recombinant clotting factors for the treatment of the common inherited bleeding disorders. A longer term goal of this knowledge has been the establishment of gene transfer to provide continuing access to missing or defective hemostatic proteins. Because of the relative infrequency of inherited coagulation factor disorders and the availability of safe and effective alternative means of management, the application of gene therapy for these conditions has been slow to realize clinical application. Nevertheless, the tools for effective and safe gene transfer are now much improved, and we have started to see examples of clinical gene therapy successes. Leading the way has been the use of adeno-associated virus-based strategies for factor IX gene transfer in hemophilia B. Several small phase 1/2 clinical studies using this approach have shown prolonged expression of therapeutically beneficial levels of factor IX. Nevertheless, before the application of gene therapy for coagulation disorders becomes widespread, several obstacles need to be overcome. Immunologic responses to the vector and transgenic protein need to be mitigated, and production strategies for clinical grade vectors require enhancements. There is little doubt that with the development of more efficient and facile strategies for genome editing and the application of other nucleic acid-based approaches to influence the coagulation system, the future of genetic therapies for hemostasis is bright. PMID:27126652

  20. Proopiomelanocortin Deficiency - GeneReviews - NCBI Bookshelf [GeneReviews

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available p a.figpopup{display:inline !important} .bk_tt {font-family: monospace} .body-content h2 {border ... tin gene is associated with serum leptin levels in lean ... but not in obese individuals. Int J Obes Relat Met ...

  1. Shuffling Yeast Gene Expression Data

    CERN Document Server

    Bilke, S

    2000-01-01

    A new method to sort gene expression patterns into functional groups is presented. The method is based on a sorting algorithm using a non-local similarity score, which takes all other patterns in the dataset into account. The method is therefore very robust with respect to noise. Using the expression data for yeast, we extract information about functional groups. Without prior knowledge of parameters the cell cycle regulated genes in yeast can be identified. Furthermore a second, independent cell clock is identified. The capability of the algorithm to extract information about signal flow in the regulatory network underlying the expression patterns is demonstrated.

  2. Zipf's Law in Gene Expression

    CERN Document Server

    Furusawa, C; Furusawa, Chikara; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2002-01-01

    Using data from gene expression databases on various organisms and tissues, including yeast, nematodes, human normal and cancer tissues, and embryonic stem cells, we found that the abundances of expressed genes exhibit a power-law distribution with an exponent close to -1, i.e., they obey Zipf's law. Furthermore, by simulations of a simple model with an intra-cellular reaction network, we found that Zipf's law of chemical abundance is a universal feature of cells where such a network optimizes the efficiency and faithfulness of self-reproduction. These findings provide novel insights into the nature of the organization of reaction dynamics in living cells.

  3. Mutated genes as research tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green plants are the ultimate source of all resources required for man's life, his food, his clothes, and almost all his energy requirements. Primitive prehistoric man could live from the abundance of nature surrounding him. Man today, dominating nature in terms of numbers and exploiting its limited resources, cannot exist without employing his intelligence to direct natural evolution. Plant sciences, therefore, are not a matter of curiosity but an essential requirement. From such considerations, the IAEA and FAO jointly organized a symposium to assess the value of mutation research for various kinds of plant science, which directly or indirectly might contribute to sustaining and improving crop production. The benefit through developing better cultivars that plant breeders can derive from using the additional genetic resources resulting from mutation induction has been assessed before at other FAO/IAEA meetings (Rome 1964, Pullman 1969, Ban 1974, Ibadan 1978) and is also monitored in the Mutation Breeding Newsletter, published by IAEA twice a year. Several hundred plant cultivars which carry economically important characters because their genes have been altered by ionizing radiation or other mutagens, are grown by farmers and horticulturists in many parts of the world. But the benefit derived from such mutant varieties is without any doubt surpassed by the contribution which mutation research has made towards the advancement of genetics. For this reason, a major part of the papers and discussions at the symposium dealt with the role induced-mutation research played in providing insight into gene action and gene interaction, the organization of genes in plant chromosomes in view of homology and homoeology, the evolutionary role of gene duplication and polyploidy, the relevance of gene blocks, the possibilities for chromosome engineering, the functioning of cytroplasmic inheritance and the genetic dynamics of populations. In discussing the evolutionary role of

  4. Genome-wide Analysis of Gene Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yun

    cells are capable of regulating their gene expression, so that each cell can only express a particular set of genes yielding limited numbers of proteins with specialized functions. Therefore a rigid control of differential gene expression is necessary for cellular diversity. On the other hand, aberrant...... gene regulation will disrupt the cell’s fundamental processes, which in turn can cause disease. Hence, understanding gene regulation is essential for deciphering the code of life. Along with the development of high throughput sequencing (HTS) technology and the subsequent large-scale data analysis......, genome-wide assays have increased our understanding of gene regulation significantly. This thesis describes the integration and analysis of HTS data across different important aspects of gene regulation. Gene expression can be regulated at different stages when the genetic information is passed from gene...

  5. Concerted evolution of human amylase genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumucio, D.L.; Wiebauer, K.; Caldwell, R.M.; Samuelson, L.C.; Meisler, M.H.

    1988-03-01

    Cosmid clones containing 250 kilobases of genomic DNA from the human amylase gene cluster have been isolated. These clones contain seven distinct amylase genes which appear to comprise the complete multigene family. By sequence comparison with the cDNAs, the authors have identified two pancreatic amylase gene and three salivary amylase genes. Two truncated pseudogenes were also recovered. Intergenic distances of 17 to 22 kilobases separate the amylase gene copies. Within the past 10 million years, duplications, gene conversion, and unequal crossover events have resulted in a very high level of sequence similarity among human amylase gene copies. To identify sequence elements involved in tissue-specific expression and hormonal regulation, the promoter regions of the human amylase genes were sequenced and compared with those of the corresponding mouse genes. The promoters of the human and mouse pancreatic amylase genes are highly homologous between nucleotide - 160 and the cap site. Two sequence elements througth to influence pancreas-specific expression of the rodent genes are present in the human genes. In contrast, similarity in the 5' lanking sequences of the salivary amylase genes is limited to several short sequence elements whose positions and orientations differ in the two species. Some of these sequence elements are also associated with other parotid-specific genes and may be involved in their tissue-specific expression. A glucocorticoid response element and a general enhancer element are closely associated in several of the amylase promoters.

  6. Evidence based selection of housekeeping genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik J M de Jonge

    Full Text Available For accurate and reliable gene expression analysis, normalization of gene expression data against housekeeping genes (reference or internal control genes is required. It is known that commonly used housekeeping genes (e.g. ACTB, GAPDH, HPRT1, and B2M vary considerably under different experimental conditions and therefore their use for normalization is limited. We performed a meta-analysis of 13,629 human gene array samples in order to identify the most stable expressed genes. Here we show novel candidate housekeeping genes (e.g. RPS13, RPL27, RPS20 and OAZ1 with enhanced stability among a multitude of different cell types and varying experimental conditions. None of the commonly used housekeeping genes were present in the top 50 of the most stable expressed genes. In addition, using 2,543 diverse mouse gene array samples we were able to confirm the enhanced stability of the candidate novel housekeeping genes in another mammalian species. Therefore, the identified novel candidate housekeeping genes seem to be the most appropriate choice for normalizing gene expression data.

  7. Genes and Syndromic Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keats, Bronya J. B.

    2002-01-01

    This article provides a description of the human genome and patterns of inheritance and discusses genes that are associated with some of the syndromes for which hearing loss is a common finding, including: Waardenburg, Stickler, Jervell and Lange-Neilsen, Usher, Alport, mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, and sensorineural hearing loss. (Contains…

  8. Genome position and gene amplification

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirsová, Pavla; Snijders, A.M.; Kwek, S.; Roydasgupta, R.; Fridlyand, J.; Tokuyasu, T.; Pinkel, D.; Albertson, D. G.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 6 (2007), r120. ISSN 1474-760X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : gene amplification * array comparative genomic hybridization * oncogene Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 6.589, year: 2007

  9. Gene-Culture Coevolutionary Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blute, Marion

    2006-01-01

    Gene-culture interactions have largely been modelled employing population genetic-type models. Moreover, in the most notable application to date, the "interactive" modes have been one way rather than bidirectional. This paper suggests using game theoretic, fully interactive models. Employing the logic utilized in population ecology for coevolution…

  10. Positional cloning of deafness genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremer, H.; Cremers, F.P.M.

    2009-01-01

    The identification of the majority of the known causative genes involved in nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss (NSHL) started with linkage analysis as part of a positional cloning procedure. The human and mouse genome projects in combination with technical developments on genotyping, transcript

  11. Gene expression profile of pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galicia, J C; Henson, B R; Parker, J S; Khan, A A

    2016-06-01

    The cost, prevalence and pain associated with endodontic disease necessitate an understanding of the fundamental molecular aspects of its pathogenesis. This study was aimed to identify the genetic contributors to pulpal pain and inflammation. Inflamed pulps were collected from patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis (n=20). Normal pulps from teeth extracted for various reasons served as controls (n=20). Pain level was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). Genome-wide microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix GeneTitan Multichannel Instrument. The difference in gene expression levels were determined by the significance analysis of microarray program using a false discovery rate (q-value) of 5%. Genes involved in immune response, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and signaling, integrin cell surface interactions, and others were expressed at relatively higher levels in the pulpitis group. Moreover, several genes known to modulate pain and inflammation showed differential expression in asymptomatic and mild pain patients (⩾30 mm on VAS) compared with those with moderate to severe pain. This exploratory study provides a molecular basis for the clinical diagnosis of pulpitis. With an enhanced understanding of pulpal inflammation, future studies on treatment and management of pulpitis and on pain associated with it can have a biological reference to bridge treatment strategies with pulpal biology. PMID:27052691

  12. Gene Expression in Trypanosomatid Parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Martínez-Calvillo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The parasites Leishmania spp., Trypanosoma brucei, and Trypanosoma cruzi are the trypanosomatid protozoa that cause the deadly human diseases leishmaniasis, African sleeping sickness, and Chagas disease, respectively. These organisms possess unique mechanisms for gene expression such as constitutive polycistronic transcription of protein-coding genes and trans-splicing. Little is known about either the DNA sequences or the proteins that are involved in the initiation and termination of transcription in trypanosomatids. In silico analyses of the genome databases of these parasites led to the identification of a small number of proteins involved in gene expression. However, functional studies have revealed that trypanosomatids have more general transcription factors than originally estimated. Many posttranslational histone modifications, histone variants, and chromatin modifying enzymes have been identified in trypanosomatids, and recent genome-wide studies showed that epigenetic regulation might play a very important role in gene expression in this group of parasites. Here, we review and comment on the most recent findings related to transcription initiation and termination in trypanosomatid protozoa.

  13. Ethics of Gene Therapy Debated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borman, Stu

    1991-01-01

    Presented are the highlights of a press conference featuring biomedical ethicist LeRoy Walters of Georgetown University and attorney Andrew Kimbrell of the Foundation on Economic Trends. The opposing points of view of these two speakers serve to outline the pros and cons of the gene therapy issue. (CW)

  14. What drives plant stress genes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, M.G.M.; Fiers, M.W.E.J.

    2003-01-01

    Currently, there is a lot of interest in the plant stress response. Using large-scale genomics approaches, more and more genes are being identified that are involved in or even regulate this complex process. The recent boost in expression profile analyses for several plant stress responses has enabl

  15. Gene mutations in hepatocellular adenomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raft, Marie B; Jørgensen, Ernö N; Vainer, Ben

    2015-01-01

    associated with bi-allelic mutations in the TCF1 gene and morphologically has marked steatosis. β-catenin activating HCA has increased activity of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and is associated with possible malignant transformation. Inflammatory HCA is characterized by an oncogene-induced inflammation due to...

  16. Statistical Approach to Gene Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Chattopadhyay, Sujay; William A. Kanner; Chakrabarti, Jayprokas

    2001-01-01

    The evolution in coding DNA sequences brings new flexibility and freedom to the codon words, even as the underlying nucleotides get significantly ordered. These curious contra-rules of gene organisation are observed from the distribution of words and the second moments of the nucleotide letters. These statistical data give us the physics behind the classification of bacteria.

  17. Buffering in cyclic gene networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glyzin, S. D.; Kolesov, A. Yu.; Rozov, N. Kh.

    2016-06-01

    We consider cyclic chains of unidirectionally coupled delay differential-difference equations that are mathematical models of artificial oscillating gene networks. We establish that the buffering phenomenon is realized in these system for an appropriate choice of the parameters: any given finite number of stable periodic motions of a special type, the so-called traveling waves, coexist.

  18. Clock gene expression during development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sumová, Alena; Bendová, Zdeňka; Sládek, Martin; Kováčiková, Zuzana; El-Hennamy, Rehab; Laurinová, Kristýna; Illnerová, Helena

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 191, Suppl.658 (2007), s. 18-18. ISSN 1748-1708. [Joint meeting of The Slovak Physiological Society, The Physiological Society and The Federation of European Physiological Societies. 11.09.2007-14.09.2007, Bratislava] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : cpr1 * clock genes * suprachiasmatic nucleus * rat Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition

  19. Empirical study of supervised gene screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Shuangge

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray studies provide a way of linking variations of phenotypes with their genetic causations. Constructing predictive models using high dimensional microarray measurements usually consists of three steps: (1 unsupervised gene screening; (2 supervised gene screening; and (3 statistical model building. Supervised gene screening based on marginal gene ranking is commonly used to reduce the number of genes in the model building. Various simple statistics, such as t-statistic or signal to noise ratio, have been used to rank genes in the supervised screening. Despite of its extensive usage, statistical study of supervised gene screening remains scarce. Our study is partly motivated by the differences in gene discovery results caused by using different supervised gene screening methods. Results We investigate concordance and reproducibility of supervised gene screening based on eight commonly used marginal statistics. Concordance is assessed by the relative fractions of overlaps between top ranked genes screened using different marginal statistics. We propose a Bootstrap Reproducibility Index, which measures reproducibility of individual genes under the supervised screening. Empirical studies are based on four public microarray data. We consider the cases where the top 20%, 40% and 60% genes are screened. Conclusion From a gene discovery point of view, the effect of supervised gene screening based on different marginal statistics cannot be ignored. Empirical studies show that (1 genes passed different supervised screenings may be considerably different; (2 concordance may vary, depending on the underlying data structure and percentage of selected genes; (3 evaluated with the Bootstrap Reproducibility Index, genes passed supervised screenings are only moderately reproducible; and (4 concordance cannot be improved by supervised screening based on reproducibility.

  20. Discovering Implicit Entity Relation with the Gene-Citation-Gene Network

    OpenAIRE

    Min Song; Nam-Gi Han; Yong-Hwan Kim; Ying Ding; Tamy Chambers

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we apply the entitymetrics model to our constructed Gene-Citation-Gene (GCG) network. Based on the premise there is a hidden, but plausible, relationship between an entity in one article and an entity in its citing article, we constructed a GCG network of gene pairs implicitly connected through citation. We compare the performance of this GCG network to a gene-gene (GG) network constructed over the same corpus but which uses gene pairs explicitly connected through traditional c...

  1. Selection of housekeeping genes for gene expression studies in human reticulocytes using real-time PCR

    OpenAIRE

    Thein Swee; Jiang Jie; Best Steve; Silver Nicholas

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Control genes, which are often referred to as housekeeping genes, are frequently used to normalise mRNA levels between different samples. However, the expression level of these genes may vary among tissues or cells and may change under certain circumstances. Thus, the selection of housekeeping genes is critical for gene expression studies. To address this issue, 7 candidate housekeeping genes including several commonly used ones were investigated in isolated human reticulo...

  2. Mining Association Rules among Gene Functions in Clusters of Similar Gene Expression Maps

    OpenAIRE

    An, Li; Obradovic, Zoran; Smith, Desmond; Bodenreider, Olivier; Megalooikonomou, Vasileios

    2009-01-01

    Association rules mining methods have been recently applied to gene expression data analysis to reveal relationships between genes and different conditions and features. However, not much effort has focused on detecting the relation between gene expression maps and related gene functions. Here we describe such an approach to mine association rules among gene functions in clusters of similar gene expression maps on mouse brain. The experimental results show that the detected association rules ...

  3. RCDB: Renal Cancer Gene Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramana Jayashree

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Renal cell carcinoma or RCC is one of the common and most lethal urological cancers, with 40% of the patients succumbing to death because of metastatic progression of the disease. Treatment of metastatic RCC remains highly challenging because of its resistance to chemotherapy as well as radiotherapy, besides surgical resection. Whereas RCC comprises tumors with differing histological types, clear cell RCC remains the most common. A major problem in the clinical management of patients presenting with localized ccRCC is the inability to determine tumor aggressiveness and accurately predict the risk of metastasis following surgery. As a measure to improve the diagnosis and prognosis of RCC, researchers have identified several molecular markers through a number of techniques. However the wealth of information available is scattered in literature and not easily amenable to data-mining. To reduce this gap, this work describes a comprehensive repository called Renal Cancer Gene Database, as an integrated gateway to study renal cancer related data. Findings Renal Cancer Gene Database is a manually curated compendium of 240 protein-coding and 269 miRNA genes contributing to the etiology and pathogenesis of various forms of renal cell carcinomas. The protein coding genes have been classified according to the kind of gene alteration observed in RCC. RCDB also includes the miRNAsdysregulated in RCC, along with the corresponding information regarding the type of RCC and/or metastatic or prognostic significance. While some of the miRNA genes showed an association with other types of cancers few were unique to RCC. Users can query the database using keywords, category and chromosomal location of the genes. The knowledgebase can be freely accessed via a user-friendly web interface at http://www.juit.ac.in/attachments/jsr/rcdb/homenew.html. Conclusions It is hoped that this database would serve as a useful complement to the existing public

  4. Msx homeobox gene family and craniofacial development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SYLVIA ALAPPAT; ZUN YI ZHANG; YI PING CHEN

    2003-01-01

    Vertebrate Msx genes are unlinked,homeobox-containing genes that bear homology to the Drosophila muscle segment homeobox gene.These genes are expressed at multiple sites of tissue-tissue interactions during vertebrate embryonic development.Inductive interactions mediated by the Msx genes are essential for normal craniofacial,limb and ectodermal organ morphogenesis,and are also essential to survival in mice,as manifested by the phenotypic abnormalities shown in knockout mice and in humans.This review summarizes studies on the expression,regulation,and functional analysis of Msx genes that bear relevance to craniofacial development in humans and mice.

  5. Delivery of genes into the CF airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Deborah R; Hyde, Stephen C

    2014-10-01

    Gene therapy was suggested as a potential treatment for cystic fibrosis (CF), even before the identification of the CFTR gene. Initial enthusiasm has been tempered as it became apparent that reintroduction of the CFTR gene into the cells of the lung is more difficult than anticipated. Here, we review the major gene delivery vectors evaluated clinically, and suggest that advances in either plasmid DNA design and/or hybrid lentivirus biology may finally facilitate lung gene transfer with efficiencies sufficient for CF gene therapy to offer clinical benefit. PMID:25015239

  6. The P450 gene superfamily: recommended nomenclature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebert, D W; Adesnik, M; Coon, M J; Estabrook, R W; Gonzalez, F J; Guengerich, F P; Gunsalus, I C; Johnson, E F; Kemper, B; Levin, W

    1987-02-01

    A nomenclature for the P450 gene superfamily is proposed based on evolution. Recommendations include Roman numerals for distinct gene families, capital letters for subfamilies, and Arabic numerals for individual genes. An updating of this list, which presently includes 65 entries, will be required every 1-2 years. Assignment of orthologous genes is presently uncertain in some cases--between widely diverged species and especially in the P450II family due to the large number of genes. As more is known, it might become necessary to change some gene assignments that are based on our present knowledge. PMID:3829886

  7. The Nme gene family in fish.

    OpenAIRE

    Desvignes, T.; FOSTIER, A.; Fauvel, C.; Bobe, J

    2013-01-01

    The Nme gene family, also known as Nm23 or NDPK, is a very ancient gene family that can be found in all kingdoms of life. In the late eighties, a gene of the Nme family, NME1, was identified as the first metastatic suppressor gene, resulting in a major interest for this family. Due to the complexity of the family, the need for a unified and evolutionary-supported gene nomenclature was recently stressed by the scientific community. Based on a complete evolutionary history study of the gene fam...

  8. Gene expression profiles in skeletal muscle after gene electrotransfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriksen Jens

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene transfer by electroporation (DNA electrotransfer to muscle results in high level long term transgenic expression, showing great promise for treatment of e.g. protein deficiency syndromes. However little is known about the effects of DNA electrotransfer on muscle fibres. We have therefore investigated transcriptional changes through gene expression profile analyses, morphological changes by histological analysis, and physiological changes by force generation measurements. DNA electrotransfer was obtained using a combination of a short high voltage pulse (HV, 1000 V/cm, 100 μs followed by a long low voltage pulse (LV, 100 V/cm, 400 ms; a pulse combination optimised for efficient and safe gene transfer. Muscles were transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP and excised at 4 hours, 48 hours or 3 weeks after treatment. Results Differentially expressed genes were investigated by microarray analysis, and descriptive statistics were performed to evaluate the effects of 1 electroporation, 2 DNA injection, and 3 time after treatment. The biological significance of the results was assessed by gene annotation and supervised cluster analysis. Generally, electroporation caused down-regulation of structural proteins e.g. sarcospan and catalytic enzymes. Injection of DNA induced down-regulation of intracellular transport proteins e.g. sentrin. The effects on muscle fibres were transient as the expression profiles 3 weeks after treatment were closely related with the control muscles. Most interestingly, no changes in the expression of proteins involved in inflammatory responses or muscle regeneration was detected, indicating limited muscle damage and regeneration. Histological analysis revealed structural changes with loss of cell integrity and striation pattern in some fibres after DNA+HV+LV treatment, while HV+LV pulses alone showed preservation of cell integrity. No difference in the force generation capacity was observed in

  9. Vascular Gene Expression: A Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Concepción eMartínez-Navarro

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The phloem is the conduit through which photoassimilates are distributed from autotrophic to heterotrophic tissues and is involved in the distribution of signaling molecules that coordinate plant growth and responses to the environment. Phloem function depends on the coordinate expression of a large array of genes. We have previously identified conserved motifs in upstream regions of the Arabidopsis genes, encoding the homologs of pumpkin phloem sap mRNAs, displaying expression in vascular tissues. This tissue-specific expression in Arabidopsis is predicted by the overrepresentation of GA/CT-rich motifs in gene promoters. In this work we have searched for common motifs in upstream regions of the homologous genes from plants considered to possess a primitive vascular tissue (a lycophyte, as well as from others that lack a true vascular tissue (a bryophyte, and finally from chlorophytes. Both lycophyte and bryophyte display motifs similar to those found in Arabidopsis with a significantly low E-value, while the chlorophytes showed either a different conserved motif or no conserved motif at all. These results suggest that these same genes are expressed coordinately in non- vascular plants; this coordinate expression may have been one of the prerequisites for the development of conducting tissues in plants. We have also analyzed the phylogeny of conserved proteins that may be involved in phloem function and development. The presence of CmPP16, APL, FT and YDA in chlorophytes suggests the recruitment of ancient regulatory networks for the development of the vascular tissue during evolution while OPS is a novel protein specific to vascular plants.

  10. Transferring alien genes to wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In broad terms an alien gene can be considered to be any gene transferred to wheat from a related species. As described above by Maan (section 7D) the genus Triticum contains a broad range of species, some of which cross readily with the cultivated tetraploid (T. Turgidum L.) or hexaploid (T. aestivum L.) wheats, and others only with great difficulty. In addition, wheat will also cross with species in a number of other genera including Agropyron, Elymus, Elytrigia (=Agropyron), Haynaldia, Hordeum, and Secale (Riley and Kimber, 1966; Knobloch, 1968; Feldman and Sears, 1981). In discussing the Triticum and Aegilops spp., the classification by Kimber and Sears, section SA-I, above, will be followed. For the Agropyron and related species the classification described by Dewey (1983) will be used. To avoid confusion, in referring to the literature the designations used by the authors will be given, followed by the new designation. The wild relatives of wheat are adapted to a broad range of environments and carry a large reservoir of useful genes (Zohary et al., 1969; Kerber and Dyck, 1973; Brezhnev, 1977; Feldman and Sears, 1981; Limin and Fowler, 1981; Sharma et aI., 1981; McGuire and Dvorak, 1981). Initially they were considered to be primarily sources of disease resistance, but more recently they have been recognized as potential sources of genes for high protein, cold tolerance, salt tolerance, drought tolerance, lodging resistance, early maturity, and even yield. Extensive screening of the wild relatives of wheat needs to be done before their useful genes can be fully utilized

  11. GenePRIMP: A GENE PRediction IMprovement Pipeline for Prokaryotic genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Hooper, Sean D.; Lykidis, Athanasios; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2010-04-01

    We present 'gene prediction improvement pipeline' (GenePRIMP; http://geneprimp.jgi-psf.org/), a computational process that performs evidence-based evaluation of gene models in prokaryotic genomes and reports anomalies including inconsistent start sites, missed genes and split genes. We found that manual curation of gene models using the anomaly reports generated by GenePRIMP improved their quality, and demonstrate the applicability of GenePRIMP in improving finishing quality and comparing different genome-sequencing and annotation technologies.

  12. Detection of gene expression pattern in the early stage after spinal cord injury by gene chip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘成龙; 靳安民; 童斌辉

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the changes of the gene expression pattern of spinal cord tissues in the early stage after injury by DNA microarray (gene chip). Methods: The contusion model of rat spinal cord was established according to Allen's falling strike method and the gene expression patterns of normal and injured spinal cord tissues were studied by gene chip. Results: The expression of 45 genes was significantly changed in the early stage after spinal cord injury, in which 22 genes up-regulated and 23 genes down-regulated. Conclusions: The expression of some genes changes significantly in the early stage after spinal cord injury, which indicates the complexity of secondary spinal cord injury.

  13. Bifidobacterium commune sp. nov. isolated from the bumble bee gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praet, Jessy; Meeus, Ivan; Cnockaert, Margo; Aerts, Maarten; Smagghe, Guy; Vandamme, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Bifidobacteria were isolated from the gut of Bombus lapidarius, Bombus terrestris and Bombus hypnorum bumble bees by direct isolation on modified trypticase phytone yeast extract agar. The MALDI-TOF MS profiles of four isolates (LMG 28292(T), R-53560, R-53124, LMG 28626) were found to be identical and did not cluster with the profiles of established Bifidobacterium species. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain LMG 28292(T) revealed that LMG 28292(T) is most closely related to the Bifidobacterium bohemicum type strain (96.8%), which was also isolated from bumble bee gut specimens. The hsp60 gene of strain LMG 28292(T) shows 85.8% sequence similarity to that of the B. bohemicum type strain. The (GTG)5-PCR profiles and the hsp60 sequences of all four isolates were indistinguishable; however, three different phenotypes were observed among the four isolates by means of the API 50CHL microtest system. Based on the phylogenetic, genotypic and phenotypic data, we propose to classify the four isolates within the novel species Bifidobacterium commune sp. nov., with LMG 28292(T) (= DSM 28792(T)) as the type strain. PMID:25753540

  14. GENE THERAPY AND ITS IMPLICATIONS IN SPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Vitošević

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to the very successful Human Genome Project and the identification of genes involved in genetic disease, we now have the ability to treat many conditions. However, the identification of the genes which code certain phenotype characteristics has opened the way for abuse in the fields of sport and physical exercise. The principles of gene therapy and the ways in which genes are transferred have completely been copied from gene therapy and are now being used to increase the physical abilities of athletes. The genes most frequently used by athletes include: the the ACE gene, the ACTN3 gene, myostatin, the erythropoietin gene, PPAR-delta and the like. The misuse of these genes with the aim of increasing physical abilities has already become part of sport and is extremely difficult to identify, since genes and gene sequences entering the human body are proteins that are already struc-tural and functional parts of the organism. On the other hand, viral vectors as the instruments for gene transfer attack and destroy the human immune system, and the reaction of the human body can be negative, with a danger of insertional mutagenesis and the appearance of oncogenes. Gene ther-apy might actually be much more useful in treating sports injuries, but even these procedures are still far from clinical practice. There is a fine line between gene therapy and gene doping in athletes. A number of growth factors will enhance repair, but it happen that expression of these factors increase the strength of bones and tendons, so that giving an adventage to competitors. First of all, it is neces-sary to acquaint athletes as much as possible with the negative consequences of using gene therapy. However victory and glory may be strong achievements, the health of these young people, and respect for fundamental and ethical principles, humanity, and fair play game have a more lasting value and represent the heavier weight on the scales.

  15. cis sequence effects on gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobs Kevin

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequence and transcriptional variability within and between individuals are typically studied independently. The joint analysis of sequence and gene expression variation (genetical genomics provides insight into the role of linked sequence variation in the regulation of gene expression. We investigated the role of sequence variation in cis on gene expression (cis sequence effects in a group of genes commonly studied in cancer research in lymphoblastoid cell lines. We estimated the proportion of genes exhibiting cis sequence effects and the proportion of gene expression variation explained by cis sequence effects using three different analytical approaches, and compared our results to the literature. Results We generated gene expression profiling data at N = 697 candidate genes from N = 30 lymphoblastoid cell lines for this study and used available candidate gene resequencing data at N = 552 candidate genes to identify N = 30 candidate genes with sufficient variance in both datasets for the investigation of cis sequence effects. We used two additive models and the haplotype phylogeny scanning approach of Templeton (Tree Scanning to evaluate association between individual SNPs, all SNPs at a gene, and diplotypes, with log-transformed gene expression. SNPs and diplotypes at eight candidate genes exhibited statistically significant (p cis sequence effects in our study, respectively. Conclusion Based on analysis of our results and the extant literature, one in four genes exhibits significant cis sequence effects, and for these genes, about 30% of gene expression variation is accounted for by cis sequence variation. Despite diverse experimental approaches, the presence or absence of significant cis sequence effects is largely supported by previously published studies.

  16. Thesaurus-based disambiguation of gene symbols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wain Hester M

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Massive text mining of the biological literature holds great promise of relating disparate information and discovering new knowledge. However, disambiguation of gene symbols is a major bottleneck. Results We developed a simple thesaurus-based disambiguation algorithm that can operate with very little training data. The thesaurus comprises the information from five human genetic databases and MeSH. The extent of the homonym problem for human gene symbols is shown to be substantial (33% of the genes in our combined thesaurus had one or more ambiguous symbols, not only because one symbol can refer to multiple genes, but also because a gene symbol can have many non-gene meanings. A test set of 52,529 Medline abstracts, containing 690 ambiguous human gene symbols taken from OMIM, was automatically generated. Overall accuracy of the disambiguation algorithm was up to 92.7% on the test set. Conclusion The ambiguity of human gene symbols is substantial, not only because one symbol may denote multiple genes but particularly because many symbols have other, non-gene meanings. The proposed disambiguation approach resolves most ambiguities in our test set with high accuracy, including the important gene/not a gene decisions. The algorithm is fast and scalable, enabling gene-symbol disambiguation in massive text mining applications.

  17. Optimal search-based gene subset selection for gene array cancer classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiexun; Su, Hua; Chen, Hsinchun; Futscher, Bernard W

    2007-07-01

    High dimensionality has been a major problem for gene array-based cancer classification. It is critical to identify marker genes for cancer diagnoses. We developed a framework of gene selection methods based on previous studies. This paper focuses on optimal search-based subset selection methods because they evaluate the group performance of genes and help to pinpoint global optimal set of marker genes. Notably, this paper is the first to introduce tabu search (TS) to gene selection from high-dimensional gene array data. Our comparative study of gene selection methods demonstrated the effectiveness of optimal search-based gene subset selection to identify cancer marker genes. TS was shown to be a promising tool for gene subset selection. PMID:17674622

  18. Progress in Chimeric Vector and Chimeric Gene Based Cardiovascular Gene Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Chun-Song; YOON Young-sup; ISNER Jeffrey M.; LOSORDO Douglas W.

    2003-01-01

    Gene therapy for cardiovascular diseases has developed from preliminary animal experiments to clinical trials. However, vectors and target genes used currently in gene therapy are mainly focused on viral, nonviral vector and single target gene or monogene. Each vector system has a series of advantages and limitations. Chimeric vectors which combine the advantages of viral and nonviral vector,chimeric target genes which combine two or more target genes and novel gene delivery modes are being developed. In this article, we summarized the progress in chimeric vectors and chimeric genes based cardiovascular gene therapy, which including proliferative or occlusive vascular diseases such as atheroslerosis and restenosis, hypertonic vascular disease such as hypertension and cardiac diseases such as myocardium ischemia, dilated cardiomyopathy and heart failure, even heart transplantation. The development of chimeric vector, chimeric gene and their cardiovascular gene therapy is promising.

  19. Somatic gene therapy for hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillips M.I.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy for hypertension is needed for the next generation of antihypertensive drugs. Current drugs, although effective, have poor compliance, are expensive and short-lasting (hours or one day. Gene therapy offers a way to produce long-lasting antihypertensive effects (weeks, months or years. We are currently using two strategies: a antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (AS-ODN and b antisense DNA delivered in viral vectors to inhibit genes associated with vasoconstrictive properties. It is not necessary to know all the genes involved in hypertension, since many years of experience with drugs show which genes need to be controlled. AS-ODN are short, single-stranded DNA that can be injected in naked form or in liposomes. AS-ODN, targeted to angiotensin type 1 receptors (AT1-R, angiotensinogen (AGT, angiotensin converting enzyme, and ß1-adrenergic receptors effectively reduce hypertension in rat models (SHR, 2K-1C and cold-induced hypertension. A single dose is effective up to one month when delivered with liposomes. No side effects or toxic effects have been detected, and repeated injections can be given. For the vector, adeno-associated virus (AAV is used with a construct to include a CMV promoter, antisense DNA to AGT or AT1-R and a reporter gene. Results in SHR demonstrate reduction and slowing of development of hypertension, with a single dose administration. Left ventricular hypertrophy is also reduced by AAV-AGT-AS treatment. Double transgenic mice (human renin plus human AGT with high angiotensin II causing high blood pressure, treated with AAV-AT1-R-AS, show a normalization of blood pressure for over six months with a single injection of vector. We conclude that ODNs will probably be developed first because they can be treated like drugs for the treatment of hypertension with long-term effects. Viral vector delivery needs more engineering to be certain of its safety, but one day may be used for a very prolonged control of blood pressure.

  20. Cattle Candidate Genes for Milk Production Traits

    OpenAIRE

    Kadlec,Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to make an overview of important candidate genes affecting milk yield and milk quality parameters, with an emphasis on genes associated with the quantity and quality of milk proteins and milk fat.

  1. Biodegradable nanoparticles for gene therapy technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapid propagations in materials technology together with biology have initiated great hopes in the possibility of treating many diseases by gene therapy technology. Viral and non-viral gene carriers are currently applied for gene delivery. Non-viral technology is safe and effective for the delivery of genetic materials to cells and tissues. Non-viral systems are based on plasmid expression containing a gene encoding a therapeutic protein and synthetic biodegradable nanoparticles as a safe carrier of gene. Biodegradable nanoparticles have shown great interest in drug and gene delivery systems as they are easy to be synthesized and have no side effect in cells and tissues. This review provides a critical view of applications of biodegradable nanoparticles on gene therapy technology to enhance the localization of in vitro and in vivo and improve the function of administered genes

  2. Alzheimer's Gene May Show Effects in Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159854.html Alzheimer's Gene May Show Effects in Childhood Brain scans ... 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A gene related to Alzheimer's disease may start to show effects on brain ...

  3. Modulation of gene expression made easy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solem, Christian; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2002-01-01

    A new approach for modulating gene expression, based on randomization of promoter (spacer) sequences, was developed. The method was applied to chromosomal genes in Lactococcus lactis and shown to generate libraries of clones with broad ranges of expression levels of target genes. In one example...... beta-glucuronidase, resulting in an operon structure in which both genes are transcribed from a common promoter. We show that there is a linear correlation between the expressions of the two genes, which facilitates screening for mutants with suitable enzyme activities. In a second example, we show...... that the method can be applied to modulating the expression of native genes on the chromosome. We constructed a series of strains in which the expression of the las operon, containing the genes pfk, pyk, and ldh, was modulated by integrating a truncated copy of the pfk gene. Importantly, the modulation...

  4. 'Sunscreen' Gene May Guard Against Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_158935.html 'Sunscreen' Gene May Guard Against Skin Cancer Researchers hope their ... say they've identified a so-called "sunscreen" gene that may help protect against skin cancer. They ...

  5. Biodegradable nanoparticles for gene therapy technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein, E-mail: hosseinkhani@mail.ntust.edu.tw; He, Wen-Jie [National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (Taiwan Tech), Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering (China); Chiang, Chiao-Hsi [School of Pharmacy, National Defense Medical Center (China); Hong, Po-Da [National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (Taiwan Tech), Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering (China); Yu, Dah-Shyong [Nanomedicine Research Center, National Defense Medical Center (China); Domb, Abraham J. [The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Institute of Drug Research, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology and The Alex Grass Center for Drug Design and Synthesis (Israel); Ou, Keng-Liang [College of Oral Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Research Center for Biomedical Devices and Prototyping Production (China)

    2013-07-15

    Rapid propagations in materials technology together with biology have initiated great hopes in the possibility of treating many diseases by gene therapy technology. Viral and non-viral gene carriers are currently applied for gene delivery. Non-viral technology is safe and effective for the delivery of genetic materials to cells and tissues. Non-viral systems are based on plasmid expression containing a gene encoding a therapeutic protein and synthetic biodegradable nanoparticles as a safe carrier of gene. Biodegradable nanoparticles have shown great interest in drug and gene delivery systems as they are easy to be synthesized and have no side effect in cells and tissues. This review provides a critical view of applications of biodegradable nanoparticles on gene therapy technology to enhance the localization of in vitro and in vivo and improve the function of administered genes.

  6. 'Sunscreen' Gene May Guard Against Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158935.html 'Sunscreen' Gene May Guard Against Skin Cancer Researchers hope their ... say they've identified a so-called "sunscreen" gene that may help protect against skin cancer. They ...

  7. NIH Researchers Identify OCD Risk Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News From NIH NIH Researchers Identify OCD Risk Gene Past Issues / Summer 2006 Table of Contents For ... and Alcoholism (NIAAA) have identified a previously unknown gene variant that doubles an individual's risk for obsessive- ...

  8. Five New Genes Linked to Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159556.html Five New Genes Linked to Colon Cancer But researchers say it's ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists have identified five new gene mutations that may be tied to colon cancer. ...

  9. In The Genes? Searching for Methuselah

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Special Section In The Genes? Searching for Methuselah Past Issues / Winter 2007 Table ... 18 million effort to learn more about the genes, lifestyle or other factors that contribute to long, ...

  10. Gene coexpression network analysis as a source of functional annotation for rice genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin L Childs

    Full Text Available With the existence of large publicly available plant gene expression data sets, many groups have undertaken data analyses to construct gene coexpression networks and functionally annotate genes. Often, a large compendium of unrelated or condition-independent expression data is used to construct gene networks. Condition-dependent expression experiments consisting of well-defined conditions/treatments have also been used to create coexpression networks to help examine particular biological processes. Gene networks derived from either condition-dependent or condition-independent data can be difficult to interpret if a large number of genes and connections are present. However, algorithms exist to identify modules of highly connected and biologically relevant genes within coexpression networks. In this study, we have used publicly available rice (Oryza sativa gene expression data to create gene coexpression networks using both condition-dependent and condition-independent data and have identified gene modules within these networks using the Weighted Gene Coexpression Network Analysis method. We compared the number of genes assigned to modules and the biological interpretability of gene coexpression modules to assess the utility of condition-dependent and condition-independent gene coexpression networks. For the purpose of providing functional annotation to rice genes, we found that gene modules identified by coexpression analysis of condition-dependent gene expression experiments to be more useful than gene modules identified by analysis of a condition-independent data set. We have incorporated our results into the MSU Rice Genome Annotation Project database as additional expression-based annotation for 13,537 genes, 2,980 of which lack a functional annotation description. These results provide two new types of functional annotation for our database. Genes in modules are now associated with groups of genes that constitute a collective functional

  11. Bimodal gene expression patterns in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolsky Yuri; Bugrim Andrej; Shi Weiwei; Kirillov Eugene; Bessarabova Marina; Nikolskaya Tatiana

    2010-01-01

    Abstract We identified a set of genes with an unexpected bimodal distribution among breast cancer patients in multiple studies. The property of bimodality seems to be common, as these genes were found on multiple microarray platforms and in studies with different end-points and patient cohorts. Bimodal genes tend to cluster into small groups of four to six genes with synchronised expression within the group (but not between the groups), which makes them good candidates for robust conditional ...

  12. Smart Polymeric Nanoparticles for Cancer Gene Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Guimei; Zhang, Hong; Huang, Leaf

    2014-01-01

    The massive amount of human genetic information already available has accelerated the identification of target genes, making gene and nucleic acid therapy the next generation of medicine. Nanoparticle (NP)-based anticancer gene therapy treatment has received significant interest in this evolving field. Recent advances in vector technology have improved gene transfection efficiencies of nonviral vectors to a level similar to viruses. This review serves as an introduction to surface modificatio...

  13. Quality Measures for Gene Expression Biclusters

    OpenAIRE

    Beatriz Pontes; Ral Girldez; Aguilar-Ruiz, Jess S.

    2015-01-01

    An noticeable number of biclustering approaches have been proposed proposed for the study of gene expression data, especially for discovering functionally related gene sets under different subsets of experimental conditions. In this context, recognizing groups of co-expressed or co-regulated genes, that is, genes which follow a similar expression pattern, is one of the main objectives. Due to the problem complexity, heuristic searches are usually used instead of exhaustive algorithms. Further...

  14. Organization of an echinoderm Hox gene cluster

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez, Pedro; Rast, Jonathan P.; Arenas-Mena, César; Davidson, Eric H.

    1999-01-01

    The Strongylocentrotus purpuratus genome contains a single ten-gene Hox complex >0.5 megabase in length. This complex was isolated on overlapping bacterial artificial chromosome and P1 artificial chromosome genomic recombinants by using probes for individual genes and by genomic walking. Echinoderm Hox genes of Paralog Groups (PG) 1 and 2 are reported. The cluster includes genes representing all paralog groups of vertebrate Hox clusters, except that there is a sing...

  15. Gene Therapy Used in Cancer Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Wirth; Seppo Ylä-Herttuala

    2014-01-01

    Cancer has been, from the beginning, a target of intense research for gene therapy approaches. Currently, more than 60% of all on-going clinical gene therapy trials worldwide are targeting cancer. Indeed, there is a clear unmet medical need for novel therapies. This is further urged by the fact that current conventional cancer therapies are frequently troubled by their toxicities. Different gene therapy strategies have been employed for cancer, such as pro-drug activating suicide gene therapy...

  16. Gensko zdravljenje raka: Cancer gene therapy:

    OpenAIRE

    Serša, Gregor; Čemažar, Maja; KOČEVAR, NINA

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy uses genes to treat diseases. Large amount of research is based on cancer because current methods for cancer treatment have limited efficiencyand unwanted side effects. In the following article we first presentthe basic principles of gene therapy. Next, we describe the main delivery systems, which are viral and non-viral, and then the main therapeuticstrategies of cancer gene therapy. These can be divided into immunological, where we take advantage of the immune system for cancer...

  17. Regulation of the genes involved in nitrification.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arp, D.J.; Sayavedra-Soto, L.A.

    2003-08-14

    OAK-B135 This project focuses on the characterization of the regulation of the genes involved in nitrification in the bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea. The key genes in the nitrification pathway, amo and hao, are present in multiple copies in the genome. The promoters for these genes were identified and characterized. It was shown that there were some differences in the transcriptional regulation of the copies of these genes.

  18. Topological Features In Cancer Gene Expression Data

    OpenAIRE

    Lockwood, Svetlana; Krishnamoorthy, Bala

    2014-01-01

    We present a new method for exploring cancer gene expression data based on tools from algebraic topology. Our method selects a small relevant subset from tens of thousands of genes while simultaneously identifying nontrivial higher order topological features, i.e., holes, in the data. We first circumvent the problem of high dimensionality by dualizing the data, i.e., by studying genes as points in the sample space. Then we select a small subset of the genes as landmarks to construct topologic...

  19. Gene therapy and its implications in Periodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Mahale Swapna; Dani Nitin; Ansari Shumaila; Kale Triveni

    2009-01-01

    Gene therapy is a field of Biomedicine. With the advent of gene therapy in dentistry, significant progress has been made in the control of periodontal diseases and reconstruction of dento-alveolar apparatus. Implementation in periodontics include: -As a mode of tissue engineering with three approaches: cell, protein-based and gene delivery approach. -Genetic approach to Biofilm Antibiotic Resistance. Future strategies of gene therapy in preventing periodontal diseases: -Enhances host defense...

  20. Identity Gene Expression in Proteus Mirabilis

    OpenAIRE

    Gibbs, Karine Alexine; Wenren, Larissa Man-Yin; Greenberg, E. Peter

    2011-01-01

    Swarming colonies of independent Proteus mirabilis isolates recognize each other as foreign and do not merge together, whereas apposing swarms of clonal isolates merge with each other. Swarms of mutants with deletions in the ids gene cluster do not merge with their parent. Thus, ids genes are involved in the ability of P. mirabilis to distinguish self from nonself. Here we have characterized expression of the ids genes. We show that idsABCDEF genes are transcribed as an operon, and we define ...

  1. The evolution of heart gene delivery vectors

    OpenAIRE

    Wasala, Nalinda B.; Shin, Jin-Hong; Duan, Dongsheng

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy holds promise for treating numerous heart diseases. A key premise for the success of cardiac gene therapy is the development of powerful gene transfer vehicles that can achieve highly efficient and persistent gene transfer specifically in the heart. Other features of an ideal vector include negligible toxicity, minimal immunogenicity and easy manufacturing. Rapid progress in the fields of molecular biology and virology has offered great opportunities to engineer various genetic m...

  2. The HUGO Gene Nomenclature Database, 2006 updates

    OpenAIRE

    Eyre, T. A.; Ducluzeau, F.; Sneddon, T. P.; Povey, S; Bruford, E. A.; Lush, M. J.

    2005-01-01

    The HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC) aims to give every human gene a unique and ideally meaningful name and symbol. The HGNC database, previously known as Genew, contains over 22,000 public records with approved human gene nomenclature and associated information. The database has undergone major improvements throughout the last year, is publicly available for online searching at http://www.gene.ucl.ac.uk/cgi-bin/nomenclature/searchgenes.pl and has a new custom downloads interface at ht...

  3. Alcoholism and Alternative Splicing of Candidate Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Toshikazu Sasabe; Shoichi Ishiura

    2010-01-01

    Gene expression studies have shown that expression patterns of several genes have changed during the development of alcoholism. Gene expression is regulated not only at the level of transcription but also through alternative splicing of pre-mRNA. In this review, we discuss some of the evidence suggesting that alternative splicing of candidate genes such as DRD2 (encoding dopamine D2 receptor) may form the basis of the mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of alcoholism. These reports sugg...

  4. Human germline gene therapy reconsidered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, D B; Langer, P J

    2001-07-20

    This paper reevaluates the notion of human germline gene therapy (HGLGT) in light of developments in biomedicine, biotechnology, and ethical and policy analysis. The essay makes the following key points. First, because the distinction among "therapy," "prevention," and "enhancement" is not clear in human genetics, "gene therapy" is an inadequate descriptor of the process and goals of germline genetic alterations. The alternate use of the phrase "human germline genome modification" (HGLGM) could avoid a misleading label. Second, procedures that could be construed as genetic "enhancement" may not be as morally problematic as some have supposed, once one understands that the boundaries between therapy, prevention, and enhancement are not obvious in genetic medicine. Third, HGLGM might be the medically and morally most appropriate way of avoiding the birth of a child with a genetic disease in only a small range of cases. Fourth, there are still many ethical and scientific problems relating to the safety and efficacy of HGLGM. PMID:11485636

  5. Horizontal gene transfer in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Caihua; Ren, Xiaodong; Mason, Annaliese S; Liu, Honglei; Xiao, Meili; Li, Jiana; Fu, Donghui

    2014-03-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) describes the transmission of genetic material across species boundaries. HGT often occurs in microbic and eukaryotic genomes. However, the pathways by which HGTs occur in multicellular eukaryotes, especially in plants, are not well understood. We systematically summarized more than ten possible pathways for HGT. The intimate contact which frequently occurs in parasitism, symbiosis, pathogen, epiphyte, entophyte, and grafting interactions could promote HGTs between two species. Besides these direct transfer methods, genes can be exchanged with a vector as a bridge: possible vectors include pollen, fungi, bacteria, viruses, viroids, plasmids, transposons, and insects. HGT, especially when involving horizontal transfer of transposable elements, is recognized as a significant force propelling genomic variation and biological innovation, playing an important functional and evolutionary role in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic genomes. We proposed possible mechanisms by which HGTs can occur, which is useful in understanding the genetic information exchange among distant species or distant cellular components. PMID:24132513

  6. Gene therapy for gastric cancer: A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Zhang; Zhan-Kui Liu

    2003-01-01

    Gastric cancer is common in China, and its early diagnosis and treatment are difficult. In recent years great progress has been achieved in gene therapy, and a wide array of gene therapy systems for gastric cancer has been investigated. The present article deals with the general principles of gene therapy and then focuses on how these principles may be applied to gastric cancer.

  7. Mitochondrial RNA granules: Compartmentalizing mitochondrial gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdain, Alexis A; Boehm, Erik; Maundrell, Kinsey; Martinou, Jean-Claude

    2016-03-14

    In mitochondria, DNA replication, gene expression, and RNA degradation machineries coexist within a common nondelimited space, raising the question of how functional compartmentalization of gene expression is achieved. Here, we discuss the recently characterized "mitochondrial RNA granules," mitochondrial subdomains with an emerging role in the regulation of gene expression. PMID:26953349

  8. The rat androgen receptor gene promoter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.M. Baarends (Willy); A.P.N. Themmen (Axel); L.J. Blok (Leen); P. Mackenbach (Petra); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert); D.N. Meijer (Dies); P.W. Faber; J. Trapman (Jan); J.A. Grootegoed (Anton)

    1990-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract The androgen receptor (AR) is activated upon binding of testosterone or dihydrotestosterone and exerts regulatory effects on gene expression in androgen target cells. To study transcriptional regulation of the rat AR gene itself, the 5' genomic region of this gene was clon

  9. Targeting Gene-Virotherapy for Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Yuan LIU; Jing-Fa GU; Wen-Fang SHI

    2005-01-01

    Gene therapy and viral therapy for cancer have therapeutic effects, but there has been no significant breakthrough in these two forms of therapy. Therefore, a new strategy called "targeting genevirotherapy", which combines the advantages of gene therapy and viral therapy, has been formulated. This new therapy has stronger antitumor effects than either gene therapy or viral therapy. A tumor-specific replicative adenovirus vector ZD55 (E1B55KD deleted Adv.) was constructed and various single therapeutic genes were inserted into ZD55 to form ZD55-gene. These are the targeting gene-virotherapy genes. But experiments showed that a single gene was not effective in eliminating the tumor mass, and therefore two genes were separately inserted into ZD55. This strategy is called "targeting dual gene-virotherapy" (with PCT patent). Better results were obtained with this strategy, and all the xenograft tumor masses were completely eliminated in all mice when two suitable genes producing a synergetic or compensative effect were chosen. Twenty-six papers on these strategies have been published by researchers in our laboratory.Furthermore, an adenoviral vector with two targeting promoters harboring two antitumor genes has been constructed for cancer therapy. Promising results have been obtained with this adenoviral vectorand another patent has been applied for. This antitumor strategy can be used to kill tumor cells completely with minimum damage to normal cells.

  10. A constructive approach to gene expression dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, experiments on mRNA abundance (gene expression) have revealed that gene expression shows a stationary organization described by a scale-free distribution. Here we propose a constructive approach to gene expression dynamics which restores the scale-free exponent and describes the intermediate state dynamics. This approach requires only one assumption: Markov property

  11. Uses of antimicrobial genes from microbial genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorek, Rotem; Rubin, Edward M.

    2013-08-20

    We describe a method for mining microbial genomes to discover antimicrobial genes and proteins having broad spectrum of activity. Also described are antimicrobial genes and their expression products from various microbial genomes that were found using this method. The products of such genes can be used as antimicrobial agents or as tools for molecular biology.

  12. Genes Causing Male Infertility in Humans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lawrence C. Layman

    2002-01-01

    There are an accumulating number of identified gene mutations that cause infertility in humans. Most of the known gene mutations impair normal puberty and subsequently cause infertility by either hypothalamic /pituitary deficiency of important tropic factors to the gonad or by gonadal genes.

  13. GENE THERAPY FOR VENTRICULAR TACHYARRHYTHMIAS

    OpenAIRE

    Donahue, J. Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac arrest is the leading cause of death in the United States and other developed countries. Ventricular tachyarrhythmias are the most prominent cause of cardiac arrest, and patients with structural heart disease are at increased risk for these abnormal heart rhythms. Drug and device therapy have important limitations that make them inadequate to meet this challenge. We and others have proposed development of arrhythmia gene therapy as an alternative to current treatment methods. In this ...

  14. Orthopedic Gene Therapy in 2008

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Christopher H.; Ghivizzani, Steven C; Robbins, Paul D.

    2008-01-01

    Orthopedic disorders, although rarely fatal, are the leading cause of morbidity and impose a huge socioeconomic burden. Their prevalence will increase dramatically as populations age and gain weight. Many orthopedic conditions are difficult to treat by conventional means; however, they are good candidates for gene therapy. Clinical trials have already been initiated for arthritis and the aseptic loosening of prosthetic joints, and the development of bone-healing applications is at an advanced...

  15. The insect SNMP gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Richard G; Miller, Natalie E; Litvack, Rachel; Fandino, Richard A; Sparks, Jackson; Staples, Jon; Friedman, Robert; Dickens, Joseph C

    2009-07-01

    SNMPs are membrane proteins observed to associate with chemosensory neurons in insects; in Drosophila melanogaster, SNMP1 has been shown to be essential for the detection of the pheromone cis-vaccenyl acetate (CVA). SNMPs are one of three insect gene clades related to the human fatty acid transporter CD36. We previously characterized the CD36 gene family in 4 insect Orders that effectively cover the Holometabola, or some 80% of known insect species and the 300 million years of evolution since this lineage emerged: Lepidoptera (e.g. Bombyx mori, Antheraea polyphemus, Manduca sexta, Heliothis virescens, Helicoverpa assulta, Helicoverpa armigera, Mamestra brassicae); Diptera (D. melanogaster, Drosophila pseudoobscura, Aedes aegypti, Anopheles gambiae, Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus); Hymenoptera (Apis mellifera); and Coleoptera (Tribolium castaneum). This previous study suggested a complex topography within the SNMP clade including a strongly supported SNMP1 sub-clade plus additional SNMP genes. To further resolve the SNMP clade here, we used cDNA sequences of SNMP1 and SNMP2 from various Lepidoptera species, D. melanogaster and Ae. aegypti, as well as BAC derived genomic sequences from Ae. aegypti as models for proposing corrected sequences of orthologues in the D. pseudoobscura and An. gambiae genomes, and for identifying orthologues in the B. mori and C. pipiens q. genomes. We then used these sequences to analyze the SNMP clade of the insect CD36 gene family, supporting the existence of two well supported sub-clades, SNMP1 and SNMP2, throughout the dipteran and lepidopteran lineages, and plausibly throughout the Holometabola and across a broad evolutionary time scale. We present indirect evidence based on evolutionary selection (dN/dS) that the dipteran SNMPs are expressed as functional proteins. We observed expansions of the SNMP1 sub-clade in C. pipiens q. and T. castaneum suggesting that the SNMP1s may have an expanded functional role in these species. PMID

  16. Genomics screens for metastasis genes

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Jinchun; Huang, Qihong

    2012-01-01

    Metastasis is responsible for most cancer mortality. The process of metastasis is complex, requiring the coordinated expression and fine regulation of many genes in multiple pathways in both the tumor and host tissues. Identification and characterization of the genetic programs that regulate metastasis is critical to understanding the metastatic process and discovering molecular targets for the prevention and treatment of metastasis. Genomic approaches and functional genomic analyses can syst...

  17. Gene trees and hominoid phylogeny.

    OpenAIRE

    RUVOLO, M; Pan, D.; Zehr, S; Goldberg, T.; Disotell, T R; von Dornum, M

    1994-01-01

    Here we present a DNA sequence study that incorporates intraspecific variation from all five genera of hominoids (apes and humans). Recently it has been claimed that using single individuals to analyze species' relationships might be misleading if within-species variation is great. Our results indicate that despite high intraspecific variation in mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit II gene sequences of some hominoids, humans and chimpanzees are nonetheless significantly most closely rela...

  18. Horizontal gene transfer in chromalveolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya Debashish

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Horizontal gene transfer (HGT, the non-genealogical transfer of genetic material between different organisms, is considered a potentially important mechanism of genome evolution in eukaryotes. Using phylogenomic analyses of expressed sequence tag (EST data generated from a clonal cell line of a free living dinoflagellate alga Karenia brevis, we investigated the impact of HGT on genome evolution in unicellular chromalveolate protists. Results We identified 16 proteins that have originated in chromalveolates through ancient HGTs before the divergence of the genera Karenia and Karlodinium and one protein that was derived through a more recent HGT. Detailed analysis of the phylogeny and distribution of identified proteins demonstrates that eight have resulted from independent HGTs in several eukaryotic lineages. Conclusion Recurring intra- and interdomain gene exchange provides an important source of genetic novelty not only in parasitic taxa as previously demonstrated but as we show here, also in free-living protists. Investigating the tempo and mode of evolution of horizontally transferred genes in protists will therefore advance our understanding of mechanisms of adaptation in eukaryotes.

  19. Targeted gene flow for conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ella; Phillips, Ben L

    2016-04-01

    Anthropogenic threats often impose strong selection on affected populations, causing rapid evolutionary responses. Unfortunately, these adaptive responses are rarely harnessed for conservation. We suggest that conservation managers pay close attention to adaptive processes and geographic variation, with an eye to using them for conservation goals. Translocating pre-adapted individuals into recipient populations is currently considered a potentially important management tool in the face of climate change. Targeted gene flow, which involves moving individuals with favorable traits to areas where these traits would have a conservation benefit, could have a much broader application in conservation. Across a species' range there may be long-standing geographic variation in traits or variation may have rapidly developed in response to a threatening process. Targeted gene flow could be used to promote natural resistance to threats to increase species resilience. We suggest that targeted gene flow is a currently underappreciated strategy in conservation that has applications ranging from the management of invasive species and their impacts to controlling the impact and virulence of pathogens. PMID:26332195

  20. Revisiting MHC genes in spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breban, Maxime; Costantino, Félicie; André, Claudine; Chiocchia, Gilles; Garchon, Henri-Jean

    2015-06-01

    Spondyloarthritis (SpA) refers to a variety of inflammatory rheumatic disorders with strong heritability. Shared genetic predisposition, as shown by familial aggregation, is largely attributable to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus, which was estimated to account for approximately half of the whole disease heritability. The first predisposing allele identified more than 40 years ago is HLA-B27, which is a major gene predisposing to all forms of SpA. However, despite intensive research, its pathogenesis remains uncertain. Other MHC alleles belonging to the class I and class II regions have been identified to exert additional effect. Candidate-gene approaches and genome-wide studies have recently allowed identification of several new loci residing outside of the MHC region that are involved in the predisposition to SpA. Interestingly, some of those new genes, such as ERAP1, ERAP2, and NPEPPS, code for aminopeptidases that are involved in MHC class I presentation and were shown to interact with HLA-B27. PMID:25903667